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Sample records for accurate molecular mass

  1. Accurate Mass Measurements in Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tao; Belov, Mikhail E.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-08-01

    To understand different aspects of life at the molecular level, one would think that ideally all components of specific processes should be individually isolated and studied in details. Reductionist approaches, i.e., studying one biological event at a one-gene or one-protein-at-a-time basis, indeed have made significant contributions to our understanding of many basic facts of biology. However, these individual “building blocks” can not be visualized as a comprehensive “model” of the life of cells, tissues, and organisms, without using more integrative approaches.1,2 For example, the emerging field of “systems biology” aims to quantify all of the components of a biological system to assess their interactions and to integrate diverse types of information obtainable from this system into models that could explain and predict behaviors.3-6 Recent breakthroughs in genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics are making this daunting task a reality.7-14 Proteomics, the systematic study of the entire complement of proteins expressed by an organism, tissue, or cell under a specific set of conditions at a specific time (i.e., the proteome), has become an essential enabling component of systems biology. While the genome of an organism may be considered static over short timescales, the expression of that genome as the actual gene products (i.e., mRNAs and proteins) is a dynamic event that is constantly changing due to the influence of environmental and physiological conditions. Exclusive monitoring of the transcriptomes can be carried out using high-throughput cDNA microarray analysis,15-17 however the measured mRNA levels do not necessarily correlate strongly with the corresponding abundances of proteins,18-20 The actual amount of functional proteins can be altered significantly and become independent of mRNA levels as a result of post-translational modifications (PTMs),21 alternative splicing,22,23 and protein turnover.24,25 Moreover, the functions of expressed

  2. Molecular speciated isotope dilution mass spectrometric methods for accurate, reproducible and direct quantification of reduced, oxidized and total glutathione in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Fahrenholz, Timothy; Wolle, Mesay Mulugeta; Kingston, H M Skip; Faber, Scott; Kern, John C; Pamuku, Matt; Miller, Logan; Chatragadda, Hemasudha; Kogelnik, Andreas

    2015-01-20

    Novel protocols were developed to accurately quantify reduced (GSH), oxidized (GSSG) and total (tGSH) glutathione in biological samples using molecular speciated isotope dilution mass spectrometry (SIDMS). For GSH and GSSG measurement, the sample was spiked with isotopically enriched analogues of the analytes ((310)GSH and (616)GSSG), along with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), and treated with acetonitrile to solubilize the endogenous analytes via protein precipitation and equilibrate them with the spikes. The supernatant was analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and the analytes were quantified with simultaneous tracking and correction for auto-oxidation of GSH to GSSG. For tGSH assay, a (310)GSH-spiked sample was treated with dithiothreitol (DTT) to convert disulfide-bonded glutathione to GSH. After removing the protein, the supernatant was analyzed by LC-MS/MS and the analyte was quantified by single-spiking isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). The mathematical relationships in IDMS and SIDMS quantifications are based on isotopic ratios and do not involve calibration curves. The protocols were validated using spike recovery tests and by analyzing synthetic standard solutions. Red blood cell (RBC) and saliva samples obtained from healthy subjects, and whole blood samples collected and shipped from a remote location were analyzed. The concentrations of tGSH in the RBC and whole blood samples were 2 orders of magnitude higher than those found in saliva. The fractions of GSSG were 0.2-2.2% (RBC and blood) and 15-47% (saliva) of the free glutathione (GSH + 2xGSSG) in the corresponding samples. Up to 3% GSH was auto-oxidized to GSSG during sample workup; the highest oxidations (>1%) were in the saliva samples. PMID:25519489

  3. Accurate Molecular Polarizabilities Based on Continuum Electrostatics

    PubMed Central

    Truchon, Jean-François; Nicholls, Anthony; Iftimie, Radu I.; Roux, Benoît; Bayly, Christopher I.

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach for representing the intramolecular polarizability as a continuum dielectric is introduced to account for molecular electronic polarization. It is shown, using a finite-difference solution to the Poisson equation, that the Electronic Polarization from Internal Continuum (EPIC) model yields accurate gas-phase molecular polarizability tensors for a test set of 98 challenging molecules composed of heteroaromatics, alkanes and diatomics. The electronic polarization originates from a high intramolecular dielectric that produces polarizabilities consistent with B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ and experimental values when surrounded by vacuum dielectric. In contrast to other approaches to model electronic polarization, this simple model avoids the polarizability catastrophe and accurately calculates molecular anisotropy with the use of very few fitted parameters and without resorting to auxiliary sites or anisotropic atomic centers. On average, the unsigned error in the average polarizability and anisotropy compared to B3LYP are 2% and 5%, respectively. The correlation between the polarizability components from B3LYP and this approach lead to a R2 of 0.990 and a slope of 0.999. Even the F2 anisotropy, shown to be a difficult case for existing polarizability models, can be reproduced within 2% error. In addition to providing new parameters for a rapid method directly applicable to the calculation of polarizabilities, this work extends the widely used Poisson equation to areas where accurate molecular polarizabilities matter. PMID:23646034

  4. Microbalance accurately measures extremely small masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patashnick, H.

    1970-01-01

    Oscillating fiber microbalance has a vibrating quartz fiber as balance arm to hold the mass to be weighed. Increasing fiber weight decreases its resonant frequency. Scaler and timer measure magnitude of the shift. This instrument withstands considerable physical abuse and has calibration stability at normal room temperatures.

  5. Accurate measurements of mass and center of mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, E. Y.; Trubert, M. R.

    1979-01-01

    Object is measured for mass and center of mass with accuracies of 0.01% and 0.14 respectively, using method that eliminates errors in alignment, leveling, and calibration. Method is applied to scientific instruments, recorder turntables, flywheels, and other devices that require precise balancing.

  6. Developing accurate molecular mechanics force fields for conjugated molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Do, Hainam; Troisi, Alessandro

    2015-10-14

    A rapid method to parameterize the intramolecular component of classical force fields for complex conjugated molecules is proposed. The method is based on a procedure of force matching with a reference electronic structure calculation. It is particularly suitable for those applications where molecular dynamics simulations are used to generate structures that are therefore analysed by electronic structure methods, because it is possible to build force fields that are consistent with electronic structure calculations that follow classical simulations. Such applications are commonly encountered in organic electronics, spectroscopy of complex systems and photobiology (e.g. photosynthetic systems). We illustrate the method by parameterizing the force fields of a molecule used in molecular semiconductors (2,2-dicyanovinyl-capped S,N-heteropentacene or DCV-SN5), a polymeric semiconductor (thieno[3,2-b]thiophene-diketopyrrolopyrrole TT-DPP) and a chromophore embedded in a protein environment (15,16-dihydrobiliverdin or DBV) where several hundreds of parameters need to be optimized in parallel. PMID:26349916

  7. A robust and accurate formulation of molecular and colloidal electrostatics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; Klaseboer, Evert; Chan, Derek Y C

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a re-formulation of the boundary integral method for the Debye-Hückel model of molecular and colloidal electrostatics that removes the mathematical singularities that have to date been accepted as an intrinsic part of the conventional boundary integral equation method. The essence of the present boundary regularized integral equation formulation consists of subtracting a known solution from the conventional boundary integral method in such a way as to cancel out the singularities associated with the Green's function. This approach better reflects the non-singular physical behavior of the systems on boundaries with the benefits of the following: (i) the surface integrals can be evaluated accurately using quadrature without any need to devise special numerical integration procedures, (ii) being able to use quadratic or spline function surface elements to represent the surface more accurately and the variation of the functions within each element is represented to a consistent level of precision by appropriate interpolation functions, (iii) being able to calculate electric fields, even at boundaries, accurately and directly from the potential without having to solve hypersingular integral equations and this imparts high precision in calculating the Maxwell stress tensor and consequently, intermolecular or colloidal forces, (iv) a reliable way to handle geometric configurations in which different parts of the boundary can be very close together without being affected by numerical instabilities, therefore potentials, fields, and forces between surfaces can be found accurately at surface separations down to near contact, and (v) having the simplicity of a formulation that does not require complex algorithms to handle singularities will result in significant savings in coding effort and in the reduction of opportunities for coding errors. These advantages are illustrated using examples drawn from molecular and colloidal electrostatics. PMID:27497538

  8. A robust and accurate formulation of molecular and colloidal electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiang; Klaseboer, Evert; Chan, Derek Y. C.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a re-formulation of the boundary integral method for the Debye-Hückel model of molecular and colloidal electrostatics that removes the mathematical singularities that have to date been accepted as an intrinsic part of the conventional boundary integral equation method. The essence of the present boundary regularized integral equation formulation consists of subtracting a known solution from the conventional boundary integral method in such a way as to cancel out the singularities associated with the Green's function. This approach better reflects the non-singular physical behavior of the systems on boundaries with the benefits of the following: (i) the surface integrals can be evaluated accurately using quadrature without any need to devise special numerical integration procedures, (ii) being able to use quadratic or spline function surface elements to represent the surface more accurately and the variation of the functions within each element is represented to a consistent level of precision by appropriate interpolation functions, (iii) being able to calculate electric fields, even at boundaries, accurately and directly from the potential without having to solve hypersingular integral equations and this imparts high precision in calculating the Maxwell stress tensor and consequently, intermolecular or colloidal forces, (iv) a reliable way to handle geometric configurations in which different parts of the boundary can be very close together without being affected by numerical instabilities, therefore potentials, fields, and forces between surfaces can be found accurately at surface separations down to near contact, and (v) having the simplicity of a formulation that does not require complex algorithms to handle singularities will result in significant savings in coding effort and in the reduction of opportunities for coding errors. These advantages are illustrated using examples drawn from molecular and colloidal electrostatics.

  9. A general, accurate procedure for calculating molecular interaction force.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pinghai; Qian, Xiaoping

    2009-09-15

    The determination of molecular interaction forces, e.g., van der Waals force, between macroscopic bodies is of fundamental importance for understanding sintering, adhesion and fracture processes. In this paper, we develop an accurate, general procedure for van der Waals force calculation. This approach extends a surface formulation that converts a six-dimensional (6D) volume integral into a 4D surface integral for the force calculation. It uses non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) surfaces to represent object surfaces. Surface integrals are then done on the parametric domain of the NURBS surfaces. It has combined advantages of NURBS surface representation and surface formulation, including (1) molecular interactions between arbitrary-shaped objects can be represented and evaluated by the NURBS model further common geometries such as spheres, cones, planes can be represented exactly and interaction forces are thus calculated accurately; (2) calculation efficiency is improved by converting the volume integral to the surface integral. This approach is implemented and validated via its comparison with analytical solutions for simple geometries. Calculation of van der Waals force between complex geometries with surface roughness is also demonstrated. A tutorial on the NURBS approach is given in Appendix A. PMID:19596335

  10. Accurate Evaluation Method of Molecular Binding Affinity from Fluctuation Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Tyuji; Iwamoto, Koji; Ode, Hirotaka; Ohdomari, Iwao

    2008-05-01

    Exact estimation of the molecular binding affinity is significantly important for drug discovery. The energy calculation is a direct method to compute the strength of the interaction between two molecules. This energetic approach is, however, not accurate enough to evaluate a slight difference in binding affinity when distinguishing a prospective substance from dozens of candidates for medicine. Hence more accurate estimation of drug efficacy in a computer is currently demanded. Previously we proposed a concept of estimating molecular binding affinity, focusing on the fluctuation at an interface between two molecules. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the compatibility between the proposed computational technique and experimental measurements, through several examples for computer simulations of an association of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) protease and its inhibitor (an example for a drug-enzyme binding), a complexation of an antigen and its antibody (an example for a protein-protein binding), and a combination of estrogen receptor and its ligand chemicals (an example for a ligand-receptor binding). The proposed affinity estimation has proven to be a promising technique in the advanced stage of the discovery and the design of drugs.

  11. Accurate mass spectrometry based protein quantification via shared peptides.

    PubMed

    Dost, Banu; Bandeira, Nuno; Li, Xiangqian; Shen, Zhouxin; Briggs, Steven P; Bafna, Vineet

    2012-04-01

    In mass spectrometry-based protein quantification, peptides that are shared across different protein sequences are often discarded as being uninformative with respect to each of the parent proteins. We investigate the use of shared peptides which are ubiquitous (~50% of peptides) in mass spectrometric data-sets for accurate protein identification and quantification. Different from existing approaches, we show how shared peptides can help compute the relative amounts of the proteins that contain them. Also, proteins with no unique peptide in the sample can still be analyzed for relative abundance. Our article uses shared peptides in protein quantification and makes use of combinatorial optimization to reduce the error in relative abundance measurements. We describe the topological and numerical properties required for robust estimates, and use them to improve our estimates for ill-conditioned systems. Extensive simulations validate our approach even in the presence of experimental error. We apply our method to a model of Arabidopsis thaliana root knot nematode infection, and investigate the differential role of several protein family members in mediating host response to the pathogen. PMID:22414154

  12. Microsatellites Are Molecular Clocks That Support Accurate Inferences about History

    PubMed Central

    Mullikin, James C.; Patterson, Nick; Reich, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Microsatellite length mutations are often modeled using the generalized stepwise mutation process, which is a type of random walk. If this model is sufficiently accurate, one can estimate the coalescence time between alleles of a locus after a mathematical transformation of the allele lengths. When large-scale microsatellite genotyping first became possible, there was substantial interest in using this approach to make inferences about time and demography, but that interest has waned because it has not been possible to empirically validate the clock by comparing it with data in which the mutation process is well understood. We analyzed data from 783 microsatellite loci in human populations and 292 loci in chimpanzee populations, and compared them with up to one gigabase of aligned sequence data, where the molecular clock based upon nucleotide substitutions is believed to be reliable. We empirically demonstrate a remarkable linearity (r2 > 0.95) between the microsatellite average square distance statistic and sequence divergence. We demonstrate that microsatellites are accurate molecular clocks for coalescent times of at least 2 million years (My). We apply this insight to confirm that the African populations San, Biaka Pygmy, and Mbuti Pygmy have the deepest coalescent times among populations in the Human Genome Diversity Project. Furthermore, we show that microsatellites support unbiased estimates of population differentiation (FST) that are less subject to ascertainment bias than single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) FST. These results raise the prospect of using microsatellite data sets to determine parameters of population history. When genotyped along with SNPs, microsatellite data can also be used to correct for SNP ascertainment bias. PMID:19221007

  13. Towards Accurate Molecular Modeling of Plastic Bonded Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantawansri, T. L.; Andzelm, J.; Taylor, D.; Byrd, E.; Rice, B.

    2010-03-01

    There is substantial interest in identifying the controlling factors that influence the susceptibility of polymer bonded explosives (PBXs) to accidental initiation. Numerous Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of PBXs using the COMPASS force field have been reported in recent years, where the validity of the force field in modeling the solid EM fill has been judged solely on its ability to reproduce lattice parameters, which is an insufficient metric. Performance of the COMPASS force field in modeling EMs and the polymeric binder has been assessed by calculating structural, thermal, and mechanical properties, where only fair agreement with experimental data is obtained. We performed MD simulations using the COMPASS force field for the polymer binder hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene and five EMs: cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine, 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetra-azacyclo-octane, 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexantirohexaazazisowurzitane, 2,4,6-trinitro-1,3,5-benzenetriamine, and pentaerythritol tetranitate. Predicted EM crystallographic and molecular structural parameters, as well as calculated properties for the binder will be compared with experimental results for different simulation conditions. We also present novel simulation protocols, which improve agreement between experimental and computation results thus leading to the accurate modeling of PBXs.

  14. Application of the accurate mass and time tag approach in studies of the human blood lipidome

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Jie; Sorensen, Christina M.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Jiang, Hongliang; Orton, Daniel J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2008-08-15

    We report a preliminary demonstration of the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag approach for lipidomics. Initial data-dependent LC-MS/MS analyses of human plasma, erythrocyte, and lymphocyte lipids were performed in order to identify lipid molecular species in conjunction with complementary accurate mass and isotopic distribution information. Identified lipids were used to populate initial lipid AMT tag databases containing 250 and 45 entries for those species detected in positive and negative electrospray ionization (ESI) modes, respectively. The positive ESI database was then utilized to identify human plasma, erythrocyte, and lymphocyte lipids in high-throughput quantitative LC-MS analyses based on the AMT tag approach. We were able to define the lipid profiles of human plasma, erythrocytes, and lymphocytes based on qualitative and quantitative differences in lipid abundance. In addition, we also report on the optimization of a reversed-phase LC method for the separation of lipids in these sample types.

  15. Molecular adsorption at Pt(111). How accurate are DFT functionals?

    PubMed

    Gautier, Sarah; Steinmann, Stephan N; Michel, Carine; Fleurat-Lessard, Paul; Sautet, Philippe

    2015-11-21

    Molecular chemisorption at a metal surface is a key step for many processes, such as catalysis, electrochemistry, surface treatment, tribology and friction. Modeling with density functional theory is largely used on these systems. From a detailed comparison with accurate micro-calorimetric data on ten systems (involving ethylene, cyclohexene, benzene, naphthalene, CO, O2, H2, methane, ethane), we study the accuracy, for chemisorption on Pt(111), of five exchange-correlation functionals including one generalized gradient approximation functional (PBE) and four functionals that take into account van der Waals interactions (optPBE-vdW, optB86b-vdW, BEEF-vdW, PBE-dDsC). If the functionals used provide very similar geometries and electronic structures, as shown by projected density of states, they give strikingly different results for the adsorption energy of molecules on Pt(111). Among the set of chemisorption data, the lowest mean absolute deviations (MAD) are obtained with the optPBE-vdW and PBE-dDsC functionals (∼0.2 eV) while PBE and optB86b-vdW give twice larger MAD (∼0.45 eV). BEEF-vdW is intermediate with a MAD of 0.33 eV. For laterally π-bound unsaturated hydrocarbons (cyclohexene, benzene, naphthalene) the PBE and the BEEF-vdW functionals are severally under-bound, while optPBE-vdW and PBE-dDsC provide a good match with experiments. Hence both the incorporation of van der Waals dispersive forces and the choice of the exchange functional have a key influence on the chemisorption energy. Vertically bound ethylidyne and CO are in contrast over-bound with all functionals, the best agreement being obtained with BEEF-vdW. None of the selected functionals hence provides a universally accurate treatment of chemisorption energies. PMID:26455444

  16. High-resolution accurate mass spectrometry as a technique for characterization of complex lysimeter leachate samples.

    PubMed

    Hand, Laurence H; Marshall, Samantha J; Saeed, Mansoor; Earll, Mark; Hadfield, Stephen T; Richardson, Kevan; Rawlinson, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Lysimeter studies can be used to identify and quantify soil degradates of agrochemicals (metabolites) that have the potential to leach to groundwater. However, the apparent metabolic profile of such lysimeter leachate samples will often be significantly more complex than would be expected in true groundwater samples. This is particularly true for S-metolachlor, which has an extremely complex metabolic pathway. Consequently, it was not practically possible to apply a conventional analytical approach to identify all metabolites in an S-metolachlor lysimeter study, because there was insufficient mass to enable the use of techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance. Recent advances in high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry, however, allow innovative screening approaches to characterize leachate samples to a greater extent than previously possible. Leachate from the S-metolachlor study was screened for accurate masses (±5 ppm of the nominal mass) corresponding to more than 400 hypothetical metabolite structures. A refined list of plausible metabolites was constructed from these data to provide a comprehensive description of the most likely metabolites present. The properties of these metabolites were then evaluated using a principal component analysis model, based on molecular descriptors, to visualize the entire chemical space and to cluster the metabolites into a number of subclasses. This characterization and principal component analysis evaluation enabled the selection of suitable representative metabolites that were subsequently used as exemplars to assess the toxicological relevance of the leachate as a whole. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1401-1412. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26627902

  17. Accurate Mass Determinations in Decay Chains with Missing Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H.-C; Gunion, John F.; Han Zhenyu; Engelhardt, Dalit; McElrath, Bob

    2008-06-27

    Many beyond the standard model theories include a stable dark matter candidate that yields missing or invisible energy in collider detectors. If observed at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, we must determine if its mass and other properties (and those of its partners) predict the correct dark matter relic density. We give a new procedure for determining its mass with small error.

  18. Accurate mass determinations in decay chains with missing energy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Engelhardt, Dalit; Gunion, John F; Han, Zhenyu; McElrath, Bob

    2008-06-27

    Many beyond the standard model theories include a stable dark matter candidate that yields missing or invisible energy in collider detectors. If observed at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, we must determine if its mass and other properties (and those of its partners) predict the correct dark matter relic density. We give a new procedure for determining its mass with small error. PMID:18643654

  19. Molecular chemistry and the missing mass problem in planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, R. K.; Gruenwald, R.; Aleman, I.

    2012-05-01

    Context. Detections of molecular lines, mainly from H2 and CO, reveal molecular material in planetary nebulae. Observations of a variety of molecules suggest that the molecular composition in these objects differs from that found in interstellar clouds or in circumstellar envelopes. The success of the models, which are mostly devoted to explain molecular densities in specific planetary nebulae, is still partial however. Aims: The present study aims at identifying the influence of stellar and nebular properties on the molecular composition of planetary nebulae by means of chemical models. A comparison of theoretical results with those derived from the observations may provide clues to the conditions that favor the presence of a particular molecule. Methods: A self-consistent photoionization numerical code was adapted to simulate cold molecular regions beyond the ionized zone. The code was used to obtain a grid of models and the resulting column densities are compared with those inferred from observations. Results: Our models show that the inclusion of an incident flux of X-rays is required to explain the molecular composition derived for planetary nebulae. We also obtain a more accurate relation for the N(CO)/N(H2) ratio in these objects. Molecular masses obtained by previous works in the literature were then recalculated, showing that these masses can be underestimated by up to three orders of magnitude. We conclude that the problem of the missing mass in planetary nebulae can be solved by a more accurate calculation of the molecular mass.

  20. Identification of "Known Unknowns" Utilizing Accurate Mass Data and Chemical Abstracts Service Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, James L.; Cleven, Curtis D.; Brown, Stacy D.

    2011-02-01

    In many cases, an unknown to an investigator is actually known in the chemical literature. We refer to these types of compounds as "known unknowns." Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Registry is a particularly good source of these substances as it contains over 54 million entries. Accurate mass measurements can be used to query the CAS Registry by either molecular formulae or average molecular weights. Searching the database by the web-based version of SciFinder is the preferred approach when molecular formulae are available. However, if a definitive molecular formula cannot be ascertained, searching the database with STN Express by average molecular weights is a viable alternative. The results from either approach are refined by employing the number of associated references or minimal sample history as orthogonal filters. These approaches were shown to be successful in identifying "known unknowns" noted in LC-MS and even GC-MS analyses in our laboratory. In addition, they were demonstrated in the identification of a variety of compounds of interest to others.

  1. Accurate mass tag retention time database for urine proteome analysis by chromatography--mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Agron, I A; Avtonomov, D M; Kononikhin, A S; Popov, I A; Moshkovskii, S A; Nikolaev, E N

    2010-05-01

    Information about peptides and proteins in urine can be used to search for biomarkers of early stages of various diseases. The main technology currently used for identification of peptides and proteins is tandem mass spectrometry, in which peptides are identified by mass spectra of their fragmentation products. However, the presence of the fragmentation stage decreases sensitivity of analysis and increases its duration. We have developed a method for identification of human urinary proteins and peptides. This method based on the accurate mass and time tag (AMT) method does not use tandem mass spectrometry. The database of AMT tags containing more than 1381 AMT tags of peptides has been constructed. The software for database filling with AMT tags, normalizing the chromatograms, database application for identification of proteins and peptides, and their quantitative estimation has been developed. The new procedures for peptide identification by tandem mass spectra and the AMT tag database are proposed. The paper also lists novel proteins that have been identified in human urine for the first time. PMID:20632944

  2. Accurate prediction of lattice energies and structures of molecular crystals with molecular quantum chemistry methods.

    PubMed

    Fang, Tao; Li, Wei; Gu, Fangwei; Li, Shuhua

    2015-01-13

    We extend the generalized energy-based fragmentation (GEBF) approach to molecular crystals under periodic boundary conditions (PBC), and we demonstrate the performance of the method for a variety of molecular crystals. With this approach, the lattice energy of a molecular crystal can be obtained from the energies of a series of embedded subsystems, which can be computed with existing advanced molecular quantum chemistry methods. The use of the field compensation method allows the method to take long-range electrostatic interaction of the infinite crystal environment into account and make the method almost translationally invariant. The computational cost of the present method scales linearly with the number of molecules in the unit cell. Illustrative applications demonstrate that the PBC-GEBF method with explicitly correlated quantum chemistry methods is capable of providing accurate descriptions on the lattice energies and structures for various types of molecular crystals. In addition, this approach can be employed to quantify the contributions of various intermolecular interactions to the theoretical lattice energy. Such qualitative understanding is very useful for rational design of molecular crystals. PMID:26574207

  3. A highly accurate method for the determination of mass and center of mass of a spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, E. Y.; Trubert, M. R.; Egwuatu, A.

    1978-01-01

    An extremely accurate method for the measurement of mass and the lateral center of mass of a spacecraft has been developed. The method was needed for the Voyager spacecraft mission requirement which limited the uncertainty in the knowledge of lateral center of mass of the spacecraft system weighing 750 kg to be less than 1.0 mm (0.04 in.). The method consists of using three load cells symmetrically located at 120 deg apart on a turntable with respect to the vertical axis of the spacecraft and making six measurements for each load cell. These six measurements are taken by cyclic rotations of the load cell turntable and of the spacecraft, about the vertical axis of the measurement fixture. This method eliminates all alignment, leveling, and load cell calibration errors for the lateral center of mass determination, and permits a statistical best fit of the measurement data. An associated data reduction computer program called MASCM has been written to implement this method and has been used for the Voyager spacecraft.

  4. Identification of "Known Unknowns" Utilizing Accurate Mass Data and ChemSpider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, James L.; Williams, Antony J.; Pshenichnov, Alexey; Tkachenko, Valery

    2012-01-01

    In many cases, an unknown to an investigator is actually known in the chemical literature, a reference database, or an internet resource. We refer to these types of compounds as "known unknowns." ChemSpider is a very valuable internet database of known compounds useful in the identification of these types of compounds in commercial, environmental, forensic, and natural product samples. The database contains over 26 million entries from hundreds of data sources and is provided as a free resource to the community. Accurate mass mass spectrometry data is used to query the database by either elemental composition or a monoisotopic mass. Searching by elemental composition is the preferred approach. However, it is often difficult to determine a unique elemental composition for compounds with molecular weights greater than 600 Da. In these cases, searching by the monoisotopic mass is advantageous. In either case, the search results are refined by sorting the number of references associated with each compound in descending order. This raises the most useful candidates to the top of the list for further evaluation. These approaches were shown to be successful in identifying "known unknowns" noted in our laboratory and for compounds of interest to others.

  5. Accurate, reliable control of process gases by mass flow controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.; McKnight, T.

    1997-02-01

    The thermal mass flow controller, or MFC, has become an instrument of choice for the monitoring and controlling of process gas flow throughout the materials processing industry. These MFCs are used on CVD processes, etching tools, and furnaces and, within the semiconductor industry, are used on 70% of the processing tools. Reliability and accuracy are major concerns for the users of the MFCs. Calibration and characterization technologies for the development and implementation of mass flow devices are described. A test facility is available to industry and universities to test and develop gas floe sensors and controllers and evaluate their performance related to environmental effects, reliability, reproducibility, and accuracy. Additional work has been conducted in the area of accuracy. A gravimetric calibrator was invented that allows flow sensors to be calibrated in corrosive, reactive gases to an accuracy of 0.3% of reading, at least an order of magnitude better than previously possible. Although MFCs are typically specified with accuracies of 1% of full scale, MFCs may often be implemented with unwarranted confidence due to the conventional use of surrogate gas factors. Surrogate gas factors are corrections applied to process flow indications when an MFC has been calibrated on a laboratory-safe surrogate gas, but is actually used on a toxic, or corrosive process gas. Previous studies have indicated that the use of these factors may cause process flow errors of typically 10%, but possibly as great as 40% of full scale. This paper will present possible sources of error in MFC process gas flow monitoring and control, and will present an overview of corrective measures which may be implemented with MFC use to significantly reduce these sources of error.

  6. Alignment of capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry datasets using accurate mass information.

    PubMed

    Nevedomskaya, Ekaterina; Derks, Rico; Deelder, André M; Mayboroda, Oleg A; Palmblad, Magnus

    2009-12-01

    Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS) is a powerful technique for the analysis of small soluble compounds in biological fluids. A major drawback of CE is the poor migration time reproducibility, which makes it difficult to combine data from different experiments and correctly assign compounds. A number of alignment algorithms have been developed but not all of them can cope with large and irregular time shifts between CE-MS runs. Here we present a genetic algorithm designed for alignment of CE-MS data using accurate mass information. The utility of the algorithm was demonstrated on real data, and the results were compared with one of the existing packages. The new algorithm showed a significant reduction of elution time variation in the aligned datasets. The importance of mass accuracy for the performance of the algorithm was also demonstrated by comparing alignments of datasets from a standard time-of-flight (TOF) instrument with those from the new ultrahigh resolution TOF maXis (Bruker Daltonics). PMID:19826795

  7. Device for accurately measuring mass flow of gases

    DOEpatents

    Hylton, James O.; Remenyik, Carl J.

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring mass flow of gases which utilizes a substantially buoyant pressure vessel suspended within a fluid/liquid in an enclosure. The pressure vessel is connected to a weighing device for continuously determining weight change of the vessel as a function of the amount of gas within the pressure vessel. In the preferred embodiment, this pressure vessel is formed from inner and outer right circular cylindrical hulls, with a volume between the hulls being vented to the atmosphere external the enclosure. The fluid/liquid, normally in the form of water typically with an added detergent, is contained within an enclosure with the fluid/liquid being at a level such that the pressure vessel is suspended beneath this level but above a bottom of the enclosure. The buoyant pressure vessel can be interconnected with selected valves to an auxiliary pressure vessel so that initial flow can be established to or from the auxiliary pressure vessel prior to flow to or from the buoyant pressure vessel.

  8. Device for accurately measuring mass flow of gases

    DOEpatents

    Hylton, J.O.; Remenyik, C.J.

    1994-08-09

    A device for measuring mass flow of gases which utilizes a substantially buoyant pressure vessel suspended within a fluid/liquid in an enclosure is disclosed. The pressure vessel is connected to a weighing device for continuously determining weight change of the vessel as a function of the amount of gas within the pressure vessel. In the preferred embodiment, this pressure vessel is formed from inner and outer right circular cylindrical hulls, with a volume between the hulls being vented to the atmosphere external the enclosure. The fluid/liquid, normally in the form of water typically with an added detergent, is contained within an enclosure with the fluid/liquid being at a level such that the pressure vessel is suspended beneath this level but above a bottom of the enclosure. The buoyant pressure vessel can be interconnected with selected valves to an auxiliary pressure vessel so that initial flow can be established to or from the auxiliary pressure vessel prior to flow to or from the buoyant pressure vessel. 5 figs.

  9. High-resolution accurate mass measurements of biomolecules using a new electrospray ionization ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Winger, B E; Hofstadler, S A; Bruce, J E; Udseth, H R; Smith, R D

    1993-07-01

    A novel electrospray ionization/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer based on a 7-T superconducting magnet was developed for high-resolution accurate mass measurements of large biomolecules. Ions formed at atmospheric pressure using electrospray ionization (ESI) were transmitted (through six differential pumping stages) to the trapped ion cell maintained below 10(-9) torr. The increased pumping speed attainable with cryopumping (> 10(5) L/s) allowed brief pressure excursions to above 10(-4) torr, with greatly enhanced trapping efficiencies and subsequent short pumpdown times, facilitating high-resolution mass measurements. A set of electromechanical shutters were also used to minimize the effect of the directed molecular beam produced by the ES1 source and were open only during ion injection. Coupled with the use of the pulsed-valve gas inlet, the trapped ion cell was generally filled to the space charge limit within 100 ms. The use of 10-25 ms ion injection times allowed mass spectra to be obtained from 4 fmol of bovine insulin (Mr 5734) and ubiquitin (Mr 8565, with resolution sufficient to easily resolve the isotopic envelopes and determine the charge states. The microheterogeneity of the glycoprotein ribonuclease B was examined, giving a measured mass of 14,898.74 Da for the most abundant peak in the isotopic envelope of the normally glycosylated protein (i.e., with five mannose and two N-acetylglucosamine residues (an error of approximately 2 ppm) and an average error of approximately 1 ppm for the higher glycosylated and various H3PO4 adducted forms of the protein. Time-domain signals lasting in excess of 80 s were obtained for smaller proteins, producing, for example, a mass resolution of more than 700,000 for the 4(+) charge state (m/z 1434) of insulin. PMID:24227643

  10. Accurate and predictive antibody repertoire profiling by molecular amplification fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Tarik A.; Friedensohn, Simon; de Vries, Arthur R. Gorter; Straszewski, Jakub; Ruscheweyh, Hans-Joachim; Reddy, Sai T.

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput antibody repertoire sequencing (Ig-seq) provides quantitative molecular information on humoral immunity. However, Ig-seq is compromised by biases and errors introduced during library preparation and sequencing. By using synthetic antibody spike-in genes, we determined that primer bias from multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) library preparation resulted in antibody frequencies with only 42 to 62% accuracy. Additionally, Ig-seq errors resulted in antibody diversity measurements being overestimated by up to 5000-fold. To rectify this, we developed molecular amplification fingerprinting (MAF), which uses unique molecular identifier (UID) tagging before and during multiplex PCR amplification, which enabled tagging of transcripts while accounting for PCR efficiency. Combined with a bioinformatic pipeline, MAF bias correction led to measurements of antibody frequencies with up to 99% accuracy. We also used MAF to correct PCR and sequencing errors, resulting in enhanced accuracy of full-length antibody diversity measurements, achieving 98 to 100% error correction. Using murine MAF-corrected data, we established a quantitative metric of recent clonal expansion—the intraclonal diversity index—which measures the number of unique transcripts associated with an antibody clone. We used this intraclonal diversity index along with antibody frequencies and somatic hypermutation to build a logistic regression model for prediction of the immunological status of clones. The model was able to predict clonal status with high confidence but only when using MAF error and bias corrected Ig-seq data. Improved accuracy by MAF provides the potential to greatly advance Ig-seq and its utility in immunology and biotechnology. PMID:26998518

  11. Accurate and predictive antibody repertoire profiling by molecular amplification fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tarik A; Friedensohn, Simon; Gorter de Vries, Arthur R; Straszewski, Jakub; Ruscheweyh, Hans-Joachim; Reddy, Sai T

    2016-03-01

    High-throughput antibody repertoire sequencing (Ig-seq) provides quantitative molecular information on humoral immunity. However, Ig-seq is compromised by biases and errors introduced during library preparation and sequencing. By using synthetic antibody spike-in genes, we determined that primer bias from multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) library preparation resulted in antibody frequencies with only 42 to 62% accuracy. Additionally, Ig-seq errors resulted in antibody diversity measurements being overestimated by up to 5000-fold. To rectify this, we developed molecular amplification fingerprinting (MAF), which uses unique molecular identifier (UID) tagging before and during multiplex PCR amplification, which enabled tagging of transcripts while accounting for PCR efficiency. Combined with a bioinformatic pipeline, MAF bias correction led to measurements of antibody frequencies with up to 99% accuracy. We also used MAF to correct PCR and sequencing errors, resulting in enhanced accuracy of full-length antibody diversity measurements, achieving 98 to 100% error correction. Using murine MAF-corrected data, we established a quantitative metric of recent clonal expansion-the intraclonal diversity index-which measures the number of unique transcripts associated with an antibody clone. We used this intraclonal diversity index along with antibody frequencies and somatic hypermutation to build a logistic regression model for prediction of the immunological status of clones. The model was able to predict clonal status with high confidence but only when using MAF error and bias corrected Ig-seq data. Improved accuracy by MAF provides the potential to greatly advance Ig-seq and its utility in immunology and biotechnology. PMID:26998518

  12. Accurate molecular classification of cancer using simple rules

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaosheng; Gotoh, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    Background One intractable problem with using microarray data analysis for cancer classification is how to reduce the extremely high-dimensionality gene feature data to remove the effects of noise. Feature selection is often used to address this problem by selecting informative genes from among thousands or tens of thousands of genes. However, most of the existing methods of microarray-based cancer classification utilize too many genes to achieve accurate classification, which often hampers the interpretability of the models. For a better understanding of the classification results, it is desirable to develop simpler rule-based models with as few marker genes as possible. Methods We screened a small number of informative single genes and gene pairs on the basis of their depended degrees proposed in rough sets. Applying the decision rules induced by the selected genes or gene pairs, we constructed cancer classifiers. We tested the efficacy of the classifiers by leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) of training sets and classification of independent test sets. Results We applied our methods to five cancerous gene expression datasets: leukemia (acute lymphoblastic leukemia [ALL] vs. acute myeloid leukemia [AML]), lung cancer, prostate cancer, breast cancer, and leukemia (ALL vs. mixed-lineage leukemia [MLL] vs. AML). Accurate classification outcomes were obtained by utilizing just one or two genes. Some genes that correlated closely with the pathogenesis of relevant cancers were identified. In terms of both classification performance and algorithm simplicity, our approach outperformed or at least matched existing methods. Conclusion In cancerous gene expression datasets, a small number of genes, even one or two if selected correctly, is capable of achieving an ideal cancer classification effect. This finding also means that very simple rules may perform well for cancerous class prediction. PMID:19874631

  13. DeconMSn: A Software Tool for accurate parent ion monoisotopic mass determination for tandem mass spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Mayampurath, Anoop M.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Purvine, Samuel O.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-04-01

    We present a new software tool for tandem MS analyses that: • accurately calculates the monoisotopic mass and charge of high–resolution parent ions • accurately operates regardless of the mass selected for fragmentation • performs independent of instrument settings • enables optimal selection of search mass tolerance for high mass accuracy experiments • is open source and thus can be tailored to individual needs • incorporates a SVM-based charge detection algorithm for analyzing low resolution tandem MS spectra • creates multiple output data formats (.dta, .MGF) • handles .RAW files and .mzXML formats • compatible with SEQUEST, MASCOT, X!Tandem

  14. In-Depth Glycoproteomic Characterization of γ-Conglutin by High-Resolution Accurate Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Schiarea, Silvia; Arnoldi, Lolita; Fanelli, Roberto; De Combarieu, Eric; Chiabrando, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    The molecular characterization of bioactive food components is necessary for understanding the mechanisms of their beneficial or detrimental effects on human health. This study focused on γ-conglutin, a well-known lupin seed N-glycoprotein with health-promoting properties and controversial allergenic potential. Given the importance of N-glycosylation for the functional and structural characteristics of proteins, we studied the purified protein by a mass spectrometry-based glycoproteomic approach able to identify the structure, micro-heterogeneity and attachment site of the bound N-glycan(s), and to provide extensive coverage of the protein sequence. The peptide/N-glycopeptide mixtures generated by enzymatic digestion (with or without N-deglycosylation) were analyzed by high-resolution accurate mass liquid chromatography–multi-stage mass spectrometry. The four main micro-heterogeneous variants of the single N-glycan bound to γ-conglutin were identified as Man2(Xyl) (Fuc) GlcNAc2, Man3(Xyl) (Fuc) GlcNAc2, GlcNAcMan3(Xyl) (Fuc) GlcNAc2 and GlcNAc 2Man3(Xyl) (Fuc) GlcNAc2. These carry both core β1,2-xylose and core α1-3-fucose (well known Cross-Reactive Carbohydrate Determinants), but corresponding fucose-free variants were also identified as minor components. The N-glycan was proven to reside on Asn131, one of the two potential N-glycosylation sites. The extensive coverage of the γ-conglutin amino acid sequence suggested three alternative N-termini of the small subunit, that were later confirmed by direct-infusion Orbitrap mass spectrometry analysis of the intact subunit. PMID:24069245

  15. Time-of-flight accurate mass spectrometry identification of quinoline alkaloids in honey.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cabo, Tamara; Moniruzzaman, Mohammed; Rodríguez, Isaac; Ramil, María; Cela, Rafael; Gan, Siew Hua

    2015-08-01

    Time-of-flight accurate mass spectrometry (TOF-MS), following a previous chromatographic (gas or liquid chromatography) separation step, is applied to the identification and structural elucidation of quinoline-like alkaloids in honey. Both electron ionization (EI) MS and positive electrospray (ESI+) MS spectra afforded the molecular ions (M(.+) and M+H(+), respectively) of target compounds with mass errors below 5 mDa. Scan EI-MS and product ion scan ESI-MS/MS spectra permitted confirmation of the existence of a quinoline ring in the structures of the candidate compounds. Also, the observed fragmentation patterns were useful to discriminate between quinoline derivatives having the same empirical formula but different functionalities, such as aldoximes and amides. In the particular case of phenylquinolines, ESI-MS/MS spectra provided valuable clues regarding the position of the phenyl moiety attached to the quinoline ring. The aforementioned spectral information, combined with retention times matching, led to the identification of quinoline and five quinoline derivatives, substituted at carbon number 4, in honey samples. An isomer of phenyquinoline was also noticed; however, its exact structure could not be established. Liquid-liquid microextraction and gas chromatography (GC) TOF-MS were applied to the screening of the aforementioned compounds in a total of 62 honeys. Species displaying higher occurrence frequencies were 4-quinolinecarbonitrile, 4-quinolinecarboxaldehyde, 4-quinolinealdoxime, and the phenylquinoline isomer. The Pearson test revealed strong correlations among the first three compounds. PMID:26041455

  16. Fatty acids composition of Caenorhabditis elegans using accurate mass GCMS-QTOF.

    PubMed

    Henry, Parise; Owopetu, Olufunmilayo; Adisa, Demilade; Nguyen, Thao; Anthony, Kevin; Ijoni-Animadu, David; Jamadar, Sakha; Abdel-Rahman, Fawzia; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2016-08-01

    The free living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a proven model organism for lipid metabolism research. Total lipids of C. elegans were extracted using chloroform and methanol in 2:1 ratio (v/v). Fatty acids composition of the extracted total lipids was converted to their corresponding fatty acids methyl esters (FAMEs) and analyzed by gas chromatography/accurate mass quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry using both electron ionization and chemical ionization techniques. Twenty-eight fatty acids consisting of 12 to 22 carbon atoms were identified, 65% of them were unsaturated. Fatty acids containing 12 to17 carbons were mostly saturated with stearic acid (18:0) as the major constituent. Several branched-chain fatty acids were identified. Methyl-14-methylhexadecanoate (iso- 17:0) was the major identified branched fatty acid. This is the first report to detect the intact molecular parent ions of the identified fatty acids in C. elegans using chemical ionization compared to electron ionization which produced fragmentations of the FAMEs. PMID:27166662

  17. Molecular beam mass spectrometer development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, F. J.; Hueser, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    An analytical model, based on the kinetics theory of a drifting Maxwellian gas is used to determine the nonequilibrium molecular density distribution within a hemispherical shell open aft with its axis parallel to its velocity. The concept of a molecular shield in terrestrial orbit above 200 km is also analyzed using the kinetic theory of a drifting Maxwellian gas. Data are presented for the components of the gas density within the shield due to the free stream atmosphere, outgassing from the shield and enclosed experiments, and atmospheric gas scattered off a shield orbiter system. A description is given of a FORTRAN program for computating the three dimensional transition flow regime past the space shuttle orbiter that employs the Monte Carlo simulation method to model real flow by some thousands of simulated molecules.

  18. Using CO to Measure Molecular Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolatto, A. D.

    2016-05-01

    With an increased appreciation for the role of gas in galaxy evolution, there is renewed interest in measuring gas masses for galaxies. I review some of the basic concepts in using CO to determine molecular masses, and discuss some of the recent work.

  19. Leg mass characteristics of accurate and inaccurate kickers--an Australian football perspective.

    PubMed

    Hart, Nicolas H; Nimphius, Sophia; Cochrane, Jodie L; Newton, Robert U

    2013-01-01

    Athletic profiling provides valuable information to sport scientists, assisting in the optimal design of strength and conditioning programmes. Understanding the influence these physical characteristics may have on the generation of kicking accuracy is advantageous. The aim of this study was to profile and compare the lower limb mass characteristics of accurate and inaccurate Australian footballers. Thirty-one players were recruited from the Western Australian Football League to perform ten drop punt kicks over 20 metres to a player target. Players were separated into accurate (n = 15) and inaccurate (n = 16) groups, with leg mass characteristics assessed using whole body dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans. Accurate kickers demonstrated significantly greater relative lean mass (P ≤ 0.004) and significantly lower relative fat mass (P ≤ 0.024) across all segments of the kicking and support limbs, while also exhibiting significantly higher intra-limb lean-to-fat mass ratios for all segments across both limbs (P ≤ 0.009). Inaccurate kickers also produced significantly larger asymmetries between limbs than accurate kickers (P ≤ 0.028), showing considerably lower lean mass in their support leg. These results illustrate a difference in leg mass characteristics between accurate and inaccurate kickers, highlighting the potential influence these may have on technical proficiency of the drop punt. PMID:23687978

  20. MASS MEASUREMENTS BY AN ACCURATE AND SENSITIVE SELECTED ION RECORDING TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trace-level components of mixtures were successfully identified or confirmed by mass spectrometric accurate mass measurements, made at high resolution with selected ion recording, using GC and LC sample introduction. Measurements were made at 20 000 or 10 000 resolution, respecti...

  1. Accurate Mass Searching of Individual Lipid Species Candidate from High-resolution Mass Spectra for Shotgun Lipidomics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Miao; Huang, Yingying; Han, Xianlin

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE With the increased mass accuracy and resolution in commercialized mass spectrometers, new development on shotgun lipidomics could be expected with increased speed, dynamic range, and coverage over lipid species and classes. However, we found that the major issue by using high mass accuracy/resolution instruments to search lipid species is the partial overlap between the two 13C atom-containing isotopologue of a species M (i.e., M+2 isotopologue) and the ion of a species less a double bond than M (assigned here as L). This partial overlap alone could cause a mass shift of the species L to the lower mass end up to 12 ppm around m/z 750 as well as significant peak broadening. METHODS We developed an approach for accurate mass searching by exploring one of the major features of shotgun lipidomics data that lipid species of a class are present in ion clusters where neighboring masses from different species differ by one or a few double bonds. In the approach, a mass-searching window of 18 ppm (from −15 to 3 ppm) was first searched for an entire group of species of a lipid class. Then accurate mass searching of the plus one 13C isotopologue of individual species was used to eliminate the potential false positive. RESULTS The approach was extensively validated through comparing with the species determined by the multi-dimensional MS-based shotgun lipidomics platform. The newly developed strategy of accurate mass search enables identifying the overlapped L species and acquiring the corresponding peak intensities. CONCLUSIONS We believe that this novel approach could substantially broaden the applications of high mass accurate/resolution mass spectrometry for shotgun lipidomics. PMID:25178724

  2. USING AN ACCURATE MASS, TRIPLE QUADRUPOLE MASS SPECTROMETER AND AN ION CORRELATION PROGRAM TO IDENTIFY COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most compounds are not found in mass spectral libraries and must be identified by other means. Often, compound identities can be deduced from the compositions of the ions in their mass spectra and review of the chemical literature. Confirmation is provided by mass spectra and r...

  3. DETERMINING ION COMPOSITIONS USING AN ACCURATE MASS, TRIPLE QUADRUPOLE MASS SPECTROMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    For the past decade, we have used double focusing mass spectrometers to determine
    compositions of ions observed in mass spectra produced from compounds introduced by GC
    based on measured exact masses of the ions and their +1 and +2 isotopic profiles arising from atoms of ...

  4. Accurate on-line mass flow measurements in supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tarafder, Abhijit; Vajda, Péter; Guiochon, Georges

    2013-12-13

    This work demonstrates the possible advantages and the challenges of accurate on-line measurements of the CO2 mass flow rate during supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) operations. Only the mass flow rate is constant along the column in SFC. The volume flow rate is not. The critical importance of accurate measurements of mass flow rates for the achievement of reproducible data and the serious difficulties encountered in supercritical fluid chromatography for its assessment were discussed earlier based on the physical properties of carbon dioxide. In this report, we experimentally demonstrate the problems encountered when performing mass flow rate measurements and the gain that can possibly be achieved by acquiring reproducible data using a Coriolis flow meter. The results obtained show how the use of a highly accurate mass flow meter permits, besides the determination of accurate values of the mass flow rate, a systematic, constant diagnosis of the correct operation of the instrument and the monitoring of the condition of the carbon dioxide pump. PMID:24210558

  5. Invited Article: Time accurate mass flow measurements of solid-fueled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olliges, Jordan D.; Lilly, Taylor C.; Joslyn, Thomas B.; Ketsdever, Andrew D.

    2008-10-01

    A novel diagnostic method is described that utilizes a thrust stand mass balance (TSMB) to directly measure time-accurate mass flow from a solid-fuel thruster. The accuracy of the TSMB mass flow measurement technique was demonstrated in three ways including the use of an idealized numerical simulation, verifying a fluid mass calibration with high-speed digital photography, and by measuring mass loss in more than 30 hybrid rocket motor firings. Dynamic response of the mass balance was assessed through weight calibration and used to derive spring, damping, and mass moment of inertia coefficients for the TSMB. These dynamic coefficients were used to determine the mass flow rate and total mass loss within an acrylic and gaseous oxygen hybrid rocket motor firing. Intentional variations in the oxygen flow rate resulted in corresponding variations in the total propellant mass flow as expected. The TSMB was optimized to determine mass losses of up to 2.5 g and measured total mass loss to within 2.5% of that calculated by a NIST-calibrated digital scale. Using this method, a mass flow resolution of 0.0011 g/s or 2% of the average mass flow in this study has been achieved.

  6. Invited article: Time accurate mass flow measurements of solid-fueled systems.

    PubMed

    Olliges, Jordan D; Lilly, Taylor C; Joslyn, Thomas B; Ketsdever, Andrew D

    2008-10-01

    A novel diagnostic method is described that utilizes a thrust stand mass balance (TSMB) to directly measure time-accurate mass flow from a solid-fuel thruster. The accuracy of the TSMB mass flow measurement technique was demonstrated in three ways including the use of an idealized numerical simulation, verifying a fluid mass calibration with high-speed digital photography, and by measuring mass loss in more than 30 hybrid rocket motor firings. Dynamic response of the mass balance was assessed through weight calibration and used to derive spring, damping, and mass moment of inertia coefficients for the TSMB. These dynamic coefficients were used to determine the mass flow rate and total mass loss within an acrylic and gaseous oxygen hybrid rocket motor firing. Intentional variations in the oxygen flow rate resulted in corresponding variations in the total propellant mass flow as expected. The TSMB was optimized to determine mass losses of up to 2.5 g and measured total mass loss to within 2.5% of that calculated by a NIST-calibrated digital scale. Using this method, a mass flow resolution of 0.0011 g/s or 2% of the average mass flow in this study has been achieved. PMID:19044695

  7. The utility of accurate mass and LC elution time information in the analysis of complex proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Norbeck, Angela D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Daly, Don S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-08-01

    Theoretical tryptic digests of all predicted proteins from the genomes of three organisms of varying complexity were evaluated for specificity and possible utility of combined peptide accurate mass and predicted LC normalized elution time (NET) information. The uniqueness of each peptide was evaluated using its combined mass (+/- 5 ppm and 1 ppm) and NET value (no constraint, +/- 0.05 and 0.01 on a 0-1 NET scale). The set of peptides both underestimates actual biological complexity due to the lack of specific modifications, and overestimates the expected complexity since many proteins will not be present in the sample or observable on the mass spectrometer because of dynamic range limitations. Once a peptide is identified from an LCMS/MS experiment, its mass and elution time is representative of a unique fingerprint for that peptide. The uniqueness of that fingerprint in comparison to that for the other peptides present is indicative of the ability to confidently identify that peptide based on accurate mass and NET measurements. These measurements can be made using HPLC coupled with high resolution MS in a high-throughput manner. Results show that for organisms with comparatively small proteomes, such as Deinococcus radiodurans, modest mass and elution time accuracies are generally adequate for peptide identifications. For more complex proteomes, increasingly accurate easurements are required. However, the majority of proteins should be uniquely identifiable by using LC-MS with mass accuracies within +/- 1 ppm and elution time easurements within +/- 0.01 NET.

  8. Main-Sequence Effective Temperatures from a Revised Mass-Luminosity Relation Based on Accurate Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eker, Z.; Soydugan, F.; Soydugan, E.; Bilir, S.; Yaz Gökçe, E.; Steer, I.; Tüysüz, M.; Şenyüz, T.; Demircan, O.

    2015-04-01

    The mass-luminosity (M-L), mass-radius (M-R), and mass-effective temperature (M-{{T}eff}) diagrams for a subset of galactic nearby main-sequence stars with masses and radii accurate to ≤slant 3% and luminosities accurate to ≤slant 30% (268 stars) has led to a putative discovery. Four distinct mass domains have been identified, which we have tentatively associated with low, intermediate, high, and very high mass main-sequence stars, but which nevertheless are clearly separated by three distinct break points at 1.05, 2.4, and 7 {{M}⊙ } within the studied mass range of 0.38-32 {{M}⊙ }. Further, a revised mass-luminosity relation (MLR) is found based on linear fits for each of the mass domains identified. The revised, mass-domain based MLRs, which are classical (L\\propto {{M}α }), are shown to be preferable to a single linear, quadratic, or cubic equation representing an alternative MLR. Stellar radius evolution within the main sequence for stars with M\\gt 1 {{M}⊙ } is clearly evident on the M-R diagram, but it is not clear on the M-{{T}eff} diagram based on published temperatures. Effective temperatures can be calculated directly using the well known Stephan-Boltzmann law by employing the accurately known values of M and R with the newly defined MLRs. With the calculated temperatures, stellar temperature evolution within the main sequence for stars with M\\gt 1 {{M}⊙ } is clearly visible on the M-{{T}eff} diagram. Our study asserts that it is now possible to compute the effective temperature of a main-sequence star with an accuracy of ˜6%, as long as its observed radius error is adequately small (\\lt 1%) and its observed mass error is reasonably small (\\lt 6%).

  9. Dual Polarity Accurate Mass Calibration for ESI and MALDI Mass Spectrometry Using Maltooligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Clowers, Brian H.; Dodds, Eric D.; Seipert, Richard R.; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2009-01-01

    In view of the fact that memory effects associated with instrument calibration hinder the use of many m/z and tuning standards, identification of robust, comprehensive, inexpensive, and memory-free calibration standards are of particular interest to the mass spectrometry community. Glucose and its isomers are known to have a residue mass of 162.05282 Da; therefore, both linear and branched forms of poly-hexose oligosaccharides possess well defined masses making them ideal candidates for mass calibration. Using a wide range of maltooligosaccharides (MOS) derived from commercially available beers, ions with m/z ratios from ~500 Da to 2500 Da or more have been observed using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) and time of flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS). The mixtures of MOS were further characterized using infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) and nano-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (nano-LC/MS). In addition to providing well defined series of positive and negative calibrant ions using either ESI or MALDI, the MOS are not encumbered by memory effects and are thus well suited mass calibration and instrument tuning standards for carbohydrate analysis. PMID:18655765

  10. Accurate mass determination of short-lived isotopes by a tandem Penning-trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Stolzenberg, H.; Becker, S.; Bollen, G.; Kern, F.; Kluge, H.; Otto, T.; Savard, G.; Schweikhard, L. ); Audi, G. ); Moore, R.B. ); The ISOLDE Collaboration

    1990-12-17

    A mass spectrometer consisting of two Penning traps has been set up for short-lived isotopes at the on-line mass separator ISOLDE at CERN. The ion beam is collected and cooled in the first trap. After delivery to the second trap, high-accuracy direct mass measurements are made by determining the cyclotron frequency of the stored ions. Measurements have been performed for {sup 118}Cs--{sup 137}Cs. A resolving power of over 10{sup 6} and an accuracy of 1.4{times}10{sup {minus}7} have been achieved, corresponding to about 20 keV.

  11. Desorption electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry of low molecular weight synthetic polymers.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Anthony T; Williams, Jonathan P; Scrivens, James H

    2006-01-01

    A range of low molecular weight synthetic polymers has been characterised by means of desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) combined with both mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Accurate mass experiments were used to aid the structural determination of some of the oligomeric materials. The polymers analysed were poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), polypropylene glycol (PPG), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and poly(alpha-methyl styrene). An application of the technique for characterisation of a polymer used as part of an active ingredient in a pharmaceutical tablet is described. The mass spectra and tandem mass spectra of all of the polymers were obtained in seconds, indicating the sensitivity of the technique. PMID:16912984

  12. Analysis of hydraulic fracturing flowback and produced waters using accurate mass: identification of ethoxylated surfactants.

    PubMed

    Thurman, E Michael; Ferrer, Imma; Blotevogel, Jens; Borch, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Two series of ethylene oxide (EO) surfactants, polyethylene glycols (PEGs from EO3 to EO33) and linear alkyl ethoxylates (LAEs C-9 to C-15 with EO3-EO28), were identified in hydraulic fracturing flowback and produced water using a new application of the Kendrick mass defect and liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The Kendrick mass defect differentiates the proton, ammonium, and sodium adducts in both singly and doubly charged forms. A structural model of adduct formation is presented, and binding constants are calculated, which is based on a spherical cagelike conformation, where the central cation (NH4(+) or Na(+)) is coordinated with ether oxygens. A major purpose of the study was the identification of the ethylene oxide (EO) surfactants and the construction of a database with accurate masses and retention times in order to unravel the mass spectral complexity of surfactant mixtures used in hydraulic fracturing fluids. For example, over 500 accurate mass assignments are made in a few seconds of computer time, which then is used as a fingerprint chromatogram of the water samples. This technique is applied to a series of flowback and produced water samples to illustrate the usefulness of ethoxylate "fingerprinting", in a first application to monitor water quality that results from fluids used in hydraulic fracturing. PMID:25164376

  13. Reflection mass spectrometry technique for monitoring and controlling composition during molecular beam epitaxy

    DOEpatents

    Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E.; Tsao, J.Y.

    1992-12-15

    A method for on-line accurate monitoring and precise control of molecular beam epitaxial growth of Groups III-III-V or Groups III-V-V layers in an advanced semiconductor device incorporates reflection mass spectrometry. The reflection mass spectrometry is responsive to intentional perturbations in molecular fluxes incident on a substrate by accurately measuring the molecular fluxes reflected from the substrate. The reflected flux is extremely sensitive to the state of the growing surface and the measurements obtained enable control of newly forming surfaces that are dynamically changing as a result of growth. 3 figs.

  14. Reflection mass spectrometry technique for monitoring and controlling composition during molecular beam epitaxy

    DOEpatents

    Brennan, Thomas M.; Hammons, B. Eugene; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.

    1992-01-01

    A method for on-line accurate monitoring and precise control of molecular beam epitaxial growth of Groups III-III-V or Groups III-V-V layers in an advanced semiconductor device incorporates reflection mass spectrometry. The reflection mass spectrometry is responsive to intentional perturbations in molecular fluxes incident on a substrate by accurately measuring the molecular fluxes reflected from the substrate. The reflected flux is extremely sensitive to the state of the growing surface and the measurements obtained enable control of newly forming surfaces that are dynamically changing as a result of growth.

  15. An accurate and efficient algorithm for Peptide and ptm identification by tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ning, Kang; Ng, Hoong Kee; Leong, Hon Wai

    2007-01-01

    Peptide identification by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is one of the most important problems in proteomics. Recent advances in high throughput MS/MS experiments result in huge amount of spectra. Unfortunately, identification of these spectra is relatively slow, and the accuracies of current algorithms are not high with the presence of noises and post-translational modifications (PTMs). In this paper, we strive to achieve high accuracy and efficiency for peptide identification problem, with special concern on identification of peptides with PTMs. This paper expands our previous work on PepSOM with the introduction of two accurate modified scoring functions: Slambda for peptide identification and Slambda* for identification of peptides with PTMs. Experiments showed that our algorithm is both fast and accurate for peptide identification. Experiments on spectra with simulated and real PTMs confirmed that our algorithm is accurate for identifying PTMs. PMID:18546510

  16. The Use of Accurate Mass Tags for High-Throughput Microbial Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Richard D. ); Anderson, Gordon A. ); Lipton, Mary S. ); Masselon, Christophe D. ); Pasa Tolic, Ljiljana ); Shen, Yufeng ); Udseth, Harold R. )

    2002-08-01

    We describe and demonstrate a global strategy that extends the sensitivity, dynamic range, comprehensiveness, and throughput of proteomic measurements based upon the use of peptide accurate mass tags (AMTs) produced by global protein enzymatic digestion. The two-stage strategy exploits Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry to validate peptide AMTs for a specific organism, tissue or cell type from potential mass tags identified using conventional tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) methods, providing greater confidence in identifications as well as the basis for subsequent measurements without the need for MS/MS, and thus with greater sensitivity and increased throughput. A single high resolution capillary liquid chromatography separation combined with high sensitivity, high resolution and ac-curate FT-ICR measurements has been shown capable of characterizing peptide mixtures of significantly more than 10 5 components with mass accuracies of -1 ppm, sufficient for broad protein identification using AMTs. Other attractions of the approach include the broad and relatively unbiased proteome coverage, the capability for exploiting stable isotope labeling methods to realize high precision for relative protein abundance measurements, and the projected potential for study of mammalian proteomes when combined with additional sample fractionation. Using this strategy, in our first application we have been able to identify AMTs for 60% of the potentially expressed proteins in the organism Deinococcus radiodurans.

  17. Fast and accurate mock catalogue generation for low-mass galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Jun; Blake, Chris; Beutler, Florian; Kazin, Eyal; Marin, Felipe

    2016-06-01

    We present an accurate and fast framework for generating mock catalogues including low-mass haloes, based on an implementation of the COmoving Lagrangian Acceleration (COLA) technique. Multiple realisations of mock catalogues are crucial for analyses of large-scale structure, but conventional N-body simulations are too computationally expensive for the production of thousands of realizations. We show that COLA simulations can produce accurate mock catalogues with a moderate computation resource for low- to intermediate-mass galaxies in 1012 M⊙ haloes, both in real and redshift space. COLA simulations have accurate peculiar velocities, without systematic errors in the velocity power spectra for k ≤ 0.15 h Mpc-1, and with only 3-per cent error for k ≤ 0.2 h Mpc-1. We use COLA with 10 time steps and a Halo Occupation Distribution to produce 600 mock galaxy catalogues of the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. Our parallelized code for efficient generation of accurate halo catalogues is publicly available at github.com/junkoda/cola_halo.

  18. iPE-MMR: An integrated approach to accurately assign monoisotopic precursor masses to tandem mass spectrometric data

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hee-Jung; Purvine, Samuel O.; Kim, Hokeun; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Hyung, Seok-Won; Monroe, Matthew E.; Mun, Dong-Gi; Kim, Kyong-Chul; Park, Jong-Moon; Kim, Su-Jin; Tolic, Nikola; Slysz, Gordon W.; Moore, Ronald J.; Zhao, Rui; Adkins, Joshua N.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Lee, Hookeun; Camp, David G.; Yu, Myeong-Hee; Smith, Richard D.; Lee, Sang-Won

    2010-01-01

    Accurate assignment of monoisotopic precursor masses to tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) data is a fundamental and critically important step for successful peptide identifications in mass spectrometry based proteomics. Here we describe an integrated approach that combines three previously reported methods of treating MS/MS data for precursor mass refinement. This combined method, “integrated Post-Experiment Monoisotopic Mass Refinement” (iPE-MMR), integrates steps: 1) generation of refined MS/MS data by DeconMSn; 2) additional refinement of the resultant MS/MS data by a modified version of PE-MMR; 3) elimination of systematic errors of precursor masses using DtaRefinery. iPE-MMR is the first method that utilizes all MS information from multiple MS scans of a precursor ion including multiple charge states, in an MS scan, to determine precursor mass. By combining these methods, iPE-MMR increases sensitivity in peptide identification and provides increased accuracy when applied to complex high-throughput proteomics data. PMID:20863060

  19. Mass spectrometry-based protein identification with accurate statistical significance assignment

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Gelio; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Assigning statistical significance accurately has become increasingly important as metadata of many types, often assembled in hierarchies, are constructed and combined for further biological analyses. Statistical inaccuracy of metadata at any level may propagate to downstream analyses, undermining the validity of scientific conclusions thus drawn. From the perspective of mass spectrometry-based proteomics, even though accurate statistics for peptide identification can now be achieved, accurate protein level statistics remain challenging. Results: We have constructed a protein ID method that combines peptide evidences of a candidate protein based on a rigorous formula derived earlier; in this formula the database P-value of every peptide is weighted, prior to the final combination, according to the number of proteins it maps to. We have also shown that this protein ID method provides accurate protein level E-value, eliminating the need of using empirical post-processing methods for type-I error control. Using a known protein mixture, we find that this protein ID method, when combined with the Sorić formula, yields accurate values for the proportion of false discoveries. In terms of retrieval efficacy, the results from our method are comparable with other methods tested. Availability and implementation: The source code, implemented in C++ on a linux system, is available for download at ftp://ftp.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pub/qmbp/qmbp_ms/RAId/RAId_Linux_64Bit. Contact: yyu@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25362092

  20. Advances in Proteomics Data Analysis and Display Using an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, Jennifer S.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-01-20

    Proteomics, and the larger field of systems biology, have recently demonstrated utility in both the understanding of cellular processes on the molecular level and the identification of potential biomarkers of various disease states. The large amount of data generated by utilizing high mass accuracy mass spectrometry for high-throughput proteomics analyses presents a challenge in data processing, analysis and display. This review focuses on recent advances in nanoLC-FTICR-MS-based proteomics analysis and the accompanying data processing tools that have been developed in order to interpret and display the large volumes of data produced.

  1. Advances in Proteomics Data Analysis and Display Using an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Jennifer S.D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Proteomics has recently demonstrated utility in understanding cellular processes on the molecular level as a component of systems biology approaches and for identifying potential biomarkers of various disease states. The large amount of data generated by utilizing high efficiency (e.g., chromatographic) separations coupled to high mass accuracy mass spectrometry for high-throughput proteomics analyses presents challenges related to data processing, analysis, and display. This review focuses on recent advances in nanoLC-FTICR-MS-based proteomics approaches and the accompanying data processing tools that have been developed to display and interpret the large volumes of data being produced. PMID:16429408

  2. MS2Analyzer: A Software for Small Molecule Substructure Annotations from Accurate Tandem Mass Spectra

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Systematic analysis and interpretation of the large number of tandem mass spectra (MS/MS) obtained in metabolomics experiments is a bottleneck in discovery-driven research. MS/MS mass spectral libraries are small compared to all known small molecule structures and are often not freely available. MS2Analyzer was therefore developed to enable user-defined searches of thousands of spectra for mass spectral features such as neutral losses, m/z differences, and product and precursor ions from MS/MS spectra in MSP/MGF files. The software is freely available at http://fiehnlab.ucdavis.edu/projects/MS2Analyzer/. As the reference query set, 147 literature-reported neutral losses and their corresponding substructures were collected. This set was tested for accuracy of linking neutral loss analysis to substructure annotations using 19 329 accurate mass tandem mass spectra of structurally known compounds from the NIST11 MS/MS library. Validation studies showed that 92.1 ± 6.4% of 13 typical neutral losses such as acetylations, cysteine conjugates, or glycosylations are correct annotating the associated substructures, while the absence of mass spectra features does not necessarily imply the absence of such substructures. Use of this tool has been successfully demonstrated for complex lipids in microalgae. PMID:25263576

  3. Structure elucidation of degradation products of the antibiotic amoxicillin with ion trap MS(n) and accurate mass determination by ESI TOF.

    PubMed

    Nägele, Edgar; Moritz, Ralf

    2005-10-01

    Today, it is necessary to identify relevant compounds appearing in discovery and development of new drug substances in the pharmaceutical industry. For that purpose, the measurement of accurate molecular mass and empirical formula calculation is very important for structure elucidation in addition to other available analytical methods. In this work, the identification and confirmation of degradation products in a finished dosage form of the antibiotic drug amoxicillin obtained under stress conditions will be demonstrated. Structure elucidation is performed utilizing liquid chromatography (LC) ion trap MS/MS and MS3 together with accurate mass measurement of the molecular ions and of the collision induced dissociation (CID) fragments by liquid chromatography electro spray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-TOF). PMID:16099170

  4. Proteome Analyses Using Accurate Mass and Elution Time Peptide Tags with Capillary LC Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Strittmatter, Eric F.; Ferguson, Patrick L.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2003-09-01

    We describe the application of capillary liquid chromatography (LC) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometric instrumentation for the rapid characterization of microbial proteomes. Previously (Lipton et al. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA, 99, 2002, 11049) the peptides from a series of growth conditions of Deinococcus radiodurans have been characterized using capillary LC MS/MS and accurate mass measurements which are logged in an accurate mass and time (AMT) tag database. Using this AMT tag database, detected peptides can be assigned using measurements obtained on a TOF due to the additional use of elution time data as a constraint. When peptide matches are obtained using AMT tags (i.e. using both constraints) unique matches of a mass spectral peak occurs 88% of the time. Not only are AMT tag matches unique in most cases, the coverage of the proteome is high; {approx}3500 unique peptide AMT tags are found on average per capillary LC run. From the results of the AMT tag database search, {approx}900 ORFs detected using LC-TOFMS, with {approx}500 ORFs covered by at least two AMT tags. These results indicate that AMT databases searches with modest mass and elution time criteria can provide proteomic information for approximately one thousand proteins in a single run of <3 hours. The advantage of this method over using MS/MS based techniques is the large number of identifications that occur in a single experiment as well as the basis for improved quantitation. For MS/MS experiments, the number of peptide identifications is severely restricted because of the time required to dissociate the peptides individually. These results demonstrate the utility of the AMT tag approach using capillary LC-TOF MS instruments, and also show that AMT tags developed using other instrumentation can be effectively utilized.

  5. Induced Dual-Nanospray: A Novel Internal Calibration Method for Convenient and Accurate Mass Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yafeng; Zhang, Ning; Zhou, Yueming; Wang, Jianing; Zhang, Yiming; Wang, Jiyun; Xiong, Caiqiao; Chen, Suming; Nie, Zongxiu

    2013-09-01

    Accurate mass information is of great importance in the determination of unknown compounds. An effective and easy-to-control internal mass calibration method will dramatically benefit accurate mass measurement. Here we reported a simple induced dual-nanospray internal calibration device which has the following three advantages: (1) the two sprayers are in the same alternating current field; thus both reference ions and sample ions can be simultaneously generated and recorded. (2) It is very simple and can be easily assembled. Just two metal tubes, two nanosprayers, and an alternating current power supply are included. (3) With the low-flow-rate character and the versatility of nanoESI, this calibration method is capable of calibrating various samples, even untreated complex samples such as urine and other biological samples with small sample volumes. The calibration errors are around 1 ppm in positive ion mode and 3 ppm in negative ion mode with good repeatability. This new internal calibration method opens up new possibilities in the determination of unknown compounds, and it has great potential for the broad applications in biological and chemical analysis.

  6. Influence of mass resolution on species matching in accurate mass and retention time (AMT) tag proteomics experiments.

    PubMed

    Masselon, Christophe D; Kieffer-Jaquinod, Sylvie; Brugière, Sabine; Dupierris, Véronique; Garin, Jérôme

    2008-04-01

    Diverse mass spectrometric instruments have been used to provide data for accurate mass and retention time (AMT) tag proteomics analyses, including ion trap, quadrupole time-of-flight, and Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS). An important attribute of these instruments, beside mass accuracy, is their spectral resolution. In fact, the ability to separate peaks with close m/z values is likely to play a major role in enabling species identification and matching in analyses of very complex proteomics samples. In FTMS, resolution is directly proportional to the detection period and can therefore be easily tuned. We took advantage of this feature to investigate the effect of resolution on species identification and matching in an AMT tag experiment. Using an Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast protein extract as prototypical 'real-life' sample, we have compared the number of detected features, the optimal mass tolerance for species matching, the number of matched species and the false discovery rate obtained at various resolution settings. It appears that while the total number of matches is not significantly affected by a reduction of resolution in the range investigated, the confidence level of identifications significantly drops as evidenced by the estimated false discovery rate. PMID:18320544

  7. Purification of pharmaceutical preparations using thin-layer chromatography to obtain mass spectra with Direct Analysis in Real Time and accurate mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wood, Jessica L; Steiner, Robert R

    2011-06-01

    Forensic analysis of pharmaceutical preparations requires a comparative analysis with a standard of the suspected drug in order to identify the active ingredient. Purchasing analytical standards can be expensive or unattainable from the drug manufacturers. Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART™) is a novel, ambient ionization technique, typically coupled with a JEOL AccuTOF™ (accurate mass) mass spectrometer. While a fast and easy technique to perform, a drawback of using DART™ is the lack of component separation of mixtures prior to ionization. Various in-house pharmaceutical preparations were purified using thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and mass spectra were subsequently obtained using the AccuTOF™- DART™ technique. Utilizing TLC prior to sample introduction provides a simple, low-cost solution to acquiring mass spectra of the purified preparation. Each spectrum was compared against an in-house molecular formula list to confirm the accurate mass elemental compositions. Spectra of purified ingredients of known pharmaceuticals were added to an in-house library for use as comparators for casework samples. Resolving isomers from one another can be accomplished using collision-induced dissociation after ionization. Challenges arose when the pharmaceutical preparation required an optimized TLC solvent to achieve proper separation and purity of the standard. Purified spectra were obtained for 91 preparations and included in an in-house drug standard library. Primary standards would only need to be purchased when pharmaceutical preparations not previously encountered are submitted for comparative analysis. TLC prior to DART™ analysis demonstrates a time efficient and cost saving technique for the forensic drug analysis community. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:21548141

  8. Isotopic Ratio Outlier Analysis of the S. cerevisiae Metabolome Using Accurate Mass Gas Chromatography/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry: A New Method for Discovery.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yunping; Moir, Robyn; Willis, Ian; Beecher, Chris; Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Garrett, Timothy J; Yost, Richard A; Kurland, Irwin J

    2016-03-01

    Isotopic ratio outlier analysis (IROA) is a (13)C metabolomics profiling method that eliminates sample to sample variance, discriminates against noise and artifacts, and improves identification of compounds, previously done with accurate mass liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). This is the first report using IROA technology in combination with accurate mass gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOF-MS), here used to examine the S. cerevisiae metabolome. S. cerevisiae was grown in YNB media, containing randomized 95% (13)C, or 5%(13)C glucose as the single carbon source, in order that the isotopomer pattern of all metabolites would mirror the labeled glucose. When these IROA experiments are combined, the abundance of the heavy isotopologues in the 5%(13)C extracts, or light isotopologues in the 95%(13)C extracts, follows the binomial distribution, showing mirrored peak pairs for the molecular ion. The mass difference between the (12)C monoisotopic and the (13)C monoisotopic equals the number of carbons in the molecules. The IROA-GC/MS protocol developed, using both chemical and electron ionization, extends the information acquired from the isotopic peak patterns for formulas generation. The process that can be formulated as an algorithm, in which the number of carbons, as well as the number of methoximations and silylations are used as search constraints. In electron impact (EI/IROA) spectra, the artifactual peaks are identified and easily removed, which has the potential to generate "clean" EI libraries. The combination of chemical ionization (CI) IROA and EI/IROA affords a metabolite identification procedure that enables the identification of coeluting metabolites, and allowed us to characterize 126 metabolites in the current study. PMID:26820234

  9. Machine learning predictions of molecular properties: Accurate many-body potentials and nonlocality in chemical space

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hansen, Katja; Biegler, Franziska; Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; Pronobis, Wiktor; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Müller, Klaus -Robert; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2015-06-04

    Simultaneously accurate and efficient prediction of molecular properties throughout chemical compound space is a critical ingredient toward rational compound design in chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Aiming toward this goal, we develop and apply a systematic hierarchy of efficient empirical methods to estimate atomization and total energies of molecules. These methods range from a simple sum over atoms, to addition of bond energies, to pairwise interatomic force fields, reaching to the more sophisticated machine learning approaches that are capable of describing collective interactions between many atoms or bonds. In the case of equilibrium molecular geometries, even simple pairwise force fields demonstratemore » prediction accuracy comparable to benchmark energies calculated using density functional theory with hybrid exchange-correlation functionals; however, accounting for the collective many-body interactions proves to be essential for approaching the “holy grail” of chemical accuracy of 1 kcal/mol for both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium geometries. This remarkable accuracy is achieved by a vectorized representation of molecules (so-called Bag of Bonds model) that exhibits strong nonlocality in chemical space. The same representation allows us to predict accurate electronic properties of molecules, such as their polarizability and molecular frontier orbital energies.« less

  10. Machine learning predictions of molecular properties: Accurate many-body potentials and nonlocality in chemical space

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Katja; Biegler, Franziska; Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; Pronobis, Wiktor; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Müller, Klaus -Robert; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2015-06-04

    Simultaneously accurate and efficient prediction of molecular properties throughout chemical compound space is a critical ingredient toward rational compound design in chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Aiming toward this goal, we develop and apply a systematic hierarchy of efficient empirical methods to estimate atomization and total energies of molecules. These methods range from a simple sum over atoms, to addition of bond energies, to pairwise interatomic force fields, reaching to the more sophisticated machine learning approaches that are capable of describing collective interactions between many atoms or bonds. In the case of equilibrium molecular geometries, even simple pairwise force fields demonstrate prediction accuracy comparable to benchmark energies calculated using density functional theory with hybrid exchange-correlation functionals; however, accounting for the collective many-body interactions proves to be essential for approaching the “holy grail” of chemical accuracy of 1 kcal/mol for both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium geometries. This remarkable accuracy is achieved by a vectorized representation of molecules (so-called Bag of Bonds model) that exhibits strong nonlocality in chemical space. The same representation allows us to predict accurate electronic properties of molecules, such as their polarizability and molecular frontier orbital energies.

  11. Accurate mass fragment library for rapid analysis of pesticides on produce using ambient pressure desorption ionization with high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kern, Sara E; Lin, Lora A; Fricke, Frederick L

    2014-08-01

    U.S. food imports have been increasing steadily for decades, intensifying the need for a rapid and sensitive screening technique. A method has been developed that uses foam disks to sample the surface of incoming produce. This work provides complimentary information to the extensive amount of published pesticide fragmentation data collected using LCMS systems (Sack et al. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 59, 6383-6411, 2011; Mol et al. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 403, 2891-2908, 2012). The disks are directly analyzed using transmission-mode direct analysis in real time (DART) ambient pressure desorption ionization coupled to a high resolution accurate mass-mass spectrometer (HRAM-MS). In order to provide more certainty in the identification of the pesticides detected, a library of accurate mass fragments and isotopes of the protonated parent molecular ion (the [M+H]⁺) has been developed. The HRAM-MS is equipped with a quadrupole mass filter, providing the capability of "data-dependent" fragmentation, as opposed to "all -ion" fragmentation (where all of the ions enter a collision chamber and are fragmented at once). A temperature gradient for the DART helium stream and multiple collision energies were employed to detect and fragment 164 pesticides of varying chemical classes, sizes, and polarities. The accurate mass information of precursor ([M+H]⁺ ion) and fragment ions is essential in correctly identifying chemical contaminants on the surface of imported produce. Additionally, the inclusion of isotopes of the [M+H]⁺ in the database adds another metric to the confirmation process. The fragmentation data were collected using a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer and were added to a database used to process data collected with an Exactive mass spectrometer, an instrument that is more readily available for this screening application. The commodities investigated range from smooth-skinned produce such as apples to rougher surfaces like broccoli

  12. Accurate Mass Fragment Library for Rapid Analysis of Pesticides on Produce Using Ambient Pressure Desorption Ionization with High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Sara E.; Lin, Lora A.; Fricke, Frederick L.

    2014-08-01

    U.S. food imports have been increasing steadily for decades, intensifying the need for a rapid and sensitive screening technique. A method has been developed that uses foam disks to sample the surface of incoming produce. This work provides complimentary information to the extensive amount of published pesticide fragmentation data collected using LCMS systems (Sack et al. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 59, 6383-6411, 2011; Mol et al. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 403, 2891-2908, 2012). The disks are directly analyzed using transmission-mode direct analysis in real time (DART) ambient pressure desorption ionization coupled to a high resolution accurate mass-mass spectrometer (HRAM-MS). In order to provide more certainty in the identification of the pesticides detected, a library of accurate mass fragments and isotopes of the protonated parent molecular ion (the [M+H]+) has been developed. The HRAM-MS is equipped with a quadrupole mass filter, providing the capability of "data-dependent" fragmentation, as opposed to "all -ion" fragmentation (where all of the ions enter a collision chamber and are fragmented at once). A temperature gradient for the DART helium stream and multiple collision energies were employed to detect and fragment 164 pesticides of varying chemical classes, sizes, and polarities. The accurate mass information of precursor ([M+H]+ ion) and fragment ions is essential in correctly identifying chemical contaminants on the surface of imported produce. Additionally, the inclusion of isotopes of the [M+H]+ in the database adds another metric to the confirmation process. The fragmentation data were collected using a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer and were added to a database used to process data collected with an Exactive mass spectrometer, an instrument that is more readily available for this screening application. The commodities investigated range from smooth-skinned produce such as apples to rougher surfaces like broccoli. The

  13. Global analysis of the Deinococcus radiodurans proteome by using accurate mass tags

    PubMed Central

    Lipton, Mary S.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Anderson, Gordon A.; Anderson, David J.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Battista, John R.; Daly, Michael J.; Fredrickson, Jim; Hixson, Kim K.; Kostandarithes, Heather; Masselon, Christophe; Markillie, Lye Meng; Moore, Ronald J.; Romine, Margaret F.; Shen, Yufeng; Stritmatter, Eric; Tolić, Nikola; Udseth, Harold R.; Venkateswaran, Amudhan; Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Zhao, Rui; Smith, Richard D.

    2002-01-01

    Understanding biological systems and the roles of their constituents is facilitated by the ability to make quantitative, sensitive, and comprehensive measurements of how their proteome changes, e.g., in response to environmental perturbations. To this end, we have developed a high-throughput methodology to characterize an organism's dynamic proteome based on the combination of global enzymatic digestion, high-resolution liquid chromatographic separations, and analysis by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The peptides produced serve as accurate mass tags for the proteins and have been used to identify with high confidence >61% of the predicted proteome for the ionizing radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. This fraction represents the broadest proteome coverage for any organism to date and includes 715 proteins previously annotated as either hypothetical or conserved hypothetical. PMID:12177431

  14. Accurate prediction of the ammonia probes of a variable proton-to-electron mass ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, A.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Thiel, W.; Špirko, V.

    2015-07-01

    A comprehensive study of the mass sensitivity of the vibration-rotation-inversion transitions of 14NH3, 15NH3, 14ND3 and 15ND3 is carried out variationally using the TROVE approach. Variational calculations are robust and accurate, offering a new way to compute sensitivity coefficients. Particular attention is paid to the Δk = ±3 transitions between the accidentally coinciding rotation-inversion energy levels of the ν2 = 0+, 0-, 1+ and 1- states, and the inversion transitions in the ν4 = 1 state affected by the `giant' l-type doubling effect. These transitions exhibit highly anomalous sensitivities, thus appearing as promising probes of a possible cosmological variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio μ. Moreover, a simultaneous comparison of the calculated sensitivities reveals a sizeable isotopic dependence which could aid an exclusive ammonia detection.

  15. Accurate mass - time tag library for LC/MS-based metabolite profiling of medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbertson, Daniel J.; Johnson, Sean R.; Piljac-Žegarac, Jasenka; Kappel, Julia; Schäfer, Sarah; Wüst, Matthias; Ketchum, Raymond E. B.; Croteau, Rodney B.; Marques, Joaquim V.; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.; Rolf, Megan; Kutchan, Toni M.; Soejarto, D. Doel; Lange, B. Markus

    2013-01-01

    We report the development and testing of an accurate mass – time (AMT) tag approach for the LC/MS-based identification of plant natural products (PNPs) in complex extracts. An AMT tag library was developed for approximately 500 PNPs with diverse chemical structures, detected in electrospray and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization modes (both positive and negative polarities). In addition, to enable peak annotations with high confidence, MS/MS spectra were acquired with three different fragmentation energies. The LC/MS and MS/MS data sets were integrated into online spectral search tools and repositories (Spektraris and MassBank), thus allowing users to interrogate their own data sets for the potential presence of PNPs. The utility of the AMT tag library approach is demonstrated by the detection and annotation of active principles in 27 different medicinal plant species with diverse chemical constituents. PMID:23597491

  16. A Statistical Method for Assessing Peptide Identification Confidence in Accurate Mass and Time Tag Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, Jeffrey R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Karpievitch, Yuliya V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Dabney, Alan R.

    2011-07-15

    High-throughput proteomics is rapidly evolving to require high mass measurement accuracy for a variety of different applications. Increased mass measurement accuracy in bottom-up proteomics specifically allows for an improved ability to distinguish and characterize detected MS features, which may in turn be identified by, e.g., matching to entries in a database for both precursor and fragmentation mass identification methods. Many tools exist with which to score the identification of peptides from LC-MS/MS measurements or to assess matches to an accurate mass and time (AMT) tag database, but these two calculations remain distinctly unrelated. Here we present a statistical method, Statistical Tools for AMT tag Confidence (STAC), which extends our previous work incorporating prior probabilities of correct sequence identification from LC-MS/MS, as well as the quality with which LC-MS features match AMT tags, to evaluate peptide identification confidence. Compared to existing tools, we are able to obtain significantly more high-confidence peptide identifications at a given false discovery rate and additionally assign confidence estimates to individual peptide identifications. Freely available software implementations of STAC are available in both command line and as a Windows graphical application.

  17. ACCURATE UNIVERSAL MODELS FOR THE MASS ACCRETION HISTORIES AND CONCENTRATIONS OF DARK MATTER HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, D. H.; Jing, Y. P.; Mo, H. J.; Boerner, G.

    2009-12-10

    A large amount of observations have constrained cosmological parameters and the initial density fluctuation spectrum to a very high accuracy. However, cosmological parameters change with time and the power index of the power spectrum dramatically varies with mass scale in the so-called concordance LAMBDACDM cosmology. Thus, any successful model for its structural evolution should work well simultaneously for various cosmological models and different power spectra. We use a large set of high-resolution N-body simulations of a variety of structure formation models (scale-free, standard CDM, open CDM, and LAMBDACDM) to study the mass accretion histories, the mass and redshift dependence of concentrations, and the concentration evolution histories of dark matter halos. We find that there is significant disagreement between the much-used empirical models in the literature and our simulations. Based on our simulation results, we find that the mass accretion rate of a halo is tightly correlated with a simple function of its mass, the redshift, parameters of the cosmology, and of the initial density fluctuation spectrum, which correctly disentangles the effects of all these factors and halo environments. We also find that the concentration of a halo is strongly correlated with the universe age when its progenitor on the mass accretion history first reaches 4% of its current mass. According to these correlations, we develop new empirical models for both the mass accretion histories and the concentration evolution histories of dark matter halos, and the latter can also be used to predict the mass and redshift dependence of halo concentrations. These models are accurate and universal: the same set of model parameters works well for different cosmological models and for halos of different masses at different redshifts, and in the LAMBDACDM case the model predictions match the simulation results very well even though halo mass is traced to about 0.0005 times the final mass

  18. Identification of Microorganisms by High Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Accurate Statistical Significance.

    PubMed

    Alves, Gelio; Wang, Guanghui; Ogurtsov, Aleksey Y; Drake, Steven K; Gucek, Marjan; Suffredini, Anthony F; Sacks, David B; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2016-02-01

    Correct and rapid identification of microorganisms is the key to the success of many important applications in health and safety, including, but not limited to, infection treatment, food safety, and biodefense. With the advance of mass spectrometry (MS) technology, the speed of identification can be greatly improved. However, the increasing number of microbes sequenced is challenging correct microbial identification because of the large number of choices present. To properly disentangle candidate microbes, one needs to go beyond apparent morphology or simple 'fingerprinting'; to correctly prioritize the candidate microbes, one needs to have accurate statistical significance in microbial identification. We meet these challenges by using peptidome profiles of microbes to better separate them and by designing an analysis method that yields accurate statistical significance. Here, we present an analysis pipeline that uses tandem MS (MS/MS) spectra for microbial identification or classification. We have demonstrated, using MS/MS data of 81 samples, each composed of a single known microorganism, that the proposed pipeline can correctly identify microorganisms at least at the genus and species levels. We have also shown that the proposed pipeline computes accurate statistical significances, i.e., E-values for identified peptides and unified E-values for identified microorganisms. The proposed analysis pipeline has been implemented in MiCId, a freely available software for Microorganism Classification and Identification. MiCId is available for download at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/downloads.html . Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26510657

  19. Identification of Microorganisms by High Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Accurate Statistical Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Gelio; Wang, Guanghui; Ogurtsov, Aleksey Y.; Drake, Steven K.; Gucek, Marjan; Suffredini, Anthony F.; Sacks, David B.; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2016-02-01

    Correct and rapid identification of microorganisms is the key to the success of many important applications in health and safety, including, but not limited to, infection treatment, food safety, and biodefense. With the advance of mass spectrometry (MS) technology, the speed of identification can be greatly improved. However, the increasing number of microbes sequenced is challenging correct microbial identification because of the large number of choices present. To properly disentangle candidate microbes, one needs to go beyond apparent morphology or simple `fingerprinting'; to correctly prioritize the candidate microbes, one needs to have accurate statistical significance in microbial identification. We meet these challenges by using peptidome profiles of microbes to better separate them and by designing an analysis method that yields accurate statistical significance. Here, we present an analysis pipeline that uses tandem MS (MS/MS) spectra for microbial identification or classification. We have demonstrated, using MS/MS data of 81 samples, each composed of a single known microorganism, that the proposed pipeline can correctly identify microorganisms at least at the genus and species levels. We have also shown that the proposed pipeline computes accurate statistical significances, i.e., E-values for identified peptides and unified E-values for identified microorganisms. The proposed analysis pipeline has been implemented in MiCId, a freely available software for Microorganism Classification and Identification. MiCId is available for download at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/downloads.html.

  20. SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging enables accurate evaluation of radiotracers for β-cell mass assessments

    PubMed Central

    Eter, Wael A.; Parween, Saba; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Eriksson, Maria; Brom, Maarten; Ahlgren, Ulf; Gotthardt, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has become a promising experimental approach to monitor changes in β-cell mass (BCM) during diabetes progression. SPECT imaging of pancreatic islets is most commonly cross-validated by stereological analysis of histological pancreatic sections after insulin staining. Typically, stereological methods do not accurately determine the total β-cell volume, which is inconvenient when correlating total pancreatic tracer uptake with BCM. Alternative methods are therefore warranted to cross-validate β-cell imaging using radiotracers. In this study, we introduce multimodal SPECT - optical projection tomography (OPT) imaging as an accurate approach to cross-validate radionuclide-based imaging of β-cells. Uptake of a promising radiotracer for β-cell imaging by SPECT, 111In-exendin-3, was measured by ex vivo-SPECT and cross evaluated by 3D quantitative OPT imaging as well as with histology within healthy and alloxan-treated Brown Norway rat pancreata. SPECT signal was in excellent linear correlation with OPT data as compared to histology. While histological determination of islet spatial distribution was challenging, SPECT and OPT revealed similar distribution patterns of 111In-exendin-3 and insulin positive β-cell volumes between different pancreatic lobes, both visually and quantitatively. We propose ex vivo SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging as a highly accurate strategy for validating the performance of β-cell radiotracers. PMID:27080529

  1. SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging enables accurate evaluation of radiotracers for β-cell mass assessments.

    PubMed

    Eter, Wael A; Parween, Saba; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Eriksson, Maria; Brom, Maarten; Ahlgren, Ulf; Gotthardt, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has become a promising experimental approach to monitor changes in β-cell mass (BCM) during diabetes progression. SPECT imaging of pancreatic islets is most commonly cross-validated by stereological analysis of histological pancreatic sections after insulin staining. Typically, stereological methods do not accurately determine the total β-cell volume, which is inconvenient when correlating total pancreatic tracer uptake with BCM. Alternative methods are therefore warranted to cross-validate β-cell imaging using radiotracers. In this study, we introduce multimodal SPECT - optical projection tomography (OPT) imaging as an accurate approach to cross-validate radionuclide-based imaging of β-cells. Uptake of a promising radiotracer for β-cell imaging by SPECT, (111)In-exendin-3, was measured by ex vivo-SPECT and cross evaluated by 3D quantitative OPT imaging as well as with histology within healthy and alloxan-treated Brown Norway rat pancreata. SPECT signal was in excellent linear correlation with OPT data as compared to histology. While histological determination of islet spatial distribution was challenging, SPECT and OPT revealed similar distribution patterns of (111)In-exendin-3 and insulin positive β-cell volumes between different pancreatic lobes, both visually and quantitatively. We propose ex vivo SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging as a highly accurate strategy for validating the performance of β-cell radiotracers. PMID:27080529

  2. Application of the G-JF discrete-time thermostat for fast and accurate molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Hayre, Natha Robert; Farago, Oded

    2014-02-01

    A new Langevin-Verlet thermostat that preserves the fluctuation-dissipation relationship for discrete time steps is applied to molecular modeling and tested against several popular suites (AMBER, GROMACS, LAMMPS) using a small molecule as an example that can be easily simulated by all three packages. Contrary to existing methods, the new thermostat exhibits no detectable changes in the sampling statistics as the time step is varied in the entire numerical stability range. The simple form of the method, which we express in the three common forms (Velocity-Explicit, Störmer-Verlet, and Leap-Frog), allows for easy implementation within existing molecular simulation packages to achieve faster and more accurate results with no cost in either computing time or programming complexity.

  3. CAST: a new program package for the accurate characterization of large and flexible molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Grebner, Christoph; Becker, Johannes; Weber, Daniel; Bellinger, Daniel; Tafipolski, Maxim; Brückner, Charlotte; Engels, Bernd

    2014-09-15

    The presented program package, Conformational Analysis and Search Tool (CAST) allows the accurate treatment of large and flexible (macro) molecular systems. For the determination of thermally accessible minima CAST offers the newly developed TabuSearch algorithm, but algorithms such as Monte Carlo (MC), MC with minimization, and molecular dynamics are implemented as well. For the determination of reaction paths, CAST provides the PathOpt, the Nudge Elastic band, and the umbrella sampling approach. Access to free energies is possible through the free energy perturbation approach. Along with a number of standard force fields, a newly developed symmetry-adapted perturbation theory-based force field is included. Semiempirical computations are possible through DFTB+ and MOPAC interfaces. For calculations based on density functional theory, a Message Passing Interface (MPI) interface to the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU)-accelerated TeraChem program is available. The program is available on request. PMID:25056524

  4. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Capture by Montmorillonite Using an Accurate and Flexible Force Field

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, V N; Cygan, R T; Myshakin, E M

    2012-06-21

    Naturally occurring clay minerals provide a distinctive material for carbon capture and carbon dioxide sequestration. Swelling clay minerals, such as the smectite variety, possess an aluminosilicate structure that is controlled by low-charge layers that readily expand to accommodate water molecules and, potentially, CO2. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated the efficacy of intercalating CO2 in the interlayer of layered clays, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the process and the extent of carbon capture as a function of clay charge and structure. A series of molecular dynamics simulations and vibrational analyses have been completed to assess the molecular interactions associated with incorporation of CO2 and H2O in the interlayer of montmorillonite clay and to help validate the models with experimental observation. An accurate and fully flexible set of interatomic potentials for CO2 is developed and combined with Clayff potentials to help evaluate the intercalation mechanism and examine the effect of molecular flexibility onthe diffusion rate of CO2 in water.

  5. Identification of Novel Perfluoroalkyl Ether Carboxylic Acids (PFECAs) and Sulfonic Acids (PFESAs) in Natural Waters Using Accurate Mass Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (TOFMS).

    PubMed

    Strynar, Mark; Dagnino, Sonia; McMahen, Rebecca; Liang, Shuang; Lindstrom, Andrew; Andersen, Erik; McMillan, Larry; Thurman, Michael; Ferrer, Imma; Ball, Carol

    2015-10-01

    Recent scientific scrutiny and concerns over exposure, toxicity, and risk have led to international regulatory efforts resulting in the reduction or elimination of certain perfluorinated compounds from various products and waste streams. Some manufacturers have started producing shorter chain per- and polyfluorinated compounds to try to reduce the potential for bioaccumulation in humans and wildlife. Some of these new compounds contain central ether oxygens or other minor modifications of traditional perfluorinated structures. At present, there has been very limited information published on these "replacement chemistries" in the peer-reviewed literature. In this study we used a time-of-flight mass spectrometry detector (LC-ESI-TOFMS) to identify fluorinated compounds in natural waters collected from locations with historical perfluorinated compound contamination. Our workflow for discovery of chemicals included sequential sampling of surface water for identification of potential sources, nontargeted TOFMS analysis, molecular feature extraction (MFE) of samples, and evaluation of features unique to the sample with source inputs. Specifically, compounds were tentatively identified by (1) accurate mass determination of parent and/or related adducts and fragments from in-source collision-induced dissociation (CID), (2) in-depth evaluation of in-source adducts formed during analysis, and (3) confirmation with authentic standards when available. We observed groups of compounds in homologous series that differed by multiples of CF2 (m/z 49.9968) or CF2O (m/z 65.9917). Compounds in each series were chromatographically separated and had comparable fragments and adducts produced during analysis. We detected 12 novel perfluoroalkyl ether carboxylic and sulfonic acids in surface water in North Carolina, USA using this approach. A key piece of evidence was the discovery of accurate mass in-source n-mer formation (H(+) and Na(+)) differing by m/z 21.9819, corresponding to the

  6. A mechanical micro molecular mass sensor

    PubMed Central

    Kurhekar, A. S.; Apte, P. R.

    2014-01-01

    One of the bio-sensing mechanisms is mechanical. Rather than measuring shift in resonance frequency, we adopt to measure the change in spring constant due to adsorption, as one of the fundamental sensing mechanism. This study explains determination of spring constant of a surface functionalized micro machined micro cantilever, which resonates in a trapezoidal cavity-on Silicon <100> wafer, with the resonating frequency of 7000 cycles per second. This thin-flimsy-oxide micro-cantilever has a typical shape, and the tip of the micro-cantilever is dip-coated with chemically and biologically active material. The change in mass, due to adsorption, is detected by measuring the change in spring constant. The Force-Distance spectroscopy is used to detect the change in spring constant. The experimental results, show that the mechanical sensing scheme used, permit this surface functionalized micro machined micro cantilever to be used as a molecular mass sensor. The mechanical spring behaviour of a micro-cantilever, a micro-mechanical device can be used to develop ultra-tech micro-mechanical system using computer interface. PMID:24459585

  7. Alternative Filament Loading Solution for Accurate Analysis of Boron Isotopes by Negative Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, G. S.; Vengosh, A.

    2008-12-01

    The negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry technique has become the major tool for investigating boron isotopes in the environment. The high sensitivity of BO2- ionization enables measurements of ng levels of boron. However, B isotope measurement by this technique suffers from two fundamental problems (1) fractionation induced by selective ionization of B isotopes in the mass spectrometer; and (2) CNO- interference on mass 42 that is often present in some load solutions (such as B-free seawater processed through ion-exchange resin). Here we report a potentially improved methodology using an alternative filament loading solution with a recently-installed Thermo Scientific TRITON thermal ionization mass spectrometer. Our initial results suggest that this solution -- prepared by combining high-purity single- element standard solutions of Ca, Mg, Na, and K in proportions similar to those in seawater in a 5% HCl matrix -- may offer significant improvement over some other commonly used load solutions. Total loading blank is around 15pg as determined by isotope dilution (NIST952). Replicate analyses of NIST SRM951 and modern seawater thus far have yielded 11B/10B ratios of 4.0057 (±0.0008, n=14) and 4.1645 (±0.0017, n=7; δ11B=39.6 permil), respectively. Replicate analyses of samples and SRM951 yield an average standard deviation (1 σ) of approximately 0.001 (0.25 permil). Fractionation during analysis (60-90 minutes) has thus far typically been less than 0.002 (0.5 permil). The load solution delivers ionization efficiency similar to directly-loaded seawater and has negligible signal at mass 26 (CN-), a proxy for the common interfering molecular ion (CNO-) on mass 42. Standards and samples loaded with the solution behave fairly predictably during filament heating and analysis, thus allowing for the possibility of fully automated data collection.

  8. Assessing temporal flux of plant hormones in stored processing potatoes using high definition accurate mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ordaz-Ortiz, José Juan; Foukaraki, Sofia; Terry, Leon Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Plant hormones are important molecules which at low concentration can regulate various physiological processes. Mass spectrometry has become a powerful technique for the quantification of multiple classes of plant hormones because of its high sensitivity and selectivity. We developed a new ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography–full-scan high-definition accurate mass spectrometry method, for simultaneous determination of abscisic acid and four metabolites phaseic acid, dihydrophaseic acid, 7′-hydroxy-abscisic acid and abscisic acid glucose ester, cytokinins zeatin, zeatin riboside, gibberellins (GA1, GA3, GA4 and GA7) and indole-3-acetyl-L-aspartic acid. We measured the amount of plant hormones in the flesh and skin of two processing potato cvs. Sylvana and Russet Burbank stored for up to 30 weeks at 6 °C under ambient air conditions. Herein, we report for the first time that abscisic acid glucose ester seems to accumulate in the skin of potato tubers throughout storage time. The method achieved a lowest limit of detection of 0.22 ng g−1 of dry weight and a limit of quantification of 0.74 ng g−1 dry weight (zeatin riboside), and was able to recover, detect and quantify a total of 12 plant hormones spiked on flesh and skin of potato tubers. In addition, the mass accuracy for all compounds (<5 ppm) was evaluated. PMID:26504563

  9. Quantitation and accurate mass analysis of pesticides in vegetables by LC/TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Imma; Thurman, E Michael; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R

    2005-05-01

    A quantitative method consisting of solvent extraction followed by liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOF-MS) analysis was developed for the identification and quantitation of three chloronicotinyl pesticides (imidacloprid, acetamiprid, thiacloprid) commonly used on salad vegetables. Accurate mass measurements within 3 ppm error were obtained for all the pesticides studied in various vegetable matrixes (cucumber, tomato, lettuce, pepper), which allowed an unequivocal identification of the target pesticides. Calibration curves covering 2 orders of magnitude were linear over the concentration range studied, thus showing the quantitative ability of TOF-MS as a monitoring tool for pesticides in vegetables. Matrix effects were also evaluated using matrix-matched standards showing no significant interferences between matrixes and clean extracts. Intraday reproducibility was 2-3% relative standard deviation (RSD) and interday values were 5% RSD. The precision (standard deviation) of the mass measurements was evaluated and it was less than 0.23 mDa between days. Detection limits of the chloronicotinyl insecticides in salad vegetables ranged from 0.002 to 0.01 mg/kg. These concentrations are equal to or better than the EU directives for controlled pesticides in vegetables showing that LC/TOF-MS analysis is a powerful tool for identification of pesticides in vegetables. Robustness and applicability of the method was validated for the analysis of market vegetable samples. Concentrations found in these samples were in the range of 0.02-0.17 mg/kg of vegetable. PMID:15859598

  10. Molecular Simulation of the Free Energy for the Accurate Determination of Phase Transition Properties of Molecular Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellers, Michael; Lisal, Martin; Brennan, John

    2015-06-01

    Investigating the ability of a molecular model to accurately represent a real material is crucial to model development and use. When the model simulates materials in extreme conditions, one such property worth evaluating is the phase transition point. However, phase transitions are often overlooked or approximated because of difficulty or inaccuracy when simulating them. Techniques such as super-heating or super-squeezing a material to induce a phase change suffer from inherent timescale limitations leading to ``over-driving,'' and dual-phase simulations require many long-time runs to seek out what frequently results in an inexact location of phase-coexistence. We present a compilation of methods for the determination of solid-solid and solid-liquid phase transition points through the accurate calculation of the chemical potential. The methods are applied to the Smith-Bharadwaj atomistic potential's representation of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) to accurately determine its melting point (Tm) and the alpha to gamma solid phase transition pressure. We also determine Tm for a coarse-grain model of RDX, and compare its value to experiment and atomistic counterpart. All methods are employed via the LAMMPS simulator, resulting in 60-70 simulations that total 30-50 ns. Approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited.

  11. Indirect Terahertz Spectroscopy of Molecular Ions Using Highly Accurate and Precise Mid-Ir Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Andrew A.; Ford, Kyle B.; Kreckel, Holger; Perera, Manori; Crabtree, Kyle N.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2009-06-01

    With the advent of Herschel and SOFIA, laboratory methods capable of providing molecular rest frequencies in the terahertz and sub-millimeter regime are increasingly important. As of yet, it has been difficult to perform spectroscopy in this wavelength region due to the limited availability of radiation sources, optics, and detectors. Our goal is to provide accurate THz rest frequencies for molecular ions by combining previously recorded microwave transitions with combination differences obtained from high precision mid-IR spectroscopy. We are constructing a Sensitive Resolved Ion Beam Spectroscopy setup which will harness the benefits of kinematic compression in a molecular ion beam to enable very high resolution spectroscopy. This ion beam is interrogated by continuous-wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy using a home-made widely tunable difference frequency laser that utilizes two near-IR lasers and a periodically-poled lithium niobate crystal. Here, we report our efforts to optimize our ion beam spectrometer and to perform high-precision and high-accuracy frequency measurements using an optical frequency comb. footnote

  12. A large catalog of accurate distances to molecular clouds from PS1 photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Schlafly, E. F.; Rix, H.-W.; Martin, N. F.; Green, G.; Finkbeiner, D. P.; Bell, E. F.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Hodapp, K. W.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Tonry, J. L.; Draper, P. W.; Metcalfe, N.; Price, P. A.

    2014-05-01

    Distance measurements to molecular clouds are important but are often made separately for each cloud of interest, employing very different data and techniques. We present a large, homogeneous catalog of distances to molecular clouds, most of which are of unprecedented accuracy. We determine distances using optical photometry of stars along lines of sight toward these clouds, obtained from PanSTARRS-1. We simultaneously infer the reddenings and distances to these stars, tracking the full probability distribution function using a technique presented in Green et al. We fit these star-by-star measurements using a simple dust screen model to find the distance to each cloud. We thus estimate the distances to almost all of the clouds in the Magnani et al. catalog, as well as many other well-studied clouds, including Orion, Perseus, Taurus, Cepheus, Polaris, California, and Monoceros R2, avoiding only the inner Galaxy. Typical statistical uncertainties in the distances are 5%, though the systematic uncertainty stemming from the quality of our stellar models is about 10%. The resulting catalog is the largest catalog of accurate, directly measured distances to molecular clouds. Our distance estimates are generally consistent with available distance estimates from the literature, though in some cases the literature estimates are off by a factor of more than two.

  13. Masses, luminosities and dynamics of galactic molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, P. M.; Rivolo, A. R.; Mooney, T. J.; Barrett, J. W.; Sage, L. J.

    1987-01-01

    Star formation in galaxies takes place in molecular clouds and the Milky Way is the only galaxy in which it is possible to resolve and study the physical properties and star formation activity of individual clouds. The masses, luminosities, dynamics, and distribution of molecular clouds, primarily giant molecular clouds in the Milky Way are described and analyzed. The observational data sets are the Massachusetts-Stony Brook CO Galactic Plane Survey and the IRAS far IR images. The molecular mass and infrared luminosities of glactic clouds are then compared with the molecular mass and infrared luminosities of external galaxies.

  14. A hierarchical approach to accurate predictions of macroscopic thermodynamic behavior from quantum mechanics and molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, Stephen L.

    2005-07-01

    The combination of molecular simulations and potentials obtained from quantum chemistry is shown to be able to provide reasonably accurate thermodynamic property predictions. Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations are used to understand the effects of small perturbations to various regions of the model Lennard-Jones 12-6 potential. However, when the phase behavior and second virial coefficient are scaled by the critical properties calculated for each potential, the results obey a corresponding states relation suggesting a non-uniqueness problem for interaction potentials fit to experimental phase behavior. Several variations of a procedure collectively referred to as quantum mechanical Hybrid Methods for Interaction Energies (HM-IE) are developed and used to accurately estimate interaction energies from CCSD(T) calculations with a large basis set in a computationally efficient manner for the neon-neon, acetylene-acetylene, and nitrogen-benzene systems. Using these results and methods, an ab initio, pairwise-additive, site-site potential for acetylene is determined and then improved using results from molecular simulations using this initial potential. The initial simulation results also indicate that a limited range of energies important for accurate phase behavior predictions. Second virial coefficients calculated from the improved potential indicate that one set of experimental data in the literature is likely erroneous. This prescription is then applied to methanethiol. Difficulties in modeling the effects of the lone pair electrons suggest that charges on the lone pair sites negatively impact the ability of the intermolecular potential to describe certain orientations, but that the lone pair sites may be necessary to reasonably duplicate the interaction energies for several orientations. Two possible methods for incorporating the effects of three-body interactions into simulations within the pairwise-additivity formulation are also developed. A low density

  15. CycloBranch: De Novo Sequencing of Nonribosomal Peptides from Accurate Product Ion Mass Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, Jiří; Lemr, Karel; Schug, Kevin A.; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2015-07-01

    Nonribosomal peptides have a wide range of biological and medical applications. Their identification by tandem mass spectrometry remains a challenging task. A new open-source de novo peptide identification engine CycloBranch was developed and successfully applied in identification or detailed characterization of 11 linear, cyclic, branched, and branch-cyclic peptides. CycloBranch is based on annotated building block databases the size of which is defined by the user according to ribosomal or nonribosomal peptide origin. The current number of involved nonisobaric and isobaric building blocks is 287 and 521, respectively. Contrary to all other peptide sequencing tools utilizing either peptide libraries or peptide fragment libraries, CycloBranch represents a true de novo sequencing engine developed for accurate mass spectrometric data. It is a stand-alone and cross-platform application with a graphical and user-friendly interface; it supports mzML, mzXML, mgf, txt, and baf file formats and can be run in parallel on multiple threads. It can be downloaded for free from http://ms.biomed.cas.cz/cyclobranch/, where the User's manual and video tutorials can be found.

  16. Enantiomeric separation in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with accurate mass analysis.

    PubMed

    Chin, Sung-Tong; Nolvachai, Yada; Marriott, Philip J

    2014-11-01

    Chiral comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (eGC×GC) coupled to quadrupole-accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOFMS) was evaluated for its capability to report the chiral composition of several monoterpenes, namely, α-pinene, β-pinene, and limonene in cardamom oil. Enantiomers in a standard mixture were fully resolved by direct enantiomeric-GC analysis with a 2,3-di-O-methyl-6-t-butylsilyl derivatized β-cyclodextrin phase; however, the (+)-(R)-limonene enantiomer in cardamom oil was overlapped with other background components including cymene and cineole. Verification of (+)-(R)-limonene components based on characteristic ions at m/z 136, 121, and 107 acquired by chiral single-dimension GC-QTOFMS in the alternate MS/MSMS mode of operation was unsuccessful due to similar parent/daughter ions generated by interfering or co-eluting cymene and cineole. Column phases SUPELCOWAX, SLB-IL111, HP-88, and SLB-IL59, were incorporated as the second dimension column ((2)D) in chiral GC×GC analysis; the SLB-IL59 offered the best resolution for the tested monoterpene enantiomers from the matrix background. Enantiomeric ratios for α-pinene, β-pinene, and limonene were determined to be 1.325, 2.703, and 1.040, respectively, in the cardamom oil sample based on relative peak area data. PMID:24420979

  17. Accurate and Efficient Resolution of Overlapping Isotopic Envelopes in Protein Tandem Mass Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Kaijie; Yu, Fan; Fang, Houqin; Xue, Bingbing; Liu, Yan; Tian, Zhixin

    2015-01-01

    It has long been an analytical challenge to accurately and efficiently resolve extremely dense overlapping isotopic envelopes (OIEs) in protein tandem mass spectra to confidently identify proteins. Here, we report a computationally efficient method, called OIE_CARE, to resolve OIEs by calculating the relative deviation between the ideal and observed experimental abundance. In the OIE_CARE method, the ideal experimental abundance of a particular overlapping isotopic peak (OIP) is first calculated for all the OIEs sharing this OIP. The relative deviation (RD) of the overall observed experimental abundance of this OIP relative to the summed ideal value is then calculated. The final individual abundance of the OIP for each OIE is the individual ideal experimental abundance multiplied by 1 + RD. Initial studies were performed using higher-energy collisional dissociation tandem mass spectra on myoglobin (with direct infusion) and the intact E. coli proteome (with liquid chromatographic separation). Comprehensive data at the protein and proteome levels, high confidence and good reproducibility were achieved. The resolving method reported here can, in principle, be extended to resolve any envelope-type overlapping data for which the corresponding theoretical reference values are available. PMID:26439836

  18. Analysis and accurate quantification of CpG methylation by MALDI mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Tost, Jörg; Schatz, Philipp; Schuster, Matthias; Berlin, Kurt; Gut, Ivo Glynne

    2003-01-01

    As the DNA sequence of the human genome is now nearly finished, the main task of genome research is to elucidate gene function and regulation. DNA methylation is of particular importance for gene regulation and is strongly implicated in the development of cancer. Even minor changes in the degree of methylation can have severe consequences. An accurate quantification of the methylation status at any given position of the genome is a powerful diagnostic indicator. Here we present the first assay for the analysis and precise quantification of methylation on CpG positions in simplex and multiplex reactions based on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ ionisation mass spectrometry detection. Calibration curves for CpGs in two genes were established and an algorithm was developed to account for systematic fluctuations. Regression analysis gave R2 ≥ 0.99 and standard deviation around 2% for the different positions. The limit of detection was ∼5% for the minor isomer. Calibrations showed no significant differences when carried out as simplex or multiplex analyses. All variable parameters were thoroughly investigated, several paraffin-embedded tissue biopsies were analysed and results were verified by established methods like analysis of cloned material. Mass spectrometric results were also compared to chip hybridisation. PMID:12711695

  19. Accurate evolutions of inspiralling and magnetized neutron stars: Equal-mass binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomazzo, Bruno; Rezzolla, Luciano; Baiotti, Luca

    2011-02-15

    By performing new, long and numerically accurate general-relativistic simulations of magnetized, equal-mass neutron-star binaries, we investigate the role that realistic magnetic fields may have in the evolution of these systems. In particular, we study the evolution of the magnetic fields and show that they can influence the survival of the hypermassive neutron star produced at the merger by accelerating its collapse to a black hole. We also provide evidence that, even if purely poloidal initially, the magnetic fields produced in the tori surrounding the black hole have toroidal and poloidal components of equivalent strength. When estimating the possibility that magnetic fields could have an impact on the gravitational-wave signals emitted by these systems either during the inspiral or after the merger, we conclude that for realistic magnetic-field strengths B < or approx. 10{sup 12} G such effects could be detected, but only marginally, by detectors such as advanced LIGO or advanced Virgo. However, magnetically induced modifications could become detectable in the case of small-mass binaries and with the development of gravitational-wave detectors, such as the Einstein Telescope, with much higher sensitivities at frequencies larger than {approx_equal}2 kHz.

  20. Fast and accurate quantum molecular dynamics of dense plasmas across temperature regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Sjostrom, Travis; Daligault, Jerome

    2014-10-10

    Here, we develop and implement a new quantum molecular dynamics approximation that allows fast and accurate simulations of dense plasmas from cold to hot conditions. The method is based on a carefully designed orbital-free implementation of density functional theory. The results for hydrogen and aluminum are in very good agreement with Kohn-Sham (orbital-based) density functional theory and path integral Monte Carlo calculations for microscopic features such as the electron density as well as the equation of state. The present approach does not scale with temperature and hence extends to higher temperatures than is accessible in the Kohn-Sham method and lower temperatures than is accessible by path integral Monte Carlo calculations, while being significantly less computationally expensive than either of those two methods.

  1. Fast and accurate quantum molecular dynamics of dense plasmas across temperature regimes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sjostrom, Travis; Daligault, Jerome

    2014-10-10

    Here, we develop and implement a new quantum molecular dynamics approximation that allows fast and accurate simulations of dense plasmas from cold to hot conditions. The method is based on a carefully designed orbital-free implementation of density functional theory. The results for hydrogen and aluminum are in very good agreement with Kohn-Sham (orbital-based) density functional theory and path integral Monte Carlo calculations for microscopic features such as the electron density as well as the equation of state. The present approach does not scale with temperature and hence extends to higher temperatures than is accessible in the Kohn-Sham method and lowermore » temperatures than is accessible by path integral Monte Carlo calculations, while being significantly less computationally expensive than either of those two methods.« less

  2. Accurate force fields and methods for modelling organic molecular crystals at finite temperatures.

    PubMed

    Nyman, Jonas; Pundyke, Orla Sheehan; Day, Graeme M

    2016-06-21

    We present an assessment of the performance of several force fields for modelling intermolecular interactions in organic molecular crystals using the X23 benchmark set. The performance of the force fields is compared to several popular dispersion corrected density functional methods. In addition, we present our implementation of lattice vibrational free energy calculations in the quasi-harmonic approximation, using several methods to account for phonon dispersion. This allows us to also benchmark the force fields' reproduction of finite temperature crystal structures. The results demonstrate that anisotropic atom-atom multipole-based force fields can be as accurate as several popular DFT-D methods, but have errors 2-3 times larger than the current best DFT-D methods. The largest error in the examined force fields is a systematic underestimation of the (absolute) lattice energy. PMID:27230942

  3. Simple, rapid and accurate molecular diagnosis of acute promyelocytic leukemia by loop mediated amplification technology

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, Orietta; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Rigo, Francesca; Zanghì, Pamela; D'Agostini, Elena; Amicarelli, Giulia; Colotta, Francesco; Divona, Mariadomenica; Ciardi, Claudia; Coco, Francesco Lo; Minnucci, Giulia

    2015-01-01

    The diagnostic work-up of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) includes the cytogenetic demonstration of the t(15;17) translocation and/or the PML-RARA chimeric transcript by RQ-PCR or RT-PCR. This latter assays provide suitable results in 3-6 hours. We describe here two new, rapid and specific assays that detect PML-RARA transcripts, based on the RT-QLAMP (Reverse Transcription-Quenching Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification) technology in which RNA retrotranscription and cDNA amplification are carried out in a single tube with one enzyme at one temperature, in fluorescence and real time format. A single tube triplex assay detects bcr1 and bcr3 PML-RARA transcripts along with GUS housekeeping gene. A single tube duplex assay detects bcr2 and GUSB. In 73 APL cases, these assays detected in 16 minutes bcr1, bcr2 and bcr3 transcripts. All 81 non-APL samples were negative by RT-QLAMP for chimeric transcripts whereas GUSB was detectable. In 11 APL patients in which RT-PCR yielded equivocal breakpoint type results, RT-QLAMP assays unequivocally and accurately defined the breakpoint type (as confirmed by sequencing). Furthermore, RT-QLAMP could amplify two bcr2 transcripts with particularly extended PML exon 6 deletions not amplified by RQ-PCR. RT-QLAMP reproducible sensitivity is 10−3 for bcr1 and bcr3 and 10−2 for bcr2 thus making this assay particularly attractive at diagnosis and leaving RQ-PCR for the molecular monitoring of minimal residual disease during the follow up. In conclusion, PML-RARA RT-QLAMP compared to RT-PCR or RQ-PCR is a valid improvement to perform rapid, simple and accurate molecular diagnosis of APL. PMID:25815362

  4. Surface electron density models for accurate ab initio molecular dynamics with electronic friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novko, D.; Blanco-Rey, M.; Alducin, M.; Juaristi, J. I.

    2016-06-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics with electronic friction (AIMDEF) is a valuable methodology to study the interaction of atomic particles with metal surfaces. This method, in which the effect of low-energy electron-hole (e-h) pair excitations is treated within the local density friction approximation (LDFA) [Juaristi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 116102 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.116102], can provide an accurate description of both e-h pair and phonon excitations. In practice, its applicability becomes a complicated task in those situations of substantial surface atoms displacements because the LDFA requires the knowledge at each integration step of the bare surface electron density. In this work, we propose three different methods of calculating on-the-fly the electron density of the distorted surface and we discuss their suitability under typical surface distortions. The investigated methods are used in AIMDEF simulations for three illustrative adsorption cases, namely, dissociated H2 on Pd(100), N on Ag(111), and N2 on Fe(110). Our AIMDEF calculations performed with the three approaches highlight the importance of going beyond the frozen surface density to accurately describe the energy released into e-h pair excitations in case of large surface atom displacements.

  5. PyVCI: A flexible open-source code for calculating accurate molecular infrared spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibaev, Marat; Crittenden, Deborah L.

    2016-06-01

    The PyVCI program package is a general purpose open-source code for simulating accurate molecular spectra, based upon force field expansions of the potential energy surface in normal mode coordinates. It includes harmonic normal coordinate analysis and vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) algorithms, implemented primarily in Python for accessibility but with time-consuming routines written in C. Coriolis coupling terms may be optionally included in the vibrational Hamiltonian. Non-negligible VCI matrix elements are stored in sparse matrix format to alleviate the diagonalization problem. CPU and memory requirements may be further controlled by algorithmic choices and/or numerical screening procedures, and recommended values are established by benchmarking using a test set of 44 molecules for which accurate analytical potential energy surfaces are available. Force fields in normal mode coordinates are obtained from the PyPES library of high quality analytical potential energy surfaces (to 6th order) or by numerical differentiation of analytic second derivatives generated using the GAMESS quantum chemical program package (to 4th order).

  6. Accurate and molecular-size-tolerant NMR quantitation of diverse components in solution

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Hideyasu; Nishimura, Hiroshi; Nagata, Takashi; Kigawa, Takanori; Watanabe, Takashi; Katahira, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Determining the amount of each component of interest in a mixture is a fundamental first step in characterizing the nature of the solution and to develop possible means of utilization of its components. Similarly, determining the composition of units in complex polymers, or polymer mixtures, is crucial. Although NMR is recognized as one of the most powerful methods to achieve this and is widely used in many fields, variation in the molecular sizes or the relative mobilities of components skews quantitation due to the size-dependent decay of magnetization. Here, a method to accurately determine the amount of each component by NMR was developed. This method was validated using a solution that contains biomass-related components in which the molecular sizes greatly differ. The method is also tolerant of other factors that skew quantitation such as variation in the one-bond C–H coupling constant. The developed method is the first and only way to reliably overcome the skewed quantitation caused by several different factors to provide basic information on the correct amount of each component in a solution. PMID:26883279

  7. Accurate Mass MS/MS/MS Analysis of Siderophores Ferrioxamine B and E1 by Collision-Induced Dissociation Electrospray Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidebottom, Ashley M.; Karty, Jonathan A.; Carlson, Erin E.

    2015-11-01

    Siderophores are bacterially secreted, small molecule iron chelators that facilitate the binding of insoluble iron (III) for reuptake and use in various biological processes. These compounds are classified by their iron (III) binding geometry, as dictated by subunit composition and include groups such as the trihydroxamates (hexadentate ligand) and catecholates (bidentate). Small modifications to the core structure such as acetylation, lipid tail addition, or cyclization, make facile characterization of new siderophores difficult by molecular ion detection alone (MS1). We have expanded upon previous fragmentation-directed studies using electrospray ionization collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-CID-MS/MS/MS) and identified diagnostic MS3 features from the trihydroxamate siderophore class for ferrioxamine B and E1 by accurate mass. Diagnostic features for MS3 include C-C, C-N, amide, and oxime cleavage events with proposed losses of water and -CO from the iron (III) coordination sites. These insights will facilitate the discovery of novel trihydroxamate siderophores from complex sample matrices.

  8. STELLAR MASS-TO-LIGHT RATIOS FROM GALAXY SPECTRA: HOW ACCURATE CAN THEY BE?

    SciTech Connect

    Gallazzi, Anna; Bell, Eric F. E-mail: ericbell@umich.edu

    2009-12-01

    Stellar masses play a crucial role in the exploration of galaxy properties and the evolution of the galaxy population. In this paper, we explore the minimum possible uncertainties in stellar mass-to-light ratios (M {sub *}/L) from the assumed star formation history (SFH) and metallicity distribution, with the goals of providing a minimum set of requirements for observational studies. We use a large Monte Carlo library of SFHs to study as a function of galaxy spectral type and signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) the statistical uncertainties of M {sub *}/L values using either absorption-line data or broadband colors. The accuracy of M {sub *}/L estimates can be significantly improved by using metal-sensitive indices in combination with age-sensitive indices, in particular for galaxies with intermediate-age or young stellar populations. While M {sub *}/L accuracy clearly depends on the spectral S/N, there is no significant gain in improving the S/N much above 50 pixel{sup -1} and limiting uncertainties of {approx}0.03 dex are reached. Assuming that dust is accurately corrected or absent and that the redshift is known, color-based M {sub *}/L estimates are only slightly more uncertain than spectroscopic estimates (at comparable spectroscopic and photometric quality), but are more easily affected by systematic biases. This is the case in particular for galaxies with bursty SFHs (high H{delta} {sub A} at fixed D4000 {sub n}), the M {sub *}/L of which cannot be constrained any better than {approx}0.15 dex with any indicators explored here. Finally, we explore the effects of the assumed prior distribution in SFHs and metallicity, finding them to be higher for color-based estimates.

  9. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Accurate Panchromatic Photometry from Optical Priors using LAMBDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, A. H.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Bourne, N.; Driver, S. P.; Dunne, L.; Maddox, S. J.; Alpaslan, M.; Andrews, S. K.; Bauer, A. E.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cluver, M.; Davies, L. J. M.; Holwerda, B. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Jarrett, T. H.; Kafle, P. R.; Lange, R.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Moffett, A. J.; Norberg, P.; Popescu, C. C.; Smith, M.; Taylor, E. N.; Tuffs, R. J.; Wang, L.; Wilkins, S. M.

    2016-04-01

    We present the Lambda Adaptive Multi-band Deblending Algorithm in R (LAMBDAR), a novel code for calculating matched aperture photometry across images that are neither pixel- nor PSF-matched, using prior aperture definitions derived from high resolution optical imaging. The development of this program is motivated by the desire for consistent photometry and uncertainties across large ranges of photometric imaging, for use in calculating spectral energy distributions. We describe the program, specifically key features required for robust determination of panchromatic photometry: propagation of apertures to images with arbitrary resolution, local background estimation, aperture normalisation, uncertainty determination and propagation, and object deblending. Using simulated images, we demonstrate that the program is able to recover accurate photometric measurements in both high-resolution, low-confusion, and low-resolution, high-confusion, regimes. We apply the program to the 21-band photometric dataset from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) Panchromatic Data Release (PDR; Driver et al. 2016), which contains imaging spanning the far-UV to the far-IR. We compare photometry derived from LAMBDAR with that presented in Driver et al. (2016), finding broad agreement between the datasets. Nonetheless, we demonstrate that the photometry from LAMBDAR is superior to that from the GAMA PDR, as determined by a reduction in the outlier rate and intrinsic scatter of colours in the LAMBDAR dataset. We similarly find a decrease in the outlier rate of stellar masses and star formation rates using LAMBDAR photometry. Finally, we note an exceptional increase in the number of UV and mid-IR sources able to be constrained, which is accompanied by a significant increase in the mid-IR colour-colour parameter-space able to be explored.

  10. Galaxy And Mass Assembly: accurate panchromatic photometry from optical priors using LAMBDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, A. H.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Bourne, N.; Driver, S. P.; Dunne, L.; Maddox, S. J.; Alpaslan, M.; Andrews, S. K.; Bauer, A. E.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Clarke, C.; Cluver, M.; Davies, L. J. M.; Grootes, M. W.; Holwerda, B. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Jarrett, T. H.; Kafle, P. R.; Lange, R.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Moffett, A. J.; Norberg, P.; Popescu, C. C.; Smith, M.; Taylor, E. N.; Tuffs, R. J.; Wang, L.; Wilkins, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    We present the Lambda Adaptive Multi-Band Deblending Algorithm in R (LAMBDAR), a novel code for calculating matched aperture photometry across images that are neither pixel- nor PSF-matched, using prior aperture definitions derived from high-resolution optical imaging. The development of this program is motivated by the desire for consistent photometry and uncertainties across large ranges of photometric imaging, for use in calculating spectral energy distributions. We describe the program, specifically key features required for robust determination of panchromatic photometry: propagation of apertures to images with arbitrary resolution, local background estimation, aperture normalization, uncertainty determination and propagation, and object deblending. Using simulated images, we demonstrate that the program is able to recover accurate photometric measurements in both high-resolution, low-confusion, and low-resolution, high-confusion, regimes. We apply the program to the 21-band photometric data set from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) Panchromatic Data Release (PDR; Driver et al. 2016), which contains imaging spanning the far-UV to the far-IR. We compare photometry derived from LAMBDAR with that presented in Driver et al. (2016), finding broad agreement between the data sets. None the less, we demonstrate that the photometry from LAMBDAR is superior to that from the GAMA PDR, as determined by a reduction in the outlier rate and intrinsic scatter of colours in the LAMBDAR data set. We similarly find a decrease in the outlier rate of stellar masses and star formation rates using LAMBDAR photometry. Finally, we note an exceptional increase in the number of UV and mid-IR sources able to be constrained, which is accompanied by a significant increase in the mid-IR colour-colour parameter-space able to be explored.

  11. Multiple apolipoprotein kinetics measured in human HDL by high-resolution/accurate mass parallel reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sasha A; Andraski, Allison B; Pieper, Brett; Goh, Wilson; Mendivil, Carlos O; Sacks, Frank M; Aikawa, Masanori

    2016-04-01

    Endogenous labeling with stable isotopes is used to study the metabolism of proteins in vivo. However, traditional detection methods such as GC/MS cannot measure tracer enrichment in multiple proteins simultaneously, and multiple reaction monitoring MS cannot measure precisely the low tracer enrichment in slowly turning-over proteins as in HDL. We exploited the versatility of the high-resolution/accurate mass (HR/AM) quadrupole Orbitrap for proteomic analysis of five HDL sizes. We identified 58 proteins in HDL that were shared among three humans and that were organized into five subproteomes according to HDL size. For seven of these proteins, apoA-I, apoA-II, apoA-IV, apoC-III, apoD, apoE, and apoM, we performed parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) to measure trideuterated leucine tracer enrichment between 0.03 to 1.0% in vivo, as required to study their metabolism. The results were suitable for multicompartmental modeling in all except apoD. These apolipoproteins in each HDL size mainly originated directly from the source compartment, presumably the liver and intestine. Flux of apolipoproteins from smaller to larger HDL or the reverse contributed only slightly to apolipoprotein metabolism. These novel findings on HDL apolipoprotein metabolism demonstrate the analytical breadth and scope of the HR/AM-PRM technology to perform metabolic research. PMID:26862155

  12. Toward Sensitive and Accurate Analysis of Antibody Biotherapeutics by Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    An, Bo; Zhang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Remarkable methodological advances in the past decade have expanded the application of liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis of biotherapeutics. Currently, LC/MS represents a promising alternative or supplement to the traditional ligand binding assay (LBA) in the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and toxicokinetic studies of protein drugs, owing to the rapid and cost-effective method development, high specificity and reproducibility, low sample consumption, the capacity of analyzing multiple targets in one analysis, and the fact that a validated method can be readily adapted across various matrices and species. While promising, technical challenges associated with sensitivity, sample preparation, method development, and quantitative accuracy need to be addressed to enable full utilization of LC/MS. This article introduces the rationale and technical challenges of LC/MS techniques in biotherapeutics analysis and summarizes recently developed strategies to alleviate these challenges. Applications of LC/MS techniques on quantification and characterization of antibody biotherapeutics are also discussed. We speculate that despite the highly attractive features of LC/MS, it will not fully replace traditional assays such as LBA in the foreseeable future; instead, the forthcoming trend is likely the conjunction of biochemical techniques with versatile LC/MS approaches to achieve accurate, sensitive, and unbiased characterization of biotherapeutics in highly complex pharmaceutical/biologic matrices. Such combinations will constitute powerful tools to tackle the challenges posed by the rapidly growing needs for biotherapeutics development. PMID:25185260

  13. Toward an Accurate Prediction of the Arrival Time of Geomagnetic-Effective Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, T.; Wang, Y.; Wan, L.; Cheng, X.; Ding, M.; Zhang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Accurately predicting the arrival of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) to the Earth based on remote images is of critical significance for the study of space weather. Here we make a statistical study of 21 Earth-directed CMEs, specifically exploring the relationship between CME initial speeds and transit times. The initial speed of a CME is obtained by fitting the CME with the Graduated Cylindrical Shell model and is thus free of projection effects. We then use the drag force model to fit results of the transit time versus the initial speed. By adopting different drag regimes, i.e., the viscous, aerodynamics, and hybrid regimes, we get similar results, with a least mean estimation error of the hybrid model of 12.9 hr. CMEs with a propagation angle (the angle between the propagation direction and the Sun-Earth line) larger than their half-angular widths arrive at the Earth with an angular deviation caused by factors other than the radial solar wind drag. The drag force model cannot be reliably applied to such events. If we exclude these events in the sample, the prediction accuracy can be improved, i.e., the estimation error reduces to 6.8 hr. This work suggests that it is viable to predict the arrival time of CMEs to the Earth based on the initial parameters with fairly good accuracy. Thus, it provides a method of forecasting space weather 1-5 days following the occurrence of CMEs.

  14. Secondary ion mass spectrometry of MCsn+molecular ion complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Biswajit; Chakraborty, Purushottam

    2007-05-01

    Excellent detection sensitivity, high dynamic range and good depth resolution make the SIMS technique extremely powerful for the analysis of surfaces and interfaces. However, a serious problem in SIMS analysis is its "matrix effect" that hinders the quantification of a certain species in a sample and consequently, probing the composition of surfaces or interfaces by SIMS is greatly hindered. Appropriate corrective measures are therefore, needed to calibrate the secondary ion currents into respective concentrations for accurate compositional analysis. Working in the MCs+-SIMS mode (M - element to be analyzed, Cs+ - bombarding ions) can circumvent the matrix effect. The quantitative potential of the MCs+-SIMS method is understood by assuming that an MCs+ ion is generated by the combination of a secondary neutral M0 atom with a re-sputtered Cs+ ion in the near-surface region. The emission process for the species M0 is thus decoupled from the subsequent MCs+ ion formation process, in analogy with the ion formation in secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS), resulting in a drastic decrease in matrix effect. Although this technique has found its applicability in direct quantification, it generally suffers from a low useful yield. In such cases, detection of MCsn+(n = 2, 3, …) molecular ions offers a better sensitivity as the yields of such molecular ion complexes have often been found higher than that of MCs+ ions. This is true in most of the cases where the elements are strongly electronegative with respect to cesium. Several works have been reported on the emission of MCsn+molecular ions in the SIMS process, but a complete understanding on the formation mechanism of these ion complexes is still lacking. The kinetic energy distributions of secondary MCsn+molecular ion complexes has been found to be an effective approach to estimate the local instantaneous surface work function changes under various surface exposure conditions, thereby enabling one to elucidate on

  15. Accurate calculation of binding energies for molecular clusters - Assessment of different models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Joachim; Fiedler, Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    In this work we test different strategies to compute high-level benchmark energies for medium-sized molecular clusters. We use the incremental scheme to obtain CCSD(T)/CBS energies for our test set and carefully validate the accuracy for binding energies by statistical measures. The local errors of the incremental scheme are <1 kJ/mol. Since they are smaller than the basis set errors, we obtain higher total accuracy due to the applicability of larger basis sets. The final CCSD(T)/CBS benchmark values are ΔE = - 278.01 kJ/mol for (H2O)10, ΔE = - 221.64 kJ/mol for (HF)10, ΔE = - 45.63 kJ/mol for (CH4)10, ΔE = - 19.52 kJ/mol for (H2)20 and ΔE = - 7.38 kJ/mol for (H2)10 . Furthermore we test state-of-the-art wave-function-based and DFT methods. Our benchmark data will be very useful for critical validations of new methods. We find focal-point-methods for estimating CCSD(T)/CBS energies to be highly accurate and efficient. For foQ-i3CCSD(T)-MP2/TZ we get a mean error of 0.34 kJ/mol and a standard deviation of 0.39 kJ/mol.

  16. Hydration free energies of cyanide and hydroxide ions from molecular dynamics simulations with accurate force fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.; Meuwly, M.

    2013-01-01

    The evaluation of hydration free energies is a sensitive test to assess force fields used in atomistic simulations. We showed recently that the vibrational relaxation times, 1D- and 2D-infrared spectroscopies for CN(-) in water can be quantitatively described from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with multipolar force fields and slightly enlarged van der Waals radii for the C- and N-atoms. To validate such an approach, the present work investigates the solvation free energy of cyanide in water using MD simulations with accurate multipolar electrostatics. It is found that larger van der Waals radii are indeed necessary to obtain results close to the experimental values when a multipolar force field is used. For CN(-), the van der Waals ranges refined in our previous work yield hydration free energy between -72.0 and -77.2 kcal mol(-1), which is in excellent agreement with the experimental data. In addition to the cyanide ion, we also study the hydroxide ion to show that the method used here is readily applicable to similar systems. Hydration free energies are found to sensitively depend on the intermolecular interactions, while bonded interactions are less important, as expected. We also investigate in the present work the possibility of applying the multipolar force field in scoring trajectories generated using computationally inexpensive methods, which should be useful in broader parametrization studies with reduced computational resources, as scoring is much faster than the generation of the trajectories.

  17. Hydration free energies of cyanide and hydroxide ions from molecular dynamics simulations with accurate force fields.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Won; Meuwly, Markus

    2013-12-14

    The evaluation of hydration free energies is a sensitive test to assess force fields used in atomistic simulations. We showed recently that the vibrational relaxation times, 1D- and 2D-infrared spectroscopies for CN(-) in water can be quantitatively described from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with multipolar force fields and slightly enlarged van der Waals radii for the C- and N-atoms. To validate such an approach, the present work investigates the solvation free energy of cyanide in water using MD simulations with accurate multipolar electrostatics. It is found that larger van der Waals radii are indeed necessary to obtain results close to the experimental values when a multipolar force field is used. For CN(-), the van der Waals ranges refined in our previous work yield hydration free energy between -72.0 and -77.2 kcal mol(-1), which is in excellent agreement with the experimental data. In addition to the cyanide ion, we also study the hydroxide ion to show that the method used here is readily applicable to similar systems. Hydration free energies are found to sensitively depend on the intermolecular interactions, while bonded interactions are less important, as expected. We also investigate in the present work the possibility of applying the multipolar force field in scoring trajectories generated using computationally inexpensive methods, which should be useful in broader parametrization studies with reduced computational resources, as scoring is much faster than the generation of the trajectories. PMID:24170171

  18. Computationally efficient and accurate enantioselectivity modeling by clusters of molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Wijma, Hein J; Marrink, Siewert J; Janssen, Dick B

    2014-07-28

    Computational approaches could decrease the need for the laborious high-throughput experimental screening that is often required to improve enzymes by mutagenesis. Here, we report that using multiple short molecular dynamics (MD) simulations makes it possible to accurately model enantioselectivity for large numbers of enzyme-substrate combinations at low computational costs. We chose four different haloalkane dehalogenases as model systems because of the availability of a large set of experimental data on the enantioselective conversion of 45 different substrates. To model the enantioselectivity, we quantified the frequency of occurrence of catalytically productive conformations (near attack conformations) for pairs of enantiomers during MD simulations. We found that the angle of nucleophilic attack that leads to carbon-halogen bond cleavage was a critical variable that limited the occurrence of productive conformations; enantiomers for which this angle reached values close to 180° were preferentially converted. A cluster of 20-40 very short (10 ps) MD simulations allowed adequate conformational sampling and resulted in much better agreement to experimental enantioselectivities than single long MD simulations (22 ns), while the computational costs were 50-100 fold lower. With single long MD simulations, the dynamics of enzyme-substrate complexes remained confined to a conformational subspace that rarely changed significantly, whereas with multiple short MD simulations a larger diversity of conformations of enzyme-substrate complexes was observed. PMID:24916632

  19. Towards More Accurate Measurements of the Ionization Energy of Molecular Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprecher, D.; Beyer, M.; Liu, J.; Merkt, F.; Salumbides, E.; Eikema, K. S. E.; Ubachs, W.; Jungen, Ch.

    2013-06-01

    With two electrons and two protons, molecular hydrogen is the simplest molecule displaying all features of a chemical bond. H_2 is therefore a fundamental system for testing molecular quantum mechanics and quantum electrodynamics in molecules. The test can be performed by comparing measured and calculated intervals between different rovibronic states of H_2. Two further quantities that can be used for this test are the dissociation and ionization energies of H_2, and considerable efforts have been invested over more than 80 years to improve the precision and accuracy of experimental and theoretical determination of these two quantities. The current status of the comparison is that the theoretical and experimental values of the ionization and dissociation energies of H_2 agree within the combined uncertainty of 30 MHz (see also). The factors currently limiting the precision of the experimental determination will be discussed and the strategies that are being implemented towards overcoming these limitations will be presented. A long-term goal is to achieve a precision of better than 15 kHz, which is the ultimate limit imposed on the accuracy of the theoretical determination by the current uncertainty of the proton-to-electron mass ratio. E. J. Salumbides, G. D. Dickenson, T. I. Ivanov and W. Ubachs, {Phys. Rev. Lett.} 107 (4), 043005 (2011). K. Piszczatowski, G. Lach, M. Przybytek, J. Komasa, K. Pachuckiand and B. Jeziorski, {J. Chem. Theory Comput.} 5 (11), 3039 (2009). J. Liu, E. J. Salumbides, U. Hollenstein, J. C. J. Koelemeij, K. S. E. Eikema, W. Ubachs and F. Merkt, {J. Chem. Phys.} 130 (17), 174306 (2009). D. Sprecher, Ch. Jungen, W. Ubachs and F. Merkt, {Faraday Discuss.} 150, 51 (2011).

  20. Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) (Revised) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. NREL has six MBMS systems that researchers and industry partners can use to understand thermochemical biomass conversion and biomass composition recalcitrance.

  1. Degradation of reactive dyes in wastewater from the textile industry by ozone: analysis of the products by accurate masses.

    PubMed

    Constapel, Marc; Schellenträger, Marc; Marzinkowski, Joachim Michael; Gäb, Siegmar

    2009-02-01

    The present work describes the use of ozone to degrade selected reactive dyes from the textile industry and the analysis of the resulting complex mixture by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC-MS). To allow certain identification of the substances detected in the wastewater, the original dyes were also investigated either separately or in a synthetic mixture of three dyes (trichromie). Since the reactive dyes are hydrolyzed during the dyeing process, procedures for the hydrolysis were worked out first for the individual dyes. The ozonated solutions were concentrated by solid-phase extraction, which separated very polar or ionic substances from moderately polar degradation products. The latter, which are the primary degradation products, were investigated by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry with a tandem quadrupole time-of-flight mass analyzer. Accurate masses, which in most cases could be determined with a deviation of mass analyzer to provide UV-vis spectra of the products in the same run. With retention times, mass spectra, accurate masses, UV-vis spectra and, of course, knowledge of the structures of the original dyes, plausible structures could be proposed for most of the components of the moderately polar fraction. These structures were confirmed by 1H NMR in cases where it was practical to isolate the degradation products by preparative HPLC. PMID:19110293

  2. Accurate stellar masses for SB2 components: Interferometric observations for Gaia validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halbwachs, J.-L.; Boffin, H. M. J.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Famaey, B.; Salomon, J.-B.; Arenou, F.; Pourbaix, D.; Anthonioz, F.; Grellmann, R.; Guieu, S.; Guillout, P.; Jorissen, A.; Kiefer, F.; Lebreton, Y.; Mazeh, T.; Nebot Gómez-Morán, A.; Sana, H.; Tal-Or, L.

    2015-12-01

    A sample of about 70 double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2) is followed with radial velocity (RV) measurements, in order to derive the masses of their components when the astrometric measurements of Gaia will be available. A subset of 6 SB2 was observed in interferometry with VLTI/PIONIER, and the components were separated for each binary. The RV measurements already obtained were combined with the interferometric observations and the masses of the components were derived. The accuracies of the 12 masses are presently between 0.4 and 7 %, but they will still be improved in the future. These masses will be used to validate the masses which will be obtained from Gaia. In addition, the parallaxes derived from the combined visual+spectroscopic orbits are compared to that of Hipparcos, and a mass-luminosity relation is derived in the infrared H band.

  3. An experimental correction proposed for an accurate determination of mass diffusivity of wood in steady regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohoun, Sylvain; Agoua, Eusèbe; Degan, Gérard; Perre, Patrick

    2002-08-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the mass diffusion in the hygroscopic region of four temperate species and three tropical ones. In order to simplify the interpretation of the phenomena, a dimensionless parameter called reduced diffusivity is defined. This parameter varies from 0 to 1. The method used is firstly based on the determination of that parameter from results of the measurement of the mass flux which takes into account the conditions of operating standard device (tightness, dimensional variations and easy installation of samples of wood, good stability of temperature and humidity). Secondly the reasons why that parameter has to be corrected are presented. An abacus for this correction of mass diffusivity of wood in steady regime has been plotted. This work constitutes an advanced deal nowadays for characterising forest species.

  4. Collision-induced fragmentation accurate mass spectrometric analysis methods to rapidly characterize phytochemicals in plant extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rapid advances in analytical chromatography equipment have made the reliable and reproducible measurement of a wide range of plant chemical components possible. Full chemical characterization of a given plant material is possible with the new mass spectrometers currently available. New methods a...

  5. Mass Spectrometry Provides Accurate and Sensitive Quantitation of A2E

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Danielle B.; Blakeley, Lorie; Goletz, Patrice W.; Schey, Kevin L.; Hanneken, Anne; Koutalos, Yiannis; Crouch, Rosalie K.; Ablonczy, Zsolt

    2010-01-01

    Summary Orange autofluorescence from lipofuscin in the lysosomes of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a hallmark of aging in the eye. One of the major components of lipofuscin is A2E, the levels of which increase with age and in pathologic conditions, such as Stargardt disease or age-related macular degeneration. In vitro studies have suggested that A2E is highly phototoxic and, more specifically, that A2E and its oxidized derivatives contribute to RPE damage and subsequent photoreceptor cell death. To date, absorption spectroscopy has been the primary method to identify and quantitate A2E. Here, a new mass spectrometric method was developed for the specific detection of low levels of A2E and compared to a traditional method of analysis. The new mass spectrometry method allows the detection and quantitation of approximately 10,000-fold less A2E than absorption spectroscopy and the detection and quantitation of low levels of oxidized A2E, with localization of the oxidation sites. This study suggests that identification and quantitation of A2E from tissue extracts by chromatographic absorption spectroscopyoverestimates the amount of A2E. This mass spectrometry approach makes it possible to detect low levels of A2E and its oxidized metabolites with greater accuracy than traditional methods, thereby facilitating a more exact analysis of bis-retinoids in animal models of inherited retinal degeneration as well as in normal and diseased human eyes. PMID:20931136

  6. ACCURATE MASSES FOR THE PRIMARY AND SECONDARY IN THE ECLIPSING WHITE DWARF BINARY NLTT 11748

    SciTech Connect

    Kilic, Mukremin; Brown, Warren R.; Kenyon, S. J.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Agueeros, M. A.; Camilo, Fernando

    2010-10-01

    We measure the radial velocity curve of the eclipsing detached white dwarf binary NLTT 11748. The primary exhibits velocity variations with a semi-amplitude of 273 km s{sup -1} and an orbital period of 5.641 hr. We do not detect any spectral features from the secondary star or any spectral changes during the secondary eclipse. We use our composite spectrum to constrain the temperature and surface gravity of the primary to be T {sub eff} = 8690 {+-} 140 K and log g = 6.54 {+-} 0.05, which correspond to a mass of 0.18 M {sub sun}. For an inclination angle of 89.{sup 0}9 derived from the eclipse modeling, the mass function requires a 0.76 M {sub sun} companion. The merger time for the system is 7.2 Gyr. However, due to the extreme mass ratio of 0.24, the binary will most likely create an AM CVn system instead of a merger.

  7. Crucial test for covariant density functional theory with new and accurate mass measurements from Sn to Pa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P. W.; Song, L. S.; Sun, B.; Geissel, H.; Meng, J.

    2012-12-01

    The covariant density functional theory with the point-coupling interaction PC-PK1 is compared with new and accurate experimental masses in the element range from 50 to 91. The experimental data are from a mass measurement performed with the storage ring mass spectrometry at Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) [Chen , Nucl. Phys. ANUPABL0375-947410.1016/j.nuclphysa.2012.03.002 882, 71 (2012)]. Although the microscopic theory contains only 11 parameters, it agrees well with the experimental data. The comparison is characterized by a rms deviation of 0.859 MeV. For even-even nuclei, the theory agrees within about 600 keV. Larger deviations are observed in this comparison for the odd-A and odd-odd nuclei. Improvements and possible reasons for the deviations are discussed in this contribution as well.

  8. Fast and accurate modeling of molecular atomization energies with machine learning.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Matthias; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Müller, Klaus-Robert; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole

    2012-02-01

    We introduce a machine learning model to predict atomization energies of a diverse set of organic molecules, based on nuclear charges and atomic positions only. The problem of solving the molecular Schrödinger equation is mapped onto a nonlinear statistical regression problem of reduced complexity. Regression models are trained on and compared to atomization energies computed with hybrid density-functional theory. Cross validation over more than seven thousand organic molecules yields a mean absolute error of ∼10  kcal/mol. Applicability is demonstrated for the prediction of molecular atomization potential energy curves. PMID:22400967

  9. Balancing an accurate representation of the molecular surface in generalized born formalisms with integrator stability in molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Chocholousová, Jana; Feig, Michael

    2006-04-30

    Different integrator time steps in NVT and NVE simulations of protein and nucleic acid systems are tested with the GBMV (Generalized Born using Molecular Volume) and GBSW (Generalized Born with simple SWitching) methods. The simulation stability and energy conservation is investigated in relation to the agreement with the Poisson theory. It is found that very close agreement between generalized Born methods and the Poisson theory based on the commonly used sharp molecular surface definition results in energy drift and simulation artifacts in molecular dynamics simulation protocols with standard 2-fs time steps. New parameters are proposed for the GBMV method, which maintains very good agreement with the Poisson theory while providing energy conservation and stable simulations at time steps of 1 to 1.5 fs. PMID:16518883

  10. Accurate mass analysis of ethanesulfonic acid degradates of acetochlor and alachlor using high-performance liquid chromatography and time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Ferrer, I.; Parry, R.

    2002-01-01

    Degradates of acetochlor and alachlor (ethanesulfonic acids, ESAs) were analyzed in both standards and in a groundwater sample using high-performance liquid chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization. The negative pseudomolecular ion of the secondary amide of acetochlor ESA and alachlor ESA gave average masses of 256.0750??0.0049 amu and 270.0786??0.0064 amu respectively. Acetochlor and alachlor ESA gave similar masses of 314.1098??0.0061 amu and 314.1153??0.0048 amu; however, they could not be distinguished by accurate mass because they have the same empirical formula. On the other hand, they may be distinguished using positive-ion electrospray because of different fragmentation spectra, which did not occur using negative-ion electrospray.

  11. Accurate prediction of interference minima in linear molecular harmonic spectra by a modified two-center model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Cui; Di-Yu, Zhang; Gao, Chen; Ji-Gen, Chen; Si-Liang, Zeng; Fu-Ming, Guo; Yu-Jun, Yang

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate that the interference minima in the linear molecular harmonic spectra can be accurately predicted by a modified two-center model. Based on systematically investigating the interference minima in the linear molecular harmonic spectra by the strong-field approximation (SFA), it is found that the locations of the harmonic minima are related not only to the nuclear distance between the two main atoms contributing to the harmonic generation, but also to the symmetry of the molecular orbital. Therefore, we modify the initial phase difference between the double wave sources in the two-center model, and predict the harmonic minimum positions consistent with those simulated by SFA. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB922200) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11274001, 11274141, 11304116, 11247024, and 11034003), and the Jilin Provincial Research Foundation for Basic Research, China (Grant Nos. 20130101012JC and 20140101168JC).

  12. Accurate mass measurements of short-lived isotopes with the MISTRAL* rf spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Toader, C.; Audi, G.; Doubre, H.; Jacotin, M.; Henry, S.; Kepinski, J.-F.; Le Scornet, G.; Lunney, D.; Monsanglant, C.; Saint Simon, M. de; Thibault, C.; Borcea, C.; Duma, M.; Lebee, G.

    1999-01-15

    The MISTRAL* experiment has measured its first masses at ISOLDE. Installed in May 1997, this radiofrequency transmission spectrometer is to concentrate on nuclides with particularly short half-lives. MISTRAL received its first stable beam in October and first radioactive beam in November 1997. These first tests, with a plasma ion source, resulted in excellent isobaric separation and reasonable transmission. Further testing and development enabled first data taking in July 1998 on neutron-rich Na isotopes having half-lives as short as 31 ms.

  13. Dynamic Bayesian Network for Accurate Detection of Peptides from Tandem Mass Spectra.

    PubMed

    Halloran, John T; Bilmes, Jeff A; Noble, William S

    2016-08-01

    A central problem in mass spectrometry analysis involves identifying, for each observed tandem mass spectrum, the corresponding generating peptide. We present a dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) toolkit that addresses this problem by using a machine learning approach. At the heart of this toolkit is a DBN for Rapid Identification (DRIP), which can be trained from collections of high-confidence peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs). DRIP's score function considers fragment ion matches using Gaussians rather than fixed fragment-ion tolerances and also finds the optimal alignment between the theoretical and observed spectrum by considering all possible alignments, up to a threshold that is controlled using a beam-pruning algorithm. This function not only yields state-of-the art database search accuracy but also can be used to generate features that significantly boost the performance of the Percolator postprocessor. The DRIP software is built upon a general purpose DBN toolkit (GMTK), thereby allowing a wide variety of options for user-specific inference tasks as well as facilitating easy modifications to the DRIP model in future work. DRIP is implemented in Python and C++ and is available under Apache license at http://melodi-lab.github.io/dripToolkit . PMID:27397138

  14. Testing molecular effects for tritium-based neutrino mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parno, Diana; Bodine, Laura; Robertson, R. G. Hamish

    2015-10-01

    The upcoming KATRIN experiment will use the kinematics of tritium beta decay to probe the neutrino mass. The tritium source is molecular, however, and one of KATRIN's largest expected systematic uncertainties arises from the population of molecular final states following beta decay. To study this uncertainty, the Tritium Recoil-Ion Mass Spectrometer will measure the dissociation probability of the daughter molecule following beta decay, addressing a discrepancy between modern, high-precision theoretical calculations and two mass spectrometry measurements from the 1950s. We will describe the novel measurement technique and the commissioning of the experiment. This research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Award Number DE-FG02-97ER41020.

  15. Screening of the polyphenol content of tomato-based products through accurate-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-QTOF).

    PubMed

    Vallverdú-Queralt, Anna; Jáuregui, Olga; Di Lecce, Giuseppe; Andrés-Lacueva, Cristina; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa M

    2011-12-01

    Tomatoes, the second most important vegetable crop worldwide, are a key component in the so-called "Mediterranean diet" and its consumption has greatly increased worldwide over the past 2 decades, mostly due to a growing demand for tomato-based products such as ketchups, gazpachos and tomato juices. In this work, tomato-based products were analysed after a suitable work-up extraction procedure using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation-time of flight-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-QTOF) with negative ion detection using information-dependent acquisition (IDA) to determine their phenolic composition. The compounds were confirmed by accurate mass measurements in MS and MS(2) modes. The elemental composition was selected according to the accurate masses and isotopic pattern. In this way, 47 compounds (simple phenolic and hydroxycinnamoylquinic acids and flavone, flavonol, flavanone and dihydrochalcone derivatives) were identified in tomato-based products, five of them, as far as was known, were previously unreported in tomatoes. The phenolic fingerprint showed that tomato-based products differ in phenolic composition, principally in protocatechuic acid-O-hexoside, apigenin and its glycosylated forms, quercetin-O-dihexoside, kaempferol-C-hexoside and eriodictyol-O-dihexoside. Gazpacho showed the highest number of phenolic compounds due to the vegetables added for its production. PMID:25212313

  16. Accurate determination of silver nanoparticles in animal tissues by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veverková, Lenka; Hradilová, Šárka; Milde, David; Panáček, Aleš; Skopalová, Jana; Kvítek, Libor; Petrželová, Kamila; Zbořil, Radek

    2014-12-01

    This study examined recoveries of silver determination in animal tissues after wet digestion by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The composition of the mineralization mixture for microwave assisted digestion was optimized and the best recoveries were obtained for mineralization with HNO3 and addition of HCl promptly after digestion. The optimization was performed on model samples of chicken meat spiked with silver nanoparticles and a solution of ionic silver. Basic calculations of theoretical distribution of Ag among various silver-containing species were implemented and the results showed that most of the silver is in the form of soluble complexes AgCl2- and AgCl32 - for the optimized composition of the mineralization mixture. Three animal tissue certified reference materials were then analyzed to verify the trueness and precision of the results.

  17. A feasibility study of UHPLC-HRMS accurate-mass screening methods for multiclass testing of organic contaminants in food.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ortega, Patricia; Lara-Ortega, Felipe J; García-Reyes, Juan F; Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Trojanowicz, Marek; Molina-Díaz, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    The feasibility of accurate-mass multi-residue screening methods using liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS) using time-of-flight mass spectrometry has been evaluated, including over 625 multiclass food contaminants as case study. Aspects such as the selectivity and confirmation capability provided by HRMS with different acquisition modes (full-scan or full-scan combined with collision induced dissociation (CID) with no precursor ion isolation), and chromatographic separation along with main limitations such as sensitivity or automated data processing have been examined. Compound identification was accomplished with retention time matching and accurate mass measurements of the targeted ions for each analyte (mainly (de)protonated molecules). Compounds with the same nominal mass (isobaric species) were very frequent due to the large number of compounds included. Although 76% of database compounds were involved in isobaric groups, they were resolved in most cases (99% of these isobaric species were distinguished by retention time, resolving power, isotopic profile or fragment ions). Only three pairs could not be resolved with these tools. In-source CID fragmentation was evaluated in depth, although the results obtained in terms of information provided were not as thorough as those obtained using fragmentation experiments without precursor ion isolation (all ion mode). The latter acquisition mode was found to be the best suited for this type of large-scale screening method instead of classic product ion scan, as provided excellent fragmentation information for confirmatory purposes for an unlimited number of compounds. Leaving aside the sample treatment limitations, the main weaknesses noticed are basically the relatively low sensitivity for compounds which does not map well against electrospray ionization and also quantitation issues such as those produced by signal suppression due to either matrix effects from coeluting matrix or from

  18. Utilizing fast multipole expansions for efficient and accurate quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Schwörer, Magnus; Lorenzen, Konstantin; Mathias, Gerald; Tavan, Paul

    2015-03-14

    Recently, a novel approach to hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations has been suggested [Schwörer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 138, 244103 (2013)]. Here, the forces acting on the atoms are calculated by grid-based density functional theory (DFT) for a solute molecule and by a polarizable molecular mechanics (PMM) force field for a large solvent environment composed of several 10(3)-10(5) molecules as negative gradients of a DFT/PMM hybrid Hamiltonian. The electrostatic interactions are efficiently described by a hierarchical fast multipole method (FMM). Adopting recent progress of this FMM technique [Lorenzen et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 3244 (2014)], which particularly entails a strictly linear scaling of the computational effort with the system size, and adapting this revised FMM approach to the computation of the interactions between the DFT and PMM fragments of a simulation system, here, we show how one can further enhance the efficiency and accuracy of such DFT/PMM-MD simulations. The resulting gain of total performance, as measured for alanine dipeptide (DFT) embedded in water (PMM) by the product of the gains in efficiency and accuracy, amounts to about one order of magnitude. We also demonstrate that the jointly parallelized implementation of the DFT and PMM-MD parts of the computation enables the efficient use of high-performance computing systems. The associated software is available online. PMID:25770527

  19. Utilizing fast multipole expansions for efficient and accurate quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Schwörer, Magnus; Lorenzen, Konstantin; Mathias, Gerald; Tavan, Paul

    2015-03-14

    Recently, a novel approach to hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations has been suggested [Schwörer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 138, 244103 (2013)]. Here, the forces acting on the atoms are calculated by grid-based density functional theory (DFT) for a solute molecule and by a polarizable molecular mechanics (PMM) force field for a large solvent environment composed of several 10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} molecules as negative gradients of a DFT/PMM hybrid Hamiltonian. The electrostatic interactions are efficiently described by a hierarchical fast multipole method (FMM). Adopting recent progress of this FMM technique [Lorenzen et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 3244 (2014)], which particularly entails a strictly linear scaling of the computational effort with the system size, and adapting this revised FMM approach to the computation of the interactions between the DFT and PMM fragments of a simulation system, here, we show how one can further enhance the efficiency and accuracy of such DFT/PMM-MD simulations. The resulting gain of total performance, as measured for alanine dipeptide (DFT) embedded in water (PMM) by the product of the gains in efficiency and accuracy, amounts to about one order of magnitude. We also demonstrate that the jointly parallelized implementation of the DFT and PMM-MD parts of the computation enables the efficient use of high-performance computing systems. The associated software is available online.

  20. Utilizing fast multipole expansions for efficient and accurate quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwörer, Magnus; Lorenzen, Konstantin; Mathias, Gerald; Tavan, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Recently, a novel approach to hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations has been suggested [Schwörer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 138, 244103 (2013)]. Here, the forces acting on the atoms are calculated by grid-based density functional theory (DFT) for a solute molecule and by a polarizable molecular mechanics (PMM) force field for a large solvent environment composed of several 103-105 molecules as negative gradients of a DFT/PMM hybrid Hamiltonian. The electrostatic interactions are efficiently described by a hierarchical fast multipole method (FMM). Adopting recent progress of this FMM technique [Lorenzen et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 3244 (2014)], which particularly entails a strictly linear scaling of the computational effort with the system size, and adapting this revised FMM approach to the computation of the interactions between the DFT and PMM fragments of a simulation system, here, we show how one can further enhance the efficiency and accuracy of such DFT/PMM-MD simulations. The resulting gain of total performance, as measured for alanine dipeptide (DFT) embedded in water (PMM) by the product of the gains in efficiency and accuracy, amounts to about one order of magnitude. We also demonstrate that the jointly parallelized implementation of the DFT and PMM-MD parts of the computation enables the efficient use of high-performance computing systems. The associated software is available online.

  1. Fast and Accurate Fourier Series Solutions to Gravitational Lensing by a General Family of Two-Power-Law Mass Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Kyu-Hyun

    2002-04-01

    Fourier series solutions to the deflection and magnification by a family of three-dimensional cusped two-power-law ellipsoidal mass distributions are presented. The cusped two-power-law ellipsoidal mass distributions are characterized by inner and outer power-law radial indices and a break (or transition) radius. The model family includes mass models mimicking Jaffe, Hernquist, and η models and dark matter halo profiles from numerical simulations. The Fourier series solutions for the cusped two-power-law mass distributions are relatively simple and allow a very fast calculation, even for a chosen small fractional calculational error (e.g., 10-5). These results will be particularly useful for studying lensed systems that provide a number of accurate lensing constraints and for systematic analyses of large numbers of lenses. Subroutines employing these results for the two-power-law model and the results by Chae, Khersonsky, & Turnshek for the generalized single-power-law mass model are made publicly available.

  2. Accurate Alpha Abundance and C/O of Low-mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veyette, Mark; Muirhead, Philip; Mann, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    We investigate methods for measuring elemental abundances in M dwarf stars from high resolution (R>25,000), near-infrared spectra. With synthetic spectra from the BT-Settl model atmosphere library, we identify NIR features sensitive to enhancement of alpha elements (C, O, Mg, Si, S, Ca, and Ti) in M dwarfs. We also describe a method for measuring the amount of oxygen not bound in CO from molecular and atomic features in the NIR Y-band that, when combined with recently published methods of measuring carbon abundance in M dwarfs from K-band spectra, provides the ratio of carbon to oxygen (C/O). The ratio of carbon to oxygen is an important parameter for determining interior structures of exoplanets and processes that drive planet formation as evidenced by recent studies of the super Earth 55 Cnc e. We outline a potential observing program to empirically calibrate these methods via a sample of M dwarfs with widely-separated (5''-1500''), but associated, F, G or K-type binary companions. Once calibrated, we will apply these methods to a survey of nearby M dwarfs, including many stars that will be observed by NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS).

  3. The Use of Accurate Mass Tags based upon High-Throughput Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry for Global Proteomic Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2004-07-30

    In this review, we describe the technological basis and progress towards a new global proteomics strategy that uses peptide accurate mass measurements augmented by information from separations (e.g. LC retention times) to provide large improvements in sensitivity, dynamic range, comprehensiveness and throughput. The use of ?accurate mass and time? (AMT) tags serves to eliminate the need for routine MS/MS measurements [#4109]. As the case study, we use our own research efforts to illustrate the role of AMTs within the broader context of a state-of-the-art proteomics effort. Our strategy exploits high-resolution capillary LC separations combined with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR). AMTs represent peptide biomarkers and can be used to confidently identify proteins based on the high mass measurement accuracy provided by FTICR combined with LC elution times. Once identified using MS/MS, these biomarkers provide the foundation for subsequent high throughput studies using only AMT tags to identify and quantify the proteins expressed within a cell system. Key attractions of this approach include the feasibility of completely automated high confidence protein identifications, extensive proteome coverage, and the capability for exploiting stable-isotope labeling methods for high precision abundance measurements [#4019]. Additional developments described in this review include methods for more effective coverage of membrane proteins [#4184], for dynamic range expansion of proteome measurements [#4012], and for multi-stage separations that promise to enable more focused analyses, further extend the quality of measurements, and also extend measurements to more complex proteomes.

  4. Faster and more accurate graphical model identification of tandem mass spectra using trellises

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shengjie; Halloran, John T.; Bilmes, Jeff A.; Noble, William S.

    2016-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is the dominant high throughput technology for identifying and quantifying proteins in complex biological samples. Analysis of the tens of thousands of fragmentation spectra produced by an MS/MS experiment begins by assigning to each observed spectrum the peptide that is hypothesized to be responsible for generating the spectrum. This assignment is typically done by searching each spectrum against a database of peptides. To our knowledge, all existing MS/MS search engines compute scores individually between a given observed spectrum and each possible candidate peptide from the database. In this work, we use a trellis, a data structure capable of jointly representing a large set of candidate peptides, to avoid redundantly recomputing common sub-computations among different candidates. We show how trellises may be used to significantly speed up existing scoring algorithms, and we theoretically quantify the expected speedup afforded by trellises. Furthermore, we demonstrate that compact trellis representations of whole sets of peptides enables efficient discriminative learning of a dynamic Bayesian network for spectrum identification, leading to greatly improved spectrum identification accuracy. Contact: bilmes@uw.edu or william-noble@uw.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307634

  5. A black-hole mass measurement from molecular gas kinematics in NGC4526.

    PubMed

    Davis, Timothy A; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Sarzi, Marc; Blitz, Leo

    2013-02-21

    The masses of the supermassive black holes found in galaxy bulges are correlated with a multitude of galaxy properties, leading to suggestions that galaxies and black holes may evolve together. The number of reliably measured black-hole masses is small, and the number of methods for measuring them is limited, holding back attempts to understand this co-evolution. Directly measuring black-hole masses is currently possible with stellar kinematics (in early-type galaxies), ionized-gas kinematics (in some spiral and early-type galaxies) and in rare objects that have central maser emission. Here we report that by modelling the effect of a black hole on the kinematics of molecular gas it is possible to fit interferometric observations of CO emission and thereby accurately estimate black-hole masses. We study the dynamics of the gas in the early-type galaxy NGC 4526, and obtain a best fit that requires the presence of a central dark object of 4.5(+4.2)(-3.1) × 10(8) solar masses (3σ confidence limit). With the next-generation millimetre-wavelength interferometers these observations could be reproduced in galaxies out to 75 megaparsecs in less than 5 hours of observing time. The use of molecular gas as a kinematic tracer should thus allow one to estimate black-hole masses in hundreds of galaxies in the local Universe, many more than are accessible with current techniques. PMID:23364690

  6. Mass-density relationship in molecular cloud clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donkov, Sava; Veltchev, Todor V.; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2011-12-01

    We study the mass-density relationship n ∝ mx in molecular cloud condensations (clumps), considering various equipartition relations between their gravitational, kinetic, internal and magnetic energies. Clumps are described statistically, with a density distribution that reflects a lognormal probability density function in turbulent cold interstellar medium. The clump mass-density exponent x derived at different scales L varies in most of the cases within the range -2.5 ≲x≲-0.2, with a pronounced scale dependence and in consistency with observations. When derived from the global size-mass relationship ? for set of clumps, generated at all scales, the clump mass-density exponent has typical values -3.0 ≲x(γglob) ≲-0.3 that depend on the forms of energy, included in the equipartition relations, and on the velocity scaling law, whereas the description of clump geometry is important when magnetic energy is taken into account.

  7. Molecular Detection of Foodborne Pathogens: A Rapid and Accurate Answer to Food Safety.

    PubMed

    Mangal, Manisha; Bansal, Sangita; Sharma, Satish K; Gupta, Ram K

    2016-07-01

    Food safety is a global health concern. For the prevention and recognition of problems related to health and safety, detection of foodborne pathogen is of utmost importance at all levels of food production chain. For several decades, a lot of research has been targeted at the development of rapid methodology as reducing the time needed to complete pathogen detection tests has been the primary goal of food microbiologists. With the result, food microbiology laboratories now have a wide array of detection methods and automated technologies such as enzyme immunoassay, polymerase chain reaction, and microarrays, which can cut test times considerably. Nucleic acid amplification strategies and advances in amplicon detection methodologies have been the key factors in the progress of molecular microbiology. A comprehensive literature survey has been carried out to give an overview in the field of foodborne pathogen detection. In this paper, we describe the conventional methods, as well as recent developments in food pathogen detection, identification, and quantification, with a major emphasis on molecular detection methods. PMID:25830555

  8. Accurate mass and nuclear magnetic resonance identification of bisphenolic can coating migrants and their interference with liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometric analysis of bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Luke K; Noonan, Gregory O; Begley, Timothy H; Mazzola, Eugene P

    2011-05-15

    Two unknown compounds were previously determined to be potential interferences in liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) analysis of bisphenol A (BPA) in canned infant formula. Both yielded two identical MS/MS transitions to BPA. The identities of the unknowns were investigated using accurate mass LC/MS, LC/MS/MS, and elemental formula and structures proposed. Exact identities were confirmed through purification or synthesis followed by (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments, as well as comparisons of one unknown with commercial standards. Comparisons of negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI) MS/MS and accurate mass spectra suggested both unknowns to be structurally identical (to BPA and each other). Positive ion ESI spectra confirmed both were larger molecules, suggesting that in the negative mode they likely fragmented to the deprotonated BPA ion in the source [corrected]. Elemental composition of positive ion accurate mass spectra and NMR analysis concluded the unknowns were oxidized forms of the known epoxy can coating monomer, bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE). One of the unknowns, 2,2-[bis-4-(2,3-dihydroxypropoxy)phenyl]propane, commonly known as BADGE*2H(2)O, is widely reported as an epoxy-phenolic can coating migrant, but has not been suggested to interfere with the MS/MS analysis of BPA. The other unknown, 2-[4-(2,3-dihydroxypropoxy)phenyl]-2-[4'-hydroxyphenyl]propane, or the oxidized form of bisphenol A monoglycidyl ether (BAMGE*H(2)O), has not been previously reported in food or packaging. PMID:21488128

  9. Molecular Isotopic Distribution Analysis (MIDAs) with adjustable mass accuracy.

    PubMed

    Alves, Gelio; Ogurtsov, Aleksey Y; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present Molecular Isotopic Distribution Analysis (MIDAs), a new software tool designed to compute molecular isotopic distributions with adjustable accuracies. MIDAs offers two algorithms, one polynomial-based and one Fourier-transform-based, both of which compute molecular isotopic distributions accurately and efficiently. The polynomial-based algorithm contains few novel aspects, whereas the Fourier-transform-based algorithm consists mainly of improvements to other existing Fourier-transform-based algorithms. We have benchmarked the performance of the two algorithms implemented in MIDAs with that of eight software packages (BRAIN, Emass, Mercury, Mercury5, NeutronCluster, Qmass, JFC, IC) using a consensus set of benchmark molecules. Under the proposed evaluation criteria, MIDAs's algorithms, JFC, and Emass compute with comparable accuracy the coarse-grained (low-resolution) isotopic distributions and are more accurate than the other software packages. For fine-grained isotopic distributions, we compared IC, MIDAs's polynomial algorithm, and MIDAs's Fourier transform algorithm. Among the three, IC and MIDAs's polynomial algorithm compute isotopic distributions that better resemble their corresponding exact fine-grained (high-resolution) isotopic distributions. MIDAs can be accessed freely through a user-friendly web-interface at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/midas/index.html. PMID:24254576

  10. Molecular Isotopic Distribution Analysis (MIDAs) with Adjustable Mass Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Gelio; Ogurtsov, Aleksey Y.; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present Molecular Isotopic Distribution Analysis (MIDAs), a new software tool designed to compute molecular isotopic distributions with adjustable accuracies. MIDAs offers two algorithms, one polynomial-based and one Fourier-transform-based, both of which compute molecular isotopic distributions accurately and efficiently. The polynomial-based algorithm contains few novel aspects, whereas the Fourier-transform-based algorithm consists mainly of improvements to other existing Fourier-transform-based algorithms. We have benchmarked the performance of the two algorithms implemented in MIDAs with that of eight software packages (BRAIN, Emass, Mercury, Mercury5, NeutronCluster, Qmass, JFC, IC) using a consensus set of benchmark molecules. Under the proposed evaluation criteria, MIDAs's algorithms, JFC, and Emass compute with comparable accuracy the coarse-grained (low-resolution) isotopic distributions and are more accurate than the other software packages. For fine-grained isotopic distributions, we compared IC, MIDAs's polynomial algorithm, and MIDAs's Fourier transform algorithm. Among the three, IC and MIDAs's polynomial algorithm compute isotopic distributions that better resemble their corresponding exact fine-grained (high-resolution) isotopic distributions. MIDAs can be accessed freely through a user-friendly web-interface at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/midas/index.html.

  11. A simple and accurate algorithm for path integral molecular dynamics with the Langevin thermostat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Li, Dezhang; Liu, Xinzijian

    2016-07-14

    We introduce a novel simple algorithm for thermostatting path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) with the Langevin equation. The staging transformation of path integral beads is employed for demonstration. The optimum friction coefficients for the staging modes in the free particle limit are used for all systems. In comparison to the path integral Langevin equation thermostat, the new algorithm exploits a different order of splitting for the phase space propagator associated to the Langevin equation. While the error analysis is made for both algorithms, they are also employed in the PIMD simulations of three realistic systems (the H2O molecule, liquid para-hydrogen, and liquid water) for comparison. It is shown that the new thermostat increases the time interval of PIMD by a factor of 4-6 or more for achieving the same accuracy. In addition, the supplementary material shows the error analysis made for the algorithms when the normal-mode transformation of path integral beads is used. PMID:27421393

  12. Accurate reaction-diffusion operator splitting on tetrahedral meshes for parallel stochastic molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, I; Chen, W; De Schutter, E

    2016-08-01

    Spatial stochastic molecular simulations in biology are limited by the intense computation required to track molecules in space either in a discrete time or discrete space framework, which has led to the development of parallel methods that can take advantage of the power of modern supercomputers in recent years. We systematically test suggested components of stochastic reaction-diffusion operator splitting in the literature and discuss their effects on accuracy. We introduce an operator splitting implementation for irregular meshes that enhances accuracy with minimal performance cost. We test a range of models in small-scale MPI simulations from simple diffusion models to realistic biological models and find that multi-dimensional geometry partitioning is an important consideration for optimum performance. We demonstrate performance gains of 1-3 orders of magnitude in the parallel implementation, with peak performance strongly dependent on model specification. PMID:27497550

  13. Accurate reaction-diffusion operator splitting on tetrahedral meshes for parallel stochastic molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepburn, I.; Chen, W.; De Schutter, E.

    2016-08-01

    Spatial stochastic molecular simulations in biology are limited by the intense computation required to track molecules in space either in a discrete time or discrete space framework, which has led to the development of parallel methods that can take advantage of the power of modern supercomputers in recent years. We systematically test suggested components of stochastic reaction-diffusion operator splitting in the literature and discuss their effects on accuracy. We introduce an operator splitting implementation for irregular meshes that enhances accuracy with minimal performance cost. We test a range of models in small-scale MPI simulations from simple diffusion models to realistic biological models and find that multi-dimensional geometry partitioning is an important consideration for optimum performance. We demonstrate performance gains of 1-3 orders of magnitude in the parallel implementation, with peak performance strongly dependent on model specification.

  14. A rapid and accurate method for calculation of stratospheric photolysis rates with molecular scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boughner, Robert E.

    1986-01-01

    A method for calculating the photodissociation rates needed for photochemical modeling of the stratosphere, which includes the effects of molecular scattering, is described. The procedure is based on Sokolov's method of averaging functional correction. The radiation model and approximations used to calculate the radiation field are examined. The approximated diffuse fields and photolysis rates are compared with exact data. It is observed that the approximate solutions differ from the exact result by 10 percent or less at altitudes above 15 km; the photolysis rates differ from the exact rates by less than 5 percent for altitudes above 10 km and all zenith angles, and by less than 1 percent for altitudes above 15 km.

  15. A simple and accurate algorithm for path integral molecular dynamics with the Langevin thermostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Li, Dezhang; Liu, Xinzijian

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a novel simple algorithm for thermostatting path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) with the Langevin equation. The staging transformation of path integral beads is employed for demonstration. The optimum friction coefficients for the staging modes in the free particle limit are used for all systems. In comparison to the path integral Langevin equation thermostat, the new algorithm exploits a different order of splitting for the phase space propagator associated to the Langevin equation. While the error analysis is made for both algorithms, they are also employed in the PIMD simulations of three realistic systems (the H2O molecule, liquid para-hydrogen, and liquid water) for comparison. It is shown that the new thermostat increases the time interval of PIMD by a factor of 4-6 or more for achieving the same accuracy. In addition, the supplementary material shows the error analysis made for the algorithms when the normal-mode transformation of path integral beads is used.

  16. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis for the Rapid and Accurate Characterization of Hexacosanoylceramide.

    PubMed

    Ross, Charles W; Simonsick, William J; Bogusky, Michael J; Celikay, Recep W; Guare, James P; Newton, Randall C

    2016-01-01

    Ceramides are a central unit of all sphingolipids which have been identified as sites of biological recognition on cellular membranes mediating cell growth and differentiation. Several glycosphingolipids have been isolated, displaying immunomodulatory and anti-tumor activities. These molecules have generated considerable interest as potential vaccine adjuvants in humans. Accurate analyses of these and related sphingosine analogues are important for the characterization of structure, biological function, and metabolism. We report the complementary use of direct laser desorption ionization (DLDI), sheath flow electrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) and high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis for the rapid, accurate identification of hexacosanoylceramide and starting materials. DLDI does not require stringent sample preparation and yields representative ions. Sheath-flow ESI yields ions of the product and byproducts and was significantly better than monospray ESI due to improved compound solubility. Negative ion sheath flow ESI provided data of starting materials and products all in one acquisition as hexacosanoic acid does not ionize efficiently when ceramides are present. NMR provided characterization of these lipid molecules complementing the results obtained from MS analyses. NMR data was able to differentiate straight chain versus branched chain alkyl groups not easily obtained from mass spectrometry. PMID:27367671

  17. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis for the Rapid and Accurate Characterization of Hexacosanoylceramide

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Charles W.; Simonsick, William J.; Bogusky, Michael J.; Celikay, Recep W.; Guare, James P.; Newton, Randall C.

    2016-01-01

    Ceramides are a central unit of all sphingolipids which have been identified as sites of biological recognition on cellular membranes mediating cell growth and differentiation. Several glycosphingolipids have been isolated, displaying immunomodulatory and anti-tumor activities. These molecules have generated considerable interest as potential vaccine adjuvants in humans. Accurate analyses of these and related sphingosine analogues are important for the characterization of structure, biological function, and metabolism. We report the complementary use of direct laser desorption ionization (DLDI), sheath flow electrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) and high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis for the rapid, accurate identification of hexacosanoylceramide and starting materials. DLDI does not require stringent sample preparation and yields representative ions. Sheath-flow ESI yields ions of the product and byproducts and was significantly better than monospray ESI due to improved compound solubility. Negative ion sheath flow ESI provided data of starting materials and products all in one acquisition as hexacosanoic acid does not ionize efficiently when ceramides are present. NMR provided characterization of these lipid molecules complementing the results obtained from MS analyses. NMR data was able to differentiate straight chain versus branched chain alkyl groups not easily obtained from mass spectrometry. PMID:27367671

  18. Accurate description of phase diagram of clathrate hydrates at the molecular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belosludov, Rodion V.; Subbotin, Oleg S.; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Belosludov, Vladimir R.

    2009-12-01

    In order to accurately estimate the thermodynamic properties of hydrogen clathrate hydrates, we developed a method based on the solid solution theory of van der Waals and Platteeuw. This model allows one to take into account the influence of guest molecules on the host lattice and guest-guest interactions—especially when more than one guest molecule occupies a cage. The free energies, equations of state, and chemical potentials of hydrogen and mixed propane-hydrogen clathrate hydrates of cubic structure II with different cage fillings have been estimated using this approach. Moreover, the proposed theory has been used for construction p -T phase diagrams of hydrogen hydrate and mixed hydrogen-propane hydrates in a wide range of pressures and temperatures. For the systems with well defined interactions the calculated curves of "guest gas-hydrate-ice Ih" equilibrium agree with the available experimental data. We also believe that the present model allows one not only to calculate the hydrogen storage ability of known hydrogen hydrate but also predict this value for structures that have not yet been realized by experiment.

  19. Utilizing Ion-Mobility Data to Estimate Molecular Masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Tuan; Kanik, Isik

    2008-01-01

    A method is being developed for utilizing readings of an ion-mobility spectrometer (IMS) to estimate molecular masses of ions that have passed through the spectrometer. The method involves the use of (1) some feature-based descriptors of structures of molecules of interest and (2) reduced ion mobilities calculated from IMS readings as inputs to (3) a neural network. This development is part of a larger effort to enable the use of IMSs as relatively inexpensive, robust, lightweight instruments to identify, via molecular masses, individual compounds or groups of compounds (especially organic compounds) that may be present in specific environments or samples. Potential applications include detection of organic molecules as signs of life on remote planets, modeling and detection of biochemicals of interest in the pharmaceutical and agricultural industries, and detection of chemical and biological hazards in industrial, homeland-security, and industrial settings.

  20. Molecular dynamics of nanodroplet impact: The effect of the projectile's molecular mass on sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiz, Fernan; Gamero-Castaño, Manuel

    2016-06-01

    The impact of electrosprayed nanodroplets on ceramics at several km/s alters the atomic order of the target, causing sputtering, surface amorphization and cratering. The molecular mass of the projectile is known to have a strong effect on the impact phenomenology, and this article aims to rationalize this dependency using molecular dynamics. To achieve this goal, the article models the impact of four projectiles with molecular masses between 45 and 391 amu, and identical diameters and kinetic energies, 10 nm and 63 keV, striking a silicon target. In agreement with experiments, the simulations show that the number of sputtered atoms strongly increases with molecular mass. This is due to the increasing intensity of collision cascades with molecular mass: when the fixed kinetic energy of the projectile is distributed among fewer, more massive molecules, their collisions with the target produce knock-on atoms with higher energies, which in turn generate more energetic and larger numbers of secondary and tertiary knock-on atoms. The more energetic collision cascades intensify both knock-on sputtering and, upon thermalization, thermal sputtering. Besides enhancing sputtering, heavier molecules also increase the fraction of the projectile's energy that is transferred to the target, as well as the fraction of this energy that is dissipated.

  1. Microfluidic Western Blotting of Low-Molecular-Mass Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe a microfluidic Western blot assay (μWestern) using a Tris tricine discontinuous buffer system suitable for analyses of a wide molecular mass range (6.5–116 kDa). The Tris tricine μWestern is completed in an enclosed, straight glass microfluidic channel housing a photopatterned polyacrylamide gel that incorporates a photoactive benzophenone methacrylamide monomer. Upon brief ultraviolet (UV) light exposure, the hydrogel toggles from molecular sieving for size-based separation to a covalent immobilization scaffold for in situ antibody probing. Electrophoresis controls all assay stages, affording purely electronic operation with no pumps or valves needed for fluid control. Electrophoretic introduction of antibody into and along the molecular sieving gel requires that the probe must traverse through (i) a discontinuous gel interface central to the transient isotachophoresis used to achieve high-performance separations and (ii) the full axial length of the separation gel. In-channel antibody probing of small molecular mass species is especially challenging, since the gel must effectively sieve small proteins while permitting effective probing with large-molecular-mass antibodies. To create a well-controlled gel interface, we introduce a fabrication method that relies on a hydrostatic pressure mismatch between the buffer and polymer precursor solution to eliminate the interfacial pore-size control issues that arise when a polymerizing polymer abuts a nonpolymerizing polymer solution. Combined with a new swept antibody probe plug delivery scheme, the Tris tricine μWestern blot enables 40% higher separation resolution as compared to a Tris glycine system, destacking of proteins down to 6.5 kDa, and a 100-fold better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for small pore gels, expanding the range of applicable biological targets. PMID:25268977

  2. Microfluidic Western blotting of low-molecular-mass proteins.

    PubMed

    Gerver, Rachel E; Herr, Amy E

    2014-11-01

    We describe a microfluidic Western blot assay (μWestern) using a Tris tricine discontinuous buffer system suitable for analyses of a wide molecular mass range (6.5-116 kDa). The Tris tricine μWestern is completed in an enclosed, straight glass microfluidic channel housing a photopatterned polyacrylamide gel that incorporates a photoactive benzophenone methacrylamide monomer. Upon brief ultraviolet (UV) light exposure, the hydrogel toggles from molecular sieving for size-based separation to a covalent immobilization scaffold for in situ antibody probing. Electrophoresis controls all assay stages, affording purely electronic operation with no pumps or valves needed for fluid control. Electrophoretic introduction of antibody into and along the molecular sieving gel requires that the probe must traverse through (i) a discontinuous gel interface central to the transient isotachophoresis used to achieve high-performance separations and (ii) the full axial length of the separation gel. In-channel antibody probing of small molecular mass species is especially challenging, since the gel must effectively sieve small proteins while permitting effective probing with large-molecular-mass antibodies. To create a well-controlled gel interface, we introduce a fabrication method that relies on a hydrostatic pressure mismatch between the buffer and polymer precursor solution to eliminate the interfacial pore-size control issues that arise when a polymerizing polymer abuts a nonpolymerizing polymer solution. Combined with a new swept antibody probe plug delivery scheme, the Tris tricine μWestern blot enables 40% higher separation resolution as compared to a Tris glycine system, destacking of proteins down to 6.5 kDa, and a 100-fold better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for small pore gels, expanding the range of applicable biological targets. PMID:25268977

  3. Accurate mass screening and identification of emerging contaminants in environmental samples by liquid chromatography-hybrid linear ion trap Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hogenboom, A C; van Leerdam, J A; de Voogt, P

    2009-01-16

    The European Reach legislation will possibly drive producers to develop newly designed chemicals that will be less persistent, bioaccumulative or toxic. If this innovation leads to an increased use of more hydrophilic chemicals it may result in higher mobilities of chemicals in the aqueous environment. As a result, the drinking water companies may face stronger demands on removal processes as the hydrophilic compounds inherently are more difficult to remove. Monitoring efforts will also experience a shift in focus to more water-soluble compounds. Screening source waters on the presence of (emerging) contaminants is an essential step in the control of the water cycle from source to tap water. In this article, some of our experiences are presented with the hybrid linear ion trap (LTQ) FT Orbitrap mass spectrometer, in the area of chemical water analysis. A two-pronged strategy in mass spectrometric research was employed: (i) exploring effluent, surface, ground- and drinking-water samples searching for accurate masses corresponding to target compounds (and their product ions) known from, e.g. priority lists or the scientific literature and (ii) full-scan screening of water samples in search of 'unknown' or unexpected masses, followed by MS(n) experiments to elucidate the structure of the unknowns. Applications of both approaches to emerging water contaminants are presented and discussed. Results are presented for target analysis search for pharmaceuticals, benzotriazoles, illicit drugs and for the identification of unknown compounds in a groundwater sample and in a polar extract of a landfill soil sample (a toxicity identification evaluation bioassay sample). The applications of accurate mass screening and identification described in this article demonstrate that the LC-LTQ FT Orbitrap MS is well equipped to meet the challenges posed by newly emerging polar contaminants. PMID:18771771

  4. Accurate mass determination, quantification and determination of detection limits in liquid chromatography-high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry: challenges and practical solutions.

    PubMed

    Vergeynst, Leendert; Van Langenhove, Herman; Joos, Pieter; Demeestere, Kristof

    2013-07-30

    Uniform guidelines for the data processing and validation of qualitative and quantitative multi-residue analysis using full-spectrum high-resolution mass spectrometry are scarce. Through systematic research, optimal mass accuracy and sensitivity are obtained after refining the post-processing of the HRMS data. For qualitative analysis, transforming the raw profile spectra to centroid spectra is recommended resulting in a 2.3 fold improved precision on the accurate mass determination of spectrum peaks. However, processing centroid data for quantitative purposes could lead to signal interruption when too narrow mass windows are applied for the construction of extracted ion chromatograms. Therefore, peak integration on the raw profile data is recommended. An optimal width of the mass window of 50 ppm, which is a trade-off between sensitivity and selectivity, was obtained for a TOF instrument providing a resolving power of 20,000 at full width at half maximum (FWHM). For the validation of HRMS analytical methods, widespread concepts such as the signal-to-noise ratios for the determination of decision limits and detection capabilities have shown to be not always applicable because in some cases almost no noise can be detected anymore. A statistical methodology providing a reliable alternative is extended and applied. PMID:23856232

  5. Robust Algorithm for Alignment of Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analyses in an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Data Analysis Pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Jaitly, Navdeep; Monroe, Matthew E.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Clauss, Therese RW; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-11-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has become a standard technique for analyzing complex peptide mixtures to determine composition and relative quantity. Several high-throughput proteomics techniques attempt to combine complementary results from multiple LC-MS and LC-MS/MS analyses to provide more comprehensive and accurate results. To effectively collate results from these techniques, variations in mass and elution time measurements between related analyses are corrected by using algorithms designed to align the various types of results: LC-MS/MS vs. LC-MS/MS, LC-MS vs. LC-MS/MS, and LC-MS vs. LC-MS. Described herein are new algorithms referred to collectively as Liquid Chromatography based Mass Spectrometric Warping and Alignment of Retention times of Peptides (LCMSWARP) which use a dynamic elution time warping approach similar to traditional algorithms that correct variation in elution time using piecewise linear functions. LCMSWARP is compared to a linear alignment algorithm that assumes a linear transformation of elution time between analyses. LCMSWARP also corrects for drift in mass measurement accuracies that are often seen in an LC-MS analysis due to factors such as analyzer drift. We also describe the alignment of LC-MS results and provide examples of alignment of analyses from different chromatographic systems to demonstrate more complex transformation functions.

  6. Accurate Photodissociation in UV and X-ray Irradiated Molecular Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancil, Phillip C.; Gay, C. D.; Cieszewski, R. M.; el-Qadi, W.; Kuri, A.; Miyake, S.; Abel, N.; Porter, R. L.; Shaw, G.; Ferland, G. J.; van Hoof, P. A. M.

    2011-05-01

    Molecules are primarily destroyed in diffuse and translucent regions, in protoplanetary disks, in cool stellar atmospheres, in photodissociation regions, and in x-ray dominated regions via photodissociation (PD) due to the incident radiation field. The majority of astrochemical/spectral modeling codes available today use pre-computed exponentially-attenuated photorates based on dust scattering/absorption for an ``average" interstellar cloud. Since there is clearly a large scatter in the dust properties and local radiation field for various environments in the Galaxy and beyond, the adoption of such pre-computed photorates can lead to considerable errors in predicted abundances. To improve current modeling capabilities, we are computing new rovibrationally-resolved PD cross sections for H_2, HD, HeH+, NH, C_2, CN, and CS and implementing the cross sections in the spectral simulation code Cloudy for explicit computation of local photorates. We present model results using the new photodissociation cross sections for a variety of environments emphasizing differences in total and state-specific molecular column densities. This work was partially supported by NASA grants NNG06GJ11G and HST-AR-11776.01-A, NSF grant AST-0607733, and the PRODEX Programme of ESA.

  7. Accurate and efficient integration for molecular dynamics simulations at constant temperature and pressure.

    PubMed

    Lippert, Ross A; Predescu, Cristian; Ierardi, Douglas J; Mackenzie, Kenneth M; Eastwood, Michael P; Dror, Ron O; Shaw, David E

    2013-10-28

    In molecular dynamics simulations, control over temperature and pressure is typically achieved by augmenting the original system with additional dynamical variables to create a thermostat and a barostat, respectively. These variables generally evolve on timescales much longer than those of particle motion, but typical integrator implementations update the additional variables along with the particle positions and momenta at each time step. We present a framework that replaces the traditional integration procedure with separate barostat, thermostat, and Newtonian particle motion updates, allowing thermostat and barostat updates to be applied infrequently. Such infrequent updates provide a particularly substantial performance advantage for simulations parallelized across many computer processors, because thermostat and barostat updates typically require communication among all processors. Infrequent updates can also improve accuracy by alleviating certain sources of error associated with limited-precision arithmetic. In addition, separating the barostat, thermostat, and particle motion update steps reduces certain truncation errors, bringing the time-average pressure closer to its target value. Finally, this framework, which we have implemented on both general-purpose and special-purpose hardware, reduces software complexity and improves software modularity. PMID:24182003

  8. Accurate vibrational spectra via molecular tailoring approach: A case study of water clusters at MP2 level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Nityananda; Gadre, Shridhar R.

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the recent advents in parallel algorithms and computer hardware, high-level calculation of vibrational spectra of large molecules is still an uphill task. To overcome this, significant effort has been devoted to the development of new algorithms based on fragmentation methods. The present work provides the details of an efficient and accurate procedure for computing the vibrational spectra of large clusters employing molecular tailoring approach (MTA). The errors in the Hessian matrix elements and dipole derivatives arising due to the approximation nature of MTA are reduced by grafting the corrections from a smaller basis set. The algorithm has been tested out for obtaining vibrational spectra of neutral and charged water clusters at Møller-Plesset second order level of theory, and benchmarking them against the respective full calculation (FC) and/or experimental results. For (H2O)16 clusters, the estimated vibrational frequencies are found to differ by a maximum of 2 cm-1 with reference to the corresponding FC values. Unlike the FC, the MTA-based calculations including grafting procedure can be performed on a limited hardware, yet take a fraction of the FC time. The present methodology, thus, opens a possibility of the accurate estimation of the vibrational spectra of large molecular systems, which is otherwise impossible or formidable.

  9. Accurate vibrational spectra via molecular tailoring approach: a case study of water clusters at MP2 level.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Nityananda; Gadre, Shridhar R

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the recent advents in parallel algorithms and computer hardware, high-level calculation of vibrational spectra of large molecules is still an uphill task. To overcome this, significant effort has been devoted to the development of new algorithms based on fragmentation methods. The present work provides the details of an efficient and accurate procedure for computing the vibrational spectra of large clusters employing molecular tailoring approach (MTA). The errors in the Hessian matrix elements and dipole derivatives arising due to the approximation nature of MTA are reduced by grafting the corrections from a smaller basis set. The algorithm has been tested out for obtaining vibrational spectra of neutral and charged water clusters at Møller-Plesset second order level of theory, and benchmarking them against the respective full calculation (FC) and/or experimental results. For (H2O)16 clusters, the estimated vibrational frequencies are found to differ by a maximum of 2 cm(-1) with reference to the corresponding FC values. Unlike the FC, the MTA-based calculations including grafting procedure can be performed on a limited hardware, yet take a fraction of the FC time. The present methodology, thus, opens a possibility of the accurate estimation of the vibrational spectra of large molecular systems, which is otherwise impossible or formidable. PMID:25573553

  10. Highly accurate isotope composition measurements by a miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer designed for in situ investigations on planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedo, A.; Meyer, S.; Heredia, B.; Neuland, M. B.; Bieler, A.; Tulej, M.; Leya, I.; Iakovleva, M.; Mezger, K.; Wurz, P.

    2013-10-01

    An experimental procedure for precise and accurate measurements of isotope abundances by a miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer for space research is described. The measurements were conducted on different untreated NIST standards and galena samples by applying pulsed UV laser radiation (266 nm, 3 ns and 20 Hz) for ablation, atomisation, and ionisation of the sample material. Mass spectra of released ions are measured by a reflectron-type time-of-flight mass analyser. A computer controlled performance optimiser was used to operate the system at maximum ion transmission and mass resolution. At optimal experimental conditions, the best relative accuracy and precision achieved for Pb isotope compositions are at the per mill level and were obtained in a range of applied laser irradiances and a defined number of accumulated spectra. A similar relative accuracy and precision was achieved in the study of Pb isotope compositions in terrestrial galena samples. The results for the galena samples are similar to those obtained with a thermal ionisation mass spectrometer (TIMS). The studies of the isotope composition of other elements yielded relative accuracy and precision at the per mill level too, with characteristic instrument parameters for each element. The relative accuracy and precision of the measurements is degrading with lower element/isotope concentration in a sample. For the elements with abundances below 100 ppm these values drop to the percent level. Depending on the isotopic abundances of Pb in minerals, 207Pb/206Pb ages with accuracy in the range of tens of millions of years can be achieved.

  11. Implications of (Less) Accurate Mass-Radius-Measurements for the Habitability of Extrasolar Terrestrial Planets: Why Do We Need PLATO?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, L.; Wagner, F. W.; Plesa, A.-C.; Höning, D.; Sohl, F.; Breuer, D.; Rauer, H.

    2012-04-01

    Several space missions (CoRoT, Kepler and others) already provided promising candidates for terrestrial exoplanets (i.e. with masses less than about 10 Earth masses) and thereby triggered an exciting new research branch of planetary modelling to investigate the possible habitability of such planets. Earth analogues (low-mass planets with an Earth-like structure and composition) are likely to be found in the near future with new missions such as the proposed M3 mission PLATO. Planets may be more diverse in the universe than they are in the solar system. Our neighbouring planets in the habitable zone are all terrestrial by the means of being differentiated into an iron core, a silicate mantle and a crust. To reliably determine the interior structure of an exoplanet, measurements of mass and radius have to be sufficiently accurate (around +/-2% error allowed for the radius and +/-5% for the mass). An Earth-size planet with an Earth-like mass but an expected error of ~15% in mass for example may have either a Mercury-like, an Earth-like or a Moon-like (i.e. small iron core) structure [1,2]. Even though the atmospheric escape is not strongly influenced by the interior structure, the outgassing of volatiles and the likeliness of plate tectonics and an ongoing carbon-cycle may be very different. Our investigations show, that a planet with a small silicate mantle is less likely to shift into the plate-tectonics regime, cools faster (which may lead to the loss of a magnetic field after a short time) and outgasses less volatiles than a planet with the same mass but a large silicate mantle and small iron core. To be able to address the habitability of exoplanets, space missions such as PLATO, which can lead up to 2% accuracy in radius [3], are extremely important. Moreover, information about the occurrence of different planetary types helps us to better understand the formation of planetary systems and to further constrain the Drake's equation, which gives an estimate of the

  12. Ab initio molecular dynamics with noisy and cheap quantum Monte Carlo forces: accurate calculation of vibrational frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ye; Sorella, Sandro

    2014-03-01

    We introduce a general and efficient method for the calculation of vibrational frequencies of electronic systems, ranging from molecules to solids. By performing damped molecular dynamics with ab initio forces, we show that quantum vibrational frequencies can be evaluated by diagonalizing the time averaged position-position or force-force correlation matrices, although the ionic motion is treated on the classical level within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The novelty of our approach is to evaluate atomic forces with QMC by means of a highly accurate and correlated variational wave function which is optimized simultaneously during the dynamics. QMC is an accurate and promising many-body technique for electronic structure calculation thanks to massively parallel computers. However, since infinite statistics is not feasible, property evaluation may be affected by large noise that is difficult to harness. Our approach controls the QMC stochastic bias systematically and gives very accurate results with moderate computational effort, namely even with noisy forces. We prove the accuracy and efficiency of our method on the water monomer[A. Zen et al., JCTC 9 (2013) 4332] and dimer. We are currently working on the challenging problem of simulating liquid water at ambient conditions.

  13. A Support Vector Machine model for the prediction of proteotypic peptides for accurate mass and time proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Cannon, William R.; Oehmen, Christopher S.; Shah, Anuj R.; Gurumoorthi, Vidhya; Lipton, Mary S.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2008-07-01

    Motivation: The standard approach to identifying peptides based on accurate mass and elution time (AMT) compares these profiles obtained from a high resolution mass spectrometer to a database of peptides previously identified from tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) studies. It would be advantageous, with respect to both accuracy and cost, to only search for those peptides that are detectable by MS (proteotypic). Results: We present a Support Vector Machine (SVM) model that uses a simple descriptor space based on 35 properties of amino acid content, charge, hydrophilicity, and polarity for the quantitative prediction of proteotypic peptides. Using three independently derived AMT databases (Shewanella oneidensis, Salmonella typhimurium, Yersinia pestis) for training and validation within and across species, the SVM resulted in an average accuracy measure of ~0.8 with a standard deviation of less than 0.025. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these results are achievable with a small set of 12 variables and can achieve high proteome coverage. Availability: http://omics.pnl.gov/software/STEPP.php

  14. High resolution/accurate mass (HRMS) detection of anatoxin-a in lake water using LDTD-APCI coupled to a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Roy-Lachapelle, Audrey; Solliec, Morgan; Sinotte, Marc; Deblois, Christian; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    A new innovative analytical method combining ultra-fast analysis time with high resolution/accurate mass detection was developed to eliminate the misidentification of anatoxin-a (ANA-a), a cyanobacterial toxin, from the natural amino acid phenylalanine (PHE). This was achieved by using the laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LDTD-APCI) coupled to the Q-Exactive, a high resolution/accurate mass spectrometer (HRMS). This novel combination, the LDTD-APCI-HRMS, allowed for an ultra-fast analysis time (<15 s/sample). A comparison of two different acquisition modes (full scan and targeted ion fragmentation) was made to determine the most rigorous analytical method using the LDTD-APCI interface. Method development focused toward selectivity and sensitivity improvement to reduce the possibility of false positives and to lower detection limits. The Q-Exactive mass spectrometer operates with resolving powers between 17500 and 140000 FWHM (m/z 200). Nevertheless, a resolution of 17500FWHM is enough to dissociate ANA-a and PHE signals. Mass accuracy was satisfactory with values below 1 ppm reaching precision to the fourth decimal. Internal calibration with standard addition was achieved with the isotopically-labeled (D5) phenylalanine with good linearity (R(2)>0.999). Enhancement of signal to noise ratios relative to a standard triple-quadrupole method was demonstrated with lower detection and quantification limit values of 0.2 and 0.6 μg/L using the Q-Exactive. Accuracy and interday/intraday relative standard deviations were below 15%. The new method was applied to 8 different lake water samples with signs of cyanobacterial blooms. This work demonstrates the possibility of using an ultra-fast LDTD-APCI sample introduction system with an HRMS hybrid instrument for quantitative purposes with high selectivity in complex environmental matrices. PMID:25476385

  15. Multiclass semi-volatile compounds determination in wine by gas chromatography accurate time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cabo, T; Rodríguez, I; Ramil, M; Silva, A; Cela, R

    2016-04-15

    The performance of gas chromatography (GC) with accurate, high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) for the determination of a group of 39 semi-volatile compounds related to wine quality (pesticide residues, phenolic off-flavours, phenolic pollutants and bioactive stilbenes) is investigated. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) was used as extraction technique, previously to acetylation (phenolic compounds) and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) concentration. Compounds were determined by GC coupled to a quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) MS system through an electron ionization (EI) source. The final method attained limits of quantification (LOQs) at the very low ng mL(-1) level, covering the range of expected concentrations for target compounds in red and white wines. For 38 out of 39 compounds, performance of sample preparation and determination steps were hardly affected by the wine matrix; thus, accurate recoveries were achieved by using pseudo-external calibration. Levels of target compounds in a set of 25 wine samples are reported. The capabilities of the described approach for the post-run identification of species not considered during method development, without retention time information, are illustrated and discussed with selected examples of compounds from different classes. PMID:26971021

  16. Incentives Increase Participation in Mass Dog Rabies Vaccination Clinics and Methods of Coverage Estimation Are Assessed to Be Accurate

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Melissa; Czupryna, Anna; Bigambo, Machunde; Mzimbiri, Imam; Powell, George; Gwakisa, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In this study we show that incentives (dog collars and owner wristbands) are effective at increasing owner participation in mass dog rabies vaccination clinics and we conclude that household questionnaire surveys and the mark-re-sight (transect survey) method for estimating post-vaccination coverage are accurate when all dogs, including puppies, are included. Incentives were distributed during central-point rabies vaccination clinics in northern Tanzania to quantify their effect on owner participation. In villages where incentives were handed out participation increased, with an average of 34 more dogs being vaccinated. Through economies of scale, this represents a reduction in the cost-per-dog of $0.47. This represents the price-threshold under which the cost of the incentive used must fall to be economically viable. Additionally, vaccination coverage levels were determined in ten villages through the gold-standard village-wide census technique, as well as through two cheaper and quicker methods (randomized household questionnaire and the transect survey). Cost data were also collected. Both non-gold standard methods were found to be accurate when puppies were included in the calculations, although the transect survey and the household questionnaire survey over- and under-estimated the coverage respectively. Given that additional demographic data can be collected through the household questionnaire survey, and that its estimate of coverage is more conservative, we recommend this method. Despite the use of incentives the average vaccination coverage was below the 70% threshold for eliminating rabies. We discuss the reasons and suggest solutions to improve coverage. Given recent international targets to eliminate rabies, this study provides valuable and timely data to help improve mass dog vaccination programs in Africa and elsewhere. PMID:26633821

  17. Incentives Increase Participation in Mass Dog Rabies Vaccination Clinics and Methods of Coverage Estimation Are Assessed to Be Accurate.

    PubMed

    Minyoo, Abel B; Steinmetz, Melissa; Czupryna, Anna; Bigambo, Machunde; Mzimbiri, Imam; Powell, George; Gwakisa, Paul; Lankester, Felix

    2015-12-01

    In this study we show that incentives (dog collars and owner wristbands) are effective at increasing owner participation in mass dog rabies vaccination clinics and we conclude that household questionnaire surveys and the mark-re-sight (transect survey) method for estimating post-vaccination coverage are accurate when all dogs, including puppies, are included. Incentives were distributed during central-point rabies vaccination clinics in northern Tanzania to quantify their effect on owner participation. In villages where incentives were handed out participation increased, with an average of 34 more dogs being vaccinated. Through economies of scale, this represents a reduction in the cost-per-dog of $0.47. This represents the price-threshold under which the cost of the incentive used must fall to be economically viable. Additionally, vaccination coverage levels were determined in ten villages through the gold-standard village-wide census technique, as well as through two cheaper and quicker methods (randomized household questionnaire and the transect survey). Cost data were also collected. Both non-gold standard methods were found to be accurate when puppies were included in the calculations, although the transect survey and the household questionnaire survey over- and under-estimated the coverage respectively. Given that additional demographic data can be collected through the household questionnaire survey, and that its estimate of coverage is more conservative, we recommend this method. Despite the use of incentives the average vaccination coverage was below the 70% threshold for eliminating rabies. We discuss the reasons and suggest solutions to improve coverage. Given recent international targets to eliminate rabies, this study provides valuable and timely data to help improve mass dog vaccination programs in Africa and elsewhere. PMID:26633821

  18. Bipolar Molecular Outflows from High-Mass Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yu-Nung; Zhang, Qizhou; Lim, Jeremy

    2004-03-01

    We report observations of the bipolar molecular outflows associated with the luminous (~2×104 Lsolar) far-IR sources IRAS 21519+5613 and IRAS 22506+5944, as well the dust and molecular gas condensations on which these outflows appear to be centered. The observations were made in 12CO, 13CO, C18O, and continuum at 3 mm with the BIMA array and in 12CO and 13CO with the NRAO 12 m telescope to recover extended emission filtered out by the interferometric array. We find that the outflow associated with each IRAS source shows a clear bipolar morphology in 12CO, with properties (i.e., total mass of order 10-100 Msolar, mass-outflow rate >~10-3 Msolar, dynamical timescale 104-105 yr, and energetics) comparable with those of other massive outflows associated with luminous young stellar objects. Each outflow appears to be centered on a dust and gas condensation with a mass of 200-300 Msolar, likely marking the location of the driving source. The outflow lobes of both sources are fully resolved along their major but not minor axes, and they have collimation factors that may be comparable with young low-mass stars. The mass-velocity diagrams of both outflows change in slope at a velocity of ~10 km s-1, suggesting that the high-velocity component (HVC) may drive the low-velocity component (LVC). Although the HVC of IRAS 21519+5613 shows evidence for deceleration, no such signature is seen in the HVC of IRAS 22506+5944. Neither HVC has a momentum supply rate sufficient to drive their corresponding LVCs, although it is possible that the HVC is more highly excited and hence its thrust underestimated. Like for other molecular outflows the primary driving agent cannot be ionized gas, leaving atomic gas as the other remaining candidate. Neither IRAS 21519+5613 nor IRAS 22506+5944 exhibits detectable free-free emission, which together with the observed properties of their molecular outflows and surrounding condensations make them credible candidates for high-mass protostars. The mass

  19. Using molecular recognition of beta-cyclodextrin to determine molecular weights of low-molecular-weight explosives by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Shi, Zhen; Bai, Yinjuan; Gao, Yong; Hu, Rongzu; Zhao, Fenqi

    2006-02-01

    This study presents a novel method for determining the molecular weights of low molecular weight (MW) energetic compounds through their complexes of beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) in a mass range of 500 to 1700 Da, avoiding matrix interference. The MWs of one composite explosive composed of 2,6-DNT, TNT, and RDX, one propellant with unknown components, and 14 single-compound explosives (RDX, HMX, 3,4-DNT, 2,6-DNT, 2,5-DNT, 2,4,6-TNT, TNAZ, DNI, BTTN, NG, TO, NTO, NP, and 662) were measured. The molecular recognition and inclusion behavior of beta-CD to energetic materials (EMs) were investigated. The results show that (1) the established method is sensitive, simple, accurate, and suitable for determining the MWs of low-MW single-compound explosives and energetic components in composite explosives and propellants; and (2) beta-CD has good inclusion and modular recognition abilities to the above EMs. PMID:16406809

  20. Development and evaluation of a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method for rapid, accurate quantitation of malondialdehyde in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Sobsey, Constance A; Han, Jun; Lin, Karen; Swardfager, Walter; Levitt, Anthony; Borchers, Christoph H

    2016-09-01

    Malondialdhyde (MDA) is a commonly used marker of lipid peroxidation in oxidative stress. To provide a sensitive analytical method that is compatible with high throughput, we developed a multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) approach using 3-nitrophenylhydrazine chemical derivatization, isotope-labeling, and liquid chromatography (LC) with electrospray ionization (ESI)-tandem mass spectrometry assay to accurately quantify MDA in human plasma. A stable isotope-labeled internal standard was used to compensate for ESI matrix effects. The assay is linear (R(2)=0.9999) over a 20,000-fold concentration range with a lower limit of quantitation of 30fmol (on-column). Intra- and inter-run coefficients of variation (CVs) were <2% and ∼10% respectively. The derivative was stable for >36h at 5°C. Standards spiked into plasma had recoveries of 92-98%. When compared to a common LC-UV method, the LC-MS method found near-identical MDA concentrations. A pilot project to quantify MDA in patient plasma samples (n=26) in a study of major depressive disorder with winter-type seasonal pattern (MDD-s) confirmed known associations between MDA concentrations and obesity (p<0.02). The LC-MS method provides high sensitivity and high reproducibility for quantifying MDA in human plasma. The simple sample preparation and rapid analysis time (5x faster than LC-UV) offers high throughput for large-scale clinical applications. PMID:27437618

  1. Accurate determination of selected pesticides in soya beans by liquid chromatography coupled to isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huertas Pérez, J F; Sejerøe-Olsen, B; Fernández Alba, A R; Schimmel, H; Dabrio, M

    2015-05-01

    A sensitive, accurate and simple liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry method for the determination of 10 selected pesticides in soya beans has been developed and validated. The method is intended for use during the characterization of selected pesticides in a reference material. In this process, high accuracy and appropriate uncertainty levels associated to the analytical measurements are of utmost importance. The analytical procedure is based on sample extraction by the use of a modified QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, safe) extraction and subsequent clean-up of the extract with C18, PSA and Florisil. Analytes were separated on a C18 column using gradient elution with water-methanol/2.5 mM ammonium acetate mobile phase, and finally identified and quantified by triple quadrupole mass spectrometry in the multiple reaction monitoring mode (MRM). Reliable and accurate quantification of the analytes was achieved by means of stable isotope-labelled analogues employed as internal standards (IS) and calibration with pure substance solutions containing both, the isotopically labelled and native compounds. Exceptions were made for thiodicarb and malaoxon where the isotopically labelled congeners were not commercially available at the time of analysis. For the quantification of those compounds methomyl-(13)C2(15)N and malathion-D10 were used respectively. The method was validated according to the general principles covered by DG SANCO guidelines. However, validation criteria were set more stringently. Mean recoveries were in the range of 86-103% with RSDs lower than 8.1%. Repeatability and intermediate precision were in the range of 3.9-7.6% and 1.9-8.7% respectively. LODs were theoretically estimated and experimentally confirmed to be in the range 0.001-0.005 mg kg(-1) in the matrix, while LOQs established as the lowest spiking mass fractionation level were in the range 0.01-0.05 mg kg(-1). The method reliably identifies and quantifies the

  2. Accurate measurement of pancreatic islet β-cell mass using a second-generation fluorescent exendin-4 analog

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, Thomas; Thurber, Greg; Gaglia, Jason; Vinegoni, Claudio; Liew, Chong Wee; Upadhyay, Rabi; Kohler, Rainer H.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane; Weissleder, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    The hallmark of type 1 diabetes is autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing β-cells of the pancreatic islets. Autoimmune diabetes has been difficult to study or treat because it is not usually diagnosed until substantial β-cell loss has already occurred. Imaging agents that permit noninvasive visualization of changes in β-cell mass remain a high-priority goal. We report on the development and testing of a near-infrared fluorescent β-cell imaging agent. Based on the amino acid sequence of exendin-4, we created a neopeptide via introduction of an unnatural amino acid at the K12 position, which could subsequently be conjugated to fluorophores via bioorthogonal copper-catalyzed click-chemistry. Cell assays confirmed that the resulting fluorescent probe (E4×12-VT750) had a high binding affinity (∼3 nM). Its in vivo properties were evaluated using high-resolution intravital imaging, histology, whole-pancreas visualization, and endoscopic imaging. According to intravital microscopy, the probe rapidly bound to β-cells and, as demonstrated by confocal microscopy, it was internalized. Histology of the whole pancreas showed a close correspondence between fluorescence and insulin staining, and there was an excellent correlation between imaging signals and β-cell mass in mice treated with streptozotocin, a β-cell toxin. Individual islets could also be visualized by endoscopic imaging. In short, E4×12-VT750 showed strong and selective binding to glucose-like peptide-1 receptors and permitted accurate measurement of β-cell mass in both diabetic and nondiabetic mice. This near-infrared imaging probe, as well as future radioisotope-labeled versions of it, should prove to be important tools for monitoring diabetes, progression, and treatment in both experimental and clinical contexts. PMID:21768367

  3. A Proteomic Study of the HUPO Plasma Proteome Project's Pilot Samples using an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, Joshua N.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Shen, Yufeng; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Vitzthum, Frank; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.; Smith, Richard D.; Pounds, Joel G.

    2005-08-01

    Characterization of the human blood plasma proteome is critical to the discovery of routinely useful clinical biomarkers. We used an Accurate Mass and Time (AMT) tag strategy with high-resolution mass accuracy capillary liquid chromatography Fourier-Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (cLC-FTICR MS) to perform a global proteomic analysis of pilot study samples as part of the HUPO Plasma Proteome Project. HUPO reference serum and citrated plasma samples from African Americans, Asian Americans, and Caucasian Americans were analyzed, in addition to a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory reference serum and plasma. The AMT tag strategy allowed us to leverage two previously published “shotgun” proteomics experiments to perform global analyses on these samples in triplicate in less than 4 days total analysis time. A total of 722 (22% with multiple peptide identifications) International Protein Index (IPI) redundant proteins, or 377 protein families by ProteinProphet, were identified over the 6 individual HUPO serum and plasma samples. The samples yielded a similar number of identified redundant proteins in the plasma samples (average 446 +/-23) as found in the serum samples (average 440+/-20). These proteins were identified by an average of 956+/-35 unique peptides in plasma and 930+/-11 unique peptides in serum. In addition to this high-throughput analysis, the AMT tag approach was used with a Z-score normalization to compare relative protein abundances. This analysis highlighted both known differences in serum and citrated plasma such as fibrinogens, and reproducible differences in peptide abundances from proteins such as soluble activin receptor-like kinase 7b and glycoprotein m6b. The AMT tag strategy not only improved our sample throughput, and provided a basis for estimated quantitation.

  4. Molecular Characterization of Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds in Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Alexander; Smith, Jeffrey S.; Laskin, Julia

    2009-05-13

    Although nitrogen-containing organic compounds (NOC) are important components of atmospheric aerosols, little is known about their chemical compositions. Here we present detailed characterization of the NOC constituents of biomass burning aerosol (BBA) samples using high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS). Accurate mass measurements combined with MS/MS fragmentation experiments of selected ions were used to assign molecular structures to individual NOC species. Our results indicate that N-heterocyclic alkaloid compounds - species naturally produced by plants and living organisms - comprise a substantial fraction of NOC in BBA samples collected from test burns of five biomass fuels. High abundance of alkaloids in test burns of ponderosa pine - a widespread tree in the western U.S. areas frequently affected by large scale fires - suggests that N-heterocyclic alkaloids in BBA can play a significant role in dry and wet deposition of fixed nitrogen in this region.

  5. Bottom-up coarse-grained models that accurately describe the structure, pressure, and compressibility of molecular liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Nicholas J. H.; Noid, W. G.

    2015-12-28

    The present work investigates the capability of bottom-up coarse-graining (CG) methods for accurately modeling both structural and thermodynamic properties of all-atom (AA) models for molecular liquids. In particular, we consider 1, 2, and 3-site CG models for heptane, as well as 1 and 3-site CG models for toluene. For each model, we employ the multiscale coarse-graining method to determine interaction potentials that optimally approximate the configuration dependence of the many-body potential of mean force (PMF). We employ a previously developed “pressure-matching” variational principle to determine a volume-dependent contribution to the potential, U{sub V}(V), that approximates the volume-dependence of the PMF. We demonstrate that the resulting CG models describe AA density fluctuations with qualitative, but not quantitative, accuracy. Accordingly, we develop a self-consistent approach for further optimizing U{sub V}, such that the CG models accurately reproduce the equilibrium density, compressibility, and average pressure of the AA models, although the CG models still significantly underestimate the atomic pressure fluctuations. Additionally, by comparing this array of models that accurately describe the structure and thermodynamic pressure of heptane and toluene at a range of different resolutions, we investigate the impact of bottom-up coarse-graining upon thermodynamic properties. In particular, we demonstrate that U{sub V} accounts for the reduced cohesion in the CG models. Finally, we observe that bottom-up coarse-graining introduces subtle correlations between the resolution, the cohesive energy density, and the “simplicity” of the model.

  6. A Rapid, Fully Automated, Molecular-Based Assay Accurately Analyzes Sentinel Lymph Nodes for the Presence of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Steven J.; Xi, Liqiang; Raja, Siva; Gooding, William; Cole, David J.; Gillanders, William E.; Mikhitarian, Keidi; McCarty, Kenneth; Silver, Susan; Ching, Jesus; McMillan, William; Luketich, James D.; Godfrey, Tony E.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To develop a fully automated, rapid, molecular-based assay that accurately and objectively evaluates sentinel lymph nodes (SLN) from breast cancer patients. Summary Background Data: Intraoperative analysis for the presence of metastatic cancer in SLNs from breast cancer patients lacks sensitivity. Even with immunohistochemical staining (IHC) and time-consuming review, alarming discordance in the interpretation of SLN has been observed. Methods: A total of 43 potential markers were evaluated for the ability to accurately characterize lymph node specimens from breast cancer patients as compared with complete histologic analysis including IHC. Selected markers then underwent external validation on 90 independent SLN specimens using rapid, multiplex quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR) assays. Finally, 18 SLNs were analyzed using a completely automated RNA isolation, reverse transcription, and quantitative PCR instrument (GeneXpert). Results: Following analysis of potential markers, promising markers were evaluated to establish relative level of expression cutoff values that maximized classification accuracy. A validation set of 90 SLNs from breast cancer patients was prospectively characterized using 4 markers individually or in combinations, and the results compared with histologic analysis. A 2-marker assay was found to be 97.8% accurate (94% sensitive, 100% specific) compared with histologic analysis. The fully automated GeneXpert instrument produced comparable and reproducible results in less than 35 minutes. Conclusions: A rapid, fully automated QRT-PCR assay definitively characterizes breast cancer SLN with accuracy equal to conventional pathology. This approach is superior to intraoperative SLN analysis and can provide standardized, objective results to assist in pathologic diagnosis. PMID:16495705

  7. Accurate path integral molecular dynamics simulation of ab-initio water at near-zero added cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elton, Daniel; Fritz, Michelle; Soler, José; Fernandez-Serra, Marivi

    It is now established that nuclear quantum motion plays an important role in determining water's structure and dynamics. These effects are important to consider when evaluating DFT functionals and attempting to develop better ones for water. The standard way of treating nuclear quantum effects, path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD), multiplies the number of energy/force calculations by the number of beads, which is typically 32. Here we introduce a method whereby PIMD can be incorporated into a DFT molecular dynamics simulation at virtually zero cost. The method is based on the cluster (many body) expansion of the energy. We first subtract the DFT monomer energies, using a custom DFT-based monomer potential energy surface. The evolution of the PIMD beads is then performed using only the more-accurate Partridge-Schwenke monomer energy surface. The DFT calculations are done using the centroid positions. Various bead thermostats can be employed to speed up the sampling of the quantum ensemble. The method bears some resemblance to multiple timestep algorithms and other schemes used to speed up PIMD with classical force fields. We show that our method correctly captures some of key effects of nuclear quantum motion on both the structure and dynamics of water. We acknowledge support from DOE Award No. DE-FG02-09ER16052 (D.E.) and DOE Early Career Award No. DE-SC0003871 (M.V.F.S.).

  8. Increasingly accurate dynamic molecular models of G-protein coupled receptor oligomers: Panacea or Pandora's box for novel drug discovery?

    PubMed Central

    Filizola, Marta

    2009-01-01

    For years conventional drug design at G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) has mainly focused on the inhibition of a single receptor at a usually well-defined ligand-binding site. The recent discovery of more and more physiologically relevant GPCR dimers/oligomers suggests that selectively targeting these complexes or designing small molecules that inhibit receptor-receptor interactions might provide new opportunities for novel drug discovery. To uncover the fundamental mechanisms and dynamics governing GPCR dimerization/oligomerization, it is crucial to understand the dynamic process of receptor-receptor association, and to identify regions that are suitable for selective drug binding. This minireview highlights current progress in the development of increasingly accurate dynamic molecular models of GPCR oligomers based on structural, biochemical, and biophysical information that has recently appeared in the literature. In view of this new information, there has never been a more exciting time for computational research into GPCRs than at present. Information-driven modern molecular models of GPCR complexes are expected to efficiently guide the rational design of GPCR oligomer-specific drugs, possibly allowing researchers to reach for the high-hanging fruits in GPCR drug discovery, i.e. more potent and selective drugs for efficient therapeutic interventions. PMID:19465029

  9. Critical evaluation of screening techniques for emerging environmental contaminants based on accurate mass measurements with time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nurmi, Joonas; Pellinen, Jukka; Rantalainen, Anna-Lea

    2012-03-01

    Emerging contaminants from wastewater effluent samples were analysed, using posttarget and nontarget analysis techniques. The samples were analysed with an ultra performance liquid chromatograph-time-of-flight mass spectrometer (UPLC-TOF-MS), and the resulting data were processed with commercial deconvolution software. The method works well for posttarget analysis with prior information about the retention times of the compounds of interest. With positive polarity, 63 of 66 compounds and with negative polarity, 18 of 20 compounds were correctly identified in a spiked sample, while two compounds of a total of 88 fell out of the mass range. Furthermore, a four-stage process for identification was developed for the posttarget analysis lacking the retention time data. In the process, the number of candidate compounds was reduced by using the accurate mass of selected compounds in two steps (stages 1 and 2), structure-property relationships (stage 3) and isotope patterns of the analytes (stage 4). The process developed was validated by analysing wastewater samples spiked with 88 compounds. This procedure can be used to gain a preliminary indication of the presence of certain analytes in the samples. Nontarget analysis was tested by applying a theoretical mass spectra library for a wastewater sample spiked with six pharmaceuticals. The results showed a high number of false identifications. In addition, manual processing of the data was considered laborious and ineffective. Finally, the posttarget analysis was applied to a real wastewater sample. The analysis revealed the presence of six compounds that were afterwards confirmed with standard compounds as being correct. Three psycholeptics (nordiazepam, oxazepam and temazepam) could be tentatively identified, using the identification process developed. Posttarget analysis with UPLC-TOF-MS proved to be a promising method for analysing wastewater samples, while we concluded that the software for nontarget analysis will need

  10. Elucidating molecular mass and shape of a neurotoxic Aβ oligomer.

    PubMed

    Sebollela, Adriano; Mustata, Gina-Mirela; Luo, Kevin; Velasco, Pauline T; Viola, Kirsten L; Cline, Erika N; Shekhawat, Gajendra S; Wilcox, Kyle C; Dravid, Vinayak P; Klein, William L

    2014-12-17

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most prevalent type of dementia, has been associated with the accumulation of amyloid β oligomers (AβOs) in the central nervous system. AβOs vary widely in size, ranging from dimers to larger than 100 kDa. Evidence indicates that not all oligomers are toxic, and there is yet no consensus on the size of the actual toxic oligomer. Here we used NU4, a conformation-dependent anti-AβO monoclonal antibody, to investigate size and shape of a toxic AβO assembly. By using size-exclusion chromatography and immuno-based detection, we isolated an AβO-NU4 complex amenable for biochemical and morphological studies. The apparent molecular mass of the NU4-targeted oligomer was 80 kDa. Atomic force microscopy imaging of the AβO-NU4 complex showed a size distribution centered at 5.37 nm, an increment of 1.5 nm compared to the size of AβOs (3.85 nm). This increment was compatible with the size of NU4 (1.3 nm), suggesting a 1:1 oligomer to NU4 ratio. NU4-reactive oligomers extracted from AD human brain concentrated in a molecular mass range similar to that found for in vitro prepared oligomers, supporting the relevance of the species herein studied. These results represent an important step toward understanding the connection between AβO size and toxicity. PMID:25343357

  11. Elucidating Molecular Mass and Shape of a Neurotoxic Aβ Oligomer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most prevalent type of dementia, has been associated with the accumulation of amyloid β oligomers (AβOs) in the central nervous system. AβOs vary widely in size, ranging from dimers to larger than 100 kDa. Evidence indicates that not all oligomers are toxic, and there is yet no consensus on the size of the actual toxic oligomer. Here we used NU4, a conformation-dependent anti-AβO monoclonal antibody, to investigate size and shape of a toxic AβO assembly. By using size-exclusion chromatography and immuno-based detection, we isolated an AβO-NU4 complex amenable for biochemical and morphological studies. The apparent molecular mass of the NU4-targeted oligomer was 80 kDa. Atomic force microscopy imaging of the AβO-NU4 complex showed a size distribution centered at 5.37 nm, an increment of 1.5 nm compared to the size of AβOs (3.85 nm). This increment was compatible with the size of NU4 (1.3 nm), suggesting a 1:1 oligomer to NU4 ratio. NU4-reactive oligomers extracted from AD human brain concentrated in a molecular mass range similar to that found for in vitro prepared oligomers, supporting the relevance of the species herein studied. These results represent an important step toward understanding the connection between AβO size and toxicity. PMID:25343357

  12. Innovations in Mass Spectrometry for Precise and Accurate Isotope Ratio Determination from Very Small Analyte Quantities (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, N. S.; Bouman, C.; Horstwood, M. S.; Parrish, R. R.; Schwieters, J. B.

    2010-12-01

    This presentation describes progress in mass spectrometry for analysing very small analyte quantities, illustrated by example applications from nuclear forensics. In this challenging application, precise and accurate (‰) uranium isotope ratios are required from 1 - 2 µm diameter uranium oxide particles, which comprise less than 40 pg of uranium. Traditionally these are analysed using thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS), and more recently using secondary ionisation mass spectrometry (SIMS). Multicollector inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) can offer higher productivity compared to these techniques, but is traditionally limited by low efficiency of analyte utilisation (sample through to ion detection). Samples can either be introduced as a solution, or sampled directly from solid using laser ablation. Large multi-isotope ratio datasets can help identify provenance and intended use of anthropogenic uranium and other nuclear materials [1]. The Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus (Bremen, Germany) with ‘Jet Interface’ option offers unparalleled MC-ICP-MS sensitivity. An analyte utilisation of c. 4% has previously been reported for uranium [2]. This high-sensitivity configuration utilises a dry high-capacity (100 m3/h) interface pump, special skimmer and sampler cones and a desolvating nebuliser system. Coupled with new acquisition methodologies, this sensitivity enhancement makes possible the analysis of micro-particles and small sample volumes at higher precision levels than previously achieved. New, high-performance, full-size and compact discrete dynode secondary electron multipliers (SEM) exhibit excellent stability and linearity over a large dynamic range and can be configured to simultaneously measure all of the uranium isotopes. Options for high abundance-sensitivity filters on two ion beams are also available, e.g. for 236U and 234U. Additionally, amplifiers with high ohm (1012 - 1013) feedback resistors have been developed to

  13. Colors for molecular masses: fusion of spectroscopy and mass spectrometry for identification of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Kopysov, Vladimir; Makarov, Alexander; Boyarkin, Oleg V

    2015-01-01

    We present an approach that integrates ultraviolet (UV) photofragmentation spectroscopy of cold ions with high-resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS) and uses mathematical analysis of the recorded 2D data arrays for structural identification of biomolecules. The synergy of the two orthogonal techniques makes these arrays unique fingerprints of molecular ions, enabling their reliable identifications. Using preliminary created libraries of fingerprints, the UV-MS approach was successfully applied for quantitative identification of exact isobaric molecules in their mixtures, which is one of the challenging cases for mass spectrometry. We also demonstrate how the UV and fragmentation mass spectra of unknown chemical components of a mixture can be recovered from its fingerprint even without a use of library. PMID:25844804

  14. Rapid and Accurate U-Th Dating of Ancient Carbonates using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douville, Eric; Sallé, Eline; Frank, Norbert; Eisele, Markus; Pons-Branchu, Edwige; Ayrault, Sophie

    2010-05-01

    Here, the potential for rapid and accurate U-Th dating technique of marine aragonite skeletons (deep-sea corals, Lophelia pertusa) and secondary calcite deposits (speleothems and stalagmites) has been explored using inductively-coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS). The analytical procedure includes a largely simplified chemical separation technique for uranium (U) and thorium (Th) using UTEVA resin. The developed technique permits simultaneous quantification of uranium [238U] and thorium [232Th] concentrations and their respective isotopic composition, required for U-series disequilibrium dating. Up to 50 U-Th dates per day can be achieved through ICP-QMS with 234U and 230Th reproducibility (2sigma) of 3-4 permil and 1 percent, respectively. The high sensitivity (> 300 000 cps/ppb) together with low background (<0.5 cps) on each mass between 228-236 amu allowed U-Th dating of ancient deep water corals (15-260 kyrs) and stalagmites (30-85 kyrs) at precision levels of less than 2%. Consequently, the combination of simplified chemistry using UTEVA with state-of-the-art ICP-QMS isotopic measurements that do not require a U-Th separation step now provides an extremely rapid and low-cost U-series dating technology. The level of precision is most convenient for numerous geochronological applications, such as the determination of climatic influences on ecosystem development and carbonate precipitation. As a first-example application we present ICP-QMS U-Th dates of North Atlantic deep-water coral fragments retrieved in the southeastern Porcupine Seabight (MD01-2463G, Mound Thérèse), indicating a purely interglacial growth of deep-water corals on so-called carbonate mounds over several climate cycles.

  15. Rapid Screening of Bovine Milk Oligosaccharides in a Whey Permeate Product and Domestic Animal Milks by Accurate Mass Database and Tandem Mass Spectral Library.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Cuthbertson, Daniel J; Otter, Don E; Barile, Daniela

    2016-08-17

    A bovine milk oligosaccharide (BMO) library, prepared from cow colostrum, with 34 structures was generated and used to rapidly screen oligosaccharides in domestic animal milks and a whey permeate powder. The novel library was entered into a custom Personal Compound Database and Library (PCDL) and included accurate mass, retention time, and tandem mass spectra. Oligosaccharides in minute-sized samples were separated using nanoliquid chromatography (nanoLC) coupled to a high resolution and sensitive quadrupole-Time of Flight (Q-ToF) MS system. Using the PCDL, 18 oligosaccharides were found in a BMO-enriched product obtained from whey permeate processing. The usefulness of the analytical system and BMO library was further validated using milks from domestic sheep and buffaloes. Through BMO PCDL searching, 15 and 13 oligosaccharides in the BMO library were assigned in sheep and buffalo milks, respectively, thus demonstrating significant overlap between oligosaccharides in bovine (cow and buffalo) and ovine (sheep) milks. This method was shown to be an efficient, reliable, and rapid tool to identify oligosaccharide structures using automated spectral matching. PMID:27428379

  16. Accurate quantification of creatinine in serum by coupling a measurement standard to extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Keke; Li, Ming; Li, Hongmei; Li, Mengwan; Jiang, You; Fang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Ambient ionization (AI) techniques have been widely used in chemistry, medicine, material science, environmental science, forensic science. AI takes advantage of direct desorption/ionization of chemicals in raw samples under ambient environmental conditions with minimal or no sample preparation. However, its quantitative accuracy is restricted by matrix effects during the ionization process. To improve the quantitative accuracy of AI, a matrix reference material, which is a particular form of measurement standard, was coupled to an AI technique in this study. Consequently the analyte concentration in a complex matrix can be easily quantified with high accuracy. As a demonstration, this novel method was applied for the accurate quantification of creatinine in serum by using extractive electrospray ionization (EESI) mass spectrometry. Over the concentration range investigated (0.166 ~ 1.617 μg/mL), a calibration curve was obtained with a satisfactory linearity (R2 = 0.994), and acceptable relative standard deviations (RSD) of 4.6 ~ 8.0% (n = 6). Finally, the creatinine concentration value of a serum sample was determined to be 36.18 ± 1.08 μg/mL, which is in excellent agreement with the certified value of 35.16 ± 0.39 μg/mL. PMID:26759071

  17. Theory of bi-molecular association dynamics in 2D for accurate model and experimental parameterization of binding rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogurtcu, Osman N.; Johnson, Margaret E.

    2015-08-01

    The dynamics of association between diffusing and reacting molecular species are routinely quantified using simple rate-equation kinetics that assume both well-mixed concentrations of species and a single rate constant for parameterizing the binding rate. In two-dimensions (2D), however, even when systems are well-mixed, the assumption of a single characteristic rate constant for describing association is not generally accurate, due to the properties of diffusional searching in dimensions d ≤ 2. Establishing rigorous bounds for discriminating between 2D reactive systems that will be accurately described by rate equations with a single rate constant, and those that will not, is critical for both modeling and experimentally parameterizing binding reactions restricted to surfaces such as cellular membranes. We show here that in regimes of intrinsic reaction rate (ka) and diffusion (D) parameters ka/D > 0.05, a single rate constant cannot be fit to the dynamics of concentrations of associating species independently of the initial conditions. Instead, a more sophisticated multi-parametric description than rate-equations is necessary to robustly characterize bimolecular reactions from experiment. Our quantitative bounds derive from our new analysis of 2D rate-behavior predicted from Smoluchowski theory. Using a recently developed single particle reaction-diffusion algorithm we extend here to 2D, we are able to test and validate the predictions of Smoluchowski theory and several other theories of reversible reaction dynamics in 2D for the first time. Finally, our results also mean that simulations of reactive systems in 2D using rate equations must be undertaken with caution when reactions have ka/D > 0.05, regardless of the simulation volume. We introduce here a simple formula for an adaptive concentration dependent rate constant for these chemical kinetics simulations which improves on existing formulas to better capture non-equilibrium reaction dynamics from dilute

  18. Accurate Mass GC/LC-Quadrupole Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Fatty Acids and Triacylglycerols of Spicy Fruits from the Apiaceae Family.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thao; Aparicio, Mario; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2015-01-01

    The triacylglycerol (TAG) structure and the regio-stereospecific distribution of fatty acids (FA) of seed oils from most of the Apiaceae family are not well documented. The TAG structure ultimately determines the final physical properties of the oils and the position of FAs in the TAG molecule affects the digestion; absorption and metabolism; and physical and technological properties of TAGs. Fixed oils from the fruits of dill (Anethum graveolens), caraway (Carum carvi), cumin (Cuminum cyminum), coriander (Coriandrum sativum), anise (Pimpinella anisum), carrot (Daucus carota), celery (Apium graveolens), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), and Khella (Ammi visnaga), all from the Apiaceae family, were extracted at room temperature in chloroform/methanol (2:1 v/v) using percolators. Crude lipids were fractionated by solid phase extraction to separate neutral triacylglycerols (TAGs) from other lipids components. Neutral TAGs were subjected to transesterification process to convert them to their corresponding fatty acids methyl esters (FAMES) using 1% boron trifluoride (BF₃) in methanol. FAMES were analyzed by gas chromatography-quadrupole time of flight (GC-QTOF) mass spectrometry. Triglycerides were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight (LC-QTOF) mass spectrometry. Petroselinic acid was the major fatty acid in all samples ranging from 57% of the total fatty acids in caraway up to 82% in fennel. All samples contained palmitic (16:0), palmitoleic (C16:1n-9), stearic (C18:0), petroselinic (C18:1n-12), linoleic (C18:2n-6), linolinic (18:3n-3), and arachidic (C20:0) acids. TAG were analyzed using LC-QTOF for accurate mass identification and mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques for regiospesific elucidation of the identified TAGs. Five major TAGs were detected in all samples but with different relative concentrations in all of the tested samples. Several other TAGs were detected as minor components and were present in

  19. Accurate Mass GC/LC-Quadrupole Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Fatty Acids and Triacylglycerols of Spicy Fruits from the Apiaceae Family

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thao; Aparicio, Mario; Saleh, Mahmoud A.

    2016-01-01

    The triacylglycerol (TAG) structure and the regio-stereospecific distribution of fatty acids (FA) of seed oils from most of the Apiaceae family are not well documented. The TAG structure ultimately determines the final physical properties of the oils and the position of FAs in the TAG molecule affects the digestion; absorption and metabolism; and physical and technological properties of TAGs. Fixed oils from the fruits of dill (Anethum graveolens), caraway (Carum carvi), cumin (Cuminum cyminum), coriander (Coriandrum sativum), anise (Pimpinella anisum), carrot (Daucus carota), celery (Apium graveolens), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), and Khella (Ammi visnaga), all from the Apiaceae family, were extracted at room temperature in chloroform/methanol (2:1 v/v) using percolators. Crude lipids were fractionated by solid phase extraction to separate neutral triacylglycerols (TAGs) from other lipids components. Neutral TAGs were subjected to transesterification process to convert them to their corresponding fatty acids methyl esters (FAMES) using 1% boron trifluoride (BF3) in methanol. FAMES were analyzed by gas chromatography-quadrupole time of flight (GC-QTOF) mass spectrometry. Triglycerides were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight (LC-QTOF) mass spectrometry. Petroselinic acid was the major fatty acid in all samples ranging from 57% of the total fatty acids in caraway up to 82% in fennel. All samples contained palmitic (16:0), palmitoleic (C16:1n-9), stearic (C18:0), petroselinic (C18:1n-12), linoleic (C18:2n-6), linolinic (18:3n-3), and arachidic (C20:0) acids. TAG were analyzed using LC-QTOF for accurate mass identification and mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques for regiospesific elucidation of the identified TAGs. Five major TAGs were detected in all samples but with different relative concentrations in all of the tested samples. Several other TAGs were detected as minor components and were present in

  20. An accurate metalloprotein-specific scoring function and molecular docking program devised by a dynamic sampling and iteration optimization strategy.

    PubMed

    Bai, Fang; Liao, Sha; Gu, Junfeng; Jiang, Hualiang; Wang, Xicheng; Li, Honglin

    2015-04-27

    Metalloproteins, particularly zinc metalloproteins, are promising therapeutic targets, and recent efforts have focused on the identification of potent and selective inhibitors of these proteins. However, the ability of current drug discovery and design technologies, such as molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations, to probe metal-ligand interactions remains limited because of their complicated coordination geometries and rough treatment in current force fields. Herein we introduce a robust, multiobjective optimization algorithm-driven metalloprotein-specific docking program named MpSDock, which runs on a scheme similar to consensus scoring consisting of a force-field-based scoring function and a knowledge-based scoring function. For this purpose, in this study, an effective knowledge-based zinc metalloprotein-specific scoring function based on the inverse Boltzmann law was designed and optimized using a dynamic sampling and iteration optimization strategy. This optimization strategy can dynamically sample and regenerate decoy poses used in each iteration step of refining the scoring function, thus dramatically improving both the effectiveness of the exploration of the binding conformational space and the sensitivity of the ranking of the native binding poses. To validate the zinc metalloprotein-specific scoring function and its special built-in docking program, denoted MpSDockZn, an extensive comparison was performed against six universal, popular docking programs: Glide XP mode, Glide SP mode, Gold, AutoDock, AutoDock4Zn, and EADock DSS. The zinc metalloprotein-specific knowledge-based scoring function exhibited prominent performance in accurately describing the geometries and interactions of the coordination bonds between the zinc ions and chelating agents of the ligands. In addition, MpSDockZn had a competitive ability to sample and identify native binding poses with a higher success rate than the other six docking programs. PMID:25746437

  1. Accurate molecular structures and infrared spectra of trans-2,3-dideuterooxirane, methyloxirane, and trans-2,3-dimethyloxirane

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, Vincenzo; Biczysko, Malgorzata Bloino, Julien; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2014-07-21

    Oxirane derivatives are the most used benchmarks for chiroptical spectroscopies in view of their small size and relative rigidity. The molecular structure, vibrational harmonic and anharmonic frequencies, and infrared intensities of the ground electronic states are analyzed in this paper. Equilibrium structure and harmonic force fields have been evaluated by means of high-level quantum-chemical calculations at the coupled-cluster level including single and double excitations together with a perturbative treatment of triples (CCSD(T)). Extrapolation to the complete basis-set limit as well as core-correlation effects have also been taken into account. Anharmonic contributions have been computed at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level for trans-2,3-dideuterooxirane. These data can serve as references to evaluate the accuracy of less expensive computational approaches rooted in the density functional theory (DFT). The latter have been used within hybrid CC/DFT approaches, which have been applied to simulate fully anharmonic infrared (IR) spectra. Finally, the best theoretical estimates of the equilibrium structures and vibrational wavenumbers are compared to the most accurate experimental data and show in all cases very good agreement, i.e., within 0.001 Å, 0.1 deg, 10 cm{sup −1}, and 0.5 km mol{sup −1}, for bond lengths, angles, wavenumbers, and IR intensities, respectively.

  2. Toward accurate molecular identification of species in complex environmental samples: testing the performance of sequence filtering and clustering methods

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Jullien M; Brown, Emily A; Chain, Frédéric J J; MacIsaac, Hugh J; Cristescu, Melania E

    2015-01-01

    Metabarcoding has the potential to become a rapid, sensitive, and effective approach for identifying species in complex environmental samples. Accurate molecular identification of species depends on the ability to generate operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that correspond to biological species. Due to the sometimes enormous estimates of biodiversity using this method, there is a great need to test the efficacy of data analysis methods used to derive OTUs. Here, we evaluate the performance of various methods for clustering length variable 18S amplicons from complex samples into OTUs using a mock community and a natural community of zooplankton species. We compare analytic procedures consisting of a combination of (1) stringent and relaxed data filtering, (2) singleton sequences included and removed, (3) three commonly used clustering algorithms (mothur, UCLUST, and UPARSE), and (4) three methods of treating alignment gaps when calculating sequence divergence. Depending on the combination of methods used, the number of OTUs varied by nearly two orders of magnitude for the mock community (60–5068 OTUs) and three orders of magnitude for the natural community (22–22191 OTUs). The use of relaxed filtering and the inclusion of singletons greatly inflated OTU numbers without increasing the ability to recover species. Our results also suggest that the method used to treat gaps when calculating sequence divergence can have a great impact on the number of OTUs. Our findings are particularly relevant to studies that cover taxonomically diverse species and employ markers such as rRNA genes in which length variation is extensive. PMID:26078860

  3. Nonlinear Optical Properties of Fluorescent Dyes Allow for Accurate Determination of Their Molecular Orientations in Phospholipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Timr, Štěpán; Brabec, Jiří; Bondar, Alexey; Ryba, Tomáš; Železný, Miloš; Lazar, Josef; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2015-07-30

    Several methods based on single- and two-photon fluorescence detected linear dichroism have recently been used to determine the orientational distributions of fluorescent dyes in lipid membranes. However, these determinations relied on simplified descriptions of nonlinear anisotropic properties of the dye molecules, using a transition dipole-moment-like vector instead of an absorptivity tensor. To investigate the validity of the vector approximation, we have now carried out a combination of computer simulations and polarization microscopy experiments on two representative fluorescent dyes (DiI and F2N12S) embedded in aqueous phosphatidylcholine bilayers. Our results indicate that a simplified vector-like treatment of the two-photon transition tensor is applicable for molecular geometries sampled in the membrane at ambient conditions. Furthermore, our results allow evaluation of several distinct polarization microscopy techniques. In combination, our results point to a robust and accurate experimental and computational treatment of orientational distributions of DiI, F2N12S, and related dyes (including Cy3, Cy5, and others), with implications to monitoring physiologically relevant processes in cellular membranes in a novel way. PMID:26146848

  4. Mass Spectral Molecular Networking of Living Microbial Colonies

    SciTech Connect

    Watrous, Jeramie D.; Roach, Patrick J.; Alexandrov, Theodore; Heath, Brandi S.; Yang, Jane Y.; Kersten, Roland; vander Voort, Menno; Pogliano, Kit; Gross, Harald; Raaijmakers, Jos M.; Moore, Bradley S.; Laskin, Julia; Bandeira, Nuno; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2012-06-26

    Integrating the governing chemistry with the genomics and phenotypes of microbial colonies has been a "holy grail" in microbiology. This work describes a highly sensitive, broadly applicable, and costeffective approach that allows metabolic profiling of live microbial colonies directly from a Petri dish without any sample preparation. Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (MS), combined with alignment of MS data and molecular networking, enabled monitoring of metabolite production from live microbial colonies from diverse bacterial genera, including Bacillus subtilis, Streptomyces coelicolor, Mycobacterium smegmatis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This work demonstrates that, by using these tools to visualize small molecular changes within bacterial interactions, insights can be gained into bacterial developmental processes as a result of the improved organization of MS/MS data. To validate this experimental platform, metabolic profiling was performed on Pseudomonas sp. SH-C52, which protects sugar beet plants from infections by specific soil-borne fungi [R. Mendes et al. (2011) Science 332:1097–1100]. The antifungal effect of strain SHC52 was attributed to thanamycin, a predicted lipopeptide encoded by a nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene cluster. Our technology, in combination with our recently developed peptidogenomics strategy, enabled the detection and partial characterization of thanamycin and showed that it is amonochlorinated lipopeptide that belongs to the syringomycin family of antifungal agents. In conclusion, the platform presented here provides a significant advancement in our ability to understand the spatiotemporal dynamics of metabolite production in live microbial colonies and communities.

  5. Quality control of automotive engine oils with mass-sensitive chemical sensors--QCMs and molecularly imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Dickert, F L; Forth, P; Lieberzeit, P A; Voigt, G

    2000-04-01

    Molecularly imprinted polyurethanes were used as sensor materials for monitoring the degradation of automotive engine oils. Imprinting with characteristic oils permits the analysis of these complex mixtures without accurately knowing their composition. Mass-sensitive quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs) coated with such layers exhibit mass effects in addition to frequency shifts caused by viscosity, which can be compensated by an uncoated quartz or a non-imprint layer. Incorporation of degradation products into the imprinted coatings is a bulk phenomenon, which is proven by variation of the sensor layer height. Therefore, the resulting sensor effects are determined by the degradation products in the oil. PMID:11227411

  6. The initial mass function of star clusters that form in turbulent molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, M. S.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2015-05-01

    We simulate the formation and evolution of young star clusters using the combination of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations and direct N-body simulations. We start by performing SPH simulations of the giant molecular cloud (GMC) with a turbulent velocity field, a mass of 4 × 104 to 5 × 106 M⊙, and a density between ρ ˜ 1.7 × 103 and 170 cm-3. We continue the hydrodynamical simulations for a free-fall time-scale (tff ≃ 0.83 and 2.5 Myr), and analyse the resulting structure of the collapsed cloud. We subsequently replace a density-selected subset of SPH particles with stars by adopting a local star formation efficiency proportional to ρ1/2. As a consequence, the local star formation efficiency exceeds 30 per cent, whereas globally only a few per cent of the gas is converted to stars. The stellar distribution by the time gas is converted to stars is very clumpy, with typically a dozen bound conglomerates that consist of 100-104 stars. We continue to evolve the stars dynamically using the collisional N-body method, which accurately treats all pairwise interactions, stellar collisions and stellar evolution. We analyse the results of the N-body simulations when the stars have an age of 2 and 10 Myr. During the dynamical simulations, massive clusters grow via hierarchical merging of smaller clusters. The shape of the cluster mass function that originates from an individual molecular cloud is consistent with a Schechter function with a power-law slope of β = -1.73 at 2 Myr and β = -1.67 at 10 Myr, which fits to observed cluster mass function of the Carina region. The superposition of mass functions have a power-law slope of ≲ -2, which fits the observed mass function of star clusters in the Milky Way, M31 and M83. We further find that the mass of the most massive cluster formed in a single molecular cloud with a mass of Mg scales with 6.1 M_g^{0.51} which also agrees with recent observation of the GMC and young clusters in M51.

  7. A high pressure modulated molecular beam mass spectrometric sampling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Fryburg, G. C.; Miller, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    The current state of understanding of free-jet high pressure sampling is critically reviewed and modifications of certain theoretical and empirical considerations are presented. A high pressure, free-jet expansion, modulated molecular beam, mass spectrometric sampling apparatus was constructed and this apparatus is described in detail. Experimental studies have demonstrated that the apparatus can be used to sample high temperature systems at pressures up to one atmosphere. Condensible high temperature gaseous species have been routinely sampled and the mass spectrometric detector has provided direct identification of sampled species. System sensitivity is better than one tenth of a part per million. Experimental results obtained with argon and nitrogen beams are presented and compared to theoretical predictions. These results and the respective comparison are taken to indicate acceptable performance of the sampling apparatus. Results are also given for two groups of experiments related to hot corrosion studies. The formation of gaseous sodium sulfate in doped methane-oxygen flames was characterized and the oxidative vaporization of metals was studied in an atmospheric pressure flowing gas system to which gaseous salt partial pressures were added.

  8. One-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy of pyridine: Determination of accurate ionization energy and cationic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yu Ran; Kang, Do Won; Kim, Hong Lae E-mail: hlkim@kangwon.ac.kr; Kwon, Chan Ho E-mail: hlkim@kangwon.ac.kr

    2014-11-07

    Ionization energies and cationic structures of pyridine were intensively investigated utilizing one-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy with vacuum ultraviolet radiation generated by four-wave difference frequency mixing in Kr. The present one-photon high-resolution MATI spectrum of pyridine demonstrated a much finer and richer vibrational structure than that of the previously reported two-photon MATI spectrum. From the MATI spectrum and photoionization efficiency curve, the accurate ionization energy of the ionic ground state of pyridine was confidently determined to be 73 570 ± 6 cm{sup −1} (9.1215 ± 0.0007 eV). The observed spectrum was almost completely assigned by utilizing Franck-Condon factors and vibrational frequencies calculated through adjustments of the geometrical parameters of cationic pyridine at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level. A unique feature unveiled through rigorous analysis was the prominent progression of the 10 vibrational mode, which corresponds to in-plane ring bending, and the combination of other totally symmetric fundamentals with the ring bending overtones, which contribute to the geometrical change upon ionization. Notably, the remaining peaks originate from the upper electronic state ({sup 2}A{sub 2}), as predicted by high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy studies and symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction calculations. Based on the quantitatively good agreement between the experimental and calculated results, it was concluded that upon ionization the pyridine cation in the ground electronic state should have a planar structure of C{sub 2v} symmetry through the C-N axis.

  9. Accurate physical laws can permit new standard units: The two laws F→=ma→ and the proportionality of weight to mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saslow, Wayne M.

    2014-04-01

    Three common approaches to F→=ma→ are: (1) as an exactly true definition of force F→ in terms of measured inertial mass m and measured acceleration a→; (2) as an exactly true axiom relating measured values of a→, F→ and m; and (3) as an imperfect but accurately true physical law relating measured a→ to measured F→, with m an experimentally determined, matter-dependent constant, in the spirit of the resistance R in Ohm's law. In the third case, the natural units are those of a→ and F→, where a→ is normally specified using distance and time as standard units, and F→ from a spring scale as a standard unit; thus mass units are derived from force, distance, and time units such as newtons, meters, and seconds. The present work develops the third approach when one includes a second physical law (again, imperfect but accurate)—that balance-scale weight W is proportional to m—and the fact that balance-scale measurements of relative weight are more accurate than those of absolute force. When distance and time also are more accurately measurable than absolute force, this second physical law permits a shift to standards of mass, distance, and time units, such as kilograms, meters, and seconds, with the unit of force—the newton—a derived unit. However, were force and distance more accurately measurable than time (e.g., time measured with an hourglass), this second physical law would permit a shift to standards of force, mass, and distance units such as newtons, kilograms, and meters, with the unit of time—the second—a derived unit. Therefore, the choice of the most accurate standard units depends both on what is most accurately measurable and on the accuracy of physical law.

  10. Dissecting plasmodesmata molecular composition by mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Magali S.; Bayer, Emmanuelle M. F.

    2013-01-01

    In plants, the intercellular communication through the membranous channels called plasmodesmata (PD; singular plasmodesma) plays pivotal roles in the orchestration of development, defence responses, and viral propagation. PD are dynamic structures embedded in the plant cell wall that are defined by specialized domains of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the plasma membrane (PM). PD structure and unique functions are guaranteed by their particular molecular composition. Yet, up to recent years and despite numerous approaches such as mutant screens, immunolocalization, or screening of random cDNAs, only few PD proteins had been conclusively identified and characterized. A clear breakthrough in the search of PD constituents came from mass-spectrometry-based proteomic approaches coupled with subcellular fractionation strategies. Due to their position, firmly anchored in the extracellular matrix, PD are notoriously difficult to isolate for biochemical analysis. Proteomic-based approaches have therefore first relied on the use of cell wall fractions containing embedded PD then on “free” PD fractions whereby PD membranes were released from the walls by enzymatic degradation. To discriminate between likely contaminants and PD protein candidates, bioinformatics tools have often been used in combination with proteomic approaches. GFP fusion proteins of selected candidates have confirmed the PD association of several protein families. Here we review the accomplishments and limitations of the proteomic-based strategies to unravel the functional and structural complexity of PD. We also discuss the role of the identified PD-associated proteins. PMID:23335932

  11. Determination of hyaluronan molecular mass distribution in human breast milk.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Han; Amin, Ripal; Ye, Xin; de la Motte, Carol A; Cowman, Mary K

    2015-04-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) in human milk mediates host responses to microbial infection via TLR4- and CD44-dependent signaling. Signaling by HA is generally size specific. Because pure HA with average molecular mass (M) of 35 kDa can elicit a protective response in intestinal epithelial cells, it has been proposed that human milk HA may have a bioactive low-M component. Here we report the size distribution of HA in human milk samples from 20 unique donors. A new method for HA analysis, employing ion exchange (IEX) chromatography to fractionate HA by size and specific quantification of each size fraction by competitive enzyme-linked sorbent assay (ELSA), was developed. When separated into four fractions, milk HA with M⩽20 kDa, M∼20 to 60 kDa, and M∼60 to 110 kDa comprised averages of 1.5, 1.4, and 2.0% of the total HA, respectively. The remaining 95% was HA with M⩾110 kDa. Electrophoretic analysis of the higher M HA from 13 samples showed nearly identical M distributions, with an average M of approximately 440 kDa. This higher M HA component in human milk is proposed to bind to CD44 and to enhance human beta defensin 2 (HBD2) induction by the low-M HA components. PMID:25579786

  12. Determination of Hyaluronan Molecular Mass Distribution in Human Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Han; Amin, Ripal; Ye, Xin; De La Motte, Carol A.; Cowman, Mary K.

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) in human milk mediates host responses to microbial infection, via TLR4- and CD44-dependent signaling. Signaling by HA is generally size-specific. Because pure HA with average molecular mass (M) of 35 kDa can elicit a protective response in intestinal epithelial cells, it has been proposed that human milk HA may have a bioactive low M component. Here we report the size distribution of HA in human milk samples from twenty unique donors. A new method for HA analysis, employingion exchange (IEX) chromatography to fractionate HA by size, and specific quantification of each size fraction by competitive Enzyme Linked Sorbent Assay (ELSA), was developed. When separated into four fractions, milk HA with M ≤ 20 kDa, M ≈20-60 kDa, and M ≈ 60-110 kDa comprised an average of 1.5%, 1.4% and 2% of the total HA, respectively. The remaining 95% was HA with M≥110 kDa. Electrophoretic analysis of the higher M HA from thirteen samples showed nearly identical M distributions, with an average M of ∼440 kDa. This higher M HA component in human milk is proposed to bind to CD44 and to enhance human beta defensin 2 (HBD2) induction by the low M HA components. PMID:25579786

  13. Molecular-genetic analysis is essential for accurate classification of renal carcinoma resembling Xp11.2 translocation carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Malcolm; Peckova, Kvetoslava; Martinek, Petr; Hora, Milan; Kalusova, Kristyna; Straka, Lubomir; Daum, Ondrej; Kokoskova, Bohuslava; Rotterova, Pavla; Pivovarčikova, Kristyna; Branzovsky, Jindrich; Dubova, Magdalena; Vesela, Pavla; Michal, Michal; Hes, Ondrej

    2015-03-01

    tumours can only be sub-classified accurately by multi-parameter molecular-genetic analysis. PMID:25544614

  14. Protected Amine Labels: A Versatile Molecular Scaffold for Multiplexed Nominal Mass and Sub-Da Isotopologue Quantitative Proteomic Reagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficarro, Scott B.; Biagi, Jessica M.; Wang, Jinhua; Scotcher, Jenna; Koleva, Rositsa I.; Card, Joseph D.; Adelmant, Guillaume; He, Huan; Askenazi, Manor; Marshall, Alan G.; Young, Nicolas L.; Gray, Nathanael S.; Marto, Jarrod A.

    2014-04-01

    We assemble a versatile molecular scaffold from simple building blocks to create binary and multiplexed stable isotope reagents for quantitative mass spectrometry. Termed Protected Amine Labels (PAL), these reagents offer multiple analytical figures of merit including, (1) robust targeting of peptide N-termini and lysyl side chains, (2) optimal mass spectrometry ionization efficiency through regeneration of primary amines on labeled peptides, (3) an amino acid-based mass tag that incorporates heavy isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen to ensure matched physicochemical and MS/MS fragmentation behavior among labeled peptides, and (4) a molecularly efficient architecture, in which the majority of hetero-atom centers can be used to synthesize a variety of nominal mass and sub-Da isotopologue stable isotope reagents. We demonstrate the performance of these reagents in well-established strategies whereby up to four channels of peptide isotopomers, each separated by 4 Da, are quantified in MS-level scans with accuracies comparable to current commercial reagents. In addition, we utilize the PAL scaffold to create isotopologue reagents in which labeled peptide analogs differ in mass based on the binding energy in carbon and nitrogen nuclei, thereby allowing quantification based on MS or MS/MS spectra. We demonstrate accurate quantification for reagents that support 6-plex labeling and propose extension of this scheme to 9-channels based on a similar PAL scaffold. Finally, we provide exemplar data that extend the application of isotopologe-based quantification reagents to medium resolution, quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometers.

  15. Quantitative Proteome Analysis of Human Plasma Following in vivo Lipopolysaccharide Administration using 16O/18O Labeling and the Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Wei-Jun; Monroe, Matthew E.; Liu, Tao; Jacobs, Jon M.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Shen, Yufeng; Moore, Ronald J.; Anderson, David J.; Zhang, Rui; Calvano, Steve E.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Identification of novel diagnostic or therapeutic biomarkers from human blood plasma would benefit significantly from quantitative measurements of the proteome constituents over a range of physiological conditions. Herein we describe an initial demonstration of proteome-wide quantitative analysis of human plasma. The approach utilizes post-digestion trypsin-catalyzed 16O/18O peptide labeling, two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC)-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance ((FTICR) mass spectrometry, and the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag strategy to identify and quantify peptides/proteins from complex samples. A peptide accurate mass and LC-elution time AMT tag database was initially generated using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) following extensive multidimensional LC separations to provide the basis for subsequent peptide identifications. The AMT tag database contains >8,000 putative identified peptides, providing 938 confident plasma protein identifications. The quantitative approach was applied without depletion for high abundant proteins for comparative analyses of plasma samples from an individual prior to and 9 h after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. Accurate quantification of changes in protein abundance was demonstrated by both 1:1 labeling of control plasma and the comparison between the plasma samples following LPS administration. A total of 429 distinct plasma proteins were quantified from the comparative analyses and the protein abundances for 25 proteins, including several known inflammatory response mediators, were observed to change significantly following LPS administration. PMID:15753121

  16. Quantitative Proteome Analysis of Human Plasma Following in vivo Lipopolysaccharide Administration using O-16/O-18 Labeling and the Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Weijun; Monroe, Matthew E.; Liu, Tao; Jacobs, Jon M.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Shen, Yufeng; Moore, Ronald J.; Anderson, David J.; Zhang, Rui; Calvano, Steven E.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-05-01

    Identification of novel diagnostic or therapeutic biomarkers from human blood plasma would benefit significantly from quantitative measurements of the proteome constituents over a range of physiological conditions. We describe here an initial demonstration of proteome-wide quantitative analysis of human plasma. The approach utilizes post-digestion trypsin-catalyzed 16O/18O labeling, two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC)-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance ((FTICR) mass spectrometry, and the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag strategy for identification and quantification of peptides/proteins from complex samples. A peptide mass and time tag database was initially generated using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) following extensive multidimensional LC separations and the database serves as a ‘look-up’ table for peptide identification. The mass and time tag database contains >8,000 putative identified peptides, which yielded 938 confident plasma protein identifications. The quantitative approach was applied to the comparative analyses of plasma samples from an individual prior to and 9 hours after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration without depletion of high abundant proteins. Accurate quantification of changes in protein abundance was demonstrated with both 1:1 labeling of control plasma and the comparison between the plasma samples following LPS administration. A total of 429 distinct plasma proteins were quantified from the comparative analyses and the protein abundances for 28 proteins were observed to be significantly changed following LPS administration, including several known inflammatory response mediators.

  17. Molecular beam mass spectrometry with tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, Amir; Ahmed, Musahid

    2012-01-01

    Tunable soft ionization coupled to mass spectroscopy is a powerful method to investigate isolated molecules, complexes and clusters and their spectroscopy and dynamics.[1-4] Fundamental studies of photoionization processes of biomolecules provide information about electronic structure of these systems. Furthermore determinations of ionization energies and other properties of biomolecules in the gas phase are not trivial, and these experiments provide a platform to generate these data. We have developed a thermal vaporization technique coupled with supersonic molecular beams that provides a gentle way to transport these species into the gas phase. Judicious combination of source gas and temperature allows for formation of dimers and higher clusters of the DNA bases. The focus of this particular work is on the effects of non-covalent interactions, i.e., hydrogen bonding, stacking, and electrostatic interactions, on the ionization energies and proton transfer of individual biomolecules, their complexes and upon micro-hydration by water.[1, 5-9] We have performed experimental and theoretical characterization of the photoionization dynamics of gas-phase uracil and 1,3-methyluracil dimers using molecular beams coupled with synchrotron radiation at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline[10] located at the Advanced Light Source and the experimental details are visualized here. This allowed us to observe the proton transfer in 1,3-dimethyluracil dimers, a system with pi stacking geometry and with no hydrogen bonds[1]. Molecular beams provide a very convenient and efficient way to isolate the sample of interest from environmental perturbations which in return allows accurate comparison with electronic structure calculations[11, 12]. By tuning the photon energy from the synchrotron, a photoionization efficiency (PIE) curve can be plotted which informs us about the cationic electronic states. These values can then be compared to theoretical models and calculations and in turn, explain

  18. Stability of high-mass molecular libraries: the role of the oligoporphyrin core

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Uĝur; Schmid, Philipp; Felix, Lukas; Mayor, Marcel; Arndt, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Molecular beam techniques are a key to many experiments in physical chemistry and quantum optics. In particular, advanced matter-wave experiments with high-mass molecules profit from the availability of slow, neutral and mass-selected molecular beams that are sufficiently stable to remain intact during laser heating and photoionization mass spectrometry. We present experiments on the photostability with molecular libraries of tailored oligoporphyrins with masses up to 25 000 Da. We compare two fluoroalkylsulfanyl-functionalized libraries based on two different molecular cores that offer the same number of anchor points for functionalization but differ in their geometry and electronic properties. A pentaporphyrin core stabilizes a library of chemically well-defined molecules with more than 1600 atoms. They can be neutrally desorbed with velocities as low as 20 m/s and efficiently analyzed in photoionization mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25601698

  19. Assessment of gas chromatography time-of-flight accurate mass spectrometry for identification of volatile and semi-volatile compounds in honey.

    PubMed

    Moniruzzaman, M; Rodríguez, I; Ramil, M; Cela, R; Sulaiman, S A; Gan, S H

    2014-11-01

    The performance of gas chromatography (GC) combined with a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (MS) system for the determination of volatile and semi-volatile compounds in honey samples is evaluated. After headspace (HS) solid-phase microextraction (SPME) of samples, the accurate mass capabilities of the above system were evaluated for compounds identification. Accurate scan electron impact (EI) MS spectra allowed discriminating compounds displaying the same nominal masses, but having different empirical formulae. Moreover, the use of a mass window with a width of 0.005 Da provided highly specific chromatograms for selected ions, avoiding the contribution of interferences to their peak areas. Additional information derived from positive chemical ionization (PCI) MS spectra and ion product scan MS/MS spectra permitted confirming the identity of novel compounds. The above possibilities are illustrated with examples of honey aroma compounds, belonging to different chemical classes and containing different elements in their molecules. Examples of compounds whose structures could not be described are also provided. Overall, 84 compounds, from a total of 89 species, could be identified in 19 honey samples from 3 different geographic areas in the world. The suitability of responses measured for selected ions, corresponding to above species, for authentication purposes is assessed through principal components analysis. PMID:25127626

  20. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Animal Species in Natural Leather Goods by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Izuchi, Yukari; Takashima, Tsuneo; Hatano, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The demand for leather goods has grown globally in recent years. Industry revenue is forecast to reach $91.2 billion by 2018. There is an ongoing labelling problem in the leather items market, in that it is currently impossible to identify the species that a given piece of leather is derived from. To address this issue, we developed a rapid and simple method for the specific identification of leather derived from cattle, horses, pigs, sheep, goats, and deer by analysing peptides produced by the trypsin-digestion of proteins contained in leather goods using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. We determined species-specific amino acid sequences by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis using the Mascot software program and demonstrated that collagen α-1(I), collagen α-2(I), and collagen α-1(III) from the dermal layer of the skin are particularly useful in species identification. PMID:27313979

  1. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Animal Species in Natural Leather Goods by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Izuchi, Yukari; Takashima, Tsuneo; Hatano, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The demand for leather goods has grown globally in recent years. Industry revenue is forecast to reach $91.2 billion by 2018. There is an ongoing labelling problem in the leather items market, in that it is currently impossible to identify the species that a given piece of leather is derived from. To address this issue, we developed a rapid and simple method for the specific identification of leather derived from cattle, horses, pigs, sheep, goats, and deer by analysing peptides produced by the trypsin-digestion of proteins contained in leather goods using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. We determined species-specific amino acid sequences by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis using the Mascot software program and demonstrated that collagen α-1(I), collagen α-2(I), and collagen α-1(III) from the dermal layer of the skin are particularly useful in species identification. PMID:27313979

  2. CLASH-VLT: Constraints on the Dark Matter Equation of State from Accurate Measurements of Galaxy Cluster Mass Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartoris, Barbara; Biviano, Andrea; Rosati, Piero; Borgani, Stefano; Umetsu, Keiichi; Bartelmann, Matthias; Girardi, Marisa; Grillo, Claudio; Lemze, Doron; Zitrin, Adi; Balestra, Italo; Mercurio, Amata; Nonino, Mario; Postman, Marc; Czakon, Nicole; Bradley, Larry; Broadhurst, Tom; Coe, Dan; Medezinski, Elinor; Melchior, Peter; Meneghetti, Massimo; Merten, Julian; Annunziatella, Marianna; Benitez, Narciso; Czoske, Oliver; Donahue, Megan; Ettori, Stefano; Ford, Holland; Fritz, Alexander; Kelson, Dan; Koekemoer, Anton; Kuchner, Ulrike; Lombardi, Marco; Maier, Christian; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Munari, Emiliano; Presotto, Valentina; Scodeggio, Marco; Seitz, Stella; Tozzi, Paolo; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Bodo

    2014-03-01

    A pressureless scenario for the dark matter (DM) fluid is a widely adopted hypothesis, despite the absence of direct observational evidence. According to general relativity, the total mass-energy content of a system shapes the gravitational potential well, but different test particles perceive this potential in different ways depending on their properties. Cluster galaxy velocities, being Ltc, depend solely on the gravitational potential, whereas photon trajectories reflect the contributions from the gravitational potential plus a relativistic-pressure term that depends on the cluster mass. We exploit this phenomenon to constrain the equation of state (EoS) parameter of the fluid, primarily DM, contained in galaxy clusters. We use complementary information provided by the kinematic and lensing mass profiles of the galaxy cluster MACS 1206.2-0847 at z = 0.44, as obtained in an extensive imaging and spectroscopic campaign within the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble. The unprecedented high quality of our data set and the properties of this cluster are well suited to determine the EoS parameter of the cluster fluid. Since baryons contribute at most 15% to the total mass in clusters and their pressure is negligible, the EoS parameter we derive describes the behavior of the DM fluid. We obtain the most stringent constraint on the DM EoS parameter to date, w = (pr + 2 pt )/(3 c 2ρ) = 0.00 ± 0.15 (stat) ± 0.08 (syst), averaged over the radial range 0.5 Mpc <= r <= r 200, where pr and pt are the radial and tangential pressure, and ρ is the density. We plan to further improve our constraint by applying the same procedure to all clusters from the ongoing Cluster Lensing And Supernova Survey with Hubble-Very Large Telescope program.

  3. CLASH-VLT: CONSTRAINTS ON THE DARK MATTER EQUATION OF STATE FROM ACCURATE MEASUREMENTS OF GALAXY CLUSTER MASS PROFILES

    SciTech Connect

    Sartoris, Barbara; Borgani, Stefano; Girardi, Marisa; Biviano, Andrea; Balestra, Italo; Nonino, Mario; Umetsu, Keiichi; Czakon, Nicole; Bartelmann, Matthias; Grillo, Claudio; Lemze, Doron; Medezinski, Elinor; Zitrin, Adi; Mercurio, Amata; Broadhurst, Tom; Melchior, Peter; and others

    2014-03-01

    A pressureless scenario for the dark matter (DM) fluid is a widely adopted hypothesis, despite the absence of direct observational evidence. According to general relativity, the total mass-energy content of a system shapes the gravitational potential well, but different test particles perceive this potential in different ways depending on their properties. Cluster galaxy velocities, being <mass. We exploit this phenomenon to constrain the equation of state (EoS) parameter of the fluid, primarily DM, contained in galaxy clusters. We use complementary information provided by the kinematic and lensing mass profiles of the galaxy cluster MACS 1206.2–0847 at z = 0.44, as obtained in an extensive imaging and spectroscopic campaign within the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble. The unprecedented high quality of our data set and the properties of this cluster are well suited to determine the EoS parameter of the cluster fluid. Since baryons contribute at most 15% to the total mass in clusters and their pressure is negligible, the EoS parameter we derive describes the behavior of the DM fluid. We obtain the most stringent constraint on the DM EoS parameter to date, w = (p{sub r} + 2 p{sub t} )/(3 c {sup 2}ρ) = 0.00 ± 0.15 (stat) ± 0.08 (syst), averaged over the radial range 0.5 Mpc ≤ r ≤ r {sub 200}, where p{sub r} and p{sub t} are the radial and tangential pressure, and ρ is the density. We plan to further improve our constraint by applying the same procedure to all clusters from the ongoing Cluster Lensing And Supernova Survey with Hubble-Very Large Telescope program.

  4. Rapid screening for 67 drugs and metabolites in serum or plasma by accurate-mass LC-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Marin, Stephanie J; Hughes, John M; Lawlor, Bryan G; Clark, Chantry J; McMillin, Gwendolyn A

    2012-09-01

    Sixty-seven drugs and metabolites were detected in serum or plasma using a fast (7.5 min) liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOF-MS) method. This method was developed as a blood drug screen, with emphasis on the detection of common drugs of abuse and drugs used to manage chronic pain. Qualitative drug detection may identify a drug exposure, assure patient adherence with prescribed therapy and document abstinence from non-prescribed medications. Compound identification is based on chromatographic retention time, mass, isotope spacing and isotope abundance. Data analysis software (Agilent) generates a compound score based on how well these observed criteria matched theoretical and empirical values. The method was validated using fortified samples and 299 residual patient specimens (920 positive results). All results were confirmed by gas chromatography-MS or LC-tandem MS. The accuracy of positive results (samples meeting all qualitative criteria for retention time, mass and compound score) was >90% for drugs and/or metabolites, except for two benzodiazepines. There were 35 false positive results (seven compounds, 3.8%) that could be distinguished by retention time and/or absence of metabolites. The most frequent was 6-acetylmorphine in the absence of morphine. The LC-TOF-MS targeted screening method presented represents a sensitive and specific technology for drug screening of serum or plasma. PMID:22802572

  5. Three-dimensional nanoscale molecular imaging by extreme ultraviolet laser ablation mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Ilya; Filevich, Jorge; Dong, Feng; Woolston, Mark; Chao, Weilun; Anderson, Erik H.; Bernstein, Elliot R.; Crick, Dean C.; Rocca, Jorge J.; Menoni, Carmen S.

    2015-01-01

    Analytical probes capable of mapping molecular composition at the nanoscale are of critical importance to materials research, biology and medicine. Mass spectral imaging makes it possible to visualize the spatial organization of multiple molecular components at a sample's surface. However, it is challenging for mass spectral imaging to map molecular composition in three dimensions (3D) with submicron resolution. Here we describe a mass spectral imaging method that exploits the high 3D localization of absorbed extreme ultraviolet laser light and its fundamentally distinct interaction with matter to determine molecular composition from a volume as small as 50 zl in a single laser shot. Molecular imaging with a lateral resolution of 75 nm and a depth resolution of 20 nm is demonstrated. These results open opportunities to visualize chemical composition and chemical changes in 3D at the nanoscale. PMID:25903827

  6. Accurate mass determination for double-lined spectroscopic binaries by digital cross-correlation spectroscopy: DM Virginis revisited.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, D. W.; Nordstroem, B.; Andersen, J.; Torres, G.; Stefanik, R. P.; Thaller, M.; Bester, M. J.

    1996-10-01

    Fundamental mass determinations in eclipsing binaries rely on radial velocities derived from double-lined spectra. We evaluate the performance of the CfA Digital Speedometers for deriving radial velocities of double-lined systems, using simulated observations of composite spectra. When XCSAO (Kurtz et al. 1992) is used to calculate a one-dimensional cross-correlation, simple fits to the double peaks in the correlation function can lead to systematic errors as large as 3km/s due to the effects of line blending. The two-dimensional correlation scheme TODCOR (Zucker & Mazeh 1994ApJ...420..806Z) can reduce the systematic errors by an order of magnitude. We apply TODCOR to a new mass determination for the F-type eclipsing binary DM Vir, achieving an accuracy of 0.6%. The improved physical properties of DM Vir agree very well with stellar evolution models incorporating the most recent opacity data, both with and without convective core overshooting, and for reasonable assumptions about the chemical composition. The age of DM Vir is found to be 1.75+/-0.20x10^9^yr, metallicity being the dominant source of uncertainty.

  7. Toward Accurate Reaction Energetics for Molecular Line Growth at Surface: Quantum Monte Carlo and Density Functional Theory Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai, Y; Takeuchi, N

    2009-10-14

    We revisit the molecular line growth mechanism of styrene on the hydrogenated Si(001) 2x1 surface. In particular, we investigate the energetics of the radical chain reaction mechanism by means of diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. For the exchange correlation (XC) functional we use the non-empirical generalized-gradient approximation (GGA) and meta-GGA. We find that the QMC result also predicts the intra dimer-row growth of the molecular line over the inter dimer-row growth, supporting the conclusion based on DFT results. However, the absolute magnitudes of the adsorption and reaction energies, and the heights of the energy barriers differ considerably between the QMC and DFT with the GGA/meta-GGA XC functionals.

  8. Accurate and Scalable O(N) Algorithm for First-Principles Molecular-Dynamics Computations on Large Parallel Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osei-Kuffuor, Daniel; Fattebert, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    We present the first truly scalable first-principles molecular dynamics algorithm with O(N) complexity and controllable accuracy, capable of simulating systems with finite band gaps of sizes that were previously impossible with this degree of accuracy. By avoiding global communications, we provide a practical computational scheme capable of extreme scalability. Accuracy is controlled by the mesh spacing of the finite difference discretization, the size of the localization regions in which the electronic wave functions are confined, and a cutoff beyond which the components of the overlap matrix can be omitted when computing selected elements of its inverse. We demonstrate the algorithm's excellent parallel scaling for up to 101 952 atoms on 23 328 processors, with a wall-clock time of the order of 1 min per molecular dynamics time step and numerical error on the forces of less than 7×10-4 Ha/Bohr.

  9. Accurate and Scalable O(N) Algorithm for First-Principles Molecular-Dynamics Computations on Large Parallel Computers

    SciTech Connect

    Osei-Kuffuor, Daniel; Fattebert, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    We present the first truly scalable first-principles molecular dynamics algorithm with O(N) complexity and controllable accuracy, capable of simulating systems with finite band gaps of sizes that were previously impossible with this degree of accuracy. By avoiding global communications, we provide a practical computational scheme capable of extreme scalability. Accuracy is controlled by the mesh spacing of the finite difference discretization, the size of the localization regions in which the electronic wave functions are confined, and a cutoff beyond which the components of the overlap matrix can be omitted when computing selected elements of its inverse. We demonstrate the algorithm's excellent parallel scaling for up to 101 952 atoms on 23 328 processors, with a wall-clock time of the order of 1 min per molecular dynamics time step and numerical error on the forces of less than 7x10-4 Ha/Bohr.

  10. Development of an accurate molecular mechanics model for buckling behavior of multi-walled carbon nanotubes under axial compression.

    PubMed

    Safaei, B; Naseradinmousavi, P; Rahmani, A

    2016-04-01

    In the present paper, an analytical solution based on a molecular mechanics model is developed to evaluate the elastic critical axial buckling strain of chiral multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). To this end, the total potential energy of the system is calculated with the consideration of the both bond stretching and bond angular variations. Density functional theory (DFT) in the form of generalized gradient approximation (GGA) is implemented to evaluate force constants used in the molecular mechanics model. After that, based on the principle of molecular mechanics, explicit expressions are proposed to obtain elastic surface Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of the single-walled carbon nanotubes corresponding to different types of chirality. Selected numerical results are presented to indicate the influence of the type of chirality, tube diameter, and number of tube walls in detailed. An excellent agreement is found between the present numerical results and those found in the literature which confirms the validity as well as the accuracy of the present closed-form solution. It is found that the value of critical axial buckling strain exhibit significant dependency on the type of chirality and number of tube walls. PMID:26930445

  11. Comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem diode array detector (DAD) and accurate mass QTOF-MS for the analysis of flavonoids and iridoid glycosides in Hedyotis diffusa.

    PubMed

    Li, Duxin; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of chemical constituents in Chinese herbal medicines (CHMs) is a challenge because of numerous compounds with various polarities and functional groups. Liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (LC/MS) is of particular interest in the analysis of herbal components. One of the main attributes of QTOF that makes it an attractive analytical technique is its accurate mass measurement for both precursor and product ions. For the separation of CHMs, comprehensive two-dimensional chromatography (LCxLC) provides much higher resolving power than traditional one-dimensional separation. Therefore, a LCxLC-QTOF-MS system was developed and applied to the analysis of flavonoids and iridoid glycosides in aqueous extracts of Hedyotis diffusa (Rubiaceae). Shift gradient was applied in the two-dimensional separation in the LCxLC system to increase the orthogonality and effective peak distribution area of the analysis. Tentative identification of compounds was done by accurate mass interpretation and validation by UV spectrum. A clear classification of flavonol glycosides (FGs), acylated FGs, and iridoid glycosides (IGs) was shown in different regions of the LCxLC contour plot. In total, five FGs, four acylated FGs, and three IGs were tentatively identified. In addition, several novel flavonoids were found, which demonstrates that LCxLC-QTOF-MS detection also has great potential in herbal medicine analysis. PMID:25171829

  12. Accurate determination of ⁴¹Ca concentrations in spent resins from the nuclear industry by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nottoli, Emmanuelle; Bourlès, Didier; Bienvenu, Philippe; Labet, Alexandre; Arnold, Maurice; Bertaux, Maité

    2013-12-01

    The radiological characterisation of nuclear waste is essential for managing storage sites. Determining the concentration of Long-Lived RadioNuclides (LLRN) is fundamental for their long-term management. This paper focuses on the measurement of low (41)Ca concentrations in ions exchange resins used for primary fluid purification in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR). (41)Ca concentrations were successfully measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) after the acid digestion of resin samples, followed by radioactive decontamination and isobaric suppression through successive hydroxide, carbonate, nitrate and final CaF2 precipitations. Measured (41)Ca concentrations ranged from 0.02 to 0.03 ng/g, i.e. from 0.06 to 0.09 Bq/g. The (41)Ca/(60)Co activity ratios obtained were remarkably reproducible and in good agreement with the current ratio used for resins management. PMID:24144617

  13. Self-aliquoting microarray plates for accurate quantitative matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pabst, Martin; Fagerer, Stephan R; Köhling, Rudolf; Küster, Simon K; Steinhoff, Robert; Badertscher, Martin; Wahl, Fabian; Dittrich, Petra S; Jefimovs, Konstantins; Zenobi, Renato

    2013-10-15

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is a fast analysis tool employed for the detection of a broad range of analytes. However, MALDI-MS has a reputation of not being suitable for quantitative analysis. Inhomogeneous analyte/matrix co-crystallization, spot-to-spot inhomogeneity, as well as a typically low number of replicates are the main contributing factors. Here, we present a novel MALDI sample target for quantitative MALDI-MS applications, which addresses the limitations mentioned above. The platform is based on the recently developed microarray for mass spectrometry (MAMS) technology and contains parallel lanes of hydrophilic reservoirs. Samples are not pipetted manually but deposited by dragging one or several sample droplets with a metal sliding device along these lanes. Sample is rapidly and automatically aliquoted into the sample spots due to the interplay of hydrophilic/hydrophobic interactions. With a few microliters of sample, it is possible to aliquot up to 40 replicates within seconds, each aliquot containing just 10 nL. The analyte droplet dries immediately and homogeneously, and consumption of the whole spot during MALDI-MS analysis is typically accomplished within few seconds. We evaluated these sample targets with respect to their suitability for use with different samples and matrices. Furthermore, we tested their application for generating calibration curves of standard peptides with α-cyano-4-hdydroxycinnamic acid as a matrix. For angiotensin II and [Glu(1)]-fibrinopeptide B we achieved coefficients of determination (r(2)) greater than 0.99 without the use of internal standards. PMID:24003910

  14. Molecular mass dependence of hyaluronan detection by sandwich ELISA-like assay and membrane blotting using biotinylated hyaluronan binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Han; Tank, Mihir; Alsofyani, Abeer; Shah, Naman; Talati, Nishant; LoBello, Jaclyn C; Kim, Jin Ryoun; Oonuki, Yoji; de la Motte, Carol A; Cowman, Mary K

    2013-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is widely detected in biological samples and its concentration is most commonly determined by the use of a labeled specific HA binding protein (aggrecan G1-IGD-G2, HABP), employing membrane blotting and sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-like methods. However, the detected signal intensity or the quantified value obtained by using these surface-based methods is related to the molecular mass (M) of HA, especially for HA in the low M range below ∼150 kDa. At the same mass or mass concentration, higher M HA gives a higher signal than lower M HA. We have experimentally determined the quantitative relationship between the M of HA (in the range 20–150 kDa) and the relative signal intensity in comparison with a standard HA, in a sandwich ELISA-like assay. An M-dependent signal correction factor (SCF) was calculated and used to correct the signal intensity, so that the corrected concentration value would more accurately reflect the true HA concentration in solution. The SCF for polydisperse low M HA was also calculated and compared with experimental results. When the molecular mass distribution of an HA sample is determined by a method such as gel electrophoresis, then its appropriately averaged SCF can be calculated and used to correct the signal in sandwich ELISA to obtain a more accurate concentration estimation. The correction method works for HA with M between ∼150 and 20 kDa, but lower M HA is too poorly detected for useful analysis. The physical basis of the M-dependent detection is proposed to be the increase in detector-accessible fraction of each surface-bound molecule as M increases. PMID:23964097

  15. Prediction of chirality- and size-dependent elastic properties of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes based on an accurate molecular mechanics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Mirnezhad, M.; Sahmani, S.

    2015-04-01

    Molecular mechanics theory has been widely used to investigate the mechanical properties of nanostructures analytically. However, there is a limited number of research in which molecular mechanics model is utilized to predict the elastic properties of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In the current study, the mechanical properties of chiral single-walled BNNTs are predicted analytically based on an accurate molecular mechanics model. For this purpose, based upon the density functional theory (DFT) within the framework of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA), the exchange correlation of Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof is adopted to evaluate force constants used in the molecular mechanics model. Afterwards, based on the principle of molecular mechanics, explicit expressions are given to calculate surface Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of the single-walled BNNTs for different values of tube diameter and types of chirality. Moreover, the values of surface Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio and bending stiffness of boron nitride sheets are obtained via the DFT as byproducts. The results predicted by the present model are in reasonable agreement with those reported by other models in the literature.

  16. The Molecular Envelopes of High-Mass Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yu-Nung; Lim, Jeremy

    We report (JK) = (11)(22) and (33) ammonia observations towards luminous far-IR sources IRAS 06058+2138 made with the VLA in D-configuration. IRAS 06058+2138 has a bolometric luminosity of 2 x 104 Lsun and exhibits energetic maser activities but extremely weak cm-wave free-free emission indicating that there are very young high-mass stars perhaps massive protostars. All ammonia (11) (22) and (33) lines are detected and the emission is spatially coincident with the H13CO+ and SiO emission and 3-mm dust continuum. The centroids of the ammonia (33) condensations agree very well with those of other signposts (i.e. dust continuum and water masers) for new-born high-mass stars while the centroids of ammonia (11) and (22) emission does not. This indicates that ammonia (33) is a better tracer for high-mass star forming regions than ammonia (11) and (22). The condensations of ammonia (33) emission could mark the positions of young high-mass stars.

  17. The route to MBxNyCz molecular wheels: II. Results using accurate functionals and basis sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güthler, A.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pandey, R.; Boustani, I.

    2014-04-01

    Applying ab initio quantum chemical methods, molecular wheels composed of metal and light atoms were investigated. High quality basis sets 6-31G*, TZPV, and cc-pVTZ as well as exchange and non-local correlation functionals B3LYP, BP86 and B3P86 were used. The ground-state energy and structures of cyclic planar and pyramidal clusters TiBn (for n = 3-10) were computed. In addition, the relative stability and electronic structures of molecular wheels TiBxNyCz (for x, y, z = 0-10) and MBnC10-n (for n = 2 to 5 and M = Sc to Zn) were determined. This paper sustains a follow-up study to the previous one of Boustani and Pandey [Solid State Sci. 14 (2012) 1591], in which the calculations were carried out at the HF-SCF/STO3G/6-31G level of theory to determine the initial stability and properties. The results show that there is a competition between the 2D planar and the 3D pyramidal TiBn clusters (for n = 3-8). Different isomers of TiB10 clusters were also studied and a structural transition of 3D-isomer into 2D-wheel is presented. Substitution boron in TiB10 by carbon or/and nitrogen atoms enhances the stability and leads toward the most stable wheel TiB3C7. Furthermore, the computations show that Sc, Ti and V at the center of the molecular wheels are energetically favored over other transition metal atoms of the first row.

  18. Accurate determination of ochratoxin A in Korean fermented soybean paste by isotope dilution-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Seonghee; Lee, Suyoung; Lee, Joonhee; Kim, Byungjoo

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), a naturally occurring mycotoxin, has been frequently detected in doenjang, a traditional fermented soybean paste, when it is fermented under improper conditions. Reliable screening of OTA in traditional fermented soybean paste (doenjang) is a special food-safety issue in Korea. Our laboratory, the National Metrology Institute of Korea, established an isotope dilution-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (ID-LC/MS/MS) method as a higher-order reference method to be used for SI-traceable value-assignment of OTA in certified reference materials (CRMs). (13)C20-OTA was used as an internal standard. Sample preparation conditions and LC/MS measurement parameters were optimised for this purpose. The analytical method was validated by measuring samples fortified with OTA at various levels. Repeatability and reproducibility studies showed that the ID-LC/MS/MS method is reliable and reproducible within 2% relative standard deviation. The analytical method was applied to determine OTA in various commercial doenjang products and home-made doenjang products. PMID:26212984

  19. CLASH-VLT: Insights on the Mass Substructures in the Frontier Fields Cluster MACS J0416.1-2403 through Accurate Strong Lens Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillo, C.; Suyu, S. H.; Rosati, P.; Mercurio, A.; Balestra, I.; Munari, E.; Nonino, M.; Caminha, G. B.; Lombardi, M.; De Lucia, G.; Borgani, S.; Gobat, R.; Biviano, A.; Girardi, M.; Umetsu, K.; Coe, D.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Postman, M.; Zitrin, A.; Halkola, A.; Broadhurst, T.; Sartoris, B.; Presotto, V.; Annunziatella, M.; Maier, C.; Fritz, A.; Vanzella, E.; Frye, B.

    2015-02-01

    We present a detailed mass reconstruction and a novel study on the substructure properties in the core of the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) and Frontier Fields galaxy cluster MACS J0416.1-2403. We show and employ our extensive spectroscopic data set taken with the VIsible Multi-Object Spectrograph instrument as part of our CLASH-VLT program, to confirm spectroscopically 10 strong lensing systems and to select a sample of 175 plausible cluster members to a limiting stellar mass of log (M */M ⊙) ~= 8.6. We reproduce the measured positions of a set of 30 multiple images with a remarkable median offset of only 0.''3 by means of a comprehensive strong lensing model comprised of two cluster dark-matter halos, represented by cored elliptical pseudo-isothermal mass distributions, and the cluster member components, parameterized with dual pseudo-isothermal total mass profiles. The latter have total mass-to-light ratios increasing with the galaxy HST/WFC3 near-IR (F160W) luminosities. The measurement of the total enclosed mass within the Einstein radius is accurate to ~5%, including the systematic uncertainties estimated from six distinct mass models. We emphasize that the use of multiple-image systems with spectroscopic redshifts and knowledge of cluster membership based on extensive spectroscopic information is key to constructing robust high-resolution mass maps. We also produce magnification maps over the central area that is covered with HST observations. We investigate the galaxy contribution, both in terms of total and stellar mass, to the total mass budget of the cluster. When compared with the outcomes of cosmological N-body simulations, our results point to a lack of massive subhalos in the inner regions of simulated clusters with total masses similar to that of MACS J0416.1-2403. Our findings of the location and shape of the cluster dark-matter halo density profiles and on the cluster substructures provide intriguing tests of the

  20. CLASH-VLT: INSIGHTS ON THE MASS SUBSTRUCTURES IN THE FRONTIER FIELDS CLUSTER MACS J0416.1–2403 THROUGH ACCURATE STRONG LENS MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Grillo, C.; Suyu, S. H.; Umetsu, K.; Rosati, P.; Caminha, G. B.; Mercurio, A.; Balestra, I.; Munari, E.; Nonino, M.; De Lucia, G.; Borgani, S.; Biviano, A.; Girardi, M.; Lombardi, M.; Gobat, R.; Zitrin, A.; Halkola, A. and others

    2015-02-10

    We present a detailed mass reconstruction and a novel study on the substructure properties in the core of the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) and Frontier Fields galaxy cluster MACS J0416.1–2403. We show and employ our extensive spectroscopic data set taken with the VIsible Multi-Object Spectrograph instrument as part of our CLASH-VLT program, to confirm spectroscopically 10 strong lensing systems and to select a sample of 175 plausible cluster members to a limiting stellar mass of log (M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) ≅ 8.6. We reproduce the measured positions of a set of 30 multiple images with a remarkable median offset of only 0.''3 by means of a comprehensive strong lensing model comprised of two cluster dark-matter halos, represented by cored elliptical pseudo-isothermal mass distributions, and the cluster member components, parameterized with dual pseudo-isothermal total mass profiles. The latter have total mass-to-light ratios increasing with the galaxy HST/WFC3 near-IR (F160W) luminosities. The measurement of the total enclosed mass within the Einstein radius is accurate to ∼5%, including the systematic uncertainties estimated from six distinct mass models. We emphasize that the use of multiple-image systems with spectroscopic redshifts and knowledge of cluster membership based on extensive spectroscopic information is key to constructing robust high-resolution mass maps. We also produce magnification maps over the central area that is covered with HST observations. We investigate the galaxy contribution, both in terms of total and stellar mass, to the total mass budget of the cluster. When compared with the outcomes of cosmological N-body simulations, our results point to a lack of massive subhalos in the inner regions of simulated clusters with total masses similar to that of MACS J0416.1–2403. Our findings of the location and shape of the cluster dark-matter halo density profiles and on the cluster substructures provide intriguing

  1. IMPROVED METHOD FOR ESTIMATING MOLECULAR WEIGHTS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM LOW RESOLUTION MASS SPECTRA

    EPA Science Inventory

    An improved method of estimating molecular weights of volatile organic compound from their mass spectra has been developed and implemented with an expert system. he method is based on the strong correlation of MAXMASS, the highest mass with an intensity of 5% of the base peak in ...

  2. Using Pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry to Characterize Soil Organic Carbon in Native Prairie Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to characterize soil organic carbon (SOC) with pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry (py-MBMS) and then to determine correlations between the mass spectra and associated soil characterization data. Both soil carbon chemistry and the organic forms in which SOC is...

  3. Masses of the components of SB2 binaries observed with Gaia - III. Accurate SB2 orbits for 10 binaries and masses of HIP 87895

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, F.; Halbwachs, J.-L.; Arenou, F.; Pourbaix, D.; Famaey, B.; Guillout, P.; Lebreton, Y.; Nebot Gómez-Morán, A.; Mazeh, T.; Salomon, J.-B.; Soubiran, C.; Tal-Or, L.

    2016-05-01

    In anticipation of the Gaia astrometric mission, a large sample of spectroscopic binaries has been observed since 2010 with the Spectrographe pour l'Observation des PHénomènes des Intérieurs Stellaires et des Exoplanètes spectrograph at the Haute-Provence Observatory. Our aim is to derive the orbital elements of double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2s) with an accuracy sufficient to finally obtain the masses of the components with relative errors as small as 1 per cent when the astrometric measurements of Gaia are taken into account. In this paper, we present the results from five years of observations of 10 SB2 systems with periods ranging from 37 to 881 d. Using the TODMOR algorithm, we computed radial velocities from the spectra, and then derived the orbital elements of these binary systems. The minimum masses of the components are then obtained with an accuracy better than 1.2 per cent for the 10 binaries. Combining the radial velocities with existing interferometric measurements, we derived the masses of the primary and secondary components of HIP 87895 with an accuracy of 0.98 and 1.2 per cent, respectively.

  4. An accurate and scalable O(N) algorithm for First-Principles Molecular Dynamics computations on petascale computers and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osei-Kuffuor, Daniel; Fattebert, Jean-Luc

    2014-03-01

    We present a truly scalable First-Principles Molecular Dynamics algorithm with O(N) complexity and fully controllable accuracy, capable of simulating systems of sizes that were previously impossible with this degree of accuracy. By avoiding global communication, we have extended W. Kohn's condensed matter ``nearsightedness'' principle to a practical computational scheme capable of extreme scalability. Accuracy is controlled by the mesh spacing of the finite difference discretization, the size of the localization regions in which the electronic wavefunctions are confined, and a cutoff beyond which the components of the overlap matrix can be omitted when computing selected elements of its inverse. We demonstrate the algorithm's excellent parallel scaling for up to 100,000 atoms on 100,000 processors, with a wall-clock time of the order of one minute per molecular dynamics time step. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Molecular Weight Determinations of Proteins by Californium Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundqvist, B.; Roepstorff, Peter; Fohlman, J.; Hedin, A.; Hakansson, P.; Kamensky, I.; Lindberg, M.; Salehpour, M.; Sawe, G.

    1984-11-01

    The plasma desorption mass spectrometry method is used to determine the molecular weights of larger molecules than before, to determine the molecular weights of proteins and peptides in mixtures, and to monitor protein modification reactions. Proteins up to molecular weight 25,000 can now be studied with a mass spectrometric technique. Protein-peptide mixtures that could not be resolved with conventional techniques were successfully analyzed by this technique. The precision of the method is good enough to permit one to follow the different steps in the conversion of porcine insulin to human insulin.

  6. Accurate analysis of trace earthy-musty odorants in water by headspace solid phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kang; Zhang, Jin Na; Zhao, Min; He, Ya Juan

    2012-06-01

    A simple and sensitive method was developed for the simultaneous separation and determination of trace earthy-musty compounds including geosmin, 2-methylisoborneol, 2-isobutyl-3-methoxypyrazine, 2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine, 2,3,4-trichloroanisole, 2,4,6-trichloroanisole, and 2,3,6-trichloroanisole in water samples. This method combined headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and used naphthalene-d(8) as internal standard. A divinylbenzene/carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane fiber exposing at 90°C for 30 min provided effective sample enrichment in HS-SPME. These compounds were separated by a DB-1701MS capillary column and detected in selected ion monitoring mode within 12 min. The method showed a good linearity from 1 to 100 ng L(-1) and detection limits within (0.25-0.61 ng L(-1)) for all compounds. Using naphthalene-d(8) as the internal standard, the intra-day relative standard deviation (RSD) was within (2.6-3.4%), while the inter-day RSD was (3.5-4.9%). Good recoveries were obtained for tap water (80.5-90.6%), river water (81.5-92.4%), and lake water (83.5-95.2%) spiked at 10 ng L(-1). Compared with other methods using HS-SPME for determination of odor compounds in water samples, this present method had more analytes, better precision, and recovery. This method was successfully applied for analysis of earthy-musty odors in water samples from different sources. PMID:22740259

  7. Protected Amine Labels: A Versatile Molecular Scaffold for Multiplexed Nominal Mass and Sub-Da Isotopologue Quantitative Proteomic Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Ficarro, Scott B.; Biagi, Jessica M.; Wang, Jinhua; Scotcher, Jenna; Koleva, Rositsa I.; Card, Joseph D.; Adelmant, Guillaume; He, Huan; Askenazi, Manor; Marshall, Alan G.; Young, Nicolas L.; Gray, Nathanael S.; Marto, Jarrod A.

    2014-01-01

    We assemble a versatile molecular scaffold from simple building blocks to create binary and multiplexed stable isotope reagents for quantitative mass spectrometry. Termed Protected Amine Labels (PAL), these reagents offer multiple analytical figures of merit including, (i) robust targeting of peptide N-termini and lysyl side chains, (ii) optimal mass spectrometry ionization efficiency through regeneration of primary amines on labeled peptides, (iii) an amino acid-based mass tag that incorporates heavy isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen to ensure matched physicochemical and MS/MS fragmentation behavior among labeled peptides, and (iv) a molecularly efficient architecture, in which the majority of hetero-atom centers can be used to synthesize a variety of nominal mass and sub-Da isotopologue stable isotope reagents. We demonstrate the performance of these reagents in well-established strategies whereby up to four channels of peptide isotopomers, each separated by 4 Da are quantified in MS-level scans with accuracies comparable to current commercial reagents. In addition we utilize the PAL scaffold to create isotopologue reagents in which labeled peptide analogs differ in mass based on the binding energy in carbon and nitrogen nuclei, thereby allowing quantification based on MS or MS/MS spectra. We demonstrate accurate quantification for reagents that support 6-plex labeling and propose extension of this scheme to 9-channels based on a similar PAL scaffold. Finally we provide exemplar data that extends the application of isotopologe-based quantification reagents to medium resolution, quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometers. PMID:24496597

  8. Protected amine labels: a versatile molecular scaffold for multiplexed nominal mass and sub-Da isotopologue quantitative proteomic reagents.

    PubMed

    Ficarro, Scott B; Biagi, Jessica M; Wang, Jinhua; Scotcher, Jenna; Koleva, Rositsa I; Card, Joseph D; Adelmant, Guillaume; He, Huan; Askenazi, Manor; Marshall, Alan G; Young, Nicolas L; Gray, Nathanael S; Marto, Jarrod A

    2014-04-01

    We assemble a versatile molecular scaffold from simple building blocks to create binary and multiplexed stable isotope reagents for quantitative mass spectrometry. Termed Protected Amine Labels (PAL), these reagents offer multiple analytical figures of merit including, (1) robust targeting of peptide N-termini and lysyl side chains, (2) optimal mass spectrometry ionization efficiency through regeneration of primary amines on labeled peptides, (3) an amino acid-based mass tag that incorporates heavy isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen to ensure matched physicochemical and MS/MS fragmentation behavior among labeled peptides, and (4) a molecularly efficient architecture, in which the majority of hetero-atom centers can be used to synthesize a variety of nominal mass and sub-Da isotopologue stable isotope reagents. We demonstrate the performance of these reagents in well-established strategies whereby up to four channels of peptide isotopomers, each separated by 4 Da, are quantified in MS-level scans with accuracies comparable to current commercial reagents. In addition, we utilize the PAL scaffold to create isotopologue reagents in which labeled peptide analogs differ in mass based on the binding energy in carbon and nitrogen nuclei, thereby allowing quantification based on MS or MS/MS spectra. We demonstrate accurate quantification for reagents that support 6-plex labeling and propose extension of this scheme to 9-channels based on a similar PAL scaffold. Finally, we provide exemplar data that extend the application of isotopologe-based quantification reagents to medium resolution, quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometers. PMID:24496597

  9. Dense molecular gas tracers in high mass star formation regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hong-Jun; Gao, Yu; Wu, Jing-Wen

    2016-02-01

    We report the FCRAO observations that mapped HCN (1-0), CS (2-1), HNC (1-0) and HCO+ (1-0) in ten high-mass star forming cores associated with water masers. We present velocity integrated intensity maps of the four lines for these dense cores, compare their line profiles, and derive physical properties of these cores. We find that these four tracers identify areas with similar properties in these massive dense cores, and in most cases, the emissions of HCN and HCO+ are stronger than those of HNC and CS. We also use the line ratios of HCO+/HCN, HNC/HCN and HNC/HCO+ as the diagnostics to explore the environment of these high-mass star forming regions, and find that most of the cores agree with the model that photodominated regions dominate the radiation field, except for W44, for which the radiation field is similar to an X-ray dominated region.

  10. Deblurring molecular images using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Parry, R. Mitchell; Galhena, Asiri S.; Fernandez, Facundo M.; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional imaging techniques for studying the spatial distribution of biological molecules such as proteins, metabolites, and lipids, require the a priori selection of a handful of target molecules. Imaging mass spectrometry provides a means to analyze thousands of molecules at a time within a tissue sample, adding spatial detail to proteomic, metabolomic, and lipidomic studies. Compared to traditional microscopic images, mass spectrometric images have reduced spatial resolution and require a destructive acquisition process. In order to increase spatial detail, we propose a constrained acquisition path and signal degradation model enabling the use of a general image deblurring algorithm. Our analysis shows the potential of this approach and supports prior observations that the effect of the sprayer focuses on a central region much smaller than the extent of the spray. PMID:19963935

  11. A Century of Progress in Molecular Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLafferty, Fred W.

    2011-07-01

    The first mass spectrum of a molecule was measured by J.J. Thomson in 1910. Mass spectrometry (MS) soon became crucial to the study of isotopes and atomic weights and to the development of atomic weapons for World War II. Its notable applications to molecules began with the quantitative analysis of light hydrocarbons during World War II. When I joined the Dow Chemical Company in 1950, MS was not favored by organic chemists. This situation improved only with an increased understanding of gaseous ion chemistry, which was obtained through the use of extensive reference data. Gas chromatography-MS was developed in 1956, and tandem MS was first used a decade later. In neutralization-reionization MS, an unusual, unstable species is prepared by ion-beam neutralization and characterized by reionization. Electrospray ionization of a protein mixture produces its corresponding ionized molecules. In top-down proteomics, ions from an individual component can be mass separated and subjected to collision-activated and electron-capture dissociation to provide extensive sequence information.

  12. A Simple and Accurate Method To Calculate Free Energy Profiles and Reaction Rates from Restrained Molecular Simulations of Diffusive Processes.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, Victor; Nam, Kwangho; Karplus, Martin

    2016-08-25

    A method is developed to obtain simultaneously free energy profiles and diffusion constants from restrained molecular simulations in diffusive systems. The method is based on low-order expansions of the free energy and diffusivity as functions of the reaction coordinate. These expansions lead to simple analytical relationships between simulation statistics and model parameters. The method is tested on 1D and 2D model systems; its accuracy is found to be comparable to or better than that of the existing alternatives, which are briefly discussed. An important aspect of the method is that the free energy is constructed by integrating its derivatives, which can be computed without need for overlapping sampling windows. The implementation of the method in any molecular simulation program that supports external umbrella potentials (e.g., CHARMM) requires modification of only a few lines of code. As a demonstration of its applicability to realistic biomolecular systems, the method is applied to model the α-helix ↔ β-sheet transition in a 16-residue peptide in implicit solvent, with the reaction coordinate provided by the string method. Possible modifications of the method are briefly discussed; they include generalization to multidimensional reaction coordinates [in the spirit of the model of Ermak and McCammon (Ermak, D. L.; McCammon, J. A. J. Chem. Phys. 1978, 69, 1352-1360)], a higher-order expansion of the free energy surface, applicability in nonequilibrium systems, and a simple test for Markovianity. In view of the small overhead of the method relative to standard umbrella sampling, we suggest its routine application in the cases where umbrella potential simulations are appropriate. PMID:27135391

  13. Combined use of medium mass resolution and desolvation introduction system for accurate plutonium determination in the femtogram range by inductively coupled plasma-sector-field mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pointurier, Fabien; Pottin, Anne-Claire; Hémet, Philippe; Hubert, Amélie

    2011-03-01

    Formation of a polyatomic species made of an atom of a heavy element like lead, mercury or iridium, and atoms abundant in plasma (argon, nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrogen) when using an inductively coupled plasma-sector-field mass spectrometer (ICP-SFMS) may lead to false detection of femtograms (fg) of plutonium or bias in the measured concentrations. Mathematical corrections, based on the measurement of heavy element concentrations in the sample solutions and determination of the extents of formation of the polyatomic interferences, are efficient but time-consuming and degrade detection limits. We describe and discuss a new method based on the combination of, on the one hand, medium mass resolution (MR) of the ICP-SFMS to separate plutonium isotopes physically from interfering polyatomic species, and, on the other, use of a desolvation introduction system (DIS) to enhance sensitivity, thus partly compensating for the loss of transmission due to use of a higher resolution. Plutonium peaks are perfectly separated from the major interfering species (PbO 2, HgAr, and IrO 3) with a mass resolution of ~ 4000. The resulting nine-fold transmission loss is partly compensated by a five-fold increase in sensitivity obtained with the DIS and a lower background. The instrumental detection limits for plutonium isotopes, calculated for measurements of pure synthetic solutions, of the new method (known as MR-DIS method) and of the one currently used in the laboratory (LR method), based on a low mass resolution equal to 360, a microconcentric nebulizer and two in-line cooled spray chambers, are roughly equivalent, at around 0.2 fg ml - 1 . Regarding the measurement of real-life samples, the results obtained with both methods agree and the corresponding analytical detection limits for plutonium isotopes 239Pu, 240Pu and 241Pu are of a few fg·ml - 1 of sample solution, slightly lower with the MR-DIS method than with the current LR method. Although less sensitive than other plutonium

  14. Accurate determination of genetic identity for a single cacao bean, using molecular markers with a nanofluidic system, ensures cocoa authentication.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wanping; Meinhardt, Lyndel W; Mischke, Sue; Bellato, Cláudia M; Motilal, Lambert; Zhang, Dapeng

    2014-01-15

    Cacao (Theobroma cacao L.), the source of cocoa, is an economically important tropical crop. One problem with the premium cacao market is contamination with off-types adulterating raw premium material. Accurate determination of the genetic identity of single cacao beans is essential for ensuring cocoa authentication. Using nanofluidic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping with 48 SNP markers, we generated SNP fingerprints for small quantities of DNA extracted from the seed coat of single cacao beans. On the basis of the SNP profiles, we identified an assumed adulterant variety, which was unambiguously distinguished from the authentic beans by multilocus matching. Assignment tests based on both Bayesian clustering analysis and allele frequency clearly separated all 30 authentic samples from the non-authentic samples. Distance-based principle coordinate analysis further supported these results. The nanofluidic SNP protocol, together with forensic statistical tools, is sufficiently robust to establish authentication and to verify gourmet cacao varieties. This method shows significant potential for practical application. PMID:24354624

  15. The effect of the molecular mass on the sputtering by electrosprayed nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrajo-Pelaez, Rafael; Gamero-Castaño, Manuel

    2015-07-01

    Energetic bombardment of covalently bonded materials by electrosprayed nanodroplets causes sputtering and topographic changes on the surface of the target. This work investigates the influence of the projectile's molecular mass on these phenomena by sputtering single-crystal silicon wafers with a variety of liquids (molecular masses between 45.0 and 773.3 amu), and acceleration voltages. The electrosprays are characterized via time of flight to determine the charge to mass ratio of the nanodroplets which, together with the acceleration voltage, yield the impact velocity, the stagnation pressure, and the molecular kinetic energy of the projectile. The estimated range of droplet diameters is 20-79 nm, while the impact velocity, the stagnation pressure and the molecular kinetic energy range between 2.9-10 km/s, 4.7-63 GPa, and 2.1-98 eV. We find that the damage on the surface of the targets strongly depends on the molecular mass of the projectile: liquids with low molecular mass sputter significantly less and produce nanometric indentations and low surface roughness, the latter increasing moderately with stagnation pressure; in contrast, the roughness and sputtering caused by the impacts of droplets with larger molecular mass reach significantly higher values, and exhibit non-monotonic behaviors. The maximum sputtering yields for formamide, EAN, EMI-BF4, EMI-Im, TES, and TPP are 0.20, 0.75, 1.20, 2.80, 4.00 and 2.90 silicon atoms per molecule in the projectile. These trends indicate that despite their rather large diameters, the sputtering by electrosprayed nanodroplets is intrinsically a molecular scale phenomenon.

  16. Mass Spectrometry-based Workflow for Accurate Quantification of Escherichia coli Enzymes: How Proteomics Can Play a Key Role in Metabolic Engineering*

    PubMed Central

    Trauchessec, Mathieu; Jaquinod, Michel; Bonvalot, Aline; Brun, Virginie; Bruley, Christophe; Ropers, Delphine; de Jong, Hidde; Garin, Jérôme; Bestel-Corre, Gwenaëlle; Ferro, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic engineering aims to design high performance microbial strains producing compounds of interest. This requires systems-level understanding; genome-scale models have therefore been developed to predict metabolic fluxes. However, multi-omics data including genomics, transcriptomics, fluxomics, and proteomics may be required to model the metabolism of potential cell factories. Recent technological advances to quantitative proteomics have made mass spectrometry-based quantitative assays an interesting alternative to more traditional immuno-affinity based approaches. This has improved specificity and multiplexing capabilities. In this study, we developed a quantification workflow to analyze enzymes involved in central metabolism in Escherichia coli (E. coli). This workflow combined full-length isotopically labeled standards with selected reaction monitoring analysis. First, full-length 15N labeled standards were produced and calibrated to ensure accurate measurements. Liquid chromatography conditions were then optimized for reproducibility and multiplexing capabilities over a single 30-min liquid chromatography-MS analysis. This workflow was used to accurately quantify 22 enzymes involved in E. coli central metabolism in a wild-type reference strain and two derived strains, optimized for higher NADPH production. In combination with measurements of metabolic fluxes, proteomics data can be used to assess different levels of regulation, in particular enzyme abundance and catalytic rate. This provides information that can be used to design specific strains used in biotechnology. In addition, accurate measurement of absolute enzyme concentrations is key to the development of predictive kinetic models in the context of metabolic engineering. PMID:24482123

  17. Incorporating Biological Mass Spectrometry into Undergraduate Teaching Labs, Part 2: Peptide Identification via Molecular Mass Determination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnquist, Isaac J.; Beussman, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become a routine analytical tool in the undergraduate curriculum in the form of GC-MS. While relatively few undergraduate programs have incorporated biological mass spectrometry into their programs, the importance of these techniques, as demonstrated by their recognition with the 2002 Nobel Prize, will hopefully lead to…

  18. The Impact of Molecular Gas on Mass Models of Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, B. S.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Walter, F.; Leroy, A.; Carignan, C.

    2016-04-01

    We present CO velocity fields and rotation curves for a sample of nearby galaxies, based on data from HERACLES. We combine our data with THINGS, SINGS, and KINGFISH results to provide a comprehensive sample of mass models of disk galaxies inclusive of molecular gas. We compare the kinematics of the molecular (CO from HERACLES) and atomic (H i from THINGS) gas distributions to determine the extent to which CO may be used to probe the dynamics in the inner part of galaxies. In general, we find good agreement between the CO and H i kinematics, with small differences in the inner part of some galaxies. We add the contribution of the molecular gas to the mass models in our galaxies by using two different conversion factors αCO to convert CO luminosity to molecular gas mass surface density—the constant Milky Way value and the radially varying profiles determined in recent work based on THINGS, HERACLES, and KINGFISH data. We study the relative effect that the addition of the molecular gas has on the halo rotation curves for Navarro-Frenk-White and the observationally motivated pseudo-isothermal halos. The contribution of the molecular gas varies for galaxies in our sample—for those galaxies where there is a substantial molecular gas content, using different values of αCO can result in significant differences to the relative contribution of the molecular gas and hence the shape of the dark matter halo rotation curves in the central regions of galaxies.

  19. Accurate Treatment of Electrostatics during Molecular Adsorption in Nanoporous Crystals without Assigning Point Charges to Framework Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, T; Manz, TA; Sholl, DS

    2011-03-24

    Molecular simulations have become an important complement to experiments for studying gas adsorption and separation in crystalline nanoporous materials. Conventionally, these simulations use force fields that model adsorbate-pore interactions by assigning point charges to the atoms of the adsorbent. The assignment of framework charges always introduces ambiguity because there are many different choices for defining point charges, even when the true electron density of a material is known. We show how to completely avoid such ambiguity by using the electrostatic potential energy surface (EPES) calculated from plane wave density functional theory (DFT). We illustrate this approach by simulating CO(2) adsorption in four metal-organic frameworks (MOFs): IRMOF-1, ZIE-8, ZIE-90, and Zn(nicotinate)(2). The resulting CO(2) adsorption isotherms are insensitive to the exchange-correlation functional used in the DFT calculation of the EPES but are sensitive to changes in the crystal structure and lattice parameters. Isotherms computed from the DFT EPES are compared to those computed from several point charge models. This comparison makes possible, for the first time, an unbiased assessment of the accuracy of these point charge models for describing adsorption in MOFs. We find an unusually high Henry's constant (109 mmol/g.bar) and intermediate isosteric heat of adsorption (34.9 kJ/mol) for Zn(nicotinate)(2), which makes it a potentially attractive mateiial for CO(2) adsorption applications.

  20. Efficient and accurate determination of lattice-vacancy diffusion coefficients via non equilibrium ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangiovanni, D. G.; Hellman, O.; Alling, B.; Abrikosov, I. A.

    2016-03-01

    We revisit the color-diffusion algorithm [Aeberhard et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 095901 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.095901] in non equilibrium ab initio molecular dynamics (NE-AIMD) and propose a simple efficient approach for the estimation of monovacancy jump rates in crystalline solids at temperatures well below melting. Color-diffusion applied to monovacancy migration entails that one lattice atom (colored atom) is accelerated toward the neighboring defect site by an external constant force F. Considering bcc molybdenum between 1000 and 2800 K as a model system, NE-AIMD results show that the colored-atom jump rate kNE increases exponentially with the force intensity F , up to F values far beyond the linear-fitting regime employed previously. Using a simple model, we derive an analytical expression which reproduces the observed kNE(F ) dependence on F . Equilibrium rates extrapolated by NE-AIMD results are in excellent agreement with those of unconstrained dynamics. The gain in computational efficiency achieved with our approach increases rapidly with decreasing temperatures and reaches a factor of 4 orders of magnitude at the lowest temperature considered in the present study.

  1. Avoiding fractional electrons in subsystem DFT based ab-initio molecular dynamics yields accurate models for liquid water and solvated OH radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, Alessandro; Ceresoli, Davide; Pavanello, Michele

    2016-06-01

    In this work we achieve three milestones: (1) we present a subsystem DFT method capable of running ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations accurately and efficiently. (2) In order to rid the simulations of inter-molecular self-interaction error, we exploit the ability of semilocal frozen density embedding formulation of subsystem DFT to represent the total electron density as a sum of localized subsystem electron densities that are constrained to integrate to a preset, constant number of electrons; the success of the method relies on the fact that employed semilocal nonadditive kinetic energy functionals effectively cancel out errors in semilocal exchange-correlation potentials that are linked to static correlation effects and self-interaction. (3) We demonstrate this concept by simulating liquid water and solvated OH• radical. While the bulk of our simulations have been performed on a periodic box containing 64 independent water molecules for 52 ps, we also simulated a box containing 256 water molecules for 22 ps. The results show that, provided one employs an accurate nonadditive kinetic energy functional, the dynamics of liquid water and OH• radical are in semiquantitative agreement with experimental results or higher-level electronic structure calculations. Our assessments are based upon comparisons of radial and angular distribution functions as well as the diffusion coefficient of the liquid.

  2. Very accurate variational non-relativistic non-Born-Oppenheimer atomic & molecular spectra predictions employing explicitly correlated Gaussian basis functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkey, Keeper

    2015-03-01

    Due to the fast increasing capabilities of modern computers it now becomes feasible to calculate spectra of small atom and molecules with accuracy which matches the accuracy of high-resolution measurements. The algorithms for the calculations are directly derived from the first principles of quantum mechanics. The Hamiltonian operator used in the approach is called the internal Hamiltonian and is obtained by rigorously separating out the center-of-mass motion from the laboratory-frame Hamiltonian. Algorithms for determining the isotopic energy shifts of L=0 and M=0 states of atoms were implemented and tested in the calculations of the ground 4S state of the nitrogen atom. Bound states of diatomic molecules corresponding to the total angular momentum quantum number equal to one (N=1) was derived and implemented and was tested in the calculations of the N=1, v=0, . . . , 22 states of the HD+ ion and in the calculations of the ortho-para spin isomerization of the hydrogen molecule in its all bound vibrational states. This has lead to the development of a new studying of muonic molecules (dp μ, tp μ and td μ). The algorithms for calculating rovibrational states of small molecules is currently being extended to H3+using sin and cos ECGs. National Science Foundation.

  3. Molecular resolution and fragmentation of fulvic acid by electrospray ionization/multistage tandem mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Rostad, C.E.; Gates, Paul M.; Furlong, E.T.; Ferrer, I.

    2001-01-01

    Molecular weight distributions of fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia, were investigated by electrospray ionization/quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI/QMS), and fragmentation pathways of specific fulvic acid masses were investigated by electrospray ionization/ion trap multistage tandem mass spectrometry (ESI/MST/MS). ESI/QMS studies of the free acid form of low molecular weight poly(carboxylic acid) standards in 75% methanol/25% water mobile phase found that negative ion detection gave the optimum generation of parent ions that can be used for molecular weight determinations. However, experiments with poly(acrylic acid) mixtures and specific high molecular weight standards found multiply charged negative ions that gave a low bias to molecular mass distributions. The number of negative charges on a molecule is dependent on the distance between charges. ESI/MST/MS of model compounds found characteristic water loss from alcohol dehydration and anhydride formation, as well as CO2 loss from decarboxylation, and CO loss from ester structures. Application of these fragmentation pathways to specific masses of fulvic acid isolated and fragmented by ESI/MST/MS is indicative of specific structures that can serve as a basis for future structural confirmation after these hypothesized structures are synthesized.

  4. Histologic subtypes, immunohistochemistry, FISH or molecular screening for the accurate diagnosis of ALK-rearrangement in lung cancer: a comprehensive study of Caucasian non-smokers.

    PubMed

    Just, Pierre-Alexandre; Cazes, Aurélie; Audebourg, Anne; Cessot, Anatole; Pallier, Karine; Danel, Claire; Vacher-Lavenu, Marie-Cécile; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Terris, Benoît; Blons, Hélène

    2012-06-01

    EML4-ALK adenocarcinomas constitute a new molecular subgroup of lung tumours that respond very well to crizotinib, an ALK inhibitor. However, the diagnosis of ALK rearrangement in lung cancer is challenging. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of five different methods in a series of 20 EGFR(wt/wt) lung adenocarcinomas from non- or light- smokers. Multiplex RT-PCR was considered as gold standard and identified four ALK-rearranged tumours among the 20 tested tumours. qRT-PCR got an interpretability rate of 100% and accurately typed all 20 tumours. qRT-PCR from corresponding formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens got an interpretability rate of 65%. Out of the four previously identified ALK-rearranged cases, three were interpretable and two were retrieved using FFPE qRT-PCR. ALK break-apart FISH got an interpretability rate of 60% and accurately typed all of the twelve remaining cases. Anti-ALK immunohistochemistry (IHC) accurately typed all twenty tumours using a cut-off value of strong staining of 100% tumour cells. The 16 non ALK-rearranged tumours got no/light staining in 13 cases, and a moderate staining of 80-100% tumour cells in 3 cases. We then analysed four solid signet-ring lung adenocarcinomas. FFPE qRT-PCR, FISH and immunohistochemistry were concordant in three cases, with positive and negative results in respectively one and two cases. The fourth case, which was positive by FISH and immunohistochemistry but negative by RT-PCR, was shown to have a non-EML4-ALK ALK-rearrangement. As various factors such as RNA quality, fixation quality and type of ALK rearrangement may impede ALK screening, we propose a combined FISH/molecular biology diagnostic algorithm in which anti-ALK immunohistochemistry is used as a pre-screening step. PMID:22153831

  5. Direct molecular mass determination of trehalose monomycolate from 11 species of mycobacteria by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yukiko; Naka, Takashi; Doi, Takeshi; Yano, Ikuya

    2005-05-01

    Direct estimation of the molecular mass of single molecular species of trehalose 6-monomycolate (TMM), a ubiquitous cell-wall component of mycobacteria, was performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. When less than 1 microg TMM was analysed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, quasimolecular ions [M+Na]+ of each molecular species were demonstrated and the numbers of carbons and double bonds (or cyclopropane rings) were determined. Since the introduction of oxygen atoms such as carbonyl, methoxy and ester groups yielded the appropriate shift of mass ions, the major subclasses of mycolic acid (alpha, methoxy, keto and wax ester) were identified without resorting to hydrolytic procedures. The results showed a marked difference in the molecular species composition of TMM among mycobacterial species. Unexpectedly, differing from other mycoloyl glycolipids, TMM from Mycobacterium tuberculosis showed a distinctive mass pattern, with abundant odd-carbon-numbered monocyclopropanoic (or monoenoic) alpha-mycolates besides dicyclopropanoic mycolate, ranging from C75 to C85, odd- and even-carbon-numbered methoxymycolates ranging from C83 to C94 and even- and odd-carbon-numbered ketomycolates ranging from C83 to C90. In contrast, TMM from Mycobacterium bovis (wild strain and BCG substrains) possessed even-carbon-numbered dicyclopropanoic alpha-mycolates. BCG Connaught strain lacked methoxymycolates almost completely. These results were confirmed by MALDI-TOF mass analysis of mycolic acid methyl esters liberated by alkaline hydrolysis and methylation of the original TMM. Wax ester-mycoloyl TMM molecular species were demonstrated for the first time as an intact form in the Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare group, M. phlei and M. flavescens. The M. avium-intracellulare group possessed predominantly C85 and C87 wax ester-mycoloyl TMM, while M. phlei and the rapid growers tested contained C80, C81, C82 and C83 wax ester

  6. Synchrotron based mass spectrometry to investigate the molecular properties of mineral-organic associations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Suet Yi; Kleber, Markus; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Nico, Peter; Keiluweit, Marco; Ahmed, Musahid

    2013-04-01

    Soil organic matter (OM) is important because its decay drives life processes in the biosphere. Analysis of organic compounds in geological systems is difficult because of their intimate association with mineral surfaces. To date there is no procedure capable of quantitatively separating organic from mineral phases without creating artifacts or mass loss. Therefore, analytical techniques that can (a) generate information about both organic and mineral phases simultaneously and (b) allow the examination of predetermined high-interest regions of the sample as opposed to conventional bulk analytical techniques are valuable. Laser Desorption Synchrotron Postionization (synchrotron-LDPI) mass spectrometry is introduced as a novel analytical tool to characterize the molecular properties of organic compounds in mineral-organic samples from terrestrial systems, and it is demonstrated that when combined with Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), can provide complementary information on mineral composition. Mass spectrometry along a decomposition gradient in density fractions, verifies the consistency of our results with bulk analytical techniques. We further demonstrate that by changing laser and photoionization energies, variations in molecular stability of organic compounds associated with mineral surfaces can be determined. The combination of synchrotron-LDPI and SIMS shows that the energetic conditions involved in desorption and ionization of organic matter may be a greater determinant of mass spectral signatures than the inherent molecular structure of the organic compounds investigated. The latter has implications for molecular models of natural organic matter that are based on mass spectrometric information.

  7. Non-targeted screening for contaminants in paper and board food-contact materials using effect-directed analysis and accurate mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bengtström, Linda; Rosenmai, Anna Kjerstine; Trier, Xenia; Jensen, Lisbeth Krüger; Granby, Kit; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Driffield, Malcolm; Højslev Petersen, Jens

    2016-06-01

    Due to large knowledge gaps in chemical composition and toxicological data for substances involved, paper and board food-contact materials (P&B FCM) have been emerging as a FCM type of particular concern for consumer safety. This study describes the development of a step-by-step strategy, including extraction, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fractionation, tentative identification of relevant substances and in vitro testing of selected tentatively identified substances. As a case study, we used two fractions from a recycled pizza box sample which exhibited aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activity. These fractions were analysed by gas chromatography (GC) and ultra-HPLC (UHPLC) coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometers (QTOF MS) in order tentatively to identify substances. The elemental composition was determined for peaks above a threshold, and compared with entries in a commercial mass spectral library for GC-MS (GC-EI-QTOF MS) analysis and an in-house built library of accurate masses for substances known to be used in P&B packaging for UHPLC-QTOF analysis. Of 75 tentatively identified substances, 15 were initially selected for further testing in vitro; however, only seven were commercially available and subsequently tested in vitro and quantified. Of these seven, the identities of three pigments found in printing inks were confirmed by UHPLC tandem mass spectrometry (QqQ MS/MS). Two pigments had entries in the database, meaning that a material relevant accurate mass database can provide a fast tentative identification. Pure standards of the seven tentatively identified substances were tested in vitro but could not explain a significant proportion of the AhR-response in the extract. Targeted analyses of dioxins and PCBs, both well-known AhR agonists, was performed. However, the dioxins could explain approximately 3% of the activity observed in the pizza box extract indicating that some very AhR active substance(s) still remain to be

  8. Molecular and mass spectroscopic analysis of isotopically labeled organic residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendoza-Gomez, Celia X.; Greenberg, J. Mayo; Mccain, P.; Ferris, J. P.; Briggs, R.; Degroot, M. S.; Schutte, Willem A.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental studies aimed at understanding the evolution of complex organic molecules on interstellar grains were performed. The photolysis of frozen gas mixtures of various compositions containing H2O, CO, NH3, and CH4 was studied. These species were chosen because of their astrophysical importance as deducted from observational as well as theoretical studies of ice mantles on interstellar grains. These ultraviolet photolyzed ices were warmed up in order to produce refractory organic molecules like the ones formed in molecular clouds when the icy mantles are being irradiated and warmed up either by a nearby stellar source or impulsive heating. The laboratory studies give estimates of the efficiency of production of such organic material under interstellar conditions. It is shown that the gradual carbonization of organic mantles in the diffuse cloud phase leads to higher and higher visual absorptivity - yellow residues become brown in the laboratory. The obtained results can be applied to explaining the organic components of comets and their relevance to the origin of life.

  9. Effect of protein molecular weight on the mass transfer in protein mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asad, Ahmed; Chai, Chuan; Wu, JiangTao

    2012-03-01

    The mixing of protein solutions with that of precipitating agents is very important in protein crystallization experiments. In this work, the interferometry images were recorded during the mixing of two proteins with different molecular weights: lysozyme of ˜14.6 kDa, trypsin of ˜23.3 kDa and pepsin of ˜34.8 kDa were placed in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The protein molecular weight dependence on the competition of the transport process and kinetics at the interface was studied. The concentration profiles of protein solutions were calculated to analyze the mass transfer during the mixing process. It was observed that the mass transfer process is more efficient during the mixing of proteins with higher molecular weights. In addition, the more rapid concentration changes above the interface suggest that convection may dominate the diffusion. The phenomenon of convection is higher in the protein solutions with higher molecular weight.

  10. MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry: Spatial Molecular Analysis to Enable a New Age of Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Gessel, Megan M.; Norris, Jeremy L.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) combines the sensitivity and selectivity of mass spectrometry with spatial analysis to provide a new dimension for histological analyses to provide unbiased visualization of the arrangement of biomolecules in tissue. As such, MALDI IMS has the capability to become a powerful new molecular technology for the biological and clinical sciences. In this review, we briefly describe several applications of MALDI IMS covering a range of molecular weights, from drugs to proteins. Current limitations and challenges are discussed along with recent developments to address these issues. PMID:24686089

  11. A Molecular Disk Survey of Low-Mass Stars in the TW Hya Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, David R.; van der Plas, Gerrit; Kastner, Joel H.; Schneider, Adam C.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Mardones, Diego; Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Principe, David

    2016-01-01

    We have carried out an ALMA Cycle 2 survey of 15 confirmed or candidate low-mass (<0.2M ⊙) members of the TW Hya Association (TWA) with the goal of detecting line emission from CO molecular gas and continuum emission from cold dust. Our targets have spectral types of M4-L0 and hence represent the extreme low end of the TWA's mass function. The survey has yielded a detection of 12CO(2-1) emission around TWA 34. This newly discovered ~10 Myr-old molecular gas disk lies just ~50pc from Earth.

  12. Low-mass spiral galaxies with little molecular gas and prodigious star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenney, Jeffrey D.; Young, Judith S.

    1988-01-01

    A comparison of CO and H I properties is used here to demonstrate that many CO-poor low-mass Virgo spiral galaxies are rich in atomic gas, which implies that the lack of CO emission from them is due, at least partly, to a lack of molecular gas. Despite the paucity of molecular gas, these H I-rich, CO-poor, low-mass spiral galaxies are undergoing extensive massive star formation. A column density of 10 to the 21st nuclei/sq cm is a necessary but insufficient condition for the creation of an H2-dominated interstellar medium.

  13. Incorporating Biological Mass Spectrometry into Undergraduate Teaching Labs, Part 1: Identifying Proteins Based on Molecular Mass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnquist, Isaac J.; Beussman, Douglas J.

    2007-01-01

    Biological mass spectrometry is an important analytical technique in drug discovery, proteomics, and research at the biology-chemistry interface. Currently, few hands-on opportunities exist for undergraduate students to learn about this technique. With the 2002 Nobel Prize being awarded, in part, for the development of biological mass…

  14. An ion mobility mass spectrometer for investigating photoisomerization and photodissociation of molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, B. D.; Coughlan, N. J. A.; Markworth, P. B.; Bieske, E. J.; Continetti, R. E.

    2014-12-15

    An ion mobility mass spectrometry apparatus for investigating the photoisomerization and photodissociation of electrosprayed molecular ions in the gas phase is described. The device consists of a drift tube mobility spectrometer, with access for a laser beam that intercepts the drifting ion packet either coaxially or transversely, followed by a quadrupole mass filter. An ion gate halfway along the drift region allows the instrument to be used as a tandem ion mobility spectrometer, enabling mobility selection of ions prior to irradiation, with the photoisomer ions being separated over the second half of the drift tube. The utility of the device is illustrated with photoisomerization and photodissociation action spectra of carbocyanine molecular cations. The mobility resolution of the device for singly charged ions is typically 80 and it has a mass range of 100-440 Da, with the lower limit determined by the drive frequency for the ion funnels, and the upper limit by the quadrupole mass filter.

  15. Fast graphically inspired algorithm for assignment of molecular formulae in ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Green, Nelson W; Perdue, E Michael

    2015-05-19

    This study focuses on the deterministic task of assigning molecular formulae to exact masses that are generated by ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry. A new algorithm based on low-mass moieties (LMMs) such as CH4O(-1) and C4O(-3) completely replaces conventional computational loops that explore a user-defined range of C, H, and O when searching for molecular formulae that have a given exact mass. The LMM-based algorithm has been coupled with a combinatorial algorithm that uses nested loops for N, P, S, and (13)C to assign molecular formulae. The resulting program is more than 1700 times faster than its brute-force counterpart that uses nested loops for all elements, and both programs yield identical output files. The new LMM-based program is 1050 times faster than the open-source program HR2, 60 times faster than Molecular Formula Calculator, and 3.6 times faster than MassCalc/FormCalc. PMID:25857207

  16. Assessment of molecular effects on neutrino mass measurements from tritium β decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodine, L. I.; Parno, D. Â. S.; Robertson, R. Â. G. Â. H.

    2015-03-01

    The β decay of molecular tritium currently provides the highest sensitivity in laboratory-based neutrino mass measurements. The upcoming Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment will improve the sensitivity to 0.2 eV, making a percent-level quantitative understanding of molecular effects essential. The modern theoretical calculations available for neutrino mass experiments agree with spectroscopic data. Moreover, when neutrino mass experiments performed in the 1980s with gaseous tritium are reevaluated using these modern calculations, the extracted neutrino mass squared values are consistent with zero instead of being significantly negative. However, the calculated molecular final-state branching ratios are in conflict with dissociation experiments performed in the 1950s. We reexamine the theory of the final-state spectrum of molecular-tritium decay and its effect on the determination of the neutrino mass, with an emphasis on the role of the vibrational- and rotational-state distribution in the ground electronic state. General features can be reproduced quantitatively from considerations of kinematics and zero-point motion. We summarize the status of validation efforts and suggest means for resolving the apparent discrepancy in dissociation rates.

  17. Mass transport properties of Pu/DT mixtures from orbital free molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, Joel David; Ticknor, Christopher; Collins, Lee A.

    2015-09-16

    Mass transport properties (shear viscosity and diffusion coefficients) for Pu/DT mixtures were calculated with Orbital Free Molecular Dynamics (OFMD). The results were fitted to simple functions of mass density (for ρ=10.4 to 62.4 g/cm3) and temperature (for T=100 up to 3,000 eV) for Pu/DT mixtures consisting of 100/0, 25/75, 50/50, and 75/25 by number.

  18. Atmospheric organic matter in clouds: exact masses and molecular formula identification using ultrahigh resolution FT-ICR mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Hallar, A. G.; Mazzoleni, L. R.

    2013-08-01

    Clouds alter the composition of atmospheric aerosol by acting as a medium for interactions between gaseous and particulate phase substances. To determine the cloud water atmospheric organic matter (AOM) composition and study the cloud processing of aerosols, two samples of supercooled clouds were collected at Storm Peak Laboratory near Steamboat Spring, Colorado (3220 m a.s.l.). Approximately 3000 molecular formulas were assigned to ultrahigh resolution mass spectra of the samples after using a reverse phase extraction procedure to isolate the AOM components from the cloud water. Nitrogen containing compounds (CHNO compounds), sulfur containing compounds (CHOS and CHNOS compounds) and other oxygen containing compounds (CHO compounds) with molecular weights up to 700 Da were observed. Average oxygen-to-carbon ratios of ~0.6 indicate a slightly more oxidized composition than most water-soluble organic carbon identified in aerosol studies, which may result from aqueous oxidation in the clouds. The AOM composition indicates significant influences from biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and residential wood combustion. We observed 60% of the cloud water CHO molecular formulas to be identical to SOA samples of α-pinene, β-pinene, d-limonene, and β-caryophyllene ozonolysis. CHNO compounds had the highest number frequency and relative abundances and are associated with residential wood combustion and NOx oxidation. We observed multiple nitrogen atoms in the assigned molecular formulas for the nighttime cloud sample composite indicating the significance of nighttime emissions or NOx oxidation on the AOM composition. Several CHOS and CHNOS compounds with reduced sulfur (in addition to the commonly observed oxidized sulfur containing compounds) were also observed, however further investigation is needed to determine the origin of the reduced sulfur containing compounds. Overall, the molecular composition determined using ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion

  19. Communication: Rate coefficients of the H + CH4 → H2 + CH3 reaction from ring polymer molecular dynamics on a highly accurate potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingyong; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Dong H.

    2015-09-01

    The ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) calculations are performed to calculate rate constants for the title reaction on the recently constructed potential energy surface based on permutation invariant polynomial (PIP) neural-network (NN) fitting [J. Li et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 204302 (2015)]. By inspecting convergence, 16 beads are used in computing free-energy barriers at 300 K ≤ T ≤ 1000 K, while different numbers of beads are used for transmission coefficients. The present RPMD rates are in excellent agreement with quantum rates computed on the same potential energy surface, as well as with the experimental measurements, demonstrating further that the RPMD is capable of producing accurate rates for polyatomic chemical reactions even at rather low temperatures.

  20. Hybrid quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometry analysis with accurate-mass database and parallel reaction monitoring for high-throughput screening and quantification of multi-xenobiotics in honey.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhang, Jinzhen; Jin, Yue; Wang, Lin; Zhao, Wen; Zhang, Wenwen; Zhai, Lifei; Zhang, Yaping; Zhang, Yongxin; Zhou, Jinhui

    2016-01-15

    This study reports a rapid, automated screening and quantification method for the determination of multi-xenobiotic residues in honey using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-Orbitrap) with a user-built accurate-mass database plus parallel reaction monitoring (PRM). The database contains multi-xenobiotic information including formulas, adduct types, theoretical exact mass and retention time, characteristic fragment ions, ion ratios, and mass accuracies. A simple sample preparation method was developed to reduce xenobiotic loss in the honey samples. The screening method was validated based on retention time deviation, mass accuracy via full scan-data-dependent MS/MS (full scan-ddMS2), multi-isotope ratio, characteristic ion ratio, sensitivity, and positive/negative switching performance between the spiked sample and corresponding standard solution. The quantification method based on the PRM mode is a promising new quantitative tool which we validated in terms of selectivity, linearity, recovery (accuracy), repeatability (precision), decision limit (CCα), detection capability (CCβ), matrix effects, and carry-over. The optimized methods proposed in this study enable the automated screening and quantification of 157 compounds in less than 15 min in honey. The results of this study, as they represent a convenient protocol for large-scale screening and quantification, also provide a research approach for analysis of various contaminants in other matrices. PMID:26724099

  1. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonks, James P.; Galloway, Ewan C.; King, Martin O.; Kerherve, Gwilherm; Watts, John F.

    2016-08-01

    A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques.

  2. A High-Mass Cold Core in the Auriga-California Giant Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnus McGehee, Peregrine; Paladini, Roberta; Pelkonen, Veli-Matti; Toth, Viktor; Sayers, Jack

    2015-08-01

    The Auriga-California Giant Molecular Cloud is noted for its relatively low star formation rate, especially at the high-mass end of the Initial Mass Function. We combine maps acquired by the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory's Multiwavelength Submillimeter Inductance Camera [MUSIC] in the wavelength range 0.86 to 2.00 millimeters with Planck and publicly-available Herschel PACS and SPIRE data in order to characterize the mass, dust properties, and environment of the bright core PGCC G163.32-8.41.

  3. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments.

    PubMed

    Tonks, James P; Galloway, Ewan C; King, Martin O; Kerherve, Gwilherm; Watts, John F

    2016-08-01

    A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques. PMID:27587173

  4. Mass estimates for very cold (<8 K) gas in molecular cloud cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinacker, J.; Linz, H.; Beuther, H.; Henning, Th.; Bacmann, A.

    2016-09-01

    Context. The mass of prestellar cores is an essential ingredient to understand the onset of star formation in the core. The low level of emission from cold dust may keep parts of this dust hidden from observation. Aims: We aim to determine the fraction of core mass in the temperature range <8 K that can be expected for typical low- and high-mass star formation regions. Methods: We calculated the dust temperature within standard spherically symmetric prestellar cores for a grid of density power laws in the outer core regions, core masses, and variations in the external multicomponent radiation field. We assume the dust is composed of amorphous silicate and carbon and we discuss variations of its optical properties. As a measure for the distribution of cores and clumps, we used core mass functions derived for various environments. In view of the high densities in very cold central regions, dust and gas temperatures are assumed to be equal. Results: We find that the fraction of mass with temperatures <8 K in typical low- and high-mass cores is <20%. It is possible to obtain higher fractions of very cold gas by placing intermediate- or high-mass cores in a typical low-mass star formation environment. We show that the mass uncertainty arising from far-infrared to mm modeling of very cold dust emission is smaller than the mass uncertainty owing to the unknown dust opacities. Conclusions: Under typical star formation conditions, dust with temperatures <8 K covers a small mass fraction in molecular cloud cores, but may play a more important role for special cases. The major unknown in determining the total core mass from thermal dust emission is the uncertainty in the dust opacity, not in the underestimated very cold dust mass.

  5. LARGE SCALE EVALUATION OF A PATTERN RECOGNITION/EXPERT SYSTEM FOR MASS SPECTRAL MOLECULAR WEIGHT ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fast, personal-computer based method of estimating molecular weights of organic compounds from low resolution mass I spectra has been thoroughly evaluated. he method is based on a rule-based pattern,recognition/expert system approach which uses empirical linear corrections whic...

  6. Laser mass spectrometry of biological molecular ions produced by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, W. J.; Kosmidis, C.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; Scott, C. T. J.; Singhal, R. P.

    1996-10-01

    A tandem reflectron laser mass spectrometer is used for investigations of the photo fragmentation of molecular ions. The observed fragmentation patterns for 2,5-dihydrobenzoic acid and its fragments ions are analysed. PTH-trytophan and PTH-valine ions, generated by MALDI, are photodissociated and their fragmentation pattern is discussed.

  7. Determination of the Subunit Molecular Mass and Composition of Alcohol Dehydrogenase by SDS-PAGE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Barbara T.

    2007-01-01

    SDS-PAGE is a simple, rapid technique that has many uses in biochemistry and is readily adaptable to the undergraduate laboratory. It is, however, a technique prone to several types of procedural pitfalls. This article describes the use of SDS-PAGE to determine the subunit molecular mass and composition of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase employing…

  8. Ratios of the molecular species of triacylglycerols in lesquerella (Physaria fendleri) oil estimated by mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ratios of regioisomers of 72 molecular species of triacylglycerols (TAG) in lesquerella oil were estimated using the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the lithium adducts of TAG in the HPLC fractions of lesquerella oil. The ratios of ion signal intensities (or relative abundances) of ...

  9. Ratios of the molecular species of triacylglycerols in lesquerella (Physaria fendleri) oil estimated by mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ratios of regioisomers of 74 molecular species of triacylglycerols (TAG) in lesquerella oil were estimated using HPLC and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the lithium adducts of TAG in the HPLC fractions of lequerella oil. The ratios of relative abundances of the fragment ions fr...

  10. Characterization of the low-molecular-mass proteins of virulent Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed Central

    Stamm, L V; Parrish, E A

    1994-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that Treponema pallidum cells incubated in vitro in the presence of heat-inactivated normal rabbit serum (HINRS) synthesize, in very small quantities, several pathogen-specific, low-molecular-mass proteins that appear to be localized extracellularly. In this study, we have taken advantage of our ability to metabolically radiolabel T. pallidum cells to high specific activity to further characterize these antigens. We found that the low-molecular-mass proteins are not related to the 15- and 17-kDa detergent-phase proteins (J. D. Radolf, N. R. Chamberlain, A. Clausell, and M. V. Norgard, Infect. Immun. 56:490-498, 1988). The low-molecular-mass proteins did not incorporate 3H-labeled fatty acids and were not precipitated by rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies directed against glutathione S-transferase fusions to the nonlipidated 15- and 17-kDa proteins. We prepared polyclonal antisera to the low-molecular-mass proteins by immunizing two rabbits with the concentrated supernatant of T. pallidum cells. IgG antibodies present in the sera of both rabbits precipitated a 21.5-kDa protein from solubilized extracts of T. pallidum supernatant and cells. IgG antibodies in the serum of the second rabbit precipitated an additional 15.5-kDa low-molecular-mass protein only from solubilized extracts of supernatant. While investigating the effect of eliminating HINRS from the extraction medium, we observed that the low-molecular-mass proteins remained associated with treponemal cells that were incubated in the absence of HINRS. These proteins could be eluted from the cells by the addition of HINRS or rabbit serum albumin, suggesting that they are located on or near the treponemal cell surface. The 15.5- and 21.5-kDa low-molecular-mass proteins were not washed off treponemal cells with buffer containing 1 M KCl. Experiments employing selective solubilization of the T. pallidum outer membrane with 0.1% Triton X-114 and proteinase K accessibility indicated

  11. Thermally modulated nano-trampoline material as smart skin for gas molecular mass detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Hua

    2012-06-01

    Conventional multi-component gas analysis is based either on laser spectroscopy, laser and photoacoustic absorption at specific wavelengths, or on gas chromatography by separating the components of a gas mixture primarily due to boiling point (or vapor pressure) differences. This paper will present a new gas molecular mass detection method based on thermally modulated nano-trampoline material as smart skin for gas molecular mass detection by fiber Bragg grating-based gas sensors. Such a nanomaterial and fiber Bragg grating integrated sensing device has been designed to be operated either at high-energy level (highly thermal strained status) or at low-energy level (low thermal strained status). Thermal energy absorption of gas molecular trigs the sensing device transition from high-thermal-energy status to low-thermal- energy status. Experiment has shown that thermal energy variation due to gas molecular thermal energy absorption is dependent upon the gas molecular mass, and can be detected by fiber Bragg resonant wavelength shift with a linear function from 17 kg/kmol to 32 kg/kmol and a sensitivity of 0.025 kg/kmol for a 5 micron-thick nano-trampoline structure and fiber Bragg grating integrated gas sensing device. The laboratory and field validation data have further demonstrated its fast response characteristics and reliability to be online gas analysis instrument for measuring effective gas molecular mass from single-component gas, binary-component gas mixture, and multi-gas mixture. The potential industrial applications include fouling and surge control for gas charge centrifugal compressor ethylene production, gas purity for hydrogen-cooled generator, gasification for syngas production, gasoline/diesel and natural gas fuel quality monitoring for consumer market.

  12. High-molecular-mass multi-c-heme cytochromes from Methylococcus capsulatus bath.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, D J; Zahn, J A; DiSpirito, A A

    1999-02-01

    The polypeptide and structural gene for a high-molecular-mass c-type cytochrome, cytochrome c553O, was isolated from the methanotroph Methylococcus capsulatus Bath. Cytochrome c553O is a homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of 124,350 Da and an isoelectric point of 6. 0. The heme c concentration was estimated to be 8.2 +/- 0.4 mol of heme c per subunit. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum showed the presence of multiple low spin, S = 1/2, hemes. A degenerate oligonucleotide probe synthesized based on the N-terminal amino acid sequence of cytochrome c553O was used to identify a DNA fragment from M. capsulatus Bath that contains occ, the gene encoding cytochrome c553O. occ is part of a gene cluster which contains three other open reading frames (ORFs). ORF1 encodes a putative periplasmic c-type cytochrome with a molecular mass of 118, 620 Da that shows approximately 40% amino acid sequence identity with occ and contains nine c-heme-binding motifs. ORF3 encodes a putative periplasmic c-type cytochrome with a molecular mass of 94, 000 Da and contains seven c-heme-binding motifs but shows no sequence homology to occ or ORF1. ORF4 encodes a putative 11,100-Da protein. The four ORFs have no apparent similarity to any proteins in the GenBank database. The subunit molecular masses, arrangement and number of hemes, and amino acid sequences demonstrate that cytochrome c553O and the gene products of ORF1 and ORF3 constitute a new class of c-type cytochrome. PMID:9922265

  13. High-Molecular-Mass Multi-c-Heme Cytochromes from Methylococcus capsulatus Bath†

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, David J.; Zahn, James A.; DiSpirito, Alan A.

    1999-01-01

    The polypeptide and structural gene for a high-molecular-mass c-type cytochrome, cytochrome c553O, was isolated from the methanotroph Methylococcus capsulatus Bath. Cytochrome c553O is a homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of 124,350 Da and an isoelectric point of 6.0. The heme c concentration was estimated to be 8.2 ± 0.4 mol of heme c per subunit. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum showed the presence of multiple low spin, S = 1/2, hemes. A degenerate oligonucleotide probe synthesized based on the N-terminal amino acid sequence of cytochrome c553O was used to identify a DNA fragment from M. capsulatus Bath that contains occ, the gene encoding cytochrome c553O. occ is part of a gene cluster which contains three other open reading frames (ORFs). ORF1 encodes a putative periplasmic c-type cytochrome with a molecular mass of 118,620 Da that shows approximately 40% amino acid sequence identity with occ and contains nine c-heme-binding motifs. ORF3 encodes a putative periplasmic c-type cytochrome with a molecular mass of 94,000 Da and contains seven c-heme-binding motifs but shows no sequence homology to occ or ORF1. ORF4 encodes a putative 11,100-Da protein. The four ORFs have no apparent similarity to any proteins in the GenBank database. The subunit molecular masses, arrangement and number of hemes, and amino acid sequences demonstrate that cytochrome c553O and the gene products of ORF1 and ORF3 constitute a new class of c-type cytochrome. PMID:9922265

  14. High molecular mass proteomics analyses of left ventricle from rats subjected to differential swimming training

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Regular exercises are commonly described as an important factor in health improvement, being directly related to contractile force development in cardiac cells. In order to evaluate the links between swimming exercise intensity and cardiac adaptation by using high molecular mass proteomics, isogenic Wistar rats were divided into four groups: one control (CG) and three training groups (TG’s), with low, moderate and high intensity of exercises. In order to evaluate the links between swimming exercise intensity and cardiac adaptation by using high molecular mass proteomics, isogenic Wistar rats were divided into four groups: one control (CG) and three training groups (TG’s), with low, moderate and high intensity of exercises. Results Findings here reported demonstrated clear morphologic alterations, significant cellular injury and increased energy supplies at high exercise intensities. α-MyHC, as well proteins associated with mitochondrial oxidative metabolism were shown to be improved. α-MyHC expression increase 1.2 fold in high intensity training group when compared with control group. α-MyHC was also evaluated by real-time PCR showing a clear expression correlation with protein synthesis data increase in 8.48 fold in high intensity training group. Other myofibrillar protein, troponin , appear only in high intensity group, corroborating the cellular injury data. High molecular masses proteins such as MRS2 and NADH dehydrogenase, involved in metabolic pathways also demonstrate increase expression, respectily 1.5 and 1.3 fold, in response to high intensity exercise. Conclusions High intensity exercise demonstrated an increase expression in some high molecular masses myofibrilar proteins, α-MyHC and troponin. Furthermore this intensity also lead a significant increase of other high molecular masses proteins such as MRS2 and NADH dehydrogenase in comparison to low and moderate intensities. However, high intensity exercise also represented a

  15. An optimized method for the accurate determination of patulin in apple products by isotope dilution-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Seo, Miyeong; Kim, Byungjoo; Baek, Song-Yee

    2015-07-01

    Patulin, a mycotoxin produced by several molds in fruits, has been frequently detected in apple products. Therefore, regulatory bodies have established recommended maximum permitted patulin concentrations for each type of apple product. Although several analytical methods have been adopted to determine patulin in food, quality control of patulin analysis is not easy, as reliable certified reference materials (CRMs) are not available. In this study, as a part of a project for developing CRMs for patulin analysis, we developed isotope dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (ID-LC/MS/MS) as a higher-order reference method for the accurate value-assignment of CRMs. (13)C7-patulin was used as internal standard. Samples were extracted with ethyl acetate to improve recovery. For further sample cleanup with solid-phase extraction (SPE), the HLB SPE cartridge was chosen after comparing with several other types of SPE cartridges. High-performance liquid chromatography was performed on a multimode column for proper retention and separation of highly polar and water-soluble patulin from sample interferences. Sample extracts were analyzed by LC/MS/MS with electrospray ionization in negative ion mode with selected reaction monitoring of patulin and (13)C7-patulin at m/z 153→m/z 109 and m/z 160→m/z 115, respectively. The validity of the method was tested by measuring gravimetrically fortified samples of various apple products. In addition, the repeatability and the reproducibility of the method were tested to evaluate the performance of the method. The method was shown to provide accurate measurements in the 3-40 μg/kg range with a relative expanded uncertainty of around 1%. PMID:25925860

  16. Evaluation of the Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer for the Molecular Fingerprinting Analysis of Natural Dissolved Organic Matter.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Jeffrey A; Dittmar, Thorsten; Patriarca, Claudia; Tranvik, Lars; Bergquist, Jonas

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the application of the LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer (LTQ-Velos Pro, Thermo Fisher) for resolving complex mixtures of natural aquatic dissolved organic matter (DOM) and compared this technique to the more established state-of-the-art technique, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS, Bruker Daltonics), in terms of the distribution of molecular masses detected and the reproducibility of the results collected. The Orbitrap was capable of excellent reproducibility: Bray-Curtis dissimilarity between duplicate measurements was 2.85 ± 0.42% (mean ± standard deviation). The Orbitrap was also capable of the detection of most major ionizable organic molecules in typical aquatic mixtures, with the exception of most sulfur and phosphorus containing masses. This result signifies that the Orbitrap is an appropriate technique for the investigation of very subtle biogeochemical processing of bulk DOM. The lower costs (purchase and maintenance) and wider availability of Orbitrap mass spectrometers in university departments means that the tools necessary for research into DOM processing at the molecular level should be accessible to a much wider group of scientists than before. The main disadvantage of the technique is that substantially fewer molecular formulas can be resolved from a complex mixture (roughly one third as many), meaning some loss of information. In balance, most biogeochemical studies that aim at molecularly fingerprinting the source of natural DOM could be satisfactorily carried out with Orbitrap mass spectrometry. For more targeted metabolomic studies where individual compounds are traced through natural systems, FTICR-MS remains advantageous. PMID:27400998

  17. Conversion Problems: How (Not) to Determine Molecular Masses in Dwarf Galaxies (Oral Contribution)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüttemeister, S.

    The determination of molecular gas masses in star forming dwarf irregular galaxies is crucial to assess the star formation process in these objects. But the derivation of the molecular gas content of dwarf galaxies has been a long-standing problem. CO, as the only practical tracer of cold molecular gas, has been (and to some extent still is) notoriously diffucult to detect. Yet, star formation clearly takes place in many dwarf irregulars. This conference contribution contrasts a number of methods commonly used to derive the molecular gas contents of dwarf galaxies based on CO observations: Procedures based on the virial theorem and those relying on radiative transfer arguments. It is shown that both classes of methods have serious drawbacks. Still, examples show that there seem to be real differences in the `correct' conversion factor both between and within star forming dwarf irregular galaxies.

  18. Targeting the untargeted in molecular phenomics with structurally-selective ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    May, Jody Christopher; Gant-Branum, Randi Lee; McLean, John Allen

    2016-06-01

    Systems-wide molecular phenomics is rapidly expanding through technological advances in instrumentation and bioinformatics. Strategies such as structural mass spectrometry, which utilizes size and shape measurements with molecular weight, serve to characterize the sum of molecular expression in biological contexts, where broad-scale measurements are made that are interpreted through big data statistical techniques to reveal underlying patterns corresponding to phenotype. The data density, data dimensionality, data projection, and data interrogation are all critical aspects of these approaches to turn data into salient information. Untargeted molecular phenomics is already having a dramatic impact in discovery science from drug discovery to synthetic biology. It is evident that these emerging techniques will integrate closely in broad efforts aimed at precision medicine. PMID:27132126

  19. Tandem Mass Spectrometry Measurement of the Collision Products of Carbamate Anions Derived from CO2 Capture Sorbents: Paving the Way for Accurate Quantitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Phil; Fisher, Keith J.; Attalla, Moetaz Ibrahim

    2011-08-01

    The reaction between CO2 and aqueous amines to produce a charged carbamate product plays a crucial role in post-combustion capture chemistry when primary and secondary amines are used. In this paper, we report the low energy negative-ion CID results for several anionic carbamates derived from primary and secondary amines commonly used as post-combustion capture solvents. The study was performed using the modern equivalent of a triple quadrupole instrument equipped with a T-wave collision cell. Deuterium labeling of 2-aminoethanol (1,1,2,2,-d4-2-aminoethanol) and computations at the M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level were used to confirm the identity of the fragmentation products for 2-hydroxyethylcarbamate (derived from 2-aminoethanol), in particular the ions CN-, NCO- and facile neutral losses of CO2 and water; there is precedent for the latter in condensed phase isocyanate chemistry. The fragmentations of 2-hydroxyethylcarbamate were generalized for carbamate anions derived from other capture amines, including ethylenediamine, diethanolamine, and piperazine. We also report unequivocal evidence for the existence of carbamate anions derived from sterically hindered amines ( Tris(2-hydroxymethyl)aminomethane and 2-methyl-2-aminopropanol). For the suite of carbamates investigated, diagnostic losses include the decarboxylation product (-CO2, 44 mass units), loss of 46 mass units and the fragments NCO- ( m/z 42) and CN- ( m/z 26). We also report low energy CID results for the dicarbamate dianion (-O2CNHC2H4NHCO{2/-}) commonly encountered in CO2 capture solution utilizing ethylenediamine. Finally, we demonstrate a promising ion chromatography-MS based procedure for the separation and quantitation of aqueous anionic carbamates, which is based on the reported CID findings. The availability of accurate quantitation methods for ionic CO2 capture products could lead to dynamic operational tuning of CO2 capture-plants and, thus, cost-savings via real-time manipulation of solvent

  20. Accurate Identification of Common Pathogenic Nocardia Species: Evaluation of a Multilocus Sequence Analysis Platform and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Meng; Pang, Lu; Chen, Sharon C-A; Fan, Xin; Zhang, Li; Li, Hai-Xia; Hou, Xin; Cheng, Jing-Wei; Kong, Fanrong; Zhao, Yu-Pei; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Species identification of Nocardia is not straightforward due to rapidly evolving taxonomy, insufficient discriminatory power of conventional phenotypic methods and also of single gene locus analysis including 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Here we evaluated the ability of a 5-locus (16S rRNA, gyrB, secA1, hsp65 and rpoB) multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) approach as well as that of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in comparison with sequencing of the 5'-end 606 bp partial 16S rRNA gene to provide identification of 25 clinical isolates of Nocardia. The 5'-end 606 bp 16S rRNA gene sequencing successfully assigned 24 of 25 (96%) clinical isolates to species level, namely Nocardia cyriacigeorgica (n = 12, 48%), N. farcinica (n = 9, 36%), N. abscessus (n = 2, 8%) and N. otitidiscaviarum (n = 1, 4%). MLSA showed concordance with 16S rRNA gene sequencing results for the same 24 isolates. However, MLSA was able to identify the remaining isolate as N. wallacei, and clustered N. cyriacigeorgica into three subgroups. None of the clinical isolates were correctly identified to the species level by MALDI-TOF MS analysis using the manufacturer-provided database. A small "in-house" spectral database was established incorporating spectra of five clinical isolates representing the five species identified in this study. After complementation with the "in-house" database, of the remaining 20 isolates, 19 (95%) were correctly identified to species level (score ≥ 2.00) and one (an N. abscessus strain) to genus level (score ≥ 1.70 and < 2.00). In summary, MLSA showed superior discriminatory power compared with the 5'-end 606 bp partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing for species identification of Nocardia. MALDI-TOF MS can provide rapid and accurate identification but is reliant on a robust mass spectra database. PMID:26808813

  1. Atmospheric organic matter in clouds: exact masses and molecular formula identification using ultrahigh-resolution FT-ICR mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Hallar, A. G.; Mazzoleni, L. R.

    2013-12-01

    Clouds alter the composition of atmospheric aerosol by acting as a medium for interactions between gas- and particulate-phase substances. To determine the cloud water atmospheric organic matter (AOM) composition and study the cloud processing of aerosols, two samples of supercooled clouds were collected at the Storm Peak Laboratory near Steamboat Springs, Colorado (3220 m a.s.l.). Approximately 3000 molecular formulas were assigned to ultrahigh-resolution mass spectra of the samples after using a reversed-phase extraction procedure to isolate the AOM components from the cloud water. Nitrogen-containing compounds (CHNO compounds), sulfur-containing compounds (CHOS and CHNOS compounds) and other oxygen-containing compounds (CHO compounds) with molecular weights up to 700 Da were observed. Average oxygen-to-carbon ratios of ∼0.6 indicate a slightly more oxidized composition than most water-soluble organic carbon identified in aerosol studies, which may result from aqueous oxidation in the clouds. The AOM composition indicates significant influences from biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and residential wood combustion. We observed 60% of the cloud water CHO molecular formulas to be identical to SOA samples of α-pinene, β-pinene, d-limonene, and β-caryophyllene ozonolysis. CHNO compounds had the highest number frequency and relative abundances and are associated with residential wood combustion and NOx oxidation. Multiple nitrogen atoms in the assigned molecular formulas for the nighttime cloud sample composite were observed, indicating the significance of nitrate radical reactions on the AOM composition. Several CHOS and CHNOS compounds with reduced sulfur (in addition to the commonly observed oxidized sulfur-containing compounds) were also observed; however further investigation is needed to determine the origin of the reduced sulfur-containing compounds. Overall, the molecular composition determined using ultrahigh-resolution Fourier-transform ion

  2. CYP450 phenotyping and metabolite identification of quinine by accurate mass UPLC-MS analysis: a possible metabolic link to blackwater fever

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The naturally occurring alkaloid drug, quinine is commonly used for the treatment of severe malaria. Despite centuries of use, its metabolism is still not fully understood, and may play a role in the haemolytic disorders associated with the drug. Methods Incubations of quinine with CYPs 1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 were conducted, and the metabolites were characterized by accurate mass UPLC-MSE analysis. Reactive oxygen species generation was also measured in human erythrocytes incubated in the presence of quinine with and without microsomes. Results The metabolites 3-hydroxyquinine, 2’-oxoquininone, and O-desmethylquinine were observed after incubation with CYPs 3A4 (3-hydroxyquinine and 2’-oxoquininone) and 2D6 (O-desmethylquinine). In addition, multiple hydroxylations were observed both on the quinoline core and the quinuclidine ring system. Of the five primary abundance CYPs tested, 3A4, 2D6, 2C9, and 2C19 all demonstrated activity toward quinine, while 1A2 did not. Further, quinine produced robust dose-dependent oxidative stress in human erythrocytes in the presence of microsomes. Conclusions Taken in context, these data suggest a CYP-mediated link between quinine metabolism and the poorly understood haemolytic condition known as blackwater fever, often associated with quinine ingestion. PMID:23800033

  3. Accurate determination of Curium and Californium isotopic ratios by inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) in 248Cm samples for transmutation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gourgiotis, A.; Isnard, H.; Aubert, M.; Dupont, E.; AlMahamid, I.; Cassette, P.; Panebianco, S.; Letourneau, A.; Chartier, F.; Tian, G.; Rao, L.; Lukens, W.

    2011-02-01

    The French Atomic Energy Commission has carried out several experiments including the mini-INCA (INcineration of Actinides) project for the study of minor-actinide transmutation processes in high intensity thermal neutron fluxes, in view of proposing solutions to reduce the radiotoxicity of long-lived nuclear wastes. In this context, a Cm sample enriched in {sup 248}Cm ({approx}97 %) was irradiated in thermal neutron flux at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) of the Laue-Langevin Institute (ILL). This work describes a quadrupole ICP-MS (ICP-QMS) analytical procedure for precise and accurate isotopic composition determination of Cm before sample irradiation and of Cm and Cf after sample irradiation. The factors that affect the accuracy and reproducibility of isotopic ratio measurements by ICP-QMS, such as peak centre correction, detector dead time, mass bias, abundance sensitivity and hydrides formation, instrumental background, and memory blank were carefully evaluated and corrected. Uncertainties of the isotopic ratios, taking into account internal precision of isotope ratio measurements, peak tailing, and hydrides formations ranged from 0.3% to 1.3%. This uncertainties range is quite acceptable for the nuclear data to be used in transmutation studies.

  4. Structural features of lipoarabinomannan from Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Determination of molecular mass by laser desorption mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Venisse, A; Berjeaud, J M; Chaurand, P; Gilleron, M; Puzo, G

    1993-06-15

    It was recently shown that mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan (LAM) can be classified into two types (Chatterjee, D., Lowell, K., Rivoire B., McNeil M. R., and Brennan, P. J. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 6234-6239) according to the presence or absence of mannosyl residues (Manp) located at the nonreducing end of the oligoarabinosyl side chains. These two types of LAM were found in a pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain and in an avirulent M. tuberculosis strain, respectively, suggesting that LAM with Manp characterizes virulent and "disease-inducing strains." We now report the structure of the LAM from Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) strain Pasteur, largely used throughout the world as vaccine against tuberculosis. Using an up-to-date analytical approach, we found that the LAM of M. bovis BCG belongs to the class of LAMs capped with Manp. By means of two-dimensional homonuclear and heteronuclear scalar coupling NMR analysis and methylation data, the sugar spin system assignments were partially established, revealing that the LAM contained two types of terminal Manp and 2-O-linked Manp. From the following four-step process: (i) partial hydrolysis of deacylated LAM (dLAM), (ii) oligosaccharide derivatization with aminobenzoic ethyl ester, (iii) HPLC purification, (iv) FAB/MS-MS analysis; it was shown that the dimannosyl unit alpha-D-Manp-(1-->2)-alpha-D-Manp is the major residue capping the termini of the arabinan of the LAM. In this report, LAM molecular mass determination was established using matrix-assisted UV-laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry which reveals that the LAM molecular mass is around 17.4 kDa. The similarity of the LAM structures between M. bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis H37Rv is discussed in regard to their function in the immunopathology of mycobacterial infection. PMID:8509380

  5. The dense gas mass fraction of molecular clouds in the Milky Way

    SciTech Connect

    Battisti, Andrew J.; Heyer, Mark H. E-mail: heyer@astro.umass.edu

    2014-01-10

    The mass fraction of dense gas within giant molecular clouds (GMCs) of the Milky Way is investigated using {sup 13}CO data from the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory Galactic Plane Surveys and the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) of 1.1 mm dust continuum emission. A sample of 860 compact dust sources are selected from the BGPS catalog and kinematically linked to 344 clouds of extended (>3') {sup 13}CO J = 1-0 emission. Gas masses are tabulated for the full dust source and subregions within the dust sources with mass surface densities greater than 200 M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2}, which are assumed to be regions of enhanced volume density. Masses of the parent GMCs are calculated assuming optically thin {sup 13}CO J = 1-0 emission and local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. The mean fractional mass of dust sources to host GMC mass is 0.11{sub −0.06}{sup +0.12}. The high column density subregions comprise 0.07{sub −0.05}{sup +0.13} of the mass of the cloud. Owing to our assumptions, these values are upper limits to the true mass fractions. The fractional mass of dense gas is independent of GMC mass and gas surface density. The low dense gas mass fraction suggests that the formation of dense structures within GMCs is the primary bottleneck for star formation. The distribution of velocity differences between the dense gas and the low density material along the line of sight is also examined. We find a strong, centrally peaked distribution centered on zero velocity displacement. This distribution of velocity differences is modeled with radially converging flows toward the dense gas position that are randomly oriented with respect to the observed line of sight. These models constrain the infall velocities to be 2-4 km s{sup –1} for various flow configurations.

  6. Imaging Mass Spectrometry: Enabling a New Age of Discovery in Biology and Medicine Through Molecular Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprioli, Richard M.

    2015-06-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has become a valuable tool for the production of molecular maps in samples ranging from solid inorganic materials to biologicals such as cells and tissues. The unique features of IMS are its ability to map a wide variety of different types of molecules, its superb molecular specificity, and its potential for discovery since no target-specific reagents are needed. IMS has made significant contributions in biology and medicine and promises to be a next generation tool in anatomic pathology.

  7. Imaging Mass Spectrometry: Enabling a New Age of Discovery in Biology and Medicine Through Molecular Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Caprioli, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has become a valuable tool for the production of molecular maps in samples ranging from solid inorganic materials to biologicals such as cells and tissues. The unique features of IMS are its ability to map a wide variety of different types of molecules, its superb molecular specificity, and its potential for discovery since no target specific reagents are needed. IMS has made significant contributions in biology and medicine and promises to be a next generation tool in anatomic pathology. PMID:25801587

  8. Molecular gas mass functions of normal star-forming galaxies since z ~ 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta, S.; Lutz, D.; Nordon, R.; Genzel, R.; Magnelli, B.; Popesso, P.; Rosario, D.; Saintonge, A.; Wuyts, S.; Tacconi, L. J.

    2013-07-01

    We used deep far-infrared data from the PEP/GOODS-Herschel surveys and restframe ultraviolet photometry to study the evolution of the molecular gas mass function of normal star-forming galaxies. Computing the molecular gas mass, Mmol, by scaling star formation rates through depletion timescales, or combining infrared (IR) luminosity and obscuration properties as described in the literature, we obtained Mmol for roughly 700, z = 0.2-3.0 galaxies near the star-forming main sequence. The number density of galaxies follows a Schechter function of Mmol. The characteristic mass M ∗ is found to strongly evolve up to z ~ 1 and then flatten at earlier epochs, resembling the IR luminosity evolution of similar objects. At z ~ 1, our result is supported by an estimate based on the stellar mass function of star-forming galaxies and gas fraction scalings from the PHIBSS survey. We compared our measurements with results from current models, finding better agreement with those that are treating star formation laws directly rather than in post-processing. Integrating the mass function, we studied the evolution of the Mmol density and its density parameter Ωmol. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  9. Light-quark mass behaviour of the X(3872) as a molecular state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baru, V.; Epelbaum, E.; Filin, A. A.; Gegelia, J.; Nefediev, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    Chiral extrapolations of the binding energy of the X(3872) molecular state are investigated using an explicitly renormalizable framework free of finite cut-off artefacts. Insights into the binding mechanisms are discussed: if the X is less bound with the growing pion mass, its binding energy is governed by the explicit pion mass dependence from one-pion exchange; an opposite behaviour would indicate the importance of the pionmass dependent short-range interactions, in addition to pionic effects. The important role of the three-body DD¯π dynamics is emphasised.

  10. Ab initio molecular dynamics of liquid water using embedded-fragment second-order many-body perturbation theory towards its accurate property prediction.

    PubMed

    Willow, Soohaeng Yoo; Salim, Michael A; Kim, Kwang S; Hirata, So

    2015-01-01

    A direct, simultaneous calculation of properties of a liquid using an ab initio electron-correlated theory has long been unthinkable. Here we present structural, dynamical, and response properties of liquid water calculated by ab initio molecular dynamics using the embedded-fragment spin-component-scaled second-order many-body perturbation method with the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. This level of theory is chosen as it accurately and inexpensively reproduces the water dimer potential energy surface from the coupled-cluster singles, doubles, and noniterative triples with the aug-cc-pVQZ basis set, which is nearly exact. The calculated radial distribution function, self-diffusion coefficient, coordinate number, and dipole moment, as well as the infrared and Raman spectra are in excellent agreement with experimental results. The shapes and widths of the OH stretching bands in the infrared and Raman spectra and their isotropic-anisotropic Raman noncoincidence, which reflect the diverse local hydrogen-bond environment, are also reproduced computationally. The simulation also reveals intriguing dynamic features of the environment, which are difficult to probe experimentally, such as a surprisingly large fluctuation in the coordination number and the detailed mechanism by which the hydrogen donating water molecules move across the first and second shells, thereby causing this fluctuation. PMID:26400690

  11. How Iron-Containing Proteins Control Dioxygen Chemistry: A Detailed Atomic Level Description Via Accurate Quantum Chemical and Mixed Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    SciTech Connect

    Friesner, Richard A.; Baik, Mu-Hyun; Gherman, Benjamin F.; Guallar, Victor; Wirstam, Maria E.; Murphy, Robert B.; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2003-03-01

    Over the past several years, rapid advances in computational hardware, quantum chemical methods, and mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) techniques have made it possible to model accurately the interaction of ligands with metal-containing proteins at an atomic level of detail. In this paper, we describe the application of our computational methodology, based on density functional (DFT) quantum chemical methods, to two diiron-containing proteins that interact with dioxygen: methane monooxygenase (MMO) and hemerythrin (Hr). Although the active sites are structurally related, the biological function differs substantially. MMO is an enzyme found in methanotrophic bacteria and hydroxylates aliphatic C-H bonds, whereas Hr is a carrier protein for dioxygen used by a number of marine invertebrates. Quantitative descriptions of the structures and energetics of key intermediates and transition states involved in the reaction with dioxygen are provided, allowing their mechanisms to be compared and contrasted in detail. An in-depth understanding of how the chemical identity of the first ligand coordination shell, structural features, electrostatic and van der Waals interactions of more distant shells control ligand binding and reactive chemistry is provided, affording a systematic analysis of how iron-containing proteins process dioxygen. Extensive contact with experiment is made in both systems, and a remarkable degree of accuracy and robustness of the calculations is obtained from both a qualitative and quantitative perspective.

  12. Ring polymer molecular dynamics fast computation of rate coefficients on accurate potential energy surfaces in local configuration space: Application to the abstraction of hydrogen from methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingyong; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Dong H.

    2016-04-01

    To fast and accurately compute rate coefficients of the H/D + CH4 → H2/HD + CH3 reactions, we propose a segmented strategy for fitting suitable potential energy surface (PES), on which ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) simulations are performed. On the basis of recently developed permutation invariant polynomial neural-network approach [J. Li et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 204302 (2015)], PESs in local configuration spaces are constructed. In this strategy, global PES is divided into three parts, including asymptotic, intermediate, and interaction parts, along the reaction coordinate. Since less fitting parameters are involved in the local PESs, the computational efficiency for operating the PES routine is largely enhanced by a factor of ˜20, comparing with that for global PES. On interaction part, the RPMD computational time for the transmission coefficient can be further efficiently reduced by cutting off the redundant part of the child trajectories. For H + CH4, good agreements among the present RPMD rates and those from previous simulations as well as experimental results are found. For D + CH4, on the other hand, qualitative agreement between present RPMD and experimental results is predicted.

  13. Ab initio molecular dynamics of liquid water using embedded-fragment second-order many-body perturbation theory towards its accurate property prediction

    PubMed Central

    Willow, Soohaeng Yoo; Salim, Michael A.; Kim, Kwang S.; Hirata, So

    2015-01-01

    A direct, simultaneous calculation of properties of a liquid using an ab initio electron-correlated theory has long been unthinkable. Here we present structural, dynamical, and response properties of liquid water calculated by ab initio molecular dynamics using the embedded-fragment spin-component-scaled second-order many-body perturbation method with the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. This level of theory is chosen as it accurately and inexpensively reproduces the water dimer potential energy surface from the coupled-cluster singles, doubles, and noniterative triples with the aug-cc-pVQZ basis set, which is nearly exact. The calculated radial distribution function, self-diffusion coefficient, coordinate number, and dipole moment, as well as the infrared and Raman spectra are in excellent agreement with experimental results. The shapes and widths of the OH stretching bands in the infrared and Raman spectra and their isotropic-anisotropic Raman noncoincidence, which reflect the diverse local hydrogen-bond environment, are also reproduced computationally. The simulation also reveals intriguing dynamic features of the environment, which are difficult to probe experimentally, such as a surprisingly large fluctuation in the coordination number and the detailed mechanism by which the hydrogen donating water molecules move across the first and second shells, thereby causing this fluctuation. PMID:26400690

  14. Development of a sensitive, accurate and robust liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric method for profiling of angiotensin peptides in plasma and its application for atherosclerotic mice.

    PubMed

    Olkowicz, Mariola; Radulska, Adrianna; Suraj, Joanna; Kij, Agnieszka; Walczak, Maria; Chlopicki, Stefan; Smolenski, Ryszard T

    2015-05-01

    Quantification of angiotensin (Ang) peptides in biological matrices is a challenge due to their low picomolar (pM) concentration and poor analytical performance of current methods. This work aimed to select an optimal strategy for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) quantification of major angiotensins in plasma of wild type and atherosclerotic mice. Optimal LC/MS set-up for Ang quantification was chosen, based on analytical performance, from: nanoflow/orbitrap, nanoflow/triple quadrupole and preconcentration nanoflow/triple quadrupole. The best LC/MS configuration (preconcentration nanoflow/triple quadrupole) was validated and used for measurement of angiotensins (Ang I, II, III, IV and (1-7)) in plasma of 6-month-old atherosclerotic apolipoprotein E/LDL receptor double knock-outs (ApoE/LDLR (--/--)) and wild type C57BL/6J (WT) mice. The method established for Ang quantification was selective, accurate and highly sensitive with LLOQ of 5pgmL(-1). The peak area intra-day precisions for Ang II and Ang-(1-7) were in the range 3.0-5.1 and 3.5-5.8, respectively, with corresponding accuracy of 95.4-103.5% and 95.6-106.3%. Plasma angiotensin profile was substantially modified in ApoE/LDLR knock-out mice with increase in concentration of Ang II from 37.6±21.3pgmL(-1) in WT to 200.2±47.6pgmL(-1). Concentrations of Ang I, III and IV were also increased 3-10 fold in ApoE/LDLR (--/--) mice while that of Ang-(1-7) was unchanged. We conclude that the method developed could be effectively used for accurate, comprehensive profiling of angiotensin peptides in mouse plasma. We identified substantial changes in renin-angiotensin system in a genetic mouse model of atherosclerosis consistent with the overactivation of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and the impairment of ACE2. PMID:25817477

  15. Variations in the molecular masses of the capsular exopolysaccharides amylovoran, pyrifolan and stewartan.

    PubMed

    Schollmeyer, Martin; Langlotz, Christine; Huber, Anton; Coplin, David L; Geider, Klaus

    2012-04-01

    Erwinia amylovora, causing fire blight of apple, pear and some ornamentals, Erwinia pyrifoliae, causing Asian pear blight, and Pantoea stewartii, causing Stewart's wilt of sweet maize, synthesize capsular extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs) with a high molecular mass. The EPSs are virulence factors and form viscous aggregates, which participate in clogging vessels of infected plants and causing wilting. The sizes of EPSs produced under different environmental growth conditions were determined by analysis with large pore HPLC columns. Their molecular mass of ca. 5 MDa, when isolated from agar plates, decreases to ca. 1 MDa for E. amylovora amylovoran from freeze-dried supernatants from liquid cultures and to 2 MDa for freeze-dried preparations of P. stewartii stewartan. Size changes were also found following growth in various other media and for different strains. Stewartan, amylovoran and E. pyrifoliae pyrifolan were also shown to be completely degraded by a bacteriophage EPS depolymerase. PMID:22266385

  16. Pathology interface for the molecular analysis of tissue by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Jeremy L.; Tsui, Tina; Gutierrez, Danielle B.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) generates molecular images directly from tissue sections to provide better diagnostic insights and expand the capabilities of clinical anatomic pathology. Although IMS technology has matured over recent years, the link between microscopy imaging currently used by pathologists and MS-based molecular imaging has not been established. Methods: We adapted the Vanderbilt University Tissue Core workflow for IMS into a web-based system that facilitates remote collaboration. The platform was designed to perform within acceptable web response times for viewing, annotating, and processing high resolution microscopy images. Results: We describe a microscopy-driven approach to tissue analysis by IMS. Conclusion: The Pathology Interface for Mass Spectrometry is designed to provide clinical access to IMS technology and deliver enhanced diagnostic value. PMID:27141319

  17. ARE MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS AROUND HIGH-MASS STARS DRIVEN BY IONIZATION FEEDBACK?

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Klaassen, Pamela D.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Banerjee, Robi

    2012-11-20

    The formation of massive stars exceeding 10 M {sub Sun} usually results in large-scale molecular outflows. Numerical simulations, including ionization, of the formation of such stars show evidence for ionization-driven molecular outflows. Here we examine whether the outflows seen in these models reproduce the observations. We compute synthetic ALMA and CARMA maps of CO emission lines of the outflows, and compare their signatures to existing single-dish and interferometric data. We find that the ionization-driven models can only reproduce weak outflows around high-mass star-forming regions. We argue that expanding H II regions probably do not represent the dominant mechanism for driving observed outflows. We suggest instead that observed outflows are driven by the collective action of the outflows from the many lower-mass stars that inevitably form around young massive stars in a cluster.

  18. Mesozoic mass extinctions and angiosperm radiation: does the molecular clock tell something new?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruban, Dmitry A.

    2012-03-01

    Angiosperms evolved rapidly in the late Mesozoic. Data from the genetic-based approach called ‘molecular clock’ permit an evaluation of the radiation of flowering plants through geological time and of the possible influences of Mesozoic mass extinctions. A total of 261 divergence ages of angiosperm families are considered. The radiation of flowering plants peaked in the Albian, early Campanian, and Maastrichtian. From the three late Mesozoic mass extinctions (Jurassic/Cretaceous, Cenomanian/Turonian, and Cretaceous/Palaeogene), only the Cretaceous/Palaeogene event coincided with a significant, abrupt, and long-term decline in angiosperm radiation. If their link will be further proven, this means that global-scale environmental perturbation precluded from many innovations in the development of plants. This decline was, however, not unprecedented in the history of the angiosperms. The implication of data from the molecular clock for evolutionary reconstructions is limited, primarily because this approach deals with only extant lineages.

  19. Reaction sequence and molecular mass of a Cl(-)-translocating P-type ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Gerencser, G A; Zelezna, B

    1993-01-01

    The basolateral membranes of Aplysia californica foregut absorptive cells contain both Cl(-)-stimulated ATPase and ATP-dependent Cl- transport activities, and each was inhibited by orthovanadate. Both of these orthovanadate-sensitive activities were reconstituted into proteoliposomes. The reaction sequence kinetics were determined by [gamma-32P]ATP-induced phosphorylation of the reconstituted Cl- pump. Rapid phosphorylation and dephosphorylation kinetics of acyl phosphate bonding were confirmed by destabilization of the phosphoprotein by either hydroxylamine or high pH. Mg2+ caused phosphorylation of the enzyme; Cl- caused dephosphorylation. Orthovanadate almost completely inhibited the Mg(2+)-driven phosphorylation reaction. The molecular mass of the catalytic unit (subunit) of the enzyme appeared to be 110 kDa, which is in agreement with molecular masses of all other catalytic units (subunits) of P-type ATPases. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:8367450

  20. Computation of the gas mass and heat fluxes in a rectangular channel in the free molecular regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germider, O. V.; Popov, V. N.; Yushkanov, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    The problem of heat- and mass transfer in a long rectangular channel of a constant cross section is solved in the free molecular regime. The distributions of the mass flow rate and the heat flux vector over the channel cross section are calculated. The specific gas mass flux and heat flux are calculated. The results are compared with those obtained for nearly free molecular flows.

  1. 2MASS J17112318-2724315: A DEEPLY EMBEDDED LOW-MASS PROTOSTELLAR SYSTEM IN THE B59 MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Riaz, B.; Martin, E. L.; Bouy, H.; Tata, R.

    2009-08-01

    We present near-infrared observations of the low-mass deeply embedded Class 0/I system 2MASS J17112318-2724315 (2M171123) in the B59 molecular cloud. Bright scattered light nebulosity is observed toward this source in the K{sub s} images, that seems to trace the edges of an outflow cavity. We report the detection of a low-luminosity protostar 2M17112255-27243448 (2M17112255) that lies {approx}8'' ({approx}1000 AU) from 2M171123. This is a Class I system, as indicated by its 2-8 {mu}m slope and Infrared Array Camera colors, with an estimated internal luminosity of {approx}0.3 L{sub sun}. We estimate a mass of {approx}0.12-0.25 M{sub sun} for this source, at an age of 0.1-1 Myr. Also presented is detailed modeling of the 2M171123 system. The best-fit parameters indicate a large envelope density of the order of {approx}10{sup -13} g cm{sup -3}, and an intermediate inclination between 53 deg. and 59 deg. The observed K{sub s} -band variability for this system could be explained by slight variability in the mass infall rate between 2.5E-5 and 1.8E-5 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. The protostar 2M171123 exhibits a rarely observed absorption feature near 11.3 {mu}m within its 10 {mu}m silicate band. We find a strong correlation between the strength in this 11.3 {mu}m 'edge' and the H{sub 2}O-ice column density, indicating the origin of this feature in the thickness of the ice mantle over the silicate grains.

  2. Tandem mass spectrometry and ion mobility mass spectrometry for the analysis of molecular sequence and architecture of hyperbranched glycopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiumin; Cool, Lydia R.; Lin, Kenneth; Kasko, Andrea M.; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional mass spectrometry techniques, combining matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) or electrospray ionization (ESI) with tandem mass spectrometry (MS2), multistage mass spectrometry (MSn) or ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS), have been employed to gain precise structural insight on the compositions, sequences and architectures of small oligomers of a hyperbranched glycopolymer, prepared by atom transfer radical copolymerization of an acrylate monomer (A) and an acrylate inimer (B), both carrying mannose ester pendants. The MS data confirmed the incorporation of multiple inimer repeat units, which ultimately lead to the hyperbranched material. The various possible structures of n-mers with the same composition were subsequently elucidated based on MS2 and MSn studies. The characteristic elimination of bromomethane molecule provided definitive information about the comonomer connectivity in the copolymeric AB2 trimer and A2B2 tetramer, identifying as present only one of the three possible trimeric isomers (viz. sequence BBA) and only two of the six possible tetrameric isomers (viz. sequences BBA2 and BABA). Complementary IM-MS studies confirmed that only one of the tetrameric structures is formed. Comparison of the experimentally determined collision cross-section of the detected isomer with those predicted by molecular simulations for the two possible sequences ascertained BBA2 as the predominant tetrameric architecture. The multidimensional MS approaches presented provide connectivity information at the atomic level without requiring high product purity (due to the dispersive nature of MS) and, hence, should be particularly useful for the microstructure characterization of novel glycopolymers and other types of complex copolymers. PMID:25519163

  3. Molecular composition of atmospheric aerosols from Halley Bay, Antarctica, using ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtchev, Ivan; Brough, Neil; Rincon, Angela; Jones, Anna; Kalberer, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Antarctica is one of the few pristine places to study natural processes of atmospheric aerosols and anthropogenic impacts on the clean remote atmosphere. Although stratospheric aerosol in Antarctica has now been explored in some detail because of the ozone depletion phenomenon, tropospheric aerosol particles in Antarctica remain very little studied. The main goal of this work is to identify in detail the organic chemical composition of aerosol from Halley Bay station, which is located on the Brunt Ice Shelf floating on the Weddell Sea in Antarctica. In this study we characterise the molecular composition of aerosols from three seasons (summer, autumn and winter in 2012) using ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry (UHRMS). The technique provides high accuracy and high mass resolving power that allows determining unambiguous number of organic compounds present in complex organic mixtures (Noziere et al., 2015). The molecular composition interpretation was facilitated using visualisation methods (e.g. double bond equivalent, Van Krevelen diagrams, Kendrick mass analysis, and carbon oxidation state), which allowed to identify patterns, such as differences between sampling times and atmospheric processes. The majority of the identified compounds were attributed to nitrogen and sulphur containing species which exhibited very strong seasonal trends. Relatively large fraction (up to 30% of the total number of molecules) of these species contained very low hydrogen to carbon ratios (below 1) indicating that the site is impacted by anthropogenic emissions. Influences of the meteorological parameters and air mass trajectories on the molecular composition are discussed. Nozière et al., The Molecular Identification of Organic Compounds in the Atmosphere: State of the Art and Challenges, Chem. Rev., 115, 3920-3983, 2015.

  4. Development of Laser Desorption Imaging Mass Spectrometry Methods to Investigate the Molecular Composition of Latent Fingermarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauzon, Nidia; Dufresne, Martin; Chauhan, Vinita; Chaurand, Pierre

    2015-06-01

    For a century, fingermark analysis has been one of the most important and common methods in forensic investigations. Modern chemical analysis technologies have added the potential to determine the molecular composition of fingermarks and possibly identify chemicals a suspect may have come into contact with. Improvements in analytical detection of the molecular composition of fingermarks is therefore of great importance. In this regard, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and laser desorption ionization (LDI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) have proven to be useful technologies for fingermark analysis. In these analyses, the choice of ionizing agent and its mode of deposition are critical steps for the identification of molecular markers. Here we propose two novel and complementary IMS approaches for endogenous and exogenous substance detection in fingermarks: sublimation of 2-mercaptobenzothiazol (2-MBT) matrix and silver sputtering.

  5. Development of laser desorption imaging mass spectrometry methods to investigate the molecular composition of latent fingermarks.

    PubMed

    Lauzon, Nidia; Dufresne, Martin; Chauhan, Vinita; Chaurand, Pierre

    2015-06-01

    For a century, fingermark analysis has been one of the most important and common methods in forensic investigations. Modern chemical analysis technologies have added the potential to determine the molecular composition of fingermarks and possibly identify chemicals a suspect may have come into contact with. Improvements in analytical detection of the molecular composition of fingermarks is therefore of great importance. In this regard, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and laser desorption ionization (LDI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) have proven to be useful technologies for fingermark analysis. In these analyses, the choice of ionizing agent and its mode of deposition are critical steps for the identification of molecular markers. Here we propose two novel and complementary IMS approaches for endogenous and exogenous substance detection in fingermarks: sublimation of 2-mercaptobenzothiazol (2-MBT) matrix and silver sputtering. PMID:25846823

  6. Higher Molecular Mass Organic Matter Molecules Compete with Orthophosphate for Adsorption to Iron (Oxy)hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Chassé, Alexander W; Ohno, Tsutomu

    2016-07-19

    The competition between orthophosphate and water-extractable organic matter (WEOM) for adsorption to iron (oxy)hydroxide mineral surfaces is an important factor in determining the plant bioavailability of P in soils. Chemical force spectroscopy was used to determine the binding force between orthophosphate and iron (oxy)hydroxide that was coated onto atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips and adsorbed with WEOM. The force measurements were conducted at pH 4.65 and 0.02 M ionic strength which are representative of typical acid soil solutions. The chemical composition of the WEOM was determined by ultrahigh resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry. The results indicate a correlation between aromatic WEOM molecules that are greater than 600 Da and the reduced binding force of orthophosphate to WEOM-adsorbed iron (oxy)hydroxide AFM tips suggesting that the molecular mass of aromatic WEOM molecules plays a critical role in regulating the WEOM-P interactions with surface functional groups of minerals. Based on the results of this study, we show the importance of obtaining a detailed, molecular-scale understanding of soil processes that can help develop better management strategies to reduce waste of limited P resources and adverse environmental impacts. Specifically, soil amendments with greater content of high molecular mass aromatic components may positively affect dissolved P use efficiency in soils by maintaining P in soil solution. PMID:27362894

  7. High-molecular-mass lipopolysaccharides are involved in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae adherence to porcine respiratory tract cells.

    PubMed Central

    Paradis, S E; Dubreuil, D; Rioux, S; Gottschalk, M; Jacques, M

    1994-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia. The major adhesin of A. pleuropneumoniae has been identified as the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) (M. Bélanger, D. Dubreuil, J. Harel, C. Girard, and M. Jacques, Infect. Immun. 58:3523-3530, 1990). Using immunoelectron microscopy and flow cytometry, we showed in the present study that LPSs were well exposed at the surface of this encapsulated microorganism. Immunolocalization with porcine lung and tracheal frozen sections showed that extracted LPS bound to the lung mesenchyme and vascular endothelium and to the tracheal epithelium, respectively. Inhibition of adherence of A. pleuropneumoniae with extracted LPS was also performed with lung and tracheal frozen sections. Acid hydrolysis of LPS revealed that the active component of LPS was not lipid A but the polysaccharides. LPSs from A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1 and 2 were separated by chromatography on Sephacryl S-300 SF, in the presence of sodium deoxycholate, according to their molecular masses. The adherence-inhibitory activity was found in the high-molecular-mass fractions. These high-molecular-mass fractions contained 2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonic acid and neutral sugars, and they were recognized by a monoclonal antibody directed against A. pleuropneumoniae O antigen but not recognized by a monoclonal antibody against capsular antigen. Images PMID:8039902

  8. Mass accommodation of water: bridging the gap between molecular dynamics simulations and kinetic condensation models.

    PubMed

    Julin, Jan; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Miles, Rachael E H; Reid, Jonathan P; Pöschl, Ulrich; Riipinen, Ilona

    2013-01-17

    The condensational growth of submicrometer aerosol particles to climate relevant sizes is sensitive to their ability to accommodate vapor molecules, which is described by the mass accommodation coefficient. However, the underlying processes are not yet fully understood. We have simulated the mass accommodation and evaporation processes of water using molecular dynamics, and the results are compared to the condensation equations derived from the kinetic gas theory to shed light on the compatibility of the two. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed for a planar TIP4P-Ew water surface at four temperatures in the range 268-300 K as well as two droplets, with radii of 1.92 and 4.14 nm at T = 273.15 K. The evaporation flux from molecular dynamics was found to be in good qualitative agreement with that predicted by the simple kinetic condensation equations. Water droplet growth was also modeled with the kinetic multilayer model KM-GAP of Shiraiwa et al. [Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2012, 12, 2777]. It was found that, due to the fast transport across the interface, the growth of a pure water droplet is controlled by gas phase diffusion. These facts indicate that the simple kinetic treatment is sufficient in describing pure water condensation and evaporation. The droplet size was found to have minimal effect on the value of the mass accommodation coefficient. The mass accommodation coefficient was found to be unity (within 0.004) for all studied surfaces, which is in agreement with previous simulation work. Additionally, the simulated evaporation fluxes imply that the evaporation coefficient is also unity. Comparing the evaporation rates of the mass accommodation and evaporation simulations indicated that the high collision flux, corresponding to high supersaturation, present in typical molecular dynamics mass accommodation simulations can under certain conditions lead to an increase in the evaporation rate. Consequently, in such situations the mass accommodation coefficient

  9. Mass Accommodation of Water: Bridging the Gap Between Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Kinetic Condensation Models

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The condensational growth of submicrometer aerosol particles to climate relevant sizes is sensitive to their ability to accommodate vapor molecules, which is described by the mass accommodation coefficient. However, the underlying processes are not yet fully understood. We have simulated the mass accommodation and evaporation processes of water using molecular dynamics, and the results are compared to the condensation equations derived from the kinetic gas theory to shed light on the compatibility of the two. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed for a planar TIP4P-Ew water surface at four temperatures in the range 268–300 K as well as two droplets, with radii of 1.92 and 4.14 nm at T = 273.15 K. The evaporation flux from molecular dynamics was found to be in good qualitative agreement with that predicted by the simple kinetic condensation equations. Water droplet growth was also modeled with the kinetic multilayer model KM-GAP of Shiraiwa et al. [Atmos. Chem. Phys.2012, 117, 2777]. It was found that, due to the fast transport across the interface, the growth of a pure water droplet is controlled by gas phase diffusion. These facts indicate that the simple kinetic treatment is sufficient in describing pure water condensation and evaporation. The droplet size was found to have minimal effect on the value of the mass accommodation coefficient. The mass accommodation coefficient was found to be unity (within 0.004) for all studied surfaces, which is in agreement with previous simulation work. Additionally, the simulated evaporation fluxes imply that the evaporation coefficient is also unity. Comparing the evaporation rates of the mass accommodation and evaporation simulations indicated that the high collision flux, corresponding to high supersaturation, present in typical molecular dynamics mass accommodation simulations can under certain conditions lead to an increase in the evaporation rate. Consequently, in such situations the mass accommodation

  10. Accurate Identification of Common Pathogenic Nocardia Species: Evaluation of a Multilocus Sequence Analysis Platform and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sharon C-A.; Fan, Xin; Zhang, Li; Li, Hai-Xia; Hou, Xin; Cheng, Jing-Wei; Kong, Fanrong; Zhao, Yu-Pei; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Species identification of Nocardia is not straightforward due to rapidly evolving taxonomy, insufficient discriminatory power of conventional phenotypic methods and also of single gene locus analysis including 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Here we evaluated the ability of a 5-locus (16S rRNA, gyrB, secA1, hsp65 and rpoB) multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) approach as well as that of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in comparison with sequencing of the 5’-end 606 bp partial 16S rRNA gene to provide identification of 25 clinical isolates of Nocardia. The 5’-end 606 bp 16S rRNA gene sequencing successfully assigned 24 of 25 (96%) clinical isolates to species level, namely Nocardia cyriacigeorgica (n = 12, 48%), N. farcinica (n = 9, 36%), N. abscessus (n = 2, 8%) and N. otitidiscaviarum (n = 1, 4%). MLSA showed concordance with 16S rRNA gene sequencing results for the same 24 isolates. However, MLSA was able to identify the remaining isolate as N. wallacei, and clustered N. cyriacigeorgica into three subgroups. None of the clinical isolates were correctly identified to the species level by MALDI-TOF MS analysis using the manufacturer-provided database. A small “in-house” spectral database was established incorporating spectra of five clinical isolates representing the five species identified in this study. After complementation with the “in-house” database, of the remaining 20 isolates, 19 (95%) were correctly identified to species level (score ≥ 2.00) and one (an N. abscessus strain) to genus level (score ≥ 1.70 and < 2.00). In summary, MLSA showed superior discriminatory power compared with the 5’-end 606 bp partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing for species identification of Nocardia. MALDI-TOF MS can provide rapid and accurate identification but is reliant on a robust mass spectra database. PMID:26808813

  11. Gamma Ray Constraints on Astrochemistry: Cosmic-Ray Flux and Molecular Cloud Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indriolo, Nick

    2016-01-01

    As cosmic rays traverse the interstellar medium, they interact with the ambient material in a variety of ways. Some of these include the ionization and excitation of neutral atoms and molecules, the spallation (fragmentation) of heavier nuclei into light element isotopes, and inelastic collisions that produce neutral pions which rapidly decay into pairs of gamma ray photons. Each interaction generates an observable, and each interaction has an energy dependent cross section, such that a suite of observations should be able to constrain the cosmic-ray energy spectrum in a variety of environments outside of our solar system. I am currently using proton spectra inferred in molecular clouds for energies above ~1 GeV from Fermi-LAT observations in concert with abundances of molecular ions sensitive to the cosmic-ray ionization rate that constrain the flux of 1-10 MeV particles for the purpose of investigating how the particle spectrum changes between different locations in our Galaxy, and between diffuse and dense molecular gas. Additionally, somewhere between diffuse and dense gas lies the "CO-dark" molecular gas, a regime where hydrogen is in molecular form but CO has yet to reach an appreciable abundance. Estimates of the H2 mass based solely on CO emission do not account for this material, and it has been estimated that up to 30% of the gas in a molecular cloud is in this phase. Cosmic-ray protons do interact with this material though, and the flux of pionic gamma rays from a molecular cloud can be used to place constraints on the amount of CO-dark molecular gas.

  12. The ATLAS3D project - XX. Mass-size and mass-σ distributions of early-type galaxies: bulge fraction drives kinematics, mass-to-light ratio, molecular gas fraction and stellar initial mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellari, Michele; McDermid, Richard M.; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, M.; Crocker, Alison F.; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M.

    2013-07-01

    In the companion Paper XV of this series, we derive accurate total mass-to-light ratios (M/L)_JAM≈ (M/L)({r}= {R_e}) within a sphere of radius r= {R_e} centred on the galaxy, as well as stellar (M/L)stars (with the dark matter removed) for the volume-limited and nearly mass-selected (stellar mass M_star ≳ 6× 10^9 { M_{⊙}}) ATLAS3D sample of 260 early-type galaxies (ETGs, ellipticals Es and lenticulars S0s). Here, we use those parameters to study the two orthogonal projections ({M_JAM}, {σ _e}) and ({M_JAM}, {R_e^maj}) of the thin Mass Plane (MP) ({M_JAM}, {σ _e}, {R_e^maj}) which describes the distribution of the galaxy population, where {M_JAM}≡ L× (M/L)_JAM≈ M_star. The distribution of galaxy properties on both projections of the MP is characterized by: (i) the same zone of exclusion (ZOE), which can be transformed from one projection to the other using the scalar virial equation. The ZOE is roughly described by two power laws, joined by a break at a characteristic mass {M_JAM}≈ 3× 10^{10} { M_{⊙}}, which corresponds to the minimum Re and maximum stellar density. This results in a break in the mean {M_JAM}-{σ _e} relation with trends {M_JAM}∝ σ _e^{2.3} and {M_JAM}∝ σ _e^{4.7} at small and large σe, respectively; (ii) a characteristic mass {M_JAM}≈ 2× 10^{11} { M_{⊙}} which separates a population dominated by flat fast rotator with discs and spiral galaxies at lower masses, from one dominated by quite round slow rotators at larger masses; (iii) below that mass the distribution of ETGs' properties on the two projections of the MP tends to be constant along lines of roughly constant σe, or equivalently along lines with {R_e^maj}∝ {M_JAM}, respectively (or even better parallel to the ZOE: {R_e^maj}∝ M_JAM^{0.75}); (iv) it forms a continuous and parallel sequence with the distribution of spiral galaxies; (v) at even lower masses, the distribution of fast-rotator ETGs and late spirals naturally extends to that of dwarf ETGs (Sph

  13. Method for the Compound Annotation of Conjugates in Nontargeted Metabolomics Using Accurate Mass Spectrometry, Multistage Product Ion Spectra and Compound Database Searching

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Tairo; Bamba, Takeshi; Tai, Akihiro; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2015-01-01

    Owing to biotransformation, xenobiotics are often found in conjugated form in biological samples such as urine and plasma. Liquid chromatography coupled with accurate mass spectrometry with multistage collision-induced dissociation provides spectral information concerning these metabolites in complex materials. Unfortunately, compound databases typically do not contain a sufficient number of records for such conjugates. We report here on the development of a novel protocol, referred to as ChemProphet, to annotate compounds, including conjugates, using compound databases such as PubChem and ChemSpider. The annotation of conjugates involves three steps: 1. Recognition of the type and number of conjugates in the sample; 2. Compound search and annotation of the deconjugated form; and 3. In silico evaluation of the candidate conjugate. ChemProphet assigns a spectrum to each candidate by automatically exploring the substructures corresponding to the observed product ion spectrum. When finished, it annotates the candidates assigning a rank for each candidate based on the calculated score that ranks its relative likelihood. We assessed our protocol by annotating a benchmark dataset by including the product ion spectra for 102 compounds, annotating the commercially available standard for quercetin 3-glucuronide, and by conducting a model experiment using urine from mice that had been administered a green tea extract. The results show that by using the ChemProphet approach, it is possible to annotate not only the deconjugated molecules but also the conjugated molecules using an automatic interpretation method based on deconjugation that involves multistage collision-induced dissociation and in silico calculated conjugation. PMID:26819907

  14. Subset of Kappa and Lambda Germline Sequences Result in Light Chains with a Higher Molecular Mass Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Barnidge, David R; Lundström, Susanna L; Zhang, Bo; Dasari, Surendra; Murray, David L; Zubarev, Roman A

    2015-12-01

    In our previous work, we showed that electrospray ionization of intact polyclonal kappa and lambda light chains isolated from normal serum generates two distinct, Gaussian-shaped, molecular mass distributions representing the light-chain repertoire. During the analysis of a large (>100) patient sample set, we noticed a low-intensity molecular mass distribution with a mean of approximately 24 250 Da, roughly 800 Da higher than the mean of the typical kappa molecular-mass distribution mean of 23 450 Da. We also observed distinct clones in this region that did not appear to contain any typical post-translational modifications that would account for such a large mass shift. To determine the origin of the high molecular mass clones, we performed de novo bottom-up mass spectrometry on a purified IgM monoclonal light chain that had a calculated molecular mass of 24 275.03 Da. The entire sequence of the monoclonal light chain was determined using multienzyme digestion and de novo sequence-alignment software and was found to belong to the germline allele IGKV2-30. The alignment of kappa germline sequences revealed ten IGKV2 and one IGKV4 sequences that contained additional amino acids in their CDR1 region, creating the high-molecular-mass phenotype. We also performed an alignment of lambda germline sequences, which showed additional amino acids in the CDR2 region, and the FR3 region of functional germline sequences that result in a high-molecular-mass phenotype. The work presented here illustrates the ability of mass spectrometry to provide information on the diversity of light-chain molecular mass phenotypes in circulation, which reflects the germline sequences selected by the immunoglobulin-secreting B-cell population. PMID:26598961

  15. Advanced solvent based methods for molecular characterization of soil organic matter by high-resolution mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tfaily, Malak M.; Chu, Rosalie K.; Tolic, Nikola; Roscioli, Kristyn M.; Anderton, Christopher R.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Robinson, Errol W.; Hess, Nancy J.

    2015-05-19

    Soil organic matter (SOM) a complex, heterogeneous mixture of above and belowground plant litter and animal and microbial residues at various degrees of decomposition, is a key reservoir for carbon (C) and nutrient biogeochemical cycling in soil based ecosystems. A limited understanding of the molecular composition of SOM limits the ability to routinely decipher chemical processes within soil and predict accurately how terrestrial carbon fluxes will response to changing climatic conditions and land use. To elucidate the molecular-level structure of SOM, we selectively extracted a broad range of intact SOM compounds by a combination of different organic solvents from soils with a wide range of C content. Our use of Electrospray ionization (ESI) coupled with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) and a suite of solvents with varying polarity significantly expands the inventory of the types of organic molecules present in soils. Specifically, we found that hexane is selective for lipid-like compounds with very low O:C ratios; water was selective for carbohydrates with high O:C ratios; acetonitrile preferentially extracts lignin, condensed structures, and tannin poly phenolic compounds with O:C > 0.5; methanol has higher selectivity towards compounds characterized with low O:C < 0.5; and hexane, MeOH, ACN and water solvents increase the number and types of organic molecules extracted from soil for a broader range of chemically diverse soil types. Our study of SOM molecules by ESI-FTICR MS revealed new insight into the molecular-level complexity of organics contained in soils.

  16. Mass transfer in SCW extraction molecular diffusion and mass transfer coefficients of ketones and alkenes in sub- and supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Goemans, M.G.E.; Gloyna, E.F.

    1996-10-01

    The potential of sub- and supercritical water as extraction solvents has been demonstrated for the (reactive) extraction of coals, used car tires, organic species from residual aqueous solutions, and class selective extraction of organic pollutants with different polarities from solids. In addition, the potential of extraction of coal with supercritical aqueous solutions has been studied. However, physical transport in water at elevated temperature and pressures- and their impact on heterogenous reactions and (reactive) extraction -are not adequately understood. This situation is largely due to the limited data that is available for diffusion in high temperature, high pressure water mixture. Only the molecular diffusion of Iodine ions and hydroquinone in near-critical subcritical water and the self diffusion of coefficient of compressed supercritical water have been reported. In this paper, we present molecular diffusion coefficients of benzophenone, acetone, naphthalene, and anthracene in water at infinite dilution. Pressures ranged from 250 to 500 bar at temperatures ranging from 50{degrees}C to 500{degrees}C resulting in water densities ranging from 1000 to 150 kg/m{sup 3}. Diffusion coefficients were determined by the Taylor-Aris dispersion technique. The effects of increased diffusion on the mass transfer coefficients for emulsions and packed beds were quantified. Molecular division coefficients were 10 to 20 times faster in supercritical water than in water at ambient conditions. Experimental results were correlated with hydrodynamic and kinetic theory. This study and results to be published elsewhere show that diffusion-limited conditions are much more likely to be encountered in supercritical water than is commonly acknowledged.

  17. Agarose and Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis Methods for Molecular Mass Analysis of 5–500 kDa Hyaluronan

    PubMed Central

    Bhilocha, Shardul; Amin, Ripal; Pandya, Monika; Yuan, Han; Tank, Mihir; LoBello, Jaclyn; Shytuhina, Anastasia; Wang, Wenlan; Wisniewski, Hans-Georg; de la Motte, Carol; Cowman, Mary K.

    2011-01-01

    Agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis systems for the molecular mass-dependent separation of hyaluronan (HA) in the size range of approximately 5–500 kDa have been investigated. For agarose-based systems, the suitability of different agarose types, agarose concentrations, and buffers systems were determined. Using chemoenzymatically synthesized HA standards of low polydispersity, the molecular mass range was determined for each gel composition, over which the relationship between HA mobility and logarithm of the molecular mass was linear. Excellent linear calibration was obtained for HA molecular mass as low as approximately 9 kDa in agarose gels. For higher resolution separation, and for extension to molecular masses as low as approximately 5 kDa, gradient polyacrylamide gels were superior. Densitometric scanning of stained gels allowed analysis of the range of molecular masses present in a sample, and calculation of weight-average and number-average values. The methods were validated for polydisperse HA samples with viscosity-average molecular masses of 112, 59, 37, and 22 kDa, at sample loads of 0.5 µg (for polyacrylamide) to 2.5 µg (for agarose). Use of the methods for electrophoretic mobility shift assays was demonstrated for binding of the HA-binding region of aggrecan (recombinant human aggrecan G1-IGD-G2 domains) to a 150 kDa HA standard. PMID:21684248

  18. Characterization of methyl methacrylate oligomers using secondary ion mass spectrometry, APCI mass spectrometry and molecular orbital theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, T.; Iwai, K.; Momoji, K.; Miyamoto, I.; Saiki, K.; Hashimoto, K.

    2003-01-01

    The ionization efficiency and fragmentation mechanism of methyl methacrylate (MMA) oligomers (3-mer˜8-mer) were investigated by using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and APCI mass spectrometry (APCI-MS). Protonation and fragmentation mechanisms of MMA oligomers were clarified by using molecular orbital (MO) methods. MMA oligomers were synthesized in anionic polymerization, and the oligomers were fractionated into 3-mer˜8-mer using gel permeation chromatography (GPC). In SIMS of MMA oligomers (3-mer˜8-mer), [MH] +, [MH-CH 3OH] +, [MH-methyl formate] + and [MH-2CH 3OH-methyl formate] + appeared. The peak intensities of adduct ions [M+Li] +, [M+Na] + and [M+K] + increased with the increase of the polymerization degree. The optimized geometries and H +, Li +, Na + and K + affinities of MMA monomer (1-mer), dimer (2-mer), and trimer (3-mer) were calculated using the PM3 and ab initio MO methods. The calculated H +, Li +, Na + and K + affinities increased in order of 1-mer, 2-mer and 3-mer of MMA.

  19. Molecular and nanoparticle postcolumn reagents for assay of low-molecular-mass biothiols using high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zu, Yanbing

    2009-10-15

    Determination of low-molecular-mass (LMM) biothiols in biological matrixes is of importance in the studies of their related bio-processes and for the clinical diagnostics of a variety of diseases. Standard method for the assay of the small biothiols is in demand. Postcolumn techniques used in high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) allow automation of the derivatization step and, therefore, are suitable for standardization of HPLC analysis. This paper gives an overview of the existing reaction systems useful for the postcolumn assay of the LMM biothiol molecules in conjunction with HPLC. The postcolumn reagents are classified by the types of their reactions with thiol-containing compounds. The chemical reactivity and selectivity as well as the spectroscopic characteristics of the postcolumn reagents have been addressed. The emerging strategies of using nanoparticles as thiol-reactive reagents and their applications in postcolumn detection of the LMM biothiols have also been discussed in detail. PMID:19442593

  20. Imaging mass spectrometry of the visual system: Advancing the molecular understanding of retina degenerations.

    PubMed

    Bowrey, Hannah E; Anderson, David M; Pallitto, Patrick; Gutierrez, Danielle B; Fan, Jie; Crouch, Rosalie K; Schey, Kevin L; Ablonczy, Zsolt

    2016-04-01

    Visual sensation is fundamental for quality of life, and loss of vision to retinal degeneration is a debilitating condition. The eye is the only part of the central nervous system that can be noninvasively observed with optical imaging. In the clinics, various spectroscopic methods provide high spatial resolution images of the fundus and the developing degenerative lesions. However, the currently utilized tools are not specific enough to establish the molecular underpinnings of retinal diseases. In contrast, mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool to identify molecularly specific disease indicators and classification markers. This technique is particularly well suited to the eye, where molecular information can be correlated with clinical data collected via noninvasive diagnostic imaging modalities. Recent studies during the last few recent years have uncovered a plethora of new spatially defined molecular information on several vision-threatening diseases, including age-related macular degeneration, Stargardt disease, glaucoma, cataract, as well as lipid disorders. Even though MS inside the eye cannot be performed noninvasively, by linking diagnostic and molecular information, these studies are the first step toward the development of smart ophthalmic diagnostic and surgical tools. Here, we provide an overview of current approaches applying MSI technology to ocular pathology. PMID:26586164

  1. Giant Molecular Clouds and High-Mass Star Formation in the Milky Way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    We are conducting an extensive investigation of high-mass (OB) star formation within the dense cores of giant molecular clouds (GMCS) throughout the first Galactic quadrant of the Milky Way using enhanced resolution Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) images in combination with high-resolution ground-based observations in millimeter wave molecular transitions and radio continuum. As part of this investigation several resolution enhancement algorithms are applied to the IRAS data, including the HIgh RESolution (HIRES) algorithm developed at the IRAS Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC), as well as others ("pixon" image reconstruction). In addition, as part of a related study, we have completed a large survey of the CO emission in the first Galactic quadrant using the 15-element array detector (QUARRY) with the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory (FCRAO) 14 m antenna, which provides sampling at an angular resolution of 50", comparable to that attained in the reprocessed IRAS data. Both of these data sets are compared with a sample of ultra-compact (UC) H II regions taken from a high-resolution multi-wavelength (6 and 20 cm) radio survey of the Galactic plane using the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA). Selected regions are observed in 1.3 mm continuum, which has proven to be particularly sensitive to the dust column density. Extensive observations of molecular clouds at high resolution in CO, CS and HCN are combined with the reprocessed IRAS high-resolution images to give a more complete picture of the physical conditions and kinematics of high-mass star forming GMCS. Our goals are to study in detail the morphology, structure, and rate of high-mass star formation within GMCs throughout the Galactic disk from the inner edge of the molecular ring to the outer Galaxy.

  2. High-molecular-mass hyaluronan mediates the cancer resistance of the naked mole rat.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiao; Azpurua, Jorge; Hine, Christopher; Vaidya, Amita; Myakishev-Rempel, Max; Ablaeva, Julia; Mao, Zhiyong; Nevo, Eviatar; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2013-07-18

    The naked mole rat (Heterocephalus glaber) displays exceptional longevity, with a maximum lifespan exceeding 30 years. This is the longest reported lifespan for a rodent species and is especially striking considering the small body mass of the naked mole rat. In comparison, a similarly sized house mouse has a maximum lifespan of 4 years. In addition to their longevity, naked mole rats show an unusual resistance to cancer. Multi-year observations of large naked mole-rat colonies did not detect a single incidence of cancer. Here we identify a mechanism responsible for the naked mole rat's cancer resistance. We found that naked mole-rat fibroblasts secrete extremely high-molecular-mass hyaluronan (HA), which is over five times larger than human or mouse HA. This high-molecular-mass HA accumulates abundantly in naked mole-rat tissues owing to the decreased activity of HA-degrading enzymes and a unique sequence of hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2). Furthermore, the naked mole-rat cells are more sensitive to HA signalling, as they have a higher affinity to HA compared with mouse or human cells. Perturbation of the signalling pathways sufficient for malignant transformation of mouse fibroblasts fails to transform naked mole-rat cells. However, once high-molecular-mass HA is removed by either knocking down HAS2 or overexpressing the HA-degrading enzyme, HYAL2, naked mole-rat cells become susceptible to malignant transformation and readily form tumours in mice. We speculate that naked mole rats have evolved a higher concentration of HA in the skin to provide skin elasticity needed for life in underground tunnels. This trait may have then been co-opted to provide cancer resistance and longevity to this species. PMID:23783513

  3. Current controlled vocabularies are insufficient to uniquely map molecular entities to mass spectrometry signal

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The comparison of analyte mass spectrometry precursor (MS1) signal is central to many proteomic (and other -omic) workflows. Standard vocabularies for mass spectrometry exist and provide good coverage for most experimental applications yet are insufficient for concise and unambiguous description of data concepts spanning the range of signal provenance from a molecular perspective (e.g. from charged peptides down to fine isotopes). Without a standard unambiguous nomenclature, literature searches, algorithm reproducibility and algorithm evaluation for MS-omics data processing are nearly impossible. Results We show how terms from current official ontologies are too vague or ambiguous to explicitly map molecular entities to MS signals and we illustrate the inconsistency and ambiguity of current colloquially used terms. We also propose a set of terms for MS1 signal that uniquely, succinctly and intuitively describe data concepts spanning the range of signal provenance from full molecule downs to fine isotopes. We suggest that additional community discussion of these terms should precede any further standardization efforts. We propose a novel nomenclature that spans the range of the required granularity to describe MS data processing from the perspective of the molecular provenance of the MS signal. Conclusions The proposed nomenclature provides a chain of succinct and unique terms spanning the signal created by a charged molecule down through each of its constituent subsignals. We suggest that additional community discussion of these terms should precede any further standardization efforts. PMID:25952148

  4. Ambient mass spectrometry for the intraoperative molecular diagnosis of human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Eberlin, Livia S; Norton, Isaiah; Orringer, Daniel; Dunn, Ian F; Liu, Xiaohui; Ide, Jennifer L; Jarmusch, Alan K; Ligon, Keith L; Jolesz, Ferenc A; Golby, Alexandra J; Santagata, Sandro; Agar, Nathalie Y R; Cooks, R Graham

    2013-01-29

    The main goal of brain tumor surgery is to maximize tumor resection while preserving brain function. However, existing imaging and surgical techniques do not offer the molecular information needed to delineate tumor boundaries. We have developed a system to rapidly analyze and classify brain tumors based on lipid information acquired by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS). In this study, a classifier was built to discriminate gliomas and meningiomas based on 36 glioma and 19 meningioma samples. The classifier was tested and results were validated for intraoperative use by analyzing and diagnosing tissue sections from 32 surgical specimens obtained from five research subjects who underwent brain tumor resection. The samples analyzed included oligodendroglioma, astrocytoma, and meningioma tumors of different histological grades and tumor cell concentrations. The molecular diagnosis derived from mass-spectrometry imaging corresponded to histopathology diagnosis with very few exceptions. Our work demonstrates that DESI-MS technology has the potential to identify the histology type of brain tumors. It provides information on glioma grade and, most importantly, may help define tumor margins by measuring the tumor cell concentration in a specimen. Results for stereotactically registered samples were correlated to preoperative MRI through neuronavigation, and visualized over segmented 3D MRI tumor volume reconstruction. Our findings demonstrate the potential of ambient mass spectrometry to guide brain tumor surgery by providing rapid diagnosis, and tumor margin assessment in near-real time. PMID:23300285

  5. Signature of an Intermediate-mass Black Hole in the Central Molecular Zone of Our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Tomoharu; Mizuno, Reiko; Miura, Kodai; Takekawa, Shunya

    2016-01-01

    We mapped the high-velocity compact cloud CO-0.40-0.22 in 21 molecular lines in the 3 mm band using the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m radio telescope. Eighteen lines were detected from CO-0.40-0.22. The map of each detected line shows that this cloud has a compact appearance (d ≃ 3 pc) and extremely broad velocity width (ΔV ≃ 100 km s-1). The mass and kinetic energy of CO-0.40-0.22 are estimated to be 103.6 M⊙ and 1049.7 erg, respectively. The representative position-velocity map along the major axis shows that CO-0.40-0.22 consists of an intense region with a shallow velocity gradient and a less intense high-velocity wing. Here, we show that this kinematical structure can be attributed to a gravitational kick to the molecular cloud caused by an invisible compact object with a mass of ˜105 M⊙. Its compactness and the absence of counterparts at other wavelengths suggest that this massive object is an intermediate-mass black hole.

  6. Screening for low molecular weight compounds in fish meal solubles by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple analytical method using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry was developed to screen for low molecular weight compounds in enzyme treated and untreated Alaskan pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) stickwater (SW) generated from processing fish meal with po...

  7. Elucidation of Drug Metabolite Structural Isomers Using Molecular Modeling Coupled with Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reading, Eamonn; Munoz-Muriedas, Jordi; Roberts, Andrew D; Dear, Gordon J; Robinson, Carol V; Beaumont, Claire

    2016-02-16

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) in combination with molecular modeling offers the potential for small molecule structural isomer identification by measurement of their gas phase collision cross sections (CCSs). Successful application of this approach to drug metabolite identification would facilitate resource reduction, including animal usage, and may benefit other areas of pharmaceutical structural characterization including impurity profiling and degradation chemistry. However, the conformational behavior of drug molecules and their metabolites in the gas phase is poorly understood. Here the gas phase conformational space of drug and drug-like molecules has been investigated as well as the influence of protonation and adduct formation on the conformations of drug metabolite structural isomers. The use of CCSs, measured from IM-MS and molecular modeling information, for the structural identification of drug metabolites has also been critically assessed. Detection of structural isomers of drug metabolites using IM-MS is demonstrated and, in addition, a molecular modeling approach has been developed offering rapid conformational searching and energy assessment of candidate structures which agree with experimental CCSs. Here it is illustrated that isomers must possess markedly dissimilar CCS values for structural differentiation, the existence and extent of CCS differences being ionization state and molecule dependent. The results present that IM-MS and molecular modeling can inform on the identity of drug metabolites and highlight the limitations of this approach in differentiating structural isomers. PMID:26752623

  8. The size-line width relation and the mass of molecular hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, M.; MacLaren, I.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    1990-03-01

    Some difficulties associated with the problem of cloud definition are considered, with particular regard to the crowded distribution of clouds and the difficulty of choosing an appropriate boundary in such circumstances. A number of tests carried out on the original data suggest that the delta(v) - S relation found by Solomon et al. (1987) is not a genuine reflection of the dynamical state of Giant Molecular Clouds. The Solomon et al. parameters, are insensitive to the actual cloud properties and are unable to distinguish true clouds from the consequences of sampling any crowded region of emission down to a low threshold temperature. The overall effect of such problems is to overestimate both the masses of Giant Molecular Clouds and the number of very large clouds.

  9. A molecular beam/quadrupole mass spectrometer system with synchronized beam modulation and digital waveform analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Adams, B. R.

    1983-01-01

    A performance evaluation is conducted for a molecular beam/mass spectrometer (MB/MS) system, as applied to a 1-30 torr microwave-discharge flow reactor (MWFR) used in the formation of the methylperoxy radical and a study of its subsequent destruction in the presence or absence of NO(x). The modulated MB/MS system is four-staged and differentially pumped. The results obtained by the MWFR study is illustrative of overall system performance, including digital waveform analysis; significant improvements over previous designs are noted in attainable S/N ratio, detection limit, and accuracy.

  10. Ultrasensitive detection of atmospheric constituents by supersonic molecular beam, multiphoton ionization, mass spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Syage, J A; Pollard, J E; Cohen, R B

    1987-09-01

    An ultrasensitive detection method for atmospheric monitoring has been developed based on the technique of supersonic molecular beam, resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization, and time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (MB/REMPI/TOFMS). Several organophosphonate and organosulfide compounds, representing simulants to a class of toxic compounds, were studied. Detection levels as low as 300 ppt (dimethyl sulfide) were obtained. Single-vibronic-level REMPI of the cooled molecules in conjunction with TOFMS provided selectivity of ~10(4) against chemically similar compounds in humid air expansions. The fragment ions formed by REMPI excitation are shown for diisopropyl methylphosphonate to depend strongly on the resonant intermediate state of the neutral molecule. PMID:20490096

  11. A laser and molecular beam mass spectrometer study of low-pressure dimethyl ether flames

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew McIlroy; Toby D. Hain; Hope A. Michelsen; Terrill A. Cool

    2000-12-15

    The oxidation of dimethyl ether (DME) is studied in low-pressure flames using new molecular beam mass spectrometer and laser diagnostics. Two 30.0-Torr, premixed DME/oxygen/argon flames are investigated with stoichiometries of 0.98 and 1.20. The height above burner profiles of nine stable species and two radicals are measured. These results are compared to the detailed chemical reaction mechanism of Curran and coworkers. Generally good agreement is found between the model and data. The largest discrepancies are found for the methyl radical profiles where the model predicts qualitatively different trends in the methyl concentration with stoichiometry than observed in the experiment.

  12. Sharing and community curation of mass spectrometry data with Global Natural Products Social Molecular Networking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingxun; Carver, Jeremy J; Phelan, Vanessa V; Sanchez, Laura M; Garg, Neha; Peng, Yao; Nguyen, Don Duy; Watrous, Jeramie; Kapono, Clifford A; Luzzatto-Knaan, Tal; Porto, Carla; Bouslimani, Amina; Melnik, Alexey V; Meehan, Michael J; Liu, Wei-Ting; Crüsemann, Max; Boudreau, Paul D; Esquenazi, Eduardo; Sandoval-Calderón, Mario; Kersten, Roland D; Pace, Laura A; Quinn, Robert A; Duncan, Katherine R; Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Floros, Dimitrios J; Gavilan, Ronnie G; Kleigrewe, Karin; Northen, Trent; Dutton, Rachel J; Parrot, Delphine; Carlson, Erin E; Aigle, Bertrand; Michelsen, Charlotte F; Jelsbak, Lars; Sohlenkamp, Christian; Pevzner, Pavel; Edlund, Anna; McLean, Jeffrey; Piel, Jörn; Murphy, Brian T; Gerwick, Lena; Liaw, Chih-Chuang; Yang, Yu-Liang; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Maansson, Maria; Keyzers, Robert A; Sims, Amy C; Johnson, Andrew R; Sidebottom, Ashley M; Sedio, Brian E; Klitgaard, Andreas; Larson, Charles B; Boya P, Cristopher A; Torres-Mendoza, Daniel; Gonzalez, David J; Silva, Denise B; Marques, Lucas M; Demarque, Daniel P; Pociute, Egle; O'Neill, Ellis C; Briand, Enora; Helfrich, Eric J N; Granatosky, Eve A; Glukhov, Evgenia; Ryffel, Florian; Houson, Hailey; Mohimani, Hosein; Kharbush, Jenan J; Zeng, Yi; Vorholt, Julia A; Kurita, Kenji L; Charusanti, Pep; McPhail, Kerry L; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Vuong, Lisa; Elfeki, Maryam; Traxler, Matthew F; Engene, Niclas; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Vining, Oliver B; Baric, Ralph; Silva, Ricardo R; Mascuch, Samantha J; Tomasi, Sophie; Jenkins, Stefan; Macherla, Venkat; Hoffman, Thomas; Agarwal, Vinayak; Williams, Philip G; Dai, Jingqui; Neupane, Ram; Gurr, Joshua; Rodríguez, Andrés M C; Lamsa, Anne; Zhang, Chen; Dorrestein, Kathleen; Duggan, Brendan M; Almaliti, Jehad; Allard, Pierre-Marie; Phapale, Prasad; Nothias, Louis-Felix; Alexandrov, Theodore; Litaudon, Marc; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Kyle, Jennifer E; Metz, Thomas O; Peryea, Tyler; Nguyen, Dac-Trung; VanLeer, Danielle; Shinn, Paul; Jadhav, Ajit; Müller, Rolf; Waters, Katrina M; Shi, Wenyuan; Liu, Xueting; Zhang, Lixin; Knight, Rob; Jensen, Paul R; Palsson, Bernhard Ø; Pogliano, Kit; Linington, Roger G; Gutiérrez, Marcelino; Lopes, Norberto P; Gerwick, William H; Moore, Bradley S; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Bandeira, Nuno

    2016-08-01

    The potential of the diverse chemistries present in natural products (NP) for biotechnology and medicine remains untapped because NP databases are not searchable with raw data and the NP community has no way to share data other than in published papers. Although mass spectrometry (MS) techniques are well-suited to high-throughput characterization of NP, there is a pressing need for an infrastructure to enable sharing and curation of data. We present Global Natural Products Social Molecular Networking (GNPS; http://gnps.ucsd.edu), an open-access knowledge base for community-wide organization and sharing of raw, processed or identified tandem mass (MS/MS) spectrometry data. In GNPS, crowdsourced curation of freely available community-wide reference MS libraries will underpin improved annotations. Data-driven social-networking should facilitate identification of spectra and foster collaborations. We also introduce the concept of 'living data' through continuous reanalysis of deposited data. PMID:27504778

  13. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry: In Situ Molecular Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Peggi M.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a relatively new imaging modality that allows mapping of a wide range of biomolecules within a thin tissue section. The technology uses a laser beam to directly desorb and ionize molecules from discrete locations on the tissue that are subsequently recorded in a mass spectrometer. IMS is distinguished by the ability to directly measure molecules in situ ranging from small metabolites to proteins, reporting hundreds to thousands of expression patterns from a single imaging experiment. This article reviews recent advances in IMS technology, applications, and experimental strategies that allow it to significantly aid in the discovery and understanding of molecular processes in biological and clinical samples. PMID:23259809

  14. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry for direct tissue analysis: a new frontier for molecular histology

    PubMed Central

    Rauser, Sandra; Deininger, Sören-Oliver; Höfler, Heinz

    2008-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a powerful tool for investigating the distribution of proteins and small molecules within biological systems through the in situ analysis of tissue sections. MALDI-IMS can determine the distribution of hundreds of unknown compounds in a single measurement and enables the acquisition of cellular expression profiles while maintaining the cellular and molecular integrity. In recent years, a great many advances in the practice of imaging mass spectrometry have taken place, making the technique more sensitive, robust, and ultimately useful. In this review, we focus on the current state of the art of MALDI-IMS, describe basic technological developments for MALDI-IMS of animal and human tissues, and discuss some recent applications in basic research and in clinical settings. PMID:18618129

  15. Evaluation of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the metabolic profiling of plant-fungus interaction in Aquilaria malaccensis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yong Foo; Chin, Sung-Tong; Perlmutter, Patrick; Marriott, Philip J

    2015-03-27

    To explore the possible obligate interactions between the phytopathogenic fungus and Aquilaria malaccensis which result in generation of a complex array of secondary metabolites, we describe a comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) method, coupled to accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) for the untargeted and comprehensive metabolic profiling of essential oils from naturally infected A. malaccensis trees. A polar/non-polar column configuration was employed, offering an improved separation pattern of components when compared to other column sets. Four different grades of the oils displayed quite different metabolic patterns, suggesting the evolution of a signalling relationship between the host tree (emergence of various phytoalexins) and fungi (activation of biotransformation). In total, ca. 550 peaks/metabolites were detected, of which tentative identification of 155 of these compounds was reported, representing between 20.1% and 53.0% of the total ion count. These are distributed over the chemical families of monoterpenic and sesquiterpenic hydrocarbons, oxygenated monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes (comprised of ketone, aldehyde, oxide, alcohol, lactone, keto-alcohol and diol), norterpenoids, diterpenoids, short chain glycols, carboxylic acids and others. The large number of metabolites detected, combined with the ease with which they are located in the 2D separation space, emphasises the importance of a comprehensive analytical approach for the phytochemical analysis of plant metabolomes. Furthermore, the potential of this methodology in grading agarwood oils by comparing the obtained metabolic profiles (pattern recognition for unique metabolite chemical families) is discussed. The phytocomplexity of the agarwood oils signified the production of a multitude of plant-fungus mediated secondary metabolites as chemical signals for natural ecological communication. To the best of our knowledge, this is the most complete

  16. Development and Validation of a Mass Spectrometry-Based Assay for the Molecular Diagnosis of Mucin-1 Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Blumenstiel, Brendan; DeFelice, Matthew; Birsoy, Ozge; Bleyer, Anthony J; Kmoch, Stanislav; Carter, Todd A; Gnirke, Andreas; Kidd, Kendrah; Rehm, Heidi L; Ronco, Lucienne; Lander, Eric S; Gabriel, Stacey; Lennon, Niall J

    2016-07-01

    Mucin-1 kidney disease, previously described as medullary cystic kidney disease type 1 (MCKD1, OMIM 174000), is an autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease recently shown to be caused by a single-base insertion within the variable number tandem repeat region of the MUC1 gene. Because of variable age of disease onset and often subtle signs and symptoms, clinical diagnosis of mucin-1 kidney disease and differentiation from other forms of hereditary kidney disease have been difficult. The causal insertion resides in a variable number tandem repeat region with high GC content, which has made detection by standard next-generation sequencing impossible to date. The inherently difficult nature of this mutation required an alternative method for routine detection and clinical diagnosis of the disease. We therefore developed and validated a mass spectrometry-based probe extension assay with a series of internal controls to detect the insertion event using 24 previously characterized positive samples from patients with mucin-1 kidney disease and 24 control samples known to be wild type for the variant. Validation results indicate an accurate and reliable test for clinically establishing the molecular diagnosis of mucin-1 kidney disease with 100% sensitivity and specificity across 275 tests called. PMID:27157321

  17. Atmospheric Oxidation of Squalene: Molecular Study Using COBRA Modeling and High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Fooshee, David R.; Aiona, Paige K.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Baldi, Pierre

    2015-10-22

    Squalene is a major component of skin and plant surface lipids, and is known to be present at high concentrations in indoor dust. Its high reactivity toward ozone makes it an important ozone sink and a natural protectant against atmospheric oxidizing agents. While the volatile products of squalene ozonolysis are known, the condensed-phase products have not been characterized. We present an analysis of condensed-phase products resulting from an extensive oxidation of squalene by ozone probed by electrospray ionization (ESI) high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS). A complex distribution of nearly 1,300 peaks assignable to molecular formulas is observed in direct infusion positive ion mode ESI mass spectra. The distribution of peaks in the mass spectra suggests that there are extensive cross-coupling reactions between hydroxy-carbonyl products of squalene ozonolysis. To get additional insights into the mechanism, we apply a Computational Brewing Application (COBRA) to simulate the oxidation of squalene in the presence of ozone, and compare predicted results with those observed by the HR-MS experiments. The system predicts over one billion molecular structures between 0-1450 Da, which correspond to about 27,000 distinct elemental formulas. Over 83% of the squalene oxidation products inferred from the mass spectrometry data are matched by the simulation. Simulation indicates a prevalence of peroxy groups, with hydroxyl and ether groups being the second-most important O-containing functional groups formed during squalene oxidation. These highly oxidized products of squalene ozonolysis may accumulate on indoor dust and surfaces, and contribute to their redox capacity.

  18. Atmospheric Oxidation of Squalene: Molecular Study Using COBRA Modeling and High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fooshee, David R; Aiona, Paige K; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A; Baldi, Pierre F

    2015-11-17

    Squalene is a major component of skin and plant surface lipids and is known to be present at high concentrations in indoor dust. Its high reactivity toward ozone makes it an important ozone sink and a natural protectant against atmospheric oxidizing agents. While the volatile products of squalene ozonolysis are known, the condensed-phase products have not been characterized. We present an analysis of condensed-phase products resulting from an extensive oxidation of squalene by ozone probed by electrospray ionization (ESI) high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS). A complex distribution of nearly 1300 peaks assignable to molecular formulas is observed in direct infusion positive ion mode ESI mass spectra. The distribution of peaks in the mass spectra suggests that there are extensive cross-coupling reactions between hydroxy-carbonyl products of squalene ozonolysis. To get additional insights into the mechanism, we apply a Computational Brewing Application (COBRA) to simulate the oxidation of squalene in the presence of ozone, and compare predicted results with those observed by the HR-MS experiments. The system predicts over one billion molecular structures between 0 and 1450 Da, which correspond to about 27 000 distinct elemental formulas. Over 83% of the squalene oxidation products inferred from the mass spectrometry data are matched by the simulation. The simulation indicates a prevalence of peroxy groups, with hydroxyl and ether groups being the second-most important O-containing functional groups formed during squalene oxidation. These highly oxidized products of squalene ozonolysis may accumulate on indoor dust and surfaces and contribute to their redox capacity. PMID:26492333

  19. Low-mass molecular dynamics simulation: A simple and generic technique to enhance configurational sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Yuan-Ping

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Reducing atomic masses by 10-fold vastly improves sampling in MD simulations. • CLN025 folded in 4 of 10 × 0.5-μs MD simulations when masses were reduced by 10-fold. • CLN025 folded as early as 96.2 ns in 1 of the 4 simulations that captured folding. • CLN025 did not fold in 10 × 0.5-μs MD simulations when standard masses were used. • Low-mass MD simulation is a simple and generic sampling enhancement technique. - Abstract: CLN025 is one of the smallest fast-folding proteins. Until now it has not been reported that CLN025 can autonomously fold to its native conformation in a classical, all-atom, and isothermal–isobaric molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. This article reports the autonomous and repeated folding of CLN025 from a fully extended backbone conformation to its native conformation in explicit solvent in multiple 500-ns MD simulations at 277 K and 1 atm with the first folding event occurring as early as 66.1 ns. These simulations were accomplished by using AMBER forcefield derivatives with atomic masses reduced by 10-fold on Apple Mac Pros. By contrast, no folding event was observed when the simulations were repeated using the original AMBER forcefields of FF12SB and FF14SB. The results demonstrate that low-mass MD simulation is a simple and generic technique to enhance configurational sampling. This technique may propel autonomous folding of a wide range of miniature proteins in classical, all-atom, and isothermal–isobaric MD simulations performed on commodity computers—an important step forward in quantitative biology.

  20. Molecular characterization of dissolved organic matter through a desalination process by high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Francisco, Nuria; Caixach, Josep

    2013-09-01

    The effect of different water treatments such as ultrafiltration (UF) and reverse osmosis (RO) on dissolved organic matter (DOM) is still unknown. Electrospray ionization Fourier transform orbitrap mass spectrometry has been used to provide valuable information of marine DOM evolution through a desalination process on a molecular scale. In the present manuscript, the characterization of four real composite water samples from a desalination pilot plant installed in the coast of Barcelona (Spain) has been carried out. The sampling was performed on each point of the pilot plant: raw seawater (RSW), UF effluent, brine RO and permeate RO. The mass spectra of the different samples show several thousand peaks, however for the present screening study, only the mass range m/z 200-500 and the main signals in this mass range (relative intensities ≥1%) have been considered. The analysis of RSW and UF samples reveal that there is little effect on DOM by the UF pilot. However, when the water is treated on the RO an important change on DOM has been observed. The recurring periodical patterns found in RSW and UF are lost in Permeate RO sample. Compounds with more aliphatic character, with higher H/C ratio (H/Cav 1.72) are present in the Permeate and some of them have been tentatively identified as fatty acids. PMID:23879562

  1. Low mass star and brown dwarf formation in the Orion B molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Joanna Lisa

    I present an extensive near-infrared imaging and spectroscopic survey of young, low mass objects in the Orion B molecular cloud. Results of this survey are used to investigate the shape of the low mass initial mass function (IMF) and examine the stellar and substellar populations of three young clusters in Orion B, ultimately placing observational constraints on models of brown dwarf formation. Classical star formation theory predicts that the minimum mass required for the birth of a star is roughly one solar mass. However, studies of Galactic field stars have revealed many smaller objects, including significant populations of sub-solar mass stars (M[Asymptotically = to]0.2-0.3[Special characters omitted.] ) and brown dwarfs (M<0.08[Special characters omitted.] ). The origin of these objects remains an unsolved problem in modern astrophysics. Using FLAMINGOS on the Kitt Peak National Observatory 2.1 and 4 meter telescopes, I have completed a new J, H , and K -band imaging survey of ~6 square degrees of Orion B and compiled a new library of ~200 JH spectra of M stars in the young clusters NGC 2024, NGC 2068, and NGC 2071. I combine the photometry and spectroscopy to construct Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams, inferring masses and ages for cluster members using pre-main sequence evolutionary models. Median ages, substellar disk frequencies, IMFs, and the abundance of brown dwarfs ( R ss ) are determined and the spatial distribution of M stars is discussed. The results show the IMF peaks for the Orion B clusters (M peak [Asymptotically = to]0.2-0.3[Special characters omitted.] ) are consistent with each other but different from isolated star forming regions such as Taurus. There is also evidence for a dependence of the peak mass on local gas density. A significant fraction of brown dwarfs are shown to have an infrared excess, indicative of circumsubstellar disks. Finally, I find that the R ss is not universal but varies from region to region. After examining the

  2. On the probability distribution function of the mass surface density of molecular clouds. II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischera, Jörg

    2014-11-01

    The probability distribution function (PDF) of the mass surface density of molecular clouds provides essential information about the structure of molecular cloud gas and condensed structures out of which stars may form. In general, the PDF shows two basic components: a broad distribution around the maximum with resemblance to a log-normal function, and a tail at high mass surface densities attributed to turbulence and self-gravity. In a previous paper, the PDF of condensed structures has been analyzed and an analytical formula presented based on a truncated radial density profile, ρ(r) = ρc/ (1 + (r/r0)2)n/ 2 with central density ρc and inner radius r0, widely used in astrophysics as a generalization of physical density profiles. In this paper, the results are applied to analyze the PDF of self-gravitating, isothermal, pressurized, spherical (Bonnor-Ebert spheres) and cylindrical condensed structures with emphasis on the dependence of the PDF on the external pressure pext and on the overpressure q-1 = pc/pext, where pc is the central pressure. Apart from individual clouds, we also consider ensembles of spheres or cylinders, where effects caused by a variation of pressure ratio, a distribution of condensed cores within a turbulent gas, and (in case of cylinders) a distribution of inclination angles on the mean PDF are analyzed. The probability distribution of pressure ratios q-1 is assumed to be given by P(q-1) ∝ q-k1/ (1 + (q0/q)γ)(k1 + k2) /γ, where k1, γ, k2, and q0 are fixed parameters. The PDF of individual spheres with overpressures below ~100 is well represented by the PDF of a sphere with an analytical density profile with n = 3. At higher pressure ratios, the PDF at mass surface densities Σ ≪ Σ(0), where Σ(0) is the central mass surface density, asymptotically approaches the PDF of a sphere with n = 2. Consequently, the power-law asymptote at mass surface densities above the peak steepens from Psph(Σ) ∝ Σ-2 to Psph(Σ) ∝ Σ-3. The

  3. Early stages of insulin fibrillogenesis examined with ion mobility mass spectrometry and molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Cole, Harriet; Porrini, Massimiliano; Morris, Ryan; Smith, Tom; Kalapothakis, Jason; Weidt, Stefan; Mackay, C Logan; MacPhee, Cait E; Barran, Perdita E

    2015-10-21

    A prevalent type of protein misfolding causes the formation of β-sheet-rich structures known as amyloid fibrils. Research into the mechanisms of fibril formation has implications for both disease prevention and nanoscale templating technologies. This investigation into the aggregation of insulin utilises ion mobility mass spectrometry coupled with molecular modelling to identify and characterise oligomers formed during the 'lag' phase that precedes fibril growth. High resolution mass spectrometry and collision induced dissociation is used to unequivocally assign species as m/z coincident multimers or confomers, providing a robust analytical approach that supports the use of molecular dynamics to atomistically resolve the observed oligomers. We show that insulin oligomerises to form species In where 2 ≤ n ≤ 12 and within this set of oligomers we delineate over 60 distinct conformations, the most dominant of which are compact species. Modelling trained with experimental data suggests that the dominant compact dimers are enriched in β-sheet secondary structure and dominated by hydrophobic interactions, and provides a linear relationship between Rg and collision cross section. This approach provides detailed insight to the early stages of assembly of this much studied amyloidogenic protein, and can be used to inform models of nucleation and growth. PMID:26369607

  4. Molecular characterization of low molecular weight dissolved organic matter in water reclamation processes using Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Phungsai, Phanwatt; Kurisu, Futoshi; Kasuga, Ikuro; Furumai, Hiroaki

    2016-09-01

    Reclaimed water has recently become an important water source for urban use, but the composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in reclaimed water has rarely been characterized at the compound level because of its complexity. In this study, the transformation and changes in composition of low molecular weight DOM in water reclamation processes, where secondary effluent of the municipal wastewater treatment plant was further treated by biofiltration, ozonation and chlorination, were investigated by "unknown" screening analysis using Orbitrap mass spectrometry (Orbitrap MS). The intense ions were detected over an m/z range from 100 to 450. In total, 2412 formulae with various heteroatoms were assigned, and formulae with carbon (C), hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O) only and C, H, O and sulfur (S) were the most abundant species. During biofiltration, CHO-only compounds with relatively high hydrogen to carbon (H/C) ratio or with saturated structure were preferentially removed, while CHOS compounds were mostly removed. Ozonation induced the greatest changes in DOM composition. CHOS compounds were mostly decreased after ozonation while ozone selectively removed CHO compounds with relatively unsaturated structure and produced compounds that were more saturated and with a higher degree of oxidation. After chlorination, 168 chlorine-containing formulae, chlorinated disinfection by-products (DBPs), were additionally detected. Candidate DBP precursors were determined by tracking chlorinated DBPs formed via electrophilic substitution, half of which were generated during the ozonation. PMID:27235773

  5. Detection of Labile Low-Molecular-Mass Transition Metal Complexes in Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Sean P; Moore, Michael J; Lindahl, Paul A

    2015-06-01

    Liquid chromatography was used with an online inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer to detect low-molecular-mass (LMM) transition metal complexes in mitochondria isolated from fermenting yeast cells, human Jurkat cells, and mouse brain and liver. These complexes constituted 20-40% of total mitochondrial Mn, Fe, Zn, and Cu ions. The major LMM Mn complex in yeast mitochondria, called Mn1100, had a mass of ∼1100 Da and a concentration of ∼2 μM. Mammalian mitochondria contained a second Mn species with a mass of ∼2000 Da at a comparable concentration. The major Fe complex in mitochondria isolated from exponentially growing yeast cells had a mass of ∼580 Da; the concentration of Fe580 in mitochondria was ∼100 μM. When mitochondria were isolated from fermenting cells in postexponential phase, the mass of the dominant LMM Fe complex was ∼1100 Da. Upon incubation, the intensity of Fe1100 declined and that of Fe580 increased, suggesting that the two are interrelated. Mammalian mitochondria contained Fe580 and two other Fe species (Fe2000 and Fe1100) at concentrations of ∼50 μM each. The dominant LMM Zn species in mitochondria had a mass of ∼1200 Da and a concentration of ∼110 μM. Mammalian mitochondria contained a second major LMM Zn species at 1500 Da. The dominant LMM Cu species in yeast mitochondria had a mass of ∼5000 Da and a concentration in yeast mitochondria of ∼16 μM; Cu5000 was not observed in mammalian mitochondria. The dominant Co species in mitochondria, Co1200, had a concentration of 20 nM and was probably a cobalamin. Mammalian but not yeast mitochondria contained a LMM Mo species, Mo730, at a concentration of ∼1 μM. Increasing Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn concentrations 10-fold in the medium increased the concentration of the same element in the corresponding isolated mitochondria. Treatment with metal chelators confirmed that these LMM species were labile. The dominant S species at 1100 Da was not free glutathione or glutathione

  6. Detection of Labile Low-Molecular-Mass Transition Metal Complexes in Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Sean P.; Moore, Michael J.; Lindahl, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid chromatography was used with an on-line inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer to detect low-molecular-mass (LMM) transition metal complexes in mitochondria isolated from fermenting yeast cells, human Jurkat cells, and mouse brain and liver. These complexes constituted 20 – 40% of total mitochondrial Mn, Fe, Zn, and Cu ions. The major LMM Mn complex in yeast mitochondria had a mass of ca. 1100 Da and a concentration of ~ 2 μM. Mammalian mitochondria contained a second Mn species with a mass of ca. 2000 Da at a comparable concentration. The major Fe complex in mitochondria isolated from exponentially growing yeast cells had a mass of ca. 580 Da; the concentration of Fe580 in mitochondria was ca. 100 μM. When mitochondria were isolated from fermenting cells in post-exponential phase, the mass of the dominant LMM Fe complex was ca. 1100 Da. Upon incubation, the intensity of Fe1100 declined and Fe580 increased, suggesting that the two are interrelated. Mammalian mitochondria contained Fe580 and 2 other Fe species (Fe2000 and Fe1100) at concentrations of ca. 50 μM each. The dominant LMM Zn species in mitochondria had a mass of ca. 1200 Da and a concentration of ca. 110 μM. Mammalian mitochondria contained a second major LMM Zn species at 1500 Da. The dominant LMM Cu species in yeast mitochondria had a mass of ca. 5000 Da and a concentration in yeast mitochondria of ca. 16 μM; Cu5000 was not observed in mammalian mitochondria. The dominant Co species in mitochondria, Co1200, had a concentration of 20 nM and was probably a cobalamin. Mammalian but not yeast mitochondria contained a LMM Mo species, Mo730, at ca. 1 μM concentration. Increasing Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn concentrations 10 fold in the medium increased the concentration of the same element in the corresponding isolated mitochondria. Treatment with metal chelators confirmed that these LMM species were labile. The dominant S species at 1100 Da was not free GSH or GSSG. PMID:26018429

  7. Mass-spectrometry-based molecular characterization of extracellular vesicles: lipidomics and proteomics.

    PubMed

    Kreimer, Simion; Belov, Arseniy M; Ghiran, Ionita; Murthy, Shashi K; Frank, David A; Ivanov, Alexander R

    2015-06-01

    This review discusses extracellular vesicles (EVs), which are submicron-scale, anuclear, phospholipid bilayer membrane enclosed vesicles that contain lipids, metabolites, proteins, and RNA (micro and messenger). They are shed from many, if not all, cell types and are present in biological fluids and conditioned cell culture media. The term EV, as coined by the International Society of Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV), encompasses exosomes (30-100 nm in diameter), microparticles (100-1000 nm), apoptotic blebs, and other EV subsets. EVs have been implicated in cell-cell communication, coagulation, inflammation, immune response modulation, and disease progression. Multiple studies report that EV secretion from disease-affected cells contributes to disease progression, e.g., tumor niche formation and cancer metastasis. EVs are attractive sources of biomarkers due to their biological relevance and relatively noninvasive accessibility from a range of physiological fluids. This review is focused on the molecular profiling of the protein and lipid constituents of EVs, with emphasis on mass-spectrometry-based "omic" analytical techniques. The challenges in the purification and molecular characterization of EVs, including contamination of isolates and limitations in sample quantities, are discussed along with possible solutions. Finally, the review discusses the limited but growing investigation of post-translational modifications of EV proteins and potential strategies for future in-depth molecular characterization of EVs. PMID:25927954

  8. Molecular and system parameters governing mass and charge transport in polar liquids and electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Petrowsky, Matt; Fleshman, Allison; Ismail, Mohd; Glatzhofer, Daniel T; Bopege, Dharshani N; Frech, Roger

    2012-08-23

    Onsager's model of the dielectric constant is used to provide a molecular-level picture of how the dielectric constant affects mass and charge transport in organic liquids and organic liquid electrolytes. Specifically, the molecular and system parameters governing transport are the molecular dipole moment μ and the solvent dipole density N. The compensated Arrhenius formalism (CAF) writes the temperature-dependent ionic conductivity or diffusion coefficient as an Arrhenius-like expression that also includes a static dielectric constant (ε(s)) dependence in the exponential prefactor. The temperature dependence of ε(s) and therefore the temperature dependence of the exponential prefactor is due to the quantity N/T, where T is the temperature. Using the procedure described in the CAF, values of the activation energy can be obtained by scaling out the N/T dependence instead of the ε(s) dependence. It has been previously shown that a plot of the prefactors versus ε(s) results in a master curve, and here it is shown that a master curve also results by plotting the prefactors against N/T. Therefore, the CAF can be applied by using temperature-dependent density data instead of temperature-dependent dielectric constant data. This application is demonstrated for diffusion data of n-nitriles, n-thiols, n-acetates, and 2-ketones, as well as conductivity data for dilute tetrabutylammonium triflate-nitrile electrolytes. PMID:22838847

  9. Mass transport and alloying during InN growth on GaN by molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Xie, M.H.; Wu, H.S.; Tong, S.Y.

    2006-05-29

    During Stranski-Krastanov (SK) growth of InN on GaN by molecular-beam epitaxy, a mass transport is noted from the two-dimensional wetting layer and/or the surface excess metal adlayers to the SK islands when the excess nitrogen flux is used for deposition. The extent of mass transport depends on the material coverage. For growth under the excess indium flux condition, no such mass transport is observed.

  10. Molecular Line Emission Towards High-Mass Clumps: The MALT90 Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathborne, J. M.; Whitaker, J. S.; Jackson, J. M.; Foster, J. B.; Contreras, Y.; Stephens, I. W.; Guzmán, A. E.; Longmore, S. N.; Sanhueza, P.; Schuller, F.; Wyrowski, F.; Urquhart, J. S.

    2016-07-01

    The Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz survey aims to characterise the physical and chemical evolution of high-mass clumps. Recently completed, it mapped 90 GHz line emission towards 3 246 high-mass clumps identified from the ATLASGAL 870 μm Galactic plane survey. By utilising the broad frequency coverage of the Mopra telescope's spectrometer, maps in 16 different emission lines were simultaneously obtained. Here, we describe the first catalogue of the detected line emission, generated by Gaussian profile fitting to spectra extracted towards each clumps' 870 μm dust continuum peak. Synthetic spectra show that the catalogue has a completeness of > 95%, a probability of a false-positive detection of < 0.3%, and a relative uncertainty in the measured quantities of < 20% over the range of detection criteria. The detection rates are highest for the (1-0) transitions of HCO+, HNC, N2H+, and HCN (~77-89%). Almost all clumps (~95%) are detected in at least one of the molecular transitions, just over half of the clumps (~53%) are detected in four or more of the transitions, while only one clump is detected in 13 transitions. We find several striking trends in the ensemble of properties for the different molecular transitions when plotted as a function of the clumps' evolutionary state as estimated from Spitzer mid-IR images, including (1) HNC is relatively brighter in colder, less evolved clumps than those that show active star formation, (2) N2H+ is relatively brighter in the earlier stages, (3) that the observed optical depth decreases as the clumps evolve, and (4) the optically thickest HCO+ emission shows a `blue-red asymmetry' indicating overall collapse that monotonically decreases as the clumps evolve. This catalogue represents the largest compiled database of line emission towards high-mass clumps and is a valuable data set for detailed studies of these objects.

  11. Chemical analysis and genotoxicity of high molecular mass PAH in sediment samples and biota

    SciTech Connect

    McCarry, B.E.; Marvin, C.H.; Smith, R.W.; Bryant, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    A normal phase liquid chromatography (NPLC) method was used to fractionate the organic extracts of prepared from coal tar-contaminated sediments from hamilton Harbor in Ontario and from Sydney Harbor in Nova Scotia into molecular mass classes. Each PAH fraction up to 302 amu was analyzed by GC-MS and fractions containing PAH with molecular masses greater than 302 amu were analyzed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) LC-MS.Each fraction was also subjected to Ames bioassays using a TA100-like strain of Salmonella typhimurium (YG1025 + S9). The 300/302 amu, 326/328 and 350/352 amu PAH fractions accounted for 25% of the total genotoxic response of the extract; these PAH constitute a substantial genotoxic burden. A number of 300, 302, 326, 350, 374 and 400 amu PAH were identified using APCI LC-MS and comparison with authentic standards. The non-polar aromatic extracts of bottom sediments, suspended sediments and zebra mussels from Hamilton Harbor were also examined by GC-MS, APCI LC-MS and genotoxicity bioassays. The profiles of the priority and high mass PAH in these samples were identical showing that all PAH up to and exceeding 400 amu were readily bioavailable to biota such as Zebra mussels. In addition, the pseudo faeces of the Zebra mussels and amphipod detritivores which fed on the pseudo faeces had chemical profiles identical to the Zebra mussels. Since many sport fish prize amphipods as food, this observation demonstrates a pathway for organic contaminants adsorbed to suspended sediments to enter the food chain of non-bottom-feeding fish in areas infested by Zebra mussels.

  12. Dietary flavonoid fisetin increases abundance of high-molecular-mass hyaluronan conferring resistance to prostate oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lall, Rahul K; Syed, Deeba N; Khan, Mohammad Imran; Adhami, Vaqar M; Gong, Yuansheng; Lucey, John A; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2016-09-01

    We and others have shown previously that fisetin, a plant flavonoid, has therapeutic potential against many cancer types. Here, we examined the probable mechanism of its action in prostate cancer (PCa) using a global metabolomics approach. HPLC-ESI-MS analysis of tumor xenografts from fisetin-treated animals identified several metabolic targets with hyaluronan (HA) as the most affected. Efficacy of fisetin on HA was then evaluated in vitro and also in vivo in the transgenic TRAMP mouse model of PCa. Size exclusion chromatography-multiangle laser light scattering (SEC-MALS) was performed to analyze the molar mass (Mw) distribution of HA. Fisetin treatment downregulated intracellular and secreted HA levels both in vitro and in vivo Fisetin inhibited HA synthesis and degradation enzymes, which led to cessation of HA synthesis and also repressed the degradation of the available high-molecular-mass (HMM)-HA. SEC-MALS analysis of intact HA fragment size revealed that cells and animals have more abundance of HMM-HA and less of low-molecular-mass (LMM)-HA upon fisetin treatment. Elevated HA levels have been shown to be associated with disease progression in certain cancer types. Biological responses triggered by HA mainly depend on the HA polymer length where HMM-HA represses mitogenic signaling and has anti-inflammatory properties whereas LMM-HA promotes proliferation and inflammation. Similarly, Mw analysis of secreted HA fragment size revealed less HMM-HA is secreted that allowed more HMM-HA to be retained within the cells and tissues. Our findings establish that fisetin is an effective, non-toxic, potent HA synthesis inhibitor, which increases abundance of antiangiogenic HMM-HA and could be used for the management of PCa. PMID:27335141

  13. Computer programs for the interpretation of low resolution mass spectra: Program for calculation of molecular isotopic distribution and program for assignment of molecular formulas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Kohl, F. J.

    1977-01-01

    Two FORTRAN computer programs for the interpretation of low resolution mass spectra were prepared and tested. One is for the calculation of the molecular isotopic distribution of any species from stored elemental distributions. The program requires only the input of the molecular formula and was designed for compatability with any computer system. The other program is for the determination of all possible combinations of atoms (and radicals) which may form an ion having a particular integer mass. It also uses a simplified input scheme and was designed for compatability with any system.

  14. A 2000 Solar Mass Rotating Molecular Disk Around NGC 6334A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraemer, Kathleen E.; Jackson, James M.; Paglione, A. D.; Bolatto, Alberto D.

    1997-01-01

    We present millimeter and centimeter wave spectroscopic observations of the H II region NGC 6334A. We have mapped the source in several transitions of CO, CS, and NH3. The molecular emission shows a distinct flattened structure in the east-west direction. This structure is probably a thick molecular disk or torus (2.2 x 0.9 pc) responsible for the bipolarity of the near-infrared (NIR) and radio continuum emission which extends in two "lobes" to the north and south of the shell-like H II region. The molecular disk is rotating from west to east (omega approximately equals 2.4 km/s.pc) about an axis approximately parallel to the radio and NIR emission lobes. By assuming virial equilibrium, we find that the molecular disk contains approximately 2000 solar mass. Single-component gas excitation model calculations show that the molecular gas in the disk is warmer and denser (T(sub k) approximately equals 60 K, n approximately equals 3000/cc) than the gas to the north and south (T(sub k) approximately equals 50 K, n approximately equals 400/cc). High resolution (approximately 5 sec) NH3 (3, 3) images of NGC 6334A reveal several small (approximately 0.1 pc) clumps, one of which lies southwest of the radio continuum shell, and is spatially coincident with a near-infrared source, IRS 20. A second NH3 clump is coincident with an H2O maser and the center of a molecular outflow. The dense gas tracers, CS J = 5 approaches 4 and 7 approaches 6, peak near IRS 20 and the H2O maser, not at NGC 6334A. IRS 20 has a substantial far-infrared (FIR) luminosity L(sub FIR) approximately 10(exp 5) solar luminosity, which indicates the presence of an O 7.5 star but has no detected radio continuum (F(sub 6 cm) < 0.02 Jy). The combination of dense gas, a large FIR luminosity and a lack of radio continuum can best be explained if IRS 20 is a protostar. A third clump of NH3 emission lies to the west of IRS 20 but is not associated with any other molecular or continuum features. The star formation

  15. On the use of mass scaling for stable and efficient simulated tempering with molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Tetsuro; Pantelopulos, George A; Takahashi, Takuya; Straub, John E

    2016-08-01

    Simulated tempering (ST) is a generalized-ensemble algorithm that employs trajectories exploring a range of temperatures to effectively sample rugged energy landscapes. When implemented using the molecular dynamics method, ST can require the use of short time steps for ensuring the stability of trajectories at high temperatures. To address this shortcoming, a mass-scaling ST (MSST) method is presented in which the particle mass is scaled in proportion to the temperature. Mass scaling in the MSST method leads to velocity distributions that are independent of temperature and eliminates the need for velocity scaling after the accepted temperature updates that are required in conventional ST simulations. The homogeneity in time scales with changing temperature improves the stability of simulations and allows for the use of longer time steps at high temperatures. As a result, the MSST is found to be more efficient than the standard ST method, particularly for cases in which a large temperature range is employed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27338239

  16. A novel asymmetric-loop molecular beacon-based two-phase hybridization assay for accurate and high-throughput detection of multiple drug resistance-conferring point mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qinghai; Wu, Nan; Xie, Meng; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Ming; Li, Jianjun; Zhuo, Lisha; Kuang, Hong; Fu, Weiling

    2012-01-01

    Summary The accurate and high-throughput detection of drug resistance-related multiple point mutations remains a challenge. Although the combination of molecular beacons with bio-immobilization technology, such as microarray, is promising, its application is difficult due to the ineffective immobilization of molecular beacons on the chip surface. Here, we propose a novel asymmetric-loop molecular beacon in which the loop consists of 2 parts. One is complementary to a target, while the other is complementary to an oligonucleotide probe immobilized on the chip surface. With this novel probe, a two-phase hybridization assay can be used for simultaneously detecting multiple point mutations. This assay will have advantages, such as easy probe availability, multiplex detection, low background, and high-efficiency hybridization, and may provide a new avenue for the immobilization of molecular beacons and high-throughput detection of point mutations. PMID:22460100

  17. Accurate and reliable quantification of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D species by liquid chromatography high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry[S

    PubMed Central

    Liebisch, Gerhard; Matysik, Silke

    2015-01-01

    In general, mass spectrometric quantification of small molecules in routine laboratory testing utilizes liquid chromatography coupled to low mass resolution triple-quadrupole mass spectrometers (QQQs). Here we introduce high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (quadrupole-Orbitrap) for the quantification of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D [25(OH)D], a marker of the vitamin D status, because the specificity of 25(OH)D immunoassays is still questionable and mass spectrometric quantification is becoming increasingly important. Liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/HR-MS) was used to quantify 25-hydroxy-cholecalciferol [25(OH)D3], 25-hydroxy-ergocalciferol [25(OH)D2], and their C3-epimers 3-epi-25(OH)D3 and 3-epi-25(OH)D2. The method has a run time of 5 min and was validated according to the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency guidelines. High mass resolution was advantageously applied to separate a quasi-isobaric interference of the internal standard D6-25(OH)D2 with 3-epi-25(OH)D3. All analytes showed an imprecision of below 10% coefficient of variation (CV), trueness between 90% and 110%, and limits of quantification below 10 nM. Concentrations measured by LC-MS/HR-MS are in good agreement with those of the National Institute of Standards and Technology reference methods using LC-MS/MS (QQQ). In conclusion, quantification of 25(OH)D by LC-MS/HR-MS is applicable for routine testing and also holds promise for highly specific quantification of other small molecules. PMID:25833687

  18. Low virial parameters in molecular clouds: Implications for high-mass star formation and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffmann, Jens; Pillai, Thushara; Goldsmith, Paul F. E-mail: tpillai@astro.caltech.edu

    2013-12-20

    Whether or not molecular clouds and embedded cloud fragments are stable against collapse is of utmost importance for the study of the star formation process. Only 'supercritical' cloud fragments are able to collapse and form stars. The virial parameter α = M {sub vir}/M, which compares the virial mass to the actual mass, provides one way to gauge stability against collapse. Supercritical cloud fragments are characterized by α ≲ 2, as indicated by a comprehensive stability analysis considering perturbations in pressure and density gradients. Past research has suggested that virial parameters α ≳ 2 prevail in clouds. This would suggest that collapse toward star formation is a gradual and relatively slow process and that magnetic fields are not needed to explain the observed cloud structure. Here, we review a range of very recent observational studies that derive virial parameters <<2 and compile a catalog of 1325 virial parameter estimates. Low values of α are in particular observed for regions of high-mass star formation (HMSF). These observations may argue for a more rapid and violent evolution during collapse. This would enable 'competitive accretion' in HMSF, constrain some models of 'monolithic collapse', and might explain the absence of high-mass starless cores. Alternatively, the data could point at the presence of significant magnetic fields ∼1 mG at high gas densities. We examine to what extent the derived observational properties might be biased by observational or theoretical uncertainties. For a wide range of reasonable parameters, our conclusions appear to be robust with respect to such biases.

  19. The atomic and molecular content of disks around very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Pascucci, I.; Herczeg, G.; Carr, J. S.; Bruderer, S.

    2013-12-20

    There is growing observational evidence that disk evolution is stellar-mass-dependent. Here, we show that these dependencies extend to the atomic and molecular content of disk atmospheres. We analyze a unique dataset of high-resolution Spitzer/IRS spectra from eight very low mass star and brown dwarf disks. We report the first detections of Ne{sup +}, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and tentative detections of H{sub 2}O toward these faint and low-mass disks. Two of our [Ne II] 12.81 μm emission lines likely trace the hot (≥5000 K) disk surface irradiated by X-ray photons from the central stellar/sub-stellar object. The H{sub 2} S(2) and S(1) fluxes are consistent with arising below the fully or partially ionized surface traced by the [Ne II] emission in gas at ∼600 K. We confirm the higher C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/HCN flux and column density ratio in brown dwarf disks previously noted from low-resolution IRS spectra. Our high-resolution spectra also show that the HCN/H{sub 2}O fluxes of brown dwarf disks are on average higher than those of T Tauri disks. Our LTE modeling hints that this difference extends to column density ratios if H{sub 2}O lines trace warm ≥600 K disk gas. These trends suggest that the inner regions of brown dwarf disks have a lower O/C ratio than those of T Tauri disks, which may result from a more efficient formation of non-migrating icy planetesimals. An O/C = 1, as inferred from our analysis, would have profound implications on the bulk composition of rocky planets that can form around very low mass stars and brown dwarfs.

  20. Differential Label-free Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis Cultured under Aerobic and Suboxic Conditions by Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Ruihua; Elias, Dwayne A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Shen, Yufeng; McIntosh, Martin; Wang, Pei; Goddard, Carrie D.; Callister, Stephen J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-04-01

    We describe the application of liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC/MS) without the use of stable isotope labeling for differential quantitative proteomics analysis of whole cell lysates of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cultured under aerobic and sub-oxic conditions. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to initially identify peptide sequences, and LC coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LC-FTICR) was used to confirm these identifications, as well as measure relative peptide abundances. 2343 peptides, covering 668 proteins were identified with high confidence and quantified. Among these proteins, a subset of 56 changed significantly using statistical approaches such as SAM, while another subset of 56 that were annotated as performing housekeeping functions remained essentially unchanged in relative abundance. Numerous proteins involved in anaerobic energy metabolism exhibited up to a 10-fold increase in relative abundance when S. oneidensis is transitioned from aerobic to sub-oxic conditions.

  1. Characterization of macromolecular complexes in red wine: Composition, molecular mass distribution and particle size.

    PubMed

    Bindon, Keren A; Carew, Anna L; Mierczynska-Vasilev, Agnieszka; Kassara, Stella; Kerslake, Fiona; Smith, Paul A

    2016-05-15

    Precipitates were prepared from two compositionally different Pinot noir wines with addition of excess ethanol, and contained primarily polysaccharide, tannin and protein. The ethanol-soluble material was further fractionated into polymeric (tannin) and monomeric phenolics. Tannin associated with precipitates was of a higher molecular mass than that remaining in ethanolic solution. Wine fractions were reconstituted at the ratios of the original wine and analyzed using nanoparticle tracking analysis. The average particle size of the tannin fraction was 75-89 nm, and increased when combined with the precipitate (≅ 200 nm). Addition of the monomeric fraction to the tannin-precipitate complex increased both the incidence and concentration of smaller particles, reducing the average particle size. The formation of aggregates occurred in all fractions and only minor differences in particle size distribution were found between wines. Differences in particle concentration between wines appear to be due to differences in the total concentration of macromolecules rather than compositional differences. PMID:26776042

  2. A low molecular mass cutinase of Thielavia terrestris efficiently hydrolyzes poly(esters).

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaoqing; Xu, Haibo; Yan, Qiaojuan; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Peng; Jiang, Zhengqiang

    2013-02-01

    A low molecular mass cutinase (designated TtcutA) from Thielavia terrestris was purified and biochemically characterized. The thermophilic fungus T. terrestris CAU709 secreted a highly active cutinase (90.4 U ml(-1)) in fermentation broth containing wheat bran as the carbon source. The cutinase was purified 19-fold with a recovery yield of 4.8 %. The molecular mass of the purified TtcutA was determined as 25.3 and 22.8 kDa using SDS-PAGE and gel filtration, respectively. TtcutA displayed optimal activity at pH 4.0 and 50 °C. It was highly stable up to 65 °C and in the broad pH range 2.5-10.5. Extreme stability in high concentrations (80 %, v/v) of solvents such as methanol, ethanol, acetone, acetonitrile, isopropanol, and dimethyl sulfoxide was observed for the enzyme. The K (m) values for this enzyme towards p-nitrophenyl (pNP) acetate, pNP butyrate, and pNP caproate were 7.7, 1.0, and 0.52 mM, respectively. TtcutA was able to efficiently degrade various ester polymers, including cutin, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polycaprolactone (PCL), and poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) at hydrolytic rates of 3 μmol h(-1) mg(-1) protein, 1.1 mg h(-1) mg(-1) protein, 203.6 mg h(-1) mg(-1) protein, and 56.4 mg h(-1) mg(-1) protein, respectively. Because of these unique biochemical properties, TtcutA of T. terrestris may be useful in various industrial applications in the future. PMID:23271406

  3. Laser desorption fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in supersonic molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Shahar, T; Dagan, S; Amirav, A

    1998-06-01

    A novel method for fast analysis is presented. It is based on laser desorption injection followed by fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in supersonic molecular beams. The sample was placed in an open air or purged laser desorption compartment, held at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature conditions. Desorption was performed with a XeCl Excimer pulsed laser with pulse energy of typically 3 mJ on the surface. About 20 pulses at 50 Hz were applied for sample injection, resulting in about 0.4 s injection time and one or a few micrograms sample vapor or small particles. The laser desorbed sample was further thermally vaporized at a heated frit glass filter located at the fast GC inlet. Ultrafast GC separation and quantification was achieved with a 50-cm-long megabore column operated with a high carrier gas flow rate of up to 240 mL/min. The high carrier gas flow rate provided effective and efficient entrainment of the laser desorbed species in the sweeping gas. Following the fast GC separation, the sample was analyzed by mass spectrometry in supersonic molecular beams. Both electron ionization and hyperthermal surface ionization were employed for enhanced selectivity and sensitivity. Typical laser desorption analysis time was under 10 s. The laser desorption fast GC-MS was studied and demonstrated with the following sample/matrices combinations, all without sample preparation or extraction: (a) traces of dioctylphthalate plasticizer oil on stainless steel surface and the efficiency of its cleaning; (b) the detection of methylparathion and aldicarb pesticides on orange leaves; (c) water surface analysis for the presence of methylparathion pesticide; (d) caffeine analysis in regular and decaffeinated coffee powder; (e) paracetamol and codeine drug analysis in pain relieving drug tablets; (f) caffeine trace analysis in raw urine; (g) blood analysis for the presence of 1 ppm lidocaine drug. The features and advantages of the laser desorption fast GC

  4. Parallel Elemental and Molecular Mass Spectrometry (PEMMS) for Speciation of Metals in Complex Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derry, L. A.; Sacks, G. L.; Brenna, J. T.

    2006-12-01

    The mobility, bioavailability, and toxicity of many metals are strongly influenced by their molecular form, or speciation. Many metals (M) in the environment are complexed with organic ligands (L); in some cases such complexed forms comprise virtually all of the dissolved metal. When available, stability constants can be used to model speciation, but only when the identities of species can be known or assumed. In other cases, coupling a separation tool such as HPLC to a metal detection system like ICP-MS can provide information on speciation. But because ICP-MS destroys molecular information the complexing L must be identified by retention time matching of standards. The assumptions inherent in these approaches preclude investigation of unknown compounds. Electrochemical methods can determine conditional stability constants for unknown L but do not provide information on their molecular structure or composition. Molecular MS allows characterization of molecular mass and structure and is a powerful tool for identifying unknown organic compounds. However, sensitivity for M and precision for isotope ratios are often low. We combined HPLC separation with simultaneous parallel detection of metals (M) and ligands (L) by ICP-MS and API-QTOF-MS-MS. The basis of our approach is that the shape of a chromatographic peak is essentially set by interactions with the LC column. The signal of a metal M determined by the ICP-MS in chromatographic mode is fit using an exponentially modified Gaussian function. Peak parameters including retention time, peak width and skew are determined for the M peak. The parallel QTOF signal in full scan mode may show hundreds of peaks in the same time window. The acquired peak library is searched for L peaks that match the parameters determined for the M peak on the ICP-MS. We have found that our system can correctly identify M-L pairs and L in complex samples and generates few false positives. Unknown L can be further interrogated by using the MS

  5. Analysis of low molecular weight metabolites in tea using mass spectrometry-based analytical methods.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Karl; Harrison, Scott J; Lane, Geoff A; Otter, Don E; Hemar, Yacine; Quek, Siew-Young; Rasmussen, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Tea is the second most consumed beverage in the world after water and there are numerous reported health benefits as a result of consuming tea, such as reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease and many types of cancer. Thus, there is much interest in the chemical composition of teas, for example; defining components responsible for contributing to reported health benefits; defining quality characteristics such as product flavor; and monitoring for pesticide residues to comply with food safety import/export requirements. Covered in this review are some of the latest developments in mass spectrometry-based analytical techniques for measuring and characterizing low molecular weight components of tea, in particular primary and secondary metabolites. The methodology; more specifically the chromatography and detection mechanisms used in both targeted and non-targeted studies, and their main advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Finally, we comment on the latest techniques that are likely to have significant benefit to analysts in the future, not merely in the area of tea research, but in the analytical chemistry of low molecular weight compounds in general. PMID:24499071

  6. Fusion of mass spectrometry and microscopy: a multi-modality paradigm for molecular tissue mapping

    PubMed Central

    Van de Plas, Raf; Yang, Junhai; Spraggins, Jeffrey; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    A new predictive imaging modality is created through the ‘fusion’ of two distinct technologies: imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) and microscopy. IMS-generated molecular maps, rich in chemical information but having coarse spatial resolution, are combined with optical microscopy maps, which have relatively low chemical specificity but high spatial information. The resulting images combine the advantages of both technologies, enabling prediction of a molecular distribution both at high spatial resolution and with high chemical specificity. Multivariate regression is used to model variables in one technology, using variables from the other technology. Several applications demonstrate the remarkable potential of image fusion: (i) ‘sharpening’ of IMS images, which uses microscopy measurements to predict ion distributions at a spatial resolution that exceeds that of measured ion images by ten times or more; (ii) prediction of ion distributions in tissue areas that were not measured by IMS; and (iii) enrichment of biological signals and attenuation of instrumental artifacts, revealing insights that are not easily extracted from either microscopy or IMS separately. Image fusion enables a new multi-modality paradigm for tissue exploration whereby mining relationships between different imaging sensors yields novel imaging modalities that combine and surpass what can be gleaned from the individual technologies alone. PMID:25707028

  7. A Comprehensive Review of School-Based Body Mass Index Screening Programs and Their Implications for School Health: Do the Controversies Accurately Reflect the Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruggieri, Dominique G.; Bass, Sarah B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Whereas legislation for body mass index (BMI) surveillance and screening programs has passed in 25 states, the programs are often subject to ethical debates about confidentiality and privacy, school-to-parent communication, and safety and self-esteem issues for students. Despite this debate, no comprehensive analysis has been completed…

  8. Capture, enrichment, and mass spectrometric detection of low-molecular-weight biomarkers with nanoporous silicon microparticles.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jie; Zhao, Wei-Jie; Yu, Jie-Kai; Ma, Sai; Sailor, Michael J; Wu, Jian-Min

    2012-11-01

    Mining the disease information contained in the low-molecular-weight range of a proteomic profile is becoming of increasing interest in cancer research. This work evaluates the ability of nanoporous silicon microparticles (NPSMPs) to capture, enrich, protect, and detect low-molecular-weight peptides (LMWPs) sieved from a pool of highly abundant plasma proteins. The average pore size and porosity of NPSMPs are controlled by the electrochemical preparation conditions, and the critical parameters for admission or exclusion of protein with a definite molecular weight are determined by reflectometric-interference Fourier transform spectroscopy (RIFTS). Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis of the proteins captured by the NPSMPs show that the chemical nature of the NPSMPs surface and the solution pH also play vital roles in determining the affinity of NPSMPs for target analytes. It is found that carboxyl-terminated porous microparticles with a porosity of 26% (pore diameter around 9.0 nm) specifically fractionate, enrich and protect LMWPs sieved from either simulated samples or human serum samples. Moreover, NPSMPs containing captured peptides can be directly spotted onto a MALDI plate. When placed in a conventional MALDI matrix, laser irradiation of the particles results in the release of the target peptides confined in the nanopores, which are then ionized and detected in the MALDI experiment. As a proof-of-principle test case, mass spectra of NPSMPs prepared using serum from colorectal cancer patients and from control patients can be clearly distinguished by statistical analysis. The work demonstrates the utility of the method for discovery of biomarkers in the untapped LMWP fraction of human serum, which can be of significant value in the early diagnosis and management of diseases. PMID:23184826

  9. Molecular assessment of surgical-resection margins of gastric cancer by mass-spectrometric imaging.

    PubMed

    Eberlin, Livia S; Tibshirani, Robert J; Zhang, Jialing; Longacre, Teri A; Berry, Gerald J; Bingham, David B; Norton, Jeffrey A; Zare, Richard N; Poultsides, George A

    2014-02-18

    Surgical resection is the main curative option for gastrointestinal cancers. The extent of cancer resection is commonly assessed during surgery by pathologic evaluation of (frozen sections of) the tissue at the resected specimen margin(s) to verify whether cancer is present. We compare this method to an alternative procedure, desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometric imaging (DESI-MSI), for 62 banked human cancerous and normal gastric-tissue samples. In DESI-MSI, microdroplets strike the tissue sample, the resulting splash enters a mass spectrometer, and a statistical analysis, here, the Lasso method (which stands for least absolute shrinkage and selection operator and which is a multiclass logistic regression with L1 penalty), is applied to classify tissues based on the molecular information obtained directly from DESI-MSI. The methodology developed with 28 frozen training samples of clear histopathologic diagnosis showed an overall accuracy value of 98% for the 12,480 pixels evaluated in cross-validation (CV), and 97% when a completely independent set of samples was tested. By applying an additional spatial smoothing technique, the accuracy for both CV and the independent set of samples was 99% compared with histological diagnoses. To test our method for clinical use, we applied it to a total of 21 tissue-margin samples prospectively obtained from nine gastric-cancer patients. The results obtained suggest that DESI-MSI/Lasso may be valuable for routine intraoperative assessment of the specimen margins during gastric-cancer surgery. PMID:24550265

  10. Molecular Ionization-Desorption Analysis Source (MIDAS) for Mass Spectrometry: Thin-Layer Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Gregory T.; Wilhide, Joshua A.; LaCourse, William R.

    2016-02-01

    Molecular ionization-desorption analysis source (MIDAS), which is a desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI) type source, for mass spectrometry has been developed as a multi-functional platform for the direct sampling of surfaces. In this article, its utility for the analysis of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates is highlighted. Amino acids, which are difficult to visualize without staining reagents or charring, were detected and identified directly from a TLC plate. To demonstrate the full potential of MIDAS, all active ingredients from an analgesic tablet, separated on a TLC plate, were successfully detected using both positive and negative ion modes. The identity of each of the compounds was confirmed from their mass spectra and compared against standards. Post separation, the chemical signal (blue permanent marker) as reference marks placed at the origin and solvent front were used to calculate retention factor (Rf) values from the resulting ion chromatogram. The quantitative capabilities of the device were exhibited by scanning caffeine spots on a TLC plate of increasing sample amount. A linear curve based on peak are, R2 = 0.994, was generated for seven spots ranging from 50 to 1000 ng of caffeine per spot.

  11. Mass Spectrometry of Self-Assembled Monolayers: A New Tool for Molecular Surface Science

    PubMed Central

    Mrksich, Milan

    2008-01-01

    Most reactions can be performed in solution and on a surface. Yet the challenges faced in applying known reactions or in developing entirely new reactions for modifying surfaces remain formidable. The products of many reactions performed in solution can be characterized in minutes and even products having complex structures can be characterized in hours. When performed on surfaces, even the most basic reactions require a substantial effort—requiring several weeks—to characterize the yields and structures of the products. This contrast stems from the lack of convenient analytical tools that provide rapid information on the structures of molecules attached to a surface. This review describes recent work that has established mass spectrometry as a powerful method for developing and characterizing a broad range of chemical reactions of molecules attached to self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiolates on gold. The SAMDI-TOF mass spectrometry technique will enable a next generation of applications of molecularly defined surfaces to problems in chemistry and biology. PMID:19206542

  12. The FADE mass-stat: A technique for inserting or deleting particles in molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, Matthew K.; Lockerby, Duncan A.; Reese, Jason M.

    2014-02-21

    The emergence of new applications of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation calls for the development of mass-statting procedures that insert or delete particles on-the-fly. In this paper we present a new mass-stat which we term FADE, because it gradually “fades-in” (inserts) or “fades-out” (deletes) molecules over a short relaxation period within a MD simulation. FADE applies a time-weighted relaxation to the intermolecular pair forces between the inserting/deleting molecule and any neighbouring molecules. The weighting function we propose in this paper is a piece-wise polynomial that can be described entirely by two parameters: the relaxation time scale and the order of the polynomial. FADE inherently conserves overall system momentum independent of the form of the weighting function. We demonstrate various simulations of insertions of atomic argon, polyatomic TIP4P water, polymer strands, and C{sub 60} Buckminsterfullerene molecules. We propose FADE parameters and a maximum density variation per insertion-instance that restricts spurious potential energy changes entering the system within desired tolerances. We also demonstrate in this paper that FADE compares very well to an existing insertion algorithm called USHER, in terms of accuracy, insertion rate (in dense fluids), and computational efficiency. The USHER algorithm is applicable to monatomic and water molecules only, but we demonstrate that FADE can be generally applied to various forms and sizes of molecules, such as polymeric molecules of long aspect ratio, and spherical carbon fullerenes with hollow interiors.

  13. Dipole moments and orientation polarizabilities of diatomic molecular ions for precision atomic mass measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Michelle; Brown, John M.; Rosmus, Pavel; Linguerri, Roberto; Komiha, Najia; Myers, Edmund G.

    2007-01-01

    In high precision Penning trap mass spectrometry the cyclotron frequency of a polarizable ion is perturbed due to the Stark interaction with the motional electric field. For polar diatomic molecular ions, which have adjacent rotational levels of opposite parity, these shifts can be particularly large—especially for the lowest rotational levels, which are those occupied by ions stored for many hours in cryogenic Penning traps. In order to provide corrections to precision atomic mass measurements, we consider the calculation of orientation polarizabilities of CO+ and the positive ions of the first and second row diatomic hydrides, LiH+ to ArH+ . Dipole moments for these ions have been calculated using the restricted coupled cluster method with perturbative triples and large basis sets. Using these dipoles and an effective Hamiltonian, we have obtained rotational-state dependent polarizabilities of the open-shell diatomic ions CO+ , NH+ , OH+ , FH+ , PH+ , SH+ , and ClH+ . Results are given for those rotational levels that are significantly populated at 4.2K , for magnetic fields up to 10T . For the remaining first and second row hydride cations, polarizabilities at the magnetic fields of interest can be obtained from a simple formula valid for closed-shell molecules. Conversely, in cases where the polarizability shifts can be measured, our results enable experimental determination of dipole moments.

  14. Molecular Ionization-Desorption Analysis Source (MIDAS) for Mass Spectrometry: Thin-Layer Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Winter, Gregory T; Wilhide, Joshua A; LaCourse, William R

    2016-02-01

    Molecular ionization-desorption analysis source (MIDAS), which is a desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI) type source, for mass spectrometry has been developed as a multi-functional platform for the direct sampling of surfaces. In this article, its utility for the analysis of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates is highlighted. Amino acids, which are difficult to visualize without staining reagents or charring, were detected and identified directly from a TLC plate. To demonstrate the full potential of MIDAS, all active ingredients from an analgesic tablet, separated on a TLC plate, were successfully detected using both positive and negative ion modes. The identity of each of the compounds was confirmed from their mass spectra and compared against standards. Post separation, the chemical signal (blue permanent marker) as reference marks placed at the origin and solvent front were used to calculate retention factor (Rf) values from the resulting ion chromatogram. The quantitative capabilities of the device were exhibited by scanning caffeine spots on a TLC plate of increasing sample amount. A linear curve based on peak are, R2 = 0.994, was generated for seven spots ranging from 50 to 1000 ng of caffeine per spot. PMID:26471042

  15. Molecular Surface Sampling and Chemical Imaging using Proximal Probe Thermal Desorption/Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2011-01-01

    Proximal probe thermal desorption/secondary ionization mass spectrometry was studied and applied to molecular surface sampling and chemical imaging using printed patterns on photopaper as test substrates. With the use of a circular cross section proximal probe with a tip diameter of 50 m and fixed temperature (350 C), the influence of probe-to-surface distance, lane scan spacing, and surface scan speed on signal quality and spatial resolution were studied and optimized. As a compromise between signal amplitude, signal reproducibility, and data acquisition time, a surface scan speed of 100 m/s, probe-to-paper surface distance of 5 m, and lane spacing of 10 m were used for imaging. Under those conditions the proximal probe thermal desorption/secondary ionization mass spectrometry method was able to achieve a spatial resolution of about 50 m as determined by the ability to distinguish surface patterns of known dimensions that were printed on the paper substrate. It is expected that spatial resolution and chemical image quality could be further improved by using probes of smaller cross section size and by incorporating a means to maintain a fixed optimal probe-to-surface distance real time, continuously adapting to the changing topography of the surface during a lane scan.

  16. Energy eigenfunctions for position-dependent mass particles in a new class of molecular Hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, H. R.; Cunha, M. S.

    2014-09-15

    Based on recent results on quasi-exactly solvable Schrodinger equations, we review a new phenomenological potential class lately reported. In the present paper, we consider the quantum differential equations resulting from position-dependent mass (PDM) particles. We first focus on the PDM version of the hyperbolic potential V(x) = asech{sup 2}x + bsech{sup 4}x, which we address analytically with no restrictioon the parameters and the energies. This is the celebrated Manning potential, a double-well widely used in molecular physics, until now not investigated for PDM. We also evaluate the PDM version of the sixth power hyperbolic potential V(x) = asech{sup 6}x + bsech{sup 4}x for which we could find exact expressions under some special settings. Finally, we address a triple-well case V(x) = asech{sup 6}x + bsech{sup 4}x + csech{sup 2}x of particular interest for its connection to the new trends in atomtronics. The PDM Schrodinger equations studied in the present paper yield analytical eigenfunctions in terms of local Heun functions in its confluents forms. In all the cases PDM particles are more likely tunneling than ordinary ones. In addition, it is observed a merging of eigenstates when the mass becomes nonuniform.

  17. The FADE mass-stat: A technique for inserting or deleting particles in molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, Matthew K.; Lockerby, Duncan A.; Reese, Jason M.

    2014-02-01

    The emergence of new applications of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation calls for the development of mass-statting procedures that insert or delete particles on-the-fly. In this paper we present a new mass-stat which we term FADE, because it gradually "fades-in" (inserts) or "fades-out" (deletes) molecules over a short relaxation period within a MD simulation. FADE applies a time-weighted relaxation to the intermolecular pair forces between the inserting/deleting molecule and any neighbouring molecules. The weighting function we propose in this paper is a piece-wise polynomial that can be described entirely by two parameters: the relaxation time scale and the order of the polynomial. FADE inherently conserves overall system momentum independent of the form of the weighting function. We demonstrate various simulations of insertions of atomic argon, polyatomic TIP4P water, polymer strands, and C60 Buckminsterfullerene molecules. We propose FADE parameters and a maximum density variation per insertion-instance that restricts spurious potential energy changes entering the system within desired tolerances. We also demonstrate in this paper that FADE compares very well to an existing insertion algorithm called USHER, in terms of accuracy, insertion rate (in dense fluids), and computational efficiency. The USHER algorithm is applicable to monatomic and water molecules only, but we demonstrate that FADE can be generally applied to various forms and sizes of molecules, such as polymeric molecules of long aspect ratio, and spherical carbon fullerenes with hollow interiors.

  18. Molecular formation along the atmospheric mass loss of HD 209458b and similar Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinotti, R.; Boechat-Roberty, H. M.

    2016-02-01

    The chemistry along the mass loss of Hot Jupiters is generally considered to be simple, consisting mainly of atoms, prevented from forming more complex species by the intense radiation field from their host stars. In order to probe the region where the temperature is low (T<2000 K), we developed a 1D chemical and photochemical reaction model of the atmospheric mass loss of HD 209458b, involving 56 species, including carbon chain and oxygen-bearing ones, interacting through 566 reactions. The simulation results indicate that simple molecules like OH+, H2O+ and H3O+ are formed inside the region, considering that residual H2 survives in the exosphere, a possibility indicated by recent observational work. The molecules are formed and destroyed within a radial distance of less than 107 km, but the estimated integrated column density of OH+, a potential tracer of H2, is high enough to allow detection, which, once achieved, would indicate a revision of chemical models of the upper atmosphere of Hot Jupiters. For low density Hot Jupiters receiving less intense XUV radiation from their host stars than HD 209458b, molecular species could conceivably be formed with a higher total column density.

  19. Labile Low-Molecular-Mass Metal Complexes in Mitochondria: Trials and Tribulations of a Burgeoning Field.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Paul A; Moore, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    Iron, copper, zinc, manganese, cobalt, and molybdenum play important roles in mitochondrial biochemistry, serving to help catalyze reactions in numerous metalloenzymes. These metals are also found in labile "pools" within mitochondria. Although the composition and cellular function of these pools are largely unknown, they are thought to be comprised of nonproteinaceous low-molecular-mass (LMM) metal complexes. Many problems must be solved before these pools can be fully defined, especially problems stemming from the lability of such complexes. This lability arises from inherently weak coordinate bonds between ligands and metals. This is an advantage for catalysis and trafficking, but it makes characterization difficult. The most popular strategy for investigating such pools is to detect them using chelator probes with fluorescent properties that change upon metal coordination. Characterization is limited because of the inevitable destruction of the complexes during their detection. Moreover, probes likely react with more than one type of metal complex, confusing analyses. An alternative approach is to use liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). With help from a previous lab member, the authors recently developed an LC-ICP-MS approach to analyze LMM extracts from yeast and mammalian mitochondria. They detected several metal complexes, including Fe580, Fe1100, Fe1500, Cu5000, Zn1200, Zn1500, Mn1100, Mn2000, Co1200, Co1500, and Mo780 (numbers refer to approximate masses in daltons). Many of these may be used to metalate apo-metalloproteins as they fold inside the organelle. The LC-based approach also has challenges, e.g., in distinguishing artifactual metal complexes from endogenous ones, due to the fact that cells must be disrupted to form extracts before they are passed through chromatography columns prior to analysis. Ultimately, both approaches will be needed to characterize these intriguing complexes and to

  20. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Quigg

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  1. Accurate prediction of H3O+ and D3O+ sensitivity coefficients to probe a variable proton-to-electron mass ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, A.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Polyansky, O. L.; Ovsyannikov, R. I.; Thiel, W.; Špirko, V.

    2015-12-01

    The mass sensitivity of the vibration-rotation-inversion transitions of H316O+, H318O+, and D316O+ is investigated variationally using the nuclear motion program TROVE (Yurchenko, Thiel & Jensen). The calculations utilize new high-level ab initio potential energy and dipole moment surfaces. Along with the mass dependence, frequency data and Einstein A coefficients are computed for all transitions probed. Particular attention is paid to the Δ|k| = 3 and Δ|k - l| = 3 transitions comprising the accidentally coinciding |J, K = 0, v2 = 0+> and |J, K = 3, v2 = 0-> rotation-inversion energy levels. The newly computed probes exhibit sensitivities comparable to their ammonia and methanol counterparts, thus demonstrating their potential for testing the cosmological stability of the proton-to-electron mass ratio. The theoretical TROVE results are in close agreement with sensitivities obtained using the non-rigid and rigid inverter approximate models, confirming that the ab initio theory used in the present study is adequate.

  2. Cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry and the temperature dependence of molecular depth profiles.

    PubMed

    Mao, Dan; Wucher, Andreas; Brenes, Daniel A; Lu, Caiyan; Winograd, Nicholas

    2012-05-01

    The quality of molecular depth profiles created by erosion of organic materials by cluster ion beams exhibits a strong dependence upon temperature. To elucidate the fundamental nature of this dependence, we employ the Irganox 3114/1010 organic delta-layer reference material as a model system. This delta-layer system is interrogated using a 40 keV C(60)(+) primary ion beam. Parameters associated with the depth profile such as depth resolution, uniformity of sputtering yield, and topography are evaluated between 90 and 300 K using a unique wedge-crater beveling strategy that allows these parameters to be determined as a function of erosion depth from atomic force microscope (AFM) measurements. The results show that the erosion rate calibration performed using the known Δ-layer depth in connection with the fluence needed to reach the peak of the corresponding secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) signal response is misleading. Moreover, we show that the degradation of depth resolution is linked to a decrease of the average erosion rate and the buildup of surface topography in a thermally activated manner. This underlying process starts to influence the depth profile above a threshold temperature between 210 and 250 K for the system studied here. Below that threshold, the process is inhibited and steady-state conditions are reached with constant erosion rate, depth resolution, and molecular secondary ion signals from both the matrix and the Δ-layers. In particular, the results indicate that further reduction of the temperature below 90 K does not lead to further improvement of the depth profile. Above the threshold, the process becomes stronger at higher temperature, leading to an immediate decrease of the molecular secondary ion signals. This signal decay is most pronounced for the highest m/z ions but is less for the smaller m/z ions, indicating a shift toward small fragments by accumulation of chemical damage. The erosion rate decay and surface roughness buildup

  3. Probing the molecular weight distributions of non-boiling petroleum fractions by Ag+ electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Roussis, Stilianos G; Proulx, Richard

    2004-01-01

    This work explores the possibility of Ag+ electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) to determine the molecular weight distributions of non-boiling petroleum fractions. Information about the molecular weight distributions is needed for fundamental studies on the nature of heavy crude oils and bitumens and for the development of novel recovery and processing methods. The method does not depend on thermal processes for the introduction of the fractions into the gas phase of the mass spectrometer, which is a considerable advantage over most other ionization methods. The Ag+ electrospray mass spectra of the fractions analyzed by using a toluene/methanol/cyclohexane (60:28:12%) solvent system display bimodal distributions in the ranges m/z approximately 300 to approximately 3000 and m/z 3000 to approximately 20,000. The abundances of the high molecular weight peak distributions can be reduced by in-source collisional activation experiments. Comparisons with the results obtained for model heteroatom-containing compounds (molecular weight < 600 Da) and high molecular weight polystyrene standards (up to one million Da) indicate that the majority of the structures in the saturate, naphthenoaromatic and polar aromatic fractions, and a significant portion of the asphaltenes, are small molecules. However, a considerable portion of the asphaltenes and some portion of the other fractions contain high molecular weight structures bound by covalent or strong non-covalent bonds. The results obtained by the Ag+ ESI method in this study for the saturate, aromatic, and polar fractions in a bitumen are in qualitative agreement with published molecular weight average results obtained for Cold Lake bitumen fractions analyzed by conventional gel permeation chromatography and field desorption mass spectrometry. Further work is needed to study the nature of the bonds and the interactions of the molecules in the asphaltene fractions by Ag+ ESI-MS. PMID:15282776

  4. Evaluation of triple stage mass spectrometry as a robust and accurate diagnostic tool for determination of free cordycepin in designer egg.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi Hsin; Lim, Chee Wei; Chan, Sheot Harn

    2014-05-01

    Direct determination of free cordycepin in designer egg using a highly selective mass spectrometric (MS) technique aided by a rapid and efficient dilute-and-shoot workflow would enhance their application as diagnostic tools in food fraud control. Here, triple stage mass spectrometry (MS(3)) demonstrated excellent analyte selectivity capability even when incomplete chromatographic separation was performed. Method validation was performed at six concentration levels of 100, 200, 400, 800, 1200 and 1600ngg(-1). Spiking experiments were examined at three concentration levels of 200, 400, and 1200ngg(-1) in individual egg white and egg yolk, measured over 2days. MS(3) enabled ion chromatograms with zero-background interference to be made in egg extracts. MS(3) eliminated severe over recovery (p<0.05) observed in all fortified samples, a challenge that MRM-transition could not address in a single step. Matrix-matched calibrants were needed to compensate for over recovery observed under MRM-transition mode. PMID:24360442

  5. Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Diversified Cardiolipin Molecular Species in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) has been used successfully in mapping different lipids in tissue sections, yet existing protocols fail to detect the diverse species of mitochondria-unique cardiolipins (CLs) in the brain which are essential for cellular and mitochondrial physiology. We have developed methods enabling the imaging of individual CLs in brain tissue. This was achieved by eliminating ion suppressive effects by (i) cross-linking carboxyl/amino containing molecules on tissue with 1-ethyl-3-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]-carbodiimide hydrochloride and (ii) removing highly abundant phosphatidylcholine head groups via phospholipase C treatment. These treatments allowed the detection of CL species at 100 μm resolution and did not affect the amount or molecular species distribution of brain tissue CLs. When combined with augmented matrix application, these modifications allowed the visualization and mapping of multiple CL species in various regions of the brain including the thalamus, hippocampus, and cortex. Areas such as the dentate and stratum radiatum exhibited higher CL signals than other areas within the hippocampal formation. The habenular nuclear (Hb)/dorsal third ventricle (D3 V) and lateral ventricle (LV) areas were identified as CL “hot spots”. Our method also allowed structural MS/MS fragmentation and mapping of CLs with identified fatty acid residues and demonstrated a nonrandom distribution of individual oxidizable (polyunsaturated fatty acid containing) and nonoxidizable (nonpolyunsaturated containing) CLs in different anatomical areas of the brain. To our knowledge, this method is the first label-free approach for molecular mapping of diversified CLs in brain tissue. PMID:24949523

  6. Imaging mass spectrometry of diversified cardiolipin molecular species in the brain.

    PubMed

    Amoscato, A A; Sparvero, L J; He, R R; Watkins, S; Bayir, H; Kagan, V E

    2014-07-01

    MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) has been used successfully in mapping different lipids in tissue sections, yet existing protocols fail to detect the diverse species of mitochondria-unique cardiolipins (CLs) in the brain which are essential for cellular and mitochondrial physiology. We have developed methods enabling the imaging of individual CLs in brain tissue. This was achieved by eliminating ion suppressive effects by (i) cross-linking carboxyl/amino containing molecules on tissue with 1-ethyl-3-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]-carbodiimide hydrochloride and (ii) removing highly abundant phosphatidylcholine head groups via phospholipase C treatment. These treatments allowed the detection of CL species at 100 μm resolution and did not affect the amount or molecular species distribution of brain tissue CLs. When combined with augmented matrix application, these modifications allowed the visualization and mapping of multiple CL species in various regions of the brain including the thalamus, hippocampus, and cortex. Areas such as the dentate and stratum radiatum exhibited higher CL signals than other areas within the hippocampal formation. The habenular nuclear (Hb)/dorsal third ventricle (D3 V) and lateral ventricle (LV) areas were identified as CL "hot spots". Our method also allowed structural MS/MS fragmentation and mapping of CLs with identified fatty acid residues and demonstrated a nonrandom distribution of individual oxidizable (polyunsaturated fatty acid containing) and nonoxidizable (nonpolyunsaturated containing) CLs in different anatomical areas of the brain. To our knowledge, this method is the first label-free approach for molecular mapping of diversified CLs in brain tissue. PMID:24949523

  7. The low-mass population of the ρ Ophiuchi molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves de Oliveira, C.; Moraux, E.; Bouvier, J.; Bouy, H.; Marmo, C.; Albert, L.

    2010-06-01

    Context. Star formation theories are currently divergent regarding the fundamental physical processes that dominate the substellar regime. Observations of nearby young open clusters allow the brown dwarf (BD) population to be characterised down to the planetary mass regime, which ultimately must be accommodated by a successful theory. Aims: We hope to uncover the low-mass population of the ρ Ophiuchi molecular cloud and investigate the properties of the newly found brown dwarfs. Methods: We used near-IR deep images (reaching completeness limits of approximately 20.5 mag in J and 18.9 mag in H and Ks) taken with the Wide Field IR Camera (WIRCam) at the Canada France Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) to identify candidate members of ρ Oph in the substellar regime. A spectroscopic follow-up of a small sample of the candidates allows us to assess their spectral type and subsequently their temperature and membership. Results: We select 110 candidate members of the ρ Ophiuchi molecular cloud, from which 80 have not previously been associated with the cloud. We observed a small sample of these and spectroscopically confirm six new brown dwarfs with spectral types ranging from M6.5 to M8.25. Based on observations obtained with WIRCam, a joint project of CFHT, Taiwan, Korea, Canada, France, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institute National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii. Based on observations made at the ESO La Silla and Paranal Observatory under program 083.C-0092. Based in part on data collected at Subaru Telescope, and obtained from the SMOKA, which is operated by the Astronomy Data Center, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Research supported by the Marie Curie Research Training Network CONSTELLATION under grant No. MRTN-CT- 2006-035890.Table 4 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via

  8. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  9. Molecular Xenomonitoring Using Mosquitoes to Map Lymphatic Filariasis after Mass Drug Administration in American Samoa

    PubMed Central

    Schmaedick, Mark A.; Koppel, Amanda L.; Pilotte, Nils; Torres, Melissa; Williams, Steven A.; Dobson, Stephen L.; Lammie, Patrick J.; Won, Kimberly Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mass drug administration (MDA) programs have dramatically reduced lymphatic filariasis (LF) incidence in many areas around the globe, including American Samoa. As infection rates decline and MDA programs end, efficient and sensitive methods for detecting infections are needed to monitor for recrudescence. Molecular methods, collectively termed ‘molecular xenomonitoring,’ can identify parasite DNA or RNA in human blood-feeding mosquitoes. We tested mosquitoes trapped throughout the inhabited islands of American Samoa to identify areas of possible continuing LF transmission after completion of MDA. Methodology/Principle Findings Mosquitoes were collected using BG Sentinel traps from most of the villages on American Samoa's largest island, Tutuila, and all major villages on the smaller islands of Aunu'u, Ofu, Olosega, and Ta'u. Real-time PCR was used to detect Wuchereria bancrofti DNA in pools of ≤20 mosquitoes, and PoolScreen software was used to infer territory-wide prevalences of W. bancrofti DNA in the mosquitoes. Wuchereria bancrofti DNA was found in mosquitoes from 16 out of the 27 village areas sampled on Tutuila and Aunu'u islands but none of the five villages on the Manu'a islands of Ofu, Olosega, and Ta'u. The overall 95% confidence interval estimate for W. bancrofti DNA prevalence in the LF vector Ae. polynesiensis was 0.20–0.39%, and parasite DNA was also detected in pools of Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes aegypti, and Aedes (Finlaya) spp. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest low but widespread prevalence of LF on Tutuila and Aunu'u where 98% of the population resides, but not Ofu, Olosega, and Ta'u islands. Molecular xenomonitoring can help identify areas of possible LF transmission, but its use in the LF elimination program in American Samoa is limited by the need for more efficient mosquito collection methods and a better understanding of the relationship between prevalence of W. bancrofti DNA in mosquitoes and infection and

  10. Accurate determination of ¹²⁹I concentrations and ¹²⁹I/¹³⁷Cs ratios in spent nuclear resins by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nottoli, Emmanuelle; Bienvenu, Philippe; Labet, Alexandre; Bourlès, Didier; Arnold, Maurice; Bertaux, Maité

    2014-04-01

    Determining long-lived radionuclide concentrations in radioactive waste has fundamental implications for the long-term management of storage sites. This paper focuses on the measurement of low (129)I contents in ion exchange resins used for primary fluid purification in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR). Iodine-129 concentrations were successfully determined using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) following a chemical procedure which included (1) acid digestion of resin samples in HNO3/HClO4, (2) radioactive decontamination by selective iodine extraction using a new chromatographic resin (CL Resin), and (3) AgI precipitation. Measured (129)I concentrations ranged from 4 to 12 ng/g, i.e. from 0.03 to 0.08 Bq/g. The calculation of (129)I/(137)Cs activity ratios used for routine waste management produced values in agreement with the few available data for PWR resin samples. PMID:24525301

  11. Pyrolysis-Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry to Characterize Soil Organic Matter Composition in Chemically Isolated Fractions from Differing Land Uses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Questions concerning the role of soil organic matter (SOM) in soil fertility, ecosystem functioning and global change requires knowledge of the controls on SOM stabilization and their interactions. Pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry (py-MBMS) provides a powerful and rapid means of characteri...

  12. The fragmentation of molecular clouds - Critical (Jeans) mass in the vicinity of thermal instability and influence of visible extinction variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, M.; Chieze, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    We adapt the classical Jeans analysis of gravitational stability to a molecular gas subject to thermal exchanges of the interstellar medium. At the onset of thermal instability the compressibility of a gas vanishes and so does the critical Jeans mass which is proportional to the 3/2 power of the compressibility. A spherical geometry is adopted, taking into account self-consistent variations of the opacity driven by radial density gravitational modes. The variation of the critical mass in the vicinity of thermal instabilities is presented. Nonlinear and nonequilibrium simulations of spherical clouds have been performed to study: the gravitational evolution of a thermally unstable cooling gas, and the influence of ambient radiation field variations upon stability of molecular clumps in the outer envelopes of molecular complexes. Accordingly, the following consequences are discussed: the critical mass reduction by self-consistent variations of the opacity which may occur for example when the ratio of dust to gas is locally enhanced; the location of stable hydrostatic equilibrium of the most massive clumps in large molecular clouds; and the early thermal and gravitational fragmentation of giant molecular clouds during the cooling period of large amounts of warm interstellar gas.

  13. THE DISCOVERY OF THE YOUNGEST MOLECULAR OUTFLOW ASSOCIATED WITH AN INTERMEDIATE-MASS PROTOSTELLAR CORE, MMS-6/OMC-3

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Satoko; Ho, Paul T. P.

    2012-01-20

    We present subarcsecond resolution HCN (4-3) and CO (3-2) observations made with the Submillimeter Array, toward an extremely young intermediate-mass protostellar core, MMS 6-main, located in the Orion Molecular Cloud 3 region (OMC-3). We have successfully imaged a compact molecular outflow lobe ( Almost-Equal-To 1000 AU) associated with MMS 6-main, which is also the smallest molecular outflow ever found in the intermediate-mass protostellar cores. The dynamical timescale of this outflow is estimated to be {<=}100 yr. The line width dramatically increases downstream at the end of the molecular outflow ({Delta}v {approx} 25 km s{sup -1}) and clearly shows the bow-shock-type velocity structure. The estimated outflow mass ( Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -4} M{sub Sun }) and outflow size are approximately two to four orders and one to three orders of magnitude smaller, respectively, while the outflow force ( Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -4} M{sub Sun} km s{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) is similar, compared to the other molecular outflows studied in OMC-2/3. These results show that MMS 6-main is a protostellar core at the earliest evolutionary stage, most likely shortly after the second core formation.

  14. Accurate molecular dynamics and nuclear quantum effects at low cost by multiple steps in real and imaginary time: Using density functional theory to accelerate wavefunction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapil, V.; VandeVondele, J.; Ceriotti, M.

    2016-02-01

    The development and implementation of increasingly accurate methods for electronic structure calculations mean that, for many atomistic simulation problems, treating light nuclei as classical particles is now one of the most serious approximations. Even though recent developments have significantly reduced the overhead for modeling the quantum nature of the nuclei, the cost is still prohibitive when combined with advanced electronic structure methods. Here we present how multiple time step integrators can be combined with ring-polymer contraction techniques (effectively, multiple time stepping in imaginary time) to reduce virtually to zero the overhead of modelling nuclear quantum effects, while describing inter-atomic forces at high levels of electronic structure theory. This is demonstrated for a combination of MP2 and semi-local DFT applied to the Zundel cation. The approach can be seamlessly combined with other methods to reduce the computational cost of path integral calculations, such as high-order factorizations of the Boltzmann operator or generalized Langevin equation thermostats.

  15. Simple and accurate scheme to compute electrostatic interaction: zero-dipole summation technique for molecular system and application to bulk water.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ikuo; Kamiya, Narutoshi; Yonezawa, Yasushige; Nakamura, Haruki

    2012-08-01

    The zero-dipole summation method was extended to general molecular systems, and then applied to molecular dynamics simulations of an isotropic water system. In our previous paper [I. Fukuda, Y. Yonezawa, and H. Nakamura, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 164107 (2011)], for evaluating the electrostatic energy of a classical particle system, we proposed the zero-dipole summation method, which conceptually prevents the nonzero-charge and nonzero-dipole states artificially generated by a simple cutoff truncation. Here, we consider the application of this scheme to molecular systems, as well as some fundamental aspects of general cutoff truncation protocols. Introducing an idea to harmonize the bonding interactions and the electrostatic interactions in the scheme, we develop a specific algorithm. As in the previous study, the resulting energy formula is represented by a simple pairwise function sum, enabling facile applications to high-performance computation. The accuracy of the electrostatic energies calculated by the zero-dipole summation method with the atom-based cutoff was numerically investigated, by comparison with those generated by the Ewald method. We obtained an electrostatic energy error of less than 0.01% at a cutoff length longer than 13 Å for a TIP3P isotropic water system, and the errors were quite small, as compared to those obtained by conventional truncation methods. The static property and the stability in an MD simulation were also satisfactory. In addition, the dielectric constants and the distance-dependent Kirkwood factors were measured, and their coincidences with those calculated by the particle mesh Ewald method were confirmed, although such coincidences are not easily attained by truncation methods. We found that the zero damping-factor gave the best results in a practical cutoff distance region. In fact, in contrast to the zero-charge scheme, the damping effect was insensitive in the zero-charge and zero-dipole scheme, in the molecular system we

  16. Application of imaging mass spectrometry for the molecular diagnosis of human breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xinxin; He, Jiuming; Li, Tiegang; Lu, Zhaohui; Sun, Jian; Meng, Yunxiao; Abliz, Zeper; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Distinguishing breast invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a key step in breast surgery, especially to determine whether DCIS is associated with tumor cell micro-invasion. However, there is currently no reliable method to obtain molecular information for breast tumor analysis during surgery. Here, we present a novel air flow-assisted ionization (AFAI) mass spectrometry imaging method that can be used in ambient environments to differentiate breast cancer by analyzing lipids. In this study, we demonstrate that various subtypes and histological grades of IDC and DCIS can be discriminated using AFAI-MSI: phospholipids were more abundant in IDC than in DCIS, whereas fatty acids were more abundant in DCIS than in IDC. The classification of specimens in the subtype and grade validation sets showed 100% and 78.6% agreement with the histopathological diagnosis, respectively. Our work shows the rapid classification of breast cancer utilizing AFAI-MSI. This work suggests that this method could be developed to provide surgeons with nearly real-time information to guide surgical resections. PMID:26868906

  17. Investigation into the Effect of Molds in Grasses on Their Content of Low Molecular Mass Thiols

    PubMed Central

    Skladanka, Jiri; Adam, Vojtech; Zitka, Ondrej; Krystofova, Olga; Beklova, Miroslava; Kizek, Rene; Havlicek, Zdenek; Slama, Petr; Nawrath, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of molds on levels of low molecular mass thiols in grasses. For this purpose, the three grass species Lolium perenne, Festulolium pabulare and Festulolium braunii were cultivated and sampled during four months, from June to September. The same species were also grown under controlled conditions. High-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection was used for quantification of cysteine, reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, and phytochelatins (PC2, PC3, PC4 and PC5). Data were statistically processed and analyzed. Thiols were present in all examined grass species. The effect of fungicide treatments applied under field conditions on the content of the evaluated thiols was shown to be insignificant. Species influenced (p < 0.05) PC3 and GSSG content. F. pabulare, an intergeneric hybrid of drought- and fungi-resistant Festuca arundinacea, was comparable in PC3 content with L. perenne and F. braunii under field conditions. Under controlled conditions, however, F. pabulare had higher (p < 0.05) PC3 content than did L. perenne and F. braunii. Under field conditions, differences between the evaluated species were recorded only in GSSG content, but only sampling in June was significant. F. pabulare had higher (p < 0.05) GSSG content in June than did L. perenne and F. braunii. PMID:23202817

  18. Molecular breeding of tomato lines for mass production of miraculin in a plant factory.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kazuhisa; Yoshida, Riichiro; Kikuzaki, Ayako; Hirai, Tadayoshi; Kuroda, Hirofumi; Hiwasa-Tanase, Kyoko; Takane, Kenichi; Ezura, Hiroshi; Mizoguchi, Tsuyoshi

    2010-09-01

    A transgenic tomato line (56B, "Moneymaker") that expresses the miraculin gene driven by the CaMV 35S promoter was crossed with a dwarf tomato ("Micro-Tom") for the molecular breeding of cultivars that are suitable for miraculin production in a closed cultivation system. Plant size, miraculin accumulation, and self-pruning growth were used as selection indicators for F2 plants. Two lines were chosen for further analysis, bred to the F6 or F7 generation and cultivated in a closed cultivation system. In 56B and the two crossed lines, the concentrations of miraculin in the pericarp were 140, 367, and 343 microg/g FW, respectively. We also estimated that 26.2, 73.6, and 45.9 kg FW/m2 of tomatoes and 2.2, 16.6, and 9.8 mg/m2 of miraculin in the pericarp, respectively, could be harvested per year. These two crossed lines will be useful for the mass production of miraculin, especially in a closed cultivation system. PMID:20695489

  19. An IRAS Hires study of low mass star formation in the Taurus molecular ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terebey, Susan; Surace, Jason A.

    1994-01-01

    The Taurus molecular cloud supposedly has no star clusters but only isolated star formation. However, the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) shows us that a small star cluster is currently forming in Taurus. Most of the sources are deeply embedded and are probably low-mass protostars. We use High Resolution (HiRes) images of the IRAS data from the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) to look for additional infrared members of the cluster. We also investigate the question of whether the infrared emission matches predictions for protostellar sources by examining whether the dust emission is resolved on scales of one arcminute (approx. 10(exp 17) cm). With the exception of a luminous visible star, HD 29647, we find that the sources L1527, TMC1A, TMC1, TMC1C, tMR1, and IC2087 are unresolved in the HiRes images at 60 microns. Further analysis of IC2087 shows that it is unresolved at all four IRAS wavelengths.

  20. Imaging ion and molecular transport at subcellular resolution by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Subhash; Morrison, George H.

    1995-05-01

    The transport of K+, Na+, and Ca2+ were imaged in individual cells with a Cameca IMS-3f ion microscope. Strict cryogenic frozen freeze-dry sample preparations were employed. Ion redistribution artifacts in conventional chemical preparations are discussed. Cryogenically prepared freeze-fractured freeze-dried cultured cells allowed the three-dimensional ion microscopic imaging of elements. As smaller structures in calcium images can be resolved with the 0.5 [mu]m spatial resolution, correlative techniques are needed to confirm their identity. The potentials of reflected light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and laser scanning confocal microscopy are discussed for microfeature recognition in freeze-fractured freeze-dried cells. The feasibility of using frozen freeze-dried cells for imaging molecular transport at subcellular resolution was tested. Ion microscopy successfully imaged the transport of the isotopically tagged (13C, 15N) amino acid, -arginine. The labeled amino acid was imaged at mass 28 with a Cs+ primary ion beam as the 28(13C15N)- species. After a 4 h exposure of LLC-PK1 kidney cells to 4 mM labeled arginine, the amino acid was localized throughout the cell with a preferential incorporation into the nucleus and nucleolus. An example is also shown of the ion microscopic imaging of sodium borocaptate, an experimental therapeutic drug for brain tumors, in cryogenically prepared frozen freeze-dried Swiss 3T3 cells.

  1. Application of imaging mass spectrometry for the molecular diagnosis of human breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xinxin; He, Jiuming; Li, Tiegang; Lu, Zhaohui; Sun, Jian; Meng, Yunxiao; Abliz, Zeper; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Distinguishing breast invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a key step in breast surgery, especially to determine whether DCIS is associated with tumor cell micro-invasion. However, there is currently no reliable method to obtain molecular information for breast tumor analysis during surgery. Here, we present a novel air flow-assisted ionization (AFAI) mass spectrometry imaging method that can be used in ambient environments to differentiate breast cancer by analyzing lipids. In this study, we demonstrate that various subtypes and histological grades of IDC and DCIS can be discriminated using AFAI-MSI: phospholipids were more abundant in IDC than in DCIS, whereas fatty acids were more abundant in DCIS than in IDC. The classification of specimens in the subtype and grade validation sets showed 100% and 78.6% agreement with the histopathological diagnosis, respectively. Our work shows the rapid classification of breast cancer utilizing AFAI-MSI. This work suggests that this method could be developed to provide surgeons with nearly real-time information to guide surgical resections. PMID:26868906

  2. Diversity of Clonostachys species assessed by molecular phylogenetics and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Lucas M; Moreira, Gláucia M; Ferreira, Douglas; Rodrigues-Filho, Edson; Pfenning, Ludwig H

    2014-12-01

    We assessed the species diversity among 45 strains of Clonostachys from different substrates and localities in Brazil using molecular phylogenetics, and compared the results with the phenotypic classification of strains obtained from matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Phylogenetic analyses were based on beta tubulin (Tub), ITS-LSU rDNA, and a combined Tub-ITS DNA dataset. MALDI-TOF MS analyses were performed using intact conidia and conidiophores of strains cultivated on oatmeal agar and 4% malt extract agar. Six known species were identified: Clonostachys byssicola, Clonostachys candelabrum, Clonostachys pseudochroleuca, Clonostachys rhizophaga, Clonostachys rogersoniana, and Clonostachys rosea. Two clades and two singleton lineages did not correspond to known species represented in the reference DNA dataset and were identified as Clonostachys sp. 1-4. Multivariate cluster analyses of MALDI-TOF MS data classified the strains into eight clusters and three singletons, corresponding to the ten identified species plus one additional cluster containing two strains of C. rogersoniana that split from the other co-specific strains. The consistent results of MALDI-TOF MS supported the identification of strains assigned to C. byssicola and C. pseudochroleuca, which did not form well supported clades in all phylogenetic analyses, but formed distinct clusters in the MALDI-TOF dendrograms. PMID:25457948

  3. Molecular Simulation-Based Structural Prediction of Protein Complexes in Mass Spectrometry: The Human Insulin Dimer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinyu; Rossetti, Giulia; Dreyer, Jens; Raugei, Simone; Ippoliti, Emiliano; Lüscher, Bernhard; Carloni, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Protein electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS)-based techniques are widely used to provide insight into structural proteomics under the assumption that non-covalent protein complexes being transferred into the gas phase preserve basically the same intermolecular interactions as in solution. Here we investigate the applicability of this assumption by extending our previous structural prediction protocol for single proteins in ESI-MS to protein complexes. We apply our protocol to the human insulin dimer (hIns2) as a test case. Our calculations reproduce the main charge and the collision cross section (CCS) measured in ESI-MS experiments. Molecular dynamics simulations for 0.075 ms show that the complex maximizes intermolecular non-bonded interactions relative to the structure in water, without affecting the cross section. The overall gas-phase structure of hIns2 does exhibit differences with the one in aqueous solution, not inferable from a comparison with calculated CCS. Hence, care should be exerted when interpreting ESI-MS proteomics data based solely on NMR and/or X-ray structural information. PMID:25210764

  4. Molecular simulation-based structural prediction of protein complexes in mass spectrometry: the human insulin dimer.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinyu; Rossetti, Giulia; Dreyer, Jens; Raugei, Simone; Ippoliti, Emiliano; Lüscher, Bernhard; Carloni, Paolo

    2014-09-01

    Protein electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS)-based techniques are widely used to provide insight into structural proteomics under the assumption that non-covalent protein complexes being transferred into the gas phase preserve basically the same intermolecular interactions as in solution. Here we investigate the applicability of this assumption by extending our previous structural prediction protocol for single proteins in ESI-MS to protein complexes. We apply our protocol to the human insulin dimer (hIns2) as a test case. Our calculations reproduce the main charge and the collision cross section (CCS) measured in ESI-MS experiments. Molecular dynamics simulations for 0.075 ms show that the complex maximizes intermolecular non-bonded interactions relative to the structure in water, without affecting the cross section. The overall gas-phase structure of hIns2 does exhibit differences with the one in aqueous solution, not inferable from a comparison with calculated CCS. Hence, care should be exerted when interpreting ESI-MS proteomics data based solely on NMR and/or X-ray structural information. PMID:25210764

  5. MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS IN THE SUBSTELLAR DOMAIN: MILLIMETER OBSERVATIONS OF YOUNG VERY LOW MASS OBJECTS IN TAURUS AND {rho} OPHIUCHI

    SciTech Connect

    Ngoc Phan-Bao; Lee, Chin-Fei; Ho, Paul T. P.; Tang, Ya-Wen E-mail: pbngoc@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw

    2011-07-01

    We report here our search for molecular outflows from young very low mass stars and brown dwarfs in Taurus and {rho} Ophiuchi. Using the Submillimeter Array and the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy, we have observed four targets at 1.3 mm wavelength (230 GHz) to search for CO J = 2 {yields} 1 outflows. A young very low mass star MHO 5 (in Taurus) with an estimated mass of 90 M{sub J}, which is just above the hydrogen-burning limit, shows two gas lobes that are likely outflows. While the CO map of MHO 5 does not show a clear structure of outflow, possibly due to environment gas, its position-velocity diagram indicates two distinct blue- and redshifted components. We therefore conclude that they are components of a bipolar molecular outflow from MHO 5. We estimate an outflow mass of 7.0 x 10{sup -5} M{sub sun} and a mass-loss rate of 9.0 x 10{sup -10} M{sub sun}. These values are over two orders of magnitude smaller than the typical ones for T Tauri stars and somewhat weaker than those we have observed in the young brown dwarf ISO-Oph 102 of 60 M{sub J} in {rho} Ophiuchi. This makes MHO 5 the first young very low mass star showing a bipolar molecular outflow in Taurus. The detection boosts the scenario that very low mass objects form like low-mass stars but in a version scaled down by a factor of over 100.

  6. Effect of delay time and grid voltage changes on the average molecular mass of polydisperse polymers and polymeric blends determined by delayed extraction matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mineo, Placido; Vitalini, Daniele; Scamporrino, Emilio; Bazzano, Sebastiano; Alicata, Rossana

    2005-01-01

    The dependence of the calculated average molecular mass of a polyethylene glycol with a large polydispersity on the instrumental parameters adopted in the acquisition of mass spectra using delayed extraction matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (DE MALDI-TOFMS) was investigated. It has been shown that a combined effect of delay times and potential gradients can act on the ion cloud in the source chamber affecting both mass resolution and average molecular mass value of the analyzed polymeric sample. Also examined was a blend of two different polymers (a PEG and a PMMA commercial sample having a similar average molecular mass), which presents an additional problem concerning the discrimination among the different polymer species as a function of the experimental conditions. In this work, the best instrumental conditions to obtain both good resolution and a correct average molecular mass for the examined polydisperse sample are reported. PMID:16134231

  7. Temperature modulates the cell wall mechanical properties of rice coleoptiles by altering the molecular mass of hemicellulosic polysaccharides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Yukiko; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Hoson, Takayuki

    2003-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the mechanism inducing the difference in the cell wall extensibility of rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Koshihikari) coleoptiles grown under various temperature (10-50 degrees C) conditions. The growth rate and the cell wall extensibility of rice coleoptiles exhibited the maximum value at 30-40 degrees C, and became smaller as the growth temperature rose or dropped from this temperature range. The amounts of cell wall polysaccharides per unit length of coleoptile increased in coleoptiles grown at 40 degrees C, but not at other temperature conditions. On the other hand, the molecular size of hemicellulosic polysaccharides was small at temperatures where the cell wall extensibility was high (30-40 degrees C). The autolytic activities of cell walls obtained from coleoptiles grown at 30 and 40 degrees C were substantially higher than those grown at 10, 20 and 50 degrees C. Furthermore, the activities of (1-->3),(1-->4)-beta-glucanases extracted from coleoptile cell walls showed a similar tendency. When oat (1-->3),(1-->4)-beta-glucans with high molecular mass were incubated with the cell wall enzyme preparations from coleoptiles grown at various temperature conditions, the extensive molecular mass downshifts were brought about only by the cell wall enzymes obtained from coleoptiles grown at 30-40 degrees C. There were close correlations between the cell wall extensibility and the molecular mass of hemicellulosic polysaccharides or the activity of beta -glucanases. These results suggest that the environmental temperature regulates the cell wall extensibility of rice coleoptiles by modifying mainly the molecular mass of hemicellulosic polysaccharides. Modulation of the activity of beta-glucanases under various temperature conditions may be involved in the alteration of the molecular size of hemicellulosic polysaccharides.

  8. Trimodal color-fluorescence-polarization endoscopy aided by a tumor selective molecular probe accurately detects flat lesions in colitis-associated cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charanya, Tauseef; York, Timothy; Bloch, Sharon; Sudlow, Gail; Liang, Kexian; Garcia, Missael; Akers, Walter J.; Rubin, Deborah; Gruev, Viktor; Achilefu, Samuel

    2014-12-01

    Colitis-associated cancer (CAC) arises from premalignant flat lesions of the colon, which are difficult to detect with current endoscopic screening approaches. We have developed a complementary fluorescence and polarization reporting strategy that combines the unique biochemical and physical properties of dysplasia and cancer for real-time detection of these lesions. Using azoxymethane-dextran sodium sulfate (AOM-DSS) treated mice, which recapitulates human CAC and dysplasia, we show that an octapeptide labeled with a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye selectively identified all precancerous and cancerous lesions. A new thermoresponsive sol-gel formulation allowed topical application of the molecular probe during endoscopy. This method yielded high contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) between adenomatous tumors (20.6±1.65) and flat lesions (12.1±1.03) and surrounding uninvolved colon tissue versus CNR of inflamed tissues (1.62±0.41). Incorporation of nanowire-filtered polarization imaging into NIR fluorescence endoscopy shows a high depolarization contrast in both adenomatous tumors and flat lesions in CAC, reflecting compromised structural integrity of these tissues. Together, the real-time polarization imaging provides real-time validation of suspicious colon tissue highlighted by molecular fluorescence endoscopy.

  9. Trimodal color-fluorescence-polarization endoscopy aided by a tumor selective molecular probe accurately detects flat lesions in colitis-associated cancer

    PubMed Central

    Charanya, Tauseef; York, Timothy; Bloch, Sharon; Sudlow, Gail; Liang, Kexian; Garcia, Missael; Akers, Walter J.; Rubin, Deborah; Gruev, Viktor; Achilefu, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Colitis-associated cancer (CAC) arises from premalignant flat lesions of the colon, which are difficult to detect with current endoscopic screening approaches. We have developed a complementary fluorescence and polarization reporting strategy that combines the unique biochemical and physical properties of dysplasia and cancer for real-time detection of these lesions. Using azoxymethane-dextran sodium sulfate (AOM-DSS) treated mice, which recapitulates human CAC and dysplasia, we show that an octapeptide labeled with a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye selectively identified all precancerous and cancerous lesions. A new thermoresponsive sol-gel formulation allowed topical application of the molecular probe during endoscopy. This method yielded high contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) between adenomatous tumors (20.6±1.65) and flat lesions (12.1±1.03) and surrounding uninvolved colon tissue versus CNR of inflamed tissues (1.62±0.41). Incorporation of nanowire-filtered polarization imaging into NIR fluorescence endoscopy shows a high depolarization contrast in both adenomatous tumors and flat lesions in CAC, reflecting compromised structural integrity of these tissues. Together, the real-time polarization imaging provides real-time validation of suspicious colon tissue highlighted by molecular fluorescence endoscopy. PMID:25473883

  10. Identification and Characterization of Indole and Oxindole Alkaloids from Leaves of Mitragyna speciosa Korth Using Liquid Chromatography-Accurate QToF Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Avula, Bharathi; Sagi, Satyanarayanaraju; Wang, Yan-Hong; Wang, Mei; Ali, Zulfiqar; Smillie, Troy J; Zweigenbaum, Jerry; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2015-01-01

    Alkaloids have been reported to be the major physiologically active constituents in Mitragyna. An analytical method was developed to provide an alternative, fast method for characterization of alkaloids from various M. speciosa samples. The separation was achieved using an RP octylsilyl (C8) column, MS detection, and a water-acetonitrile with formic acid gradient as the mobile phase. Ultra-HPLC/quadrupole time-of-flight MS analysis and characterization were performed on 12 corynanthe-type indole/oxindole alkaloids obtained from the leaves of M. speciosa Korth. The indoles and oxindoles had an open E ring with or without substitution occurring at the C9 position. The full single mass spectrum of alkaloids showed a strong signal for the protonated molecule [M+H]+. The product ion spectrum of mitragynine type of alkaloids showed strong response at m/z=174.0901 suggestive of an ion containing an odd number of nitrogen atoms corresponding to formula C11H12NO, which is characteristic of indole alkaloids. A multivariate statistical analysis technique, principal component analysis, was used to show discrimination between the M. speciosa samples. The results indicated that the analytical method is suitable for QC testing of various Mitragyna commercial samples and can be used to evaluate market products purported to contain M. speciosa. PMID:25857873

  11. Molecular inventories and chemical evolution of low-mass protostellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, J. K.; Schöier, F. L.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2004-03-01

    This paper presents the first substantial study of the chemistry of the envelopes around a sample of 18 low-mass pre- and protostellar objects for which physical properties have previously been derived from radiative transfer modeling of their dust continuum emission. Single-dish line observations of 24 transitions of 9 molecular species (not counting isotopes) including HCO+, N2H+, CS, SO, SO2, HCN, HNC, HC3N and CN are reported. The line intensities are used to constrain the molecular abundances by comparison to Monte Carlo radiative transfer modeling of the line strengths. In general the nitrogen-bearing species together with HCO+ and CO cannot be fitted by a constant fractional abundance when the lowest excitation transitions are included, but require radial dependences of their chemistry since the intensity of the lowest excitation lines are systematically underestimated in such models. A scenario is suggested in which these species are depleted in a specific region of the envelope where the density is high enough that the freeze-out timescale is shorter than the dynamical timescale and the temperature low enough that the molecule is not evaporated from the icy grain mantles. This can be simulated by a ``drop'' abundance profile with standard (undepleted) abundances in the inner- and outermost regions and a drop in abundance in between where the molecule freezes out. An empirical chemical network is constructed on the basis of correlations between the abundances of various species. For example, it is seen that the HCO+ and CO abundances are linearly correlated, both increasing with decreasing envelope mass. This is shown to be the case if the main formation route of HCO+ is through reactions between CO and H3+, and if the CO abundance still is low enough that reactions between H3+ and N2 are the main mechanism responsible for the removal of H3+. Species such as CS, SO and HCN show no trend with envelope mass. In particular no trend is seen between

  12. Scaled up low-mass star formation in massive star-forming cores in the G333 giant molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiles, B.; Lo, N.; Redman, M. P.; Cunningham, M. R.; Jones, P. A.; Burton, M. G.; Bronfman, L.

    2016-06-01

    Three bright molecular line sources in G333 have recently been shown to exhibit signatures of infall. We describe a molecular line radiative transfer (RT) modelling process which is required to extract the infall signature from Mopra and Nanten2 data. The observed line profiles differ greatly between individual sources but are reproduced well by variations upon a common unified model where the outflow viewing angle is the most significant difference between the sources. The models and data together suggest that the observed properties of the high-mass star-forming regions such as infall, turbulence and mass are consistent with scaled-up versions of the low-mass case with turbulent velocities that are supersonic and an order of magnitude larger than those found in low-mass star-forming regions. Using detailed RT modelling, we show that the G333 cores are essentially undergoing a scaled-up version of low-mass star formation. This is an extension of earlier work in that the degree of infall and the chemical abundances are constrained by the RT modelling in a way that is not practical with a standard analysis of observational data. We also find high velocity infall and high infall mass rates, possibly suggesting accelerated collapse due to external pressure. Molecular depletion due to freeze-out on to dust grains in central regions of the cores is suggested by low molecular abundances of several species. Strong evidence for a local enhancement of 13C-bearing species towards the outflow cloud cores is discussed, consistent with the presence of shocks caused by the supersonic motions within them.

  13. A more accurate and penetrating method to measure the enrichment and mass of UF6 storage containers using passive neutron self-interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, Howard O; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Miller, Karen A

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an unattended mode neutron measurement that can provide the enrichment of the uranium in UF{sub 6} cylinders. The new passive neutron measurement provides better penetration into the uranium mass than prior gamma-ray enrichment measurement methods. The Passive Neutron Enrichment Monitor (PNEM) provides a new measurement technique that uses passive neutron totals and coincidence counting together with neutron self-interrogation to measure the enrichment in the cylinders. The measurement uses the neutron rates from two detector pods. One of the pods has a bare polyethylene surface next to the cylinder and the other polyethylene surface is covered with Cd to prevent thermal neutrons from returning to the cylinder. The primary neutron source from the enriched UF{sub 6} is the alpha-particle decay from the {sub 234}U that interacts with the fluorine to produce random neutrons. The singles neutron counting rate is dominated by the {sub 234}U neutrons with a minor contribution from the induced fissions in the {sub 235}U. However, the doubles counting rate comes primarily from the induced fissions (i.e., multiplication) in the {sub 235}U in enriched uranium. The PNEM concept makes use of the passive neutrons that are initially produced from the {sub 234}U reactions that track the {sub 235}U enrichment during the enrichment process. The induced fission reactions from the thermal-neutron albedo are all from the {sub 235}U and provide a measurement of the {sub 235}U. The Cd ratio has the desirable feature that all of the thermal-neutron-induced fissions in {sub 235}U are independent of the original neutron source. Thus, the ratio is independent of the uranium age, purity, and prior reactor history.

  14. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry for fast and accurate identification of Pseudallescheria/Scedosporium species.

    PubMed

    Sitterlé, E; Giraud, S; Leto, J; Bouchara, J P; Rougeron, A; Morio, F; Dauphin, B; Angebault, C; Quesne, G; Beretti, J L; Hassouni, N; Nassif, X; Bougnoux, M E

    2014-09-01

    An increasing number of infections due to Pseudallescheria/Scedosporium species has been reported during the past decades, both in immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. Additionally, these fungi are now recognized worldwide as common agents of fungal colonization of the airways in cystic fibrosis patients, which represents a risk factor for disseminated infections after lung transplantation. Currently six species are described within the Pseudallescheria/Scedosporium genus, including Scedosporium prolificans and species of the Pseudallescheria/Scedosporium apiospermum complex (i.e. S. apiospermum sensu stricto, Pseudallescheria boydii, Scedosporium aurantiacum, Pseudallescheria minutispora and Scedosporium dehoogii). Precise identification of clinical isolates at the species level is required because these species differ in their antifungal drug susceptibility patterns. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-time of flight (TOF)/mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful tool to rapidly identify moulds at the species level. We investigated the potential of this technology to discriminate Pseudallescheria/Scedosporium species. Forty-seven reference strains were used to build a reference database library. Profiles from 3-, 5- and 7-day-old cultures of each reference strain were analysed to identify species-specific discriminating profiles. The database was tested for accuracy using a set of 64 clinical or environmental isolates previously identified by multilocus sequencing. All isolates were unequivocally identified at the species level by MALDI-TOF/MS. Our results, obtained using a simple protocol, without prior protein extraction or standardization of the culture, demonstrate that MALDI-TOF/MS is a powerful tool for rapid identification of Pseudallescheria/Scedosporium species that cannot be currently identified by morphological examination in the clinical setting. PMID:24476388

  15. Recent advances in thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometery method to eliminate the matrix effect between air and water samples: application to the accurate determination of Henry's law constant.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2014-05-16

    Accurate values for the Henry's law constants are essential to describe the environmental dynamics of a solute, but substantial errors are recognized in many reported data due to practical difficulties in measuring solubility and/or vapor pressure. Despite such awareness, validation of experimental approaches has scarcely been made. An experimental approach based on thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometery (TD-GC-MS) method was developed to concurrently allow the accurate determination of target compounds from the headspace and aqueous samples in closed equilibrated system. The analysis of six aromatics and eight non-aromatic oxygenates was then carried out in a static headspace mode. An estimation of the potential bias and mass balance (i.e., sum of mass measured individually from gas and liquid phases vs. the mass initially added to the system) demonstrates compound-specific phase dependency so that the best results are obtained by aqueous (less soluble aromatics) and headspace analysis (more soluble non-aromatics). Accordingly, we were able to point to the possible sources of biases in previous studies and provide the best estimates for the Henry's constants (Matm(-1)): benzene (0.17), toluene (0.15), p-xylene (0.13), m-xylene (0.13), o-xylene (0.19), styrene (0.27); propionaldehyde (9.26), butyraldehyde (6.19), isovaleraldehyde (2.14), n-valeraldehyde (3.98), methyl ethyl ketone (10.5), methyl isobutyl ketone (3.93), n-butyl acetate (2.41), and isobutyl alcohol (22.2). PMID:24704185

  16. Accurate molecular dynamics and nuclear quantum effects at low cost by multiple steps in real and imaginary time: Using density functional theory to accelerate wavefunction methods.

    PubMed

    Kapil, V; VandeVondele, J; Ceriotti, M

    2016-02-01

    The development and implementation of increasingly accurate methods for electronic structure calculations mean that, for many atomistic simulation problems, treating light nuclei as classical particles is now one of the most serious approximations. Even though recent developments have significantly reduced the overhead for modeling the quantum nature of the nuclei, the cost is still prohibitive when combined with advanced electronic structure methods. Here we present how multiple time step integrators can be combined with ring-polymer contraction techniques (effectively, multiple time stepping in imaginary time) to reduce virtually to zero the overhead of modelling nuclear quantum effects, while describing inter-atomic forces at high levels of electronic structure theory. This is demonstrated for a combination of MP2 and semi-local DFT applied to the Zundel cation. The approach can be seamlessly combined with other methods to reduce the computational cost of path integral calculations, such as high-order factorizations of the Boltzmann operator or generalized Langevin equation thermostats. PMID:26851912

  17. Feasibility of ultra-high performance liquid and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry for accurate determination of primary and secondary phthalate metabolites in urine samples.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Laura; Calvarro, Sagrario; Fernández, Mario A; Quintanilla-López, Jesús Eduardo; González, María José; Gómara, Belén

    2015-01-01

    Phthalates (PAEs) are ubiquitous toxic chemical compounds. During the last few years, some phthalate metabolites (MPAEs) have been proposed as appropriate biomarkers in human urine samples to determine PAE human intake and exposure. So, it is necessary to have fast, easy, robust and validated analytical methods to determine selected MPAEs in urine human samples. Two different instrumental methods based on gas (GC) and ultra-high performance liquid (UHPLC) chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) have been optimized, characterized and validated for the simultaneous determination of nine primary and secondary phthalate metabolites in urine samples. Both instrumental methods have similar sensitivity (detection limits ranged from 0.03 to 8.89 pg μL(-1) and from 0.06 to 0.49 pg μL(-1) in GC-MS and UHPLC-MS(2), respectively), precision (repeatability, expressed as relative standard deviation, which was lower than 8.4% in both systems, except for 5OH-MEHP in the case of GC-MS) and accuracy. But some advantages of the UHPLC-MS(2) method, such as more selectivity and lower time in the chromatographic runs (6.8 min vs. 28.5 min), have caused the UHPLC-MS(2) method to be chosen to analyze the twenty one human urine samples from the general Spanish population. Regarding these samples, MEP showed the highest median concentration (68.6 μg L(-1)), followed by MiBP (23.3 μg L(-1)), 5cx-MEPP (22.5 μg L(-1)) and MBP (19.3μgL(-1)). MMP (6.99 μg L(-1)), 5oxo-MEHP (6.15 μg L(-1)), 5OH-MEHP (5.30 μg L(-1)) and MEHP (4.40 μg L(-1)) showed intermediate levels. Finally, the lowest levels were found for MBzP (2.55 μg L(-1)). These data are within the same order of magnitude as those found in other similar populations. PMID:25467512

  18. Molecular dynamics investigations of ozone on an ab initio potential energy surface with the utilization of pattern-recognition neural network for accurate determination of product formation.

    PubMed

    Le, Hung M; Dinh, Thach S; Le, Hieu V

    2011-10-13

    The singlet-triplet transformation and molecular dissociation of ozone (O(3)) gas is investigated by performing quasi-classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on an ab initio potential energy surface (PES) with visible and near-infrared excitations. MP4(SDQ) level of theory with the 6-311g(2d,2p) basis set is executed for three different electronic spin states (singlet, triplet, and quintet). In order to simplify the potential energy function, an approximation is adopted by ignoring the spin-orbit coupling and allowing the molecule to switch favorably and instantaneously to the spin state that is more energetically stable (lowest in energy among the three spin states). This assumption has previously been utilized to study the SiO(2) system as reported by Agrawal et al. (J. Chem. Phys. 2006, 124 (13), 134306). The use of such assumption in this study probably makes the upper limits of computed rate coefficients the true rate coefficients. The global PES for ozone is constructed by fitting 5906 ab initio data points using a 60-neuron two-layer feed-forward neural network. The mean-absolute error and root-mean-squared error of this fit are 0.0446 eV (1.03 kcal/mol) and 0.0756 eV (1.74 kcal/mol), respectively, which reveal very good fitting accuracy. The parameter coefficients of the global PES are reported in this paper. In order to identify the spin state with high confidence, we propose the use of a pattern-recognition neural network, which is trained to predict the spin state of a given configuration (with a prediction accuracy being 95.6% on a set of testing data points). To enhance the prediction effectiveness, a buffer series of five points are validated to confirm the spin state during the MD process to gain better confidence. Quasi-classical MD simulations from 1.2 to 2.4 eV of total internal energy (including zero-point energy) result in rate coefficients of singlet-triplet transformation in the range of 0.027 ps(-1) to 1.21 ps(-1). Also, we find very

  19. Boiling Points of the Family of Small Molecules CHwFxClyBrz: How Are They Related to Molecular Mass?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laing, Michael

    2001-11-01

    A plot of boiling point versus molecular mass for the family of tetrahedral molecular compounds CHw Fx Cly Brz is not linear, but yields a two-dimensional array with the data for molecules of similar formulae lying on straight lines. A plot of boiling point versus molar refraction (polarizability) of the compounds gives three near-parallel straight lines. The highest is for the family of compounds CH2XY; the lowest is for the all-halogen compounds CFxCyBrz; the compounds CHXxYyZz and CH3X lie intermediate. The boiling points of the compounds containing hydrogen are enhanced relative to what their molecular refraction suggests (excepting CH4). Boiling point is related to the macroscopic properties of refractive index and density of the liquid and to the molecular properties of molar refraction and dipole moment. These are connected by the molecular mass, which, with the density, determines the molar volume and thus the polarizability.

    See Letter re: this article.

    See Second Letter re: this article.

  20. The Relationship Between Molecular Gas and Star Formation in Low-mass E/S0 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lisa H.; Vogel, Stuart N.; Kannappan, Sheila J.; Baker, Andrew J.; Stark, David V.; Laine, Seppo

    2010-12-01

    We consider the relationship between molecular gas and star formation surface densities in 19 morphologically defined E/S0s with stellar mass lsim4 × 1010 M sun, paying particular attention to those found on the blue sequence in color versus stellar mass parameter space, where spiral galaxies typically reside. While some blue-sequence E/S0s must be young major-merger remnants, many low-mass blue-sequence E/S0s appear much less disturbed and may be experiencing the milder starbursts associated with inner-disk building as spirals (re)grow. For a sample of eight E/S0s (four blue, two mid, and two red sequence) whose CARMA CO(1-0), Spitzer MIPS 24 μm, and GALEX FUV emission distributions are spatially resolved on a 750 pc scale, we find roughly linear relationships between molecular gas and star formation surface densities within all galaxies, with power-law indices N = 0.6-1.9 (median 1.2). Adding 11 more blue-sequence E/S0s whose CO(1-0) emission is not as well resolved, we find that most of our E/S0s have global 1-8 kpc aperture-averaged molecular gas surface densities overlapping the range spanned by the disks and centers of spiral galaxies. While many of our E/S0s fall on the same Schmidt-Kennicutt relation as local spirals, ~80% (predominantly on the blue sequence) are offset toward apparently higher molecular gas star formation efficiency (i.e., shorter molecular gas depletion time). Possible interpretations of the elevated efficiencies include bursty star formation similar to that in local dwarf galaxies, H2 depletion in advanced starbursts, or simply a failure of the CO(1-0) emission to trace all of the molecular gas.

  1. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MOLECULAR GAS AND STAR FORMATION IN LOW-MASS E/S0 GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Lisa H.; Vogel, Stuart N.; Kannappan, Sheila J.; Stark, David V.; Baker, Andrew J.; Laine, Seppo

    2010-12-10

    We consider the relationship between molecular gas and star formation surface densities in 19 morphologically defined E/S0s with stellar mass {approx}<4 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, paying particular attention to those found on the blue sequence in color versus stellar mass parameter space, where spiral galaxies typically reside. While some blue-sequence E/S0s must be young major-merger remnants, many low-mass blue-sequence E/S0s appear much less disturbed and may be experiencing the milder starbursts associated with inner-disk building as spirals (re)grow. For a sample of eight E/S0s (four blue, two mid, and two red sequence) whose CARMA CO(1-0), Spitzer MIPS 24 {mu}m, and GALEX FUV emission distributions are spatially resolved on a 750 pc scale, we find roughly linear relationships between molecular gas and star formation surface densities within all galaxies, with power-law indices N = 0.6-1.9 (median 1.2). Adding 11 more blue-sequence E/S0s whose CO(1-0) emission is not as well resolved, we find that most of our E/S0s have global 1-8 kpc aperture-averaged molecular gas surface densities overlapping the range spanned by the disks and centers of spiral galaxies. While many of our E/S0s fall on the same Schmidt-Kennicutt relation as local spirals, {approx}80% (predominantly on the blue sequence) are offset toward apparently higher molecular gas star formation efficiency (i.e., shorter molecular gas depletion time). Possible interpretations of the elevated efficiencies include bursty star formation similar to that in local dwarf galaxies, H{sub 2} depletion in advanced starbursts, or simply a failure of the CO(1-0) emission to trace all of the molecular gas.

  2. A Microscopic View of Mass Transport in Silicate Melts by Quasielastic Neutron Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Andreas; Kargl, Florian; Horbach, Jürgen

    The application of quasielastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation to the study of mass transport in silicate melts is outlined. It is shown how the knowledge of atomic dynamics and structure reveals the mechanisms of mass transport. Peculiar properties of atomic diffusion and viscous flow behaviour as a function of melt composition are discussed in terms of the formation of alkali diffusion channels in the static structure. This non-homogeneous distribution of alkali ions in a disrupted tetrahedral Si-O network is investigated in binary lithium, sodium and potassium silicate melts and in ternary sodium aluminosilicates and sodium ironsilicates representing the main compositions of natural volcanic rocks.

  3. Novel, Precise, Accurate Ion-Pairing Method to Determine the Related Substances of the Fondaparinux Sodium Drug Substance: Low-Molecular-Weight Heparin.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Amol A; Madhavan, P; Deshpande, Girish R; Chandel, Ravi Kumar; Yarbagi, Kaviraj M; Joshi, Alok R; Moses Babu, J; Murali Krishna, R; Rao, I M

    2016-01-01

    Fondaparinux sodium is a synthetic low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH). This medication is an anticoagulant or a blood thinner, prescribed for the treatment of pulmonary embolism and prevention and treatment of deep vein thrombosis. Its determination in the presence of related impurities was studied and validated by a novel ion-pair HPLC method. The separation of the drug and its degradation products was achieved with the polymer-based PLRPs column (250 mm × 4.6 mm; 5 μm) in gradient elution mode. The mixture of 100 mM n-hexylamine and 100 mM acetic acid in water was used as buffer solution. Mobile phase A and mobile phase B were prepared by mixing the buffer and acetonitrile in the ratio of 90:10 (v/v) and 20:80 (v/v), respectively. Mobile phases were delivered in isocratic mode (2% B for 0-5 min) followed by gradient mode (2-85% B in 5-60 min). An Evaporative Light Scattering Detector (ELSD) was connected to the LC system to detect the responses of chromatographic separation. Further, the drug was subjected to stress studies for acidic, basic, oxidative, photolytic, and thermal degradations as per ICH guidelines and the drug was found to be labile in acid, base hydrolysis, and oxidation, while stable in neutral, thermal, and photolytic degradation conditions. The method provided linear responses over the concentration range of the LOQ to 0.30% for each impurity with respect to the analyte concentration of 12.5 mg/mL, and regression analysis showed a correlation coefficient value (r(2)) of more than 0.99 for all the impurities. The LOD and LOQ were found to be 1.4 µg/mL and 4.1 µg/mL, respectively, for fondaparinux. The developed ion-pair method was validated as per ICH guidelines with respect to accuracy, selectivity, precision, linearity, and robustness. PMID:27110496

  4. Novel, Precise, Accurate Ion-Pairing Method to Determine the Related Substances of the Fondaparinux Sodium Drug Substance: Low-Molecular-Weight Heparin

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Amol A.; Madhavan, P.; Deshpande, Girish R.; Chandel, Ravi Kumar; Yarbagi, Kaviraj M.; Joshi, Alok R.; Moses Babu, J.; Murali Krishna, R.; Rao, I. M.

    2016-01-01

    Fondaparinux sodium is a synthetic low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH). This medication is an anticoagulant or a blood thinner, prescribed for the treatment of pulmonary embolism and prevention and treatment of deep vein thrombosis. Its determination in the presence of related impurities was studied and validated by a novel ion-pair HPLC method. The separation of the drug and its degradation products was achieved with the polymer-based PLRPs column (250 mm × 4.6 mm; 5 μm) in gradient elution mode. The mixture of 100 mM n-hexylamine and 100 mM acetic acid in water was used as buffer solution. Mobile phase A and mobile phase B were prepared by mixing the buffer and acetonitrile in the ratio of 90:10 (v/v) and 20:80 (v/v), respectively. Mobile phases were delivered in isocratic mode (2% B for 0–5 min) followed by gradient mode (2–85% B in 5–60 min). An Evaporative Light Scattering Detector (ELSD) was connected to the LC system to detect the responses of chromatographic separation. Further, the drug was subjected to stress studies for acidic, basic, oxidative, photolytic, and thermal degradations as per ICH guidelines and the drug was found to be labile in acid, base hydrolysis, and oxidation, while stable in neutral, thermal, and photolytic degradation conditions. The method provided linear responses over the concentration range of the LOQ to 0.30% for each impurity with respect to the analyte concentration of 12.5 mg/mL, and regression analysis showed a correlation coefficient value (r2) of more than 0.99 for all the impurities. The LOD and LOQ were found to be 1.4 µg/mL and 4.1 µg/mL, respectively, for fondaparinux. The developed ion-pair method was validated as per ICH guidelines with respect to accuracy, selectivity, precision, linearity, and robustness. PMID:27110496

  5. Effect of OH depletion on measurements of the mass-to-flux ratio in molecular cloud cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassis, K.; Willacy, K.; Yorke, Harold W.; Turner, Neal J.

    2014-11-01

    The ratio of mass and magnetic flux determines the relative importance of magnetic and gravitational forces in the evolution of molecular clouds and their cores. Its measurement is thus central in discriminating between different theories of core formation and evolution. Here, we discuss the effect of chemical depletion on measurements of the mass-to-flux ratio using the same molecule (OH) both for Zeeman measurements of the magnetic field and the determination of the mass of the region. The uncertainties entering through the OH abundance in determining separately the magnetic field and the mass of a region have been recognized in the literature. It has been proposed however that, when comparing two regions of the same cloud, the abundance will in both cases be the same. We show that this assumption is invalid. We demonstrate that when comparing regions with different densities, the effect of OH depletion, in measuring changes of the mass-to-flux ratio between different parts of the same cloud can even reverse the direction of the underlying trends (for example, the mass-to-flux ratio may appear to decrease as we move to higher density regions). The systematic errors enter primarily through the inadequate estimation of the mass of the region.

  6. TWO MASS DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE L 1641 MOLECULAR CLOUDS: THE HERSCHEL CONNECTION OF DENSE CORES AND FILAMENTS IN ORION A

    SciTech Connect

    Polychroni, D.; Schisano, E.; Elia, D.; Molinari, S.; Turrini, D.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Benedettini, M.; Busquet, G.; Di Giorgio, A. M.; Pestalozzi, M.; Pezzuto, S.; Roy, A.; André, Ph.; Hennemann, M.; Hill, T.; Könyves, V.; Di Francesco, J.; Arzoumanian, D.; Bontemps, S. [Université de Bordeaux, Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Bordeaux, CNRS and others

    2013-11-10

    We present Herschel survey maps of the L 1641 molecular clouds in Orion A. We extracted both the filaments and dense cores in the region. We identified which of the dense sources are proto- or pre-stellar, and studied their association with the identified filaments. We find that although most (71%) of the pre-stellar sources are located on filaments there, is still a significant fraction of sources not associated with such structures. We find that these two populations (on and off the identified filaments) have distinctly different mass distributions. The mass distribution of the sources on the filaments is found to peak at 4 M {sub ☉} and drives the shape of the core mass function (CMF) at higher masses, which we fit with a power law of the form dN/dlogM∝M {sup –1.4±0.4}. The mass distribution of the sources off the filaments, on the other hand, peaks at 0.8 M {sub ☉} and leads to a flattening of the CMF at masses lower than ∼4 M {sub ☉}. We postulate that this difference between the mass distributions is due to the higher proportion of gas that is available in the filaments, rather than in the diffuse cloud.

  7. Molecular formulae of marine and terrigenous dissolved organic matter detected by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Boris P.; Witt, Matthias; Engbrodt, Ralph; Dittmar, Thorsten; Kattner, Gerhard

    2005-07-01

    The chemical structure of refractory marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) is still largely unknown. Electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR-MS) was used to resolve the complex mixtures of DOM and provide valuable information on elemental compositions on a molecular scale. We characterized and compared DOM from two sharply contrasting aquatic environments, algal-derived DOM from the Weddell Sea (Antarctica) and terrigenous DOM from pore water of a tropical mangrove area in northern Brazil. Several thousand molecular formulas in the mass range of 300-600 Da were identified and reproduced in element ratio plots. On the basis of molecular elemental composition and double-bond equivalents (DBE) we calculated an average composition for marine DOM. O/C ratios in the marine samples were lower (0.36 ± 0.01) than in the mangrove pore-water sample (0.42). A small proportion of chemical formulas with higher molecular mass in the marine samples were characterized by very low O/C and H/C ratios probably reflecting amphiphilic properties. The average number of unsaturations in the marine samples was surprisingly high (DBE = 9.9; mangrove pore water: DBE = 9.4) most likely due to a significant contribution of carbonyl carbon. There was no significant difference in elemental composition between surface and deep-water DOM in the Weddell Sea. Although there were some molecules with unique marine elemental composition, there was a conspicuous degree of similarity between the terrigenous and algal-derived end members. Approximately one third of the molecular formulas were present in all marine as well as in the mangrove samples. We infer that different forms of microbial degradation ultimately lead to similar structural features that are intrinsically refractory, independent of the source of the organic matter and the environmental conditions where degradation took place.

  8. Effect of molecular mass on supramolecular organisation of poly(4,4''-dioctyl-2,2':5',2''-terthiophene).

    PubMed

    Jaroch, Tomasz; Knor, Marek; Nowakowski, Robert; Zagórska, Małgorzata; Proń, Adam

    2008-10-28

    The effect of the chain length on the type and extent of the 2D supramolecular organization in poly(4,4''-dioctyl-2,2':5',2''-terthiophene) (PDOTT) monomolecular layers deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) is studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and analyzed in terms of molecular modeling. The strictly monodispersed fractions of increasing molecular mass used in this study were obtained by chromatographic fractionation of the crude product of 4,4''-dioctyl-2,2':5',2''-terthiophene oxidative polymerization. STM investigations of PDOTT layers, deposited on HOPG from poly- and monodispersed fractions, show that polydispersity can be considered as a key factor seriously limiting supramolecular ordering. This is a consequence of significant differences in the type of supramolecular order observed for molecules of different chain length. It has been demonstrated that shorter molecules (consisting of 6 and 9 thiophene units) form well-defined two-dimensional islands, while the interactions between longer molecules (consisting of 12 and 15 thiophene units) become anisotropic. Consequently, for higher molecular mass fractions, the supramolecular organization is one-dimensional and consists of more or less separated rows of ordered macromolecules. In this case an increase of the chain length leads to amplification of the intermolecular interactions proceeding via interdigitation of the alkyl substituents of adjacent molecules. Polydispersed fractions show much less ordered organization because of the incompatibility of the supramolecular structures of molecules of different molecular masses. This finding is of crucial importance for the application of polythiophene derivatives in organic and molecular electronics since ordered supramolecular organization constitutes the condition sine qua non of good electrical transport properties. PMID:18846309

  9. Two dimensional mass mapping as a general method of data representation in comprehensive analysis of complex molecular mixtures.

    PubMed

    Artemenko, Konstantin A; Zubarev, Alexander R; Samgina, Tatiana Yu; Lebedev, Albert T; Savitski, Mikhail M; Zubarev, Roman A

    2009-05-15

    A recent proteomics-grade (95%+ sequence reliability) high-throughput de novo sequencing method utilizes the benefits of high resolution, high mass accuracy, and the use of two complementary fragmentation techniques collision-activated dissociation (CAD) and electron capture dissociation (ECD). With this high-fidelity sequencing approach, hundreds of peptides can be sequenced de novo in a single LC-MS/MS experiment. The high productivity of the new analysis technique has revealed a new bottleneck which occurs in data representation. Here we suggest a new method of data analysis and visualization that presents a comprehensive picture of the peptide content including relative abundances and grouping into families. The 2D mass mapping consists of putting the molecular masses onto a two-dimensional bubble plot, with the relative monoisotopic mass defect and isotopic shift being the axes and with the bubble area proportional to the peptide abundance. Peptides belonging to the same family form a compact group on such a plot, so that the family identity can in many cases be determined from the molecular mass alone. The performance of the method is demonstrated on the high-throughput analysis of skin secretion from three frogs, Rana ridibunda, Rana arvalis, and Rana temporaria. Two dimensional mass maps simplify the task of global comparison between the species and make obvious the similarities and differences in the peptide contents that are obscure in traditional data presentation methods. Even biological activity of the peptide can sometimes be inferred from its position on the plot. Two dimensional mass mapping is a general method applicable to any complex mixture, peptide and nonpeptide alike. PMID:19382811

  10. Molecular abundances and low-mass star formation. 1: Si- and S-bearing species toward IRAS 16293-2422

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Geoffrey A.; Dishoek, Ewine F. Van; Jansen, David J.; Groesbeck, T. D.; Mundy, Lee G.

    1994-01-01

    Results from millimeter and submillimeter spectral line surveys of the protobinary source Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) 16293-2422 are presented. Here we outline the abundances of silicon- and sulfur-containing species. A combination of rotation diagram and full statistical equilibrium/radiative transfer calculations is used to constrain the physical conditions toward IRAS 16293 and to construct its beam-averaged chemical composition over a 10 to 20 sec (1600 to 3200 AU) scale. The chemical complexity as judged by species such as SiO, OCS, and H2S, is intermediate between that of dark molecular clouds such as L134N and hot molecular cloud cores such as Orion KL. From the richness of the spectra compared to other young stellar objects of similar luminosity, it is clear that molecular abundances do not scale simply with mass; rather, the chemistry is a strong function of evolutionary state, i.e., age.

  11. Factors that affect molecular weight distribution of Suwannee river fulvic acid as determined by electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Leenheer, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Effects of methylation, molar response, multiple charging, solvents, and positive and negative ionization on molecular weight distributions of aquatic fulvic acid were investigated by electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry. After preliminary analysis by positive and negative modes, samples and mixtures of standards were derivatized by methylation to minimize ionization sites and reanalyzed.Positive ionization was less effective and produced more complex spectra than negative ionization. Ionization in methanol/water produced greater response than in acetonitrile/water. Molar response varied widely for the selected free acid standards when analyzed individually and in a mixture, but after methylation this range decreased. After methylation, the number average molecular weight of the Suwannee River fulvic acid remained the same while the weight average molecular weight decreased. These differences are probably indicative of disaggregation of large aggregated ions during methylation. Since the weight average molecular weight decreased, it is likely that aggregate formation in the fulvic acid was present prior to derivatization, rather than multiple charging in the mass spectra. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular characterization of dissolved organic matter in contrasted freshwater environments by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and EEM-PARAFAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parot, Jérémie; Parlanti, Edith; Guéguen, Céline

    2015-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a key parameter in the fate, transport and mobility of inorganic and organic pollutants in natural waters. Excitation emission matrix (EEM) spectra coupled to parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) provide insights on the main fluorescent DOM constituents. However, the molecular structures associated with PARAFAC DOM remain poorly understood. In this study, DOM from rivers, marshes and algal culture was characterized by EEM-PARAFAC and electrospray ionization Fourier transform mass spectrometry (ESI-FT-MS, Orbitrap Q Exactive). The high resolution of the Orbitrap (i.e. 140,000) allowed us to separate unique molecular species from the complex DOM mixtures. The majority of chemical species were found within the mass to charge ratio (m/z) 200 to 400. Weighted averages of neutral mass were 271.254, 236.480, 213.992Da for river, marsh and algal-derived DOM, respectively, congruent with previous studies. The assigned formula were dominated by CHO in humic-rich river waters whereas N- and S-containing compounds were predominant in marsh and algal samples. Marsh consisted of N and S-containing compounds, which were presumed to be linear alkylbenzene sulfonates. And the double bond equivalent (DBE) was higher in the marsh and in comparison was lower in the algal culture. Kendrick masses, used to identify homologous compounds differing only by a number of base units in high resolution mass spectra, and Van Krevelen diagrams, plot of molar ratio of hydrogen to carbon (H/C) versus oxygen to carbon (O/C), will be discussed in relation to PARAFAC components to further discriminate freshwater systems based on the origin and maturity of DOM. Together, these results showed that ESI-FT-MS has a great potential to distinguish freshwater DOM at the molecular level without any fractionation.

  13. Filtrates and Residues: Measuring the Atomic or Molecular Mass of a Gas with a Tire Gauge and a Butane Lighter Fluid Can.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.; Magginnis, Lenard J.

    1985-01-01

    Describes the use of an inexpensive apparatus (based on a butane lighter fluid can and a standard tire pressure gauge) in measuring the atomic/molecular mass of an unknown gas and in demonstrating the mass of air or the dependence of pressure on the mass of a gas. (JN)

  14. The Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP): From Molecular Clouds to Massive Young Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Peter

    2015-08-01

    I review the major science outcomes to date of the Galactic Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars, and also report the latest observational results on this unbiased, uniform sample of massive, cluster-forming molecular clumps, based on new mm-wave and IR data. These clouds represent the vast, subthermally-excited population of clumps predicted by Narayanan et al (2008) to dominate the molecular mass of disk galaxies. Besides confirming their existence, we have presented evidence that these massive clumps probably spend a large fraction (90-95%) of their long lives (possibly up to 100 Myr) in a mostly quiescent, low star formation rate (SFR) state, which is likely ended when a density or internal pressure threshold is crossed, after which vigorous, massive cluster formation consumes the densest gas with a high SFR, dispersing the embedding envelope. New results presented in two posters at this Symposium include (1) the first analysis of HCN emission from the dense gas using a full LTE solution for the column density from the hyperfine line ratios (Schap et al), which identifies low-luminosity but high-column areas that significantly increase the clumps' mass estimates, and (2) the first deep photometry of clusters in this sample based on NIR AAT and CTIO data and MIR Warm Spitzer IRAC data (Dallilar et al), which gives basic cluster parameters such as mass and luminosity as well as the associated star formation efficiency (SFE).

  15. High-molecular-mass multicatalytic proteinase complexes produced by the nitrogen-fixing actinomycete Frankia strain BR.

    PubMed Central

    Benoist, P; Müller, A; Diem, H G; Schwencke, J

    1992-01-01

    A major-high-molecular mass proteinase and seven latent minor proteinases were found in cell extracts and in concentrates of culture medium from Frankia sp. strain BR after nondenaturing electrophoresis in mixed gelatin-polyacrylamide gels. All of these complexes showed multicatalytic properties. Their molecular masses and their sedimentation coefficients varied from 1,300 kDa (28S) to 270 kDa (12S). The electroeluted 1,300-kDa proteinase complex dissociated into 11 low-molecular-mass proteinases (40 to 19 kDa) after sodium dodecyl sulfate activation at 30 degrees C and electrophoresis under denaturing conditions. All of these electroeluted proteinases hydrolyzed N-carbobenzoxy-Pro-Ala-Gly-Pro-4-methoxy-beta- naphthylamide, D-Val-Leu-Arg-4-methoxy-beta-naphthylamide, and Boc-Val-Pro-Arg-4-methyl-7-coumarylamide, whereas Suc-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-4-methyl-7-coumarylamide was cleaved only by the six lower-molecular-mass proteinases (27.5 to 19 kDa). Examination by electron microscopy of uranyl acetate-stained, electroeluted 1,300- and 650-kDa intracellular and extracellular proteinase complexes showed ring-shaped and cylindrical particles (10 to 11 nm in diameter, 15 to 16 nm long) similar to those of eukaryotic prosomes and proteasomes. Polyclonal antibodies raised against rat skeletal muscle proteasomes cross-reacted with all of the high-molecular-mass proteinase complexes and, after denaturation of the electroeluted 1,300-kDa band, with polypeptides of 35 to 38, 65, and 90 kDa. Electrophoresis of the activated cell extracts under denaturing conditions revealed 11 to 17 gelatinases from 40 to 19 kDa, including the 11 proteinases of the 1,300-kDa proteinase complex. The inhibition pattern of these proteinases is complex. Thiol-reactive compounds and 1-10-phenanthroline strongly inhibited all of the proteinases, but inhibitors against serine-type proteinases were also effective for most of them. Images PMID:1537794

  16. The Relationship Between Molecular Gas, H I, and Star Formation in the Low-mass, Low-metallicity Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, Katherine E.; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Leroy, Adam K.; Meixner, Margaret; Roman-Duval, Julia; Gordon, Karl; Hughes, Annie; Israel, Frank P.; Rubio, Monica; Indebetouw, Remy; Madden, Suzanne C.; Bot, Caroline; Hony, Sacha; Cormier, Diane; Pellegrini, Eric W.; Galametz, Maud; Sonneborn, George

    2016-07-01

    The Magellanic Clouds provide the only laboratory to study the effects of metallicity and galaxy mass on molecular gas and star formation at high (˜20 pc) resolution. We use the dust emission from HERITAGE Herschel data to map the molecular gas in the Magellanic Clouds, avoiding the known biases of CO emission as a tracer of {{{H}}}2. Using our dust-based molecular gas estimates, we find molecular gas depletion times ({τ }{{dep}}{{mol}}) of ˜0.4 Gyr in the Large Magellanic Cloud and ˜0.6 in the Small Magellanic Cloud at 1 kpc scales. These depletion times fall within the range found for normal disk galaxies, but are shorter than the average value, which could be due to recent bursts in star formation. We find no evidence for a strong intrinsic dependence of the molecular gas depletion time on metallicity. We study the relationship between the gas and the star formation rate across a range of size scales from 20 pc to ≥1 kpc, including how the scatter in {τ }{{dep}}{{mol}} changes with the size scale, and discuss the physical mechanisms driving the relationships. We compare the metallicity-dependent star formation models of Ostriker et al. and Krumholz to our observations and find that they both predict the trend in the data, suggesting that the inclusion of a diffuse neutral medium is important at lower metallicity.

  17. Communication: Rate coefficients of the H + CH{sub 4} → H{sub 2} + CH{sub 3} reaction from ring polymer molecular dynamics on a highly accurate potential energy surface

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Qingyong Chen, Jun Zhang, Dong H.

    2015-09-14

    The ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) calculations are performed to calculate rate constants for the title reaction on the recently constructed potential energy surface based on permutation invariant polynomial (PIP) neural-network (NN) fitting [J. Li et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 204302 (2015)]. By inspecting convergence, 16 beads are used in computing free-energy barriers at 300 K ≤ T ≤ 1000 K, while different numbers of beads are used for transmission coefficients. The present RPMD rates are in excellent agreement with quantum rates computed on the same potential energy surface, as well as with the experimental measurements, demonstrating further that the RPMD is capable of producing accurate rates for polyatomic chemical reactions even at rather low temperatures.

  18. Functionality-oriented molecular gels: synthesis and properties of nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD)-containing low-molecular mass gelators.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hang; Lü, Yanchao; Chen, Xiangli; Liu, Kaiqiang; Fang, Yu

    2014-12-01

    Two nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD)-containing cholesteryl (Chol) derivatives were prepared by introducing d/l-phenylalanine into the linkers between the NBD and Chol units. The compounds were denoted as and , respectively. The gelation behaviors of them were tested in 34 liquids. It was found that the chirality of the linkers shows a great effect on the gelation ability and the gel properties of the two compounds. SEM studies demonstrated that the gelator in the gel of /DMSO aggregated into uniform fibrous structures. FTIR, (1)H NMR and UV-Vis spectroscopy measurements revealed that intermolecular hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking are two main driving forces to promote the gel formation. Interestingly, the /DMSO gel exhibits rapid and reproducible gel-sol phase transition and fluorescence quenching upon introduction of ammonia. Furthermore, both the gel and the fluorescence emission could be fully recovered upon evaporation of the ammonia gas introduced. Spectroscopy and model system studies revealed the association of ammonia with the nitro group of the NBD unit of the compound, which is recognized as the main reason for the chemical responses of the gel system. On the basis of the discovery, an ammonia sensing film had been fabricated and made into a device. Furthermore, a device-based and conceptual "ammonia leaking" monitoring instrument was developed. A preliminary test demonstrated that the performance of the system is exceptionally good, a typical and persuasive example to show the important real-life applications of molecular gels. PMID:25318390

  19. Mass Spectrometry Profiles Superoxide-Induced Intra-molecular Disulfide in the FMN-binding Subunit of Mitochondrial Complex I

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liwen; Xu, Hua; Chen, Chwen-Lih; Green-Church, Kari B.; Freitas, Michael A.; Chen, Yeong-Renn

    2008-01-01

    Protein thiols with regulatory functions play a critical role in maintaining the homeostasis of the redox state in mitochondria. One major host of regulatory cysteines in mitochondria is complex I, with the thiols primarily located on its 51 kDa FMN-binding subunit. In response to oxidative stress, these thiols are expected to form intra-molecular disulfide bridges as one of their oxidative post-translational modifications. Here, to test this hypothesis and gain insights into the molecular pattern of disulfide in complex I, the isolated bovine complex I was prepared. Superoxide (O2•−) is generated by complex I under the conditions of enzyme turnover. O2•−-induced intra-molecular disulfide formation at the 51 kDa subunit was determined by tandem mass spectrometry and database searching, with the latter accomplished by adaptation of the in-house developed database search engine, MassMatrix [Xu H., et. al J. Proteome Res. (2008) 7, 138–44]. LC/MS/MS analysis of tryptic/chymotryptic digests of the 51 kDa subunit from alkylated complex I revealed that four specific cysteines (C125, C142, C187, and C206) of the 51 kDa subunit were involved in the formation of mixed intra-molecular disulfide linkages. In all, three cysteine pairs were observed: C125/C142, C187/C206, and C142/C206. The formation of disulfide bond was subsequently inhibited by superoxide dismutase, indicating the involvement of O2•−. These results elucidated by mass spectrometry indicates that the residues of C125, C142, C187, and C206 are the specific regulatory cysteines of complex I, and they participate in the oxidative modification with disulfide formation under the physiological or pathophysiological conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:18789718

  20. Determination of the Relative Atomic Masses of Metals by Liberation of Molecular Hydrogen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waghorne, W. Earle; Rous, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    Students determine the relative atomic masses of calcium, magnesium, and aluminum by reaction with hydrochloric acid and measurement of the volume of hydrogen gas liberated. The experiment demonstrates stoichiometry and illustrates clearly that mass of the reagent is not the determinant of the amounts in chemical reactions. The experiment is…

  1. Kinetics of the reaction of the heaviest hydrogen atom with H2, the 4Heμ + H2 → 4HeμH + H reaction: experiments, accurate quantal calculations, and variational transition state theory, including kinetic isotope effects for a factor of 36.1 in isotopic mass.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Donald G; Arseneau, Donald J; Sukhorukov, Oleksandr; Brewer, Jess H; Mielke, Steven L; Truhlar, Donald G; Schatz, George C; Garrett, Bruce C; Peterson, Kirk A

    2011-11-14

    The neutral muonic helium atom (4)Heμ, in which one of the electrons of He is replaced by a negative muon, may be effectively regarded as the heaviest isotope of the hydrogen atom, with a mass of 4.115 amu. We report details of the first muon spin rotation (μSR) measurements of the chemical reaction rate constant of (4)Heμ with molecular hydrogen, (4)Heμ + H(2) → (4)HeμH + H, at temperatures of 295.5, 405, and 500 K, as well as a μSR measurement of the hyperfine coupling constant of muonic He at high pressures. The experimental rate constants, k(Heμ), are compared with the predictions of accurate quantum mechanical (QM) dynamics calculations carried out on a well converged Born-Huang (BH) potential energy surface, based on complete configuration interaction calculations and including a Born-Oppenheimer diagonal correction. At the two highest measured temperatures the agreement between the quantum theory and experiment is good to excellent, well within experimental uncertainties that include an estimate of possible systematic error, but at 295.5 K the quantum calculations for k(Heμ) are below the experimental value by 2.1 times the experimental uncertainty estimates. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Variational transition state theory calculations with multidimensional tunneling have also been carried out for k(Heμ) on the BH surface, and they agree with the accurate QM rate constants to within 30% over a wider temperature range of 200-1000 K. Comparisons between theory and experiment are also presented for the rate constants for both the D + H(2) and Mu + H(2) reactions in a novel study of kinetic isotope effects for the H + H(2) reactions over a factor of 36.1 in isotopic mass of the atomic reactant. PMID:22088068

  2. High molecular weight SOA formation during limonene ozonolysis: insights from ultrahigh-resolution FT-ICR mass spectrometry characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, S.; Fisseha, R.; Putman, A. L.; Rahn, T. A.; Mazzoleni, L. R.

    2012-06-01

    The detailed molecular composition of laboratory generated limonene ozonolysis secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was studied using ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry. Approximately 1200 molecular formulas were identified in the SOA over the mass range of 140 to 850 Da. Four characteristic groups of high relative abundance species were observed; they indicate an array of accretion products that retain a large fraction of the limonene skeleton. The identified molecular formulas of each of the groups are related to one another by CH2, O and CH2O homologous series. The CH2 and O homologous series of the low molecular weight (MW) SOA (m/z < 300) are explained with a combination of functionalization and fragmentation of radical intermediates and reactive uptake of gas-phase carbonyls. They include isomerization and elimination reactions of Criegee radicals, reactions between alkyl peroxy radicals, and scission of alkoxy radicals resulting from the Criegee radicals. The presence of compounds with 10-15 carbon atoms in the first group (e.g. C11H18O6) provides evidence for SOA formation by the reactive uptake of gas-phase carbonyls during limonene ozonolysis. The high MW compounds (m/z > 300) were found to constitute a significant number fraction of the identified SOA components. The formation of high MW compounds was evaluated by molecular formula trends, fragmentation analysis of select high MW compounds and a comprehensive reaction matrix including the identified low MW SOA, hydroperoxides and Criegee radicals as building blocks. Although the formation of high MW SOA may occur via a variety of radical and non-radical reaction channels, the combined approach indicates a greater importance of the non-condensation reactions over aldol and ester condensation reaction channels. Among these hemi-acetal reactions appear to be most dominant followed by hydroperoxide and Criegee reaction channels.

  3. Evaluation and validation of an accurate mass screening method for the analysis of pesticides in fruits and vegetables using liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight-mass spectrometry with automated detection.

    PubMed

    López, Mónica García; Fussell, Richard J; Stead, Sara L; Roberts, Dominic; McCullagh, Mike; Rao, Ramesh

    2014-12-19

    This study reports the development and validation of a screening method for the detection of pesticides in 11 different fruit and vegetable commodities. The method was based on ultra performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight-mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF-MS). The objective was to validate the method in accordance with the SANCO guidance document (12571/2013) on analytical quality control and validation procedures for pesticide residues analysis in food and feed. Samples were spiked with 199 pesticides, each at two different concentrations (0.01 and 0.05 mg kg(-1)) and extracted using the QuEChERS approach. Extracts were analysed by UPLC-QTOF-MS using generic acquisition parameters. Automated detection and data filtering were performed using the UNIFI™ software and the peaks detected evaluated against a proprietary scientific library containing information for 504 pesticides. The results obtained using different data processing parameters were evaluated for 4378 pesticide/commodities combinations at 0.01 and 0.05 mg kg(-1). Using mass accuracy (± 5 ppm) with retention time (± 0.2 min) and a low response threshold (100 counts) the validated Screening Detection Limits (SDLs) were 0.01 mg kg(-1) and 0.05 mg kg(-1) for 57% and 79% of the compounds tested, respectively, with an average of 10 false detects per sample analysis. Excluding the most complex matrices (onion and leek) the detection rates increased to 69% and 87%, respectively. The use of additional parameters such as isotopic pattern and fragmentation information further reduced the number of false detects but compromised the detection rates, particularly at lower residue concentrations. The challenges associated with the validation and subsequent implementation of a pesticide multi-residue screening method are also discussed. PMID:25465001

  4. Method development for mass spectrometry based molecular characterization of fossil fuels and biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahat, Rajendra K.

    In an analytical (chemical) method development process, the sample preparation step usually determines the throughput and overall success of the analysis. Both targeted and non-targeted methods were developed for the mass spectrometry (MS) based analyses of fossil fuels (coal) and lipidomic analyses of a unique micro-organism, Gemmata obscuriglobus. In the non-targeted coal analysis using GC-MS, a microwave-assisted pressurized sample extraction method was compared with the traditional extraction method, such as Soxhlet. On the other hand, methods were developed to establish a comprehensive lipidomic profile and to confirm the presence of endotoxins (a.k.a. lipopolysaccharides, LPS) in Gemmata.. The performance of pressurized heating techniques employing hot-air oven and microwave irradiation were compared with that of Soxhlet method in terms of percentage extraction efficiency and extracted analyte profiles (via GC-MS). Sub-bituminous (Powder River Range, Wyoming, USA) and bituminous (Fruitland formation, Colorado, USA) coal samples were tested. Overall 30-40% higher extraction efficiencies (by weight) were obtained with a 4 hour hot-air oven and a 20 min microwave-heating extraction in a pressurized container when compared to a 72 hour Soxhlet extraction. The pressurized methods are 25 times more economic in terms of solvent/sample amount used and are 216 times faster in term of time invested for the extraction process. Additionally, same sets of compounds were identified by GC-MS for all the extraction methods used: n-alkanes and diterpanes in the sub-bituminous sample, and n-alkanes and alkyl aromatic compounds in the bituminous coal sample. G. obscuriglobus, a nucleated bacterium, is a micro-organism of high significances from evolutionary, cell and environmental biology standpoints. Although lipidomics is an essential tool in microbiological systematics and chemotaxonomy, complete lipid profile of this bacterium is still lacking. In addition, the presence of

  5. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry imaging reveals molecular level changes in ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene joint implants in correlation with lipid adsorption.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Sophie M; Archodoulaki, Vasiliki-Maria; Allmaier, Günter; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina

    2014-10-01

    Ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (PE-UHMW), a material with high biocompatibility and excellent mechanical properties, is among the most commonly used materials for acetabular cup replacement in artificial joint systems. It is assumed that the interaction with synovial fluid in the biocompartment leads to significant changes relevant to material failure. In addition to hyaluronic acid, lipids are particularly relevant for lubrication in an articulating process. This study investigates synovial lipid adsorption on two different PE-UHMW materials (GUR-1050 and vitamin E-doped) in an in vitro model system by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). Lipids were identified by high performance thin layer chromatography (HP-TLC) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis, with an analytical focus on phospholipids and cholesterol, both being species of high importance for lubrication. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was applied in the study to correlate molecular information with PE-UHMW material qualities. It is demonstrated that lipid adsorption preferentially occurs in rough or oxidized polymer regions. Polymer modifications were colocalized with adsorbed lipids and found with high density in regions identified by SEM. Explanted, the in vivo polymer material showed comparable and even more obvious polymer damage and lipid adsorption when compared with the static in vitro model. A three-dimensional reconstruction of MSI data from consecutive PE-UHMW slices reveals detailed information about the diffusion process of lipids in the acetabular cup and provides, for the first time, a promising starting point for future studies correlating molecular information with commonly used techniques for material analysis (e.g., Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, nanoindentation). PMID:25215499

  6. Accurate Molecular Dimensions from Stearic Acid Monolayers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Charles A.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Discusses modifications in the fatty acid monolayer experiment to reduce the inaccurate moleculary data students usually obtain. Copies of the experimental procedure used and a Pascal computer program to work up the data are available from the authors. (JN)

  7. An Evolutionary Model for Collapsing Molecular Clouds and their Star Formation Activity. II. Mass Dependence of the Star Formation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora-Avilés, Manuel; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2014-10-01

    We discuss the evolution and dependence on cloud mass of the star formation rate (SFR) and efficiency (SFE) of star-forming molecular clouds (MCs) within the scenario that clouds are undergoing global collapse and that the SFR is controlled by ionization feedback. We find that low-mass clouds (M max <~ 104 M ⊙) spend most of their evolution at low SFRs, but end their lives with a mini-burst, reaching a peak SFR ~104 M ⊙ Myr-1, although their time-averaged SFR is only langSFRrang ~ 102 M ⊙ Myr-1. The corresponding efficiencies are SFEfinal <~ 60% and langSFErang <~ 1%. For more massive clouds (M max >~ 105 M ⊙), the SFR first increases and then reaches a plateau because the clouds are influenced by stellar feedback since earlier in their evolution. As a function of cloud mass, langSFRrang and langSFErang are well represented by the fits langSFRrang ≈ 100(1 + M max/1.4 × 105 M ⊙)1.68 M ⊙ Myr-1 and langSFErang ≈ 0.03(M max/2.5 × 105 M ⊙)0.33, respectively. Moreover, the SFR of our model clouds follows closely the SFR-dense gas mass relation recently found by Lada et al. during the epoch when their instantaneous SFEs are comparable to those of the clouds considered by those authors. Collectively, a Monte Carlo integration of the model-predicted SFR(M) over a Galactic giant molecular cloud mass spectrum yields values for the total Galactic SFR that are within half an order of magnitude of the relation obtained by Gao & Solomon. Our results support the scenario that star-forming MCs may be in global gravitational collapse and that the low observed values of the SFR and SFE are a result of the interruption of each SF episode, caused primarily by the ionizing feedback from massive stars.

  8. Far-infrared molecular lines from low- to high-mass star forming regions observed with Herschel

    NASA Astrop