Science.gov

Sample records for accurate photometric redshifts

  1. Can Selforganizing Maps Accurately Predict Photometric Redshifts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, Michael J.; Klose, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We present an unsupervised machine-learning approach that can be employed for estimating photometric redshifts. The proposed method is based on a vector quantization called the self-organizing-map (SOM) approach. A variety of photometrically derived input values were utilized from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey's main galaxy sample, luminous red galaxy, and quasar samples, along with the PHAT0 data set from the Photo-z Accuracy Testing project. Regression results obtained with this new approach were evaluated in terms of root-mean-square error (RMSE) to estimate the accuracy of the photometric redshift estimates. The results demonstrate competitive RMSE and outlier percentages when compared with several other popular approaches, such as artificial neural networks and Gaussian process regression. SOM RMSE results (using delta(z) = z(sub phot) - z(sub spec)) are 0.023 for the main galaxy sample, 0.027 for the luminous red galaxy sample, 0.418 for quasars, and 0.022 for PHAT0 synthetic data. The results demonstrate that there are nonunique solutions for estimating SOM RMSEs. Further research is needed in order to find more robust estimation techniques using SOMs, but the results herein are a positive indication of their capabilities when compared with other well-known methods

  2. Can Self-Organizing Maps Accurately Predict Photometric Redshifts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, M. J.; Klose, C. D.

    2012-03-01

    We present an unsupervised machine-learning approach that can be employed for estimating photometric redshifts. The proposed method is based on a vector quantization called the self-organizing-map (SOM) approach. A variety of photometrically derived input values were utilized from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey's main galaxy sample, luminous red galaxy, and quasar samples, along with the PHAT0 data set from the Photo-z Accuracy Testing project. Regression results obtained with this new approach were evaluated in terms of root-mean-square error (RMSE) to estimate the accuracy of the photometric redshift estimates. The results demonstrate competitive RMSE and outlier percentages when compared with several other popular approaches, such as artificial neural networks and Gaussian process regression. SOM RMSE results (using Δz = zphot - zspec) are 0.023 for the main galaxy sample, 0.027 for the luminous red galaxy sample, 0.418 for quasars, and 0.022 for PHAT0 synthetic data. The results demonstrate that there are nonunique solutions for estimating SOM RMSEs. Further research is needed in order to find more robust estimation techniques using SOMs, but the results herein are a positive indication of their capabilities when compared with other well-known methods.

  3. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS OF SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Sukanya; Magnelli, Benjamin; Lutz, Dieter; Berta, Stefano; Popesso, Paola; McKee, Christopher F.; Pozzi, Francesca

    2013-08-20

    We use the photometric redshift method of Chakrabarti and McKee to infer photometric redshifts of submillimeter galaxies with far-IR (FIR) Herschel data obtained as part of the PACS Evolutionary Probe program. For the sample with spectroscopic redshifts, we demonstrate the validity of this method over a large range of redshifts (4 {approx}> z {approx}> 0.3) and luminosities, finding an average accuracy in (1 + z{sub phot})/(1 + z{sub spec}) of 10%. Thus, this method is more accurate than other FIR photometric redshift methods. This method is different from typical FIR photometric methods in deriving redshifts from the light-to-gas mass (L/M) ratio of infrared-bright galaxies inferred from the FIR spectral energy distribution, rather than dust temperatures. To assess the dependence of our photometric redshift method on the data in this sample, we contrast the average accuracy of our method when we use PACS data, versus SPIRE data, versus both PACS and SPIRE data. We also discuss potential selection effects that may affect the Herschel sample. Once the redshift is derived, we can determine physical properties of infrared-bright galaxies, including the temperature variation within the dust envelope, luminosity, mass, and surface density. We use data from the GOODS-S field to calculate the star formation rate density (SFRD) of submillimeter bright sources detected by AzTEC and PACS. The AzTEC-PACS sources, which have a threshold 850 {mu}m flux {approx}> 5 mJy, contribute 15% of the SFRD from all ultraluminous infrared galaxies (L{sub IR} {approx}> 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }), and 3% of the total SFRD at z {approx} 2.

  4. Accurate PSF-matched photometry and photometric redshifts for the extreme deep field with the Chebyshev-Fourier functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Teja, Y.; Benítez, N.; Molino, A.; Fernandes, C. A. C.

    2015-10-01

    Photometric redshifts, which have become the cornerstone of several of the largest astronomical surveys like PanStarrs, DES, J-PAS and LSST, require precise measurements of galaxy photometry in different bands using a consistent physical aperture. This is not trivial, due to the variation in the shape and width of the point spread function (PSF) introduced by wavelength differences, instrument positions and atmospheric conditions. Current methods to correct for this effect rely on a detailed knowledge of PSF characteristics as a function of the survey coordinates, which can be difficult due to the relative paucity of stars tracking the PSF behaviour. Here we show that it is possible to measure accurate, consistent multicolour photometry without knowing the shape of the PSF. The Chebyshev-Fourier functions (CHEFs) can fit the observed profile of each object and produce high signal-to-noise integrated flux measurements unaffected by the PSF. These total fluxes, which encompass all the galaxy populations, are much more useful for galaxy evolution studies than aperture photometry. We compare the total magnitudes and colours obtained using our software to traditional photometry with SEXTRACTOR, using real data from the COSMOS survey and the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (HUDF). We also apply the CHEF technique to the recently published eXtreme Deep Field (XDF) and compare the results to those from COLORPRO on the HUDF. We produce a photometric catalogue with 35 732 sources (10 823 with signal-to-noise ratio ≥5), reaching a photometric redshift precision of 2 per cent due to the extraordinary depth and wavelength coverage of the eXtreme Deep Field images.

  5. Overconfidence in photometric redshift estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittman, David; Bhaskar, Ramya; Tobin, Ryan

    2016-04-01

    We describe a new test of photometric redshift performance given a spectroscopic redshift sample. This test complements the traditional comparison of redshift differences by testing whether the probability density functions p(z) have the correct width. We test two photometric redshift codes, BPZ and EAZY, on each of two data sets and find that BPZ is consistently overconfident (the p(z) are too narrow) while EAZY produces approximately the correct level of confidence. We show that this is because EAZY models the uncertainty in its spectral energy distribution templates, and that post-hoc smoothing of the BPZ p(z) provides a reasonable substitute for detailed modelling of template uncertainties. Either remedy still leaves a small surplus of galaxies with spectroscopic redshift very far from the peaks. Thus, better modelling of low-probability tails will be needed for high-precision work such as dark energy constraints with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and other large surveys.

  6. Photometric Redshifts in the IRAC Shallow Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Brodwin, M; Brown, M; Ashby, M; Bian, C; Brand, K; Dey, A; Eisenhardt, P; Eisenstein, D; Gonzalez, A; Huang, J; Kochanek, C; McKenzie, E; Pahre, M; Smith, H; Soifer, B; Stanford, S; Stern, D; Elston, R

    2006-06-13

    Accurate photometric redshifts are calculated for nearly 200,000 galaxies to a 4.5 micron flux limit of {approx} 13 {micro}Jy in the 8.5 deg{sup 2} Spitzer/IRAC Shallow survey. Using a hybrid photometric redshift algorithm incorporating both neural-net and template-fitting techniques, calibrated with over 15,000 spectroscopic redshifts, a redshift accuracy of {sigma} = 0.06 (1+z) is achieved for 95% of galaxies at 0 < z < 1.5. The accuracy is {sigma} = 0.12 (1 + z) for 95% of AGN at 0 < z < 3. Redshift probability functions, central to several ongoing studies of the galaxy population, are computed for the full sample. We demonstrate that these functions accurately represent the true redshift probability density, allowing the calculation of valid confidence intervals for all objects. These probability functions have already been used to successfully identify a population of Spitzer-selected high redshift (z > 1) galaxy clusters. We present one such spectroscopically confirmed cluster at = 1.24, ISCS J1434.2+3426. Finally, we present a measurement of the 4.5 {micro}m-selected galaxy redshift distribution.

  7. RANDOM FORESTS FOR PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS

    SciTech Connect

    Carliles, Samuel; Szalay, Alexander S.; Budavari, Tamas; Heinis, Sebastien; Priebe, Carey

    2010-03-20

    The main challenge today in photometric redshift estimation is not in the accuracy but in understanding the uncertainties. We introduce an empirical method based on Random Forests to address these issues. The training algorithm builds a set of optimal decision trees on subsets of the available spectroscopic sample, which provide independent constraints on the redshift of each galaxy. The combined forest estimates have intriguing statistical properties, notable among which are Gaussian errors. We demonstrate the power of our approach on multi-color measurements of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

  8. Cosmology with photometric redshift surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Chris; Bridle, Sarah

    2005-11-01

    We explore the utility of future photometric redshift imaging surveys for delineating the large-scale structure of the Universe, and assess the resulting constraints on the cosmological model. We perform the following two complementary types of analysis. (i) We quantify the statistical confidence and the accuracy with which such surveys will be able to detect and measure characteristic features in the clustering power spectrum such as the acoustic oscillations and the turnover, in a `model-independent' fashion. We show for example that a 10000-deg2 imaging survey with depth r= 22.5 and photometric redshift accuracy δz/(1 +z) = 0.03 will detect the acoustic oscillations with 99.9 per cent confidence, measuring the associated preferred cosmological scale with 2 per cent precision. Such a survey will also detect the turnover with 95 per cent confidence, determining the corresponding scale with 20 per cent accuracy. (ii) By assuming a Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model power spectrum we calculate the confidence with which a non-zero baryon fraction can be deduced from such future galaxy surveys. We quantify `wiggle detection' by calculating the number of standard deviations by which the baryon fraction is measured, after marginalizing over the shape parameter. This is typically a factor of 4 more significant (in terms of number of standard deviations) than the above `model-independent' result. For both analyses, we quantify the variation of the results with magnitude depth and photometric redshift precision, and discuss the prospects for obtaining the required performance with realistic future surveys. We conclude that the precision with which the clustering pattern may be inferred from future photometric redshift surveys will be competitive with contemporaneous spectroscopic redshift surveys, assuming that systematic effects can be controlled. We find that for equivalent wiggle detection power, a photometric redshift survey requires an area approximately 12[δz/(1 +z

  9. A CRITICAL ASSESSMENT OF PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT METHODS: A CANDELS INVESTIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlen, Tomas; Ferguson, Henry C.; Mobasher, Bahram; Faber, Sandra M.; Barro, Guillermo; Guo, Yicheng; Finlator, Kristian; Fontana, Adriano; Gruetzbauch, Ruth; Johnson, Seth; Pforr, Janine; Dickinson, Mark E.; Salvato, Mara; Wuyts, Stijn; Wiklind, Tommy; Acquaviva, Viviana; Huang, Jiasheng; Huang, Kuang-Han; Newman, Jeffrey A.; and others

    2013-10-01

    We present results from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) photometric redshift methods investigation. In this investigation, the results from 11 participants, each using a different combination of photometric redshift code, template spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and priors, are used to examine the properties of photometric redshifts applied to deep fields with broadband multi-wavelength coverage. The photometry used includes U-band through mid-infrared filters and was derived using the TFIT method. Comparing the results, we find that there is no particular code or set of template SEDs that results in significantly better photometric redshifts compared to others. However, we find that codes producing the lowest scatter and outlier fraction utilize a training sample to optimize photometric redshifts by adding zero-point offsets, template adjusting, or adding extra smoothing errors. These results therefore stress the importance of the training procedure. We find a strong dependence of the photometric redshift accuracy on the signal-to-noise ratio of the photometry. On the other hand, we find a weak dependence of the photometric redshift scatter with redshift and galaxy color. We find that most photometric redshift codes quote redshift errors (e.g., 68% confidence intervals) that are too small compared to that expected from the spectroscopic control sample. We find that all codes show a statistically significant bias in the photometric redshifts. However, the bias is in all cases smaller than the scatter; the latter therefore dominates the errors. Finally, we find that combining results from multiple codes significantly decreases the photometric redshift scatter and outlier fraction. We discuss different ways of combining data to produce accurate photometric redshifts and error estimates.

  10. A Critical Assessment of Photometric Redshift Methods: A CANDELS Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlen, Tomas; Mobasher, Bahram; Faber, Sandra M.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Barro, Guillermo; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Finlator, Kristian; Fontana, Adriano; Gruetzbauch, Ruth; Johnson, Seth; Pforr, Janine; Salvato, Mara; Wiklind, Tommy; Wuyts, Stijn; Acquaviva, Viviana; Dickinson, Mark E.; Guo, Yicheng; Huang, Jiasheng; Huang, Kuang-Han; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Bell, Eric F.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Galametz, Audrey; Gawiser, Eric; Giavalisco, Mauro; Grogin, Norman A.; Hathi, Nimish; Kocevski, Dale; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Koo, David C.; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; Papovich, Casey; Peth, Michael; Ryan, Russell; Somerville, Rachel; Weiner, Benjamin; Wilson, Grant

    2013-10-01

    We present results from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) photometric redshift methods investigation. In this investigation, the results from 11 participants, each using a different combination of photometric redshift code, template spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and priors, are used to examine the properties of photometric redshifts applied to deep fields with broadband multi-wavelength coverage. The photometry used includes U-band through mid-infrared filters and was derived using the TFIT method. Comparing the results, we find that there is no particular code or set of template SEDs that results in significantly better photometric redshifts compared to others. However, we find that codes producing the lowest scatter and outlier fraction utilize a training sample to optimize photometric redshifts by adding zero-point offsets, template adjusting, or adding extra smoothing errors. These results therefore stress the importance of the training procedure. We find a strong dependence of the photometric redshift accuracy on the signal-to-noise ratio of the photometry. On the other hand, we find a weak dependence of the photometric redshift scatter with redshift and galaxy color. We find that most photometric redshift codes quote redshift errors (e.g., 68% confidence intervals) that are too small compared to that expected from the spectroscopic control sample. We find that all codes show a statistically significant bias in the photometric redshifts. However, the bias is in all cases smaller than the scatter; the latter therefore dominates the errors. Finally, we find that combining results from multiple codes significantly decreases the photometric redshift scatter and outlier fraction. We discuss different ways of combining data to produce accurate photometric redshifts and error estimates.

  11. Hierarchical Bayesian inference of galaxy redshift distributions from photometric surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leistedt, Boris; Mortlock, Daniel J.; Peiris, Hiranya V.

    2016-08-01

    Accurately characterizing the redshift distributions of galaxies is essential for analysing deep photometric surveys and testing cosmological models. We present a technique to simultaneously infer redshift distributions and individual redshifts from photometric galaxy catalogues. Our model constructs a piecewise constant representation (effectively a histogram) of the distribution of galaxy types and redshifts, the parameters of which are efficiently inferred from noisy photometric flux measurements. This approach can be seen as a generalization of template-fitting photometric redshift methods and relies on a library of spectral templates to relate the photometric fluxes of individual galaxies to their redshifts. We illustrate this technique on simulated galaxy survey data, and demonstrate that it delivers correct posterior distributions on the underlying type and redshift distributions, as well as on the individual types and redshifts of galaxies. We show that even with uninformative priors, large photometric errors and parameter degeneracies, the redshift and type distributions can be recovered robustly thanks to the hierarchical nature of the model, which is not possible with common photometric redshift estimation techniques. As a result, redshift uncertainties can be fully propagated in cosmological analyses for the first time, fulfilling an essential requirement for the current and future generations of surveys.

  12. Photometric Redshifts in the Sloan Colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowards-Emmerd, D.; McKay, T. A.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, J. A.

    1999-05-01

    In the past few years, photometric redshifts have proven themselves to be a robust means of estimating redshifts. In the near future, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey will compile high-quality photometric data for 108 galaxies. Photometric redshifts will provide approximate distances to this enormous set of objects. In this poster, we describe results from a preliminary study of photometric redshift calibration on data in the SDSS colors. We present 5 color photometry for 2195 galaxies drawn from the Las Campanas Redshift Survey. Data was obtained on the Curtis Schmidt telescope at CTIO during Aug 97 and Feb/Mar 98 using filters nearly identical to the SDSS system. We also present photometric redshift predictions expressed as polynomial functions of galaxy colors and magnitudes derived from this training set. Finally, applications of photometric redshifts will be considered, including lensing studies, cosmology, and determination of fundamental astrophysical quantities. Support was provided by NSF grant #9703282.

  13. Precision Photometric Redshifts Of Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, L.; Annis, J.

    2006-06-01

    Clusters of galaxies provide a means to achieve more precise photometric redshifts than achievable using individual galaxies simply because of the numbers of galaxies available in clusters. Here we examine the expectation that one can achieve root-N improvement using the N galaxies in a cluster. We extracted from a maxBCG SDSS cluster catalog 28,000 clusters and used SDSS DR4 spectra to find spectroscopic redshifts for the cluster. We examined both using the brightest cluster galaxy redshift as the proxy for the cluster and using the mean of a collection of galaxies within a given angular diameter and redshift (about the cluster photo-z) range. We find that the BCG provides a better estimate of the cluster redshift, to be understood in the context of a handful of spectra in the neighborhood of the cluster. We find that the cluster photo-z has an approximate root-N scaling behavior with the normalization for maxBCG techniques being 0.07. We predict what ``afterburner photo-z'' techniques, which use individual galaxy photo-z's good to 0.03-0.05, can achieve for cluster catalogs and for cluster cosmology.

  14. Probabilistic Photometric Redshifts in the Era of Petascale Astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco Kind, Matias

    2014-01-01

    With the growth of large photometric surveys, accurately estimating photometric redshifts, preferably as a probability density function (PDF), and fully understanding the implicit systematic uncertainties in this process has become increasingly important. These surveys are expected to obtain images of billions of distinct galaxies. As a result, storing and analyzing all of these photometric redshift PDFs will be non-trivial, and this challenge becomes even more severe if a survey plans to compute and store multiple different PDFs. In this thesis, we have developed an end-to-end framework that will compute accurate and robust photometric redshift PDFs for massive data sets by using two new, state-of-the-art machine learning techniques that are based on a random forest and a random atlas, respectively. By using data from several photometric surveys, we demonstrate the applicability of these new techniques, and we demonstrate that our new approach is among the best techniques currently available. We also show how different techniques can be combined by using novel Bayesian techniques to improve the photometric redshift precision to unprecedented levels while also presenting new approaches to better identify outliers. In addition, our framework provides supplementary information regarding the data being analyzed, including unbiased estimates of the accuracy of the technique without resorting to a validation data set, identification of poor photometric redshift areas within the parameter space occupied by the spectroscopic training data, and a quantification of the relative importance of the variables used during the estimation process. Furthermore, we present a new approach to represent and store photometric redshift PDFs by using a sparse representation with outstanding compression and reconstruction capabilities. We also demonstrate how this framework can also be directly incorporated into cosmological analyses. The new techniques presented in this thesis are crucial

  15. Galaxy clustering with photometric surveys using PDF redshift information

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Asorey, J.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Brunner, R. J.; Thaler, J.

    2016-03-28

    Here, photometric surveys produce large-area maps of the galaxy distribution, but with less accurate redshift information than is obtained from spectroscopic methods. Modern photometric redshift (photo-z) algorithms use galaxy magnitudes, or colors, that are obtained through multi-band imaging to produce a probability density function (PDF) for each galaxy in the map. We used simulated data to study the effect of using different photo-z estimators to assign galaxies to redshift bins in order to compare their effects on angular clustering and galaxy bias measurements. We found that if we use the entire PDF, rather than a single-point (mean or mode) estimate, the deviations are less biased, especially when using narrow redshift bins. When the redshift bin widths aremore » $$\\Delta z=0.1$$, the use of the entire PDF reduces the typical measurement bias from 5%, when using single point estimates, to 3%.« less

  16. Galaxy clustering with photometric surveys using PDF redshift information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asorey, J.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Brunner, R. J.; Thaler, J.

    2016-06-01

    Photometric surveys produce large-area maps of the galaxy distribution, but with less accurate redshift information than is obtained from spectroscopic methods. Modern photometric redshift (photo-z) algorithms use galaxy magnitudes, or colours, that are obtained through multiband imaging to produce a probability density function (PDF) for each galaxy in the map. We used simulated data to study the effect of using different photo-z estimators to assign galaxies to redshift bins in order to compare their effects on angular clustering and galaxy bias measurements. We found that if we use the entire PDF, rather than a single-point (mean or mode) estimate, the deviations are less biased, especially when using narrow redshift bins. When the redshift bin widths are Δz = 0.1, the use of the entire PDF reduces the typical measurement bias from 5 per cent, when using single point estimates, to 3 per cent.

  17. Photometric Redshift Techniques in Big-data Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Xia; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    Photometric data increase with large survey projects running. The huge volume of data influences the means and methods to deal with them. As such, the techniques of photometric redshift estimation based on photometric data must be developed and improved.

  18. Precision Cosmology with a New Probabilistic Photometric Redshifts Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco Kind, Matias; Brunner, R. J.

    2013-06-01

    A complete understanding of both dark energy and dark matter remains one of most important challenges in astrophysics today. Recent theoretical and numerical computations have made important progress in quantifying the role of these dark components on the formation and evolution of galaxies through cosmic time, but observational verification of these predictions and the development of new, more stringent constraints has not kept pace. It is in this context that, photometric redshifts have become more important with the growth of large imaging surveys, such as DES and LSST, that have been designed to address this issue. But their basic implementation has not changed significantly from their original development, as most techniques provide a single photometric redshift estimate and an associated error for the an extragalactic source. In this work, we present a unique and powerful solution that leverages the full information contained in the photometric data to address this cosmological challenge with a new approach that provides accurate photometric redshift probability density functions (PDF) for galaxies. This new approach, which scales efficiently to massive data, efficiently combines standard template fitting techniques with powerful machine learning methods. Included in this framework is our recently developed technique entitled Trees for PhotoZ (TPZ); a new, robust, parallel photometric redshift code that uses prediction trees and random forests to generate photo-z PDFs in a reliable and fast manner. In addition, our approach also provides ancillary information about the internal structure of the data, including the relative importance of variables used during the redshift estimation, an identification of areas in the training sample that provide poor predictions, and an accurate outlier rejection method. We will also present current results of this approach on a variety of datasets and discuss, by using specific examples, how the full photo-z PDF can be

  19. A sparse Gaussian process framework for photometric redshift estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almosallam, Ibrahim A.; Lindsay, Sam N.; Jarvis, Matt J.; Roberts, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate photometric redshifts are a lynchpin for many future experiments to pin down the cosmological model and for studies of galaxy evolution. In this study, a novel sparse regression framework for photometric redshift estimation is presented. Synthetic data set simulating the Euclid survey and real data from SDSS DR12 are used to train and test the proposed models. We show that approaches which include careful data preparation and model design offer a significant improvement in comparison with several competing machine learning algorithms. Standard implementations of most regression algorithms use the minimization of the sum of squared errors as the objective function. For redshift inference, this induces a bias in the posterior mean of the output distribution, which can be problematic. In this paper, we directly minimize the target metric Δz = (zs - zp)/(1 + zs) and address the bias problem via a distribution-based weighting scheme, incorporated as part of the optimization objective. The results are compared with other machine learning algorithms in the field such as artificial neural networks (ANN), Gaussian processes (GPs) and sparse GPs. The proposed framework reaches a mean absolute Δz = 0.0026(1 + zs), over the redshift range of 0 ≤ zs ≤ 2 on the simulated data, and Δz = 0.0178(1 + zs) over the entire redshift range on the SDSS DR12 survey, outperforming the standard ANNz used in the literature. We also investigate how the relative size of the training sample affects the photometric redshift accuracy. We find that a training sample of >30 per cent of total sample size, provides little additional constraint on the photometric redshifts, and note that our GP formalism strongly outperforms ANNz in the sparse data regime for the simulated data set.

  20. ArborZ: PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS USING BOOSTED DECISION TREES

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdes, David W.; Sypniewski, Adam J.; McKay, Timothy A.; Hao, Jiangang; Weis, Matthew R.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Busha, Michael T.

    2010-06-01

    Precision photometric redshifts will be essential for extracting cosmological parameters from the next generation of wide-area imaging surveys. In this paper, we introduce a photometric redshift algorithm, ArborZ, based on the machine-learning technique of boosted decision trees. We study the algorithm using galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and from mock catalogs intended to simulate both the SDSS and the upcoming Dark Energy Survey. We show that it improves upon the performance of existing algorithms. Moreover, the method naturally leads to the reconstruction of a full probability density function (PDF) for the photometric redshift of each galaxy, not merely a single 'best estimate' and error, and also provides a photo-z quality figure of merit for each galaxy that can be used to reject outliers. We show that the stacked PDFs yield a more accurate reconstruction of the redshift distribution N(z). We discuss limitations of the current algorithm and ideas for future work.

  1. ArborZ: Photometric Redshifts Using Boosted Decision Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdes, David W.; Sypniewski, Adam J.; McKay, Timothy A.; Hao, Jiangang; Weis, Matthew R.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Busha, Michael T.

    2010-06-01

    Precision photometric redshifts will be essential for extracting cosmological parameters from the next generation of wide-area imaging surveys. In this paper, we introduce a photometric redshift algorithm, ArborZ, based on the machine-learning technique of boosted decision trees. We study the algorithm using galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and from mock catalogs intended to simulate both the SDSS and the upcoming Dark Energy Survey. We show that it improves upon the performance of existing algorithms. Moreover, the method naturally leads to the reconstruction of a full probability density function (PDF) for the photometric redshift of each galaxy, not merely a single "best estimate" and error, and also provides a photo-z quality figure of merit for each galaxy that can be used to reject outliers. We show that the stacked PDFs yield a more accurate reconstruction of the redshift distribution N(z). We discuss limitations of the current algorithm and ideas for future work.

  2. A new method to search for high-redshift clusters using photometric redshifts

    SciTech Connect

    Castignani, G.; Celotti, A.; Chiaberge, M.; Norman, C.

    2014-09-10

    We describe a new method (Poisson probability method, PPM) to search for high-redshift galaxy clusters and groups by using photometric redshift information and galaxy number counts. The method relies on Poisson statistics and is primarily introduced to search for megaparsec-scale environments around a specific beacon. The PPM is tailored to both the properties of the FR I radio galaxies in the Chiaberge et al. sample, which are selected within the COSMOS survey, and to the specific data set used. We test the efficiency of our method of searching for cluster candidates against simulations. Two different approaches are adopted. (1) We use two z ∼ 1 X-ray detected cluster candidates found in the COSMOS survey and we shift them to higher redshift up to z = 2. We find that the PPM detects the cluster candidates up to z = 1.5, and it correctly estimates both the redshift and size of the two clusters. (2) We simulate spherically symmetric clusters of different size and richness, and we locate them at different redshifts (i.e., z = 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0) in the COSMOS field. We find that the PPM detects the simulated clusters within the considered redshift range with a statistical 1σ redshift accuracy of ∼0.05. The PPM is an efficient alternative method for high-redshift cluster searches that may also be applied to both present and future wide field surveys such as SDSS Stripe 82, LSST, and Euclid. Accurate photometric redshifts and a survey depth similar or better than that of COSMOS (e.g., I < 25) are required.

  3. Bayesian photometric redshifts with empirical training sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Christian

    2009-07-01

    We combine in a single framework the two complementary benefits of χ2 template fits and empirical training sets used e.g. in neural nets: χ2 is more reliable when its probability density functions (PDFs) are inspected for multiple peaks, while empirical training is more accurate when calibration and priors of query data and training set match. We present a χ2 empirical method that derives PDFs from empirical models as a subclass of kernel regression methods, and apply it to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 sample of >75000 quasi-stellar objects, which is full of ambiguities. Objects with single-peak PDFs show <1 per cent outliers, rms redshift errors <0.05 and vanishing redshift bias. At z > 2.5, these figures are two times better. Outliers result purely from the discrete nature and limited size of the model, and rms errors are dominated by the intrinsic variety of object colours. PDFs classed as ambiguous provide accurate probabilities for alternative solutions and thus weights for using both solutions and avoiding needless outliers. E.g. the PDFs predict 78.0 per cent of the stronger peaks to be correct, which is true for 77.9 per cent of them. Redshift incompleteness is common in faint spectroscopic surveys and turns into a massive undetectable outlier risk above other performance limitations, but we can quantify residual outlier risks stemming from size and completeness of the model. We propose a matched χ2 error scale for noisy data and show that it produces correct error estimates and redshift distributions accurate within Poisson errors. Our method can easily be applied to future large galaxy surveys, which will benefit from the reliability in ambiguity detection and residual risk quantification.

  4. An Improved Technique for Increasing the Accuracy of Photometrically Determined Redshifts for ___Blended___ Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Ashley Marie; /Marietta Coll. /SLAC

    2012-08-24

    The redshift of a galaxy can be determined by one of two methods; photometric or spectroscopic. Photometric is a term for any redshift determination made using the magnitudes of light in different filters. Spectroscopic redshifts are determined by measuring the absorption spectra of the object then determining the difference in wavelength between the 'standard' absorption lines and the measured ones, making it the most accurate of the two methods. The data for this research was collected from SDSS DR8 and then separated into blended and non-blended galaxy sets; the definition of 'blended' is discussed in the Introduction section. The current SDSS photometric redshift determination method does not discriminate between blended and non-blended data when it determines the photometric redshift of a given galaxy. The focus of this research was to utilize machine learning techniques to determine if a considerably more accurate photometric redshift determination method could be found, for the case of the blended and non-blended data being treated separately. The results show a reduction of 0.00496 in the RMS error of photometric redshift determinations for blended galaxies and a more significant reduction of 0.00827 for non-blended galaxies, illustrated in Table 2.

  5. Reconstructing the galaxy density field with photometric redshifts. I. Methodology and validation on stellar mass functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavasi, N.; Pozzetti, L.; Cucciati, O.; Bardelli, S.; Cimatti, A.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Measuring environment for large numbers of galaxies in the distant Universe is an open problem in astrophysics, as environment is important in determining many properties of galaxies during their formation and evolution. In order to measure galaxy environments, we need galaxy positions and redshifts. Photometric redshifts are more easily available for large numbers of galaxies, but at the price of larger uncertainties than spectroscopic redshifts. Aims: We study how photometric redshifts affect the measurement of galaxy environment and how the reconstruction of the density field may limit an analysis of the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF) in different environments. Methods: Through the use of mock galaxy catalogues, we measured galaxy environment with a fixed aperture method, using each galaxy's true and photometric redshifts. We varied the parameters defining the fixed aperture volume and explored different configurations. We also used photometric redshifts with different uncertainties to simulate the case of various surveys. We then computed GSMF of the mock galaxy catalogues as a function of redshift and environment to see how the environmental estimate based on photometric redshifts affects their analysis. Results: We found that the most extreme environments can be reconstructed in a fairly accurate way only when using high-precision photometric redshifts with σΔz/ (1 + z) ≲ 0.01, with a fraction ≥ 60 ÷ 80% of galaxies placed in the correct density quartile and a contamination of ≤10% by opposite quartile interlopers. A length of the volume in the radial direction comparable to the ±1.5σ error of photometric redshifts and a fixed aperture radius of a size similar to the physical scale of the studied environment grant a better reconstruction than other volume configurations. When using this kind of an estimate of the density field, we found that any difference between the starting GSMF (divided accordingly to the true galaxy environment

  6. Exploring the SDSS photometric galaxies with clustering redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mubdi; Mendez, Alexander J.; Ménard, Brice; Scranton, Ryan; Schmidt, Samuel J.; Morrison, Christopher B.; Budavári, Tamás

    2016-07-01

    We apply clustering-based redshift inference to all extended sources from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric catalogue, down to magnitude r = 22. We map the relationships between colours and redshift, without assumption of the sources' spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We identify and locate star-forming quiescent galaxies, and active galactic nuclei, as well as colour changes due to spectral features, such as the 4000 Å break, redshifting through specific filters. Our mapping is globally in good agreement with colour-redshift tracks computed with SED templates, but reveals informative differences, such as the need for a lower fraction of M-type stars in certain templates. We compare our clustering-redshift estimates to photometric redshifts and find these two independent estimators to be in good agreement at each limiting magnitude considered. Finally, we present the global clustering-redshift distribution of all Sloan extended sources, showing objects up to z ˜ 0.8. While the overall shape agrees with that inferred from photometric redshifts, the clustering-redshift technique results in a smoother distribution, with no indication of structure in redshift space suggested by the photometric-redshift estimates (likely artefacts imprinted by their spectroscopic training set). We also infer a higher fraction of high-redshift objects. The mapping between the four observed colours and redshift can be used to estimate the redshift probability distribution function of individual galaxies. This work is an initial step towards producing a general mapping between redshift and all available observables in the photometric space, including brightness, size, concentration, and ellipticity.

  7. Exploring the SDSS Photometric Galaxies with Clustering Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mubdi; Mendez, Alexander J.; Ménard, Brice; Scranton, Ryan; Schmidt, Samuel J.; Morrison, Christopher B.; Budavári, Tamás

    2016-04-01

    We apply clustering-based redshift inference to all extended sources from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric catalogue, down to magnitude r = 22. We map the relationships between colours and redshift, without assumption of the sources' spectral energy distributions (SED). We identify and locate star-forming, quiescent galaxies, and AGN, as well as colour changes due to spectral features, such as the 4000 Å break, redshifting through specific filters. Our mapping is globally in good agreement with colour-redshift tracks computed with SED templates, but reveals informative differences, such as the need for a lower fraction of M-type stars in certain templates. We compare our clustering-redshift estimates to photometric redshifts and find these two independent estimators to be in good agreement at each limiting magnitude considered. Finally, we present the global clustering-redshift distribution of all Sloan extended sources, showing objects up to z ˜ 0.8. While the overall shape agrees with that inferred from photometric redshifts, the clustering redshift technique results in a smoother distribution, with no indication of structure in redshift space suggested by the photometric redshift estimates (likely artifacts imprinted by their spectroscopic training set). We also infer a higher fraction of high redshift objects. The mapping between the four observed colours and redshift can be used to estimate the redshift probability distribution function of individual galaxies. This work is an initial step towards producing a general mapping between redshift and all available observables in the photometric space, including brightness, size, concentration, and ellipticity.

  8. ANNz: Estimating Photometric Redshifts Using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collister, Adrian A.; Lahav, Ofer

    2004-04-01

    We introduce ANNz, a freely available software package for photometric redshift estimation using artificial neural networks. ANNz learns the relation between photometry and redshift from an appropriate training set of galaxies for which the redshift is already known. Where a large and representative training set is available, ANNz is a highly competitive tool when compared with traditional template-fitting methods. The ANNz package is demonstrated on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 1, and for this particular data set the rms redshift error in the range 0<~z<~0.7 is σrms=0.023. Nonideal conditions (spectroscopic sets that are small or brighter than the photometric set for which redshifts are required) are simulated, and the impact on the photometric redshift accuracy is assessed.2

  9. Photometric Redshift and Classification for the XMM-COSMOS Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvato, M.; Hasinger, G.; Ilbert, O.; Zamorani, G.; Brusa, M.; Scoville, N. Z.; Rau, A.; Capak, P.; Arnouts, S.; Aussel, H.; Bolzonella, M.; Buongiorno, A.; Cappelluti, N.; Caputi, K.; Civano, F.; Cook, R.; Elvis, M.; Gilli, R.; Jahnke, K.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Impey, C. D.; Lamareille, F.; Le Floc'h, E.; Lilly, S.; Mainieri, V.; McCarthy, P.; McCracken, H.; Mignoli, M.; Mobasher, B.; Murayama, T.; Sasaki, S.; Sanders, D. B.; Schiminovich, D.; Shioya, Y.; Shopbell, P.; Silverman, J.; Smolčić, V.; Surace, J.; Taniguchi, Y.; Thompson, D.; Trump, J. R.; Urry, M.; Zamojski, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present photometric redshifts and spectral energy distribution (SED) classifications for a sample of 1542 optically identified sources detected with XMM in the COSMOS field. Our template fitting classifies 46 sources as stars and 464 as nonactive galaxies, while the remaining 1032 require templates with an active galactic nucleus (AGN) contribution. High accuracy in the derived photometric redshifts was accomplished as the result of (1) photometry in up to 30 bands with high-significance detections, (2) a new set of SED templates, including 18 hybrids covering the far-UV to mid-infrared, which have been constructed by the combination of AGNs and nonactive galaxies templates, and (3) multiepoch observations that have been used to correct for variability (most important for type 1 AGNs). The reliability of the photometric redshifts is evaluated using the subsample of 442 sources with measured spectroscopic redshifts. We achieved an accuracy of σ _{Δ z/(1+z_spec)} = 0.014 for i* AB < 22.5 (σ _{Δ z/(1+z_spec)} ˜ 0.015 for i* AB < 24.5). The high accuracies were accomplished for both type 2 (where the SED is often dominated by the host galaxy) and type 1 AGNs and QSOs out to z = 4.5. The number of outliers is a large improvement over previous photometric redshift estimates for X-ray-selected sources (4.0% and 4.8% outliers for i* AB < 22.5 and i* AB < 24.5, respectively). We show that the intermediate band photometry is vital to achieving accurate photometric redshifts for AGNs, whereas the broad SED coverage provided by mid-infrared (Spitzer/IRAC) bands is important to reduce the number of outliers for normal galaxies. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. Also based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion

  10. Submegaparsec individual photometric redshift estimation from cosmic web constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon-Calvo, M. A.; Weygaert, Rien van de; Jones, Bernard J. T.; Mobasher, Bahram

    2015-11-01

    We present a method, PhotoWeb, for estimating photometric redshifts of individual galaxies, and their equivalent distance, with megaparsec and even submegaparsec accuracy using the cosmic web as a constraint over photo-z estimates. PhotoWeb redshift errors of individual galaxies are of the order of Δz ≃ 0.0007, compared to errors of Δz ≃ 0.02 for current photo-z techniques. The mean redshift error is of the order of Δz ≃ 5 × 10-5-5 × 10-4 compared to mean errors in the range Δz ≃ 0.001-0.01 for the best available photo-z estimates in the literature. Current photo-z techniques produce redshift estimates with large errors due to the poor constraining power the galaxy's spectral energy distribution and projected clustering can provide. The cosmic web, on the other hand, provides the strongest constraints on the position of galaxies. The network of walls, filaments and voids occupy ˜ 10 per centof the volume of the Universe, yet they contain ˜ 95 per centof galaxies. The cosmic web, being a cellular system with well-defined boundaries, defines a restricted set of intermittent positions a galaxy can occupy along a given line of sight. Using the information in the density field computed from spectroscopic redshifts, we can narrow the possible locations of a given galaxy along the line of sight from a single broad probability distribution (from photo-z) to one or a few narrow peaks. Our first results improve previous photo-z errors by more than one order of magnitude allowing submegaparsec errors in some cases. Such accurate estimates for tens of millions of galaxies will allow unprecedented galaxy-Large Scale Structure (LSS) studies. In this work, we apply our technique to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey photo-z galaxy sample and discuss its performance and future improvements.

  11. Photometric redshifts for the SDSS Data Release 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Róbert; Dobos, László; Budavári, Tamás; Szalay, Alexander S.; Csabai, István

    2016-08-01

    We present the methodology and data behind the photometric redshift data base of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 12. We adopt a hybrid technique, empirically estimating the redshift via local regression on a spectroscopic training set, then fitting a spectrum template to obtain K-corrections and absolute magnitudes. The SDSS spectroscopic catalogue was augmented with data from other, publicly available spectroscopic surveys to mitigate target selection effects. The training set is comprised of 1976 978 galaxies, and extends up to redshift z ≈ 0.8, with a useful coverage of up to z ≈ 0.6. We provide photometric redshifts and realistic error estimates for the 208 474 076 galaxies of the SDSS primary photometric catalogue. We achieve an average bias of overline{Δ z_{norm}} = {5.84 × 10^{-5}}, a standard deviation of σ(Δznorm) = 0.0205, and a 3σ outlier rate of Po = 4.11 per cent when cross-validating on our training set. The published redshift error estimates and photometric error classes enable the selection of galaxies with high-quality photometric redshifts. We also provide a supplementary error map that allows additional, sophisticated filtering of the data.

  12. Photometric redshifts for the SDSS Data Release 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Róbert; Dobos, László; Budavári, Tamás; Szalay, Alexander S.; Csabai, István

    2016-04-01

    We present the methodology and data behind the photometric redshift database of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12 (SDSS DR12). We adopt a hybrid technique, empirically estimating the redshift via local regression on a spectroscopic training set, then fitting a spectrum template to obtain K-corrections and absolute magnitudes. The SDSS spectroscopic catalog was augmented with data from other, publicly available spectroscopic surveys to mitigate target selection effects. The training set is comprised of 1, 976, 978 galaxies, and extends up to redshift z ≈ 0.8, with a useful coverage of up to z ≈ 0.6. We provide photometric redshifts and realistic error estimates for the 208, 474, 076 galaxies of the SDSS primary photometric catalog. We achieve an average bias of overline{Δ z_{norm}} = 5.84 × 10^{-5}, a standard deviation of σ(Δznorm) = 0.0205, and a 3σ outlier rate of Po = 4.11% when cross-validating on our training set. The published redshift error estimates and photometric error classes enable the selection of galaxies with high quality photometric redshifts. We also provide a supplementary error map that allows additional, sophisticated filtering of the data.

  13. Exhausting the information: novel Bayesian combination of photometric redshift PDFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco Kind, Matias; Brunner, Robert J.

    2014-08-01

    The estimation and utilization of photometric redshift probability density functions (photo-z PDFs) have become increasingly important over the last few years and currently there exist a wide variety of algorithms to compute photo-z's, each with their own strengths and weaknesses. In this paper, we present a novel and efficient Bayesian framework that combines the results from different photo-z techniques into a more powerful and robust estimate by maximizing the information from the photometric data. To demonstrate this, we use a supervised machine learning technique based on random forest, an unsupervised method based on self-organizing maps, and a standard template-fitting method but can be easily extended to other existing techniques. We use data from the DEEP2 survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to explore different methods for combining the predictions from these techniques. By using different performance metrics, we demonstrate that we can improve the accuracy of our final photo-z estimate over the best input technique, that the fraction of outliers is reduced, and that the identification of outliers is significantly improved when we apply a naïve Bayes classifier to this combined information. Our more robust and accurate photo-z PDFs will allow even more precise cosmological constraints to be made by using current and future photometric surveys. These improvements are crucial as we move to analyse photometric data that push to or even past the limits of the available training data, which will be the case with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  14. THE NEXT GENERATION VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY. XV. THE PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT ESTIMATION FOR BACKGROUND SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Raichoor, A.; Mei, S.; Huertas-Company, M.; Licitra, R.; Erben, T.; Hildebrandt, H.; Ilbert, O.; Boissier, S.; Boselli, A.; Ball, N. M.; Côté, P.; Ferrarese, L.; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Chen, Y.-T.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Duc, P. A.; Guhathakurta, P.; and others

    2014-12-20

    The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) is an optical imaging survey covering 104 deg{sup 2} centered on the Virgo cluster. Currently, the complete survey area has been observed in the u*giz bands and one third in the r band. We present the photometric redshift estimation for the NGVS background sources. After a dedicated data reduction, we perform accurate photometry, with special attention to precise color measurements through point-spread function homogenization. We then estimate the photometric redshifts with the Le Phare and BPZ codes. We add a new prior that extends to i {sub AB} = 12.5 mag. When using the u* griz bands, our photometric redshifts for 15.5 mag ≤ i ≲ 23 mag or z {sub phot} ≲ 1 galaxies have a bias |Δz| < 0.02, less than 5% outliers, a scatter σ{sub outl.rej.}, and an individual error on z {sub phot} that increases with magnitude (from 0.02 to 0.05 and from 0.03 to 0.10, respectively). When using the u*giz bands over the same magnitude and redshift range, the lack of the r band increases the uncertainties in the 0.3 ≲ z {sub phot} ≲ 0.8 range (–0.05 < Δz < –0.02, σ{sub outl.rej} ∼ 0.06, 10%-15% outliers, and z {sub phot.err.} ∼ 0.15). We also present a joint analysis of the photometric redshift accuracy as a function of redshift and magnitude. We assess the quality of our photometric redshifts by comparison to spectroscopic samples and by verifying that the angular auto- and cross-correlation function w(θ) of the entire NGVS photometric redshift sample across redshift bins is in agreement with the expectations.

  15. Leveraging 3D-HST Grism Redshifts to Quantify Photometric Redshift Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezanson, Rachel; Wake, David A.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Franx, Marijn; Labbé, Ivo; Leja, Joel; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Nelson, Erica J.; Quadri, Ryan F.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2016-05-01

    We present a study of photometric redshift accuracy in the 3D-HST photometric catalogs, using 3D-HST grism redshifts to quantify and dissect trends in redshift accuracy for galaxies brighter than JH IR > 24 with an unprecedented and representative high-redshift galaxy sample. We find an average scatter of 0.0197 ± 0.0003(1 + z) in the Skelton et al. photometric redshifts. Photometric redshift accuracy decreases with magnitude and redshift, but does not vary monotonically with color or stellar mass. The 1σ scatter lies between 0.01 and 0.03 (1 + z) for galaxies of all masses and colors below z < 2.5 (for JH IR < 24), with the exception of a population of very red (U ‑ V > 2), dusty star-forming galaxies for which the scatter increases to ∼0.1 (1 + z). We find that photometric redshifts depend significantly on galaxy size; the largest galaxies at fixed magnitude have photo-zs with up to ∼30% more scatter and ∼5 times the outlier rate. Although the overall photometric redshift accuracy for quiescent galaxies is better than that for star-forming galaxies, scatter depends more strongly on magnitude and redshift than on galaxy type. We verify these trends using the redshift distributions of close pairs and extend the analysis to fainter objects, where photometric redshift errors further increase to ∼0.046 (1 + z) at {H}F160W=26. We demonstrate that photometric redshift accuracy is strongly filter dependent and quantify the contribution of multiple filter combinations. We evaluate the widths of redshift probability distribution functions and find that error estimates are underestimated by a factor of ∼1.1–1.6, but that uniformly broadening the distribution does not adequately account for fitting outliers. Finally, we suggest possible applications of these data in planning for current and future surveys and simulate photometric redshift performance in the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, Dark Energy Survey (DES), and combined DES and Vista Hemisphere

  16. TPZ: photometric redshift PDFs and ancillary information by using prediction trees and random forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco Kind, Matias; Brunner, Robert J.

    2013-06-01

    With the growth of large photometric surveys, accurately estimating photometric redshifts, preferably as a probability density function (PDF), and fully understanding the implicit systematic uncertainties in this process, has become increasingly important. In this paper, we present a new, publicly available, parallel, machine learning algorithm that generates photometric redshift PDFs by using prediction trees and random forest techniques, which we have named TPZ.1 This new algorithm incorporates measurement errors into the calculation while also dealing efficiently with missing values in the data. In addition, our implementation of this algorithm provides supplementary information regarding the data being analysed, including unbiased estimates of the accuracy of the technique without resorting to a validation data set, identification of poor photometric redshift areas within the parameter space occupied by the spectroscopic training data, a quantification of the relative importance of the variables used to construct the PDF, and a robust identification of outliers. This extra information can be used to optimally target new spectroscopic observations and to improve the overall efficacy of the redshift estimation. We have tested TPZ on galaxy samples drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) main galaxy sample and from the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe-2 (DEEP2) survey, obtaining excellent results in each case. We also have tested our implementation by participating in the PHAT1 project, which is a blind photometric redshift contest, finding that TPZ performs comparable to if not better than other empirical photometric redshift algorithms. Finally, we discuss the various parameters that control the operation of TPZ, the specific limitations of this approach and an application of photometric redshift PDFs.

  17. EXTENDED PHOTOMETRY FOR THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: A TESTBED FOR PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Daniel J.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Coil, Alison L.; Cooper, Michael C.; Gwyn, Stephen D. J. E-mail: janewman@pitt.edu E-mail: m.cooper@uci.edu

    2013-02-15

    This paper describes a new catalog that supplements the existing DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey photometric and spectroscopic catalogs with ugriz photometry from two other surveys: the Canada-France-Hawaii Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Each catalog is cross-matched by position on the sky in order to assign ugriz photometry to objects in the DEEP2 catalogs. We have recalibrated the CFHTLS photometry where it overlaps DEEP2 in order to provide a more uniform data set. We have also used this improved photometry to predict DEEP2 BRI photometry in regions where only poorer measurements were available previously. In addition, we have included improved astrometry tied to SDSS rather than USNO-A2.0 for all DEEP2 objects. In total this catalog contains {approx}27, 000 objects with full ugriz photometry as well as robust spectroscopic redshift measurements, 64% of which have r > 23. By combining the secure and accurate redshifts of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey with ugriz photometry, we have created a catalog that can be used as an excellent testbed for future photo-z studies, including tests of algorithms for surveys such as LSST and DES.

  18. Photometric redshift techniques of quasars in big-data era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanxia

    2015-08-01

    With the availability of the huge amounts of data from ground- and space-based large multiband photometric surveys, photometric redshifts provide an estimate for the distance of an astronomical object and have become a crucial tool for extragalactic astronomy and cosmology. Various phtometric redshift approaches are in bloom. Their performance and efficiency not only depend on completeness and quality of data, but also on the volume of data. The increase of data volume lead to different choice of techniques. We present various data mining methods used for photometric redshift estimation of quasars and compare their advantages and disadvantages. In the big-data era, the methods fit for large-scale data are in great requirement.

  19. SOMz: photometric redshift PDFs with self-organizing maps and random atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco Kind, Matias; Brunner, Robert J.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we explore the applicability of the unsupervised machine learning technique of self-organizing maps (SOM) to estimate galaxy photometric redshift probability density functions (PDFs). This technique takes a spectroscopic training set, and maps the photometric attributes, but not the redshifts, to a two-dimensional surface by using a process of competitive learning where neurons compete to more closely resemble the training data multidimensional space. The key feature of a SOM is that it retains the topology of the input set, revealing correlations between the attributes that are not easily identified. We test three different 2D topological mapping: rectangular, hexagonal and spherical, by using data from the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe 2 survey. We also explore different implementations and boundary conditions on the map and also introduce the idea of a random atlas, where a large number of different maps are created and their individual predictions are aggregated to produce a more robust photometric redshift PDF. We also introduced a new metric, the I-score, which efficiently incorporates different metrics, making it easier to compare different results (from different parameters or different photometric redshift codes). We find that by using a spherical topology mapping we obtain a better representation of the underlying multidimensional topology, which provides more accurate results that are comparable to other, state-of-the-art machine learning algorithms. Our results illustrate that unsupervised approaches have great potential for many astronomical problems, and in particular for the computation of photometric redshifts.

  20. Measuring photometric redshifts using galaxy images and Deep Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, B.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a new method to estimate the photometric redshift of galaxies by using the full galaxy image in each measured band. This method draws from the latest techniques and advances in machine learning, in particular Deep Neural Networks. We pass the entire multi-band galaxy image into the machine learning architecture to obtain a redshift estimate that is competitive, in terms of the measured point prediction metrics, with the best existing standard machine learning techniques. The standard techniques estimate redshifts using post-processed features, such as magnitudes and colours, which are extracted from the galaxy images and are deemed to be salient by the user. This new method removes the user from the photometric redshift estimation pipeline. However we do note that Deep Neural Networks require many orders of magnitude more computing resources than standard machine learning architectures, and as such are only tractable for making predictions on datasets of size ≤50k before implementing parallelisation techniques.

  1. GALAXY ZOO MORPHOLOGY AND PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Way, M. J.

    2011-06-10

    It has recently been demonstrated that one can accurately derive galaxy morphology from particular primary and secondary isophotal shape estimates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging catalog. This was accomplished by applying Machine Learning techniques to the Galaxy Zoo morphology catalog. Using the broad bandpass photometry of the SDSS in combination with precise knowledge of galaxy morphology should help in estimating more accurate photometric redshifts for galaxies. Using the Galaxy Zoo separation for spirals and ellipticals in combination with SDSS photometry we attempt to calculate photometric redshifts. In the best case we find that the root-mean-square error for luminous red galaxies classified as ellipticals is as low as 0.0118. Given these promising results we believe better photometric redshift estimates for all galaxies in the SDSS ({approx}350 million) will be feasible if researchers can also leverage their derived morphologies via Machine Learning. These initial results look to be promising for those interested in estimating weak lensing, baryonic acoustic oscillation, and other fields dependent upon accurate photometric redshifts.

  2. A Model-independent Photometric Redshift Estimator for Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun

    2007-01-01

    The use of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as cosmological standard candles is fundamental in modern observational cosmology. In this Letter, we derive a simple empirical photometric redshift estimator for SNe Ia using a training set of SNe Ia with multiband (griz) light curves and spectroscopic redshifts obtained by the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). This estimator is analytical and model-independent it does not use spectral templates. We use all the available SNe Ia from SNLS with near-maximum photometry in griz (a total of 40 SNe Ia) to train and test our photometric redshift estimator. The difference between the estimated redshifts zphot and the spectroscopic redshifts zspec, (zphot-zspec)/(1+zspec), has rms dispersions of 0.031 for 20 SNe Ia used in the training set, and 0.050 for 20 SNe Ia not used in the training set. The dispersion is of the same order of magnitude as the flux uncertainties at peak brightness for the SNe Ia. There are no outliers. This photometric redshift estimator should significantly enhance the ability of observers to accurately target high-redshift SNe Ia for spectroscopy in ongoing surveys. It will also dramatically boost the cosmological impact of very large future supernova surveys, such as those planned for the Advanced Liquid-mirror Probe for Astrophysics, Cosmology, and Asteroids (ALPACA) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST).

  3. DISSECTING PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT FOR ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS USING XMM- AND CHANDRA-COSMOS SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Salvato, M.; Hasinger, G.; Ilbert, O.; Rau, A.; Brusa, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Civano, F.; Elvis, M.; Zamorani, G.; Vignali, C.; Comastri, A.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Aussel, H.; Le Floc'h, E.; Mainieri, V.; Capak, P.; Caputi, K.; and others

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we release accurate photometric redshifts for 1692 counterparts to Chandra sources in the central square degree of the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field. The availability of a large training set of spectroscopic redshifts that extends to faint magnitudes enabled photometric redshifts comparable to the highest quality results presently available for normal galaxies. We demonstrate that morphologically extended, faint X-ray sources without optical variability are more accurately described by a library of normal galaxies (corrected for emission lines) than by active galactic nucleus (AGN) dominated templates, even if these sources have AGN-like X-ray luminosities. Preselecting the library on the bases of the source properties allowed us to reach an accuracy {sigma}{sub {Delta}z/(1+z{sub s{sub p{sub e{sub c)}}}}}{approx}0.015 with a fraction of outliers of 5.8% for the entire Chandra-COSMOS sample. In addition, we release revised photometric redshifts for the 1735 optical counterparts of the XMM-detected sources over the entire 2 deg{sup 2} of COSMOS. For 248 sources, our updated photometric redshift differs from the previous release by {Delta}z > 0.2. These changes are predominantly due to the inclusion of newly available deep H-band photometry (H{sub AB} = 24 mag). We illustrate once again the importance of a spectroscopic training sample and how an assumption about the nature of a source together, with the number and the depth of the available bands, influences the accuracy of the photometric redshifts determined for AGN. These considerations should be kept in mind when defining the observational strategies of upcoming large surveys targeting AGNs, such as eROSITA at X-ray energies and the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder Evolutionary Map of the Universe in the radio band.

  4. Comparision of approaches to photometric redshift estimation of quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Yang; Zhang, Yanxia; Zhao, Yongheng; Tian, Haijun

    2015-08-01

    Based on databases from various different band photometric surveys (optical from SDSS, infrared from UKIDSS and WISE), we compare k-nearest neighbor regression based on KD-tree and Ball-tree, LASSO, PLS (Partial Least Squares), SDG, ridge regression and kernel ridge regression applied for photometric redshift estimation of quasars. The experimental result shows that the perfomance order of these methods is KD-tree kNN, Ball-tree kNN, kernal ridge regression, ridge regression, PLS, SGD, LASSO.

  5. Catastrophic photometric redshift errors: Weak-lensing survey requirements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bernstein, Gary; Huterer, Dragan

    2010-01-11

    We study the sensitivity of weak lensing surveys to the effects of catastrophic redshift errors - cases where the true redshift is misestimated by a significant amount. To compute the biases in cosmological parameters, we adopt an efficient linearized analysis where the redshift errors are directly related to shifts in the weak lensing convergence power spectra. We estimate the number Nspec of unbiased spectroscopic redshifts needed to determine the catastrophic error rate well enough that biases in cosmological parameters are below statistical errors of weak lensing tomography. While the straightforward estimate of Nspec is ~106 we find that using onlymore » the photometric redshifts with z ≤ 2.5 leads to a drastic reduction in Nspec to ~ 30,000 while negligibly increasing statistical errors in dark energy parameters. Therefore, the size of spectroscopic survey needed to control catastrophic errors is similar to that previously deemed necessary to constrain the core of the zs – zp distribution. We also study the efficacy of the recent proposal to measure redshift errors by cross-correlation between the photo-z and spectroscopic samples. We find that this method requires ~ 10% a priori knowledge of the bias and stochasticity of the outlier population, and is also easily confounded by lensing magnification bias. In conclusion, the cross-correlation method is therefore unlikely to supplant the need for a complete spectroscopic redshift survey of the source population.« less

  6. DNF - Galaxy photometric redshift by Directional Neighbourhood Fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vicente, J.; Sánchez, E.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.

    2016-07-01

    Wide field images taken in several photometric bands allow simultaneous measurement of redshifts for thousands of galaxies. A variety of algorithms to make this measurement have appeared in the last few years, the majority of which can be classified as either template- or training-based methods. Among the latter, nearest neighbour estimators stand out as one of the most successful, in terms of both precision and the quality of error estimation. In this paper we describe the Directional Neighbourhood Fitting (DNF) algorithm based on the following: a new neighbourhood metric (Directional Neighbourhood), a photo-z estimation strategy (Neighbourhood Fitting) and a method for generating the photo-z probability distribution function. We compare DNF with other well-known empirical photometric redshift tools using different public data sets (Sloan Digital Sky Survey, VIMOS VLT Deep Survey and Photo-z Accuracy Testing). DNF achieves high-quality results with reliable error.

  7. Photometric Redshift with Bayesian Priors on Physical Properties of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masayuki

    2015-03-01

    We present a proof-of-concept analysis of photometric redshifts with Bayesian priors on physical properties of galaxies. This concept is particularly suited for upcoming/on-going large imaging surveys, in which only several broadband filters are available and it is hard to break some of the degeneracies in the multi-color space. We construct model templates of galaxies using a stellar population synthesis code and apply Bayesian priors on physical properties such as stellar mass and star formation rate. These priors are a function of redshift and they effectively evolve the templates with time in an observationally motivated way. We demonstrate that the priors help reduce the degeneracy and deliver significantly improved photometric redshifts. Furthermore, we show that a template error function, which corrects for systematic flux errors in the model templates as a function of rest-frame wavelength, delivers further improvements. One great advantage of our technique is that we simultaneously measure redshifts and physical properties of galaxies in a fully self-consistent manner, unlike the two-step measurements with different templates often performed in the literature. One may rightly worry that the physical priors bias the inferred galaxy properties, but we show that the bias is smaller than systematic uncertainties inherent in physical properties inferred from the spectral energy distribution fitting and hence is not a major issue. We will extensively test and tune the priors in the on-going Hyper Suprime-Cam survey and will make the code publicly available in the future.

  8. An automated algorithm for determining photometric redshifts of quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dan; Zhang, Yanxia; Zhao, Yongheng

    2010-07-01

    We employ k-nearest neighbor algorithm (KNN) for photometric redshift measurement of quasars with the Fifth Data Release (DR5) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). KNN is an instance learning algorithm where the result of new instance query is predicted based on the closest training samples. The regressor do not use any model to fit and only based on memory. Given a query quasar, we find the known quasars or (training points) closest to the query point, whose redshift value is simply assigned to be the average of the values of its k nearest neighbors. Three kinds of different colors (PSF, Model or Fiber) and spectral redshifts are used as input parameters, separatively. The combination of the three kinds of colors is also taken as input. The experimental results indicate that the best input pattern is PSF + Model + Fiber colors in all experiments. With this pattern, 59.24%, 77.34% and 84.68% of photometric redshifts are obtained within ▵z < 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3, respectively. If only using one kind of colors as input, the model colors achieve the best performance. However, when using two kinds of colors, the best result is achieved by PSF + Fiber colors. In addition, nearest neighbor method (k = 1) shows its superiority compared to KNN (k ≠ 1) for the given sample.

  9. CFHTLenS and RCSLenS: Testing Photometric Redshift Distributions Using Angular Cross-Correlations with Spectroscopic Galaxy Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, A.; Heymans, C.; Blake, C.; Hildebrandt, H.; Duncan, C. A. J.; Erben, T.; Nakajima, R.; Van Waerbeke, L.; Viola, M.

    2016-09-01

    We determine the accuracy of galaxy redshift distributions as estimated from photometric redshift probability distributions p(z). Our method utilises measurements of the angular cross-correlation between photometric galaxies and an overlapping sample of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts. We describe the redshift leakage from a galaxy photometric redshift bin j into a spectroscopic redshift bin i using the sum of the p(z) for the galaxies residing in bin j. We can then predict the angular cross-correlation between photometric and spectroscopic galaxies due to intrinsic galaxy clustering when i ≠ j as a function of the measured angular cross-correlation when i = j. We also account for enhanced clustering arising from lensing magnification using a halo model. The comparison of this prediction with the measured signal provides a consistency check on the validity of using the summed p(z) to determine galaxy redshift distributions in cosmological analyses, as advocated by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). We present an analysis of the photometric redshifts measured by CFHTLenS, which overlaps the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We also analyse the Red-sequence Cluster Lensing Survey (RCSLenS), which overlaps both BOSS and the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. We find that the summed p(z) from both surveys are generally biased with respect to the true underlying distributions. If unaccounted for, this bias would lead to errors in cosmological parameter estimation from CFHTLenS by less than ˜4%. For photometric redshift bins which spatially overlap in 3-D with our spectroscopic sample, we determine redshift bias corrections which can be used in future cosmological analyses that rely on accurate galaxy redshift distributions.

  10. GAz: a genetic algorithm for photometric redshift estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Robert; Fairbairn, Malcolm; Seeburn, Navin

    2015-05-01

    We present a new approach to the problem of estimating the redshift of galaxies from photometric data. The approach uses a genetic algorithm combined with non-linear regression to model the 2SLAQ LRG data set with SDSS DR7 photometry. The genetic algorithm explores the very large space of high order polynomials while only requiring optimization of a small number of terms. We find a σrms = 0.0408 ± 0.0006 for redshifts in the range 0.4 < z < 0.7. These results are competitive with the current state-of-the-art but can be presented simply as a polynomial which does not require the user to run any code. We demonstrate that the method generalizes well to other data sets and redshift ranges by testing it on SDSS DR11 and on simulated data. For other data sets or applications the code has been made available at https://github.com/rbrthogan/GAz.

  11. Lower Bounds on Photometric Redshift Errors from Type Ia Supernova Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asztalos, S.; Nikolaev, S.; de Vries, W.; Olivier, S.; Cook, K.; Wang, L.

    2010-04-01

    Cosmology with Type Ia supernova heretofore has required extensive spectroscopic follow-up to establish an accurate redshift. Though this resource-intensive approach is tolerable at the present discovery rate, the next generation of ground-based all-sky survey instruments will render it unsustainable. Photometry-based redshift determination may be a viable alternative, though the technique introduces non-negligible errors that ultimately degrade the ability to discriminate between competing cosmologies. We present a strictly template-based photometric redshift estimator and compute redshift reconstruction errors in the presence of statistical errors. Under highly degraded photometric conditions corresponding to a statistical error σ of 0.5, the residual redshift error is found to be 0.236 when assuming a nightly observing cadence and a single Large Synoptic Science Telescope (LSST) u-band filter. Utilizing all six LSST bandpass filters reduces the residual redshift error to 9.1 × 10-3. Assuming a more optimistic statistical error σ of 0.05, we derive residual redshift errors of 4.2 × 10-4, 5.2 × 10-4, 9.2 × 10-4, and 1.8 × 10-3 for observations occuring nightly, every 5th, 20th and 45th night, respectively, in each of the six LSST bandpass filters. Adopting an observing cadence in which photometry is acquired with all six filters every 5th night and a realistic supernova distribution, binned redshift errors are combined with photometric errors with a σ of 0.17 and systematic errors with a σ~ 0.003 to derive joint errors (σ w , σ_{w'}) of (0.012, 0.066), respectively, in (w,w') with 68% confidence using Fisher matrix formalism. Though highly idealized in the present context, the methodology is nonetheless quite relevant for the next generation of ground-based all-sky surveys.

  12. Mapping the Galaxy Color–Redshift Relation: Optimal Photometric Redshift Calibration Strategies for Cosmology Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Daniel; Capak, Peter; Stern, Daniel; Ilbert, Olivier; Salvato, Mara; Schmidt, Samuel; Longo, Giuseppe; Rhodes, Jason; Paltani, Stephane; Mobasher, Bahram; Hoekstra, Henk; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Coupon, Jean; Steinhardt, Charles; Speagle, Josh; Faisst, Andreas; Kalinich, Adam; Brodwin, Mark; Brescia, Massimo; Cavuoti, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    Calibrating the photometric redshifts of ≳109 galaxies for upcoming weak lensing cosmology experiments is a major challenge for the astrophysics community. The path to obtaining the required spectroscopic redshifts for training and calibration is daunting, given the anticipated depths of the surveys and the difficulty in obtaining secure redshifts for some faint galaxy populations. Here we present an analysis of the problem based on the self-organizing map, a method of mapping the distribution of data in a high-dimensional space and projecting it onto a lower-dimensional representation. We apply this method to existing photometric data from the COSMOS survey selected to approximate the anticipated Euclid weak lensing sample, enabling us to robustly map the empirical distribution of galaxies in the multidimensional color space defined by the expected Euclid filters. Mapping this multicolor distribution lets us determine where—in galaxy color space—redshifts from current spectroscopic surveys exist and where they are systematically missing. Crucially, the method lets us determine whether a spectroscopic training sample is representative of the full photometric space occupied by the galaxies in a survey. We explore optimal sampling techniques and estimate the additional spectroscopy needed to map out the color–redshift relation, finding that sampling the galaxy distribution in color space in a systematic way can efficiently meet the calibration requirements. While the analysis presented here focuses on the Euclid survey, similar analysis can be applied to other surveys facing the same calibration challenge, such as DES, LSST, and WFIRST.

  13. Catastrophic photometric redshift errors: Weak-lensing survey requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, Gary; Huterer, Dragan

    2010-01-11

    We study the sensitivity of weak lensing surveys to the effects of catastrophic redshift errors - cases where the true redshift is misestimated by a significant amount. To compute the biases in cosmological parameters, we adopt an efficient linearized analysis where the redshift errors are directly related to shifts in the weak lensing convergence power spectra. We estimate the number Nspec of unbiased spectroscopic redshifts needed to determine the catastrophic error rate well enough that biases in cosmological parameters are below statistical errors of weak lensing tomography. While the straightforward estimate of Nspec is ~106 we find that using only the photometric redshifts with z ≤ 2.5 leads to a drastic reduction in Nspec to ~ 30,000 while negligibly increasing statistical errors in dark energy parameters. Therefore, the size of spectroscopic survey needed to control catastrophic errors is similar to that previously deemed necessary to constrain the core of the zs – zp distribution. We also study the efficacy of the recent proposal to measure redshift errors by cross-correlation between the photo-z and spectroscopic samples. We find that this method requires ~ 10% a priori knowledge of the bias and stochasticity of the outlier population, and is also easily confounded by lensing magnification bias. In conclusion, the cross-correlation method is therefore unlikely to supplant the need for a complete spectroscopic redshift survey of the source population.

  14. A catalogue of photometric redshifts for the SDSS-DR9 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brescia, M.; Cavuoti, S.; Longo, G.; De Stefano, V.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Accurate photometric redshifts for large samples of galaxies are among the main products of modern multiband digital surveys. Over the last decade, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) has become a sort of benchmark against which to test the various methods. Aims: We present an application of a new method to the estimation of photometric redshifts for the galaxies in the SDSS Data Release 9 (SDSS-DR9). Photometric redshifts for more than 143 million galaxies were produced. Methods: The Multi Layer Perceptron with Quasi Newton Algorithm (MLPQNA) model, provided within the framework of the DAta Mining and Exploration Web Application REsource (DAMEWARE), is an interpolative method derived from machine learning models. Results: The obtained redshifts have an overall uncertainty of σ = 0.023 with a very small average bias of ~3 × 10-5, and a fraction of catastrophic outliers (|Δz| > 2σ) of ~5%. This result is slightly better than what was already available in the literature in terms of the smaller fraction of catastrophic outliers as well. The produced catalogue, composed by 58 tables is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/568/A126

  15. Using Gamma Regression for Photometric Redshifts of Survey Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, J.; de Souza, R. S.; Krone-Martins, A.; Cameron, E.; Ishida, E. E. O.; Hilbe, J.

    Machine learning techniques offer a plethora of opportunities in tackling big data within the astronomical community. We present the set of Generalized Linear Models as a fast alternative for determining photometric redshifts of galaxies, a set of tools not commonly applied within astronomy, despite being widely used in other professions. With this technique, we achieve catastrophic outlier rates of the order of ˜ 1%, that can be achieved in a matter of seconds on large datasets of size ˜ 1,000,000. To make these techniques easily accessible to the astronomical community, we developed a set of libraries and tools that are publicly available.

  16. SparsePZ: Sparse Representation of Photometric Redshift PDFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco Kind, Matias; Brunner, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    SparsePZ uses sparse basis representation to fully represent individual photometric redshift probability density functions (PDFs). This approach requires approximately half the parameters for the same multi-Gaussian fitting accuracy, and has the additional advantage that an entire PDF can be stored by using a 4-byte integer per basis function. Only 10-20 points per galaxy are needed to reconstruct both the individual PDFs and the ensemble redshift distribution, N(z), to an accuracy of 99.9 per cent when compared to the one built using the original PDFs computed with a resolution of δz = 0.01, reducing the required storage of 200 original values by a factor of 10-20. This basis representation can be directly extended to a cosmological analysis, thereby increasing computational performance without losing resolution or accuracy.

  17. Active learning applied for photometric redshift estimation of quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bo; Zhang, Yanxia; Zhao, Yongheng

    2015-08-01

    For a long time the quasars’ photometric redshifts have been estimated by learning from all available training dataset. In the scenario of big data, the amount of available data is huge and the dataset may include noise. Consequently, a major research challenge is to design a learning process that gains the most informative data from the available dataset in terms of optimal learning of the underlying relationships. By filtering out noisy data and redundant data, the optimal learning can improve both estimation accuracy and speed. Towards this objective, in this study we figure out an active learning approach that automatically learns a series of suppport vector regression models based on small size of different sampling data chunks. These models are applied on a validation dataset. By active learning, those validation data with estimation results vary in a certain range are regarded as the informative data and are aggregated in multiple training datasets. Next, the aggregated training datasets are combined into an ensemble estimator through averaging and then applied on a test dataset. Our experimental results on SDSS data show that the proposed method is helpful to improve quasars’ photometric redshift estimation accuracy.

  18. Photometric Properties of the Most Massive High-Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Brant; Li, Yuexing; Cox, Thomas J.; Hernquist, Lars; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2007-09-01

    We calculate the observable properties of the most massive high-redshift galaxies in the hierarchical formation scenario where stellar spheroid and supermassive black hole growth are fueled by gas-rich mergers. Combining high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of the hierarchical formation of a z~6 quasar, stellar population synthesis models, template active galactic nucleus (AGN) spectra, prescriptions for interstellar and intergalactic absorption, and the response of modern telescopes, the photometric evolution of galaxies destined to host z~6 quasars is modeled at redshifts z~4-14. These massive galaxies, with enormous stellar masses of M*~1011.5-1012 Msolar and star formation rates of SFR~103-104 Msolar yr-1 at z>~7, satisfy a variety of photometric selection criteria based on Lyman break techniques, including V-band dropouts at z>~5, i-band dropouts at z>~6, and z-band dropouts at z>~7. The observability of the most massive high-redshift galaxies is assessed and compared with a wide range of existing and proposed photometric surveys, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS)/Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), National Optical Astronomy Observatory Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS), UKIRT Infared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Shallow Survey, Ultradeep Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA), Dark Universe Explorer (DUNE), Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS), Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP). Massive stellar spheroids descended from z~6 quasars will likely be detected at z~4 by existing surveys, but owing to their low number densities the discovery of quasar progenitor galaxies at z>7 will likely require future surveys of large portions of the sky (>~0.5%) at wavelengths λ>~1 μm. The detection of rare, starbursting, massive galaxies at redshifts z>~6 would provide support for the

  19. A Photometric redshift galaxy catalog from the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Yee, H.K.C.; Lin, H.; Gladders, M.D.; /Carnegie Inst. Observ.

    2005-02-01

    The Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS) provides a large and deep photometric catalog of galaxies in the z' and R{sub c} bands for 90 square degrees of sky, and supplemental V and B data have been obtained for 33.6 deg{sup 2}. They compile a photometric redshift catalog from these 4-band data by utilizing the empirical quadratic polynomial photometric redshift fitting technique in combination with CNOC2 and GOODS/HDF-N redshift data. The training set includes 4924 spectral redshifts. The resulting catalog contains more than one million galaxies with photometric redshifts < 1.5 and R{sub c} < 24, giving an rms scatter {delta}({Delta}z) < 0.06 within the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.5 and {sigma}({Delta}z) < 0.11 for galaxies at 0.0 < z < 1.5. They describe the empirical quadratic polynomial photometric redshift fitting technique which they use to determine the relation between red-shift and photometry. A kd-tree algorithm is used to divide up the sample to improve the accuracy of the catalog. They also present a method for estimating the photometric redshift error for individual galaxies. They show that the redshift distribution of the sample is in excellent agreement with smaller and much deeper photometric and spectroscopic redshift surveys.

  20. Estimating Photometric Redshifts with Artificial Neural Networks and Multi-Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li-Li; Zhang, Yan-Xia; Zhao, Yong-Heng; Yang, Da-Wei

    2007-06-01

    We calculate photometric redshifts from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 2 (SDSS DR2) Galaxy Sample using artificial neural networks (ANNs). Different input sets based on various parameters (e.g. magnitude, color index, flux information) are explored. Mainly, parameters from broadband photometry are utilized and their performances in redshift prediction are compared. While any parameter may be easily incorporated in the input, our results indicate that using the dereddened magnitudes often produces more accurate photometric redshifts than using the Petrosian magnitudes or model magnitudes as input, but the model magnitudes are superior to the Petrosian magnitudes. Also, better performance results when more effective parameters are used in the training set. The method is tested on a sample of 79 346 galaxies from the SDSS DR2. When using 19 parameters based on the dereddened magnitudes, the rms error in redshift estimation is σz = 0.020184. The ANN is highly competitive tool compared to the traditional template-fitting methods when a large and representative training set is available.

  1. Pan-STARRS1 variability of XMM-COSMOS AGN. I. Impact on photometric redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simm, T.; Saglia, R.; Salvato, M.; Bender, R.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Draper, P. W.; Flewelling, H.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N.; Tonry, J. L.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2015-12-01

    Aims: Upcoming large area sky surveys like Euclid and eROSITA, which are dedicated to studying the role of dark energy in the expansion history of the Universe and the three-dimensional mass distribution of matter, crucially depend on accurate photometric redshifts. The identification of variable sources, such as active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and the achievable redshift accuracy for varying objects are important in view of the science goals of the Euclid and eROSITA missions. Methods: We probe AGN optical variability for a large sample of X-ray-selected AGNs in the XMM-COSMOS field, using the multi-epoch light curves provided by the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) 3π and Medium Deep Field surveys. To quantify variability we employed a simple statistic to estimate the probability of variability and the normalized excess variance to measure the variability amplitude. Utilizing these two variability parameters, we defined a sample of varying AGNs for every PS1 band. We investigated the influence of variability on the calculation of photometric redshifts by applying three different input photometry sets for our fitting procedure. For each of the five PS1 bands gP1, rP1, iP1, zP1, and yP1, we chose either the epochs minimizing the interval in observing time, the median magnitude values, or randomly drawn light curve points to compute the redshift. In addition, we derived photometric redshifts using PS1 photometry extended by GALEX/IRAC bands. Results: We find that the photometry produced by the 3π survey is sufficient to reliably detect variable sources provided that the fractional variability amplitude is at least ~3%. Considering the photometric redshifts of variable AGNs, we observe that minimizing the time spacing of the chosen points yields superior photometric redshifts in terms of the percentage of outliers (33%) and accuracy (0.07), outperforming the other two approaches. Drawing random points from the light curve gives rise to typically 57% of outliers and an accuracy of

  2. The ALHAMBRA survey: Accurate photometric merger fractions from PDF analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Sanjuan, C.; Cenarro, A. J..; Varela, J.; Viironen, K.; ALHAMBRA Team

    2015-05-01

    The estimation of the merger fraction in photometric surveys is limited by the large uncertainty in the photometric redshift compared with the velocity difference in kinematical close pairs (less than 500 km s^{-1}). Several efforts have conducted to deal with this limitation and we present the latest improvements. Our new method (i) provides a robust estimation of the merger fraction by using full probability distribution functions (PDFs) instead of Gaussian distributions, as in previous work; (ii) takes into account the dependence of the luminosity on redshift in both the selection of the samples and the definition of major/minor mergers; and (iii) deals with partial PDFs to define ``red" (E/S0 templates) and ``blue" (spiral/starburst templates) samples without apply any colour selection. We highlight our new method with the estimation of the merger fraction at z < 1 in the ALHAMBRA photometric survey. We find that our merger fractions and rates nicely agree with those from previous spectroscopic work. This new method will be capital for current and future large photometric surveys such as DES, SHARDS, J-PAS, or LSST.

  3. The SDSS Coadd: A Galaxy Photometric Redshift Catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, Ribamar R.R.; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Annis, James; Dodelson, Scott; Hao, Jiangang; Johnston, David; Kubo, Jeffrey; Lin, Huan; Seo, Hee-Jong; Simet, Melanie; /Chicago U.

    2011-11-01

    We present and describe a catalog of galaxy photometric redshifts (photo-z's) for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Coadd Data. We use the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) technique to calculate photo-z's and the Nearest Neighbor Error (NNE) method to estimate photo-z errors for {approx} 13 million objects classified as galaxies in the coadd with r < 24.5. The photo-z and photo-z error estimators are trained and validated on a sample of {approx} 89, 000 galaxies that have SDSS photometry and spectroscopic redshifts measured by the SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7), the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology Field Galaxy Survey (CNOC2), the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe Data Release 3(DEEP2 DR3), the SDSS-III's Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), the Visible imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph - Very Large Telescope Deep Survey (VVDS) and the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. For the best ANN methods we have tried, we find that 68% of the galaxies in the validation set have a photo-z error smaller than {sigma}{sub 68} = 0.036. After presenting our results and quality tests, we provide a short guide for users accessing the public data.

  4. Photometric Redshifts for Quasars in Multi-band Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brescia, M.; Cavuoti, S.; D'Abrusco, R.; Longo, G.; Mercurio, A.

    2013-08-01

    The Multi Layer Perceptron with Quasi Newton Algorithm (MLPQNA) is a machine learning method that can be used to cope with regression and classification problems on complex and massive data sets. In this paper, we give a formal description of the method and present the results of its application to the evaluation of photometric redshifts for quasars. The data set used for the experiment was obtained by merging four different surveys (Sloan Digital Sky Survey, GALEX, UKIDSS, and WISE), thus covering a wide range of wavelengths from the UV to the mid-infrared. The method is able (1) to achieve a very high accuracy, (2) to drastically reduce the number of outliers and catastrophic objects, and (3) to discriminate among parameters (or features) on the basis of their significance, so that the number of features used for training and analysis can be optimized in order to reduce both the computational demands and the effects of degeneracy. The best experiment, which makes use of a selected combination of parameters drawn from the four surveys, leads, in terms of Δz norm (i.e., (z spec - z phot)/(1 + z spec)), to an average of Δz norm = 0.004, a standard deviation of σ = 0.069, and a median absolute deviation, MAD = 0.02, over the whole redshift range (i.e., z spec <= 3.6), defined by the four-survey cross-matched spectroscopic sample. The fraction of catastrophic outliers, i.e., of objects with photo-z deviating more than 2σ from the spectroscopic value, is <3%, leading to σ = 0.035 after their removal, over the same redshift range. The method is made available to the community through the DAMEWARE Web application.

  5. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS FOR QUASARS IN MULTI-BAND SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Brescia, M.; Mercurio, A.; Cavuoti, S.; Longo, G.; D'Abrusco, R.

    2013-08-01

    The Multi Layer Perceptron with Quasi Newton Algorithm (MLPQNA) is a machine learning method that can be used to cope with regression and classification problems on complex and massive data sets. In this paper, we give a formal description of the method and present the results of its application to the evaluation of photometric redshifts for quasars. The data set used for the experiment was obtained by merging four different surveys (Sloan Digital Sky Survey, GALEX, UKIDSS, and WISE), thus covering a wide range of wavelengths from the UV to the mid-infrared. The method is able (1) to achieve a very high accuracy, (2) to drastically reduce the number of outliers and catastrophic objects, and (3) to discriminate among parameters (or features) on the basis of their significance, so that the number of features used for training and analysis can be optimized in order to reduce both the computational demands and the effects of degeneracy. The best experiment, which makes use of a selected combination of parameters drawn from the four surveys, leads, in terms of {Delta}z{sub norm} (i.e., (z{sub spec} - z{sub phot})/(1 + z{sub spec})), to an average of {Delta}z{sub norm} = 0.004, a standard deviation of {sigma} = 0.069, and a median absolute deviation, MAD = 0.02, over the whole redshift range (i.e., z{sub spec} {<=} 3.6), defined by the four-survey cross-matched spectroscopic sample. The fraction of catastrophic outliers, i.e., of objects with photo-z deviating more than 2{sigma} from the spectroscopic value, is <3%, leading to {sigma} = 0.035 after their removal, over the same redshift range. The method is made available to the community through the DAMEWARE Web application.

  6. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS AND QUASAR PROBABILITIES FROM A SINGLE, DATA-DRIVEN GENERATIVE MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Bovy, Jo; Hogg, David W.; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Myers, Adam D.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; McMahon, Richard G.; Schiminovich, David; Sheldon, Erin S.; Brinkmann, Jon; Schneider, Donald P.

    2012-04-10

    We describe a technique for simultaneously classifying and estimating the redshift of quasars. It can separate quasars from stars in arbitrary redshift ranges, estimate full posterior distribution functions for the redshift, and naturally incorporate flux uncertainties, missing data, and multi-wavelength photometry. We build models of quasars in flux-redshift space by applying the extreme deconvolution technique to estimate the underlying density. By integrating this density over redshift, one can obtain quasar flux densities in different redshift ranges. This approach allows for efficient, consistent, and fast classification and photometric redshift estimation. This is achieved by combining the speed obtained by choosing simple analytical forms as the basis of our density model with the flexibility of non-parametric models through the use of many simple components with many parameters. We show that this technique is competitive with the best photometric quasar classification techniques-which are limited to fixed, broad redshift ranges and high signal-to-noise ratio data-and with the best photometric redshift techniques when applied to broadband optical data. We demonstrate that the inclusion of UV and NIR data significantly improves photometric quasar-star separation and essentially resolves all of the redshift degeneracies for quasars inherent to the ugriz filter system, even when included data have a low signal-to-noise ratio. For quasars spectroscopically confirmed by the SDSS 84% and 97% of the objects with Galaxy Evolution Explorer UV and UKIDSS NIR data have photometric redshifts within 0.1 and 0.3, respectively, of the spectroscopic redshift; this amounts to about a factor of three improvement over ugriz-only photometric redshifts. Our code to calculate quasar probabilities and redshift probability distributions is publicly available.

  7. Photometric redshifts and quasar probabilities from a single, data-driven generative model

    SciTech Connect

    Bovy, Jo; Myers, Adam D.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Hogg, David W.; McMahon, Richard G.; Schiminovich, David; Sheldon, Erin S.; Brinkmann, Jon; Schneider, Donald P.; Weaver, Benjamin A.

    2012-03-20

    We describe a technique for simultaneously classifying and estimating the redshift of quasars. It can separate quasars from stars in arbitrary redshift ranges, estimate full posterior distribution functions for the redshift, and naturally incorporate flux uncertainties, missing data, and multi-wavelength photometry. We build models of quasars in flux-redshift space by applying the extreme deconvolution technique to estimate the underlying density. By integrating this density over redshift, one can obtain quasar flux densities in different redshift ranges. This approach allows for efficient, consistent, and fast classification and photometric redshift estimation. This is achieved by combining the speed obtained by choosing simple analytical forms as the basis of our density model with the flexibility of non-parametric models through the use of many simple components with many parameters. We show that this technique is competitive with the best photometric quasar classification techniques—which are limited to fixed, broad redshift ranges and high signal-to-noise ratio data—and with the best photometric redshift techniques when applied to broadband optical data. We demonstrate that the inclusion of UV and NIR data significantly improves photometric quasar-star separation and essentially resolves all of the redshift degeneracies for quasars inherent to the ugriz filter system, even when included data have a low signal-to-noise ratio. For quasars spectroscopically confirmed by the SDSS 84% and 97% of the objects with Galaxy Evolution Explorer UV and UKIDSS NIR data have photometric redshifts within 0.1 and 0.3, respectively, of the spectroscopic redshift; this amounts to about a factor of three improvement over ugriz-only photometric redshifts. Our code to calculate quasar probabilities and redshift probability distributions is publicly available.

  8. The ALHAMBRA survey: accurate merger fractions derived by PDF analysis of photometrically close pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Sanjuan, C.; Cenarro, A. J.; Varela, J.; Viironen, K.; Molino, A.; Benítez, N.; Arnalte-Mur, P.; Ascaso, B.; Díaz-García, L. A.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Jiménez-Teja, Y.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Moles, M.; Pović, M.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Alfaro, E.; Aparicio-Villegas, T.; Broadhurst, T.; Cabrera-Caño, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cepa, J.; Cerviño, M.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; Del Olmo, A.; González Delgado, R. M.; Husillos, C.; Infante, L.; Martínez, V. J.; Perea, J.; Prada, F.; Quintana, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    Aims: Our goal is to develop and test a novel methodology to compute accurate close-pair fractions with photometric redshifts. Methods: We improved the currently used methodologies to estimate the merger fraction fm from photometric redshifts by (i) using the full probability distribution functions (PDFs) of the sources in redshift space; (ii) including the variation in the luminosity of the sources with z in both the sample selection and the luminosity ratio constrain; and (iii) splitting individual PDFs into red and blue spectral templates to reliably work with colour selections. We tested the performance of our new methodology with the PDFs provided by the ALHAMBRA photometric survey. Results: The merger fractions and rates from the ALHAMBRA survey agree excellently well with those from spectroscopic work for both the general population and red and blue galaxies. With the merger rate of bright (MB ≤ -20-1.1z) galaxies evolving as (1 + z)n, the power-law index n is higher for blue galaxies (n = 2.7 ± 0.5) than for red galaxies (n = 1.3 ± 0.4), confirming previous results. Integrating the merger rate over cosmic time, we find that the average number of mergers per galaxy since z = 1 is Nmred = 0.57 ± 0.05 for red galaxies and Nmblue = 0.26 ± 0.02 for blue galaxies. Conclusions: Our new methodology statistically exploits all the available information provided by photometric redshift codes and yields accurate measurements of the merger fraction by close pairs from using photometric redshifts alone. Current and future photometric surveys will benefit from this new methodology. Based on observations collected at the German-Spanish Astronomical Center, Calar Alto, jointly operated by the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPIA) at Heidelberg and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).The catalogues, probabilities, and figures of the ALHAMBRA close pairs detected in Sect. 5.1 are available at http://https://cloud.iaa.csic.es/alhambra/catalogues/ClosePairs

  9. Dissecting Photometric Redshift for Active Galactic Nucleus Using XMM- and Chandra-COSMOS Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvato, M.; Ilbert, O.; Hasinger, G.; Rau, A.; Civano, F.; Zamorani, G.; Brusa, M.; Elvis, M.; Vignali, C.; Aussel, H.; Comastri, A.; Fiore, F.; Le Floc'h, E.; Mainieri, V.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Capak, P.; Caputi, K.; Cappelluti, N.; Carollo, C. M.; Contini, T.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; Fotopoulou, S.; Fruscione, A.; Gilli, R.; Halliday, C.; Kneib, J.-P.; Kakazu, Y.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Kovac, K.; Ideue, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Impey, C. D.; Le Fevre, O.; Lamareille, F.; Lanzuisi, G.; Le Borgne, J.-F.; Le Brun, V.; Lilly, S.; Maier, C.; Manohar, S.; Masters, D.; McCracken, H.; Messias, H.; Mignoli, M.; Mobasher, B.; Nagao, T.; Pello, R.; Puccetti, S.; Perez-Montero, E.; Renzini, A.; Sargent, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Scodeggio, M.; Scoville, N.; Shopbell, P.; Silvermann, J.; Taniguchi, Y.; Tasca, L.; Tresse, L.; Trump, J. R.; Zucca, E.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we release accurate photometric redshifts for 1692 counterparts to Chandra sources in the central square degree of the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field. The availability of a large training set of spectroscopic redshifts that extends to faint magnitudes enabled photometric redshifts comparable to the highest quality results presently available for normal galaxies. We demonstrate that morphologically extended, faint X-ray sources without optical variability are more accurately described by a library of normal galaxies (corrected for emission lines) than by active galactic nucleus (AGN) dominated templates, even if these sources have AGN-like X-ray luminosities. Preselecting the library on the bases of the source properties allowed us to reach an accuracy \\sigma _{\\Delta z/(1+z_{spec})}\\sim 0.015 with a fraction of outliers of 5.8% for the entire Chandra-COSMOS sample. In addition, we release revised photometric redshifts for the 1735 optical counterparts of the XMM-detected sources over the entire 2 deg2 of COSMOS. For 248 sources, our updated photometric redshift differs from the previous release by Δz > 0.2. These changes are predominantly due to the inclusion of newly available deep H-band photometry (H AB = 24 mag). We illustrate once again the importance of a spectroscopic training sample and how an assumption about the nature of a source together, with the number and the depth of the available bands, influences the accuracy of the photometric redshifts determined for AGN. These considerations should be kept in mind when defining the observational strategies of upcoming large surveys targeting AGNs, such as eROSITA at X-ray energies and the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder Evolutionary Map of the Universe in the radio band. Based on observations by the Chandra X-ray Observatory Center, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for and on behalf of the National Aeronautics Space Administration under

  10. Photometric Selection of High-Redshift Type Ia Supernova Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, M.; Howell, D. A.; Perrett, K.; Nugent, P. E.; Astier, P.; Aubourg, E.; Balam, D.; Basa, S.; Carlberg, R. G.; Conley, A.; Fabbro, S.; Fouchez, D.; Guy, J.; Hook, I.; Lafoux, H.; Neill, J. D.; Pain, R.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Pritchet, C. J.; Regnault, N.; Rich, J.; Taillet, R.; Aldering, G.; Baumont, S.; Bronder, J.; Filiol, M.; Knop, R. A.; Perlmutter, S.; Tao, C.

    2006-02-01

    We present a method for selecting high-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) located via rolling SN searches. The technique, using both color and magnitude information of events from only two to three epochs of multiband real-time photometry, is able to discriminate between SNe Ia and core-collapse SNe. Furthermore, for SNe Ia the method accurately predicts the redshift, phase, and light-curve parameterization of these events based only on pre-maximum-light data. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the technique on a simulated survey of SNe Ia and core-collapse SNe, where the selection method effectively rejects most core-collapse SNe while retaining SNe Ia. We also apply the selection code to real-time data acquired as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). During the period 2004 May to 2005 January in the SNLS, 440 SN candidates were discovered, of which 70 were confirmed spectroscopically as SNe Ia and 15 as core-collapse events. For this test data set, the selection technique correctly identifies 100% of the identified SNe II as non-SNe Ia with only a 1%-2% false rejection rate. The predicted parameterization of the SNe Ia has a precision of Δz/(1+zspec)<0.09 in redshift and +/-2-3 rest-frame days in phase, providing invaluable information for planning spectroscopic follow-up observations. We also investigate any bias introduced by this selection method on the ability of surveys such as SNLS to measure cosmological parameters (e.g., w and ΩM) and find any effect to be negligible.

  11. Photometric Redshifts for the Large-Area Stripe 82X Multiwavelength Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasnim Ananna, Tonima; Salvato, Mara; Urry, C. Megan; LaMassa, Stephanie M.; STRIPE 82X

    2016-06-01

    The Stripe 82X survey currently includes 6000 X-ray sources in 31.3 square degrees of XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray coverage, most of which are AGN. Using a maximum-likelihood approach, we identified optical and infrared counterparts in the SDSS, VHS K-band and WISE W1-band catalogs. 1200 objects which had different best associations in different catalogs were checked by eye. Our most recent paper provided the multiwavelength catalogs for this sample. More than 1000 counterparts have spectroscopic redshifts, either from SDSS spectroscopy or our own follow-up program. Using the extensive multiwavelength data in this field, we provide photometric redshift estimates for most of the remaining sources, which are 80-90% accurate according to the training set. Our sample has a large number of candidates that are very faint in optical and bright in IR. We expect a large fraction of these objects to be the obscured AGN sample we need to complete the census on black hole growth at a range of redshifts.

  12. CANDELS/GOODS-S, CDFS, ECDFS: Photometric Redshifts For X-Ray Detected AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, L.; Salvato, M.; Nandra, K.; Brusa, M.

    2014-07-01

    We present photometric redshifts for X-ray sources, as well as new multi-wavelength identifications in the 4Ms-CDFS/ECDFS. To find counterparts of the X-ray sources efficiently, we use a new method based on Bayesian statistics with priors on magnitudes and position errors, making associations with optical and near/mid-infrared data simultaneously. Specifically taking advantage of high-resolution HST/WFC3 data in the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and homogeneous data from the Taiwan ECDFS Near-IR Survey (TENIS), 97% of X-ray sources have multi-wavelength counterparts. To compute photo-z, in addition to the CANDELS data, the de-blended intermediate-band photometry (by TFIT method) is used for the first time in this field. Furthermore, we adopt a new set of AGN-galaxy hybrid templates which are more representative of population. These hybrids are composed of semi-empirical galaxy templates that include emission lines, in addition to type1/2 AGNs. In the entire field, we achieve a photo-z accuracy of 0.014 with 5.3% outliers. The WFC3/NIR data allow us to reach more accurate redshifts up to 7. The results are particularly accurate when incorporating the intermediate bands and emission lines that pinpoint strong line features from AGNs. The photo-z accuracy is three times better when including them in the fitting.

  13. Photometric Redshifts for the Dark Energy Survey and VISTA and Implications for Large Scale Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Banerji, Manda; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Lahav, Ofer; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab

    2007-11-01

    We conduct a detailed analysis of the photometric redshift requirements for the proposed Dark Energy Survey (DES) using two sets of mock galaxy simulations and an artificial neural network code-ANNz. In particular, we examine how optical photometry in the DES grizY bands can be complemented with near infra-red photometry from the planned VISTA Hemisphere Survey (VHS) in the JHK{sub s} bands in order to improve the photometric redshift estimate by a factor of two at z > 1. We draw attention to the effects of galaxy formation scenarios such as reddening on the photo-z estimate and using our neural network code, calculate A{sub v} for these reddened galaxies. We also look at the impact of using different training sets when calculating photometric redshifts. In particular, we find that using the ongoing DEEP2 and VVDS-Deep spectroscopic surveys to calibrate photometric redshifts for DES, will prove effective. However we need to be aware of uncertainties in the photometric redshift bias that arise when using different training sets as these will translate into errors in the dark energy equation of state parameter, w. Furthermore, we show that the neural network error estimate on the photometric redshift may be used to remove outliers from our samples before any kind of cosmological analysis, in particular for large-scale structure experiments. By removing all galaxies with a 1{sigma} photo-z scatter greater than 0.1 from our DES+VHS sample, we can constrain the galaxy power spectrum out to a redshift of 2 and reduce the fractional error on this power spectrum by {approx}15-20% compared to using the entire catalogue.

  14. Estimating luminosities and stellar masses of galaxies photometrically without determining redshifts

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, B. C.; Yee, H. K. C. E-mail: hyee@astro.utoronto.ca

    2014-09-10

    Large direct imaging surveys usually use a template-fitting technique to estimate photometric redshifts for galaxies, which are then applied to derive important galaxy properties such as luminosities and stellar masses. These estimates can be noisy and suffer from systematic biases because of the possible mis-selection of templates and the propagation of the photometric redshift uncertainty. We introduce an algorithm, the Direct Empirical Photometric method (DEmP), that can be used to directly estimate these quantities using training sets, bypassing photometric redshift determination. DEmP also applies two techniques to minimize the effects arising from the non-uniform distribution of training set galaxy redshifts from a flux-limited sample. First, for each input galaxy, fitting is performed using a subset of the training set galaxies with photometry and colors closest to those of the input galaxy. Second, the training set is artificially resampled to produce a flat distribution in redshift or other properties, e.g., luminosity. To test the performance of DEmP, we use a four filter-band mock catalog to examine its ability to recover redshift, luminosity, stellar mass, and luminosity and stellar mass functions. We also compare the results to those from two publicly available template-fitting methods, finding that the DEmP algorithm outperforms both. We find that resampling the training set to have a uniform redshift distribution produces the best results not only in photometric redshift, but also in estimating luminosity and stellar mass. The DEmP method is especially powerful in estimating quantities such as near-IR luminosities and stellar mass using only data from a small number of optical bands.

  15. The overlooked potential of Generalized Linear Models in astronomy-II: Gamma regression and photometric redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, J.; de Souza, R. S.; Krone-Martins, A.; Cameron, E.; Ishida, E. E. O.; Hilbe, J.

    2015-04-01

    Machine learning techniques offer a precious tool box for use within astronomy to solve problems involving so-called big data. They provide a means to make accurate predictions about a particular system without prior knowledge of the underlying physical processes of the data. In this article, and the companion papers of this series, we present the set of Generalized Linear Models (GLMs) as a fast alternative method for tackling general astronomical problems, including the ones related to the machine learning paradigm. To demonstrate the applicability of GLMs to inherently positive and continuous physical observables, we explore their use in estimating the photometric redshifts of galaxies from their multi-wavelength photometry. Using the gamma family with a log link function we predict redshifts from the PHoto-z Accuracy Testing simulated catalogue and a subset of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey from Data Release 10. We obtain fits that result in catastrophic outlier rates as low as ∼1% for simulated and ∼2% for real data. Moreover, we can easily obtain such levels of precision within a matter of seconds on a normal desktop computer and with training sets that contain merely thousands of galaxies. Our software is made publicly available as a user-friendly package developed in Python, R and via an interactive web application. This software allows users to apply a set of GLMs to their own photometric catalogues and generates publication quality plots with minimum effort. By facilitating their ease of use to the astronomical community, this paper series aims to make GLMs widely known and to encourage their implementation in future large-scale projects, such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  16. Astroinformatics of galaxies and quasars: a new general method for photometric redshifts estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurino, O.; D'Abrusco, R.; Longo, G.; Riccio, G.

    2011-12-01

    With the availability of the huge amounts of data produced by current and future large multiband photometric surveys, photometric redshifts have become a crucial tool for extragalactic astronomy and cosmology. In this paper we present a novel method, called Weak Gated Experts (WGE), which allows us to derive photometric redshifts through a combination of data mining techniques. The WGE, like many other machine learning techniques, is based on the exploitation of a spectroscopic knowledge base composed by sources for which a spectroscopic value of the redshift is available. This method achieves a variance σ2(Δz) = 2.3 × 10-4 [σ2(Δz) = 0.08, where Δz=zphot-zspec] for the reconstruction of the photometric redshifts for the optical galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and for the optical quasars, respectively, while the root mean square (rms) of the Δz variable distributions for the two experiments is, respectively, equal to 0.021 and 0.35. The WGE provides also a mechanism for the estimation of the accuracy of each photometric redshift. We also present and discuss the catalogues obtained for the optical SDSS galaxies, for the optical candidate quasars extracted from the Data Release 7 of SDSS photometric data set (the sample of SDSS sources on which the accuracy of the reconstruction has been assessed is composed of bright sources, for a subset of which spectroscopic redshifts have been measured) and for optical SDSS candidate quasars observed by GALEX in the ultraviolet range. The WGE method exploits the new technological paradigm provided by the virtual observatory and the emerging field of astroinformatics.

  17. Improving photometric redshifts with Lyα tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittfull, Marcel; White, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Forming a three dimensional view of the Universe is a long-standing goal of astronomical observations, and one that becomes increasingly difficult at high redshift. In this paper we discuss how tomography of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at z ≃ 2.5 can be used to estimate the redshifts of massive galaxies in a large volume of the Universe based on spectra of galaxies in their background. Our method is based on the fact that hierarchical structure formation leads to a strong dependence of the halo density on large-scale environment. A map of the latter can thus be used to refine our knowledge of the redshifts of halos and the galaxies and AGN which they host. We show that tomographic maps of the IGM at a resolution of 2.5 h-1Mpc can determine the redshifts of more than 90 per cent of massive galaxies with redshift uncertainty Δz/(1 + z) = 0.01. Higher resolution maps allow such redshift estimation for lower mass galaxies and halos.

  18. Simultaneous Estimation of Photometric Redshifts and SED Parameters: Improved Techniques and a Realistic Error Budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaviva, Viviana; Raichoor, Anand; Gawiser, Eric

    2015-05-01

    We seek to improve the accuracy of joint galaxy photometric redshift estimation and spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting. By simulating different sources of uncorrected systematic errors, we demonstrate that if the uncertainties in the photometric redshifts are estimated correctly, so are those on the other SED fitting parameters, such as stellar mass, stellar age, and dust reddening. Furthermore, we find that if the redshift uncertainties are over(under)-estimated, the uncertainties in SED parameters tend to be over(under)-estimated by similar amounts. These results hold even in the presence of severe systematics and provide, for the first time, a mechanism to validate the uncertainties on these parameters via comparison with spectroscopic redshifts. We propose a new technique (annealing) to re-calibrate the joint uncertainties in the photo-z and SED fitting parameters without compromising the performance of the SED fitting + photo-z estimation. This procedure provides a consistent estimation of the multi-dimensional probability distribution function in SED fitting + z parameter space, including all correlations. While the performance of joint SED fitting and photo-z estimation might be hindered by template incompleteness, we demonstrate that the latter is “flagged” by a large fraction of outliers in redshift, and that significant improvements can be achieved by using flexible stellar populations synthesis models and more realistic star formation histories. In all cases, we find that the median stellar age is better recovered than the time elapsed from the onset of star formation. Finally, we show that using a photometric redshift code such as EAZY to obtain redshift probability distributions that are then used as priors for SED fitting codes leads to only a modest bias in the SED fitting parameters and is thus a viable alternative to the simultaneous estimation of SED parameters and photometric redshifts.

  19. Cosmological baryonic and matter densities from 600000 SDSS luminous red galaxies with photometric redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Chris; Collister, Adrian; Bridle, Sarah; Lahav, Ofer

    2007-02-01

    We analyse MegaZ-LRG, a photometric-redshift catalogue of luminous red galaxies (LRGs) based on the imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) 4th Data Release. MegaZ-LRG, presented in a companion paper, contains >106 photometric redshifts derived with ANNZ, an artificial neural network method, constrained by a spectroscopic subsample of ~13000 galaxies obtained by the 2dF-SDSS LRG and Quasar (2SLAQ) survey. The catalogue spans the redshift range 0.4 < z < 0.7 with an rms redshift error σz ~ 0.03(1 + z), covering 5914 deg2 to map out a total cosmic volume 2.5h-3Gpc3. In this study we use the most reliable 600000 photometric redshifts to measure the large-scale structure using two methods: (1) a spherical harmonic analysis in redshift slices, and (2) a direct re-construction of the spatial clustering pattern using Fourier techniques. We present the first cosmological parameter fits to galaxy angular power spectra from a photometric-redshift survey. Combining the redshift slices with appropriate covariances, we determine best-fitting values for the matter density Ωm and baryon density Ωb of Ωmh = 0.195 +/- 0.023 and Ωb/Ωm = 0.16 +/- 0.036 (with the Hubble parameter h = 0.75 and scalar index of primordial fluctuations nscalar = 1 held fixed). These results are in agreement with and independent of the latest studies of the cosmic microwave background radiation, and their precision is comparable to analyses of contemporary spectroscopic-redshift surveys. We perform an extensive series of tests which conclude that our power spectrum measurements are robust against potential systematic photometric errors in the catalogue. We conclude that photometric-redshift surveys are competitive with spectroscopic surveys for measuring cosmological parameters in the simplest `vanilla' models. Future deep imaging surveys have great potential for further improvement, provided that systematic errors can be controlled.

  20. The Herschel Multi-Tiered Extragalactic Survey: SPIRE-mm Photometric Redshifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roseboom, I. G.; Ivison, R. J.; Greve, T. R.; Amblard, A.; Arumugam, V.; Auld, R.; Aussel, H.; Bethermin, M.; Blain, A.; Block, J.; Boselli, A.; Brisbin, D.; Buat, V.; Burgarella, D.; Castro-Rodriquez, N.; Cava, A.; Chanial, P.; Chapin, E.; Chapman, S.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conversi, L.; Dowell, C. D.; Dunlop, J. S.; Dwek, E.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the potential of submm-mm and submm-mm-radio photometric redshifts using a sample of mm-selected sources as seen at 250, 350 and 500 micron by the SPIRE instrument on Herschel. From a sample of 63 previously identified mm sources with reliable radio identifications in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey North and Lockman Hole North fields, 46 (73 per cent) are found to have detections in at least one SPIRE band. We explore the observed submm/mm color evolution with redshift, finding that the colors of mm sources are adequately described by a modified blackbody with constant optical depth Tau = (Nu/nu(sub 0))(exp Beta), where Beta = +1.8 and nu(sub 0) = c/100 micron. We find a tight correlation between dust temperature and IR luminosity. Using a single model of the dust temperature and IR luminosity relation, we derive photometric redshift estimates for the 46 SPIRE-detected mm sources. Testing against the 22 sources with known spectroscopic or good quality optical/near-IR photometric redshifts, we find submm/mm photometric redshifts offer a redshift accuracy of (absolute value of Delta sub (z))/(1 + z) = 0.16 (absolute value of Delta sub (z)) = 0.51). Including constraints from the radio-far-IR correlation, the accuracy is improved to (absolute value of Delta sub (z))/(1 + z) = 0.14 (((absolute value of Delta sub (z))) = 0.45). We estimate the redshift distribution of mm-selected sources finding a significant excess at Z > 3 when compared to approx 8S0 micron selected samples.

  1. The Herschel Multi-Tiered Extragalactic Survey: SPIRE-mm Photometric Redshifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roseboom, I. G.; Ivison, R. J.; Greve, T. R.; Amblard, A.; Arumugam, V.; Auld, R.; Aussel, H.; Bethermin, M.; Blain, A.; Bock, J.; Boselli, A.; Brisbin, D.; Buat, V.; Burgarella, D.; Castro-Rodriguez, N.; Cava, A.; Chanial, P.; Chapin, E.; Chapman, S.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conversi, L.; Cooray, A.; Dowell, C. D.; Dwek, E.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the potential of submm-mm and submm-mm-radio photometric red-shifts using a sample of mm-selected sources as seen at 250, 350 and 500 micrometers by the SPIRE instrument on Herschel. From a sample of 63 previously identified mm-sources with reliable radio identifications in the GOODS-N and Lockman Hole North fields 46 (73 per cent) are found to have detections in at least one SPIRE band. We explore the observed submm/mm colour evolution with redshift, finding that the colours of mm-sources are adequately described by a modified blackbody with constant optical depth Tau = (nu/nu(0))beta where beta = +1.8 and nu(0) = c/100 micrometers. We find a tight correlation between dust temperature and IR luminosity. Using a single model of the dust temperature and IR luminosity relation we derive photometric redshift estimates for the 46 SPIRE detected mm-sources. Testing against the 22 sources with known spectroscopic, or good quality optical/near-IR photometric, redshifts we find submm/mm photometric redshifts offer a redshift accuracy of |delta z|/(1+z) = 0.16 (less than |delta z| greater than = 0.51). Including constraints from the radio-far IR correlation the accuracy is improved to |delta z|/(1 + z) = 0.15 (less than |delta z| greater than = 0.45). We estimate the redshift distribution of mm-selected sources finding a significant excess at z greater than 3 when compared to 850 micrometer selected samples.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS-DR9 photometric redshifts (Brescia+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brescia, M.; Cavuoti, S.; Longo, G.; de Stefano, V.

    2014-07-01

    We present an application of a machine learning method to the estimation of photometric redshifts for the galaxies in the SDSS Data Release 9 (SDSS-DR9). Photometric redshifts for more than 143 million galaxies were produced. The MLPQNA (Multi Layer Perceptron with Quasi Newton Algorithm) model provided within the framework of the DAMEWARE (DAta Mining and Exploration Web Application REsource) is an interpolative method derived from machine learning models. The obtained redshifts have an overall uncertainty of σ=0.023 with a very small average bias of about 3x10-5 and a fraction of catastrophic outliers of about 5%. After removal of the catastrophic outliers, the uncertainty is about σ=0.017. The catalogue files report in their name the range of DEC degrees related to the included objects. (60 data files).

  3. The ASTRODEEP Frontier Fields catalogues. II. Photometric redshifts and rest frame properties in Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, M.; Amorín, R.; Merlin, E.; Fontana, A.; McLure, R. J.; Mármol-Queraltó, E.; Mortlock, A.; Parsa, S.; Dunlop, J. S.; Elbaz, D.; Balestra, I.; Boucaud, A.; Bourne, N.; Boutsia, K.; Brammer, G.; Bruce, V. A.; Buitrago, F.; Capak, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Ciesla, L.; Comastri, A.; Cullen, F.; Derriere, S.; Faber, S. M.; Giallongo, E.; Grazian, A.; Grillo, C.; Mercurio, A.; Michałowski, M. J.; Nonino, M.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.; Pilo, S.; Rosati, P.; Santini, P.; Schreiber, C.; Shu, X.; Wang, T.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We present the first public release of photometric redshifts, galaxy rest frame properties and associated magnification values in the cluster and parallel pointings of the first two Frontier Fields, Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416. The released catalogues aim to provide a reference for future investigations of extragalactic populations in these legacy fields: from lensed high-redshift galaxies to cluster members themselves. Methods: We exploit a multiwavelength catalogue, ranging from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to ground-based K and Spitzer IRAC, which is specifically designed to enable detection and measurement of accurate fluxes in crowded cluster regions. The multiband information is used to derive photometric redshifts and physical properties of sources detected either in the H-band image alone, or from a stack of four WFC3 bands. To minimize systematics, median photometric redshifts are assembled from six different approaches to photo-z estimates. Their reliability is assessed through a comparison with available spectroscopic samples. State-of-the-art lensing models are used to derive magnification values on an object-by-object basis by taking into account sources positions and redshifts. Results: We show that photometric redshifts reach a remarkable ~3-5% accuracy. After accounting for magnification, the H-band number counts are found to be in agreement at bright magnitudes with number counts from the CANDELS fields, while extending the presently available samples to galaxies that, intrinsically, are as faint as H ~ 32-33, thanks to strong gravitational lensing. The Frontier Fields allow the galaxy stellar mass distribution to be probed, depending on magnification, at 0.5-1.5 dex lower masses with respect to extragalactic wide fields, including sources at Mstar ~ 107-108 M⊙ at z > 5. Similarly, they allow the detection of objects with intrinsic star formation rates (SFRs) >1 dex lower than in the CANDELS fields reaching 0.1-1 M⊙/yr at z ~ 6-10. The

  4. Robust photometric redshift determinations of gamma-ray burst afterglows at z ≳ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, P. A.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Heemskerk, M. H. M.; Starling, R. L. C.; Wiersema, K.; van der Horst, A. J.

    2008-11-01

    Context: Theory suggests that about 10% of Swift-detected gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) will originate at redshifts, z, greater than 5 yet a number of high redshift candidates may be left unconfirmed due to the lack of measured redshifts. Aims: Here we introduce our code, GRBz, a method of simultaneous multi-parameter fitting of GRB afterglow optical and near infrared, spectral energy distributions. It allows for early determinations of the photometric redshift, spectral index and host extinction to be made. Methods: We assume that GRB afterglow spectra are well represented by a power-law decay and model the effects of absorption due to the Lyman forest and host extinction. We use a genetic algorithm-based routine to simultaneously fit the parameters of interest, and a Monte Carlo error analysis. Results: We use GRBs of previously determined spectroscopic redshifts to prove our method, while also introducing new near infrared data of GRB 990510 which further constrains the value of the host extinction. Conclusions: Our method is effective in estimating the photometric redshift of GRBs, relatively unbiased by assumptions of the afterglow spectral index or the host galaxy extinction. Monte Carlo error analysis is required as the method of error estimate based on the optimum population of the genetic algorithm underestimates errors significantly.

  5. WISE × SuperCOSMOS Photometric Redshift Catalog: 20 Million Galaxies over 3/pi Steradians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilicki, Maciej; Peacock, John A.; Jarrett, Thomas H.; Cluver, Michelle E.; Maddox, Natasha; Brown, Michael J. I.; Taylor, Edward N.; Hambly, Nigel C.; Solarz, Aleksandra; Holwerda, Benne W.; Baldry, Ivan; Loveday, Jon; Moffett, Amanda; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Driver, Simon P.; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2016-07-01

    We cross-match the two currently largest all-sky photometric catalogs—mid-infrared Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and SuperCOSMOS scans of UKST/POSS-II photographic plates—to obtain a new galaxy sample that covers 3π steradians. In order to characterize and purify the extragalactic data set, we use external GAMA and Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopic information to define quasar and star loci in multicolor space, aiding the removal of contamination from our extended source catalog. After appropriate data cleaning, we obtain a deep wide-angle galaxy sample that is approximately 95% pure and 90% complete at high Galactic latitudes. The catalog contains close to 20 million galaxies over almost 70% of the sky, outside the Zone of Avoidance and other confused regions, with a mean surface density of more than 650 sources per square degree. Using multiwavelength information from two optical and two mid-IR photometric bands, we derive photometric redshifts for all the galaxies in the catalog, using the ANNz framework trained on the final GAMA-II spectroscopic data. Our sample has a median redshift of {z}{med}=0.2, with a broad {dN}/{dz} reaching up to z > 0.4. The photometric redshifts have a mean bias of | δ z| ∼ {10}-3, a normalized scatter of σ z = 0.033, and less than 3% outliers beyond 3σ z . Comparison with external data sets shows no significant variation of photo-z quality with sky position. Together with the overall statistics, we also provide a more detailed analysis of photometric redshift accuracy as a function of magnitudes and colors. The final catalog is appropriate for “all-sky” three-dimensional (3D) cosmology to unprecedented depths, in particular through cross-correlations with other large-area surveys. It should also be useful for source preselection and identification in forthcoming surveys, such as TAIPAN or WALLABY.

  6. Photometric redshift estimation for quasars by integration of KNN and SVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bo; Ding, Hong-Peng; Zhang, Yan-Xia; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2016-05-01

    The massive photometric data collected from multiple large-scale sky surveys offer significant opportunities for measuring distances of celestial objects by photometric redshifts. However, catastrophic failure is an unsolved problem with a long history and it still exists in the current photometric redshift estimation approaches (such as the k-nearest neighbor (KNN) algorithm). In this paper, we propose a novel two-stage approach by integration of KNN and support vector machine (SVM) methods together. In the first stage, we apply the KNN algorithm to photometric data and estimate their corresponding z phot. Our analysis has found two dense regions with catastrophic failure, one in the range of z phot ɛ [0.3, 1.2] and the other in the range of zphot ɛ [1.2, 2.1]. In the second stage, we map the photometric input pattern of points falling into the two ranges from their original attribute space into a high dimensional feature space by using a Gaussian kernel function from an SVM. In the high dimensional feature space, many outliers resulting from catastrophic failure by simple Euclidean distance computation in KNN can be identified by a classification hyperplane of SVM and can be further corrected. Experimental results based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasar data show that the two-stage fusion approach can significantly mitigate catastrophic failure and improve the estimation accuracy of photometric redshifts of quasars. The percents in different |δz| ranges and root mean square (rms) error by the integrated method are 83.47%, 89.83%, 90.90% and 0.192, respectively, compared to the results by KNN (71.96%, 83.78%, 89.73% and 0.204).

  7. Photometric redshifts and clustering of emission line galaxies selected jointly by DES and eBOSS

    SciTech Connect

    Jouvel, S.; et al.

    2015-09-23

    We present the results of the first test plates of the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. This paper focuses on the emission line galaxies (ELG) population targetted from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) photometry. We analyse the success rate, efficiency, redshift distribution, and clustering properties of the targets. From the 9000 spectroscopic redshifts targetted, 4600 have been selected from the DES photometry. The total success rate for redshifts between 0.6 and 1.2 is 71\\% and 68\\% respectively for a bright and faint, on average more distant, samples including redshifts measured from a single strong emission line. We find a mean redshift of 0.8 and 0.87, with 15 and 13\\% of unknown redshifts respectively for the bright and faint samples. In the redshift range 0.6redshifts, the mean redshift for the bright and faint sample is 0.85 and 0.9 respectively. Star contamination is lower than 2\\%. We measure a galaxy bias averaged on scales of 1 and 10~Mpc/h of 1.72 \\pm 0.1 for the bright sample and of 1.78 \\pm 0.12 for the faint sample. The error on the galaxy bias have been obtained propagating the errors in the correlation function to the fitted parameters. This redshift evolution for the galaxy bias is in agreement with theoretical expectations for a galaxy population with MB-5\\log h < -21.0. We note that biasing is derived from the galaxy clustering relative to a model for the mass fluctuations. We investigate the quality of the DES photometric redshifts and find that the outlier fraction can be reduced using a comparison between template fitting and neural network, or using a random forest algorithm.

  8. Quasi-stellar objects in the ALHAMBRA survey. I. Photometric redshift accuracy based on 23 optical-NIR filter photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matute, I.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Husillos, C.; del Olmo, A.; Perea, J.; Alfaro, E. J.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Moles, M.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Aparicio-Villegas, T.; Benítez, N.; Broadhurst, T.; Cabrera-Cano, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cepa, J.; Cerviño, M.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; Infante, L.; González Delgado, R. M.; Martínez, V. J.; Molino, A.; Prada, F.; Quintana, J. M.

    2012-06-01

    Context. Even the spectroscopic capabilities of today's ground and space-based observatories can not keep up with the enormous flow of detections (>105 deg-2) unveiled in modern cosmological surveys as: i) would be required enormous telescope time to perform the spectroscopic follow-ups and ii) spectra remain unattainable for the fainter detected population. In the past decade, the typical accuracy of photometric redshift (photo-z) determination has drastically improved. Nowdays, it has become a perfect complement to spectroscopy, closing the gap between photometric surveys and their spectroscopic follow-ups. The photo-z precision for active galactic nuclei (AGN) has always lagged behind that for the galaxy population owing to the lack of proper templates and their intrinsic variability. Aims: Our goal is to characterize the ability of the Advanced Large, Homogeneous Area Medium-Band Redshift Astronomical (ALHAMBRA) survey in assigning accurate photo-z's to broad-line AGN (BLAGN) and quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) based on their ALHAMBRA very-low-resolution optical-near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. This will serve as a benchmark for any future compilation of ALHAMBRA selected QSOs and the basis for the statistical analysis required to derive luminosity functions up to z ~ 5. Methods: We selected a sample of spectroscopically identified BLAGN and QSOs and used a library of templates (including the SEDs of AGN and both normal and starburst galaxies, as well as stars) to fit the 23 photometric data points provided by ALHAMBRA in the optical and NIR (20 medium-band optical filters plus the standard JHKs). Results: We find that the ALHAMBRA photometry is able to provide an accurate photo-z and spectral classification for ~88% of the 170 spectroscopically identified BLAGN/QSOs over 2.5 deg2 in different areas of the survey and brighter than m678 = 23.5 (equivalent to rSLOAN ~ 24.0). The derived photo-z accuracy is below 1% and is comparable to the most recent results in

  9. The Efficacy of Galaxy Shape Parameters in Photometric Redshift Estimation: A Neural Network Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, J.; Shmakova, M.; Gerke, B.; Griffith, R.L.; Lotz, J.; /NOAO, Tucson

    2011-05-20

    We present a determination of the effects of including galaxy morphological parameters in photometric redshift estimation with an artificial neural network method. Neural networks, which recognize patterns in the information content of data in an unbiased way, can be a useful estimator of the additional information contained in extra parameters, such as those describing morphology, if the input data are treated on an equal footing. We show that certain principal components of the morphology information are correlated with galaxy type. However, we find that for the data used the inclusion of morphological information does not have a statistically significant benefit for photometric redshift estimation with the techniques employed here. The inclusion of these parameters may result in a trade-off between extra information and additional noise, with the additional noise becoming more dominant as more parameters are added.

  10. Photometric redshift estimation based on data mining with PhotoRApToR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavuoti, S.; Brescia, M.; De Stefano, V.; Longo, G.

    2015-03-01

    Photometric redshifts (photo-z) are crucial to the scientific exploitation of modern panchromatic digital surveys. In this paper we present PhotoRApToR (Photometric Research Application To Redshift): a Java/C ++ based desktop application capable to solve non-linear regression and multi-variate classification problems, in particular specialized for photo-z estimation. It embeds a machine learning algorithm, namely a multi-layer neural network trained by the Quasi Newton learning rule, and special tools dedicated to pre- and post-processing data. PhotoRApToR has been successfully tested on several scientific cases. The application is available for free download from the DAME Program web site.

  11. Incorporating photometric redshift probability density information into real-space clustering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Adam D.; White, Martin; Ball, Nicholas M.

    2009-11-01

    The use of photometric redshifts in cosmology is increasing. Often, however these photo-z are treated like spectroscopic observations, in that the peak of the photometric redshift, rather than the full probability density function (PDF), is used. This overlooks useful information inherent in the full PDF. We introduce a new real-space estimator for one of the most used cosmological statistics, the two-point correlation function, that weights by the PDF of individual photometric objects in a manner that is optimal when Poisson statistics dominate. As our estimator does not bin based on the PDF peak, it substantially enhances the clustering signal by usefully incorporating information from all photometric objects that overlap the redshift bin of interest. As a real-world application, we measure quasi-stellar object (QSO) clustering in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We find that our simplest binned estimator improves the clustering signal by a factor equivalent to increasing the survey size by a factor of 2-3. We also introduce a new implementation that fully weights between pairs of objects in constructing the cross-correlation and find that this pair-weighted estimator improves clustering signal in a manner equivalent to increasing the survey size by a factor of 4-5. Our technique uses spectroscopic data to anchor the distance scale and it will be particularly useful where spectroscopic data (e.g. from BOSS) overlap deeper photometry (e.g. from Pan-STARRS, DES or the LSST). We additionally provide simple, informative expressions to determine when our estimator will be competitive with the autocorrelation of spectroscopic objects. Although we use QSOs as an example population, our estimator can and should be applied to any clustering estimate that uses photometric objects.

  12. Photometric Redshift Probability Distributions for Galaxies in the SDSS DR8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, Erin S.; Cunha, Carlos E.; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Brinkmann, J.; Weaver, Benjamin A.

    2012-08-01

    We present redshift probability distributions for galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 imaging data. We used the nearest-neighbor weighting algorithm to derive the ensemble redshift distribution N(z), and individual redshift probability distributions P(z) for galaxies with r < 21.8 and u < 29.0. As part of this technique, we calculated weights for a set of training galaxies with known redshifts such that their density distribution in five-dimensional color-magnitude space was proportional to that of the photometry-only sample, producing a nearly fair sample in that space. We estimated the ensemble N(z) of the photometric sample by constructing a weighted histogram of the training-set redshifts. We derived P(z)'s for individual objects by using training-set objects from the local color-magnitude space around each photometric object. Using the P(z) for each galaxy can reduce the statistical error in measurements that depend on the redshifts of individual galaxies. The spectroscopic training sample is substantially larger than that used for the DR7 release. The newly added PRIMUS catalog is now the most important training set used in this analysis by a wide margin. We expect the primary sources of error in the N(z) reconstruction to be sample variance and spectroscopic failures: The training sets are drawn from relatively small volumes of space, and some samples have large incompleteness. Using simulations we estimated the uncertainty in N(z) due to sample variance at a given redshift to be ~10%-15%. The uncertainty on calculations incorporating N(z) or P(z) depends on how they are used; we discuss the case of weak lensing measurements. The P(z) catalog is publicly available from the SDSS Web site.

  13. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS FOR GALAXIES IN THE SDSS DR8

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldon, Erin S.; Cunha, Carlos E.; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Brinkmann, J.; Weaver, Benjamin A.

    2012-08-01

    We present redshift probability distributions for galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 imaging data. We used the nearest-neighbor weighting algorithm to derive the ensemble redshift distribution N(z), and individual redshift probability distributions P(z) for galaxies with r < 21.8 and u < 29.0. As part of this technique, we calculated weights for a set of training galaxies with known redshifts such that their density distribution in five-dimensional color-magnitude space was proportional to that of the photometry-only sample, producing a nearly fair sample in that space. We estimated the ensemble N(z) of the photometric sample by constructing a weighted histogram of the training-set redshifts. We derived P(z)'s for individual objects by using training-set objects from the local color-magnitude space around each photometric object. Using the P(z) for each galaxy can reduce the statistical error in measurements that depend on the redshifts of individual galaxies. The spectroscopic training sample is substantially larger than that used for the DR7 release. The newly added PRIMUS catalog is now the most important training set used in this analysis by a wide margin. We expect the primary sources of error in the N(z) reconstruction to be sample variance and spectroscopic failures: The training sets are drawn from relatively small volumes of space, and some samples have large incompleteness. Using simulations we estimated the uncertainty in N(z) due to sample variance at a given redshift to be {approx}10%-15%. The uncertainty on calculations incorporating N(z) or P(z) depends on how they are used; we discuss the case of weak lensing measurements. The P(z) catalog is publicly available from the SDSS Web site.

  14. THE NEWFIRM MEDIUM-BAND SURVEY: PHOTOMETRIC CATALOGS, REDSHIFTS, AND THE BIMODAL COLOR DISTRIBUTION OF GALAXIES OUT TO z {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, Katherine E.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Brammer, Gabriel; Muzzin, Adam; Bezanson, Rachel; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Lundgren, Britt; Nelson, Erica J.; Tal, Tomer; Wake, David A.; Labbe, Ivo; Williams, Rik J.; Kriek, Mariska; Marchesini, Danilo; Quadri, Ryan F.; Franx, Marijn; Illingworth, Garth D.

    2011-07-10

    We present deep near-IR (NIR) medium-bandwidth photometry over the wavelength range 1-1.8 {mu}m in the All-wavelength Extended Groth strip International Survey (AEGIS) and Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) fields. The observations were carried out using the NOAO Extremely Wide-Field Infrared Imager (NEWFIRM) on the Mayall 4 m Telescope on Kitt Peak as part of the NEWFIRM Medium-Band Survey (NMBS), an NOAO survey program. In this paper, we describe the full details of the observations, data reduction, and photometry for the survey. We also present a public K-selected photometric catalog, along with accurate photometric redshifts. The redshifts are computed with 37 (20) filters in the COSMOS (AEGIS) fields, combining the NIR medium-bandwidth data with existing UV (Galaxy Evolution Explorer), visible and NIR (Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and Subaru Telescope), and mid-IR (Spitzer/IRAC) imaging. We find excellent agreement with publicly available spectroscopic redshifts, with {sigma}{sub z}/(1 + z) {approx} 1%-2% for {approx}4000 galaxies at z = 0-3. The NMBS catalogs contain {approx}13,000 galaxies at z > 1.5 with accurate photometric redshifts and rest-frame colors. Due to the increased spectral resolution obtained with the five NIR medium-band filters, the median 68% confidence intervals of the photometric redshifts of both quiescent and star-forming galaxies are a factor of about two times smaller when comparing catalogs with medium-band NIR photometry to NIR broadband photometry. We show evidence for a clear bimodal color distribution between quiescent and star-forming galaxies that persists to z {approx} 3, a higher redshift than has been probed so far.

  15. PHOTOMETRIC ESTIMATES OF REDSHIFTS AND DISTANCE MODULI FOR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, Richard; Frieman, Joshua A.; Cinabro, David; Bassett, Bruce; Smith, Mathew; Dilday, Benjamin; Jha, Saurabh; Garnavich, Peter M.; Marriner, John; Nichol, Robert C.; Sako, Masao; Bernstein, Joseph P.; Kuhlmann, Stephen; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Goobar, Ariel; Schneider, Donald P.; Stritzinger, Maximilian

    2010-07-01

    Large planned photometric surveys will discover hundreds of thousands of supernovae (SNe), outstripping the resources available for spectroscopic follow-up and necessitating the development of purely photometric methods to exploit these events for cosmological study. We present a light curve fitting technique for type Ia supernova (SN Ia) photometric redshift (photo-z) estimation in which the redshift is determined simultaneously with the other fit parameters. We implement this 'LCFIT+Z' technique within the frameworks of the MLCS2K2 and SALTII light curve fit methods and determine the precision on the redshift and distance modulus. This method is applied to a spectroscopically confirmed sample of 296 SNe Ia from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) SN Survey and 37 publicly available SNe Ia from the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). We have also applied the method to a large suite of realistic simulated light curves for existing and planned surveys, including the SDSS, SNLS, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. When intrinsic SN color fluctuations are included, the photo-z precision for the simulation is consistent with that in the data. Finally, we compare the LCFIT+Z photo-z precision with previous results using color-based SN photo-z estimates.

  16. Photometric redshifts with the quasi Newton algorithm (MLPQNA) Results in the PHAT1 contest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavuoti, S.; Brescia, M.; Longo, G.; Mercurio, A.

    2012-10-01

    Context. Since the advent of modern multiband digital sky surveys, photometric redshifts (photo-z's) have become relevant if not crucial to many fields of observational cosmology, such as the characterization of cosmic structures and the weak and strong lensing. Aims: We describe an application to an astrophysical context, namely the evaluation of photometric redshifts, of MLPQNA, which is a machine-learning method based on the quasi Newton algorithm. Methods: Theoretical methods for photo-z evaluation are based on the interpolation of a priori knowledge (spectroscopic redshifts or SED templates), and they represent an ideal comparison ground for neural network-based methods. The MultiLayer Perceptron with quasi Newton learning rule (MLPQNA) described here is an effective computing implementation of neural networks exploited for the first time to solve regression problems in the astrophysical context. It is offered to the community through the DAMEWARE (DAta Mining & Exploration Web Application REsource) infrastructure. Results: The PHAT contest (Hildebrandt et al. 2010, A&A, 523, A31) provides a standard dataset to test old and new methods for photometric redshift evaluation and with a set of statistical indicators that allow a straightforward comparison among different methods. The MLPQNA model has been applied on the whole PHAT1 dataset of 1984 objects after an optimization of the model performed with the 515 available spectroscopic redshifts as training set. When applied to the PHAT1 dataset, MLPQNA obtains the best bias accuracy (0.0006) and very competitive accuracies in terms of scatter (0.056) and outlier percentage (16.3%), scoring as the second most effective empirical method among those that have so far participated in the contest. MLPQNA shows better generalization capabilities than most other empirical methods especially in the presence of underpopulated regions of the knowledge base.

  17. The effect of binary stars on photometric redshift for galaxies at z ~ 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Liu, Jinzhong

    2016-02-01

    Evolutionary population synthesis (EPS) models play an important role in many studies on the formation and evolution of galaxy. The poorly calibration for some stellar evolution stages in EPS models can lead to uncertainty of the parameter determinations for galaxies. By means of the HyperZ code and a set of theoretical galaxy template, which are built on the EPS models with and without binary interactions, we present photometric redshift (photo-z) estimates for passive galaxy sample at redshift z ~ 2.0. The passive galaxy sample is selected from Fang et al., and they also provide the redshift for these passive galaxies. By comparing the photo-z determined from EPS models with and without binary interactions, we find that the binary interactions have little effect in the photo-z determinations.

  18. SDSS-IV: The Clustering of eBOSS LRGs using photometric redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Abhishek; SDSS-IV/eBOSS

    2016-01-01

    SDSS-IV/eBOSS is producing an exciting data set for cosmology which will add to our understanding of the large-scale structure of the Universe. The Luminous Red Galaxy (LRG) component of this survey will cover a redshift regime barely explored by SDSS-III/BOSS and will allow a ˜1% measurement of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) scale and a 4.0% Redshift Space Distortion (RSD) measurement using a relatively uniform set of luminous, early-type galaxies in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 1. We briefly review a new technique of selecting high-z LRGs utilizing SDSS and WISE (infrared) photometry in combination. These galaxies are old, elliptical systems with strong 4000 °A breaks. Old stellar populations exhibit a global maximum in their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) at a wavelength of 1.6 μm, commonly referred to as the '1.6 μm bump'. Since LRGs possess very few young stars, this feature generally dominates their overall SEDs which makes them extremely bright in infrared. SDSS-IV/eBOSS LRGs range from redshift z = 0.6 to 1.0 over 10,000 square degrees of the sky. Here we briefly present the results of the 3D real space clustering power spectrum of a sample of 600,000 luminous red galaxies (LRGs) measured by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), using photometric redshifts. Although spectroscopic redshifts provide stronger constraints on large scale measurements, these results demonstrate the ability to make precise clustering measurements with photometric surveys.

  19. Analytic photometric redshift estimator for Type Ia supernovae from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun; Gjergo, E.; Kuhlmann, S.

    2015-08-01

    Accurate and precise photometric redshifts (photo-zs) of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) can enable the use of SNe Ia, measured only with photometry, to probe cosmology. This dramatically increases the science return of supernova surveys planned for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). In this paper we describe a significantly improved version of the simple analytic photo-z estimator proposed by Wang and further developed by Wang, Narayan & Wood-Vasey. We apply it to 55 422 simulated SNe Ia generated using the SNANA package with the LSST filters. We find that the estimated errors on the photo-zs, σ _{z_phot}/(1+z_phot), can be used as filters to produce a set of photo-zs that have high precision, accuracy, and purity. Using SN Ia colours as well as SN Ia peak magnitude in the i band, we obtain a set of photo-zs with 2 per cent accuracy (with σ(zphot - zspec)/(1 + zspec) = 0.02), a bias in zphot (the mean of zphot - zspec) of -9 × 10-5, and an outlier fraction (with |(zphot - zspec)/(1 + zspec)| > 0.1) of 0.23 per cent, with the requirement that σ _{z_phot}/(1+z_phot)<0.01. Using the SN Ia colours only, we obtain a set of photo-zs with similar quality by requiring that σ _{z_phot}/(1+z_phot)<0.007; this leads to a set of photo-zs with 2 per cent accuracy, a bias in zphot of 5.9 × 10-4, and an outlier fraction of 0.32 per cent.

  20. ANNz2 - Photometric redshift and probability density function estimation using machine-learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeh, Iftach

    2014-05-01

    Large photometric galaxy surveys allow the study of questions at the forefront of science, such as the nature of dark energy. The success of such surveys depends on the ability to measure the photometric redshifts of objects (photo-zs), based on limited spectral data. A new major version of the public photo-z estimation software, ANNz , is presented here. The new code incorporates several machine-learning methods, such as artificial neural networks and boosted decision/regression trees, which are all used in concert. The objective of the algorithm is to dynamically optimize the performance of the photo-z estimation, and to properly derive the associated uncertainties. In addition to single-value solutions, the new code also generates full probability density functions in two independent ways.

  1. Photometric redshifts as a tool for studying the Coma cluster galaxy populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, C.; Ilbert, O.; Pelló, R.; Cuillandre, J. C.; Durret, F.; Mazure, A.; Picat, J. P.; Ulmer, M. P.

    2008-12-01

    Aims: We apply photometric redshift techniques to an investigation of the Coma cluster galaxy luminosity function (GLF) at faint magnitudes, in particular in the u* band where basically no studies are presently available at these magnitudes. Methods: Cluster members were selected based on probability distribution function from photometric redshift calculations applied to deep u^*, B, V, R, I images covering a region of almost 1 deg2 (completeness limit R ~ 24). In the area covered only by the u* image, the GLF was also derived after a statistical background subtraction. Results: Global and local GLFs in the B, V, R, and I bands obtained with photometric redshift selection are consistent with our previous results based on a statistical background subtraction. The GLF in the u* band shows an increase in the faint end slope towards the outer regions of the cluster. The analysis of the multicolor type spatial distribution reveals that late type galaxies are distributed in clumps in the cluster outskirts, where X-ray substructures are also detected and where the GLF in the u* band is steeper. Conclusions: We can reproduce the GLFs computed with classical statistical subtraction methods by applying a photometric redshift technique. The u* GLF slope is steeper in the cluster outskirts, varying from α ~ -1 in the cluster center to α ~ -2 in the cluster periphery. The concentrations of faint late type galaxies in the cluster outskirts could explain these very steep slopes, assuming a short burst of star formation in these galaxies when entering the cluster. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is also partly based on data products produced at

  2. The first analytical expression to estimate photometric redshifts suggested by a machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krone-Martins, A.; Ishida, E. E. O.; de Souza, R. S.

    2014-09-01

    We report the first analytical expression purely constructed by a machine to determine photometric redshifts (zphot) of galaxies. A simple and reliable functional form is derived using 41 214 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 (SDSS-DR10) spectroscopic sample. The method automatically dropped the u and z bands, relying only on g, r and i for the final solution. Applying this expression to other 1417 181 SDSS-DR10 galaxies, with measured spectroscopic redshifts (zspec), we achieved a mean <(zphot - zspec)/(1 + zspec)> ≲ 0.0086 and a scatter σ(zphot - zspec)/(1 + zspec) ≲ 0.045 when averaged up to z ≲ 1.0. The method was also applied to the PHAT0 data set, confirming the competitiveness of our results when faced with other methods from the literature. This is the first use of symbolic regression in cosmology, representing a leap forward in astronomy-data-mining connection.

  3. Can We Detect the Color–Density Relation with Photometric Redshifts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chuan-Chin; Lin, Lihwai; Jian, Hung-Yu; Chiueh, Tzi-Hong; Merson, Alex; Baugh, Carlton M.; Foucaud, Sebastien; Chen, Chin-Wei; Chen, Wen-Ping

    2016-07-01

    A variety of methods have been proposed to define and to quantify galaxy environments. While these techniques work well in general with spectroscopic redshift samples, their application to photometric redshift surveys remains uncertain. To investigate whether galaxy environments can be robustly measured with photo-z samples, we quantify how the density measured with the nearest-neighbor approach is affected by photo-z uncertainties by using the Durham mock galaxy catalogs in which the 3D real-space environments and the properties of galaxies are known exactly. Furthermore, we present an optimization scheme in the choice of parameters used in the 2D projected measurements that yield the tightest correlation with respect to the 3D real-space environments. By adopting the optimized parameters in the density measurements, we show that the correlation between the 2D projected optimized density and the real-space density can still be revealed, and the color–density relation is also visible out to z ˜ 0.8 even for a photo-z uncertainty ({σ }{{{Δ }}z/(1+z)}) up to 0.06. We find that at redshifts 0.3 < z < 0.5 a deep (i ˜ 25) photometric redshift survey with {σ }{{{Δ }}z/(1+z)} = 0.02 yields a performance in small-scale density measurement that is comparable to a shallower i ˜ 22.5 spectroscopic sample with ˜10% sampling rate. Finally, we discuss the application of the local density measurements to the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey (PS-MDS), one of the largest deep optical imaging surveys. Using data from ˜5 square degrees of survey area, our results show that it is possible to measure local density and to probe the color–density relation with 3σ confidence level out to z ˜ 0.8 in the PS-MDS. The color–density relation, however, quickly degrades for data covering smaller areas.

  4. A photometric redshift of z = 6.39 +/- 0.12 for GRB 050904.

    PubMed

    Haislip, J B; Nysewander, M C; Reichart, D E; Levan, A; Tanvir, N; Cenko, S B; Fox, D B; Price, P A; Castro-Tirado, A J; Gorosabel, J; Evans, C R; Figueredo, E; MacLeod, C L; Kirschbrown, J R; Jelinek, M; Guziy, S; de Ugarte Postigo, A; Cypriano, E S; LaCluyze, A; Graham, J; Priddey, R; Chapman, R; Rhoads, J; Fruchter, A S; Lamb, D Q; Kouveliotou, C; Wijers, R A M J; Bayliss, M B; Schmidt, B P; Soderberg, A M; Kulkarni, S R; Harrison, F A; Moon, D S; Gal-Yam, A; Kasliwal, M M; Hudec, R; Vitek, S; Kubanek, P; Crain, J A; Foster, A C; Clemens, J C; Bartelme, J W; Canterna, R; Hartmann, D H; Henden, A A; Klose, S; Park, H-S; Williams, G G; Rol, E; O'Brien, P; Bersier, D; Prada, F; Pizarro, S; Maturana, D; Ugarte, P; Alvarez, A; Fernandez, A J M; Jarvis, M J; Moles, M; Alfaro, E; Ivarsen, K M; Kumar, N D; Mack, C E; Zdarowicz, C M; Gehrels, N; Barthelmy, S; Burrows, D N

    2006-03-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and their afterglows are the most brilliant transient events in the Universe. Both the bursts themselves and their afterglows have been predicted to be visible out to redshifts of z approximately 20, and therefore to be powerful probes of the early Universe. The burst GRB 000131, at z = 4.50, was hitherto the most distant such event identified. Here we report the discovery of the bright near-infrared afterglow of GRB 050904 (ref. 4). From our measurements of the near-infrared afterglow, and our failure to detect the optical afterglow, we determine the photometric redshift of the burst to be z = 6.39 - 0.12 + 0.11 (refs 5-7). Subsequently, it was measured spectroscopically to be z = 6.29 +/- 0.01, in agreement with our photometric estimate. These results demonstrate that GRBs can be used to trace the star formation, metallicity, and reionization histories of the early Universe. PMID:16525465

  5. Galaxy Clustering, Photometric Redshifts and Diagnosis of Systematics in the DES Science Verification Data

    SciTech Connect

    Crocce, M.

    2015-12-09

    We study the clustering of galaxies detected at i < 22.5 in the Science Verification observations of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Two-point correlation functions are measured using 2.3 × 106 galaxies over a contiguous 116 deg2 region in five bins of photometric redshift width Δz = 0.2 in the range 0.2 < z < 1.2. The impact of photometric redshift errors is assessed by comparing results using a template-based photo-zalgorithm (BPZ) to a machine-learning algorithm (TPZ). A companion paper presents maps of several observational variables (e.g. seeing, sky brightness) which could modulate the galaxy density. Here we characterize and mitigate systematic errors on the measured clustering which arise from these observational variables, in addition to others such as Galactic dust and stellar contamination. After correcting for systematic effects, we then measure galaxy bias over a broad range of linear scales relative to mass clustering predicted from the Planck Λ cold dark matter model, finding agreement with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) measurements with χ2 of 4.0 (8.7) with 5 degrees of freedom for the TPZ (BPZ) redshifts. Furthermore, we test a ‘linear bias’ model, in which the galaxy clustering is a fixed multiple of the predicted non-linear dark matter clustering. The precision of the data allows us to determine that the linear bias model describes the observed galaxy clustering to 2.5 percent accuracy down to scales at least 4–10 times smaller than those on which linear theory is expected to be sufficient.

  6. Galaxy clustering, photometric redshifts and diagnosis of systematics in the DES Science Verification data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocce, M.; Carretero, J.; Bauer, A. H.; Ross, A. J.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Giannantonio, T.; Sobreira, F.; Sanchez, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Kind, M. Carrasco; Sánchez, C.; Bonnett, C.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Brunner, R. J.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Cawthon, R.; Fosalba, P.; Hartley, W.; Kim, E. J.; Leistedt, B.; Miquel, R.; Peiris, H. V.; Percival, W. J.; Rosenfeld, R.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sánchez, E.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Banerji, M.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Castander, F. J.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Neto, A. Fausti; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Sako, M.; Santiago, B.; Schubnell, M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.; Zuntz, J.; DES Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    We study the clustering of galaxies detected at i < 22.5 in the Science Verification observations of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Two-point correlation functions are measured using 2.3 × 106 galaxies over a contiguous 116 deg2 region in five bins of photometric redshift width Δz = 0.2 in the range 0.2 < z < 1.2. The impact of photometric redshift errors is assessed by comparing results using a template-based photo-z algorithm (BPZ) to a machine-learning algorithm (TPZ). A companion paper presents maps of several observational variables (e.g. seeing, sky brightness) which could modulate the galaxy density. Here we characterize and mitigate systematic errors on the measured clustering which arise from these observational variables, in addition to others such as Galactic dust and stellar contamination. After correcting for systematic effects, we measure galaxy bias over a broad range of linear scales relative to mass clustering predicted from the Planck Λ cold dark matter model, finding agreement with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) measurements with χ2 of 4.0 (8.7) with 5 degrees of freedom for the TPZ (BPZ) redshifts. We test a `linear bias' model, in which the galaxy clustering is a fixed multiple of the predicted non-linear dark matter clustering. The precision of the data allows us to determine that the linear bias model describes the observed galaxy clustering to 2.5 per cent accuracy down to scales at least 4-10 times smaller than those on which linear theory is expected to be sufficient.

  7. Galaxy Clustering, Photometric Redshifts and Diagnosis of Systematics in the DES Science Verification Data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Crocce, M.

    2015-12-09

    We study the clustering of galaxies detected at i < 22.5 in the Science Verification observations of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Two-point correlation functions are measured using 2.3 × 106 galaxies over a contiguous 116 deg2 region in five bins of photometric redshift width Δz = 0.2 in the range 0.2 < z < 1.2. The impact of photometric redshift errors is assessed by comparing results using a template-based photo-zalgorithm (BPZ) to a machine-learning algorithm (TPZ). A companion paper presents maps of several observational variables (e.g. seeing, sky brightness) which could modulate the galaxy density. Here we characterize andmore » mitigate systematic errors on the measured clustering which arise from these observational variables, in addition to others such as Galactic dust and stellar contamination. After correcting for systematic effects, we then measure galaxy bias over a broad range of linear scales relative to mass clustering predicted from the Planck Λ cold dark matter model, finding agreement with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) measurements with χ2 of 4.0 (8.7) with 5 degrees of freedom for the TPZ (BPZ) redshifts. Furthermore, we test a ‘linear bias’ model, in which the galaxy clustering is a fixed multiple of the predicted non-linear dark matter clustering. The precision of the data allows us to determine that the linear bias model describes the observed galaxy clustering to 2.5 percent accuracy down to scales at least 4–10 times smaller than those on which linear theory is expected to be sufficient.« less

  8. Photometric Redshift Survey Forecast for Luminous Red Galaxies at z 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaosheng; Schlegel, D. J.

    2006-12-01

    We analyzed the data from the DEEP2 Redshift Survey to obtain the number densities for luminous red galaxies between z=0.4 and 1.2. Based on the DEEP photometric data in B, R and I bands and the spectroscopic redshift we synthesized spectrophotometry for the 4000 DEEP galaxies in the extended groth strip (EGS) field, using templates from the Kinney-Calzetti catalog and Coleman, Wu and Weedman. We determined the number densities in the redshift ranges of 0.4

  9. The Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC): Deep Medium-band Optical Imaging and High-quality 32-band Photometric Redshifts in the ECDF-S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardamone, Carolin N.; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Urry, C. Megan; Taniguchi, Yoshi; Gawiser, Eric; Brammer, Gabriel; Taylor, Edward; Damen, Maaike; Treister, Ezequiel; Cobb, Bethany E.; Bond, Nicholas; Schawinski, Kevin; Lira, Paulina; Murayama, Takashi; Saito, Tomoki; Sumikawa, Kentaro

    2010-08-01

    We present deep optical 18-medium-band photometry from the Subaru telescope over the ~30' × 30' Extended Chandra Deep Field-South, as part of the Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC). This field has a wealth of ground- and space-based ancillary data, and contains the GOODS-South field and the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. We combine the Subaru imaging with existing UBVRIzJHK and Spitzer IRAC images to create a uniform catalog. Detecting sources in the MUSYC "BVR" image we find ~40,000 galaxies with R AB < 25.3, the median 5σ limit of the 18 medium bands. Photometric redshifts are determined using the EAzY code and compared to ~2000 spectroscopic redshifts in this field. The medium-band filters provide very accurate redshifts for the (bright) subset of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts, particularly at 0.1 < z < 1.2 and at z >~ 3.5. For 0.1 < z < 1.2, we find a 1σ scatter in Δz/(1 + z) of 0.007, similar to results obtained with a similar filter set in the COSMOS field. As a demonstration of the data quality, we show that the red sequence and blue cloud can be cleanly identified in rest-frame color-magnitude diagrams at 0.1 < z < 1.2. We find that ~20% of the red sequence galaxies show evidence of dust emission at longer rest-frame wavelengths. The reduced images, photometric catalog, and photometric redshifts are provided through the public MUSYC Web site. Based (in part) on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  10. THE MULTIWAVELENGTH SURVEY BY YALE-CHILE (MUSYC): DEEP MEDIUM-BAND OPTICAL IMAGING AND HIGH-QUALITY 32-BAND PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS IN THE ECDF-S

    SciTech Connect

    Cardamone, Carolin N.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Urry, C. Megan; Brammer, Gabriel; Taniguchi, Yoshi; Gawiser, Eric; Bond, Nicholas; Taylor, Edward; Damen, Maaike; Treister, Ezequiel; Cobb, Bethany E.; Schawinski, Kevin; Lira, Paulina; Murayama, Takashi; Saito, Tomoki; Sumikawa, Kentaro

    2010-08-15

    We present deep optical 18-medium-band photometry from the Subaru telescope over the {approx}30' x 30' Extended Chandra Deep Field-South, as part of the Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC). This field has a wealth of ground- and space-based ancillary data, and contains the GOODS-South field and the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. We combine the Subaru imaging with existing UBVRIzJHK and Spitzer IRAC images to create a uniform catalog. Detecting sources in the MUSYC 'BVR' image we find {approx}40,000 galaxies with R {sub AB} < 25.3, the median 5{sigma} limit of the 18 medium bands. Photometric redshifts are determined using the EAzY code and compared to {approx}2000 spectroscopic redshifts in this field. The medium-band filters provide very accurate redshifts for the (bright) subset of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts, particularly at 0.1 < z < 1.2 and at z {approx}> 3.5. For 0.1 < z < 1.2, we find a 1{sigma} scatter in {Delta}z/(1 + z) of 0.007, similar to results obtained with a similar filter set in the COSMOS field. As a demonstration of the data quality, we show that the red sequence and blue cloud can be cleanly identified in rest-frame color-magnitude diagrams at 0.1 < z < 1.2. We find that {approx}20% of the red sequence galaxies show evidence of dust emission at longer rest-frame wavelengths. The reduced images, photometric catalog, and photometric redshifts are provided through the public MUSYC Web site.

  11. New Approaches to Photometric Redshift Prediction Via Gaussian Process Regression in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, M. J.; Foster, L. V.; Gazis, P. R.; Srivastava, A. N.

    2009-11-01

    Expanding upon the work of Way & Srivastava we demonstrate how the use of training sets of comparable size continue to make Gaussian process regression (GPR) a competitive approach to that of neural networks and other least-squares fitting methods. This is possible via new large-size matrix inversion techniques developed for Gaussian processes (GPs) that do not require that the kernel matrix be sparse. This development, combined with a neural-network kernel function appears to give superior results for this problem. Our best-fit results for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Main Galaxy Sample using u, g, r, i, z filters gives an rms error of 0.0201 while our results for the same filters in the luminous red galaxy sample yield 0.0220. We also demonstrate that there appears to be a minimum number of training-set galaxies needed to obtain the optimal fit when using our GPR rank-reduction methods. We find that morphological information included with many photometric surveys appears, for the most part, to make the photometric redshift evaluation slightly worse rather than better. This would indicate that most morphological information simply adds noise from the GP point of view in the data used herein. In addition, we show that cross-match catalog results involving combinations of the Two Micron All Sky Survey, SDSS, and Galaxy Evolution Explorer have to be evaluated in the context of the resulting cross-match magnitude and redshift distribution. Otherwise one may be misled into overly optimistic conclusions.

  12. Sparse representation of photometric redshift probability density functions: preparing for petascale astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco Kind, Matias; Brunner, Robert J.

    2014-07-01

    One of the consequences of entering the era of precision cosmology is the widespread adoption of photometric redshift probability density functions (PDFs). Both current and future photometric surveys are expected to obtain images of billions of distinct galaxies. As a result, storing and analysing all of these PDFs will be non-trivial and even more severe if a survey plans to compute and store multiple different PDFs. In this paper we propose the use of a sparse basis representation to fully represent individual photo-z PDFs. By using an orthogonal matching pursuit algorithm and a combination of Gaussian and Voigt basis functions, we demonstrate how our approach is superior to a multi-Gaussian fitting, as we require approximately half of the parameters for the same fitting accuracy with the additional advantage that an entire PDF can be stored by using a 4-byte integer per basis function, and we can achieve better accuracy by increasing the number of bases. By using data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey, we demonstrate that only 10-20 points per galaxy are sufficient to reconstruct both the individual PDFs and the ensemble redshift distribution, N(z), to an accuracy of 99.9 per cent when compared to the one built using the original PDFs computed with a resolution of δz = 0.01, reducing the required storage of 200 original values by a factor of 10-20. Finally, we demonstrate how this basis representation can be directly extended to a cosmological analysis, thereby increasing computational performance without losing resolution nor accuracy.

  13. ESTIMATING PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS OF QUASARS VIA THE k-NEAREST NEIGHBOR APPROACH BASED ON LARGE SURVEY DATABASES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yanxia; Ma He; Peng Nanbo; Zhao Yongheng; Wu Xuebing

    2013-08-01

    We apply one of the lazy learning methods, the k-nearest neighbor (kNN) algorithm, to estimate the photometric redshifts of quasars based on various data sets from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE; the SDSS sample, the SDSS-UKIDSS sample, the SDSS-WISE sample, and the SDSS-UKIDSS-WISE sample). The influence of the k value and different input patterns on the performance of kNN is discussed. kNN performs best when k is different with a special input pattern for a special data set. The best result belongs to the SDSS-UKIDSS-WISE sample. The experimental results generally show that the more information from more bands, the better performance of photometric redshift estimation with kNN. The results also demonstrate that kNN using multiband data can effectively solve the catastrophic failure of photometric redshift estimation, which is met by many machine learning methods. Compared with the performance of various other methods of estimating the photometric redshifts of quasars, kNN based on KD-Tree shows superiority, exhibiting the best accuracy.

  14. CANDELS/GOODS-S, CDFS, and ECDFS: Photometric Redshifts for Normal and X-Ray-Detected Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Li-Ting; Salvato, Mara; Nandra, Kirpal; Brusa, Marcella; Bender, Ralf; Buchner, Johannes; Donley, Jennifer L.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Guo, Yicheng; Hathi, Nimish P.; Rangel, Cyprian; Willner, S. P.; Brightman, Murray; Georgakakis, Antonis; Budavári, Tamás; Szalay, Alexander S.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Barro, Guillermo; Dahlen, Tomas; Faber, Sandra M.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Galametz, Audrey; Grazian, Andrea; Grogin, Norman A.; Huang, Kuang-Han; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Lucas, Ray A.; McGrath, Elizabeth; Mobasher, Bahram; Peth, Michael; Rosario, David J.; Trump, Jonathan R.

    2014-11-01

    We present photometric redshifts and associated probability distributions for all detected sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS). This work makes use of the most up-to-date data from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and the Taiwan ECDFS Near-Infrared Survey (TENIS) in addition to other data. We also revisit multi-wavelength counterparts for published X-ray sources from the 4 Ms CDFS and 250 ks ECDFS surveys, finding reliable counterparts for 1207 out of 1259 sources (~96%). Data used for photometric redshifts include intermediate-band photometry deblended using the TFIT method, which is used for the first time in this work. Photometric redshifts for X-ray source counterparts are based on a new library of active galactic nuclei/galaxy hybrid templates appropriate for the faint X-ray population in the CDFS. Photometric redshift accuracy for normal galaxies is 0.010 and for X-ray sources is 0.014 and outlier fractions are 4% and 5.2%, respectively. The results within the CANDELS coverage area are even better, as demonstrated both by spectroscopic comparison and by galaxy-pair statistics. Intermediate-band photometry, even if shallow, is valuable when combined with deep broadband photometry. For best accuracy, templates must include emission lines.

  15. CANDELS/GOODS-S, CDFS, and ECDFS: photometric redshifts for normal and X-ray-detected galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Li-Ting; Salvato, Mara; Nandra, Kirpal; Brusa, Marcella; Bender, Ralf; Buchner, Johannes; Brightman, Murray; Georgakakis, Antonis; Donley, Jennifer L.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Guo, Yicheng; Barro, Guillermo; Faber, Sandra M.; Rangel, Cyprian; Willner, S. P.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Budavári, Tamás; Szalay, Alexander S.; Dahlen, Tomas; and others

    2014-11-20

    We present photometric redshifts and associated probability distributions for all detected sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS). This work makes use of the most up-to-date data from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and the Taiwan ECDFS Near-Infrared Survey (TENIS) in addition to other data. We also revisit multi-wavelength counterparts for published X-ray sources from the 4 Ms CDFS and 250 ks ECDFS surveys, finding reliable counterparts for 1207 out of 1259 sources (∼96%). Data used for photometric redshifts include intermediate-band photometry deblended using the TFIT method, which is used for the first time in this work. Photometric redshifts for X-ray source counterparts are based on a new library of active galactic nuclei/galaxy hybrid templates appropriate for the faint X-ray population in the CDFS. Photometric redshift accuracy for normal galaxies is 0.010 and for X-ray sources is 0.014 and outlier fractions are 4% and 5.2%, respectively. The results within the CANDELS coverage area are even better, as demonstrated both by spectroscopic comparison and by galaxy-pair statistics. Intermediate-band photometry, even if shallow, is valuable when combined with deep broadband photometry. For best accuracy, templates must include emission lines.

  16. THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY CO-ADD: A GALAXY PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, Ribamar R. R.; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Annis, James; Dodelson, Scott; Hao Jiangang; Johnston, David; Kubo, Jeffrey; Lin Huan; Seo, Hee-Jong; Simet, Melanie

    2012-03-01

    We present and describe a catalog of galaxy photometric redshifts (photo-z) for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Co-add Data. We use the artificial neural network (ANN) technique to calculate the photo-z and the nearest neighbor error method to estimate photo-z errors for {approx}13 million objects classified as galaxies in the co-add with r < 24.5. The photo-z and photo-z error estimators are trained and validated on a sample of {approx}83,000 galaxies that have SDSS photometry and spectroscopic redshifts measured by the SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7), the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology Field Galaxy Survey, the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe Data Release 3, the VIsible imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph-Very Large Telescope Deep Survey, and the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. For the best ANN methods we have tried, we find that 68% of the galaxies in the validation set have a photo-z error smaller than {sigma}{sub 68} = 0.031. After presenting our results and quality tests, we provide a short guide for users accessing the public data.

  17. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS AND SYSTEMATIC VARIATIONS IN THE SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF LUMINOUS RED GALAXIES FROM SDSS DR7

    SciTech Connect

    Greisel, N.; Seitz, S.; Bender, R.; Saglia, R. P.; Snigula, J.; Drory, N.

    2013-05-10

    We describe the construction of a template set of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for the estimation of photometric redshifts of luminous red galaxies (LRGs) with a Bayesian template fitting method. By examining the color properties of several publicly available SED sets within a redshift range of 0 < z {approx}< 0.5 and comparing them to Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 data, we show that only some of the investigated SEDs approximately match the colors of the LRG data throughout the redshift range, however not at the quantitative level required for precise photometric redshifts. This is because the SEDs of galaxies evolve with time (and redshift) and because at fixed redshift the LRG colors have an intrinsic spread such that they cannot be matched by one SED only. We generate new SEDs by superposing model SEDs of composite stellar populations with a burst model, allowing both components to be reddened by dust, in order to match the data in five different redshift bins. We select a set of SEDs which represents the LRG data in color space within five redshift bins, thus defining our new SED template set for photometric redshift estimates. The results we obtain with the new template set and our Bayesian template fitting photometric redshift code (PhotoZ) are nearly unbiased, with a scatter of {sigma}{sub {Delta}z} = 0.027 (including outliers), a fraction of catastrophic outliers (|z{sub phot} - z{sub spec}|/(1 + z{sub spec}) > 0.15) of {eta} = 0.12%, and a normalized median absolute rest frame deviation (NMAD) of {sigma}{sub NMAD} = 1.48 Multiplication-Sign MAD = 0.017 for non-outliers. We show that templates that optimally describe the brightest galaxies (-24.5 {<=} M{sub R} {<=} -22.7) indeed vary from z = 0.1 to z = 0.5, consistent with aging of the stellar population. Furthermore, we find that templates that optimally describe galaxies at z < 0.1 strongly differ as a function of the absolute magnitude of the galaxies, indicating an increase in

  18. BL Lacertae Objects Beyond Redshift 1.3 - UV-to-NIR Photometry and Photometric Redshift for Fermi/LAT Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rau, A.; Schady, P.; Greiner, J.; Salvato, M.; Ajello, M.; Bottacini, E.; Gehrels, N.; Afonso, P. M. J.; Elliott, J.; Filgas, R.; Kann, D. A.; Klose, S.; Kruehler, T.; Nardini, M.; Guelbenzu, A. Nicuesa; OlivaresE, F.; Rossi, A.; Sudilovsky. V.; Updike, A. C.; Hartmann, D. H.

    2011-01-01

    Context. Observations of the gamma-ray sky with Fermi led to significant advances towards understanding blazars, the most extreme class of Active Galactic Nuclei. A large fraction of the population detected by Fermi is formed by BL Lacertae (BL Lac) objects, whose sample has always suffered from a severe redshift incompleteness due to the quasi-featureless optical spectra. Aims. Our goal is to provide a significant increase of the number of confirmed high-redshift BL Lac objects contained in the 2 LAC Fermi/LAT catalog. Methods. For 103 Fermi/LAT blazars, photometric redshifts using spectral energy distribution fitting have been obtained. The photometry includes 13 broad-band filters from the far ultraviolet to the near-IR observed with Swift/UVOT and the multi-channel imager GROND at the MPG/ESO 2.2m telescope. Data have been taken quasi-simultaneously and the remaining source-intrinsic variability has been corrected for. Results. We release the UV-to-near-IR 13-band photometry for all 103 sources and provide redshift constraints for 75 sources without previously known redshift. Out of those, eight have reliable photometric redshifts at z > or approx. 1.3, while for the other 67 sources we provide upper limits. Six of the former eight are BL Lac objects, which quadruples the sample of confirmed high-redshift BL Lac. This includes three sources with redshifts higher than the previous record for BL Lac, including CRATES J0402-2615, with the best-fit solution at z approx. = 1.9.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Revised SWIRE photometric redshifts (Rowan-Robinson+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan-Robinson, M.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Vaccari, M.; Marchetti, L.

    2013-11-01

    The revised SWIRE photometric redshift catalogues for the Lockman, EN1, EN2 and XMM-LSS areas (plus original catalogues for ES1, CDFS, VVDS and SXDS areas). There are 1009607 lines of data (EN1: 204421, EN2: 116195, Lock: 217461, XMM-LSS: 280478, CDFS: 149766, ES1: 41757) The methodology is based on Rowan-Robinson et al. (2008MNRAS.386..697R). The main change here is the incorporation of SDSS and UKIDSS data into the solution. The details of how this was done will be reported in Rowan-Robinson et al. (2013MNRAS.428.1958R) but the main features are: (1) WFC data treated as in RR08 (Cat. II/290), but revised WFS data of Gonzalez-Solares et al. (2011MNRAS.416..927G) used for EN1, EN2, Lockman. New Megacam data used for XMM-LSS. (2) SDSS model magnitudes used, aperture corrected by forcing r-band magnitude to be same as r-WFC. (3) 2MASS point-source magnitudes used if available, aperture corrected by using a multiple (0.8) of the WFC r-band aperture correction. If not, UKIDSS point-source magnitudes used, aperture corrected by using a multiple (1.1) of the WFC r-band aperture correction. (4) IRAC fluxes are aperture corrected as in Rowan-Robinson et al. (2008MNRAS.386..697R). (5) Lockman data are from 2008 reduction, with requirement that S(3.6)>7.5μJy. (6) SXDS sources with new Megacam data are reanalyzed using Subaru+Megacam data (40553 sources). The remainder (13655 sources) are from the 2008 reduction. New spectroscopic redshifts from Chris Simpson (2012 in prep) are incorporated. (7) For quasars we have added AGN dust torus templates to our 3 QSO templates, with amplitudes corresponding to Ltor/Lopt = 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, and used 1.25-8.0μm data in the redshift solution. This improves the outlier rejection (see the paper for details). (8) Although the redshifts have not changed greatly from the 2008 catalogue, it was necessary to rerun the infrared template fitting in order to register the correct infrared luminosity, ir sed type and derived quantities

  20. The DAFT/FADA survey. I.Photometric redshifts along lines of sight to clusters in the z=[0.4,0.9] interval

    SciTech Connect

    Guennou, L.; Adami, C.; Ulmer, M.P.; LeBrun, V.; Durret, F.; Johnston, D.; Ilbert, O.; Clowe, D.; Gavazzi, R.; Murphy, K.; Schrabback, T.; /Leiden Observ. /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    As a contribution to the understanding of the dark energy concept, the Dark energy American French Team (DAFT, in French FADA) has started a large project to characterize statistically high redshift galaxy clusters, infer cosmological constraints from Weak Lensing Tomography, and understand biases relevant for constraining dark energy and cluster physics in future cluster and cosmological experiments. Aims. The purpose of this paper is to establish the basis of reference for the photo-z determination used in all our subsequent papers, including weak lensing tomography studies. This project is based on a sample of 91 high redshift (z {ge} 0.4), massive ({approx}> 3 x 10{sup 14} M{sub {circle_dot}}) clusters with existing HST imaging, for which we are presently performing complementary multi-wavelength imaging. This allows us in particular to estimate spectral types and determine accurate photometric redshifts for galaxies along the lines of sight to the first ten clusters for which all the required data are available down to a limit of I{sub AB} = 24./24.5 with the LePhare software. The accuracy in redshift is of the order of 0.05 for the range 0.2 {le} z {le} 1.5. We verified that the technique applied to obtain photometric redshifts works well by comparing our results to with previous works. In clusters, photo-z accuracy is degraded for bright absolute magnitudes and for the latest and earliest type galaxies. The photo-z accuracy also only slightly varies as a function of the spectral type for field galaxies. As a consequence, we find evidence for an environmental dependence of the photo-z accuracy, interpreted as the standard used Spectral Energy Distributions being not very well suited to cluster galaxies. Finally, we modeled the LCDCS 0504 mass with the strong arcs detected along this line of sight.

  1. Two Micron All Sky Survey Photometric Redshift Catalog: A Comprehensive Three-dimensional Census of the Whole Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilicki, Maciej; Jarrett, Thomas H.; Peacock, John A.; Cluver, Michelle E.; Steward, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Key cosmological applications require the three-dimensional (3D) galaxy distribution on the entire celestial sphere. These include measuring the gravitational pull on the Local Group, estimating the large-scale bulk flow, and testing the Copernican principle. However, the largest all-sky redshift surveys—the 2MASS Redshift Survey and IRAS Point Source Catalog Redshift Survey—have median redshifts of only z = 0.03 and sample the very local universe. All-sky galaxy catalogs exist that reach much deeper—SuperCOSMOS in the optical, the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) in the near-IR, and WISE in the mid-IR—but these lack complete redshift information. At present, the only rapid way toward larger 3D catalogs covering the whole sky is through photometric redshift techniques. In this paper we present the 2MASS Photometric Redshift catalog (2MPZ) containing one million galaxies, constructed by cross-matching Two Micron All Sky Survey Extended Source Catalog (2MASS XSC), WISE, and SuperCOSMOS all-sky samples and employing the artificial neural network approach (the ANNz algorithm), trained on such redshift surveys as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, 6dFGS, and 2dFGRS. The derived photometric redshifts have errors nearly independent of distance, with an all-sky accuracy of σ z = 0.015 and a very small percentage of outliers. In this way, we obtain redshift estimates with a typical precision of 12% for all the 2MASS XSC galaxies that lack spectroscopy. In addition, we have made an early effort toward probing the entire 3D sky beyond 2MASS, by pairing up WISE with SuperCOSMOS and training the ANNz on GAMA redshift data currently reaching to z med ~ 0.2. This has yielded photo-z accuracies comparable to those in the 2MPZ. These all-sky photo-z catalogs, with a median z ~ 0.1 for the 2MPZ, and significantly deeper for future WISE-based samples, will be the largest and most complete of their kind for the foreseeable future.

  2. Apples to apples A2 - I. Realistic galaxy simulated catalogues and photometric redshift predictions for next-generation surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascaso, B.; Mei, S.; Benítez, N.

    2015-11-01

    We present new mock catalogues for two of the largest Stage IV next-generation surveys in the optical and infrared: Large Synoptic Sky Telescope (LSST) and Euclid, based on an N-body simulation+semi-analytical cone with a posterior modification with PHOTREAL. This technique modifies the original photometry by using an empirical library of spectral templates to make it more realistic. The reliability of the catalogues is confirmed by comparing the obtained colour-magnitude relation, the luminosity and mass function and the angular correlation function with those of real data. Consistent comparisons between the expected photometric redshifts for different surveys are also provided. Very deep near-infrared surveys such as Euclid will provide very good performance (Δz/(1 + z) ˜ 0.025-0.053) down to H ˜ 24 AB mag and up to z ˜ 3 depending on the optical observations available from the ground, whereas extremely deep optical surveys such as LSST will obtain an overall lower photometric redshift resolution (Δz/(1 + z) ˜ 0.045) down to i ˜ 27.5 AB mag, being considerably improved (Δz/(1 + z) ˜ 0.035) if we restrict the sample down to i ˜ 24 AB mag. Those numbers can be substantially upgraded by selecting a subsample of galaxies with the best quality photometric redshifts. We finally discuss the impact that these surveys will have for the community in terms of photometric redshift legacy. This is the first of a series of papers where we set a framework for comparability between mock catalogues and observations with a particular focus on cluster surveys. The Euclid and LSST mocks are made publicly available.

  3. Machine-learning-based photometric redshifts for galaxies of the ESO Kilo-Degree Survey data release 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavuoti, S.; Brescia, M.; Tortora, C.; Longo, G.; Napolitano, N. R.; Radovich, M.; Barbera, F. La; Capaccioli, M.; de Jong, J. T. A.; Getman, F.; Grado, A.; Paolillo, M.

    2015-09-01

    We have estimated photometric redshifts (zphot) for more than 1.1 million galaxies of the public European Southern Observatory (ESO) Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) data release 2. KiDS is an optical wide-field imaging survey carried out with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) Survey Telescope (VST) and the OmegaCAM camera, which aims to tackle open questions in cosmology and galaxy evolution, such as the origin of dark energy and the channel of galaxy mass growth. We present a catalogue of photometric redshifts obtained using the Multi-Layer Perceptron with Quasi-Newton Algorithm (MLPQNA) model, provided within the framework of the DAta Mining and Exploration Web Application REsource (DAMEWARE). These photometric redshifts are based on a spectroscopic knowledge base that was obtained by merging spectroscopic data sets from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) data release 2 and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) data release 9. The overall 1σ uncertainty on Δz = (zspec - zphot)/(1 + zspec) is ˜0.03, with a very small average bias of ˜0.001, a normalized median absolute deviation of ˜0.02 and a fraction of catastrophic outliers (|Δz| > 0.15) of ˜0.4 per cent.

  4. The VIPERS Multi-Lambda Survey. I. UV and near-IR observations, multi-colour catalogues, and photometric redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutard, T.; Arnouts, S.; Ilbert, O.; Coupon, J.; Hudelot, P.; Vibert, D.; Comte, V.; Conseil, S.; Davidzon, I.; Guzzo, L.; Llebaria, A.; Martin, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Milliard, B.; Morrison, G.; Schiminovich, D.; Treyer, M.; Van Werbaeke, L.

    2016-05-01

    We present observations collected in the CFHTLS-VIPERS region in the ultraviolet with the GALEX satellite (far- and near-ultraviolet channels) and in the near-infrared with the CFHT/WIRCam camera (Ks band) over an area of 22 and 27 deg2, respectively. The depth of the photometry was optimised to measure the physical properties (e.g., star formation rate, stellar masses) of all the galaxies in the VIPERS spectroscopic survey. The large volume explored by VIPERS will enable a unique investigation of the relationship between the galaxy properties and their environment (density field and cosmic web) at high redshift (0.5 ≤ z ≤ 1.2). In this paper, we present the observations, the data reductions, and the build-up of the multi-colour catalogues. The CFHTLS-T0007 (gri-χ2) images are used as reference to detect and measure the Ks-band photometry, while the T0007 u∗-selected sources are used as priors to perform the GALEX photometry based on a dedicated software (EMphot). Our final sample reaches NUVAB ~ 25 (at 5σ) and KAB ~ 22 (at 3σ). The large spectroscopic sample (~51 000 spectroscopic redshifts) allows us to highlight the robustness of our star/galaxy separation and the reliability of our photometric redshifts with a typical accuracy of σz ≤ 0.04 and a fraction of catastrophic failures η ≤ 2% down to i ~ 23. We present various tests on the Ks-band completeness and photometric redshift accuracy by comparing our results with existing overlapping deep photometric catalogues. Finally, we discuss the BzK sample of passive and active galaxies at high redshift and the evolution of galaxy morphology in the (NUV-r) vs. (r-Ks) diagram at low redshift (z ≤ 0.25) based on the high image quality of the CFHTLS. The catalogue is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/590/A102The images, catalogues, and photometric redshifts for 1.5 million sources (down to NUV

  5. Robust Machine Learning Applied to Astronomical Data Sets. II. Quantifying Photometric Redshifts for Quasars Using Instance-based Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Nicholas M.; Brunner, Robert J.; Myers, Adam D.; Strand, Natalie E.; Alberts, Stacey L.; Tcheng, David; Llorà, Xavier

    2007-07-01

    We apply instance-based machine learning in the form of a k-nearest neighbor algorithm to the task of estimating photometric redshifts for 55,746 objects spectroscopically classified as quasars in the Fifth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We compare the results obtained to those from an empirical color-redshift relation (CZR). In contrast to previously published results using CZRs, we find that the instance-based photometric redshifts are assigned with no regions of catastrophic failure. Remaining outliers are simply scattered about the ideal relation, in a manner similar to the pattern seen in the optical for normal galaxies at redshifts z<~1. The instance-based algorithm is trained on a representative sample of the data and pseudo-blind-tested on the remaining unseen data. The variance between the photometric and spectroscopic redshifts is σ2=0.123+/-0.002 (compared to σ2=0.265+/-0.006 for the CZR), and 54.9%+/-0.7%, 73.3%+/-0.6%, and 80.7%+/-0.3% of the objects are within Δz<0.1, 0.2, and 0.3, respectively. We also match our sample to the Second Data Release of the Galaxy Evolution Explorer legacy data, and the resulting 7642 objects show a further improvement, giving a variance of σ2=0.054+/-0.005, with 70.8%+/-1.2%, 85.8%+/-1.0%, and 90.8%+/-0.7% of objects within Δz<0.1, 0.2, and 0.3. We show that the improvement is indeed due to the extra information provided by GALEX, by training on the same data set using purely SDSS photometry, which has a variance of σ2=0.090+/-0.007. Each set of results represents a realistic standard for application to further data sets for which the spectra are representative.

  6. Photometric Redshifts in the Hawaii-Hubble Deep Field-North (H-HDF-N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, G.; Xue, Y. Q.; Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F. E.; Cui, W.; Kong, X.; Lehmer, B. D.; Wang, J.-X.; Wu, X.-B.; Yuan, F.; Yuan, Y.-F.; Zhou, H. Y.

    2014-12-01

    We derive photometric redshifts (z phot) for sources in the entire (~0.4 deg2) Hawaii-Hubble Deep Field-North (H-HDF-N) field with the EAzY code, based on point-spread-function-matched photometry of 15 broad bands from the ultraviolet (U band) to mid-infrared (IRAC 4.5 μm). Our catalog consists of a total of 131,678 sources. We evaluate the z phot quality by comparing z phot with spectroscopic redshifts (z spec) when available, and find a value of normalized median absolute deviation σNMAD = 0.029 and an outlier fraction of 5.5% (outliers are defined as sources having |zphot - zspec |/(1 + zspec ) > 0.15) for non-X-ray sources. More specifically, we obtain σNMAD = 0.024 with 2.7% outliers for sources brighter than R = 23 mag, σNMAD = 0.035 with 7.4% outliers for sources fainter than R = 23 mag, σNMAD = 0.026 with 3.9% outliers for sources having z < 1, and σNMAD = 0.034 with 9.0% outliers for sources having z > 1. Our z phot quality shows an overall improvement over an earlier z phot work that focused only on the central H-HDF-N area. We also classify each object as a star or galaxy through template spectral energy distribution fitting and complementary morphological parameterization, resulting in 4959 stars and 126,719 galaxies. Furthermore, we match our catalog with the 2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-North main X-ray catalog. For the 462 matched non-stellar X-ray sources (281 having z spec), we improve their z phot quality by adding three additional active galactic nucleus templates, achieving σNMAD = 0.035 and an outlier fraction of 12.5%. We make our catalog publicly available presenting both photometry and z phot, and provide guidance on how to make use of our catalog.

  7. Photometric Redshifts in the Hawaii-Hubble Deep Field-North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang; Xue, Yongquan

    2015-08-01

    We derive photometric redshifts (\\zp) for sources in the entire (˜0.4 deg^2) Hawaii-Hubble Deep Field-North (H-HDF-N) field with the EAzY code, based on point spread function-matched photometry of 15 broad bands from the ultraviolet to mid-infrared (IRAC 4.5um). Our catalog consists of a total of 131,678 sources. We evaluate the \\zp~quality by comparing \\zp~with spectroscopic redshifts (\\zs) when available, and find a value of normalized median absolute deviation \\sigm=0.029 and an outlier fraction of 5.5\\% (outliers are defined as sources having |\\zp - \\zs|/(1+\\zs)>0.15) for non-X-ray sources. More specifically, we obtain \\sigm=0.024 with 2.7\\% outliers for sources brighter than R=23mag, \\sigm=0.035 with 7.4\\% outliers for sources fainter than R=23mag, \\sigm=0.026 with 3.9\\% outliers for sources having z<1, and \\sigm=0.034 with 9.0\\% outliers for sources having z>1. Our \\zp\\ quality shows an overall improvement over an earlier \\zp\\ work that focused only on the central H-HDF-N area. We also classify each object as star or galaxy through template spectral energy distribution fitting and complementary morphological parametrization, resulting in 4959 stars and 126,719 galaxies. Furthermore, we match our catalog with the 2Ms Chandra Deep Field-North main X-ray catalog. For the 462 matched non-stellar X-ray sources (281 having \\zs), we improve their \\zp~quality by adding three additional AGN templates, achieving \\sigm=0.035 and an outlier fraction of 12.5\\%. We make our catalog publicly available presenting both photometry and \\zp, and provide guidance on how to make use of our catalog. (This work has been published as Yang, Xue, et al. 2014, ApJS, 215, 27; December 2014.)

  8. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS IN THE HAWAII-HUBBLE DEEP FIELD-NORTH (H-HDF-N)

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.; Xue, Y. Q.; Kong, X.; Wang, J.-X.; Yuan, Y.-F.; Zhou, H. Y.; Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F. E.; Cui, W.; Lehmer, B. D.; Wu, X.-B.; Yuan, F. E-mail: xuey@ustc.edu.cn

    2015-01-01

    We derive photometric redshifts (z {sub phot}) for sources in the entire (∼0.4 deg{sup 2}) Hawaii-Hubble Deep Field-North (H-HDF-N) field with the EAzY code, based on point-spread-function-matched photometry of 15 broad bands from the ultraviolet (U band) to mid-infrared (IRAC 4.5 μm). Our catalog consists of a total of 131,678 sources. We evaluate the z {sub phot} quality by comparing z {sub phot} with spectroscopic redshifts (z {sub spec}) when available, and find a value of normalized median absolute deviation σ{sub NMAD} = 0.029 and an outlier fraction of 5.5% (outliers are defined as sources having |z{sub phot} – z{sub spec} |/(1 + z{sub spec} ) > 0.15) for non-X-ray sources. More specifically, we obtain σ{sub NMAD} = 0.024 with 2.7% outliers for sources brighter than R = 23 mag, σ{sub NMAD} = 0.035 with 7.4% outliers for sources fainter than R = 23 mag, σ{sub NMAD} = 0.026 with 3.9% outliers for sources having z < 1, and σ{sub NMAD} = 0.034 with 9.0% outliers for sources having z > 1. Our z {sub phot} quality shows an overall improvement over an earlier z {sub phot} work that focused only on the central H-HDF-N area. We also classify each object as a star or galaxy through template spectral energy distribution fitting and complementary morphological parameterization, resulting in 4959 stars and 126,719 galaxies. Furthermore, we match our catalog with the 2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-North main X-ray catalog. For the 462 matched non-stellar X-ray sources (281 having z {sub spec}), we improve their z {sub phot} quality by adding three additional active galactic nucleus templates, achieving σ{sub NMAD} = 0.035 and an outlier fraction of 12.5%. We make our catalog publicly available presenting both photometry and z {sub phot}, and provide guidance on how to make use of our catalog.

  9. Photometric monitoring of eta Carinae, and the general problem of accurate photometry of S Dor variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.; Freyhammer, L. M.; Arentoft, T.; van Genderen, A. M.

    2001-06-01

    We review the particular problems of ground-based photometry of the composite object eta Carinae for which high-precision long-term photometric monitoring is so hard to accomplish. eta Car, by its appearance as an ultrabright extended object, by its anomalous spectral nature, and by its most outspoken variability, is the single most difficult stellar object to measure photometrically and to monitor over a long time interval. The problems belong to several levels: very limited availability of an astrophysically appropriate photometric system, the presence of strong (and variable) emission lines, the need for a telescope with a suitable f-ratio, and the steadily diminishing possibilities to collect data over a long period of time. We demonstrate that the transformation from our y measurements to V is valid for many stars, but not for eta Car nor for some less peculiar objects. Even pure Johnson V data can not be guaranteed to be accurately tied to the E-region standard stars. The'underestimated' V-magnitude of eta Car based on y-filter photometry is not to be considered a suspicious characteristic of our intermediate-band photometry, but is an inherent element of the photometric approach of discussing V magnitudes on the basis of data obtained with a Stromgren y filter. Aperture corrections of a single isolated measurement remain prone to random errors of the order of 0.005-0.015 mag.

  10. The DAFT/FADA survey. I. Photometric redshifts along lines of sight to clusters in the z = [0.4, 0.9] interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guennou, L.; Adami, C.; Ulmer, M. P.; Lebrun, V.; Durret, F.; Johnston, D.; Ilbert, O.; Clowe, D.; Gavazzi, R.; Murphy, K.; Schrabback, T.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Basa, S.; Benoist, C.; Biviano, A.; Cappi, A.; Kubo, J. M.; Marshall, P.; Mazure, A.; Rostagni, F.; Russeil, D.; Slezak, E.

    2010-11-01

    Context. As a contribution to the understanding of the dark energy concept, the Dark energy American French Team (DAFT, in French FADA) has started a large project to characterize statistically high redshift galaxy clusters, infer cosmological constraints from weak lensing tomography, and understand biases relevant for constraining dark energy and cluster physics in future cluster and cosmological experiments. Aims: The purpose of this paper is to establish the basis of reference for the photo-z determination used in all our subsequent papers, including weak lensing tomography studies. Methods: This project is based on a sample of 91 high redshift (z ≥ 0.4), massive (⪆3 × 1014 M_⊙) clusters with existing HST imaging, for which we are presently performing complementary multi-wavelength imaging. This allows us in particular to estimate spectral types and determine accurate photometric redshifts for galaxies along the lines of sight to the first ten clusters for which all the required data are available down to a limit of IAB = 24./24.5 with the LePhare software. The accuracy in redshift is of the order of 0.05 for the range 0.2 ≤ z ≤ 1.5. Results: We verified that the technique applied to obtain photometric redshifts works well by comparing our results to with previous works. In clusters, photo-z accuracy is degraded for bright absolute magnitudes and for the latest and earliest type galaxies. The photo-z accuracy also only slightly varies as a function of the spectral type for field galaxies. As a consequence, we find evidence for an environmental dependence of the photo-z accuracy, interpreted as the standard used spectral energy distributions being not very well suited to cluster galaxies. Finally, we modeled the LCDCS 0504 mass with the strong arcs detected along this line of sight. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the data archive at the Space Telescope Institute and the Space Telescope European

  11. 3D-HST WFC3-SELECTED PHOTOMETRIC CATALOGS IN THE FIVE CANDELS/3D-HST FIELDS: PHOTOMETRY, PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS, AND STELLAR MASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Skelton, Rosalind E.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Bezanson, Rachel; Leja, Joel; Nelson, Erica J.; Oesch, Pascal; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Labbé, Ivo; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Van der Wel, Arjen; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Maseda, Michael V.; Förster Schreiber, Natascha; Kriek, Mariska; Lundgren, Britt F.; Magee, Daniel; Marchesini, Danilo; and others

    2014-10-01

    The 3D-HST and CANDELS programs have provided WFC3 and ACS spectroscopy and photometry over ≈900 arcmin{sup 2} in five fields: AEGIS, COSMOS, GOODS-North, GOODS-South, and the UKIDSS UDS field. All these fields have a wealth of publicly available imaging data sets in addition to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data, which makes it possible to construct the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of objects over a wide wavelength range. In this paper we describe a photometric analysis of the CANDELS and 3D-HST HST imaging and the ancillary imaging data at wavelengths 0.3-8 μm. Objects were selected in the WFC3 near-IR bands, and their SEDs were determined by carefully taking the effects of the point-spread function in each observation into account. A total of 147 distinct imaging data sets were used in the analysis. The photometry is made available in the form of six catalogs: one for each field, as well as a master catalog containing all objects in the entire survey. We also provide derived data products: photometric redshifts, determined with the EAZY code, and stellar population parameters determined with the FAST code. We make all the imaging data that were used in the analysis available, including our reductions of the WFC3 imaging in all five fields. 3D-HST is a spectroscopic survey with the WFC3 and ACS grisms, and the photometric catalogs presented here constitute a necessary first step in the analysis of these grism data. All the data presented in this paper are available through the 3D-HST Web site (http://3dhst.research.yale.edu)

  12. Precise photometric redshifts with a narrow-band filter set: the PAU survey at the William Herschel Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí, P.; Miquel, R.; Castander, F. J.; Gaztañaga, E.; Eriksen, M.; Sánchez, C.

    2014-07-01

    The Physics of the Accelerating Universe (PAU) survey at the William Herschel Telescope will use a new optical camera (PAUCam) with a large set of narrow-band filters to perform a photometric galaxy survey with a quasi-spectroscopic redshift precision of σ(z)/(1 + z) ˜ 0.0035 and map the large-scale structure of the universe in three dimensions up to iAB < 22.5-23.0. In this paper, we present a detailed photo-z performance study using photometric simulations for 40 equally spaced 12.5-nm-wide (full width at half-maximum) filters with an ˜25 per cent overlap and spanning the wavelength range from 450 to 850 nm, together with a ugrizY broad-band filter system. We then present the migration matrix rij, containing the probability that a galaxy in a true redshift bin j is measured in a photo-z bin i, and study its effect on the determination of galaxy auto- and cross-correlations. Finally, we also study the impact on the photo-z performance of small variations of the filter set in terms of width, wavelength coverage, etc., and find a broad region where slightly modified filter sets provide similar results, with the original set being close to optimal.

  13. The Blanco Cosmology Survey: Data Reduction, Calibration and Photometric Redshift Estimation to Four Distant Galaxy Clusters Discovered by the South Pole Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngeow, Chow Choong; Mohr, J.; Zenteno, A.; Data Management, DES; BCS; SPT Collaborations

    2009-01-01

    The Blanco Cosmology Survey (BCS) is designed to enable a study of the cosmic acceleration using multiple techniques. To date, BCS has acquired Sloan griz band imaging data from 60 nights (15 nights per year from 2005 to 2008) using the Blanco 4m Telescope located at CTIO. The astronomical imaging data taken from this survey have been processed on high performance computer TeraGrid platforms at NCSA, using the automated Dark Energy Survey (DES) data management (DM) system. The DES DM system includes (1) middlewares for controlling and managing the processing jobs, and serve as an application container encapsulating the scientific codes; and (2) DES archive, which includes filesystem nodes, a relational database and a data access framework, to support the pipeline processing, data storage and scientific analyzes. Photometric solution module (PSM) were run on photometric nights to determine the zeropoints (ZP) and other photometric solutions. We remapped and coadded the images that lie within the pre-defined coadd tiles in the sky. When running the coaddition pipeline, we determined the ZP for each images using the photometric ZP from PSM, the magnitude offsets between overlapping images, and the sky brightness ratio for CCDs within a given exposure. We also applied aperture correction and color-term correction to the coadded catalogs. Satisfactory photometric and astrometric precision were achieved. These enabled initial estimation of photometric redshifts using ANNz codes, trained from 5000 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts. RMS in the photometric redshifts ranges from 0.05 to 0.1 in sigma_z/(1+z) for redshift extended to z=1. We used the BCS data to optically confirm and estimate redshifts for four of the highest S/N galaxy clusters discovered with the South Pole Telescope using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect.

  14. Upper Bound of 0.28 eV on Neutrino Masses from the Largest Photometric Redshift Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Shaun A.; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Lahav, Ofer

    2010-07-16

    We present a new limit of (95% CL) on the sum of the neutrino masses assuming a flat {Lambda}CDM cosmology. This relaxes slightly to and when quasinonlinear scales are removed and w{ne}-1, respectively. These are derived from a new photometric catalogue of over 700 000 luminous red galaxies (MegaZ DR7) with a volume of 3.3 (Gpc h{sup -1}){sup 3} and redshift range 0.45

  15. Photometric ``Flicker:'' Tracer of Granulation and an Accurate Measure of Stellar Surface Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastien, Fabienne

    2015-04-01

    As a result of the high precision and cadence of surveys like NASA's Kepler, we may now directly observe the very low-level light variations in Sun-like stars. In my dissertation, I found that some of these variations unexpectedly arise from granulation, a result that enables us to more accurately determine the physical properties of Sun-like stars, permits us to understand the nature of surface convection and its connection to activity, and allows us to better determine the properties of planets around Sun-like stars. I find that granulation manifests through light ``flicker,'' thereby yielding a simple measurement of stellar surface gravity with a precision of 0.1 dex. I use this, together and solely with two other simple ways of characterizing the stellar photometric variations in a high quality light curve, to construct an evolutionary diagram for Sun-like stars from the main-sequence on towards the red giant branch. I use flicker to re-determine the fundamental properties of Kepler planet host stars, finding that the stars - and hence the planets orbiting them - are 20-30% larger than previous estimates. Finally, I show that high precision light curves can yield remarkably clean predictors of radial velocity (RV) jitter in magnetically inactive stars, allowing the exoplanet community to prioritize RV follow-up campaigns with discovery light curves and providing insight into the primary physical drivers of RV jitter in such stars.

  16. SPIDERz: SuPport vector classification for IDEntifying Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Evan; Singal, J.

    2016-08-01

    SPIDERz (SuPport vector classification for IDEntifying Redshifts) applies powerful support vector machine (SVM) optimization and statistical learning techniques to custom data sets to obtain accurate photometric redshift (photo-z) estimations. It is written for the IDL environment and can be applied to traditional data sets consisting of photometric band magnitudes, or alternatively to data sets with additional galaxy parameters (such as shape information) to investigate potential correlations between the extra galaxy parameters and redshift.

  17. Upper bound of 0.28 eV on neutrino masses from the largest photometric redshift survey.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Shaun A; Abdalla, Filipe B; Lahav, Ofer

    2010-07-16

    We present a new limit of ∑m(v) ≤ 0.28 (95% CL) on the sum of the neutrino masses assuming a flat ΛCDM cosmology. This relaxes slightly to ∑m(ν) ≤ 0.34 and ∑m(v) ≤ 0.47 when quasinonlinear scales are removed and w≠ -1, respectively. These are derived from a new photometric catalogue of over 700,000 luminous red galaxies (MegaZ DR7) with a volume of 3.3  (Gpc h(-1))(3) and redshift range 0.45 < z < 0.65. The data are combined with WMAP 5-year CMB, baryon acoustic oscillations, supernovae, and a Hubble Space Telescope prior on h. When combined with WMAP these data are as constraining as adding all supernovae and baryon oscillation data available. The upper limit is one of the tightest constraints on the neutrino from cosmology or particle physics. Further, if these bounds hold, they all predict that current-to-next generation neutrino experiments, such as KATRIN, are unlikely to obtain a detection. PMID:20867754

  18. Self-calibration of photometric redshift scatter in weak-lensing surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengjie; Pen, Ue -Li; Bernstein, Gary

    2010-06-11

    Photo-z errors, especially catastrophic errors, are a major uncertainty for precision weak lensing cosmology. We find that the shear-(galaxy number) density and density-density cross correlation measurements between photo-z bins, available from the same lensing surveys, contain valuable information for self-calibration of the scattering probabilities between the true-z and photo-z bins. The self-calibration technique we propose does not rely on cosmological priors nor parameterization of the photo-z probability distribution function, and preserves all of the cosmological information available from shear-shear measurement. We estimate the calibration accuracy through the Fisher matrix formalism. We find that, for advanced lensing surveys such as the planned stage IV surveys, the rate of photo-z outliers can be determined with statistical uncertainties of 0.01-1% for z < 2 galaxies. Among the several sources of calibration error that we identify and investigate, the galaxy distribution bias is likely the most dominant systematic error, whereby photo-z outliers have different redshift distributions and/or bias than non-outliers from the same bin. This bias affects all photo-z calibration techniques based on correlation measurements. As a result, galaxy bias variations of O(0.1) produce biases in photo-z outlier rates similar to the statistical errors of our method, so this galaxy distribution bias may bias the reconstructed scatters at several-σ level, but is unlikely to completely invalidate the self-calibration technique.

  19. Self-calibration of photometric redshift scatter in weak-lensing surveys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Pengjie; Pen, Ue -Li; Bernstein, Gary

    2010-06-11

    Photo-z errors, especially catastrophic errors, are a major uncertainty for precision weak lensing cosmology. We find that the shear-(galaxy number) density and density-density cross correlation measurements between photo-z bins, available from the same lensing surveys, contain valuable information for self-calibration of the scattering probabilities between the true-z and photo-z bins. The self-calibration technique we propose does not rely on cosmological priors nor parameterization of the photo-z probability distribution function, and preserves all of the cosmological information available from shear-shear measurement. We estimate the calibration accuracy through the Fisher matrix formalism. We find that, for advanced lensing surveys such as themore » planned stage IV surveys, the rate of photo-z outliers can be determined with statistical uncertainties of 0.01-1% for z < 2 galaxies. Among the several sources of calibration error that we identify and investigate, the galaxy distribution bias is likely the most dominant systematic error, whereby photo-z outliers have different redshift distributions and/or bias than non-outliers from the same bin. This bias affects all photo-z calibration techniques based on correlation measurements. As a result, galaxy bias variations of O(0.1) produce biases in photo-z outlier rates similar to the statistical errors of our method, so this galaxy distribution bias may bias the reconstructed scatters at several-σ level, but is unlikely to completely invalidate the self-calibration technique.« less

  20. A PUBLIC K{sub s} -SELECTED CATALOG IN THE COSMOS/ULTRAVISTA FIELD: PHOTOMETRY, PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS, AND STELLAR POPULATION PARAMETERS {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Muzzin, Adam; Franx, Marijn; Labbe, Ivo; Marchesini, Danilo; Stefanon, Mauro; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Dunlop, James S.; Brammer, Gabriel; Van Dokkum, Pieter

    2013-05-01

    We present a catalog covering 1.62 deg{sup 2} of the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field with point-spread function (PSF) matched photometry in 30 photometric bands. The catalog covers the wavelength range 0.15-24 {mu}m including the available GALEX, Subaru, Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, VISTA, and Spitzer data. Catalog sources have been selected from the DR1 UltraVISTA K{sub s} band imaging that reaches a depth of K {sub s,tot} = 23.4 AB (90% completeness). The PSF-matched catalog is generated using position-dependent PSFs ensuring accurate colors across the entire field. Also included is a catalog of photometric redshifts (z {sub phot}) for all galaxies computed with the EAZY code. Comparison with spectroscopy from the zCOSMOS 10k bright sample shows that up to z {approx} 1.5 the z {sub phot} are accurate to {Delta}z/(1 + z) = 0.013, with a catastrophic outlier fraction of only 1.6%. The z {sub phot} also show good agreement with the z {sub phot} from the NEWFIRM Medium Band Survey out to z {approx} 3. A catalog of stellar masses and stellar population parameters for galaxies determined using the FAST spectral energy distribution fitting code is provided for all galaxies. Also included are rest-frame U - V and V - J colors, L {sub 2800} and L {sub IR}. The UVJ color-color diagram confirms that the galaxy bi-modality is well-established out to z {approx} 2. Star-forming galaxies also obey a star-forming 'main sequence' out to z {approx} 2.5, and this sequence evolves in a manner consistent with previous measurements. The COSMOS/UltraVISTA K{sub s} -selected catalog covers a unique parameter space in both depth, area, and multi-wavelength coverage and promises to be a useful tool for studying the growth of the galaxy population out to z {approx} 3-4.

  1. A PARAMETERIZED GALAXY CATALOG SIMULATOR FOR TESTING CLUSTER FINDING, MASS ESTIMATION, AND PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT ESTIMATION IN OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jeeseon; Mohr, Joseph J.; Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Rude, Cody; Warren, Michael S.; Dolag, Klaus

    2012-03-01

    We present a galaxy catalog simulator that converts N-body simulations with halo and subhalo catalogs into mock, multiband photometric catalogs. The simulator assigns galaxy properties to each subhalo in a way that reproduces the observed cluster galaxy halo occupation distribution, the radial and mass-dependent variation in fractions of blue galaxies, the luminosity functions in the cluster and the field, and the color-magnitude relation in clusters. Moreover, the evolution of these parameters is tuned to match existing observational constraints. Parameterizing an ensemble of cluster galaxy properties enables us to create mock catalogs with variations in those properties, which in turn allows us to quantify the sensitivity of cluster finding to current observational uncertainties in these properties. Field galaxies are sampled from existing multiband photometric surveys of similar depth. We present an application of the catalog simulator to characterize the selection function and contamination of a galaxy cluster finder that utilizes the cluster red sequence together with galaxy clustering on the sky. We estimate systematic uncertainties in the selection to be at the {<=}15% level with current observational constraints on cluster galaxy populations and their evolution. We find the contamination in this cluster finder to be {approx}35% to redshift z {approx} 0.6. In addition, we use the mock galaxy catalogs to test the optical mass indicator B{sub gc} and a red-sequence redshift estimator. We measure the intrinsic scatter of the B{sub gc}-mass relation to be approximately log normal with {sigma}{sub log10M}{approx}0.25 and we demonstrate photometric redshift accuracies for massive clusters at the {approx}3% level out to z {approx} 0.7.

  2. UV-TO-FIR ANALYSIS OF SPITZER/IRAC SOURCES IN THE EXTENDED GROTH STRIP. II. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS, STELLAR MASSES, AND STAR FORMATION RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Barro, G.; Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.; Gallego, J.; Villar, V.; Zamorano, J.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Kajisawa, M.; Yamada, T.; Miyazaki, S.

    2011-04-01

    Based on the ultraviolet to far-infrared photometry already compiled and presented in a companion paper (Paper I), we present a detailed spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis of nearly 80,000 IRAC 3.6 + 4.5 {mu}m selected galaxies in the Extended Groth Strip. We estimate photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and star formation rates (SFRs) separately for each galaxy in this large sample. The catalog includes 76,936 sources with [3.6] {<=} 23.75 (85% completeness level of the IRAC survey) over 0.48 deg{sup 2}. The typical photometric redshift accuracy is {Delta}z/(1 + z) = 0.034, with a catastrophic outlier fraction of just 2%. We quantify the systematics introduced by the use of different stellar population synthesis libraries and initial mass functions in the calculation of stellar masses. We find systematic offsets ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 dex, with a typical scatter of 0.3 dex. We also provide UV- and IR-based SFRs for all sample galaxies, based on several sets of dust emission templates and SFR indicators. We evaluate the systematic differences and goodness of the different SFR estimations using the deep FIDEL 70 {mu}m data available in the Extended Groth Strip. Typical random uncertainties of the IR-bases SFRs are a factor of two, with non-negligible systematic effects at z {approx}> 1.5 observed when only MIPS 24 {mu}m data are available. All data products (SEDs, postage stamps from imaging data, and different estimations of the photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and SFRs of each galaxy) described in this and the companion paper are publicly available, and they can be accessed through our the Web interface utility Rainbow-navigator.

  3. Measuring Redshifts of Emission-line Galaxies Using Ramp Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesser, Ryan William; Bohman, John; McNeff, Mathew; Holden, Marcus; Moody, Joseph; Joner, Michael D.; Barnes, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Photometric redshifts are routinely obtained for galaxies without emission using broadband photometry. It is possible in theory to derive reasonably accurate (< 200 km/sec) photometric redshift values for emission-line objects using "ramp" filters with a linearly increasing/decreasing transmission through the bandpass. To test this idea we have obtained a set of filters tuned for isolating H-alpha at a redshift range of 0-10,000 km/sec. These filters consist of two that vary close to linearly in transmission, have opposite slope, and cover the wavelength range from 655nm - 685nm, plus a Stromgren y and 697nm filter to measure the continuum. Redshifts are derived from the ratio of the ramp filters indices after the continuum has been subtracted out. We are finishing the process of obtaining photometric data on a set of about 100 galaxies with known redshift to calibrate the technique and will report on our results.

  4. The Subaru-XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS). VIII. Multi-wavelength identification, optical/NIR spectroscopic properties, and photometric redshifts of X-ray sources†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Masayuki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Watson, Mike G.; Furusawa, Hisanori; Takata, Tadafumi; Simpson, Chris; Morokuma, Tomoki; Yamada, Toru; Ohta, Kouji; Iwamuro, Fumihide; Yabe, Kiyoto; Tamura, Naoyuki; Moritani, Yuuki; Takato, Naruhisa; Kimura, Masahiko; Maihara, Toshinori; Dalton, Gavin; Lewis, Ian; Lee, Hanshin; Curtis-Lake, Emma; Macaulay, Edward; Clarke, Frazer; Silverman, John D.; Croom, Scott; Ouchi, Masami; Hanami, Hitoshi; Díaz Tello, Jorge; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Fujishiro, Naofumi; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiro

    2015-10-01

    We report on the multi-wavelength identification of the X-ray sources found in the Subaru-XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS) using deep imaging data covering the wavelength range between the far-UV and mid-IR (MIR). We select a primary counterpart of each X-ray source by applying the likelihood ratio method to R-band, 3.6 μm, near-UV, and 24 μm source catalogs as well as matching catalogs of active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates selected in 1.4 GHz radio and i '-band variability surveys. Once candidates for Galactic stars, ultra-luminous X-ray sources in a nearby galaxy, and clusters of galaxies are removed there are 896 AGN candidates in the sample. We conduct spectroscopic observations of the primary counterparts with multi-object spectrographs in the optical and NIR; 65% of the X-ray AGN candidates are spectroscopically identified. For the remaining X-ray AGN candidates, we evaluate their photometric redshift with photometric data in 15 bands. Utilizing the multi-wavelength photometric data of the large sample of X-ray-selected AGNs, we evaluate the stellar masses, M*, of the host galaxies of the narrow-line AGNs. The distribution of the stellar mass is remarkably constant from z = 0.1 to 4.0. The relation between M* and 2-10 keV luminosity can be explained with strong cosmological evolution of the relationship between the black hole mass and M*. We also evaluate the scatter of the UV-MIR spectral energy distribution (SED) of the X-ray AGNs as a function of X-ray luminosity and absorption by the nucleus. The scatter is compared with galaxies which have redshift and stellar mass distribution matched with the X-ray AGN. The UV-NIR (near-IR) SEDs of obscured X-ray AGNs are similar to those of the galaxies in the matched sample. In the NIR-MIR range, the median SEDs of X-ray AGNs are redder, but the scatter of the SEDs of the X-ray AGN broadly overlaps that of the galaxies in the matched sample.

  5. Large-scale clustering measurements with photometric redshifts: comparing the dark matter haloes of X-ray AGN, star-forming and passive galaxies at z ≈ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakakis, A.; Mountrichas, G.; Salvato, M.; Rosario, D.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Lutz, D.; Nandra, K.; Coil, A.; Cooper, M. C.; Newman, J. A.; Berta, S.; Magnelli, B.; Popesso, P.; Pozzi, F.

    2014-10-01

    We combine multi-wavelength data in the AEGIS-XD and C-COSMOS surveys to measure the typical dark matter halo mass of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) [LX(2-10 keV) > 1042 erg s- 1] in comparison with far-infrared selected star-forming galaxies detected in the Herschel/PEP survey (PACS Evolutionary Probe; LIR > 1011 L⊙) and quiescent systems at z ≈ 1. We develop a novel method to measure the clustering of extragalactic populations that uses photometric redshift probability distribution functions in addition to any spectroscopy. This is advantageous in that all sources in the sample are used in the clustering analysis, not just the subset with secure spectroscopy. The method works best for large samples. The loss of accuracy because of the lack of spectroscopy is balanced by increasing the number of sources used to measure the clustering. We find that X-ray AGN, far-infrared selected star-forming galaxies and passive systems in the redshift interval 0.6 < z < 1.4 are found in haloes of similar mass, log MDMH/(M⊙ h-1) ≈ 13.0. We argue that this is because the galaxies in all three samples (AGN, star-forming, passive) have similar stellar mass distributions, approximated by the J-band luminosity. Therefore, all galaxies that can potentially host X-ray AGN, because they have stellar masses in the appropriate range, live in dark matter haloes of log MDMH/(M⊙ h-1) ≈ 13.0 independent of their star formation rates. This suggests that the stellar mass of X-ray AGN hosts is driving the observed clustering properties of this population. We also speculate that trends between AGN properties (e.g. luminosity, level of obscuration) and large-scale environment may be related to differences in the stellar mass of the host galaxies.

  6. A direct probe of cosmological power spectra of the peculiar velocity field and the gravitational lensing magnification from photometric redshift surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Nusser, Adi; Feix, Martin; Branchini, Enzo E-mail: branchin@fis.uniroma3.it

    2013-01-01

    The cosmological peculiar velocity field (deviations from the pure Hubble flow) of matter carries significant information on dark energy, dark matter and the underlying theory of gravity on large scales. Peculiar motions of galaxies introduce systematic deviations between the observed galaxy redshifts z and the corresponding cosmological redshifts z{sub c{sub o{sub s}}}. A novel method for estimating the angular power spectrum of the peculiar velocity field based on observations of galaxy redshifts and apparent magnitudes m (or equivalently fluxes) is presented. This method exploits the fact that a mean relation between z{sub c{sub o{sub s}}} and m of galaxies can be derived from all galaxies in a redshift-magnitude survey. Given a galaxy magnitude, it is shown that the z{sub c{sub o{sub s}}}(m) relation yields its cosmological redshift with a 1σ error of σ{sub z} ∼ 0.3 for a survey like Euclid ( ∼ 10{sup 9} galaxies at z∼<2), and can be used to constrain the angular power spectrum of z−z{sub c{sub o{sub s}}}(m) with a high signal-to-noise ratio. At large angular separations corresponding to l∼<15, we obtain significant constraints on the power spectrum of the peculiar velocity field. At 15∼

  7. Spectrophotometric Redshifts in the Faint Infrared Grism Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pharo, John; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.

    2016-06-01

    We have combined HST grism spectroscopy and deep broadband imaging to measure spectro-photometric redshifts (SPZs) of faint galaxies. Using a technique pioneered by Ryan et al. 2007, one can combine spectra and photometry to yield an SPZ that is more accurate than pure photometric redshifts, and can probe more deeply than ground-based spectroscopic redshifts. By taking mid-resolution spectra from the HST Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS), SPZs can be found for measurements potentially down to 27th magnitude (the typical brightness of a dwarf galaxy at redshift ∼1.5). A galaxy’s redshift is vital for understanding its place in the growth and evolution of the universe. The measurement of high-accuracy SPZs for FIGS sources will improve the faint-end and high-redshift portions of the luminosity function, and make possible a robust analysis of the FIGS fields for signs of Large Scale Structure (LSS). The improved redshift and distance measurements allowed for the identification of a structure at z=0.83 in one of the FIGS fields.

  8. RECONSTRUCTING REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTIONS WITH CROSS-CORRELATIONS: TESTS AND AN OPTIMIZED RECIPE

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Daniel J.; Newman, Jeffrey A. E-mail: janewman@pitt.ed

    2010-09-20

    Many of the cosmological tests to be performed by planned dark energy experiments will require extremely well-characterized photometric redshift measurements. Current estimates for cosmic shear are that the true mean redshift of the objects in each photo-z bin must be known to better than 0.002(1 + z), and the width of the bin must be known to {approx}0.003(1 + z) if errors in cosmological measurements are not to be degraded significantly. A conventional approach is to calibrate these photometric redshifts with large sets of spectroscopic redshifts. However, at the depths probed by Stage III surveys (such as DES), let alone Stage IV (LSST, JDEM, and Euclid), existing large redshift samples have all been highly (25%-60%) incomplete, with a strong dependence of success rate on both redshift and galaxy properties. A powerful alternative approach is to exploit the clustering of galaxies to perform photometric redshift calibrations. Measuring the two-point angular cross-correlation between objects in some photometric redshift bin and objects with known spectroscopic redshift, as a function of the spectroscopic z, allows the true redshift distribution of a photometric sample to be reconstructed in detail, even if it includes objects too faint for spectroscopy or if spectroscopic samples are highly incomplete. We test this technique using mock DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift survey light cones constructed from the Millennium Simulation semi-analytic galaxy catalogs. From this realistic test, which incorporates the effects of galaxy bias evolution and cosmic variance, we find that the true redshift distribution of a photometric sample can, in fact, be determined accurately with cross-correlation techniques. We also compare the empirical error in the reconstruction of redshift distributions to previous analytic predictions, finding that additional components must be included in error budgets to match the simulation results. This extra error contribution is small for surveys that

  9. High-precision Photometric Redshifts from Spitzer/IRAC: Extreme [3.6] - [4.5] Colors Identify Galaxies in the Redshift Range z ˜ 6.6 - 6.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, Renske; Bouwens, Rychard J.; Franx, Marijn; Oesch, Pascal A.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Willner, S. P.; Labbé, Ivo; Holwerda, Benne; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Huang, J.-S.

    2015-03-01

    One of the most challenging aspects of studying galaxies in the z≳ 7 universe is the infrequent confirmation of their redshifts through spectroscopy, a phenomenon thought to occur from the increasing opacity of the intergalactic medium to Lyα photons at z\\gt 6.5. The resulting redshift uncertainties inhibit the efficient search for [C ii] in z˜ 7 galaxies with sub-millimeter instruments such as ALMA, given their limited scan speed for faint lines. One means by which to improve the precision of the inferred redshifts is to exploit the potential impact of strong nebular emission lines on the colors of z ˜ 4 - 8 galaxies as observed by Spitzer/IRAC. At z˜ 6.8, galaxies exhibit IRAC colors as blue as [3.6]-[4.5]˜ -1, likely due to the contribution of [O iii]+Hβ to the 3.6 μm flux combined with the absence of line contamination in the 4.5 μm band. In this paper we explore the use of extremely blue [3.6]-[4.5] colors to identify galaxies in the narrow redshift window z ˜ 6.6 - 6.9. When combined with an I-dropout criterion, we demonstrate that we can plausibly select a relatively clean sample of z˜ 6.8 galaxies. Through a systematic application of this selection technique to our catalogs from all five CANDELS fields, we identify 20 probable z ˜ 6.6 - 6.9 galaxies. We estimate that our criteria select the ˜50% strongest line emitters at z˜ 6.8 and from the IRAC colors we estimate a typical [O iii]+Hβ rest-frame equivalent width of 1085 Å for this sample. The small redshift uncertainties on our sample make it particularly well suited for follow-up studies with facilities such as ALMA.

  10. Requirements on the Redshift Accuracy for future Supernova andNumber Count Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Huterer, Dragan; Kim, Alex; Broderick, Tamara

    2004-08-09

    We investigate the required redshift accuracy of type Ia supernova and cluster number-count surveys in order for the redshift uncertainties not to contribute appreciably to the dark energy parameter error budget. For the SNAP supernova experiment, we find that, without the assistance of ground-based measurements, individual supernova redshifts would need to be determined to about 0.002 or better, which is a challenging but feasible requirement for a low-resolution spectrograph. However, we find that accurate redshifts for z < 0.1 supernovae, obtained with ground-based experiments, are sufficient to immunize the results against even relatively large redshift errors at high z. For the future cluster number-count surveys such as the South Pole Telescope, Planck or DUET, we find that the purely statistical error in photometric redshift is less important, and that the irreducible, systematic bias in redshift drives the requirements. The redshift bias will have to be kept below 0.001-0.005 per redshift bin (which is determined by the filter set), depending on the sky coverage and details of the definition of the minimal mass of the survey. Furthermore, we find that X-ray surveys have a more stringent required redshift accuracy than Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect surveys since they use a shorter lever arm in redshift; conversely, SZ surveys benefit from their high redshift reach only so long as some redshift information is available for distant (zgtrsim1) clusters.

  11. PHOTOMETRIC CONSTRAINTS ON THE REDSHIFT OF z {approx} 10 CANDIDATE UDFj-39546284 FROM DEEPER WFC3/IR+ACS+IRAC OBSERVATIONS OVER THE HUDF

    SciTech Connect

    Bouwens, R. J.; Labbe, I.; Franx, M.; Smit, R.; Oesch, P. A.; Illingworth, G. D.; Magee, D.; Gonzalez, V.; Brammer, G.; Spitler, L. R.; Trenti, M.; Carollo, C. M.

    2013-03-01

    Ultra-deep WFC3/IR observations on the HUDF from the HUDF09 program revealed just one plausible z {approx} 10 candidate, UDFj-39546284. UDFj-39546284 had all the properties expected of a galaxy at z {approx} 10 showing (1) no detection in the deep ACS+WFC3 imaging data blueward of the F160W band, exhibiting (2) a blue spectral slope redward of the break, and showing (3) no prominent detection in deep IRAC observations. The new, similarly deep WFC3/IR HUDF12 F160W observations over the HUDF09/XDF allow us to further assess this candidate. These observations show that this candidate, previously only detected at {approx}5.9{sigma} in a single band, clearly corresponds to a real source. It is detected at {approx}5.3{sigma} in the new H{sub 160}-band data and at {approx}7.8{sigma} in the full 85-orbit H{sub 160}-band stack. Interestingly, the non-detection of the source (<1{sigma}) in the new F140W observations suggests a higher redshift. Formally, the best-fit redshift of the source utilizing all the WFC3+ACS (and IRAC+K{sub s} -band) observations is 11.8 {+-} 0.3. However, we consider the z {approx} 12 interpretation somewhat unlikely, since the source would either need to be {approx}20 Multiplication-Sign more luminous than expected or show very high-EW Ly{alpha} emission (which seems improbable given the extensive neutral gas prevalent early in the reionization epoch). Lower-redshift solutions fail if only continuum models are allowed. Plausible lower-redshift solutions require that the H{sub 160}-band flux be dominated by line emission such as H{alpha} or [O III] with extreme EWs. The tentative detection of line emission at 1.6 {mu}m in UDFj-39546284 in a companion paper suggests that such emission may have already been found.

  12. Photometric Constraints on the Redshift of z ~ 10 Candidate UDFj-39546284 from Deeper WFC3/IR+ACS+IRAC Observations over the HUDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwens, R. J.; Oesch, P. A.; Illingworth, G. D.; Labbé, I.; van Dokkum, P. G.; Brammer, G.; Magee, D.; Spitler, L. R.; Franx, M.; Smit, R.; Trenti, M.; Gonzalez, V.; Carollo, C. M.

    2013-03-01

    Ultra-deep WFC3/IR observations on the HUDF from the HUDF09 program revealed just one plausible z ~ 10 candidate, UDFj-39546284. UDFj-39546284 had all the properties expected of a galaxy at z ~ 10 showing (1) no detection in the deep ACS+WFC3 imaging data blueward of the F160W band, exhibiting (2) a blue spectral slope redward of the break, and showing (3) no prominent detection in deep IRAC observations. The new, similarly deep WFC3/IR HUDF12 F160W observations over the HUDF09/XDF allow us to further assess this candidate. These observations show that this candidate, previously only detected at ~5.9σ in a single band, clearly corresponds to a real source. It is detected at ~5.3σ in the new H 160-band data and at ~7.8σ in the full 85-orbit H 160-band stack. Interestingly, the non-detection of the source (<1σ) in the new F140W observations suggests a higher redshift. Formally, the best-fit redshift of the source utilizing all the WFC3+ACS (and IRAC+Ks -band) observations is 11.8 ± 0.3. However, we consider the z ~ 12 interpretation somewhat unlikely, since the source would either need to be ~20× more luminous than expected or show very high-EW Lyα emission (which seems improbable given the extensive neutral gas prevalent early in the reionization epoch). Lower-redshift solutions fail if only continuum models are allowed. Plausible lower-redshift solutions require that the H 160-band flux be dominated by line emission such as Hα or [O III] with extreme EWs. The tentative detection of line emission at 1.6 μm in UDFj-39546284 in a companion paper suggests that such emission may have already been found. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained by the Space Telescope Science Institute. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  13. Photometric Lunar Surface Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nefian, Ara V.; Alexandrov, Oleg; Morattlo, Zachary; Kim, Taemin; Beyer, Ross A.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate photometric reconstruction of the Lunar surface is important in the context of upcoming NASA robotic missions to the Moon and in giving a more accurate understanding of the Lunar soil composition. This paper describes a novel approach for joint estimation of Lunar albedo, camera exposure time, and photometric parameters that utilizes an accurate Lunar-Lambertian reflectance model and previously derived Lunar topography of the area visualized during the Apollo missions. The method introduced here is used in creating the largest Lunar albedo map (16% of the Lunar surface) at the resolution of 10 meters/pixel.

  14. Surveying the Origin of O VI Gas at Low Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochaska, Jason X.; Tripp, Todd; Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Mulchaey, John

    2002-08-01

    A comparison of the baryonic mass density inferred from BBN with a census of visible baryonic components (i.e. galaxies, HI gas) at the present epoch indicates a significant fraction of the universe's baryons are hidden in a dark component. Theoretical investigations into these missing bayons suggest the majority lie in a hot (T ~ 10^5-7 K), low density medium which can be efficiently detected through O VI absorption. More importantly, recent STIS+FUSE surveys for O VI are consistent with this gas comprising a significant fraction of the missing baryons. Establishing the physical nature of these O VI absorbers, therefore, may have great impact on our understanding of the distribution of baryons in the universe. The principal goal of this proposal is to determine if this O VI gas arises in galactic halos, the intragroup or intracluster medium, the low density 'cosmic web' which connects collapsed objects, or a different region of the universe altogether. We are currently pursuing a program to search for galaxies associated with O VI absorbers at low redshift (z < 0.5). To accomplish this project, we will obtain deep UBVRI images of the galaxies in four fields surrounding quasars surveyed for O VI absorption. This dataset will provide accurate photometric redshifts of the z< 0.5 galaxies with L > L^*/10 and will reveal their physical characteristics. Ultimately, we will utilize the photometric redshifts to efficiently pre-select galaxies for follow-up spectroscopy on multi- slit spectrographs. By correlating the photometric and spectroscopy galaxy redshifts against the O VI absorption lines and comparing directly with detailed cosmological simulations, we will establish the origin of the O VI gas.

  15. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Marriner, John; /Fermilab

    2012-06-29

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  16. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marriner, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  17. Photometric Supernova Classification with Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lochner, Michelle; McEwen, Jason D.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Lahav, Ofer; Winter, Max K.

    2016-08-01

    Automated photometric supernova classification has become an active area of research in recent years in light of current and upcoming imaging surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, given that spectroscopic confirmation of type for all supernovae discovered will be impossible. Here, we develop a multi-faceted classification pipeline, combining existing and new approaches. Our pipeline consists of two stages: extracting descriptive features from the light curves and classification using a machine learning algorithm. Our feature extraction methods vary from model-dependent techniques, namely SALT2 fits, to more independent techniques that fit parametric models to curves, to a completely model-independent wavelet approach. We cover a range of representative machine learning algorithms, including naive Bayes, k-nearest neighbors, support vector machines, artificial neural networks, and boosted decision trees (BDTs). We test the pipeline on simulated multi-band DES light curves from the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge. Using the commonly used area under the curve (AUC) of the Receiver Operating Characteristic as a metric, we find that the SALT2 fits and the wavelet approach, with the BDTs algorithm, each achieve an AUC of 0.98, where 1 represents perfect classification. We find that a representative training set is essential for good classification, whatever the feature set or algorithm, with implications for spectroscopic follow-up. Importantly, we find that by using either the SALT2 or the wavelet feature sets with a BDT algorithm, accurate classification is possible purely from light curve data, without the need for any redshift information.

  18. ESO & NOT photometric monitoring of the Cloverleaf quasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostensen, R.; Remy, M.; Lindblad, P. O.; Refsdal, S.; Stabell, R.; Surdej, J.; Barthel, P. D.; Emanuelsen, P. I.; Festin, L.; Gosset, E.; Hainaut, O.; Hakala, P.; Hjelm, M.; Hjorth, J.; Hutsemekers, D.; Jablonski, M.; Kaas, A. A.; Kristen, H.; Larsson, S.; Magain, P.; Pettersson, B.; Pospieszalska-Surdej, A.; Smette, A.; Teuber, J.; Thomsen, B.; van Drom, E.

    1997-12-01

    The Cloverleaf quasar, H1413+117, has been photometrically monitored at ESO (La Silla, Chile) and with the NOT (La Palma, Spain) during the period 1987--1994. All good quality CCD frames have been successfully analysed using two independent methods (i.e. an automatic image decomposition technique and an interactive CLEAN algorithm). The photometric results from the two methods are found to be very similar, and they show that the four lensed QSO images vary significantly in brightness (by up to 0.45 mag), nearly in parallel. The lightcurve of the $D$ component presents some slight departures from the general trend which are very likely caused by micro-lensing effects. Upper limits, at the 99% confidence level, of 150 days on the absolute value for the time delays between the photometric lightcurves of this quadruply imaged variable QSO, are derived. This is unfortunately too large to constrain the lens model but there is little doubt that a better sampling of the lightcurves should allow to accurately derive these time delays. Pending a direct detection of the lensing galaxy (position and redshift), this system thus constitutes another good candidate for a direct and independent determination of the Hubble parameter. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory (La Silla, Chile) and with the Nordic Optical Telescope (La Palma, Spain). Table 1. Logbook for the ESO and NOT observations together with photometric results for the Cloverleaf quasar. This long table can be accessed on the WWW at the URL address: http://vela.astro.ulg.ac.be/grav_lens/glp_homepage.html}

  19. Fast and accurate estimation for astrophysical problems in large databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Joseph W.

    2010-10-01

    A recent flood of astronomical data has created much demand for sophisticated statistical and machine learning tools that can rapidly draw accurate inferences from large databases of high-dimensional data. In this Ph.D. thesis, methods for statistical inference in such databases will be proposed, studied, and applied to real data. I use methods for low-dimensional parametrization of complex, high-dimensional data that are based on the notion of preserving the connectivity of data points in the context of a Markov random walk over the data set. I show how this simple parameterization of data can be exploited to: define appropriate prototypes for use in complex mixture models, determine data-driven eigenfunctions for accurate nonparametric regression, and find a set of suitable features to use in a statistical classifier. In this thesis, methods for each of these tasks are built up from simple principles, compared to existing methods in the literature, and applied to data from astronomical all-sky surveys. I examine several important problems in astrophysics, such as estimation of star formation history parameters for galaxies, prediction of redshifts of galaxies using photometric data, and classification of different types of supernovae based on their photometric light curves. Fast methods for high-dimensional data analysis are crucial in each of these problems because they all involve the analysis of complicated high-dimensional data in large, all-sky surveys. Specifically, I estimate the star formation history parameters for the nearly 800,000 galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 spectroscopic catalog, determine redshifts for over 300,000 galaxies in the SDSS photometric catalog, and estimate the types of 20,000 supernovae as part of the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge. Accurate predictions and classifications are imperative in each of these examples because these estimates are utilized in broader inference problems

  20. High redshift galaxies in the ALHAMBRA survey . I. Selection method and number counts based on redshift PDFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viironen, K.; Marín-Franch, A.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Varela, J.; Chaves-Montero, J.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; Molino, A.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Vilella-Rojo, G.; Ascaso, B.; Cenarro, A. J.; Cerviño, M.; Cepa, J.; Ederoclite, A.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Moles, M.; Oteo, I.; Pović, M.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Alfaro, E.; Aparicio-Villegas, T.; Benítez, N.; Broadhurst, T.; Cabrera-Caño, J.; Castander, J. F.; Del Olmo, A.; González Delgado, R. M.; Husillos, C.; Infante, L.; Martínez, V. J.; Perea, J.; Prada, F.; Quintana, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Most observational results on the high redshift restframe UV-bright galaxies are based on samples pinpointed using the so-called dropout technique or Ly-α selection. However, the availability of multifilter data now allows the dropout selections to be replaced by direct methods based on photometric redshifts. In this paper we present the methodology to select and study the population of high redshift galaxies in the ALHAMBRA survey data. Aims: Our aim is to develop a less biased methodology than the traditional dropout technique to study the high redshift galaxies in ALHAMBRA and other multifilter data. Thanks to the wide area ALHAMBRA covers, we especially aim at contributing to the study of the brightest, least frequent, high redshift galaxies. Methods: The methodology is based on redshift probability distribution functions (zPDFs). It is shown how a clean galaxy sample can be obtained by selecting the galaxies with high integrated probability of being within a given redshift interval. However, reaching both a complete and clean sample with this method is challenging. Hence, a method to derive statistical properties by summing the zPDFs of all the galaxies in the redshift bin of interest is introduced. Results: Using this methodology we derive the galaxy rest frame UV number counts in five redshift bins centred at z = 2.5,3.0,3.5,4.0, and 4.5, being complete up to the limiting magnitude at mUV(AB) = 24, where mUV refers to the first ALHAMBRA filter redwards of the Ly-α line. With the wide field ALHAMBRA data we especially contribute to the study of the brightest ends of these counts, accurately sampling the surface densities down to mUV(AB) = 21-22. Conclusions: We show that using the zPDFs it is easy to select a very clean sample of high redshift galaxies. We also show that it is better to do statistical analysis of the properties of galaxies using a probabilistic approach, which takes into account both the incompleteness and contamination issues in a

  1. Plasma Redshift Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brynjolfsson, Ari

    2011-04-01

    The newly discovered plasma redshift cross section explains a long range of phenomena; including the cosmological redshift, and the intrinsic redshift of Sun, stars, galaxies and quasars. It explains the beautiful black body spectrum of the CMB, and it predicts correctly: a) the observed XRB, b) the magnitude redshift relation for supernovae, and c) the surface- brightness-redshift relation for galaxies. There is no need for Big Bang, Inflation, Dark Energy, Dark Matter, Accelerated Expansion, and Black Holes. The universe is quasi-static and can renew itself forever (for details, see: http://www.plasmaredshift.org). There is no cosmic time dilation. In intergalactic space, the average electron temperature is T = 2.7 million K, and the average electron density is N = 0.0002 per cubic cm. Plasma redshift is derived theoretically from conventional axioms of physics by using more accurate methods than those conventionally used. The main difference is: 1) the proper inclusion of the dielectric constant, 2) more exact calculations of imaginary part of the dielectric constant, and as required 3) a quantum mechanical treatment of the interactions.

  2. REAL OR INTERLOPER? THE REDSHIFT LIKELIHOODS OF z > 8 GALAXIES IN THE HUDF12

    SciTech Connect

    Pirzkal, Nor; Ryan, Russell; Coe, Dan; Noeske, Kai; Rothberg, Barry; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James

    2013-09-20

    In the absence of spectra, the technique of fitting model galaxy template spectra to observed photometric fluxes has become the workhorse method for determining the redshifts and other properties for high-z galaxy candidates. In this paper, we present an analysis of the most recent and possibly most distant galaxies (z {approx} 8-12) discovered in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) using a more robust method of redshift estimation based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) fitting, in contrast to the ''best fit'' models obtained using simpler {chi}{sup 2} minimization techniques. The advantage of MCMC fitting is the ability to accurately estimate the probability density function of the redshift for each object as well as any input model parameters. This makes it possible to derive accurate, credible intervals by properly marginalizing over all other input model parameters. We apply our method to 13 recently identified sources in the HUDF and show that, despite claims based on {chi}{sup 2} minimization, none of these sources can be securely ruled out as low redshift interlopers (z < 4) due to the low signal-to-noise of currently available observations. There is an average probability of 21% that these sources are low redshift interlopers.

  3. Sky Mining - Application to Photomorphic Redshift Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Pragyansmita

    The field of astronomy has evolved from the ancient craft of observing the sky. In it's present form, astronomers explore the cosmos not just by observing through the tiny visible window used by our eyes, but also by exploiting the electromagnetic spectrum from radio waves to gamma rays. The domain is undoubtedly at the forefront of data-driven science. The data growth rate is expected to be around 50%--100% per year. This data explosion is attributed largely to the large-scale wide and deep surveys of the different regions of the sky at multiple wavelengths (both ground and space-based surveys). This dissertation describes the application of machine learning methods to the estimation of galaxy redshifts leveraging such a survey data. Galaxy is a large system of stars held together by mutual gravitation and isolated from similar systems by vast regions of space. Our view of the universe is closely tied to our understanding of galaxy formation. Thus, a better understanding of the relative location of the multitudes of galaxies is crucial. The position of each galaxy can be characterized using three coordinates. Right Ascension (ra) and Declination (dec) are the two coordinates that locate the galaxy in two dimensions on the plane of the sky. It is relatively straightforward to measure them. In contrast, fixing the third coordinate that is the galaxy's distance from the observer along the line of sight (redshift 'z') is considerably more challenging. "Spectroscopic redshift" method gives us accurate and precise measurements of z. However, it is extremely time-intensive and unusable for faint objects. Additionally, the rate at which objects are being identified via photometric surveys far exceeds the rate at which the spectroscopic redshift measurements can keep pace in determining their distance. As the surveys go deeper into the sky, the proportion of faint objects being identified also continues to increase. In order to tackle both these drawbacks increasing in

  4. Searches for High Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, R.

    In recent years, the technique of Lyman break imaging has proven very effective at identifying large numbers of galaxies at high redshifts through deep multicolour imaging (Steidel et al 1996b; Steidel et al 1999). The combination of an intrinsic break in the spectra of star-forming galaxies below the rest-frame wavelength of Lyman-alpha and attenuation by intervening HI systems on the line of sight to high redshifts makes for a pronounced drop in the flux of high redshift galaxies between 912 Å and 1216 Å in the rest-frame. At redshifts z> 3, the break is shifted sufficiently far into the optical window accessible to ground-based telescopes for galaxies at such redshift to be distinguished from the foreground galaxy population through photometry alone. Through modelling of the expected colours of a wide range of galaxy types, ages and redshifts, taking into account the effects of reddening (Calzetti, Kinney and Storchi-Bergmann 1994) and intergalactic attenuation (Madau 1995), we assess the likely colours of high redshift galaxies and determine the redshift ranges most effectively probed by the imaging filters. We obtain multicolour imaging of the fields of four high redshift radio galaxies, covering around 40 arcmin2 in each, allowing us to attempt to find ordinary galaxies at similar redshifts to the central radio galaxies through photometric colour selection techniques. Some idea as to the effectiveness comes through additional colour and morphological information obtained from high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope images and from data taken in the near infra-red. While we do not have spectroscopic evidence for the redshifts of our candidates, given the available evidence we conclude that the number densities of Lyman break galaxies in the radio galaxy fields are in broad agreement with the data of Steidel et al (1999). Finally, we assess the prospects for future studies of the high redshift Universe, in particular the potential of the Oxford Deep Wide Field

  5. Bayesian redshift-space distortions correction from galaxy redshift surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Ata, Metin; Angulo, Raul E.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Monteagudo, Carlos Hernández; Prada, Francisco; Yepes, Gustavo

    2016-03-01

    We present a Bayesian reconstruction method which maps a galaxy distribution from redshift- to real-space inferring the distances of the individual galaxies. The method is based on sampling density fields assuming a lognormal prior with a likelihood modelling non-linear stochastic bias. Coherent redshift-space distortions are corrected in a Gibbs-sampling procedure by moving the galaxies from redshift- to real-space according to the peculiar motions derived from the recovered density field using linear theory. The virialized distortions are corrected by sampling candidate real-space positions along the line of sight, which are compatible with the bulk flow corrected redshift-space position adding a random dispersion term in high-density collapsed regions (defined by the eigenvalues of the Hessian). This approach presents an alternative method to estimate the distances to galaxies using the three-dimensional spatial information, and assuming isotropy. Hence the number of applications is very broad. In this work, we show the potential of this method to constrain the growth rate up to k ˜ 0.3 h Mpc-1. Furthermore it could be useful to correct for photometric redshift errors, and to obtain improved baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) reconstructions.

  6. Redshift surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Margaret J.; Huchra, J. P.

    1991-01-01

    Present-day understanding of the large-scale galaxy distribution is reviewed. The statistics of the CfA redshift survey are briefly discussed. The need for deeper surveys to clarify the issues raised by recent studies of large-scale galactic distribution is addressed.

  7. MAGNIFICATION AS A PROBE OF DARK MATTER HALOS AT HIGH REDSHIFTS

    SciTech Connect

    Van Waerbeke, L.; Ford, J.; Milkeraitis, M.; Hildebrandt, H.

    2010-11-01

    We propose a new approach for measuring the mass profile of dark matter halos by stacking the lensing magnification of distant background galaxies behind groups and clusters of galaxies. The main advantage of lensing magnification is that, unlike lensing shear, it relies on accurate photometric redshifts only and not on galaxy shapes, thus enabling the study of the dark matter distribution with unresolved source galaxies. We present a feasibility study, using a real population of z {>=} 2.5 Lyman break galaxies as source galaxies, and where, similar to galaxy-galaxy lensing, foreground lenses are stacked in order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. We find that there is an interesting new observational window for gravitational lensing as a probe of dark matter halos at high redshift, which does not require a measurement of galaxy shapes.

  8. J-PLUS: The Javalambre Photometric Local Universe Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenarro, Javier; Marin-Franch, Antonio; Moles, Mariano; Cristobal-Hornillos, David; Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia; Sodre, Laerte

    2015-08-01

    The Javalambre-Photometric Local Universe Survey, J-PLUS (www.j-plus.es), is defined to observe 8500 deg2 of the sky visible from the Javalambre Observatory (Teruel, Spain) with the panoramic camera T80Cam at the JAST/T80 telescope, using a set of 12 broad, intermediate and narrow band optical filters. The Project is particularly designed to carry out the photometric calibration of J-PAS (http://j-pas.org). For this reason, some J-PLUS filters are located at key stellar spectral features that allow to retrieve very accurate spectral energy distributions for more than 5 millions of stars in our Galaxy. Beyond the calibration goals, the unusually large FOV of T80Cam, 2deg2, together with the unique width and location of some filters, turn the J-PLUS Project into a powerful 3D view of the nearby Universe, mapping more than 20 millions of galaxies with reliable distance determinations and a similar number of stars of the Milky Way halo. At a rate of 100 gigabytes of data per night, J-PLUS will provide unprecedented multi-color images of the Universe to address a wide variety of astrophysical questions related with cosmology, large scale structure, galaxy clusters, 2D stellar populations and star formation studies in galaxies, the discovery of high redshift galaxies at specific redshift slices, quasars, supernovae, Milky Way science and structure, and minor bodies in the Solar System. In addition, the repetition of the whole area over time in certain filters will allow to face variability studies in the time domain.Complementing J-PLUS, a replica of the JAST/T80 telescope, T80Cam and the J-PLUS filters have been installed at the CTIO, allowing to extend the project to the Southern Hemisphere. J-PLUS together with the southern extension, S-PLUS, constitute an All-sky Photometric Local Universe Survey whose details and scientific applications are the bulk of the present talk.

  9. Galaxy Evolution Across The Redshift Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotulla, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    GALEV evolutionary synthesis models are an ideal tool to study the formation and evolution of galaxies. I present a large model grid that contains undisturbed E and Sa-Sd type galaxies as well as a wide range of models undergoing starbursts of various strengths and at different times and also includes the subsequent post-starburst phases for these galaxies. This model grid not only allows to describe and refine currently used color selection criteria for Lyman Break Galaxies, BzK galaxies, Extremely Red Objects (ERO) and both Distant and Luminous Red Galaxies (DRG, LRG). It also gives accurate stellar masses, gas fractions, star formation rates, metallicities and burst strengths for an unprecedentedly large sample of galaxies with multi-band photometry. We find, amongst other things, that LBGs are most likely progenitors of local early type spiral galaxies and low-mass ellipticals. We are for the first time able to reproduce E+A features in EROs by post-starbursts as an alternative to dusty starforming galaxies and predict how to discriminate between these scenarios. Our results from photometric analyses perfectly agree with all available spectroscopic information and open up a much wider perspective, including the bulk of the less luminous and more typical galaxy population, in the redshift desert and beyond. All model data are available online at http://www.galev.org.

  10. REDSHIFT CATALOG FOR SWIFT LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Limin; Schaefer, Bradley E.

    2011-04-20

    We present a catalog of the redshifts for most long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) by Swift from 2004 December 20 to 2008 July 23 (258 bursts in total). All available information is collected, including spectroscopic redshifts, photometric redshift limits, and redshifts calculated from various luminosity relations. Error bars for the redshifts derived from the luminosity relations are asymmetric, with tails extended to the high-redshift end, and this effect is evaluated by looking at the 30% of Swift bursts with spectroscopic redshifts. A simulation is performed to eliminate this asymmetric effect, and the resultant redshift distribution is deconvolved. We test and confirm this simulation on the sample of bursts with known spectroscopic redshifts and then apply it to the 70% of Swift bursts that do not have spectroscopic measures. A final intrinsic redshift distribution is then made for almost all Swift bursts, and the efficiency of the spectroscopic detections is evaluated. The efficiency of spectroscopic redshifts varies from near unity at low redshift to 0.5 at z = 1, to near 0.3 at z = 4, and to 0.1 at z = 6. We also find that the fraction of GRBs with z>5 is {approx}10%, and this fraction is compared with simulations from a cosmological model.

  11. CONSTRAINING SOURCE REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTIONS WITH GRAVITATIONAL LENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Wittman, D.; Dawson, W. A.

    2012-09-10

    We introduce a new method for constraining the redshift distribution of a set of galaxies, using weak gravitational lensing shear. Instead of using observed shears and redshifts to constrain cosmological parameters, we ask how well the shears around clusters can constrain the redshifts, assuming fixed cosmological parameters. This provides a check on photometric redshifts, independent of source spectral energy distribution properties and therefore free of confounding factors such as misidentification of spectral breaks. We find that {approx}40 massive ({sigma}{sub v} = 1200 km s{sup -1}) cluster lenses are sufficient to determine the fraction of sources in each of six coarse redshift bins to {approx}11%, given weak (20%) priors on the masses of the highest-redshift lenses, tight (5%) priors on the masses of the lowest-redshift lenses, and only modest (20%-50%) priors on calibration and evolution effects. Additional massive lenses drive down uncertainties as N{sub lens}{sup -1/2}, but the improvement slows as one is forced to use lenses further down the mass function. Future large surveys contain enough clusters to reach 1% precision in the bin fractions if the tight lens-mass priors can be maintained for large samples of lenses. In practice this will be difficult to achieve, but the method may be valuable as a complement to other more precise methods because it is based on different physics and therefore has different systematic errors.

  12. A Catalog of Photometry for Las Campanas Redshift Survey Galaxies on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey System

    SciTech Connect

    Sowards-Emmerd, David; Smith, J. Allyn; McKay, Timothy A.; Sheldon, Erin; Tucker, Douglas L.; Castander, Francisco J.

    2000-06-01

    We present high-quality photometry in the five Sloan Digital Sky Survey filters, u', g', r', i', and z', for 2195 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts measured by the Las Campanas Redshift Survey. In addition, a polynomial photometric redshift estimator is derived, with an uncertainty of 0.035 out to z = 0.25. (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society.

  13. A Catalog of Photometry for Las Campanas Redshift Survey Galaxies on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowards-Emmerd, David; Smith, J. Allyn; McKay, Timothy A.; Sheldon, Erin; Tucker, Douglas L.; Castander, Francisco J.

    2000-06-01

    We present high-quality photometry in the five Sloan Digital Sky Survey filters, u', g', r', i', and z', for 2195 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts measured by the Las Campanas Redshift Survey. In addition, a polynomial photometric redshift estimator is derived, with an uncertainty of 0.035 out to z=0.25.

  14. THE PHOTOMETRIC CLASSIFICATION SERVER FOR Pan-STARRS1

    SciTech Connect

    Saglia, R. P.; Bender, R.; Seitz, S.; Senger, R.; Snigula, J.; Phleps, S.; Wilman, D.; Tonry, J. L.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Heasley, J. N.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Morgan, J. S.; Greisel, N.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Klement, R. J.; Rix, H.-W.; Smith, K.; Green, P. J.; and others

    2012-02-20

    The Pan-STARRS1 survey is obtaining multi-epoch imaging in five bands (g{sub P1} r{sub P1} i{sub P1} z{sub P1} y{sub P1}) over the entire sky north of declination -30 deg. We describe here the implementation of the Photometric Classification Server (PCS) for Pan-STARRS1. PCS will allow the automatic classification of objects into star/galaxy/quasar classes based on colors and the measurement of photometric redshifts for extragalactic objects, and will constrain stellar parameters for stellar objects, working at the catalog level. We present tests of the system based on high signal-to-noise photometry derived from the Medium-Deep Fields of Pan-STARRS1, using available spectroscopic surveys as training and/or verification sets. We show that the Pan-STARRS1 photometry delivers classifications and photometric redshifts as good as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry to the same magnitude limits. In particular, our preliminary results, based on this relatively limited data set down to the SDSS spectroscopic limits, and therefore potentially improvable, show that stars are correctly classified as such in 85% of cases, galaxies in 97%, and QSOs in 84%. False positives are less than 1% for galaxies, Almost-Equal-To 19% for stars, and Almost-Equal-To 28% for QSOs. Moreover, photometric redshifts for 1000 luminous red galaxies up to redshift 0.5 are determined to 2.4% precision (defined as 1.48 Multiplication-Sign Median|z{sub phot} - z{sub spec}|/(1 + z)) with just 0.4% catastrophic outliers and small (-0.5%) residual bias. For bluer galaxies up to the same redshift, the residual bias (on average -0.5%) trend, percentage of catastrophic failures (1.2%), and precision (4.2%) are higher, but still interestingly small for many science applications. Good photometric redshifts (to 5%) can be obtained for at most 60% of the QSOs of the sample. PCS will create a value-added catalog with classifications and photometric redshifts for eventually many millions of sources.

  15. THREE CANDIDATE CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES AT REDSHIFT {approx}1.8: THE 'MISSING LINK' BETWEEN PROTOCLUSTERS AND LOCAL CLUSTERS?

    SciTech Connect

    Chiaberge, Marco; Macchetto, F. Duccio; Capetti, A.; Rosati, P.; Tozzi, P.; Tremblay, G. R.

    2010-02-20

    We present three candidate clusters of galaxies at redshifts most likely between 1.7 and 2.0, which corresponds to a fundamentally unexplored epoch of cluster evolution. The candidates were found by studying the environment around our newly selected sample of 'beacons' low-luminosity (FR I) radio galaxies in the COSMOS field. In this way, we intend to use the fact that FR Is at low z are almost invariably located in clusters of galaxies. We use the most accurate photometric redshifts available to date, derived by the COSMOS collaboration using photometry with a set of 30 filters, to look for three-dimensional space overdensities around our objects. Three out of the five FR Is in our sample which possess reliable photometric redshifts between z {sub phot} = 1.7 and 2.0 display overdensities that together are statistically significant at the 4{sigma} level, compared to field counts, arguing for the presence of rich clusters of galaxies in their Mpc environment. These first results show that the new method for finding high-z clusters we recently proposed, which makes use of low-power FR I radio galaxies instead of the more powerful FR II sources often used in the literature to date, is returning very promising candidates.

  16. Spectra of High-Redshift Type Ia Supernovae and a Comparison withtheir Low-Redshift Counterparts

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, I.M.; Howell, D.A.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Burns,M.S.; Conley, A.; Deustua, S.E.; Ellis, R.; Fabbro, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Folatelli, G.; Garavini, G.; Gibbons, R.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.E.; Kim, A.G.; Knop, R.A.; Kowalski, M.; Lidman, C.; Nobili, S.; Nugent, P.E.; Pain, R.; Pennypacker, C.R.; Perlmutter, S.; Ruiz-Lapuente,P.; Sainton, G.; Schaefer, B.E.; Smith, E.; Spadafora, A.L.; Stanishev,V.; Thomas, R.C.; Walton, N.A.; Wang, L.; Wood-Vasey, W.M.

    2005-07-20

    We present spectra for 14 high-redshift (0.17 < z < 0.83) supernovae, which were discovered by the Supernova Cosmology Project as part of a campaign to measure cosmological parameters. The spectra are used to determine the redshift and classify the supernova type, essential information if the supernovae are to be used for cosmological studies. Redshifts were derived either from the spectrum of the host galaxy or from the spectrum of the supernova itself. We present evidence that these supernovae are of Type Ia by matching to spectra of nearby supernovae. We find that the dates of the spectra relative to maximum light determined from this fitting process are consistent with the dates determined from the photometric light curves, and moreover the spectral time-sequence for SNe Type Ia at low and high redshift is indistinguishable. We also show that the expansion velocities measured from blueshifted Ca H&K are consistent with those measured for low-redshift Type Ia supernovae. From these first-level quantitative comparisons we find no evidence for evolution in SNIa properties between these low- and high-redshift samples. Thus even though our samples may not be complete, we conclude that there is a population of SNe Ia at high redshift whose spectral properties match those at low redshift.

  17. Using cross correlations to calibrate lensing source redshift distributions: Improving cosmological constraints from upcoming weak lensing surveys

    SciTech Connect

    De Putter, Roland; Doré, Olivier; Das, Sudeep

    2014-01-10

    Cross correlations between the galaxy number density in a lensing source sample and that in an overlapping spectroscopic sample can in principle be used to calibrate the lensing source redshift distribution. In this paper, we study in detail to what extent this cross-correlation method can mitigate the loss of cosmological information in upcoming weak lensing surveys (combined with a cosmic microwave background prior) due to lack of knowledge of the source distribution. We consider a scenario where photometric redshifts are available and find that, unless the photometric redshift distribution p(z {sub ph}|z) is calibrated very accurately a priori (bias and scatter known to ∼0.002 for, e.g., EUCLID), the additional constraint on p(z {sub ph}|z) from the cross-correlation technique to a large extent restores the cosmological information originally lost due to the uncertainty in dn/dz(z). Considering only the gain in photo-z accuracy and not the additional cosmological information, enhancements of the dark energy figure of merit of up to a factor of four (40) can be achieved for a SuMIRe-like (EUCLID-like) combination of lensing and redshift surveys, where SuMIRe stands for Subaru Measurement of Images and Redshifts). However, the success of the method is strongly sensitive to our knowledge of the galaxy bias evolution in the source sample and we find that a percent level bias prior is needed to optimize the gains from the cross-correlation method (i.e., to approach the cosmology constraints attainable if the bias was known exactly).

  18. THE CARNEGIE SUPERNOVA PROJECT: FIRST PHOTOMETRY DATA RELEASE OF LOW-REDSHIFT TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras, Carlos; Phillips, M. M.; Folatelli, Gaston; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Boldt, Luis; Gonzalez, Sergio; Krzeminski, Wojtek; Morrell, Nidia; Roth, Miguel; Salgado, Francisco; Hamuy, Mario; Maureira, MarIa Jose; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Persson, S. E.; Burns, Christopher R.; Freedman, W. L.; Madore, Barry F.; Murphy, David; Wyatt, Pamela

    2010-02-15

    The Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) is a five-year survey being carried out at the Las Campanas Observatory to obtain high-quality light curves of {approx}100 low-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in a well-defined photometric system. Here we present the first release of photometric data that contains the optical light curves of 35 SNe Ia, and near-infrared light curves for a subset of 25 events. The data comprise 5559 optical (ugriBV) and 1043 near-infrared (Y JHK{sub s} ) data points in the natural system of the Swope telescope. Twenty-eight SNe have pre-maximum data, and for 15 of these, the observations begin at least 5 days before B maximum. This is one of the most accurate data sets of low-redshift SNe Ia published to date. When completed, the CSP data set will constitute a fundamental reference for precise determinations of cosmological parameters, and serve as a rich resource for comparison with models of SNe Ia.

  19. Anomaly detection for machine learning redshifts applied to SDSS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Ben; Rau, Markus Michael; Paech, Kerstin; Bonnett, Christopher; Seitz, Stella; Weller, Jochen

    2015-10-01

    We present an analysis of anomaly detection for machine learning redshift estimation. Anomaly detection allows the removal of poor training examples, which can adversely influence redshift estimates. Anomalous training examples may be photometric galaxies with incorrect spectroscopic redshifts, or galaxies with one or more poorly measured photometric quantity. We select 2.5 million `clean' SDSS DR12 galaxies with reliable spectroscopic redshifts, and 6730 `anomalous' galaxies with spectroscopic redshift measurements which are flagged as unreliable. We contaminate the clean base galaxy sample with galaxies with unreliable redshifts and attempt to recover the contaminating galaxies using the Elliptical Envelope technique. We then train four machine learning architectures for redshift analysis on both the contaminated sample and on the preprocessed `anomaly-removed' sample and measure redshift statistics on a clean validation sample generated without any preprocessing. We find an improvement on all measured statistics of up to 80 per cent when training on the anomaly removed sample as compared with training on the contaminated sample for each of the machine learning routines explored. We further describe a method to estimate the contamination fraction of a base data sample.

  20. Three-dimensional stereo by photometric ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, L.B.; Angelopoulou, E.

    1994-11-01

    We present a methodology for corresponding a dense set of points on an object surface from photometric values for three-dimensional stereo computation of depth. The methodology utilizes multiple stereo pairs of images, with each stereo pair being taken of the identical scene but under different illumination. With just two stereo pairs of images taken under two different illumination conditions, a stereo pair of ratio images can be produced, one for the ratio of left-hand images and one for the ratio of right-hand images. We demonstrate how the photometric ratios composing these images can be used for accurate correspondence of object points. Object points having the same photometric ratio with respect to two different illumination conditions constitute a well-defined equivalence class of physical constraints defined by local surface orientation relative to illumination conditions. We formally show that for diffuse reflection the photometric ratio is invariant to varying camera characteristics, surface albedo, and viewpoint and that therefore the same photometric ratio in both images of a stereo pair implies the same equivalence class of physical constraints. The correspondence of photometric ratios along epipolar lines in a stereo pair of images under different illumination conditions is a correspondence of equivalent physical constraints, and the determination of depth from stereo can be performed. Whereas illumination planning is required, our photometric-based stereo methodology does not require knowledge of illumination conditions in the actual computation of three-dimensional depth and is applicable to perspective views. This technique extends the stereo determination of three-dimensional depth to smooth featureless surfaces without the use of precisely calibrated lighting. We demonstrate experimental depth maps from a dense set of points on smooth objects of known ground-truth shape, determined to within 1% depth accuracy.

  1. Dusty Quasars at High Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine

    2016-09-01

    A population of quasars at z ˜ 2 is determined based on dust luminosities νL ν (7.8 μm) that includes unobscured, partially obscured, and obscured quasars. Quasars are classified by the ratio νL ν (0.25 μm)/νL ν (7.8 μm) = UV/IR, assumed to measure obscuration of UV luminosity by the dust that produces IR luminosity. Quasar counts at rest-frame 7.8 μm are determined for quasars in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey using 24 μm sources with optical redshifts from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES) or infrared redshifts from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. Spectral energy distributions are extended to far-infrared wavelengths using observations from the Herschel Space Observatory Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE), and new SPIRE photometry is presented for 77 high-redshift quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. It is found that unobscured and obscured quasars have similar space densities at rest-frame 7.8 μm, but the ratio L ν (100 μm)/L ν (7.8 μm) is about three times higher for obscured quasars than for unobscured, so that far-infrared or submillimeter quasar detections are dominated by obscured quasars. We find that only ˜5% of high-redshift submillimeter sources are quasars and that existing 850 μm surveys or 2 mm surveys should already have detected sources at z ˜ 10 if quasar and starburst luminosity functions remain the same from z = 2 until z = 10.

  2. Mimas - Photometric roughness and albedo map

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verbiscer, Anne J.; Veverka, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    The backscattering phase function asssociated with bright icy satellites may render Hapke's (1986) isotropic approximation to multiple scattering inadequate. A reanalysis is accordingly conducted here of the Voyager observations of Mimas, using a modification to Hapke's equation that accommodates anisotropic multiple scattering, in order to characterize the physical and photometric properties of the heavily cratered icy surface. The roughness parameter of Mimas is in this way redefined, and an accurate albedo map is obtained which deminstrates small latitudinal and longitudinal albedo variations.

  3. The angular power spectra of photometric Sloan Digital Sky Survey luminous red galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Shaun A.; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Lahav, Ofer

    2011-04-01

    We construct new galaxy angular power spectra Cℓ based on the extended, updated and final Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) II luminous red galaxy (LRG) photometric redshift survey - MegaZ (DR7). Encapsulating 7746 deg2 we utilize 723 556 photometrically determined LRGs between 0.45 < z < 0.65 in a 3.3 (Gpc h-1)3 spherical harmonic analysis of the galaxy distribution. By combining four photometric redshift bins, we find preliminary parameter constraints of fb≡Ωb/Ωm= 0.173 ± 0.046 and Ωm= 0.260 ± 0.035 assuming H0= 75 km s-1 Mpc-1, ns= 1 and Ωk= 0. These limits are consistent with the cosmic microwave background and the previous data release (DR4). The Cℓ are sensitive to redshift space distortions and therefore we also recast our constraints into a measurement of β≈Ω0.55m/b in different redshift shells. The robustness of these power spectra with respect to a number of potential systematics such as extinction, photometric redshift and ANNz training set extrapolation are examined. The latter includes a cosmological comparison of available photometric redshift estimation codes where we find excellent agreement between template and empirical estimation methods. MegaZ DR7 represents a methodological prototype to next generation surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and, furthermore, is a photometric precursor to the spectroscopic BOSS survey. Our galaxy catalogue and all power spectra data can be found at .

  4. Voyager photometry of Triton - Haze and surface photometric properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Verbiscer, A.; Veverka, J.

    1991-01-01

    The Voyager whole-disk observations of Triton at 0.41, 0.48, and 0.56 micron filter wavelengths are analyzed using a model which combines an improved version of Hapke's photometric equation with a thin atmospheric haze layer in the appropriate spherical geometry. The model is shown to describe accurately the phase curves over a range of phase angles and to agree with disk-resolved brightness scans along the photometric equator and mirror meridian. According to the model, the photometric parameters of Triton's regolith are reasonably typical of icy satellites, except for the extremely high (close to unity) single-scattering albedo.

  5. Quasars, Redshifts and Controversies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arp, Halton C.

    1988-09-01

    Introduction; 1. Distance of quasars; 2. The battle over statistics; 3. Galaxies visibly connected to quasars; 4. Certain galaxies with many quasars; 5. Distribution of quasars in space; 6. Galaxies with excess redshift; 7. Small excess redshifts, the local group of galaxies, and quantization of redshifts; 8. Correcting intrinsic redshifts and identifying hydrogen clouds within nearby groups of galaxies; 9. Ejection from galaxies; 10. The sociology of the controversy; 11. Interpretations; Glossary; Index.

  6. Standard Asteroid Photometric Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piironen, J.; Lagerkvist, C.-I.; Torppa, J.; Kaasalainen, M.; Warner, B.

    2001-12-01

    The Asteroid Photometric Catalogue (APC) is now in its fifth update with over 8600 lightcurves of more than 1000 asteroids in the database. The APC also has references of over one thousand lightcurves not in digital format. The catalogue has been published by Uppsala University Observatory and is distributed by request (contact: classe@astro.uu.se). The new update also includes a list of known asteroid rotational periods and a CD-ROM containing all the existing digital data in the APC. The total number of observed lightcurves is growing rapidly, not the least because of the new state-of-the-art equipment and growing interest among amateur astronomers. The photometric database is now so large that the present format must be altered to facilitate a user-friendly on-line service for the down- and uploading of data. We are proposing (and have started to construct) a new Internet-based Standard Asteroid Photometric Catalogue (SAPC). The website is planned to open during the first half of the year 2002. In addition to the data files, the site would contain the index and guide to the catalogue, a web-form for reporting observations, and some general observing guidelines (e.g., on filters, timing, etc.). There would also be a list of asteroids for which more observations are needed, together with recommended observing periods. This would be accompanied by an up-to-date collection of physical asteroid models based on photometric data, as well as links to observer network pages and other sites that work in collaboration with the catalogue project. Our aim is to develop this site into a global standard service used by everyone involved in asteroid photometry.

  7. Star formation and mass assembly in high redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santini, P.; Fontana, A.; Grazian, A.; Salimbeni, S.; Fiore, F.; Fontanot, F.; Boutsia, K.; Castellano, M.; Cristiani, S.; de Santis, C.; Gallozzi, S.; Giallongo, E.; Menci, N.; Nonino, M.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.; Vanzella, E.

    2009-09-01

    Aims: The goal of this work is to infer the star formation properties and the mass assembly process of high redshift (0.3 ≤ z < 2.5) galaxies from their IR emission using the 24 μm band of MIPS-Spitzer. Methods: We used an updated version of the GOODS-MUSIC catalog, which has multiwavelength coverage from 0.3 to 24 μm and either spectroscopic or accurate photometric redshifts. We describe how the catalog has been extended by the addition of mid-IR fluxes derived from the MIPS 24 μm image. We compared two different estimators of the star formation rate (SFR hereafter). One is the total infrared emission derived from 24 μm, estimated using both synthetic and empirical IR templates. The other one is a multiwavelength fit to the full galaxy SED, which automatically accounts for dust reddening and age-star formation activity degeneracies. For both estimates, we computed the SFR density and the specific SFR. Results: We show that the two SFR indicators are roughly consistent, once the uncertainties involved are taken into account. However, they show a systematic trend, IR-based estimates exceeding the fit-based ones as the star formation rate increases. With this new catalog, we show that: a) at z>0.3, the star formation rate is correlated well with stellar mass, and this relationship seems to steepen with redshift if one relies on IR-based estimates of the SFR; b) the contribution to the global SFRD by massive galaxies increases with redshift up to ≃ 2.5, more rapidly than for galaxies of lower mass, but appears to flatten at higher z; c) despite this increase, the most important contributors to the SFRD at any z are galaxies of about, or immediately lower than, the characteristic stellar mass; d) at z≃ 2, massive galaxies are actively star-forming, with a median {SFR} ≃ 300 M_⊙ yr-1. During this epoch, our targeted galaxies assemble a substantial part of their final stellar mass; e) the specific SFR (SSFR) shows a clear bimodal distribution. Conclusions

  8. The Galaxy Luminosity Function at Redshifts 7 < z < 9 from the Hubble Ultradeep Field 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenker, Matthew; McLure, R.; Ono, Y.; Ellis, R. S.; Dunlop, J.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Robertson, B. E.; UDF12 Team

    2013-01-01

    The UV-selected galaxy luminosity function at z > 6 provides a crucial observational constraint on the earliest phases of galaxy evolution and the likely role galaxies play in cosmic reionization. Within this context, we present new results on the galaxy luminosity function at redshifts 7 < z < 9 arising from the unprecedented deep near-IR imaging data provided by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Ultra Deep Field 2012 (UDF12) program undertaken with the near-infrared arm of the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3/IR). Compared to previous data in the UDF, the new UDF12 program quadruples the integration time in the vital Y-band filter (F105W), reaching a 5-sigma detection limit of 30.0 AB, and provides the first ultra-deep imaging (5-sigma limit=29.8 AB) in the previously unused J-band/F140W filter. Using a combination of traditional drop-out selection and photometric redshift techniques we have assembled a well defined sample of over 200 galaxies at z>6.5, drawn from UDF12 and wider field HST imaging sampling a total area of 300 square arcmin. Our combined analyses provide the most accurate measures to data of the faint end of the luminosity function at z=7 and z=8, and the first census of the population at z=9. High redshift galaxy samples derived from the UDF12 program will provide a premier resource for studying high-redshift galaxy evolution in the era prior to the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope.

  9. Supernova Photometric Lightcurve Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, Tayeb; Narayan, Gautham

    2016-01-01

    This is a preliminary report on photometric supernova classification. We first explore the properties of supernova light curves, and attempt to restructure the unevenly sampled and sparse data from assorted datasets to allow for processing and classification. The data was primarily drawn from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) simulated data, created for the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge. This poster shows a method for producing a non-parametric representation of the light curve data, and applying a Random Forest classifier algorithm to distinguish between supernovae types. We examine the impact of Principal Component Analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the dataset, for future classification work. The classification code will be used in a stage of the ANTARES pipeline, created for use on the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope alert data and other wide-field surveys. The final figure-of-merit for the DES data in the r band was 60% for binary classification (Type I vs II).Zaidi was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  10. Subpixel photometric stereo.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ping; Lin, Stephen; Quan, Long

    2008-08-01

    Conventional photometric stereo recovers one normal direction per pixel of the input image. This fundamentally limits the scale of recovered geometry to the resolution of the input image, and cannot model surfaces with subpixel geometric structures. In this paper, we propose a method to recover subpixel surface geometry by studying the relationship between the subpixel geometry and the reflectance properties of a surface. We first describe a generalized physically-based reflectance model that relates the distribution of surface normals inside each pixel area to its reflectance function. The distribution of surface normals can be computed from the reflectance functions recorded in photometric stereo images. A convexity measure of subpixel geometry structure is also recovered at each pixel, through an analysis of the shadowing attenuation. Then, we use the recovered distribution of surface normals and the surface convexity to infer subpixel geometric structures on a surface of homogeneous material by spatially arranging the normals among pixels at a higher resolution than that of the input image. Finally, we optimize the arrangement of normals using a combination of belief propagation and MCMC based on a minimum description length criterion on 3D textons over the surface. The experiments demonstrate the validity of our approach and show superior geometric resolution for the recovered surfaces. PMID:18566498

  11. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III photometric quasar clustering: probing the initial conditions of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Shirley; Agarwal, Nishant; Myers, Adam D.; Lyons, Richard; Disbrow, Ashley; Seo, Hee-Jong; Ross, Ashley; Hirata, Christopher; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; O'Connell, Ross; Huff, Eric; Schlegel, David; Slosar, Anže; Weinberg, David; Strauss, Michael; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schneider, Donald P.; Bahcall, Neta; Brinkmann, J.; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yèche, Christophe

    2015-05-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has surveyed 14,555 square degrees of the sky, and delivered over a trillion pixels of imaging data. We present the large-scale clustering of 1.6 million quasars between z=0.5 and z=2.5 that have been classified from this imaging, representing the highest density of quasars ever studied for clustering measurements. This data set spans 0~ 11,00 square degrees and probes a volume of 80 h-3 Gpc3. In principle, such a large volume and medium density of tracers should facilitate high-precision cosmological constraints. We measure the angular clustering of photometrically classified quasars using an optimal quadratic estimator in four redshift slices with an accuracy of ~ 25% over a bin width of δl ~ 10-15 on scales corresponding to matter-radiation equality and larger (0l ~ 2-3). Observational systematics can strongly bias clustering measurements on large scales, which can mimic cosmologically relevant signals such as deviations from Gaussianity in the spectrum of primordial perturbations. We account for systematics by employing a new method recently proposed by Agarwal et al. (2014) to the clustering of photometrically classified quasars. We carefully apply our methodology to mitigate known observational systematics and further remove angular bins that are contaminated by unknown systematics. Combining quasar data with the photometric luminous red galaxy (LRG) sample of Ross et al. (2011) and Ho et al. (2012), and marginalizing over all bias and shot noise-like parameters, we obtain a constraint on local primordial non-Gaussianity of fNL = -113+154-154 (1σ error). We next assume that the bias of quasar and galaxy distributions can be obtained independently from quasar/galaxy-CMB lensing cross-correlation measurements (such as those in Sherwin et al. (2013)). This can be facilitated by spectroscopic observations of the sources, enabling the redshift distribution to be completely determined, and allowing precise estimates of the bias

  12. Combining spectroscopic and photometric surveys: Same or different sky?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, Martin; Gaztañaga, Enrique

    2015-08-01

    This paper looks at the combined constraints from a photometric and spectroscopic survey. These surveys will measure cosmology using weak lensing (WL), galaxy clustering, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and redshift space distortions (RSD). We find, contrary to some findings in the recent literature, that overlapping surveys can give important benefits when measuring dark energy. We therefore try to clarify the status of this issue with a full forecast of two stage-IV surveys using a new approach to properly account for covariance between the different probes in the overlapping samples. The benefit of the overlapping survey can be traced back to two factors: additional observables and sample variance cancellation. Both needs to be taken into account and contribute equally when combining 3D power spectrum and 2D correlations for lensing. With an analytic example we also illustrate that for optimal constraints, one should minimize the (Pearson) correlation coefficient between cosmological and nuisance parameters and maximize the one among nuisance parameters (e.g. galaxy bias) in the two samples. This can be achieved by increasing the overlap between the spectroscopic and photometric surveys. We show how BAO, WL and RSD contribute to this benefit and also look at some other survey designs, such as photometric redshift errors and spectroscopic density.

  13. Properties of the redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tifft, William G.; Cocke, W. J.

    1990-01-01

    Central to any analysis of dynamical systems, or large scale motion, is the interpretation of redshifts of galaxies as classical Doppler velocity shifts. This is a testable assumption and for many years evidence has accumulated that is inconsistent with the assumption. Here, the authors review recent evidence suggesting systematic radial dependence and temporal variation of redshifts.

  14. The magnitude-redshift relation for 561 Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, M.; Huchra, J. P.; Geller, M. J.; Henry, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    The Hubble diagram for the 561 Abell clusters with measured redshifts has been examined using Abell's (1958) corrected photo-red magnitudes for the tenth-ranked cluster member (m10). After correction for the Scott effect and K dimming, the data are in good agreement with a linear magnitude-redshift relation with a slope of 0.2 out to z = 0.1. New redshift data are also presented for 20 Abell clusters. Abell's m10 is suitable for redshift estimation for clusters with m10 of no more than 16.5. At fainter m10, the number of foreground galaxies expected within an Abell radius is large enough to make identification of the tenth-ranked galaxy difficult. Interlopers bias the estimated redshift toward low values at high redshift. Leir and van den Bergh's (1977) redshift estimates suffer from this same bias but to a smaller degree because of the use of multiple cluster parameters. Constraints on deviations of cluster velocities from the mean cosmological flow require greater photometric accuracy than is provided by Abell's m10 magnitudes.

  15. The number density of quiescent compact galaxies at intermediate redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Damjanov, Ivana; Hwang, Ho Seong; Geller, Margaret J.; Chilingarian, Igor

    2014-09-20

    Massive compact systems at 0.2 < z < 0.6 are the missing link between the predominantly compact population of massive quiescent galaxies at high redshift and their analogs and relics in the local volume. The evolution in number density of these extreme objects over cosmic time is the crucial constraining factor for the models of massive galaxy assembly. We select a large sample of ∼200 intermediate-redshift massive compacts from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) spectroscopy by identifying point-like Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric sources with spectroscopic signatures of evolved redshifted galaxies. A subset of our targets have publicly available high-resolution ground-based images that we use to augment the dynamical and stellar population properties of these systems by their structural parameters. We confirm that all BOSS compact candidates are as compact as their high-redshift massive counterparts and less than half the size of similarly massive systems at z ∼ 0. We use the completeness-corrected numbers of BOSS compacts to compute lower limits on their number densities in narrow redshift bins spanning the range of our sample. The abundance of extremely dense quiescent galaxies at 0.2 < z < 0.6 is in excellent agreement with the number densities of these systems at high redshift. Our lower limits support the models of massive galaxy assembly through a series of minor mergers over the redshift range 0 < z < 2.

  16. ALMA REDSHIFTS OF MILLIMETER-SELECTED GALAXIES FROM THE SPT SURVEY: THE REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION OF DUSTY STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, A.; De Breuck, C.; Aravena, M.; Biggs, A. D.; Marrone, D. P.; Bothwell, M.; Vieira, J. D.; Bock, J. J.; Aguirre, J. E.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bayliss, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Bethermin, M.; Brodwin, M.; Chapman, S. C.; and others

    2013-04-10

    Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, we have conducted a blind redshift survey in the 3 mm atmospheric transmission window for 26 strongly lensed dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) selected with the South Pole Telescope. The sources were selected to have S{sub 1.4{sub mm}} > 20 mJy and a dust-like spectrum and, to remove low-z sources, not have bright radio (S{sub 843{sub MHz}} < 6 mJy) or far-infrared counterparts (S{sub 100{sub {mu}m}} < 1 Jy, S{sub 60{sub {mu}m}} < 200 mJy). We robustly detect 44 line features in our survey, which we identify as redshifted emission lines of {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, C I, H{sub 2}O, and H{sub 2}O{sup +}. We find one or more spectral features in 23 sources yielding a {approx}90% detection rate for this survey; in 12 of these sources we detect multiple lines, while in 11 sources we detect only a single line. For the sources with only one detected line, we break the redshift degeneracy with additional spectroscopic observations if available, or infer the most likely line identification based on photometric data. This yields secure redshifts for {approx}70% of the sample. The three sources with no lines detected are tentatively placed in the redshift desert between 1.7 < z < 2.0. The resulting mean redshift of our sample is z-bar = 3.5. This finding is in contrast to the redshift distribution of radio-identified DSFGs, which have a significantly lower mean redshift of z-bar = 2.3 and for which only 10%-15% of the population is expected to be at z > 3. We discuss the effect of gravitational lensing on the redshift distribution and compare our measured redshift distribution to that of models in the literature.

  17. AN ACCURATE NEW METHOD OF CALCULATING ABSOLUTE MAGNITUDES AND K-CORRECTIONS APPLIED TO THE SLOAN FILTER SET

    SciTech Connect

    Beare, Richard; Brown, Michael J. I.; Pimbblet, Kevin

    2014-12-20

    We describe an accurate new method for determining absolute magnitudes, and hence also K-corrections, that is simpler than most previous methods, being based on a quadratic function of just one suitably chosen observed color. The method relies on the extensive and accurate new set of 129 empirical galaxy template spectral energy distributions from Brown et al. A key advantage of our method is that we can reliably estimate random errors in computed absolute magnitudes due to galaxy diversity, photometric error and redshift error. We derive K-corrections for the five Sloan Digital Sky Survey filters and provide parameter tables for use by the astronomical community. Using the New York Value-Added Galaxy Catalog, we compare our K-corrections with those from kcorrect. Our K-corrections produce absolute magnitudes that are generally in good agreement with kcorrect. Absolute griz magnitudes differ by less than 0.02 mag and those in the u band by ∼0.04 mag. The evolution of rest-frame colors as a function of redshift is better behaved using our method, with relatively few galaxies being assigned anomalously red colors and a tight red sequence being observed across the whole 0.0 < z < 0.5 redshift range.

  18. COSMOLOGY WITH PHOTOMETRIC SURVEYS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Yan; Cooray, Asantha; Chen Xuelei

    2010-02-01

    We discuss the extent to which photometric measurements alone can be used to identify Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) and to determine the redshift and other parameters of interest for cosmological studies. We fit the light curve data of the type expected from a survey such as the one planned with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and also remove the contamination from the core-collapse SNe to SNIa samples. We generate 1000 SNIa mock flux data for each of the LSST filters based on existing design parameters, then use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis to fit the redshift, apparent magnitude, stretch factor, and the phase of the SNIa. We find that the model fitting works adequately well when the true SNe redshift is below 0.5, while at z < 0.2 the accuracy of the photometric data is almost comparable with spectroscopic measurements of the same sample. We discuss the contamination of Type Ib/c (SNIb/c) and Type II supernova (SNII) on the SNIa data set. We find that it is easy to distinguish the SNII through the large chi{sup 2} mismatch when fitting to photometric data with Ia light curves. This is not the case for SNIb/c. We implement a statistical method based on the Bayesian estimation in order to statistically reduce the contamination from SNIb/c for cosmological parameter measurements from the whole SNe sample. The proposed statistical method also evaluates the fraction of the SNIa in the total SNe data set, which provides a valuable guide to establish the degree of contamination.

  19. Photometric Properties of Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Yang; Jorda, L.; Keller, H. U.; Mastrodemos, N.; Mottola, S.; Nathues, A.; Pieters, C.; Reddy, V.; Raymond, C. A.; Roatsch, T.; Russell, C. T.; Buratti, B. J.; Schroder, S. E.; Sykes, M. V.; Titus, T.; Capaccioni, F.; Capria, M. T.; Le Corre, L.; Denevi, B. W.; de Sanctis, M.; Hoffmann, M.; Hicks, M. D.

    2015-03-01

    The Dawn spacecraft orbited Asteroid (4) Vesta for a year, and returned disk-resolved images and spectra covering visible and near-infrared wavelengths at scales as high as 20 m/pix. The visible geometric albedo of Vesta is ~ 0.36. The disk-integrated phase function of Vesta in the visible wavelengths derived from Dawn approach data, previous ground-based observations, and Rosetta OSIRIS observations is consistent with an IAU H-G phase law with H=3.2 mag and G=0.28. Hapke's modeling yields a disk-averaged single-scattering albedo of 0.50, an asymmetry factor of -0.25, and a roughness parameter of ~20 deg at 700 nm wavelength. Vesta's surface displays the largest albedo variations observed so far on asteroids, ranging from ~0.10 to ~0.76 in geometric albedo in the visible wavelengths. The phase function of Vesta displays obvious systematic variations with respect to wavelength, with steeper slopes within the 1- and 2-micron pyroxene bands, consistent with previous ground-based observations and laboratory measurement of HED meteorites showing deeper bands at higher phase angles. The relatively high albedo of Vesta suggests significant contribution of multiple scattering. The non-linear effect of multiple scattering and the possible systematic variations of phase function with albedo across the surface of Vesta may invalidate the traditional algorithm of applying photometric correction on airless planetary surfaces.

  20. Photometric stereo endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Parot, Vicente; Lim, Daryl; González, Germán; Traverso, Giovanni; Nishioka, Norman S.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. While color video endoscopy has enabled wide-field examination of the gastrointestinal tract, it often misses or incorrectly classifies lesions. Many of these missed lesions exhibit characteristic three-dimensional surface topographies. An endoscopic system that adds topographical measurements to conventional color imagery could therefore increase lesion detection and improve classification accuracy. We introduce photometric stereo endoscopy (PSE), a technique which allows high spatial frequency components of surface topography to be acquired simultaneously with conventional two-dimensional color imagery. We implement this technique in an endoscopic form factor and demonstrate that it can acquire the topography of small features with complex geometries and heterogeneous optical properties. PSE imaging of ex vivo human gastrointestinal tissue shows that surface topography measurements enable differentiation of abnormal shapes from surrounding normal tissue. Together, these results confirm that the topographical measurements can be obtained with relatively simple hardware in an endoscopic form factor, and suggest the potential of PSE to improve lesion detection and classification in gastrointestinal imaging. PMID:23864015

  1. GTC Photometric Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Cesare, M. A.; Hammersley, P. L.; Rodriguez Espinosa, J. M.

    2006-06-01

    We are currently developing the calibration programme for GTC using techniques similar to the ones use for the space telescope calibration (Hammersley et al. 1998, A&AS, 128, 207; Cohen et al. 1999, AJ, 117, 1864). We are planning to produce a catalogue with calibration stars which are suitable for a 10-m telescope. These sources will be not variable, non binary and do not have infrared excesses if they are to be used in the infrared. The GTC science instruments require photometric calibration between 0.35 and 2.5 microns. The instruments are: OSIRIS (Optical System for Imaging low Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy), ELMER and EMIR (Espectrógrafo Multiobjeto Infrarrojo) and the Acquisition and Guiding boxes (Di Césare, Hammersley, & Rodriguez Espinosa 2005, RevMexAA Ser. Conf., 24, 231). The catalogue will consist of 30 star fields distributed in all of North Hemisphere. We will use fields containing sources over the range 12 to 22 magnitude, and spanning a wide range of spectral types (A to M) for the visible and near infrared. In the poster we will show the method used for selecting these fields and we will present the analysis of the data on the first calibration fields observed.

  2. High Redshift Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin S.

    1996-01-01

    The report for this period includes three papers: 'Associated Absorption at Low and High Redshift'; 'Strong X-ray Absorption in a Broad Absorption Line Quasar: PHL5200'; and 'ASCA and ROSAT X-ray Spectra of High-Redshift Radio-Loud Quasars'. The first gives examples from both low and high redshift for combining information on absorbing material in active galactic nuclei from both x-ray and the UV. The second presents ASCA observations of the z = 1.98 prototype broad absorption line quasar (BALQSO): PHL 5200, detected with both the solid-state imaging spectrometers and the gas imaging spectometers. The third paper presents results on the x-ray properties of 9 high-redshift radio-loud quasars observed by ASCA and ROSAT, including ASCA observations of S5 0014+81 (z = 3.38) and S5 0836+71 (z = 2.17) and ROSAT observations of PKS 2126-158.

  3. MARZ: Redshifting Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinton, Samuel

    2016-05-01

    MARZ analyzes objects and produces high quality spectroscopic redshift measurements. Spectra not matched correctly by the automatic algorithm can be redshifted manually by cycling automatic results, manual template comparison, or marking spectral features. The software has an intuitive interface and powerful automatic matching capabilities on spectra, and can be run interactively or from the command line, and runs as a Web application. MARZ can be run on a local server; it is also available for use on a public server.

  4. Surveying the Origin of O VI Gas at Low Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochaska, Jason X.; Tripp, Todd; Aracil, Bastien; Davé, Romeel; Mulchaey, John; Chen, Hsiao-Wen

    2005-08-01

    A comparison of the baryonic mass density inferred from BBN and the CMB with a census of visible baryonic components at the present epoch indicates a significant fraction of the universe's baryons are hidden in a dark component. Theoretical investigations predict that the majority of 'missing' baryons lie in a hot (T ~ 10^5-7 K), low density medium which can be efficiently detected through O VI absorption. More importantly, recent STIS+FUSE surveys for O VI are consistent with this gas comprising a significant fraction of the missing baryons. Establishing the physical nature of these O VI absorbers directly impacts our understanding of the distribution of baryons in the universe. The principal goal of our program is to determine if this O VI gas arises in galactic halos, the intragroup or intracluster medium, the low density 'cosmic web', or a different region of the universe altogether. We are pursuing an observational program to search for galaxies associated with O VI absorbers at low redshift. To accomplish this project, we require deep UBVRI images in fields surrounding quasars surveyed for O VI absorption. This dataset will provide precise photometric redshifts of z< 0.3 galaxies with L > L^*/10 and measures of color and morphology. Ultimately, we will use the photometric redshifts to efficiently pre-select galaxies for spectroscopy on multi-slit spectrometers. By correlating the galaxy redshifts against the O VI absorption lines and comparing directly with cosmological simulations, we will establish the origin of the O VI gas.

  5. Surveying the Origin of O VI Gas at Low Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochaska, Jason X.; Tripp, Todd; Aracil, Bastien; Davé, Romeel; Mulchaey, John; Chen, Hsiao-Wen

    2006-02-01

    A comparison of the baryonic mass density inferred from BBN and the CMB with a census of visible baryonic components at the present epoch indicates a significant fraction of the universe's baryons are hidden in a dark component. Theoretical investigations predict that the majority of 'missing' baryons lie in a hot (T ~ 10^5-7 K), low density medium which can be efficiently detected through O VI absorption. More importantly, recent STIS+FUSE surveys for O VI are consistent with this gas comprising a significant fraction of the missing baryons. Establishing the physical nature of these O VI absorbers directly impacts our understanding of the distribution of baryons in the universe. The principal goal of our program is to determine if this O VI gas arises in galactic halos, the intragroup or intracluster medium, the low density 'cosmic web', or a different region of the universe altogether. We are pursuing an observational program to search for galaxies associated with O VI absorbers at low redshift. To accomplish this project, we require deep UBVRI images in fields surrounding quasars surveyed for O VI absorption. This dataset will provide precise photometric redshifts of z< 0.3 galaxies with L > L^*/10 and measures of color and morphology. Ultimately, we will use the photometric redshifts to efficiently pre-select galaxies for spectroscopy on multi-slit spectrometers. By correlating the galaxy redshifts against the O VI absorption lines and comparing directly with cosmological simulations, we will establish the origin of the O VI gas.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Trumpler 5 photometric BV catalog (Donati+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, P.; Cocozza, G.; Bragaglia, A.; Pancino, E.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carrera, R.; Tosi, M.

    2014-11-01

    We combined high-quality photometric observations obtained with WFI and high-resolution spectra obtained with FLAMES to determine accurate cluster parameters, namely age, distance, reddening, and metallicity. (2 data files).

  7. Photometric selection of Type Ia supernovae in the Supernova Legacy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, G.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Rich, J.; Aubourg, E.; Astier, P.; Balland, C.; Basa, S.; Carlberg, R. G.; Conley, A.; Fouchez, D.; Guy, J.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I. M.; Howell, D. A.; Pain, R.; Perrett, K.; Pritchet, C. J.; Regnault, N.; Sullivan, M.; Fourmanoit, N.; González-Gaitán, S.; Lidman, C.; Perlmutter, S.; Ripoche, P.; Walker, E. S.

    2011-10-01

    We present a sample of 485 photometrically identified Type Ia supernova candidates mined from the first three years of data of the CFHT SuperNova Legacy Survey (SNLS). The images were submitted to a deferred processing independent of the SNLS real-time detection pipeline. Light curves of all transient events were reconstructed in the gM, rM, iM and zM filters and submitted to automated sequential cuts in order to identify possible supernovae. Pure noise and long-term variable events were rejected by light curve shape criteria. Type Ia supernova identification relied on event characteristics fitted to their light curves assuming the events to be normal SNe Ia. The light curve fitter SALT2 was used for this purpose, assigning host galaxy photometric redshifts to the tested events. The selected sample of 485 candidates is one magnitude deeper than that allowed by the SNLS spectroscopic identification. The contamination by supernovae of other types is estimated to be 4%. Testing Hubble diagram residuals with this enlarged sample allows us to measure the Malmquist bias due to spectroscopic selections directly. The result is fully consistent with the precise Monte Carlo based estimate used to correct SN Ia distance moduli in the SNLS 3-year cosmological analyses. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of a photometric selection of high redshift supernovae with known host galaxy redshifts, opening interesting prospects for cosmological analyses from future large photometric SN Ia surveys.

  8. The redshift evolution of clustering in the Hubble Deep Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliocchetti, M.; Maddox, S. J.

    1999-07-01

    We present a correlation function analysis for the catalogue of photometric redshifts obtained from the Hubble Deep Field image by Fernandez-Soto, Lanzetta & Yahil. By dividing the catalogue into redshift bins of width Deltaz=0.4 we measured the angular correlation function w(theta) as a function of redshift up to z~4.8. From these measurements we derive the trend of the correlation length r_0. We find that r_0(z) is roughly constant with look-back time up to z~=2, and then increases to higher values at z>~2.4. We estimate the values of r_0, assuming xi(r,z)=[rr_0(z)]^-gamma, gamma=1.8 and various geometries. For Omega_0=1 we find r_0(z=3)~=7.00+/-4.87h^-1Mpc, in good agreement with the values obtained from analysis of the Lyman break galaxies.

  9. Radio-loud high-redshift protogalaxy canidates in Bootes

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, S; van Breugel, W; Brown, M J; de Vries, W; Dey, A; Eisenhardt, P; Jannuzi, B; Rottgering, H; Stanford, S A; Stern, D; Willner, S P

    2007-07-20

    We used the Near Infrared Camera (NIRC) on Keck I to obtain K{sub s}-band images of four candidate high-redshift radio galaxies selected using optical and radio data in the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey in Bootes. Our targets have 1.4 GHz radio flux densities greater than 1 mJy, but are undetected in the optical. Spectral energy distribution fitting suggests that three of these objects are at z > 3, with radio luminosities near the FR-I/FR-II break. The other has photometric redshift z{sub phot} = 1.2, but may in fact be at higher redshift. Two of the four objects exhibit diffuse morphologies in K{sub s}-band, suggesting that they are still in the process of forming.

  10. PHOTOMETRIC SUPERNOVA COSMOLOGY WITH BEAMS AND SDSS-II

    SciTech Connect

    Hlozek, Renee; Kunz, Martin; Bassett, Bruce; Smith, Mat; Newling, James; Varughese, Melvin; Kessler, Rick; Frieman, Joshua; Bernstein, Joseph P.; Kuhlmann, Steve; Marriner, John; Campbell, Heather; Lampeitl, Hubert; Nichol, Robert C.; Dilday, Ben; Falck, Bridget; Riess, Adam G.; Sako, Masao; Schneider, Donald P.

    2012-06-20

    Supernova (SN) cosmology without spectroscopic confirmation is an exciting new frontier, which we address here with the Bayesian Estimation Applied to Multiple Species (BEAMS) algorithm and the full three years of data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SN). BEAMS is a Bayesian framework for using data from multiple species in statistical inference when one has the probability that each data point belongs to a given species, corresponding in this context to different types of SNe with their probabilities derived from their multi-band light curves. We run the BEAMS algorithm on both Gaussian and more realistic SNANA simulations with of order 10{sup 4} SNe, testing the algorithm against various pitfalls one might expect in the new and somewhat uncharted territory of photometric SN cosmology. We compare the performance of BEAMS to that of both mock spectroscopic surveys and photometric samples that have been cut using typical selection criteria. The latter typically either are biased due to contamination or have significantly larger contours in the cosmological parameters due to small data sets. We then apply BEAMS to the 792 SDSS-II photometric SNe with host spectroscopic redshifts. In this case, BEAMS reduces the area of the {Omega}{sub m}, {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} contours by a factor of three relative to the case where only spectroscopically confirmed data are used (297 SNe). In the case of flatness, the constraints obtained on the matter density applying BEAMS to the photometric SDSS-II data are {Omega}{sup BEAMS}{sub m} = 0.194 {+-} 0.07. This illustrates the potential power of BEAMS for future large photometric SN surveys such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  11. Metallicity calibration and photometric parallax estimation: I. UBV photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunçel Güçtekin, S.; Bilir, S.; Karaali, S.; Ak, S.; Ak, T.; Bostancı, Z. F.

    2016-06-01

    We present metallicity and photometric parallax calibrations for the F and G type dwarfs with photometric, astrometric and spectroscopic data. The sample consists of 168 dwarf stars covering the colour, iron abundance and absolute magnitude intervals 0.30<(B-V)0<0.68 mag, -2.0<[Fe/H]<0.4 dex and 3.4< MV<6.0 mag, respectively. The means and standard deviations of the metallicity and absolute magnitude residuals are small, i.e. <Δ[Fe/H]_{res}rangle=0 and σ=0.134 dex, and <Δ (MV)_{res}rangle=0 and σ=0.174 mag, respectively, which indicate accurate metallicity and photometric parallax estimations.

  12. Towards a photometric metallicity scale for open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netopil, M.; Paunzen, E.

    2013-09-01

    Context. Open clusters are a useful tool when investigating several topics connected with stellar evolution; for example the age or distance can be more accurately determined than for field stars. However, one important parameter, the metallicity, is only known for a marginal percentage of open clusters. Aims: We aim at a consistent set of parameters for the open clusters investigated in our photometric Δa survey of chemically peculiar stars. Special attention is paid to expanding our knowledge of cluster metallicities and verifying their scale. Methods: Making use of a previously developed method based on normalised evolutionary grids and photometric data, the distance, age, reddening, and metallicity of open clusters were derived. To transform photometric measurements into effective temperatures to use as input for our method, a set of temperature calibrations for the most commonly used colour indices and photometric systems was compiled. Results: We analysed 58 open clusters in total. Our derived metallicity values were in excellent agreement with about 30 spectroscopically studied targets. The mean value of the absolute deviations was found to be 0.03 dex, with no noticeable offset or gradient. The method was also applied using recent evolutionary models based on the currently accepted lower solar abundance value Z ~ 0.014. No significant differences were found compared to grids using the former adopted solar value Z = 0.02. Furthermore, some divergent photometric datasets were identified and discussed. Conclusions: The method provides an accurate way of obtaining properly scaled metallicity values for open clusters. In light of present and future homogeneous photometric sky surveys, the sample of stellar clusters can be extended to the outskirts of the Milky Way, where spectroscopic studies are almost impossible. This will help for determining galactic metallicity gradients in more detail. Figure 7 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  13. SHELS: Complete Redshift Surveys of Two Widely Separated Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, Margaret J.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Dell’Antonio, Ian P.; Zahid, Harus Jabran; Kurtz, Michael J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.

    2016-05-01

    The Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey (SHELS) is a complete redshift survey covering two well-separated fields (F1 and F2) of the Deep Lens Survey (DLS). Both fields are more than 94% complete to a Galactic extinction corrected R 0 = 20.2. Here, we describe the redshift survey of the F1 field centered at R.A.2000 = 00h53m25.ˢ3 and decl.2000 = 12°33‧55″ like F2, the F1 field covers ˜4 deg2. The redshift survey of the F1 field includes 9426 new galaxy redshifts measured with Hectospec on the MMT (published here). As a guide to future uses of the combined survey, we compare the mass metallicity relation and the distributions of D n 4000 as a function of stellar mass and redshift for the two fields. The mass–metallicity relations differ by an insignificant 1.6σ. For galaxies in the stellar mass range 1010–1011 M ⊙, the increase in the star-forming fraction with redshift is remarkably similar in the two fields. The seemingly surprising 31%–38% difference in the overall galaxy counts in F1 and F2 is probably consistent with the expected cosmic variance given the subtleties of the relative systematics in the two surveys. We also review the DLS cluster detections in the two fields: poorer photometric data for F1 precluded secure detection of the single massive cluster at z = 0.35 that we find in SHELS. Taken together, the two fields include 16,055 redshifts for galaxies with {R}0≤slant 20.2 and 20,754 redshifts for galaxies with R ≤ 20.6. These dense surveys in two well-separated fields provide a basis for future investigations of galaxy properties and large-scale structure.

  14. SHELS: Complete Redshift Surveys of Two Widely Separated Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, Margaret J.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Dell’Antonio, Ian P.; Zahid, Harus Jabran; Kurtz, Michael J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.

    2016-05-01

    The Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey (SHELS) is a complete redshift survey covering two well-separated fields (F1 and F2) of the Deep Lens Survey (DLS). Both fields are more than 94% complete to a Galactic extinction corrected R 0 = 20.2. Here, we describe the redshift survey of the F1 field centered at R.A.2000 = 00h53m25.ˢ3 and decl.2000 = 12°33‧55″ like F2, the F1 field covers ∼4 deg2. The redshift survey of the F1 field includes 9426 new galaxy redshifts measured with Hectospec on the MMT (published here). As a guide to future uses of the combined survey, we compare the mass metallicity relation and the distributions of D n 4000 as a function of stellar mass and redshift for the two fields. The mass–metallicity relations differ by an insignificant 1.6σ. For galaxies in the stellar mass range 1010–1011 M ⊙, the increase in the star-forming fraction with redshift is remarkably similar in the two fields. The seemingly surprising 31%–38% difference in the overall galaxy counts in F1 and F2 is probably consistent with the expected cosmic variance given the subtleties of the relative systematics in the two surveys. We also review the DLS cluster detections in the two fields: poorer photometric data for F1 precluded secure detection of the single massive cluster at z = 0.35 that we find in SHELS. Taken together, the two fields include 16,055 redshifts for galaxies with {R}0≤slant 20.2 and 20,754 redshifts for galaxies with R ≤ 20.6. These dense surveys in two well-separated fields provide a basis for future investigations of galaxy properties and large-scale structure.

  15. Redshift periodicity in the Local Supercluster.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthrie, B. N. G.; Napier, W. M.

    1996-06-01

    Persistent claims have been made over the last ~15yr that extragalactic redshifts, when corrected for the Sun's motion around the Galactic centre, occur in multiples of ~24 or ~36km/s. A recent investigation by us of 40 spiral galaxies out to 1000km/s, with accurately measured redshifts, gave evidence of a periodicity ~37.2-37.7km/s. Here we extend our enquiry out to the edge of the Local Supercluster (~2600km/s), applying a simple and robust procedure to a total of 97 accurately determined redshifts. We find that, when corrected for related vectors close to recent estimates of the Sun's galactocentric motion, the redshifts of spirals are strongly periodic (P~37.6km/s). The formal confidence level of the result is extremely high, and the signal is seen independently with different radio telescopes. We also examine a further sample of 117 spirals observed with the 300-foot Green Bank telescope alone. The periodicity phenomenon appears strongest for the galaxies linked by group membership, but phase coherence probably holds over large regions of the Local Supercluster.

  16. Accurate PSF-matched photometry for the J-PAS survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Teja, Yolanda; Benitez, Txitxo; Dupke, Renato a.

    2015-08-01

    The Javalambre-PAU Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS) is expected to map 8,600 squared-degrees of the sky using 54 narrow and 5 broad band filters. Carried out by a Spanish-Brazilian consortium, the main goal of this survey is to measure Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAOs) with photometric redshifts. The expectation is measuring these photometric redshifts with a precision of dz/(1 + z) ~ 0.003 for 100 million galaxies and a few millions of quasars, and reaching an accuracy of dz/(1 + z) ~ 0.01 for other 300 million galaxies. With these numbers, it will be possible to determine w in the Dark Energy (DE) equation of state with an accuracy of < 4%. To achieve such precision and measure the radial BAOs, not only an advanced technical setup but also special data processing tools are required. These tools must be accurate as well as suitable to be implemented in fully automated and computationally efficient algorithms.The factor that most influences the photometric redshift precision is the quality of the photometry. For that reason we have developed a new technique based on the Chebyshev-Fourier bases (CHEFs, Jiménez-Teja & Benítez 2012, ApJ, 745, 150) to obtain a highly precise multicolor photometry without PSF consideration, thus saving a considerable amount of time and circumventing severe problems such as the PSF variability across the images. The CHEFs are a set of mathematical orthonormal bases with different scale and resolution levels, originally designed to fit the surface light distribution of galaxies. They have proved to be able to model any kind of morphology, including spirals, highly elliptical, or irregular galaxies, including isophotal twists and fine substructure. They also fit high signal-to-noise images, lensing arcs and stars with great accuracy. We can calculate optimal, unbiased, total magnitudes directly through these CHEFs models and, thus, colors without needing the PSF.We compare our photometry with widely-used codes such as SExtractor (Bertin

  17. Spectroscopic identification of a redshift 1.55 supernova host galaxy from the Subaru Deep Field Supernova Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederiksen, Teddy F.; Graur, Or; Hjorth, Jens; Maoz, Dan; Poznanski, Dovi

    2014-03-01

    Context. The Subaru Deep Field (SDF) Supernova Survey discovered ten Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the redshift range 1.5 < z < 2.0, determined solely from photometric redshifts of the host galaxies. However, photometric redshifts might be biased, and the SN sample could be contaminated by active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Aims: We aim to obtain the first robust redshift measurement and classification of a z > 1.5 SDF SN Ia host galaxy candidate. Methods: We use the X-shooter (U-to-K-band) spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope to allow the detection of different emission lines in a wide spectral range. Results: We measure a spectroscopic redshift of 1.54563 ± 0.00027 of hSDF0705.25, consistent with its photometric redshift of 1.552 ± 0.018. From the strong emission-line spectrum we rule out AGN activity, thereby confirming the optical transient as a SN. The host galaxy follows the fundamental metallicity relation showing that the properties of this high-redshift SN Ia host galaxy is similar to other field galaxies. Conclusions: Spectroscopic confirmation of additional SDF SN hosts would be required to confirm the cosmic SN rate evolution measured in the SDF. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under program ID 089.A-0739.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: VUDS Dicovery of a high-redshift protocluster (Lemaux+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaux, B. C.; Cucciati, O.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Le Fevre, O.; Zamorani, G.; Cassata, P.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Pentericci, L.; Thomas, R.; Vanzella, E.; Zucca, E.; Amorin, R.; Bardelli, S.; Capak, P.; Cassara, L.; Castellano, M.; Cimatti, A.; Cuby, J. G.; de la Torre, S.; Durkalec, A.; Fontana, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Grazian, A.; Hathi, N. P.; Ilbert, O.; Moreau, C.; Paltani, S.; Ribeiro, B.; Salvato, M.; Schaerer, D.; Scodeggio, M.; Sommariva, V.; Talia, M.; Taniguchi, Y.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Wang, P. W.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Fotopoulou, S.; Gal, R. R.; Kocevski, D. D.; Lopez-Sanjuan, C.; Lubin, L. M.; Mellier, Y.; Sadibekova, T.; Scoville, N.

    2014-08-01

    Parameters for the 19 secure spectroscopic members and the 6 questionable spectroscopic members of Cl J0227-0421. The given parameters are galaxy equatorial coordinates, all optical and NIR magnitudes, spectroscopic redshifts with a corresponding confidence flag, photometric redshifts, absolute magnitudes in the NUV, r', & J bands, stellar mass, and star formation rate. The latter four quantities only available when the photometry allowed for a fit. Magnitudes are either MAG_AUTO (optical+JHK) or aperture-corrected total magnitudes (Spitzer Channels 1 & 2) and are corrected for Galactic extinction. Stellar masses and SFRs are calculated for a Chabrier (2003PASP..115..763C) initial mass function. Best-fit values from the spectral energy distribution fitting are adopted. For galaxies with a confidence flag 1 or 9, the redshift was not fixed in the spectral energy distribution fitting process. For all other galaxies the redshift was fixed to the spectroscopic redshift. (1 data file).

  19. Photometric normalization of LROC WAC images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Boyd, A. K.; Denevi, B. W.; Robinson, M. S.; Hapke, B. W.; McEwen, A. S.; Humm, D. C.; LROC Science Operations Team

    2011-12-01

    Monthly global Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) observations of the Moon, acquired with varying emission and incidence angles, enable the precise derivation of spatially resolved Hapke photometric parameters [1]. The WAC global mosaics are stacked in a time series to enable phase curve fitting using a tile-by-tile method, with a wide range of phase angle in each tile. Tile-by-tile calculations provide photometric parameters for each tile (currently 1° by 1° from 80° to -80° latitude), resulting in resolved near-global photometric parameter maps (w, xi, Bco, and hc)[2]. Incidence, emission, and phase angles are computed using a new WAC stereometric digital terrain model (100 m/pixel)[3]. In the tile-by-tile method, we obtain low phase observations only near the equator resulting in an inability to accurately estimate Bco at higher latitudes (Hapke parameter controls the y-intercept of phase curve). We interpolated Bco poleward of +/- 5° latitudes, using a negative correlation between w and Bco observed in the equator +/- 5° latitudes. This interpolation method can decrease one free parameter, resulting in short calculation time and much less failed tiles. The normalized image using this parameter map shows almost no tile boundary, which shows that the tile-by-tile method works well. After the tile-by-tile method was applied with twenty months of data over a full range of beta angle, we observed an I/F offset with time. This offset results in reflectance differences at month-to-month boundaries in a global mosaic constructed from sequences acquired over different months (constructed to minimize incidence angle differences as a function of latitude). After significant tests of any possible parameters controlling the residual I/F value, incidence angle was revealed to be a dominant factor, indicating that the photometry model may not completely accounting for incidence angle. The main function dealing with incidence angle is the Lommel

  20. SHARDS: AN OPTICAL SPECTRO-PHOTOMETRIC SURVEY OF DISTANT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo G.; Cava, Antonio; Barro, Guillermo; Villar, Victor; Cardiel, Nicolas; Espino, Nestor; Gallego, Jesus; Ferreras, Ignacio; Rodriguez-Espinosa, Jose Miguel; Balcells, Marc; Cepa, Jordi; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Cenarro, Javier; Charlot, Stephane; Cimatti, Andrea; Conselice, Christopher J.; Daddi, Emmanuele; Elbaz, David; Gobat, R. [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA and others

    2013-01-01

    We present the Survey for High-z Absorption Red and Dead Sources (SHARDS), an ESO/GTC Large Program carried out using the OSIRIS instrument on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). SHARDS is an ultra-deep optical spectro-photometric survey of the GOODS-N field covering 130 arcmin{sup 2} at wavelengths between 500 and 950 nm with 24 contiguous medium-band filters (providing a spectral resolution R {approx} 50). The data reach an AB magnitude of 26.5 (at least at a 3{sigma} level) with sub-arcsec seeing in all bands. SHARDS' main goal is to obtain accurate physical properties of intermediate- and high-z galaxies using well-sampled optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs) with sufficient spectral resolution to measure absorption and emission features, whose analysis will provide reliable stellar population and active galactic nucleus (AGN) parameters. Among the different populations of high-z galaxies, SHARDS' principal targets are massive quiescent galaxies at z > 1, whose existence is one of the major challenges facing current hierarchical models of galaxy formation. In this paper, we outline the observational strategy and include a detailed discussion of the special reduction and calibration procedures which should be applied to the GTC/OSIRIS data. An assessment of the SHARDS data quality is also performed. We present science demonstration results on the detection and study of emission-line galaxies (star-forming objects and AGNs) at z = 0-5. We also analyze the SEDs for a sample of 27 quiescent massive galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the range 1.0 < z {approx}< 1.4. We discuss the improvements introduced by the SHARDS data set in the analysis of their star formation history and stellar properties. We discuss the systematics arising from the use of different stellar population libraries, typical in this kind of study. Averaging the results from the different libraries, we find that the UV-to-MIR SEDs of the massive quiescent galaxies at z = 1

  1. Testing dark matter clustering with redshift space distortions

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V.

    2013-04-01

    The growth rate of large scale structure can probe whether dark matter clusters at gravitational strength or deviates from this, e.g. due to self interactions. Measurement of the growth rate through redshift space distortions in galaxy redshift surveys constrains the clustering strength, and its redshift dependence. We compare such effects on growth to those from high redshift deviations (e.g. early dark energy) or modified gravity, and give a simple, highly accurate analytic prescription. Current observations can constrain the dark matter clustering strength to F{sub cl} = 0.99±0.02 of standard, if all other parameters are held fixed, but substantial covariances exist. Future galaxy redshift surveys may constrain an evolving clustering strength to 28%, marginalizing over the other parameters, or 4% if the dark energy parameters are held fixed while fitting for dark matter growth. Tighter constraints on the nature of dark matter could be obtained by combining cosmological and astrophysical probes.

  2. Using Morphology to Identify Galaxy Mergers at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blancato, Kirsten; Kartaltepe, J. S.; CANDELS Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed a set of 22,003 galaxies in three of the five CANDELS fields: COSMOS, UDS, and GOODS-S, in order to determine how well automated image statistics did with classifying galaxy morphology and mergers at high redshifts (z > 1). For each galaxy in our set, we have multi-wavelength data, photometric redshifts from SED fitting, visual classifications from the CANDELS structure and morphology group, and automated image statistics. The redshifts of our sample range from z = .01 to 4 with = 1.33. We constructed a conservative set of 1,914 galaxies that we believe to be mergers and interactions. Of this set of merging galaxies, 1,343 were at a redshift greater than z = 1. We also identified a conservative set of 535 spheroids and a set of 2,902 disks. Several different quantitative methods were then used to attempt an automated classification of these visually classified samples. Of the different image statistics, we found M20 and Gini to be the most successful at picking out high redshift mergers and morphological characteristics. Blancato was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  3. Constraints on Photoionization Feedback from Number Counts of Ultra-faint High-redshift Galaxies in the Frontier Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, M.; Yue, B.; Ferrara, A.; Merlin, E.; Fontana, A.; Amorín, R.; Grazian, A.; Mármol-Queralto, E.; Michałowski, M. J.; Mortlock, A.; Paris, D.; Parsa, S.; Pilo, S.; Santini, P.

    2016-06-01

    We exploit a sample of ultra-faint high-redshift galaxies (demagnified Hubble Space Telescope, HST, H 160 magnitude > 30) in the Frontier Fields clusters A2744 and M0416 to constrain a theoretical model for the UV luminosity function in the presence of photoionization feedback. The objects have been selected on the basis of accurate photometric redshifts computed from multi-band photometry including seven HST bands and deep K s and IRAC observations. Magnification is computed on an object-by-object basis from all available lensing models of the two clusters. We take into account source detection completeness as a function of luminosity and size, magnification effects, and systematics in the lens modeling of the clusters under investigation. We find that our sample of high-z galaxies constrain the cutoff halo circular velocity below which star formation is suppressed by photoionization feedback to {v}c{{cut}}\\lt 50 km s‑1. This circular velocity corresponds to a halo mass of ≈5.6 × 109 M ⊙ and ≈2.3 × 109 M ⊙ at z = 5 and 10, respectively: higher-mass halos can thus sustain continuous star formation activity without being quenched by external ionizing flux. More stringent constraints are prevented by the uncertainty in the modeling of the cluster lens, as embodied by systematic differences among the lens models available.

  4. A Photometric and Kinematic Study of AWM 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koranyi, Daniel M.; Geller, Margaret J.; Mohr, Joseph J.; Wegner, Gary

    1998-11-01

    We have measured redshifts and Kron-Cousins R-band magnitudes for a sample of galaxies in the poor cluster AWM 7. We have measured redshifts for 172 galaxies; 106 of these are cluster members. We determine the luminosity function (LF) from a photometric survey of the central 1.2 x 1.2 h^-1 Mpc. The LF has a bump at the bright end and a faint-end slope of alpha = -1.37 +/- 0.16, populated almost exclusively by absorption-line galaxies. The cluster velocity dispersion is lower in the core (~530 km s^-1) than at the outskirts (~680 km s^-1), consistent with the cooling flow seen in the X-ray. The cold core extends ~150 h^-1 kpc from the cluster center. The Kron-Cousins R-band mass-to-light ratio of the system is 650 +/- 170 h M_⊙/L_⊙, substantially lower than previous optical determinations, but consistent with most previous X-ray determinations. We adopt H_0 = 100 h km s^-1 Mpc^-1 throughout this paper; at the mean cluster redshift (5247 +/- 76 km s^-1), 1 h^-1 Mpc subtends 65.5‧.

  5. Low X-Ray Luminosity Galaxy Clusters: Main Goals, Sample Selection, Photometric and Spectroscopic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilo Castellón, José Luis; Alonso, M. Victoria; García Lambas, Diego; Valotto, Carlos; O’ Mill, Ana Laura; Cuevas, Héctor; Carrasco, Eleazar R.; Ramírez, Amelia; Astudillo, José M.; Ramos, Felipe; Jaque Arancibia, Marcelo; Ulloa, Natalie; Órdenes, Yasna

    2016-06-01

    We present our study of 19 low X-ray luminosity galaxy clusters (L{}X ∼ 0.5–45 × 1043 erg s‑1), selected from the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counters Pointed Observations and the revised version of Mullis et al. in the redshift range of 0.16–0.7. This is the introductory paper of a series presenting the sample selection, photometric and spectroscopic observations, and data reduction. Photometric data in different passbands were taken for eight galaxy clusters at Las Campanas Observatory; three clusters at Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory; and eight clusters at the Gemini Observatory. Spectroscopic data were collected for only four galaxy clusters using Gemini telescopes. Using the photometry, the galaxies were defined based on the star-galaxy separation taking into account photometric parameters. For each galaxy cluster, the catalogs contain the point-spread function and aperture magnitudes of galaxies within the 90% completeness limit. They are used together with structural parameters to study the galaxy morphology and to estimate photometric redshifts. With the spectroscopy, the derived galaxy velocity dispersion of our clusters ranged from 507 km s‑1 for [VMF98]022 to 775 km s‑1 for [VMF98]097 with signs of substructure. Cluster membership has been extensively discussed taking into account spectroscopic and photometric redshift estimates. In this sense, members are the galaxies within a projected radius of 0.75 Mpc from the X-ray emission peak and with clustercentric velocities smaller than the cluster velocity dispersion or 6000 km s‑1, respectively. These results will be used in forthcoming papers to study, among the main topics, the red cluster sequence, blue cloud and green populations, the galaxy luminosity function, and cluster dynamics.

  6. Colors of 2625 Quasars at 0Photometric System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Gordon T.; Fan, Xiaohui; Schneider, Donald P.; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Strauss, Michael A.; York, Donald G.; Anderson, John E., Jr.; Anderson, Scott F.; Annis, James; Bahcall, Neta A.; Bernardi, Mariangela; Briggs, John W.; Brinkmann, J.; Brunner, Robert; Burles, Scott; Carey, Larry; Castander, Francisco J.; Connolly, A. J.; Crocker, J. H.; Csabai, István; Doi, Mamoru; Finkbeiner, Douglas; Friedman, Scott D.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Fukugita, Masataka; Gunn, James E.; Hindsley, Robert B.; Ivezić, Željko; Kent, Stephen; Knapp, G. R.; Lamb, D. Q.; Leger, R. French; Long, Daniel C.; Loveday, Jon; Lupton, Robert H.; McKay, Timothy A.; Meiksin, Avery; Merrelli, Aronne; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Newcomb, Matt; Nichol, R. C.; Owen, Russell; Pier, Jeffrey R.; Pope, Adrian; Richmond, Michael W.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Schlegel, David J.; Siegmund, Walter A.; Smee, Stephen; Snir, Yehuda; Stoughton, Chris; Stubbs, Christopher; SubbaRao, Mark; Szalay, Alexander S.; Szokoly, Gyula P.; Tremonti, Christy; Uomoto, Alan; Waddell, Patrick; Yanny, Brian; Zheng, Wei

    2001-05-01

    We present an empirical investigation of the colors of quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometric system. The sample studied includes 2625 quasars with SDSS photometry: 1759 quasars found during SDSS spectroscopic commissioning and SDSS follow-up observations on other telescopes, 50 matches to FIRST quasars, 573 matches to quasars from the NASA Extragalactic Database, and 243 quasars from two or more of these sources. The quasars are distributed in a 2.5d wide stripe centered on the celestial equator covering ~529 deg2. Positions (accurate to 0.2") and SDSS magnitudes are given for the 898 quasars known prior to SDSS spectroscopic commissioning. New SDSS quasars, which range in brightness from i*=15.39 to the photometric magnitude limit of the survey, represent an increase of over 200% in the number of known quasars in this area of the sky. The ensemble average of the observed colors of quasars in the SDSS passbands are well represented by a power-law continuum with αν=-0.5 (fν~να) and are close to those predicted by previous simulations. However, the contributions of the ``small blue (or λ3000) bump'' and other strong emission lines have a significant effect upon the colors. The color-redshift relation exhibits considerable structure, which may be of use in determining photometric redshifts for quasars from their colors alone. The range of colors at a given redshift can generally be accounted for by a range in the optical spectral index with a distribution αν=-0.5+/-0.65 (95% confidence), but there is a red tail in the distribution. This tail may be a sign of internal reddening, especially since fainter objects at a given redshift tend to exhibit redder colors than the average. Finally, we show that there is a continuum of properties between quasars and Seyfert galaxies, and we test the validity of the traditional dividing line (MB=-23) between the two classes of active galactic nuclei. Based on observations obtained with the Sloan Digital

  7. High redshift GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K.

    2012-09-01

    The Swift mission has opened a new, high redshift window on the universe. In this review we provide an overview of gamma-ray burst (GRB) science, describe the Swift mission, discuss high-z GRBs and tools for high-z studies, and look forward at future capabilities. A new mission concept - Lobster - is described that would monitor the X-ray sky at order of magnitude higher sensitivity than current missions.

  8. High Redshift GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K.

    2012-01-01

    The Swift mission has opened a new, high redshift window on the universe. In this review we provide an overview of gamma-ray burst (GRB) science, describe the Swift mission, discuss high-z GRBs and tools for high-z studies, and look forward at future capabilities. A new mission concept - Lobster - is described that would monitor the X-ray sky at order of magnitude higher sensitivity than current missions.

  9. Toward Millimagnitude Photometric Calibration (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dose, E.

    2014-12-01

    (Abstract only) Asteroid roation, exoplanet transits, and similar measurements will increasingly call for photometric precisions better than about 10 millimagnitudes, often between nights and ideally between distant observers. The present work applies detailed spectral simulations to test popular photometric calibration practices, and to test new extensions of these practices. Using 107 synthetic spectra of stars of diverse colors, detailed atmospheric transmission spectra computed by solar-energy software, realistic spectra of popular astronomy gear, and the option of three sources of noise added at realistic millimagnitude levels, we find that certain adjustments to current calibration practices can help remove small systematic errors, especially for imperfect filters, high airmasses, and possibly passing thin cirrus clouds.

  10. Photometric monitoring of polar candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabdeev, M. M.

    2015-10-01

    We present photometric observations of two polar candidates, IPHAS J052832.69+283837.6 and 1RXS J073346.0+261933. Both objects reveal brightness variations related to the orbital period with an amplitude of about 1m, and about 0ṃ5 on the long-termscale. The object IPHASJ052832.69+283837.6 also exhibits variations of color indices and light curve shape. Long-term observations allowed us to determine the orbital period of the first system and refine the orbital period of the second system, which proved to be {P_{ord}} = 0_.^d055593(4) and {P_{ord}} = 0_.^d139095(2) respectively. The photometric data analysis proves that these systems are polars.

  11. Photometrics at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams, J.Y.; Hill, R.A.; Hughes, R.L.

    1990-07-01

    This report highlights Sandia National Laboratories' work in the following areas: photometrics and optical development; still and time-lapse photography; real-time motion photography; high-speed photography; image-motion photography; schlieren photography; ultra-high-speed photography; electronic imaging; shuttered video and high-speed video; infrared imaging radiometry; exoatmospheric photography and videography; microdensitometry and image analysis; and optical system design and development.

  12. The Redshift Distribution of Dusty Star-forming Galaxies from the SPT Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strandet, M. L.; Weiss, A.; Vieira, J. D.; de Breuck, C.; Aguirre, J. E.; Aravena, M.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Béthermin, M.; Bradford, C. M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chapman, S. C.; Crawford, T. M.; Everett, W.; Fassnacht, C. D.; Furstenau, R. M.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Greve, T. R.; Gullberg, B.; Hezaveh, Y.; Kamenetzky, J. R.; Litke, K.; Ma, J.; Malkan, M.; Marrone, D. P.; Menten, K. M.; Murphy, E. J.; Nadolski, A.; Rotermund, K. M.; Spilker, J. S.; Stark, A. A.; Welikala, N.

    2016-05-01

    We use the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Cycle 1 to determine spectroscopic redshifts of high-redshift dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) selected by their 1.4 mm continuum emission in the South Pole Telescope (SPT) survey. We present ALMA 3 mm spectral scans between 84 and 114 GHz for 15 galaxies and targeted ALMA 1 mm observations for an additional eight sources. Our observations yield 30 new line detections from CO, [C i], [N ii], H2O and NH3. We further present Atacama Pathfinder Experiment [C ii] and CO mid-J observations for seven sources for which only a single line was detected in spectral-scan data from ALMA Cycle 0 or Cycle 1. We combine the new observations with previously published and new millimeter/submillimeter line and photometric data of the SPT-selected DSFGs to study their redshift distribution. The combined data yield 39 spectroscopic redshifts from molecular lines, a success rate of >85%. Our sample represents the largest data set of its kind today and has the highest spectroscopic completeness among all redshift surveys of high-z DSFGs. The median of the redshift distribution is z = 3.9 ± 0.4, and the highest-redshift source in our sample is at z = 5.8. We discuss how the selection of our sources affects the redshift distribution, focusing on source brightness, selection wavelength, and strong gravitational lensing. We correct for the effect of gravitational lensing and find the redshift distribution for 1.4 mm selected sources with a median redshift of z = 3.1 ± 0.3. Comparing to redshift distributions selected at shorter wavelengths from the literature, we show that selection wavelength affects the shape of the redshift distribution.

  13. USING THE 1.6 {mu}m BUMP TO STUDY REST-FRAME NEAR-INFRARED-SELECTED GALAXIES AT REDSHIFT 2

    SciTech Connect

    Sorba, Robert; Sawicki, Marcin

    2010-10-01

    We explore the feasibility and limitations of using the 1.6 {mu}m bump as a photometric redshift indicator and selection technique, and use it to study the rest-frame H-band galaxy luminosity and stellar mass functions (SMFs) at redshift z {approx} 2. We use publicly available Spitzer/IRAC images in the GOODS fields and find that color selection in the IRAC bandpasses alone is comparable in completeness and contamination to BzK selection. We find that the shape of the 1.6 {mu}m bump is robust, and photometric redshifts are not greatly affected by choice of model parameters. Comparison with spectroscopic redshifts shows photometric redshifts to be reliable. We create a rest-frame NIR-selected catalog of galaxies at z {approx} 2 and construct a galaxy SMF. Comparisons with other SMFs at approximately the same redshift but determined using shorter wavelengths show good agreement. This agreement suggests that selection at bluer wavelengths does not miss a significant amount of stellar mass in passive galaxies. Comparison with SMFs at other redshifts shows evidence for the downsizing scenario of galaxy evolution. We conclude by pointing out the potential for using the 1.6 {mu}m bump technique to select high-redshift galaxies with the JWST, whose {lambda}>0.6 {mu}m coverage will not be well suited to selecting galaxies using techniques that require imaging at shorter wavelengths.

  14. An accurate and practical method for inference of weak gravitational lensing from galaxy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Gary M.; Armstrong, Robert; Krawiec, Christina; March, Marisa C.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate highly accurate recovery of weak gravitational lensing shear using an implementation of the Bayesian Fourier Domain (BFD) method proposed by Bernstein & Armstrong, extended to correct for selection biases. The BFD formalism is rigorously correct for Nyquist-sampled, background-limited, uncrowded images of background galaxies. BFD does not assign shapes to galaxies, instead compressing the pixel data D into a vector of moments M, such that we have an analytic expression for the probability P(M|g) of obtaining the observations with gravitational lensing distortion g along the line of sight. We implement an algorithm for conducting BFD's integrations over the population of unlensed source galaxies which measures ≈10 galaxies s-1 core-1 with good scaling properties. Initial tests of this code on ≈109 simulated lensed galaxy images recover the simulated shear to a fractional accuracy of m = (2.1 ± 0.4) × 10-3, substantially more accurate than has been demonstrated previously for any generally applicable method. Deep sky exposures generate a sufficiently accurate approximation to the noiseless, unlensed galaxy population distribution assumed as input to BFD. Potential extensions of the method include simultaneous measurement of magnification and shear; multiple-exposure, multiband observations; and joint inference of photometric redshifts and lensing tomography.

  15. An accurate and practical method for inference of weak gravitational lensing from galaxy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Gary M.; Armstrong, Robert; Krawiec, Christina; March, Marisa C.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate highly accurate recovery of weak gravitational lensing shear using an implementation of the Bayesian Fourier Domain (BFD) method proposed by Bernstein & Armstrong (2014, BA14), extended to correct for selection biases. The BFD formalism is rigorously correct for Nyquist-sampled, background-limited, uncrowded image of background galaxies. BFD does not assign shapes to galaxies, instead compressing the pixel data D into a vector of moments M, such that we have an analytic expression for the probability P(M|g) of obtaining the observations with gravitational lensing distortion g along the line of sight. We implement an algorithm for conducting BFD's integrations over the population of unlensed source galaxies which measures ≈10 galaxies/second/core with good scaling properties. Initial tests of this code on ≈109 simulated lensed galaxy images recover the simulated shear to a fractional accuracy of m = (2.1 ± 0.4) × 10-3, substantially more accurate than has been demonstrated previously for any generally applicable method. Deep sky exposures generate a sufficiently accurate approximation to the noiseless, unlensed galaxy population distribution assumed as input to BFD. Potential extensions of the method include simultaneous measurement of magnification and shear; multiple-exposure, multi-band observations; and joint inference of photometric redshifts and lensing tomography.

  16. A Large-scale Structure at Redshift 1.71 in the Lockman Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, J. Patrick; Aoki, Kentaro; Finoguenov, Alexis; Fotopoulou, Sotiria; Hasinger, Günther; salvato, Mara; Suh, Hyewon; Tanaka, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified LH146, a diffuse X-ray source in the Lockman Hole, as a galaxy cluster at redshift 1.753. The redshift was based on one spectroscopic value, buttressed by seven additional photometric redshifts. We confirm here the previous spectroscopic redshift and present concordant spectroscopic redshifts for an additional eight galaxies. The average of these nine redshifts is 1.714 ± 0.012 (error on the mean). Scrutiny of the galaxy distribution in redshift space and the plane of the sky shows that there are two concentrations of galaxies near the X-ray source. In addition, there are three diffuse X-ray sources spread along the axis connecting the galaxy concentrations. LH146 is one of these three and lies approximately at the center of the two galaxy concentrations and the outer two diffuse X-ray sources. We thus conclude that LH146 is at the redshift initially reported but it is not a single virialized galaxy cluster, as previously assumed. Rather, it appears to mark the approximate center of a larger region containing more objects. For brevity, we refer to all these objects and their alignments as a large-scale structure. The exact nature of LH146 itself remains unclear.

  17. On the formation redshift of Low-Mass Star-Forming Galaxies at intermediate redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, Jesus; Rodriguez-Muñoz, Lucía; Pacifici, Camilla; Tresse, Laurence; Charlot, Stéphane; Gil de Paz, Armando; Barro, Guillermo; Gomez-Guijarro, Carlos; Villar, Víctor

    2015-08-01

    Dwarf galaxies play a key role in galaxy formation and evolution: (1) hierarchical models predict that low-mass systems merged to form massive galaxies (building block paradigm; Dekel & Silk 1986); (2) dwarf systems might have been responsible for the reionization of the Universe (Wyithe & Loeb 2006); (3) theoretical models are particularly sensitive to the density of low-mass systems at diferent redshifts (Mamon et al. 2011), being one of the key science cases for the future E-ELT (Evans et al. 2013). While the history of low-mass dark matter halos is relatively well understood, the formation history of dwarf galaxies is still poorly reproduced by the models due to the distinct evolution of baryonic and dark matter.We present constraints on the star formation histories (SFHs) of a sample of low-mass Star-Forming Galaxies (LMSFGs; 7.3 < log M∗/Mo < 8.0, at 0.3 < zspec < 0.9) selected by photometric stellar mass and apparent magnitude. The SFHs were obtained through the analysis of their spectral energy distributions using a novel approach (Pacifici et al. 2012) that (1) consistently combines photometric (HST and ground-based multi-broadband) and spectroscopic (equivalent widths of emission lines from VLT and GTC spectroscopy) data, and (2) uses physically motivated SFHs with non-uniform variations of the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of time.The median SFH of our LMSFGs appears to form 90% of the median stellar mass inferred for the sample in the ˜0.5-1.8 Gyr immediately preceding the observation. These results suggest a recent stellar mass assembly for dwarf SFGs, consistent with the cosmological downsizing trends. We find similar median SFH timescales for a slightly more massive secondary sample 8.0 < log M∗/Mo < 9.1).This is a pilot study for future surveys on dwarf galaxies at high redshift.

  18. Compact Nuclei in Galaxies at Moderate Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarajedini, Vicki Lynn

    The purpose of this study is to understand the space density and properties of active galaxies to z ≃ 0.8. We have investigated the frequency and nature of unresolved nuclei in galaxies at moderate redshift as indicators of nuclear activity such as Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) or starbursts. Candidates are selected by fitting imaged galaxies with multi-component models using maximum likelihood estimate techniques to determine the best model fit. We select those galaxies requiring an unresolved, point source component in the galaxy nucleus, in addition to a disk and/or bulge component, to adequately model the galaxy light. We have searched 70 WFPC2 images primarily from the Medium Deep Survey for galaxies containing compact nuclei. In our survey of 1033 galaxies, the fraction containing an unresolved nuclear component ≥3% of the total galaxy light is 16±3% corrected for incompleteness and 9±1% for nuclei ≥5% of the galaxy light. Most of the nuclei are ~<20% of the total galaxy light. The majority of the host galaxies are spirals with little or no bulge component. The V-I colors of the nuclei are compared with synthetic colors for Seyferts and starburst nuclei to help differentiate between AGNs and starbursts in our sample. Spectroscopic redshifts have been obtained for 35 of our AGN/starburst candidates and photometric redshifts are estimated to an accuracy of σz≃0.1 for the remaining sample. We present the upper limit luminosity function (LF) for low-luminosity AGN (LLAGN) in two redshift bins to z = 0.8. We detect mild number density evolution of the form φ∝ (1+z)1.9 for nuclei at -18 ~

  19. High-Redshift Supernovae in the Hubble Deep Field

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliland, R.L.; Nugent, P.E.; Phillips, M.M.

    1999-08-01

    Two supernovae detected in the Hubble Deep Field (HDF) using the original 1995 December epoch and data from a shorter (63,000 s in F814W) 1997 December visit with {ital HST} are discussed. The supernovae (SNe) are both associated with distinct galaxies at redshifts of 0.95 (spectroscopic) from Cohen et al. and 1.32 (photometric) from the work of Fern{acute a}ndez-Soto, Lanzetta, & Yahil. These redshifts are near, in the case of 0.95, and well beyond, for 1.32, the greatest distance reported previously for SNe. We show that our observations are sensitive to supernovae to z{approx_lt}1.8 in either epoch for an event near peak brightness. Detailed simulations are discussed that quantify the level at which false events from our search phase would start to arise and the completeness of our search as a function of both SN brightness and host galaxy redshift. The number of Type Ia and Type II SNe expected as a function of redshift in the two HDF epochs are discussed in relation to several published predictions and our own detailed calculations. A mean detection frequency of one SN per epoch for the small HDF area is consistent with expectations from current theory. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1999.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  20. High-Redshift Supernovae in the Hubble Deep Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilliland, Ronald L.; Nugent, Peter E.; Phillips, M. M.

    1999-08-01

    Two supernovae detected in the Hubble Deep Field (HDF) using the original 1995 December epoch and data from a shorter (63,000 s in F814W) 1997 December visit with HST are discussed. The supernovae (SNe) are both associated with distinct galaxies at redshifts of 0.95 (spectroscopic) from Cohen et al. and 1.32 (photometric) from the work of Fernández-Soto, Lanzetta, & Yahil. These redshifts are near, in the case of 0.95, and well beyond, for 1.32, the greatest distance reported previously for SNe. We show that our observations are sensitive to supernovae to z<~1.8 in either epoch for an event near peak brightness. Detailed simulations are discussed that quantify the level at which false events from our search phase would start to arise and the completeness of our search as a function of both SN brightness and host galaxy redshift. The number of Type Ia and Type II SNe expected as a function of redshift in the two HDF epochs are discussed in relation to several published predictions and our own detailed calculations. A mean detection frequency of one SN per epoch for the small HDF area is consistent with expectations from current theory. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  1. Probing neutrinos from Planck and forthcoming galaxy redshift surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Yoshitaka; Kadota, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    We investigate how much the constraints on the neutrino properties can be improved by combining the CMB, the photometric and spectroscopic galaxy redshift surveys which include the CMB lensing, galaxy lensing tomography, galaxy clustering and redshift space distortion observables. We pay a particular attention to the constraint on the neutrino mass in view of the forthcoming redshift surveys such as the Euclid satellite and the LSST survey along with the Planck CMB lensing measurements. Combining the transverse mode information from the angular power spectrum and the longitudinal mode information from the spectroscopic survey with the redshift space distortion measurements can determine the total neutrino mass with the projected error of Script O(0.02) eV. Our analysis fixes the mass splittings among the neutrino species to be consistent with the neutrino oscillation data, and we accordingly study the sensitivity of our parameter estimations on the minimal neutrino mass. The cosmological measurement of the total neutrino mass can distinguish between the normal and inverted mass hierarchy scenarios if the minimal neutrino mass lesssim0.005 eV with the predicted 1-σ uncertainties taken into account.

  2. Identifying high-redshift gamma-ray bursts with RATIR

    SciTech Connect

    Littlejohns, O. M.; Butler, N. R.; Cucchiara, A.; Watson, A. M.; Lee, W. H.; Richer, M. G.; De Diego, J. A.; Georgiev, L.; González, J.; Román-Zúñiga, C. G.; Kutyrev, A. S.; Troja, E.; Gehrels, N.; Moseley, H.; Klein, C. R.; Fox, O. D.; Bloom, J. S.; Prochaska, J. X.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.

    2014-07-01

    We present a template-fitting algorithm for determining photometric redshifts, z {sub phot}, of candidate high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Using afterglow photometry, obtained by the Reionization and Transients InfraRed (RATIR) camera, this algorithm accounts for the intrinsic GRB afterglow spectral energy distribution, host dust extinction, and the effect of neutral hydrogen (local and cosmological) along the line of sight. We present the results obtained by this algorithm and the RATIR photometry of GRB 130606A, finding a range of best-fit solutions, 5.6 < z {sub phot} < 6.0, for models of several host dust extinction laws (none, the Milky Way, Large Magellanic Clouds, and Small Magellanic Clouds), consistent with spectroscopic measurements of the redshift of this GRB. Using simulated RATIR photometry, we find that our algorithm provides precise measures of z {sub phot} in the ranges of 4 < z {sub phot} ≲ 8 and 9 < z {sub phot} < 10 and can robustly determine when z {sub phot} > 4. Further testing highlights the required caution in cases of highly dust-extincted host galaxies. These tests also show that our algorithm does not erroneously find z {sub phot} < 4 when z {sub sim} > 4, thereby minimizing false negatives and allowing us to rapidly identify all potential high-redshift events.

  3. Probing neutrinos from Planck and forthcoming galaxy redshift surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Yoshitaka; Kadota, Kenji E-mail: kadota.kenji@f.nagoya-u.jp

    2014-01-01

    We investigate how much the constraints on the neutrino properties can be improved by combining the CMB, the photometric and spectroscopic galaxy redshift surveys which include the CMB lensing, galaxy lensing tomography, galaxy clustering and redshift space distortion observables. We pay a particular attention to the constraint on the neutrino mass in view of the forthcoming redshift surveys such as the Euclid satellite and the LSST survey along with the Planck CMB lensing measurements. Combining the transverse mode information from the angular power spectrum and the longitudinal mode information from the spectroscopic survey with the redshift space distortion measurements can determine the total neutrino mass with the projected error of O(0.02) eV. Our analysis fixes the mass splittings among the neutrino species to be consistent with the neutrino oscillation data, and we accordingly study the sensitivity of our parameter estimations on the minimal neutrino mass. The cosmological measurement of the total neutrino mass can distinguish between the normal and inverted mass hierarchy scenarios if the minimal neutrino mass ∼<0.005 eV with the predicted 1–σ uncertainties taken into account.

  4. Tuning target selection algorithms to improve galaxy redshift estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Ben; Paech, Kerstin; Rau, Markus Michael; Seitz, Stella; Weller, Jochen

    2016-06-01

    We showcase machine learning (ML) inspired target selection algorithms to determine which of all potential targets should be selected first for spectroscopic follow-up. Efficient target selection can improve the ML redshift uncertainties as calculated on an independent sample, while requiring less targets to be observed. We compare seven different ML targeting algorithms with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) target order, and with a random targeting algorithm. The ML inspired algorithms are constructed iteratively by estimating which of the remaining target galaxies will be most difficult for the ML methods to accurately estimate redshifts using the previously observed data. This is performed by predicting the expected redshift error and redshift offset (or bias) of all of the remaining target galaxies. We find that the predicted values of bias and error are accurate to better than 10-30 per cent of the true values, even with only limited training sample sizes. We construct a hypothetical follow-up survey and find that some of the ML targeting algorithms are able to obtain the same redshift predictive power with 2-3 times less observing time, as compared to that of the SDSS, or random, target selection algorithms. The reduction in the required follow-up resources could allow for a change to the follow-up strategy, for example by obtaining deeper spectroscopy, which could improve ML redshift estimates for deeper test data.

  5. Quasar redshifts: the intrinsic component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Peter M.

    2016-09-01

    The large observed redshift of quasars has suggested large cosmological distances and a corresponding enormous energy output to explain the brightness or luminosity as seen at earth. Alternative or complementary sources of redshift have not been identified by the astronomical community. This study examines one possible source of additional redshift: an intrinsic component based on the plasma characteristics of high temperature and high electron density which are believed to be present.

  6. A photometric study of Enceladus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verbiscer, Anne J.; Veverka, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    We have supplemented Voyager imaging data from Enceladus (limited to phase angles of 13 deg-43 deg) with recent Earth-based CCD observations to obtain an improved determination of the Bond albedo, to construct an albedo map of the satellite, and to constrain parameters in Hapke's (1986) photometric equation. A major result is evidence of regional variations in the physical properties of Enceladus' surface. The average global photometric properties are described by single scattering albedo omega(sub 0) average = 0.998 +/- 0.001, macroscopic roughness parameter theta average = 6 +/- 1 deg, and Henyey-Greenstein asymmetry parameter g = -0.399 +/- 0.005. The value of theta average is smaller than the 14 deg found by fitting whole-disk data, which include all terrains on Enceladus. The opposition surge amplitude B(sub 0) = 0.21 +/- 0.07 and regolith compaction parameter h = 0.014 +/- 0.02 are loosely constrained by the scarcity of and uncertainty in near-opposition observations. From the solar phase curve we determine the geometric albedo of Enceladus p(sub v) = 0.99 +/- 0.06 and phase integral q = 0.92 +/- 0.05, which corresponds to a spherical albedo A = p(sub v)q = 0.91 +/- 0.1. Since the spectrum of Enceladus is fairly flat, we can approximate the Bond albedo A(sub B) with the spherical albedo. Our photometric analysis is summarized in terms of an albedo map which generally reproduces the satellite's observed lightcurve and indicates that normal reflectances range from 0.9 on the leading hemisphere to 1.4 on the trailing one. The albedo map also revels an albedo variation of 15% from longitudes 170 deg to 200 deg, corresponding to the boundary between the leading and trailing hemispheres.

  7. THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: DESIGN, OBSERVATIONS, DATA REDUCTION, AND REDSHIFTS

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Conroy, Charlie; Harker, Justin J.; Lai, Kamson; Dutton, Aaron A.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Gerke, Brian F.; Rosario, David J.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Willmer, C. N. A.; Yan Renbin; Kassin, Susan A.; Konidaris, N. P. E-mail: djm70@pitt.edu E-mail: mdavis@berkeley.edu E-mail: koo@ucolick.org E-mail: phillips@ucolick.org; and others

    2013-09-15

    We describe the design and data analysis of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, the densest and largest high-precision redshift survey of galaxies at z {approx} 1 completed to date. The survey was designed to conduct a comprehensive census of massive galaxies, their properties, environments, and large-scale structure down to absolute magnitude M{sub B} = -20 at z {approx} 1 via {approx}90 nights of observation on the Keck telescope. The survey covers an area of 2.8 deg{sup 2} divided into four separate fields observed to a limiting apparent magnitude of R{sub AB} = 24.1. Objects with z {approx}< 0.7 are readily identifiable using BRI photometry and rejected in three of the four DEEP2 fields, allowing galaxies with z > 0.7 to be targeted {approx}2.5 times more efficiently than in a purely magnitude-limited sample. Approximately 60% of eligible targets are chosen for spectroscopy, yielding nearly 53,000 spectra and more than 38,000 reliable redshift measurements. Most of the targets that fail to yield secure redshifts are blue objects that lie beyond z {approx} 1.45, where the [O II] 3727 A doublet lies in the infrared. The DEIMOS 1200 line mm{sup -1} grating used for the survey delivers high spectral resolution (R {approx} 6000), accurate and secure redshifts, and unique internal kinematic information. Extensive ancillary data are available in the DEEP2 fields, particularly in the Extended Groth Strip, which has evolved into one of the richest multiwavelength regions on the sky. This paper is intended as a handbook for users of the DEEP2 Data Release 4, which includes all DEEP2 spectra and redshifts, as well as for the DEEP2 DEIMOS data reduction pipelines. Extensive details are provided on object selection, mask design, biases in target selection and redshift measurements, the spec2d two-dimensional data-reduction pipeline, the spec1d automated redshift pipeline, and the zspec visual redshift verification process, along with examples of instrumental signatures or

  8. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Design, Observations, Data Reduction, and Redshifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Coil, Alison L; Guhathakurta, Puraga; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Conroy, Charlie; Dutton, Aaron A.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Gerke, Brian F.; Rosario, David J.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Wilmer, C. N. A.; Yan, Renbin; Harker, Justin J.; Kassin, Susan A.; Konidaris, N. P.; Lai, Kamson; Madgwick, Darren S.; Noeske, K. G.; Wirth, Gregory D.; Kirby, Evan N.; Lotz, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the design and data analysis of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, the densest and largest high-precision redshift survey of galaxies at z approx. 1 completed to date. The survey was designed to conduct a comprehensive census of massive galaxies, their properties, environments, and large-scale structure down to absolute magnitude MB = -20 at z approx. 1 via approx.90 nights of observation on the Keck telescope. The survey covers an area of 2.8 Sq. deg divided into four separate fields observed to a limiting apparent magnitude of R(sub AB) = 24.1. Objects with z approx. < 0.7 are readily identifiable using BRI photometry and rejected in three of the four DEEP2 fields, allowing galaxies with z > 0.7 to be targeted approx. 2.5 times more efficiently than in a purely magnitude-limited sample. Approximately 60% of eligible targets are chosen for spectroscopy, yielding nearly 53,000 spectra and more than 38,000 reliable redshift measurements. Most of the targets that fail to yield secure redshifts are blue objects that lie beyond z approx. 1.45, where the [O ii] 3727 Ang. doublet lies in the infrared. The DEIMOS 1200 line mm(exp -1) grating used for the survey delivers high spectral resolution (R approx. 6000), accurate and secure redshifts, and unique internal kinematic information. Extensive ancillary data are available in the DEEP2 fields, particularly in the Extended Groth Strip, which has evolved into one of the richest multiwavelength regions on the sky. This paper is intended as a handbook for users of the DEEP2 Data Release 4, which includes all DEEP2 spectra and redshifts, as well as for the DEEP2 DEIMOS data reduction pipelines. Extensive details are provided on object selection, mask design, biases in target selection and redshift measurements, the spec2d two-dimensional data-reduction pipeline, the spec1d automated redshift pipeline, and the zspec visual redshift verification process, along with examples of instrumental signatures or other

  9. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Design, Observations, Data Reduction, and Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Coil, Alison L.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Conroy, Charlie; Dutton, Aaron A.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Gerke, Brian F.; Rosario, David J.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Willmer, C. N. A.; Yan, Renbin; Harker, Justin J.; Kassin, Susan A.; Konidaris, N. P.; Lai, Kamson; Madgwick, Darren S.; Noeske, K. G.; Wirth, Gregory D.; Connolly, A. J.; Kaiser, N.; Kirby, Evan N.; Lemaux, Brian C.; Lin, Lihwai; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Luppino, G. A.; Marinoni, C.; Matthews, Daniel J.; Metevier, Anne; Schiavon, Ricardo P.

    2013-09-01

    We describe the design and data analysis of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, the densest and largest high-precision redshift survey of galaxies at z ~ 1 completed to date. The survey was designed to conduct a comprehensive census of massive galaxies, their properties, environments, and large-scale structure down to absolute magnitude MB = -20 at z ~ 1 via ~90 nights of observation on the Keck telescope. The survey covers an area of 2.8 deg2 divided into four separate fields observed to a limiting apparent magnitude of R AB = 24.1. Objects with z <~ 0.7 are readily identifiable using BRI photometry and rejected in three of the four DEEP2 fields, allowing galaxies with z > 0.7 to be targeted ~2.5 times more efficiently than in a purely magnitude-limited sample. Approximately 60% of eligible targets are chosen for spectroscopy, yielding nearly 53,000 spectra and more than 38,000 reliable redshift measurements. Most of the targets that fail to yield secure redshifts are blue objects that lie beyond z ~ 1.45, where the [O II] 3727 Å doublet lies in the infrared. The DEIMOS 1200 line mm-1 grating used for the survey delivers high spectral resolution (R ~ 6000), accurate and secure redshifts, and unique internal kinematic information. Extensive ancillary data are available in the DEEP2 fields, particularly in the Extended Groth Strip, which has evolved into one of the richest multiwavelength regions on the sky. This paper is intended as a handbook for users of the DEEP2 Data Release 4, which includes all DEEP2 spectra and redshifts, as well as for the DEEP2 DEIMOS data reduction pipelines. Extensive details are provided on object selection, mask design, biases in target selection and redshift measurements, the spec2d two-dimensional data-reduction pipeline, the spec1d automated redshift pipeline, and the zspec visual redshift verification process, along with examples of instrumental signatures or other artifacts that in some cases remain after data reduction. Redshift

  10. Photometric Study of IC 2156

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadross, A. L.; Hendy, Y. H. M.

    2016-04-01

    We present an optical UBVRI photometric analysis of the poorly studied open star cluster IC 2156 using Sloan Digital Sky Survey data in order to estimate its astrophysical properties. We compare these with results from our previous studies that relied on the 2MASS JHK near-infrared photometry. The stellar density distributions and color-magnitude diagrams of the cluster are used to determine its geometrical structure, real radius, core and tidal radii, and its distance from the Sun, the Galactic plane, and the Galactic center. We also estimate, the age, color excesses, reddening-free distance modulus, membership, total mass, luminosity function, mass function, and relaxation time of the cluster.

  11. Data augmentation for machine learning redshifts applied to Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Ben; Rau, Markus Michael; Bonnett, Christopher; Seitz, Stella; Weller, Jochen

    2015-06-01

    We present analyses of data augmentation for machine learning redshift estimation. Data augmentation makes a training sample more closely resemble a test sample, if the two base samples differ, in order to improve measured statistics of the test sample. We perform two sets of analyses by selecting 800 000 (1.7 million) Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8 (Data Release 10) galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts. We construct a base training set by imposing an artificial r-band apparent magnitude cut to select only bright galaxies and then augment this base training set by using simulations and by applying the K-CORRECT package to artificially place training set galaxies at a higher redshift. We obtain redshift estimates for the remaining faint galaxy sample, which are not used during training. We find that data augmentation reduces the error on the recovered redshifts by 40 per cent in both sets of analyses, when compared to the difference in error between the ideal case and the non-augmented case. The outlier fraction is also reduced by at least 10 per cent and up to 80 per cent using data augmentation. We finally quantify how the recovered redshifts degrade as one probes to deeper magnitudes past the artificial magnitude limit of the bright training sample. We find that at all apparent magnitudes explored, the use of data augmentation with tree-based methods provide an estimate of the galaxy redshift with a low value of bias, although the error on the recovered redshifts increases as we probe to deeper magnitudes. These results have applications for surveys which have a spectroscopic training set which forms a biased sample of all photometric galaxies, for example if the spectroscopic detection magnitude limit is shallower than the photometric limit.

  12. The silicon solar cell as a photometric detector.

    PubMed

    Witherell, P G; Faulhaber, M E

    1970-01-01

    Early in their development, silicon solar cells were recognized to have characteristics desirable for photometric detectors. It is therefore surprising that their use in this way has not become more widespread. Results of an investigation to establish more completely the photometric capabilities of these cells are presented in this paper. An equivalent circuit model is used to predict performance from basic cell parameters and the dependence on illumination level and load impedance is established. When load impedance is low, silicon cells have a small temperature coefficient and the cell current is accurately proportional to illumination. With high impedance loads and high illumination levels, the cell voltage is logarithmically related to illumination and the temperature sensitivity is approximately an order of magnitude greater. Variation of spectral response between unselected cells from the same manufacturer was found to be considerably less than that typically measured for unselected phototubes. PMID:20076139

  13. Classic and New Photometric Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, I. S.

    2006-08-01

    For many critical applications it is necessary to understand the limitations of the large-scale surveys in terms of photometric systematics and source confusion. The photometric surveys of the present and past employ a variety of different filter systems, even if nominally standard. Very often the fiducial colours of stars in a given survey are based on modelling from theoretical atmospheres or spectrophotometry rather than on observational data made with the same set of filters. The output of a particular detector is dependent, inter alia, on a precise knowledge of the transmission characteristics of the filters and the atmosphere. The filter manufacturing process itself is limited in precision. Measurements of transmission as a function of wavelength may not be available for the temperature at which a filter is used. For objects with smooth spectra and not suffering severe interstellar reddening, colour transformations are usually very successful. However, in studies of extincted regions, such as along the Galactic Plane, the calculation of reddening amounts can be heavily dependent on filter characteristics, not just their "effective wavelengths". Confusion will of course become significant according to source densities and pixel sizes. In heavily extincted areas, there is a danger of identifying nearby faint sources with distant ones observed at longer wavelengths where the extinction is less.

  14. Improved Linear Algebra Methods for Redshift Computation from Limited Spectrum Data - II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Leslie; Waagen, Alex; Aijaz, Nabella; Hurley, Michael; Luis, Apolo; Rinsky, Joel; Satyavolu, Chandrika; Gazis, Paul; Srivastava, Ashok; Way, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Given photometric broadband measurements of a galaxy, Gaussian processes may be used with a training set to solve the regression problem of approximating the redshift of this galaxy. However, in practice solving the traditional Gaussian processes equation is too slow and requires too much memory. We employed several methods to avoid this difficulty using algebraic manipulation and low-rank approximation, and were able to quickly approximate the redshifts in our testing data within 17 percent of the known true values using limited computational resources. The accuracy of one method, the V Formulation, is comparable to the accuracy of the best methods currently used for this problem.

  15. Stacking for machine learning redshifts applied to SDSS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitlau, Roman; Hoyle, Ben; Paech, Kerstin; Weller, Jochen; Rau, Markus Michael; Seitz, Stella

    2016-08-01

    We present an analysis of a general machine learning technique called `stacking' for the estimation of photometric redshifts. Stacking techniques can feed the photometric redshift estimate, as output by a base algorithm, back into the same algorithm as an additional input feature in a subsequent learning round. We show how all tested base algorithms benefit from at least one additional stacking round (or layer). To demonstrate the benefit of stacking, we apply the method to both unsupervised machine learning techniques based on self-organizing maps (SOMs), and supervised machine learning methods based on decision trees. We explore a range of stacking architectures, such as the number of layers and the number of base learners per layer. Finally we explore the effectiveness of stacking even when using a successful algorithm such as AdaBoost. We observe a significant improvement of between 1.9 per cent and 21 per cent on all computed metrics when stacking is applied to weak learners (such as SOMs and decision trees). When applied to strong learning algorithms (such as AdaBoost) the ratio of improvement shrinks, but still remains positive and is between 0.4 per cent and 2.5 per cent for the explored metrics and comes at almost no additional computational cost.

  16. Stacking for machine learning redshifts applied to SDSS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitlau, Roman; Hoyle, Ben; Paech, Kerstin; Weller, Jochen; Rau, Markus Michael; Seitz, Stella

    2016-08-01

    We present an analysis of a general machine learning technique called 'stacking' for the estimation of photometric redshifts. Stacking techniques can feed the photometric redshift estimate, as output by a base algorithm, back into the same algorithm as an additional input feature in a subsequent learning round. We shown how all tested base algorithms benefit from at least one additional stacking round (or layer). To demonstrate the benefit of stacking, we apply the method to both unsupervised machine learning techniques based on self-organising maps (SOMs), and supervised machine learning methods based on decision trees. We explore a range of stacking architectures, such as the number of layers and the number of base learners per layer. Finally we explore the effectiveness of stacking even when using a successful algorithm such as AdaBoost. We observe a significant improvement of between 1.9% and 21% on all computed metrics when stacking is applied to weak learners (such as SOMs and decision trees). When applied to strong learning algorithms (such as AdaBoost) the ratio of improvement shrinks, but still remains positive and is between 0.4% and 2.5% for the explored metrics and comes at almost no additional computational cost.

  17. The Aquarius Superclusters. II. Spectroscopic and Photometric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caretta, César A.; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Willmer, Christopher N. A.

    2004-12-01

    We present spectroscopic and photometric data for 920 galaxies selected in 68 fields of the Aquarius Cluster Catalog. Typically, the 15 brightest candidate members with magnitudes in the range 16redshift determinations, we assign galaxies to groups and clusters, and by including data from the literature we calculate systemic velocities and velocity dispersions for 74 clusters, each with redshifts measured for at least six individual galaxies. Partly based on observations at European Southern Observatory (ESO) at the ESO Schmidt Telescope and the 1.52 m telescope under the ESO-ON agreement; Observatório do Pico dos Dias, operated by the Laboratório Nacional de Astrofísica (LNA); and Complejo Astronomico El Leoncito (CASLEO), operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba, and San Juan.

  18. Semi-supervised learning for photometric supernova classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Joseph W.; Homrighausen, Darren; Freeman, Peter E.; Schafer, Chad M.; Poznanski, Dovi

    2012-01-01

    We present a semi-supervised method for photometric supernova typing. Our approach is to first use the non-linear dimension reduction technique diffusion map to detect structure in a data base of supernova light curves and subsequently employ random forest classification on a spectroscopically confirmed training set to learn a model that can predict the type of each newly observed supernova. We demonstrate that this is an effective method for supernova typing. As supernova numbers increase, our semi-supervised method efficiently utilizes this information to improve classification, a property not enjoyed by template-based methods. Applied to supernova data simulated by Kessler et al. to mimic those of the Dark Energy Survey, our methods achieve (cross-validated) 95 per cent Type Ia purity and 87 per cent Type Ia efficiency on the spectroscopic sample, but only 50 per cent Type Ia purity and 50 per cent efficiency on the photometric sample due to their spectroscopic follow-up strategy. To improve the performance on the photometric sample, we search for better spectroscopic follow-up procedures by studying the sensitivity of our machine-learned supernova classification on the specific strategy used to obtain training sets. With a fixed amount of spectroscopic follow-up time, we find that, despite collecting data on a smaller number of supernovae, deeper magnitude-limited spectroscopic surveys are better for producing training sets. For supernova Ia (II-P) typing, we obtain a 44 per cent (1 per cent) increase in purity to 72 per cent (87 per cent) and 30 per cent (162 per cent) increase in efficiency to 65 per cent (84 per cent) of the sample using a 25th (24.5th) magnitude-limited survey instead of the shallower spectroscopic sample used in the original simulations. When redshift information is available, we incorporate it into our analysis using a novel method of altering the diffusion map representation of the supernovae. Incorporating host redshifts leads to a 5

  19. Redshift Survey Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. W.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Kaiser, N.

    1994-12-01

    In the first half of 1995, the Anglo-Australian Observatory is due to commission a wide field (2.1(deg) ), 400-fiber, double spectrograph system (2dF) at the f/3.3 prime focus of the AAT 3.9m bi-national facility. The instrument should be able to measure ~ 4000 galaxy redshifts (assuming a magnitude limit of b_J ~\\ 20) in a single dark night and is therefore ideally suited to studies of large-scale structure. We have carried out simple 3D numerical simulations to judge the relative merits of sparse surveys and contiguous surveys. We generate a survey volume and fill it randomly with particles according to a selection function which mimics a magnitude-limited survey at b_J = 19.7. Each of the particles is perturbed by a gaussian random field according to the dimensionless power spectrum k(3) P(k) / 2pi (2) determined by Feldman, Kaiser & Peacock (1994) from the IRAS QDOT survey. We introduce some redshift-space distortion as described by Kaiser (1987), a `thermal' component measured from pairwise velocities (Davis & Peebles 1983), and `fingers of god' due to rich clusters at random density enhancements. Our particular concern is to understand how the window function W(2(k)) of the survey geometry compromises the accuracy of statistical measures [e.g., P(k), xi (r), xi (r_sigma ,r_pi )] commonly used in the study of large-scale structure. We also examine the reliability of various tools (e.g. genus) for describing the topological structure within a contiguous region of the survey.

  20. GALAXY CLUSTERS AT HIGH REDSHIFT AND EVOLUTION OF BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Z. L.; Han, J. L.

    2011-06-10

    Identification of high-redshift clusters is important for studies of cosmology and cluster evolution. Using photometric redshifts of galaxies, we identify 631 clusters from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) wide field, 202 clusters from the CFHT deep field, 187 clusters from the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field, and 737 clusters from the Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic Survey (SWIRE) field. The redshifts of these clusters are in the range 0.1 {approx}< z {approx}< 1.6. Merging these cluster samples gives 1644 clusters in the four survey fields, of which 1088 are newly identified and more than half are from the large SWIRE field. Among 228 clusters of z {>=} 1, 191 clusters are newly identified, and most of them from the SWIRE field. With this large sample of high-redshift clusters, we study the color evolution of the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). The r' - z' and r{sup +} - m{sub 3.6{mu}m} colors of the BCGs are consistent with a stellar population synthesis model in which the BCGs are formed at redshift z{sub f} {>=} 2 and evolved passively. The g' - z' and B - m{sub 3.6{mu}m} colors of the BCGs at redshifts z > 0.8 are systematically bluer than the passive evolution model for galaxies formed at z{sub f} {approx} 2, indicating star formation in high-redshift BCGs.

  1. Star Formation and the Butcher-Oemler effect in Intermediate Redshift Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, S. M.; Bershady, M. A.; Hoessel, J. G.

    2005-12-01

    The Butcher-Oemler effect, the increasing population of blue galaxies in galaxy clusters with redshift, has been confirmed through extensive photometric and spectroscopic studies, but strong variations are seen between clusters even at similar redshifts. Furthermore, the total star formation, measured via several different methods, occurring in a small sample of intermediate redshift clusters displays trends with redshift, mass, and X-ray luminosity. We present narrow-band observations from the WIYN 3.5m telescope of six intermediate redshift (0.5 < z < 0.9) galaxy clusters to measure the total star formation in these rich clusters. These observations almost double the number of measurements of star formation occurring in intermediate redshift clusters and give a consistent measurement of un-obscured star formation through the OII[λ 3727] emission line down to 0.1 M{⊙ }/yr. We investigate any trends seen between the clusters total star formation and its properties such as mass, luminosity, redshift, and virialization. We quantify the virialization through the luminosity gap statistic, the asymmetry of the galaxy distribution, and the offset from the Tx- σ relationship for each cluster. The recent merger history in galaxy clusters is one explanation for the excess in blue galaxies seen in some clusters. This work was supported by HST ARCHIVE grant #9917, NSF grant AST-0307417, and an award from the Wisconsin Space Grant Corportation.

  2. Constraints on Primordial Non-Gaussianity from 800 000 Photometric Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leistedt, Boris; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Roth, Nina

    2014-11-01

    We derive robust constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity (PNG) using the clustering of 800 000 photometric quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey in the redshift range 0.5 accurate measurement of quasar halo bias at the largest scales, while discarding as little as possible of the data. The standard local-type PNG parameters fNL and gNL both imprint a k-2 scale-dependent effect in the bias. Constraining these individually, we obtain -49 redshift distributions, shot noise, and the bias prescription used to relate the quasar clustering to the underlying dark matter. These are the strongest constraints obtained to date on PNG using a single population of large-scale structure tracers, and are already at the level of pre-Planck constraints from the cosmic microwave background. A conservative forecast for a Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)-like survey incorporating mode projection yields σ (fNL)˜5 —competitive with the Planck result—highlighting the power of upcoming large scale structure surveys to probe the initial conditions of the Universe.

  3. THE RED-SEQUENCE CLUSTER SURVEY-2 (RCS-2): SURVEY DETAILS AND PHOTOMETRIC CATALOG CONSTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbank, David G.; Gladders, M. D.; Yee, H. K. C.; Hsieh, B. C.

    2011-03-15

    The second Red-sequence Cluster Survey (RCS-2) is a {approx}1000 deg{sup 2}, multi-color imaging survey using the square-degree imager, MegaCam, on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. It is designed to detect clusters of galaxies over the redshift range 0.1 {approx}< z {approx}< 1. The primary aim is to build a statistically complete, large ({approx}10{sup 4}) sample of clusters, covering a sufficiently long redshift baseline to be able to place constraints on cosmological parameters via the evolution of the cluster mass function. Other main science goals include building a large sample of high surface brightness, strongly gravitationally lensed arcs associated with these clusters, and an unprecedented sample of several tens of thousands of galaxy clusters and groups, spanning a large range of halo mass, with which to study the properties and evolution of their member galaxies. This paper describes the design of the survey and the methodology for acquiring, reducing, and calibrating the data for the production of high-precision photometric catalogs. We describe the method for calibrating our griz imaging data using the colors of the stellar locus and overlapping Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry. This yields an absolute accuracy of <0.03 mag on any color and {approx}0.05 mag in the r-band magnitude, verified with respect to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Our astrometric calibration is accurate to <<0.''3 from comparison with SDSS positions. RCS-2 reaches average 5{sigma} point-source limiting magnitudes of griz = [24.4, 24.3, 23.7, 22.8], approximately 1-2 mag deeper than the SDSS. Due to the queue-scheduled nature of the observations, the data are highly uniform and taken in excellent seeing, mostly FWHM {approx}< 0.''7 in the r band. In addition to the main science goals just described, these data form the basis for a number of other planned and ongoing projects (including the WiggleZ survey), making RCS-2 an important next-generation imaging survey.

  4. Constraints on Primordial Non-Gaussianity from 800 000 Photometric Quasars.

    PubMed

    Leistedt, Boris; Peiris, Hiranya V; Roth, Nina

    2014-11-28

    We derive robust constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity (PNG) using the clustering of 800 000 photometric quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey in the redshift range 0.5accurate measurement of quasar halo bias at the largest scales, while discarding as little as possible of the data. The standard local-type PNG parameters f_{NL} and g_{NL} both imprint a k^{-2} scale-dependent effect in the bias. Constraining these individually, we obtain -49redshift distributions, shot noise, and the bias prescription used to relate the quasar clustering to the underlying dark matter. These are the strongest constraints obtained to date on PNG using a single population of large-scale structure tracers, and are already at the level of pre-Planck constraints from the cosmic microwave background. A conservative forecast for a Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)-like survey incorporating mode projection yields σ(f_{NL})∼5-competitive with the Planck result-highlighting the power of upcoming large scale structure surveys to probe the initial conditions of the Universe. PMID:25494066

  5. Orbital and photometric properties of SZ Lyncis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffett, Thomas J.; Barnes, Thomas G., III; Fekel, Francis C., Jr.; Jefferys, William H.; Achtermann, Jeffrey M.

    1988-01-01

    New photometric results based on 3760 observations made on the Johnson BVRI system and 69 new radial-velocity measurements of the large-amplitude Delta Scuti binary SZ Lyncis are reported. Using these data and previous observations from the literature, improved values for the pulsation and orbital parameters are derived. The pulsation period is found to be 0.12052115 days, which is shorter than earlier determinations. The pulsation period is undergoing a secular period change of 3 X 10 to the -12th days/cycle. The orbital period of the binary is found to be 1181.1 days, with an orbital eccentricity of 0.188. A new ephemeris is given, which accurately predicts the times of light maximum and is consistent with the spectroscopic orbit. The mass function is 0.101 solar, which, together with other known properties of SZ Lyn, indicates that the unseen companion is most likely on the main sequence with a spectral type between F2 and K3.

  6. Photometric invariant stereo matching method.

    PubMed

    Gu, Feifei; Zhao, Hong; Zhou, Xiang; Li, Jinjun; Bu, Penghui; Zhao, Zixin

    2015-12-14

    A robust stereo matching method based on a comprehensive mathematical model for color formation process is proposed to estimate the disparity map of stereo images with noise and photometric variations. The band-pass filter with DoP kernel is firstly used to filter out noise component of the stereo images. Then the log-chromaticity normalization process is applied to eliminate the influence of lightning geometry. All the other factors that may influence the color formation process are removed through the disparity estimation process with a specific matching cost. Performance of the developed method is evaluated by comparing with some up-to-date algorithms. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate the robustness and accuracy of the method. PMID:26698970

  7. The Muenster Redshift Project (MRSP).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuecker, P.; Horstmann, H.; Seitter, W. C.; Ott, H.-A.; Duemmler, R.; Tucholke, H.-J.; Teuber, D.; Meijer, J.; Cunow, B.

    The Astronomical Institute Muenster, in 1986, has started the Muenster Redshift Project (MRSP), where redshifts z are measured automatically from low-dispersion objective prism plates. The number of galaxy redshifts per square degree is approximately 250, the scale reached z = 0.3, compared to about 2 galaxies per square degree and z = 0.05 for currently available large-area surveys. This is a significant growth, gained, however, with the loss of resolution in redshift space: the low dispersion of the spectra gives redshift accuracies of dz = 0.01 or 30 h-1Mpc (H0 = 100 h km s-1Mpc-1, q0 = 0.5). Nevertheless, in most cases the large numbers of objects compensate for the statistical redshift errors, while the derivations of global and cosmological quantities are less affected by small-number statistics, are more representative, and thus lead to more reliable values. The detection of voids on scales z < 0.02 is not possible, unless the structures in redshift space are sharpened, using, e.g. deconvolution techniques.

  8. Photometric and polarimetric mapping of water turbidity and water depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halajian, J.; Hallock, H.

    1973-01-01

    A Digital Photometric Mapper (DPM) was used in the Fall of 1971 in an airborne survey of New York and Boston area waters to acquire photometric, spectral and polarimetric data. The object of this study is to analyze these data with quantitative computer processing techniques to assess the potential of the DPM in the measurement and regional mapping of water turbidity and depth. These techniques have been developed and an operational potential has been demonstrated. More emphasis is placed at this time on the methodology of data acquisition, analysis and display than on the quantity of data. The results illustrate the type, quantity and format of information that could be generated operationally with the DPM-type sensor characterized by high photometric stability and fast, accurate digital output. The prototype, single-channel DPM is suggested as a unique research tool for a number of new applications. For the operational mapping of water turbidity and depth, the merits of a multichannel DPM coupled with a laser system are stressed.

  9. Establishment of the NIST flashing-light photometric unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Yoshihiro; Zong, Yuqin

    1997-09-01

    There is a need for accurate measurement of flashing lights for the proper maintenance of aircraft anticollision lights. A large variation in the measured intensities of anticollision lights has been a problem, and thus, NIST has undertaken the task to establish flashing-light photometric standards to provide calibration services in this area. A flashing-light photometric unit [lux second, (lx (DOT) s)] has been realized based on the NIST detector-based candela, using four standard photometers equipped with current integrators. Two different approaches have been taken to calibrate these standard photometers: one based on electrical calibration of the current integrator, and the other based on electronic pulsing of a steady-state photometric standard. The units realized using these two independent methods agreed to within 0.2%. The relative expanded uncertainty (k equals 2) of the standard photometers, in the measurement of the white xenon flash, is estimated to be 0.6%. The standard photometers are characterized for temporal response, linearity, and spectral responsivity, to be used for measurement of xenon flash sources of various waveforms and colors. Calibration services have been established at NIST for flashing-light photometers with white and red anticollision lights.

  10. Calibration of LSST Instrumental and Atmospheric Photometric Passbands

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, David L.; Axelrod, T.; Barrau, Aurelien; Baumont, Sylvain; Blondin, Stephane; Claver, Chuck; Gorecki, Alexia; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jones, Lynne; Krabbendam, Victor; Liang, Ming; Saha, Abhijit; Smith, Allyn; Smith, R.Chris; Stubbs, Christopher W.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2011-07-06

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will continuously image the entire sky visible from Cerro Pachon in northern Chile every 3-4 nights throughout the year. The LSST will provide data for a broad range of science investigations that require better than 1% photometric precision across the sky (repeatability and uniformity) and a similar accuracy of measured broadband color. The fast and persistent cadence of the LSST survey will significantly improve the temporal sampling rate with which celestial events and motions are tracked. To achieve these goals, and to optimally utilize the observing calendar, it will be necessary to obtain excellent photometric calibration of data taken over a wide range of observing conditions - even those not normally considered 'photometric'. To achieve this it will be necessary to routinely and accurately measure the full optical passband that includes the atmosphere as well as the instrumental telescope and camera system. The LSST mountain facility will include a new monochromatic dome illumination projector system to measure the detailed wavelength dependence of the instrumental passband for each channel in the system. The facility will also include an auxiliary spectroscopic telescope dedicated to measurement of atmospheric transparency at all locations in the sky during LSST observing. In this paper, we describe these systems and present laboratory and observational data that illustrate their performance.

  11. THE POPULATION OF HIGH-REDSHIFT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN THE CHANDRA-COSMOS SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Civano, F.; Elvis, M.; Hao, H.; Brusa, M.; Comastri, A.; Zamorani, G.; Gilli, R.; Mignoli, M.; Salvato, M.; Capak, P.; Kakazu, Y.; Masters, D.; Fiore, F.; Ikeda, H.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Miyaji, T.; Puccetti, S.; Shankar, F.; Silverman, J.; Vignali, C.

    2011-11-10

    We present the high-redshift (3 photometric (50) redshifts plus 20 sources with a formal z{sub phot} < 3 but with a broad photometric redshift probability distribution, such that z{sub phot} + 1{sigma} > 3. Eighty-one sources are selected in the 0.5-2 keV band, fourteen are selected in the 2-10 keV and six in the 0.5-10 keV bands. We sample the high-luminosity (log L{sub (2-10keV)} > 44.15 erg s{sup -1}) space density up to z {approx} 5 and a fainter luminosity range (43.5 erg s{sup -1} < log L{sub (2-10keV)} < 44.15 erg s{sup -1}) than previous studies, up to z = 3.5. We weighted the contribution to the number counts and the space density of the sources with photometric redshift by using their probability of being at z > 3. We find that the space density of high-luminosity AGNs declines exponentially at all the redshifts, confirming the trend observed for optically selected quasars. At lower luminosity, the measured space density is not conclusive, and a larger sample of faint sources is needed. Comparisons with optical luminosity functions and black hole formation models are presented together with prospects for future surveys.

  12. Photometric Observations of 107P/(4015) Wilson-Harrington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urakawa, Seitaro; Okumura, Shin-Ichiro; Nishiyama, Kota; Sakamoto, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Noritsugu; Ishiguro, Masateru; Yoshikawa, Makoto

    We present the photometric observations of 107P/(4015) Wilson-Harrington using the Bisei Spaceguard Center (BSGC) 1.0m telescope and the University of Hawaii (UH) 2.2m telescope. Hayabusa explored an S-type asteroid Itokawa. The subsequent mission Hayabusa-2 is planned to explore a C-type asteroid 1999JU3. In addition, a more advanced sample return mission from a D-type asteroid or an asteroid-comet transition object is envisaged. This mission is called "Hayabusa Mk-2". A promising candidate to be explored by Hayabusa Mk-2 is a near-Earth asteroid-comet transition object 107P/(4015) Wilson-Harrington. The physical characteristics of 107P/(4015) Wilson-Harrington such as the rotational period, the pole direction, and the shape are important to design the mission plan. The photometric observations of light variation make clear the physical characteristics. We have conducted the photometric observation of 107P/(4015) Wilson-Harrington with the BSGC 1.0m telescope since October 2009. In order to determine the precise rotational period with the full-phase lightcurve, the collaborating observations were carried out on December 18 with the UH 2.2m telescope. We found that the rotational period is around 6.22 hours, which are more accurate than the known value (6.1 hours). The photometric observations were continued till the end of February 2010. In addition to it, we obtained the multi-band photometry data to investigate the surface color uniformity. In this paper, we summarize the observations of 107P/(4015) Wilson-Harrington and discuss the rotational period, pole direction, the shape and the surface color uniformity.

  13. A WFC3 Grism Emission Line Redshift Catalog in the GOODS-South Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Aaron M.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Barro, Guillermo; Dahlen, Tomas; Faber, Sandra M.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Fontana, Adriano; Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman A.; Grützbauch, Ruth; Guo, Yicheng; Hsu, Li-Ting; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Koo, David C.; Mobasher, Bahram; Pforr, Janine; Salvato, Mara; Wiklind, Tommy; Wuyts, Stijn

    2015-06-01

    We combine Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Wide Field Camera3 (WFC3) imaging and G141 grism observations from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and 3D-HST surveys to produce a catalog of grism spectroscopic redshifts for galaxies in the CANDELS/GOODS-South field. The WFC3/G141 grism spectra cover a wavelength range of 1.1≤slant λ ≤slant 1.7 μm with a resolving power of R∼ 130 for point sources, thus providing rest-frame optical spectra for galaxies out to z∼ 3.5. The catalog is selected in the H-band (F160W) and includes both galaxies with and without previously published spectroscopic redshifts. Grism spectra are extracted for all H-band detected galaxies with H ≤slant 24 and a CANDELS photometric redshift {{z}phot}≥slant 0.6. The resulting spectra are visually inspected to identify emission lines, and redshifts are determined using cross-correlation with empirical spectral templates. To establish the accuracy of our redshifts, we compare our results against high-quality spectroscopic redshifts from the literature. Using a sample of 411 control galaxies, this analysis yields a precision of {{σ }NMAD}=0.0028 for the grism-derived redshifts, which is consistent with the accuracy reported by the 3D-HST team. Our final catalog covers an area of 153 arcmin2 and contains 1019 redshifts for galaxies in GOODS-S. Roughly 60% (608/1019) of these redshifts are for galaxies with no previously published spectroscopic redshift. These new redshifts span a range of 0.677≤slant z≤slant 3.456 and have a median redshift of z = 1.282. The catalog contains a total of 234 new redshifts for galaxies at z\\gt 1.5. In addition, we present 20 galaxy pair candidates identified for the first time using the grism redshifts in our catalog, including four new galaxy pairs at z∼ 2, nearly doubling the number of such pairs previously identified.

  14. Effects of Interstellar Dust on the Photometric Properties of Faint Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzual, G. A.; Magris, C.

    1986-02-01

    We compute the effects of interstellar dust on the photometric properties of disk galaxies in several photographic and photoelectric bands. The solution to the radiative transfer problem including absorption and multiple scattering 0+ light by dust grains is taken from a previous paper by the authors (Magris and Bruzual, this conference). We present magnitudes and colors V. redshift for galaxies seen at different inclination angles and with different values of the optical depth through the plane of the galaxy. The results are compared with those obtained from a straightforward application of the galactic extinction law. It is concluded that in order to properly take into account the effects of dust in the photometric properties of distant galaxies of cosmological interest it is necessary to use correction factors such as those of Magris and Bruzual.

  15. Photometric Studies of GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Cowardin, Heather M.; Barker, Edwin; Abercromby, Kira J.; Foreman, Gary; Horstman, Matt

    2009-01-01

    The photometric signature of a debris object can be useful in determining what the physical characteristics of a piece of debris are. We report on optical observations in multiple filters of debris at geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). Our sample is taken from GEO objects discovered in a survey with the University of Michigan's 0.6-m aperture Schmidt telescope MODEST (for Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), and then followed up in real-time with the SMARTS (Small and Medium Aperture Research Telescope System) 0.9-m at CTIO for orbits and photometry. Our goal is to determine 6 parameter orbits and measure colors for all objects fainter than R = 15 th magnitude that are discovered in the MODEST survey. At this magnitude the distribution of observed angular rates changes significantly from that of brighter objects. There are two objectives: 1. Estimate the orbital distribution of objects selected on the basis of two observational criteria: brightness (magnitude) and angular rates. 2. Obtain magnitudes and colors in standard astronomical filters (BVRI) for comparison with reflectance spectra of likely spacecraft materials. What is the faint debris likely to be? In this paper we report on the photometric results. For a sample of 50 objects, more than 90 calibrated sequences of R-B-V-I-R magnitudes have been obtained with the CTIO 0.9-m. For objects that do not show large brightness variations, the colors are largely redder than solar in both B-R and R-I. The width of the color distribution may be intrinsic to the nature of the surfaces, but also could be that we are seeing irregularly shaped objects and measuring the colors at different times with just one telescope. For a smaller sample of objects we have observed with synchronized CCD cameras on the two telescopes. The CTIO 0.9-m observes in B, and MODEST in R. The CCD cameras are electronically linked together so that the start time and duration of observations are the same to better than 50 milliseconds. Thus

  16. Photometric theory for wide-angle phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usher, Peter D.

    1990-01-01

    An examination is made of the problem posed by wide-angle photographic photometry, in order to extract a photometric-morphological history of Comet P/Halley. Photometric solutions are presently achieved over wide angles through a generalization of an assumption-free moment-sum method. Standard stars in the field allow a complete solution to be obtained for extinction, sky brightness, and the characteristic curve. After formulating Newton's method for the solution of the general nonlinear least-square problem, an implementation is undertaken for a canonical data set. Attention is given to the problem of random and systematic photometric errors.

  17. Calibration of the MEarth Photometric System: Optical Magnitudes and Photometric Metallicity Estimates for 1802 Nearby M-Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmann, Jason A.; Irwin, Jonathan M.; Charbonneau, David; Newton, Elisabeth R.

    2016-02-01

    The MEarth Project is a photometric survey systematically searching the smallest stars near the Sun for transiting rocky planets. Since 2008, MEarth has taken approximately two million images of 1844 stars suspected to be mid-to-late M dwarfs. We have augmented this survey by taking nightly exposures of photometric standard stars and have utilized this data to photometrically calibrate the MEarth system, identify photometric nights, and obtain an optical magnitude with 1.5% precision for each M dwarf system. Each optical magnitude is an average over many years of data, and therefore should be largely immune to stellar variability and flaring. We combine this with trigonometric distance measurements, spectroscopic metallicity measurements, and 2MASS infrared magnitude measurements in order to derive a color-magnitude-metallicity relation across the mid-to-late M dwarf spectral sequence that can reproduce spectroscopic metallicity determinations to a precision of 0.1 dex. We release optical magnitudes and metallicity estimates for 1567 M dwarfs, many of which did not have an accurate determination of either prior to this work. For an additional 277 stars without a trigonometric parallax, we provide an estimate of the distance, assuming solar neighborhood metallicity. We find that the median metallicity for a volume-limited sample of stars within 20 pc of the Sun is [Fe/H] = -0.03 ± 0.008, and that 29/565 of these stars have a metallicity of [Fe/H] = -0.5 or lower, similar to the low-metallicity distribution of nearby G dwarfs. When combined with the results of ongoing and future planet surveys targeting these objects, the metallicity estimates presented here will be important for assessing the significance of any putative planet-metallicity correlation.

  18. Very high redshift radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W.J.M., LLNL

    1997-12-01

    High redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs) provide unique targets for the study of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies and galaxy clusters at very high redshifts. We discuss how efficient HzRG samples ae selected, the evidence for strong morphological evolution at near-infracd wavelengths, and for jet-induced star formation in the z = 3 800 HzRG 4C41 17

  19. Redshifts distribution in A262

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, M. S. R.; Abidin, Z. Z.; Ibrahim, U. F. S. U.; Hashim, N.; Lee, D. A. A.

    2016-05-01

    Galaxy clusters are the largest virialized systems in the Universe containing a collection of galaxies of different redshifts. The redshift distribution of galaxies in galaxy clusters is concentrated at a certain redshift range which remarkably tells us that only the galaxies in a certain radial range belong to the galaxy cluster. This leads to a boundary estimation of the cluster. Background and foreground systems are represented by a histogram that determines whether some of the galaxies are too far or too high in redshift to be counted as the member of the cluster. With the recent advances in multifibre spectroscopy, it has become possible to perform detailed analysis of the redshift distribution of several galaxy clusters in the Abell Catalogue. This has given rise to significantly improved estimates of cluster membership, extent and dynamical history. Here we present a spectroscopic analysis of the galaxy cluster A262. We find 55 galaxies fall within z = 0.0143 and 0.0183 with velocity range 4450-5300 km s-1, and are therefore members of the cluster. We derived a new mean redshift of z = 0.016 173 ± 0.000 074 (4852 ± 22 km s-1) for the system of which we compare with our neutral hydrogen (H I) detection which peaks at 4970 ± 0.5 km s-1. It is found that the distribution of H I tends to be located at the edge of the cluster since most of spiral rich galaxies were away from cluster centre.

  20. Cosmology with Photometrically Classified Type Ia Supernovae from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Heather; D'Andrea, Chris B.; Nichol, Robert C.; Sako, Masao; Smith, Mathew; Lampeitl, Hubert; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Bassett, Bruce; Biswas, Rahul; Brown, Peter; Cinabro, David; Dawson, Kyle S.; Dilday, Ben; Foley, Ryan J.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Garnavich, Peter; Hlozek, Renee; Jha, Saurabh W.; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kunz, Martin; Marriner, John; Miquel, Ramon; Richmond, Michael; Riess, Adam; Schneider, Donald P.; Sollerman, Jesper; Taylor, Matt; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2013-02-01

    We present the cosmological analysis of 752 photometrically classified Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained from the full Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova (SN) Survey, supplemented with host-galaxy spectroscopy from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. Our photometric-classification method is based on the SN classification technique of Sako et al., aided by host-galaxy redshifts (0.05 < z < 0.55). SuperNova ANAlysis simulations of our methodology estimate that we have an SN Ia classification efficiency of 70.8%, with only 3.9% contamination from core-collapse (non-Ia) SNe. We demonstrate that this level of contamination has no effect on our cosmological constraints. We quantify and correct for our selection effects (e.g., Malmquist bias) using simulations. When fitting to a flat ΛCDM cosmological model, we find that our photometric sample alone gives Ω m = 0.24+0.07 -0.05 (statistical errors only). If we relax the constraint on flatness, then our sample provides competitive joint statistical constraints on Ω m and ΩΛ, comparable to those derived from the spectroscopically confirmed Three-year Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS3). Using only our data, the statistics-only result favors an accelerating universe at 99.96% confidence. Assuming a constant wCDM cosmological model, and combining with H 0, cosmic microwave background, and luminous red galaxy data, we obtain w = -0.96+0.10 -0.10, Ω m = 0.29+0.02 -0.02, and Ω k = 0.00+0.03 -0.02 (statistical errors only), which is competitive with similar spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia analyses. Overall this comparison is reassuring, considering the lower redshift leverage of the SDSS-II SN sample (z < 0.55) and the lack of spectroscopic confirmation used herein. These results demonstrate the potential of photometrically classified SN Ia samples in improving cosmological constraints.

  1. Photometric properties of Triton hazes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Veverka, J.

    1994-01-01

    Voyager imaging observations of Triton have been used to investigate the characteristics of the atmospheric hazes on Triton at three wavelengths: violet (0.41 micrometers), blue (0.48 micrometers), and green (0.56 micrometers). The globally averaged optical depth is wavelength dependent, varying from 0.034 in green to 0.063 in violet. These photometric results are dominated by the properties of localized discrete clouds rather than by those of the thinner, more widespread haze known to occur on Triton. The cloud particles are bright, with single-scattering albedos near unity at all three wavelengths, suggestive of a transparent icy condensate. The asymmetry parameter (+0.6) and the wavelength dependence of the optical depth both indicate cloud particles 0.2-0.4 micrometers in radius. The clouds are concentrated at 50-60 deg S latitude, where opacities up to three times the global average are observed. This is the same latitude region where most of the evidence for current surface activity is found, suggesting that the clouds may be related to the plumes or at least to some process connected with the sublimation of the south polar cap. The effects of possible temporal variations in the haze opacity are examined. Increases in the haze opacity tend to redden Triton. However, the degree of reddening is not sufficient to explain the full range of observed changed in Triton over the past decade; variations in the surface properties appear to be necessary.

  2. Classic and new photometric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, I. S.

    Many large photometric surveys are based on new or unusual systems. The users of the information they provide need to be aware of certain pitfalls. This paper outlines some of them. Very often the stated fiducal colours of stars in a given survey are based on modelling from theoretical atmospheres or spectrophotometry rather than actual observational data made with the same set of filters. While models may be satisfactory at the initial stage of data interpretation, for refined studies they may prove inadequate. The output of a particular detector is dependent, inter alia, on its quantum efficiency, its fore-optics including filters, and the transparency of the Earth's atmosphere. These can virtually never be reproduced exactly between one installation and another. However, for objects with smooth spectra and not suffering severe interstellar reddening, colour transformations are usually reliable between systems with filters having similar central wavelengths and bandwidths. In studies of extincted regions, such as along the Galactic Plane, the calculation of reddening amounts can depend on detailed filter characteristics and not merely on their ``effective wavelengths". Confusion may become significant according to source densities and pixel sizes. In heavily extincted areas, there is a danger of identifying nearby faint sources with distant ones observed at longer wavelengths where the extinction is less. It is therefore necessary to understand the process that is used in cross-correlating the different images when cataloguing colours.

  3. Photometric Study of Uranian Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kesten, Philip R.

    1998-01-01

    The best summary of my work at NASA is expressed in the following abstract, submitted the Division for Planetary Science of the American Astronomical Society and to be presented at the annual meeting in Madison in October. We report photometric measurements of Uranian satellites Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel and Titania (10.4 Aug. 1995), and Neptune's satellite Triton (21.2 Sept. 1995) with the infrared camera (IRCAM) and standard J (1.13 - 1.42 microns), H (1.53 - 1.81 microns), and K (2.00 - 2.41 microns) filters at the 3.8-m UKIRT telescope on Mauna Kea. The individual images frames are 256 x 256 pixels with a platescale of .286 arcsec/pixel, resulting in a 1.22 arc min field of view. This summer brought the IR photometry measurements nearly to a close. As indicated by the abstract above, I will present this work at the annual DPS meeting in October. In anticipation of the opening of the new Carl Sagan Laboratory for Cosmochemisty, of which I will be a participating member, I also devoted a considerable fraction of the summer to learning the biochemistry which underlies the experiments to be conducted. To put the end of the summary close to the beginning, it was a most productive summer.

  4. A systematic search for lensed high-redshift galaxies in HST images of MACS clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repp, A.; Ebeling, H.; Richard, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of a 135-arcmin2 search for high-redshift galaxies lensed by 29 clusters from the MAssive Cluster and extended MAssive Cluster Surveys. We use relatively shallow images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope in four passbands, namely, F606W, F814W, F110W, and F140W. We identify 130 F814W dropouts as candidates for galaxies at z ≳ 6. In order to fit the available broad-band photometry to galaxy spectral energy distribution (SED) templates, we develop a prior for the level of dust extinction at various redshifts. We also investigate the systematic biases incurred by the use of SED-fit software. The fits we obtain yield an estimate of 20 Lyman-break galaxies with photometric redshifts from z ˜ 7 to 9. In addition, our survey has identified over 100 candidates with a significant probability of being lower redshift (z ˜ 2) interlopers. We conclude that even as few as four broad-band filters - when combined with fitting the SEDs - are capable of isolating promising objects. Such surveys thus allow one both to probe the bright end (M1500 ≲ -19) of the high-redshift ultraviolet luminosity function and to identify candidate massive evolved galaxies at lower redshifts.

  5. BINARY QUASARS AT HIGH REDSHIFT. I. 24 NEW QUASAR PAIRS AT z {approx} 3-4

    SciTech Connect

    Hennawi, Joseph F.; Myers, Adam D.; Shen, Yue; Strauss, Michael A.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Glikman, Eilat; Mahabal, Ashish; Fan Xiaohui; Martin, Crystal L.; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shankar, Francesco

    2010-08-20

    The clustering of quasars on small scales yields fundamental constraints on models of quasar evolution and the buildup of supermassive black holes. This paper describes the first systematic survey to discover high-redshift binary quasars. Using color-selection and photometric redshift techniques, we searched 8142 deg{sup 2} of Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data for binary quasar candidates, and confirmed them with follow-up spectroscopy. Our sample of 27 high-redshift binaries (24 of them new discoveries) at redshifts 2.9 < z < 4.3 with proper transverse separations 10 kpc < R{sub perpendicular} < 650 kpc increases the number of such objects known by an order of magnitude. Eight members of this sample are very close pairs with R{sub perpendicular} < 100 kpc, and of these close systems four are at z>3.5. The completeness and efficiency of our well-defined selection algorithm are quantified using simulated photometry and we find that our sample is {approx}50% complete. Our companion paper uses this knowledge to make the first measurement of the small-scale clustering (R < 1 h {sup -1} Mpc comoving) of high-redshift quasars. High-redshift binaries constitute exponentially rare coincidences of two extreme (M {approx}> 10{sup 9} M {sub sun}) supermassive black holes. At z {approx} 4, there is about one close binary per 10 Gpc{sup 3}, thus these could be the highest sigma peaks, the analogs of superclusters, in the early universe.

  6. Catalogue-Wide Satellite Photometric Behavior Paradigms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejduk, M.

    2010-09-01

    Few categorization approaches for satellite photometric response as constructed from individual point-photometry measurements have been proposed; and as this is the largest and most typical photometry-collection approach, the discipline is in need of a taxonomy for the different photometric response types. The Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC) photometric modeling approach offers an opportunity to define categories of response, as it calculates a number of parameters in applying both deterministic and stochastic models in order to predict expected satellite brightnesses. In examining these calculated parameters, a subset show promise in both identifying pathological cases and separating the more mainstream response into natural categories. A successive application of four nested tests is proposed in order to place satellites into basic photometric response types.

  7. Spectral Observations and Analyses of Low-Redshift Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Jeffrey Michael

    The explosive deaths of stars, known as a supernovae (SNe), have been critical to our understanding of the Universe for centuries. An introduction to SNe, their importance in astronomy, and how we observe them is given in Chapter 1. In the second Chapter, I present the full BSNIP sample which consists of 1298 low-redshift (z ≤ 0.2) optical spectra of 582 SNe Ia observed from 1989 through the end of 2008. I describe our spectral classification scheme (using the SuperNova IDentification code, SNID; Blondin & Tonry 2007), utilizing my newly constructed set of SNID spectral templates. These templates allow me to accurately spectroscopically classify the entire BSNIP dataset, and by doing so I am able to reclassify a handful of objects as bona fide SNe Ia and a few other objects as members of some of the peculiar SN Ia subtypes. In fact, the BSNIP dataset includes spectra of nearly 90 spectroscopically peculiar SNe Ia. I also present spectroscopic host-galaxy redshifts of some SNe Ia where these values were previously unknown. I present measurements of spectral features of 432 low-redshift ( z < 0.1) optical spectra within 20 d of maximum brightness of 261 SNe Ia from the BSNIP sample in the third Chapter. I describe in detail my method of automated, robust spectral feature definition and measurement which expands upon similar previous studies. Using this procedure, I attempt to measure expansion velocities, (pseudo-)equivalent widths (pEWs), spectral feature depths, and fluxes at the center and endpoints of each of nine major spectral feature complexes. A sanity check of the consistency of the measurements is performed using the BSNIP data (as well as a separate spectral dataset). I investigate how velocity and pEW evolve with time and how they correlate with each other. Various spectral classification schemes are employed and quantitative spectral differences among the subclasses are investigated. Several ratios of pEW values are calculated and studied. Furthermore

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Photometric redshifts in the Hawaii-HDF-N (Yang+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, G.; Xue, Y. Q.; Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F. E.; Cui, W.; Kong, X.; Lehmer, B. D.; Wang, J.-X.; Wu, X.-B.; Yuan, F.; Yuan, Y.-F.; Zhou, H. Y.

    2015-02-01

    We collect the U-, B-, V-, R-, I-, z'-, and HK'-band images from Capak+, 2004, J/AJ/127/180, the J- and H-band images from Keenan et al. (2010ApJS..186...94K), and the Ks-band image from Wang et al. (2010, J/ApJS/187/251), respectively. We also make use of an independently observed z'-band image from Ouchi et al. (2009ApJ...706.1136O). The IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0um images were obtained from the Spitzer Heritage Archive, while another set of IRAC 3.6 and 4.5um images were taken from the Spitzer Extended Deep Survey (SEDS) presented in Ashby et al. (2013, J/ApJ/769/80). (1 data file).

  9. Redshift distortions of clustering: a Lagrangian approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hivon, E.; Bouchet, F. R.; Colombi, S.; Juszkiewicz, R.

    1995-06-01

    We study the effects of peculiar velocities on statistical measures of galaxy clustering. These effects occur when distances to the galaxies are estimated from their redshifts. It is assumed that the clustering pattern results from the gravitational instability of initially Gaussian, small-amplitude perturbations of a Friedman-Lemaitre cosmological model. Explicit expressions are given for an arbitrary density parameter {OMEGA} of the model, both when the cosmological constant, {LAMBDA}, is zero, and when the model is spatially flat, {OMEGA}+ {LAMBDA}/3H^2^ =1. Kaiser (1987) had analyzed the redshift distortion of the two-point correlation function. This function determines the variance of the density field distribution function and can be computed using linear perturbation theory. We show here how to compute higher order moments in redshift space, paying special attention to the skewness, or third moment of the density field, and its Fourier space counterpart, the bispectrum. This calls for a weakly non-linear analysis. We rely on a perturbative expansion of particle trajectories in Lagrangian coordinates, using the formalism introduced by Moutarde et al. (1991) and further developed by Bouchet et al. (1992, 1994). This formalism extends to higher orders the Zel'dovich first order (i.e. linear) solution (1970). The lowest non-vanishing contribution to the skewness comes from the first and second-order terms in perturbation theory. Therefore, using Zel'dovich approximation would not be self-consistent and would yield inaccurate results. We show that a physically consistent and quantitatively accurate analysis of the growth skewness in redshift space can be obtained from second-order Lagrangian theory. With practical applications to redshift surveys in mind, we also study the effects of spatial smoothing of the evolved density field. The necessary formalism was developed by Juszkiewicz & Bouchet (1991) and Juszkiewicz et al. (1993a). Here we give the first complete

  10. NEAR-INFRARED PHOTOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF 130,000 QUASARS: AN SDSS-UKIDSS-MATCHED CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Peth, Michael A.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2011-04-15

    We present a catalog of over 130,000 quasar candidates with near-infrared (NIR) photometric properties, with an areal coverage of approximately 1200 deg{sup 2}. This is achieved by matching the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) in the optical ugriz bands to the UKIRT Infrared Digital Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Large Area Survey (LAS) in the NIR YJHK bands. We match the {approx}1 million SDSS DR6 Photometric Quasar catalog to Data Release 3 of the UKIDSS LAS (ULAS) and produce a catalog with 130,827 objects with detections in one or more NIR bands, of which 74,351 objects have optical and K-band detections and 42,133 objects have the full nine-band photometry. The majority ({approx}85%) of the SDSS objects were not matched simply because these were not covered by the ULAS. The positional standard deviation of the SDSS Quasar to ULAS matches is {delta}{sub R.A.} = 0.''1370 and {delta}{sub decl.} = 0.''1314. We find an absolute systematic astrometric offset between the SDSS Quasar catalog and the UKIDSS LAS, of |R.A.{sub offset}| = 0.''025 and |decl.{sub offset}| = 0.''040; we suggest the nature of this offset to be due to the matching of catalog, rather than image, level data. Our matched catalog has a surface density of {approx}53 deg{sup -2} for K {<=} 18.27 objects; tests using our matched catalog, along with data from the UKIDSS Deep Extragalactic Survey, imply that our limiting magnitude is i {approx} 20.6. Color-redshift diagrams, for the optical and NIR, show a close agreement between our matched catalog and recent quasar color models at redshift z {approx}< 2.0, while at higher redshifts, the models generally appear to be bluer than the mean observed quasar colors. The gJK and giK color spaces are used to examine methods of differentiating between stars and (mid-redshift) quasars, the key to currently ongoing quasar surveys. Finally, we report on the NIR photometric properties of high, z > 4.6, and very high, z > 5.7, redshift previously discovered quasars.

  11. Near-infrared Photometric Properties of 130,000 Quasars: An SDSS-UKIDSS-matched Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peth, Michael A.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2011-04-01

    We present a catalog of over 130,000 quasar candidates with near-infrared (NIR) photometric properties, with an areal coverage of approximately 1200 deg2. This is achieved by matching the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) in the optical ugriz bands to the UKIRT Infrared Digital Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Large Area Survey (LAS) in the NIR YJHK bands. We match the ≈1 million SDSS DR6 Photometric Quasar catalog to Data Release 3 of the UKIDSS LAS (ULAS) and produce a catalog with 130,827 objects with detections in one or more NIR bands, of which 74,351 objects have optical and K-band detections and 42,133 objects have the full nine-band photometry. The majority (~85%) of the SDSS objects were not matched simply because these were not covered by the ULAS. The positional standard deviation of the SDSS Quasar to ULAS matches is δR.A. = 0farcs1370 and δdecl. = 0farcs1314. We find an absolute systematic astrometric offset between the SDSS Quasar catalog and the UKIDSS LAS, of |R.A.offset| = 0farcs025 and |decl.offset| = 0farcs040; we suggest the nature of this offset to be due to the matching of catalog, rather than image, level data. Our matched catalog has a surface density of ≈53 deg-2 for K <= 18.27 objects; tests using our matched catalog, along with data from the UKIDSS Deep Extragalactic Survey, imply that our limiting magnitude is i ≈ 20.6. Color-redshift diagrams, for the optical and NIR, show a close agreement between our matched catalog and recent quasar color models at redshift z <~ 2.0, while at higher redshifts, the models generally appear to be bluer than the mean observed quasar colors. The gJK and giK color spaces are used to examine methods of differentiating between stars and (mid-redshift) quasars, the key to currently ongoing quasar surveys. Finally, we report on the NIR photometric properties of high, z > 4.6, and very high, z > 5.7, redshift previously discovered quasars.

  12. High redshift QSOs and the x ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Impey, Chris

    1993-01-01

    ROSAT pointed observations were made of 9 QSO's from the Large Bright Quasar Survey (LBQS). The LBQS is based on machine measurement of objective prism plates taken with the UK Schmidt Telescope. Software has been used to select QSO's by both color and by the presence of spectral features and continuum breaks. The probability of detection can be calculated as a function of magnitude, redshift and spectral features, and the completeness of the survey can be accurately estimated. Nine out of 1040 QSO's in the LBQS have z greater than 3. The observations will provide an important data point in the X-ray luminosity function of QSO's at high redshift. The QSO's with z greater than 3 span less than a magnitude in M(sub B), so can be combined as a homogeneous sample. This analysis is only possible with a sample drawn from a large and complete catalog such as the LBQS. Four of the 9 QSO's that were observed with the ROSAT PSPC for this proposal were detected, including one of the most luminous X-ray sources ever observed. The April 1992 version of the PROS DETECT package was used to reduce the data. The results have been used to search for evolution of the X-ray properties of QSO's in redshift. The 9 QSO's lie in the range -28.7 less than M(sub B) less than -27.8. When combined with data for 16 QSO's in a similar luminosity range at lower redshift correlations with luminosity and redshift can be separated out. The LBQS sample also yields a new constraint on the contribution of high redshift QSO's to the X-ray background. An initial requirement is knowledge of the X-ray properties (alpha(sub OX)) as a function of redshift. Integration over the evolving luminosity function of the LBQS then gives the QSO contribution to the source counts.

  13. Baryon acoustic oscillations in 2D: Modeling redshift-space power spectrum from perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Taruya, Atsushi; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Saito, Shun

    2010-09-15

    We present an improved prescription for the matter power spectrum in redshift space taking proper account of both nonlinear gravitational clustering and redshift distortion, which are of particular importance for accurately modeling baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs). Contrary to the models of redshift distortion phenomenologically introduced but frequently used in the literature, the new model includes the corrections arising from the nonlinear coupling between the density and velocity fields associated with two competitive effects of redshift distortion, i.e., Kaiser and Finger-of-God effects. Based on the improved treatment of perturbation theory for gravitational clustering, we compare our model predictions with the monopole and quadrupole power spectra of N-body simulations, and an excellent agreement is achieved over the scales of BAOs. Potential impacts on constraining dark energy and modified gravity from the redshift-space power spectrum are also investigated based on the Fisher-matrix formalism, particularly focusing on the measurements of the Hubble parameter, angular diameter distance, and growth rate for structure formation. We find that the existing phenomenological models of redshift distortion produce a systematic error on measurements of the angular diameter distance and Hubble parameter by 1%-2%, and the growth-rate parameter by {approx}5%, which would become non-negligible for future galaxy surveys. Correctly modeling redshift distortion is thus essential, and the new prescription for the redshift-space power spectrum including the nonlinear corrections can be used as an accurate theoretical template for anisotropic BAOs.

  14. Surface reconstruction from photometric normals with reference height measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Lindsay W.

    2015-06-01

    In the dome imaging system at UCL, sets of pixel-registered images can be captured, with a different direction of illumination for each image. A new method has been developed to estimate surface normals more accurately by solving the photometric normal equations as a regression over a set of illumination angles and intensities selected from the subset corresponding to the diffuse component of reflection from the object surface (the 'body colour'). The gradients are integrated to reconstruct a digital terrain map, using a Fourier transform to regularise (i.e. enforce integrability of) the gradients in the frequency domain. This yields a 3D surface that is continuous but distorted over the whole area with the height greatly amplified. The problem is that although the gradients give a good representation of the spatial frequencies in the surface, right up to the Nyquist frequency, they are not accurate for very low frequencies of a few cycles over the full object diameter. Such frequencies are represented in the Fourier plane by only a few sample points close to the (shifted) origin. Errors in these frequencies can result in 'curl' or 'heave' in the baseplane, even though the superimposed higher spatial frequencies may be accurate. The solution is to replace the inaccurate low frequencies of the photometric normals by the more accurate low frequencies of a surface constructed from a few known heights. This is conveniently achieved from the values measured by a digital height gauge by interpolating to produce a smooth `hump' and then transforming into the frequency domain by an FFT.

  15. Metals at high redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitjean, Patrick

    The amount of metals present in the Universe and its cosmological evolution is a key issue for our understanding of how star formation proceeds from the collapse of the first objects to the formation of present day galaxies. We discuss here recent results at the two extremes of the density scale. 1. Part of the tenuous intergalactic medium (IGM) revealed by neutral hydrogen absorptions in the spectra of remote quasars (the so-called Lyman-α forest) contains metals. This is not surprising as there is a close interplay between the formation of galaxies and the evolution of the IGM. The IGM acts as the baryonic reservoir from which galaxies form, while star formation in the forming galaxies strongly influences the IGM by enrichment with metals and the emission of ionizing radiation. The spatial distribution of metals in the IGM is largely unknown however. The possibility remains that metals are associated with the filaments and sheets of the dark matter spatial distribution where stars are expected to form, whereas the space delineated by these features remains unpolluted. 2. Damped Lyman-α (DLA) systems observed in the spectra of high-redshift quasars are considered as the progenitors of present-day galaxies. Indeed, the large neutral hydrogen column densities observed and the presence of metals imply that the gas is somehow closely associated with regions of star formation. The nature of the absorbing objects is unclear however. It is probable that very different objects contribute to this population of absorption systems. Here we concentrate on summarizing the properties of the gas: presence of dust in small amount; nucleosynthesis signature and lack of H_2 molecules. The presence of H_2 molecules has been investigated in the course of a mini-survey with UVES at the VLT. The upper limits on the molecular fraction, f = 2N(H_2)/(2N(H_2)+N(HI)), derived in eight systems are in the range 1.2 ×10^-7 - 1.6 × 10^-5. There is no evidence in this sample for any

  16. Relativistic Transverse Gravitational Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, A. F.

    2012-12-01

    symmetric energy potential exists between the frames that is quantified by the instantaneous Δ {v} = v\\cdot{d}φ between them; in order for either frame to become indistinguishable from the other, such that their respective velocity and acceleration vectors are parallel, a change in velocity is required. While the qualitative features of general relativity imply this phenomenon (i.e., a symmetric potential difference between two points on a Newtonian `equipotential surface' that is similar to a friction effect), it is not predicted by the field equations due to a modeling error concerning time. This is an error of omission; time has fundamental geometric properties implied by the principles of relativity that are not reflected in the field equations. Where b is the radius and g is the gravitational acceleration characterizing a spherical geoid S of an ideal point-source gravitational field, an elegant derivation that rests on first principles shows that for two points at rest on S separated by a distance d << b, a symmetric relativistic redshift exists between these points of magnitude z = gd2/bc^2, which over 1 km at Earth sea level yields z ˜{10-17}. It can be tested with a variety of methods, in particular laser interferometry. A more sophisticated derivation yields a considerably more complex predictive formula for any two points in a gravitational field.

  17. High-Redshift Candidates and the Nature of Small Galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storrie-Lombardi, Lisa J.; Weymann, Ray J.; Thompson, Rodger I.

    2003-07-01

    We present results on two related topics: (1) a discussion of high-redshift candidates (z>4.5) and (2) a study of very small galaxies at intermediate redshifts, both sets being detected in the region of the northern Hubble Deep Field (HDF) covered by the deep NICMOS observations at 1.6 and 1.1 μm. The high-redshift candidates are just those with redshift z>4.5 as given in the recent catalog of Thompson, Weymann, and Storrie-Lombardi, while the ``small galaxy'' sample is defined to be those objects with isophotal area <=0.2 arcsec2 and with photometric redshift 1<=z<=4.5. Of the 19 possible high-redshift candidates listed in the Thompson et al. catalog, 11 have (nominal) photometric redshifts less than 5.0. Of these, however, only four are ``robust'' in the sense of yielding high redshifts when the fluxes are randomly perturbed with errors comparable to the estimated measuring error in each wave band. For the eight other objects with nominal photometric redshifts greater than 5.0, one (WFPC2 4-473) has a published spectroscopic redshift. Of the remaining seven, four are robust in the sense indicated above. Two of these form a close pair (NIC 586 and NIC 107). The redshift of the object having formally the highest redshift, at 6.56 (NIC 118=WFPC2 4-601), is problematic, since F606W and F814W flux are clearly present, and the nature of this object poses a dilemma. Previous work by Colley et al. has suggested that compact sources in the WFPC2 HDF images are subgalactic components at redshifts z>0.5 since they are correlated on scales less than 1", corresponding to physical scales of less than 8 kpc (H0=65 km s-1 Mpc-1, q0=0.125). We confirm these correlations in the WFPC2 data. However, we do not detect the correlation of close pairs of galaxies on small scales in the ~0.65 arcmin2 region of the HDF that we surveyed with NICMOS. The smaller area surveyed and lower resolution will make any real correlation more difficult to measure in these data. We have examined

  18. Galaxy and cluster redshift surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Margaret J.; Huchra, John P.

    1988-01-01

    The present evaluation of galaxy and cluster redshift surveys gives attention to the CfA redshift survey and a deep Abell cluster redshift survey. These data support a structure in which galaxies lie on thin sheets which nearly surround vast, low-density voids. Voids such as that in Bootes are a common feature of galaxy distribution, posing a serious challenge for models. The Huchra et al. (1988) deep-cluster survey exhibits a correlation function amplitude that is a factor of about 2 smaller than that of the earlier Bahcall and Soneira (1983) sample; the difference may not be significant, however, because the cluster samples are sufficiently small to be dominated by single systems.

  19. PHOTOMETRIC ORBITS OF EXTRASOLAR PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Robert A.

    2009-09-10

    We define and analyze the photometric orbit (PhO) of an extrasolar planet observed in reflected light. In our definition, the PhO is a Keplerian entity with six parameters: semimajor axis, eccentricity, mean anomaly at some particular time, argument of periastron, inclination angle, and effective radius, which is the square root of the geometric albedo times the planetary radius. Preliminarily, we assume a Lambertian phase function. We study in detail the case of short-period giant planets (SPGPs) and observational parameters relevant to the Kepler mission: 20 ppm photometry with normal errors, 6.5 hr cadence, and three-year duration. We define a relevant 'planetary population of interest' in terms of probability distributions of the PhO parameters. We perform Monte Carlo experiments to estimate the ability to detect planets and to recover PhO parameters from light curves. We calibrate the completeness of a periodogram search technique, and find structure caused by degeneracy. We recover full orbital solutions from synthetic Kepler data sets and estimate the median errors in recovered PhO parameters. We treat in depth a case of a Jupiter body-double. For the stated assumptions, we find that Kepler should obtain orbital solutions for many of the 100-760 SPGP that Jenkins and Doyle estimate Kepler will discover. Because most or all of these discoveries will be followed up by ground-based radial velocity observations, the estimates of inclination angle from the PhO may enable the calculation of true companion masses: Kepler photometry may break the 'msin i' degeneracy. PhO observations may be difficult. There is uncertainty about how low the albedos of SPGPs actually are, about their phase functions, and about a possible noise floor due to systematic errors from instrumental and stellar sources. Nevertheless, simple detection of SPGPs in reflected light should be robust in the regime of Kepler photometry, and estimates of all six orbital parameters may be feasible in

  20. Atom gravimeters and gravitational redshift.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Peter; Blanchet, Luc; Bordé, Christian J; Reynaud, Serge; Salomon, Christophe; Cohen-Tannoudji, Claude

    2010-09-01

    In ref. 1 the authors present a re-interpretation of atom interferometry experiments published a decade ago. They now consider the atom interferometry experiments as a measurement of the gravitational redshift on the quantum clock operating at the Compton frequency omega(C) = mc(2)/ approximately 2pi x 3.0 x 10(25) Hz, where m is the caesium (Cs) atom rest mass. They then argue that this redshift measurement compares favourably with existing as well as projected clock tests. Here we show that this interpretation is incorrect. PMID:20811407

  1. The effect of photometric and geometric context on photometric and geometric lightness effects

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Thomas Y.; Brainard, David H.

    2014-01-01

    We measured the lightness of probe tabs embedded at different orientations in various contextual images presented on a computer-controlled stereo display. Two background context planes met along a horizontal roof-like ridge. Each plane was a graphic rendering of a set of achromatic surfaces with the simulated illumination for each plane controlled independently. Photometric context was varied by changing the difference in simulated illumination intensity between the two background planes. Geometric context was varied by changing the angle between them. We parsed the data into separate photometric effects and geometric effects. For fixed geometry, varying photometric context led to linear changes in both the photometric and geometric effects. Varying geometric context did not produce a statistically reliable change in either the photometric or geometric effects. PMID:24464163

  2. Difference image analysis: The interplay between the photometric scale factor and systematic photometric errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramich, D. M.; Bachelet, E.; Alsubai, K. A.; Mislis, D.; Parley, N.

    2015-05-01

    Context. Understanding the source of systematic errors in photometry is essential for their calibration. Aims: We investigate how photometry performed on difference images can be influenced by errors in the photometric scale factor. Methods: We explore the equations for difference image analysis (DIA), and we derive an expression describing how errors in the difference flux, the photometric scale factor and the reference flux are propagated to the object photometry. Results: We find that the error in the photometric scale factor is important, and while a few studies have shown that it can be at a significant level, it is currently neglected by the vast majority of photometric surveys employing DIA. Conclusions: Minimising the error in the photometric scale factor, or compensating for it in a post-calibration model, is crucial for reducing the systematic errors in DIA photometry.

  3. Determination of the Rotation Parameters of Reference Artificial Satellite Ajisai and Synchronization of the Photometric Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshkin, N. I.; Korobeinikova, E. A.; Strakhova, S. L.; Shakun, L. S.; Lopachenko, V. V.

    The aim of the present study is to obtain the adjusted current coordinates of the rotation pole of artificial satellite Ajisai and the up-to-date sidereal period of its rotation. To do that, the light curves obtained in Odessa during 2009-2010 are considered. Using both the Ajisai pole's coordinates and the reduced null point of the hardware-based time scale, has made it possible to improve the timing of the observed flashes of its brightness. By the accurate timing of the simultaneous photometric observations of Ajisai satellite the photometric channels synchronization at the stations in Odessa and Eupatoria is accomplished. The further photometric observations of that satellite are necessary to construct a theory of its rotation about the centre of mass; that will allow of its using as a reference source of the time-calibrated optical signals for any ground-based observatories.

  4. Io: Comparison of photometric scans produced by the Minnaert and Hapke functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonelli, Damon P.; Veverka, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    Experience has shown that the empirical Minnaert function is a very useful approximation to real photometric behavior near opposition (phase angle = 0), but that in general it cannot accurately model photometric scans across the face of even a homogeneous planet at higher phase angles. Given recent work on fitting the rigorous Hapke function to Voyager data for Io, we can test to what degree the Minnaert function breaks down in the case of Ionian materials by comparing photometric scans produced by the two approaches. At phase angles 2, 20, 30, 60, and 90 deg, we have computed scans of the reflectance along the photometric equator and mirror meridian that would be expected for a homogeneous planet whose surface obeys Hapke's law. The values used for the Hapke parameters omega(0), h, g, and bar-theta were derived for Io by Simonelli and Veverka in both the Voyager narrow angle camera violet filter and orange filter. Each calculated Hapke scan is compared with the corresponding scan predicted by Minnaert's law for various values of the Minnaert limb-darkening parameter k. For a Minnaert scan at a particular k, the value of the reflectance parameter B(0) is arbitrarily chosen so that the Minnaert and Hapke scans coincide at the so-called specular point (the point where the photometric equator and mirror meridian intersect). The violet filter photometric scans that result from this process are shown. Results indicate that the empirical Minnaert function, while not a perfect model of real photometric behavior, does provide a very useful parameterization of limb darkening at phase angles out to 90 deg, and is especially useful near opposition.

  5. Edgeworth streaming model for redshift space distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlemann, Cora; Kopp, Michael; Haugg, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    We derive the Edgeworth streaming model (ESM) for the redshift space correlation function starting from an arbitrary distribution function for biased tracers of dark matter by considering its two-point statistics and show that it reduces to the Gaussian streaming model (GSM) when neglecting non-Gaussianities. We test the accuracy of the GSM and ESM independent of perturbation theory using the Horizon Run 2 N -body halo catalog. While the monopole of the redshift space halo correlation function is well described by the GSM, higher multipoles improve upon including the leading order non-Gaussian correction in the ESM: the GSM quadrupole breaks down on scales below 30 Mpc /h whereas the ESM stays accurate to 2% within statistical errors down to 10 Mpc /h . To predict the scale-dependent functions entering the streaming model we employ convolution Lagrangian perturbation theory (CLPT) based on the dust model and local Lagrangian bias. Since dark matter halos carry an intrinsic length scale given by their Lagrangian radius, we extend CLPT to the coarse-grained dust model and consider two different smoothing approaches operating in Eulerian and Lagrangian space, respectively. The coarse graining in Eulerian space features modified fluid dynamics different from dust while the coarse graining in Lagrangian space is performed in the initial conditions with subsequent single-streaming dust dynamics, implemented by smoothing the initial power spectrum in the spirit of the truncated Zel'dovich approximation. Finally, we compare the predictions of the different coarse-grained models for the streaming model ingredients to N -body measurements and comment on the proper choice of both the tracer distribution function and the smoothing scale. Since the perturbative methods we considered are not yet accurate enough on small scales, the GSM is sufficient when applied to perturbation theory.

  6. Steps Toward Unveiling the True Population of AGN: Photometric Selection of Broad-Line AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Evan; Impey, C.

    2012-01-01

    We present an AGN selection technique that enables identification of broad-line AGN using only photometric data. An extension of infrared selection techniques, our method involves fitting a given spectral energy distribution with a model consisting of three physically motivated components: infrared power law emission, optical accretion disk emission, and host galaxy emission. Each component can be varied in intensity, and a reduced chi-square minimization routine is used to determine the optimum parameters for each object. Using this model, both broad- and narrow-line AGN are seen to fall within discrete ranges of parameter space that have plausible bounds, allowing physical trends with luminosity and redshift to be determined. Based on a fiducial sample of AGN from the catalog of Trump et al. (2009), we find the region occupied by broad-line AGN to be distinct from that of quiescent or star-bursting galaxies. Because this technique relies only on photometry, it will allow us to find AGN at fainter magnitudes than are accessible in spectroscopic surveys, and thus probe a population of less luminous and/or higher redshift objects. With the vast availability of photometric data in large surveys, this technique should have broad applicability and result in large samples that will complement X-ray AGN catalogs.

  7. aTmcam: A Simple Atmospheric Transmission Monitoring Camera For Sub 1 Percent Photometric Precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T.; DePoy, D. L.; Kessler, R.; Burke, D. L.; Marshall, J. L.; Wise, J.; Rheault, J.-P.; Carona, D. W.; Boada, S.; Prochaska, T.; Allen, R.

    2016-05-01

    Traditional color and airmass corrections can typically achieve ˜0.02 mag precision in photometric observing conditions. A major limiting factor is the variability in atmospheric throughput, which changes on timescales of less than a night. We present preliminary results for a system to monitor the throughput of the atmosphere, which should enable photometric precision when coupled to more traditional techniques of less than 1% in photometric conditions. The system, aTmCam, consists of a set of imagers each with a narrow-band filter that monitors the brightness of suitable standard stars. Each narrowband filter is selected to monitor a different wavelength region of the atmospheric transmission, including regions dominated by the precipitable water absorption and aerosol scattering. We have built a prototype system to test the notion that an atmospheric model derived from a few color indices measurements can be an accurate representation of the true atmospheric transmission. We have measured the atmospheric transmission with both narrowband photometric measurements and spectroscopic measurements; we show that the narrowband imaging approach can predict the changes in the throughput of the atmosphere to better than ˜10% across a broad wavelength range, so as to achieve photometric precision less than 0.01 mag.

  8. Three photometric methods tested on ground-based data of Q 2237+0305

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burud, I.; Stabell, R.; Magain, P.; Courbin, F.; Ostensen, R.; Refsdal, S.; Remy, M.; Teuber, J.

    1998-11-01

    The Einstein Cross, Q 2237+0305, has been photometrically observed in four bands on two successive nights at NOT (La Palma, Spain) in October 1995. Three independent algorithms have been used to analyse the data: an automatic image decomposition technique, a CLEAN algorithm and the new MCS deconvolution code. The photometric and astrometric results obtained with the three methods are presented. No photometric variations were found in the four quasar images. Comparison of the photometry from the three techniques shows that both systematic and random errors affect each method. When the seeing is worse than 1farcs0 , the errors from the automatic image decomposition technique and the Clean algorithm tend to be large (0.04-0.1 magnitudes) while the deconvolution code still gives accurate results (1sigma error below 0.04) even for frames with seeing as bad as 1farcs7 . Reddening is observed in the quasar images and is found to be compatible with either extinction from the lensing galaxy or colour dependent microlensing. The photometric accuracy depends on the light distribution used to model the lensing galaxy. In particular, using a numerical galaxy model, as done with the MCS algorithm, makes the method less seeing dependent. Another advantage of using a numerical model is that eventual non-homogeneous structures in the galaxy can be modeled. Finally, we propose an observational strategy for a future photometric monitoring of the Einstein Cross. Based on observations obtained at NOT, La Palma.

  9. A New Determination of the High Redshift Type Ia Supernova Rateswith the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsova, N.; Barbary, K.; Connolly, B.; Kim, A.G.; Pain, R.; Roe, N.A.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Dawson, K.; Doi, M.; Fadeyev, V.; Fruchter, A.S.; Gibbons, R.; Goldhaber, G.; Goober, A.; Gude, A.; Knop,R.A.; Kowalski, M.; Lidman, C.; Morokuma, T.; Meyers, J.; Perlmutter, S.; Rubin, D.; Schlegel, D.J.; Spadafora, A.L.; Stanishev, V.; Strovink, M.; Suzuki, N.; Wang, L.; Yasuda, N.

    2007-10-01

    We present a new measurement of the volumetric rate of Type Ia supernova up to a redshift of 1.7, using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) GOODS data combined with an additional HST dataset covering the North GOODS field collected in 2004. We employ a novel technique that does not require spectroscopic data for identifying Type Ia supernovae (although spectroscopic measurements of redshifts are used for over half the sample); instead we employ a Bayesian approach using only photometric data to calculate the probability that an object is a Type Ia supernova. This Bayesian technique can easily be modified to incorporate improved priors on supernova properties, and it is well-suited for future high-statistics supernovae searches in which spectroscopic follow up of all candidates will be impractical. Here, the method is validated on both ground- and space-based supernova data having some spectroscopic follow up. We combine our volumetric rate measurements with low redshift supernova data, and fit to a number of possible models for the evolution of the Type Ia supernova rate as a function of redshift. The data do not distinguish between a flat rate at redshift > 0.5 and a previously proposed model, in which the Type Ia rate peaks at redshift {approx} 1 due to a significant delay from star-formation to the supernova explosion. Except for the highest redshifts, where the signal to noise ratio is generally too low to apply this technique, this approach yields smaller or comparable uncertainties than previous work.

  10. The Highest Redshift Relativistic Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, C.C.; Stawarz, L.; Siemiginowska, A.; Harris, D.E; Schwartz, D.A.; Wardle, J.F.C.; Gobeille, D.; Lee, N.P.

    2007-12-18

    We describe our efforts to understand large-scale (10's-100's kpc) relativistic jet systems through observations of the highest-redshift quasars. Results from a VLA survey search for radio jets in {approx} 30 z > 3.4 quasars are described along with new Chandra observations of 4 selected targets.

  11. Are quasar redshifts randomly distributed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weymann, R. J.; Boroson, T.; Scargle, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    A statistical analysis of possible clumping (not periodicity) of emission line redshifts of QSO's shows the available data to be compatible with random fluctuations of a smooth, non-clumped distribution. This result is demonstrated with Monte Carlo simulations as well as with the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. It is in complete disagreement with the analysis by Varshni, which is shown to be incorrect.

  12. The redshift-distance relation.

    PubMed Central

    Segal, I E

    1993-01-01

    Key predictions of the Hubble law are inconsistent with direct observations on equitable complete samples of extragalactic sources in the optical, infrared, and x-ray wave bands-e.g., the predicted dispersion in apparent magnitude is persistently greatly in excess of its observed value, precluding an explanation via hypothetical perturbations or irregularities. In contrast, the predictions of the Lundmark (homogeneous quadratic) law are consistent with the observations. The Lundmark law moreover predicts the deviations between Hubble law predictions and observation with statistical consistency, while the Hubble law provides no explanation for the close fit of the Lundmark law. The flux-redshift law F [symbol, see text] (1 + z)/z appears consistent with observations on equitable complete samples in the entire observed redshift range, when due account is taken of flux limits by an optimal statistical method. Under the theoretical assumption that space is a fixed sphere, as in the Einstein universe, this law implies the redshift-distance relation z = tan2(r/2R), where R is the radius of the spherical space. This relation coincides with the prediction of chronometric cosmology, which estimates R as 160 +/- 40 Mpc (1 parsec = 3.09 x 10(16) m) from the proper motion to redshift relation of superluminal sources. Tangential aspects, including statistical methodology, fundamental physical theory, bright cluster galaxy samples, and proposed luminosity evolution, are briefly considered. PMID:11607390

  13. The Weyl Definition of Redshifts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Alex

    2012-01-01

    In 1923, Weyl published a (not widely known) protocol for the calculation of redshifts. It is completely independent of the origin of the shift and treats it as a pure Doppler shift. The method is comprehensive and depends solely on the relation between the world lines of source and observer. It has the merit of simplicity of statement and…

  14. The Candela and Photometric and Radiometric Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Albert C.

    2001-01-01

    The national measurement system for photometric and radiometric quantities is presently based upon techniques that make these quantities traceable to a high-accuracy cryogenic radiometer. The redefinition of the candela in 1979 provided the opportunity for national measurement laboratories to base their photometric measurements on optical detector technology rather than on the emission from high-temperature blackbody optical sources. The ensuing technical developments of the past 20 years, including the significant improvements in cryogenic radiometer performance, have provided the opportunity to place the fundamental maintenance of photometric quantities upon absolute detector based technology as was allowed by the 1979 redefinition. Additionally, the development of improved photodetectors has had a significant impact on the methodology in most of the radiometric measurement areas. This paper will review the status of the NIST implementation of the technical changes mandated by the 1979 redefinition of the candela and its effect upon the maintenance and dissemination of optical radiation measurements. PMID:27500020

  15. The geological interpretation of photometric surface roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfenstein, Paul

    1988-01-01

    A computer-generated km-scale relief map, whose topographic facets on scales of less than a few m are assumed to have smooth particulate surfaces, is the basis of the present investigation of the relationship between photometrically-derived values of Hapke's (1984) roughness parameter theta and topographic scale. The addition of m-km scale-range relief to the otherwise smooth surface alters integral photometric behavior in a way that is consistent with Hapke's equation; the roughness characterized by theta is an integral property over all scales up to the resolution limit of the photometric data used in its determination. With sufficient phase angle coverage, theta can distinguish terrains with very different integral roughnesses.

  16. Defining photometric peculiar type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    González-Gaitán, S.; Pignata, G.; Förster, F.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Bufano, F.; Galbany, L.; Hamuy, M.; De Jaeger, T.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Phillips, M. M.; Folatelli, G.; Anderson, J. P.

    2014-11-10

    We present a new photometric identification technique for SN 1991bg-like type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), i.e., objects with light curve characteristics such as later primary maxima and the absence of a secondary peak in redder filters. This method is capable of selecting this sub-group from the normal type Ia population. Furthermore, we find that recently identified peculiar sub-types such as SNe Iax and super-Chandrasekhar SNe Ia have photometric characteristics similar to 91bg-like SNe Ia, namely, the absence of secondary maxima and shoulders at longer wavelengths, and can also be classified with our technique. The similarity of these different SN Ia sub-groups perhaps suggests common physical conditions. This typing methodology permits the photometric identification of peculiar SNe Ia in large upcoming wide-field surveys either to study them further or to obtain a pure sample of normal SNe Ia for cosmological studies.

  17. Zernike polynomials for photometric characterization of LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velázquez, J. L.; Ferrero, A.; Pons, A.; Campos, J.; Hernanz, M. L.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a method based on Zernike polynomials to characterize photometric quantities and descriptors of light emitting diodes (LEDs) from measurements of the angular distribution of the luminous intensity, such as total luminous flux, BA, inhomogeneity, anisotropy, direction of the optical axis and Lambertianity of the source. The performance of this method was experimentally tested for 18 high-power LEDs from different manufacturers and with different photometric characteristics. A small set of Zernike coefficients can be used to calculate all the mentioned photometric quantities and descriptors. For applications not requiring a great accuracy such as those of lighting design, the angular distribution of the luminous intensity of most of the studied LEDs can be interpolated with only two Zernike polynomials.

  18. (Sub)millimetre interferometric imaging of a sample of COSMOS/AzTEC submillimetre galaxies. I. Multiwavelength identifications and redshift distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miettinen, O.; Smolčić, V.; Novak, M.; Aravena, M.; Karim, A.; Masters, D.; Riechers, D. A.; Bussmann, R. S.; McCracken, H. J.; Ilbert, O.; Bertoldi, F.; Capak, P.; Feruglio, C.; Halliday, C.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Navarrete, F.; Salvato, M.; Sanders, D.; Schinnerer, E.; Sheth, K.

    2015-05-01

    We used the Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) to map a sample of 15 submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) in the COSMOS field at the wavelength of 1.3 mm. The target SMGs were originally discovered in the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT)/AzTEC 1.1 mm continuum survey at S/N1.1 mm = 4-4.5. This paper presents, for the first time, interferometric millimetre-wavelength observations of these sources. The angular resolution of our observations, 1''&dotbelow;8, allowed us to accurately determine the positions of the target SMGs. Using a detection threshold of S/N1.3 mm> 4.5 regardless of multiwavelength counterpart association, and 4 photometric redshifts, available spectroscopic redshifts, and redshifts estimated from the radio-to-submm spectral index we infer a median redshift of tilde{z}= 3.20 ± 0.25 for our sample. To study the overall multiplicity and redshift distribution of flux-limited samples of SMGs we combined these sources with the 15 brightest JCMT/AzTEC SMGs detected at 1.1 mm, AzTEC1-15, and studied previously. This constitutes a complete, flux- and S/N-limited 1.1-mm selected sample. We find that the median redshift for the 15 brightest JCMT/AzTEC SMGs (tilde{z}= 3.05 ± 0.44) is consistent with that for AzTEC16-30. This conforms to recent observational findings that SMGs do not exhibit any significant trend between the redshift and (sub)mm flux density. For the combined AzTEC1-30 sample we derive a median redshift of tilde{z}= 3.17 ± 0.27, consistent with previous results based on mm

  19. Photometric diversity of terrains on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Veverka, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Lee, P.

    1994-01-01

    Voyager disk-resolved images of Triton in the violet (0.41 micrometers) and green (0.56 micrometer wavelengths have been analyzed to derive the photometric characteristics of terrains on Triton. Similar conclusions are found using two distinct but related definitions of photometric units, one based on color ratio and albedo properties (A. S. McEwen, 1990), the other on albedo and brightness ratios at different phase angles (P. Lee et al., 1992). A significant diversity of photometric behavior, much broader than that discovered so far on any other icy satellite, occurs among Triton's terrains. Remarkably, differences in photometric behavior do not correlate well with geologic terrain boundaries defined on the basis of surface morphology. This suggests that in most cases photometric properties on Triton are controlled by thin deposits superposed on underlying geologic units. Single scattering albedos are 0.98 or higher and asymmetry factors range from -0.35 to -0.45 for most units. The most distinct scattering behavior is exhibited by the reddish northern units already identified as the Anomalously Scattering Region (ASR), which scatters light almost isotropically with g = -0.04. In part due to the effects of Triton's clouds and haze, it is difficult to constrain the value of bar-theta, Hapke's macroscopic roughness parameter, precisely for Triton or to map differences in bar-theta among the different photometric terrains. However, our study shows that Triton must be relatively smooth, with bar-theta less than 15-20 degs and suggests that a value of 14 degs is appropriate. The differences in photometric characteristics lead to significantly different phase angle behavior for the various terrains. For example, a terrain (e.g., the ASR) that appears dark relative to another at low phase angles will reverse its contrast (become relatively brighter) at larger phase angles. The photometric parameters have been used to calculate hemispherical albedos for the units and to

  20. The photometric properties of galaxies in the early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Stephen M.; Feng, Yu; Di-Matteo, Tiziana; Croft, Rupert; Stanway, Elizabeth R.; Bunker, Andrew; Waters, Dacen; Lovell, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    We use the large cosmological hydro-dynamic simulation BlueTides to predict the photometric properties of galaxies during the epoch of reionisation ($z=8-15$). These properties include the rest-frame UV to near-IR broadband spectral energy distributions, the Lyman continuum photon production, the UV star formation rate calibration, and intrinsic UV continuum slope. In particular we focus on exploring the effect of various modelling assumptions, including the assumed choice of stellar population synthesis model, initial mass function, and the escape fraction of Lyman continuum photons, upon these quantities. We find that these modelling assumptions can have a dramatic effect on photometric properties leading to consequences for the accurate determination of physical properties from observations. For example, at $z=8$ we predict that nebular emission can account for up-to $50\\%$ of the rest-frame $R$-band luminosity, while the choice of stellar population synthesis model can change the Lyman continuum production rate up to a factor of $\\times 2$.

  1. The photometric properties of galaxies in the early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Stephen M.; Feng, Yu; Di-Matteo, Tiziana; Croft, Rupert; Stanway, Elizabeth R.; Bunker, Andrew; Waters, Dacen; Lovell, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    We use the large cosmological hydro-dynamic simulation BLUETIDES to predict the photometric properties of galaxies during the epoch of reionization (z = 8-15). These properties include the rest-frame UV to near-IR broad-band spectral energy distributions, the Lyman continuum (LyC) photon production, the UV star formation rate calibration, and intrinsic UV continuum slope. In particular we focus on exploring the effect of various modelling assumptions, including the assumed choice of stellar population synthesis (SPS) model, initial mass function, and the escape fraction of LyC photons, upon these quantities. We find that these modelling assumptions can have a dramatic effect on photometric properties leading to consequences for the accurate determination of physical properties from observations. For example, at z = 8 we predict that nebular emission can account for up to 50 per cent of the rest-frame R-band luminosity, while the choice of SPS model can change the LyC production rate up to a factor of ×2.

  2. Probing the dark ages: Observations of the high-redshift universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Daniel Keith

    This thesis attempts to describe some of the earliest phases in the collapse of galaxies from an observational standpoint. The work is composed of an assortment of projects which sample objects at very high redshift, probing the Universe 1-3 Gyr after the Big Bang. The first section of the thesis concerns high-redshift galaxies. Search techniques for identifying distant galaxies are extensively reviewed. Radio selection was once the primary vehicle to targeting the early Universe. Keck spectroscopy of high-redshift radio galaxies from the MIT-Greenbank radio catalog (S5GHz >~ 50 mJy) are discussed. We synthesize a composite radio galaxy spectrum, which we compare with other composite active galaxy spectra. Our data suggests a correlation between radio power and ionization state in high-redshift radio galaxies. The following three chapters detail individual galaxies confirmed at z > 5. These galaxies are among the half-dozen most distant sources known at the close of the 20th Century. Two of the galaxies were photometrically-selected from the Hubble Deep Field (HDF 4-473.0 at z = 5.60 and HDF 3-951.0 at z = 5.34 +/- 0.01). The third is TN J0924-2201, a radio galaxy at z = 5.19 selected on the basis of steep radio spectral index and faint K-band brightness. This source contains the most distant active galactic nucleus currently known, requiring early formation of supermassive blackholes within a Gyr after the Big Bang. The second section of the thesis concerns searches for high-redshift Lyα emission, identified either from deep, narrow-band imaging surveys or deep slit spectra. We discuss in detail one faint, high equivalent width line-emitter. Conventional wisdom would suggest identifying the 9185 Å line with Lyα at z = 6.55. We argue [O II] λ3727 at z = 1.46 is the more likely identification and discuss observational tests to distinguish Lyα-emitters at high redshift from foreground (active) sources. The final section of the thesis concerns high-redshift

  3. GRB 050502B optical afterglow: a jet-break at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonso, P.; Greiner, J.; Pian, E.; Covino, S.; Malesani, D.; Küpcü Yoldaş, A.; Krühler, T.; Clemens, C.; McBreen, S.; Rau, A.; Giannios, D.; Hjorth, J.

    2011-02-01

    Aims: Swift GRB 050502B is well known for the very bright flare displayed in its X-ray light curve. Despite extensive studies, however, the optical light curve has never been discussed and its redshift is unconstrained. Possible correlations between optical and X-ray data are analysed. Methods: Photometric data from TNG in the R and I bands were used to compare the optical afterglow with the X-ray light curve. The HyperZ package and a late-time VLT host observation were used to derive redshift estimates. Results: The I-band afterglow decay followed a power law of index α = 2.1±0.6, after a late break at ~ 1.3×105 s. The R-I colour is remarkably red and the broadband spectral index βOX = 0.9±0.1 is consistent with the X-ray spectral slope βX. Although a photometric redshift of z > 4 is the most conservative result to consider, a photometric redshift of z = 5.2±0.3 is suggested with no extinction in the host, based on which an isotropic energy Eγ,iso = (3.8±0.7)×1052 erg and a jet opening angle θ ~ 3.7° are subsequently derived. Conclusions: The combined X-ray and optical data suggest an achromatic break, which we interpret as a jet-break. The post jet-break slope roughly obeys the closure relation for the jet's slow cooling model. Because of the afterglow's very red colour, in order for the redshift to be low (z < 1), extinction must be significantly high if present in the host. Since the optical-to-X-ray index is consistent with the X-ray spectrum, and there is no XRT evidence for excess NH, GRB 050502B was likely at high redshift. Based on observations made with the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) operated on the island of La Palma by the Fundación Galileo Galilei of the INAF (Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica) at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (programme AOT11-59) and with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatories under programme ID 177.A-0591.

  4. THE FIRST HIGH-REDSHIFT QUASAR FROM Pan-STARRS

    SciTech Connect

    Morganson, Eric; De Rosa, Gisella; Decarli, Roberto; Walter, Fabian; Rix, Hans-Walter; Chambers, Ken; Burgett, William; Flewelling, Heather; Hodapp, Klaus; Kaiser, Nick; Magnier, Eugene; Sweeney, Bill; Waters, Christopher; McGreer, Ian; Fan, Xiaohui; Greiner, Jochen; Price, Paul

    2012-06-15

    We present the discovery of the first high-redshift (z > 5.7) quasar from the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 (Pan-STARRS1 or PS1). This quasar was initially detected as an i{sub P1} dropout in PS1, confirmed photometrically with the SAO Wide-field InfraRed Camera at Arizona's Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT) and the Gamma-Ray Burst Optical/Near-Infrared Detector at the MPG 2.2 m telescope in La Silla. The quasar was verified spectroscopically with the MMT Spectrograph, Red Channel and the Cassegrain Twin Spectrograph at the Calar Alto 3.5 m telescope. Its near-infrared spectrum was taken at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory (LBT) with the LBT Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Utility with Camera and Integral Field Unit for Extragalactic Research. It has a redshift of 5.73, an AB z{sub P1} magnitude of 19.4, a luminosity of 3.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 47} erg s{sup -1}, and a black hole mass of 6.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }. It is a broad absorption line quasar with a prominent Ly{beta} peak and a very blue continuum spectrum. This quasar is the first result from the PS1 high-redshift quasar search that is projected to discover more than 100 i{sub P1} dropout quasars and could potentially find more than 10 z{sub P1} dropout (z > 6.8) quasars.

  5. REDSHIFT EVOLUTION OF THE GALAXY VELOCITY DISPERSION FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Bezanson, Rachel; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Franx, Marijn; Brinchmann, Jarle; Labbe, Ivo; Van de Sande, Jesse; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Kriek, Mariska; Quadri, Ryan F.; Williams, Rik J.; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2011-08-20

    We present a study of the evolution of the galaxy velocity dispersion function (VDF) from z = 0 to z = 1.5 using photometric data from the Ultra-Deep and the NEWFIRM Medium-Band Survey in the COSMOS field. The VDF has been measured locally using direct kinematic measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), but direct studies of the VDF at high redshift are difficult as they require velocity dispersion measurements of many thousands of galaxies. Taylor et al. demonstrated that dynamical and stellar masses are linearly related when the structure of the galaxy is accounted for. We show that the stellar mass, size, and Sersic index can reliably predict the velocity dispersions of SDSS galaxies. We apply this relation to galaxies at high redshift and determine the evolution of the inferred VDF. We find that the VDF at z {approx} 0.5 is very similar to the VDF at z = 0. At higher redshifts, we find that the number density of galaxies with dispersions {approx}< 200 km s{sup -1} is lower, but the number of high-dispersion galaxies is constant or even higher. At fixed cumulative number density, the velocity dispersions of galaxies with log N[Mpc{sup -3}] < -3.5 increase with time by a factor of {approx}1.4 from z {approx} 1.5-0, whereas the dispersions of galaxies with lower number density are approximately constant or decrease with time. The VDF appears to show less evolution than the stellar mass function, particularly at the lowest number densities. We note that these results are still somewhat uncertain and we suggest several avenues for further calibrating the inferred velocity dispersions.

  6. System for clinical photometric stereo endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durr, Nicholas J.; González, Germán.; Lim, Daryl; Traverso, Giovanni; Nishioka, Norman S.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.; Parot, Vicente

    2014-02-01

    Photometric stereo endoscopy is a technique that captures information about the high-spatial-frequency topography of the field of view simultaneously with a conventional color image. Here we describe a system that will enable photometric stereo endoscopy to be clinically evaluated in the large intestine of human patients. The clinical photometric stereo endoscopy system consists of a commercial gastroscope, a commercial video processor, an image capturing and processing unit, custom synchronization electronics, white light LEDs, a set of four fibers with diffusing tips, and an alignment cap. The custom pieces that come into contact with the patient are composed of biocompatible materials that can be sterilized before use. The components can then be assembled in the endoscopy suite before use. The resulting endoscope has the same outer diameter as a conventional colonoscope (14 mm), plugs into a commercial video processor, captures topography and color images at 15 Hz, and displays the conventional color image to the gastroenterologist in real-time. We show that this system can capture a color and topographical video in a tubular colon phantom, demonstrating robustness to complex geometries and motion. The reported system is suitable for in vivo evaluation of photometric stereo endoscopy in the human large intestine.

  7. Photometric properties of Mars soils analogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.; Jost, B.; Beck, P.; Okubo, C.; McEwen, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    We have measured the bidirectional reflectance of analogs of dry, wet, and frozen Martian soils over a wide range of phase angles in the visible spectral range. All samples were produced from two geologic samples: the standard JSC Mars-1 soil simulant and Hawaiian basaltic sand. In a first step, experiments were conducted with the dry samples to investigate the effects of surface texture. Comparisons with results independently obtained by different teams with similar samples showed a satisfying reproducibility of the photometric measurements as well as a noticeable influence of surface textures resulting from different sample preparation procedures. In a second step, water was introduced to produce wet and frozen samples and their photometry investigated. Optical microscope images of the samples provided information about their microtexture. Liquid water, even in relatively low amount, resulted in the disappearance of the backscattering peak and the appearance of a forward-scattering peak whose intensity increases with the amount of water. Specular reflections only appeared when water was present in an amount large enough to allow water to form a film at the surface of the sample. Icy samples showed a wide variability of photometric properties depending on the physical properties of the water ice. We discuss the implications of these measurements in terms of the expected photometric behavior of the Martian surface, from equatorial to circum-polar regions. In particular, we propose some simple photometric criteria to improve the identification of wet and/or icy soils from multiple observations under different geometries.

  8. Photometric properties of Mars soils analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.; Jost, B.; Beck, P.; Okubo, C.; McEwen, A. S.

    2013-10-01

    We have measured the bidirectional reflectance of analogs of dry, wet, and frozen Martian soils over a wide range of phase angles in the visible spectral range. All samples were produced from two geologic samples: the standard JSC Mars-1 soil simulant and Hawaiian basaltic sand. In a first step, experiments were conducted with the dry samples to investigate the effects of surface texture. Comparisons with results independently obtained by different teams with similar samples showed a satisfying reproducibility of the photometric measurements as well as a noticeable influence of surface textures resulting from different sample preparation procedures. In a second step, water was introduced to produce wet and frozen samples and their photometry investigated. Optical microscope images of the samples provided information about their microtexture. Liquid water, even in relatively low amount, resulted in the disappearance of the backscattering peak and the appearance of a forward-scattering peak whose intensity increases with the amount of water. Specular reflections only appeared when water was present in an amount large enough to allow water to form a film at the surface of the sample. Icy samples showed a wide variability of photometric properties depending on the physical properties of the water ice. We discuss the implications of these measurements in terms of the expected photometric behavior of the Martian surface, from equatorial to circum-polar regions. In particular, we propose some simple photometric criteria to improve the identification of wet and/or icy soils from multiple observations under different geometries.

  9. Philosophy and updating of the asteroid photometric catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnusson, Per; Barucci, M. Antonietta; Capria, M. T.; Dahlgren, Mats; Fulchignoni, Marcello; Lagerkvist, C. I.

    1992-01-01

    The Asteroid Photometric Catalogue now contains photometric lightcurves for 584 asteroids. We discuss some of the guiding principles behind it. This concerns both observers who offer input to it and users of the product.

  10. High-redshift galaxy populations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Esther M; Cowie, Lennox L

    2006-04-27

    We now see many galaxies as they were only 800 million years after the Big Bang, and that limit may soon be exceeded when wide-field infrared detectors are widely available. Multi-wavelength studies show that there was relatively little star formation at very early times and that star formation was at its maximum at about half the age of the Universe. A small number of high-redshift objects have been found by targeting X-ray and radio sources and most recently, gamma-ray bursts. The gamma-ray burst sources may provide a way to reach even higher-redshift galaxies in the future, and to probe the first generation of stars. PMID:16641986

  11. Photometric Color Conversions for Space Surveillance Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, J.

    In order to maximize sensitivity, optical space surveillance sensors use detectors that have good sensitivity over a wide region of the spectrum. For example, the CCD detectors for the Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research (LINEAR) Project, which are nearly identical to the detectors of the Ground-based Electro-Optical Deep Space Surveillance System, have good sensitivity over the visible spectrum from 380 nanometers to beyond 1000 nanometers. However, photometric calibration of the intensities of objects (stars, satellites, asteroids, etc.) measured by these systems must be referenced to astronomical star catalogs that were measured over much narrower portions of the available spectrum. For example, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Photometric Database contains photometric measurements in five bandpasses that are each about 150 nanometers wide. This paper will present a method for converting between photometric systems with different bandpasses. The method uses the measured response functions of the detectors of interest along with a model of the spectral transmissivity of the atmosphere (Stone, 1996), and a catalog of stellar spectra (Pickles, 1998) to derive polynomial functions that allow for the conversion of brightness measurements from astronomical catalogs to the bandpass of the sensor. The method has been extensively tested using data from the Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research project in comparison with catalog measurements from the USNO B1.0 astrometric catalog, and the SDSS Photometric Database. Through OPAL (Optical Processing Architecture at Lincoln), this technique is being applied to ground-based and space-based sensors including the Space-Based Visible (SBV) system, the Space-Based Space Surveillance (SBSS) system, and the Space Surveillance Telescope (SST).

  12. Equivalence Principle and Gravitational Redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Hohensee, Michael A.; Chu, Steven; Mueller, Holger; Peters, Achim

    2011-04-15

    We investigate leading order deviations from general relativity that violate the Einstein equivalence principle in the gravitational standard model extension. We show that redshift experiments based on matter waves and clock comparisons are equivalent to one another. Consideration of torsion balance tests, along with matter-wave, microwave, optical, and Moessbauer clock tests, yields comprehensive limits on spin-independent Einstein equivalence principle-violating standard model extension terms at the 10{sup -6} level.

  13. El Universo a alto redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, M. V.

    The Universe we see today is the result of structures and galaxies that have been evolving since earlier times. Looking the evolution of the galaxy population at z ˜ 1 has emphasized the important role played by high redshift data. This is the case of the morphology - density relationship, where the morphological type of galaxies in distant clusters has given us a clear vision of evolutionary processes, partly led by environmental effects. I review part of the data available at high redshifts that are fundamental today to check the validity of galaxy formation models in reproducing local and basic galaxy properties. Briefly, I will comment about high redshift studies, a still little explored portion of the Universe, and the current strategies that allow us the study. In this sense, the epoch of reionization is essential for understanding the formation of structures because it is the phase where the first protogalaxies were formed, creating stars and enriching the intergalactic medium. Because of the great distances involved in these studies, gamma-ray bursts, quasars and Lyman-α galaxies are the best tools to study these earlier times. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  14. DISCOVERING BRIGHT QUASARS AT INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFTS BASED ON OPTICAL/NEAR-INFRARED COLORS

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xue-Bing; Zuo, Wenwen; Yang, Jinyi; Yang, Qian; Wang, Feige

    2013-10-01

    The identification of quasars at intermediate redshifts (2.2 < z < 3.5) has been inefficient in most previous quasar surveys since the optical colors of quasars are similar to those of stars. The near-IR K-band excess technique has been suggested to overcome this difficulty. Our recent study also proposed to use optical/near-IR colors for selecting z < 4 quasars. To verify the effectiveness of this method, we selected a list of 105 unidentified bright targets with i ≤ 18.5 from the quasar candidates of SDSS DR6 with both SDSS ugriz optical and UKIDSS YJHK near-IR photometric data, which satisfy our proposed Y – K/g – z criterion and have photometric redshifts between 2.2 and 3.5 estimated from the nine-band SDSS-UKIDSS data. We observed 43 targets with the BFOSC instrument on the 2.16 m optical telescope at Xinglong station of the National Astronomical Observatory of China in the spring of 2012. We spectroscopically identified 36 targets as quasars with redshifts between 2.1 and 3.4. The high success rate of discovering these quasars in the SDSS spectroscopic surveyed area further demonstrates the robustness of both the Y – K/g – z selection criterion and the photometric redshift estimation technique. We also used the above criterion to investigate the possible stellar contamination rate among the quasar candidates of SDSS DR6, and found that the rate is much higher when selecting 3 < z < 3.5 quasar candidates than when selecting lower redshift candidates (z < 2.2). The significant improvement in the photometric redshift estimation when using the nine-band SDSS-UKIDSS data over the five-band SDSS data is demonstrated and a catalog of 7727 unidentified quasar candidates in SDSS DR6 selected with optical/near-IR colors and having photometric redshifts between 2.2 and 3.5 is provided. We also tested the Y – K/g – z selection criterion with the recently released SDSS-III/DR9 quasar catalog and found that 96.2% of 17,999 DR9 quasars with UKIDSS Y- and K

  15. Neutrino Redshifts -- A Search for Information.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, Charles

    2005-04-01

    Neutrinos will undergo Redshifts due to Doppler and/or Space Expansion effects similar to Electromagnetic Radiation (Photons). However, in some situations (ex., Quasars, etc), Photon Redshifts may be due to cumulative energy-loss mechanisms with the intervening medium. In this situation, the corresponding Neutrino Redshifts will be much smaller since the interaction cross-section for neutrino-medium interactions will be much smaller than any photon-medium cross-section. Thus, observation and comparison of photon redshifts vs corresponding neutrinos redshifts will be very informative. If the photon and neutrino redshifts are similar, then a Doppler and/or Space Expansion interpretation is justified. If the neutrino redshift is much smaller than any corresponding photon redshift, then an interpretation via a cumulative energy-loss mechanism is justified. This is a very definitive experimental test of redshift interpretations. The latest neutrino data will be examined, particularly relevant to quasars and supernova. Reference: ``Redshifts of Cosmological Neutrinos as Definitive Experimental Test of Doppler versus Non-Doppler Redshifts'' by C. F. Gallo in IEEE Trans. Plasma Science, vol. 31, No. 6, pgs. 1230-1231, Dec. 2003.

  16. What is the Dominant Mode of Star-Formation as a Function of Galaxy Mass and Redshift?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassin, Susan

    We propose to determine star formation histories of galaxies since a redshift of 5. In particular, we will measure the fraction of galaxies which experience significantly elevated and depressed star-formation activity with respect to the cosmic average, and quantify the amount of time galaxies spend in such states. We will do this using our new galaxy spectral models which are based on a combination of star-formation and chemical enrichment histories from hierarchical simulations of galaxy formation. We propose to use these models to fit an extremely large data set of 105,000 galaxies over 0.2 < z < 5 with photometry spanning the UV through the infrared and with spectroscopic (80%, mostly from low resolution spectra) and photometric (20%) redshifts. There is no other data set larger or more complete in terms of redshift or wavelength, and there will likely not be one until JWST or 30-meter class telescopes are online.

  17. DISCOVERY OF A QUADRUPLE LENS IN CANDELS WITH A RECORD LENS REDSHIFT z = 1.53

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Wel, A.; Van de Ven, G.; Maseda, M.; Rix, H. W.; Rudnick, G. H.; Grazian, A.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Koo, D. C.; Faber, S. M.; Kocevski, D. D.

    2013-11-01

    Using spectroscopy from the Large Binocular Telescope and imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope we discovered the first strong galaxy lens at z {sub lens} > 1. The lens has a secure photometric redshift of z = 1.53 ± 0.09 and the source is spectroscopically confirmed at z = 3.417. The Einstein radius (0.''35; 3.0 kpc) encloses 7.6 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, with an upper limit on the dark matter fraction of 60%. The highly magnified (40×) source galaxy has a very small stellar mass (∼10{sup 8} M {sub ☉}) and shows an extremely strong [O III]{sub 5007Å} emission line (EW{sub 0} ∼ 1000 Å) bolstering the evidence that intense starbursts among very low-mass galaxies are common at high redshift.

  18. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): curation and reanalysis of 16.6k redshifts in the G10/COSMOS region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, L. J. M.; Driver, S. P.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Baldry, I. K.; Lange, R.; Liske, J.; Meyer, M.; Popping, A.; Wilkins, S. M.; Wright, A. H.

    2015-02-01

    We discuss the construction of the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) 10h region (G10) using publicly available data in the Cosmic Evolution Survey region (COSMOS) in order to extend the GAMA survey to z ˜ 1 in a single deg2 field. In order to obtain the maximum number of high precision spectroscopic redshifts we re-reduce all archival zCOSMOS-bright data and use the GAMA automatic cross-correlation redshift fitting code AUTOZ. We use all available redshift information (AUTOZ, zCOSMOS-bright 10k, PRIMUS, VVDS, SDSS and photometric redshifts) to calculate robust best-fitting redshifts for all galaxies and visually inspect all 1D and 2D spectra to obtain 16 583 robust redshifts in the full COSMOS region. We then define the G10 region to be the central ˜1 deg2 of COSMOS, which has relatively high spectroscopic completeness, and encompasses the CHILES VLA region. We define a combined r < 23.0 mag and i < 22.0 mag G10 sample (selected to have the highest bijective overlap) with which to perform future analysis, containing 9861 sources with reliable high-precision VLT-VIMOS spectra. All tables, spectra and imaging are available at http://ict.icrar.org/cutout/G10.

  19. Optical Variability and Classification of High Redshift (3.5 < z < 5.5) Quasars on SDSS Stripe 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlSayyad, Yusra; McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui; Connolly, Andrew J.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Becker, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown promise in combining optical colors with variability to efficiently select and estimate the redshifts of low- to mid-redshift quasars in upcoming ground-based time-domain surveys. We extend these studies to fainter and less abundant high-redshift quasars using light curves from 235 sq. deg. and 10 years of Stripe 82 imaging reprocessed with the prototype LSST data management stack. Sources are detected on the i-band co-adds (5σ: i ~ 24) but measured on the single-epoch (ugriz) images, generating complete and unbiased lightcurves for sources fainter than the single-epoch detection threshold. Using these forced photometry lightcurves, we explore optical variability characteristics of high redshift quasars and validate classification methods with particular attention to the low signal limit. In this low SNR limit, we quantify the degradation of the uncertainties and biases on variability parameters using simulated light curves. Completeness/efficiency and redshift accuracy are verified with new spectroscopic observations on the MMT and APO 3.5m. These preliminary results are part of a survey to measure the z~4 luminosity function for quasars (i < 23) on Stripe 82 and to validate purely photometric classification techniques for high redshift quasars in LSST.

  20. An HST surface photometric study of ultraluminous infrared galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Z.; Wu, H.; Mao, S.; Xia, X.-Y.; Deng, Z.-G.; Zou, Z.-L.

    1999-09-01

    We study the surface photometry for 13 single-nucleus ultraluminous IRAS galaxies (ULIRGs), selected from a parent sample of 58 galaxies obtained in a Hubble Space Telescope I-band snapshot survey. These galaxies can be classified into two classes using a quantitative chi (2) criterion based on whether their surface brightness profiles are well fitted by the R(1) / 4 law. The surface brightness profiles of all four galaxies in the first class are well fitted by the R(1) / 4 law. Their isophotes are all disky at R <~ 1 h(-1) kpc, consistent with the molecular disks/rings found in nearby ULIRGs from CO observations. For the nine class II objects, their surface brightness profiles are less well fitted by the R(1) / 4 law. Qualitatively, the class II objects can be further divided into two sub-classes (IIa and IIb) based on their photometric behaviors. The four galaxies in class IIa have a bright nucleus, an inner R(1) / 4 component and an outer extension. Remarkably all these four galaxies are Seyfert 1 galaxies with luminosities in the quasar regime and with relatively narrow permitted and strong FeII emission lines. The remaining five galaxies in Class IIb have surface brightness profiles deviating to various degrees from the R(1) / 4 law, including one galaxy that is well fitted by an exponential law. In contrast to class IIa, spectral classifications of galaxies in class IIb are mostly HII regions or LINERs. We also present new spectroscopic observations for some of these galaxies. We establish the redshift of IR 09427+1929 to be 0.284, instead of 0.149 as adopted in the literature. Our analyzes support the idea that mergings of disk galaxies produce elliptical or S0 galaxies. These observations also suggest that the formation of QSOs may be an integral part of elliptical galaxy formation (at low redshifts). This research was based on observations obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope through the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by

  1. Quasar probabilities and redshifts from WISE mid-IR through GALEX UV photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Bovy, J.; Myers, A. D.; Lang, D.

    2015-09-01

    Extreme deconvolution (XD) of broad-band photometric data can both separate stars from quasars and generate probability density functions for quasar redshifts, while incorporating flux uncertainties and missing data. Mid-infrared photometric colours are now widely used to identify hot dust intrinsic to quasars, and the release of all-sky WISE data has led to a dramatic increase in the number of IR-selected quasars. Using forced photometry on public WISE data at the locations of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) point sources, we incorporate this all-sky data into the training of the XDQSOz models originally developed to select quasars from optical photometry. The combination of WISE and SDSS information is far more powerful than SDSS alone, particularly at z > 2. The use of SDSS+WISE photometry is comparable to the use of SDSS+ultraviolet+near-IR data. We release a new public catalogue of 5537 436 (total; 3874 639 weighted by probability) potential quasars with probability PQSO > 0.2. The catalogue includes redshift probabilities for all objects. We also release an updated version of the publicly available set of codes to calculate quasar and redshift probabilities for various combinations of data. Finally, we demonstrate that this method of selecting quasars using WISE data is both more complete and efficient than simple WISE colour-cuts, especially at high redshift. Our fits verify that above z ˜ 3 WISE colours become bluer than the standard cuts applied to select quasars. Currently, the analysis is limited to quasars with optical counterparts, and thus cannot be used to find highly obscured quasars that WISE colour-cuts identify in significant numbers.

  2. Redshift Distributions of Galaxies in the DES Science Verification Shear Catalogue and Implications for Weak Lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnett, C.

    2015-07-21

    We present photometric redshift estimates for galaxies used in the weak lensing analysis of the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification (DES SV) data. Four model- or machine learning-based photometric redshift methods { annz2, bpz calibrated against BCC-U fig simulations, skynet, and tpz { are analysed. For training, calibration, and testing of these methods, we also construct a catalogue of spectroscopically confirmed galaxies matched against DES SV data. The performance of the methods is evalu-ated against the matched spectroscopic catalogue, focusing on metrics relevant for weak lensing analyses, with additional validation against COSMOS photo-zs. From the galaxies in the DES SV shear catalogue, which have mean redshift 0.72 ±0.01 over the range 0:3 < z < 1:3, we construct three tomographic bins with means of z = {0.45; 0.67,1.00g}. These bins each have systematic uncertainties δz ≲ 0.05 in the mean of the fiducial skynet photo-z n(z). We propagate the errors in the redshift distributions through to their impact on cosmological parameters estimated with cosmic shear, and find that they cause shifts in the value of σ8 of approx. 3%. This shift is within the one sigma statistical errors on σ8 for the DES SV shear catalog. We also found that further study of the potential impact of systematic differences on the critical surface density, Σcrit, contained levels of bias safely less than the statistical power of DES SV data. We recommend a final Gaussian prior for the photo-z bias in the mean of n(z) of width 0:05 for each of the three tomographic bins, and show that this is a sufficient bias model for the corresponding cosmology analysis.

  3. QUEST FOR COSMOS SUBMILLIMETER GALAXY COUNTERPARTS USING CARMA AND VLA: IDENTIFYING THREE HIGH-REDSHIFT STARBURST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Smolcic, V.; Navarrete, F.; Bertoldi, F.; Aravena, M.; Sheth, K.; Ilbert, O.; Yun, M. S.; Salvato, M.; Finoguenov, A.; McCracken, H. J.; Diener, C.; Aretxaga, I.; Hughes, D.; Wilson, G.; Riechers, D. A.; Capak, P.; Scoville, N. Z.; Karim, A.; Schinnerer, E.

    2012-05-01

    We report on interferometric observations at 1.3 mm at 2''-3'' resolution using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. We identify multi-wavelength counterparts of three submillimeter galaxies (SMGs; F{sub 1m} > 5.5 mJy) in the COSMOS field, initially detected with MAMBO and AzTEC bolometers at low, {approx}10''-30'', resolution. All three sources-AzTEC/C1, Cosbo-3, and Cosbo-8-are identified to coincide with positions of 20 cm radio sources. Cosbo-3, however, is not associated with the most likely radio counterpart, closest to the MAMBO source position, but with that farther away from it. This illustrates the need for intermediate-resolution ({approx}2'') mm-observations to identify the correct counterparts of single-dish-detected SMGs. All of our three sources become prominent only at NIR wavelengths, and their mm-to-radio flux based redshifts suggest that they lie at redshifts z {approx}> 2. As a proof of concept, we show that photometric redshifts can be well determined for SMGs, and we find photometric redshifts of 5.6 {+-} 1.2, 1.9{sup +0.9}{sub -0.5}, and {approx}4 for AzTEC/C1, Cosbo-3, and Cosbo-8, respectively. Using these we infer that these galaxies have radio-based star formation rates of {approx}> 1000 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}and IR luminosities of {approx}10{sup 13} L{sub Sun} consistent with properties of high-redshift SMGs. In summary, our sources reflect a variety of SMG properties in terms of redshift and clustering, consistent with the framework that SMGs are progenitors of z {approx} 2 and today's passive galaxies.

  4. Astrophysical science with a spaceborne photometric telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granados, Arno F. (Editor); Borucki, William J. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The FRESIP Project (FRequency of Earth-Sized Inner Planets) is currently under study at NASA Ames Research Center. The goal of FRESIP is the measurement of the frequency of Earth-sized extra-solar planets in inner orbits via the photometric signature of a transit event. This will be accomplished with a spaceborne telescope/photometer capable of photometric precision of two parts in 100,000 at a magnitude of m(sub v) = 12.5. To achieve the maximum scientific value from the FRESIP mission, an astrophysical science workshop was held at the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California, November 11-12, 1993. Workshop participants were invited as experts in their field of astrophysical research and discussed the astrophysical science that can be achieved within the context of the FRESIP mission.

  5. Photometric Periods of Recent Southern Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Frederick M.; Pagnotta, Ashley; Kafka, Stella

    2013-02-01

    We initiated a program to follow the temporal evolution of novae using the SMARTS facilities in 2003. Since then we have followed the evolution of the 68 galactic novae, resulting in the ``Stony Brook/SMARTS Atlas of mostly Southern Novae", a spectroscopic and photometric database. The next step is to undertake a systematic search for orbital periods. We propose here for a week of classical time on the 0.9m to search for photometric periods in the range of a few hours to a few days; we have identified two systems with periods of 1.1 and 5.2 hours. Our targets are recent novae visible in the A semester, mostly in the galactic center region. This complements our continuing longer-term SMARTS monitoring of these systems as they approach quiescence.

  6. Photometric Standards for Non-Standard Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoot, John E.

    2015-05-01

    The AAVSO, professional collaborators, and research consortiums are increasingly requesting that photometric observations be submitted after they have been transformed onto 'standard' photometric systems. This greatly reduces the burden on the principal investigators in managing and merging data from many disparate contributors, but discourages many potential contributors who are unaware that their present equipment can make a valuable contribution. Many potential observers, amateurs, students and instructors are confused over what filters are required and what standards are best. This paper focuses on the best standards and observation methods for observers with one shot color cameras and those possessing monochrome CCD cameras with LRGB filter sets, the two most common configurations used in amateur and educational observatories. This paper examines which current standards best match common equipment and present effective ways for amateurs and students to reduce data to standard systems with common tools and a minimum of mathematical rigor.

  7. BROADBAND PHOTOMETRY OF 105 GIANT ARCS: REDSHIFT CONSTRAINTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR GIANT ARC STATISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Bayliss, Matthew B.

    2012-01-10

    We measure the photometric properties of 105 giant arcs that were identified in systematic searches for galaxy-cluster-scale strong lenses in the Second Red-Sequence Cluster Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The cluster lenses span 0.2 < z{sub l} < 1.2 in redshift, with a median z-bar{sub l}=0.58. Using broadband color criteria we sort the entire arc sample into redshift bins based on u-g and g-r colors, and also r-z colors for the {approx}90% of arcs that have z-band data. This analysis yields broad redshift constraints with 71{sup +5}{sub -4%} of the arcs at z {>=} 1.0, 64{sup +6}{sub -4%} at z {>=} 1.4, 56{sup +5}{sub -4%} at z {>=} 1.9, and 21{sup +4}{sub -2%} at z {>=} 2.7. The remaining 29{sup +03}{sub -5%} have z < 1. The inferred median redshift is z-bar{sub s}= 2.0{+-}0.1, in good agreement with a previous determination from a smaller sample of brighter arcs (g {approx}< 22.5). This agreement confirms that z{sub s} = 2.0 {+-} 0.1 is the typical redshift for giant arcs with g {approx}< 24 that are produced by cluster-scale strong lenses and that there is no evidence for strong evolution in the redshift distribution of arcs over a wide range of g-band magnitudes (20 {<=} g {<=}24). Establishing that half of all giant arcs are at z {approx}> 2 contributes significantly toward relieving the tension between the number of arcs observed and the number expected in a {Lambda}CDM cosmology, but there is considerable evidence to suggest that a discrepancy persists. Additionally, this work confirms that forthcoming large samples of giant arcs will supply the observational community with many magnified galaxies at z {approx}> 2.

  8. Dust Formation, Evolution, and Obscuration Effects in the Very High-Redshift Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli; Staguhn, Johannes; Arendt, Richard G.; Kovacs, Attila; Su, Ting; Benford, Dominic J.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of dust at redshifts z > or approx. 9, and consequently the dust properties, differs greatly from that in the local universe. In contrast to the local universe, core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are the only source of thermally-condensed dust. Because of the low initial dust-to-gas mass ratio, grain destruction rates are low, so that CCSNe are net producers of interstellar dust. Galaxies with large initial gas mass or high mass infall rate will therefore have a more rapid net rate of dust production comported to galaxies with lower gas mass, even at the same star formation rate. The dust composition is dominated by silicates, which exhibit a strong rise in the UV opacity near the Lyman break. This "silicate-UV break" may be confused with the Lyman break, resulting in a misidentification of a galaxies' photometric redshift. In this paper we demonstrate these effects by analyzing the spectral energy distribution (SED) of MACS1149-JD, a lensed galaxy at z = 9.6. A potential 2mm counterpart of MACS1149-JD has been identified with GISMO. While additional observations are required to corroborate this identification, we use this possible association to illustrate the physical processes and the observational effects of dust in the very high redshift universe. Subject headings: galaxies: high-redshift - galaxies: evolution - galaxies: individual (MACS1149- JD) - Interstellar medium (ISM), nebulae: dust, extinction - physical data and processes: nuclear reactions, nucleosynthesis, abundances.

  9. Improving LSST Photometric Calibration with Gaia Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelrod, Tim; Miller, Calder

    2014-12-01

    We consider the possibility that the Gaia mission can supply data which will improve the photometric calibration of LSST. After outlining the LSST calibration process and the information that will be available from Gaia, we explore two options for using Gaia data. The first is to use Gaia G-band photometry of selected stars, in conjunction with knowledge of the stellar parameters Teff, log g, and AV, and in some cases Z, to create photometric standards in the LSST u, g, r, i, z, and y bands. We consider both main sequence (MS) stars and DA white dwarfs (WD). The accuracies of the resulting standard magnitudes from MS stars are found to be insufficient to satisfy LSST requirements using Gaia data alone, but with the potential to do so when supplemented with ground-based spectroscopy. The accuracies of the WD derived standards are generally adequate, but also require ground-based spectroscopy. The second option is combine the LSST bandpasses into a synthetic Gaia G band, which is a close approximation to the real Gaia G band. This allows synthetic Gaia G photometry to be directly compared with actual Gaia G photometry at a level of accuracy which is useful for both verifying and improving LSST photometric calibration.

  10. A Blind Test of Hapke's Photometric Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfenstein, P.; Shepard, M. K.

    2003-01-01

    Hapke's bidirectional reflectance equation is a versatile analytical tool for predicting (i.e. forward modeling) the photometric behavior of a particulate surface from the observed optical and structural properties of its constituents. Remote sensing applications of Hapke s model, however, generally seek to predict the optical and structural properties of particulate soil constituents from the observed photometric behavior of a planetary surface (i.e. inverse-modeling). Our confidence in the latter approach can be established only if we ruthlessly test and optimize it. Here, we summarize preliminary results from a blind-test of the Hapke model using laboratory measurements obtained with the Bloomsburg University Goniometer (B.U.G.). The first author selected eleven well-characterized powder samples and measured the spectrophotometric behavior of each. A subset of twenty undisclosed examples of the photometric measurement sets were sent to the second author who fit the data using the Hapke model and attempted to interpret their optical and mechanical properties from photometry alone.

  11. Photometric analysis as an aid to 3D reconstruction of indoor scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serfaty, Veronique; Ackah-Miezan, Andrew; Lutton, Evelyne; Gagalowicz, Andre

    1993-06-01

    In an Image Understanding framework, our aim is to reconstruct an actual indoor scene from a (sequence of) color pair(s) of stereoscopic images. The desired (synthesis-oriented) description requires the analysis of both 3D geometric and photometric parameters in order to use the feedback provided by image synthesis to control the image analysis. The environment model is a hierarchy of polyhedral 3D objects (planar lambertian facets). Two main physical phenomena determine the image intensities: surface reflectance properties and light sources. From illumination models established in Computer Graphics, we derive the appropriate irradiance equations. Rather than use a point source located at infinity, we choose instead isotropic point sources with decreasing energy. This allows us to discriminate small irradiance gradients inside regions. For indoor scenes, such photometric models are more realistic, due to the presence of ceiling lights, desk lamps, and so on. Both a photometric reconstruction algorithm and a technique for localizing the 'dominant' light source are presented along with lighting simulations. For comparison purposes, corresponding artificial images are shown. Using this work, we wish to highlight the fruitful cooperation between the Vision and Graphics domains in order to perform a more accurate scene reconstruction, both photometrically and geometrically. The emphasis is on the illumination characterization which influences the scene interpretation.

  12. Establishing traceability of photometric absorbance values for accurate measurements of the haemoglobin concentration in blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, K.; Wolf, H. U.; Heuck, C.; Kammel, M.; Kummrow, A.; Neukammer, J.

    2013-10-01

    Haemoglobin concentration in blood is one of the most frequently measured analytes in laboratory medicine. Reference and routine methods for the determination of the haemoglobin concentration in blood are based on the conversion of haeme, haemoglobin and haemiglobin species into uniform end products. The total haemoglobin concentration in blood is measured using the absorbance of the reaction products. Traceable absorbance measurement values on the highest metrological level are a prerequisite for the calibration and evaluation of procedures with respect to their suitability for routine measurements and their potential as reference measurement procedures. For this purpose, we describe a procedure to establish traceability of spectral absorbance measurements for the haemiglobincyanide (HiCN) method and for the alkaline haematin detergent (AHD) method. The latter is characterized by a higher stability of the reaction product. In addition, the toxic hazard of cyanide, which binds to the iron ion of the haem group and thus inhibits the oxygen transport, is avoided. Traceability is established at different wavelengths by applying total least-squares analysis to derive the conventional quantity values for the absorbance from the measured values. Extrapolation and interpolation are applied to get access to the spectral regions required to characterize the Q-absorption bands of the HiCN and AHD methods, respectively. For absorbance values between 0.3 and 1.8, the contributions of absorbance measurements to the total expanded uncertainties (95% level of confidence) of absorbance measurements range from 1% to 0.4%.

  13. ANALYTICAL GALAXY PROFILES FOR PHOTOMETRIC AND LENSING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Spergel, David N.

    2010-11-15

    This article introduces a family of analytical functions of the form x {sup {nu}} K {sub {nu}}(x), where K {sub {nu}} is the incomplete Bessel function of the third kind. This family of functions can describe the density profile, projected and integrated light profiles, and the gravitational potentials of galaxies. For the proper choice of parameters, these functions accurately approximate Sersic functions over a range of indices and are good fits to galaxy light profiles. With an additional parameter corresponding to a galaxy core radius, these functions can fit galaxy like M87 over a factor of 10{sup 5} in radius. Unlike Sersic profiles, these functions have simple analytical two-dimensional and three-dimensional Fourier transforms, so they are easily convolved with spatially varying point-spread function (PSF) and are well suited for photometric and lensing analysis. We use these functions to estimate the effects of seeing on lensing measurements and show that high S/N measurements, even when the PSF is larger than the galaxy effective radius, should be able to recover accurate estimates of lensing distortions by weighting light in the outer isophotes that are less affected by seeing.

  14. The X-ray luminosity function of active galactic nuclei in the redshift interval z=3-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakakis, A.; Aird, J.; Buchner, J.; Salvato, M.; Menzel, M.-L.; Brandt, W. N.; McGreer, I. D.; Dwelly, T.; Mountrichas, G.; Koki, C.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Hsu, L.-T.; Merloni, A.; Liu, Z.; Nandra, K.; Ross, N. P.

    2015-10-01

    We combine deep X-ray survey data from the Chandra observatory and the wide-area/shallow XMM-XXL field to estimate the active galactic nuclei (AGN) X-ray luminosity function in the redshift range z = 3-5. The sample consists of nearly 340 sources with either photometric (212) or spectroscopic (128) redshift in the above range. The combination of deep and shallow survey fields also provides a luminosity baseline of three orders of magnitude, LX(2-10 keV) ≈ 1043-1046 erg s- 1 at z > 3. We follow a Bayesian approach to determine the binned AGN space density and explore their evolution in a model-independent way. Our methodology properly accounts for Poisson errors in the determination of X-ray fluxes and uncertainties in photometric redshift estimates. We demonstrate that the latter is essential for unbiased measurement of space densities. We find that the AGN X-ray luminosity function evolves strongly between the redshift intervals z = 3-4 and z = 4-5. There is also suggestive evidence that the amplitude of this evolution is luminosity dependent. The space density of AGN with LX(2-10 keV) < 1045 erg s- 1 drops by a factor of 5 between the redshift intervals above, while the evolution of brighter AGN appears to be milder. Comparison of our X-ray luminosity function with that of ultraviolet (UV)/optical selected quasi-stellar objects at similar redshifts shows broad agreement at bright luminosities, LX(2-10 keV) > 1045 erg s- 1. At fainter luminosities X-ray surveys measure higher AGN space densities. The faint-end slope of UV/optical luminosity functions, however, is steeper than for X-ray selected AGN. This implies that the Type I AGN fraction increases with decreasing luminosity at z > 3, opposite to trends established at lower redshift. We also assess the significance of AGN in keeping the hydrogen ionized at high redshift. Our X-ray luminosity function yields ionizing photon rate densities that are insufficient to keep the Universe ionized at redshift z > 4. A

  15. High Energy Continuum of High Redshift Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Discussion with the RXTE team at GSFC showed that a sufficiently accurate background subtraction procedure had now, been derived for sources at the flux level of PKS 2126-158. However this solution does not apply to observations carried out before April 1997, including our observation. The prospect of an improved solution becoming available soon is slim. As a result the RXTE team agreed to re-observe PKS2126-158. The new observation was carried out in April 1999. Quasi-simultaneous optical observations were obtained, as Service observing., at the 4-meter Anglo-Australian Telescope, and ftp-ed from the AAT on 22April. The RXTE data was processed in late June, arriving at SAO in early July. Coincidentally, our collaborative Beppo-SAX observation of PKS2126-158 was made later in 1999, and a GTO Chandra observation (with which we are involved) was made on November 16. Since this gives us a unique monitoring data for a high redshift quasar over a broad pass-band we are now combining all three observations into a single comprehensive study Final publication of the RXTE data will thus take place under another grant.

  16. DISCOVERY OF NINE INTERMEDIATE-REDSHIFT COMPACT QUIESCENT GALAXIES IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Damjanov, Ivana; Chilingarian, Igor; Hwang, Ho Seong; Geller, Margaret J.

    2013-10-01

    We identify nine galaxies with dynamical masses of M {sub dyn} ∼> 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} as photometric point sources, but with redshifts between z = 0.2 and z = 0.6, in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectro-photometric database. All nine galaxies have archival Hubble Space Telescope images. Surface brightness profile fitting confirms that all nine galaxies are extremely compact (0.4 < R {sub e,c} < 6.6 kpc with the median R {sub e,c} = 0.74 kpc) for their velocity dispersion (110 < σ < 340 km s{sup –1}; median σ = 178 km s{sup –1}). From the SDSS spectra, three systems are dominated by very young stars; the other six are older than ∼1 Gyr (two are E+A galaxies). The three young galaxies have disturbed morphologies and the older systems have smooth profiles consistent with a single-Sérsic function. All nine lie below the z ∼ 0 velocity dispersion-half-light radius relation. The most massive system—SDSSJ123657.44+631115.4—lies right within the locus for massive compact z > 1 galaxies and the other eight objects follow the high-redshift dynamical size-mass relation.

  17. The discovery of high-redshift supernovae and their cosmological implications

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, A G

    1997-09-01

    In this thesis the author discusses the methodology for doing photometry: from procedure of extracting supernova counts from images that contain combined supernova plus galaxy flux, to standard star calibration, to additional instrumental corrections that arise due to the multiple telescopes used for observations. He discusses the different sources of photometric error and their correlations, and the construction of the covariance matrix for all the points in the light curve. He then describes the K corrections which account for the redshifting of spectra that are necessary to compare the photometry of the high-redshift data with those from nearby (z < 0.1) supernovae. Finally, he uses the first seven of the supernovae to test the hypothesis that they live in an under-dense bubble where the locally measured Hubble constant differs significantly from the true Hubble constant. He also uses the data to place limits on the value of the Hubble constant. Discussions of several other important aspects of the data analysis are or will be included in other papers. These topics include a description of how the covariance matrix is used to generate light-curve fits, a discussion of non-photometric systematic errors that also effect the measurements, and a discussion of the application of the supernovae to address other scientific/cosmological problems.

  18. MagAl: A new tool to analyse galaxies photometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenell, W.; Benítez, N.; Cid Fernandes, R.

    2014-10-01

    On galaxy spectra, one can find mainly two features: emission lines, which tell us about the ionised gas content, and the continuum plus absorption lines, which tell us about the stellar content. They thus allow us to derive gas-phase abundances, the main radiation sources, chemical enrichment and star formation histories. Braad-band photometry, on the other hand, is much more limited and hinders our ability to recover a galaxy's physical properties to such a degree of detail. However, with the recent development of redshift surveys using the technology of ultra-narrow filters (≍ 100 Å), such as ALHAMBRA, J-PAS and DES, it will be invaluable to be able to retrieve information on physical properties of galaxies from photometric data. Motivated by this data avalanche (which goes up to the petabyte scale), we decided to build our own SED-fitting code: Magnitudes Analyser (MagAl), which has three modules. 1) A template library generation module: generates empirical and theoretical template libraries. 2) Bayesian fitting module: calculates probability distribution functions (PDFs) for given observed and library template data. This is similar to the method to measure photometric redshifts by Benitez (2000). 3) A result-analyser module: streamlines data analysis from the large output PDFs files. A fourth module to manage 3D data is being developed and a few preliminary tests are also shown. To investigate the reliability of results obtained by MagAl, we have created a mock galaxy sample for the ALHAMBRA survey filter system (http://alhambrasurvey.com) and tried to recover their physical properties. We show that for our sample of simulated galaxies we can measure stellar ages, metallicities and extinctions with a precision of less than 0.3 dex. Also, we apply the code to the ALHAMBRA survey catalog and show that we can measure stellar masses with an accuracy of 0.2 dex when comparing to previous results like COSMOS masses measured by Bundy et al. (2006).

  19. Photometric Properties of Galaxies in Poor Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M.; Prabhu, T.

    We study several statistical properties of galaxies in four poor clusters of galaxies using optical photometry. We select these poor clusters as luminous, extended X-ray sources identified with poor galaxy systems in the EMSS catalogue of clusters of galaxies. The clusters are at moderate redshifts (0.08redshift richness 0 clusters and higher than those of richer clusters at similar redshifts. The luminosity functions (LFs) of the individual clusters are not significantly different from each other. Using these, we construct composite LFs in B, V , and R bands (to MV=-18). The faint-end of these LFs are flat, like the V-band LF of other (e.g., MKW/AWM) poor clusters, but steeper than the field LF in the R-band. In terms of the statistical properties of their member galaxies, poor clusters appear to be lower-mass extensions of their rich counterparts.

  20. Photometric quantities for solar irradiance modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preminger, D. G.; Walton, S. R.; Chapman, G. A.

    2002-11-01

    We analyze photometric quantities for the modeling of the total solar irradiance, S. These quantities are derived from full-disk solar images taken at the San Fernando Observatory. We introduce a new quantity, the photometric sum, Σ, which is the sum over an entire image of each pixel's contribution to the irradiance in that image. Σ combines both bright and dark features; and because the sum is over the entire image, it will include low contrast features that cannot be identified directly. Specifically, we examine Σr, Σb, and ΣK, the photometric sums over broadband red, broadband blue, and 1-nm bandpass Ca II K images, respectively. Σr and Σb measure the effects of solar features on the variability in S at two different continuum wavelengths. ΣK measures the variability in spectral lines due to solar features. We find that Σr and Σb have no long-term trend. ΣK, however, varies in phase with the solar cycle. We carry out several multiple linear regressions on the value of S from cycle 22; the best fit uses Σr and ΣK and reproduces the observed composite S with a multiple regression coefficient R = 0.96. We conclude that the long-term change in S over the solar cycle can be accounted for by the variability in the spectral lines as measured by ΣK, assuming no change in the quiet Sun; the contribution of the continuum to the variations in S is only on active region timescales.

  1. Intergalactic shells at large redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, J. M.; Silk, J.

    1981-01-01

    The intergalactic shells produced by galactic explosions at large redshift, whose interiors cool by inverse Compton scattering off the cosmic background radiation, have a characteristic angular size of about 1 arcmin at peak brightness. At z values lower than 2, the shells typically have a radius of 0.5 Mpc, a velocity of about 50 km/sec, a metal abundance of about 0.0001 of cosmic values, and strong radiation in H I(Lyman-alpha), He II 304 A, and the IR fine-structure lines of C II and Si II. The predicted extragalactic background emission from many shells, strongly peaked toward the UV, sets an upper limit to the number of exploding sources at z values of about 10. Shell absorption lines of H I, C II, Si II, and Fe II, which may be seen at more recent epochs in quasar spectra, may probe otherwise invisible explosions in the early universe.

  2. The Definitive Johnson Kron-Cousins UBVRI Photometric System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landolt, Arlo U.; Clem, James L.

    2015-08-01

    The defining characteristics and a brief history of the Johnson Kron-Cousins UBVRI photometric system will be reviewed, and recent observational efforts to extend the UBVRI standard star network, both in magnitude and sky coverage, presented. The current incarnation of this network now comprises more than 50,000 photometric standards distributed around the sky in three declination zones centered on -50 degrees, the celestial equator, and +50 degrees. The majority of these standards encompass the magnitude range of ~9 < V <~ 22, and the color index range of ~ -0.3 < B-V <~ +2. The standard error of the mean in the photometry is less than 0.005 magnitudes in BVRI and 0.015 magn. in U. Relations have been developed to permit conversion between the UBVRI and SDSS ugriz photometric systems, thereby enhancing the versatility of both photometric systems. Several uses of the UBVRI photometric system, and its synergy with other photometric systems, will be noted.

  3. Gravitational redshift in Kerr-Newman geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Anuj Kumar; Sen, A. K.

    2015-11-01

    It is well known fact that gravitational mass can alter the space time structure and gravitational redshift is one of its examples. Static electric or magnetic charge can also alter the space time structure, similar to gravitational mass, giving rise to its effect on redshift. This can also be considered as electro and magneto static redshift. Gravitational redshift has been reported by most of the authors without consideration of static electric and/or magnetic charges present in the rotating body. In the present paper, we considered the three parameters: mass, rotation parameter and charge to discuss their combined effect on redshift, for a charged rotating body by using Kerr-Newman metric. It has been found that, the presence of electrostatic and magnetostatic charge increases the value of so-called gravitational redshift. Calculations have been also done here to determine the effect of electrostatic and magnetostatic charges on the amount of redshift of a light ray emitted at various latitudes from a charged rotating body. The variation of gravitational redshift from equatorial to non- equatorial region has been calculated, for a given set of values of electrostatic and magnetostatic charges.

  4. A photometric study of Saturn's F Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Showalter, Mark R.; Pollack, James B.; Ockert, Maureen E.; Doyle, Laurance R.; Dalton, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    The Saturn F Ring's radially integrated brightness has been measured over a wide range of phase angles from Voyager images; in order to model the resultant phase curve, the ring population has been divided into a dust regime and one of larger bodies, and while single scattering properties of small particles are modeled by semiempirical nonspherical/randomly oriented particles, those of large bodies are based on the photometric behavior of satellites. It is suggested that the dust in the envelope arises from micrometeoroid impacts into the large core particles, and then migrates inward.

  5. Photometric solutions of some contact ASAS binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezer, İ.; Bozkurt, Z.

    2016-04-01

    We present the first light curve solution of 6 contact binary systems which are chosen from the ASAS catalog. The photometric elements and the estimated absolute parameters of all systems are obtained with the light curve analyses. We calculated the values of degree of contact for the systems. The location of the targets on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and the mass-radius plane is compared to the other well-known contact binaries and the evolutionary status of the systems are also discussed.

  6. Photometric functions for photoclinometry and other applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, Alfred S.

    1991-01-01

    The simpler Minnaert and lunar-Lambert functions, which are needed to reduce the number of unknown parameters in photoclinometry, are presently given least-squares fits to the brightness profiles across a disk, or 'limb darkening', described by Hapke's photometric function. The variation of limb darkening with single-scattering albedo and the particle-phase function's asymmetry factor are reduced of eliminated when the Hapke parameters are in the range representative of most planetary surfaces, thereby simplifying the problem of photoclinometry across terrains with variable surface materials.

  7. Atmospheric Emissions Photometric Imaging (AEPI) experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. B.

    1988-01-01

    Space plasma physics will be studied on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) NASA mission during the Atmospheric Emissions Photometric Imaging (AEPI) experiment. The basic scientific objective of the AEPI is the investigation of the upper atmosphere-ionosphere and the space shuttle environment. The experiment areas of the AEPI include: (1) the investigation of ionospheric transport processes by observing Mg(+) ions; (2) studies of optical properties of artificially induced electron beams; (3) measurement of electron cross sections for selected atmospheric species; (4) studies of natural airglow; and (5) studies of natural auroras. On ATLAS 1, optical emissions generated by the shuttle (shuttle ram glow) will also be investigated.

  8. Unsupervised self-organized mapping: a versatile empirical tool for object selection, classification and redshift estimation in large surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geach, James E.

    2012-01-01

    We present an application of unsupervised machine learning - the self-organized map (SOM) - as a tool for visualizing, exploring and mining the catalogues of large astronomical surveys. Self-organization culminates in a low-resolution representation of the 'topology' of a parameter volume, and this can be exploited in various ways pertinent to astronomy. Using data from the Cosmological Evolution Survey (COSMOS), we demonstrate two key astronomical applications of the SOM: (i) object classification and selection, using galaxies with active galactic nuclei as an example, and (ii) photometric redshift estimation, illustrating how SOMs can be used as totally empirical predictive tools. With a training set of ˜3800 galaxies with zspec≤ 1, we achieve photometric redshift accuracies competitive with other (mainly template fitting) techniques that use a similar number of photometric bands [σ(Δz) = 0.03 with a ˜2 per cent outlier rate when using u* band to 8 ?m photometry]. We also test the SOM as a photo-z tool using the PHoto-z Accuracy Testing (PHAT) synthetic catalogue of Hildebrandt et al., which compares several different photo-z codes using a common input/training set. We find that the SOM can deliver accuracies that are competitive with many of the established template fitting and empirical methods. This technique is not without clear limitations, which are discussed, but we suggest it could be a powerful tool in the era of extremely large -'petabyte'- data bases where efficient data mining is a paramount concern.

  9. OPTICAL REDSHIFT AND RICHNESS ESTIMATES FOR GALAXY CLUSTERS SELECTED WITH THE SUNYAEV-Zel'dovich EFFECT FROM 2008 SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    High, F. W.; Stalder, B.; Song, J.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aird, K. A.; Allam, S. S.; Buckley-Geer, E. J.; Armstrong, R.; Barkhouse, W. A.; Benson, B. A.; Bertin, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Brodwin, M.; Challis, P.; De Haan, T.

    2010-11-10

    We present redshifts and optical richness properties of 21 galaxy clusters uniformly selected by their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) signature. These clusters, plus an additional, unconfirmed candidate, were detected in a 178 deg{sup 2} area surveyed by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) in 2008. Using griz imaging from the Blanco Cosmology Survey and from pointed Magellan telescope observations, as well as spectroscopy using Magellan facilities, we confirm the existence of clustered red-sequence galaxies, report red-sequence photometric redshifts, present spectroscopic redshifts for a subsample, and derive R{sub 200} radii and M{sub 200} masses from optical richness. The clusters span redshifts from 0.15 to greater than 1, with a median redshift of 0.74; three clusters are estimated to be at z>1. Redshifts inferred from mean red-sequence colors exhibit 2% rms scatter in {sigma}{sub z}/(1 + z) with respect to the spectroscopic subsample for z < 1. We show that the M{sub 200} cluster masses derived from optical richness correlate with masses derived from SPT data and agree with previously derived scaling relations to within the uncertainties. Optical and infrared imaging is an efficient means of cluster identification and redshift estimation in large SZ surveys, and exploiting the same data for richness measurements, as we have done, will be useful for constraining cluster masses and radii for large samples in cosmological analysis.

  10. Real-time cosmography with redshift derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, C. J. A. P.; Martinelli, M.; Calabrese, E.; Ramos, M. P. L. P.

    2016-08-01

    The drift in the redshift of objects passively following the cosmological expansion has long been recognized as a key model-independent probe of cosmology. Here, we study the cosmological relevance of measurements of time or redshift derivatives of this drift, arguing that the combination of first and second redshift derivatives is a powerful test of the Λ CDM cosmological model. In particular, the latter can be obtained numerically from a set of measurements of the drift at different redshifts. We show that, in the low-redshift limit, a measurement of the derivative of the drift can provide a constraint on the jerk parameter, which is j =1 for flat Λ CDM , while generically j ≠1 for other models. We emphasize that such a measurement is well within the reach of the ELT-HIRES and SKA Phase 2 array surveys.

  11. Calibrated Tully-fisher Relations For Improved Photometric Estimates Of Disk Rotation Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Reinabelle; Mandelbaum, R.; Gunn, J. E.; Pizagno, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present calibrated scaling relations (also referred to as Tully-Fisher relations or TFRs) between rotation velocity and photometric quantities-- absolute magnitude, stellar mass, and synthetic magnitude (a linear combination of absolute magnitude and color)-- of disk galaxies at z 0.1. First, we selected a parent disk sample of 170,000 galaxies from SDSS DR7, with redshifts between 0.02 and 0.10 and r band absolute magnitudes between -18.0 and -22.5. Then, we constructed a child disk sample of 189 galaxies that span the parameter space-- in absolute magnitude, color, and disk size-- covered by the parent sample, and for which we have obtained kinematic data. Long-slit spectroscopy were obtained from the Dual Imaging Spectrograph (DIS) at the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m for 99 galaxies, and from Pizagno et al. (2007) for 95 galaxies (five have repeat observations). We find the best photometric estimator of disk rotation velocity to be a synthetic magnitude with a color correction that is consistent with the Bell et al. (2003) color-based stellar mass ratio. The improved rotation velocity estimates have a wide range of scientific applications, and in particular, in combination with weak lensing measurements, they enable us to constrain the ratio of optical-to-virial velocity in disk galaxies.

  12. Photometric identification of objects from Galaxy Evolution Explorer Survey and Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preethi, K.; Gudennavar, S. B.; Bubbly, S. G.; Murthy, Jayant; Brosch, Noah

    2014-01-01

    We have used Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) observations to extract seven band photometric magnitudes for over 80 000 objects in the vicinity of the North Galactic Pole. Although these had been identified as stars by the SDSS pipeline, we found through fitting with model spectral energy distributions that most were, in fact, of extragalactic origin. Only about 9 per cent of these objects turned out to be main-sequence stars and about 11 per cent were white dwarfs and red giants collectively, while galaxies and quasars contributed to the remaining 80 per cent of the data. We have classified these objects into different spectral types (for the stars) and into different galactic types (for the galaxies). As part of our fitting procedure, we derive the distance and extinction to each object and the photometric redshift towards galaxies and quasars. This method easily allows for the addition of any number of observations to cover a more diverse range of wavelengths, as well as the addition of any number of model templates. The primary objective of this work is to eventually derive a three-dimensional extinction map of the Milky Way Galaxy.

  13. Transmission and division of total optical depth method: A universal calibration method for Sun photometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming; Gong, Wei; Ma, Yingying; Wang, Lunche; Chen, Zhongyong

    2016-03-01

    Sun photometric measurements, which provide accurate and timely information on atmospheric components such as aerosols, clouds, and gases are important to climate research. For regions with heavy and variable aerosol loading, the traditional Langley plot method cannot be applied for Sun photometric instrument calibration, as almost no suitable prolonged periods with stable atmosphere and low-aerosol loading occurs. An improved calibration method, namely, the transmission and division of total optical depth method, is proposed in this study. Atmospheric total optical depth variation information obtained via other methods is transmitted, and period groups with similar atmospheric extinction effects are selected for Langley regression. This method is validated through calibration of a multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer under heavy aerosol-loading conditions. The obtained aerosol optical depth (AOD) compares well with the interpolated AOD from a Cimel Sun-sky radiometer.

  14. STELLAR MASS-TO-LIGHT RATIOS FROM GALAXY SPECTRA: HOW ACCURATE CAN THEY BE?

    SciTech Connect

    Gallazzi, Anna; Bell, Eric F. E-mail: ericbell@umich.edu

    2009-12-01

    Stellar masses play a crucial role in the exploration of galaxy properties and the evolution of the galaxy population. In this paper, we explore the minimum possible uncertainties in stellar mass-to-light ratios (M {sub *}/L) from the assumed star formation history (SFH) and metallicity distribution, with the goals of providing a minimum set of requirements for observational studies. We use a large Monte Carlo library of SFHs to study as a function of galaxy spectral type and signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) the statistical uncertainties of M {sub *}/L values using either absorption-line data or broadband colors. The accuracy of M {sub *}/L estimates can be significantly improved by using metal-sensitive indices in combination with age-sensitive indices, in particular for galaxies with intermediate-age or young stellar populations. While M {sub *}/L accuracy clearly depends on the spectral S/N, there is no significant gain in improving the S/N much above 50 pixel{sup -1} and limiting uncertainties of {approx}0.03 dex are reached. Assuming that dust is accurately corrected or absent and that the redshift is known, color-based M {sub *}/L estimates are only slightly more uncertain than spectroscopic estimates (at comparable spectroscopic and photometric quality), but are more easily affected by systematic biases. This is the case in particular for galaxies with bursty SFHs (high H{delta} {sub A} at fixed D4000 {sub n}), the M {sub *}/L of which cannot be constrained any better than {approx}0.15 dex with any indicators explored here. Finally, we explore the effects of the assumed prior distribution in SFHs and metallicity, finding them to be higher for color-based estimates.

  15. SCREEN photometric property detection system based on area CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fu-cai; Ye, Wei; Xu, Yu; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Yu-wei

    2011-08-01

    The photometric property detection of screen display is crucial for screen display quality test. Traditional photometry detection technologies were based on photoelectric sensors such as silicon photocell, photo-electric multiplier and CdS, which can detect only some isolated points. To break the limitation of randomness, incompleteness and detection accuracy in current technologies, we designed a screen photometric detection system based on area CCD. The system consists of photometric image sensor, photometric image acquisition hardware and photometric image analyzing software. The photometric image sensor, which adopts optical lens, optical filters and area CCD, adapts its spectrum response property to fit the spectrum luminous efficiency curve V (λ) by adjusting the thickness and quantity of appropriate optical filters. photometric image acquisition hardware adopts the DSP as a core processor to drive the area CCD, to sample, acquire , process and save the image from image sensor, to transmit the image to computer. For real-time performance of transmitting, the hardware system adopts the transmission protocol of USB2.0. The uploaded image will be processed by photometric image analyzing software, and then displayed in real time with detection results. The screen photometric detection technology based on area CCD can detect specifications of the whole screen such as luminance, contrast, onoff ratio and uniformity, breaks the limitation of randomness and incompleteness in current detection technology, exactly and fully reflects the integrated display quality of the whole screen. According to the test results, the accuracy of this system has reached the accuracy level one in China.

  16. RED-SEQUENCE GALAXIES AT HIGH REDSHIFT BY THE COMBO-17+4 SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, Marie-Helene; Meisenheimer, Klaus; Wolf, Christian; Tapken, Christian E-mail: meise@mpia.de E-mail: ctapken@aip.de

    2011-01-20

    We investigate the evolution of the galaxy population since redshift 2 with a focus on the color bimodality and mass density of the red sequence. We obtain precise and reliable photometric redshifts up to z = 2 by supplementing the optical survey COMBO-17 with observations in four near-infrared bands on 0.2 deg{sup 2} of the COMBO-17 A901-field. Our results are based on an H-band-selected catalog of 10,692 galaxies complete to H = 21fm7. We measure the rest-frame color (U{sub 280}-V) of each galaxy, which across the redshift range of our interest requires no extrapolation and is robust against moderate redshift errors by staying clear of the 4000 A break. We measure the color-magnitude relation of the red sequence as a function of look-back time from the peak in a color-error-weighted histogram, and thus trace the galaxy bimodality out to z {approx_equal} 1.65. The (U{sub 280}-V) of the red sequence is found to evolve almost linearly with look-back time. At high redshift, we find massive galaxies in both the red and the blue population. Red-sequence galaxies with log M{sub *}/M{sub sun}>11 increase in mass density by a factor of {approx}4 from z {approx} 2 to 1 and remain nearly constant at z < 1. However, some galaxies as massive as log M{sub *}/M{sub sun} = 11.5 are already in place at z {approx} 2.

  17. Constraining the minimum luminosity of high redshift galaxies through gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashian, Natalie; Loeb, Abraham

    2013-12-01

    We simulate the effects of gravitational lensing on the source count of high redshift galaxies as projected to be observed by the Hubble Frontier Fields program and the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) in the near future. Taking the mass density profile of the lensing object to be the singular isothermal sphere (SIS) or the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile, we model a lens residing at a redshift of zL = 0.5 and explore the radial dependence of the resulting magnification bias and its variability with the velocity dispersion of the lens, the photometric sensitivity of the instrument, the redshift of the background source population, and the intrinsic maximum absolute magnitude (Mmax) of the sources. We find that gravitational lensing enhances the number of galaxies with redshifts zgtrsim 13 detected in the angular region θE/2 <= θ <= 2θE (where θE is the Einstein angle) by a factor of ~ 3 and 1.5 in the HUDF (df/dν0 ~ 9 nJy) and medium-deep JWST surveys (df/dν0 ~ 6 nJy). Furthermore, we find that even in cases where a negative magnification bias reduces the observed number count of background sources, the lensing effect improves the sensitivity of the count to the intrinsic faint-magnitude cut-off of the Schechter luminosity function. In a field centered on a strong lensing cluster, observations of zgtrsim 6 and zgtrsim 13 galaxies with JWST can be used to infer this cut-off magnitude for values as faint as Mmax ~ -14.4 and -16.1 mag (Lmin ≈ 2.5 × 1026 and 1.2 × 1027 erg s-1 Hz-1) respectively, within the range bracketed by existing theoretical models. Gravitational lensing may therefore offer an effective way of constraining the low-luminosity cut-off of high-redshift galaxies.

  18. Photometric stellar catalogue for TV meteor astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, V. A.; Bagrov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Photometry for ordinary astrophysics was carefully developed for its own purposes. As stars radiation is very similar to the blackbody radiation, astronomers measure star illumination in wide or narrow calibrated spectral bands. This is enough for star photometry with precise accuracy and for measuring their light flux in these bands in energetic units. Meteors are moving objects and do not allow collection of more photons then they emit. So meteor observers use the whole spectral band that can be covered by sensitivity of their light sensors. This is why measurements of stellar magnitudes of background stars by these sensors are not the same as catalogued star brightness in standard photometric spectral bands. Here we present a special photometric catalogue of 93 bright non-variable stars of the northern hemisphere, that can be used by meteor observers of standard background whose brightness are calculated in energetic units as well as in non-systematic stellar magnitudes in spectral wavelength of the WATEC 902 sensitivity.

  19. Photometric observations of the brightest Jupiter Greeks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatelain, Joseph P.; Henry, Todd J.; Pewett, Tiffany D.; French, Linda M.; Stephens, Robert D.

    2013-02-01

    We propose to finish BVRI photometric observations of the 113 brightest Jupiter Trojans from both the L4 (Greek) and the L5 (Trojan) Lagrange points using the CTIO 0.9m, in conjunction with data gathered at Lowell Observatory. With these data we will investigate any color trends and/or differences between the largest members of the two camps as well as reveal any unusual outliers worthy of extensive followup. A comprehensive database of uniform photometry does not exist for this effectively complete sample, so robust comparisons are virtually impossible at this time. These data will also enable comparisons between the Greek and Trojan swarms and other Solar System populations to discover the possible origins of the two camps, which remain surprisingly obscure. In non-photometric conditions, we will measure light curves that yield information about albedo and color changes, shapes, and rotation periods. These data will also lead to important phase curves that can be used to determine surface features and composition. Here we propose for the last southern run for this ongoing photometry program. emphThe proposed observations will comprise a significant portion of the PI's PhD thesis.

  20. Photometric and television supervision of polar lights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, G. V.; Velichko, V. A.

    2002-01-01

    The basic stages of a life and V.P.Samsonov's scientific - organizational activity, his(its) role in becoming and development of a department aeronomy in IKFIA the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science are briefly stated. The basic scientific results received by V.P.Samsonov and his (its) pupils during researches of structure, dynamics (changes), intensity of spatial parameters homogeneous - quiet and discrete - active forms of polar lights photometric and television are considered by methods. Data on development of ideas of V.P.Samsonov on studying substorms are resulted. The analysis of experimental data of photometric and geomagnetic measurements Yakut meridional chains, and also magnetogramms stations of a world (global) network and the given measurements from satellites is lead (carried out) with the purpose of revealing new properties brightness auroral glow on a growth phase of a substorm. For experts in the field of the top atmosphere and planetary geophysics, and also for post-graduate students and students of physical faculties.

  1. Ceres photometric properties from VIR on Dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarniello, M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ammannito, E.; Capaccioni, F.; Capria, M. T.; Carrozzo, F. G.; Fonte, S.; Frigeri, A.; Giardino, M.; Longobardo, A.; Magni, G.; Palomba, E.; Raponi, A.; Tosi, F.; Zambon, F.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.; Li, J.-Y.

    2015-10-01

    Dawn spacecraft [1] entered orbit around Ceres on 6 March 2015. During the approach phase to this dwarf planet and later, through the Survey, High Altitude Mapping (HAMO) and Low Altitude Mapping Orbits (LAMO), the Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIR) will perform detailed observations of the surface of the body. VIR [2] is an imaging spectrometer onboard the Dawn mission and it is composed of two spectral channels: the visible (VIS) covering the 0.25 μm - 1.0 μm wavelength range and the infrared (IR) for the 0.95 μm - 5.0 μm interval. During the various phases of the mission, the surface of Ceres will be observed under different observation geometries. The measured signal is then affected by photometric issues that need to be minimized in order to exploit the intrinsic spectral variability of the surface, thus allowing the direct comparison between acquisitions taken under different observation conditions. In order to accomplish this task we perform a photometric reduction of the dataset by means of a simplified Hapke model, following the approach of [3].

  2. INTRINSIC ALIGNMENT OF CLUSTER GALAXIES: THE REDSHIFT EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Hao Jiangang; Kubo, Jeffrey M.; Feldmann, Robert; Annis, James; Johnston, David E.; Lin Huan; McKay, Timothy A.

    2011-10-10

    We present measurements of two types of cluster galaxy alignments based on a volume limited and highly pure ({>=}90%) sample of clusters from the GMBCG catalog derived from Data Release 7 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS DR7). We detect a clear brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) alignment (the alignment of major axis of the BCG toward the distribution of cluster satellite galaxies). We find that the BCG alignment signal becomes stronger as the redshift and BCG absolute magnitude decrease and becomes weaker as BCG stellar mass decreases. No dependence of the BCG alignment on cluster richness is found. We can detect a statistically significant ({>=}3{sigma}) satellite alignment (the alignment of the major axes of the cluster satellite galaxies toward the BCG) only when we use the isophotal fit position angles (P.A.s), and the satellite alignment depends on the apparent magnitudes rather than the absolute magnitudes of the BCGs. This suggests that the detected satellite alignment based on isophotal P.A.s from the SDSS pipeline is possibly due to the contamination from the diffuse light of nearby BCGs. We caution that this should not be simply interpreted as non-existence of the satellite alignment, but rather that we cannot detect them with our current photometric SDSS data. We perform our measurements on both SDSS r-band and i-band data, but do not observe a passband dependence of the alignments.

  3. The fate of high-redshift massive compact galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Rosa, Ignacio G.; La Barbera, Francesco; Ferreras, Ignacio; Sánchez Almeida, Jorge; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Martínez-Valpuesta, Inma; Stringer, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Massive high-redshift quiescent compact galaxies (nicknamed red nuggets) have been traditionally connected to present-day elliptical galaxies, often overlooking the relationships that they may have with other galaxy types. We use large bulge-disc decomposition catalogues based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to check the hypothesis that red nuggets have survived as compact cores embedded inside the haloes or discs of present-day massive galaxies. In this study, we designate a compact core as the bulge component that satisfies a prescribed compactness criterion. Photometric and dynamic mass-size and mass-density relations are used to show that, in the inner regions of galaxies at z ˜ 0.1, there are abundant compact cores matching the peculiar properties of the red nuggets, an abundance comparable to that of red nuggets at z ˜ 1.5. Furthermore, the morphology distribution of the present-day galaxies hosting compact cores is used to demonstrate that, in addition to the standard channel connecting red nuggets with elliptical galaxies, a comparable fraction of red nuggets might have ended up embedded in discs. This result generalizes the inside-out formation scenario; present-day massive galaxies can begin as dense spheroidal cores (red nuggets), around which either a spheroidal halo or a disc is formed later.

  4. Effective theory of dark energy at redshift survey scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleyzes, Jérôme; Langlois, David; Mancarella, Michele; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2016-02-01

    We explore the phenomenological consequences of general late-time modifications of gravity in the quasi-static approximation, in the case where cold dark matter is non-minimally coupled to the gravitational sector. Assuming spectroscopic and photometric surveys with configuration parameters similar to those of the Euclid mission, we derive constraints on our effective description from three observables: the galaxy power spectrum in redshift space, tomographic weak-lensing shear power spectrum and the correlation spectrum between the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect and the galaxy distribution. In particular, with ΛCDM as fiducial model and a specific choice for the time dependence of our effective functions, we perform a Fisher matrix analysis and find that the unmarginalized 68% CL errors on the parameters describing the modifications of gravity are of order σ~10-2-10-3. We also consider two other fiducial models. A nonminimal coupling of CDM enhances the effects of modified gravity and reduces the above statistical errors accordingly. In all cases, we find that the parameters are highly degenerate, which prevents the inversion of the Fisher matrices. Some of these degeneracies can be broken by combining all three observational probes.

  5. Mass calibration of galaxy clusters at redshift 0.1-1.0 using weak lensing in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 co-add

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesner, Matthew P.; Lin, Huan; Soares-Santos, Marcelle

    2015-09-01

    We present galaxy cluster mass-richness relations found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 co-add using clusters found using a Voronoi tessellation cluster finder. These relations were found using stacked weak lensing shear observed in a large sample of galaxy clusters. These mass-richness relations are presented for four redshift bins, 0.1 < z ≤ 0.4, 0.4 < z ≤ 0.7, 0.7 < z ≤ 1.0 and 0.1 < z ≤ 1.0. We describe the sample of galaxy clusters and explain how these clusters were found using a Voronoi tessellation cluster finder. We fit a Navarro-Frenk-White profile to the stacked weak lensing shear signal in redshift and richness bins in order to measure virial mass (M200). We describe several effects that can bias weak lensing measurements, including photometric redshift bias, the effect of the central BCG, halo miscentering, photometric redshift uncertainty and foreground galaxy contamination. We present mass-richness relations using richness measure NVT with each of these effects considered separately as well as considered altogether. We also examine redshift evolution of the mass-richness relation. As a result, we present measurements of the mass coefficient (M200|20) and the power-law slope (α) for power-law fits to the mass and richness values in each of the redshift bins. We find values of the mass coefficient of 8.49 ± 0.526, 14.1 ± 1.78, 30.2 ± 8.74 and 9.23 ± 0.525 × 1013 h-1 M⊙ for each of the four redshift bins, respectively. We find values of the power-law slope of 0.905 ± 0.0585, 0.948 ± 0.100, 1.33 ± 0.260 and 0.883 ± 0.0500, respectively.

  6. IONIZED NITROGEN AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Decarli, R.; Walter, F.; Neri, R.; Cox, P.; Bertoldi, F.; Carilli, C.; Kneib, J. P.; Lestrade, J. F.; Maiolino, R.; Omont, A.; Richard, J.; Riechers, D.; Thanjavur, K.; Weiss, A.

    2012-06-10

    We present secure [N II]{sub 205{mu}m} detections in two millimeter-bright, strongly lensed objects at high redshift, APM 08279+5255 (z = 3.911) and MM 18423+5938 (z = 3.930), using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Due to its ionization energy [N II]{sub 205{mu}m} is a good tracer of the ionized gas phase in the interstellar medium. The measured fluxes are S([N II]{sub 205{mu}m}) = (4.8 {+-} 0.8) Jy km s{sup -1} and (7.4 {+-} 0.5) Jy km s{sup -1}, respectively, yielding line luminosities of L([N II]{sub 205{mu}m}) = (1.8 {+-} 0.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} {mu}{sup -1} L{sub Sun} for APM 08279+5255 and L([N II]{sub 205{mu}m}) = (2.8 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} {mu}{sup -1} L{sub Sun} for MM 18423+5938. Our high-resolution map of the [N II]{sub 205{mu}m} and 1 mm continuum emission in MM 18423+5938 clearly resolves an Einstein ring in this source and reveals a velocity gradient in the dynamics of the ionized gas. A comparison of these maps with high-resolution EVLA CO observations enables us to perform the first spatially resolved study of the dust continuum-to-molecular gas surface brightness ({Sigma}{sub FIR}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sup N}{sub CO}, which can be interpreted as the star formation law) in a high-redshift object. We find a steep relation (N = 1.4 {+-} 0.2), consistent with a starbursting environment. We measure a [N II]{sub 205{mu}m}/FIR luminosity ratio in APM 08279+5255 and MM 18423+5938 of 9.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} and 5.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}, respectively. This is in agreement with the decrease of the [N II]{sub 205{mu}m}/FIR ratio at high FIR luminosities observed in local galaxies.

  7. The VIMOS Ultra-Deep Survey: ~10 000 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts to study galaxy assembly at early epochs 2 < z ≃ 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Fèvre, O.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Cassata, P.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Pentericci, L.; Thomas, R.; Vanzella, E.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Amorin, R.; Bardelli, S.; Capak, P.; Cassarà, L.; Castellano, M.; Cimatti, A.; Cuby, J. G.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; Durkalec, A.; Fontana, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Grazian, A.; Hathi, N. P.; Ilbert, O.; Lemaux, B. C.; Moreau, C.; Paltani, S.; Ribeiro, B.; Salvato, M.; Schaerer, D.; Scodeggio, M.; Sommariva, V.; Talia, M.; Taniguchi, Y.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Wang, P. W.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Fotopoulou, S.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Mellier, Y.; Scoville, N.

    2015-04-01

    We present the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey (VUDS), a spectroscopic redshift survey of ~10 000 very faint galaxies to study the main phase of galaxy assembly in 2 < z ≃ 6. The survey covers 1 deg2 in three separate fields: COSMOS, ECDFS, and VVDS-02h, with the selection of targets based on an inclusive combination of photometric redshifts and colour properties. Spectra covering 3650 < λ < 9350 Å are obtained with VIMOS on the ESO-VLT with integration times of 14h. Here we present the survey strategy, target selection, data processing, and the redshift measurement process with an emphasis on the specific methods used to adapt to this high-redshift range. We discuss the spectra quality and redshift reliability and derive a success rate in redshift measurement of 91%, or 74% by limiting the dataset to the most reliable measurements, down to a limiting magnitude iAB = 25. Measurements are performed all the way down to iAB = 27. The mean redshift of the main sample is z ~ 3 and extends over a broad redshift range mainly in 2 < z < 6. At 3 < z < 5, the galaxies cover a wide range of luminosities -23 < MNUV < -20.5, stellar mass 109M⊙ < M∗ < 1011M⊙, and star formation rates 1M⊙/yr < SFR < 103M⊙/yr. We discuss the spectral properties of galaxies using individual as well asstacked spectra. The comparison between spectroscopic and photometric redshifts as well as colour selection demonstrate the effectiveness of our selection scheme. From about ~ 90% of the data analysed so far, we expect to assemble >6000 galaxies with reliable spectroscopic redshifts in 2 < z < 6 when complete. This makes the VUDS the largest survey at these redshifts and offers the opportunity for unprecedented studies of the star-forming galaxy population and its distribution in large-scale structures during the main phase of galaxy assembly. Based on data obtained with the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal, Chile, under Large Program 185.A-0791.Staged releases of the

  8. NGC 1428: from the Discordant Redshift Caused by a Star, to the Determination of the Morphological Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merluzzi, P.; Busarello, G.; Terranegra, L.; Colless, M. M.; Graham, A. W.

    We summarise the main results of our study of NGC 1428, an early-type galaxy belonging to the Fornax cluster. By means of long-slit spectroscopic data we study it's kinematics and also solve the problems connected to a star superimposed on its nucleus - which have led to wrong measurements of its redshift in the past. The present analysis allows us to determine the morphological type of NGC 1428 as well as an accurate value of its redshift.

  9. Assessment of Systematic Chromatic Errors that Impact Sub-1% Photometric Precision in Large-Area Sky Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T.S.; et al.

    2016-01-01

    Meeting the science goals for many current and future ground-based optical large-area sky surveys requires that the calibrated broadband photometry is stable in time and uniform over the sky to 1% precision or better. Past surveys have achieved photometric precision of 1-2% by calibrating the survey's stellar photometry with repeated measurements of a large number of stars observed in multiple epochs. The calibration techniques employed by these surveys only consider the relative frame-by-frame photometric zeropoint offset and the focal plane position-dependent illumination corrections, which are independent of the source color. However, variations in the wavelength dependence of the atmospheric transmission and the instrumental throughput induce source color-dependent systematic errors. These systematic errors must also be considered to achieve the most precise photometric measurements. In this paper, we examine such systematic chromatic errors using photometry from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) as an example. We define a natural magnitude system for DES and calculate the systematic errors on stellar magnitudes, when the atmospheric transmission and instrumental throughput deviate from the natural system. We conclude that the systematic chromatic errors caused by the change of airmass in each exposure, the change of the precipitable water vapor and aerosol in the atmosphere over time, and the non-uniformity of instrumental throughput over the focal plane, can be up to 2% in some bandpasses. We compare the calculated systematic chromatic errors with the observed DES data. For the test sample data, we correct these errors using measurements of the atmospheric transmission and instrumental throughput. The residual after correction is less than 0.3%. We also find that the errors for non-stellar objects are redshift-dependent and can be larger than those for stars at certain redshifts.

  10. Assessment of Systematic Chromatic Errors that Impact Sub-1% Photometric Precision in Large-area Sky Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T. S.; DePoy, D. L.; Marshall, J. L.; Tucker, D.; Kessler, R.; Annis, J.; Bernstein, G. M.; Boada, S.; Burke, D. L.; Finley, D. A.; James, D. J.; Kent, S.; Lin, H.; Marriner, J.; Mondrik, N.; Nagasawa, D.; Rykoff, E. S.; Scolnic, D.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Allam, S.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D’Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Maia, M. A. G.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Vikram, V.; The DES Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Meeting the science goals for many current and future ground-based optical large-area sky surveys requires that the calibrated broadband photometry is both stable in time and uniform over the sky to 1% precision or better. Past and current surveys have achieved photometric precision of 1%–2% by calibrating the survey’s stellar photometry with repeated measurements of a large number of stars observed in multiple epochs. The calibration techniques employed by these surveys only consider the relative frame-by-frame photometric zeropoint offset and the focal plane position-dependent illumination corrections, which are independent of the source color. However, variations in the wavelength dependence of the atmospheric transmission and the instrumental throughput induce source color-dependent systematic errors. These systematic errors must also be considered to achieve the most precise photometric measurements. In this paper, we examine such systematic chromatic errors (SCEs) using photometry from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) as an example. We first define a natural magnitude system for DES and calculate the systematic errors on stellar magnitudes when the atmospheric transmission and instrumental throughput deviate from the natural system. We conclude that the SCEs caused by the change of airmass in each exposure, the change of the precipitable water vapor and aerosol in the atmosphere over time, and the non-uniformity of instrumental throughput over the focal plane can be up to 2% in some bandpasses. We then compare the calculated SCEs with the observed DES data. For the test sample data, we correct these errors using measurements of the atmospheric transmission and instrumental throughput from auxiliary calibration systems. The residual after correction is less than 0.3%. Moreover, we calculate such SCEs for Type Ia supernovae and elliptical galaxies and find that the chromatic errors for non-stellar objects are redshift-dependent and can be larger than those for

  11. An ALMA survey of submillimeter galaxies in the extended Chandra deep field south: The redshift distribution and evolution of submillimeter galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J. M.; Swinbank, A. M.; Smail, Ian; Alexander, D. M.; Danielson, A. L. R.; Thomson, A. P.; Brandt, W. N.; Bertoldi, F.; Karim, A.; De Breuck, C.; Chapman, S. C.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Da Cunha, E.; Hodge, J. A.; Schinnerer, E.; Dannerbauer, H.; Greve, T. R.; Ivison, R. J.; Knudsen, K. K.; Poggianti, B. M.; and others

    2014-06-20

    We present the first photometric redshift distribution for a large sample of 870 μm submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) with robust identifications based on observations with ALMA. In our analysis we consider 96 SMGs in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South, 77 of which have 4-19 band photometry. We model the SEDs for these 77 SMGs, deriving a median photometric redshift of z {sub phot} = 2.3 ± 0.1. The remaining 19 SMGs have insufficient photometry to derive photometric redshifts, but a stacking analysis of Herschel observations confirms they are not spurious. Assuming that these SMGs have an absolute H-band magnitude distribution comparable to that of a complete sample of z ∼ 1-2 SMGs, we demonstrate that they lie at slightly higher redshifts, raising the median redshift for SMGs to z {sub phot} = 2.5 ± 0.2. Critically we show that the proportion of galaxies undergoing an SMG-like phase at z ≥ 3 is at most 35% ± 5% of the total population. We derive a median stellar mass of M {sub *} = (8 ± 1) × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, although there are systematic uncertainties of up to 5 × for individual sources. Assuming that the star formation activity in SMGs has a timescale of ∼100 Myr, we show that their descendants at z ∼ 0 would have a space density and M{sub H} distribution that are in good agreement with those of local ellipticals. In addition, the inferred mass-weighted ages of the local ellipticals broadly agree with the look-back times of the SMG events. Taken together, these results are consistent with a simple model that identifies SMGs as events that form most of the stars seen in the majority of luminous elliptical galaxies at the present day.

  12. Asteroid models from the Lowell photometric database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ďurech, J.; Hanuš, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Vančo, R.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Information about shapes and spin states of individual asteroids is important for the study of the whole asteroid population. For asteroids from the main belt, most of the shape models available now have been reconstructed from disk-integrated photometry by the lightcurve inversion method. Aims: We want to significantly enlarge the current sample (~350) of available asteroid models. Methods: We use the lightcurve inversion method to derive new shape models and spin states of asteroids from the sparse-in-time photometry compiled in the Lowell Photometric Database. To speed up the time-consuming process of scanning the period parameter space through the use of convex shape models, we use the distributed computing project Asteroids@home, running on the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) platform. This way, the period-search interval is divided into hundreds of smaller intervals. These intervals are scanned separately by different volunteers and then joined together. We also use an alternative, faster, approach when searching the best-fit period by using a model of triaxial ellipsoid. By this, we can independently confirm periods found with convex models and also find rotation periods for some of those asteroids for which the convex-model approach gives too many solutions. Results: From the analysis of Lowell photometric data of the first 100 000 numbered asteroids, we derived 328 new models. This almost doubles the number of available models. We tested the reliability of our results by comparing models that were derived from purely Lowell data with those based on dense lightcurves, and we found that the rate of false-positive solutions is very low. We also present updated plots of the distribution of spin obliquities and pole ecliptic longitudes that confirm previous findings about a non-uniform distribution of spin axes. However, the models reconstructed from noisy sparse data are heavily biased towards more elongated bodies with high

  13. DUST FORMATION, EVOLUTION, AND OBSCURATION EFFECTS IN THE VERY HIGH-REDSHIFT UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Dwek, Eli; Benford, Dominic J.; Staguhn, Johannes; Su, Ting; Arendt, Richard G.; Kovacks, Attila

    2014-06-20

    The evolution of dust at redshifts z ≳ 9, and consequently the dust properties, differs greatly from that in the local universe. In contrast to the local universe, core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are the only source of thermally condensed dust. Because of the low initial dust-to-gas mass ratio, grain destruction rates are low, so that CCSNe are net producers of interstellar dust. Galaxies with large initial gas mass or high mass infall rate will therefore have a more rapid net rate of dust production compared to galaxies with lower gas mass, even at the same star formation rate. The dust composition is dominated by silicates, which exhibit a strong rise in the UV opacity near the Lyman break. This ''silicate-UV break'' may be confused with the Lyman break, resulting in a misidentification of a galaxy's photometric redshift. In this Letter we demonstrate these effects by analyzing the spectral energy distribution of MACS1149-JD, a lensed galaxy at z = 9.6. A potential 2 mm counterpart of MACS1149-JD has been identified with GISMO. While additional observations are required to corroborate this identification, we use this possible association to illustrate the physical processes and the observational effects of dust in the very high-redshift universe.

  14. Dust Formation, Evolution, and Obscuration Effects in the Very High-Redshift Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli; Staguhn, Johannes; Arendt, Richard G.; Kovacks, Attila; Su, Ting; Benford, Dominic J.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of dust at redshifts z > or approx. 9, and consequently the dust properties, differs greatly from that in the local universe. In contrast to the local universe, core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are the only source of thermally-condensed dust. Because of the low initial dust-togas mass ratio, grain destruction rates are low, so that CCSNe are net producers of interstellar dust. Galaxies with large initial gas mass or high mass infall rate will therefore have a more rapid net rate of dust production comported to galaxies with lower gas mass, even at the same star formation rate. The dust composition is dominated by silicates, which exhibit a strong rise in the UV opacity near the Lyman break. This "silicate-UV break" may be confused with the Lyman break, resulting in a misidentification of a galaxies' photometric redshift. In this paper we demonstrate these effects by analyzing the spectral energy distribution (SED) of MACS1149-JD, a lensed galaxy at z = 9.6. A potential 2mm counterpart of MACS1149-JD has been identified with GISMO. While additional observations are required to corroborate this identification, we use this possible association to illustrate the physical processes and the observational effects of dust in the very high redshift universe.

  15. Planck intermediate results. XXVI. Optical identification and redshifts of Planck clusters with the RTT150 telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Barrena, R.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Clements, D. L.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Fromenteau, S.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Gilfanov, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2015-10-01

    We present the results of approximately three years of observations of Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) sources with the Russian-Turkish 1.5 m telescope (RTT150), as a part of the optical follow-up programme undertaken by the Planck collaboration. During this time period approximately 20% of all dark and grey clear time available at the telescope was devoted to observations of Planck objects. Some observations of distant clusters were also done at the 6 m Bolshoi Telescope Alt-azimutalnyi (BTA) of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences. In total, deep, direct images of more than one hundred fields were obtained in multiple filters. We identified 47 previously unknown galaxy clusters, 41 of which are included in the Planck catalogue of SZ sources. The redshifts of 65 Planck clusters were measured spectroscopically and 14 more were measured photometrically. We discuss the details of cluster optical identifications and redshift measurements. We also present new spectroscopic redshifts for 39 Planck clusters that were not included in the Planck SZ source catalogue and are published here for the first time.

  16. THE DISCOVERY OF THE MOST DISTANT KNOWN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA AT REDSHIFT 1.914

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, David O.; Rodney, Steven A.; Riess, Adam G.; Mobasher, Bahram; Dahlen, Tomas; Casertano, Stefano; Koekemoer, Anton; McCully, Curtis; Keeton, Charles R.; Patel, Brandon; Frederiksen, Teddy F.; Hjorth, Jens; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Wiklind, Tommy G.; Challis, Peter; Hayden, Brian; Garnavich, Peter; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; and others

    2013-05-10

    We present the discovery of a Type Ia supernova (SN) at redshift z = 1.914 from the CANDELS multi-cycle treasury program on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). This SN was discovered in the infrared using the Wide-Field Camera 3, and it is the highest-redshift Type Ia SN yet observed. We classify this object as a SN Ia by comparing its light curve and spectrum with those of a large sample of Type Ia and core-collapse SNe. Its apparent magnitude is consistent with that expected from the {Lambda}CDM concordance cosmology. We discuss the use of spectral evidence for classification of z > 1.5 SNe Ia using HST grism simulations, finding that spectral data alone can frequently rule out SNe II, but distinguishing between SNe Ia and SNe Ib/c can require prohibitively long exposures. In such cases, a quantitative analysis of the light curve may be necessary for classification. Our photometric and spectroscopic classification methods can aid the determination of SN rates and cosmological parameters from the full high-redshift CANDELS SN sample.

  17. High-orbit satellite magnitude estimation using photometric measurement method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shixue

    2015-12-01

    The means to get the accurate high-orbit satellite magnitude can be significant in space target surveillance. This paper proposes a satellite photometric measurement method based on image processing. We calculate the satellite magnitude by comparing the output value of camera's CCD between the known fixed star and the satellite. We calculate the luminance value of a certain object on the acquired image using a background-removing method. According to the observation parameters such as azimuth, elevation, height and the situation of the telescope, we can draw the star map on the image, so we can get the real magnitude of a certain fixed star in the image. We derive a new method to calculate the magnitude value of a certain satellite according to the magnitude of the fixed star in the image. To guarantee the algorithm's stability, we evaluate the measurement precision of the method, and analysis the restrict condition in actual application. We have made plenty of experiment of our system using large telescope in satellite surveillance, and testify the correctness of the algorithm. The experimental result shows that the precision of the proposed algorithm in satellite magnitude measurement is 0.24mv, and this method can be generalized to other relative fields.

  18. Photometric observations of the Baptistina asteroid family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M.-J.

    2014-04-01

    The Baptistina family is one of the typical young asteroid families with an age estimated to be about 140-320 Myrs old [1]; considered to have not enough time to experience a significant collisional and dynamical evolution since it was formed. Therefore, it may offer a unique insight into spin rate distribution of relatively fresh fragments and physical mechanism of a family break-up event. We carried out time series photometric observations for the family members to obtain their physical properties, including sizes, shapes, rotational periods, spin axes, colors, and H-G parameters based on near round- theclock observations, using several 0.5-2 meter class telescopes. This study is expected to find some important clues on the collisional history and transport mechanism of the members from the resonance region in the Main-belt to the near Earth space.

  19. Retroreflectance measurements of photometric standards and coatings.

    PubMed

    Egan, W G; Hilgeman, T

    1976-07-01

    Using a technique that we have developed, the opposition effect (brightening in the retroreflection direction) has been measured for MgCO(3), BaSO(4) paint, and sulfur in the visual region with incandescent illumination and found to be 1.3,1.5, and 1.3, respectively, independent of wavelength. Nextel red, blue, white, and black paints are generally similar. However, in comparison to incoherent illumination, 0.6328-microM laser illumination shows a reduction in diffuse reflectance for angles less than 40 degrees from the incident direction. In addition, the coherent opposition effect may be very large for dark paints. The opposition effect in photometric standards can lead to calibration errors at near opposition and spurious responses in integrating spheres coated with such materials. PMID:20165275

  20. High-speed photometric imaging of elves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santeler, C.; Moore, R. C.

    2011-12-01

    A new high-speed photometric array is used to analyze the properties of optical emissions associated with elves, including the expansion rate and luminosity as a function of time. The new instrument samples 8 channels at 2.5 MHz with 14-bit resolution and streams data to a 12 TB RAID array, enabling continuous operation during thunderstorm activity. In order to leverage the full bandwidth of the system, a particular observational geometry is required. The array is aimed vertically at the overlying ionosphere in order to detect elves produced by lightning flashes ~50 to 100 km distant. We address the issue of cloud coverage by choosing among several favorable observation locations on the night of the storm. This paper provides a summary of observations performed in Florida during the winter and the summer of 2011.

  1. Systematic Effects in Large-Scale Angular Power Spectra of Photometric Quasars and Implications for Constraining Primordial Non-Gaussianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullen, Anthony R.; Hirata, Christopher M.

    2013-06-01

    Primordial non-Gaussianity of local type is predicted to lead to enhanced halo clustering on very large scales. Photometric quasars, which can be seen from cosmological redshifts z > 2 even in wide-shallow optical surveys, are promising tracers for constraining non-Gaussianity using this effect. However, large-scale systematics can also mimic this signature of non-Gaussianity. In order to assess the contribution of systematic effects, we cross-correlate overdensity maps of photometric quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 6 (DR6) in different redshift ranges. We find that the maps are significantly correlated on large scales, even though we expect the angular distributions of quasars at different redshifts to be uncorrelated. This implies that the quasar maps are contaminated with systematic errors. We investigate the use of external templates that provide information on the spatial dependence of potential systematic errors to reduce the level of spurious clustering in the quasar data. We find that templates associated with stellar density, the stellar color locus, airmass, and seeing are major contaminants of the quasar maps, with seeing having the largest effect. Using template projection, we are able to decrease the significance of the cross-correlation measurement on the largest scales from 9.2σ to 5.4σ. Although this is an improvement, the remaining cross-correlation suggests the contamination in this quasar sample is too great to allow a competitive constraint on fNL by correlations internal to this sample. The SDSS quasar catalog exhibits spurious number density fluctuations of approximately 2% rms, and we need a contamination level less than 1% (0.6%) in order to measure values of fNL less than 100 (10). Properly dealing with these systematics will be paramount for future large scale structure surveys that seek to constrain non-Gaussianity.

  2. Photometric Properties of Poor Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M.; Prabhu, T. P.

    2002-12-01

    We study several statistical properties of galaxies in four poor clusters of galaxies using multi-color optical photometry obtained at the Vainu Bappu Telescope, India. The clusters, selected from the EMSS Catalog, are at moderate redshifts (0.08 < z < 0.25), of equivalent Abell richness R=0, and appear to be dynamically young. The early-type galaxy populations are clearly evolved, as traced by the tightness of the color-magnitude relations and the accordance of the latter with those of the Virgo cluster. The blue galaxy fractions are similar to those of R=0 clusters and higher than those of richer clusters at similar redshifts. The composite luminosity functions (LFs) in B, V, and R bands are flat at the faint end, similar to the V-band LF derived by Yamagata & Maehara for other (MKW/AWM) poor clusters but steeper than the R-band field LF derived by Lin et al. In terms of the statistical properties of their member galaxies, poor clusters appear to be lower-mass extensions of their rich counterparts. The brightest galaxies of three of these poor clusters appear to be luminous ellipticals with no incontrovertible signatures of a halo. It is likely that they were formed from multiple mergers early in the history of the clusters.

  3. Photometric Properties of Enceladus' South Polar Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annex, Andrew; Verbiscer, A. J.; Helfenstein, P.

    2012-10-01

    Cassini images reveal in exquisite detail the complex and varied terrains within the geologically active south pole of Enceladus. The region is dominated by four parallel rifts or sulci, informally known as tiger stripes, from which plumes comprised primarily of water vapor erupt [1,2]. The rich data set of Cassini images acquired at high spatial resolution (< 0.5 km/pixel) and a variety of viewing and illumination geometries enables the quantitative analysis of surface scattering properties through disk-resolved photometry. Here we investigate the photometric properties of individual terrain units [3] through fits of the Hapke photometric model [4] to data acquired in the clear (CL1 CL2), UV3, GRN, and IR3 filters, centered at 0.61, 0.34, 0.57, and 0.93 μm, respectively. Terrain units include the tiger stripe smooth and platy plank formations, tiger stripe medial dorsum structures, relict tiger stripe structures, south pole funiscular (ropy) plains, south pole lateral fold-and-wedge formations, and the south pole reticulated plains. Despite the constant, ubiquitous infall of plume particles onto the surface, differences in scattering properties, texture, and albedo among terrain units can be discerned. Work supported by NASA's Cassini Data Analysis Program. [1] Porco et al. 2006 Science 311, 1393-1401. [2] Hansen et al. 2008 Nature 456, 477-479. [3] Spencer et al. 2009 in Saturn from Cassini-Huygens (M. K. Dougherty et al. Eds.) 683-724. [4] Hapke 2002 Icarus 157, 523-534.

  4. Redshifts for Superliminal Candidates.II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeulen, R. C.; Taylor, G. B.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Browne, I. W. A.

    1996-03-01

    Spectra are presented for 24 compact extragalactic radio sources from complete samples being studied with VLBI. New emission line redshifts are given for 21 of the objects; in 7 of these we have also identified associated or intervening absorption line systems. In 1 other source there are absorption lines which provide a lower limit to the redshift. The remaining 2 objects have strong featureless spectra and are likely to be blazars.

  5. Longterm changes of silicon photodiodes and their use for photometric standardization.

    PubMed

    Eppeldauer, G

    1990-05-20

    A secondary standard silicon photodiode matched with a V-lambda filter was calibrated against primary standard, self-calibrated inversion layer silicon photodiodes, to achieve a high accuracy photometer, according to the new definition of the canadela (the photometric base unit). The measured several percent/year specular spectral reflectance change of the windowless primary standard photodiodes was eliminated by their repeated self-calibration. This self-calibration also eliminated the measured several tenth of a percent/year spectral response change of the secondary standard silicon photodiode. The secondary standard detector could be a nonunity quantum efficiency light detector. The spectral response calibration of the V-lambda matched detector of medium spectral mismatch (f(1)= 3.0%) against the absolute spectral responses of three self-calibrated photodiodes resulted in a standard deviation of 0.17% in luminous flux (lumen) calibration. Also illuminance (lux) and light intensity (candela) calibrations were derived from the above primary photometric calibration. It is shown that the V-lambda matched photometer with the above spectral calibration can be used for accurate photometric measurements for all kinds of light sources of known spectral power distribution. PMID:20563163

  6. Astronomical redshifts and the expansion of space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Nick

    2014-03-01

    In homogeneous cosmological models, the wavelength λ of a photon exchanged between two fundamental observers changes in proportion to expansion of the space D between them, so Δ log (λ/D) = 0. This is exactly the same as for a pair of observers receding from each other in flat space-time where the effect is purely kinematic. The interpretation of this has been the subject of considerable debate, and it has been suggested that all redshifts are a relative velocity effect, raising the question of whether the wavelength always stretches in proportion to the emitter-receiver separation. Here, we show that, for low redshift at least, Δ log (λ/D) vanishes for a photon exchanged between any two freely falling observers in a spatially constant tidal field, because such a field stretches wavelengths and the space between the observers identically. But in general there is a non-kinematic, and essentially gravitational, component of the redshift that is given by a weighted average of the gradient of the tidal field along the photon path. While the redshift can always be formally expressed using the Doppler formula, in situations where the gravitational redshift dominates, the `relative velocity' is typically quite different from the rate of change of D and it is misleading to think of the redshift as being a velocity or `kinematic' effect.

  7. Simulation of High-Redshift Galactic Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Robert J.; Scannapieco, E.; Windhorst, R. A.; Thacker, R.

    2009-12-01

    We construct an observational model of galaxies at high redshifts (z 3 - 13) from numerical N-body and SPH simulations of galaxy formation using the computing cluster "Saguaro” at Arizona State University. The model uses a concordance Lambda-CDM model including baryonic components with gas heating and cooling and star formation using Gadget-2 simulations. Snapshots at various redshifts yield star "particles” (populations) with a modeled metallicity and age of formation. The Bruzual-Charlot '03 stellar population models are used to compute a red-shifted flux for various filters for each simulated star population. The flux and spatial coordinates are then used to create a pixel image in a fits file format. The different redshift "slices” are shifted randomly in the simulation periodic box, and resized according to the comoving distance to correct for the angular pixel mapping. The various redshift corrected fits images are then combined into a single image for each filter to produce simulated observational images. This is to enable the use of observational imaging tools to detect galaxies and to aid observational proposals at high redshifts including the new WFC3 camera to be installed on the HST. This method also permits estimates of the luminosity function at z >6 directly from the simulated stellar populations rather than just the size of the Dark Matter haloes. With runs of higher resolution, this will permit exploration of the faint end of the luminosity function. The computing time was supplied by the ASU Fulton HPC center.

  8. Astronomical redshifts of highly ionized regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Peter M.

    2014-07-01

    Astronomical or cosmological redshifts are an observable property of extragalactic objects and have historically been wholly attributed to the recessional velocity of that object. The question of other, or intrinsic, components of the redshift has been highly controversial since it was first proposed. This paper investigates one theoretical source of intrinsic redshift that has been identified. The highly ionized regions of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and Quasi-Stellar Objects (QSO) are, by definition, plasmas. All plasmas have electromagnetic scattering characteristics that could contribute to the observed redshift. To investigate this possibility, one region of a generalized AGN was selected, the so called Broad Line Region (BLR). Even though unresolvable with current instrumentation, physical estimates of this region have been published for years in the astronomical literature. These data, selected and then averaged, are used to construct an overall model that is consistent with the published data to within an order of magnitude. The model is then subjected to a theoretical scattering investigation. The results suggest that intrinsic redshifts, derivable from the characteristics of the ambient plasma, may indeed contribute to the overall observed redshift of these objects.

  9. Spectral clustering for optical confirmation and redshift estimation of X-ray selected galaxy cluster candidates in the SDSS Stripe 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, E.; Takey, A.; Shoukry, A.

    2016-07-01

    We develop a galaxy cluster finding algorithm based on spectral clustering technique to identify optical counterparts and estimate optical redshifts for X-ray selected cluster candidates. As an application, we run our algorithm on a sample of X-ray cluster candidates selected from the third XMM-Newton serendipitous source catalog (3XMM-DR5) that are located in the Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Our method works on galaxies described in the color-magnitude feature space. We begin by examining 45 galaxy clusters with published spectroscopic redshifts in the range of 0.1-0.8 with a median of 0.36. As a result, we are able to identify their optical counterparts and estimate their photometric redshifts, which have a typical accuracy of 0.025 and agree with the published ones. Then, we investigate another 40 X-ray cluster candidates (from the same cluster survey) with no redshift information in the literature and found that 12 candidates are considered as galaxy clusters in the redshift range from 0.29 to 0.76 with a median of 0.57. These systems are newly discovered clusters in X-rays and optical data. Among them 7 clusters have spectroscopic redshifts for at least one member galaxy.

  10. Infrared-faint radio sources remain undetected at far-infrared wavelengths. Deep photometric observations using the Herschel Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, A.; Norris, R. P.; Middelberg, E.; Spitler, L. R.; Leipski, C.; Parker, Q. A.

    2015-08-01

    Context. Showing 1.4 GHz flux densities in the range of a few to a few tens of mJy, infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are a type of galaxy characterised by faint or absent near-infrared counterparts and consequently extreme radio-to-infrared flux density ratios up to several thousand. Recent studies showed that IFRS are radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at redshifts ≳2, potentially linked to high-redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs). Aims: This work explores the far-infrared emission of IFRS, providing crucial information on the star forming and AGN activity of IFRS. Furthermore, the data enable examining the putative relationship between IFRS and HzRGs and testing whether IFRS are more distant or fainter siblings of these massive galaxies. Methods: A sample of six IFRS was observed with the Herschel Space Observatory between 100 μm and 500 μm. Using these results, we constrained the nature of IFRS by modelling their broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED). Furthermore, we set an upper limit on their infrared SED and decomposed their emission into contributions from an AGN and from star forming activity. Results: All six observed IFRS were undetected in all five Herschel far-infrared channels (stacking limits: σ = 0.74 mJy at 100 μm, σ = 3.45 mJy at 500 μm). Based on our SED modelling, we ruled out the following objects to explain the photometric characteristics of IFRS: (a) known radio-loud quasars and compact steep-spectrum sources at any redshift; (b) starburst galaxies with and without an AGN and Seyfert galaxies at any redshift, even if the templates were modified; and (c) known HzRGs at z ≲ 10.5. We find that the IFRS analysed in this work can only be explained by objects that fulfil the selection criteria of HzRGs. More precisely, IFRS could be (a) known HzRGs at very high redshifts (z ≳ 10.5); (b) low-luminosity siblings of HzRGs with additional dust obscuration at lower redshifts; (c) scaled or unscaled versions of Cygnus A at any

  11. Photometric normalization of LROC WAC images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Denevi, B.; Robinson, M. S.; Hapke, B. W.; McEwen, A. S.; LROC Science Team

    2010-12-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) acquires near global coverage on a monthly basis. The WAC is a push frame sensor with a 90° field of view (FOV) in BW mode and 60° FOV in 7-color mode (320 nm to 689 nm). WAC images are acquired during each orbit in 10° latitude segments with cross track coverage of ~50 km. Before mosaicking, WAC images are radiometrically calibrated to remove instrumental artifacts and to convert at sensor radiance to I/F. Images are also photometrically normalized to common viewing and illumination angles (30° phase), a challenge due to the wide angle nature of the WAC where large differences in phase angle are observed in a single image line (±30°). During a single month the equatorial incidence angle drifts about 28° and over the course of ~1 year the lighting completes a 360° cycle. The light scattering properties of the lunar surface depend on incidence(i), emission(e), and phase(p) angles as well as soil properties such as single-scattering albedo and roughness that vary with terrain type and state of maturity [1]. We first tested a Lommel-Seeliger Correction (LSC) [cos(i)/(cos(i) + cos(e))] [2] with a phase function defined by an exponential decay plus 4th order polynomial term [3] which did not provide an adequate solution. Next we employed a LSC with an exponential 2nd order decay phase correction that was an improvement, but still exhibited unacceptable frame-to-frame residuals. In both cases we fitted the LSC I/F vs. phase angle to derive the phase corrections. To date, the best results are with a lunar-lambert function [4] with exponential 2nd order decay phase correction (LLEXP2) [(A1exp(B1p)+A2exp(B2p)+A3) * cos(i)/(cos(e) + cos(i)) + B3cos(i)]. We derived the parameters for the LLEXP2 from repeat imaging of a small region and then corrected that region with excellent results. When this correction was applied to the whole Moon the results were less than optimal - no surprise given the

  12. Absolute redshifts in the CIV 1548 A line in the transition region of the quiet sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henze, William; Engvold, Oddbjorn

    1992-01-01

    Observations with the Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter instrument on the SMM spacecraft were made at the polar limb and disk center for the accurate determination of Doppler shifts of the CIV 1548 A emission line formed at 10 exp -5 K in the transition region of the quiet sun. Individual data points representing 3 arcsec square pixels yield both redshifts and blueshifts, but the mean values from four different days of observations are toward the red. The mean redshifts are in the range 4-8 km/s and are produced by nearly vertically directed flows; the uncertainty associated with the mean values corresponds to +/- 0.5 km/s. The redshift increases with brightness of the CIV line.

  13. One Moon, many measurements 2: Photometric corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besse, S.; Yokota, Y.; Boardman, J.; Green, R.; Haruyama, J.; Isaacson, P.; Mall, U.; Matsunaga, T.; Ohtake, M.; Pieters, C.; Staid, M.; Sunshine, J.; Yamamoto, S.

    2013-09-01

    Observations of the lunar surface within the past 10 years have been made with various lunar remote sensing instruments, the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) onboard the Chandrayaan-1 mission, the Spectral Profiler (SP), the Multiband Imager (MI), the Terrain Camera (TC) onboard the SELENE mission, and the ground based USGS Robotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) for some of them. The lunar phase functions derived from these datasets, which are used in the photometric modeling to correct for the various illumination conditions of the data, are compared to assess their differences and similarity in order to improve interpretations of lunar surface spectra. The phase functions are found to be similar across various phase angles except in the 0-20° range. Differences across the 0-20° range likely result from two different inputs in the photometric modeling of the M3 and SP data: (1) M3 has larger emission angles due to the characteristics of the instrument and the attitude of the spacecraft, and (2) M3 viewing geometry was derived from the local topography whereas SP used a spherical Moon (no topography). The combination of these two different inputs affects the phase function at small phase angles where shadows play a more substantial role, with spatial resolution differences between M3 and SP being another possible source for the differences. SP data are found to be redder (i.e., steeper slope with increasing wavelengths) than MI, M3 and ROLO. Finally, the M3 overall reflectance is also found to be lower than that the other instruments (i.e., MI, SP, and ROLO), generally at least 10% darker than MI. These differences can be observed at local scales in specific examples at hundreds of meters resolutions. At regional and global scales, the same differences are found, which demonstrates the overall stability of the various datasets. The observations from M3, TC, SP and MI are very stable and agree well; however caution should be used when making interpretations based on the

  14. A photometric search for transiting planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baliber, Nairn Reese

    In the decade since the discovery of the first planet orbiting a main-sequence star other than the Sun, more than 160 planets have been detected in orbit around other stars, most of them discovered by measuring the velocity of the reflexive motion of their parent stars caused by the gravitational pull of the planets. These discoveries produced a population of planets much different to the ones in our Solar System and created interest in other methods to detect these planets. One such method is searching for transits, the slight photometric dimming of stars caused by a close-orbiting, Jupiter-sized planet passing between a star and our line of sight once per orbit. We report results from TeMPEST, the Texas, McDonald Photometric Extrasolar Search for Transits, a transit survey conducted with the McDonald Observatory 0.76 m Prime Focus Corrector (PFC). We monitored five fields of stars in the plane of the Milky Way over the course of two and a half years. We created a photometry pipeline to perform high-precision differential photometry on all of the images, and used a software detection algorithm to detect transit signals in the light curves. Although no transits were found, we calculated our detection probability by determining the fraction of the stars monitored by TeMPEST which were suitable to show transits, measuring the probability of detecting transit signals based on the temporal coverage of our fields, and measuring our detection efficiency by inserting false transits into TeMPEST data to see what fraction could be recovered by our automatic detection software. We conclude that in our entire data set, we generated an effective sample of 2660 stars, a sample in which if any star is showing a transit, it would have been detected. We found no convincing transits in our data, but current statistics from radial velocity surveys indicate that only one in about 1300 of these stars should be showing transits. These numbers are consistent with the lack of transits

  15. The accelerated build-up of the red sequence in high-redshift galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerulo, P.; Couch, W. J.; Lidman, C.; Demarco, R.; Huertas-Company, M.; Mei, S.; Sánchez-Janssen, R.; Barrientos, L. F.; Muñoz, R. P.

    2016-04-01

    We analyse the evolution of the red sequence in a sample of galaxy clusters at redshifts 0.8 < z < 1.5 taken from the HAWK-I Cluster Survey (HCS). The comparison with the low-redshift (0.04 < z < 0.08) sample of the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) and other literature results shows that the slope and intrinsic scatter of the cluster red sequence have undergone little evolution since z = 1.5. We find that the luminous-to-faint ratio and the slope of the faint end of the luminosity distribution of the HCS red sequence are consistent with those measured in WINGS, implying that there is no deficit of red galaxies at magnitudes fainter than M_V^{ast } at high redshifts. We find that the most massive HCS clusters host a population of bright red sequence galaxies at MV < -22.0 mag, which are not observed in low-mass clusters. Interestingly, we also note the presence of a population of very bright (MV < -23.0 mag) and massive (log (M*/M⊙) > 11.5) red sequence galaxies in the WINGS clusters, which do not include only the brightest cluster galaxies and which are not present in the HCS clusters, suggesting that they formed at epochs later than z = 0.8. The comparison with the luminosity distribution of a sample of passive red sequence galaxies drawn from the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field in the photometric redshift range 0.8 < zphot < 1.5 shows that the red sequence in clusters is more developed at the faint end, suggesting that halo mass plays an important role in setting the time-scales for the build-up of the red sequence.

  16. Grading More Accurately

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rom, Mark Carl

    2011-01-01

    Grades matter. College grading systems, however, are often ad hoc and prone to mistakes. This essay focuses on one factor that contributes to high-quality grading systems: grading accuracy (or "efficiency"). I proceed in several steps. First, I discuss the elements of "efficient" (i.e., accurate) grading. Next, I present analytical results…

  17. Bulgeless galaxies at intermediate redshift: Sample selection, color properties, and the existence of powerful active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bizzocchi, Luca; Leonardo, Elvira; Grossi, Marco; Afonso, José; Fernandes, Cristina; Retrê, João; Filho, Mercedes E.; Lobo, Catarina; Griffith, Roger L.; Anton, Sonia; Bell, Eric F.; Brinchmann, Jarle; Henriques, Bruno; Messias, Hugo

    2014-02-10

    We present a catalog of bulgeless galaxies, which includes 19,225 objects selected in four of the deepest, largest multi-wavelength data sets available—COSMOS, AEGIS, GEMS, and GOODS—at intermediate redshift (0.4 ≤ z ≤ 1.0). The morphological classification was provided by the Advanced Camera for Surveys General Catalog (ACS-GC), which used publicly available data obtained with the ACS instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope. Rest-frame photometric quantities were derived using kcorrect. We analyze the properties of the sample and the evolution of pure-disk systems with redshift. Very massive [log (M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) > 10.5] bulgeless galaxies contribute to ∼30% of the total galaxy population number density at z ≥ 0.7, but their number density drops substantially with decreasing redshift. We show that only a negligible fraction of pure disks appear to be quiescent systems, and red sequence bulgeless galaxies show indications of dust-obscured star formation. X-ray catalogs were used to search for X-ray emission within our sample. After visual inspection and detailed parametric morphological fitting we identify 30 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) that reside in galaxies without a classical bulge. The finding of such peculiar objects at intermediate redshift shows that while AGN growth in merger-free systems is a rare event (0.2% AGN hosts in this sample of bulgeless galaxies), it can indeed happen relatively early in the history of the universe.

  18. Herschel-ATLAS: Dust Temperature and Redshift Distribution of SPIRE and PACS Detected Sources Using Submillimetre Colours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amblard, A.; Cooray, Asantha; Serra, P.; Temi, P.; Barton, E.; Negrello, M.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Baldry, I. K.; Bamford, S.; Blain, A.; Bock, J.; Bonfield, D.; Burgarella, D.; Buttiglione, S.; Cameron, E.; Cava, A.; Clements, D.; Croom, S.; Dariush, A.; deZotti, G.; Driver, S.; Dunlop, J.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.

    2010-01-01

    We present colour-colour diagrams of detected sources in the Herschel-ATLAS Science Demonstration Field from 100 to 500/microns using both PACS and SPIRE. We fit isothermal modified-blackbody spectral energy distribution (SED) models in order to extract the dust temperature of sources with counterparts in GAMA or SDSS with either a spectroscopic or a photometric redshift. For a subsample of 331 sources detected in at least three FIR bands with significance greater than 30 sigma, we find an average dust temperature of (28 plus or minus 8)K. For sources with no known redshifts, we populate the colour-colour diagram with a large number of SEDs generated with a broad range of dust temperatures and emissivity parameters and compare to colours of observed sources to establish the redshift distribution of those samples. For another subsample of 1686 sources with fluxes above 35 mJy at 350 microns and detected at 250 and 500 microns with a significance greater than 3sigma, we find an average redshift of 2.2 plus or minus 0.6.

  19. BULK FLOWS FROM GALAXY LUMINOSITIES: APPLICATION TO 2MASS REDSHIFT SURVEY AND FORECAST FOR NEXT-GENERATION DATA SETS

    SciTech Connect

    Nusser, Adi; Branchini, Enzo; Davis, Marc E-mail: branchin@fis.uniroma3.it

    2011-07-10

    We present a simple method for measuring cosmological bulk flows from large redshift surveys, based on the apparent dimming or brightening of galaxies due to their peculiar motion. It is aimed at estimating bulk flows of cosmological volumes containing large numbers of galaxies. Constraints on the bulk flow are obtained by minimizing systematic variations in galaxy luminosities with respect to a reference luminosity function measured from the whole survey. This method offers two advantages over more popular bulk flow estimators: it is independent of error-prone distance indicators and of the poorly known galaxy bias. We apply the method to the Two Micron All Sky Survey redshift survey to measure the local bulk flows of spherical shells centered on the Milky Way (MW). The result is consistent with that obtained by Nusser and Davis using the SFI++ catalogue of Tully-Fisher distance indicators. We also make an assessment of the ability of the method to constrain bulk flows at larger redshifts (z = 0.1-0.5) from next-generation data sets. As a case study we consider the planned EUCLID survey. Using this method we will be able to measure a bulk motion of {approx}200 km s{sup -1} of 10{sup 6} galaxies with photometric redshifts, at the 3{sigma} level for both z {approx} 0.15 and z {approx} 0.5. Thus, the method will allow us to put strong constraints on dark energy models as well as alternative theories for structure formation.

  20. Physical properties from VLT spectroscopy of a sample of star-forming dwarf galaxies at intermediate redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Muñoz, L.; Gallego, J.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Tresse, L.; Gil de Paz, A.; Barro, G.; Villar, V.; Le Fèvre, O.

    2013-05-01

    Dwarf galaxies remain as one of the most important and missing pieces of the great puzzle of formation and evolution of galaxies. Due to their low luminosities, their study has been mainly biased to the local universe or clusters, which hampers our knowledge of their redshift of formation and properties along the cosmological time, strong observational tests to recent models of formation and evolution of low-mass galaxies. Using the multiwavelength database RAINBOW, that provides photometric redshifts and masses estimations, we selected a representative sample of dwarf galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field-South (CDFS) within the redshift range 0.3redshifts and measurements of emission lines such as [OII]3727Å , Hβ, [OIII]4958,5007Å , and Hα, from which we estimate the physical properties of our dwarf galaxy sample.

  1. BROADBAND PHOTOMETRIC REVERBERATION MAPPING OF NGC 4395

    SciTech Connect

    Edri, Haim; Rafter, Stephen E.; Kaspi, Shai; Behar, Ehud; Chelouche, Doron E-mail: shai@physics.technion.ac.il E-mail: doron@sci.haifa.ac.il

    2012-09-01

    We present results of broadband photometric reverberation mapping (RM) to measure the radius of the broad-line region, and subsequently the black hole mass (M{sub BH}), in the nearby, low-luminosity active galactic nuclei NGC 4395. Using the Wise Observatory's 1 m telescope equipped with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey g', r', and i' broadband filters, we monitored NGC 4395 for nine consecutive nights and obtained three light curves each with over 250 data points. The g' and r' bands include time variable contributions from H{beta} and H{alpha}, respectively, plus continuum. The i' band is free of broad lines and covers exclusively continuum. We show that by looking for a peak in the difference between the cross-correlation and the auto-correlation functions for all combinations of filters, we can get a reliable estimate of the time lag necessary to compute M{sub BH}. We measure the time lag for H{alpha} to be 3.6 {+-} 0.8 hr, comparable to previous studies using the line-resolved spectroscopic RM method. We argue that this lag implies a black hole mass of M{sub BH} = (4.9 {+-} 2.6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }.

  2. Photometric Monitoring of Quasars with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, Stephen C.; Wehrle, A. E.; Wiita, P. J.; Revalski, M.; Silano, D.; Sprague, D.; Di Lorenzo, P.

    2013-01-01

    We have observed the photometric variability of four flat-spectrum radio quasars, and one radio galaxy (Cyg A) with Kepler, since mid-2010. Kepler’s ability to observe uninterrupted for very extended durations provides a unique opportunity to obtain very long time sequences on active galactic nuclei, something that is hard to do even with dedicated ground-based telescope networks. It allows us to examine these light curves for variability on timescales from hours to weeks, and to probe the physical processes involved in accretion around the central black hole and the organization of some of that energy into jets that ultimately power double-lobed radio sources. Kepler was designed to detect exoplanet transits of stars, and the data analysis pipeline is highly optimized for that purpose. We cannot use the standard analysis tools for the quasi-random variability in quasars, so we re-analysed the raw data, and overcame some of the challenges in calibrating these light curves. We briefly discuss some of the issues in producing calibrated light curves for long timescales. For each quasar we computed power spectra, and found power-law slopes of around -2 for most. Although sensitive to quasi-periodic variations, we did not find any convincing evidence for periodicity in any of our targets. This research was carried out, in part, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Copyright 2012. California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  3. Photometric support for future astonomical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. S.; Genet, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    The I.A.P.P.P. is described and how that organization can provide photometric support for future astronomical research projects such as the 1982-1984 eclipse of epsilon Aurigae discussed at this workshop. I.A.P.P.P., International Amateur-Professional Photoelectric Photometry, is an organization founded in Fairborn, Ohio by the authors in 1980. Its purpose is to encourage contact between amateur and professional astronomers interested in photoelectric photometry, for their mutual benefit and for the benefit of astronomical research. Aspects dealt with include instrumentation, electronics, computer hardware and software, observing techniques, data reduction, and observing programs. Starting with the June 1980 issue, I.A.P.P.P. has published the quarterly I.A.P.P.P. Communications. The Communications contain articles dealing with all the above aspects of photoelectric photometry, although it does not publish observational results as such. Photoelectric photometry obtained by amateurs is published in the same journals which publish photometry obtained by professionals.

  4. Astrometric and Photometric Variability in Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrei, A. H.; Bouquillon, S.; Penna, J. L.; Taris, F.; Anton, S.; Souchay, J.; Camargo, J. I. B.; da Silva Neto, D. N.; Vieira Martins, R.; Assafin, M.; Pinto, S. dos Reis Carvalho

    2010-05-01

    Quasars are the choicest objects to define a quasi-inertial reference frame. At the same time, they are active galactic nuclei powered by a massive black hole. As the astrometric precision of ground-based optical observations approaches the limit set by the forthcoming GAIA mission, astrometric stability can be investigated. Though the optical emission from the core region usually exceeds the other components by a factor of a hundred, the variability of those components must surely imply some measure of variability of the astrometric baricenter. Whether this is confirmed or not, it puts important constraints on the relationship of the quasar's central engine to the surrounding distribution of matter. To investigate the correlation between long-term optical variability and what is dubbed as the “random walk” of the astrometric center, a program is being pursued at the WFI/ESO 2.2m. The sample was selected from quasars known to undergo large-amplitude and long-term optical variations (Smith et al. 1993; Teerikorpi 2000). The observations are typically made every two months. The treatment is differential, comparing the quasar position and brightness against a sample of selected stars for which the average relative distances and magnitudes remain constant. The provisional results for four objects bring strong support to the hypothesis of a relationship between astrometric and photometric variability. A full account is provided by Andrei et al. (2009).

  5. Astrometric and photometric variability in quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrei, A. H.; Bouquillon, S.; de Camargo, J. I. B.; Penna, J. L.; Taris, F.; Souchay, J.; da Silva Neto, D. N.; Vieira Martins, R.; Assafin, M.

    2009-09-01

    Quasars are the choicest objects to define a quasi-inertial reference frame. At the same time they are active galactic nuclei powered by a massive black hole. As the astrometric precision approaches the limit set by the forthcoming GAIA mission, the astrometric stability can be investigated. Though the optical emission from the core region usually exceeds the other components by a factor of hundred, the variability of those components must surely imply in some measure of variability on the astrometric barycenter. To investigate the correlation between long term optical variability and what is dubbed as the random walk of the astrometric center, a program is being pursued at the WFI/ESO2.2m. A sample of quasars was selected by the large amplitude and long term optical variability. The observations are typically made every two months. The treatment is all differential, comparing the quasar position and brightness against a basket of selected stars for which the average relative distances and magnitudes remain constant. The provisional results for four objects bring strong support to the hypothesis of a degree of relationship between astrometric and photometric variability.

  6. Photometric Detection of Extra-Solar Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatzes, Artie P.; Cochran, William D.

    2004-01-01

    This NASA Origins Program grant supported the TEMPEST Texas McDonald Photometric Extrasolar Search for Transits) program at McDonald Observatory, which searches for transits of extrasolar planets across the disks of their parent stars. The basic approach is to use a wide-field ground-based telescope (in our case the McDonald Observatory 0.76m telescope and it s Prime Focus Corrector) to search for transits of short period (1-15 day orbits) of close-in hot-Jupiter planets in orbit around a large sample of field stars. The next task is to search these data streams for possible transit events. We collected our first set of test data for this program using the 0.76 m PFC in the summer of 1998. From those data, we developed the optimal observing procedures, including tailoring the stellar density, exposure times, and filters to best-suit the instrument and project. In the summer of 1999, we obtained the first partial season of data on a dedicated field in the constellation Cygnus. These data were used to develop and refine the reduction and analysis procedures to produce high-precision photometry and search for transits in the resulting light curves. The TeMPEST project subsequently obtained three full seasons of data on six different fields using the McDonald Observatory 0.76m PFC.

  7. Photometric functions for photoclinometry and other applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEwen, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    Least-squared fits to the brightness profiles across a disk or "limb darkening" described by Hapke's photometric function are found for the simpler Minnaert and lunar-Lambert functions. The simpler functions are needed to reduce the number of unknown parameters in photoclinometry, especially to distinguish the brightness variations of the surface materials from that due to the resolved topography. The limb darkening varies with the Hapke parameters for macroscopic roughness (??), the single-scattering albedo (w), and the asymmetry factor of the particle phase function (g). Both of the simpler functions generally provide good matches to the limb darkening described by Hapke's function, but the lunar-Lambert function is superior when viewing angles are high and when (??) is less than 30??. Although a nonunique solution for the Minnaert function at high phase angles has been described for smooth surfaces, the discrepancy decreases with increasing (??) and virtually disappears when (??) reaches 30?? to 40??. The variation in limb darkening with w and g, pronounced for smooth surfaces, is reduced or eliminated when the Hapke parameters are in the range typical of most planetary surfaces; this result simplifies the problem of photoclinometry across terrains with variable surface materials. The Minnaert or lunar-Lambert fits to published Hapke models will give photoclinometric solutions that are very similar (>1?? slope discrepancy) to the Hapke-function solutions for nearly all of the bodies and terrains thus far modeled by Hapke's function. ?? 1991.

  8. Robust, Error-Tolerant Photometric Projector Compensation.

    PubMed

    Grundhöfer, Anselm; Iwai, Daisuke

    2015-12-01

    We propose a novel error tolerant optimization approach to generate a high-quality photometric compensated projection. The application of a non-linear color mapping function does not require radiometric pre-calibration of cameras or projectors. This characteristic improves the compensation quality compared with related linear methods if this approach is used with devices that apply complex color processing, such as single-chip digital light processing projectors. Our approach consists of a sparse sampling of the projector's color gamut and non-linear scattered data interpolation to generate the per-pixel mapping from the projector to camera colors in real time. To avoid out-of-gamut artifacts, the input image's luminance is automatically adjusted locally in an optional offline optimization step that maximizes the achievable contrast while preserving smooth input gradients without significant clipping errors. To minimize the appearance of color artifacts at high-frequency reflectance changes of the surface due to usually unavoidable slight projector vibrations and movement (drift), we show that a drift measurement and analysis step, when combined with per-pixel compensation image optimization, significantly decreases the visibility of such artifacts. PMID:26390454

  9. Stellar Populations. A User Guide from Low to High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greggio, Laura; Renzini, Alvio

    2011-09-01

    This textbook is meant to illustrate the specific role played by stellar population diagnostics in our attempt to understand galaxy formation and evolution. The book starts with a rather unconventional summary of the results of stellar evolution theory (Chapter 1), as they provide the basis for the construction of synthetic stellar populations. Current limitations of stellar models are highlighted, which arise from the necessity to parametrize all those physical processes that involve bulk mass motions, such as convection, mixing, mass loss, etc. Chapter 2 deals with the foundations of the theory of synthetic stellar populations, and illustrates their energetics and metabolic functions, providing basic tools that will be used in subsequent chapters. Chapters 3 and 4 deal with resolved stellar populations, first addressing some general problems encountered in photometric studies of stellar fields. Then some highlights are presented illustrating our current capacity of measuring stellar ages in Galactic globular clusters, in the Galactic bulge and in nearby galaxies. Chapter 5 is dedicated to the exemplification of synthetic spectra of simple as well as composite stellar populations, drawing attention to those spectral features that may depend on less secure results of stellar evolution models. Chapter 6 illustrates how synthetic stellar populations are used to derive basic galaxy properties, such as star formation rates, stellar masses, ages and metallicities, and does so for galaxies at low as well as at high redshifts. Chapter 7 is dedicated to supernovae, distinguishing them in core collapse and thermonuclear cases, describing the evolution of their rates for various star formation histories, and estimating the supernova productivity of stellar populations and their chemical yields. In Chapter 8 the stellar initial mass function (IMF) is discussed, first showing how even apparently small IMF variations may have large effects on the demo! graphy of stellar

  10. Developing the Optimal Technique for Cluster Photometric Redshift Determination: An Essential Ingredient in Measuring Dark Energy with Cluster Abundances

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Stubbs

    2009-04-16

    We received funding to fabricate and characterize dichroic beamsplitters for optical filtering applications in astronomical instrumentation. A competitive bidding process led to the selection of a vendor who has successfully fabricated subcomponents that meet our optical specifications. The final assembly of the subcomponents into a complete optical module is under way, and we expect final delivery of the part to our laboratory in May 2009.

  11. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  12. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  13. Photometric astrometry applied to asteroids 6, 15, 43, and 624

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalowski, Tadeusz

    A new version of photometric astrometry is presented. This method made it possible to obtain the sense of rotation, sidereal period and pole orientation of the following asteroids: 6 Hebe, 15 Eunomia, 43 Ariadne and 624 Hektor.

  14. redMaPPer - IV. Photometric membership identification of red cluster galaxies with 1 per cent precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Becker, M.; Reddick, R. M.; Wechsler, R. H.

    2015-10-01

    In order to study the galaxy population of galaxy clusters with photometric data, one must be able to accurately discriminate between cluster members and non-members. The redMaPPer cluster finding algorithm treats this problem probabilistically, focusing exclusively on the red galaxy population. Here, we utilize Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Galaxy And Mass Assembly spectroscopic membership rates to validate the redMaPPer membership probability estimates for clusters with z ∈ [0.1, 0.3]. We find small - but correctable - biases, sourced by three different systematics. The first two were expected a priori, namely blue cluster galaxies and correlated structure along the line of sight. The third systematic is new: the redMaPPer template fitting exhibits a non-trivial dependence on photometric noise, which biases the original redMaPPer probabilities when utilizing noisy data. After correcting for these effects, we find exquisite agreement (≈1 per cent) between the photometric probability estimates and the spectroscopic membership rates, demonstrating that we can robustly recover cluster membership estimates from photometric data alone. As a byproduct of our analysis we find that on average unavoidable projection effects from correlated structure contribute ≈6 per cent of the richness of a redMaPPer galaxy cluster. This work also marks the second public release of the SDSS redMaPPer cluster catalogue.

  15. REDSHIFTS, SAMPLE PURITY, AND BCG POSITIONS FOR THE GALAXY CLUSTER CATALOG FROM THE FIRST 720 SQUARE DEGREES OF THE SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.; Zenteno, A.; Desai, S.; Bazin, G.; Stalder, B.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bayliss, M.; Bleem, L. E.; Benson, B. A.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Aird, K. A.; Armstrong, R.; Bertin, E.; Brodwin, M.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; De Haan, T.; and others

    2012-12-10

    We present the results of the ground- and space-based optical and near-infrared (NIR) follow-up of 224 galaxy cluster candidates detected with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in the 720 deg{sup 2} of the South Pole Telescope (SPT) survey completed in the 2008 and 2009 observing seasons. We use the optical/NIR data to establish whether each candidate is associated with an overdensity of galaxies and to estimate the cluster redshift. Most photometric redshifts are derived through a combination of three different cluster redshift estimators using red-sequence galaxies, resulting in an accuracy of {Delta}z/(1 + z) = 0.017, determined through comparison with a subsample of 57 clusters for which we have spectroscopic redshifts. We successfully measure redshifts for 158 systems and present redshift lower limits for the remaining candidates. The redshift distribution of the confirmed clusters extends to z = 1.35 with a median of z{sub med} = 0.57. Approximately 18% of the sample with measured redshifts lies at z > 0.8. We estimate a lower limit to the purity of this SPT SZ-selected sample by assuming that all unconfirmed clusters are noise fluctuations in the SPT data. We show that the cumulative purity at detection significance {xi} > 5({xi} > 4.5) is {>=}95% ({>=}70%). We present the red brightest cluster galaxy (rBCG) positions for the sample and examine the offsets between the SPT candidate position and the rBCG. The radial distribution of offsets is similar to that seen in X-ray-selected cluster samples, providing no evidence that SZ-selected cluster samples include a different fraction of recent mergers from X-ray-selected cluster samples.

  16. Redshifts, Sample Purity, and BCG Positions for the Galaxy Cluster Catalog from the First 720 Square Degrees of the South Pole Telescope Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, J.; Zenteno, A.; Stalder, B.; Desai, S.; Bleem, L. E.; Aird, K. A.; Armstrong, R.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bayliss, M.; Bazin, G.; Benson, B. A.; Bertin, E.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dudley, J. P.; Foley, R. J.; George, E. M.; Gettings, D.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; High, F. W.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hoover, S.; Hrubes, J. D.; Joy, M.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Liu, J.; Lueker, M.; Luong-Van, D.; Marrone, D. P.; McDonald, M.; McMahon, J. J.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L.; Mohr, J. J.; Montroy, T. E.; Natoli, T.; Nurgaliev, D.; Padin, S.; Plagge, T.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruel, J.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shaw, L.; Shirokoff, E.; Šuhada, R.; Spieler, H. G.; Stanford, S. A.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K.; Stubbs, C. W.; van Engelen, A.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.

    2012-12-01

    We present the results of the ground- and space-based optical and near-infrared (NIR) follow-up of 224 galaxy cluster candidates detected with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in the 720 deg2 of the South Pole Telescope (SPT) survey completed in the 2008 and 2009 observing seasons. We use the optical/NIR data to establish whether each candidate is associated with an overdensity of galaxies and to estimate the cluster redshift. Most photometric redshifts are derived through a combination of three different cluster redshift estimators using red-sequence galaxies, resulting in an accuracy of Δz/(1 + z) = 0.017, determined through comparison with a subsample of 57 clusters for which we have spectroscopic redshifts. We successfully measure redshifts for 158 systems and present redshift lower limits for the remaining candidates. The redshift distribution of the confirmed clusters extends to z = 1.35 with a median of z med = 0.57. Approximately 18% of the sample with measured redshifts lies at z > 0.8. We estimate a lower limit to the purity of this SPT SZ-selected sample by assuming that all unconfirmed clusters are noise fluctuations in the SPT data. We show that the cumulative purity at detection significance ξ > 5(ξ > 4.5) is >=95% (>=70%). We present the red brightest cluster galaxy (rBCG) positions for the sample and examine the offsets between the SPT candidate position and the rBCG. The radial distribution of offsets is similar to that seen in X-ray-selected cluster samples, providing no evidence that SZ-selected cluster samples include a different fraction of recent mergers from X-ray-selected cluster samples.

  17. Steps Toward Unveiling the True Population of Active Galactic Nuclei: Photometric Characterization of Active Galactic Nuclei in COSMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Evan E.; Impey, Christopher D.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Salvato, Mara

    2013-04-01

    Using a physically motivated, model-based active galactic nucleus (AGN) characterization technique, we fit a large sample of X-ray-selected AGNs with known spectroscopic redshifts from the Cosmic Evolution Survey field. We identify accretion disks in the spectral energy distributions of broad- and narrow-line AGNs, and infer the presence or absence of host galaxy light in the SEDs. Based on infrared and UV excess AGN selection techniques, our method involves fitting a given SED with a model consisting of three components: infrared power-law emission, optical-UV accretion disk emission, and host galaxy emission. Each component can be varied in relative contribution, and a reduced chi-square minimization routine is used to determine the optimum parameters for each object. Using this technique, both broad- and narrow-line AGNs fall within well-defined and plausible bounds on the physical parameters of the model, allowing trends with luminosity and redshift to be determined. In particular, based on our sample of spectroscopically confirmed AGNs, we find that approximately 95% of the broad-line AGNs and 50% of the narrow-line AGNs in our sample show evidence of an accretion disk, with maximum disk temperatures ranging from 1 to 10 eV. Because this fitting technique relies only on photometry, we hope to apply it in future work to the characterization and eventually the selection of fainter AGNs than are accessible in wide-field spectroscopic surveys, and thus probe a population of less luminous and/or higher redshift objects without prior redshift or X-ray data. With the abundant availability of photometric data from large surveys, the ultimate goal is to use this technique to create large samples that will complement and complete AGN catalogs selected by X-ray emission alone.

  18. STEPS TOWARD UNVEILING THE TRUE POPULATION OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: PHOTOMETRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN COSMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Evan E.; Impey, Christopher D.; Trump, Jonathan R.

    2013-04-01

    Using a physically motivated, model-based active galactic nucleus (AGN) characterization technique, we fit a large sample of X-ray-selected AGNs with known spectroscopic redshifts from the Cosmic Evolution Survey field. We identify accretion disks in the spectral energy distributions of broad- and narrow-line AGNs, and infer the presence or absence of host galaxy light in the SEDs. Based on infrared and UV excess AGN selection techniques, our method involves fitting a given SED with a model consisting of three components: infrared power-law emission, optical-UV accretion disk emission, and host galaxy emission. Each component can be varied in relative contribution, and a reduced chi-square minimization routine is used to determine the optimum parameters for each object. Using this technique, both broad- and narrow-line AGNs fall within well-defined and plausible bounds on the physical parameters of the model, allowing trends with luminosity and redshift to be determined. In particular, based on our sample of spectroscopically confirmed AGNs, we find that approximately 95% of the broad-line AGNs and 50% of the narrow-line AGNs in our sample show evidence of an accretion disk, with maximum disk temperatures ranging from 1 to 10 eV. Because this fitting technique relies only on photometry, we hope to apply it in future work to the characterization and eventually the selection of fainter AGNs than are accessible in wide-field spectroscopic surveys, and thus probe a population of less luminous and/or higher redshift objects without prior redshift or X-ray data. With the abundant availability of photometric data from large surveys, the ultimate goal is to use this technique to create large samples that will complement and complete AGN catalogs selected by X-ray emission alone.

  19. Intensity measurement of automotive headlamps using a photometric vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Balvant; Cruz, Jose; Perry, David L.; Himebaugh, Frederic G.

    1996-01-01

    Requirements for automotive head lamp luminous intensity tests are introduced. The rationale for developing a non-goniometric photometric test system is discussed. The design of the Ford photometric vision system (FPVS) is presented, including hardware, software, calibration, and system use. Directional intensity plots and regulatory test results obtained from the system are compared to corresponding results obtained from a Ford goniometric test system. Sources of error for the vision system and goniometer are discussed. Directions for new work are identified.

  20. Photometric Study on an Eclipsing Close Binary System NSVS 14256825

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Semra; Kalomeni, Belinda

    2016-07-01

    Photometric Study on an Eclipsing Close Binary System NSVS 14256825 We present multi colour light variations of a close binary system NSVS14256825 obtained at the TÜBİTAK National Observatory with T100 telescope. Orbital and physical parameters of the system NSVS14256825 are obtained by simultaneous solution of the newly obtained data with the photometric and spectroscopic data that exist in the literature .

  1. Photometric study of an eclipsing binary in Praesepe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanti Priya, Devarapalli; Sriram, Kandulapati; Vivekananda Rao, Pasagada

    2013-04-01

    We present CCD photometric observations of an eclipsing binary in the direction of the open cluster Praesepe using the 2 m telescope at IUCAA Girawali Observatory, India. Though the system was classified as an eclipsing binary by Pepper et al., detailed investigations have been lacking. The photometric solutions using the Wilson-Devinney code suggest that it is a W-type W UMa system and, interestingly, the system parameters are similar to another contact binary system SW Lac.

  2. Inferring solar structure variations from photometric and helioseismic observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    Present large scale photometric and helioseismic data may be related to spatial and temporal deviations from an otherwise static, spherical solar convection zone (SCZ). New space experiments combine precise photometric, helioseismic, and magnetic observational capabilities (like SOHO and MDI) and will provide data needed to understand the interaction of magnetic fields and global scale circulation in the SCZ. Even simple physical arguments make it clear that the anticipated accuracy of these new experiments virtually guarantees new constraints on models of the SCZ.

  3. Cluster redshifts in five suspected superclusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciardullo, R.; Ford, H.; Harms, R.

    1985-01-01

    Redshift surveys for rich superclusters were carried out in five regions of the sky containing surface-density enhancements of Abell clusters. While several superclusters are identified, projection effects dominate each field, and no system contains more than five rich clusters. Two systems are found to be especially interesting. The first, field 0136 10, is shown to contain a superposition of at least four distinct superclusters, with the richest system possessing a small velocity dispersion. The second system, 2206 - 22, though a region of exceedingly high Abell cluster surface density, appears to be a remarkable superposition of 23 rich clusters almost uniformly distributed in redshift space between 0.08 and 0.24. The new redshifts significantly increase the three-dimensional information available for the distance class 5 and 6 Abell clusters and allow the spatial correlation function around rich superclusters to be estimated.

  4. Gravitational Redshift of Deformed Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Alexis; Zubairi, Omair; Weber, Fridolin

    2015-04-01

    Non-rotating neutron stars are generally treated in theoretical studies as perfect spheres. Such a treatment, however, may not be correct if strong magnetic fields are present and/or the pressure of the matter in the cores of neutron stars is non-isotropic, leading to neutron stars which are deformed. In this work, we investigate the impact of deformation on the gravitational redshift of neutron stars in the framework of general relativity. Using a parameterized metric to model non-spherical mass distributions, we derive an expression for the gravitational redshift in terms of the mass, radius, and deformity of a neutron star. Numerical solutions for the redshifts of sequences of deformed neutron stars are presented and observational implications are pointed out. This research is funded by the NIH through the Maximizing Access to Research Careers (MARC), under Grant Number: 5T34GM008303-25 and through the National Science Foundation under grant PHY-1411708.

  5. SCUBA Observations of High Redshift Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Reuland, M; Rottgering, H; van Breugel, W

    2003-03-11

    High redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs) are key targets for studies of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies.The role of dust in these processes is uncertain. We have therefore observed the dust continuum emission from a sample of z > 3 radio galaxies with the SCUBA bolometer array. We confirm and strengthen the result found by Archibald et al. (1), that HzRGs are massive starforming systems and that submillimeter detection rate appears to be primarily a strong function of redshift. We also observed HzRG-candidates that have so far eluded spectroscopic redshift determination. Four of these have been detected, and provide evidence that they may be extremely obscured radio galaxies, possibly in an early stage of their evolution.

  6. Dusty Galaxies at the Highest Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, David L.

    2015-08-01

    Galaxies with very high star formation rates are usually shrouded in substantial amounts of dust obscuration, making their discovery impossible through optical and/or near-IR observations. Observations in the far-IR/submm in contrast can identify such objects from their colours, allowing these rare objects to be followup up in detail. Herschel surveys have found a significant population of such objects at 4redshift record holder lying at z=6.34. Such objects are a challenge for all current models of galaxy formation and evolution. We here present the latest results from the HerMES consortium's ongoing work on this population, including new imaging and spectroscopic redshifts from ALMA, analysis of lensing for bright z>5 sources, and progress in the search for dusty star forming galaxies at still higher redshifts.

  7. SIDRA: a blind algorithm for signal detection in photometric surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mislis, D.; Bachelet, E.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bramich, D. M.; Parley, N.

    2016-01-01

    We present the Signal Detection using Random-Forest Algorithm (SIDRA). SIDRA is a detection and classification algorithm based on the Machine Learning technique (Random Forest). The goal of this paper is to show the power of SIDRA for quick and accurate signal detection and classification. We first diagnose the power of the method with simulated light curves and try it on a subset of the Kepler space mission catalogue. We use five classes of simulated light curves (CONSTANT, TRANSIT, VARIABLE, MLENS and EB for constant light curves, transiting exoplanet, variable, microlensing events and eclipsing binaries, respectively) to analyse the power of the method. The algorithm uses four features in order to classify the light curves. The training sample contains 5000 light curves (1000 from each class) and 50 000 random light curves for testing. The total SIDRA success ratio is ≥90 per cent. Furthermore, the success ratio reaches 95-100 per cent for the CONSTANT, VARIABLE, EB and MLENS classes and 92 per cent for the TRANSIT class with a decision probability of 60 per cent. Because the TRANSIT class is the one which fails the most, we run a simultaneous fit using SIDRA and a Box Least Square (BLS)-based algorithm for searching for transiting exoplanets. As a result, our algorithm detects 7.5 per cent more planets than a classic BLS algorithm, with better results for lower signal-to-noise light curves. SIDRA succeeds to catch 98 per cent of the planet candidates in the Kepler sample and fails for 7 per cent of the false alarms subset. SIDRA promises to be useful for developing a detection algorithm and/or classifier for large photometric surveys such as TESS and PLATO exoplanet future space missions.

  8. Realistic uncertainties on Hapke model parameters from photometric measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Frédéric; Fernando, Jennifer

    2015-11-01

    The single particle phase function describes the manner in which an average element of a granular material diffuses the light in the angular space usually with two parameters: the asymmetry parameter b describing the width of the scattering lobe and the backscattering fraction c describing the main direction of the scattering lobe. Hapke proposed a convenient and widely used analytical model to describe the spectro-photometry of granular materials. Using a compilation of the published data, Hapke (Hapke, B. [2012]. Icarus 221, 1079-1083) recently studied the relationship of b and c for natural examples and proposed the hockey stick relation (excluding b > 0.5 and c > 0.5). For the moment, there is no theoretical explanation for this relationship. One goal of this article is to study a possible bias due to the retrieval method. We expand here an innovative Bayesian inversion method in order to study into detail the uncertainties of retrieved parameters. On Emission Phase Function (EPF) data, we demonstrate that the uncertainties of the retrieved parameters follow the same hockey stick relation, suggesting that this relation is due to the fact that b and c are coupled parameters in the Hapke model instead of a natural phenomena. Nevertheless, the data used in the Hapke (Hapke, B. [2012]. Icarus 221, 1079-1083) compilation generally are full Bidirectional Reflectance Diffusion Function (BRDF) that are shown not to be subject to this artifact. Moreover, the Bayesian method is a good tool to test if the sampling geometry is sufficient to constrain the parameters (single scattering albedo, surface roughness, b, c , opposition effect). We performed sensitivity tests by mimicking various surface scattering properties and various single image-like/disk resolved image, EPF-like and BRDF-like geometric sampling conditions. The second goal of this article is to estimate the favorable geometric conditions for an accurate estimation of photometric parameters in order to provide

  9. KECK SPECTROSCOPY OF FAINT 3 < z < 8 LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES: EVIDENCE FOR A DECLINING FRACTION OF EMISSION LINE SOURCES IN THE REDSHIFT RANGE 6 < z < 8

    SciTech Connect

    Schenker, Matthew A.; Ellis, Richard S.; Robertson, Brant E.; Stark, Daniel P.; Dunlop, James S.; McLure, Ross J.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Richard, Johan

    2012-01-10

    Using deep Keck spectroscopy of Lyman break galaxies selected from infrared imaging data taken with the Wide Field Camera 3 on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we present new evidence for a reversal in the redshift-dependent fraction of star-forming galaxies with detectable Lyman alpha (Ly{alpha}) emission in the redshift range 6.3 < z < 8.8. Our earlier surveys with the DEIMOS spectrograph demonstrated a significant increase with redshift in the fraction of line emitting galaxies over the interval 4 < z < 6, particularly for intrinsically faint systems which dominate the luminosity density. Using the longer wavelength sensitivities of Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer and NIRSPEC, we have targeted 19 Lyman break galaxies selected using recent WFC3/IR data whose photometric redshifts are in the range 6.3 < z < 8.8 and which span a wide range of intrinsic luminosities. Our spectroscopic exposures typically reach a 5{sigma} sensitivity of <50 A for the rest-frame equivalent width (EW) of Ly{alpha} emission. Despite the high fraction of emitters seen only a few hundred million years later, we find only two convincing and one possible line emitter in our more distant sample. Combining with published data on a further seven sources obtained using FORS2 on the ESO Very Large Telescope, and assuming continuity in the trends found at lower redshift, we discuss the significance of this apparent reversal in the redshift-dependent Ly{alpha} fraction in the context of our range in continuum luminosity. Assuming all the targeted sources are at their photometric redshift and our assumptions about the Ly{alpha} EW distribution are correct, we would expect to find so few emitters in less than 1% of the realizations drawn from our lower redshift samples. Our new results provide further support for the suggestion that, at the redshifts now being probed spectroscopically, we are entering the era where the intergalactic medium is partially neutral. With the arrival of more

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Redshift of 97 spirals (Guthrie+, 1996)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthrie, B. N. G.; Napier, W. M.

    1996-02-01

    Persistent claims have been made over the last ~15yr that extragalactic redshifts, when corrected for the Sun's motion around the Galactic centre, occur in multiples of ~24 or ~36km/s. A recent investigation by us of 40 spiral galaxies out to 1000km/s, with accurately measured redshifts, gave evidence of a periodicity ~37.2-37.7km/s. Here we extend our enquiry out to the edge of the Local Super cluster (~2600km/s), applying a simple and robust procedure to a total of 97 accurately determined redshifts. We find that, when corrected for related vectors close to recent estimates of the Sun's galactocentric motion, the redshifts of spirals are strongly periodic (P~37.6km/s). The formal confidence level of the result is extremely high, and the signal is seen independently with different radio telescopes. We also examine a further sample of 117 spirals observed with the 300-foot Green Bank telescope alone. The periodicity phenomenon appears strongest for the galaxies linked by group membership, but phase coherence probably holds over large regions of the Local Supercluster. (2 data files).

  11. Stars and gas in high redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettini, Max

    Recent advances in instrumentation and observing techniques have made it possible to begin to study in detail the stellar populations and the interstellar media of galaxies at redshift z=3, when the universe was still in its "teen years". In keeping with the theme of this conference, I show how our knowledge of local star-forming regions can be applied directly to these distant galaxies to deduce their ages, metallicities, initial mass function, and masses. I also discuss areas where current limitations in stellar astrophysics have a direct bearing on the interpretation of the data being gathered, at an ever increasing rate, on the high redshift universe.

  12. GLAST observation of high-redshift GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Longo, Francesco; Barbiellini, Guido; Calura, Francesco; Matteucci, Francesca; Omodei, Nicola

    2007-07-12

    We compare predicted Type Ib/c supernova (SNIb/c) rates with the observed long-duration Gamma-Ray-Burst (GRB) rates both locally and as a function of redshift, by assuming different star formation histories in galaxies of different morphological types. Due to the high star formation in spheroids at high redshift, we predict a large number of GRBs beyond z > 7. Moreover, based on our studies and on the current LAT performance, an estimate of the detection possibility of this burst population is presented.

  13. EZ: A Tool For Automatic Redshift Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fumana, Marco; Garilli, Bianca

    2012-10-01

    EZ (Easy-Z) estimates redshifts for extragalactic objects. It compares the observed spectrum with a set of (user given) spectral templates to find out the best value for the redshift. To accomplish this task, it uses a highly configurable set of algorithms. EZ is easily extendible with new algorithms. It is implemented as a set of C programs and a number of python classes. It can be used as a standalone program, or the python classes can be directly imported by other applications.

  14. Analytic model for the bispectrum of galaxies in redshift space

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Robert E.; Sheth, Ravi K.; Scoccimarro, Roman

    2008-07-15

    We develop an analytic theory for the redshift space bispectrum of dark matter, haloes, and galaxies. This is done within the context of the halo model of structure formation, as this allows for the self-consistent inclusion of linear and nonlinear redshift-space distortions and also for the nonlinearity of the halo bias. The model is applicable over a wide range of scales: on the largest scales the predictions reduce to those of the standard perturbation theory (PT); on smaller scales they are determined primarily by the nonlinear virial velocities of galaxies within haloes, and this gives rise to the U-shaped anisotropy in the reduced bispectrum--a finger print of the Finger-Of-God distortions. We then confront the predictions with measurements of the redshift-space bispectrum of dark matter from an ensemble of numerical simulations. On very large scales, k=0.05h Mpc{sup -1}, we find reasonably good agreement between our halo model, PT and the data, to within the errors. On smaller scales, k=0.1h Mpc{sup -1}, the measured bispectra differ from the PT at the level of {approx}10%-20%, especially for colinear triangle configurations. The halo model predictions improve over PT, but are accurate to no better than 10%. On smaller scales k=0.5-1.0h Mpc{sup -1}, our model provides a significant improvement over PT, which breaks down. This implies that studies which use the lowest order PT to extract galaxy bias information are not robust on scales k > or approx. 0.1h Mpc{sup -1}. The analytic and simulation results also indicate that there is no observable scale for which the configuration dependence of the reduced bispectrum is constant--hierarchical models for the higher-order correlation functions in redshift space are unlikely to be useful. It is hoped that our model will facilitate extraction of information from large-scale structure surveys of the Universe, because different galaxy populations are naturally included into our description.

  15. Photometric Variability of Neptune, 1950-2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockwood, G. W.

    2001-11-01

    Photometry of Neptune from 1950-1966 in B (440 nm) and 1972-2001 in b (472 nm) and y (551 nm) shows that as the planet approaches its 2007 southern summer solstice its disk-averaged albedo is presently greater than at any time during the past half century. Neptune has brightened by 11% in b and 10% in y since 1980 with most of the increase occurring in nearly equal yearly increments beginning in 1990. A smaller than average increase from 2000 to 2001 may signal an imminent end to the brightening trend. The nature of the year-to-year variations changed after 1990 when a steady rise overshadowed an inverse correlation with cyclic solar activity. That correlation remains statistically significant over the 30-year time series, 1972-2001, for the varying solar Lyman alpha flux but not for the galactic cosmic ray flux modulated by solar activity. Therefore a photochemical mechanism is now favored over a particle-induced condensation process. Comparison of visible and near infrared photometry during the 1976 infrared outburst reveals similar patterns of variation, but with 20-50x smaller amplitude at visible wavelengths. Other comparisons in 1989 with ground-based and Voyager images reveal a photometric signature associated with disk transits of the Great Dark Spot/Bright Companion complex. The long-term record shows that (1) the 1976 outburst was a unique event; (2) Voyager's arrival at Neptune occurred at the end of a three-year interval of enhanced atmospheric activity during which discrete features perhaps even larger than the GDS/BC complex were continually present. This work is supported by NASA Planetary Astronomy grant NAG5-7853.

  16. PROPERTIES OF SATELLITE GALAXIES IN THE SDSS PHOTOMETRIC SURVEY: LUMINOSITIES, COLORS, AND PROJECTED NUMBER DENSITY PROFILES

    SciTech Connect

    Lares, M.; Lambas, D. G.; Dominguez, M. J.

    2011-07-15

    We analyze photometric data in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS-DR7) to infer statistical properties of faint satellites associated with isolated bright galaxies (M{sub r} < -20.5) in the redshift range 0.03 < z < 0.1. The mean projected radial number density profile shows an excess of companions in the photometric sample around the primaries, with approximately a power-law shape that extends up to {approx_equal} 700 kpc. Given this overdensity signal, a suitable background subtraction method is used to study the statistical properties of the population of bound satellites, down to magnitude M{sub r} = -14.5, in the projected radial distance range 100 < r{sub p} /kpc < 3(R{sub vir}). The maximum projected distance corresponds to the range 470-660 kpc for the different samples. We have also considered a color cut consistent with the observed colors of spectroscopic satellites in nearby galaxies so that distant redshifted galaxies do not dominate the statistics. We have tested the implementation of this background subtraction procedure using a mock catalog derived from the Millennium simulation semianalytic galaxy catalog based on a {Lambda} cold dark matter model. We find that the method is effective in reproducing the true projected radial satellite number density profile and luminosity distributions, providing confidence in the results derived from SDSS data. We find that the spatial extent of satellite systems is larger for bright, red primaries. Also, we find a larger spatial distribution of blue satellites. For the different samples analyzed, we derive the average number of satellites and their luminosity distributions down to M{sub r} = -14.5. The mean number of satellites depends very strongly on host luminosity. Bright primaries (M{sub r} < -21.5) host on average {approx}6 satellites with M{sub r} < -14.5. This number is reduced for primaries with lower luminosities (-21.5 < M{sub r} < -20.5) which have less than one satellite per host. We

  17. A simple and robust method for automated photometric classification of supernovae using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpenka, N. V.; Feroz, F.; Hobson, M. P.

    2013-02-01

    A method is presented for automated photometric classification of supernovae (SNe) as Type Ia or non-Ia. A two-step approach is adopted in which (i) the SN light curve flux measurements in each observing filter are fitted separately to an analytical parametrized function that is sufficiently flexible to accommodate virtually all types of SNe and (ii) the fitted function parameters and their associated uncertainties, along with the number of flux measurements, the maximum-likelihood value of the fit and Bayesian evidence for the model, are used as the input feature vector to a classification neural network that outputs the probability that the SN under consideration is of Type Ia. The method is trained and tested using data released following the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge (SNPCC), consisting of light curves for 20 895 SNe in total. We consider several random divisions of the data into training and testing sets: for instance, for our sample D_1 (D_4), a total of 10 (40) per cent of the data are involved in training the algorithm and the remainder used for blind testing of the resulting classifier; we make no selection cuts. Assigning a canonical threshold probability of pth = 0.5 on the network output to class an SN as Type Ia, for the sample D_1 (D_4) we obtain a completeness of 0.78 (0.82), purity of 0.77 (0.82) and SNPCC figure of merit of 0.41 (0.50). Including the SN host-galaxy redshift and its uncertainty as additional inputs to the classification network results in a modest 5-10 per cent increase in these values. We find that the quality of the classification does not vary significantly with SN redshift. Moreover, our probabilistic classification method allows one to calculate the expected completeness, purity and figure of merit (or other measures of classification quality) as a function of the threshold probability pth, without knowing the true classes of the SNe in the testing sample, as is the case in the classification of real SNe

  18. Effect of realistic and filtered stellar photometric noise on the detection of moons using photometric transit timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, K.

    2011-02-01

    The photometric transit timing technique was proposed by Szabó et al. (2006) as a method for discovering moons of transiting extrasolar planets. In the preliminary analysis of this technique, it was assumed that the noise in the transit lightcurve was well described by uncorrelated white noise. However, this assumption is not necessarily realistic. To determine the effect of using more realistic lightcurves, transit timing uncertainties are calculated for the case of white noise, measured solar photometric noise and measured solar photometric noise that has been filtered. It is found that for light curves contaminated with realistic photometric noise, the transit timing uncertainties are dramatically increased (and thus moon detection reduced). In addition, we find that while filtering reduced this problem, it did not negate it.

  19. The Supernova Legacy Survey 3-year sample: Type Ia supernovae photometric distances and cosmological constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, J.; Sullivan, M.; Conley, A.; Regnault, N.; Astier, P.; Balland, C.; Basa, S.; Carlberg, R. G.; Fouchez, D.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I. M.; Howell, D. A.; Pain, R.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Perrett, K. M.; Pritchet, C. J.; Rich, J.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Balam, D.; Baumont, S.; Ellis, R. S.; Fabbro, S.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Fourmanoit, N.; González-Gaitán, S.; Graham, M. L.; Hsiao, E.; Kronborg, T.; Lidman, C.; Mourao, A. M.; Perlmutter, S.; Ripoche, P.; Suzuki, N.; Walker, E. S.

    2010-11-01

    Aims: We present photometric properties and distance measurements of 252 high redshift Type Ia supernovae (0.15 < z < 1.1) discovered during the first three years of the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). These events were detected and their multi-colour light curves measured using the MegaPrime/MegaCam instrument at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), by repeatedly imaging four one-square degree fields in four bands. Follow-up spectroscopy was performed at the VLT, Gemini and Keck telescopes to confirm the nature of the supernovae and to measure their redshifts. Methods: Systematic uncertainties arising from light curve modeling are studied, making use of two techniques to derive the peak magnitude, shape and colour of the supernovae, and taking advantage of a precise calibration of the SNLS fields. Results: A flat ΛCDM cosmological fit to 231 SNLS high redshift type Ia supernovae alone gives Ω_M = 0.211 ± 0.034(stat) ± 0.069(sys). The dominant systematic uncertainty comes from uncertainties in the photometric calibration. Systematic uncertainties from light curve fitters come next with a total contribution of ±0.026 on Ω_M. No clear evidence is found for a possible evolution of the slope (β) of the colour-luminosity relation with redshift. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products produced at the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, a collaborative project of NRC and CNRS. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory using the Very Large Telescope on the Cerro Paranal (ESO Large Programme 171.A-0486 & 176.A-0589). Based on

  20. Local gravitational redshifts can bias cosmological measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtak, Radosław; Davis, Tamara M.; Wiis, Jophiel

    2015-07-01

    Measurements of cosmological parameters via the distance-redshift relation usually rely on models that assume a homogenous universe. It is commonly presumed that the large-scale structure evident in our Universe has a negligible impact on the measurement if distances probed in observations are sufficiently large (compared to the scale of inhomogeneities) and are averaged over different directions on the sky. This presumption does not hold when considering the effect of the gravitational redshift caused by our local gravitational potential, which alters light coming from all distances and directions in the same way. Despite its small magnitude, this local gravitational redshift gives rise to noticeable effects in cosmological inference using SN Ia data. Assuming conservative prior knowledge of the local potential given by sampling a range of gravitational potentials at locations of Milky-Way-like galaxies identified in cosmological simulations, we show that ignoring the gravitational redshift effect in a standard data analysis leads to an additional systematic error of ~1% in the determination of density parameters and the dark energy equation of state. We conclude that our local gravitational field affects our cosmological inference at a level that is important in future observations aiming to achieve percent-level accuracy.