Science.gov

Sample records for accurate physical characterization

  1. Towards Accurate Application Characterization for Exascale (APEX)

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Simon David

    2015-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has been engaged in hardware and software codesign activities for a number of years, indeed, it might be argued that prototyping of clusters as far back as the CPLANT machines and many large capability resources including ASCI Red and RedStorm were examples of codesigned solutions. As the research supporting our codesign activities has moved closer to investigating on-node runtime behavior a nature hunger has grown for detailed analysis of both hardware and algorithm performance from the perspective of low-level operations. The Application Characterization for Exascale (APEX) LDRD was a project concieved of addressing some of these concerns. Primarily the research was to intended to focus on generating accurate and reproducible low-level performance metrics using tools that could scale to production-class code bases. Along side this research was an advocacy and analysis role associated with evaluating tools for production use, working with leading industry vendors to develop and refine solutions required by our code teams and to directly engage with production code developers to form a context for the application analysis and a bridge to the research community within Sandia. On each of these accounts significant progress has been made, particularly, as this report will cover, in the low-level analysis of operations for important classes of algorithms. This report summarizes the development of a collection of tools under the APEX research program and leaves to other SAND and L2 milestone reports the description of codesign progress with Sandia’s production users/developers.

  2. Does a pneumotach accurately characterize voice function?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Gage; Krane, Michael

    2016-11-01

    A study is presented which addresses how a pneumotach might adversely affect clinical measurements of voice function. A pneumotach is a device, typically a mask, worn over the mouth, in order to measure time-varying glottal volume flow. By measuring the time-varying difference in pressure across a known aerodynamic resistance element in the mask, the glottal volume flow waveform is estimated. Because it adds aerodynamic resistance to the vocal system, there is some concern that using a pneumotach may not accurately portray the behavior of the voice. To test this hypothesis, experiments were performed in a simplified airway model with the principal dimensions of an adult human upper airway. A compliant constriction, fabricated from silicone rubber, modeled the vocal folds. Variations of transglottal pressure, time-averaged volume flow, model vocal fold vibration amplitude, and radiated sound with subglottal pressure were performed, with and without the pneumotach in place, and differences noted. Acknowledge support of NIH Grant 2R01DC005642-10A1.

  3. Accurate Scientific Visualization in Research and Physics Teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendler, Tim

    2011-10-01

    Accurate visualization is key in the expression and comprehension of physical principles. Many 3D animation software packages come with built-in numerical methods for a variety of fundamental classical systems. Scripting languages give access to low-level computational functionality, thereby revealing a virtual physics laboratory for teaching and research. Specific examples will be presented: Galilean relativistic hair, energy conservation in complex systems, scattering from a central force, and energy transfer in bi-molecular reactions.

  4. How accurate are physical property estimation programs for organosilicon compounds?

    PubMed

    Boethling, Robert; Meylan, William

    2013-11-01

    Organosilicon compounds are important in chemistry and commerce, and nearly 10% of new chemical substances for which premanufacture notifications are processed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) contain silicon (Si). Yet, remarkably few measured values are submitted for key physical properties, and the accuracy of estimation programs such as the Estimation Programs Interface (EPI) Suite and the SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry (SPARC) system is largely unknown. To address this issue, the authors developed an extensive database of measured property values for organic compounds containing Si and evaluated the performance of no-cost estimation programs for several properties of importance in environmental assessment. These included melting point (mp), boiling point (bp), vapor pressure (vp), water solubility, n-octanol/water partition coefficient (log KOW ), and Henry's law constant. For bp and the larger of 2 vp datasets, SPARC, MPBPWIN, and the USEPA's Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (TEST) had similar accuracy. For log KOW and water solubility, the authors tested 11 and 6 no-cost estimators, respectively. The best performers were Molinspiration and WSKOWWIN, respectively. The TEST's consensus mp method outperformed that of MPBPWIN by a considerable margin. Generally, the best programs estimated the listed properties of diverse organosilicon compounds with accuracy sufficient for chemical screening. The results also highlight areas where improvement is most needed.

  5. A More Accurate Characterization of UH-60A Pitch Link Loads Using Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottapalli, Sesi; Aiken, Ed (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A more accurate, neural-network-based characterization of the full-scale UH-60A maximum, vibratory pitch link loads (MXVPLL) was obtained. The MXVPLL data were taken from the NASA/Army UH-60A Airloads Program flight test database. This database includes data from level flights, and both simple and "complex" maneuvers. In the present context, a complex maneuver was defined as one which involved simultaneous, non-zero aircraft angle-of-bank (associated with turns) and aircraft pitch-rate (associated with a pull-up or a push-over). The present approach combines physical insight followed by the neural networks application. Since existing load factors do not represent the above-defined complex maneuver, a new, combined load factor ('p resent-load-factor') was introduced. A back-propagation type of neural network with five inputs and one output was used to characterize the UH-60A MXVPLL. The neural network inputs were as follows: rotor advance ratio, aircraft gross weight, rotor RPM, air density ratio, and the present-load-factor. The neural network output was the maximum, vibratory pitch link load (MXVPLL). It was shown that a more accurate characterization of the full-scale flight test pitch link loads can be obtained by combining physical insight with a neural-network-based approach.

  6. Highly accurate spectral retardance characterization of a liquid crystal retarder including Fabry-Perot interference effects

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Asticio; Mar Sánchez-López, María del; García-Martínez, Pascuala; Arias, Julia; Moreno, Ignacio

    2014-01-21

    Multiple-beam Fabry-Perot (FP) interferences occur in liquid crystal retarders (LCR) devoid of an antireflective coating. In this work, a highly accurate method to obtain the spectral retardance of such devices is presented. On the basis of a simple model of the LCR that includes FP effects and by using a voltage transfer function, we show how the FP features in the transmission spectrum can be used to accurately retrieve the ordinary and extraordinary spectral phase delays, and the voltage dependence of the latter. As a consequence, the modulation characteristics of the device are fully determined with high accuracy by means of a few off-state physical parameters which are wavelength-dependent, and a single voltage transfer function that is valid within the spectral range of characterization.

  7. A CASE STUDY ILLUSTRATING THE IMPORTANCE OF ACCURATE SITE CHARACTERIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Too frequently, researchers rely on incomplete site characterization data to determine the placement of the sampling wells. They forget that it is these sampling wells that will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of their research efforts. This case study illustrates the eff...

  8. Phase rainbow refractometry for accurate droplet variation characterization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yingchun; Promvongsa, Jantarat; Saengkaew, Sawitree; Wu, Xuecheng; Chen, Jia; Gréhan, Gérard

    2016-10-15

    We developed a one-dimensional phase rainbow refractometer for the accurate trans-dimensional measurements of droplet size on the micrometer scale as well as the tiny droplet diameter variations at the nanoscale. The dependence of the phase shift of the rainbow ripple structures on the droplet variations is revealed. The phase-shifting rainbow image is recorded by a telecentric one-dimensional rainbow imaging system. Experiments on the evaporating monodispersed droplet stream show that the phase rainbow refractometer can measure the tiny droplet diameter changes down to tens of nanometers. This one-dimensional phase rainbow refractometer is capable of measuring the droplet refractive index and diameter, as well as variations.

  9. Physical Characterization of Electronic Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

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  10. Accurate measurements of the acoustical physical constants of synthetic alpha-quartz for SAW devices.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Juin-ichi; Takanaga, Izumi; Nishiyama, Shouichi

    2002-01-01

    Accurate measurements of the acoustical physical constants (elastic constants, piezoelectric constants, dielectric constants, and density) of commercially available and widely used surface acoustic wave (SAW)-grade synthetic a-quartz are reported. The propagation directions and modes of bulk waves optimal for accurately determining the constants were selected through numerical calculations, and three principal X-, Y-, and Z-cut specimens and several rotated Y-cut specimens were prepared from a single crystal ingot to determine the constants and to confirm their accuracy. All of the constants were determined through highly accurate measurements of the longitudinal velocities, shear velocities, dielectric constants, and density. The velocity values measured for the specimens that were not used to determine the constants agreed well with those calculated from the determined constants, within a difference of +/- 0.20 m/s (+/- 0.004%).

  11. Physical sampling for site and waste characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnough, T.L.

    1994-06-01

    Physical sampling plays a basic role in site and waste characterization program effort. The term ``physical sampling`` used here means collecting tangible, physical samples of soil, water, air, waste streams, or other materials. The industry defines the term ``physical sampling`` broadly to include measurements of physical conditions such as temperature, wind conditions, and pH which are also often taken in a sample collection effort. Most environmental compliance actions are supported by the results of taking, recording, and analyzing physical samples and the measuring of physical conditions taken in association with sample collecting.

  12. Defining allowable physical property variations for high accurate measurements on polymer parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, A.; Sonne, M. R.; Madruga, D. G.; De Chiffre, L.; Hattel, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    Measurement conditions and material properties have a significant impact on the dimensions of a part, especially for polymers parts. Temperature variation causes part deformations that increase the uncertainty of the measurement process. Current industrial tolerances of a few micrometres demand high accurate measurements in non-controlled ambient. Most of polymer parts are manufactured by injection moulding and their inspection is carried out after stabilization, around 200 hours. The overall goal of this work is to reach ±5μm in uncertainty measurements a polymer products which is a challenge in today`s production and metrology environments. The residual deformations in polymer products at room temperature after injection molding are important when micrometer accuracy needs to be achieved. Numerical modelling can give a valuable insight to what is happening in the polymer during cooling down after injection molding. In order to obtain accurate simulations, accurate inputs to the model are crucial. In reality however, the material and physical properties will have some variations. Although these variations may be small, they can act as a source of uncertainty for the measurement. In this paper, we investigated how big the variation in material and physical properties are allowed in order to reach the 5 μm target on the uncertainty.

  13. Accurate Semilocal Density Functional for Condensed-Matter Physics and Quantum Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jianmin; Mo, Yuxiang

    2016-08-12

    Most density functionals have been developed by imposing the known exact constraints on the exchange-correlation energy, or by a fit to a set of properties of selected systems, or by both. However, accurate modeling of the conventional exchange hole presents a great challenge, due to the delocalization of the hole. Making use of the property that the hole can be made localized under a general coordinate transformation, here we derive an exchange hole from the density matrix expansion, while the correlation part is obtained by imposing the low-density limit constraint. From the hole, a semilocal exchange-correlation functional is calculated. Our comprehensive test shows that this functional can achieve remarkable accuracy for diverse properties of molecules, solids, and solid surfaces, substantially improving upon the nonempirical functionals proposed in recent years. Accurate semilocal functionals based on their associated holes are physically appealing and practically useful for developing nonlocal functionals.

  14. Accurate Semilocal Density Functional for Condensed-Matter Physics and Quantum Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jianmin; Mo, Yuxiang

    2016-08-01

    Most density functionals have been developed by imposing the known exact constraints on the exchange-correlation energy, or by a fit to a set of properties of selected systems, or by both. However, accurate modeling of the conventional exchange hole presents a great challenge, due to the delocalization of the hole. Making use of the property that the hole can be made localized under a general coordinate transformation, here we derive an exchange hole from the density matrix expansion, while the correlation part is obtained by imposing the low-density limit constraint. From the hole, a semilocal exchange-correlation functional is calculated. Our comprehensive test shows that this functional can achieve remarkable accuracy for diverse properties of molecules, solids, and solid surfaces, substantially improving upon the nonempirical functionals proposed in recent years. Accurate semilocal functionals based on their associated holes are physically appealing and practically useful for developing nonlocal functionals.

  15. Massive physical and dynamical characterization of asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillot, William; Berthier, Jerôme; Sarkissian, Armand; Mickaelian, Areg M.; Sargsyan, Lena A.; Iglesias, Jesus; Lainey, Valery; Birlan, Mirel; Simon, Guy

    2007-08-01

    Numerous new Solar System objects, mainly asteroids, are still detected nowadays but their physical and dynamical characteristics remain not accurately determined, until dedicated observations and analysis are made. However, the Virtual Observatory is a perfect framework to search for this characterization by data mining. We are developing two studies for this goal by exploring the DENIS infrared and DFBS spectroscopic surveys. In order to scan the survey catalogues and to search for Solar System objects, we have developed a VO compliant workflow founded on the use of a recent VO tool labelled SkyBoT (Sky Bodies Tracker) (Berthier et al. 2005) and on the VizieR service provided by CDS. A public version of SkyBoT is implemented in the sky atlas Aladin since January 2006. It allows us to quickly get the precise coordinates of the asteroids, planets and natural satellites in any star field, provided we know its center, its size and the precise date of the exposure (between 1949 and 2009). Our data mining workflow performs cone search queries on SkyBoT and VizieR to extract all the known astronomical objects observed by the survey. Then the sources which are detected in the survey are correlated with the known objects to determine the matched and unmatched objects.

  16. Fast Physically Accurate Rendering of Multimodal Signatures of Distributed Fracture in Heterogeneous Materials.

    PubMed

    Visell, Yon

    2015-04-01

    This paper proposes a fast, physically accurate method for synthesizing multimodal, acoustic and haptic, signatures of distributed fracture in quasi-brittle heterogeneous materials, such as wood, granular media, or other fiber composites. Fracture processes in these materials are challenging to simulate with existing methods, due to the prevalence of large numbers of disordered, quasi-random spatial degrees of freedom, representing the complex physical state of a sample over the geometric volume of interest. Here, I develop an algorithm for simulating such processes, building on a class of statistical lattice models of fracture that have been widely investigated in the physics literature. This algorithm is enabled through a recently published mathematical construction based on the inverse transform method of random number sampling. It yields a purely time domain stochastic jump process representing stress fluctuations in the medium. The latter can be readily extended by a mean field approximation that captures the averaged constitutive (stress-strain) behavior of the material. Numerical simulations and interactive examples demonstrate the ability of these algorithms to generate physically plausible acoustic and haptic signatures of fracture in complex, natural materials interactively at audio sampling rates.

  17. Characterizing the Epistemologicai Development of Physics Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gire, Elizabeth; Price, Edward; Jones, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Differences between novice and expert physics students have frequently been reported, yet students' development through intermediate stages has seldom been described. In this study, we characterize undergraduate physics majors' epistemological sophistication at various levels of degree progress. A cross-section of physics majors was surveyed with the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey. Beginning physics majors are significantly more expert-like than non-physics majors in introductory physics courses; furthermore, this high level of sophistication is constant over the first three years of the physics degree program, with increases at the senior and graduate levels. Based on longitudinal data on a subset of students, we observe negligible average shift in students' responses over periods of up to two years. We discuss implications for how and why physics students' epistemological sophistication develops, including a possible connection between CLASS survey response and self-identification as a physicist.

  18. Physical Characterization of Florida International University Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    HANSEN, ERICHK.

    2004-08-19

    Florida International University shipped Laponite, clay (bentonite and kaolin blend), and Quality Assurance Requirements Document AZ-101 simulants to the Savannah River Technology Center for physical characterization and to report the results. The objectives of the task were to measure the physical properties of the fluids provided by FIU and to report the results. The physical properties were measured using the approved River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant characterization procedure [Ref. 1]. This task was conducted in response to the work outlined in CCN066794 [Ref. 2], authored by Gary Smith and William Graves of RPP-WTP.

  19. Public directory data sources do not accurately characterize the food environment in two predominantly rural states.

    PubMed

    Longacre, Meghan R; Primack, Brian A; Owens, Peter M; Gibson, Lucinda; Beauregard, Sandy; Mackenzie, Todd A; Dalton, Madeline A

    2011-04-01

    Communities are being encouraged to develop locally based interventions to address environmental risk factors for obesity. Online public directories represent an affordable and easily accessible mechanism for mapping community food environments, but may have limited utility in rural areas. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of public directories vs rigorous onsite field verification to characterize the community food environment in 32 geographically dispersed towns from two rural states covering 1,237.6 square miles. Eight types of food outlets were assessed in 2007, including food markets and eating establishments, first using two publically available online directories followed by onsite field verification by trained coders. χ(2) and univariate binomial regression were used to determine whether the proportion of outlets accurately listed varied by food outlet type or town population. Among 1,340 identified outlets, only 36.9% were accurately listed through public directories; 29.6% were not listed but were located during field observation. Accuracy varied by outlet type, being most accurate for big box stores and least accurate for farm/produce stands. Overall, public directories accurately identified fewer than half of the food outlets. Accuracy was significantly lower for rural and small towns compared to mid-size and urban towns (P<0.001). In this geographic sample, public directories seriously misrepresented the actual distribution of food outlets, particularly for rural and small towns. To inform local obesity-prevention efforts, communities should strongly consider using field verification to characterize the food environment in low-population areas.

  20. Physically Accurate Soil Freeze-Thaw Processes in a Global Land Surface Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, M.; Haverd, V.

    2013-12-01

    Transfer of energy and moisture in frozen soil, and hence the active layer depth, are strongly influenced by the soil freezing curve which specifies liquid moisture content as a function of temperature. However, the curve is typically not represented in global land surface models, with less physically-based approximations being used instead. In this work, we develop a physically accurate model of soil freeze-thaw processes, suitable for use in a global land surface scheme. We incorporated soil freeze-thaw processes into an existing detailed model for the transfer of heat, liquid water and water vapor in soils, including isotope diagnostics - Soil-Litter-Iso (SLI, Haverd & Cuntz 2010), which has been used successfully for water and carbon balances of the Australian continent (Haverd et al. 2013). A unique feature of SLI is that fluxes of energy and moisture are coupled using a single system of linear equations. The extension to include freeze-thaw processes and snow maintains this elegant coupling, requiring only coefficients in the linear equations to be modified. No impedance factor for hydraulic conductivity is needed because of the formulation by matric flux potential rather than pressure head. Iterations are avoided which results in the same computational speed as without freezing. The extended model is evaluated extensively in stand-alone mode (against theoretical predictions, lab experiments and field data) and as part of the CABLE global land surface scheme. SLI accurately solves the classical Stefan problem of a homogeneous medium undergoing a phase change. The model also accurately reproduces the freezing front, which is observed in laboratory experiments (Hansson et al. 2004). SLI was further tested against observations at a permafrost site in Tibet (Weismüller et al. 2011). It reproduces seasonal thawing and freezing of the active layer to within 3 K of the observed soil temperature and to within 10% of the observed volumetric liquid soil moisture

  1. Physically Accurate Soil Freeze-Thaw Processes in a Global Land Surface Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, Matthias; Haverd, Vanessa

    2014-05-01

    Transfer of energy and moisture in frozen soil, and hence the active layer depth, are strongly influenced by the soil freezing curve which specifies liquid moisture content as a function of temperature. However, the curve is typically not represented in global land surface models, with less physically-based approximations being used instead. In this work, we develop a physically accurate model of soil freeze-thaw processes, suitable for use in a global land surface scheme. We incorporated soil freeze-thaw processes into an existing detailed model for the transfer of heat, liquid water and water vapor in soils, including isotope diagnostics - Soil-Litter-Iso (SLI, Haverd & Cuntz 2010), which has been used successfully for water and carbon balances of the Australian continent (Haverd et al. 2013). A unique feature of SLI is that fluxes of energy and moisture are coupled using a single system of linear equations. The extension to include freeze-thaw processes and snow maintains this elegant coupling, requiring only coefficients in the linear equations to be modified. No impedance factor for hydraulic conductivity is needed because of the formulation by matric flux potential rather than pressure head. Iterations are avoided which results in the same computational speed as without freezing. The extended model is evaluated extensively in stand-alone mode (against theoretical predictions, lab experiments and field data) and as part of the CABLE global land surface scheme. SLI accurately solves the classical Stefan problem of a homogeneous medium undergoing a phase change. The model also accurately reproduces the freezing front, which is observed in laboratory experiments (Hansson et al. 2004). SLI was further tested against observations at a permafrost site in Tibet (Weismüller et al. 2011). It reproduces seasonal thawing and freezing of the active layer to within 3 K of the observed soil temperature and to within 10% of the observed volumetric liquid soil moisture

  2. Characterizing scientific production and consumption in Physics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Perra, Nicola; Gonçalves, Bruno; Ciulla, Fabio; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the entire publication database of the American Physical Society generating longitudinal (50 years) citation networks geolocalized at the level of single urban areas. We define the knowledge diffusion proxy, and scientific production ranking algorithms to capture the spatio-temporal dynamics of Physics knowledge worldwide. By using the knowledge diffusion proxy we identify the key cities in the production and consumption of knowledge in Physics as a function of time. The results from the scientific production ranking algorithm allow us to characterize the top cities for scholarly research in Physics. Although we focus on a single dataset concerning a specific field, the methodology presented here opens the path to comparative studies of the dynamics of knowledge across disciplines and research areas. PMID:23571320

  3. Characterizing scientific production and consumption in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Perra, Nicola; Gonçalves, Bruno; Ciulla, Fabio; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    We analyze the entire publication database of the American Physical Society generating longitudinal (50 years) citation networks geolocalized at the level of single urban areas. We define the knowledge diffusion proxy, and scientific production ranking algorithms to capture the spatio-temporal dynamics of Physics knowledge worldwide. By using the knowledge diffusion proxy we identify the key cities in the production and consumption of knowledge in Physics as a function of time. The results from the scientific production ranking algorithm allow us to characterize the top cities for scholarly research in Physics. Although we focus on a single dataset concerning a specific field, the methodology presented here opens the path to comparative studies of the dynamics of knowledge across disciplines and research areas.

  4. Characterizing scientific production and consumption in physics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Perra, Nicola; Gonçalves, Bruno; Ciulla, Fabio; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the entire publication database of the American Physical Society generating longitudinal (50 years) citation networks geolocalized at the level of single urban areas. We define the knowledge diffusion proxy, and scientific production ranking algorithms to capture the spatio-temporal dynamics of Physics knowledge worldwide. By using the knowledge diffusion proxy we identify the key cities in the production and consumption of knowledge in Physics as a function of time. The results from the scientific production ranking algorithm allow us to characterize the top cities for scholarly research in Physics. Although we focus on a single dataset concerning a specific field, the methodology presented here opens the path to comparative studies of the dynamics of knowledge across disciplines and research areas.

  5. Accurate characterization of weak neutron fields by using a Bayesian approach.

    PubMed

    Medkour Ishak-Boushaki, G; Allab, M

    2017-04-01

    A Bayesian analysis of data derived from neutron spectrometric measurements provides the advantage of determining rigorously integral physical quantities characterizing the neutron field and their respective related uncertainties. The first and essential step in a Bayesian approach is the parameterization of the investigated neutron spectrum. The aim of this paper is to investigate the sensitivity of the Bayesian results, mainly the neutron dose H(*)(10) required for radiation protection purposes and its correlated uncertainty, to the selected neutron spectrum parameterization.

  6. Fast and accurate roughness characterization techniques for wafers and hard disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothe, Hendrik; Kasper, Andre

    1996-11-01

    Especially for wafers, hard disks and flat panel displays fast and accurate technical means for roughness characterization are needed. However, speed and accuracy are contradictory. Generally speaking, fast roughness sensors are not accurate, and precise instruments are slow. It turned out in the last years that with multi aperture fiber optic sensors which acquire ARS/TIS data a very fast estimation of surface roughness is possible. But it is rather difficult to convince e.g. chip manufacturers that the results of such sensors are reliable, because there are no accepted international standards for these kinds of optical measurements. Therefore we decided to establish a setup of our ARS/TIS sensor for roughness characterization and an instrument for roughness measurement in a cleanroom consisting of the following parts: (1) 200 X 200 mm stages, speed 0.4 ms-1, +/- 1 micron accuracy, acceleration 1 g; (2) visual inspection head consisting of 50 X objective and CCD camera; (3) AFM scan head; (4) ARS/TIS fiber optic sensor; and (5) laminar box. Topics of the paper are measurement philosophy, specs of the setup, architecture of the fiber optic ARS/TIS head, as well as data processing algorithms and software.

  7. Physical Characterization of Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxin Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    jacewoburylicwn was obtained. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 115. NUMBER OF PAGES Foreign, BD, Clostridium , Cloning, Vaccines , BL3, ________ DNAotrahnsfery, Gn...met with either very limited success (eg., type A toxin of Clostridium difficile ; von Eichel-Streiber, 1989) or total failure (eg., the bacteriocin of...AD-A27 2 939 GRANT NO: DAMDl7-90-Z-0033 TITLE: PHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM NEUROTOXIN GENES PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Nigel P

  8. Physical Characterization of Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxin Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-17

    type A toxin of Clostridium difficile ; Von Eichel-Streiber, 1989) or total failure (eg., the bacteriocir, of the Clostridium perf•ingens plasmid... CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM NEUROTOXIN GENES PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATIR: NIGEL P. MINTON PI ADDRESS: Public Health Laboratory Service Center for Applied...NUMBERS Physical Characterization of Clostridium botulinum DAMDl7-90-Z-0033 Neurotoxin Genes 61102A 6. AUTHOR(S) 3Ml61102BSI2 AA Nigel P. Minton DA335530

  9. How accurately will SWOT measurements be able to characterize river discharge?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, M.; Alsdorf, D.; Bates, P.; Rodríguez, E.; Andreadis, K.; Clark, E.

    2008-12-01

    The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission is a swath mapping radar altimeter that would provide new measurements of inland water surface elevation (WSE) for rivers, lakes, wetlands and reservoirs. SWOT has been recommended by the National Research Council Decadal Survey to measure ocean topography as well as WSE over land; the proposed launch date timeframe is between 2013 - 2016. SWOT WSE estimates would provide a source of information for characterizing streamflow globally. In this paper, we evaluate the accuracy of river discharge estimates obtained from SWOT measurements over the Ohio River and eight of its major tributaries within the context of a virtual mission (VM). SWOT VM measurements are obtained by simulation from the hydrodynamic model LISFLOOD, using USGS streamflow gages as boundary conditions and validation data. SWOT measurements are then input into an algorithm to obtain estimates of discharge variations. The algorithm is based on Manning's equation, in which river width and slope are obtained from SWOT, roughness is estimated a priori. Three different algorithms are used to estimate depth. SWOT discharge estimates are compared to the discharge simulated by LISFLOOD. In this way, we are able to characterize the accuracy of SWOT estimates of instantaneous discharge. More specifically, we characterize how SWOT accuracy varies as a function of the river characteristics and contributing area, such as Strahler order. More accurate depth and discharge estimates can be obtained by data assimilation, but will be more computationally expensive.

  10. Physical and Numerical Model Studies of Cross-flow Turbines Towards Accurate Parameterization in Array Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnik, M.; Bachant, P.

    2014-12-01

    Cross-flow turbines, often referred to as vertical-axis turbines, show potential for success in marine hydrokinetic (MHK) and wind energy applications, ranging from small- to utility-scale installations in tidal/ocean currents and offshore wind. As turbine designs mature, the research focus is shifting from individual devices to the optimization of turbine arrays. It would be expensive and time-consuming to conduct physical model studies of large arrays at large model scales (to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers), and hence numerical techniques are generally better suited to explore the array design parameter space. However, since the computing power available today is not sufficient to conduct simulations of the flow in and around large arrays of turbines with fully resolved turbine geometries (e.g., grid resolution into the viscous sublayer on turbine blades), the turbines' interaction with the energy resource (water current or wind) needs to be parameterized, or modeled. Models used today--a common model is the actuator disk concept--are not able to predict the unique wake structure generated by cross-flow turbines. This wake structure has been shown to create "constructive" interference in some cases, improving turbine performance in array configurations, in contrast with axial-flow, or horizontal axis devices. Towards a more accurate parameterization of cross-flow turbines, an extensive experimental study was carried out using a high-resolution turbine test bed with wake measurement capability in a large cross-section tow tank. The experimental results were then "interpolated" using high-fidelity Navier--Stokes simulations, to gain insight into the turbine's near-wake. The study was designed to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers for the results to be Reynolds number independent with respect to turbine performance and wake statistics, such that they can be reliably extrapolated to full scale and used for model validation. The end product of

  11. ACCURATE SPECTROSCOPIC CHARACTERIZATION OF PROTONATED OXIRANE: A POTENTIAL PREBIOTIC SPECIES IN TITAN’S ATMOSPHERE

    PubMed Central

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Ali, Ashraf; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    An accurate spectroscopic characterization of protonated oxirane has been carried out by means of state-of-the-art computational methods and approaches. The calculated spectroscopic parameters from our recent computational investigation of oxirane together with the corresponding experimental data available were used to assess the accuracy of our predicted rotational and IR spectra of protonated oxirane. We found an accuracy of about 10 cm−1 for vibrational transitions (fundamentals as well as overtones and combination bands) and, in relative terms, of 0.1% for rotational transitions. We are therefore confident that the spectroscopic data provided herein are a valuable support for the detection of protonated oxirane not only in Titan’s atmosphere but also in the interstellar medium. PMID:26543241

  12. Towards more accurate wind and solar power prediction by improving NWP model physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Andrea; Köhler, Carmen; von Schumann, Jonas; Ritter, Bodo

    2014-05-01

    The growing importance and successive expansion of renewable energies raise new challenges for decision makers, economists, transmission system operators, scientists and many more. In this interdisciplinary field, the role of Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) is to reduce the errors and provide an a priori estimate of remaining uncertainties associated with the large share of weather-dependent power sources. For this purpose it is essential to optimize NWP model forecasts with respect to those prognostic variables which are relevant for wind and solar power plants. An improved weather forecast serves as the basis for a sophisticated power forecasts. Consequently, a well-timed energy trading on the stock market, and electrical grid stability can be maintained. The German Weather Service (DWD) currently is involved with two projects concerning research in the field of renewable energy, namely ORKA*) and EWeLiNE**). Whereas the latter is in collaboration with the Fraunhofer Institute (IWES), the project ORKA is led by energy & meteo systems (emsys). Both cooperate with German transmission system operators. The goal of the projects is to improve wind and photovoltaic (PV) power forecasts by combining optimized NWP and enhanced power forecast models. In this context, the German Weather Service aims to improve its model system, including the ensemble forecasting system, by working on data assimilation, model physics and statistical post processing. This presentation is focused on the identification of critical weather situations and the associated errors in the German regional NWP model COSMO-DE. First steps leading to improved physical parameterization schemes within the NWP-model are presented. Wind mast measurements reaching up to 200 m height above ground are used for the estimation of the (NWP) wind forecast error at heights relevant for wind energy plants. One particular problem is the daily cycle in wind speed. The transition from stable stratification during

  13. Characterizing production and consumption in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Ciulla, Fabio; Goncalves, Bruno; Perra, Nicola; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2013-03-01

    We analyze the entire database of publications in the American Physical Society and generate longitudinal (50 years) citation networks at two different geographical levels. We define the knowledge diffusion proxy and Scientific Production Ranking algorithms to capture the complex nature of citation networks, and to provide a global view of spatial distributions of production and consumption of knowledge in Physics as well as its temporal evolution. Using the knowledge diffusion proxy we identify the key actors in producing and consuming knowledge in Physics as a function of time. The ranking results from the Scientific Production Ranking algorithm allow us to characterize the top countries/cities in the world for Physical sciences. Among all the results, we find that in 50 years major states and cities in US stably rank on the top and have been main knowledge producers, whereas the major European countries, Japan and Russia have greatly improved their their ranking since 1990. Interestingly, we notice that China and Spain as well as major cities in those countries have gradually become major knowledge consumers in the last two decades.

  14. 40 CFR 792.135 - Physical and chemical characterization studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Physical and chemical characterization... A Study § 792.135 Physical and chemical characterization studies. (a) All provisions of the GLPs shall apply to physical and chemical characterization studies designed to determine...

  15. 40 CFR 792.135 - Physical and chemical characterization studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Physical and chemical characterization... A Study § 792.135 Physical and chemical characterization studies. (a) All provisions of the GLPs shall apply to physical and chemical characterization studies designed to determine...

  16. 40 CFR 792.135 - Physical and chemical characterization studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Physical and chemical characterization... A Study § 792.135 Physical and chemical characterization studies. (a) All provisions of the GLPs shall apply to physical and chemical characterization studies designed to determine...

  17. 40 CFR 792.135 - Physical and chemical characterization studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Physical and chemical characterization... A Study § 792.135 Physical and chemical characterization studies. (a) All provisions of the GLPs shall apply to physical and chemical characterization studies designed to determine...

  18. 40 CFR 792.135 - Physical and chemical characterization studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Physical and chemical characterization... A Study § 792.135 Physical and chemical characterization studies. (a) All provisions of the GLPs shall apply to physical and chemical characterization studies designed to determine...

  19. Characterization of the physical properties for solid granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Jonathan R.; Shadle, Lawrence J.; Guenther, Chris; Benyahia, Sofiane; Mei, Joseph S.; Banta, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Accurate prediction of the behavior of a system is strongly governed by the components within that system. For multiphase systems incorporating solid powder-like particles, there are many different physical properties which need to be known to some level of accuracy for proper design, modeling, or data analysis. In the past, the material properties were determined initially as a secondary part of the study or design. In an attempt to provide results with the least level of uncertainty, a procedure was developed and implemented to provide consistent analysis of several different types of materials. The properties that were characterized included particle sizing and size distributions, shape analysis, density (particle, skeletal and bulk), minimum fluidization velocities, void fractions, particle porosity, and assignment within the Geldart Classification. In the methods used for this experiment, a novel form of the Ergun equation was used to determine the bulk void fractions and particle density. Materials of known properties were initially characterized to validate the accuracy and methodology, prior to testing materials of unknown properties. The procedures used yielded valid and accurate results, with a high level of repeatability. A database of these materials has been developed to assist in model validation efforts and future designs. It is also anticipated that further development of these procedures wil be expanded increasing the properties included in the database.

  20. Accurate Characterization of Benign and Cancerous Breast Tissues: Aspecific Patient Studies using Piezoresistive Microcantilevers

    PubMed Central

    PANDYA, HARDIK J.; ROY, RAJARSHI; CHEN, WENJIN; CHEKMAREVA, MARINA A.; FORAN, DAVID J.; DESAI, JAYDEV P.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the largest detected cancer amongst women in the US. In this work, our team reports on the development of piezoresistive microcantilevers (PMCs) to investigate their potential use in the accurate detection and characterization of benign and diseased breast tissues by performing indentations on the micro-scale tissue specimens. The PMCs used in these experiments have been fabricated using laboratory-made silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate, which significantly reduces the fabrication costs. The PMCs are 260 μm long, 35 μm wide and 2 μm thick with resistivity of order 1.316 X 10−3 Ω-cm obtained by using boron diffusion technique. For indenting the tissue, we utilized 8 μm thick cylindrical SU-8 tip. The PMC was calibrated against a known AFM probe. Breast tissue cores from seven different specimens were indented using PMC to identify benign and cancerous tissue cores. Furthermore, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) of benign and cancerous specimens showed marked differences in the tissue morphology, which further validates our observed experimental data with the PMCs. While these patient aspecific feasibility studies clearly demonstrate the ability to discriminate between benign and cancerous breast tissues, further investigation is necessary to perform automated mechano-phenotyping (classification) of breast cancer: from onset to disease progression. PMID:25128621

  1. Accurate means of detecting and characterizing abnormal patterns of ventricular activation by phase image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Botvinick, E.H.; Frais, M.A.; Shosa, D.W.; O'Connell, J.W.; Pacheco-Alvarez, J.A.; Scheinman, M.; Hattner, R.S.; Morady, F.; Faulkner, D.B.

    1982-08-01

    The ability of scintigraphic phase image analysis to characterize patterns of abnormal ventricular activation was investigated. The pattern of phase distribution and sequential phase changes over both right and left ventricular regions of interest were evaluated in 16 patients with normal electrical activation and wall motion and compared with those in 8 patients with an artificial pacemaker and 4 patients with sinus rhythm with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and delta waves. Normally, the site of earliest phase angle was seen at the base of the interventricular septum, with sequential change affecting the body of the septum and the cardiac apex and then spreading laterally to involve the body of both ventricles. The site of earliest phase angle was located at the apex of the right ventricle in seven patients with a right ventricular endocardial pacemaker and on the lateral left ventricular wall in one patient with a left ventricular epicardial pacemaker. In each case the site corresponded exactly to the position of the pacing electrode as seen on posteroanterior and left lateral chest X-ray films, and sequential phase changes spread from the initial focus to affect both ventricles. In each of the patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, the site of earliest ventricular phase angle was located, and it corresponded exactly to the site of the bypass tract as determined by endocardial mapping. In this way, four bypass pathways, two posterior left paraseptal, one left lateral and one right lateral, were correctly localized scintigraphically. On the basis of the sequence of mechanical contraction, phase image analysis provides an accurate noninvasive method of detecting abnormal foci of ventricular activation.

  2. In-Depth Glycoproteomic Characterization of γ-Conglutin by High-Resolution Accurate Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Schiarea, Silvia; Arnoldi, Lolita; Fanelli, Roberto; De Combarieu, Eric; Chiabrando, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    The molecular characterization of bioactive food components is necessary for understanding the mechanisms of their beneficial or detrimental effects on human health. This study focused on γ-conglutin, a well-known lupin seed N-glycoprotein with health-promoting properties and controversial allergenic potential. Given the importance of N-glycosylation for the functional and structural characteristics of proteins, we studied the purified protein by a mass spectrometry-based glycoproteomic approach able to identify the structure, micro-heterogeneity and attachment site of the bound N-glycan(s), and to provide extensive coverage of the protein sequence. The peptide/N-glycopeptide mixtures generated by enzymatic digestion (with or without N-deglycosylation) were analyzed by high-resolution accurate mass liquid chromatography–multi-stage mass spectrometry. The four main micro-heterogeneous variants of the single N-glycan bound to γ-conglutin were identified as Man2(Xyl) (Fuc) GlcNAc2, Man3(Xyl) (Fuc) GlcNAc2, GlcNAcMan3(Xyl) (Fuc) GlcNAc2 and GlcNAc 2Man3(Xyl) (Fuc) GlcNAc2. These carry both core β1,2-xylose and core α1-3-fucose (well known Cross-Reactive Carbohydrate Determinants), but corresponding fucose-free variants were also identified as minor components. The N-glycan was proven to reside on Asn131, one of the two potential N-glycosylation sites. The extensive coverage of the γ-conglutin amino acid sequence suggested three alternative N-termini of the small subunit, that were later confirmed by direct-infusion Orbitrap mass spectrometry analysis of the intact subunit. PMID:24069245

  3. 40 CFR 160.135 - Physical and chemical characterization studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Physical and chemical characterization... and chemical characterization studies. (a) All provisions of the GLP standards shall apply to physical and chemical characterization studies designed to determine stability, solubility, octanol...

  4. 40 CFR 160.135 - Physical and chemical characterization studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Physical and chemical characterization... and chemical characterization studies. (a) All provisions of the GLP standards shall apply to physical and chemical characterization studies designed to determine stability, solubility, octanol...

  5. 40 CFR 160.135 - Physical and chemical characterization studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Physical and chemical characterization... and chemical characterization studies. (a) All provisions of the GLP standards shall apply to physical and chemical characterization studies designed to determine stability, solubility, octanol...

  6. 40 CFR 160.135 - Physical and chemical characterization studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Physical and chemical characterization... and chemical characterization studies. (a) All provisions of the GLP standards shall apply to physical and chemical characterization studies designed to determine stability, solubility, octanol...

  7. 40 CFR 160.135 - Physical and chemical characterization studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Physical and chemical characterization... and chemical characterization studies. (a) All provisions of the GLP standards shall apply to physical and chemical characterization studies designed to determine stability, solubility, octanol...

  8. Physical activity intensity can be accurately monitored by smartphone global positioning system 'app'.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Brett Ashley; Bruce, Lyndell; Benson, Amanda Clare

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring physical activity is important to better individualise health and fitness benefits. This study assessed the concurrent validity of a smartphone global positioning system (GPS) 'app' and a sport-specific GPS device with a similar sampling rate, to measure physical activity components of speed and distance, compared to a higher sampling sport-specific GPS device. Thirty-eight (21 female, 17 male) participants, mean age of 24.68, s = 6.46 years, completed two 2.400 km trials around an all-weather athletics track wearing GPSports Pro™ (PRO), GPSports WiSpi™ (WISPI) and an iPhone™ with a Motion X GPS™ 'app' (MOTIONX). Statistical agreement, assessed using t-tests and Bland-Altman plots, indicated an (mean; 95% LOA) underestimation of 2% for average speed (0.126 km·h(-1); -0.389 to 0.642; p < .001), 1.7% for maximal speed (0.442 km·h(-1); -2.676 to 3.561; p = .018) and 1.9% for distance (0.045 km; -0.140 to 0.232; p < .001) by MOTIONX compared to that measured by PRO. In contrast, compared to PRO, WISPI overestimated average speed (0.232 km·h(-1); -0.376 to 0.088; p < .001) and distance (0.083 km; -0.129 to -0.038; p < .001) by 3.5% whilst underestimating maximal speed by 2.5% (0.474 km·h(-1); -1.152 to 2.099; p < .001). Despite the statistically significant difference, the MOTIONX measures intensity of physical activity, with a similar error as WISPI, to an acceptable level for population-based monitoring in unimpeded open-air environments. This presents a low-cost, minimal burden opportunity to remotely monitor physical activity participation to improve the prescription of exercise as medicine.

  9. [Accurate assessment of heart murmurs in children: thorough medical history and physical examination required].

    PubMed

    Brus, F; Vandewall, M; Molenschot, M M C; van Setten, P A; Landstra, A M

    2006-07-08

    4 children, boys aged 12, 5, 1.5 and 11 years, had a heart murmur. The 12-year-old boy could also not finish a football match and appeared to have atrioseptal defects (ASD). The 1.5-year-old boy had pulmonary symptoms that were not responsive to asthma medication; he also had ASD. The 11-year-old boy had had chest pain and pressure following exertion for 2 years; he appeared to have an aortic stenosis. Symptoms disappeared in all 3 patients after surgical correction. In the 5-year-old asymptomatic boy the murmur was deemed to be innocent following medical history and physical examination. Children frequently have heart murmurs. Most heart murmurs are innocent but some are caused by heart defects. Careful evaluation of the medical history and physical examination are critical in the differentiation of innocent and pathological heart murmurs. Routine supplementary diagnostic tests in children with heart murmurs are of limited value and are often misleading. One should inquire about specific and nonspecific symptoms and also perform systematic inspection, palpation and auscultation to identify any characteristics that suggest a heart murmur caused by a heart defect.

  10. Physical sampling for site and waste characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnough, T.L.

    1996-08-01

    Physical sampling plays a basic role in high-level radioactive waste management program effort. The term ``physical sampling`` used here means collecting tangible, physical samples of soil, water, air, waste streams, or other materials. The industry defines the term ``physical sampling`` broadly to include measurements of physical conditions such as temperature, wind conditions, and pH, which are also often taken in a sample collection effort. Most environmental compliance actions are supported by the results of taking, recording, and analyzing physical samples and the measurements of physical conditions taken in association with sample collecting. Therefore, the when and how to take samples is needed to be known and planned.

  11. Characterization of the Source Physics Experiment Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussman, A. J.; Schultz-Fellenz, E. S.; Broome, S. T.; Townsend, M.; Abbott, R. E.; Snelson, C. M.; Cogbill, A. H.; Conklin, G.; Mitra, G.; Sabbeth, L.

    2012-12-01

    Designed to improve long-range treaty monitoring capabilities, the Source Physics Experiments, conducted at the Nevada National Security Site, also provide an opportunity to advance near-field monitoring and field-based investigations of suspected underground test locations. In particular, features associated with underground testing can be evaluated using Source Physics Experiment activities as analogs, linking on-site inspections with remote sensing technologies. Following a calibration shot (SPE 1), SPE 2 (10/2011) and SPE 3 (07/2012) were performed in the same emplacement hole with 1.0 ton of explosives at 150 ft depth. Because one of the goals of the Source Physics Experiments is to determine damage effects on seismic wave propagation and improve modeling capabilities, a key component in the predictive component and ultimate validation of the models is a full understanding of the intervening geology between the source and instrumented bore holes. Ground-based LIDAR and fracture mapping, mechanical properties determined via laboratory testing of rock core, discontinuity analysis and optical microscopy of the core rocks were performed prior to and following each experiment. In addition, gravity and magnetic data were collected between SPE 2 and 3. The source region of the explosions was also characterized using cross-borehole seismic tomography and vertical seismic profiling utilizing two sets of two boreholes within 40 meters of ground zero. The two sets of boreholes are co-linear with the explosives hole in two directions. Results of the LIDAR collects from both SPE 2 and 3 indicate a permanent ground displacement of up to several centimeters aligning along the projected surface traces of two faults observed in the core and fractures mapped at the surface. Laboratory testing and optical work show a difference in the characteristics of the rocks below and above 40 feet and within the fault zones.The estimated near-surface densities from the gravity survey show

  12. Characterizing the epistemological development of physics majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gire, Elizabeth; Jones, Barbara; Price, Edward

    2009-06-01

    Students in introductory physics courses are likely to have views about physics that differ from those of experts. However, students who continue to study physics eventually become experts themselves. Presumably these students either possess or develop more expertlike views. To investigate this process, the views of introductory physics students majoring in physics are compared with the views of introductory physics students majoring in engineering. In addition, the views of physics majors are assessed at various stages of degree progress. The Colorado learning attitudes about science survey is used to evaluate students’ views about physics, and students’ overall survey scores and responses to individual survey items are analyzed. Beginning physics majors are significantly more expertlike than nonmajors in introductory physics courses, and this high level of sophistication is consistent for most of undergraduate study.

  13. Quantitatively accurate activity measurements with a dedicated cardiac SPECT camera: Physical phantom experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pourmoghaddas, Amir Wells, R. Glenn

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Recently, there has been increased interest in dedicated cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scanners with pinhole collimation and improved detector technology due to their improved count sensitivity and resolution over traditional parallel-hole cameras. With traditional cameras, energy-based approaches are often used in the clinic for scatter compensation because they are fast and easily implemented. Some of the cardiac cameras use cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) detectors which can complicate the use of energy-based scatter correction (SC) due to the low-energy tail—an increased number of unscattered photons detected with reduced energy. Modified energy-based scatter correction methods can be implemented, but their level of accuracy is unclear. In this study, the authors validated by physical phantom experiments the quantitative accuracy and reproducibility of easily implemented correction techniques applied to {sup 99m}Tc myocardial imaging with a CZT-detector-based gamma camera with multiple heads, each with a single-pinhole collimator. Methods: Activity in the cardiac compartment of an Anthropomorphic Torso phantom (Data Spectrum Corporation) was measured through 15 {sup 99m}Tc-SPECT acquisitions. The ratio of activity concentrations in organ compartments resembled a clinical {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi scan and was kept consistent across all experiments (1.2:1 heart to liver and 1.5:1 heart to lung). Two background activity levels were considered: no activity (cold) and an activity concentration 1/10th of the heart (hot). A plastic “lesion” was placed inside of the septal wall of the myocardial insert to simulate the presence of a region without tracer uptake and contrast in this lesion was calculated for all images. The true net activity in each compartment was measured with a dose calibrator (CRC-25R, Capintec, Inc.). A 10 min SPECT image was acquired using a dedicated cardiac camera with CZT detectors (Discovery NM530c, GE

  14. Characterization of condenser microphones under different environmental conditions for accurate speed of sound measurements with acoustic resonators.

    PubMed

    Guianvarc'h, Cécile; Gavioso, Roberto M; Benedetto, Giuliana; Pitre, Laurent; Bruneau, Michel

    2009-07-01

    Condenser microphones are more commonly used and have been extensively modeled and characterized in air at ambient temperature and static pressure. However, several applications of interest for metrology and physical acoustics require to use these transducers in significantly different environmental conditions. Particularly, the extremely accurate determination of the speed of sound in monoatomic gases, which is pursued for a determination of the Boltzmann constant k by an acoustic method, entails the use of condenser microphones mounted within a spherical cavity, over a wide range of static pressures, at the temperature of the triple point of water (273.16 K). To further increase the accuracy achievable in this application, the microphone frequency response and its acoustic input impedance need to be precisely determined over the same static pressure and temperature range. Few previous works examined the influence of static pressure, temperature, and gas composition on the microphone's sensitivity. In this work, the results of relative calibrations of 1/4 in. condenser microphones obtained using an electrostatic actuator technique are presented. The calibrations are performed in pure helium and argon gas at temperatures near 273 K and in the pressure range between 10 and 600 kPa. These experimental results are compared with the predictions of a realistic model available in the literature, finding a remarkable good agreement. The model provides an estimate of the acoustic impedance of 1/4 in. condenser microphones as a function of frequency and static pressure and is used to calculate the corresponding frequency perturbations induced on the normal modes of a spherical cavity when this is filled with helium or argon gas.

  15. Characterization of condenser microphones under different environmental conditions for accurate speed of sound measurements with acoustic resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Guianvarc'h, Cecile; Pitre, Laurent; Bruneau, Michel

    2009-07-15

    Condenser microphones are more commonly used and have been extensively modeled and characterized in air at ambient temperature and static pressure. However, several applications of interest for metrology and physical acoustics require to use these transducers in significantly different environmental conditions. Particularly, the extremely accurate determination of the speed of sound in monoatomic gases, which is pursued for a determination of the Boltzmann constant k by an acoustic method, entails the use of condenser microphones mounted within a spherical cavity, over a wide range of static pressures, at the temperature of the triple point of water (273.16 K). To further increase the accuracy achievable in this application, the microphone frequency response and its acoustic input impedance need to be precisely determined over the same static pressure and temperature range. Few previous works examined the influence of static pressure, temperature, and gas composition on the microphone's sensitivity. In this work, the results of relative calibrations of 1/4 in. condenser microphones obtained using an electrostatic actuator technique are presented. The calibrations are performed in pure helium and argon gas at temperatures near 273 K and in the pressure range between 10 and 600 kPa. These experimental results are compared with the predictions of a realistic model available in the literature, finding a remarkable good agreement. The model provides an estimate of the acoustic impedance of 1/4 in. condenser microphones as a function of frequency and static pressure and is used to calculate the corresponding frequency perturbations induced on the normal modes of a spherical cavity when this is filled with helium or argon gas.

  16. Physical characterization of fast rotator NEOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikwaya Eluo, Jean-Baptiste; Hergenrother, Carl W.

    2015-08-01

    Understanding the physical characteristics of fast rotator NEOs (sub-km sizes with H > 22) is important for two reasons: to establish properties that can constraint models of their potential hazard, and to learn about the origin and the evolution of the solar system. Technically it is difficult to cover different ranges of wavelengths using one telescope with one instrument. Setting up a network of telescopes with different instruments observing simultaneously the same object will efficiently contribute to the characterization of NEOs.ART (Arizona Robotic Telescope) is a University of Arizona initiative whose goal is to use local 2-m size telescopes to provide near real-time observations of Target of Opportunity objects covering the visible and the near- infrared wavelengths. We plan to use three telescopes of the ART project to observe fast rotator NEOs: 1) VATT (Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope) at Mount Graham (longitude: -109.8719, latitude: 32.7016, elevation: 10469 feet) with VATT-4K optical imager for photometry to estimate colors, lightcurves to get the rotation rate, and estimate the phase angle function of NEOs, 2) Bok 2.3 m at Kitt Peak (longitude: -111.6004, latitude: 31.9629, elevation: 6795 feet) with BCSpec (Boller & Chivens Spectrograph) for visible spectroscopy, and 3) Kuiper 1.5-m at Mount Bigelow (longitude: -110.7345, latitude: 32.4165, elevation: 8235 feet) with a near-infrared instrument.We report here the preliminary results of several NEOs whose rotation rate, color, and type have been estimated using photometry with images recorded with VATT-4K. 2009 SQ104 has a rotation rate of 6.85+/- 0.03 h, 2014 AY28 has a rotation rate of 0.91 +/- 0.02 h, 2014 EC of 0.54 +/-0.04 h, 2014 FA44 of 3.45 +/- 0.05 h, 2014 KS40 of 1.11 +/- 0.06 h, 2011 PT of 0.17 +/- 0.05 h, 2014 SC324 of 0.36 +/- 0.43 h, 2014 WF201 of 1.00 +/- 0.03 h. Of these objects, 2014 HM2, 2014 FA, 2014 SB145, 2011 PT fall among X-type asteroids; 2014 KS, 2014 WF are likely to be

  17. Refined Characterization of Student Perspectives on Quantum Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baily, Charles; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2010-01-01

    The perspectives of introductory classical physics students can often negatively influence how those students later interpret quantum phenomena when taking an introductory course in modern physics. A detailed exploration of student perspectives on the interpretation of quantum physics is needed, both to characterize student understanding of…

  18. Efficient and accurate local model for colorimetric characterization of liquid-crystal displays.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wenhai; Xu, Haisong; Gong, Rui

    2012-01-01

    Taking the chromaticity inconstancy of LCDs and the inverse efficiency into account, a novel local colorimetric characterization model was developed in this Letter. Rather than dividing the device color space into many subspaces to refine the chromaticity description as existent local models, the proposed model tailored the transformation relationship uniquely for each characterized color with look-up tables and a local chromaticity matrix. Based on this model, the characterization task could be efficiently accomplished within a few steps for either the forward or the inverse transformation. Test experiments on several commercial LCDs indicated that the average color difference between the estimated and measured tristimulus values could be achieved in a low level of about 0.4 CIEDE2000 units, effectively demonstrating the proposed model.

  19. Collision-induced fragmentation accurate mass spectrometric analysis methods to rapidly characterize plant extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rapid advances in analytical chromatography equipment have made the reliable and reproducible measurement of a wide range of plant chemical components possible. Full chemical characterization of a given plant material is possible with the new mass spectrometers currently available. However, th...

  20. Collision-induced fragmentation accurate mass spectrometric analysis methods to rapidly characterize phytochemicals in plant extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rapid advances in analytical chromatography equipment have made the reliable and reproducible measurement of a wide range of plant chemical components possible. Full chemical characterization of a given plant material is possible with the new mass spectrometers currently available. New methods a...

  1. Collision-induced fragmentation accurate mass spectrometric analysis methods to rapidly characterize plant extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rapid advances in analytical chromatography equipment have made the reliable and reproducible measurement of a wide range of plant chemical components possible. Full chemical characterization of a given plant material is possible with the new mass spectrometers currently available. For phytochem...

  2. Characterization of Thin Film Materials using SCAN meta-GGA, an Accurate Nonempirical Density Functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buda, I. G.; Lane, C.; Barbiellini, B.; Ruzsinszky, A.; Sun, J.; Bansil, A.

    2017-03-01

    We discuss self-consistently obtained ground-state electronic properties of monolayers of graphene and a number of ’beyond graphene’ compounds, including films of transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), using the recently proposed strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN) meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) to the density functional theory. The SCAN meta-GGA results are compared with those based on the local density approximation (LDA) as well as the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). As expected, the GGA yields expanded lattices and softened bonds in relation to the LDA, but the SCAN meta-GGA systematically improves the agreement with experiment. Our study suggests the efficacy of the SCAN functional for accurate modeling of electronic structures of layered materials in high-throughput calculations more generally.

  3. Characterization of Thin Film Materials using SCAN meta-GGA, an Accurate Nonempirical Density Functional

    PubMed Central

    Buda, I. G.; Lane, C.; Barbiellini, B.; Ruzsinszky, A.; Sun, J.; Bansil, A.

    2017-01-01

    We discuss self-consistently obtained ground-state electronic properties of monolayers of graphene and a number of ’beyond graphene’ compounds, including films of transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), using the recently proposed strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN) meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) to the density functional theory. The SCAN meta-GGA results are compared with those based on the local density approximation (LDA) as well as the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). As expected, the GGA yields expanded lattices and softened bonds in relation to the LDA, but the SCAN meta-GGA systematically improves the agreement with experiment. Our study suggests the efficacy of the SCAN functional for accurate modeling of electronic structures of layered materials in high-throughput calculations more generally. PMID:28333131

  4. Accurate Wind Characterization in Complex Terrain Using the Immersed Boundary Method

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, K A; Chow, F K; Lundquist, J K; Kosovic, B

    2009-09-30

    This paper describes an immersed boundary method (IBM) that facilitates the explicit resolution of complex terrain within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Two different interpolation methods, trilinear and inverse distance weighting, are used at the core of the IBM algorithm. Functional aspects of the algorithm's implementation and the accuracy of results are considered. Simulations of flow over a three-dimensional hill with shallow terrain slopes are preformed with both WRF's native terrain-following coordinate and with both IB methods. Comparisons of flow fields from the three simulations show excellent agreement, indicating that both IB methods produce accurate results. However, when ease of implementation is considered, inverse distance weighting is superior. Furthermore, inverse distance weighting is shown to be more adept at handling highly complex urban terrain, where the trilinear interpolation algorithm breaks down. This capability is demonstrated by using the inverse distance weighting core of the IBM to model atmospheric flow in downtown Oklahoma City.

  5. CAST: a new program package for the accurate characterization of large and flexible molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Grebner, Christoph; Becker, Johannes; Weber, Daniel; Bellinger, Daniel; Tafipolski, Maxim; Brückner, Charlotte; Engels, Bernd

    2014-09-15

    The presented program package, Conformational Analysis and Search Tool (CAST) allows the accurate treatment of large and flexible (macro) molecular systems. For the determination of thermally accessible minima CAST offers the newly developed TabuSearch algorithm, but algorithms such as Monte Carlo (MC), MC with minimization, and molecular dynamics are implemented as well. For the determination of reaction paths, CAST provides the PathOpt, the Nudge Elastic band, and the umbrella sampling approach. Access to free energies is possible through the free energy perturbation approach. Along with a number of standard force fields, a newly developed symmetry-adapted perturbation theory-based force field is included. Semiempirical computations are possible through DFTB+ and MOPAC interfaces. For calculations based on density functional theory, a Message Passing Interface (MPI) interface to the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU)-accelerated TeraChem program is available. The program is available on request.

  6. Efficient design, accurate fabrication and effective characterization of plasmonic quasicrystalline arrays of nano-spherical particles

    PubMed Central

    Namin, Farhad A.; Yuwen, Yu A.; Liu, Liu; Panaretos, Anastasios H.; Werner, Douglas H.; Mayer, Theresa S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the scattering properties of two-dimensional quasicrystalline plasmonic lattices are investigated. We combine a newly developed synthesis technique, which allows for accurate fabrication of spherical nanoparticles, with a recently published variation of generalized multiparticle Mie theory to develop the first quantitative model for plasmonic nano-spherical arrays based on quasicrystalline morphologies. In particular, we study the scattering properties of Penrose and Ammann- Beenker gold spherical nanoparticle array lattices. We demonstrate that by using quasicrystalline lattices, one can obtain multi-band or broadband plasmonic resonances which are not possible in periodic structures. Unlike previously published works, our technique provides quantitative results which show excellent agreement with experimental measurements. PMID:26911709

  7. Development of transfer standard devices for ensuring the accurate calibration of ultrasonic physical therapy machines in clinical use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hekkenberg, R. T.; Richards, A.; Beissner, K.; Zeqiri, B.; Prout, G.; Cantrall, Ch; Bezemer, R. A.; Koch, Ch; Hodnett, M.

    2004-01-01

    Physical therapy ultrasound is widely applied to patients. However, many devices do not comply with the relevant standard stating that the actual power output shall be within +/-20% of the device indication. Extreme cases have been reported: from delivering effectively no ultrasound or operating at maximum power at all powers indicated. This can potentially lead to patient injury as well as mistreatment. The present European (EC) project is an ongoing attempt to improve the quality of the treatment of patients being treated with ultrasonic physical-therapy. A Portable ultrasound Power Standard (PPS) is being developed and accurately calibrated. The PPS includes: Ultrasound transducers (including one exhibiting an unusual output) and a driver for the ultrasound transducers that has calibration and proficiency test functions. Also included with the PPS is a Cavitation Detector to determine the onset of cavitation occurring within the propagation medium. The PPS will be suitable for conducting in-the-field accreditation (proficiency testing and calibration). In order to be accredited it will be important to be able to show traceability of the calibration, the calibration process and qualification of testing staff. The clinical user will benefit from traceability because treatments will be performed more reliably.

  8. An infrastructure for accurate characterization of single-event transients in digital circuits☆

    PubMed Central

    Savulimedu Veeravalli, Varadan; Polzer, Thomas; Schmid, Ulrich; Steininger, Andreas; Hofbauer, Michael; Schweiger, Kurt; Dietrich, Horst; Schneider-Hornstein, Kerstin; Zimmermann, Horst; Voss, Kay-Obbe; Merk, Bruno; Hajek, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We present the architecture and a detailed pre-fabrication analysis of a digital measurement ASIC facilitating long-term irradiation experiments of basic asynchronous circuits, which also demonstrates the suitability of the general approach for obtaining accurate radiation failure models developed in our FATAL project. Our ASIC design combines radiation targets like Muller C-elements and elastic pipelines as well as standard combinational gates and flip-flops with an elaborate on-chip measurement infrastructure. Major architectural challenges result from the fact that the latter must operate reliably under the same radiation conditions the target circuits are exposed to, without wasting precious die area for a rad-hard design. A measurement architecture based on multiple non-rad-hard counters is used, which we show to be resilient against double faults, as well as many triple and even higher-multiplicity faults. The design evaluation is done by means of comprehensive fault injection experiments, which are based on detailed Spice models of the target circuits in conjunction with a standard double-exponential current injection model for single-event transients (SET). To be as accurate as possible, the parameters of this current model have been aligned with results obtained from 3D device simulation models, which have in turn been validated and calibrated using micro-beam radiation experiments at the GSI in Darmstadt, Germany. For the latter, target circuits instrumented with high-speed sense amplifiers have been used for analog SET recording. Together with a probabilistic analysis of the sustainable particle flow rates, based on a detailed area analysis and experimental cross-section data, we can conclude that the proposed architecture will indeed sustain significant target hit rates, without exceeding the resilience bound of the measurement infrastructure. PMID:24748694

  9. An infrastructure for accurate characterization of single-event transients in digital circuits.

    PubMed

    Savulimedu Veeravalli, Varadan; Polzer, Thomas; Schmid, Ulrich; Steininger, Andreas; Hofbauer, Michael; Schweiger, Kurt; Dietrich, Horst; Schneider-Hornstein, Kerstin; Zimmermann, Horst; Voss, Kay-Obbe; Merk, Bruno; Hajek, Michael

    2013-11-01

    We present the architecture and a detailed pre-fabrication analysis of a digital measurement ASIC facilitating long-term irradiation experiments of basic asynchronous circuits, which also demonstrates the suitability of the general approach for obtaining accurate radiation failure models developed in our FATAL project. Our ASIC design combines radiation targets like Muller C-elements and elastic pipelines as well as standard combinational gates and flip-flops with an elaborate on-chip measurement infrastructure. Major architectural challenges result from the fact that the latter must operate reliably under the same radiation conditions the target circuits are exposed to, without wasting precious die area for a rad-hard design. A measurement architecture based on multiple non-rad-hard counters is used, which we show to be resilient against double faults, as well as many triple and even higher-multiplicity faults. The design evaluation is done by means of comprehensive fault injection experiments, which are based on detailed Spice models of the target circuits in conjunction with a standard double-exponential current injection model for single-event transients (SET). To be as accurate as possible, the parameters of this current model have been aligned with results obtained from 3D device simulation models, which have in turn been validated and calibrated using micro-beam radiation experiments at the GSI in Darmstadt, Germany. For the latter, target circuits instrumented with high-speed sense amplifiers have been used for analog SET recording. Together with a probabilistic analysis of the sustainable particle flow rates, based on a detailed area analysis and experimental cross-section data, we can conclude that the proposed architecture will indeed sustain significant target hit rates, without exceeding the resilience bound of the measurement infrastructure.

  10. Accurate spectroscopic characterization of ethyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide isotopologues: a route toward their astrophysical detection

    SciTech Connect

    Puzzarini, C.; Senent, M. L.; Domínguez-Gómez, R.; Carvajal, M.; Hochlaf, M.; Al-Mogren, M. Mogren E-mail: senent@iem.cfmac.csic.es E-mail: miguel.carvajal@dfa.uhu.es E-mail: mmogren@ksu.edu.sa

    2014-11-20

    Using state-of-the-art computational methodologies, we predict a set of reliable rotational and torsional parameters for ethyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide monosubstituted isotopologues. This includes rotational, quartic, and sextic centrifugal-distortion constants, torsional levels, and torsional splittings. The accuracy of the present data was assessed from a comparison to the available experimental data. Generally, our computed parameters should help in the characterization and the identification of these organo-sulfur molecules in laboratory settings and in the interstellar medium.

  11. Characterizing the gender gap in introductory physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kost, Lauren E.; Pollock, Steven J.; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2009-06-01

    Previous research [S. J. Pollock , Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 3, 1 (2007)] showed that despite the use of interactive engagement techniques, the gap in performance between males and females on a conceptual learning survey persisted from pretest to post-test at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Such findings were counter to previously published work [M. Lorenzo , Am. J. Phys. 74, 118 (2006)]. This study begins by identifying a variety of other gender differences. There is a small but significant difference in the course grades of males and females. Males and females have significantly different prior understandings of physics and mathematics. Females are less likely to take high school physics than males, although they are equally likely to take high school calculus. Males and females also differ in their incoming attitudes and beliefs about physics. This collection of background factors is analyzed to determine the extent to which each factor correlates with performance on a conceptual post-test and with gender. Binned by quintiles, we observe that males and females with similar pretest scores do not have significantly different post-test scores (p>0.2) . The post-test data are then modeled using two regression models (multiple regression and logistic regression) to estimate the gender gap in post-test scores after controlling for these important prior factors. These prior factors account for about 70% of the observed gender gap. The results indicate that the gender gap exists in interactive physics classes at our institution but is largely associated with differences in previous physics and math knowledge and incoming attitudes and beliefs.

  12. Design and highly accurate 3D displacement characterization of monolithic SMA microgripper using computer vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellouard, Yves; Sulzmann, Armin; Jacot, Jacques; Clavel, Reymond

    1998-01-01

    In the robotics field, several grippers have been developed using SMA technologies, but, so far, SMA is only used as the actuating part of the mechanical device. However mechanical device requires assembly and in some cases this means friction. In the case of micro-grippers, this becomes a major problem due to the small size of the components. In this paper, a new monolithic concept of micro-gripper is presented. This concept is applied to the grasping of sub- millimeter optical elements such as Selfoc lenses and the fastening of optical fibers. Measurements are performed using a newly developed high precision 3D-computer vision tracking system to characterize the spatial positions of the micro-gripper in action. To characterize relative motion of the micro-gripper the natural texture of the micro-gripper is used to compute 3D displacement. The microscope image CCD receivers high frequency changes in light intensity from the surface of the ripper. Using high resolution camera calibration, passive auto focus algorithms and 2D object recognition, the position of the micro-gripper can be characterized in the 3D workspace and can be guided in future micro assembly tasks.

  13. Accurate characterization of SiO2 thin films using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Matthias; Lomonosov, Alexey M; Warkentin, Paul; Jäger, Philipp M; Ruile, Werner; Kirschner, Hans-Peter; Honal, Matthias; Bleyl, Ingo; Mayer, Andreas P; Reindl, Leonhard M

    2015-04-01

    We have investigated the acoustic properties of silicon dioxide thin films. Therefore, we determined the phase velocity dispersion of LiNbO3 substrate covered with SiO2 deposited by a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and a physical vapor deposition (PVD) process using differential delay lines and laser ultrasonic method. The density p and the elastic constants (c11 and c44) can be extracted by fitting corresponding finite element simulations to the phase velocities within an accuracy of at least +4%. Additionally, we propose two methods to improve the accuracy of the phase velocity determination by dealing with film thickness variation of the PVD process.

  14. Accurate read-based metagenome characterization using a hierarchical suite of unique signatures

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Tracey Allen K.; Li, Po-E; Scholz, Matthew B.; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in the field of shotgun metagenomics is the accurate identification of organisms present within a microbial community, based on classification of short sequence reads. Though existing microbial community profiling methods have attempted to rapidly classify the millions of reads output from modern sequencers, the combination of incomplete databases, similarity among otherwise divergent genomes, errors and biases in sequencing technologies, and the large volumes of sequencing data required for metagenome sequencing has led to unacceptably high false discovery rates (FDR). Here, we present the application of a novel, gene-independent and signature-based metagenomic taxonomic profiling method with significantly and consistently smaller FDR than any other available method. Our algorithm circumvents false positives using a series of non-redundant signature databases and examines Genomic Origins Through Taxonomic CHAllenge (GOTTCHA). GOTTCHA was tested and validated on 20 synthetic and mock datasets ranging in community composition and complexity, was applied successfully to data generated from spiked environmental and clinical samples, and robustly demonstrates superior performance compared with other available tools. PMID:25765641

  15. Physical and Electrical Characterization of Aluminum Polymer Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, David; Sampson, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Polymer aluminum capacitors from several manufacturers with various combinations of capacitance, rated voltage, and ESR values were physically examined and electrically characterized. The physical construction analysis of the capacitors revealed three different capacitor structures, i.e., traditional wound, stacked, and laminated. Electrical characterization results of polymer aluminum capacitors are reported for frequency-domain dielectric response at various temperatures, surge breakdown voltage, and other dielectric properties. The structure-property relations in polymer aluminum capacitors are discussed.

  16. Physical and Electrical Characterization of Polymer Aluminum Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, David; Sampson, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Polymer aluminum capacitors from several manufacturers with various combinations of capacitance, rated voltage, and ESR values were physically examined and electrically characterized. The physical construction analysis of the capacitors revealed three different capacitor structures, i.e., traditional wound, stacked, and laminated. Electrical characterization results of polymer aluminum capacitors are reported for frequency-domain dielectric response at various temperatures, surge breakdown voltage, and other dielectric properties. The structure-property relations in polymer aluminum capacitors are discussed.

  17. High resolution DEM from Tandem-X interferometry: an accurate tool to characterize volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albino, Fabien; Kervyn, Francois

    2013-04-01

    Tandem-X mission was launched by the German agency (DLR) in June 2010. It is a new generation high resolution SAR sensor mainly dedicated to topographic applications. For the purpose of our researches focused on the study of the volcano-tectonic activity in the Kivu Rift area, a set of Tandem-X bistatic radar images were used to produce a high resolution InSAR DEM of the Virunga Volcanic Province (VVP). The VVP is part of the Western branch of the African rift, situated at the boundary between D.R. Congo, Rwanda and Uganda. It has two highly active volcanoes, Nyiragongo and Nyamulagira. A first task concerns the quantitative assessment of the vertical accuracy that can be achieved with these new data. The new DEMs are compared to other space borne datasets (SRTM, ASTER) but also to field measurements given by differential GPS. Multi-temporal radar acquisitions allow us to produce several DEM of the same area. This appeared to be very useful in the context of an active volcanic context where new geomorphological features (faults, fissures, volcanic cones and lava flows) appear continuously through time. For example, since the year 2000, time of the SRTM acquisition, we had one eruption at Nyiragongo (2002) and six eruptions at Nyamulagira (2001, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2010 and 2011) which all induce large changes in the landscape with the emplacement of new lava fields and scoria cones. From our repetitive Tandem-X DEM production, we have a tool to identify and also quantify in term of size and volume all the topographic changes relative to this past volcanic activity. These parameters are high value information to improve the understanding of the Virunga volcanoes; the accurate estimation of erupted volume and knowledge of structural features associated to past eruptions are key parameters to understand the volcanic system, to ameliorate the hazard assessment, and finally contribute to risk mitigation in a densely populated area.

  18. Design and development of a profilometer for the fast and accurate characterization of optical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Pedrero, José A.; Rodríguez-Ibañez, Diego; Alonso, José; Quirgoa, Juan A.

    2015-09-01

    With the advent of techniques devised for the mass production of optical components made with surfaces of arbitrary form (also known as free form surfaces) in the last years, a parallel development of measuring systems adapted for these new kind of surfaces constitutes a real necessity for the industry. Profilometry is one of the preferred methods for the assessment of the quality of a surface, and is widely employed in the optical fabrication industry for the quality control of its products. In this work, we present the design, development and assembly of a new profilometer with five axis of movement, specifically suited to the measurement of medium size (up to 150 mm of diameter) "free-form" optical surfaces with sub-micrometer accuracy and low measuring times. The apparatus is formed by three X, Y, Z linear motorized positioners plus and additional angular and a tilt positioner employed to locate accurately the surface to be measured and the probe which can be a mechanical or an optical one, being optical one a confocal sensor based on chromatic aberration. Both optical and mechanical probes guarantee an accuracy lower than the micrometer in the determination of the surface height, thus ensuring an accuracy in the surface curvatures of the order of 0.01 D or better. An original calibration procedure based on the measurement of a precision sphere has been developed in order to correct the perpendicularity error between the axes of the linear positioners. To reduce the measuring time of the profilometer, a custom electronics, based on an Arduino™ controller, have been designed and produced in order to synchronize the five motorized positioners and the optical and mechanical probes so that a medium size surface (around 10 cm of diameter) with a dynamic range in curvatures of around 10 D, can be measured in less than 300 seconds (using three axes) keeping the resolution in height and curvature in the figures mentioned above.

  19. Data on the physical characterization of oil in water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Zalazar, Aldana L; Gliemmo, María F; Campos, Carmen A

    2016-12-01

    This article contains experimental data and images for the physical characterization of oil in water emulsions. Mentioned data are related to the research article "Effect of stabilizers, oil level and structure on the growth of Zygosaccharomyces bailii and on physical stability of model systems simulating acid sauces" (A.L. Zalazar, M.F. Gliemmo, C.A. Campos, 2016) [1]. Physical characterization of emulsions was performed through the evaluation of Span and Specific Surface Area (SSA) determined by light scattering using a Mastersizer. Furthermore, microscopy images were recorded by confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). The latter are presented to collaborate in the analysis of emulsion microstructure.

  20. Watershed mean residence times and travel time distributions: how accurately can they be characterized?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godsey, S. E.; Kirchner, J. W.

    2006-12-01

    The average time that rainfall takes to reach the stream - the mean residence time - is a basic parameter used to characterize watersheds. Watersheds are also characterized by the distribution of travel times for individual parcels of precipitation that fall on different points across the catchment. This travel time distribution is an important control on catchment response to contamination events. Catchments with shorter residence times or narrower distributions will have a flashier response to contamination events, whereas catchments with longer residence times or longer-tailed distributions will have a more persistent response to those same contamination events. Catchments' travel time distributions are typically inferred from time series of passive tracers (such as water isotopes, chloride, or bromide) in rainfall and streamflow. Tracer fluctuations in streamflow are typically damped compared to those in preciptation, because precipitation inputs of different ages (and different tracer signatures) are mixed within the catchment. Mathematically, this mixing process is modeled by the convolution of the travel time distribution and the precipitation tracer inputs to generate the stream tracer outputs. The parameters describing the travel time distribution are typically estimated by maximizing the goodness of fit between the modeled and measured tracer outputs. This approach is potentially subject to at least two sources of uncertainty. First, both the input and output tracer concentrations are subject to measurement error. Second, although the catchment mixing process is continuous, the inputs and outputs are only sampled at discrete points in time. Here we test how these two sources of uncertainty may affect travel time distributions that are estimated from catchment monitoring data. We begin by generating synthetic tracer input time series, and convolve these with a specified travel-time distribution to generate a synthetic output time series. We then subsample

  1. Electret accelerometers: physics and dynamic characterization.

    PubMed

    Hillenbrand, J; Haberzettl, S; Motz, T; Sessler, G M

    2011-06-01

    Electret microphones are produced in numbers that significantly exceed those for all other microphone types. This is due to the fact that air-borne electret sensors are of simple and low-cost design but have very good acoustical properties. In contrast, most of the discrete structure-borne sound sensors (or accelerometers) are based on the piezoelectric effect. In the present work, capacitive accelerometers utilizing the electret principle were constructed, built, and characterized. These electret accelerometers comprise a metallic seismic mass, covered by an electret film, a ring of a soft cellular polymer supplying the restoring force, and a metallic backplate. These components replace membrane, spacer, and back electrode, respectively, of the electret microphone. An adjustable static pressure to the seismic mass is generated by two metal springs. The dynamic characterization of the accelerometers was carried out by using an electrodynamic shaker and an external charge or voltage amplifier. Sensors with various seismic masses, air gap distances, and electret voltages were investigated. Charge sensitivities from 10 to 40 pC/g, voltage sensitivities from 600 to 2000 mV/g, and resonance frequencies from 3 to 1.5 kHz were measured. A model describing both the charge and the voltage sensitivity is presented. Good agreement of experimental and calculated values is found. The experimental results show that sensitive, lightweight, and inexpensive electret accelerometers can be built.

  2. Accurate characterization of carcinogenic DNA adducts using MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Charles A.; Chiu, Norman H. L.

    2009-01-01

    Many chemical carcinogens and their in vivo activated metabolites react readily with genomic DNA, and form covalently bound carcinogen-DNA adducts. Clinically, carcinogen-DNA adducts have been linked to various cancer diseases. Among the current methods for DNA adduct analysis, mass spectroscopic method allows the direct measurement of unlabeled DNA adducts. The goal of this study is to explore the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) to determine the identity of carcinogen-DNA adducts. Two of the known carcinogenic DNA adducts, namely N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenyl-imidazo [4,5-b] pyridine (dG-C8-PhIP) and N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8yl)-4-aminobiphenyl (dG-C8-ABP), were selected as our models. In MALDI-TOF MS measurements, the small matrix ion and its cluster ions did not interfere with the measurements of both selected dG adducts. To achieve a higher accuracy for the characterization of selected dG adducts, 1 keV collision energy in MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS was used to measure the adducts. In comparison to other MS/MS techniques with lower collision energies, more extensive precursor ion dissociations were observed. The detection of the corresponding fragment ions allowed the identities of guanine, PhIP or ABP, and the position of adduction to be confirmed. Some of the fragment ions of dG-C8-PhIP have not been reported by other MS/MS techniques.

  3. An X-band waveguide measurement technique for the accurate characterization of materials with low dielectric loss permittivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Kenneth W.; Scott, Mark M.; Reid, David R.; Bean, Jeffrey A.; Ellis, Jeremy D.; Morris, Andrew P.; Marsh, Jeramy M.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we present a new X-band waveguide (WR90) measurement method that permits the broadband characterization of the complex permittivity for low dielectric loss tangent material specimens with improved accuracy. An electrically long polypropylene specimen that partially fills the cross-section is inserted into the waveguide and the transmitted scattering parameter (S21) is measured. The extraction method relies on computational electromagnetic simulations, coupled with a genetic algorithm, to match the experimental S21 measurement. The sensitivity of the technique to sample length was explored by simulating specimen lengths from 2.54 to 15.24 cm, in 2.54 cm increments. Analysis of our simulated data predicts the technique will have the sensitivity to measure loss tangent values on the order of 10-3 for materials such as polymers with relatively low real permittivity values. The ability to accurately characterize low-loss dielectric material specimens of polypropylene is demonstrated experimentally. The method was validated by excellent agreement with a free-space focused-beam system measurement of a polypropylene sheet. This technique provides the material measurement community with the ability to accurately extract material properties of low-loss material specimen over the entire X-band range. This technique could easily be extended to other frequency bands.

  4. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis for the Rapid and Accurate Characterization of Hexacosanoylceramide.

    PubMed

    Ross, Charles W; Simonsick, William J; Bogusky, Michael J; Celikay, Recep W; Guare, James P; Newton, Randall C

    2016-06-28

    Ceramides are a central unit of all sphingolipids which have been identified as sites of biological recognition on cellular membranes mediating cell growth and differentiation. Several glycosphingolipids have been isolated, displaying immunomodulatory and anti-tumor activities. These molecules have generated considerable interest as potential vaccine adjuvants in humans. Accurate analyses of these and related sphingosine analogues are important for the characterization of structure, biological function, and metabolism. We report the complementary use of direct laser desorption ionization (DLDI), sheath flow electrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) and high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis for the rapid, accurate identification of hexacosanoylceramide and starting materials. DLDI does not require stringent sample preparation and yields representative ions. Sheath-flow ESI yields ions of the product and byproducts and was significantly better than monospray ESI due to improved compound solubility. Negative ion sheath flow ESI provided data of starting materials and products all in one acquisition as hexacosanoic acid does not ionize efficiently when ceramides are present. NMR provided characterization of these lipid molecules complementing the results obtained from MS analyses. NMR data was able to differentiate straight chain versus branched chain alkyl groups not easily obtained from mass spectrometry.

  5. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis for the Rapid and Accurate Characterization of Hexacosanoylceramide

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Charles W.; Simonsick, William J.; Bogusky, Michael J.; Celikay, Recep W.; Guare, James P.; Newton, Randall C.

    2016-01-01

    Ceramides are a central unit of all sphingolipids which have been identified as sites of biological recognition on cellular membranes mediating cell growth and differentiation. Several glycosphingolipids have been isolated, displaying immunomodulatory and anti-tumor activities. These molecules have generated considerable interest as potential vaccine adjuvants in humans. Accurate analyses of these and related sphingosine analogues are important for the characterization of structure, biological function, and metabolism. We report the complementary use of direct laser desorption ionization (DLDI), sheath flow electrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) and high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis for the rapid, accurate identification of hexacosanoylceramide and starting materials. DLDI does not require stringent sample preparation and yields representative ions. Sheath-flow ESI yields ions of the product and byproducts and was significantly better than monospray ESI due to improved compound solubility. Negative ion sheath flow ESI provided data of starting materials and products all in one acquisition as hexacosanoic acid does not ionize efficiently when ceramides are present. NMR provided characterization of these lipid molecules complementing the results obtained from MS analyses. NMR data was able to differentiate straight chain versus branched chain alkyl groups not easily obtained from mass spectrometry. PMID:27367671

  6. Accurate physical laws can permit new standard units: The two laws F→=ma→ and the proportionality of weight to mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saslow, Wayne M.

    2014-04-01

    Three common approaches to F→=ma→ are: (1) as an exactly true definition of force F→ in terms of measured inertial mass m and measured acceleration a→; (2) as an exactly true axiom relating measured values of a→, F→ and m; and (3) as an imperfect but accurately true physical law relating measured a→ to measured F→, with m an experimentally determined, matter-dependent constant, in the spirit of the resistance R in Ohm's law. In the third case, the natural units are those of a→ and F→, where a→ is normally specified using distance and time as standard units, and F→ from a spring scale as a standard unit; thus mass units are derived from force, distance, and time units such as newtons, meters, and seconds. The present work develops the third approach when one includes a second physical law (again, imperfect but accurate)—that balance-scale weight W is proportional to m—and the fact that balance-scale measurements of relative weight are more accurate than those of absolute force. When distance and time also are more accurately measurable than absolute force, this second physical law permits a shift to standards of mass, distance, and time units, such as kilograms, meters, and seconds, with the unit of force—the newton—a derived unit. However, were force and distance more accurately measurable than time (e.g., time measured with an hourglass), this second physical law would permit a shift to standards of force, mass, and distance units such as newtons, kilograms, and meters, with the unit of time—the second—a derived unit. Therefore, the choice of the most accurate standard units depends both on what is most accurately measurable and on the accuracy of physical law.

  7. Characterising molecules for fundamental physics: an accurate spectroscopic model of methyltrioxorhenium derived from new infrared and millimetre-wave measurements.

    PubMed

    Asselin, Pierre; Berger, Yann; Huet, Thérèse R; Margulès, Laurent; Motiyenko, Roman; Hendricks, Richard J; Tarbutt, Michael R; Tokunaga, Sean K; Darquié, Benoît

    2017-02-08

    Precise spectroscopic analysis of polyatomic molecules enables many striking advances in physical chemistry and fundamental physics. We use several new high-resolution spectroscopic devices to improve our understanding of the rotational and rovibrational structure of methyltrioxorhenium (MTO), the achiral parent of a family of large oxorhenium compounds that are ideal candidate species for a planned measurement of parity violation in chiral molecules. Using millimetre-wave and infrared spectroscopy in a pulsed supersonic jet, a cryogenic buffer gas cell, and room temperature absorption cells, we probe the ground state and the Re[double bond, length as m-dash]O antisymmetric and symmetric stretching excited states of both CH3(187)ReO3 and CH3(185)ReO3 isotopologues in the gas phase with unprecedented precision. By extending the rotational spectra to the 150-300 GHz range, we characterize the ground state rotational and hyperfine structure up to J = 43 and K = 41, resulting in refinements to the rotational, quartic and hyperfine parameters, and the determination of sextic parameters and a centrifugal distortion correction to the quadrupolar hyperfine constant. We obtain rovibrational data for temperatures between 6 and 300 K in the 970-1015 cm(-1) range, at resolutions down to 8 MHz and accuracies of 30 MHz. We use these data to determine more precise excited-state rotational, Coriolis and quartic parameters, as well as the ground-state centrifugal distortion parameter DK of the (187)Re isotopologue. We also account for hyperfine structure in the rovibrational transitions and hence determine the upper state rhenium atom quadrupole coupling constant eQq'.

  8. Physical characterization of the Skua fast burst assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Paternoster, R.; Bounds, J.; Sanchez, R.; Miko, D.

    1994-08-01

    In this paper we discuss the system design and ongoing efforts to characterize the machine physics and operating properties of the Skua fast burst assembly. The machine is currently operating up to prompt critical while we await approval for super-prompt burst operations. Efforts have centered on characterizing neutron kinetic properties, comparing calculated and measured temperature coefficients and power distributions, improving the burst reproducibility, examining the site-wide dose characteristics, and fitting the machine with cooling and filtration systems.

  9. Full vectorial simulation for characterizing loss or gain in optical devices with an accurate and automated finite-element program.

    PubMed

    Tzolov, V P; Fontaine, M; Sewell, G; Delâge, A

    1997-01-20

    An efficient, accurate, and automated vectorial finite-element method is described to characterize arbitrarily shaped optical devices having loss or gain properties. The method can be easily implemented inside the pde 2 d software environment, where an interactive session allows the user to specify the problem in a easy-to-use format. For the method to be validated, modal dispersion characteristics of high loss metal-coated optical fibers that have recently been used in applications in scanning near-field optical microscopy are presented and compared with results obtained with two vectorial approaches, i.e., the field expansion and the multiple-multipole methods. These results clearly illustrate the flexibility, accuracy, and ease of implementation of the method.

  10. Rapid Bayesian point source inversion using pattern recognition --- bridging the gap between regional scaling relations and accurate physical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, A. P.; Kaeufl, P.; De Wit, R. W. L.; Trampert, J.

    2014-12-01

    Obtaining knowledge about source parameters in (near) real-time during or shortly after an earthquake is essential for mitigating damage and directing resources in the aftermath of the event. Therefore, a variety of real-time source-inversion algorithms have been developed over recent decades. This has been driven by the ever-growing availability of dense seismograph networks in many seismogenic areas of the world and the significant advances in real-time telemetry. By definition, these algorithms rely on short time-windows of sparse, local and regional observations, resulting in source estimates that are highly sensitive to observational errors, noise and missing data. In order to obtain estimates more rapidly, many algorithms are either entirely based on empirical scaling relations or make simplifying assumptions about the Earth's structure, which can in turn lead to biased results. It is therefore essential that realistic uncertainty bounds are estimated along with the parameters. A natural means of propagating probabilistic information on source parameters through the entire processing chain from first observations to potential end users and decision makers is provided by the Bayesian formalism.We present a novel method based on pattern recognition allowing us to incorporate highly accurate physical modelling into an uncertainty-aware real-time inversion algorithm. The algorithm is based on a pre-computed Green's functions database, containing a large set of source-receiver paths in a highly heterogeneous crustal model. Unlike similar methods, which often employ a grid search, we use a supervised learning algorithm to relate synthetic waveforms to point source parameters. This training procedure has to be performed only once and leads to a representation of the posterior probability density function p(m|d) --- the distribution of source parameters m given observations d --- which can be evaluated quickly for new data.Owing to the flexibility of the pattern

  11. Characterization and Physics-Based Modeling of Electrochemical Memristors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-16

    state electrolyte materials. Numerical simulations enable a physics-based characterization of the dynamics of filament formation and dissolution in ion...14  Figure 17. (a) 3D cross-section of PMC, (b) optical image of the top view of PMC, and (c) TEM image of Cu...56  Table 6. Parameters for filament growth

  12. Accurate characterization of the stellar and orbital parameters of the exoplanetary system WASP-33 b from orbital dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, L.

    2016-01-01

    By using the most recently published Doppler tomography measurements and accurate theoretical modelling of the oblateness-driven orbital precessions, we tightly constrain some of the physical and orbital parameters of the planetary system hosted by the fast rotating star WASP-33. In particular, the measurements of the orbital inclination ip to the plane of the sky and of the sky-projected spin-orbit misalignment λ at two epochs about six years apart allowed for the determination of the longitude of the ascending node Ω and of the orbital inclination I to the apparent equatorial plane at the same epochs. As a consequence, average rates of change dot{Ω }_exp, dot{I}_exp of this two orbital elements, accurate to a ≈10-2 deg yr-1 level, were calculated as well. By comparing them to general theoretical expressions dot{Ω }_{J_2}, dot{I}_{J_2} for their precessions induced by an oblate star whose symmetry axis is arbitrarily oriented, we were able to determine the angle i⋆ between the line of sight the star's spin {S}^{star } and its first even zonal harmonic J_2^{star } obtaining i^{star } = {142}^{+10}_{-11} deg, J_2^{star } = 2.1^{+0.8}_{-0.5}times; 10^{-4}. As a by-product, the angle between {S}^{star } and the orbital angular momentum L is as large as about ψ ≈ 100 ° psi; ^{2008} = 99^{+5}_{-4} deg, ψ ^{{2014}} = 103^{+5}_{-4} deg and changes at a rate dot{ψ }= 0.{7}^{+1.5}_{-1.6} deg {yr}^{-1}. The predicted general relativistic Lense-Thirring precessions, of the order of ≈10-3deg yr-1, are, at present, about one order of magnitude below the measurability threshold.

  13. Physical characterization of ultrashort laser pulse drilling of biological tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Kim, B.M.; Da Silva, L.D.; Stuart, B.C.; Perry, M.D.

    1997-07-21

    Ultrashort laser pulse ablation removes material with low energy fluence required and minimal collateral damage. The ultimate usefulness of this technology for biomedical applications depends, in part, on characterization of the physical conditions attained and determination of the zone of shockwave and heat affected material in particular tissues. Detailed numerical modeling of the relevant physics (deposition, plasma formation, shockwave generation and propagation, thermal conduction) are providing this information. A wide range of time scales is involved, ranging from picosecond for energy deposition and peak pressure and temperature, to nanosecond for development of shockwave, to microsecond for macroscopic thermophysical response.

  14. Accurate Characterization of the Peptide Linkage in the Gas Phase: a Joint Quantum-Chemical and Rotational Spectroscopy Study of the Glycine Dipeptide Analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Barone, Vincenzo; Largo, Laura; Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L.

    2014-06-01

    Accurate structures of aminoacids in the gas phase have been obtained by joint microwave and quantum-chemical investigations. However, the structure and conformational behavior of α-aminoacids once incorporated into peptide chains are completely different and have not yet been characterized with the same accuracy. To fill this gap, we present here an accurate characterization of the simplest dipeptide analogue (N-acetylglycinamide) involving peptidic bonds. State-of-the-art quantum-chemical computations are complemented by a comprehensive study of the rotational spectrum using a combination of Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy with laser ablation. The coexistence of the C_7 and C_5 conformers has been proved and energetically as well as spectroscopically characterized. This joint theoretical-experimental investigation demonstrated the feasibility of obtaining accurate structures for flexible small biomolecules, thus paving the route to the elucidation of the inherent behavior of peptides.

  15. Characterization of high school mathematics and physics language genres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Michelle L.

    Research indicates that language factors play a critical role in the learning of school mathematics and science. Symbols and language-forms have been created to represent and discuss mathematical ideas. Understanding language factors, therefore, is critical in improving the teaching and learning of school mathematics and science. The specific goal of this research was to characterize language genres found in secondary school mathematics and physics classrooms. The research presented here was conducted in two secondary school classrooms---one algebra and one physics---taught by the same teacher. The focus was on the discourse between the teacher and her students. In both mathematics and physics, the teacher attended to the meaning of mathematical concepts and processes, but the talk differed. Physics talk focused on developing meaning for the physics concepts through activities and discussion, which were accompanied by mathematical calculations and analyses. Algebra talk, on the other hand, was procedural and narrative in nature. Thus physics talk was more descriptive of individual concepts and situation, and was more explanatory and exploratory than algebra talk. All discourse inevitably reflects one's thinking and beliefs about the content of that discourse. Thus talking algebra and talking physics, as observed in this study, both represented the teacher's beliefs about teaching and learning and the nature of the school curriculum. Even for a teacher with a strong academic background in both mathematics and science, integrating across the curriculum can be hindered by the approved school curriculum and by the reality of the particular classroom context. Providing professional development and implementing one of several available integrated curricula would be needed if more integration were to be implemented. This study presents a literature-based description of the conceptual notion of language genre. It additionally presents a conceptualization of mathematics and

  16. Physical and biological characterization of a seawater ultraviolet radiation sterilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrentera, Laura; Uribe, Roberto M.; Rodríguez, Romana R.; Carrillo, Ricardo E.

    1994-03-01

    The physical and biological characterization of a seawater ultraviolet (UV) sterilizer is described. The physical characterization was performed using radiochromic dye films by evaluating the uniformity of the radiant exposure along each lamp, the effect of the radiation from one lamp on the array of adjacent lamps, and by measuring the UV radiation absorption of seawater with respect to distilled water. The biological characterization was performed by measuring the amount of reduction of bacteria in stored seawater after different filtration and UV treatments. Among the filtration methods tested, differential filtration (5, 3 and 0.45 μm filters connected in series) caused the highest bacterial reduction factor of 60%. UV radiant exposures of 212, 424, 636 and 848 J m -2 yielded bacteria reduction factors of 99.86, 99.969, 99.997 and 100%, respectively, for populations of Vibrio and Pseudomonas bacteria present in stored seawater. It is concluded that the system is useful for water disinfection when 1, 2 or 3 lamps are on; when 4 lamps are used the treated water becomes sterile.

  17. Physical characterization of wax/oil crystalline networks.

    PubMed

    Martini, Silvana; Tan, Chin Yiap; Jana, Sarbojeet

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the physical properties of different types of wax/oil systems. Olive (OO), corn (CO), soybean (SBO), sunflower (SFO), safflower (SAFO), and canola (CAO) oils were mixed with sunflower oil wax (SFOW), paraffin wax (PW), and beeswax (BW) at different concentrations (1% to 10%). Results from this study show that the physical properties of wax/oil systems is affected not only by the concentration and type of wax used, but also by the type of oil used. In general, wax/oil systems formulated with SFOW generated crystalline networks with high enthalpies (1 to 22 J/g) and high G' values (2 to 6 × 10(6) Pa) compared with the values obtained for BW and PW. SFOW crystalline networks were characterized by needle-like crystals independently of the wax concentrations and type of oil used. BW crystalline networks, however, were characterized by different crystal morphologies (needle-like or spherulites) depending on the wax concentration and type of oil used. PW samples were characterized by a crystalline network formed by needle- and platelet-like crystals. Enthalpy values of BW and PW samples were similar (0.3 to 20 J/g), but BW samples resulted in significantly higher (P < 0.05) G' values in the 5% and 10% samples with values of 3.9 × 10(6) and 6.1 × 10(5) Pa for 10% BW and PW, respectively.

  18. Feasibility study for image guided kidney surgery: assessment of required intraoperative surface for accurate image to physical space registrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benincasa, Anne B.; Clements, Logan W.; Herrell, S. Duke; Chang, Sam S.; Cookson, Michael S.; Galloway, Robert L.

    2006-03-01

    Currently, the removal of kidney tumor masses uses only direct or laparoscopic visualizations, resulting in prolonged procedure and recovery times and reduced clear margin. Applying current image guided surgery (IGS) techniques, as those used in liver cases, to kidney resections (nephrectomies) presents a number of complications. Most notably is the limited field of view of the intraoperative kidney surface, which constrains the ability to obtain a surface delineation that is geometrically descriptive enough to drive a surface-based registration. Two different phantom orientations were used to model the laparoscopic and traditional partial nephrectomy views. For the laparoscopic view, fiducial point sets were compiled from a CT image volume using anatomical features such as the renal artery and vein. For the traditional view, markers attached to the phantom set-up were used for fiducials and targets. The fiducial points were used to perform a point-based registration, which then served as a guide for the surface-based registration. Laser range scanner (LRS) obtained surfaces were registered to each phantom surface using a rigid iterative closest point algorithm. Subsets of each phantom's LRS surface were used in a robustness test to determine the predictability of their registrations to transform the entire surface. Results from both orientations suggest that about half of the kidney's surface needs to be obtained intraoperatively for accurate registrations between the image surface and the LRS surface, suggesting the obtained kidney surfaces were geometrically descriptive enough to perform accurate registrations. This preliminary work paves the way for further development of kidney IGS systems.

  19. The effect of repeated physical disturbance on soft tissue decomposition--are taphonomic studies an accurate reflection of decomposition?

    PubMed

    Adlam, Rachel E; Simmons, Tal

    2007-09-01

    Although the relationship between decomposition and postmortem interval has been well studied, almost no studies examined the potential effects of physical disturbance occurring as a result of data collection procedures. This study compares physically disturbed rabbit carcasses with a series of undisturbed carcasses to assess the presence and magnitude of any effects resulting from repetitive disturbance. Decomposition was scored using visual assessment of soft tissue changes, and numerical data such as weight loss and carcass temperature were recorded. The effects of disturbance over time on weight loss, carcass temperature, soil pH and decomposition were studied. In addition, this study aimed to validate some of the anecdotal evidence regarding decomposition. Results indicate disturbance significantly inversely affects both weight loss and carcass temperature. No differences were apparent between groups for soil pH change or overall decomposition stage. An insect-mediated mechanism for the disturbance effect is suggested, along with indications as to why this effect may be cancelled when scoring overall decomposition.

  20. Comparing the standards of one metabolic equivalent of task in accurately estimating physical activity energy expenditure based on acceleration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dohyun; Lee, Jongshill; Park, Hoon Ki; Jang, Dong Pyo; Song, Soohwa; Cho, Baek Hwan; Jung, Yoo-Suk; Park, Rae-Woong; Joo, Nam-Seok; Kim, In Young

    2016-08-24

    The purpose of the study is to analyse how the standard of resting metabolic rate (RMR) affects estimation of the metabolic equivalent of task (MET) using an accelerometer. In order to investigate the effect on estimation according to intensity of activity, comparisons were conducted between the 3.5 ml O2 · kg(-1) · min(-1) and individually measured resting VO2 as the standard of 1 MET. MET was estimated by linear regression equations that were derived through five-fold cross-validation using 2 types of MET values and accelerations; the accuracy of estimation was analysed through cross-validation, Bland and Altman plot, and one-way ANOVA test. There were no significant differences in the RMS error after cross-validation. However, the individual RMR-based estimations had as many as 0.5 METs of mean difference in modified Bland and Altman plots than RMR of 3.5 ml O2 · kg(-1) · min(-1). Finally, the results of an ANOVA test indicated that the individual RMR-based estimations had less significant differences between the reference and estimated values at each intensity of activity. In conclusion, the RMR standard is a factor that affects accurate estimation of METs by acceleration; therefore, RMR requires individual specification when it is used for estimation of METs using an accelerometer.

  1. Physical and chemical characterization of waste wood derived biochars.

    PubMed

    Yargicoglu, Erin N; Sadasivam, Bala Yamini; Reddy, Krishna R; Spokas, Kurt

    2015-02-01

    Biochar, a solid byproduct generated during waste biomass pyrolysis or gasification in the absence (or near-absence) of oxygen, has recently garnered interest for both agricultural and environmental management purposes owing to its unique physicochemical properties. Favorable properties of biochar include its high surface area and porosity, and ability to adsorb a variety of compounds, including nutrients, organic contaminants, and some gases. Physical and chemical properties of biochars are dictated by the feedstock and production processes (pyrolysis or gasification temperature, conversion technology and pre- and post-treatment processes, if any), which vary widely across commercially produced biochars. In this study, several commercially available biochars derived from waste wood are characterized for physical and chemical properties that can signify their relevant environmental applications. Parameters characterized include: physical properties (particle size distribution, specific gravity, density, porosity, surface area), hydraulic properties (hydraulic conductivity and water holding capacity), and chemical and electrochemical properties (organic matter and organic carbon contents, pH, oxidation-reduction potential and electrical conductivity, zeta potential, carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen (CHN) elemental composition, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), heavy metals, and leachable PAHs and heavy metals). A wide range of fixed carbon (0-47.8%), volatile matter (28-74.1%), and ash contents (1.5-65.7%) were observed among tested biochars. A high variability in surface area (0.1-155.1g/m(2)) and PAH and heavy metal contents of the solid phase among commercially available biochars was also observed (0.7-83 mg kg(-1)), underscoring the importance of pre-screening biochars prior to application. Production conditions appear to dictate PAH content--with the highest PAHs observed in biochar produced via fast pyrolysis and lowest among the gasification

  2. Accurate mode characterization of graded-index multimode fibers for the application of mode-noise analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yueai; Rahman, B. M. A.; Ning, Ya Nong; Grattan, K. T. V.

    1995-03-01

    Guided modes in graded-index multimode optical fibers are accurately analyzed with the vector H-field finite-element method, aided by the use of the WKB method. As a result, exact mode-propagation constants and the corresponding modal eigenfield distributions are provided for the study of the modal noise that is due to the mode-coupling effect.

  3. Physical and chemical characterization techniques for metallic powders

    SciTech Connect

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Stutzman, P. E.; Ferraris, C. F.; Watson, S. S.; Peltz, M. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-18

    Systematic studies have been carried out on two different powder materials used for additive manufacturing: stainless steel and cobalt-chrome. An extensive array of characterization techniques were applied to these two powders. The physical techniques included laser-diffraction particle-size analysis, X-ray computed tomography for size and shape analysis, and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Techniques sensitive to chemistry included X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive analytical X-ray analysis. The background of these techniques will be summarized and some typical findings comparing different samples of virgin additive manufacturing powders, taken from the same lot, will be given. The techniques were used to confirm that different samples of powder from the same lot were essentially identical, within the uncertainty of the measurements.

  4. Observation procedures characterizing occupational physical activities: critical review.

    PubMed

    Denis, D; Lortie, M; Rossignol, M

    2000-01-01

    The first objective of this paper is to compare the observation procedures proposed to characterize physical work. The second objective is to examine the following 3 methodological issues: reliability, observer training, and internal validity. Seventy-two papers were reviewed, 38 of which proposed a new or modified observation grid. The observation variables identified were broken down into 7 categories as follows: posture, exertion, load handled, work environment, use of feet, use of hands, and activities or tasks performed. The review revealed the variability of existing procedures. The examination of methodological issues showed that observation data can be reliable and can present an adequate internal validity. However, little information about the conditions necessary to achieve good reliability was available.

  5. Reconstruction of the activity of point sources for the accurate characterization of nuclear waste drums by segmented gamma scanning.

    PubMed

    Krings, Thomas; Mauerhofer, Eric

    2011-06-01

    This work improves the reliability and accuracy in the reconstruction of the total isotope activity content in heterogeneous nuclear waste drums containing point sources. The method is based on χ(2)-fits of the angular dependent count rate distribution measured during a drum rotation in segmented gamma scanning. A new description of the analytical calculation of the angular count rate distribution is introduced based on a more precise model of the collimated detector. The new description is validated and compared to the old description using MCNP5 simulations of angular dependent count rate distributions of Co-60 and Cs-137 point sources. It is shown that the new model describes the angular dependent count rate distribution significantly more accurate compared to the old model. Hence, the reconstruction of the activity is more accurate and the errors are considerably reduced that lead to more reliable results. Furthermore, the results are compared to the conventional reconstruction method assuming a homogeneous matrix and activity distribution.

  6. Computing Highly Accurate Spectroscopic Line Lists that Cover a Large Temperature Range for Characterization of Exoplanet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T. J.; Huang, X.; Schwenke, D. W.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last decade, it has become apparent that the most effective approach for determining highly accurate rotational and rovibrational line lists for molecules of interest in planetary atmospheres is through a combination of high-resolution laboratory experiments coupled with state-of-the art ab initio quantum chemistry methods. The approach involves computing the most accurate potential energy surface (PES) possible using state-of-the art electronic structure methods, followed by computing rotational and rovibrational energy levels using an exact variational method to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Then, reliable experimental data from high-resolution experiments is used to refine the ab initio PES in order to improve the accuracy of the computed energy levels and transition energies. From the refinement step, we have been able to achieve an accuracy of approximately 0.015 cm-1 for rovibrational transition energies, and even better for purely rotational transitions. This combined 'experiment / theory' approach allows for determination of essentially a complete line list, with hundreds of millions of transitions, and having the transition energies and intensities be highly accurate. Our group has successfully applied this approach to determine highly accurate line lists for NH3 and CO2 (and isotopologues), and very recently for SO2 and isotopologues. Here I will report our latest results for SO2 including all isotopologues. Comparisons to the available data in HITRAN2012 and other available databases will be shown, though we note that our line lists SO2 are significantly more complete than any other databases. Since it is important to span a large temperature range in order to model the spectral signature of exoplanets, we will also demonstrate how the spectra change on going from low temperatures (100 K) to higher temperatures (500 K).

  7. Application of physical and chemical characterization techniques to metallic powders

    SciTech Connect

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Watson, S. S.; Stutzman, P. E.; Ferraris, C. F.; Peltz, M. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-18

    Systematic studies have been carried out on two different powder materials used for additive manufacturing: stainless steel and cobalt-chrome. The characterization of these powders is important in NIST efforts to develop appropriate measurements and standards for additive materials and to document the property of powders used in a NIST-led additive manufacturing material round robin. An extensive array of characterization techniques was applied to these two powders, in both virgin and recycled states. The physical techniques included laser diffraction particle size analysis, X-ray computed tomography for size and shape analysis, and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Techniques sensitive to chemistry, including X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive analytical X-ray analysis using the X-rays generated during scanning electron microscopy, were also employed. Results of these analyses will be used to shed light on the question: how does virgin powder change after being exposed to and recycled from one or more additive manufacturing build cycles? In addition, these findings can give insight into the actual additive manufacturing process.

  8. ACCURATE SPECTROSCOPIC CHARACTERIZATION OF OXIRANE: A VALUABLE ROUTE TO ITS IDENTIFICATION IN TITAN’S ATMOSPHERE AND THE ASSIGNMENT OF UNIDENTIFIED INFRARED BANDS

    PubMed Central

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to provide an accurate spectroscopic characterization of oxirane, state-of-the-art computational methods and approaches have been employed to determine highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and rotational parameters. Available experimental data were used to assess the reliability of our computations, and an accuracy on average of 10 cm−1 for fundamental transitions as well as overtones and combination bands has been pointed out. Moving to rotational spectroscopy, relative discrepancies of 0.1%, 2%–3%, and 3%–4% were observed for rotational, quartic, and sextic centrifugal-distortion constants, respectively. We are therefore confident that the highly accurate spectroscopic data provided herein can be useful for identification of oxirane in Titan’s atmosphere and the assignment of unidentified infrared bands. Since oxirane was already observed in the interstellar medium and some astronomical objects are characterized by very high D/H ratios, we also considered the accurate determination of the spectroscopic parameters for the mono-deuterated species, oxirane-d1. For the latter, an empirical scaling procedure allowed us to improve our computed data and to provide predictions for rotational transitions with a relative accuracy of about 0.02% (i.e., an uncertainty of about 40 MHz for a transition lying at 200 GHz). PMID:26543240

  9. Physical and chemical methods for the characterization of hazardous wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, C. W.; Maskarinec, M. P.; Lee, D. W.

    Numerous test methods have been proposed and developed to evaluate the hazards associated with handling and disposal of wastes in landfills. The major concern is the leaching of toxic constituents from the wastes. The fate of hazardous constituents in landfilled wastes is highly dependent on the physical and chemical characteristics of the waste. Thus, the primary objective in the selection of waste characterization procedures should be focused on those methods that gauge the fate of the waste's hazardous constituents in a specific landfill environment. Waste characterization in the United States has centered around the characteristics of ignitability, corrosivity, reactivity, and toxicity. The strategy employed in the development of most regulatory waste characterization procedures has been a pass or fail approach, usually tied to some form of a mismanagement scenario for that waste. For example, USEPA has chosen the disposal of a waste in a municipal waste landfill as a mismanagement scenario for the development of the waste leaching tests to determine the toxicity characteristic. Many wastes, such as large-volume utility wastes or mining wastes, are not disposed of in municipal waste landfills. As a consequence, more effort is needed in the development of waste leaching tests that determine the long-term leaching characteristics of that waste in the landfill environment in which the waste is to be disposed. Waste leaching models also need to be developed and tested as to their ability to simulate actual disposal environments. These models need to be compared with laboratory leaching tests, and, if practical, coupled with groundwater transport models.

  10. Students' Preconceptions about Evolution: How Accurate Is the Characterization as "Lamarckian" when Considering the History of Evolutionary Thought?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kampourakis, Kostas; Zogza, Vasso

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the main points of Lamarck's and Darwin's theoretical conceptual schemes about evolution are compared to those derived from 15 years old students' explanations of evolutionary episodes. We suggest that secondary students' preconceptions should not be characterized as "Lamarckian", because they are essentially different from the…

  11. Characterizing interactive engagement activities in a flipped introductory physics class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Anna K.; Galloway, Ross K.; Donnelly, Robyn; Hardy, Judy

    2016-06-01

    Interactive engagement activities are increasingly common in undergraduate physics teaching. As research efforts move beyond simply showing that interactive engagement pedagogies work towards developing an understanding of how they lead to improved learning outcomes, a detailed analysis of the way in which these activities are used in practice is needed. Our aim in this paper is to present a characterization of the type and duration of interactions, as experienced by students, that took place during two introductory physics courses (1A and 1B) at a university in the United Kingdom. Through this work, a simple framework for analyzing lectures—the framework for interactive learning in lectures (FILL), which focuses on student interactions (with the lecturer, with each other, and with the material) is proposed. The pedagogical approach is based on Peer Instruction (PI) and both courses are taught by the same lecturer. We find lecture activities can be categorized into three types: interactive (25%), vicarious interactive (20%) (involving questions to and from the lecturer), and noninteractive (55%). As expected, the majority of both interactive and vicarious interactive activities took place during PI. However, the way that interactive activities were used during non-PI sections of the lecture varied significantly between the two courses. Differences were also found in the average time spent on lecturer-student interactions (28% for 1A and 12% for 1B), although not on student-student interactions (12% and 12%) or on individual learning (10% and 7%). These results are explored in detail and the implications for future research are discussed.

  12. Physical properties of inulin and inulin-orange juice: physical characterization and technological application.

    PubMed

    Saavedra-Leos, M Z; Leyva-Porras, C; Martínez-Guerra, E; Pérez-García, S A; Aguilar-Martínez, J A; Álvarez-Salas, C

    2014-05-25

    In this work two systems based on a carbohydrate polymer were studied: inulin as model system and inulin-orange juice as complex system. Both system were stored at different water activity conditions and subsequently characterized. Water adsorption isotherms type II were fitted by the GAB model and the water monolayer content was determined for each system. From thermal analyzes it was found that at low water activities (aw) systems were fully amorphous. As aw increased, crystallinity was developed. This behavior was corroborated by X-ray diffraction. In the inulin-orange juice system, crystallization appears at lower water activity caused by the intensification of the chemical interaction of the low molecular weight species contained in orange juice. Glass transition temperature (Tg), determined by modulated differential scanning calorimeter, decreased with aw. As water is adsorbed, the physical appearance of samples changed which could be observed by optical microscopy and effectively related with the microstructure found by scanning electron microscopy.

  13. Ancient mortars from Cape Verde: mineralogical and physical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Fernando; Costa, Cristiana; Velosa, Ana; Quintela, Ana; Terroso, Denise; Marques, Vera

    2014-05-01

    Times and locations of different building constructions means different knowledge, habits, different construction methods and materials. The study and safeguarding of the architectural heritage takes nowadays a progressive importance as a vehicle for transmission of cultures and history of nations. The coatings are of great importance in the durability of a building due to the protective role of the masonry. The compatibility between the materials with which they are executed (masonry, mortar and grout settlement) promotes the proper functioning of the wall and a consequent increase in durability. Therefore, it becomes important to study and characterize the mortar coating of buildings to know its characteristics and to use compatible materials in the rehabilitation and maintenance of buildings. This study aims to characterize the chemical, physical, mechanical and mineralogical mortar samples collected in buildings in three islands of Cape Verde, for the conservation, rehabilitation and preservation of them. The collected samples belong to buildings constructed in the end of XIX century and in the beginning of XX century. In order to characterize the mortar samples some tests was made, such as X-Ray Diffraction, X- Ray Fluorescence, acid attack and mechanical strength. The samples were divided into three groups depending on origin; so we have a first group collected on the island of Santiago, the second on the island of Saint Vincent and the third on the island of Santo Antao. The samples are all carbonated, but Santiago samples have a lower carbonates content. In terms of insoluble residue (from the acid attack) it was concluded that the samples have similar value ranging from 9 to 26%. The compressive strength of the mortars have a range between 1.36 and 4.55 MPa, which is related to the presence of more binder in samples with higher resistance. The chemical and mineralogical analyzes showed that these consist of lime mortars (binder), natural pozzolan and

  14. SAXS Combined with UV-vis Spectroscopy and QELS: Accurate Characterization of Silver Sols Synthesized in Polymer Matrices.

    PubMed

    Bulavin, Leonid; Kutsevol, Nataliya; Chumachenko, Vasyl; Soloviov, Dmytro; Kuklin, Alexander; Marynin, Andrii

    2016-12-01

    The present work demonstrates a validation of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) combining with ultra violet and visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) analysis for characterization of silver sols synthesized in polymer matrices. Polymer matrix internal structure and polymer chemical nature actually controlled the sol size characteristics. It was shown that for precise analysis of nanoparticle size distribution these techniques should be used simultaneously. All applied methods were in good agreement for the characterization of size distribution of small particles (less than 60 nm) in the sols. Some deviations of the theoretical curves from the experimental ones were observed. The most probable cause is that nanoparticles were not entirely spherical in form.

  15. MRI-aided tissues interface characterization: An accurate signal propagation time calculation method for UWB breast tumor imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang; Xiao, Xia; Kikkawa, Takamaro

    2016-12-01

    Radar-based ultrawideband (UWB) microwave imaging is expected to be a safe, low-cost tool for breast cancer detection. However, since radar wave travels at different speeds in different tissues, propagation time is hard to be estimated in heterogeneous breast. Wrongly estimated propagation time leads to error of tumor location in resulting image, aka imaging error. In this paper, we develop a magnetic resonance imaging-aided (MRI-aided) propagation time calculation technique which is independent from radar imaging system but can help decrease the imaging error. The technique can eliminate the influence of the rough interface between fat layer and gland layer in breast and get relative accurate thicknesses of two layers. The propagation time in each layer is calculated and summed. The summed propagation time is used in Confocal imaging algorithm to increase the accuracy of resulting image. 25 patients' breast models with glands of varying size are classified into four categories for imaging simulation tests. Imaging accuracy in terms of tumor location along x-direction has been improved for 21 among 25 cases, as a result, overall around 50% improvement compared to conventional UWB imaging.

  16. Accurate Characterization of Ion Transport Properties in Binary Symmetric Electrolytes Using In Situ NMR Imaging and Inverse Modeling.

    PubMed

    Sethurajan, Athinthra Krishnaswamy; Krachkovskiy, Sergey A; Halalay, Ion C; Goward, Gillian R; Protas, Bartosz

    2015-09-17

    We used NMR imaging (MRI) combined with data analysis based on inverse modeling of the mass transport problem to determine ionic diffusion coefficients and transference numbers in electrolyte solutions of interest for Li-ion batteries. Sensitivity analyses have shown that accurate estimates of these parameters (as a function of concentration) are critical to the reliability of the predictions provided by models of porous electrodes. The inverse modeling (IM) solution was generated with an extension of the Planck-Nernst model for the transport of ionic species in electrolyte solutions. Concentration-dependent diffusion coefficients and transference numbers were derived using concentration profiles obtained from in situ (19)F MRI measurements. Material properties were reconstructed under minimal assumptions using methods of variational optimization to minimize the least-squares deviation between experimental and simulated concentration values with uncertainty of the reconstructions quantified using a Monte Carlo analysis. The diffusion coefficients obtained by pulsed field gradient NMR (PFG-NMR) fall within the 95% confidence bounds for the diffusion coefficient values obtained by the MRI+IM method. The MRI+IM method also yields the concentration dependence of the Li(+) transference number in agreement with trends obtained by electrochemical methods for similar systems and with predictions of theoretical models for concentrated electrolyte solutions, in marked contrast to the salt concentration dependence of transport numbers determined from PFG-NMR data.

  17. Accurately characterizing the importance of wave-particle interactions in radiation belt dynamics: The pitfalls of statistical wave representations.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kyle R; Mann, Ian R; Rae, I Jonathan; Sibeck, David G; Watt, Clare E J

    2016-08-01

    Wave-particle interactions play a crucial role in energetic particle dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts. However, the relative importance of different wave modes in these dynamics is poorly understood. Typically, this is assessed during geomagnetic storms using statistically averaged empirical wave models as a function of geomagnetic activity in advanced radiation belt simulations. However, statistical averages poorly characterize extreme events such as geomagnetic storms in that storm-time ultralow frequency wave power is typically larger than that derived over a solar cycle and Kp is a poor proxy for storm-time wave power.

  18. Accurately characterizing the importance of wave‐particle interactions in radiation belt dynamics: The pitfalls of statistical wave representations

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Ian R.; Rae, I. Jonathan; Sibeck, David G.; Watt, Clare E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Wave‐particle interactions play a crucial role in energetic particle dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts. However, the relative importance of different wave modes in these dynamics is poorly understood. Typically, this is assessed during geomagnetic storms using statistically averaged empirical wave models as a function of geomagnetic activity in advanced radiation belt simulations. However, statistical averages poorly characterize extreme events such as geomagnetic storms in that storm‐time ultralow frequency wave power is typically larger than that derived over a solar cycle and Kp is a poor proxy for storm‐time wave power. PMID:27867798

  19. Accurately characterizing the importance of wave-particle interactions in radiation belt dynamics: The pitfalls of statistical wave representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Kyle R.; Mann, Ian R.; Rae, I. Jonathan; Sibeck, David G.; Watt, Clare E. J.

    2016-08-01

    Wave-particle interactions play a crucial role in energetic particle dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts. However, the relative importance of different wave modes in these dynamics is poorly understood. Typically, this is assessed during geomagnetic storms using statistically averaged empirical wave models as a function of geomagnetic activity in advanced radiation belt simulations. However, statistical averages poorly characterize extreme events such as geomagnetic storms in that storm-time ultralow frequency wave power is typically larger than that derived over a solar cycle and Kp is a poor proxy for storm-time wave power.

  20. Characterization of scatter in digital mammography from physical measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, Stephanie M. Wagner, Louis K.; Brateman, Libby F.

    2014-06-15

    .16, and the MRE ranged from about 3 to 13 mm. Without a grid, the SF ranged from a minimum of 0.25 to a maximum of 0.52, and the MRE ranged from about 20 to 45 mm. The SF with a grid demonstrated a mild dependence on target/filter combination and kV, whereas the SF without a grid was independent of these factors. The MRE demonstrated a complex relationship as a function of kV, with notable difference among target/filter combinations. The primary source of change in both the SF and MRE was phantom thickness. Conclusions: Because breast tissue varies spatially in physical density and elemental content, the effective thickness of breast tissue varies spatially across the imaging field, resulting in a spatially-variant scatter distribution in the imaging field. The data generated in this study can be used to characterize the scatter contribution on a point-by-point basis, for a variety of different techniques.

  1. Efficient floating diffuse functions for accurate characterization of the surface-bound excess electrons in water cluster anions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changzhe; Bu, Yuxiang

    2017-01-25

    In this work, the effect of diffuse function types (atom-centered diffuse functions versus floating functions and s-type versus p-type diffuse functions) on the structures and properties of three representative water cluster anions featuring a surface-bound excess electron is studied and we find that an effective combination of such two kinds of diffuse functions can not only reduce the computational cost but also, most importantly, considerably improve the accuracy of results and even avoid incorrect predictions of spectra and the EE shape. Our results indicate that (a) simple augmentation of atom-centered diffuse functions is beneficial for the vertical detachment energy convergence, but it leads to very poor descriptions for the singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) distributions of the water cluster anions featuring a surface-bound excess electron and thus a significant ultraviolet spectrum redshift; (b) the ghost-atom-based floating diffuse functions can not only contribute to accurate electronic calculations of the ground state but also avoid poor and even incorrect descriptions of the SOMO and the LUMO induced by excessive augmentation of atom-centered diffuse functions; (c) the floating functions can be realized by ghost atoms and their positions could be determined through an optimization routine along the dipole moment vector direction. In addition, both the s- and p-type floating functions are necessary to supplement in the basis set which are responsible for the ground (s-type character) and excited (p-type character) states of the surface-bound excess electron, respectively. The exponents of the diffuse functions should also be determined to make the diffuse functions cover the main region of the excess electron distribution. Note that excessive augmentation of such diffuse functions is redundant and even can lead to unreasonable LUMO characteristics.

  2. Bio- chemical and physical characterizations of mesenchymal stromal cells along the time course of directed differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yin-Quan; Liu, Yi-Shiuan; Liu, Yu-An; Wu, Yi-Chang; del Álamo, Juan C.; Chiou, Arthur; Lee, Oscar K.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular biophysical properties are novel biomarkers of cell phenotypes which may reflect the status of differentiating stem cells. Accurate characterizations of cellular biophysical properties, in conjunction with the corresponding biochemical properties could help to distinguish stem cells from primary cells, cancer cells, and differentiated cells. However, the correlated evolution of these properties in the course of directed stem cells differentiation has not been well characterized. In this study, we applied video particle tracking microrheology (VPTM) to measure intracellular viscoelasticity of differentiating human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hMSCs). Our results showed that osteogenesis not only increased both elastic and viscous moduli, but also converted the intracellular viscoelasticity of differentiating hMSCs from viscous-like to elastic-like. In contrast, adipogenesis decreased both elastic and viscous moduli while hMSCs remained viscous-like during the differentiation. In conjunction with bio- chemical and physical parameters, such as gene expression profiles, cell morphology, and cytoskeleton arrangement, we demonstrated that VPTM is a unique approach to quantify, with high data throughput, the maturation level of differentiating hMSCs and to anticipate their fate decisions. This approach is well suited for time-lapsed study of the mechanobiology of differentiating stem cells especially in three dimensional physico-chemical biomimetic environments including porous scaffolds. PMID:27526936

  3. Full-waveform modeling of Zero-Offset Electromagnetic Induction for Accurate Characterization of Subsurface Electrical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadas, D.; André, F.; Vereecken, H.; Lambot, S.

    2009-04-01

    singularities. We tested the model in controlled laboratory conditions for EMI measurements at different heights above a copper sheet, playing the role of a perfect electrical conductor. Good agreement was obtained between the measurements and the model, especially for the resonance frequency of the loop antenna. The loop antenna height could be retrieved by inversion of the Green's function. For practical applications, the method is still limited by the low sensitivity of the antenna with respect to the dynamic range of the VNA. Once this will be resolved, we believe that the proposed method should be very flexible and promising for accurate, multi-frequency EMI data inversion.

  4. Best Practices for Accurate Characterization of Morphological and Optical Properties of Fractal-Like Black Carbon Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, R. K.; Moosmuller, H.; Garro, M. A.; Garro, B. A.; Chancellor, S.; Herald, C. M.

    2010-12-01

    The three dimensional (3-d) fractal dimension D is considered the key morphological parameter for black carbon (BC) aggregates as it influences BC optical, physical, and chemical properties. Using electron microscopy and image processing techniques, there are several approaches for extracting D and other structural parameters of BC aggregates, which are commonly unknown, from their two dimensional microscopy images. The nested squares method (NSM), the perimeter grid method (PGM), and the ensemble method (EM) have found wide use as image analysis techniques for determination of D for individual and ensemble BC aggregates. However, so far no study has quantified the errors involved in the measured D by these three analysis techniques. In this talk, we highlight the errors associated with using these three fractal analysis techniques for the determination of D and put forth a recommendation on the most reliable analysis technique for use in future research. The talk will conclude by discussing the results obtained by (i) applying the recommended image analysis technique to real-world, flame-generated BC aggregates for calculating their D and other morphological properties; (ii) further making use of the calculated aggregate morphological parameters to theoretically determine BC optical properties using three well-known theories, namely Rayleigh-Debye-Gans (RDG) approximation, volume-equivalent Mie theory, and integral equation formulation for scattering (IEFS); and (iii) comparison of the theoretically determined BC optical properties with experimental data.

  5. [Characterization of recombinant single-stranded DNA-binding protein from Escherichia coli and its application in accurate pyrosequencing].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianping; Zou, Bingjie; Chen, Zhiyao; Ma, Yinjiao; Xu, Shu; Zhou, Guohua

    2011-10-01

    We expressed recombinant single-stranded DNA-binding protein (r-SSBP) from Escherichia coli with the molecular weight of 24-kDa by using genetic engineering strategy, and demonstrated the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding activity of r-SSBP by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). To further characterize r-SSBP, we studied the effects of r-SSBP on melting temperature (T(m)) of DNA. The results showed that r-SSBP could bind to ssDNA, and lower the T(m) of DNA, especially for single-base mismatched DNA. Therefore, r-SSBP significantly increased the T(m) difference between single-base mismatched DNA and perfect matched DNA. These results are very beneficial for single-nucleotide polymorphism detection. Moreover, we applied r-SSBP in high sensitive pyrosequencing system developed by our group. The results suggest that the r-SSBP decreased non-specific signals, corrected the proportion of signal peak height and improved the performance of pyrosequencing.

  6. Eclipsing Binaries as Astrophysical Laboratories: CM Draconis - Accurate Absolute Physical Properties of Low Mass Stars and an Independent Estimate of the Primordial Helium Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCook, G. P.; Guinan, E. F.; Saumon, D.; Kang, Y. W.

    1997-05-01

    CM Draconis (Gl 630.1; Vmax = +12.93) is an important eclipsing binary consisting of two dM4.5e stars with an orbital period of 1.2684 days. This binary is a high velocity star (s= 164 km/s) and the brighter member of a common proper motion pair with a cool faint white dwarf companion (LP 101-16). CM Dra and its white dwarf companion were once considered by Zwicky to belong to a class of "pygmy stars", but they turned out to be ordinary old, cool white dwarfs or faint red dwarfs. Lacy (ApJ 218,444L) determined the first orbital and physical properties of CM Dra from the analysis of his light and radial velocity curves. In addition to providing directly measured masses, radii, and luminosities for low mass stars, CM Dra was also recognized by Lacy and later by Paczynski and Sienkiewicz (ApJ 286,332) as an important laboratory for cosmology, as a possible old Pop II object where it may be possible to determine the primordial helium abundance. Recently, Metcalfe et al.(ApJ 456,356) obtained accurate RV measures for CM Dra and recomputed refined elements along with its helium abundance. Starting in 1995, we have been carrying out intensive RI photoelectric photometry of CM Dra to obtain well defined, accurate light curves so that its fundamental properties can be improved, and at the same time, to search for evidence of planets around the binary from planetary transit eclipses. During 1996 and 1997 well defined light curves were secured and these were combined with the RV measures of Metcalfe et al. (1996) to determine the orbital and physical parameters of the system, including a refined orbital period. A recent version of the Wilson-Devinney program was used to analyze the data. New radii, masses, mean densities, Teff, and luminosities were found as well as a re-determination of the helium abundance (Y). The results of the recent analyses of the light and RV curves will be presented and modelling results discussed. This research is supported by NSF grants AST-9315365

  7. Characterizing, modeling, and addressing gender disparities in introductory college physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kost-Smith, Lauren Elizabeth

    2011-12-01

    The underrepresentation and underperformance of females in physics has been well documented and has long concerned policy-makers, educators, and the physics community. In this thesis, we focus on gender disparities in the first- and second-semester introductory, calculus-based physics courses at the University of Colorado. Success in these courses is critical for future study and careers in physics (and other sciences). Using data gathered from roughly 10,000 undergraduate students, we identify and model gender differences in the introductory physics courses in three areas: student performance, retention, and psychological factors. We observe gender differences on several measures in the introductory physics courses: females are less likely to take a high school physics course than males and have lower standardized mathematics test scores; males outscore females on both pre- and post-course conceptual physics surveys and in-class exams; and males have more expert-like attitudes and beliefs about physics than females. These background differences of males and females account for 60% to 70% of the gender gap that we observe on a post-course survey of conceptual physics understanding. In analyzing underlying psychological factors of learning, we find that female students report lower self-confidence related to succeeding in the introductory courses (self-efficacy) and are less likely to report seeing themselves as a "physics person". Students' self-efficacy beliefs are significant predictors of their performance, even when measures of physics and mathematics background are controlled, and account for an additional 10% of the gender gap. Informed by results from these studies, we implemented and tested a psychological, self-affirmation intervention aimed at enhancing female students' performance in Physics 1. Self-affirmation reduced the gender gap in performance on both in-class exams and the post-course conceptual physics survey. Further, the benefit of the self

  8. Accurate Characterization of Winter Precipitation Using In-Situ Instrumentation, CSU-CHILL Radar, and Advanced Scattering Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, A. J.; Notaros, B. M.; Bringi, V. N.; Kleinkort, C.; Huang, G. J.; Kennedy, P.; Thurai, M.

    2015-12-01

    We present a novel approach to remote sensing and characterization of winter precipitation and modeling of radar observables through a synergistic use of advanced in-situ instrumentation for microphysical and geometrical measurements of ice and snow particles, image processing methodology to reconstruct complex particle three-dimensional (3D) shapes, computational electromagnetics to analyze realistic precipitation scattering, and state-of-the-art polarimetric radar. Our in-situ measurement site at the Easton Valley View Airport, La Salle, Colorado, shown in the figure, consists of two advanced optical imaging disdrometers within a 2/3-scaled double fence intercomparison reference wind shield, and also includes PLUVIO snow measuring gauge, VAISALA weather station, and collocated NCAR GPS advanced upper-air system sounding system. Our primary radar is the CSU-CHILL radar, with a dual-offset Gregorian antenna featuring very high polarization purity and excellent side-lobe performance in any plane, and the in-situ instrumentation site being very conveniently located at a range of 12.92 km from the radar. A multi-angle snowflake camera (MASC) is used to capture multiple different high-resolution views of an ice particle in free-fall, along with its fall speed. We apply a visual hull geometrical method for reconstruction of 3D shapes of particles based on the images collected by the MASC, and convert these shapes into models for computational electromagnetic scattering analysis, using a higher order method of moments. A two-dimensional video disdrometer (2DVD), collocated with the MASC, provides 2D contours of a hydrometeor, along with the fall speed and other important parameters. We use the fall speed from the MASC and the 2DVD, along with state parameters measured at the Easton site, to estimate the particle mass (Böhm's method), and then the dielectric constant of particles, based on a Maxwell-Garnet formula. By calculation of the "particle-by-particle" scattering

  9. Physical Characterization of the Binary Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt Object 2001 QT297

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osip, David J.; Kern, S. D.; Elliot, J. L.

    2003-06-01

    Following our discovery of 2001 QT297 as the second known binary Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt Object (EKBO) in October of 2001 [IAUC 7733], we have carried out additional high spatial resolution ground based imaging in October and November of 2001 and July, August, and September of 2002. Using the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Magellan Instant Camera (MagIC) on the Baade and Clay 6.5 m telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile, we have obtained accurate astrometric and photometric measurements in the Sloan r', i', and g' filters. Superb seeing conditions and PSF fitting allow an accurate determination of the binary component separation and position angle over time as well as a detailed study of color and temporal variability of the individual components. Here we present a physical characterization of the individual components of 2001 QT297 based on these astrometric, color and variability measurements. We find the primary to exhibit colors about 0.3 magnitudes redder than solar with no evidence for variability. The secondary component, however, exhibits strong variability (~0.6 magnitudes) with a best fit period of 4.7526 +/- 0.0007 h for a single peak lightcurve or 9.505 +/- 0.001 h for a dual peaked lightcurve. The colors measured for the secondary also suggest variability. Based on a preliminary orbit fit for the pair using observations spanning a one year arc, we are able to estimate a system mass of ~ 3.2 × 1018 kg and provide constraints to the surface albedo of 9-14% for assumed densities between 1 and 2 g/cm3.

  10. Physical and chemical characterization of Dead Sea mud

    SciTech Connect

    Khlaifat, Abdelaziz; Al-Khashman, Omar; Qutob, Hani

    2010-05-15

    A laboratory analysis was performed to determine the physical and chemical properties of 24 Dead Sea mud samples collected from three different locations on the eastern shore of the Dead Sea. Several analytical techniques were used to determine the chemical and mineralogical compositions of those samples including atomic absorption spectrometry and X-ray diffraction. Physical parameters such as specific gravity, Atterberg limits, grain size, specific surface area, cation exchange capacity, pH and electrical conductivity were also studied. The main focus of the work was to document mud characteristics and to study the interrelation between physical and chemical properties. The mud samples were quite rich in minerals. Strontium was the most abundant trace element in the samples (range: 410-810 ppm) followed by barium (range: 155-380 ppm), vanadium (range: 209-264 ppm) and lead (range: 108-114 ppm). There were significant differences in the elemental contents of mud samples collected from different locations.

  11. Characterizing Interactive Engagement Activities in a Flipped Introductory Physics Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Anna K.; Galloway, Ross K.; Donnelly, Robyn; Hardy, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Interactive engagement activities are increasingly common in undergraduate physics teaching. As research efforts move beyond simply showing that interactive engagement pedagogies work towards developing an understanding of "how" they lead to improved learning outcomes, a detailed analysis of the way in which these activities are used in…

  12. Characterization of physical and aerodynamic properties of walnuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to study the physical and aerodynamic properties of freshly harvested walnuts. Measurements were carried out for three walnut varieties, Tulare, Howard and Chandler cultivated in California, USA. The nuts treated with and without Ethephon were collected from mechan...

  13. Accurate characterization and understanding of interface trap density trends between atomic layer deposited dielectrics and AlGaN/GaN with bonding constraint theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanan, Narayanan; Lee, Bongmook; Misra, Veena

    2015-06-15

    Many dielectrics have been proposed for the gate stack or passivation of AlGaN/GaN based metal oxide semiconductor heterojunction field effect transistors, to reduce gate leakage and current collapse, both for power and RF applications. Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is preferred for dielectric deposition as it provides uniform, conformal, and high quality films with precise monolayer control of film thickness. Identification of the optimum ALD dielectric for the gate stack or passivation requires a critical investigation of traps created at the dielectric/AlGaN interface. In this work, a pulsed-IV traps characterization method has been used for accurate characterization of interface traps with a variety of ALD dielectrics. High-k dielectrics (HfO{sub 2}, HfAlO, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) are found to host a high density of interface traps with AlGaN. In contrast, ALD SiO{sub 2} shows the lowest interface trap density (<2 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2}) after annealing above 600 °C in N{sub 2} for 60 s. The trend in observed trap densities is subsequently explained with bonding constraint theory, which predicts a high density of interface traps due to a higher coordination state and bond strain in high-k dielectrics.

  14. Characterization of physically vapor deposited AF2400 thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R.; Spragge, M.K.; Loomis, G.E.; Rainer, F.; Ward, R.; Thomas, I.M.; Kozlowski, M.R.

    1993-11-01

    Anti-reflective coatings made with Teflon AF2400 had the highest damage thresholds recorded for physical vapor deposited coatings at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory damage facility. Physical vapor deposited layers of Teflon AF2400, a perfluorinated amorphous polymer, maintained the bulk optical properties of a high transmittance from 200 nm to 1600 nm, and a low refractive index. In addition, the refractive index can be intentionally reduced by control of two common deposition parameters, deposition rate and substrate temperature. Scanning electron microscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance observations indicated that morphological changes caused the variations in the refractive index rather than compositional changes. The coatings adhered to fused silica and silicon wafers under normal laboratory handling conditions.

  15. Unique characterization of lunar samples by physical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, T.; Richter, D. A.; Simmons, G.; Wang, H.

    1973-01-01

    The measurement of compressional velocity, shear velocity, static compressibility, and thermal expansion of (1) a suite of shocked rocks fron the Ries impact in Germany, (2) a suite of samples cracked by thermal cycling to high temperatures, (3) many terrestrial igneous rocks, and (4) lunar basalts, gabbroic anorthosites, and breccias, indicate that shock metamorphism is the primary cause for values of physical properties of lunar rocks being diffferent from their intrinsic values. Large scale thermal metamorphism, thermal cycling between temperatures of lunar day and night, large thermal gradients, or thermal fatigue could possibly cause minor cracking in the top few centimeters of the lunar regolith, but are probably not important mechanism for extensively changing values of physical properties of lunar rocks.-

  16. Characterization of physical activity and sitting time among patients on hemodialysis using a new physical activity instrument

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Kirsten L.; Painter, Patricia; Delgado, Cynthia; Doyle, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Objective Physical activity questionnaires usually focus on moderate to vigorous activities and may not accurately capture physical activity or variation in levels of activity among extremely inactive groups like dialysis patients. Design Cross-sectional study Setting Three dialysis facilities in the San Francisco Bay Area Subjects 68 prevalent hemodialysis patients Intervention We administered a new physical activity questionnaire designed to capture activity in the lower end of the range, the Low Physical Activity Questionnaire (LoPAQ). Main Outcome Measure Outcome measures were correlation with a validated physical activity questionnaire, the Minnesota Leisure Time Activity (LTA) questionnaire and with self-reported physical function (Physical Function score of the SF-36) and physical performance (gait speed, chair stand, balance, and Short Physical Performance Battery [SPPB]) . We also determined whether patients who were frail or reported limitations in activities of daily living (ADL) were less active on the LoPAQ. Results 68 participants (mean age 59 ± 14 years, 59% men) completed the study. Patients were inactive according to the LoPAQ, with a median (IQR) of 517 (204 – 1190) kcal/week of physical activity. Although activity from the LTA was lower than on the LoPAQ (411 (61 – 902) kcal/week), the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.20), and results from the two instruments were strongly correlated (rho =0.62, p < 0.001). In addition, higher physical activity measured by the LoPAQ was correlated with better self-reported functioning (rho = 0.64, p < 0.001), better performance on gait speed (rho = 0.32, p=0.02), balance (rho = 0.45, p < 0.001), and chair rising (rho = −0.32, p=0.03) tests and with higher SPPB total score (rho = 0.51, p < 0.001). Frail patients and patients with ADL limitations were less active than those who were not frail or limited. Conclusion The LoPAQ performed similarly to the Minnesota LTA questionnaire in our

  17. Physical and Chemical Characterization of Carbonaceous Aerosols in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choung, S.; Jin, J. S.; Hwang, G. S.; Jang, K. S.; Han, W. S.; OH, J.; Kwon, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have been recently paid attention more in environmental research due to their negative effects on air quality, public health, and climate change. The aerosols contain approximately >20-50% carbonaceous components such as organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC) (or elemental carbon [EC]) derived from organic compounds, biomass burning, and incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. The physical, chemical, and biological properties of atmospheric aerosols are strongly dependent on the carbonaceous components. In particular, the BC could significantly affect the regional air quality in the northeastern Asia, because China is one of the foremost BC emission country in the world. Previous studies have mainly focused on the quantification and source identification for carbonaceous aerosols. However, understanding of physical and chemical properties for the carbonaceous aerosols related to environmental contamination and toxicity was still incomplete due to analytical difficulties. This study is addressed to evaluate the contribution of carbonaceous aerosols to air pollution through the surface, mass spectroscopic, and electron microscopic analyses, and determination of chemical composition and structure using the air particulate matter (PM2.5 and >PM2.5) samples.

  18. Toward a Physical Characterization of Raindrop Collision Outcome Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Testik, F. Y.; Barros, Ana P.; Bilven, Francis L.

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive raindrop collision outcome regime diagram that delineates the physical conditions associated with the outcome regimes (i.e., bounce, coalescence, and different breakup types) of binary raindrop collisions is proposed. The proposed diagram builds on a theoretical regime diagram defined in the phase space of collision Weber numbers We and the drop diameter ratio p by including critical angle of impact considerations. In this study, the theoretical regime diagram is first evaluated against a comprehensive dataset for drop collision experiments representative of raindrop collisions in nature. Subsequently, the theoretical regime diagram is modified to explicitly describe the dominant regimes of raindrop interactions in (We, p) by delineating the physical conditions necessary for the occurrence of distinct types of collision-induced breakup (neck/filament, sheet, disk, and crown breakups) based on critical angle of impact consideration. Crown breakup is a subtype of disk breakup for lower collision kinetic energy that presents distinctive morphology. Finally, the experimental results are analyzed in the context of the comprehensive collision regime diagram, and conditional probabilities that can be used in the parameterization of breakup kernels in stochastic models of raindrop dynamics are provided.

  19. Bioclimatic and physical characterization of the world's islands.

    PubMed

    Weigelt, Patrick; Jetz, Walter; Kreft, Holger

    2013-09-17

    The Earth's islands harbor a distinct, yet highly threatened, biological and cultural diversity that has been shaped by geographic isolation and unique environments. Island systems are key natural laboratories for testing theory in ecology and evolution. However, despite their potential usefulness for research, a quantitative description of island environments and an environmental classification are still lacking. Here, we prepare a standardized dataset and perform a comprehensive global environmental characterization for 17,883 of the world's marine islands >1 km(2) (∼98% of total island area). We consider area, temperature, precipitation, seasonality in temperature and precipitation, past climate change velocity, elevation, isolation, and past connectivity--key island characteristics and drivers of ecosystem processes. We find that islands are significantly cooler, wetter, and less seasonal than mainlands. Constrained by their limited area, they show less elevational heterogeneity. Wet temperate climates are more prevalent on islands, whereas desert climates are comparatively rare. We use ordination and clustering to characterize islands in multidimensional environmental space and to delimit island ecoregions, which provides unique insights into the environmental configuration and diversity of the world's islands. Combining ordination and classification together with global environmental data in a common framework opens up avenues for a more integrative use of islands in biogeography, macroecology, and conservation. To showcase possible applications of the presented data, we predict vascular plant species richness for all 17,883 islands based on statistically derived environment-richness relationships.

  20. Physical Characterization of the Near-Earth Object Population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binzel, Richard P.

    2003-01-01

    This program seeks to address the fundamental question: What are the relationships between asteroids, comets, and meteorites? To answer this question, we are studying the population of asteroids near the Earth which likely contain both asteroids and extinct comets and which is the immediate source for meteorites. An analysis of new and existing visible wavelength spectral data for more than 100 (Near-Earth Objects) NEOs, and Keck albedo data for more than 20 NEOs is underway. New asteroid-meteorite links are being found, the NEO population and hazard is being characterized, and the extinct comet component is being constrained. These results are contained within the following publication work during the current period: 1 book, 2 book chapters, 1 published paper, 2 papers submitted, 2 papers in preparation, 1 Ph. D. thesis in preparation, and 7 meeting abstracts/presentations.

  1. Characterizing the physical and chemical properties of aluminum dross

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfredi, O.; Wuth, W.; Bohlinger, I.

    1997-11-01

    In this article, the results of an investigation of granular and compact aluminum drosses are reported. The bulk density of granular drosses was determined according to DIN 52110-B, while DIN 52102-RE-VA was applied to compact drosses. The salt contents of the drosses were measured by applying the leaching test DIN 38414-S4; the metal contents by the salt-melting process were measured on a laboratory scale. In addition to the density data, the particle-size analysis, the distribution of elements in the different fractions, composition, metal content of recovered alloys, and gas evolution were compiled in a dross identity card characterizing each dross and simplifying the preanalysis for recovery.

  2. Physical property characterization of bulk MgB2 superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awana, V. P. S.; Vajpayee, A.; Mudgel, M.; Ganesan, V.; Awasthi, A. M.; Bhalla, G. L.; Kishan, H.

    2008-04-01

    We report synthesis, structure/micro-structure, resistivity under magnetic field [ρ(T)H], Raman spectra, thermoelectric power S(T), thermal conductivity κ(T), and magnetization of ambient pressure argon annealed polycrystalline bulk samples of MgB2, processed under identical conditions. The compound crystallizes in hexagonal structure with space group P6/mmm. Transmission electron microscopy ( TEM) reveals electron micrographs showing various types of defect features along with the presence of 3 4 nm thick amorphous layers forming the grain boundaries of otherwise crystalline MgB2. Raman spectra of the compound at room temperature exhibited characteristic phonon peak at 600 cm-1. Superconductivity is observed at 37.2 K by magnetic susceptibility χ(T), resistivity ρ(T), thermoelectric power S(T), and thermal conductivity κ(T) measurements. The power law fitting of ρ(T) give rise to Debye temperature (ΘD) at 1400 K which is found consistent with the theoretical fitting of S(T), exhibiting Θ D of 1410 K and carrier density of 3.81 × 1028/m3. Thermal conductivity κ(T) shows a jump at 38 K, i.e., at Tc, which was missing in some earlier reports. Critical current density (Jc) of up to 105 A/cm2 in 1 2 T (Tesla) fields at temperatures (T) of up to 10 K is seen from magnetization measurements. The irreversibility field, defined as the field related to merging of M(H) loops is found to be 78, 68 and 42 kOe at 4, 10 and 20 K respectively. The superconducting performance parameters viz. irreversibility field (Hirr) and critical current density Jc(H) of the studied MgB2 are improved profoundly with addition of nano-SiC and nano-diamond. The physical property parameters measured for polycrystalline MgB2 are compared with earlier reports and a consolidated insight of various physical properties is presented.

  3. Physical characterization of functionalized spider silk: electronic and sensing properties

    PubMed Central

    Steven, Eden; Park, Jin Gyu; Paravastu, Anant; Lopes, Elsa Branco; Brooks, James S; Englander, Ongi; Siegrist, Theo; Kaner, Papatya; Alamo, Rufina G

    2011-01-01

    This work explores functional, fundamental and applied aspects of naturally harvested spider silk fibers. Natural silk is a protein polymer where different amino acids control the physical properties of fibroin bundles, producing, for example, combinations of β-sheet (crystalline) and amorphous (helical) structural regions. This complexity presents opportunities for functional modification to obtain new types of material properties. Electrical conductivity is the starting point of this investigation, where the insulating nature of neat silk under ambient conditions is described first. Modification of the conductivity by humidity, exposure to polar solvents, iodine doping, pyrolization and deposition of a thin metallic film are explored next. The conductivity increases exponentially with relative humidity and/or solvent, whereas only an incremental increase occurs after iodine doping. In contrast, iodine doping, optimal at 70 °C, has a strong effect on the morphology of silk bundles (increasing their size), on the process of pyrolization (suppressing mass loss rates) and on the resulting carbonized fiber structure (that becomes more robust against bending and strain). The effects of iodine doping and other functional parameters (vacuum and thin film coating) motivated an investigation with magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) to monitor doping-induced changes in the amino acid-protein backbone signature. MAS-NMR revealed a moderate effect of iodine on the helical and β-sheet structures, and a lesser effect of gold sputtering. The effects of iodine doping were further probed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, revealing a partial transformation of β-sheet-to-amorphous constituency. A model is proposed, based on the findings from the MAS-NMR and FTIR, which involves iodine-induced changes in the silk fibroin bundle environment that can account for the altered physical properties. Finally, proof-of-concept applications of

  4. Reactor Physics Characterization of the HTR Module with UCO Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard Strydom

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT The HTR Module [1] is a graphite-moderated, helium cooled pebble bed High Temperature Reactor (HTR) design that has been extensively used as a reference template for the former South African and current Chinese HTR [2] programs. This design utilized spherical fuel elements packed into a dynamic pebble bed, consisting of TRISO coated uranium oxide (UO2) fuel kernels with a U-235 enrichment of 7.8% and a Heavy Metal loading of 7 grams per pebble. The main objective of this study is to compare several important reactor physics and core design parameters for the HTR Module and an identical design utilizing UCO fuel kernels. Fuel kernels of this type are currently being tested in the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as part of the larger Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. The PEBBED-THERMIX [3] code, which was developed specifically for the analysis of pebble bed HTRs, was used to compare the coupled neutronic and thermal fluid performance of the two designs.

  5. Physics characterization and frequency stability of the pulsed rubidium maser

    SciTech Connect

    Godone, Aldo; Micalizio, Salvatore; Levi, Filippo; Calosso, Claudio

    2006-10-15

    In this paper we report the theoretical and experimental characterization of a pulsed optically pumped vapor-cell frequency standard based on the detection of the free-induction decay microwave signal. The features that make this standard similar to a pulsed passive maser are presented. In order to predict and optimize the frequency stability, thermal and shot noise sources are analyzed, as well as the conversions of the laser and microwave fluctuations into the output frequency. The experimental results obtained with a clock prototype based on {sup 87}Rb in buffer gas are compared with the theoretical predictions, showing the practical possibility to implement a frequency standard limited in the medium term only by thermal drift. The achieved frequency stability is {sigma}{sub y}({tau})=1.2x10{sup -12}{tau}{sup -1/2} for measurement times up to {tau}{approx_equal}10{sup 5} s. It represents one of the best results reported in literature for gas cell frequency standards and is compliant with the present day requirements for on board space applications.

  6. Characterization by spectroscopic Ellipsometry, the physical properties of silver nanoparticles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coanga, Jean-Maurice

    2013-04-01

    Physicists are able to change their minds through their experiments. I think it is time to go kick the curse and go further in research if we want a human future. I work in the Nano-Optics and Plasmonics research. I defined with ellipsomètrie the structure of new type of Nano particles of silver. It's same be act quickly to replace the old dirty leaded electronic-connexion chip and by the other hand to find a new way for the heath care of cancer disease by nanoparticles the next killers of bad cells. Silver nanoparticle layers are obtained by Spark Plasma Sintering are investigated as an alternative to lead alloy based material for solder joint in power mechatronics modules. These layers are characterized by mean of conventional techniques that is the dilatometry technique, the resistivity measurement through the van der Pauw method, and the flash laser technique. Furthermore, the nanoparticles of silver layer are deeply studied by UV-Visible spectroscopic ellipsometry. Spectroscopic angles parameters are determined in function of temperature and dielectric constants are deduced and analyzed through an optical model which takes into account a Drude and a Lorentz component within the Bruggeman effective medium approximation (EMA). The relaxation times and the electrical conductivity are plot in function of temperature. The obtained electrical conductivity give significant result in good agreement to those reported by four points electrical measurement method.

  7. Characterization of the Southern Nevada Region for Source Physics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, M. L.; Walter, W. R.; Myers, S. C.; Pasyanos, M.; Hauk, T. F.; Ruhl, C. J.; Smith, K. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) includes an ongoing series of chemical explosions designed to advance seismic monitoring through better understanding of explosion physics and associated simulation codes. A candidate for a future SPE would result in direct comparison of seismic signals from well constrained and co-located earthquake and explosion sources at a common set of receivers. This possibility arises from an area of unusually shallow seismicity in southern Nevada. In May of 1993 a series of events with depths of 1-2 km were recorded at regional seismic stations as well as local stations that were temporarily deployed by the University of Nevada-Reno (UNR). The main shock had a magnitude of approximately 3.7 and 11 more events in the sequence had magnitudes over 2. As part of a feasibility study for a future SPE, LLNL, UNR and NSTec are working to improve our understanding of the region and the propagation of energy from sources in the area to local and regional stations in the western U.S. Six new telemetered seismic stations located at both original 1993 sites and additional sites have been installed and operating in and around the area since early 2011. Using both historic and current data we seek to ensure that we have the best possible locations for the 1993 sequence and current ongoing microseismicity in the region. For this purpose we use the Bayesloc multiple-event location algorithm (Myers et al., 2007; 2009) to improve hypocentral locations. Bayesloc formulates the location problem as a hierarchy of the travel-time model with travel-time corrections, an arrival time model including picking errors, and a prior model for each parameter. Using known locations of nearby previous nuclear tests we have the ability to test the accuracy and robustness of our relocation parameters and results. In our preliminary analysis, we use a mixture of local and regional nuclear test data with the algorithm for the first time, and initial tests show significant

  8. Treated and untreated rock dust: Quartz content and physical characterization.

    PubMed

    Soo, Jhy-Charm; Lee, Taekhee; Chisholm, William P; Farcas, Daniel; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Harper, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Rock dusting is used to prevent secondary explosions in coal mines, but inhalation of rock dusts can be hazardous if the crystalline silica (e.g., quartz) content in the respirable fraction is high. The objective of this study is to assess the quartz content and physical characteristics of four selected rock dusts, consisting of limestone or marble in both treated (such as treatment with stearic acid or stearates) and untreated forms. Four selected rock dusts (an untreated and treated limestone and an untreated and treated marble) were aerosolized in an aerosol chamber. Respirable size-selective sampling was conducted along with particle size-segregated sampling using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor. Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX) analyses were used to determine quartz mass and particle morphology, respectively. Quartz percentage in the respirable dust fraction of untreated and treated forms of the limestone dust was significantly higher than in bulk samples, but since the bulk percentage was low the enrichment factor would not have resulted in any major change to conclusions regarding the contribution of respirable rock dust to the overall airborne quartz concentration. The quartz percentage in the marble dust (untreated and treated) was very low and the respirable fractions showed no enrichment. The spectra from SEM-EDX analysis for all materials were predominantly from calcium carbonate, clay, and gypsum particles. No free quartz particles were observed. The four rock dusts used in this study are representative of those presented for use in rock dusting, but the conclusions may not be applicable to all available materials.

  9. Treated and Untreated Rock Dust: Quartz Content and Physical Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Soo, Jhy-Charm; Lee, Taekhee; Chisholm, William P.; Farcas, Daniel; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Harper, Martin

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Rock dusting is used to prevent secondary explosions in coal mines, but inhalation of rock dusts can be hazardous if the crystalline silica (e.g., quartz) content in the respirable fraction is high. The objective of this study is to assess the quartz content and physical characteristics of four selected rock dusts, consisting of limestone or marble in both treated (such as treatment with stearic acid or stearates) and untreated forms. Four selected rock dusts (an untreated and treated limestone and an untreated and treated marble) were aerosolized in an aerosol chamber. Respirable size-selective sampling was conducted along with particle size-segregated sampling using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor. Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX) analyses were used to determine quartz mass and particle morphology, respectively. Quartz percentage in the respirable dust fraction of untreated and treated forms of the limestone dust was significantly higher than in bulk samples, but since the bulk percentage was low the enrichment factor would not have resulted in any major change to conclusions regarding the contribution of respirable rock dust to the overall airborne quartz concentration. The quartz percentage in the marble dust (untreated and treated) was very low and the respirable fractions showed no enrichment. The spectra from SEM-EDX analysis for all materials were predominantly from calcium carbonate, clay, and gypsum particles. No free quartz particles were observed. The four rock dusts used in this study are representative of those presented for use in rock dusting, but the conclusions may not be applicable to all available materials. PMID:27314444

  10. Physical and chemical characterization of residential oil boiler emissions.

    PubMed

    Hays, Michael D; Beck, Lee; Barfield, Pamela; Lavrich, Richard J; Dong, Yuanji; Vander Wal, Randy L

    2008-04-01

    The toxicity of emissions from the combustion of home heating oil coupled with the regional proximity and seasonal use of residential oil boilers (ROB) is an important public health concern. Yet scant physical and chemical information about the emissions from this source is available for climate and air quality modeling and for improving our understanding of aerosol-related human health effects. The gas- and particle-phase emissions from an active ROB firing distillate fuel oil (commonly known as diesel fuel) were evaluated to address this deficiency. Ion chromatography of impactor samples showed that the ultrafine ROB aerosol emissions were approximately 45% (w/w) sulfate. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detected various n-alkanes at trace levels, sometimes in accumulation mode particles, and out of phase with the size distributions of aerosol mass and sulfate. The carbonaceous matter in the ROB aerosol was primarily light-adsorbing elemental carbon. Gas chromatography-atomic emission spectroscopy measured a previously unrecognized organosulfur compound group in the ROB aerosol emissions. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy of ROB soot indicated the presence of a highly ordered primary particle nanostructure embedded in larger aggregates. Organic gas emissions were measured using EPA Methods TO-15 and TO-11A. The ROB emitted volatile oxygenates (8 mg/(kg of oil burned)) and olefins (5 mg/(kg of oil burned)) mostly unrelated to the base fuel composition. In the final analysis, the ROB tested was a source of numerous hazardous air pollutants as defined in the Clean Air Act Amendments. Approximations conducted using emissions data from the ROB tests show relatively low contributions to a regional-level anthropogenic emissions inventory for volitile organic compounds, PM2.5, and SO2 mass.

  11. Synoptic Observations for Physical Characterization of Fast Rotator NEOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikwaya Eluo, Jean-Baptiste; Hergenrother, Carl W.

    2014-11-01

    NEOs can be studied not only dynamically, to learn about their impact hazard, but also physically, to establish various properties important both to better address their potential hazard and also to understand what they can tell us about the origin of the solar system and its ongoing processes.Taking advantage of the two-meter-class telescopes around Tucson, we plan to observe NEOs synoptically using telescopes at three different locations: VATT (Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope) at Mount Graham (longitude: -109.8719, latitude: 32.7016, elevation: 10469 feet), Bok 2.3 m at Kitt Peak (longitude: -111.6004, latitude: 31.9629, elevation: 6795 feet) and Kuiper 1.5-m at Mount Bigelow (longitude: -110.7345, latitude: 32.4165, elevation: 8235 feet). All three telescopes will aim simultaneously at the same object, each with a different instrument. The three telescopes will be part of the Arizona Robotic Telescope (ART) network, a University of Arizona initiative to provide near real-time observations of Target of Opportunity objects across the visible and near-infrared wavelengths. The VATT-4K optical imager mounted on the VATT has already been used for photometry. In the future we plan to utilize the BCSpec (Boller & Chivens Spectrograph) for visible spectroscopy on Bok 2.3 meter and a near-infrared instrument on Kuiper 1.5 meter. We report here the preliminary results of several NEOs whose rotation rate and color have been estimated using photometry with images recorded with VATT-4K. 2009 SQ104 has a rotation rate of 6.85+/- 0.03 h, 2014 AY28 has a rotation rate of 0.91 +/- 0.02 h, 2014 EC of 0.54 +/-0.04 h, 2014 FA44 of 3.45 +/- 0.05 h, and 2014 KS40 of 1.11 +/- 0.06 h.

  12. Characterizing Materials Sources and Sinks; Current Approaches: Part II. Chemical and Physical Characterization

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses methods for characterizing chemical emissions from material sources, including laboratory, dynamic chamber, and full-scale studies. Indoor sources and their interaction with sinks play a major role in determining indoor air quality (IAQ). Techniques for evalua...

  13. Primary chemical and physical characterization of acute toxic components in wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Svenson, A.; Linlin, Z.; Kaj, L. )

    1992-10-01

    A chemical and physical primary characterization work sheet was developed based on the Microtox test, a bacterial bioluminescence system used as a rapid estimate of acute aquatic toxic effects. Measurements of the variation in light reduction upon different pretreatments provided information about the chemical and physical properties of the main toxic component(s) in test wastewater samples. This primary characterization of a wastewater sample was performed within 1 day. Tests of pure toxic chemical compounds and wastewaters with known and unknown primary toxicants are presented. Outlines to the chemical analysis and identification of toxic components may be deduced from the primary characterization. The provisional characterization may also provide information on wastewater treatment techniques.

  14. Validation of the Physics Analysis used to Characterize the AGR-1 TRISO Fuel Irradiation Test

    SciTech Connect

    Sterbentz, James W.; Harp, Jason M.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Hawkes, Grant L.; Chang, Gray S.

    2015-05-01

    The results of a detailed physics depletion calculation used to characterize the AGR-1 TRISO-coated particle fuel test irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory are compared to measured data for the purpose of validation. The particle fuel was irradiated for 13 ATR power cycles over three calendar years. The physics analysis predicts compact burnups ranging from 11.30-19.56% FIMA and cumulative neutron fast fluence from 2.21?4.39E+25 n/m2 under simulated high-temperature gas-cooled reactor conditions in the ATR. The physics depletion calculation can provide a full characterization of all 72 irradiated TRISO-coated particle compacts during and post-irradiation, so validation of this physics calculation was a top priority. The validation of the physics analysis was done through comparisons with available measured experimental data which included: 1) high-resolution gamma scans for compact activity and burnup, 2) mass spectrometry for compact burnup, 3) flux wires for cumulative fast fluence, and 4) mass spectrometry for individual actinide and fission product concentrations. The measured data are generally in very good agreement with the calculated results, and therefore provide an adequate validation of the physics analysis and the results used to characterize the irradiated AGR-1 TRISO fuel.

  15. PSSP-RFE: accurate prediction of protein structural class by recursive feature extraction from PSI-BLAST profile, physical-chemical property and functional annotations.

    PubMed

    Li, Liqi; Cui, Xiang; Yu, Sanjiu; Zhang, Yuan; Luo, Zhong; Yang, Hua; Zhou, Yue; Zheng, Xiaoqi

    2014-01-01

    Protein structure prediction is critical to functional annotation of the massively accumulated biological sequences, which prompts an imperative need for the development of high-throughput technologies. As a first and key step in protein structure prediction, protein structural class prediction becomes an increasingly challenging task. Amongst most homological-based approaches, the accuracies of protein structural class prediction are sufficiently high for high similarity datasets, but still far from being satisfactory for low similarity datasets, i.e., below 40% in pairwise sequence similarity. Therefore, we present a novel method for accurate and reliable protein structural class prediction for both high and low similarity datasets. This method is based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) in conjunction with integrated features from position-specific score matrix (PSSM), PROFEAT and Gene Ontology (GO). A feature selection approach, SVM-RFE, is also used to rank the integrated feature vectors through recursively removing the feature with the lowest ranking score. The definitive top features selected by SVM-RFE are input into the SVM engines to predict the structural class of a query protein. To validate our method, jackknife tests were applied to seven widely used benchmark datasets, reaching overall accuracies between 84.61% and 99.79%, which are significantly higher than those achieved by state-of-the-art tools. These results suggest that our method could serve as an accurate and cost-effective alternative to existing methods in protein structural classification, especially for low similarity datasets.

  16. Initial Characterization of Colombian High School Physics Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge on Electric Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melo-Niño, Lina Viviana; Cañada, Florentina; Mellado, Vicente

    2017-01-01

    We explore the initial characterization of the pedagogical content knowledge of four, in-service, Colombian pre-university secondary education physics teachers on the concept of electric field. Two of them teach the content in English as a second language. The aim of the study was to obtain an image of the participants' teaching of electric field…

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTIVATED CARBONS' PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES IN RELATION TO THEIR MERCURY ADSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a characterization of the physical and chemical properties of the activated carbons used for elemental mercury (Hgo) adsorption, in order to understand the role of oxygen surface functional groups on the mechanism of Hgo adsorption by activated carbons....

  18. Characterization Of Environmentally Relevant Chemical And Physical Properties Of Silver Nano-Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding and predicting the fate and transport of nano-materials in the environment requires a detailed characterization of the chemical and physical properties that control fate and transport. In the current study, we have evaluated the surface charge, aggregation potentia...

  19. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of transuranic wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides radiological, physical and chemical characterization data for transuranic radioactive wastes and transuranic radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program (PSPI). Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 139 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 39,380{sup 3} corresponding to a total mass of approximately 19,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats Plant generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification.

  20. Characterizing pedagogical practices of university physics students in informal learning environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinko, Kathleen A.; Madigan, Peter; Miller, Eric; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2016-06-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Preparing and Supporting University Physics Educators.] University educators (UEs) have a long history of teaching physics not only in formal classroom settings but also in informal outreach environments. The pedagogical practices of UEs in informal physics teaching have not been widely studied, and they may provide insight into formal practices and preparation. We investigate the interactions between UEs and children in an afterschool physics program facilitated by university physics students from the University of Colorado Boulder. In this program, physics undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers work with K-8 children on hands-on physics activities on a weekly basis over the course of a semester. We use an activity theoretic framework as a tool to examine situational aspects of individuals' behavior in the complex structure of the afterschool program. Using this framework, we analyze video of UE-child interactions and identify three main pedagogical modalities that UEs display during activities: instruction, consultation, and participation modes. These modes are characterized by certain language, physical location, and objectives that establish differences in UE-child roles and division of labor. Based on this analysis, we discuss implications for promoting pedagogical strategies through purposeful curriculum development and university educator preparation.

  1. Holocene paleoclimate characterization in Lago Fagnano (Tierra del Fuego) using sedimentary, physical and geochemical proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizcaino Marti, A.; Dunbar, R. B.; Wahl, D.; Moy, C. M.; Mucciarone, D. A.; Anderson, L.; Guilderson, T. P.

    2010-12-01

    Tierra del Fuego is the world's southernmost landmass outside of Antarctica. Two features of ocean circulation control the climate of Tierra del Fuego: the Southern Ocean circumpolar flow and the South Pacific Gyre. Together with Patagonia, Tierra del Fuego is the only terrestrial region directly influenced by the southern hemisphere westerly winds. This region is also a tectonically active area affected by volcanic and seismic activity related to South American and Scotia-Antarctic plate boundaries. Accommodated along the Magallanes-Fagnano fault system, as part of the plate boundary, the Lago Fagnano is the largest lake in Tierra del Fuego. This E-W trending lake is 100 km long and 5-15 km wide. Our investigations were carried out on the upper 4 meters of an 8.4 m long piston core obtained at 69 m water depth in Bahía Grande (LF06-PC8); a southwestern lake sub-basin separated from the main lake by a shallow sill. Our studies are based on the integration of sediment description, physical properties, pollen, and geochemical analyses including C and N isotopes (1cm interval) and XRF scan (1mm interval). The age model for the core is based on radiocarbon ages and tephrochronology. Additionally, a 800 km long grid of high resolution seismic profiles support the sedimentary analyses and allow the correlation with other cores from within the lake basin. LF06-PC8 yields continuous and high accumulation-rate sedimentary sections for Lago Fagnano. The presented sediment record corresponds to a laminated hemipelagite with presence of a single but complex mass transport deposit interval. An accurate sedimentological interpretation of the core together with the radiocarbon ages and tephra dates allow to identify and characterize the main sedimentary processes occurring in the lake over the last 8 kyr. In addition, proxy data (C and N isotopes and XRF scan data) from the laminated hemipelagic interval provide a reliable record of past variability in the westerly wind field as

  2. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  3. Physics-based RF/microwave characterization of wave interactions within electrical connectors with partial insertion faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokgöz, Çaǧatay; Dardona, Sameh

    2016-09-01

    Electrical failures in avionics systems may result from connector faults. If fault precursors are not detected in advance, they may lead to hard failures such as open and short circuits that could ultimately result in fire or loss of flight critical systems. Therefore, It is crucial to detect, locate, and characterize fault precursors for timely preventive maintenance and mitigation before hard failures occur. In this paper, a physics-based connector model consisting of multiple coaxial line sections with different characteristic impedances and lengths is proposed. Method of Moments (MoM) analyses were performed using commercial electromagnetic simulation software, FEKO, for transverse electric and magnetic (TEM) wave propagation through a connector. The physical parameters of the connector were optimized to match the measured S parameters for multiple insertion depths. The proposed models represent the connector for multiple insertion depths by varying only two length parameters at a time while other parameters are fixed. Insertion depth-dependent resonant frequency shifts observed during measurement are also captured by the model over the full range of fully inserted to barely touching contacts. Hence, the models provide accurate representations of the connector and properly detect precursors to partial insertion faults.

  4. A Review of Wearable Technologies for Elderly Care that Can Accurately Track Indoor Position, Recognize Physical Activities and Monitor Vital Signs in Real Time

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhihua; Yang, Zhaochu; Dong, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Rapid growth of the aged population has caused an immense increase in the demand for healthcare services. Generally, the elderly are more prone to health problems compared to other age groups. With effective monitoring and alarm systems, the adverse effects of unpredictable events such as sudden illnesses, falls, and so on can be ameliorated to some extent. Recently, advances in wearable and sensor technologies have improved the prospects of these service systems for assisting elderly people. In this article, we review state-of-the-art wearable technologies that can be used for elderly care. These technologies are categorized into three types: indoor positioning, activity recognition and real time vital sign monitoring. Positioning is the process of accurate localization and is particularly important for elderly people so that they can be found in a timely manner. Activity recognition not only helps ensure that sudden events (e.g., falls) will raise alarms but also functions as a feasible way to guide people’s activities so that they avoid dangerous behaviors. Since most elderly people suffer from age-related problems, some vital signs that can be monitored comfortably and continuously via existing techniques are also summarized. Finally, we discussed a series of considerations and future trends with regard to the construction of “smart clothing” system. PMID:28208620

  5. A Review of Wearable Technologies for Elderly Care that Can Accurately Track Indoor Position, Recognize Physical Activities and Monitor Vital Signs in Real Time.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihua; Yang, Zhaochu; Dong, Tao

    2017-02-10

    Rapid growth of the aged population has caused an immense increase in the demand for healthcare services. Generally, the elderly are more prone to health problems compared to other age groups. With effective monitoring and alarm systems, the adverse effects of unpredictable events such as sudden illnesses, falls, and so on can be ameliorated to some extent. Recently, advances in wearable and sensor technologies have improved the prospects of these service systems for assisting elderly people. In this article, we review state-of-the-art wearable technologies that can be used for elderly care. These technologies are categorized into three types: indoor positioning, activity recognition and real time vital sign monitoring. Positioning is the process of accurate localization and is particularly important for elderly people so that they can be found in a timely manner. Activity recognition not only helps ensure that sudden events (e.g., falls) will raise alarms but also functions as a feasible way to guide people's activities so that they avoid dangerous behaviors. Since most elderly people suffer from age-related problems, some vital signs that can be monitored comfortably and continuously via existing techniques are also summarized. Finally, we discussed a series of considerations and future trends with regard to the construction of "smart clothing" system.

  6. Physical characterization and profiling of airway epithelial derived exosomes using light scattering.

    PubMed

    Kesimer, Mehmet; Gupta, Richa

    2015-10-01

    Exosomes and other extracellular vesicles have been gaining interest during the last decade due to their emerging role in biology and, disease pathogenesis and their biomarker potential. Almost all published research related to exosomes and other extracellular vesicles include some form of physical characterization. Therefore, these vesicles should be precisely profiled and characterized physically before studying their biological role as intercellular messengers, biomarkers or therapeutic tools. Using a combination of light scattering techniques, including dynamic light scattering (DLS) and multi-angle laser light scattering combined with size exclusion separation (SEC-MALLS), we physically characterized and compared distinct extracellular vesicles derived from the apical secretions of two different cultured airway epithelial cells. The results indicated that epithelial cells release vesicles with distinct physical properties and sizes. Human primary tracheobronchial cell culture (HTBE) derived vesicles have a hydrodynamic radius (Rh) of approximately 340 nm while their radius of gyration (Rg) is approximately 200 nm. Electron microscopy analysis, however, revealed that their spherical component is 40-100 nm in size, and they carry filamentous, entangled membrane mucins on their surface that increases their overall radius. The mucin decoration on the surface defines their size and charge as measured using light scattering techniques. Their surface properties mirror the properties of the cells from which they are derived. This may provide a unique tool for researchers to elucidate the unanswered questions in normal airway biology and innate and adaptive defense, including the remodeling of airways during inflammation, tumorigenesis and metastasis.

  7. Characterizing Pedagogical Practices of University Physics Students in Informal Learning Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinko, Kathleen

    2016-03-01

    University educators (UEs) have a long history of teaching physics not only in formal classroom settings but also in informal outreach environments. The pedagogical practices of UEs in informal physics teaching have not been widely studied, and they may provide insight into formal practices and preparation. We investigate the interactions between UEs and children in an afterschool physics program facilitated by university physics students from the University of Colorado Boulder. In this program, physics undergraduates, graduate students and post-doctoral researchers work with K-8 children on hands-on physics activities on a weekly basis over the course of a semester. We use an Activity Theoretic framework as a tool to examine situational aspects of individuals' behavior in the complex structure of the afterschool program. Using this framework, we analyze video of UE-child interactions and identify three main pedagogical modalities that UEs display during activities: Instruction, Consultation and Participation modes. These modes are characterized by certain language, physical location, and objectives that establish differences in UE-child roles and division of labor. Based on this analysis, we discuss implications for promoting pedagogical strategies through purposeful curriculum development and university educator preparation.

  8. Accurate Characterization of Rain Drop Size Distribution Using Meteorological Particle Spectrometer and 2D Video Disdrometer for Propagation and Remote Sensing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurai, Merhala; Bringi, Viswanathan; Kennedy, Patrick; Notaros, Branislav; Gatlin, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Accurate measurements of rain drop size distributions (DSD), with particular emphasis on small and tiny drops, are presented. Measurements were conducted in two very different climate regions, namely Northern Colorado and Northern Alabama. Both datasets reveal a combination of (i) a drizzle mode for drop diameters less than 0.7 mm and (ii) a precipitation mode for larger diameters. Scattering calculations using the DSDs are performed at S and X bands and compared with radar observations for the first location. Our accurate DSDs will improve radar-based rain rate estimates as well as propagation predictions.

  9. Optical Microscopy Characterization for Borehole U-15n#12 in Support of NCNS Source Physics Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Jennifer E.; Sussman, Aviva Joy

    2015-05-22

    Optical microscopy characterization of thin sections from corehole U-15n#12 is part of a larger material characterization effort for the Source Physics Experiment (SPE). The SPE program was conducted in Nevada with a series of explosive tests designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves inside Stock quartz monzonite. Optical microscopy analysis includes the following: 1) imaging of full thin sections (scans and mosaic maps); 2) high magnification imaging of petrographic texture (grain size, foliations, fractures, etc.); and 3) measurement of microfracture density.

  10. A Systematic Review of Human Bat Rabies Virus Variant Cases: Evaluating Unprotected Physical Contact with Claws and Teeth in Support of Accurate Risk Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Campagnolo, Enzo R.; Long, Jonah; Rupprecht, Charles E.

    2016-01-01

    In the United States and Canada, the most recent documented cases of rabies have been attributed to bat rabies viruses (RABV). We undertook this systematic review in an effort to summarize and enhance understanding of the risk of infection for individuals who have been potentially exposed to a suspect or confirmed rabid bat. United States rabies surveillance summaries documented a total of 41 human bat-rabies virus variant verified non-transplant cases between 1990 and 2015. All cases were fatal. Seven (17.1%) of 41 cases reported a bite from a bat. Ten (24.3%) cases had unprotected physical contact (UPC); these included seven cases that had a bat land or crawl on them (contact with claws) and one case that touched a bat’s teeth. Seven (17.1%) cases had probable UPC. Insectivorous bat teeth are extremely sharp and highly efficient for predation upon arthropod prey. Bats also have sharp claws on the end of their thumbs and feet. One of the most common bat RABV variants has an ability to replicate in non-neural cells. Questioning individuals about unprotected contact with bat teeth and claws (including a bat landing or crawling on a person) may help identify additional exposures. PMID:27459720

  11. Initial Characterization of Colombian High School Physics Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge on Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo-Niño, Lina Viviana; Cañada, Florentina; Mellado, Vicente

    2017-02-01

    We explore the initial characterization of the pedagogical content knowledge of four, in-service, Colombian pre-university secondary education physics teachers on the concept of electric field. Two of them teach the content in English as a second language. The aim of the study was to obtain an image of the participants' teaching of electric field and the inherent complexities that go with that. The results revealed that factors which involved their personal educational models, such as, how they interpret their school's curriculum, the relationship they see between physics and mathematics, the most effective strategies for teaching physics, and the time they have available to develop the topic played a significant role. The teachers considered it essential to establish new strategies that would motivate the pupils by helping them visualize the electric field.

  12. Initial Characterization of Colombian High School Physics Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge on Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo-Niño, Lina Viviana; Cañada, Florentina; Mellado, Vicente

    2015-09-01

    We explore the initial characterization of the pedagogical content knowledge of four, in-service, Colombian pre-university secondary education physics teachers on the concept of electric field. Two of them teach the content in English as a second language. The aim of the study was to obtain an image of the participants' teaching of electric field and the inherent complexities that go with that. The results revealed that factors which involved their personal educational models, such as, how they interpret their school's curriculum, the relationship they see between physics and mathematics, the most effective strategies for teaching physics, and the time they have available to develop the topic played a significant role. The teachers considered it essential to establish new strategies that would motivate the pupils by helping them visualize the electric field.

  13. Characterization of benthic communities and physical habitat in the Stanislaus, Tuolumne, and Merced Rivers, California.

    PubMed

    Hall, Lenwood W; Killen, William D; Anderson, Ronald D

    2006-04-01

    The primary goal of this study was to characterize physical habitat and benthic communities (macroinvertebrates) in the Stanislaus, Tuolumne and Merced Rivers in California's San Joaquin Valley in 2003. These rivers have been listed as impaired water bodies (303 (d) list) by the State of California due to the presence of organophosphate (OP) insecticides chlorpyrifos and diazinon, Group A pesticides (i.e., organochlorine pesticides), mercury, or unknown toxicity. Based on 10 instream and riparian physical habitat metrics, total physical habitat scores in the Stanislaus River ranged from 124 to 188 (maximum possible total score is 200). The highest total habitat score was reported at the upstream site. Tuolumne River physical habitat scores ranged from 86 to 167. Various Tuolumne River physical habitat metrics, including total habitat score, increased from downstream to upstream in this river. Merced River physical habitat scores ranged from 121 to 170 with a significant increase in various physical habitat metrics, including total habitat score, reported from downstream to upstream. Channel flow (an instream metric) and bank stability (a riparian metric) were the most important physical habitat metrics influencing the various benthic metrics for all three rivers. Abundance measures of benthic macroinvertebrates (5,100 to 5,400 individuals) were similar among the three rivers in the San Joaquin watershed. Benthic communities in all three rivers were generally dominated by: (1) Baetidae species (mayflies) which are a component of EPT taxa generally considered sensitive to environmental degradation; (2) Chironomidae (midges) which can be either tolerant or sensitive to environmental stressors depending on the species; (3) Ephemerellidae (mayflies) which are considered sensitive to pollution stress; and (4) Naididae (aquatic worms) which are generally considered tolerant to environmental stressors. The presence of 117 taxa in the Stanislaus River, 114 taxa in the

  14. Challenges in Physical Characterization of Dim Space Objects: What Can We Learn from NEOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, V.; Sanchez, J.; Thirouin, A.; Rivera-Valentin, E.; Ryan, W.; Ryan, E.; Mokovitz, N.; Tegler, S.

    2016-09-01

    Physical characterization of dim space objects in cis-lunar space can be a challenging task. Of particular interest to both natural and artificial space object behavior scientists are the properties beyond orbital parameters that can uniquely identify them. These properties include rotational state, size, shape, density and composition. A wide range of observational and non-observational factors affect our ability to characterize dim objects in cis-lunar space. For example, phase angle (angle between Sun-Target-Observer), temperature, rotational variations, temperature, and particle size (for natural dim objects). Over the last two decades, space object behavior scientists studying natural dim objects have attempted to quantify and correct for a majority of these factors to enhance our situational awareness. These efforts have been primarily focused on developing laboratory spectral calibrations in a space-like environment. Calibrations developed correcting spectral observations of natural dim objects could be applied to characterizing artificial objects, as the underlying physics is the same. The paper will summarize our current understanding of these observational and non-observational factors and present a case study showcasing the state of the art in characterization of natural dim objects.

  15. Physical Characterization Studies of Near-Earth Object Spacecraft Mission Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, E.; Ryan, W.

    2012-09-01

    Periodic asteroids and comets that come within a perihelion distance of 1.3 AU or less are defined as Near-Earth Objects (NEOs). These small bodies are in dynamically favorable positions as potential spacecraft mission targets. As a consequence, space missions to NEOs are underway or in development by several major agencies (e.g., NASA, ESA, JAXA), and recently, a manned mission to an NEO was announced as a NASA goal to be accomplished by the year 2025. Further, NASA has selected the OSIRIS-Rex unmanned spacecraft mission for launch in 2016. The spacecraft will rendezvous with and collect samples from the near-Earth asteroid 1999 RQ36. Ground-based monitoring efforts to find and characterize suitable targets for planned and existing spacecraft missions are in progress and require moderate to large-sized telescopes. Good candidate asteroids must have a well-defined orbit and be of a known spectral type. Knowledge of physical properties such as size, shape, internal structure, rotation rate (and whether the asteroid is tumbling) must also be derived. Acquiring more information about the physical nature of NEOs not only contributes to general scientific pursuits and preparation for spacecraft missions, but is important to better address the threat from dangerous NEOs having Earth-crossing orbits. Researchers at the Magdalena Ridge Observatory's (MRO) 2.4-meter telescope facility have an ongoing, comprehensive program to determine orbital and physical characterization information of newly discovered objects in the near-Earth population. The approach of the program is to leverage nightly astrometric follow-up work to obtain physical data (primarily rotation rates) on the most interesting, recently discovered NEOs, including promising spacecraft targets. This strategy allows one-of-a-kind, real-time access to the study of unique asteroids and comets before they leave the near-Earth vicinity. We will present new data obtained by photometric, spectroscopic, and other

  16. Global Threat Reduction Initiative Fuel-Thermo-Physical Characterization Project Quality Assurance Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Mario M.; Slonecker, Bruce D.

    2012-06-01

    The charter of the Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project is to ready Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) facilities and processes for the receipt of unirradiated and irradiated low enriched uranium (LEU) molybdenum (U-Mo) fuel element samples, and to perform analysis to support the Global Threat Reduction Initiative conversion program. PNNL’s support for the program will include the establishment of post-irradiation examination processes, including thermo-physical properties, unique to the U.S. Department of Energy laboratories. These processes will ultimately support the submission of the base fuel qualification (BFQ) to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and revisions to High Performance Research Reactor Safety Analysis Reports to enable conversion from highly enriched uranium to LEU fuel. This quality assurance plan (QAP) provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that support the NRC BFQ. This QAP is designed to be used by project staff, and prescribes the required management control elements that are to be met and how they are implemented. Additional controls are captured in Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project plans, existing procedures, and procedures to be developed that provide supplemental information on how work is conducted on the project.

  17. Characterizing the Physical and Thermal Properties of Planetary Regolith at Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantovani, James G.; Swanger, Adam; Townsend, Ivan I., III; Sibille, Laurent; Galloway, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    The success or failure of in-situ resource utilization for planetary surface exploration-whether for science, colonization, or commercialization-relies heavily on the design and implementation of systems that can effectively process planetary regolith and exploit its potential benefits. In most cases, this challenge necessarily includes the characterization of regolith properties at low temperatures (cryogenic). None of the nearby solar system destinations of interest, such as the moon, Mars and asteroids, possess a sufficient atmosphere to sustain the consistently "high" surface temperatures found on Earth. Therefore, they can experience permanent cryogenic temperatures or dramatic cyclical changes in surface temperature. Characterization of physical properties (e.g., specific heat, thermal and electrical conductivity) over the entire temperature profile is important when planning a mission to a planetary surface; however, the impact on mechanical properties due to the introduction of icy deposits must also be explored in order to devise effective and robust excavation technologies. The Granular Mechanics and Regolith Operations Laboratory and the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at NASA Kennedy Space Center are developing technologies and experimental methods to address these challenges and to aid in the characterization of the physical and mechanical properties of regolith at cryogenic temperatures. This paper will review the current state of knowledge concerning planetary regolith at low temperature, including that of icy regolith, and describe efforts to manipulate icy regolith through novel penetration and excavation techniques.

  18. Identification and characterization of indole and oxindole alkaloids from leaves of mitragyna speciosa korth using liquid chromatography-accurate QToF mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alkaloids have been reported to be the major physiologically active constituents in Mitragyna. An analytical method was developed to provide an alternative, fast method for characterization of alkaloids from various Mitragyna speciosa samples. The separation was achieved using a reversed phase (C-8)...

  19. Characterization of study focus of the Brazilian academic-scientific production about experimentation in Physics Teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesendonk, F. S.; Terrazzan, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    In this article, we presented a characterization of the recent academic and scientific literature on experiments in Physics Education in terms of focus and research intentions and results built through these investigations. For this, we used as a source of information 10 national Academic and Scientific Journals available on websites. By consulting these journals, we identified that 147 papers published from 2009 to 2013 had as their main focus the experimental research. We classified the Works in categories established a priori and subcategories established a posteriori. At the end, we found out that few articles deal with this issue (9%). Moreover, in most productions there is a superficial discussion of theoretical studies on the use of experimentation in teaching. This makes the contribution of these productions for the development of conceptual discussions about the potential and limited use of experimentation in Physics Education to be relatively small.

  20. Construction and characterization of external cavity diode lasers for atomic physics.

    PubMed

    Hardman, Kyle S; Bennetts, Shayne; Debs, John E; Kuhn, Carlos C N; McDonald, Gordon D; Robins, Nick

    2014-04-24

    Since their development in the late 1980s, cheap, reliable external cavity diode lasers (ECDLs) have replaced complex and expensive traditional dye and Titanium Sapphire lasers as the workhorse laser of atomic physics labs. Their versatility and prolific use throughout atomic physics in applications such as absorption spectroscopy and laser cooling makes it imperative for incoming students to gain a firm practical understanding of these lasers. This publication builds upon the seminal work by Wieman, updating components, and providing a video tutorial. The setup, frequency locking and performance characterization of an ECDL will be described. Discussion of component selection and proper mounting of both diodes and gratings, the factors affecting mode selection within the cavity, proper alignment for optimal external feedback, optics setup for coarse and fine frequency sensitive measurements, a brief overview of laser locking techniques, and laser linewidth measurements are included.

  1. Construction and Characterization of External Cavity Diode Lasers for Atomic Physics

    PubMed Central

    Hardman, Kyle S.; Bennetts, Shayne; Debs, John E.; Kuhn, Carlos C. N.; McDonald, Gordon D.; Robins, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Since their development in the late 1980s, cheap, reliable external cavity diode lasers (ECDLs) have replaced complex and expensive traditional dye and Titanium Sapphire lasers as the workhorse laser of atomic physics labs1,2. Their versatility and prolific use throughout atomic physics in applications such as absorption spectroscopy and laser cooling1,2 makes it imperative for incoming students to gain a firm practical understanding of these lasers. This publication builds upon the seminal work by Wieman3, updating components, and providing a video tutorial. The setup, frequency locking and performance characterization of an ECDL will be described. Discussion of component selection and proper mounting of both diodes and gratings, the factors affecting mode selection within the cavity, proper alignment for optimal external feedback, optics setup for coarse and fine frequency sensitive measurements, a brief overview of laser locking techniques, and laser linewidth measurements are included. PMID:24796259

  2. Seeded Physical Vapor Transport of Cadmium-Zinc Telluride Crystals: Growth and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; George, M. A.; Collins, E. E.; Chen, K.-T.; Zhang, Y.; Burger, A.

    1997-01-01

    Crystals of Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te with x = 0.2 and 40 g in weight were grown on monocrystalline cadmium-zinc telluride seeds by closed-ampoule physical vapor transport with or without excess (Cd + Zn) in the vapor phase. Two post-growth cool-down rates were used. The crystals were characterized using low temperature photoluminescence, atomic force microscopy, chemical etching, X-ray diffraction and electrical measurements. No formation of a second, ZnTe-rich phase was observed.

  3. Soil Physical, Chemical, and Thermal Characterization, Teller Road Site, Seward Peninsula, Alaska, 2016

    DOE Data Explorer

    Graham, David; Kholodov, Alexander; Busey, Bob; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Wilson, Cathy; Moon, Ji-Won

    2017-02-08

    This dataset provides the results of physical, chemical, and thermal characterization of soils at the Teller Road Site, Seward Peninsula, Alaska. Soil pits were dug from 7-14 September 2016 at designated Intensive Stations 2 through 9 at the Teller Road MM 27 Site. This dataset includes field observations and descriptions of soil layers or horizons, field measurements of soil volumetric water content, soil temperature, thermal conductivity, and heat capacity. Laboratory measurements of soil properties include gravimetric water content, bulk density, volumetric water content, and total carbon and nitrogen.

  4. MULTI-ATTRIBUTE SEISMIC/ROCK PHYSICS APPROACH TO CHARACTERIZING FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Mavko

    2000-10-01

    This project consists of three key interrelated Phases, each focusing on the central issue of imaging and quantifying fractured reservoirs, through improved integration of the principles of rock physics, geology, and seismic wave propagation. This report summarizes the results of Phase I of the project. The key to successful development of low permeability reservoirs lies in reliably characterizing fractures. Fractures play a crucial role in controlling almost all of the fluid transport in tight reservoirs. Current seismic methods to characterize fractures depend on various anisotropic wave propagation signatures that can arise from aligned fractures. We are pursuing an integrated study that relates to high-resolution seismic images of natural fractures to the rock parameters that control the storage and mobility of fluids. Our goal is to go beyond the current state-of-the art to develop and demonstrate next generation methodologies for detecting and quantitatively characterizing fracture zones using seismic measurements. Our study incorporates 3 key elements: (1) Theoretical rock physics studies of the anisotropic viscoelastic signatures of fractured rocks, including up scaling analysis and rock-fluid interactions to define the factors relating fractures in the lab and in the field. (2) Modeling of optimal seismic attributes, including offset and azimuth dependence of travel time, amplitude, impedance and spectral signatures of anisotropic fractured rocks. We will quantify the information content of combinations of seismic attributes, and the impact of multi-attribute analyses in reducing uncertainty in fracture interpretations. (3) Integration and interpretation of seismic, well log, and laboratory data, incorporating field geologic fracture characterization and the theoretical results of items 1 and 2 above. The focal point for this project is the demonstration of these methodologies in the Marathon Oil Company Yates Field in West Texas.

  5. Screening and characterization of reactive compounds with in vitro peptide-trapping and liquid chromatography/high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wei, Cong; Chupak, Louis S; Philip, Thomas; Johnson, Benjamin M; Gentles, Robert; Drexler, Dieter M

    2014-02-01

    The present study describes a novel methodology for the detection of reactive compounds using in vitro peptide-trapping and liquid chromatography-high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). Compounds that contain electrophilic groups can covalently bind to nucleophilic moieties in proteins and form adducts. Such adducts are thought to be associated with drug-mediated toxicity and therefore represent potential liabilities in drug discovery programs. In addition, reactive compounds identified in biological screening can be associated with data that can be misinterpreted if the reactive nature of the compound is not appreciated. In this work, to facilitate the triage of hits from high-throughput screening (HTS), a novel assay was developed to monitor the formation of covalent peptide adducts by compounds suspected to be chemically reactive. The assay consists of in vitro incubations of test compounds (under conditions of physiological pH) with synthetically prepared peptides presenting a variety of nucleophilic moieties such as cysteine, lysine, histidine, arginine, serine, and tyrosine. Reaction mixtures were analyzed using full-scan LC-HRMS, the data were interrogated using postacquisition data mining, and modified amino acids were identified by subsequent LC-HRMS/mass spectrometry. The study demonstrated that in vitro nucleophilic peptide trapping followed by LC-HRMS analysis is a useful approach for screening of intrinsically reactive compounds identified from HTS exercises, which are then removed from follow-up processes, thus obviating the generation of data from biochemical activity assays.

  6. Physical and optical dot gain: characterization and relation to dot shape and paper properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namedanian, Mahziar; Nyström, Daniel; Zitinski Elias, Paula; Gooran, Sasan

    2014-01-01

    The tone value increase in halftone printing commonly referred to as dot gain actually encompasses two fundamentally different phenomena. Physical dot gain refers to the fact that the size of the printed halftone dots differs from their nominal size, and is related to the printing process. Optical dot gain originates from light scattering inside the substrate, causing light exchanges between different chromatic areas. Due to their different intrinsic nature, physical and optical dot gains need to be treated separately. In this study, we characterize and compare the dot gain properties for offset prints on coated and uncoated paper, using AM and first and second generation FM halftoning. Spectral measurements are used to compute the total dot gain. Microscopic images are used to separate the physical and optical dot gain, to study ink spreading and ink penetration, and to compute the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) for the different substrates. The experimental results show that the physical dot gain depends on ink penetration and ink spreading properties. Microscopic images of the prints reveal that the ink penetrates into the pores and cavities of the uncoated paper, resulting in inhomogeneous dot shapes. For the coated paper, the ink spread on top of the surface, giving a more homogenous dot shape, but also covering a larger area, and hence larger physical dot gain. The experimental results further show that the total dot gain is larger for the uncoated paper, because of larger optical dot gain. The effect of optical dot gain depends on the lateral light scattering within the substrate, the size of the halftone dots, and on the halftone dot shape, especially the dot perimeter.

  7. Accurate Assessment of the Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalytic Activity of Mn/Polypyrrole Nanocomposites Based on Rotating Disk Electrode Measurements, Complemented with Multitechnique Structural Characterizations.

    PubMed

    Bocchetta, Patrizia; Sánchez, Carolina Ramírez; Taurino, Antonietta; Bozzini, Benedetto

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the quantitative assessment of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalytic activity of electrodeposited Mn/polypyrrole (PPy) nanocomposites for alkaline aqueous solutions, based on the Rotating Disk Electrode (RDE) method and accompanied by structural characterizations relevant to the establishment of structure-function relationships. The characterization of Mn/PPy films is addressed to the following: (i) morphology, as assessed by Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM); (ii) local electrical conductivity, as measured by Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM); and (iii) molecular structure, accessed by Raman Spectroscopy; these data provide the background against which the electrocatalytic activity can be rationalised. For comparison, the properties of Mn/PPy are gauged against those of graphite, PPy, and polycrystalline-Pt (poly-Pt). Due to the literature lack of accepted protocols for precise catalytic activity measurement at poly-Pt electrode in alkaline solution using the RDE methodology, we have also worked on the obtainment of an intralaboratory benchmark by evidencing some of the time-consuming parameters which drastically affect the reliability and repeatability of the measurement.

  8. Accurate Assessment of the Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalytic Activity of Mn/Polypyrrole Nanocomposites Based on Rotating Disk Electrode Measurements, Complemented with Multitechnique Structural Characterizations

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Carolina Ramírez; Taurino, Antonietta; Bozzini, Benedetto

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the quantitative assessment of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalytic activity of electrodeposited Mn/polypyrrole (PPy) nanocomposites for alkaline aqueous solutions, based on the Rotating Disk Electrode (RDE) method and accompanied by structural characterizations relevant to the establishment of structure-function relationships. The characterization of Mn/PPy films is addressed to the following: (i) morphology, as assessed by Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM); (ii) local electrical conductivity, as measured by Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM); and (iii) molecular structure, accessed by Raman Spectroscopy; these data provide the background against which the electrocatalytic activity can be rationalised. For comparison, the properties of Mn/PPy are gauged against those of graphite, PPy, and polycrystalline-Pt (poly-Pt). Due to the literature lack of accepted protocols for precise catalytic activity measurement at poly-Pt electrode in alkaline solution using the RDE methodology, we have also worked on the obtainment of an intralaboratory benchmark by evidencing some of the time-consuming parameters which drastically affect the reliability and repeatability of the measurement. PMID:28042491

  9. Global Threat Reduction Initiative Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project: Sample Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Casella, Amanda J.; Pereira, Mario M.; Steen, Franciska H.

    2013-01-01

    This sample management plan provides guidelines for sectioning, preparation, acceptance criteria, analytical path, and end-of-life disposal for the fuel element segments utilized in the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project. The Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project is tasked with analysis of irradiated Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Molybdenum (U-Mo) fuel element samples to support the GTRI conversion program. Sample analysis may include optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) fuel-surface interface analysis, gas pycnometry (density) measurements, laser flash analysis (LFA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis with mass spectroscopy (TG /DTA-MS), Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectrophotometry (ICP), alpha spectroscopy, and Thermal Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (TIMS). The project will utilize existing Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) operating, technical, and administrative procedures for sample receipt, processing, and analyses. Test instructions (TIs), which are documents used to provide specific details regarding the implementation of an existing RPL approved technical or operational procedure, will also be used to communicate to staff project specific parameters requested by the Principal Investigator (PI). TIs will be developed, reviewed, and issued in accordance with the latest revision of the RPL-PLN-700, RPL Operations Plan. Additionally, the PI must approve all project test instructions and red-line changes to test instructions.

  10. CHARACTERIZATION AND MEASUREMENT OF INTRODCUTORY COLLEGE ASTRONOMY AND PHYSICS STUDENT UNDERSTANDING OF NEWTONIAN GRAVITY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    The topic of Newtonian gravity offers a unique perspective from which to investigate and encourage conceptual change because it is something with which everyone has daily experience, and because it is taught in two courses that reach a variety of students - introductory college astronomy (‘Astro 101’) and physics (‘Phys 101’). Informed by the constructivist theory of learning, this study characterizes and measures Astro 101 and Phys 101 students’ understanding of Newtonian gravity within four conceptual domains - Directionality, Force Law, Independence of Other Forces, and Threshold. A phenomenographic analysis of student-supplied responses to open-ended questions about gravity resulted in characterization of students’ alternative models and misapplications of the scientific model. These student difficulties informed the development of a multiple-choice assessment instrument, the Newtonian Gravity Concept Inventory (NGCI). Classical Test Theory (CTT), student interviews, and expert review show that the NGCI is a reliable and valid tool for assessing both Astro 101 and Phys 101 students’ understanding of gravity. Furthermore, the NGCI can provide extensive and robust information about differences between Astro 101 and Phys 101 students and curricula. Comparing and contrasting CTT values and response patterns shows qualitative differences in each of the four conceptual domains. Additionally, performing an Item Response Theory (IRT) analysis calibrates item parameters for all Astro 101 and Phys 101 courses and provides Newtonian gravity ability estimates for each student. Physics students show significantly higher pre- and post-instruction IRT abilities than astronomy students, but they show approximately equal gains. Linear regression models that control for student characteristics and classroom dynamics show that: (1) differences in post-instruction abilities are most influenced by students’ pre-instruction abilities and the level of interactivity in

  11. Chemical and Physical Characterization of Collapsing Low-mass Prestellar Dense Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hincelin, U.; Commerçon, B.; Wakelam, V.; Hersant, F.; Guilloteau, S.; Herbst, E.

    2016-05-01

    The first hydrostatic core, also called the first Larson core, is one of the first steps in low-mass star formation as predicted by theory. With recent and future high-performance telescopes, the details of these first phases are becoming accessible, and observations may confirm theory and even present new challenges for theoreticians. In this context, from a theoretical point of view, we study the chemical and physical evolution of the collapse of prestellar cores until the formation of the first Larson core, in order to better characterize this early phase in the star formation process. We couple a state-of-the-art hydrodynamical model with full gas-grain chemistry, using different assumptions for the magnetic field strength and orientation. We extract the different components of each collapsing core (i.e., the central core, the outflow, the disk, the pseudodisk, and the envelope) to highlight their specific physical and chemical characteristics. Each component often presents a specific physical history, as well as a specific chemical evolution. From some species, the components can clearly be differentiated. The different core models can also be chemically differentiated. Our simulation suggests that some chemical species act as tracers of the different components of a collapsing prestellar dense core, and as tracers of the magnetic field characteristics of the core. From this result, we pinpoint promising key chemical species to be observed.

  12. Comparison of different computed radiography systems: Physical characterization and contrast detail analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rivetti, Stefano; Lanconelli, Nico; Bertolini, Marco; Nitrosi, Andrea; Burani, Aldo; Acchiappati, Domenico

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: In this study, five different units based on three different technologies--traditional computed radiography (CR) units with granular phosphor and single-side reading, granular phosphor and dual-side reading, and columnar phosphor and line-scanning reading--are compared in terms of physical characterization and contrast detail analysis. Methods: The physical characterization of the five systems was obtained with the standard beam condition RQA5. Three of the units have been developed by FUJIFILM (FCR ST-VI, FCR ST-BD, and FCR Velocity U), one by Kodak (Direct View CR 975), and one by Agfa (DX-S). The quantitative comparison is based on the calculation of the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Noise investigation was also achieved by using a relative standard deviation analysis. Psychophysical characterization is assessed by performing a contrast detail analysis with an automatic reading of CDRAD images. Results: The most advanced units based on columnar phosphors provide MTF values in line or better than those from conventional CR systems. The greater thickness of the columnar phosphor improves the efficiency, allowing for enhanced noise properties. In fact, NPS values for standard CR systems are remarkably higher for all the investigated exposures and especially for frequencies up to 3.5 lp/mm. As a consequence, DQE values for the three units based on columnar phosphors and line-scanning reading, or granular phosphor and dual-side reading, are neatly better than those from conventional CR systems. Actually, DQE values of about 40% are easily achievable for all the investigated exposures. Conclusions: This study suggests that systems based on the dual-side reading or line-scanning reading with columnar phosphors provide a remarkable improvement when compared to conventional CR units and yield results in line with those obtained from most digital detectors for radiography.

  13. Review of Physics Related Research and Development Activities in Nondestructive Characterization of Solid Rocket Motor Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Lee H.

    1998-10-01

    The perception that solid rocket motors (srm) are of relatively simple mechanical construction with a long history in private, military, and NASA applications may lead some to believe that little is left to be done in terms of basic and applied research and development in support of this technology. The fact is that srm?s are very complicated primarily because of the complexity of the materials from which they are built. The reliability and performance of srm?s are determined by the ballistic and mechanical properties of each individual material component, and by the manufacturing processes that conjoin these materials. In order to insure reliability and good performance, there are on-going materials research and development activities in the srm community. Included are activities involving the development of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods used for materials and processes characterization. Typical applications include: detection and characterization of defects in fiber reinforced composite materials, detection of weak bonds and debonds, verification of surface cleanliness prior to bonding, characterization of aging materials and bondlines, measurement of elastic properties in filled polymeric materials, monitoring of cure in polymeric materials, and measurement of film or coating thicknesses. NDE methods and physics principles upon which they are based will be described. Challenges and future research and development directions will be identified.

  14. Rock-physics and seismic-inversion based reservoir characterization of the Haynesville Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Meijuan; Spikes, Kyle T.

    2016-06-01

    Seismic reservoir characterization of unconventional gas shales is challenging due to their heterogeneity and anisotropy. Rock properties of unconventional gas shales such as porosity, pore-shape distribution, and composition are important for interpreting seismic data amplitude variations in order to locate optimal drilling locations. The presented seismic reservoir characterization procedure applied a grid-search algorithm to estimate the composition, pore-shape distribution, and porosity at the seismic scale from the seismically inverted impedances and a rock-physics model, using the Haynesville Shale as a case study. All the proposed rock properties affected the seismic velocities, and the combined effects of these rock properties on the seismic amplitude were investigated simultaneously. The P- and S-impedances correlated negatively with porosity, and the V P/V S correlated positively with clay fraction and negatively with the pore-shape distribution and quartz fraction. The reliability of these estimated rock properties at the seismic scale was verified through comparisons between two sets of elastic properties: one coming from inverted impedances, which were obtained from simultaneous inversion of prestack seismic data, and one derived from these estimated rock properties. The differences between the two sets of elastic properties were less than a few percent, verifying the feasibility of the presented seismic reservoir characterization.

  15. Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, D. Allan

    1980-01-01

    The author presents the argument that the past few years, in terms of new discoveries, insights, and questions raised, have been among the most productive in the history of physics. Selected for discussion are some of the most important new developments in physics research. (Author/SA)

  16. Coupling geostatistics to detailed reservoir description allows better visualization and more accurate characterization/simulation of turbidite reservoirs: Elk Hills oil field, California

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, M.E.; Wilson, M.L.; Wightman, J. )

    1996-01-01

    The Elk Hills giant oilfield, located in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California, has produced 1.1 billion barrels of oil from Miocene and shallow Pliocene reservoirs. 65% of the current 64,000 BOPD production is from the pressure-supported, deeper Miocene turbidite sands. In the turbidite sands of the 31 S structure, large porosity permeability variations in the Main Body B and Western 31 S sands cause problems with the efficiency of the waterflooding. These variations have now been quantified and visualized using geostatistics. The end result is a more detailed reservoir characterization for simulation. Traditional reservoir descriptions based on marker correlations, cross-sections and mapping do not provide enough detail to capture the short-scale stratigraphic heterogeneity needed for adequate reservoir simulation. These deterministic descriptions are inadequate to tie with production data as the thinly bedded sand/shale sequences blur into a falsely homogenous picture. By studying the variability of the geologic petrophysical data vertically within each wellbore and spatially from well to well, a geostatistical reservoir description has been developed. It captures the natural variability of the sands and shales that was lacking from earlier work. These geostatistical studies allow the geologic and petrophysical characteristics to be considered in a probabilistic model. The end-product is a reservoir description that captures the variability of the reservoir sequences and can be used as a more realistic starting point for history matching and reservoir simulation.

  17. Coupling geostatistics to detailed reservoir description allows better visualization and more accurate characterization/simulation of turbidite reservoirs: Elk Hills oil field, California

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, M.E.; Wilson, M.L.; Wightman, J.

    1996-12-31

    The Elk Hills giant oilfield, located in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California, has produced 1.1 billion barrels of oil from Miocene and shallow Pliocene reservoirs. 65% of the current 64,000 BOPD production is from the pressure-supported, deeper Miocene turbidite sands. In the turbidite sands of the 31 S structure, large porosity & permeability variations in the Main Body B and Western 31 S sands cause problems with the efficiency of the waterflooding. These variations have now been quantified and visualized using geostatistics. The end result is a more detailed reservoir characterization for simulation. Traditional reservoir descriptions based on marker correlations, cross-sections and mapping do not provide enough detail to capture the short-scale stratigraphic heterogeneity needed for adequate reservoir simulation. These deterministic descriptions are inadequate to tie with production data as the thinly bedded sand/shale sequences blur into a falsely homogenous picture. By studying the variability of the geologic & petrophysical data vertically within each wellbore and spatially from well to well, a geostatistical reservoir description has been developed. It captures the natural variability of the sands and shales that was lacking from earlier work. These geostatistical studies allow the geologic and petrophysical characteristics to be considered in a probabilistic model. The end-product is a reservoir description that captures the variability of the reservoir sequences and can be used as a more realistic starting point for history matching and reservoir simulation.

  18. Scaling up the Single Transducer Thickness-Independent Ultrasonic Imaging Method for Accurate Characterization of Microstructural Gradients in Monolithic and Composite Tubular Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Carney, Dorothy V.; Baaklini, George Y.; Bodis, James R.; Rauser, Richard W.

    1998-01-01

    Ultrasonic velocity/time-of-flight imaging that uses back surface reflections to gauge volumetric material quality is highly suited for quantitative characterization of microstructural gradients including those due to pore fraction, density, fiber fraction, and chemical composition variations. However, a weakness of conventional pulse-echo ultrasonic velocity/time-of-flight imaging is that the image shows the effects of thickness as well as microstructural variations unless the part is uniformly thick. This limits this imaging method's usefulness in practical applications. Prior studies have described a pulse-echo time-of-flight-based ultrasonic imaging method that requires using a single transducer in combination with a reflector plate placed behind samples that eliminates the effect of thickness variation in the image. In those studies, this method was successful at isolating ultrasonic variations due to material microstructure in plate-like samples of silicon nitride, metal matrix composite, and polymer matrix composite. In this study, the method is engineered for inspection of more complex-shaped structures-those having (hollow) tubular/curved geometry. The experimental inspection technique and results are described as applied to (1) monolithic mullite ceramic and polymer matrix composite 'proof-of-concept' tubular structures that contain machined patches of various depths and (2) as-manufactured monolithic silicon nitride ceramic and silicon carbide/silicon carbide composite tubular structures that might be used in 'real world' applications.

  19. VARIANT: Command Line, Web service and Web interface for fast and accurate functional characterization of variants found by Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Ignacio; De Maria, Alejandro; Bleda, Marta; Salavert, Francisco; Alonso, Roberto; Gonzalez, Cristina Y.; Dopazo, Joaquin

    2012-01-01

    The massive use of Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies is uncovering an unexpected amount of variability. The functional characterization of such variability, particularly in the most common form of variation found, the Single Nucleotide Variants (SNVs), has become a priority that needs to be addressed in a systematic way. VARIANT (VARIant ANalyis Tool) reports information on the variants found that include consequence type and annotations taken from different databases and repositories (SNPs and variants from dbSNP and 1000 genomes, and disease-related variants from the Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) catalog, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Catalog of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) mutations, etc). VARIANT also produces a rich variety of annotations that include information on the regulatory (transcription factor or miRNA-binding sites, etc.) or structural roles, or on the selective pressures on the sites affected by the variation. This information allows extending the conventional reports beyond the coding regions and expands the knowledge on the contribution of non-coding or synonymous variants to the phenotype studied. Contrarily to other tools, VARIANT uses a remote database and operates through efficient RESTful Web Services that optimize search and transaction operations. In this way, local problems of installation, update or disk size limitations are overcome without the need of sacrifice speed (thousands of variants are processed per minute). VARIANT is available at: http://variant.bioinfo.cipf.es. PMID:22693211

  20. Comparison of different commercial FFDM units by means of physical characterization and contrast-detail analysis.

    PubMed

    Rivetti, Stefano; Lanconelli, Nico; Campanini, Renato; Bertolini, Marco; Borasi, Gianni; Nitrosi, Andrea; Danielli, Claudio; Angelini, Lidia; Maggi, Stefania

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a complete evaluation of three pieces of clinical digital mammography equipment. Image quality was assessed by performing physical characterization and contrast-detail (CD) analysis. We considered three different FFDM systems: a computed radiography unit (Fuji "FCR 5000 MA") and two flat-panel units, the indirect conversion a-Si based GE "Senographe 2000D" and the direct conversion a-Si based IMS "Giotto Image MD." The physical characterization was estimated by measuring the MTF, NNPS, and DQE of the detectors with no antiscatter grid and over the clinical range of exposures. The CD analysis was performed using a CDMAM 3.4 phantom and custom software designed for automatic computation of the contrast-detail curves. The physical characterization of the three digital systems confirms the excellent MTF properties of the direct conversion flat-panel detector (FPD). We performed a relative standard deviation (RSD) analysis, for investigating the different components of the noise presented by the three systems. It turned out that the two FPDs show a significant additive component, whereas for the CR system the statistical noise is dominant. The multiplicative factor is a minor constituent for all the systems. The two FPDs demonstrate better DQE, with respect to the CR system, for exposures higher than 70 microGy. The CD analysis indicated that the three systems are not statistically different for detail objects with a diameter greater than 0.3 mm. However, the IMS system showed a statistically significant different response for details smaller than 0.3 mm. In this case, the poor response of the a-Se detector could be attributed to its high-frequency noise characteristics, since its MTF, NEQ, and DQE are not inferior to those of the other systems. The CD results were independent of exposure level, within the investigated clinical range. We observed slight variations in the CD results, due to the changes in the visualization

  1. Parasitic analysis and π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke model for complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor Lamb wave resonator with accurate two-port Y-parameter characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Goh, Wang Ling; Chai, Kevin T.-C.; Mu, Xiaojing; Hong, Yan; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Je, Minkyu

    2016-04-01

    The parasitic effects from electromechanical resonance, coupling, and substrate losses were collected to derive a new two-port equivalent-circuit model for Lamb wave resonators, especially for those fabricated on silicon technology. The proposed model is a hybrid π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke (PiBVD) model that accounts for the above mentioned parasitic effects which are commonly observed in Lamb-wave resonators. It is a combination of interdigital capacitor of both plate capacitance and fringe capacitance, interdigital resistance, Ohmic losses in substrate, and the acoustic motional behavior of typical Modified Butterworth-Van Dyke (MBVD) model. In the case studies presented in this paper using two-port Y-parameters, the PiBVD model fitted significantly better than the typical MBVD model, strengthening the capability on characterizing both magnitude and phase of either Y11 or Y21. The accurate modelling on two-port Y-parameters makes the PiBVD model beneficial in the characterization of Lamb-wave resonators, providing accurate simulation to Lamb-wave resonators and oscillators.

  2. Physical and optical characterization of Er3+ doped lead-zinc-borate glass.

    PubMed

    Sooraj Hussain, N; Cardoso, P J; Hungerford, G; Gomes, M J M; Ali, Nasar; Santos, J D; Buddhudu, S

    2009-06-01

    This paper reports on the systematic optical characterization of Er3+ (1.0%) doped lead-zinc-borate glass from the measured absorption, luminescence and fluorescence lifetime decay curve profiles. By the application of the Judd-Ofelt theory, spectral intensities of the absorption bands have been analysed and these absorption results have been used in evaluating the luminescence properties of the Er3+ doped lead-zinc-borate glass. Stimulated emission cross-sections (sigmapE) of the measured emission transitions have been computed. Based on the measured glass density, and refractive indices, other related physical parameters have also been evaluated. Further, the structural and morphology of the glass material have also been investigated from X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy analysis.

  3. Simplified Models for a First Characterization of New Physics at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Alwall, Johan; Schuster, Philip; Toro, Natalia

    2009-06-19

    Low-energy SUSY and several other theories that address the hierarchy problem predict pair-production at the LHC of particles with Standard Model quantum numbers that decay to jets, missing energy, and possibly leptons. If an excess of such events is seen in LHC data, a theoretical framework in which to describe it will be essential to constraining the structure of the new physics. We propose a basis of four deliberately simplified models, each specified by only 2-3 masses and 4-5 branching ratios, for use in a first characterization of data. Fits of these simplified models to the data furnish a quantitative presentation of the jet structure, electroweak decays, and heavy-flavor content of the data, independent of detector effects. These fits, together with plots comparing their predictions to distributions in data, can be used as targets for describing the data within any full theoretical model.

  4. Physical characterization of alginate-Pluronic F127 gel for endoluminal NABDs delivery.

    PubMed

    Abrami, Michela; D'Agostino, Ilenia; Milcovich, Gesmi; Fiorentino, Simona; Farra, Rossella; Asaro, Fioretta; Lapasin, Romano; Grassi, Gabriele; Grassi, Mario

    2014-02-07

    Here we focus the attention on the physical characteristics of a highly biocompatible hydrogel made up of crosslinked alginate and Pluronic F127 (PF127). This is a composite polymeric blend we propose for artery endoluminal delivery of an emerging class of molecules named nucleic acid based drugs (NABDs). The physical characterization of our composite gel, i.e. mesh size distribution and PF127-alginate mutual organization after crosslinking, can significantly determine the NABDs release kinetics. Thus, to explore these aspects, different technical approaches, i.e. rheology, low/high field NMR and TEM, were used. While rheology provided information at the macroscopic and nano-level, the other three approaches gave details at the nano-level. We observe that Pluronic micelles, organizing in cubic ordered domains, generate, upon alginate crosslinking, the formation of meshes (≈ 150 nm) larger than those occurring in a Pluronic-free alginate network (≈ 25 nm). Nevertheless, smaller alginate meshes are still on and can just host un-structured Pluronic micelles and water. Accordingly, the gel structure is quite inhomogeneous, where big meshes (filled by crystalline Pluronic) co-exist with smaller meshes (hosting water and un-structured PF127 micelles). While big meshes offer a considerable hindering action on a diffusing solute, smaller ones represent a sort of free space where solute diffusion is faster. The presence of big and small meshes indicates that drug release may follow a double kinetics characterized by a fast and slow release. Notably, this behavior is considered appropriate for endoluminal drug release to the arterial wall.

  5. Physical Characterization of Active Asteroids P/2012 T1, P/2013 R3, and 233P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Henry

    2014-08-01

    We seek to obtain sparsely-sampled observations of active asteroids P/2012 T1 (a main-belt comet, or MBC), P/2013 P5 (a disrupted asteroid), and unidentified active asteroid 233P to characterize their physical properties. Active asteroids are objects that orbit in the main asteroid belt, yet display comet-like activity (e.g. dust emission), where MBC activity is thought to be due to sublimation (like in other comets) and disrupted asteroid activity is believed to result from impacts or rotational disruption events. Determination of the nucleus size of P/2012 T1 (expected to be inactive in 2014B) will allow us to revisit observations from when it was active to quantify its activity level at the time and compare with other MBCs, and also continue refining the size distribution of the known MBC population for comparison to the background asteroid population. Meanwhile, observations of P/2013 P5 will give us insights into the first known rotational disruption of an asteroid to be observed in progress, either by allowing us to quantitatively analyze the rotational physics of the 2013 disruption event, or by giving us an ongoing look at the continuing disruption of the object, depending on whether it continues to be active in 2014B. Very little is known about our final target, 233P, and so these observations will be used to help classify it as either a MBC or disrupted asteroid, and lay groundwork for future studies.

  6. Characterization of wave physics in acoustic metamaterials using a fiber optic point detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganye, Randy; Chen, Yongyao; Liu, Haijun; Bae, Hyungdae; Wen, Zhongshan; Yu, Miao

    2016-06-01

    Due to limitations of conventional acoustic probes, full spatial field mapping (both internal and external wave amplitude and phase measurements) in acoustic metamaterials with deep subwavelength structures has not yet been demonstrated. Therefore, many fundamental wave propagation phenomena in acoustic metamaterials remain experimentally unexplored. In this work, we realized a miniature fiber optic acoustic point detector that is capable of omnidirectional detection of complex spatial acoustic fields in various metamaterial structures over a broadband spectrum. By using this probe, we experimentally characterized the wave-structure interactions in an anisotropic metamaterial waveguide. We further demonstrated that the spatial mapping of both internal and external acoustic fields of metamaterial structures can help obtain important wave propagation properties associated with material dispersion and field confinement, and develop an in-depth understanding of the waveguiding physics in metamaterials. The insights and inspirations gained from our experimental studies are valuable not only for the advancement of fundamental metamaterial wave physics but also for the development of functional metamaterial devices such as acoustic lenses, waveguides, and sensors.

  7. Characterization of silicon 3D pixel detectors for the ATLAS Forward Physics experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez Paz, I.; Cavallaro, E.; Lange, J.; Grinstein, S.

    2015-07-01

    The ATLAS Forward Physics (AFP) project aims to measure protons scattered under a small angle from the pp collisions in ATLAS. In order to perform such measurements, a new silicon tracker, together with a time-of-flight detector for pile-up removal, are planned to be installed at ∼210 m from the interaction point and at 2-3 mm from the LHC proton beam. To cope with such configuration and maximize the physics outcome, the tracker has to fulfil three main requirements: endure highly non-uniform radiation doses, due to the very inhomogeneous beam profile, have slim and efficient edges to improve the acceptance of the tracker, and provide good position resolution. Recent laboratory and beam test characterization results of AFP prototypes will be presented. Slim-edged 3D pixel detectors down to 100-200 μm were studied and later non-uniformly irradiated (with a peak fluence of several 10{sup 15} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}) to determine the fulfilment of the AFP requirements. (authors)

  8. Characterization of Athabasca Asphaltenes Separated Physically and Chemically Using Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amundarain Hurtado, Jesus Leonardo

    Athabasca asphaltenes were characterized using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) with synchrotron radiation. Two methods were used to separate asphaltenes from Athabasca bitumen. Conventional chemical separation by precipitation with n-pentane, and physical separation realized by passing bitumen through a zirconia membrane with a 20 nm average pore size. The Athabasca permeates and chemically separated samples were dispersed in 1-methylnaphtalene and n-dodecane, with temperature and asphaltene concentration ranges of 50-310 °C and 1-8 wt. %, respectively. Two approaches were also taken in the analysis of the SAXS emissions. A model-independent approach provided radii of gyration and scattering coefficients. A model-dependent fit provided size distributions for asphaltenes aggregates assuming that they are dense and spherical. Physically and chemically separated asphaltenes showed significant differences in nominal size and structure, and their structural properties exhibited different temperature dependencies. The results challenge the merits of using chemically separated asphaltene properties as a basis for asphaltene property prediction in crude oil/bitumen.

  9. Preparation and characterization of physically modified glass beads used as model carriers in dry powder inhalers.

    PubMed

    Zellnitz, Sarah; Redlinger-Pohn, Jakob Dominik; Kappl, Michael; Schroettner, Hartmuth; Urbanetz, Nora Anne

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this work is the physical modification and characterization of the surface topography of glass beads used as model carriers in dry powder inhalers (DPIs). By surface modification the contact area between drug and carrier and thereby interparticle forces may be modified. Thus the performance of DPIs that relies on interparticle interactions may be improved. Glass beads were chosen as model carriers because various prospects of physical surface modification may be applied without affecting other factors also impacting interparticle interactions like particle size and shape. To generate rough surfaces glass beads were processed mechanically by friction and impaction in a ball mill with different grinding materials that were smaller and harder with respect to the glass beads. By varying the grinding time (4 h, 8 h) and by using different grinding media (tungsten carbide, quartz) surfaces with different shades of roughness were generated. Depending on the hardness of the grinding material and the grinding time the surface roughness was more or less pronounced. Surface roughness parameters and specific surface area were determined via several complementary techniques in order to get an enhanced understanding of the impact of the modifying procedure on the surface properties of the glass beads.

  10. Physical and chemical characterization of tire-related particles: comparison of particles generated using different methodologies.

    PubMed

    Kreider, Marisa L; Panko, Julie M; McAtee, Britt L; Sweet, Leonard I; Finley, Brent L

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the physical and chemical properties of particles generated from the interaction of tires and road surfaces. Morphology, size distribution, and chemical composition were compared between particles generated using different methods, including on-road collection, laboratory generation under simulated driving conditions, and cryogenic breaking of tread rubber. Both on-road collected and laboratory generated particles exhibited the elongated shape typical of tire wear particles, whereas tread particles were more angular. Despite similar morphology for the on-road collected and the laboratory generated particles, the former were smaller on average. It is not clear at this stage if the difference is significant to the physical and chemical behavior of the particles. The chemical composition of the particles differed, with on-road generated particles containing chemical contributions from sources other than tires, such as pavement or particulates generated from other traffic-related sources. Understanding the differences between these particles is essential in apportioning contaminant contributions to the environment between tires, roadways, and other sources, and evaluating the representativeness of toxicity studies using different types of particulate generated.

  11. A physical sciences network characterization of circulating tumor cell aggregate transport

    PubMed Central

    King, Michael R.; Phillips, Kevin G.; Mitrugno, Annachiara; Lee, Tae-Rin; de Guillebon, Adelaide M. E.; Chandrasekaran, Siddarth; McGuire, Matthew J.; Carr, Russell T.; Baker-Groberg, Sandra M.; Rigg, Rachel A.; Kolatkar, Anand; Luttgen, Madelyn; Bethel, Kelly; Kuhn, Peter; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) have been implicated in the hematogenous spread of cancer. To investigate the fluid phase of cancer from a physical sciences perspective, the multi-institutional Physical Sciences-Oncology Center (PS-OC) Network performed multidisciplinary biophysical studies of single CTC and CTC aggregates from a patient with breast cancer. CTCs, ranging from single cells to aggregates comprised of 2–5 cells, were isolated using the high-definition CTC assay and biophysically profiled using quantitative phase microscopy. Single CTCs and aggregates were then modeled in an in vitro system comprised of multiple breast cancer cell lines and microfluidic devices used to model E-selectin mediated rolling in the vasculature. Using a numerical model coupling elastic collisions between red blood cells and CTCs, the dependence of CTC vascular margination on single CTCs and CTC aggregate morphology and stiffness was interrogated. These results provide a multifaceted characterization of single CTC and CTC aggregate dynamics in the vasculature and illustrate a framework to integrate clinical, biophysical, and mathematical approaches to enhance our understanding of the fluid phase of cancer. PMID:25788574

  12. Characterization of Physically and Chemically Separated Athabasca Asphaltenes Using Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Amundaraín Hurtado, Jesús Leonardo; Chodakowski, Martin; Long, Bingwen; Shaw, John M.

    2012-02-07

    Athabasca asphaltenes were characterized using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Two methods were used to separate asphaltenes from the Athabasca bitumen: namely, chemical separation by precipitation with n-pentane and physical separation by nanofiltration using a zirconia membrane with a 20 nm average pore size. The permeate and chemically separated samples were diluted in 1-methylnaphtalene and n-dodecane prior to SAXS measurements. The temperature and asphaltene concentration ranges were 50-310 C and 1-10.4 wt %, respectively. Model-independent analysis of SAXS data provided the radius of gyration and the scattering coefficients. Model-dependent fits provided size distributions for asphaltenes assuming that they are dense and spherical. Model-independent analysis for physically and chemically separated asphaltenes showed significant differences in nominal size and structure, and the temperature dependence of structural properties. The results challenge the merits of using chemically separated asphaltene properties as a basis for asphaltene property prediction in hydrocarbon resources. While the residuals for model-dependent fits are small, the results are inconsistent with the structural parameters obtained from model-independent analysis.

  13. Physical-Chemical Characterization and Formulation Considerations for Solid Lipid Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Harsh; Mohapatra, Sarat; Munt, Daniel J; Chandratre, Shantanu; Dash, Alekha

    2016-06-01

    Pure glyceryl mono-oleate (GMO) (lipid) and different batches of GMO commonly used for the preparation of GMO-chitosan nanoparticles were characterized by modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC), cryo-microscopy, and cryo-X-ray powder diffraction techniques. GMO-chitosan nanoparticles containing poloxamer 407 as a stabilizer in the absence and presence of polymers as crystallization inhibitors were prepared by ultrasonication. The effect of polymers (polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), Eudragits, hydroxyl propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC), polyethylene glycol (PEG)), surfactants (poloxamer), and oils (mineral oil and olive oil) on the crystallization of GMO was investigated. GMO showed an exothermic peak at around -10°C while cooling and another exothermic peak at around -12°C while heating. It was followed by two endothermic peaks between 15 and 30 C, indicative of GMO melting. The results are corroborated by cryo-microscopy and cryo-X-ray. Significant differences in exothermic and endothermic transition were observed between different grades of GMO and pure GMO. GMO-chitosan nanoparticles resulted in a significant increase in particle size after lyophilization. MDSC confirmed that nanoparticles showed similar exothermic crystallization behavior of lipid GMO. MDSC experiments showed that PVP inhibits GMO crystallization and addition of PVP showed no significant increase in particle size of solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN) during lyophilization. The research highlights the importance of extensive physical-chemical characterization for successful formulation of SLN.

  14. Physical property characterization of a damage zone in granitic rock - Implications for geothermal reservoir properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenning, Quinn; Madonna, Claudio; Amann, Florian; Gischig, Valentin; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Geothermal energy offers a viable alternative to mitigate greenhouse gas emitting energy production. A tradeoff between less expensive drilling costs and increased permeability at shallow depths versus increased heat production at deeper depths stipulates the economic energy potential of a given reservoir. From a geological perspective, successful retrieval of geothermal energy from the subsurface requires sufficient knowledge of the structural and stratigraphic relationship of the target formations, which govern the thermal conditions, physical properties, and fluid flow properties of reservoir rocks. In Switzerland, deep basement rocks (~5 km) with fluid conducting damage zones and enhanced fractured systems stimulated by hydraulic shearing are seen as a potential geothermal reservoir system. Damage zones, both natural and induced, provide permeability enhancement that is especially important for creating fluid conductivity where the matrix permeability is low. This study concentrates on characterizing the elastic and transport properties entering into a natural damage zone penetrated by a borehole at the Grimsel underground research laboratory. The borehole drilled from a cavern at 480 m below ground surface penetrates approximately 20 m of mostly intact Grimsel granodiorite before entering the first phyllosilicate-rich shear zone (~0.2 m thick). The borehole intersects a second shear zone at approximately 23.8m. Between the two shear zones the Grimsel granodiorite is heavily fractured. The minimum principle stress magnitude from in-situ measurements decreases along the borehole into the first shear zone. Two mutually perpendicular core samples of Grimsel granodiorite were taken every 0.1 m from 19.5 to 20.1 m to characterize the physical properties and anisotropy changes as a gradient away from the damage zone. Measurements of ultrasonic compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) velocities at 1 MHz frequency are conducted at room temperature and hydrostatic pressures

  15. Physical characterization of a watershed through GIS: a study in the Schmidt stream, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Reis, D R; Plangg, R; Tundisi, J G; Quevedo, D M

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing and geoprocessing are essential tools for obtaining and maintaining records of human actions on space over the course of time; these tools offer the basis for diagnoses of land use, environmental interference and local development. The Schmidt stream watershed, located in the Sinos River basin, in southern Brazil, has an environmental situation similar to that of the majority of small streams draining rural and urban areas in southern Brazil: agricultural and urbanization practices do not recognize the riparian area and there is removal of original vegetation, disregarding the suitability of land use; removal of wetlands; intensive water use for various activities; and lack of control and monitoring in the discharge of wastewater, among other factors, deteriorate the quality of this important environment.This article aims to achieve a physical characterization of the Schmidt stream watershed (Sinos river basin) identifying elements such as land use and occupation, soil science, geology, climatology, extent and location of watershed, among others, so as to serve as the basis for a tool that helps in the integrated environmental management of watersheds. By applying geographic information system - GIS to the process of obtaining maps of land use and occupation, pedologicaland geological, and using climatological data from the Campo Bom meteorological station, field visit, review of literature and journals, and publicly available data, the physical characterization of the Schmidt stream watershed was performed, with a view to the integrated environmental management of this watershed. Out of the total area of the Schmidt stream watershed (23.92 km(2)), in terms of geology, it was observed that 23.7% consist of colluvial deposits, 22.6% consist of grass facies, and 53.7% consist of Botucatu formation. Major soil types of the watershed: 97.4% Argisols and only 2.6% Planosols. Land use and occupation is characterized by wetland (0.5%), Native Forest (12

  16. Integrated use of soil physical and water isotope methods for ecohydrological characterization of desertified areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Külls, Christoph; Nunes, Alice; Köbel-Batista, Melanie; Branquinho, Cristina; Bianconi, Nadja; Costantini, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    Measures for monitoring desertification and soil degradation require a thorough understanding of soil physical properties and of the water balance in order to guide restoration efforts (Costantini et al. 2009). It is hypothesized that long term restoration success on degraded land depends on a series of interacting factors such as exposition, soil type, soil hydrology including lateral flow on hill-slope catenae. Recently, new soil water isotope measurement techniques have been developed (Garvelmann et al. 2012) that provide much faster and reliable stable water isotope profiles in soils. This technique yield information on groundwater recharge, soil water balance and on the origin of water available for plants, which in combination with conservative chemical tracers (chloride) can be validated. A multidisciplinary study including ecologists, soil physicists and hydrologists of the COST Action Desert Restoration Hub was carried out on four semi-arid sites in Portugal. A comparative characterization of soil physical parameters, soil water isotope and chloride profiles was performed in order to estimate pedoclimate, soil aridity, soil water balance and groundwater recharge. In combination with soil physical data a comprehensive and cross-validated characterization of pedoclimate and soil aridity was obtained. These indicators were then integrated and related to plant cover. The long-term rainfall of the four sites ranges from 512 to 638 mm, whereas air temperature is from 15.8 to 17.0°C. The De Martonne index of aridity spans from 19.3 to 24.6, pointing to semiarid to moderately arid climatic conditions. The long-term average number of days when the first 0.50 m of soil is dry ranges from 110 to 134, while the mean annual soil temperature at 0.50 m spans from 15.8 and 19.1°C. The studied profiles show different hydrological characteristics, in particular, the estimated hydraulic conductivity ranges from 0.1-1 to 10-100 µm/s. Three out of four profiles show a

  17. Transport time scales as physical descriptors to characterize heavily modified water bodies near ports in coastal zones.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Aina G; Bárcena, Javier F; Juanes, José A; Ondiviela, Bárbara; Sámano, María L

    2014-04-01

    Physical descriptors that characterize Heavily Modified Water Bodies (HMWB) based on the presence of ports should assess the degree of water exchange. The main goal of this study is to determine the optimal procedure for estimating Transport Time Scales (TTS) as physical descriptors in order to characterize and manage HMWB near ports in coastal zones. Flushing Time (FT) and Residence Time (RT), using different approaches-analytical and exponential function methods-and different hydrodynamic scenarios, were computed using numerical models. El Musel (Port of Gijon) was selected to test different transport time scales (FT and RT), methods (analytical and exponential function methods) and hydrodynamic conditions (wind and tidal forcings). FT, estimated by the exponential function method while taking into account a real tidal wave and a mean annual regime of wind as hydrodynamic forcing, was determined to be the optimal physical descriptor to characterize HMWB.

  18. Physical interpretation and development of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation techniques applied to the quantitative characterization of textile composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James G.

    1992-01-01

    The development and implementation of advanced ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation methods applied to the characterization of composite materials requires a better understanding of the physics underlying the interaction of ultrasound with the material. The purpose of this investigation is to identify and characterize the features of complex, three dimensional materials that limit the ability of ultrasound to detect flaws in this broad class of emerging materials. In order to explore the interaction of ultrasound with such complex media, we investigate the characteristics of ultrasonic fields which have propagated through samples with complex geometries and/or internal architecture. We focus on the physics that underlies the detection of flaws in such materials.

  19. PHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF VITREOUS STATE LABORATORY AY102/C106 AND AZ102 HIGH LEVEL WASTE MELTER FEED SIMULANTS (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, E

    2005-03-31

    The objective of this task is to characterize and report specified physical properties and pH of simulant high level waste (HLW) melter feeds (MF) processed through the scaled melters at Vitreous State Laboratories (VSL). The HLW MF simulants characterized are VSL AZ102 straight hydroxide melter feed, VSL AZ102 straight hydroxide rheology adjusted melter feed, VSL AY102/C106 straight hydroxide melter feed, VSL AY102/C106 straight hydroxide rheology adjusted melter feed, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) AY102/C106 precipitated hydroxide processed sludge blended with glass former chemicals at VSL to make melter feed. The physical properties and pH were characterized using the methods stated in the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) characterization procedure (Ref. 7).

  20. Multi-Attribute Seismic/Rock Physics Approach to Characterizing Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Mavko

    2004-11-30

    Most current seismic methods to seismically characterize fractures in tight reservoirs depend on a few anisotropic wave propagation signatures that can arise from aligned fractures. While seismic anisotropy can be a powerful fracture diagnostic, a number of situations can lessen its usefulness or introduce interpretation ambiguities. Fortunately, laboratory and theoretical work in rock physics indicates that a much broader spectrum of fracture seismic signatures can occur, including a decrease in P- and S-wave velocities, a change in Poisson's ratio, an increase in velocity dispersion and wave attenuation, as well as well as indirect images of structural features that can control fracture occurrence. The goal of this project was to demonstrate a practical interpretation and integration strategy for detecting and characterizing natural fractures in rocks. The approach was to exploit as many sources of information as possible, and to use the principles of rock physics as the link among seismic, geologic, and log data. Since no single seismic attribute is a reliable fracture indicator in all situations, the focus was to develop a quantitative scheme for integrating the diverse sources of information. The integrated study incorporated three key elements: The first element was establishing prior constraints on fracture occurrence, based on laboratory data, previous field observations, and geologic patterns of fracturing. The geologic aspects include analysis of the stratigraphic, structural, and tectonic environments of the field sites. Field observations and geomechanical analysis indicates that fractures tend to occur in the more brittle facies, for example, in tight sands and carbonates. In contrast, strain in shale is more likely to be accommodated by ductile flow. Hence, prior knowledge of bed thickness and facies architecture, calibrated to outcrops, are powerful constraints on the interpreted fracture distribution. Another important constraint is that fracturing

  1. Ink jet inks and substrates: Novel approaches for their physical and optical properties characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovell, Veronika

    Undoubtedly, within the last couple of decades, the progress in non impact printing technologies has grown to an enormous level. In order to keep the development of this non impact printing method to grow even more, technicians, researchers and educators must continue in conducting investigation and provoking new ideas and questions that will lead to new outcomes and expansion of ink jet printing. In this work, a broader area that comprises deep look into the ink jet ink and substrate performance, their physical properties and optical properties when printed is discussed in great details. Innovative techniques, novel materials and novel recommendations are presented here in order to enhance the progress in the area of ink jet technology in near future. The output should be evaluated in terms of overall printer capability, not only in terms of a substrate quality (price, grade, optical and physical properties), the type of ink set, and the basic level of color reproduction (density, Lab values). All these should be taken into consideration together with other very important factors, such as the length of time required for colors to stabilize, the image permanence of the printout, and the ink levels in terms of color gamut. The work includes a comprehensive study of ink and substrate combinations, the interaction between them, and integration of novel techniques, two and three dimensional color gamut projections and gamut volume values, into color output characterization. Using this method it is possible to demonstrate how properties of a substrate correlate with the final output presentation. The aforementioned approach can be also used as an image permanence evaluation technique, in preference to the change in densities and L*a*b* values of miniature charts. Definitely, the gamut volume can be utilized as a sophisticated device, which enables to control the final color output of the printing job.

  2. Physical and chemical characterizations of corn stover and poplar solids resulting from leading pretreatment technologies.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajeev; Mago, Gaurav; Balan, Venkatesh; Wyman, Charles E

    2009-09-01

    In order to investigate changes in substrate chemical and physical features after pretreatment, several characterizations were performed on untreated (UT) corn stover and poplar and their solids resulting pretreatments by ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX), ammonia recycled percolation (ARP), controlled pH, dilute acid, flowthrough, lime, and SO(2) technologies. In addition to measuring the chemical compositions including acetyl content, physical attributes determined were biomass crystallinity, cellulose degree of polymerization, cellulase adsorption capacity of pretreated solids and enzymatically extracted lignin, copper number, FT-IR responses, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) visualizations, and surface atomic composition by electron spectroscopy of chemical analysis (ESCA). Lime pretreatment removed the most acetyl groups from both corn stover and poplar, while AFEX removed the least. Low pH pretreatments depolymerized cellulose and enhanced biomass crystallinity much more than higher pH approaches. Lime pretreated corn stover solids and flowthrough pretreated poplar solids had the highest cellulase adsorption capacity, while dilute acid pretreated corn stover solids and controlled pH pretreated poplar solids had the least. Furthermore, enzymatically extracted AFEX lignin preparations for both corn stover and poplar had the lowest cellulase adsorption capacity. ESCA results showed that SO(2) pretreated solids had the highest surface O/C ratio for poplar, but for corn stover, the highest value was observed for dilute acid pretreatment with a Parr reactor. Although dependent on pretreatment and substrate, FT-IR data showed that along with changes in cross linking and chemical changes, pretreatments may also decrystallize cellulose and change the ratio of crystalline cellulose polymorphs (Ialpha/Ibeta).

  3. Characterization and Physical Mapping of Ribosomal RNA Gene Families in Plantago

    PubMed Central

    DHAR, MANOJ K.; FRIEBE, BERND; KAUL, SANJANA; GILL, BIKRAM S.

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims The organization of rRNA genes in cultivated Plantago ovata Forsk. and several of its wild allies was analysed to gain insight into the phylogenetic relationships of these species in the genus which includes some 200 species. • Methods Specific primers were designed to amplify the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and ITS2) regions from seven Plantago species and the resulting fragments were cloned and sequenced. Similarly, using specific primers, the 5S rRNA genes from these species were amplified and subsequently cloned. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) was used for physical mapping of 5S and 45S ribosomal RNA genes. • Results The ITS1 region is 19–29 bp longer than the ITS2 in different Plantago species. The 5S rRNA gene-repeating unit varies in length from 289 to 581 bp. Coding regions are highly conserved across species, but the non-transcribed spacers (NTS) do not match any database sequences. The clone from the cultivated species P. ovata was used for physical mapping of these genes by FISH. Four species have one FISH site while three have two FISH sites. In P. lanceolata and P. rhodosperma, the 5S and 45S (18S-5·8S-25S) sites are coupled. • Conclusions Characterization of 5S and 45S rRNA genes has indicated a possible origin of P. ovata, the only cultivated species of the genus and also the only species with x = 4, from a species belonging to subgenus Psyllium. Based on the studies reported here, P. ovata is closest to P. arenaria, although on the basis of other data the two species have been placed in different subgenera. FISH mapping can be used as an efficient tool to help determine phylogenetic relationships in the genus Plantago and show the interrelationship between P. lanceolata and P. lagopus. PMID:16481363

  4. Hydrodynamics Flow and Transport Characterization of a Karstified Physical Model Using Temporal Moment Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anaya, A. A.; Padilla, I. Y.

    2013-12-01

    High productivity of karst groundwater systems is often associated with conduit flow and high matrix permeability. Spatial heterogeneities and anisotropy, among others factors, result in highly complex flow patterns in these systems. The same characteristics that make these aquifers very productive also make them highly vulnerable to contamination and a likely for contaminant exposure. The understanding of contamination fate and transport processes in these complex aquifers demand different statistical and numerical approaches, such as the Temporal Moment Analysis (TMA). TMA of solute breakthrough curves provide qualitative and quantitative results to characterize hydrodynamic variables that affect the release, mobility, persistence, and possible pathways of contaminants in karst groundwater systems. The general objective of this work is to characterize flow and transport processes in conduit and diffusion-dominated flow under low and high flow conditions using TMA in a karstified physical model. A multidimensional, laboratory-scale, Geo-Hydrobed model (GHM) containing a karstified limestone block collected from the karst aquifer formation of northern Puerto Rico are used for this purpose. Experimental work entails injecting dissolved CaCl2 and trichloroethene (TCE) in the upstream boundary of the GHM while monitoring their concentrations spatially and temporally in the limestone under different groundwater flow regimes. Results from the TMA show a highly heterogeneous system resulting in large preferential flow components and specific mass-transfer limitations zones especially in diffuse flow areas. Flow variables like velocity and Reynolds number indicates defined preferential flow paths increasing spatially as flow rate increase. TMA results show to be qualitatively consistent with a previous statistical novel approach developed using mixed models. Comparison between the dissolved CaCl2 tracer and TCE show implications for reactive contaminants in the karst

  5. Contact lens physical properties and lipid deposition in a novel characterized artificial tear solution

    PubMed Central

    Heynen, Miriam; Kay, Lise M.M.; Dominici, Claudia Yvette; Khan, Warda; Ng, Wendy W.S.; Jones, Lyndon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To characterize various properties of a physiologically-relevant artificial tear solution (ATS) containing a range of tear film components within a complex salt solution, and to measure contact lens parameters and lipid deposition of a variety of contact lens materials after incubation in this ATS. Methods A complex ATS was developed that contains a range of salts, proteins, lipids, mucin, and other tear film constituents in tear-film relevant concentrations. This ATS was tested to confirm that its pH, osmolality, surface tension, and homogeneity are similar to human tears and remain so throughout the material incubation process, for up to 4 weeks. To confirm that silicone hydrogel and conventional hydrogel contact lens materials do not alter in physical characteristics beyond what is allowed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 18369–2. The diameter, center thickness, and calculated base curve were measured for five different lens materials directly out of the blister pack, after a rinse in saline and then following a two week incubation in the modified ATS. To test the ATS and the effect of its composition on lipid deposition, two lens materials were incubated in the ATS and a modified version for several time points. Both ATS solutions contained trace amounts of carbon-14 cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine, such that deposition of these specific lipids could be quantified using standard methods. Results This ATS is a complex mixture that remains stable at physiologically relevant pH (7.3–7.6), osmolality (304–306 mmol/kg), surface tension (40–46 dynes/cm) and homogeneity over an incubation period of three weeks or more. The physical parameters of the lenses tested showed no changes beyond that allowed by the ISO guidelines. Incubations with the ATS found that balafilcon A lenses deposit significantly more cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine than omafilcon A lenses (p<0.05) and that removing lactoferrin and immunoglobulin G

  6. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  7. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  8. [Physical, culinary and nutritional characterization in dry bean from the highlands of Mexico].

    PubMed

    Pérez Herrera, Patricia; Esquivel Esquivel, Gilberto; Rosales Serna, Rigoberto; Acosta-Gallegos, Jorge

    2002-06-01

    In the improvement of a given crop species, knowledge on the grain quality and related traits in the progenitors used in the breeding process is needed to establish their usefulness as a source of a given character, and as well as to plan the proper combinations between progenitors. The aim of the present research was to characterize a group of 49 genotypes of Phaseolus vulgaris and one of Phaseolus coccineus, in relation to physical, cooking and nutritional grain traits. Cultivar Blanco Tlaxcala (P. coccineus) showed a larger grain size and lower protein content than any of the P. vulgaris cultivars. The 86% of the studied genotypes showed cooking times lower to 115 min, and a significant correlation between this trait and water sorption capacity (r = 0.78 **) was found. Cultivars Redlands Pioneer and ICA Zerinza could be used as source of low cooking time; and Perry Marrow, Kaboon and ICA Zerinza in the production of low shell content cultivars. Genotypes G 2333, Negro Lolotla, REN 27 and J 117 showed the highest grain protein content. On the other hand, BY 94022, Pinto Villa and Negro 150 had the lowest trypsin inhibitor activity. Results support the possible use of the above genotypes as sources of those grain traits. In general, large variability was found for most of the quality traits determined; therefore, there is scope for improvement through recombination and selection.

  9. Rheological characterization of novel physically crosslinked terpolymeric hydrogels at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malana, Muhammad Aslam; Zohra, Rubab; Khan, Muhammad Saleem

    2012-09-01

    The main objective of this research work is to reveal the detailed and extensive rheological characterization of terpolymeric hydrogel formulations using a variety of monomers having different concentrations of acrylic acid and applying a range of temperatures. The hydrogels with the different concentrations of acrylic acid were prepared in the absence of air using three different monomers, by free radical polymerization, gradually increasing the temperature up to polymerization point, using ethyl alcohol as solvent. Different shear measurements were performed to study rheological properties, temperature dependence, and yield strength of acrylic acid pharmaceutical hydrogels. Various models were applied to analyze the rheological behavior of the gels. The acrylic acid pharmaceutical gels having physical cross links in the gel networks, exhibit remarkable temperature dependence especially with relatively higher concentration of acrylic acid at greater shear rate. Flow curves plotted at various temperatures indicate that these gels exhibit a reasonable pseudoplastic behavior. All these hydrogels require appropriate yield strength to break their network structures. The gel samples exhibit the best fit to the Modified Bingham model, which can explain the overall flow behavior of these topical gels. The rheological analysis indicates that these gels may be used as topical gels for targeted and controlled drug delivery at a specific site.

  10. Physical-chemical characterization of Tunisian clays for the synthesis of geopolymers materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selmani, S.; Essaidi, N.; Gouny, F.; Bouaziz, S.; Joussein, E.; Driss, A.; Sdiri, A.; Rossignol, S.

    2015-03-01

    Natural clay materials from Tunisia were examined as an aluminosilicate source for the synthesis of consolidated materials at low temperatures. Three clay samples were collected from the El Kef, Douiret and Gafsa basins and calcined at different temperatures. All of the samples were characterized using chemical and mineralogical analyses, thermogravimetry, dilatometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements. The chemical (XRF) and mineralogical analyses (XRD and FTIR) indicated that all of the samples contained various amounts of kaolinite and quartz, followed by calcite, mica, palygorskite and gypsum. Curing produced a binder which did not significantly affect the physic-chemical properties of these clays. The obtained materials heterogeneous did not reach the geopolymerization stage, most likely because of their low kaolinite content. The addition of a suitable aluminosilicate to these clays is therefore recommended to produce homogeneous consolidated geopolymers. The synthesized materials obtained after the addition of metakaolin to the formulation to improve reactivity have interesting properties, thereby providing good potential for Tunisian clays in the synthesis of geopolymers.

  11. Chemical, physical, structural and morphological characterization of the electric arc furnace dust.

    PubMed

    Machado, Janaína G M S; Brehm, Feliciane Andrade; Moraes, Carlos Alberto Mendes; Santos, Carlos Alberto Dos; Vilela, Antônio Cezar Faria; Cunha, João Batista Marimon da

    2006-08-25

    Electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) is a hazardous industrial waste generated in the collection of particulate material during steelmaking process via electric arc furnace. Important elements to the industry such as, Fe and Zn are the main ones in EAFD. Due to their presence, it becomes very important to know how these elements are combined before studying new technologies for its processing. The aim of this work was to carry out a chemical, physical, structural and morphological characterization of the EAFD. The investigation was carried out by using granulometry analysis, chemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy via SEM (EDS), X-ray mapping analysis via SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mössbauer spectroscopy. By XRD the following phases were detected: ZnFe(2)O(4), Fe(3)O(4), MgFe(2)O(4), FeCr(2)O (4), Ca(0.15)Fe(2.85)O(4), MgO, Mn(3)O(4), SiO(2) and ZnO. On the other hand, the phases detected by Mössbauer spectroscopy were: ZnFe(2)O(4), Fe(3)O(4), Ca(0.15)Fe(2.85)O(4) and FeCr(2)O(4). Magnesium ferrite (MgFe(2)O(4)), observed in the XRD pattern as overlapped peaks, was not identified in the Mössbauer spectroscopy analysis.

  12. Fuel Thermo-physical Characterization Project: Evaluation of Models to Calculate Thermal Diffusivity of Layered Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Burkes, Douglas; Casella, Amanda J.; Gardner, Levi D.; Casella, Andrew M.; Huber, Tanja K.; Breitkreutz, Harald

    2015-02-11

    The Office of Material Management and Minimization Fuel Thermo-physical Characterization Project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is tasked with using PNNL facilities and processes to receive irradiated low enriched uranium-molybdenum fuel plate samples and perform analyses in support of the Office of Material Management and Minimization Reactor Conversion Program. This work is in support of the Fuel Development Pillar that is managed by Idaho National Laboratory. A key portion of the scope associated with this project was to measure the thermal properties of fuel segments harvested from plates that were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor. Thermal diffusivity of samples prepared from the fuel segments was measured using laser flash analysis. Two models, one developed by PNNL and the other developed by the Technische Universität München (TUM), were evaluated to extract the thermal diffusivity of the uranium-molybdenum alloy from measurements made on the irradiated, layered composites. The experimental data of the “TC” irradiated fuel segment was evaluated using both models considering a three-layer and five-layer system. Both models are in acceptable agreement with one another and indicate that the zirconium diffusion barrier has a minimal impact on the overall thermal diffusivity of the monolithic U-Mo fuel.

  13. Physical characterization and cellular uptake of propylene glycol liposomes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Lu, Cui-Tao; Li, Wen-Feng; Cheng, Jin-Guo; Tian, Xin-Qiao; Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Li, Xing; Lv, Hai-Feng; Li, Xiao-Kun

    2012-03-01

    In order to facilitate the intracellular delivery of therapeutic agents, a new type of liposomes-propylene glycol liposomes (PGL) were prepared, and their cell translocation capability in vitro was examined. PGL was composed of hydrogenated egg yolk lecithin, cholesterol, Tween 80 and propylene glycol. With curcumin as a model drug, characterization of loaded PGL were measured including surface morphology, particle size, elasticity, encapsulation efficiency of curcumin and physical stability. Using curcumin-loaded conventional liposomes as the control, the cell uptake capacity of loaded PGL was evaluated by detection the concentration of curcumin in cytoplasm. Compared with conventional liposomes, PGL exhibited such advantages as high encapsulation efficiency (92.74% ± 3.44%), small particle size (182.4 ± 89.2 nm), high deformability (Elasticity index = 48.6) and high stability both at normal temperature (about 25°C) and low temperature at 4°C. From cell experiment in vitro, PGL exhibited the highest uptake of curcumin compared with that of conventional liposomes and free curcumin solution. Little toxic effect on cellular viability was observed by methyl tetrazolium assay. In conclusion, PGL might be developed as a promising intracellular delivery carrier for therapeutic agents.

  14. Fabricating and Characterizing Physical Properties of Electrospun Polypeptide-based Nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadka, Dhan Bahadur

    This dissertation has aimed to fabricate polypeptide based biomaterial and characterize physical properties. Electrospinning is used as a tool for the sample fabrication. Project focused on determining the feasibility of electrospinning of certain synthetic polypeptides and certain elastin-like peptides from aqueous feedstocks and to characterize physical properties of polymer aqueous solution, cast film and spun fibers and fiber mats. The research involves peptide design, polymer electrospinning, fibers crosslinking, determining the extent of crosslinking, fibers protease degradation study, fibers stability and self-organization analysis, structure and composition determination by various spectroscopy and microscopy techniques and characterization of mechanical properties of individual suspended fibers. Fiber mats of a synthetic cationic polypeptide poly(L-ornithine) (PLO) and an anionic co-polypeptide of L-glutamic acid and L-tyrosine (PLEY) of defined composition have been produced by electrospinning. Fibers were obtained from polymer aqueous solution at concentrations of 20-45% (w/v) in PLO and at concentrations of 20-60% (w/v) in PLEY. Applied voltage and spinneret-collector distance were also found to influence polymer spinnability and fibers morphology. Oriented fibers were obtained by parallel electrodes geometry. Fiber diameter and morphology was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). PLO fibers exposed on glutaraldehyde (GTA) vapor rendered fiber mats water-insoluble. A common chemical reagent, carbodiimide was used to crosslink PLEY fibers. Fiber solubility in aqueous solution varied as a function of crosslinking time and crosslinker concentration. Crosslink density has been quantified by a visible-wavelength dye-based method. Degradation of crosslinked fibers by different proteases has been demonstrated. Investigation of crosslinked PLEY fibers has provided insight into the mechanisms of stability at different

  15. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of low-level alpha contaminated wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides radiological, physical, and chemical characterization data for low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program. Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 97 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 25,450 m 3 corresponding to a total mass of approximately 12,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats-generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification.

  16. Optimizing the characterization of forest structure with remote sensing to improve physically-based hydrologic modeling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varhola, A.; Coops, N.; Teti, P.; Weiler, M.

    2013-12-01

    For more than a decade, the lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forests of British Columbia have been affected by mountain pine beetle (MPB) (Dendroctonus ponderosae), constituting one of the most destructive insect outbreaks in North America. In such a snow-dominated environment, a receding forest cover is known to be associated with an increase in snow accumulation during winter, an enhancement in snowmelt rates and the suppression of transpiration during spring. These changes can exacerbate the risk of flooding, with the corresponding threats to infrastructure and society. However, the unprecedented extent of the disturbance (180,000 km2) and the particular nature of the beetles' severe but gradual effect on the forests' structural and physiological integrity have challenged scientists aiming to more confidently quantify the real ecological impacts. Even though hydrologic models remain as the only tool currently available to evaluate the effects of MPB on snow and streamflow dynamics, they are impaired in their present form because they rely on coarse and oversimplified characterizations of forest structure unable to capture the changes caused by MPB on vegetation over large areas. Remote sensing technologies such as Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) and Landsat Thematic Mapper offer remarkable alternatives to fill this knowledge gap. First, this study presents a novel methodology to calibrate ALS data with in-situ optical hemispherical camera images to obtain the plot-level forest structure metrics that are traditionally used in physically-based hydrologic models. The approach minimizes geometrical differences between these two techniques by transforming the Cartesian coordinates of ALS data to generate synthetic images with a polar projection directly comparable to optical photography. We demonstrate how these new coordinate-transformed ALS metrics, along with additional standard vegetation variables, can be estimated at any individual location within the extent of an

  17. Charge injection in solution-processed organic field-effect transistors: physics, models and characterization methods.

    PubMed

    Natali, Dario; Caironi, Mario

    2012-03-15

    A high-mobility organic semiconductor employed as the active material in a field-effect transistor does not guarantee per se that expectations of high performance are fulfilled. This is even truer if a downscaled, short channel is adopted. Only if contacts are able to provide the device with as much charge as it needs, with a negligible voltage drop across them, then high expectations can turn into high performances. It is a fact that this is not always the case in the field of organic electronics. In this review, we aim to offer a comprehensive overview on the subject of current injection in organic thin film transistors: physical principles concerning energy level (mis)alignment at interfaces, models describing charge injection, technologies for interface tuning, and techniques for characterizing devices. Finally, a survey of the most recent accomplishments in the field is given. Principles are described in general, but the technologies and survey emphasis is on solution processed transistors, because it is our opinion that scalable, roll-to-roll printing processing is one, if not the brightest, possible scenario for the future of organic electronics. With the exception of electrolyte-gated organic transistors, where impressively low width normalized resistances were reported (in the range of 10 Ω·cm), to date the lowest values reported for devices where the semiconductor is solution-processed and where the most common architectures are adopted, are ∼10 kΩ·cm for transistors with a field effect mobility in the 0.1-1 cm(2)/Vs range. Although these values represent the best case, they still pose a severe limitation for downscaling the channel lengths below a few micrometers, necessary for increasing the device switching speed. Moreover, techniques to lower contact resistances have been often developed on a case-by-case basis, depending on the materials, architecture and processing techniques. The lack of a standard strategy has hampered the progress of the

  18. Fuel Thermo-physical Characterization Project. Fiscal Year 2014 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Burkes, Douglas; Casella, Andrew M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Edwards, Matthew K.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Pool, Karl N.; Slonecker, Bruce D.; Smith, Frances N.; Steen, Franciska H.

    2015-03-15

    The Office of Material Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked with using PNNL facilities and processes to receive irradiated low enriched uranium–molybdenum (LEU-Mo) fuel plate samples and perform analysis in support of the M3 Reactor Conversion Program. This work is in support of the M3 Reactor Conversion Fuel Development Pillar that is managed by Idaho National Laboratory. The primary research scope was to determine the thermo-physical properties as a function of temperature and burnup. Work conducted in Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 complemented measurements performed in FY 2013 on four additional irradiated LEU-Mo fuel plate samples. Specifically, the work in FY 2014 investigated the influence of different processing methods on thermal property behavior, the absence of aluminum alloy cladding on thermal property behavior for additional model validation, and the influence of higher operating surface heat flux / more aggressive irradiation conditions on thermal property behavior. The model developed in FY 2013 and refined in FY 2014 to extract thermal properties of the U-Mo alloy from the measurements conducted on an integral fuel plate sample (i.e., U-Mo alloy with a thin Zr coating and clad in AA6061) continues to perform very well. Measurements conducted in FY 2014 on samples irradiated under similar conditions compare well to measurements performed in FY 2013. In general, there is no gross influence of fabrication method on thermal property behavior, although the difference in LEU-Mo foil microstructure does have a noticeable influence on recrystallization of grains during irradiation. Samples irradiated under more aggressive irradiation conditions, e.g., higher surface heat flux, revealed lower thermal conductivity when compared to samples irradiated at moderate surface heat fluxes, with the exception of one sample. This report documents thermal

  19. The Four-Color Broadband Photometry for Physical Characterization of Fast Rotator NEOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikwaya Eluo, Jean-Baptiste; Gilmour, Cosette M.; Fedorets, Grigori

    2016-10-01

    Fast rotator NEOs, having size in the range of several meters in diameter (H > 22), turn to be very faint. In order to study their physical characterization using photometry, it is required to use a system of filters that covers for each of them a large bandwidth of at least 0.8 micrometers. Traditional and inexpensive Johnson-Cousins broadband filters (B, V, R, I) work efficiently well.11 NEOs were observed at the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope (VATT) from 2014 to 2016. Their absolute magnitudes range from 21.9 to 28.2. We found that their spin rates vary from 0.172+/- 0.003 to 2.300 +/- 0.003 hours. 6 of them (2014 AY28, 2015 TB25, 2015 VM64, 2015 VT64, 2015 XZ1, and 2016 GW221) are clearly of C-type and dominate our sample, while one (2014 KS40) belongs to X-type. One NEO (2016 EW1) falls between C-type and S-type asteroids on the plot (B-V) versus (V-R) while on the plot (V-I) versus (V-R), it is among C-type asteroids. We rule it to be C-type asteroid. NEO 2014 WF201 stays between C-type and S-type on both plots.NEO 2014 EC appears to us of very special interest as its V-R color index is close to zero. Its relative reflectance normalized to R-filter shows that it belongs to B-type asteroid. Would it be an indication of fresh interior material excavated by a recent impact?

  20. PHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND ORIGIN OF BINARY NEAR-EARTH ASTEROID (175706) 1996 FG{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Kevin J.; Delbo, Marco; Mueller, Michael; Binzel, Richard P.; DeMeo, Francesca E.

    2012-04-01

    The near-Earth asteroid (NEA) (175706) 1996 FG{sub 3} is a particularly interesting spacecraft target: a binary asteroid with a low-{Delta}v heliocentric orbit. The orbit of its satellite has provided valuable information about its mass density while its albedo and colors suggest it is primitive or part of the C-complex taxonomic grouping. We extend the physical characterization of this object with new observations of its emission at mid-infrared wavelengths and with near-infrared reflection spectroscopy. We derive an area-equivalent system diameter of 1.90 {+-} 0.28 km (corresponding to approximate component diameters of 1.83 km and 0.51 km, respectively) and a geometric albedo of 0.039 {+-} 0.012. (175706) 1996 FG{sub 3} was previously classified as a C-type asteroid, though the combined 0.4-2.5 {mu}m spectrum with thermal correction indicates classification as B-type; both are consistent with the low measured albedo. Dynamical studies show that (175706) 1996 FG{sub 3} most probably originated in the inner main asteroid belt. Recent work has suggested the inner Main Belt (142) Polana family as the possible origin of another low-{Delta}v B-type NEA, (101955) 1999 RQ{sub 36}. A similar origin for (175706) 1996 FG{sub 3} would require delivery by the overlapping Jupiter 7:2 and Mars 5:9 mean motion resonances rather than the {nu}{sub 6}, and we find this to be a low probability, but possible, origin.

  1. Physical-biopolymer characterization of polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) blended with natural rubber latex

    SciTech Connect

    Kuntanoo, K.; Promkotra, S.; Kaewkannetra, P.

    2015-03-30

    A biopolymer of polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) is blended with bio-based materials, natural rubber latex, to improve their microstructures. The various ratios between PHBV and natural rubber latex are examined to develop their mechanical properties. In general, physical properties of PHBV are hard, brittle and low flexible while natural rubber (NR) is presented itself as high elastic materials. Concentrations of the PHBV solution are constituted at 1%, 2% and 3% (w/v). The mixtures of their PHBV solutions to natural rubber latex are produced the blended films in three different ratios of 4:6, 5:5 and 6:4, respectively. They are characterized by appearance analyses which are the scanning electron microscope (SEM), universal testing machine (UTM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The SEM photomicrographs of the blended films and the controlled PHBV can provide the void distribution in the range of 12-14% and 19-21%, respectively. For mechanical properties of the blended films, the various elastic moduli of 1%, 2% and 3% (w/v) PHBV are the average of 773, 956 and 1,007 kPa, respectively. The tensile strengths of the blends increase with the increased concentrations of PHBV, similarly trend to the elastic modulus. The crystallization and melting behavior of unmixed PHBV and the blends are determined by DSC. Melting transition temperatures (T{sub m}) of the unmixed PHBV are stated two melting peak at 154°C and 173°C. Besides, the melting peaks of the blends alter in the range of 152-156°C and 168-171°C, respectively. According to morphology of the blends, the void distribution decreases twice compared to the unmixed PHBV. The results of mechanical properties and thermal analysis indicate that the blended PHBV can be developed their properties by more resilient and wide range of temperature than usual.

  2. Physical-biopolymer characterization of polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) blended with natural rubber latex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntanoo, K.; Promkotra, S.; Kaewkannetra, P.

    2015-03-01

    A biopolymer of polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) is blended with bio-based materials, natural rubber latex, to improve their microstructures. The various ratios between PHBV and natural rubber latex are examined to develop their mechanical properties. In general, physical properties of PHBV are hard, brittle and low flexible while natural rubber (NR) is presented itself as high elastic materials. Concentrations of the PHBV solution are constituted at 1%, 2% and 3% (w/v). The mixtures of their PHBV solutions to natural rubber latex are produced the blended films in three different ratios of 4:6, 5:5 and 6:4, respectively. They are characterized by appearance analyses which are the scanning electron microscope (SEM), universal testing machine (UTM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The SEM photomicrographs of the blended films and the controlled PHBV can provide the void distribution in the range of 12-14% and 19-21%, respectively. For mechanical properties of the blended films, the various elastic moduli of 1%, 2% and 3% (w/v) PHBV are the average of 773, 956 and 1,007 kPa, respectively. The tensile strengths of the blends increase with the increased concentrations of PHBV, similarly trend to the elastic modulus. The crystallization and melting behavior of unmixed PHBV and the blends are determined by DSC. Melting transition temperatures (Tm) of the unmixed PHBV are stated two melting peak at 154°C and 173°C. Besides, the melting peaks of the blends alter in the range of 152-156°C and 168-171°C, respectively. According to morphology of the blends, the void distribution decreases twice compared to the unmixed PHBV. The results of mechanical properties and thermal analysis indicate that the blended PHBV can be developed their properties by more resilient and wide range of temperature than usual.

  3. High-k dielectrics on (100) and (110) n-InAs: Physical and electrical characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C. H. Hsu, W. C.; Doornbos, G.; Astromskas, G.; Vellianitis, G.; Oxland, R.; Holland, M. C.; Passlack, M.; Huang, M. L.; Lin, C. H.; Hsieh, C. H.; Chang, Y. S.; Lee, T. L.; Chen, Y. Y.; Diaz, C. H.; Ramvall, P.; Lind, E.; Wernersson, L.-E.; Droopad, R.

    2014-04-15

    Two high-k dielectric materials (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2}) were deposited on n-type (100) and (110) InAs surface orientations to investigate physical properties of the oxide/semiconductor interfaces and the interface trap density (D{sub it}). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses (XPS) for native oxides of (100) and (110) as-grown n-InAs epi wafers show an increase in As-oxide on the (100) surface and an increase in InOx on the (110) surface. In addition, XPS analyses of high-k (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2}) on n-InAs epi show that the intrinsic native oxide difference between (100) and (110) epi surfaces were eliminated by applying conventional in-situ pre-treatment (TriMethyAluminium (TMA)) before the high-k deposition. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) characterization of HfO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} MOSCAPs on both types of n-InAs surfaces shows very similar C-V curves. The interface trap density (D{sub it}) profiles show D{sub it} minima of 6.1 × 10{sup 12}/6.5 × 10{sup 12} and 6.6 × 10{sup 12}/7.3 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1} for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2}, respectively for (100) and (110) InAs surfaces. The similar interface trap density (D{sub it}) on (100) and (110) surface orientation were observed, which is beneficial to future InAs FinFET device with both (100) and (110) surface channel orientations present.

  4. Adapting a theoretical framework for characterizing students' use of equations in physics problem solving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebello, Carina M.; Rebello, N. Sanjay

    2012-02-01

    Previous studies have focused on the resources that students activate and utilize while solving a given physics problem. However, few studies explore how students relate a given resource such as an equation, to various types of physics problems and contexts and how they ascertain the meaning and applicability of that resource. We explore how students view physics equations, derive meaning from those equations, and use those equations in physics problem solving. We adapt Dubinsky and McDonald's description of APOS (action-process-object-schema) theory of learning in mathematics, to construct a theoretical framework that describes how students interpret and use equations in physics in terms of actions, processes, objects, and schemas. This framework provides a lens for understanding how students construct their understanding of physics concepts and their relation to equations. We highlight how APOS theory can be operationalized to serve as a lens for studying the use of mathematics in physics problem solving.

  5. Physical Characterization of Solid-Liquid Slurries at High Weight Fractions Using Optical and Ultrasonic Methods, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, Lloyd W.

    2009-09-17

    Remediation of highly radioactive waste is a major technical and programmatic challenge for the DOE. Rapid, on-line physical characterization of highly concentrated slurries is required for the safe and efficient remediation of 90 million gallons of high level radioactive waste (HLW), sodium bearing waste, and mixed waste. The research presented here, describes a collaborative effort between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington to directly address the need for rapid on-line characterization of the physical properties of HLW slurries during all phases of the remediation process, from in-tank characterization of sediments to monitoring of the concentration, particle size, and degree of agglomeration and gelation of slurries during transport. Near-surface characterization of the slurry flow in the particle size range from nanometer to micrometer is examined using optical low coherence reflectometry. Volumetric characterization at depths in the slurry flow, up to several centimeters in the particle size range from the micrometer to millimeter, is realized by utilizing ultrasonic backscatter and diffuses fields. One of the strengths, the teaming up of significant talents in both experimental and theoretical optics (University of Washington) and in ultrasonics [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] provides a synergistic approach to integrate these complimentary techniques. One of the benefits of this combined approach is the physical characterization of HLW over a concentration and particle size range that is broader than can be achieved with today’s technology. This will avoid a costly increase in waste stream volume due to excess dilution, and will lessen chance of plugging pipes that could shut down expensive processing lines.

  6. Differences in sialic acid residues among bone alkaline phosphatase isoforms: a physical, biochemical, and immunological characterization.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, P; Farley, J R

    2002-12-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separates three human bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP) isoforms in serum; two major BALP isoforms, B1 and B2, and a minor fraction, B/I, which is composed on average of 70% bone and 30% intestinal ALP. The current studies were intended to identify an in vitro source of the BALP isoforms for physical, biochemical, and immunological characterizations. The three BALP isoforms were identified in extracts of human osteosarcoma (SaOS-2) cells, by HPLC, after separation by anion-exchange chromatography. All three BALP isoforms were similar with respect to freeze-thaw stability, solubility, heat inactivation, and inhibition by L-phenylalanine, L-homoarginine, and levamisole. The isoforms were also kinetically similar (i.e., maximal velocity and KM at pH 8.8 and pH 10.0). The isoforms differed, however, with respect to sensitivity to precipitation with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), P < 0.001, but not Concanavalin A. At 3.0 mg/ml, WGA precipitated approximately 25% of B/I but more than 80% of B1 and B2. Molecular weights were estimated by native gradient gel electrophoresis: B/I, 126 kDa; B1, 136 kDa; and B2, 141 kDa. Desialylation with neuraminidase reduced the apparent sizes of B1 and B2 to 127 kDa (i.e., approximately to that of B/I). The total carbohydrate content was calculated to be 18 kDa, 28 kDa, and 33 kDa (i.e., 14%, 21%, and 23%) for the BALP isofonns, B/I, B1, and B2, respectively. The number of sialic acid residues was estimated to be 29 and 45, for each B1 and B2 homodimer, respectively. Apparent discrepancies between these estimates of molecular weight and estimates based on gel filtration chromatography were attributed to nonspecific interactions between carbohydrate residues and the gel filtration beads. All three BALP isoforms showed similar dose-dependent linearity in the commercial Alkphase-B and Tandem-MP Ostase immunoassays, r = 0.944 and r = 0.985, respectively (P < 0.001). In summary, our data indicate that

  7. Characterization of the chemical structures and physical properties of exopolysaccharides produced by various Streptococcus thermophilus strains.

    PubMed

    Pachekrepapol, U; Lucey, J A; Gong, Y; Naran, R; Azadi, P

    2017-03-16

    Exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by some lactic acid bacteria are often used by the dairy industry to improve the rheological and physical properties of yogurt, but the relationship between their structure and functional effect is still unclear. The EPS from different species, or different strains from the same species, may differ in terms of molar mass, repeating unit structure, and EPS yield during fermentation of milk. This study aimed to characterize the detailed properties of EPS produced from 7 strains of Streptococcus thermophilus, which is one of the key cultures used for yogurt manufacture. Milk was fermented with strains DGCC 7698, DGCC 7710, DGCC 7785, ST-10255y, St-143, STCth-9204, and ST4239. These strains were selected because they have been used in previous studies on yogurt texture, but a complete description of their EPS structural properties has not yet been reported. All strains were fermented under a similar acidification rate by adjusting the level of supplementation with peptone or the inoculation level, which allowed for a comparison of EPS yields under similar growth conditions (reconstituted skim milk at 40°C). The EPS from each strain was isolated and the weight-average molar mass and z-average root mean square radius determined using size-exclusion chromatography multiangle laser light scattering. The monosaccharide composition of EPS was determined using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and repeating unit structure was determined using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The weight-average molar mass values of EPS ranged from 0.14 to 1.61 × 10(6) g/mol. All 7 EPS samples were uncharged. The strains ST-10255y and ST4239 had EPS with the same repeating unit structure. The monosaccharide compositions of the various EPS were mainly composed of glucose and galactose, with low levels of rhamnose in the EPS isolated from DGCC 7698, and N-acetylgalactosamine in the EPS from DGCC 7785, ST-10255y, and ST4239. The yields of EPS

  8. Fluid flow and reaction fronts: characterization of physical processes at the microscale using SEM analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, Nicolas; Koehn, Daniel; Toussaint, Renaud; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Bons, Paul; Chung, Peter; Martín-Martín, Juan Diego

    2014-05-01

    Fluid migrations are the principal agent for mineral replacement in the upper crust, leading to dramatic changes in the porosity and permeability of rocks over several kilometers. Consequently, a better understanding of the physical parameters leading to mineral replacement is required to better understand and model fluid flow and rock reservoir properties. Large-scale dolostone bodies are one of the best and most debated examples of such fluid-related mineral replacement. These formations received a lot of attention lately, and although genetic mechanics and implications for fluid volume are understood, the mechanisms controlling the formation and propagation of the dolomitization reaction front remain unclear. This contribution aims at an improvement of the knowledge about how this replacement front propagates over space and time. We study the front sharpness on hand specimen and thin section scale and what the influence of advection versus diffusion of material is on the front development. In addition, we demonstrate how preexisting heterogeneities in the host rock affect the propagation of the reaction front. The rock is normally not homogeneous but contains grain boundaries, fractures and stylolites, and such structures are important on the scale of the front width. Using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Raman Spectroscopy we characterized the reaction front chemistry and morphology in different context. Specimens of dolomitization fronts, collected from carbonate sequences of the southern Maestrat Basin, Spain and the Southwestern Scottish Highlands suggest that the front thickness is about several mm being relatively sharp. Fluid infiltrated grain boundaries and fractures forming mm-scale transition zone. We study the structure of the reaction zone in detail and discuss implications for fluid diffusion-advection models and mineral replacement. In addition we formulate a numerical model taking into account fluid flow, diffusion and advection of the mobile

  9. BIOACCESSIBILITY TESTS ACCURATELY ESTIMATE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hazards of soil-borne Pb to wild birds may be more accurately quantified if the bioavailability of that Pb is known. To better understand the bioavailability of Pb to birds, we measured blood Pb concentrations in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) fed diets containing Pb-contaminated soils. Relative bioavailabilities were expressed by comparison with blood Pb concentrations in quail fed a Pb acetate reference diet. Diets containing soil from five Pb-contaminated Superfund sites had relative bioavailabilities from 33%-63%, with a mean of about 50%. Treatment of two of the soils with P significantly reduced the bioavailability of Pb. The bioaccessibility of the Pb in the test soils was then measured in six in vitro tests and regressed on bioavailability. They were: the “Relative Bioavailability Leaching Procedure” (RBALP) at pH 1.5, the same test conducted at pH 2.5, the “Ohio State University In vitro Gastrointestinal” method (OSU IVG), the “Urban Soil Bioaccessible Lead Test”, the modified “Physiologically Based Extraction Test” and the “Waterfowl Physiologically Based Extraction Test.” All regressions had positive slopes. Based on criteria of slope and coefficient of determination, the RBALP pH 2.5 and OSU IVG tests performed very well. Speciation by X-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrated that, on average, most of the Pb in the sampled soils was sorbed to minerals (30%), bound to organic matter 24%, or present as Pb sulfate 18%. Ad

  10. Characterizing Pedagogical Practices of University Physics Students in Informal Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinko, Kathleen A.; Madigan, Peter; Miller, Eric; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2016-01-01

    University educators (UEs) have a long history of teaching physics not only in formal classroom settings but also in informal outreach environments. The pedagogical practices of UEs in informal physics teaching have not been widely studied, and they may provide insight into formal practices and preparation. We investigate the interactions between…

  11. Accurate spectral color measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltunen, Jouni; Jaeaeskelaeinen, Timo; Parkkinen, Jussi P. S.

    1999-08-01

    Surface color measurement is of importance in a very wide range of industrial applications including paint, paper, printing, photography, textiles, plastics and so on. For a demanding color measurements spectral approach is often needed. One can measure a color spectrum with a spectrophotometer using calibrated standard samples as a reference. Because it is impossible to define absolute color values of a sample, we always work with approximations. The human eye can perceive color difference as small as 0.5 CIELAB units and thus distinguish millions of colors. This 0.5 unit difference should be a goal for the precise color measurements. This limit is not a problem if we only want to measure the color difference of two samples, but if we want to know in a same time exact color coordinate values accuracy problems arise. The values of two instruments can be astonishingly different. The accuracy of the instrument used in color measurement may depend on various errors such as photometric non-linearity, wavelength error, integrating sphere dark level error, integrating sphere error in both specular included and specular excluded modes. Thus the correction formulas should be used to get more accurate results. Another question is how many channels i.e. wavelengths we are using to measure a spectrum. It is obvious that the sampling interval should be short to get more precise results. Furthermore, the result we get is always compromise of measuring time, conditions and cost. Sometimes we have to use portable syste or the shape and the size of samples makes it impossible to use sensitive equipment. In this study a small set of calibrated color tiles measured with the Perkin Elmer Lamda 18 and the Minolta CM-2002 spectrophotometers are compared. In the paper we explain the typical error sources of spectral color measurements, and show which are the accuracy demands a good colorimeter should have.

  12. Genetic characterization of physical activity behaviours in university students enrolled in kinesiology degree programs.

    PubMed

    Many, Gina M; Kendrick, Zachary; Deschamps, Chelsea L; Sprouse, Courtney; Tosi, Laura L; Devaney, Joseph M; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Barfield, Whitney; Hoffman, Eric P; Houmard, Joseph A; Pescatello, Linda S; Vogel, Hans J; Shearer, Jane; Hittel, Dustin S

    2017-03-01

    Studies of physical activity behaviours have increasingly shown the importance of heritable factors such as genetic variation. Nonsynonymous polymorphisms of alpha-actinin 3 (ACTN3) and the β-adrenergic receptors 1 and 3 (ADRB1 and ADRB3) have been previously associated with exercise capacity and cardiometabolic health. We thus hypothesized that these polymorphisms are also related to physical activity behaviours in young adults. To test this hypothesis we examined relationships between ACTN3 (R577X), ARDB1 (Arg389Gly), ADRB3 (Trp64Arg), and physical activity behaviours in university students. We stratified for student enrollment in kinesiology degree programs compared with nonmajors as we previously found this to be a predictor of physical activity. We did not identify novel associations between physical activity and ACTN3. However, the minor alleles of ADRB1 and ADRB3 were significantly underrepresented in kinesiology students compared with nonmajors. Furthermore, carriers of the ADRB1 minor allele reported reduced participation in moderate physical activity and increased afternoon fatigue compared with ancestral allele homozygotes. Together, these findings suggest that the heritability of physical activity behaviours in young adults may be linked to nonsynonymous polymorphisms within β-adrenergic receptors.

  13. Physical interpretation and development of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation techniques applied to the quantitative characterization of textile composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James G.

    1993-01-01

    In this Progress Report, we describe our current research activities concerning the development and implementation of advanced ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation methods applied to the characterization of stitched composite materials and bonded aluminum plate specimens. One purpose of this investigation is to identify and characterize specific features of polar backscatter interrogation which enhance the ability of ultrasound to detect flaws in a stitched composite laminate. Another focus is to explore the feasibility of implementing medical linear array imaging technology as a viable ultrasonic-based nondestructive evaluation method to inspect and characterize bonded aluminum lap joints. As an approach to implementing quantitative ultrasonic inspection methods to both of these materials, we focus on the physics that underlies the detection of flaws in such materials.

  14. How accurate are sphygmomanometers?

    PubMed

    Mion, D; Pierin, A M

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the accuracy and reliability of mercury and aneroid sphygmomanometers. Measurement of accuracy of calibration and evaluation of physical conditions were carried out in 524 sphygmomanometers, 351 from a hospital setting, and 173 from private medical offices. Mercury sphygmomanometers were considered inaccurate if the meniscus was not '0' at rest. Aneroid sphygmomanometers were tested against a properly calibrated mercury manometer, and were considered calibrated when the error was < or =3 mm Hg. Both types of sphygmomanometers were evaluated for conditions of cuff/bladder, bulb, pump and valve. Of the mercury sphygmomanometers tested 21 % were found to be inaccurate. Of this group, unreliability was noted due to: excessive bouncing (14%), illegibility of the gauge (7%), blockage of the filter (6%), and lack of mercury in the reservoir (3%). Bladder damage was noted in 10% of the hospital devices and in 6% of private medical practices. Rubber aging occurred in 34% and 25%, leaks/holes in 19% and 18%, and leaks in the pump bulb in 16% and 30% of hospital devices and private practice devices, respectively. Of the aneroid sphygmomanometers tested, 44% in the hospital setting and 61% in private medical practices were found to be inaccurate. Of these, the magnitude of inaccuracy was 4-6 mm Hg in 32%, 7-12 mm Hg in 19% and > 13 mm Hg in 7%. In summary, most of the mercury and aneroid sphygmomanometers showed inaccuracy (21% vs 58%) and unreliability (64% vs 70%).

  15. Aeroacoustic Characterization of the NASA Ames Experimental Aero-Physics Branch 32- by 48-Inch Subsonic Wind Tunnel with a 24-Element Phased Microphone Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costanza, Bryan T.; Horne, William C.; Schery, S. D.; Babb, Alex T.

    2011-01-01

    The Aero-Physics Branch at NASA Ames Research Center utilizes a 32- by 48-inch subsonic wind tunnel for aerodynamics research. The feasibility of acquiring acoustic measurements with a phased microphone array was recently explored. Acoustic characterization of the wind tunnel was carried out with a floor-mounted 24-element array and two ceiling-mounted speakers. The minimum speaker level for accurate level measurement was evaluated for various tunnel speeds up to a Mach number of 0.15 and streamwise speaker locations. A variety of post-processing procedures, including conventional beamforming and deconvolutional processing such as TIDY, were used. The speaker measurements, with and without flow, were used to compare actual versus simulated in-flow speaker calibrations. Data for wind-off speaker sound and wind-on tunnel background noise were found valuable for predicting sound levels for which the speakers were detectable when the wind was on. Speaker sources were detectable 2 - 10 dB below the peak background noise level with conventional data processing. The effectiveness of background noise cross-spectral matrix subtraction was assessed and found to improve the detectability of test sound sources by approximately 10 dB over a wide frequency range.

  16. THE PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE EMISSIONS FROM A RESIDENTIAL OIL BOILER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity of emissions from the combustion of home heating oil and the use of residential oil boilers (ROB) is an important health concern. Yet scant physical and chemical information about the emissions from this source are available for dispersion, climate, and source-recep...

  17. Identification of biological markers for better characterization of older subjects with physical frailty and sarcopenia

    PubMed Central

    Fougère, Bertrand; Vellas, Bruno; van Kan, Gabor Abellan; Cesari, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Population aging is rapidly accelerating worldwide; however, longer life expectancy is not the only public health goal. Indeed, extended lifetime involves maintaining function and the capacity of living independently. Sarcopenia and physical frailty are both highly relevant entities with regards to functionality and autonomy of older adults. The concepts and definitions of frailty and sarcopenia have largely been revised over the years. Sarcopenia is an age-related progressive and generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength. On the other hand, frailty is a state of increased vulnerability to stressors, responsible for exposing the older person to enhanced risk of adverse outcomes. Physical frailty and sarcopenia substantially overlap and several adverse outcomes of frailty are likely mediated by sarcopenia. Indeed, the concepts of sarcopenia and physical frailty can be perceived as related to the same target organ (i.e., skeletal muscle) and it may be possible to combine them into a unique definition. The biological background of such a close relationship needs to be explored and clarified as it can potentially provide novel and pivotal insights for the assessment and treatment of these conditions in old age. The aim of this paper is to indicate and discuss possible biological markers to be considered in the framing of physical frailty and sarcopenia. PMID:28123793

  18. Silicon Photomultiplier characterization and radiation damage investigation for high energy particle physics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garutti, E.; Klanner, R.; Laurien, S.; Parygin, P.; Popova, E.; Ramilli, M.; Xu, C.

    2014-03-01

    Within the framework of the CALICE collaboration, our group has characterized Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) from various producers, in order to enhance the single cell performances of a highly granular analog hadron calorimeter, with particular emphasis on improving the linearity of the response, ensuring environmental stability, calibration portability and reducing the parameters spread among the different channels. As an outcome, new plastic scintillator tiles coupled to KETEK PM1125 SMD SiPM have been commissioned, characterized and mounted on calorimeter modules: details and results of the characterization procedure, together with the performances of the new tile and SiPM design will be discussed. The radiation tolerance to X-rays of KETEK PM1125 is also under investigation. The amount and type of damage caused by irradiation of the devices exposed to 3 kGy and 20 MGy doses will be presented.

  19. Isothermal physical aging characterization of Polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) and Polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) films by creep and stress relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yunlong; Bradshaw, Roger D.

    2007-03-01

    This paper considers the experimental characterization of isothermal physical aging of PEEK and PPS films using a dynamic mechanical analyzer. Using the short-term test method established by Struik, momentary creep and stress relaxation curves were measured at several temperatures within 15-35°C below the glass transition temperature ( T g ) at various aging times. Stress and strain levels were such that the materials remained in the linear viscoelastic regime. These curves were then shifted together to determine momentary master curves and shift rates using the PHYAGE program. In order to validate the obtained isothermal physical aging behavior, the results of creep and stress relaxation testing were compared and shown to be consistent with one another using appropriate interconversion of the viscoelastic material functions. Time-temperature superposition of the master curves was also performed. The temperature shift factors and aging shift rates for both PEEK and PPS were consistent for both creep and stress relaxation test results.

  20. Anisotropic physical properties of myocardium characterized by ultrasonic measurements of backscatter, attenuation, and velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Steven L.

    The goal of elucidating the physical mechanisms underlying the propagation of ultrasonic waves in anisotropic soft tissue such as myocardium has posed an interesting and largely unsolved problem in the field of physics for the past 30 years. In part because of the vast complexity of the system being studied, progress towards understanding and modeling the mechanisms that underlie observed acoustic parameters may first require the guidance of careful experiment. Knowledge of the causes of observed ultrasonic properties in soft tissue including attenuation, speed of sound, and backscatter, and how those properties are altered with specific pathophysiologies, may lead to new noninvasive approaches to the diagnosis of disease. The primary aim of this Dissertation is to contribute to an understanding of the physics that underlies the mechanisms responsible for the observed interaction of ultrasound with myocardium. To this end, through-transmission and backscatter measurements were performed by varying acoustic properties as a function of angle of insonification relative to the predominant myofiber direction and by altering the material properties of myocardium by increased protein cross-linking induced by chemical fixation as an extreme form of changes that may occur in certain pathologies such as diabetes. Techniques to estimate acoustic parameters from backscatter were broadened and challenges to implementing these techniques in vivo were addressed. Provided that specific challenges identified in this Dissertation can be overcome, techniques to estimate attenuation from ultrasonic backscatter show promise as a means to investigate the physical interaction of ultrasound with anisotropic biological media in vivo. This Dissertation represents a step towards understanding the physics of the interaction of ultrasonic waves with anisotropic biological media.

  1. Physical and spectral characterization of the human cyclin A gene and its interactions with anthracycline anticancer drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Huixin; Wang, Xiaohui; Yu, Haijia; Fu, Manliang; Qu, Xiaogang; Zheng, Yongchen; Ren, Jinsong

    2007-02-01

    Over expression of cyclin A in human tumors has been linked to cancer by various experimental lines of evidence. However, physical and spectral characterization of the human cyclin A gene and its interactions with anticancer drugs have not been reported. Our gene sequence analysis, singular value decomposition method and melting studies in the presence of antitumor agents, daunomycin, doxorubicin and Hoechst 33258 showed that cyclin A gene had both AT-rich and GC-rich domains. For a ligand with unknown DNA binding specificity, this gene sequence can be used to differentiate its DNA binding preference.

  2. Physical and chemical characterization of residual oil-fired power plant emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although the toxicity of oil combustion emissions is a significant public health concern, few studies characterize the emissions from plant-scale utility boilers firing residual oil. This study remedies that deficiency by sampling and monitoring stack emissions from a 432 Giga Jo...

  3. Characterizing the microscopic physics near moving contact lines using dynamic contact angle data.

    PubMed

    Ramé, E; Garoff, S; Willson, K R

    2004-09-01

    Directly probing the fluid flow and liquid-vapor interface shape in the microscopic immediate vicinity of the moving contact line can only be accomplished in very specific and isolated cases. Yet this physics is critical to macroscopic dynamic wetting. Here we examine the microscopic (or inner) physics of spreading silicone fluids using data of macroscopic dynamic contact angle versus Capillary number Ca=U mu/sigma. This dynamic contact angle is precisely defined so that it can be related back to the microscopic behavior through detailed theory. Our results indicate that the parameters describing the inner region have a detectable dependence on spreading velocity when this velocity exceeds a critical value. This dependence is not scaled (i.e., the data are not collapsed) by Ca, which suggests that an additional time scale must be present in the model of the inner region.

  4. Site Characterization of the Source Physics Experiment Phase II Location Using Seismic Reflection Data

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, Emily; Snelson, Catherine M; Chipman, Veraun D; Emer, Dudley; White, Bob; Emmit, Ryan; Wright, Al; Drellack, Sigmund; Huckins-Gang, Heather; Mercadante, Jennifer; Floyd, Michael; McGowin, Chris; Cothrun, Chris; Bonal, Nedra

    2013-12-05

    An objective of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is to identify low-yield nuclear explosions from a regional distance. Low-yield nuclear explosions can often be difficult to discriminate among the clutter of natural and man-made explosive events (e.g., earthquakes and mine blasts). The SPE is broken into three phases. Phase I has provided the first of the physics-based data to test the empirical models that have been used to discriminate nuclear events. The Phase I series of tests were placed within a highly fractured granite body. The evolution of the project has led to development of Phase II, to be placed within the opposite end member of geology, an alluvium environment, thereby increasing the database of waveforms to build upon in the discrimination models. Both the granite and alluvium sites have hosted nearby nuclear tests, which provide comparisons for the chemical test data. Phase III of the SPE is yet to be determined.

  5. On accurate determination of contact angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.

    1992-01-01

    Methods are proposed that exploit a microgravity environment to obtain highly accurate measurement of contact angle. These methods, which are based on our earlier mathematical results, do not require detailed measurement of a liquid free-surface, as they incorporate discontinuous or nearly-discontinuous behavior of the liquid bulk in certain container geometries. Physical testing is planned in the forthcoming IML-2 space flight and in related preparatory ground-based experiments.

  6. Physical-Chemical Characterization of Nanodispersed Powders Produced by a Plasma-Chemical Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, M.; Vissokov, Grancharov G., IV

    2007-06-01

    This article presents a review on the physical-chemical properties and characteristics of plasma-chemically produced nanodispersed powders (NDP), such as metals, oxides, nitrides, carbides, and catalysts. The plasma-chemical preparation of the powders was carried out in thermal plasma (TP) created by means of high-current electric arcs, plasma jets, high-frequency (HF) discharges, etc. We also discuss certain properties and characteristics of the NDPs, which are determined largely by the conditions of preparation.

  7. A Novel Method for Characterization of Superconductors: Physical Measurements and Modeling of Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, B. F.; Moorjani, K.; Phillips, T. E.; Adrian, F. J.; Bohandy, J.; Dolecek, Q. E.

    1993-01-01

    A method for characterization of granular superconducting thin films has been developed which encompasses both the morphological state of the sample and its fabrication process parameters. The broad scope of this technique is due to the synergism between experimental measurements and their interpretation using numerical simulation. Two novel technologies form the substance of this system: the magnetically modulated resistance method for characterizing superconductors; and a powerful new computer peripheral, the Parallel Information Processor card, which provides enhanced computing capability for PC computers. This enhancement allows PC computers to operate at speeds approaching that of supercomputers. This makes atomic scale simulations possible on low cost machines. The present development of this system involves the integration of these two technologies using mesoscale simulations of thin film growth. A future stage of development will incorporate atomic scale modeling.

  8. Synthesis, characterization and physical properties of Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystalline plasma sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Sordelet

    1995-11-09

    Our lab has been working with plasma spraying of both high pressure gas atomized (HPGA) and cast and crushed quasicrystal powders. A major component of this research includes comparative studies of PAS coatings formed with starting powders prepared by both techniques. In addition, a thorough investigation of the effects of starting powder particle size on coating microstructure is included. During the course of the overall research, an interest developed in forming Al-Cu-Fe materials with finer grain sizes. Therefore, a brief study was performed to characterize the effect of adding boron to Al-Cu-Fe materials prepared by different techniques. In addition to characterizing the microstructural features of the above materials, oxidation and wear behavior was also examined.

  9. Marinosomes, marine lipid-based liposomes: physical characterization and potential application in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Moussaoui, N; Cansell, M; Denizot, A

    2002-08-21

    Marinosomes are liposomes based on a natural marine lipid extract containing a high polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) ratio. They were prepared and characterized in conditions that mimic that of topical application in terms of pH, temperature and calcium. Marinosomes were stable in storage conditions for 1 month. At low pH (pH 4) or in presence of high calcium concentrations (9 mM), complex structural rearrangements, such as aggregation and size reduction, occurred which were kinetically dependant.

  10. Characterization and evaluation physical properties biodegradable plastic composite from seaweed (Eucheuma cottonii)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deni, Glar Donia; Dhaningtyas, Shalihat Afifah; Fajar, Ibnu; Sudarno

    2015-12-01

    The characterization and evaluation of biodegradable plastic composed of a mixture PVA - carrageenan - chitosan was conducted in this study. Obtained data were then compared to commercial biodegradable plastic. Characteristic of plastic was mechanical tested such as tensile - strength and elongation. Plastic degradation was studied using composting method for 7 days and 14 days. The results showed that the increase carrageenan will decrease tensile-strength and elongation plastic composite. In addition, increase carrageenan would increase the degraded plastics composite.

  11. Compatibility, physical stability, and characterization of an IgG4 monoclonal antibody after dilution into different intravenous administration bags.

    PubMed

    Kumru, Ozan S; Liu, Jun; Ji, Junyan A; Cheng, Wilson; Wang, Y John; Wang, Tingting; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Middaugh, C Russell; Volkin, David B

    2012-10-01

    The physical stability of an immunoglobulin G4 monoclonal antibody (mAb) upon dilution into intravenous (i.v.) bags containing 0.9% saline was examined. Soluble aggregates and subvisible particles were observed by size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography (SE-HPLC) and light obscuration when formulated with suboptimal levels of polysorbate 20. The formation of soluble aggregates and particulates was further characterized by a combination of SE-HPLC, nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), microflow-digital imaging (MFI), and turbidity measurements. With sufficient PS20 levels, particle formation was minimized, although quantification of submicron sized particles by NTA was not possible because of the interference from PS20. Intravenous bags composed of polyvinyl chloride caused more protein particle formation than polyolefin bags. Differences between bag types were affected by removing headspace and by transferring the saline solution into glass vials. Characterization studies with Fourier transform infrared microscopy and extrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy demonstrated that isolated particles contained native-like secondary structure with partially altered tertiary structure, compared with heat-denatured and nonstressed controls. Transmission electron microscopy and MFI analysis showed particles had an amorphous morphology of varying sizes. Particles contained some non-native disulfide bond crosslinks, potentially initiated by low levels of free thiol in the native mAb. The critical role of proper formulation design to stabilize proteins against physical instability during i.v. administration is discussed.

  12. Joint learning of ultrasonic backscattering statistical physics and signal confidence primal for characterizing atherosclerotic plaques using intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sheet, Debdoot; Karamalis, Athanasios; Eslami, Abouzar; Noël, Peter; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy; Ray, Ajoy K; Laine, Andrew F; Carlier, Stephane G; Navab, Nassir; Katouzian, Amin

    2014-01-01

    Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS) is a predominant imaging modality in interventional cardiology. It provides real-time cross-sectional images of arteries and assists clinicians to infer about atherosclerotic plaques composition. These plaques are heterogeneous in nature and constitute fibrous tissue, lipid deposits and calcifications. Each of these tissues backscatter ultrasonic pulses and are associated with a characteristic intensity in B-mode IVUS image. However, clinicians are challenged when colocated heterogeneous tissue backscatter mixed signals appearing as non-unique intensity patterns in B-mode IVUS image. Tissue characterization algorithms have been developed to assist clinicians to identify such heterogeneous tissues and assess plaque vulnerability. In this paper, we propose a novel technique coined as Stochastic Driven Histology (SDH) that is able to provide information about co-located heterogeneous tissues. It employs learning of tissue specific ultrasonic backscattering statistical physics and signal confidence primal from labeled data for predicting heterogeneous tissue composition in plaques. We employ a random forest for the purpose of learning such a primal using sparsely labeled and noisy samples. In clinical deployment, the posterior prediction of different lesions constituting the plaque is estimated. Folded cross-validation experiments have been performed with 53 plaques indicating high concurrence with traditional tissue histology. On the wider horizon, this framework enables learning of tissue-energy interaction statistical physics and can be leveraged for promising clinical applications requiring tissue characterization beyond the application demonstrated in this paper.

  13. Rock Physics Characterization of Porous Media Containing Hydrates Formed Out of Solution: Tetrathydrofuran VS. Dissolved Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schicks, J. M.; Rydzy, M. B.; Spangenberg, E.; Batzle, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Methane hydrate formation in sediments from the dissolved gas phase is a tedious and time-consuming task, due to the relatively low solubility of methane in water. A number of studies on physical properties of hydrated sediments have been conducted on sediments containing tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrates instead. The use of THF as a hydrate former is convenient as it forms hydrate at atmospheric pressure and relatively high temperatures of about 277 K. It is completely miscible in water, thus forms hydrate out solution and promises homogeneous synthesis of THF hydrate in sediment. The applicability of THF as a proxy for methane hydrate formed out of solution, however, has often been questioned. To better understand whether THF hydrates represent a legitimate proxy for methane hydrates formed out of solution, ultrasonic velocity and resistivity measurements were performed on hydrated Ottawa Sand F110 sand and glass bead samples in conjunction with imaging techniques, such as micro X-ray computed tomography (MXCT), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thereby the tests were conducted on samples containing hydrates formed both, from methane dissolved in water and with the use of THF. The results show, that in terms of ultrasonic velocities, THF and methane hydrates exhibit the same trend. As the hydrate crystallized in the pore space, no increase in velocity was observed until a critical hydrate saturation of 35-50 percent was exceeded. On the other hand, the bulk electrical resistivity increased with increasing gas hydrate saturation. Comparison with current rock physics models suggested that the gas hydrate formed out of solution in both cases exhibits pore-filling/ load-bearing behavior, i.e. it suggests that the hydrate is formed away from the grains. This was supported through the imaging. This series of measurements provided the first direct comparison of THF and methane hydrates formed out of solution in terms of how their distribution and location in the pore

  14. Physical characterization of water treatment plant residual and top soil mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Raghu, D.; Hsieh, H.N.; Basim, S.C.; Morgan, M.

    1997-12-31

    Disposal of water treatment plant residuals is not economically feasible due to their high moisture contents, high compressibilities and very low shear strengths. This paper evaluates the physical and geotechnical characteristics of water treatment residual-top soil mixtures for beneficial reuse in construction and land application. Index, compaction, consolidation, strength and durability tests were performed in accordance with the relevant ASTM standards. It was observed that the plasticity of the mixtures decreased and handling (compaction) and other engineering characteristics improved due to the addition of top soil to residuals. There is a potential for these mixtures to be used as liner material for landfills.

  15. Identification and characterization of the water gap in physically dormant seeds of Geraniaceae, with special reference to Geranium carolinianum

    PubMed Central

    Gama-Arachchige, N. S.; Baskin, J. M.; Geneve, R. L.; Baskin, C. C.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Physical dormancy in seeds of species of Geraniaceae is caused by a water-impermeable palisade layer in the outer integument of the seed coat and a closed chalaza. The chalazal cleft has been reported to be the water gap (i.e. location of initial water entry) in innately permeable seeds of Geraniaceae. The primary aim of this study was to re-evaluate the location of the water gap and to characterize its morphology and anatomy in physically dormant seeds of Geraniaceae, with particular reference to G. carolinianum. Methods Length, width, mass, anatomy and germination of two seed types (light brown and dark brown) of G. carolinianum were compared. Location, anatomy and morphology of the water gap were characterized using free-hand and microtome tissue sectioning, light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, dye tracking, blocking and seed-burial experiments. Key Results Treatment with dry heat caused a colour change in the palisade cells adjacent to the micropyle. When placed in water, the ‘hinged valve’ (blister) erupted at the site of the colour change, exposing the water gap. The morphology and anatomy in the water-gap region differs from those of the rest of the seed coat. The morphology of the seed coat of the water-gap region is similar in G. carolinianum, G. columbinum, G. molle and G. pusillum and differs from that of the closely related species Erodium cicutarium. Conclusions Dislodgment of swollen ‘hinged valve’ palisade cells adjacent to the micropyle caused the water gap to open in physically dormant seeds of G. carolinianum, and it was clear that initial water uptake takes place through this gap and not via the chalazal opening as previously reported. This water gap (‘hinged valve gap’) differs from water gaps previously described for other families in morphology, anatomy and location in the seed coat. PMID:20400757

  16. Preparation and Characterization of Latex Particles as Potential Physical Shale Stabilizer in Water-Based Drilling Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junyi; Qiu, Zhengsong; Huang, Wei'an; Song, Dingding; Bao, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The poly(styrene-methyl methacrylate) latex particles as potential physical shale stabilizer were successfully synthesized with potassium persulfate as an initiator in isopropanol-water medium. The synthesized latex particles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), particle size distribution measurement (PSD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). FT-IR and TGA analysis confirmed that the latex particles were prepared by polymerization of styrene and methyl methacrylate and maintained good thermal stability. TEM and PSD analysis indicated that the spherical latex particles possessed unimodal distribution from 80 nm to 345 nm with the D90 value of 276 nm. The factors influencing particle size distribution (PSD) of latex particles were also discussed in detail. The interaction between latex particles and natural shale cores was investigated quantitatively via pore pressure transmission tests. The results indicated that the latex particles as potential physical shale stabilizer could be deformable to bridge and seal the nanopores and microfractures of shale to reduce the shale permeability and prevent pore pressure transmission. What is more, the latex particles as potential physical shale stabilizer work synergistically with chemical shale stabilizer to impart superior shale stability. PMID:25302336

  17. Preparation and characterization of latex particles as potential physical shale stabilizer in water-based drilling fluids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junyi; Qiu, Zhengsong; Huang, Wei'an; Song, Dingding; Bao, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The poly(styrene-methyl methacrylate) latex particles as potential physical shale stabilizer were successfully synthesized with potassium persulfate as an initiator in isopropanol-water medium. The synthesized latex particles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), particle size distribution measurement (PSD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). FT-IR and TGA analysis confirmed that the latex particles were prepared by polymerization of styrene and methyl methacrylate and maintained good thermal stability. TEM and PSD analysis indicated that the spherical latex particles possessed unimodal distribution from 80 nm to 345 nm with the D90 value of 276 nm. The factors influencing particle size distribution (PSD) of latex particles were also discussed in detail. The interaction between latex particles and natural shale cores was investigated quantitatively via pore pressure transmission tests. The results indicated that the latex particles as potential physical shale stabilizer could be deformable to bridge and seal the nanopores and microfractures of shale to reduce the shale permeability and prevent pore pressure transmission. What is more, the latex particles as potential physical shale stabilizer work synergistically with chemical shale stabilizer to impart superior shale stability.

  18. Co-Simulation Platform For Characterizing Cyber Attacks in Cyber Physical Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sadi, Mohammad A. H.; Ali, Mohammad Hassan; Dasgupta, Dipankar; Abercrombie, Robert K; Kher, Shubhalaxmi

    2015-01-01

    Smart grid is a complex cyber physical system containing a numerous and variety of sources, devices, controllers and loads. Communication/Information infrastructure is the backbone of the smart grid system where different grid components are connected with each other through this structure. Therefore, the drawbacks of the information technology related issues are also becoming a part of the smart grid. Further, smart grid is also vulnerable to the grid related disturbances. For such a dynamic system, disturbance and intrusion detection is a paramount issue. This paper presents a Simulink and OPNET based co-simulated test bed to carry out a cyber-intrusion in a cyber-network for modern power systems and smart grid. The effect of the cyber intrusion on the physical power system is also presented. The IEEE 30 bus power system model is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the simulated testbed. The experiments were performed by disturbing the circuit breakers reclosing time through a cyber-attack in the cyber network. Different disturbance situations in the proposed test system are considered and the results indicate the effectiveness of the proposed co-simulated scheme.

  19. Preparation and characterization of azithromycin--Aerosil 200 solid dispersions with enhanced physical stability.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuechao; Peng, Huanhuan; Tian, Bin; Gou, Jingxin; Yao, Qing; Tao, Xiaoguang; He, Haibing; Zhang, Yu; Tang, Xing; Cai, Cuifang

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of azithromycin (AZI)--Aerosil 200 solid dispersions specifically with high stability under accelerated condition (40 °C/75% RH). Ball milling (BM) and hot-melt extrusion (HME) were used to prepare AZI solid dispersions. The physical properties of solid dispersions were evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). For solid dispersions prepared with both methods, no crystalline of AZI was detected (except for AZI: Aerosil 200=75:25) by DSC or PXRD, indicating the amorphous state of AZI in solid dispersions. The FT-IR results demonstrated the loss of crystallization water and the formation of hydrogen bonds between Aerosil 200 and AZI during the preparation of solid dispersions. After 4 weeks storage under accelerated condition, the degree of crystallinity of AZI increased in solid dispersions prepared by BM, whereas for solid dispersions containing AZI, Aerosil 200 and glyceryl behenate (GB) prepared by HME, no crystalline of AZI was identified. This high stability can be attributed to the hydrophobic properties of GB and the presence of hydrogen bonds. Based on the above results, it is inferred the protection of hydrogen bonds between AZI and Aerosil 200 formed during preparation process effectively inhibited the recrystallization of AZI and improved the physical stability of amorphous AZI in the presence of Aerosil 200.

  20. Plasma Assisted Growth of MoNi Thin Films and Its Physical Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorannevis, Zohreh; Akbarnejad, Elaheh; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood

    2016-09-01

    In this paper effects of a RF power and a deposition time on physical properties of Mo-Ni films were studied systematically. Deposition of Mo-Ni film is performed using RF magnetron sputtering system on soda lime glass. Argon gas is used to sputter the atoms of Mo and Ni from Mo-Ni target. Structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of the films are studied using X-ray diffractometer (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), spectrophotometer and four point probe, respectively. We found that by increasing the RF power, structure of the film can change from Mo to Mo-Ni, which is due to the higher sputtering yield of the Ni at higher RF powers. On the other hand, changing the deposition time also affected the physical properties of the Mo-Ni films. By increasing the deposition time crystalline structure significantly improved and the resistivity of the films decreased as a result of higher content of the Ni atoms amount.

  1. Chemical, physical, and in vitro characterization of research cigarettes containing denicotinized tobacco.

    PubMed

    Coffa, Bonnie G; Coggins, Christopher R E; Werley, Michael S; Oldham, Michael J; Fariss, Marc W

    2016-08-01

    The use of very low nicotine tobacco cigarettes is currently being investigated as a possible harm reduction strategy. Here, we report the smoke chemistry, toxicity, and physical characteristics of very low nicotine cigarettes that were made using blended tobacco processed through a supercritical CO2 fluid extraction, which resulted in elimination of 96% of nicotine content (denicotinized (denic) tobacco). Three types of test cigarettes (TCs) were manufactured with tobacco filler containing 100% denic tobacco (TC100), 50% denic tobacco and 50% unextracted tobacco (TC50/50), and 100% unextracted tobacco (TC0). Mainstream smoke (MS) was generated for measurement of 46 analytes and cytotoxicity and mutagenicity determination. Analysis of physical characteristics of TCs demonstrated they were well made with <5% variability among cigarettes for most parameters measured. We observed significant changes in the levels of smoke constituents, including decreases in formaldehyde, nitrosamines, and phenol, and increases in aliphatic hydrocarbons, aliphatic nitrogen compounds, aromatic amines, halogen compounds, and metals. Use of denic tobacco resulted in changes in the chemical composition of MS, but these changes did not modify biological activity as measured in the mutagenicity and cytotoxicity assays.

  2. Physical modeling and characterization of the halo phenomenon in night vision goggles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul J.; Allison, Robert S.; Carr, Peter; Shen, Edward; Jennings, Sion; Macuda, Todd; Craig, Greg; Hornsey, Richard

    2005-05-01

    When a bright light source is viewed through Night Vision Goggles (NVG), the image of the source can appear enveloped in a "halo" that is much larger than the "weak-signal" point spread function of the NVG. The halo phenomenon was investigated in order to produce an accurate model of NVG performance for use in psychophysical experiments. Halos were created and measured under controlled laboratory conditions using representative Generation III NVGs. To quantitatively measure halo characteristics, the NVG eyepiece was replaced by a CMOS imager. Halo size and intensity were determined from camera images as functions of point-source intensity and ambient scene illumination. Halo images were captured over a wide range of source radiances (7 orders of magnitude) and then processed with standard analysis tools to yield spot characteristics. The spot characteristics were analyzed to verify our proposed parametric model of NVG halo event formation. The model considered the potential effects of many subsystems of the NVG in the generation of halo: objective lens, photocathode, image intensifier, fluorescent screen and image guide. A description of the halo effects and the model parameters are contained in this work, along with a qualitative rationale for some of the parameter choices.

  3. Identification and characterization of a novel Fusobacterium nucleatum adhesin involved in physical interaction and biofilm formation with Streptococcus gordonii.

    PubMed

    Lima, Bruno P; Shi, Wenyuan; Lux, Renate

    2017-02-07

    To successfully colonize the oral cavity, bacteria must directly or indirectly adhere to available oral surfaces. Fusobacterium nucleatum plays an important role in oral biofilm community development due to its broad adherence abilities, serving as a bridge between members of the oral biofilm that cannot directly bind to each other. In our efforts to characterize the molecular mechanisms utilized by F. nucleatum to physically bind to key members of the oral community, we investigated the involvement of F. nucleatum outer membrane proteins in its ability to bind to the pioneer biofilm colonizer, Streptococcus gordonii. Here, we present evidence that in addition to the previously characterized fusobacterial adhesin RadD, the interaction between F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 and S. gordonii V288 involves a second outer membrane protein, which we named coaggregation mediating protein A (CmpA). We also characterized the role of CmpA in dual-species biofilm formation with S. gordonii V288, evaluated growth-phase-dependent as well as biofilm expression profiles of radD and cmpA, and confirmed an important role for CmpA, especially under biofilm growth conditions. Our findings underscore the complex set of specific interactions involved in physical binding and thus community integration of interacting bacterial species. This complex set of interactions could have critical implications for the formation and maturation of the oral biofilms in vivo, and could provide clues to the mechanism behind the distribution of organisms inside the human oral cavity.

  4. Physics-electrical hybrid model for real time impedance matching and remote plasma characterization in RF plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sudhir, Dass Bandyopadhyay, M.; Chakraborty, A.

    2016-02-15

    Plasma characterization and impedance matching are an integral part of any radio frequency (RF) based plasma source. In long pulse operation, particularly in high power operation where plasma load may vary due to different reasons (e.g. pressure and power), online tuning of impedance matching circuit and remote plasma density estimation are very useful. In some cases, due to remote interfaces, radio activation and, due to maintenance issues, power probes are not allowed to be incorporated in the ion source design for plasma characterization. Therefore, for characterization and impedance matching, more remote schemes are envisaged. Two such schemes by the same authors are suggested in these regards, which are based on air core transformer model of inductive coupled plasma (ICP) [M. Bandyopadhyay et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 033017 (2015); D. Sudhir et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013510 (2014)]. However, the influence of the RF field interaction with the plasma to determine its impedance, a physics code HELIC [D. Arnush, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3042 (2000)] is coupled with the transformer model. This model can be useful for both types of RF sources, i.e., ICP and helicon sources.

  5. Physics-electrical hybrid model for real time impedance matching and remote plasma characterization in RF plasma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhir, Dass; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Chakraborty, A.

    2016-02-01

    Plasma characterization and impedance matching are an integral part of any radio frequency (RF) based plasma source. In long pulse operation, particularly in high power operation where plasma load may vary due to different reasons (e.g. pressure and power), online tuning of impedance matching circuit and remote plasma density estimation are very useful. In some cases, due to remote interfaces, radio activation and, due to maintenance issues, power probes are not allowed to be incorporated in the ion source design for plasma characterization. Therefore, for characterization and impedance matching, more remote schemes are envisaged. Two such schemes by the same authors are suggested in these regards, which are based on air core transformer model of inductive coupled plasma (ICP) [M. Bandyopadhyay et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 033017 (2015); D. Sudhir et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013510 (2014)]. However, the influence of the RF field interaction with the plasma to determine its impedance, a physics code HELIC [D. Arnush, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3042 (2000)] is coupled with the transformer model. This model can be useful for both types of RF sources, i.e., ICP and helicon sources.

  6. Physics-electrical hybrid model for real time impedance matching and remote plasma characterization in RF plasma sources.

    PubMed

    Sudhir, Dass; Bandyopadhyay, M; Chakraborty, A

    2016-02-01

    Plasma characterization and impedance matching are an integral part of any radio frequency (RF) based plasma source. In long pulse operation, particularly in high power operation where plasma load may vary due to different reasons (e.g. pressure and power), online tuning of impedance matching circuit and remote plasma density estimation are very useful. In some cases, due to remote interfaces, radio activation and, due to maintenance issues, power probes are not allowed to be incorporated in the ion source design for plasma characterization. Therefore, for characterization and impedance matching, more remote schemes are envisaged. Two such schemes by the same authors are suggested in these regards, which are based on air core transformer model of inductive coupled plasma (ICP) [M. Bandyopadhyay et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 033017 (2015); D. Sudhir et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013510 (2014)]. However, the influence of the RF field interaction with the plasma to determine its impedance, a physics code HELIC [D. Arnush, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3042 (2000)] is coupled with the transformer model. This model can be useful for both types of RF sources, i.e., ICP and helicon sources.

  7. Metal ions modulate thermal aggregation of beta-lactoglobulin: a joint chemical and physical characterization.

    PubMed

    Navarra, Giovanna; Tinti, Anna; Di Foggia, Michele; Leone, Maurizio; Militello, Valeria; Torreggiani, Armida

    2014-08-01

    Molecular basis of the role played by Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) ions during the thermal aggregation processes of beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) was studied by using a joint application of different techniques. In particular, Raman spectroscopy was very useful in identifying the different effects caused by the two metals at molecular level (i.e. changes in His protonation state, disulfides bridge conformation, and micro-environment of aromatic residues), evidencing the primary importance of the protein charge distribution during the aggregation process. Both metal ions are able to act on this factor and favor the protein aggregation, but Zn(2+) is able to alter the natural conformational state of BLG, causing a slight unfolding, whereas Cu(2+) ions play a role only during the thermal treatment. Thus, Zn(2+) ions favor the formation of bigger aggregates and branched fibril-like structures, whereas for Cu(2+) ions a greater number of cross-beta structures during thermal incubation and finally, fibrillar structures. The aggregation process occurs in two phases, as suggested by the measurements on the time evolution of the BLG aggregates: the first one is characterized by a partial unfolding of the protein and aggregate growth, forming oligomers and protofibrils, whereas the second one is characterized by further supramolecular assembly, leading to the formation of fibrils.

  8. Physical and chemical characterization of airborne particles from welding operations in automotive plants.

    PubMed

    Dasch, Jean; D'Arcy, James

    2008-07-01

    Airborne particles were characterized from six welding operations in three automotive plants, including resistance spot welding, metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of aluminum and resistance spot welding, MIG welding and weld-through sealer of galvanized steel. Particle levels were measured throughout the process area to select a sampling location, followed by intensive particle sampling over one working shift. Temporal trends were measured, and particles were collected on filters to characterize their size and chemistry. In all cases, the particles fell into a bimodal size distribution with very large particles >20 mum in diameter, possibly emitted as spatter or metal expulsions, and very small particles about 1 mum in diameter, possibly formed from condensation of vaporized metal. The mass median aerodynamic diameter was about 1 mum, with only about 7% of the particle mass present as ultrafine particles <100 nm. About half the mass of aluminum welding particles could be accounted for by chemical analysis, with the remainder possibly present as oxygen. Predominant species were organic carbon, elemental carbon, iron, and aluminum. More than 80% of the particle mass could be accounted for from steel welding, primarily present as iron, organic carbon, zinc, and copper. Particle concentrations and elemental concentrations were compared with allowable concentrations as recommended by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. In all cases, workplace levels were at least 11 times lower than recommended levels.

  9. Physical characterization and in silico modeling of inulin polymer conformation during vaccine adjuvant particle formation.

    PubMed

    Barclay, Thomas G; Rajapaksha, Harinda; Thilagam, Alagu; Qian, Gujie; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Cooper, Peter D; Gerson, Andrea; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2016-06-05

    This study combined physical data from synchrotron SAXS, FTIR and microscopy with in-silico molecular structure predictions and mathematical modeling to examine inulin adjuvant particle formation and structure. The results show that inulin polymer chains adopt swollen random coil in solution. As precipitation occurs from solution, interactions between the glucose end group of one chain and a fructose group of an adjacent chain help drive organized assembly, initially forming inulin ribbons with helical organization of the chains orthogonal to the long-axis of the ribbon. Subsequent aggregation of the ribbons results in the layered semicrystalline particles previously shown to act as potent vaccine adjuvants. γ-Inulin adjuvant particles consist of crystalline layers 8.5 nm thick comprising helically organized inulin chains orthogonal to the plane of the layer. These crystalline layers alternate with amorphous layers 2.4 nm thick, to give overall particle crystallinity of 78%.

  10. Characterization of bead trajectories through the draft tube of a turbine physical model

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, M. A.; Mueller, R. P.; Carlson, T. J.; Deng, Z. D.; McKinstry, C. A.

    2005-02-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) makes extensive use of 1:25 scale Plexiglass models of hydroelectric turbines along the Columbia River to study turbine hydraulic performance and to identify potential hazards for fish passing through the turbines. Plastic beads are sent through the models and imaging has been done with laser Doppler velocimetry and high-speed videography to measure flow field variables and to study the probable paths of fish through the turbine units. Understanding has been limited by the lack of data showing actual bead trajectories in three dimensions (3-D) and the lack of quantified velocity, acceleration, and other kinematics describing the trajectories of beads as they pass through the physical models.

  11. Characterization of fluid physics effects on cardiovascular response to microgravity (G-572)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pantalos, George M.; Bennett, Thomas E.; Sharp, M. Keith; Woodruff, Stewart; Oleary, Sean; Gillars, Kevin; Lemon, Mark; Sojka, Jan

    1995-01-01

    The investigation of cardiovascular adaptation to space flight has seen substantial advancement in the last several years. In-flight echocardiographic measurements of astronaut cardiac function on the Space Shuttle have documented an initial increase, followed by a progressive reduction in both left ventricular volume index and stroke volume with a compensatory increase in heart rate to maintain cardiac output. To date, the reduced cardiac size and stroke volume have been presumed to be the consequence of the reduction in circulating fluid volume within a few days after orbital insertion. However, no specific mechanism for the reduced stroke volume has been identified. The following investigation proposes the use of a hydraulic model of the cardiovascular system to examine the possibility that the observed reduction in stroke volume may, in part, be related to fluid physics effects on heart function. The automated model is being prepared to fly as a Get Away Special (GAS) payload within the next year.

  12. Physical, chemical and biological characterization of six biochars produced for the remediation of contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Denyes, Mackenzie J; Parisien, Michèle A; Rutter, Allison; Zeeb, Barbara A

    2014-11-28

    The physical and chemical properties of biochar vary based on feedstock sources and production conditions, making it possible to engineer biochars with specific functions (e.g. carbon sequestration, soil quality improvements, or contaminant sorption). In 2013, the International Biochar Initiative (IBI) made publically available their Standardized Product Definition and Product Testing Guidelines (Version 1.1) which set standards for physical and chemical characteristics for biochar. Six biochars made from three different feedstocks and at two temperatures were analyzed for characteristics related to their use as a soil amendment. The protocol describes analyses of the feedstocks and biochars and includes: cation exchange capacity (CEC), specific surface area (SSA), organic carbon (OC) and moisture percentage, pH, particle size distribution, and proximate and ultimate analysis. Also described in the protocol are the analyses of the feedstocks and biochars for contaminants including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), metals and mercury as well as nutrients (phosphorous, nitrite and nitrate and ammonium as nitrogen). The protocol also includes the biological testing procedures, earthworm avoidance and germination assays. Based on the quality assurance / quality control (QA/QC) results of blanks, duplicates, standards and reference materials, all methods were determined adequate for use with biochar and feedstock materials. All biochars and feedstocks were well within the criterion set by the IBI and there were little differences among biochars, except in the case of the biochar produced from construction waste materials. This biochar (referred to as Old biochar) was determined to have elevated levels of arsenic, chromium, copper, and lead, and failed the earthworm avoidance and germination assays. Based on these results, Old biochar would not be appropriate for use as a soil amendment for carbon sequestration, substrate quality

  13. Physical, Chemical and Biological Characterization of Six Biochars Produced for the Remediation of Contaminated Sites

    PubMed Central

    Denyes, Mackenzie J.; Parisien, Michèle A.; Rutter, Allison; Zeeb, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    The physical and chemical properties of biochar vary based on feedstock sources and production conditions, making it possible to engineer biochars with specific functions (e.g. carbon sequestration, soil quality improvements, or contaminant sorption). In 2013, the International Biochar Initiative (IBI) made publically available their Standardized Product Definition and Product Testing Guidelines (Version 1.1) which set standards for physical and chemical characteristics for biochar. Six biochars made from three different feedstocks and at two temperatures were analyzed for characteristics related to their use as a soil amendment. The protocol describes analyses of the feedstocks and biochars and includes: cation exchange capacity (CEC), specific surface area (SSA), organic carbon (OC) and moisture percentage, pH, particle size distribution, and proximate and ultimate analysis. Also described in the protocol are the analyses of the feedstocks and biochars for contaminants including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), metals and mercury as well as nutrients (phosphorous, nitrite and nitrate and ammonium as nitrogen). The protocol also includes the biological testing procedures, earthworm avoidance and germination assays. Based on the quality assurance / quality control (QA/QC) results of blanks, duplicates, standards and reference materials, all methods were determined adequate for use with biochar and feedstock materials. All biochars and feedstocks were well within the criterion set by the IBI and there were little differences among biochars, except in the case of the biochar produced from construction waste materials. This biochar (referred to as Old biochar) was determined to have elevated levels of arsenic, chromium, copper, and lead, and failed the earthworm avoidance and germination assays. Based on these results, Old biochar would not be appropriate for use as a soil amendment for carbon sequestration, substrate quality

  14. Crystal growth and physical characterization of picolinic acid cocrystallized with dicarboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somphon, Weenawan; Haller, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical cocrystals are multicomponent materials containing an active pharmaceutical ingredient with another component in well-defined stoichiometry within the same unit cell. Such cocrystals are important in drug design, particularly for improving physicochemical properties such as solubility, bioavailability, or chemical stability. Picolinic acid is an endogenous metabolite of tryptophan and is widely used for neuroprotective, immunological, and anti-proliferative effects within the body. In this paper we present cocrystallization experiments of a series of dicarboxylic acids, oxalic acid, succinic acid, DL-tartaric acid, pimelic acid, and phthalic acid, with picolinic acid. Characterization by FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, DSC and TG/DTG analysis, and X-ray powder diffraction show that new compounds are formed, including a 1:1 picolinium tartrate monohydrate, a 2:1 monohydrate adduct of picolinic acid and oxalic acid, and a 2:1 picolinic acid-succinic acid monohydrate cocrystal.

  15. Preparation, physical-chemical characterization, and cytocompatibility of polymeric calcium phosphate cements.

    PubMed

    Khashaba, Rania M; Moussa, Mervet; Koch, Christopher; Jurgensen, Arthur R; Missimer, David M; Rutherford, Ronny L; Chutkan, Norman B; Borke, James L

    2011-01-01

    Aim. Physicochemical mechanical and in vitro biological properties of novel formulations of polymeric calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) were investigated. Methods. Monocalcium phosphate, calcium oxide, and synthetic hydroxyapatite were combined with either modified polyacrylic acid, light activated polyalkenoic acid, or polymethyl vinyl ether maleic acid to obtain Types I, II, and III CPCs. Setting time, compressive and diametral strength of CPCs was compared with zinc polycarboxylate cement (control). Specimens were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. In vitro cytotoxicity of CPCs and control was assessed. Results. X-ray diffraction analysis showed hydroxyapatite, monetite, and brushite. Acid-base reaction was confirmed by the appearance of stretching peaks in IR spectra of set cements. SEM revealed rod-like crystals and platy crystals. Setting time of cements was 5-12 min. Type III showed significantly higher strength values compared to control. Type III yielded high biocompatibility. Conclusions. Type III CPCs show promise for dental applications.

  16. Physical and chemical characterization of adsorbed protein onto gold electrode functionalized with Tunisian coral and nacre.

    PubMed

    Hamza, Samir; Bouchemi, Meryem; Slimane, Noureddine; Azari, Zitouni

    2013-01-01

    Bone substitutes are more and more used in bone surgery because of their biologic safety, clinic efficiency and facility to synthesize. Bone substitutes with active osteogenic properties, associating biomaterials with organic macromolecule components of the extracellular matrix (protein, GAG) are recommended. Nevertheless, we should have a simple technique to control interactions between proteins and the material. Natural coral and nacre have been found to be impressive bone graft substitutes. In this work, we characterize nacre and coral powder using energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). We used electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy to evaluate bovine serum albumin (BSA) as model protein, adsorbed to these biomaterial surfaces. In order to understand the nacre/coral-protein interfacial compatibility, it is necessary to investigate the wettability.

  17. Epoxidized natural rubber toughened aqueous resole type liquefied EFB resin: Physical and chemical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amran, Umar Adli; Zakaria, Sarani; Chia, Chin Hua

    2013-11-01

    A preliminary study on the reaction between aqueous resole type resinified liquefied palm oil empty fruit bunches fibres (RLEFB) with epoxidized natural rubber (ENR). Liquefaction of empty fruit bunches (EFB) is carried out at different ratio of phenol to EFB (P:EFB). Resole type phenolic resin is prepared using sodium hydroxide (NaOH) as the catalyst with the ratio of liquefied EFB (LEFB) to formaldehyde (LEFB:F) of 1:1.8. 50% epoxidation of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR-50) is used to react with resole resin by mixing with ENR with aqueous resole resin. The cured resin is characterized with FT-IR and SEM. Aqueous system have been found to be unsuitable medium in the reaction between resin and ENR. This system produced a highly porous product when RLEFB/ENR resin is cured.

  18. Preparation, characterization, physical properties, and photoconducting behaviour of anthracene derivative nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jinchong; Yin, Zongyou; Yang, Bo; Liu, Yi; Ji, Li; Guo, Jun; Huang, Ling; Liu, Xuewei; Yan, Qingyu; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Qichun

    2011-11-01

    Organic nanowires of 9,10-dibromoanthracene (DBA) and 9,10-dicyanoanthracene (DCNA) were obtained by adding the THF solution of DBA/DCNA into water containing P123 surfactants. The as-prepared nanowires were characterized by UV-vis, fluorescence spectra, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). We found that DBA and DCNA nanowires emitted green light rather than blue light for molecules in THF solution. The red-shift UV and fluorescent spectra of DBA and DCNA nanowires implied that these nanowires were formed through J-aggregation. The photoconducting study of DBA/DCNA nanowire-based network on rGO/SiO2/Si shows different photocurrent behaviors upon irradiation, which displayed that electron transfer from DCNA nanowire to rGO was stronger than that of DBA nanowires to rGO.Organic nanowires of 9,10-dibromoanthracene (DBA) and 9,10-dicyanoanthracene (DCNA) were obtained by adding the THF solution of DBA/DCNA into water containing P123 surfactants. The as-prepared nanowires were characterized by UV-vis, fluorescence spectra, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). We found that DBA and DCNA nanowires emitted green light rather than blue light for molecules in THF solution. The red-shift UV and fluorescent spectra of DBA and DCNA nanowires implied that these nanowires were formed through J-aggregation. The photoconducting study of DBA/DCNA nanowire-based network on rGO/SiO2/Si shows different photocurrent behaviors upon irradiation, which displayed that electron transfer from DCNA nanowire to rGO was stronger than that of DBA nanowires to rGO. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: XRD patterns and simulations, and FT-IR spectra. CCDC reference numbers 840471. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10655d

  19. Rock Valley Source Physics Experiment Preparation: Earthquake Relocation and Attenuation Structure Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, M. L.; Walter, W. R.; Myers, S.; Pasyanos, M. E.; Smith, K. D.

    2012-12-01

    The science of nuclear test monitoring relies on seismic methods to distinguish explosion from earthquakes sources. Unfortunately, the physics behind how an explosion generates seismic waves, particularly shear waves, remains incompletely understood. The Source Physics Experiments (SPE) are an ongoing series of chemical explosions designed to address this problem and advance explosion monitoring physics and associated simulation codes. The current series of explosions are located in the Climax Stock granite on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). A future candidate for the SPEs would allow us to make a direct comparison of earthquake and explosion sources by detonating an explosion at a well constrained earthquake hypocenter and recording the resulting signals from each source at common receivers. This possibility arises from an area of unusually shallow seismicity in the Rock Valley area of the southern NNSS. While most tectonic earthquakes occur at depths greater than 5 km, a sequence of unusually shallow earthquakes with depths of 1-2 km occurred in Rock Valley in May of 1993. The main shock had a magnitude of approximately 3.7 and 11 more events in the sequence had magnitudes over 2. The shallow depths of these events were well constrained by temporary stations deployed at the time by the University of Nevada-Reno (UNR). As part of a feasibility study for a future Rock Valley SPE, LLNL, UNR and NSTec are working to re-instrument and improve our understanding of the Rock Valley region. Rock Valley is a complex set of left oblique-slip segmented fault blocks; it is a regular source region for small magnitude shallow earthquakes. A dense seismic network was operated in the southern NNSS through the Yucca Mountain project (1992-2010). Although much of the older network has been removed, six new Rock Valley telemetered seismic stations located at both original 1993 sites and additional sites, have been installed and operating since early 2011. In order to

  20. Optical and physical characterization of "Iraqi freedom" dust storm, a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Thuraya M.; Al-Dashti, Hassan

    2011-05-01

    Kuwait was exposed to a severe dust storm on 19 March 2003, the eve of operation "Iraqi Freedom". Three days of dust events (19, 26, 27 March) were analyzed for their aerosol optical and physical properties using ground-based and satellite-retrieved measurements. Ground-based measurements of aerosol optical depth (or thickness; AOD or AOT) at 675 nm, τ 657, Ångstrom coefficient α 936/657, particulate matter of diameter 10 μm or less, PM10 (μg/m3), and meteorological parameters were analyzed for March 2003. AOT exceeded 3 for the 3 days of interest and PM10 concentrations reached as high value as 2,457 μg/m3 on 19 March dust storm day. Retrieved aerosol characteristics from space using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) on board Terra and Aqua satellite were examined against ground-based measurements. A strong correlation was found between ground-based measurements of τ 675 and the Terra-MODIS retrieved AOD550. The synoptic of the dust storm were analyzed and source regions were identified using back trajectory analysis and Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer Aerosol Index.

  1. Physical characterization and recovery of corroded fingerprint impressions from postblast copper pipe bomb fragments.

    PubMed

    Bond, John W; Brady, Thomas F

    2013-05-01

    Pipe bombs made from 1 mm thick copper pipe were detonated with a low explosive power powder. Analysis of the physical characteristics of fragments revealed that the copper had undergone work hardening with an increased Vickers Hardness of 107HV1 compared with 80HV1 for unexploded copper pipe. Mean plastic strain prior to fracture was calculated at 0.28 showing evidence of both plastic deformation and wall thinning. An examination of the external surface showed microfractures running parallel with the length of the pipe at approximately 100 μm intervals and 1-2 μm in width. Many larger fragments had folded "inside out" making the original outside surface inaccessible and difficult to fold back through work hardening. A visual examination for fingerprint corrosion revealed ridge details on several fragments that were enhanced by selective digital mapping of colors reflected from the surface of the copper. One of these fingerprints was identified partially to the original donor.

  2. Characterization of PbWO4 crystals for high-energy physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M. J.; Park, H.; Kim, H. J.

    2016-09-01

    High-energy physics (HEP) experiments have employed many new types of scintillators. Specifically, bismuth germanate, thallium-doped cesium iodide, and lead tungstate (PbWO4, PWO) have been used for the L3 experiment; CLEO II, Belle and BES-III; and CMS, respectively. PWO has particularly beneficial properties, such as high density, fast decay time, short radiation length and radiation hardness. In this study, we tested the PWO crystals at low temperatures to determine their applicability in future calorimeters. Various crystals from the Proton Antiproton Annihilations at Darmstadt (PANDA) experiment in Giessen, the Bogoroditsk Techno-Chemical Plant (BTCP) in Russia and by Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (SICCAS) in China were investigated. We studied the scintillation properties of PWO crystals, such as their X-ray luminescence, relative light yields, absolute light yields, energy resolutions, decay times and longitudinal uniformities of their light yields. In addition, we measured the temperature dependences of the light yields and decay times by using a 137Cs γ-ray source. The emission spectra of the PWO crystals consisted of a broad band from 350 nm to 700 nm, and the peak emission wavelength in each spectrum was 420 nm. The emission spectra of the PWO crystals from SICCAS were slightly shifted to longer wavelengths compared with those of the crystals from the other institutions.

  3. Physical characterization and osteogenic activity of the quaternized chitosan-loaded PMMA bone cement.

    PubMed

    Tan, Honglue; Guo, Shengrong; Yang, Shengbing; Xu, Xiaofen; Tang, Tingting

    2012-07-01

    Gentamicin-loaded polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), widely used for primary cemented arthroplasty and revision surgery for preventing or treating infections, may lead to the evolution of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and dysfunction of osteogenic cells, which further influence the osteointegration of bone cement. In a previous study, we reported that a new quaternized chitosan derivative (hydroxypropyltrimethyl ammonium chloride chitosan, HACC) that was loaded into PMMA significantly inhibited the formation of biofilms caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus strains. In the present study, we further investigated the surface morphology, hydrophilicity, apatite formation ability and osteogenic activity of HACC-loaded PMMA. Chitosan-loaded PMMA, gentamicin-loaded PMMA and PMMA without antibiotic were also investigated and compared. The results showed that, compared to other PMMA-based cements, HACC-loaded PMMA had improved properties such as a lower polymerization temperature, prolonged setting time, porous structures after immersion in phosphate-buffered saline, higher hydrophilicity, more apatite formation on the surface after immersion in simulated body fluid, and better attachment and spreading of the human-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. We also found better stem cell proliferation, osteogenic differentiation, and osteogenesis-associated genes expression on the surface of the HACC-loaded PMMA compared to the gentamicin-loaded PMMA. Therefore, this new anti-infective bone cement had improved physical properties and osteogenic activity, which may lead to better osteointegration of the bone cement in cemented arthroplasty.

  4. Physical and chemical characterization of biochars derived from different agricultural residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindo, K.; Mizumoto, H.; Sawada, Y.; Sanchez-Monedero, M. A.; Sonoki, T.

    2014-12-01

    Biochar is widely recognized as an efficient tool for carbon sequestration and soil fertility. The understanding of its chemical and physical properties, which are strongly related to the type of the initial material used and pyrolysis conditions, is crucial to identify the most suitable application of biochar in soil. A selection of organic wastes with different characteristics (e.g., rice husk (RH), rice straw (RS), wood chips of apple tree (Malus pumila) (AB), and oak tree (Quercus serrata) (OB)) were pyrolyzed at different temperatures (400, 500, 600, 700, and 800 °C) in order to optimize the physicochemical properties of biochar as a soil amendment. Low-temperature pyrolysis produced high biochar yields; in contrast, high-temperature pyrolysis led to biochars with a high C content, large surface area, and high adsorption characteristics. Biochar obtained at 600 °C leads to a high recalcitrant character, whereas that obtained at 400 °C retains volatile and easily labile compounds. The biochar obtained from rice materials (RH and RS) showed a high yield and unique chemical properties because of the incorporation of silica elements into its chemical structure. The biochar obtained from wood materials (AB and OB) showed high carbon content and a high absorption character.

  5. Methods of micro- and nanoindentation for characterization of local physical and mechanical properties of multiphase materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyurin, Alexander I.; Victorov, Sergey D.; Kochanov, Alexey N.; Shuklinov, Alexey V.; Pirozhkova, Tatyana S.

    2016-11-01

    Processes of local deformation and fracture of the surface of a number of rocks (ferruginous quartzite, granite, marble, serpentine, anthracite, sandstone) are studied by means of micro- and nanoindentation under high local loadings. Numerical values of elastic, plastic and strength (hardness, Young's modulus, fracture toughness, etc.) properties of rock specimens are defined in a wide range of loads and indentation depth h (from 10 nm to 50 µm). The influence of size effects on hardness is studied, including in other physical and mechanical properties of individual phases and interphase boundaries of a wide range of rocks. Moreover, nonmonotonic dependences of hardness of certain mineral components of studied rock specimens are identified on the micro- and nanoscale. It is found that the hardness of individual mineral phases naturally increases with decreasing indentation depth up to 60-120 nm depending on the type of a rock specimen and the phase type, and then begins falling. Values of the coefficient of fracture toughness, separate mineral phases and interphase fusion boundaries of different types are identified. It is revealed that hematite in ferruginous quartzite has the greatest value of the fracture toughness factor while anthracite has the lowest one. The strongest ones are boundaries of fusion of mineral components of ferruginous quartzite and the lowest ones are boundaries of individual phase fusion in anthracite.

  6. Chemical and Physical Characterization of the First West Valley Demonstration Project High-Level Waste Feed Batch

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Ronald A.; Smith, Harry D.; Smith, Gary L.; Smith, Monty R.; Russell, Renee L.; Patello, Gertrude K.

    2002-10-07

    To support the West Valley Demonstration Project's (WVDP) Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR) and data needs associated with the support flowsheet, equipment, and process testing, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked to completely characterize a sample of the first batch of high-level waste (HLW) slurry transferred to the Concentrator Feed Make-Up Tank (CFMT) identified as CW-H. Cation, anion, and radionuclide concentrations as well as the slurry physical properties including density, total solids, and suspended solids were measured. This data will be compared to the predicted inventory of the waste. Also, laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma/mass spectroscopy (LA-ICP/MS) results for cation analysis will be compared to cation analysis results from inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Radionuclide analysis methods were developed during this work for iodine-129, selenium-79, actinium-227, and neptunium-236 and will also be presented.

  7. Physics and Process Modeling (PPM) and Other Propulsion R and T. Volume 1; Materials Processing, Characterization, and Modeling; Lifting Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This CP contains the extended abstracts and presentation figures of 36 papers presented at the PPM and Other Propulsion R&T Conference. The focus of the research described in these presentations is on materials and structures technologies that are parts of the various projects within the NASA Aeronautics Propulsion Systems Research and Technology Base Program. These projects include Physics and Process Modeling; Smart, Green Engine; Fast, Quiet Engine; High Temperature Engine Materials Program; and Hybrid Hyperspeed Propulsion. Also presented were research results from the Rotorcraft Systems Program and work supported by the NASA Lewis Director's Discretionary Fund. Authors from NASA Lewis Research Center, industry, and universities conducted research in the following areas: material processing, material characterization, modeling, life, applied life models, design techniques, vibration control, mechanical components, and tribology. Key issues, research accomplishments, and future directions are summarized in this publication.

  8. Increasing the Physical Basis of Drought Characterization: Examination of a New Drought Index with the Aid of Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeChant, C. M.; Moradkhani, H.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past half century, drought monitoring has seen an array of developments. Primarily performed with indices, drought monitoring has advanced with progress in observing climate/land surface variables, and with our ability to model hydrological and climatic phenomena. Generally, these indices are based on statistical patterns in the historic record of hydrologic states and fluxes. By casting drought from this perspective, indices become more straightforward to formulate, yet carry a severe drawback in a dynamic climate. Climate is readily highlighted as non-stationary by the majority of earth scientists, which violates the key assumption of an index based on historically observed dryness. This fact necessitates the development of physically-based (not statistically-based) indices, which are more applicable in our changing climate. In this presentation, one such drought index will be proposed, and compared to the more common statistical indices. Overall, this will highlight the potential to move towards drought monitoring that can be related to environmental water supply, through a comparison with soil water storage capacity and land cover. Such an analysis requires highly accurate land surface state estimation, and for this reason, land surface states are estimated through a remote sensing data assimilation framework, which ensures accuracy and quantifies soil/snow water storage uncertainty. The applicability of this method to the upper Colorado Basin is explored, and its sensitivity to drought persistence is assessed.

  9. Physical and electrochemical characterization of activated carbons prepared from firwoods for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Feng-Chin; Tseng, Ru-Ling; Hu, Chi-Chang; Wang, Chen-Ching

    Activated carbons prepared from firwoods by means of a steam activation method at 900 °C for 1-7 h are demonstrated as promising materials for supercapacitors. The carbons exhibit high-power, low equivalent series resistance and highly reversible characteristics between -0.1 and 0.9 V in aqueous electrolytes. The pore structure of the carbons is systematically characterized by the t-plot method based on N 2 adsorption isotherms. The adsorption equilibria of tannic acid, methylene blue, 4-chlorophenol and phenol from aqueous solutions on such carbons are perfectly fitted by the Langmuir equation. All the steam-activated carbons prepared at different activation times ( tA) display ideal capacitive performance in aqueous media. This is attributed mainly to the development of mesopores (with an average pore diameter, Dp, between 2.68 and 3.04 nm), which depends strongly on tA. The average specific capacitance of a steam-activated carbon with a tA of 7 h, as estimated from cyclic voltammetic curves measured at 200 mV s -1, reaches 120 F g -1 between -0.1 and 0.9 V in acidic electrolytes. The capacitive characteristics of steam-activated carbons in NaNO 3, H 2SO 4 and HNO 3can be roughly determined by the adsorption data of species with suitable molecular weights. The results indicate that the observed increase in double-layer capacitance arises mainly from the development of mesopores.

  10. Preparation, Physical-Chemical Characterization, and Cytocompatibility of Polymeric Calcium Phosphate Cements

    PubMed Central

    Khashaba, Rania M.; Moussa, Mervet; Koch, Christopher; Jurgensen, Arthur R.; Missimer, David M.; Rutherford, Ronny L.; Chutkan, Norman B.; Borke, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Aim. Physicochemical mechanical and in vitro biological properties of novel formulations of polymeric calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) were investigated. Methods. Monocalcium phosphate, calcium oxide, and synthetic hydroxyapatite were combined with either modified polyacrylic acid, light activated polyalkenoic acid, or polymethyl vinyl ether maleic acid to obtain Types I, II, and III CPCs. Setting time, compressive and diametral strength of CPCs was compared with zinc polycarboxylate cement (control). Specimens were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. In vitro cytotoxicity of CPCs and control was assessed. Results. X-ray diffraction analysis showed hydroxyapatite, monetite, and brushite. Acid-base reaction was confirmed by the appearance of stretching peaks in IR spectra of set cements. SEM revealed rod-like crystals and platy crystals. Setting time of cements was 5–12 min. Type III showed significantly higher strength values compared to control. Type III yielded high biocompatibility. Conclusions. Type III CPCs show promise for dental applications. PMID:21941551

  11. Model Analytical Development for Physical, Chemical, and Biological Characterization of Momordica charantia Vegetable Drug

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Geovani Pereira; Santos, Ravely Lucena; Júnior, Fernando José de Lima Ramos; da Silva, Karla Monik Alves; de Souza, Fabio Santos

    2016-01-01

    Momordica charantia is a species cultivated throughout the world and widely used in folk medicine, and its medicinal benefits are well documented, especially its pharmacological properties, including antimicrobial activities. Analytical methods have been used to aid in the characterization of compounds derived from plant drug extracts and their products. This paper developed a methodological model to evaluate the integrity of the vegetable drug M. charantia in different particle sizes, using different analytical methods. M. charantia was collected in the semiarid region of Paraíba, Brazil. The herbal medicine raw material derived from the leaves and fruits in different particle sizes was analyzed using thermoanalytical techniques as thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA), pyrolysis coupled to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (PYR-GC/MS), and nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR), in addition to the determination of antimicrobial activity. The different particle surface area among the samples was differentiated by the techniques. DTA and TG were used for assessing thermal and kinetic parameters and PYR-GC/MS was used for degradation products chromatographic identification through the pyrograms. The infusions obtained from the fruit and leaves of Momordica charantia presented antimicrobial activity. PMID:27579215

  12. Optical, physical, and chemical properties of tar balls observed during the Yosemite Aerosol Characterization Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, J. L.; Malm, W. C.; Laskin, A.; Day, D.; Lee, T.; Wang, C.; Carrico, C.; Carrillo, J.; Cowin, J. P.; Collett, J.; Iedema, M. J.

    2005-11-01

    The Yosemite Aerosol Characterization Study of summer 2002 (YACS) occurred during an active fire season in the western United States and provided an opportunity to investigate many unresolved issues related to the radiative effects of biomass burning aerosols. Single particle analysis was performed on field-collected aerosol samples using an array of electron microscopy techniques. Amorphous carbon spheres, or "tar balls," were present in samples collected during episodes of high particle light scattering coefficients that occurred during the peak of a smoke/haze event. The highest concentrations of light-absorbing carbon from a dual-wavelength aethalometer (λ = 370 and 880 nm) occurred during periods when the particles were predominantly tar balls, indicating they do absorb light in the UV and near-IR range of the solar spectrum. Closure experiments of mass concentrations and light scattering coefficients during periods dominated by tar balls did not require any distinct assumptions of organic carbon molecular weight correction factors, density, or refractive index compared to periods dominated by other types of organic carbon aerosols. Measurements of the hygroscopic behavior of tar balls using an environmental SEM indicate that tar balls do not exhibit deliquescence but do uptake some water at high (˜83%) relative humidity. The ability of tar balls to efficiently scatter and absorb light and to absorb water has important implications for their role in regional haze and climate forcing.

  13. Face-Sheet Quality Analysis and Thermo-Physical Property Characterization of OOA and Autoclave Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Lort, Richard D., III; Zimmerman, Thomas J.; Sutter, James K.; Pelham, Larry I.; McCorkle, Linda S.; Scheiman, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Increased application of polymer matrix composite (PMC) materials in large vehicle structures requires consideration of non-autoclave manufacturing technology. The NASA Composites for Exploration project, and its predecessor, Lightweight Spacecraft Structures and Materials project, were tasked with the development of materials and manufacturing processes for structures that will perform in a heavy-lift-launch vehicle environment. Both autoclave and out of autoclave processable materials were considered. Large PMC structures envisioned for such a vehicle included the payload shroud and the interstage connector. In this study, composite sandwich panels representing 1/16th segments of the barrel section of the Ares V rocket fairing were prepared as 1.8 m x 2.4 m sections of the 10 m diameter arc segment. IM7/977-3 was used as the face-sheet prepreg of the autoclave processed panels and T40-800B/5320-1 for the out of autoclave panels. The core was 49.7 kg/sq m (3.1 lb/cu ft (pcf)) aluminum honeycomb. Face-sheets were fabricated by automated tape laying 153 mm wide unidirectional tape. This work details analysis of the manufactured panels where face-sheet quality was characterized by optical microscopy, cured ply thickness measurements, acid digestion, and thermal analysis.

  14. Face-Sheet Quality Analysis and Thermo-Physical Property Characterization of OOA and Autoclave Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Lort, Richard D., III; Zimmerman, Thomas J.; Sutter, James K.; Pelham, Larry I.; McCorkle, Linda S.; Scheiman, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Increased application of polymer matrix composite (PMC) materials in large vehicle structures requires consideration of non-autoclave manufacturing technology. The NASA Composites for Exploration project, and its predecessor, Lightweight Spacecraft Structures and Materials project, were tasked with the development of materials and manufacturing processes for structures that will perform in a heavy-lift-launch vehicle environment. Both autoclave and out of autoclave processable materials were considered. Large PMC structures envisioned for such a vehicle included the payload shroud and the interstage connector. In this study, composite sandwich panels representing 1/16th segments of the barrel section of the Ares V rocket fairing were prepared as 1.8 m x 2.4 m sections of the 10 m diameter arc segment. IM7/977-3 was used as the face-sheet prepreg of the autoclave processed panels and T40-800B/5320-1 for the out of autoclave panels. The core was 49.7 kilograms per square meters (3.1 pounds per cubic feet (pcf)) aluminum honeycomb. Face-sheets were fabricated by automated tape laying 153 mm wide unidirectional tape. This work details analysis of the manufactured panels where face-sheet quality was characterized by optical microscopy, cured ply thickness measurements, acid digestion, and thermal analysis.

  15. Model Analytical Development for Physical, Chemical, and Biological Characterization of Momordica charantia Vegetable Drug.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Deysiane Oliveira; Guimarães, Geovani Pereira; Santos, Ravely Lucena; Júnior, Fernando José de Lima Ramos; da Silva, Karla Monik Alves; de Souza, Fabio Santos; Macêdo, Rui Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Momordica charantia is a species cultivated throughout the world and widely used in folk medicine, and its medicinal benefits are well documented, especially its pharmacological properties, including antimicrobial activities. Analytical methods have been used to aid in the characterization of compounds derived from plant drug extracts and their products. This paper developed a methodological model to evaluate the integrity of the vegetable drug M. charantia in different particle sizes, using different analytical methods. M. charantia was collected in the semiarid region of Paraíba, Brazil. The herbal medicine raw material derived from the leaves and fruits in different particle sizes was analyzed using thermoanalytical techniques as thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA), pyrolysis coupled to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (PYR-GC/MS), and nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR), in addition to the determination of antimicrobial activity. The different particle surface area among the samples was differentiated by the techniques. DTA and TG were used for assessing thermal and kinetic parameters and PYR-GC/MS was used for degradation products chromatographic identification through the pyrograms. The infusions obtained from the fruit and leaves of Momordica charantia presented antimicrobial activity.

  16. Synthesis of nano Cu2O on cotton: morphological, physical, biological and optical sensing characterizations.

    PubMed

    Sedighi, Ali; Montazer, Majid; Samadi, Nasrin

    2014-09-22

    In this paper, Cu2O nanoparticles were in situ synthesized on cotton fabric through a new simple and cost-effective chemical reduction method using copper sulfate, sodium hydroxide and ammonia. Cotton fabric participates as a reducing agent in reduction of copper sulfate and facilitates synthesis of cuprous oxide in nano-scale as a stabilizer. The produced cotton/nano Cu2O composite were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Interaction of Cu2O with cotton fabric in addition to alteration of cotton functional groups were studied by Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy. The intermediate solution, copper-amine complex, was analyzed by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The mechanical properties of the cotton/nano Cu2O composite were studied using Instron indicated a higher tensile strain. The antibacterial activity of the fabric samples showed considerable behavior against S. aureus and E. coli. Further, the treated fabric became highly hydrophobic and sensed ammonia and hydrogen peroxide chromatically.

  17. Chemical, Physical, and Mechanical Characterization of Isocyanate Cross-linked Amine-Modified Silica Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Atul; Shimpi, Nilesh; Roy, Samit; Lu, Hongbing; Fabrizio, Eve F.; Dass, Amala; Capadona, Lynn A.; Leventis, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    We describe a new mechanically strong lightweight porous composite material obtained by encapsulating the skeletal framework of amine-modified silica aerogels with polyurea. The conformal polymer coating preserves the mesoporous structure of the underlying silica framework and the thermal conductivity remains low at 0.041 plus or minus 0.001 W m(sup -1 K(sup -1). The potential of the new cross-linked silica aerogels for load-carrying applications was determined through characterization of their mechanical behavior under compression, three-point bending, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). A primary glass transition temperature of 130 C was identified through DMA. At room temperature, results indicate a hyperfoam behavior where in compression cross-linked aerogels are linearly elastic under small strains (less than 4%) and then exhibit yield behavior (until 40% strain), followed by densification and inelastic hardening. At room temperature the compressive Young's modulus and the Poisson's ratio were determined to be 129 plus or minus 8 MPa and 0.18, respectively, while the strain at ultimate failure is 77% and the average specific compressive stress at ultimate failure is 3.89 x 10(exp 5) N m kg(sup -1). The specific flexural strength is 2.16 x 10(exp 4) N m kg(sup -1). Effects on the compressive behavior of strain rate and low temperature were also evaluated.

  18. Physical and chemical characterization of masa and tortillas from parental lines, crosses, and one hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valderrama-Bravo, C.; Domínguez-Pacheco, A.; Hernández-Aguilar, C.; Zepeda-Bautista, R.; del Real-López, A.; Pahua-Ramos, M. E.; Arellano-Vázquez, J. L.; Moreno-Martínez, E.

    2017-01-01

    In maize plant breeding aimed at producing a hybrid, it is necessary to characterize the parents and hybrids by their agronomic aspects and grain quality so that the processing industry may offer consumers a quality product and also improve its efficiency. This study evaluated the viscoelastic parameters of masa and the chemical and texture properties of tortillas obtained from parent lines (M-54, M55, and CML-242), two single crosses (M54xM55 and M55xM54), and one hybrid (H-70). The morphology of the maize grains and tortillas was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The firmness of masa obtained from CML-242 and H-70 maize was higher than that from the other maize genotypes. M-54 tortillas showed the lowest crude fiber content. Otherwise, tortillas obtained from the M55xM54 hard grain had the lowest fat content and extensibility, while H-70 tortillas showed an intermediate breaking point and extensibility. M-54 and M54xM55 tortillas were softer due to their more swollen starch granules. In contrast, rigid tortillas were obtained from CML-242 and H-70. Grain hardness causes different morphology in starch and tortilla of maize genotypes. However, grain hardness did not influence the characteristics of texture in tortillas.

  19. Characterization of an integrally wound tungsten and aluminum filament for physical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goble, William; Ortiz, Ricardo

    2016-07-01

    As part of the effort to increase the reliability of the MMT Observatory (MMTO) 6.5m Primary Mirror Coating System, the specified filament has changed from a configuration in which the aluminum charge is hand wound around a tungsten filament to a configuration in which the aluminum is integrally wound with the tungsten at the time of filament manufacture. In the MMTO configuration, this filament consists of the three strands of tungsten wire and one strand of aluminum wire. In preparation of a full system test utilizing two hundred filaments fired simultaneously, an extensive testing program was undertaken to characterize these filaments using a four filament configuration in the MMTO small coating chamber (0.5m) and then a forty filament configuration in the University of Arizona Steward Observatory coating chamber (2m). The testing using the smaller coating chambers has shown these filaments provide very predicable coatings from test to test, and with the proper heating profile, these filaments greatly reduce the likelihood of aluminum drips. The initial filament design was modified during the course of testing by shortening the unwound filament length to closer match the aluminum load required in the MMTO coating chamber. This change increased the aluminum deposition rates without increasing the power delivered of the filament power supplies (commercial welders). Filament power levels measured at the vacuum chamber feed throughs, currents, and deposition rates from multiple coating tests, including a full system test, are presented.

  20. Physical characterization of Rhipsalis (Cactaceae) fruits and seeds germination in different temperatures and light regimes.

    PubMed

    Lone, A B; Colombo, R C; Andrade, B L G; Takahashi, L S A; Faria, R T

    2016-06-01

    The germination characteristics of the native cactus species are poorly known, being the temperature and the light the factors that the most interferes in that process. Thus, the objective of the present work was to characterize the fruits and evaluate the influence of the temperature and the light in the seed germination of Rhipsalis floccosa, Rhipsalis pilocarpa and Rhipsalis teres. The tested constant temperatures were 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 °C and the alternate of 20-30 °C and 25-35 °C in a photoperiod of 10 hours, and with determination of the most appropriate temperature, the germination was tested in light absence. The germination percentage, the index of germination speed and medium time of germination were evaluated. For R. floccosa, the highest germination percentage was at 20 °C. For R. pilocarpa and R. teres, the highest germination percentages occurred in 15 °C and 20 °C. There was correlation to germination percentage between the three species, indicating that they had similar germination behavior. Total absence of germination was verified for the three species in condition of light absence. In conclusion, the temperature of 20 °C is the most suitable for the seed germination of R. floccosa. For the species R. pilocarpa and R. teres, the temperatures of 15 and 20 °C are the most suitable.

  1. Characterization of Physical and Hydro-Geological Properties of Kanamaru Research Site in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, M.; Zhang, M.; Takeno, N.; Watanabe, Y.

    2004-12-01

    hydraulic and physical properties was different for each stratum.

  2. Physical and chemical characterizations of biochars derived from different agricultural residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindo, K.; Mizumoto, H.; Sawada, Y.; Sanchez-Monedero, M. A.; Sonoki, T.

    2014-08-01

    Biochar has received large attention as a strategy to tackle against carbon emission. Not only carbon fixation has been carried out but also other merits for agricultural application due to unique physical and chemical character such as absorption of contaminated compounds in soil, trapping ammonia and methane emission from compost, and enhancement of fertilizer quality. In our study, different local waste feed stocks (rice husk, rice straw, wood chips of apple tree (Malus Pumila) and oak tree (Quercus serrata)), in Aomori, Japan, were utilized for creating biochar with different temperature (400-800 °C). Concerning to the biochar production, the pyrolysis of lower temperature had more biochar yield than higher temperature pyrolysis process. On the contrary, surface areas and adsorption characters have been increased as increasing temperature. The proportions of carbon content in the biochars also increased together with increased temperatures. Infrared-Fourier spectra (FT-IR) and 13C-NMR were used to understand carbon chemical compositions in our biochars, and it was observed that the numbers of the shoulders representing aromatic groups, considered as stable carbon structure appeared as the temperature came closer to 600 °C, as well as in FT-IR. In rice materials, the peak assigned to SiO2, was observed in all biochars (400-800 °C) in FT-IR. We suppose that the pyrolysis at 600 °C creates the most recalcitrant character for carbon sequestration, meanwhile the pyrolysis at 400 °C produces the superior properties as a fertilizer by retaining volatile and easily labile compounds which promotes soil microbial activities.

  3. Characterization and Physical Explanation of Energetic Particles on Planck HFI Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, A.; Ade, P.; Atik, Y.; Benoit, A.; Bréele, E.; Bock, J. J.; Camus, P.; Charra, M.; Crill, B. P.; Coron, N.; Coulais, A.; Désert, F.-X.; Fauvet, L.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Guillaudin, O.; Holmes, W.; Jones, W. C.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Macías-Pérez, J.; Martinez, M.; Miniussi, A.; Monfardini, A.; Pajot, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pelissier, A.; Piat, M.; Puget, J.-L.; Renault, C.; Rosset, C.; Santos, D.; Sauvé, A.; Spencer, L.; Sudiwala, R.

    2014-09-01

    The Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) has been surveying the sky continuously from the second Lagrangian point (L2) between August 2009 and January 2012. It operates with 52 high impedance bolometers cooled at 100 mK in a range of frequency between 100 GHz and 1 THz with unprecedented sensitivity, but strong coupling with cosmic radiation. At L2, the particle flux is about 5 and is dominated by protons incident on the spacecraft. Protons with an energy above 40 MeV can penetrate the focal plane unit box causing two different effects: glitches in the raw data from direct interaction of cosmic rays with detectors (producing a data loss of about 15 % at the end of the mission) and thermal drifts in the bolometer plate at 100 mK adding non-Gaussian noise at frequencies below 0.1 Hz. The HFI consortium has made strong efforts in order to correct for this effect on the time ordered data and final Planck maps. This work intends to give a view of the physical explanation of the glitches observed in the HFI instrument in-flight. To reach this goal, we performed several ground-based experiments using protons and particles to test the impact of particles on the HFI spare bolometers with a better control of the environmental conditions with respect to the in-flight data. We have shown that the dominant part of glitches observed in the data comes from the impact of cosmic rays in the silicon die frame supporting the micro-machined bolometric detectors propagating energy mainly by ballistic phonons and by thermal diffusion. The implications of these results for future satellite missions will be discussed.

  4. ExploreNEOs. III. PHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF 65 POTENTIAL SPACECRAFT TARGET ASTEROIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Michael; Delbo', M.; Hora, J. L.; Fazio, G.; Smith, H. A.; Spahr, T. B.; Trilling, D. E.; Thomas, C. A.; Bhattacharya, B.; Chesley, S.; Mainzer, A.; Emery, J. P.; Harris, A. W.; Mommert, M.; Penprase, B.; Stansberry, J. A.

    2011-04-15

    Space missions to near-Earth objects (NEOs) are being planned at all major space agencies, and recently a manned mission to an NEO was announced as a NASA goal. Efforts to find and select suitable targets (plus backup targets) are severely hampered by our lack of knowledge of the physical properties of dynamically favorable NEOs. In particular, current mission scenarios tend to favor primitive low-albedo objects. For the vast majority of NEOs, the albedo is unknown. Here we report new constraints on the size and albedo of 65 NEOs with rendezvous {Delta}v <7 km s{sup -1}. Our results are based on thermal-IR flux data obtained in the framework of our ongoing (2009-2011) ExploreNEOs survey using NASA's 'Warm-Spitzer' space telescope. As of 2010 July 14, we have results for 293 objects in hand (including the 65 low-{Delta}v NEOs presented here); before the end of 2011, we expect to have measured the size and albedo of {approx}700 NEOs (including probably {approx}160 low-{Delta}v NEOs). While there are reasons to believe that primitive volatile-rich materials are universally low in albedo, the converse need not be true: the orbital evolution of some dark objects likely has caused them to lose their volatiles by coming too close to the Sun. For all our targets, we give the closest perihelion distance they are likely to have reached (using orbital integrations from Marchi et al. 2009) and corresponding upper limits on the past surface temperature. Low-{Delta}v objects for which both albedo and thermal history may suggest a primitive composition include (162998) 2001 SK162, (68372) 2001 PM9, and (100085) 1992 UY4.

  5. Accurate Evaluation of Quantum Integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, D. C.; Goorvitch, D.; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Combining an appropriate finite difference method with Richardson's extrapolation results in a simple, highly accurate numerical method for solving a Schrodinger's equation. Important results are that error estimates are provided, and that one can extrapolate expectation values rather than the wavefunctions to obtain highly accurate expectation values. We discuss the eigenvalues, the error growth in repeated Richardson's extrapolation, and show that the expectation values calculated on a crude mesh can be extrapolated to obtain expectation values of high accuracy.

  6. Heterogeneity, permeability patterns, and permeability upscaling: Physical characterization of a block of Massillon sandstone exhibiting nested scales of heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    TIDWELL,VINCENT C.; WILSON,JOHN L.

    2000-04-20

    Over 75,000 permeability measurements were collected from a meter-scale block of Massillon sandstone, characterized by conspicuous cross bedding that forms two distinct nested-scales of heterogeneity. With the aid of a gas minipermeameter, spatially exhaustive fields of permeability data were acquired at each of five different sample supports (i.e. sample volumes) from each block face. These data provide a unique opportunity to physically investigate the relationship between the multi-scale cross-stratified attributes of the sandstone and the corresponding statistical characteristics of the permeability. These data also provide quantitative physical information concerning the permeability upscaling of a complex heterogeneous medium. Here, a portion of the data taken from a single block face cut normal to stratification is analyzed. Results indicate a strong relationship between the calculated summary statistics and the cross-stratified structural features visible evident in the sandstone sample. Specifically, the permeability fields and semivariograms are characterized by two nested scales of heterogeneity, including a large-scale structure defined by the cross-stratified sets (delineated by distinct bounding surfaces) and a small-scale structure defined by the low-angle cross-stratification within each set. The permeability data also provide clear evidence of upscaling. That is, each calculated summary statistic exhibits distinct and consistent trends with increasing sample support. Among these trends are an increasing mean, decreasing variance, and an increasing semivariogram range. Results also clearly indicate that the different scales of heterogeneity upscale differently, with the small-scale structure being preferentially filtered from the data while the large-scale structure is preserved. Finally, the statistical and upscaling characteristics of individual cross-stratified sets were found to be very similar owing to their shared depositional environment

  7. Automatically Characterizing Sensory-Motor Patterns Underlying Reach-to-Grasp Movements on a Physical Depth Inversion Illusion

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jillian; Majmudar, Ushma V.; Ravaliya, Jay H.; Papathomas, Thomas V.; Torres, Elizabeth B.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, movement variability has been of great interest to motor control physiologists as it constitutes a physical, quantifiable form of sensory feedback to aid in planning, updating, and executing complex actions. In marked contrast, the psychological and psychiatric arenas mainly rely on verbal descriptions and interpretations of behavior via observation. Consequently, a large gap exists between the body's manifestations of mental states and their descriptions, creating a disembodied approach in the psychological and neural sciences: contributions of the peripheral nervous system to central control, executive functions, and decision-making processes are poorly understood. How do we shift from a psychological, theorizing approach to characterize complex behaviors more objectively? We introduce a novel, objective, statistical framework, and visuomotor control paradigm to help characterize the stochastic signatures of minute fluctuations in overt movements during a visuomotor task. We also quantify a new class of covert movements that spontaneously occur without instruction. These are largely beneath awareness, but inevitably present in all behaviors. The inclusion of these motions in our analyses introduces a new paradigm in sensory-motor integration. As it turns out, these movements, often overlooked as motor noise, contain valuable information that contributes to the emergence of different kinesthetic percepts. We apply these new methods to help better understand perception-action loops. To investigate how perceptual inputs affect reach behavior, we use a depth inversion illusion (DII): the same physical stimulus produces two distinct depth percepts that are nearly orthogonal, enabling a robust comparison of competing percepts. We find that the moment-by-moment empirically estimated motor output variability can inform us of the participants' perceptual states, detecting physiologically relevant signals from the peripheral nervous system that reveal internal

  8. Chemical and physical characterization of produced waters from conventional and unconventional fossil fuel resources.

    PubMed

    Alley, Bethany; Beebe, Alex; Rodgers, John; Castle, James W

    2011-09-01

    Characterization of produced waters (PWs) is an initial step for determining potential beneficial uses such as irrigation and surface water discharge at some sites. A meta-analysis of characteristics of five PW sources [i.e. shale gas (SGPWs), conventional natural gas (NGPWs), conventional oil (OPWs), coal-bed methane (CBMPWs), tight gas sands (TGSPWs)] was conducted from peer-reviewed literature, government or industry documents, book chapters, internet sources, analytical records from industry, and analyses of PW samples. This meta-analysis assembled a large dataset to extract information of interest such as differences and similarities in constituent and constituent concentrations across these sources of PWs. The PW data analyzed were comprised of 377 coal-bed methane, 165 oilfield, 137 tight gas sand, 4000 natural gas, and 541 shale gas records. Majority of SGPWs, NGPWs, OPWs, and TGSPWs contain chloride concentrations ranging from saline (>30000 mg L(-1)) to hypersaline (>40000 mg L(-1)), while most CBMPWs were fresh (<5000 mg L(-1)). For inorganic constituents, most SGPW and NGPW iron concentrations exceeded the numeric criterion for irrigation and surface water discharge, while OPW and CBMPW iron concentrations were less than the criterion. Approximately one-fourth of the PW samples in this database are fresh and likely need minimal treatment for metal and metalloid constituents prior to use, while some PWs are brackish (5000-30000 mg Cl(-) L(-1)) to saline containing metals and metalloids that may require considerable treatment. Other PWs are hypersaline and produce a considerable waste stream from reverse osmosis; remediation of these waters may not be feasible. After renovation, fresh to saline PWs may be used for irrigation and replenishing surface waters.

  9. Antimicrobial activity and physical characterization of silver nanoparticles green synthesized using nitrate reductase from Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Gholami-Shabani, Mohammadhassan; Akbarzadeh, Azim; Norouzian, Dariush; Amini, Abdolhossein; Gholami-Shabani, Zeynab; Imani, Afshin; Chiani, Mohsen; Riazi, Gholamhossein; Shams-Ghahfarokhi, Masoomeh; Razzaghi-Abyaneh, Mehdi

    2014-04-01

    Nanostructures from natural sources have received major attention due to wide array of biological activities and less toxicity for humans, animals, and the environment. In the present study, silver nanoparticles were successfully synthesized using a fungal nitrate reductase, and their biological activity was assessed against human pathogenic fungi and bacteria. The enzyme was isolated from Fusarium oxysporum IRAN 31C after culturing on malt extract-glucose-yeast extract-peptone (MGYP) medium. The enzyme was purified by a combination of ultrafiltration and ion exchange chromatography on DEAE Sephadex and its molecular weight was estimated by gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300. The purified enzyme had a maximum yield of 50.84 % with a final purification of 70 folds. With a molecular weight of 214 KDa, it is composed of three subunits of 125, 60, and 25 KDa. The purified enzyme was successfully used for synthesis of silver nanoparticles in a way dependent upon NADPH using gelatin as a capping agent. The synthesized silver nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, dynamic light scattering spectroscopy, and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. These stable nonaggregating nanoparticles were spherical in shape with an average size of 50 nm and a zeta potential of -34.3. Evaluation of the antimicrobial effects of synthesized nanoparticles by disk diffusion method showed strong growth inhibitory activity against all tested human pathogenic fungi and bacteria as evident from inhibition zones that ranged from 14 to 25 mm. Successful green synthesis of biologically active silver nanoparticles by a nitrate reductase from F. oxysporum in the present work not only reduces laborious downstream steps such as purification of nanoparticle from interfering cellular components, but also provides a constant source of safe biologically-active nanomaterials with potential application in agriculture and medicine.

  10. Physical characterization of meso-erythritol as a crystalline bulking agent for freeze-dried formulations.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Kahori; Izutsu, Ken-ichi; Kume, Migiwa; Yoshino, Takeshi; Yoshihashi, Yasuo; Sugano, Kiyohiko; Terada, Katsuhide

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize new crystalline bulking agents applicable to freeze-dried pharmaceuticals. Thermal analysis of heat-melt sugar and sugar alcohol solids as well as their frozen aqueous solutions showed high crystallization propensity of meso-erythritol and D-mannitol. Experimental freeze-drying of the aqueous meso-erythritol solutions after their cooling by two different methods (shelf-ramp cooling and immersion of vials into liquid nitrogen) resulted in cylindrical crystalline solids that varied in appearance and microscopic structure. Powder X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis indicated different crystallization processes of meso-erythritol depending on the extent of cooling. Cooling of the frozen meso-erythritol solutions at temperatures lower than their Tg' (glass transition temperature of maximally freeze-concentrated phase, -59.7°C) induced a greater number of nuclei in the highly concentrated solute phase. Growth of multiple meso-erythritol anhydride crystals at around -40°C explains the powder-like fine surface texture of the solids dried after their immersion in liquid nitrogen. Contrarily, shelf-ramp cooling of the frozen solution down to -40°C induced an extensive growth of the solute crystal from a small number of nuclei, leading to scale-like patterns in the dried solids. An early transition of the freezing step into primary drying induced collapse of the non-crystalline region in the cakes. Appropriate process control should enable the use of meso-erythritol as an alternative crystalline bulking agent in freeze-dried formulations.

  11. Physical modification and characterization of starch using pregelatinization and co-process of various tubers from Yogyakarta as an excipient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awaluddin, Rizki; Prasetya, Arif Widya; Nugraha, Yayan; Suweleh, Mohammad Fahmi; Kusuma, Aris Perdana; Indrati, Oktavia

    2017-03-01

    Starch is an economical excipient that is used in oral dosage form. It has poor compressibility and flowability. Pregelatinization and co-process as a physical modification technique have been conducted widely; nevertheless, the single modification shows a limitation. This study aims to assess and characterize the starch result of the modification of various tubers by a combination of modification methods. The starches from various tubers were extracted by sedimentation. Starch pregelatinization was conducted by manufacturing a starch suspension and was heated at 55°C for 70 minutes, and then it was mixed using concentrations HPMC k15 of 2, 3, and 4% (w/w) of the starch weight. The evaluations that were conducted are general identification, amylose concentration, physical properties, and physicochemical identification. The obtained starch of the extraction was 10-18% of the fresh tubers, with the concentration of amylose around 21-37%. The shape and particle size of the starch affected the amylose concentration. The starch modification showed an improvement of the granules physical properties by addition of HPMC. The amylose concentration of yam starch was 37.60% and showed the optimum modification result in the addition of HPMC 4%. There were no changes in the physicochemical properties of the result of IR and X-ray diffraction analysis. The melting point of yam starch-HPMC 4% was 151.24°C with reduction of the maximum weight at 328.52°C. This study indicated that the yam starch has the highest amylose concentration with optimum granules result of the modification in addition of HPMC 4% that could be used as an alternative excipient.

  12. Physical characterization and comparison of two commercially available micro-MLCs.

    PubMed

    Podder, Tarun K; Bednarz, Greg; Yu, Yan; Galvin, James M

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the physical characteristics (penumbra width variation with the source size and shape, interleaf leakage, transmission through the leaves, and the tongue-and-groove effect) of two linear accelerators (BrainLAB's Novalis and Elekta's Synergy-S Beam Modulator) have been investigated. For similar square fields (about 4.5 cm x 4.5 cm) with source-to-surface/skin-distance (SSD) ranging from 90 cm to 115 cm and measurements taken at the depth of D(max)=1.5 cm for 6 MV photon beam. The Novalis MLC has penumbra width of 2.4 ± 0.11 mm-2.8 ± 0.11 mm at the leaf-end and 2.2 ± 0.1 mm-2.7 ± 0.1 mm on the leaf-side; and those for the Synergy-S MLC are 4.4 ± 0.17 mm-5.2 ± 0.2 mm and 3.0 ± 0.12 mm-3.5 ± 0.12 mm. Upon rotating the Synergy-S collimator by 90 ° (i.e., shifting the leaf movement to the gun-target direction), significant reduction of the leaf-end penumbra width (17%) and increase of leaf-side penumbra width (28%) suggest an elliptical shape of the radiation source spot. Similar rotation of the collimator yielded reduction of the penumbras on both leaf-end (34%) and leaf-side (28%) for Novalis, indicating that the Novalis has a more symmetric source size. For all the field sizes and settings, BrainLAB's Novalis μMLC produce a smaller penumbra for simple square fields compared to the Elekta's Synergy-S. However, this difference became less pronounced for leaf-side penumbra and also for circular fields. The tongue-and-groove effect of the Novalis (23 ± 0.9%) is slightly smaller than that of the Synergy-S (25 ± 1%); while the interleaf leakage and leakage directly through leaves for Synergy-S (1.6 ± 0.07% & 0.9 ± 0.04%) are lower than that of Novalis (2 ± 0.08% & 1.3 ± 0.05%).

  13. Characterization of fluid physics effects on cardiovascular response to microgravity (G-572)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pantalos, George M.; Sharp, M. Keith; Woodruff, Stewart J.; Lorange, Richard D.; Bennett, Thomas E.; Sojka, Jan J.; Lemon, Mark W.

    1993-01-01

    The recognition and understanding of cardiovascular adaptation to spaceflight has experienced substantial advancement in the last several years. In-flight echocardiographic measurements of astronaut cardiac function on the Space Shuttle have documented a 15 percent reduction in both left ventricular volume index and stroke volume with a compensatory increase in heart rate to maintain cardiac output. To date, the reduced cardiac size and stroke volume have been presumed to be the consequence of the reduction in circulating fluid volume following diuresis and other physiological processes to reduce blood volume within a few days after orbital insertion. However, no specific mechanism for the reduced stroke volume has been elucidated. The following investigation proposes the use of a hydraulic model of the cardiovascular system to examine the possibility that the observed reduction in stroke volume may, in part, be related to fluid physics effects on heart function. The automated model is being prepared to fly as a GAS payload. The experimental apparatus consists of a pneumatically actuated, elliptical artificial ventricle connected to a closed-loop, hydraulic circuit with compliance and resistance elements to create physiologic pressure and flow conditions. The ventricle is instrumented with high-fidelity, acceleration-insensitive, catheter-tip pressure transducers (Millar Instruments) in the apex and base to determine the instantaneous ventricular pressures and (delta)P(sub LV) across the left ventricle (LVP(sub apex)-LVP(sub base). The ventricle is also instrumented with a flow probe and pressure transducers immediately upstream of the inflow valve and downstream of the outflow valve. The experiment will be microprocessor controlled with analog signals stored on the FM data tape recorder. By varying the circulating fluid volume, ventricular function can be determined for varying preload pressures with fixed afterload pressure. Pilot experiments on board the NASA KC

  14. Physical map of 1p36, placement of breakpoints in monosomy 1p36, and clinical characterization of the syndrome.

    PubMed

    Heilstedt, Heidi A; Ballif, Blake C; Howard, Leslie A; Lewis, Richard A; Stal, Samuel; Kashork, Catherine D; Bacino, Carlos A; Shapira, Stuart K; Shaffer, Lisa G

    2003-05-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is the most common terminal deletion syndrome. This contiguous gene deletion syndrome is presumably caused by haploinsufficiency of a number of genes. We have constructed a contig of overlapping large-insert clones for the most distal 10.5 Mb of 1p36, evaluated the deletion sizes in 61 subjects with monosomy 1p36 from 60 families, and created a natural deletion panel. We found pure terminal deletions, interstitial deletions, derivative chromosomes, and more complex rearrangements. Breakpoints were "binned" into 0.5-Mb regions. Analyses revealed some clustering of breakpoints but no single common breakpoint. Determination of the parental origin showed that 60% of de novo 1p36 terminal deletions arose from the maternally inherited chromosome. Of the 61 subjects, 30 were examined systematically through a protocol at the Texas Children's Hospital General Clinical Research Center. Specifically, we report hearing evaluations, palatal and ophthalmological examinations, echocardiograms, neurological assessments, and thyroid function tests. To our knowledge, this systematic molecular and clinical characterization of monosomy 1p36 is the largest and most comprehensive study of this deletion syndrome to date. Many cytogenetically visible, apparent terminal deletions are more complex than anticipated by cytogenetics, as revealed at the molecular level by our study. Our clinical findings allow for the more accurate recognition of the syndrome and for proper medical evaluation.

  15. A physical organogel electrolyte: characterized by in situ thermo-irreversible gelation and single-ion-predominent conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Soo; Cho, Yoon-Gyo; Odkhuu, Dorj; Park, Noejung; Song, Hyun-Kon

    2013-05-01

    Electrolytes are characterized by their ionic conductivity (σi). It is desirable that overall σi results from the dominant contribution of the ions of interest (e.g. Li+ in lithium ion batteries or LIB). However, high values of cationic transference number (t+) achieved by solid or gel electrolytes have resulted in low σi leading to inferior cell performances. Here we present an organogel polymer electrolyte characterized by a high liquid-electrolyte-level σi (~101 mS cm-1) with high t+ of Li+ (>0.8) for LIB. A conventional liquid electrolyte in presence of a cyano resin was physically and irreversibly gelated at 60°C without any initiators and crosslinkers, showing the behavior of lower critical solution temperature. During gelation, σi of the electrolyte followed a typical Arrhenius-type temperature dependency, even if its viscosity increased dramatically with temperature. Based on the Li+-driven ion conduction, LIB using the organogel electrolyte delivered significantly enhanced cyclability and thermal stability.

  16. A physical organogel electrolyte: characterized by in situ thermo-irreversible gelation and single-ion-predominent conduction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Soo; Cho, Yoon-Gyo; Odkhuu, Dorj; Park, Noejung; Song, Hyun-Kon

    2013-01-01

    Electrolytes are characterized by their ionic conductivity (σ(i)). It is desirable that overall σ(i) results from the dominant contribution of the ions of interest (e.g. Li(+) in lithium ion batteries or LIB). However, high values of cationic transference number (t+) achieved by solid or gel electrolytes have resulted in low σ(i) leading to inferior cell performances. Here we present an organogel polymer electrolyte characterized by a high liquid-electrolyte-level σ(i) (~10(1) mS cm(-1)) with high t+ of Li(+) (>0.8) for LIB. A conventional liquid electrolyte in presence of a cyano resin was physically and irreversibly gelated at 60°C without any initiators and crosslinkers, showing the behavior of lower critical solution temperature. During gelation, σ(i) of the electrolyte followed a typical Arrhenius-type temperature dependency, even if its viscosity increased dramatically with temperature. Based on the Li(+)-driven ion conduction, LIB using the organogel electrolyte delivered significantly enhanced cyclability and thermal stability.

  17. Physics, fabrication and characterization of III-V multi-gate FETs for low power electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thathachary, Arun V.

    With transistor technology close to its limits for power constrained scaling and the simultaneous emergence of mobile devices as the dominant driver for new scaling, a pathway to significant reduction in transistor operating voltage to 0.5V or lower is urgently sought. This however implies a fundamental paradigm shift away from mature Silicon technology. III-V compound semiconductors hold great promise in this regard due to their vastly superior electron transport properties making them prime candidates to replace Silicon in the n-channel transistor. Among the plethora of binary and ternary compounds available in the III-V space, InxGa1-xAs alloys have attracted significant interest due to their excellent electron mobility, ideally placed bandgap and mature growth technology. Simultaneously, electrostatic control mandates multigate transistor designs such as the FinFET at extremely scaled nodes. This dissertation describes the experimental realization of III-V FinFETs incorporating InXGa1-XAs heterostructure channels for high performance, low power logic applications. The chapters that follow present experimental demonstrations, simulations and analysis on the following aspects (a) motivation and key figures of merit driving material selection and design; (b) dielectric integration schemes for high-k metal-gate stack (HKMG) realization on InXGa 1-XAs, including surface clean and passivation techniques developed for high quality interfaces; (c) novel techniques for transport (mobility) characterization in nanoscale multi-gate FET architectures with experimental demonstration on In0.7Ga0.3As nanowires; (d) Indium composition and quantum confined channel design for InXGa 1-XAs FinFETs and (e) InAs heterostructure designs for high performance FinFETs. Each chapter also contains detailed benchmarking of results against state of the art demonstrations in Silicon and III-V material systems. The dissertation concludes by assessing the feasibility of InXGa 1-XAs Fin

  18. Synthesis, physical and electrical characterization of polymer electrolytes and polymer complexes containing polyhalides

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, A.L.

    1992-01-01

    The conductivity and dielectric response was determined for poly (propylene oxide) (PPO), the polymeric solid electrolytes (PPO)[sub 8]NH[sub 4]SO[sub 3]CF[sub 3], (PPO)[sub 16]NaI, (PPO)[sub 10]NaI and (PPO)[sub 8]NaI and the sodium polyiodide complex, (PPO)[sub 8]NaI[sub 9], in the frequency range from dc to 6 GHz and the temperature range from 173-323 K at 3 GHz. These data were used to make the first comparisons between an amorphous host polymer and its salt complexes. The addition of salt to PPO results in a considerable change in dielectric properties. The dielectric loss spectrum of PPO displays a broad [beta]-relaxation attributed to the micro-Brownian motion of the polymer while no appreciable relaxation peak is observed for (PPO)[sub 8]NH[sub 4]SO[sub 3]CF[sub 3]. The conductivity of the previously characterized (PEO)[sub 8]NH[sub 4]SO[sub 3]CF[sub 3] is higher than (PPO)[sub 8]NH[sub 4]SO[sub 3]CF[sub 3] over the entire frequency range covered. The methyl group on PPO apparently sterically restricts the local motions of the polymer necessary for ion conduction. The dielectric loss spectrum of (PPO)[sub 8]NaI displays a narrow relaxation peak around 10 MHz, possibly associated with the motions of NaI aggregates. (PPO)[sub 8]NaI[sub 9] displays a much higher conductivity than simple polymer-salt complexes. The lack of frequency dependence of the (PPO)[sub 8]NaI[sub 9] conductivity compared to that of the simple polymer-salt complexes suggests that long range charge transport in (PPO)[sub 8]NaI[sub 9] is dominated by a process that is much faster than the diffusion of ions in the polymer solvent. Resonance Raman spectra reveal the presence of a rich variety of polyhalide species in the products resulting from the addition of Br[sub 2], IBr or I[sub 2] to PPO-LiBr or PPO-LiI salt complexes. Impedance measurements demonstrate high bulk conductivities. There appears to be little correlation between conductivity and iodine or bromine content.

  19. Physical and optoelectronic characterization of reactively sputtered molybdenum-silicon-nitride alloy metal gate electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, P.; Nadesalingam, M.; Wallace, R. M.; Buchanan, D. A.

    2009-01-01

    With continued transistor scaling, work function tuning of metal gates has become important for advanced complementary-metal-oxide-silicon applications. The work function tuning of reactively sputtered MoxSiyNz (also referred to as MoSiN) gates has been studied through the incorporation of nitrogen. The nitrogen concentration in the MoSiN films was altered by controlling the gas flow ratio, RN=N2/(N2+Ar), during gate deposition. The sheet resistance (Rs) of blanket MoSiN films, measured using four-point resistance method, was found to increase as the gas flow ratio was varied from 10% to 40%. Current-voltage measurements confirmed excellent electrical stability of MoSiN/SiO2/p-Si gate stack for applied electric fields ranging up to 6 MV/cm. High frequency capacitance-voltage measurements were used to extract the MoSiN work function (Φm) using the relationship between the flatband voltage (VFB) and the oxide thickness (tox). The extracted MoSiN/SiO2 interfacial barrier heights, obtained through the internal photoemission of electrons, were used to corroborate the extracted values of MoSiN work function. The MoSiN work functions (Φm), extracted independently using both techniques, were consistent and were observed to decrease with increasing gas flow ratio [N2/(N2+Ar)]. Secondary ion mass spectrometry depth analysis revealed uniform distribution of nitrogen throughout the bulk MoSiN films, with no piling up at gate-dielectric interface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy surface analysis suggested a steady increase in the Mo-N bonds, and therefore the total nitrogen concentration (from ˜20% to 32%), as the gas flow ratio is increased from 10% to 40%. A similar trend was observed in the nitrogen concentration (in percent), measured using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, for these gate deposition conditions. These material characterization results demonstrate that the increase in nitrogen concentration in MoSiN films is consistent with the lowering of Mo

  20. Chemical and physical characterization of emissions from birch wood combustion in a wood stove

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedberg, Emma; Kristensson, Adam; Ohlsson, Michael; Johansson, Christer; Johansson, Per-Åke; Swietlicki, Erik; Vesely, Vaclav; Wideqvist, Ulla; Westerholm, Roger

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the emissions of a large number of chemical compounds emitted from birch wood combustion in a wood stove. Birch wood is widely used as fuel in Swedish household appliances. The fuel load was held constant during six experiments. Particles <2.5 μm in diameter were collected and the size distribution of the particles was measured. The results were compared to the size distribution in road traffic emissions. It could be seen that the number distribution differed between the sources. In traffic exhaust, the number of particles maximized at 20 nm, while the number distribution from wood burning ranged from 20 to 300 nm. The ratio K/Ca on particles was found to be significantly different in wood burning compared to road dust, range 30-330 for the former and 0.8±0.15 for the latter. The source profile of common elements emitted from wood burning differed from that found on particles at a street-level site or in long-distance transported particles. The ratio toluene/benzene in this study was found to be in the range 0.2-0.7, which is much lower than the ratio 3.6±0.5 in traffic exhaust emissions. Formaldehyde and acetone were the most abundant compounds among the volatile ketones and aldehydes. The emission factor varied between 180-710 mg/kg wood for formaldehyde and 5-1300 mg/kg wood for acetone. Of the organic acids analyzed (3,4,5)-trimethoxy benzoic acid was the most abundant compound. Of the PAHs reported, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene and pyrene contribute to more than 70% of the mass of PAH. Of the elements analyzed, K and Si were the most abundant elements, having emission factors of 27 and 9 mg/kg wood, respectively. Although fluoranthene has a toxic equivalence factor of 5% of benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P), it can be seen that the toxic potency of fluoranthene in wood burning emissions is of the same size as B(a)P. This indicates that the relative carcinogenic potency contribution of fluoranthene in

  1. Industrial wastes from the boat-building sector in the Marche Region (Italy): a parametric and chemical-physical characterization.

    PubMed

    Carchesio, M; Tatàno, F; Tosi, G; Trivellone, C H

    2013-01-01

    Using the renowned leisure boat-building sector in the Marche Region (Italy) as a case-study, this paper addresses the characterization of (1) the industrial waste generation from the building of composite material-based boats and (2) some chemical-physical properties of representative types of boat-building residues (plastic foam, hardened resin, fibre-reinforced composite residues, and sanding dust). A parametric evaluation based on the number of employees gave a representative unit generation rate per employee (UGRpE) of 1.47 tons(waste) employee(-1) year(-1) for the entire Marche regional boatbuilding district, whereas evaluations carried out separately for three case-study companies provided values of 1.56, 3.07, and 1.12 tons(waste) employee(-1) year(-1) as representative for a mass-produced motor boat builder (case-study company '1'), a customized sailing boat builder (case-study company '2'), and a mould and structural component builder (case-study company '3'), respectively. The original proposal and evaluation of two additional generation rates based on physical characteristics intrinsic to the manufactured product, i.e. the unit generation rate per boat area (UGRpA) and per boat weight (UGRpW), confirmed the higher waste generation for the sailing boat builder(representative UGRpA and UGRpW values of 0.35 tons(waste) m(-2)(boat) year(-1) and 2. 71 tons(waste) tons(-1)(boat) year(-1), respectively) compared with the motor boat builder (representative UGRpA and UGRpW values of 0.06 tons(waste) m(-2)(boat) year(-1) and 0.49 tons(waste) tons(-1)(boat) year(-1), respectively). The chemical-physical property characterization of the selected residues revealed the following aspects: a general condition of low moisture contents; significant ash contents in the glass- and carbon-fibre composite residues and the correlated sanding dust; and relatively high energy content values in the overall range 14,144-32,479 kJ kg(-1), expressed as the lower heating value.

  2. Physical characterization of single convergent beam device for teletherapy: theoretical and Monte Carlo approach.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, R G; Valente, M

    2015-09-21

    The main purpose of this work is to determine the feasibility and physical characteristics of a new teletherapy device of radiation therapy based on the application of a convergent x-ray beam of energies like those used in radiotherapy providing highly concentrated dose delivery to the target. We have denominated it Convergent Beam Radio Therapy (CBRT). Analytical methods are developed first in order to determine the dosimetry characteristic of an ideal convergent photon beam in a hypothetical water phantom. Then, using the PENELOPE Monte Carlo code, a similar convergent beam that is applied to the water phantom is compared with that of the analytical method. The CBRT device (Converay(®)) is designed to adapt to the head of LINACs. The converging beam photon effect is achieved thanks to the perpendicular impact of LINAC electrons on a large thin spherical cap target where Bremsstrahlung is generated (high-energy x-rays). This way, the electrons impact upon various points of the cap (CBRT condition), aimed at the focal point. With the X radiation (Bremsstrahlung) directed forward, a system of movable collimators emits many beams from the output that make a virtually definitive convergent beam. Other Monte Carlo simulations are performed using realistic conditions. The simulations are performed for a thin target in the shape of a large, thin, spherical cap, with an r radius of around 10-30 cm and a curvature radius of approximately 70 to 100 cm, and a cubed water phantom centered in the focal point of the cap. All the interaction mechanisms of the Bremsstrahlung radiation with the phantom are taken into consideration for different energies and cap thicknesses. Also, the magnitudes of the electric and/or magnetic fields, which are necessary to divert clinical-use electron beams (0.1 to 20 MeV), are determined using electromagnetism equations with relativistic corrections. This way the above-mentioned beam is manipulated and guided for its perpendicular impact

  3. Dynamic reservoir characterization using 4D multicomponent seismic data and rock physics modeling at Delhi Field, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal Meneses, Carla C.

    Pore pressure and CO2 saturation changes are important to detect and quantify for maximizing oil recovery in Delhi Field. Delhi Field is a enhanced oil recovery (EOR) project with active monitoring by 4D multicomponent seismic technologies. Dynamic rock physics modeling integrates the rich dataset of core, well logs, petrographic thin sections and facies providing a link between reservoir and elastic properties. The dynamic modeling in this high porosity sandstone reservoir shows that P-wave velocity is more sensitive to CO2 saturation while S-wave velocity is more sensitive to pore pressure changes. I use PP and PS seismic data to jointly invert for Vp=Vs ratio and acoustic impedance. This technique has the advantage of adding more information to the non-unique inversion problem. Combining the inversion results from the monitor surveys of June 2010 and August 2011 provides acoustic impedance and Vp=Vs percentage differences. The time-lapse inverted response enables dynamic characterization of the reservoir by fitting the predicted dynamic models (calibrated at the wells). Dynamic reservoir characterization adds value in this stratigraphic complex reservoir. The results indicate that reservoir heterogeneities and pore pressure gradients control the CO2 flow within the Paluxy reservoir. Injectors 148-2 and 140-1 showed CO2 is moving downdip following a distributary channel induced by differential pressure from an updip injector or a barrier caused by a heterogeneity in the reservoir. CO2 anomalies located above the Paluxy injector 148-2 indicates that CO2 is moving from the Paluxy up into the Tuscaloosa Formation. My work demonstrates that reservoir monitoring is necessary for reservoir management at Delhi Field.

  4. Physical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healey, Richard

    2013-02-01

    Atomistic metaphysics motivated an explanatory strategy which science has pursued with great success since the scientific revolution. By decomposing matter into its atomic and subatomic parts physics gave us powerful explanations and accurate predictions as well as providing a unifying framework for the rest of science. The success of the decompositional strategy has encouraged a widespread conviction that the physical world forms a compositional hierarchy that physics and other sciences are progressively articulating. But this conviction does not stand up to a closer examination of how physics has treated composition, as a variety of case studies will show.

  5. Effect of the generation and physical-chemical characterization of swine and dairy cattle slurries on treatment technologies.

    PubMed

    Villamar, Cristina-Alejandra; Rodríguez, Diana-Catalina; López, Daniela; Peñuela, Gustavo; Vidal, Gladys

    2013-08-01

    Differences in biodegradability can affect the treatment of slurry before its use in spraying. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the generation and physical-chemical characterization of swine and dairy cattle slurries on different biological treatment technologies. This research involved monthly sampling (number/composition) for 1 year of 24 swine farms (16%), cattle farms (38%), and mixed swine and cattle farms (46%). The results obtained showed differences in feeding (3 l water kg(-1) food for cattle and 5 l water kg(-1) food for swine) and assimilation (0.6 kg food kg (-1) milk produced and 3 kg kg(-1) weight gain), which may influence the generation of slurry (57 l animal(-1)d(-1) in cattle and 31 l animal(-1) d(-1) in swine) and its composition. In addition, the composition of swine slurry [23 g chemical oxygen demand (COD) l(-1), 3 g total nitrogen (TN) l(-1)] is significantly different (P < 0.01) to cattle slurry (4 g COD l(-1), 0.3 g TN l(-1)). Finally, the composition and the S index applied to swine slurry [COD N(-1) = 8, biological oxygen demand (BOD)5 COD(-1) = 0.3, S index > 0] and cattle slurry (COD N(-1) = 16, BOD5 COD(-1) = 0.6, S index < 0) show a difference on the biodegradability of both slurries. Suitability of anaerobic and aerobic treatment was assessed based on the findings.

  6. Characterizing the physical and genetic structure of the lodgepole pine × jack pine hybrid zone: mosaic structure and differential introgression

    PubMed Central

    Cullingham, Catherine I; James, Patrick M A; Cooke, Janice E K; Coltman, David W

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the physical and genetic structure of hybrid zones can illuminate factors affecting their formation and stability. In north-central Alberta, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud. var. latifolia) and jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb) form a complex and poorly defined hybrid zone. Better knowledge of this zone is relevant, given the recent host expansion of mountain pine beetle into jack pine. We characterized the zone by genotyping 1998 lodgepole, jack pine, and hybrids from British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario, and Minnesota at 11 microsatellites. Using Bayesian algorithms, we calculated genetic ancestry and used this to model the relationship between species occurrence and environment. In addition, we analyzed the ancestry of hybrids to calculate the genetic contribution of lodgepole and jack pine. Finally, we measured the amount of gene flow between the pure species. We found the distribution of the pine classes is explained by environmental variables, and these distributions differ from classic distribution maps. Hybrid ancestry was biased toward lodgepole pine; however, gene flow between the two species was equal. The results of this study suggest that the hybrid zone is complex and influenced by environmental constraints. As a result of this analysis, range limits should be redefined. PMID:23346232

  7. Electrical Mobility of Protons and Proton-Holes in Pure Water Characterized by Physics-Based Water Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Binbin; Sah, Chihtang

    Pure water has been characterized empirically for nearly a century, as dissociation into hydronium (H3O)1+ and hydroxide (HO)1- ions. Last March, we reported that the ~40 year experimental industrial standard of chemical equilibrium reaction constant, the ion product, can be accounted for by a statistical-physics-based concentration product of two electrical charge carriers, the positively charged protons, p+, and the negatively charged proton holes or prohols, p-, with a thermal activation energy or proton trapping well depth of Ep + / p - = 576 meV, in the 0-100OC pure liquid water. We now report that the empirically fitted industrial standard experimental data (1985, 1987, 2005) of the two dc ion mobilities in liquid water, can also be accounted for by trapping-limited drift of protons and prohols through proton channels of lower proton electrical potential valleys, Ep+/0 <= Ep-/0 <(Ep + / p -/3), in the tetrahedrally-directed electron-pair-bonded oxygen ions, O2-, in hexagonal lattice based on the 1935 Pauling statistical model using the 1933 Bernal-Fowler water rule.

  8. Characterizing the physical and genetic structure of the lodgepole pine × jack pine hybrid zone: mosaic structure and differential introgression.

    PubMed

    Cullingham, Catherine I; James, Patrick M A; Cooke, Janice E K; Coltman, David W

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the physical and genetic structure of hybrid zones can illuminate factors affecting their formation and stability. In north-central Alberta, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud. var. latifolia) and jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb) form a complex and poorly defined hybrid zone. Better knowledge of this zone is relevant, given the recent host expansion of mountain pine beetle into jack pine. We characterized the zone by genotyping 1998 lodgepole, jack pine, and hybrids from British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario, and Minnesota at 11 microsatellites. Using Bayesian algorithms, we calculated genetic ancestry and used this to model the relationship between species occurrence and environment. In addition, we analyzed the ancestry of hybrids to calculate the genetic contribution of lodgepole and jack pine. Finally, we measured the amount of gene flow between the pure species. We found the distribution of the pine classes is explained by environmental variables, and these distributions differ from classic distribution maps. Hybrid ancestry was biased toward lodgepole pine; however, gene flow between the two species was equal. The results of this study suggest that the hybrid zone is complex and influenced by environmental constraints. As a result of this analysis, range limits should be redefined.

  9. An interdisciplinary physical-chemical approach for characterization of arsenic in a calciner residue dump in Cornwall (UK).

    PubMed

    van Elteren, Johannes Teun; Slejkovec, Zdenka; Arcon, Iztok; Glass, Hylke-Jan

    2006-02-01

    During the later stages of hard-rock mining in Cornwall, UK, widespread processing and refining of arsenic in purpose-built calciners resulted in severe, localized contamination of soils with arsenic. Several physical-chemical techniques were applied to characterize arsenic in a calciner residue dump: X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), sequential extraction combined with hyphenated speciation methods, and X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) methods such as XANES (X-ray absorption near-edge structure) and EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure). Arsenic was predominantly present in pentavalent form, bound to amorphous or poorly-crystalline hydrous oxides of Fe (probably alpha-hematite). A small amount of a non-classified crystalline iron arsenate phase was found, viz. Fe2(As(AsO4)3). There was also evidence for the presence of some arsenate bound to quartz (alpha-SiO2). The overall results make us believe that the normally assumed relative safety, from a mobility point of view, is questionable since only a small fraction of arsenic is found in a crystalline iron arsenate form.

  10. Accurate radiation temperature and chemical potential from quantitative photoluminescence analysis of hot carrier populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibelli, François; Lombez, Laurent; Guillemoles, Jean-François

    2017-02-01

    In order to characterize hot carrier populations in semiconductors, photoluminescence measurement is a convenient tool, enabling us to probe the carrier thermodynamical properties in a contactless way. However, the analysis of the photoluminescence spectra is based on some assumptions which will be discussed in this work. We especially emphasize the importance of the variation of the material absorptivity that should be considered to access accurate thermodynamical properties of the carriers, especially by varying the excitation power. The proposed method enables us to obtain more accurate results of thermodynamical properties by taking into account a rigorous physical description and finds direct application in investigating hot carrier solar cells, which are an adequate concept for achieving high conversion efficiencies with a relatively simple device architecture.

  11. Accurate radiation temperature and chemical potential from quantitative photoluminescence analysis of hot carrier populations.

    PubMed

    Gibelli, François; Lombez, Laurent; Guillemoles, Jean-François

    2017-02-15

    In order to characterize hot carrier populations in semiconductors, photoluminescence measurement is a convenient tool, enabling us to probe the carrier thermodynamical properties in a contactless way. However, the analysis of the photoluminescence spectra is based on some assumptions which will be discussed in this work. We especially emphasize the importance of the variation of the material absorptivity that should be considered to access accurate thermodynamical properties of the carriers, especially by varying the excitation power. The proposed method enables us to obtain more accurate results of thermodynamical properties by taking into account a rigorous physical description and finds direct application in investigating hot carrier solar cells, which are an adequate concept for achieving high conversion efficiencies with a relatively simple device architecture.

  12. High-Accurate, Physics-Based Wake Simulation Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-27

    artificial viscos- ity sensor that has been augmented to make it more applicable to different this problem. Artificial viscosity is a necessity in...h is the minimum length, and ν is the maximum applicable viscosity . The maximum viscosity coefficient is be found by using a simple relationship...Global viscosity , or the application of viscosity to all locations, was also plotted to show how much more effective using a sensor is. The figure shows

  13. Physical and Chemical Characterization of Particles in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere: Microanalysis of Aerosol Impactor Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, Patrick J.

    1999-01-01

    Herein is reported activities to support the characterization of the aerosol in the upper troposphere (UT) and lower stratosphere (LS) collected during the Airborne Southern Hemisphere Ozone Experiment/Measurements for Assessing the Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft (ASHOE/MAESA) missions in 1994. Through a companion proposal, another group was to measure the size distribution of aerosols in the 0.008 to 2 micrometer diameter range and to collect for us impactor samples of particles larger than about 0.02 gm. In the first year, we conducted laboratory studies related to particulate deposition patterns on our collection substrates, and have performed the analysis of many ASHOE/MAESA aerosol samples from 1994 using analytical electron microscopy (AEM). We have been building an "aerosol climatology" with these data that documents the types and relative abundances of particles observed at different latitudes and altitudes. The second year (and non-funded extension periods) saw continued analyses of impactor aerosol samples, including more ASHOE/MAESA samples, some northern hemisphere samples from the NASA Stratospheric Photochemistry Aerosols and Dynamics Expedition (SPADE) program for comparison, and a few aerosol samples from the NASA Stratospheric TRacers of Atmospheric Transport (STRAT) program. A high-resolution field emission microscope was used for the analysis and re-analysis of a number of samples to determine if this instrument was superior in performance to our conventional electron microscope. In addition, some basic laboratory studies were conducted to determine the minimum detectable and analyzable particle size for different types of aerosols. In all, 61 aerosol samples were analyzed, with a total of over 30,000 individual particle analyses. In all analyzed samples, sulfate particles comprised the major aerosol number fraction. It must be stressed that particles composed of more than one species, for example sulfate and organic carbon, were classified

  14. Physical and chemical characterization of marine atmospheric aerosols over the North and South Pacific Oceans using single particle mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furutani, H.; Jung, J.; Miura, K.; Uematsu, M.

    2010-12-01

    Physical and chemical properties of marine atmospheric aerosols were characterized and compared over the North and South Pacific Ocean during two trans-Pacific cruises (from Japan to Chile and Australia to Japan) during the period of January-June 2009, which cover broad region of Pacific Ocean from 40°N to 55°S and 140°E to 70°W. The measured parameters of aerosol properties were single particle size-resolved chemical composition (D = 100 ~ 1500 nm), cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and condensation nuclei (CN) concentrations, size distribution from 10 nm to 5 μm, total aerosol nitrate and sulfate concentrations, and filter-based chemical composition. Trace gas concentrations of O3 and CO were also measured to aid air parcel categorization during the cruises. Reflecting larger anthropogenic emission in the Northern Hemisphere, pronounced concentration gradient between the North and South Pacific Ocean was observed for aerosol nitrate, CO, and O3. Aerosol sulfate also showed a similar concentration drop in the equatorial region, relatively higher sulfate concentration was observed in 30°S-40°S and 55°S regions, which was associated with increased aerosol methanesulfonic acid (MSA) concentration but little increase in local marine chlorophyll concentration, suggesting contribution of long-range transported marine biogenic sulfur from the high primary production area over the South Pacific high latitude region. Aerosol chemical classification by single particle chemical analysis revealed that certain aerosol types, such as biomass burning, elemental carbon, and elemental/organic carbon mixed type, were mainly observed in the North Pacific region, while several specific organic aerosol types with abundant aged organic and disulfur composition were identified in the South Pacific region. Further comparison of aerosol properties, aerosol sources, and atmospheric aerosol processing in the North and South Pacific Oceans will be discussed.

  15. Practical aspects of spatially high accurate methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfrey, Andrew G.; Mitchell, Curtis R.; Walters, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    The computational qualities of high order spatially accurate methods for the finite volume solution of the Euler equations are presented. Two dimensional essentially non-oscillatory (ENO), k-exact, and 'dimension by dimension' ENO reconstruction operators are discussed and compared in terms of reconstruction and solution accuracy, computational cost and oscillatory behavior in supersonic flows with shocks. Inherent steady state convergence difficulties are demonstrated for adaptive stencil algorithms. An exact solution to the heat equation is used to determine reconstruction error, and the computational intensity is reflected in operation counts. Standard MUSCL differencing is included for comparison. Numerical experiments presented include the Ringleb flow for numerical accuracy and a shock reflection problem. A vortex-shock interaction demonstrates the ability of the ENO scheme to excel in simulating unsteady high-frequency flow physics.

  16. On numerically accurate finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagtegaal, J. C.; Parks, D. M.; Rice, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A general criterion for testing a mesh with topologically similar repeat units is given, and the analysis shows that only a few conventional element types and arrangements are, or can be made suitable for computations in the fully plastic range. Further, a new variational principle, which can easily and simply be incorporated into an existing finite element program, is presented. This allows accurate computations to be made even for element designs that would not normally be suitable. Numerical results are given for three plane strain problems, namely pure bending of a beam, a thick-walled tube under pressure, and a deep double edge cracked tensile specimen. The effects of various element designs and of the new variational procedure are illustrated. Elastic-plastic computation at finite strain are discussed.

  17. Preparation and physical characterization of calcium sulfate cement/silica-based mesoporous material composites for controlled release of BMP-2

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Honglue; Yang, Shengbing; Dai, Pengyi; Li, Wuyin; Yue, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As a commonly used implant material, calcium sulfate cement (CSC), has some shortcomings, including low compressive strength, weak osteoinduction capability, and rapid degradation. In this study, silica-based mesoporous materials such as SBA-15 were synthesized and combined with CSC to prepare CSC/SBA-15 composites. The properties of SBA-15 were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms. SBA-15 was blended into CSC at 0, 5, 10, and 20 wt%, referred to as CSC, CSC-5S (5% mass ratio), CSC-10S (10% mass ratio), and CSC-20S (20% mass ratio), respectively. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and compression tests were used to determine the structure and mechanical properties of the composites, respectively. The formation of hydroxyapatite on composite surfaces was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction after soaking in simulated body fluid. BMP-2 was loaded into the composites by vacuum freeze-drying, and its release characteristics were detected by Bradford protein assay. The in vitro degradation of the CSC/SBA-15 composite was investigated by measuring weight loss. The results showed that the orderly, nanostructured, mesoporous SBA-15 possessed regular pore size and structure. The compressive strength of CSC/SBA-15 increased with the increase in SBA-15 mass ratio, and CSC-20S demonstrated the maximum strength. Compared to CSC, hydroxyapatite that formed on the surfaces of CSC/SBA-15 was uniform and compact. The degradation rate of CSC/SBA-15 decreased with increasing mass ratio of SBA-15. The adsorption of BMP-2 increased and released at a relatively slow rate; the release rate of BMP-2 in CSC-20S was the slowest, and presented characteristics of low doses of release. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the physical properties of pure CSC incorporated with SBA-15 could be improved significantly, which made the CSC/SBA-15 composite more suitable for bone repair

  18. The DEEP-SOUTH: Round-the-clock physical characterization of near-Earth objects in the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, H.; Choi, Y.; Kim, M.; Yim, H.; Bae, Y.; Ishiguro, M.; Mainzer, A.; Bauer, J.; Byun, Y.; Larson, S.; Alcock, C.

    2014-07-01

    1. Introduction: Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute started a project to build a network of wide-field optical telescopes called the KMTNet (Korea Micro-lensing Telescope Network) in 2009 [1]. Its primary scientific goal is to discover, catalogue and characterize Earth-mass exoplanets in the southern hemisphere when the Galactic Bulge lies above the horizon. While in winter this network will be devoted to other key science programs. The ''Deep Ecliptic Patrol of the Southern Sky (DEEP-SOUTH)'' is one of such secondary science projects [2]. 2. Facilities: The KMTNet consists of three identical 1.6-m prime focus optics and 18K×18K mosaic CCD cameras that result in 2×2 degrees field of view with a delivered image quality of less than 1.0 arcsec FWHM under atmospheric seeing of 0.75 arcsec in V- and I-bands. These telescopes will be located at CTIO in Chile, SAAO in South Africa, and SSO in Australia. The three stations are longitudinally well separated, and hence will have a benefit of 24-hour continuous monitoring of the southern sky. The wide-field and round-the-clock operation capabilities of the facility are ideal for discovery and physical characterization of asteroids and comets. 3. Future Plans: As of April 2014, more than 10,000 Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) have been catalogued by the Minor Planet Center; however their observational properties such as broadband colors and spin periods are known only for less than five percent of the catalogued objects. Based on time series observations with the KMTNet, orbits, absolute magnitudes (H), spin states, shapes and activity levels of asteroids and comets including NEOs will be systematically investigated at the same time. Their approximate surface mineralogy will also be discriminated using SDSS and Johnson Cousins BVRI colors. The DEEP-SOUTH has several observation modes; Opposition Census (OC) is focused on opposition in either side of the ecliptic, while Sweet spot Survey (SsS) is designed to discover the

  19. Physical-chemical characterization of the particulate matter inside two road tunnels in the São Paulo Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, J.; Rizzo, L. V.; Herckes, P.; Vasconcellos, P. C.; Caumo, S. E. S.; Fornaro, A.; Ynoue, R. Y.; Artaxo, P.; Andrade, M. F.

    2013-08-01

    The notable increase in biofuel usage by the road transportation sector in Brazil during recent years has significantly altered the vehicular fuel composition. Consequently, many uncertainties are currently found in particulate matter vehicular emission profiles. In an effort to better characterize the emitted particulate matter, measurements of aerosol physical and chemical properties were undertaken inside two tunnels located in the São Paulo Metropolitan Area (SPMA). The tunnels show very distinct fleet profiles: in the Jânio Quadros (JQ) tunnel, the vast majority of the circulating fleet are Light Duty Vehicles (LDVs), fuelled on average with the same amount of ethanol as gasoline. In the Rodoanel (RA) tunnel, the particulate emission is dominated by Heavy Duty Vehicles (HDVs) fuelled with diesel (5% biodiesel). In the JQ tunnel, PM2.5 concentration was on average 52 μg m-3, with the largest contribution of Organic Mass (OM, 42%), followed by Elemental Carbon (EC, 17%) and Crustal elements (13%). Sulphate accounted for 7% of PM2.5 and the sum of other trace elements was 10%. In the RA tunnel, PM2.5 was on average 233 μg m-3, mostly composed of EC (52%) and OM (39%). Sulphate, crustal and the trace elements showed a minor contribution with 5%, 1% and 1%, respectively. The average OC:EC ratio in the JQ tunnel was 1.59 ± 0.09, indicating an important contribution of EC despite the high ethanol fraction in the fuel composition. In the RA tunnel, the OC:EC ratio was 0.49 ± 0.12, consistent with previous measurements of diesel fuelled HDVs. Besides bulk carbonaceous aerosol measurement, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were quantified. The sum of the PAHs concentration was 56 ± 5 ng m-3 and 45 ± 9 ng m-3 in the RA and JQ tunnel, respectively. In the JQ tunnel, Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) ranged from 0.9 to 6.7 ng m-3 (0.02-0.1‰ of PM2.5) in the JQ tunnel whereas in the RA tunnel BaP ranged from 0.9 to 4.9 ng m-3 (0.004-0.02‰ of PM2.5), indicating an

  20. Study to perform preliminary experiments to evaluate particle generation and characterization techniques for zero-gravity cloud physics experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, U.

    1982-01-01

    Methods of particle generation and characterization with regard to their applicability for experiments requiring cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) of specified properties were investigated. Since aerosol characterization is a prerequisite to assessing performance of particle generation equipment, techniques for characterizing aerosol were evaluated. Aerosol generation is discussed, and atomizer and photolytic generators including preparation of hydrosols (used with atomizers) and the evaluation of a flight version of an atomizer are studied.

  1. Physics Characterization of TLD-600 and TLD-700 and Acceptance Testing of New XRAD 160 Biological X-Ray Irradiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yanan

    Project 1: Physics characterization of TLD-600 and TLD-700. Purpose: It is suggested that a pair of TLD-600 and TLD-700 can measure the exposure in neutron-photon mix fields. But the basic information of physics characterization of TLD-600 and 700 are not available. The purpose of this study was study the individual TLD variation and the energy dependence of TLD-600 and TLD-700. Methods: The individual calibration factors for 52 TLD-600 chips and 51 TLD-700 chips were determined under x-ray beams of 60 kVp, 80 kVp, 120 kVp, a mono-energetic 662 keV gamma beam of a Cs-137 source, and an Am-Be neutron beam (4.4 MeV). The individual calibration factor was calculated as the ratio of the group average response in uC/mR and the individual response in uC/mR. In addition, energy corrections factors for the individual calibration factors were determined, from each of the x-ray beams (60 kVp, 80 kVp, 120 kVp) to the 662 keV Cs-137 gamma beams. Results: For TLD-600, the range and relative standard deviation of the individual calibration factors are: 60 kVp (0.94003-1.0927, 3.5369%), 80 kVp (0.9395-1.0867, 3.0952%), 120 kVp (0.83403-1.0796, 4.5732%), 662 keV (0.80465-1.1926, 9.2515% ), AmBe (0.91740-0.94905, 3.0882% ); and the energy corrections factors relative to the 662 keV Cs-137 beams are: 60 kVp (1.2223), 80 kVp (1.1013), 120 kVp (1.0299). For TLD-700 the range and relative standard deviation of the individual calibration factors are: 60 kVp (0.94351-1.0630, 2.6044%), 80 kVp (0.91690-1.0614, 2.6996%), 120 kVp (0.95697-1.0474, 2.3606%), 662 keV (0.91348-1.2270, 4.2243%), AmBe (0.79330-1.2268, 9.1577%); and the energy corrections factors relative to the 662 keV Cs-137 beams are: 60 kVp (1.0373), 80 kVp (0.97661), 120 kVp (0.88532). Conclusion: We have measured individual calibration factors and the average energy correction factors for photon beams and Am-Be neutron beams. Our results will be used in the future experiments and measurements with TLD-600 and TLD-700. Project

  2. Accurate ab Initio Spin Densities.

    PubMed

    Boguslawski, Katharina; Marti, Konrad H; Legeza, Ors; Reiher, Markus

    2012-06-12

    We present an approach for the calculation of spin density distributions for molecules that require very large active spaces for a qualitatively correct description of their electronic structure. Our approach is based on the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm to calculate the spin density matrix elements as a basic quantity for the spatially resolved spin density distribution. The spin density matrix elements are directly determined from the second-quantized elementary operators optimized by the DMRG algorithm. As an analytic convergence criterion for the spin density distribution, we employ our recently developed sampling-reconstruction scheme [J. Chem. Phys.2011, 134, 224101] to build an accurate complete-active-space configuration-interaction (CASCI) wave function from the optimized matrix product states. The spin density matrix elements can then also be determined as an expectation value employing the reconstructed wave function expansion. Furthermore, the explicit reconstruction of a CASCI-type wave function provides insight into chemically interesting features of the molecule under study such as the distribution of α and β electrons in terms of Slater determinants, CI coefficients, and natural orbitals. The methodology is applied to an iron nitrosyl complex which we have identified as a challenging system for standard approaches [J. Chem. Theory Comput.2011, 7, 2740].

  3. An unexpected way forward: towards a more accurate and rigorous protein-protein binding affinity scoring function by eliminating terms from an already simple scoring function.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Jon; Audie, Joseph

    2017-01-16

    A fundamental and unsolved problem in biophysical chemistry is the development of a computationally simple, physically intuitive, and generally applicable method for accurately predicting and physically explaining protein-protein binding affinities from protein-protein interaction (PPI) complex coordinates. Here, we propose that the simplification of a previously described six-term PPI scoring function to a four term function results in a simple expression of all physically and statistically meaningful terms that can be used to accurately predict and explain binding affinities for a well-defined subset of PPIs that are characterized by (1) crystallographic coordinates, (2) rigid-body association, (3) normal interface size, and hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity, and (4) high quality experimental binding affinity measurements. We further propose that the four-term scoring function could be regarded as a core expression for future development into a more general PPI scoring function. Our work has clear implications for PPI modeling and structure-based drug design.

  4. THE PHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE POTENTIALLY HAZARDOUS ASTEROID 2004 BL86: A FRAGMENT OF A DIFFERENTIATED ASTEROID

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, Vishnu; Sanchez, Juan A.; Takir, Driss; Corre, Lucille Le; Gary, Bruce L.; Thomas, Cristina A.; Hardersen, Paul S.; Ogmen, Yenal; Benni, Paul; Kaye, Thomas G.; Gregorio, Joao; Garlitz, Joe; Polishook, David; Nathues, Andreas

    2015-09-20

    The physical characterization of potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs) is important for impact hazard assessment and evaluating mitigation options. Close flybys of PHAs provide an opportunity to study their surface photometric and spectral properties that enable the identification of their source regions in the main asteroid belt. We observed PHA (357439) 2004 BL86 during a close flyby of the Earth at a distance of 1.2 million km (0.0080 AU) on 2015 January 26, with an array of ground-based telescopes to constrain its photometric and spectral properties. Lightcurve observations showed that the asteroid was a binary and subsequent radar observations confirmed the binary nature and gave a primary diameter of 300 m and a secondary diameter of 50–100 m. Our photometric observations were used to derive the phase curve of 2004 BL86 in the V-band. Two different photometric functions were fitted to this phase curve, the IAU H–G model and the Shevchenko model. From the fit of the H–G function we obtained an absolute magnitude of H = 19.51 ± 0.02 and a slope parameter of G = 0.34 ± 0.02. The Shevchenko function yielded an absolute magnitude of H = 19.03 ± 0.07 and a phase coefficient b = 0.0225 ± 0.0006. The phase coefficient was used to calculate the geometric albedo (Ag) using the relationship found by Belskaya and Schevchenko, obtaining a value of Ag = 40% ± 8% in the V-band. With the geometric albedo and the absolute magnitudes derived from the H–G and the Shevchenko functions we calculated the diameter (D) of 2004 BL86, obtaining D = 263 ± 26 and D = 328 ± 35 m, respectively. 2004 BL86 spectral band parameters and pyroxene chemistry are consistent with non-cumulate eucrite meteorites. A majority of these meteorites are derived from Vesta and are analogous with surface lava flows on a differentiated parent body. A non-diagnostic spectral curve match using the Modeling for Asteroids tool yielded a best-match with non-cumulate eucrite Bereba. Three other

  5. The Physical Characterization of the Potentially Hazardous Asteroid 2004 BL86: A Fragment of a Differentiated Asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Vishnu; Gary, Bruce L.; Sanchez, Juan A.; Takir, Driss; Thomas, Cristina A.; Hardersen, Paul S.; Ogmen, Yenal; Benni, Paul; Kaye, Thomas G.; Gregorio, Joao; Garlitz, Joe; Polishook, David; Le Corre, Lucille; Nathues, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    The physical characterization of potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs) is important for impact hazard assessment and evaluating mitigation options. Close flybys of PHAs provide an opportunity to study their surface photometric and spectral properties that enable the identification of their source regions in the main asteroid belt. We observed PHA (357439) 2004 BL86 during a close flyby of the Earth at a distance of 1.2 million km (0.0080 AU) on 2015 January 26, with an array of ground-based telescopes to constrain its photometric and spectral properties. Lightcurve observations showed that the asteroid was a binary and subsequent radar observations confirmed the binary nature and gave a primary diameter of 300 m and a secondary diameter of 50-100 m. Our photometric observations were used to derive the phase curve of 2004 BL86 in the V-band. Two different photometric functions were fitted to this phase curve, the IAU H-G model and the Shevchenko model. From the fit of the H-G function we obtained an absolute magnitude of H = 19.51 ± 0.02 and a slope parameter of G = 0.34 ± 0.02. The Shevchenko function yielded an absolute magnitude of H = 19.03 ± 0.07 and a phase coefficient b = 0.0225 ± 0.0006. The phase coefficient was used to calculate the geometric albedo (Ag) using the relationship found by Belskaya & Schevchenko, obtaining a value of Ag = 40% ± 8% in the V-band. With the geometric albedo and the absolute magnitudes derived from the H-G and the Shevchenko functions we calculated the diameter (D) of 2004 BL86, obtaining D = 263 ± 26 and D = 328 ± 35 m, respectively. 2004 BL86 spectral band parameters and pyroxene chemistry are consistent with non-cumulate eucrite meteorites. A majority of these meteorites are derived from Vesta and are analogous with surface lava flows on a differentiated parent body. A non-diagnostic spectral curve match using the Modeling for Asteroids tool yielded a best-match with non-cumulate eucrite Bereba. Three other near

  6. Accurately characterized optical tissue phantoms: how, why and when?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Veilleux, Isra"l.; Noiseux, Isabelle; Mermut, Ozzy

    2011-03-01

    Optical tissue phantoms are very important tools for the development of biomedical imaging applications. Optical phantoms are often used as ground truth against which instruments results can be compared. It is therefore important that the optical properties of reference phantoms be measured in a manner that is traceable to the international system of units. SI traceability insures long term consistency of results and will therefore improve the effectiveness of diffuse optics research effort more effective by reducing unwanted variability in the data produced and shared by the community. The ultimate benefit of rigorous SI traceability is the reduction of variability in the data produced by novel diagnostic devices, which will in turn increase the statistical power of clinical trials aiming at validating their clinical usefulness. SI traceability, and therefore uncertainty analysis, is also relevant to traceability aspects mandated by FDA regulations. SI traceability is achieved through a thorough analysis of the measurement principle and its potential error sources. The uncertainty analysis should be ultimately validated by inter-laboratory comparison until a consensus is attained on the best practices for measuring the optical properties of tissue phantoms.

  7. Pendant bubble method for an accurate characterization of superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ling, William Yeong Liang; Ng, Tuck Wah; Neild, Adrian

    2011-12-06

    The commonly used sessile drop method for measuring contact angles and surface tension suffers from errors on superhydrophobic surfaces. This occurs from unavoidable experimental error in determining the vertical location of the liquid-solid-vapor interface due to a camera's finite pixel resolution, thereby necessitating the development and application of subpixel algorithms. We demonstrate here the advantage of a pendant bubble in decreasing the resulting error prior to the application of additional algorithms. For sessile drops to attain an equivalent accuracy, the pixel count would have to be increased by 2 orders of magnitude.

  8. Evaluation of multiple-scale 3D characterization for coal physical structure with DCM method and synchrotron X-ray CT.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haipeng; Yang, Yushuang; Yang, Jianli; Nie, Yihang; Jia, Jing; Wang, Yudan

    2015-01-01

    Multiscale nondestructive characterization of coal microscopic physical structure can provide important information for coal conversion and coal-bed methane extraction. In this study, the physical structure of a coal sample was investigated by synchrotron-based multiple-energy X-ray CT at three beam energies and two different spatial resolutions. A data-constrained modeling (DCM) approach was used to quantitatively characterize the multiscale compositional distributions at the two resolutions. The volume fractions of each voxel for four different composition groups were obtained at the two resolutions. Between the two resolutions, the difference for DCM computed volume fractions of coal matrix and pores is less than 0.3%, and the difference for mineral composition groups is less than 0.17%. This demonstrates that the DCM approach can account for compositions beyond the X-ray CT imaging resolution with adequate accuracy. By using DCM, it is possible to characterize a relatively large coal sample at a relatively low spatial resolution with minimal loss of the effect due to subpixel fine length scale structures.

  9. Physical Characterization of ˜2 M Diameter Near-Earth Asteroid 2015 TC25: A Possible Boulder from E-type Asteroid (44) Nysa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Vishnu; Sanchez, Juan A.; Bottke, William F.; Thirouin, Audrey; Rivera-Valentin, Edgard G.; Kelley, Michael S.; Ryan, William; Cloutis, Edward A.; Tegler, Stephen C.; Ryan, Eileen V.; Taylor, Patrick A.; Richardson, James E.; Moskovitz, Nicholas; Le Corre, Lucille

    2016-12-01

    Small near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) (<20 m) are interesting, because they are progenitors for meteorites in our terrestrial collection. The physical characteristics of these small NEAs are crucial to our understanding of the effectiveness of our atmosphere in filtering low-strength impactors. In the past, the characterization of small NEAs has been a challenge, because of the difficulty in detecting them prior to close Earth flyby. In this study, we physically characterized the 2 m diameter NEA 2015 TC25 using ground-based optical, near-infrared and radar assets during a close flyby of the Earth (distance 128,000 km) in 2015 October 12. Our observations suggest that its surface composition is similar to aubrites, a rare class of high-albedo differentiated meteorites. Aubrites make up only 0.14% of all known meteorites in our terrestrial meteorite collection. 2015 TC25 is also a very fast rotator with a period of 133 ± 6 s. We combined the spectral and dynamical properties of 2015 TC25 and found the best candidate source body in the inner main belt to be the 70 km diameter E-type asteroid (44) Nysa. We attribute the difference in spectral slope between the two objects to the lack of regolith on the surface of 2015 TC25. Using the albedo of E-type asteroids (50%-60%) we refine the diameter of 2015 TC25 to 2 m, making it one of the smallest NEAs ever to be characterized.

  10. Must Kohn-Sham oscillator strengths be accurate at threshold?

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Zenghui; Burke, Kieron; Faassen, Meta van

    2009-09-21

    The exact ground-state Kohn-Sham (KS) potential for the helium atom is known from accurate wave function calculations of the ground-state density. The threshold for photoabsorption from this potential matches the physical system exactly. By carefully studying its absorption spectrum, we show the answer to the title question is no. To address this problem in detail, we generate a highly accurate simple fit of a two-electron spectrum near the threshold, and apply the method to both the experimental spectrum and that of the exact ground-state Kohn-Sham potential.

  11. In-line sensor for accurate rf power measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gahan, D.; Hopkins, M. B.

    2005-10-01

    An in-line sensor has been constructed with 50Ω characteristic impedance to accurately measure rf power dissipated in a matched or unmatched load with a view to being implemented as a rf discharge diagnostic. The physical construction and calibration technique are presented. The design is a wide band, hybrid directional coupler/current-voltage sensor suitable for fundamental and harmonic power measurements. A comparison with a standard wattmeter using dummy load impedances shows that this in-line sensor is significantly more accurate in mismatched conditions.

  12. In-line sensor for accurate rf power measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gahan, D.; Hopkins, M.B.

    2005-10-15

    An in-line sensor has been constructed with 50 {omega} characteristic impedance to accurately measure rf power dissipated in a matched or unmatched load with a view to being implemented as a rf discharge diagnostic. The physical construction and calibration technique are presented. The design is a wide band, hybrid directional coupler/current-voltage sensor suitable for fundamental and harmonic power measurements. A comparison with a standard wattmeter using dummy load impedances shows that this in-line sensor is significantly more accurate in mismatched conditions.

  13. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  14. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  15. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  16. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  17. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  18. Accurate lineshape spectroscopy and the Boltzmann constant

    PubMed Central

    Truong, G.-W.; Anstie, J. D.; May, E. F.; Stace, T. M.; Luiten, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy has an illustrious history delivering serendipitous discoveries and providing a stringent testbed for new physical predictions, including applications from trace materials detection, to understanding the atmospheres of stars and planets, and even constraining cosmological models. Reaching fundamental-noise limits permits optimal extraction of spectroscopic information from an absorption measurement. Here, we demonstrate a quantum-limited spectrometer that delivers high-precision measurements of the absorption lineshape. These measurements yield a very accurate measurement of the excited-state (6P1/2) hyperfine splitting in Cs, and reveals a breakdown in the well-known Voigt spectral profile. We develop a theoretical model that accounts for this breakdown, explaining the observations to within the shot-noise limit. Our model enables us to infer the thermal velocity dispersion of the Cs vapour with an uncertainty of 35 p.p.m. within an hour. This allows us to determine a value for Boltzmann's constant with a precision of 6 p.p.m., and an uncertainty of 71 p.p.m. PMID:26465085

  19. Accurate upper body rehabilitation system using kinect.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sanjana; Bhowmick, Brojeshwar; Chakravarty, Kingshuk; Sinha, Aniruddha; Das, Abhijit

    2016-08-01

    The growing importance of Kinect as a tool for clinical assessment and rehabilitation is due to its portability, low cost and markerless system for human motion capture. However, the accuracy of Kinect in measuring three-dimensional body joint center locations often fails to meet clinical standards of accuracy when compared to marker-based motion capture systems such as Vicon. The length of the body segment connecting any two joints, measured as the distance between three-dimensional Kinect skeleton joint coordinates, has been observed to vary with time. The orientation of the line connecting adjoining Kinect skeletal coordinates has also been seen to differ from the actual orientation of the physical body segment. Hence we have proposed an optimization method that utilizes Kinect Depth and RGB information to search for the joint center location that satisfies constraints on body segment length and as well as orientation. An experimental study have been carried out on ten healthy participants performing upper body range of motion exercises. The results report 72% reduction in body segment length variance and 2° improvement in Range of Motion (ROM) angle hence enabling to more accurate measurements for upper limb exercises.

  20. Accurate, reproducible measurement of blood pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, N R; Chockalingam, A; Fodor, J G; McKay, D W

    1990-01-01

    The diagnosis of mild hypertension and the treatment of hypertension require accurate measurement of blood pressure. Blood pressure readings are altered by various factors that influence the patient, the techniques used and the accuracy of the sphygmomanometer. The variability of readings can be reduced if informed patients prepare in advance by emptying their bladder and bowel, by avoiding over-the-counter vasoactive drugs the day of measurement and by avoiding exposure to cold, caffeine consumption, smoking and physical exertion within half an hour before measurement. The use of standardized techniques to measure blood pressure will help to avoid large systematic errors. Poor technique can account for differences in readings of more than 15 mm Hg and ultimately misdiagnosis. Most of the recommended procedures are simple and, when routinely incorporated into clinical practice, require little additional time. The equipment must be appropriate and in good condition. Physicians should have a suitable selection of cuff sizes readily available; the use of the correct cuff size is essential to minimize systematic errors in blood pressure measurement. Semiannual calibration of aneroid sphygmomanometers and annual inspection of mercury sphygmomanometers and blood pressure cuffs are recommended. We review the methods recommended for measuring blood pressure and discuss the factors known to produce large differences in blood pressure readings. PMID:2192791

  1. Characterizing scale- and location-dependent correlation of water retention parameters with soil physical properties using wavelet techniques.

    PubMed

    Shu, Qiaosheng; Liu, Zuoxin; Si, Bingcheng

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the correlation between soil hydraulic parameters and soil physical properties is a prerequisite for the prediction of soil hydraulic properties from soil physical properties. The objective of this study was to examine the scale- and location-dependent correlation between two water retention parameters (alpha and n) in the van Genuchten (1980) function and soil physical properties (sand content, bulk density [Bd], and organic carbon content) using wavelet techniques. Soil samples were collected from a transect from Fuxin, China. Soil water retention curves were measured, and the van Genuchten parameters were obtained through curve fitting. Wavelet coherency analysis was used to elucidate the location- and scale-dependent relationships between these parameters and soil physical properties. Results showed that the wavelet coherence between alpha and sand content was significantly different from red noise at small scales (8-20 m) and from a distance of 30 to 470 m. Their wavelet phase spectrum was predominantly out of phase, indicating negative correlation between these two variables. The strong negative correlation between alpha and Bd existed mainly at medium scales (30-80 m). However, parameter n had a strong positive correlation only with Bd at scales between 20 and 80 m. Neither of the two retention parameters had significant wavelet coherency with organic carbon content. These results suggested that location-dependent scale analyses are necessary to improve the performance for soil water retention characteristic predictions.

  2. Physical and chemical characterization of biochars produced from coppiced wood of thirteen tree species for use in horticultural substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seven-year-old coppiced shoots from thirteen species of native and non-native trees and shrubs were harvested, dried, and were pyrolyzed to produce biochars for potential use in horticultural substrates. Several chemical and physical characteristics of the biochars were determined. There were slight...

  3. [Fibromyalgia and physical therapy].

    PubMed

    Tits, M

    2011-09-01

    Fibromyalgia is a syndrome characterized by the existence of widespread musculoskeletal pain, present above and below the waist and the axial skeleton for a period of at least three months. Other symptoms are frequently present, intolerance to exercise, fatigue, trouble sleeping, morning stiffness, paresthesias, anxiety, headaches, etc. The exact etiology and pathophysiology of the disease are not clearly established. Currently, we primarily retain a bad handling of pain pathways. An understanding of these mechanisms is important as a basis for a global therapeutic program and the rehabilitation of patients with fibromyalgia. By the multiple nature of these symptoms associated with fibromyalgia, an accurate assessment of the patient will be a preamble to any optimal care. Current guidelines recommend comprehensive and multidisciplinary care, however centers that offer this type of care are rare. In mono-disciplinary treatment, the physical therapy recommended is aerobic exercise and the strengthening of muscles associated with different manual techniques to decrease the nociceptive input.

  4. Physical - mechanical characterization of poly(lactide)/poly (ɛ-caprolactone) blends with ethyl ester L-lysine triisocyanate as reactive agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocita, Davide; Visco, Annamaria; Espro, Claudia

    2016-05-01

    A study on physical and mechanical properties of PLA/PCL polyesters reactive blends, obtained by adding LTI was made with the aim to apply these blends in biomedical field, for example for absorbable suture threads or scaffolds for cellular growth. Polyesters based reactive blends were obtained by internal mixing, and it was find out the possibility of finely control the characteristic properties of those materials by varying the weight fraction of the two components and the amount of reactive agent. Blends of different composition were characterized by torque measurements, uniaxial traction test and wet-ability.

  5. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of additional alpha contaminated and mixed low-level waste for treatment at the advanced mixed waste treatment project

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.P.

    1995-07-01

    This document provides physical, chemical, and radiological descriptive information for a portion of mixed waste that is potentially available for private sector treatment. The format and contents are designed to provide treatment vendors with preliminary information on the characteristics and properties for additional candidate portions of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and offsite mixed wastes not covered in the two previous characterization reports for the INEL-stored low-level alpha-contaminated and transuranic wastes. This report defines the waste, provides background information, briefly reviews the requirements of the Federal Facility Compliance Act (P.L. 102-386), and relates the Site Treatment Plans developed under the Federal Facility Compliance Act to the waste streams described herein. Each waste is summarized in a Waste Profile Sheet with text, charts, and tables of waste descriptive information for a particular waste stream. A discussion of the availability and uncertainty of data for these waste streams precedes the characterization descriptions.

  6. Using side-scan sonar to characterize and map physical habitat and anthropogenic underwater features in the St. Louis River.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Characterizing underwater habitat and other features is difficult and costly, especially in the large St. Louis River Estuary. We are using side-scan sonar (SSS), first developed in the 1960s to remotely sense underwater habitat features from reflected acoustic signals (backscatt...

  7. Using side-scan sonar to characterize and map physical habitat and anthropogenic underwater features in the St. Louis River

    EPA Science Inventory

    Characterizing underwater habitat and other features is difficult and costly, especially in large river systems. The St. Louis River is the largest US tributary to Lake Superior and the lower portion consists of a 48.5 km2 complex of wetlands, tributaries, and bays. We surveyed 8...

  8. Integrated physical-chemical procedure for soil organic carbon frationation and characterization during transition to organic farming

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two field experiments in the South of Italy were established in 2009 to study and characterize SOM during transition to organic farming. Experiments included a cereal/leguminous rotation fertilized with permitted organic amendments with three replications. A sequential fractionation procedure was us...

  9. A preliminary evaluation of the implementation and efficacy of "Physics First" at the secondary level as characterized by teachers and administrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livanis, Olga

    The efficacy of science education at the secondary level in America has been under review and attack for the last 40 years by educators, scientists, professional associations, and the United States Department of Education. Concern as to the quality of science education at the secondary level has led to articles, books, conferences and seminars calling for and in some cases designing science reforms to meet this perceived ill-preparedness of our high-school students to meet the challenges of our ever growing local and global technological advances. In light of this focused attention on science education, reforms and national standards have been set and implemented in many States. However, we have not yet, as a nation or state educational system, come to a consensus as to the most effectual way to address lagging science scores that may correlate to our critical general knowledge of science. It has been suggested by notable scientists, such as Leon Lederman and educators such as Paul Hewitt and Uri Haber-Schaim and Arthur Eisenkraft, that our high school science sequence place physics first in the science sequence. This argument is based on physics' position as a fundamental science and that all students would partake instead of about 25% of all present high school graduates. Physics First has currently experienced it's greatest expanse, implemented as of September 2001 in the San Diego School District, the fourth largest school district in American and recently embraced by the California State University system. The goal of this qualitative study was to conduct a preliminary evaluation of the implementation and efficacy of Physics First as characterized by teachers and/or administrators. Implications for generalizability among the study's respondents were apparent in several issues among which are; the characteristics of a Physics First school, the commitment to implementation of Physics First based on manufactured motivations, and a non-conformity on the definition

  10. An integrated petrophysical and rock physics analysis to improve reservoir characterization of Cretaceous sand intervals in Middle Indus Basin, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azeem, Tahir; Chun, Wang Yan; MonaLisa; Khalid, Perveiz; Xue Qing, Liu; Ehsan, Muhammad Irfan; Jawad Munawar, Muhammad; Wei, Xie

    2017-03-01

    The sand intervals of the Lower Goru Formation of the Cretaceous age, widely distributed in the Middle and Lower Indus Basin of Pakistan, are proven reservoirs. However, in the Sawan gas field of the Middle Indus Basin, these sandstone intervals are very deep and extremely heterogeneous in character, which makes it difficult to discriminate lithologies and fluid saturation. Based on petrophysical analysis and rock physics modeling, an integrated approach is adopted to discriminate between lithologies and fluid saturation in the above-mentioned sand intervals. The seismic velocities are modeled using the Xu–White clay–sand mixing rock physics model. The calibrated rock physics model shows good consistency between measured and modeled velocities. The correlation between measured and modeled P and S wave velocities is 92.76% and 84.99%, respectively. This calibrated model has been successfully used to estimate other elastic parameters, even in those wells where both shear and sonic logs were missing. These estimated elastic parameters were cross-plotted to discriminate between the lithology and fluid content in the target zone. Cross plots clearly separate the shale, shaly sand, and gas-bearing sand clusters, which was not possible through conventional petrophysical analysis. These data clusters have been exported to the corresponding well for the purpose of interpolation between wells and to analyze the lateral and vertical variations in lithology and fluid content in the reservoir zone.

  11. Effect of fiber-matrix adhesion on the creep behavior of CF/PPS composites: temperature and physical aging characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta Dias, M. H.; Jansen, K. M. B.; Luinge, J. W.; Bersee, H. E. N.; Benedictus, R.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of fiber-matrix adhesion on the linear viscoelastic creep behavior of `as received' and `surface modified' carbon fibers (AR-CF and SM-CF, respectively) reinforced polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) composite materials was investigated. Short-term tensile creep tests were performed on ±45° specimens under six different isothermal conditions, 40, 50, 60, 65, 70 and 75 °C. Physical aging effects were evaluated on both systems using the short-term test method established by Struik. The results showed that the shapes of the curves were affected neither by physical aging nor by the test temperature, allowing then superposition to be made. A unified model was proposed with a single physical aging and temperature-dependent shift factor, a_{T,te}. It was suggested that the surface treatment carried out in SM-CF/PPS had two major effects on the creep response of CF/PPS composites at a reference temperature of 40 °C: a lowering of the initial compliance of about 25 % and a slowing down of the creep response of about 1.1 decade.

  12. Accurate Fiber Length Measurement Using Time-of-Flight Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terra, Osama; Hussein, Hatem

    2016-06-01

    Fiber artifacts of very well-measured length are required for the calibration of optical time domain reflectometers (OTDR). In this paper accurate length measurement of different fiber lengths using the time-of-flight technique is performed. A setup is proposed to measure accurately lengths from 1 to 40 km at 1,550 and 1,310 nm using high-speed electro-optic modulator and photodetector. This setup offers traceability to the SI unit of time, the second (and hence to meter by definition), by locking the time interval counter to the Global Positioning System (GPS)-disciplined quartz oscillator. Additionally, the length of a recirculating loop artifact is measured and compared with the measurement made for the same fiber by the National Physical Laboratory of United Kingdom (NPL). Finally, a method is proposed to relatively correct the fiber refractive index to allow accurate fiber length measurement.

  13. Physical interpretation and development of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation techniques applied to the quantitative characterization of textile composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James G.

    1994-01-01

    In this Progress Report, we describe our continuing research activities concerning the development and implementation of advanced ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation methods applied to the inspection and characterization of complex composite structures. We explore the feasibility of implementing medical linear array imaging technology as a viable ultrasonic-based nondestructive evaluation method to inspect and characterize complex materials. As an initial step toward the application of linear array imaging technology to the interrogation of a wide range of complex composite structures, we present images obtained using an unmodified medical ultrasonic imaging system of two epoxy-bonded aluminum plate specimens, each with intentionally disbonded regions. These images are compared with corresponding conventional ultrasonic contact transducer measurements in order to assess whether these images can detect disbonded regions and provide information regarding the nature of the disbonded region. We present a description of a standoff/delay fixture which has been designed, constructed, and implemented on a Hewlett-Packard SONOS 1500 medical imaging system. This standoff/delay fixture, when attached to a 7.5 MHz linear array probe, greatly enhances our ability to interrogate flat plate specimens. The final section of this Progress Report describes a woven composite plate specimen that has been specially machined to include intentional flaws. This woven composite specimen will allow us to assess the feasibility of applying linear array imaging technology to the inspection and characterization of complex textile composite materials. We anticipate the results of this on-going investigation may provide a step toward the development of a rapid, real-time, and portable method of ultrasonic inspection and characterization based on linear array technology.

  14. Physics of enriched uranyl fluoride deposit characterizations using active neutron and gamma interrogation techniques with {sup 252}Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, M.S.; Uckan, T.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Valentine, T.E.; Hannon, T.F.

    1998-08-01

    A method was developed and successfully applied to characterize large uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 21}) deposits at the former Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. These deposits were formed by a wet air in-leakage into the UF{sub 6} process gas lines over a period of years. The resulting UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} is hygroscopic, readily absorbing moisture from the air to form hydrates as UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}-nH{sub 2}O. The ratio of hydrogen to uranium, denoted H/U, can vary from 0--16, and has significant nuclear criticality safety impacts for large deposits. In order to properly formulate the required course of action, a non-intrusive characterization of the distribution of the fissile material within the pipe, its total mass, and amount of hydration was needed. The Nuclear Weapons Identification System (NWIS) previously developed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for identification of uranium weapons components in storage containers was used to successfully characterize the distribution, hydration, and total mass of these deposits.

  15. Characterization of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectrometers for high energy density physics and light source experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K. W. Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparacio, L.; Efthimion, P.; Pablant, N. A.; Lu, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Magee, E.

    2014-11-15

    A high resolution 1D imaging x-ray spectrometer concept comprising a spherically bent crystal and a 2D pixelated detector is being optimized for diagnostics of small sources such as high energy density physics (HEDP) and synchrotron radiation or x-ray free electron laser experiments. This instrument is used on tokamak experiments for Doppler measurements of ion temperature and plasma flow velocity profiles. Laboratory measurements demonstrate a resolving power, E/ΔE of order 10 000 and spatial resolution better than 10 μm. Initial tests of the high resolution instrument on HEDP plasmas are being performed.

  16. Accurate orbit propagation with planetary close encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baù, Giulio; Milani Comparetti, Andrea; Guerra, Francesca

    2015-08-01

    We tackle the problem of accurately propagating the motion of those small bodies that undergo close approaches with a planet. The literature is lacking on this topic and the reliability of the numerical results is not sufficiently discussed. The high-frequency components of the perturbation generated by a close encounter makes the propagation particularly challenging both from the point of view of the dynamical stability of the formulation and the numerical stability of the integrator. In our approach a fixed step-size and order multistep integrator is combined with a regularized formulation of the perturbed two-body problem. When the propagated object enters the region of influence of a celestial body, the latter becomes the new primary body of attraction. Moreover, the formulation and the step-size will also be changed if necessary. We present: 1) the restarter procedure applied to the multistep integrator whenever the primary body is changed; 2) new analytical formulae for setting the step-size (given the order of the multistep, formulation and initial osculating orbit) in order to control the accumulation of the local truncation error and guarantee the numerical stability during the propagation; 3) a new definition of the region of influence in the phase space. We test the propagator with some real asteroids subject to the gravitational attraction of the planets, the Yarkovsky and relativistic perturbations. Our goal is to show that the proposed approach improves the performance of both the propagator implemented in the OrbFit software package (which is currently used by the NEODyS service) and of the propagator represented by a variable step-size and order multistep method combined with Cowell's formulation (i.e. direct integration of position and velocity in either the physical or a fictitious time).

  17. 4D reservoir characterization using well log data for feasible CO2-enhanced oil recovery at Ankleshwar, Cambay Basin - A rock physics diagnostic and modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, Shib Sankar; Vedanti, Nimisha; Dimri, V. P.

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, rock physics modeling has become an integral part of reservoir characterization as it provides the fundamental relationship between geophysical measurements and reservoir rock properties. These models are also used to quantify the effect of fluid saturation and stress on reservoir rocks by tracking the changes in elastic properties during production. Additionally, various rock physics models can be applied to obtain the information of rock properties away from existing drilled wells, which can play a crucial role in the feasibility assessment of CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operation at field. Thus, the objective of this study is to develop a rock-physics model of the Ankleshwar reservoir to predict the reservoir response under CO2-EOR. The Ankleshwar oil field is a mature field situated in Cambay Basin (Western India) that witnessed massive peripheral water flooding for around 40 years. Since the field was under water flooding for a long term, reasonable changes in reservoir elastic properties might have occurred. To identify potential reservoir zone with significant bypassed (or residual) oil saturation, we applied the diagnostic rock physics models to two available wells from the Ankleshwar oil field. The results clearly indicate transitions from clean sands to shaly sands at the base, and from sandy shale to pure shale at the top of the reservoir pay zone, suggesting a different seismic response at the top when compared to the base of the reservoir in both the wells. We also found that clay content and sorting affects the elastic properties of these sands, indicating different depositional scenario for the oil sands encountered in the Ankleshwar formation. Nevertheless, the rock physics template (RPT) analysis of the well data provides valuable information about the residual oil zone, a potential target for CO2-EOR. Further, a 4D reservoir characterization study has been conducted to assess the seismic detectability of CO2-EOR, and we

  18. Brain Serotonin Synthesis in Adult Males Characterized by Physical Aggression during Childhood: A 21-Year Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Booij, Linda; Tremblay, Richard E.; Leyton, Marco; Séguin, Jean R.; Vitaro, Frank; Gravel, Paul; Perreau-Linck, Elisabeth; Lévesque, Mélissa L.; Durand, France; Diksic, Mirko; Turecki, Gustavo; Benkelfat, Chawki

    2010-01-01

    Background Adults exhibiting severe impulsive and aggressive behaviors have multiple indices of low serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission. It remains unclear though whether low 5-HT mediates the behavior or instead reflects a pre-existing vulnerability trait. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, positron emission tomography with the tracer alpha-[11C]methyl-L-tryptophan (11C-AMT) was used to compare 5-HT synthesis capacity in two groups of adult males from a 21-year longitudinal study (mean age ± SD: 27.1±0.7): individuals with a history of childhood-limited high physical aggression (C-LHPA; N = 8) and individuals with normal (low) patterns of physical aggression (LPA; N = 18). The C-LHPA males had significantly lower trapping of 11C-AMT bilaterally in the orbitofrontal cortex and self-reported more impulsiveness. Despite this, in adulthood there were no group differences in plasma tryptophan levels, genotyping, aggression, emotional intelligence, working memory, computerized measures of impulsivity, psychosocial functioning/adjustment, and personal and family history of mood and substance abuse disorders. Conclusions/Significance These results force a re-examination of the low 5-HT hypothesis as central in the biology of violence. They suggest that low 5-HT does not mediate current behavior and should be considered a vulnerability factor for impulsive-aggressive behavior that may or may not be expressed depending on other biological factors, experience, and environmental support during development. PMID:20582306

  19. Room-temperature aging of Narmco 5208 carbon-epoxy prepreg. II - Physical, mechanical, and nondestructive characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, K.C.; Noel, D.; Hechler, J.-J.; Cielo, P.; Krapez, J.-C. )

    1991-06-01

    Samples of Narmco Rigidite 5208/WC3000 carbon-epoxy composite prepreg were exposed to ambient temperature and 50 percent relative humidity for different periods up to 66 days. The aging has a significant effect on prepreg physical properties such as tack, volatiles content, and gel time. A set of four-ply laminates made from aged prepreg was subjected to tensile testing, ultrasonic inspection, and optothermal inspection. No relationship could be discerned between laminate properties and prepreg aging time. However, variations in panel homogeneity were observed, and these correlated with thermal diffusivity and tensile modulus measurements, but not with ultimate tensile strength or elongation. A set of six-ply laminates was used to measure compressive properties, interlaminar shear strength, and physical properties. These panels also showed variations in porosity, again unrelated to aging, but in addition, the fiber-resin ratio was observed to decrease with aging time. Both factors were found to affect mechanical properties. The implications concerning the importance of monitoring the aging by physicochemical methods are discussed. 30 refs.

  20. The Pasadena Aerosol Characterization Observatory (PACO): chemical and physical analysis of the Western Los Angeles Basin aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersey, S. P.; Craven, J. S.; Schilling, K. A.; Metcalf, A. R.; Sorooshian, A.; Chan, M. N.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2011-02-01

    The Pasadena Aerosol Characterization Observatory (PACO) represents the first major aerosol characterization experiment centered in the Western/Central Los Angeles Basin. The sampling site, located on the campus of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, was positioned to sample a continuous afternoon influx of transported urban aerosol with a photochemical age of 1-2 h and generally free from major local contributions. Sampling spanned 5 months during the summer of 2009, which were broken into 3 regimes on the basis of distinct meteorological conditions. Regime I was characterized by a series of low pressure systems, resulting in high humidity and rainy periods with clean conditions. Regime II typified early summer meteorology, with significant morning marine layers and warm, sunny afternoons. Regime III was characterized by hot, dry conditions with little marine layer influence. Organic aerosol (OA) is the most significant constituent of Los Angeles aerosol (42, 43, and 55% of total submicron mass in regimes I, II, and III, respectively), and that the overall oxidation state remains relatively constant on timescales of days to weeks (O:C = 0.44 ± 0.08, 0.55 ± 0.05, and 0.48 ± 0.08 during regimes I, II, and III, respectively), with no difference in O:C between morning and afternoon periods. Periods characterized by significant morning marine layer influence followed by photochemically favorable afternoons displayed significantly higher aerosol mass and O:C ratio, suggesting that aqueous processes may be important in the generation of secondary aerosol and oxidized organic aerosol (OOA) in Los Angeles. Water soluble organic mass (WSOM) reaches maxima near 14:00-15:00 local time (LT), but the percentage of AMS organic mass contributed by WSOM remains relatively constant throughout the day. Sulfate and nitrate reside predominantly in accumulation mode aerosol, while afternoon SOA production coincides with the appearance of a distinct fine mode

  1. Synthesis and physical characterization of a P1 arginine combinatorial library, and its application to the determination of the substrate specificity of serine peptidases.

    PubMed

    Furlong, Stephen T; Mauger, Russell C; Strimpler, Anne M; Liu, Yi-Ping; Morris, Frank X; Edwards, Philip D

    2002-11-01

    Serine peptidases are a large, well-studied, and medically important class of peptidases. Despite the attention these enzymes have received, details concerning the substrate specificity of even some of the best known enzymes in this class are lacking. One approach to rapidly characterizing substrate specificity for peptidases is the use of positional scanning combinatorial substrate libraries. We recently synthesized such a library for enzymes with a preference for arginine at P1 and demonstrated the use of this library with thrombin (Edwards et al. Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett. 2000, 10, 2291). In the present work, we extend these studies by demonstrating good agreement between the theroretical and measured content of portions of this library and by showing that the library permits rapid characterization of the substrate specificity of additional SA clan serine peptidases including factor Xa, tryptase, and trypsin. These results were consistent both with cleavage sites in natural substrates and cleavage of commercially available synthetic substrates. We also demonstrate that pH or salt concentration have a quantitative effect on the rate of cleavage of the pooled library substrates but that correct prediction of optimal substrates for the enzymes studied appeared to be independent of these parameters. These studies provide new substrate specificity data on an important class of peptidases and are the first to provide physical characterization of a peptidase substrate library.

  2. Review on physical and chemical characterizations of contaminated sediments from urban stormwater infiltration basins within the framework of the French observatory for urban hydrology (SOERE URBIS).

    PubMed

    El-Mufleh, Amelène; Béchet, Béatrice; Ruban, Véronique; Legret, Michel; Clozel, Blandine; Barraud, Sylvie; Gonzalez-Merchan, Carolina; Bedell, Jean-Philippe; Delolme, Cécile

    2014-04-01

    Urban stormwater infiltration basins are designed to hold runoff from impervious surfaces and allow the settling of sediments and associated pollutants. However concerns have been expressed about the environmental impacts that may be exerted by the trapped pollutants on groundwater, soils and ecosystems. In this context, sediment characterization represents a key issue for local authorities in terms of management strategies. During the last two decades, several studies were launched including either physical or chemical characterization of stormwater sediments but without real synthesis of data and methods used. Consequently, there is an important need for reviewing the current experimental techniques devoted to the physico-chemical characterization of sediment. The review is based on the outcomes of two experimental sites for which long term monitoring and data collection have been done: the Cheviré basin (near Nantes) and the Django Reinhardt basin (near Lyon). The authors summarize the studies dealing with bulk properties, pollutant contents, their potential mobility and speciation. This paper aims at promoting the significant progresses that were made through a multidisciplinary approach involving multi-scaled and combined experimental techniques.

  3. New approaches for the chemical and physical characterization of aerosols using a single particle mass spectrometry based technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Matthew Todd

    Aerosols affect the lives of people every day. They can decrease visibility, alter cloud formation and cloud lifetimes, change the energy balance of the earth and are implicated in causing numerous health problems. Measuring the physical and chemical properties of aerosols is essential to understand and mitigate any negative impacts that aerosols might have on climate and human health. Aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS) is a technique that measures the size and chemical composition of individual particles in real time. The goal of this dissertation is to develop new and useful approaches for measuring the physical and/or chemical properties of particles using ATOFMS. This has been accomplished using laboratory experiments, ambient field measurements and sometimes comparisons between them. A comparison of mass spectra generated from petrochemical particles was made to light duty vehicle (LDV) and heavy duty diesel vehicle (HDDV) particle mass spectra. This comparison has given us new insight into how to differentiate between particles from these two sources. A method for coating elemental carbon (EC) particles with organic carbon (OC) was used to generate a calibration curve for quantifying the fraction of organic carbon and elemental carbon on particles using ATOFMS. This work demonstrates that it is possible to obtain quantitative chemical information with regards to EC and OC using ATOFMS. The relationship between electrical mobility diameter and aerodynamic diameter is used to develop a tandem differential mobility analyzer-ATOFMS technique to measure the effective density, size and chemical composition of particles. The method is applied in the field and gives new insight into the physical/chemical properties of particles. The size resolved chemical composition of aerosols was measured in the Indian Ocean during the monsoonal transition period. This field work shows that a significant fraction of aerosol transported from India was from biomass

  4. Physical interpretation and development of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation techniques applied to the quantitative characterization of textile composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, James G.

    1995-03-01

    In this Progress Report, the author describes the continuing research to explore the feasibility of implementing medical linear array imaging technology as a viable ultrasonic-based nondestructive evaluation method to inspect and characterize complex materials. Images obtained using an unmodified medical ultrasonic imaging system of a bonded aluminum plate sample with a simulated disbond region are presented. The disbond region was produced by adhering a piece of plain white paper to a piece of cellophane tape and applying the paper-tape combination to one of the aluminum plates. Because the area under the paper was not adhesively bonded to the aluminum plate, this arrangement more closely simulates a disbond. Images are also presented for an aluminum plate sample with an epoxy strip adhered to one side to help provide information for the interpretation of the images of the bonded aluminum plate sample containing the disbond region. These images are compared with corresponding conventional ultrasonic contact transducer measurements in order to provide information regarding the nature of the disbonded region. The results of this on-going investigation may provide a step toward the development of a rapid, real-time, and portable method of ultrasonic inspection and characterization based on linear array technology. In Section 2 of this Progress Report, the preparation of the aluminum plate specimens is described. Section 3 describes the method of linear array imaging. Sections 4 and 5 present the linear array images and results from contact transducer measurements, respectively. A discussion of the results are presented in Section 6.

  5. Physical interpretation and development of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation techniques applied to the quantitative characterization of textile composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James G.

    1995-01-01

    In this Progress Report, the author describes the continuing research to explore the feasibility of implementing medical linear array imaging technology as a viable ultrasonic-based nondestructive evaluation method to inspect and characterize complex materials. Images obtained using an unmodified medical ultrasonic imaging system of a bonded aluminum plate sample with a simulated disbond region are presented. The disbond region was produced by adhering a piece of plain white paper to a piece of cellophane tape and applying the paper-tape combination to one of the aluminum plates. Because the area under the paper was not adhesively bonded to the aluminum plate, this arrangement more closely simulates a disbond. Images are also presented for an aluminum plate sample with an epoxy strip adhered to one side to help provide information for the interpretation of the images of the bonded aluminum plate sample containing the disbond region. These images are compared with corresponding conventional ultrasonic contact transducer measurements in order to provide information regarding the nature of the disbonded region. The results of this on-going investigation may provide a step toward the development of a rapid, real-time, and portable method of ultrasonic inspection and characterization based on linear array technology. In Section 2 of this Progress Report, the preparation of the aluminum plate specimens is described. Section 3 describes the method of linear array imaging. Sections 4 and 5 present the linear array images and results from contact transducer measurements, respectively. A discussion of the results are presented in Section 6.

  6. Accurate Biomass Estimation via Bayesian Adaptive Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, K.; Knuth, K.; Castle, P.

    2005-12-01

    Typical estimates of standing wood derived from remote sensing sources take advantage of aggregate measurements of canopy heights (e.g. LIDAR) and canopy diameters (segmentation of IKONOS imagery) to obtain a wood volume estimate by assuming homogeneous species and a fixed function that returns volume. The validation of such techniques use manually measured diameter at breast height records (DBH). Our goal is to improve the accuracy and applicability of biomass estimation methods to heterogeneous forests and transitional areas. We are developing estimates with quantifiable uncertainty using a new form of estimation function, active sampling, and volumetric reconstruction image rendering for species specific mass truth. Initially we are developing a Bayesian adaptive sampling method for BRDF associated with the MISR Rahman model with respect to categorical biomes. This involves characterizing the probability distributions of the 3 free parameters of the Rahman model for the 6 categories of biomes used by MISR. Subsequently, these distributions can be used to determine the optimal sampling methodology to distinguish biomes during acquisition. We have a remotely controlled semi-autonomous helicopter that has stereo imaging, lidar, differential GPS, and spectrometers covering wavelengths from visible to NIR. We intend to automatically vary the way points of the flight path via the Bayesian adaptive sampling method. The second critical part of this work is in automating the validation of biomass estimates via using machine vision techniques. This involves taking 2-D pictures of trees of known species, and then via Bayesian techniques, reconstructing 3-D models of the trees to estimate the distribution moments associated with wood volume. Similar techniques have been developed by the medical imaging community. This then provides probability distributions conditional upon species. The final part of this work is in relating the BRDF actively sampled measurements to species

  7. The Pasadena Aerosol Characterization Observatory (PACO): chemical and physical analysis of the Western Los Angeles basin aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersey, S. P.; Craven, J. S.; Schilling, K. A.; Metcalf, A. R.; Sorooshian, A.; Chan, M. N.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2011-08-01

    The Pasadena Aerosol Characterization Observatory (PACO) represents the first major aerosol characterization experiment centered in the Western/Central Los Angeles Basin. The sampling site, located on the campus of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, was positioned to sample a continuous afternoon influx of transported urban aerosol with a photochemical age of 1-2 h and generally free from major local contributions. Sampling spanned 5 months during the summer of 2009, which were broken into 3 regimes on the basis of distinct meteorological conditions. Regime I was characterized by a series of low pressure systems, resulting in high humidity and rainy periods with clean conditions. Regime II typified early summer meteorology, with significant morning marine layers and warm, sunny afternoons. Regime III was characterized by hot, dry conditions with little marine layer influence. Regardless of regime, organic aerosol (OA) is the most significant constituent of nonrefractory submicron Los Angeles aerosol (42, 43, and 55 % of total submicron mass in regimes I, II, and III, respectively). The overall oxidation state remains relatively constant on timescales of days to weeks (O:C = 0.44 ± 0.08, 0.55 ± 0.05, and 0.48 ± 0.08 during regimes I, II, and III, respectively), with no difference in O:C between morning and afternoon periods. Periods characterized by significant morning marine layer influence followed by photochemically favorable afternoons displayed significantly higher aerosol mass and O:C ratio, suggesting that aqueous processes may be important in the generation of secondary aerosol and oxidized organic aerosol (OOA) in Los Angeles. Online analysis of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) indicates that water soluble organic mass (WSOM) reaches maxima near 14:00-15:00 local time (LT), but the percentage of AMS organic mass contributed by WSOM remains relatively constant throughout the day. Sulfate and nitrate reside predominantly in accumulation

  8. Novel biodegradable aliphatic poly(butylene succinate-co-cyclic carbonate)s with functional carbonate building blocks. 1. Chemical synthesis and their structural and physical characterization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Hao, Qinghui; Liu, Xiaoyun; Ba, Chaoyi; Cao, Amin

    2004-01-01

    This study presents chemical synthesis, structural, and physical characterization of novel biodegradable aliphatic poly(butylene succinate-co-cyclic carbonate)s P(BS-co-CC) bearing functional carbonate building blocks. First, five kinds of six-membered cyclic carbonate monomers, namely, trimethylene carbonate (TMC), 1-methyl-1,3-trimethylene carbonate (MTMC), 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-trimethylene carbonate (DMTMC), 5-benzyloxytrimethylene carbonate (BTMC), and 5-ethyl-5-benzyloxymethyl trimethylene carbonate (EBTMC), were well prepared from ethyl chloroformate and corresponding diols at 0 degrees C in THF solution with our modified synthetic strategies. Then, a series of new P(BS-co-CC)s were synthesized at 210 degrees C through a simple combination of poly-condensation and ring-opening-polymerization (ROP) of hydroxyl capped PBS macromers and the prepared carbonate monomers, and titanium tetra-isopropoxide Ti(i-OPr)4 was used as a more suitable catalyst of 5 candidate catalysts which could concurrently catalyze poly-condensation and ROP. By means of NMR, GPC, FTIR, and thermal analytical instruments, macromolecular structures and physical properties have been characterized for these aliphatic poly(ester carbonate)s. The experimental results indicated that novel biodegradable P(BS-co-CC)s were successfully synthesized with number average molecular weight Mn ranging from 24.3 to 99.6 KDa and various CC molar contents without any detectable decarboxylation and that the more bulky side group was attached to a cyclic carbonate monomer, the lower reactivity for its copolymerization would be observed. The occurrences of 13C NMR signal splitting of succinyl carbonyl attributed to the BS building blocks could be proposed due to the randomized sequences of BS and CC building blocks. FTIR characterization indicated two distinct absorption bands at 1716 and 1733 approximately 1735 cm(-1), respectively, stemming from carbonyl stretching modes for corresponding BS and CC units. With

  9. Accurate high-resolution measurements of 3-D tissue dynamics with registration-enhanced displacement encoded MRI.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Arnold D; Merchant, Samer S; Hsu, Edward W

    2014-06-01

    Displacement fields are important to analyze deformation, which is associated with functional and material tissue properties often used as indicators of health. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques like DENSE and image registration methods like Hyperelastic Warping have been used to produce pixel-level deformation fields that are desirable in high-resolution analysis. However, DENSE can be complicated by challenges associated with image phase unwrapping, in particular offset determination. On the other hand, Hyperelastic Warping can be hampered by low local image contrast. The current work proposes a novel approach for measuring tissue displacement with both DENSE and Hyperelastic Warping, incorporating physically accurate displacements obtained by the latter to improve phase characterization in DENSE. The validity of the proposed technique is demonstrated using numerical and physical phantoms, and in vivo small animal cardiac MRI.

  10. Characterization and mapping of surface physical properties of Mars from CRISM multi-angular data: Application to Gusev Crater and Meridiani Planum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, J.; Schmidt, F.; Pilorget, C.; Pinet, P.; Ceamanos, X.; Douté, S.; Daydou, Y.; Costard, F.

    2015-06-01

    The analysis of particle physical properties (grain size, shape and internal structure) and its organization (surface porosity, roughness, and grain size distribution) provides information about the geological processes which formed and modified planetary surfaces. CRISM (Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars) multi-angular observations (varied emission angles) allow for the characterization of the surface scattering behavior, which depends on the composition and on the material physical properties such as the grain size, shape, internal structure, and the surface roughness. After an atmospheric correction (compensating mineral aerosol effects) by the Multi-angle Approach for Retrieval of the Surface Reflectance from CRISM Observations (MARS-ReCO), the surface reflectances at different geometries were analyzed by inverting the Hapke photometric model depending on six parameters: single scattering albedo, 2 phase function terms, macroscopic roughness and 2 opposition effects terms. In this work, surface photometric maps are created to observe the spatial variations of surface scattering properties as a function of geological units. Information regarding the single scattering albedo, the particle phase function and the macroscopic roughness are provided at the CRISM spatial resolution (200 m/pixel). This article describes the application of this methodology to the data covering the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) landing sites located at Gusev Crater and Meridiani Planum where orbital and in situ observations are available. Complementary orbital observations (e.g., CRISM spectra, THermal EMission Imaging System (THEMIS), High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment, (HiRISE) images) were used for interpreting the modeled Hapke photometric parameters in terms of physical properties which can be used to constrain the geological processes. Available MER in situ observations were used as ground truth to validate the interpretations of the Hapke parameters

  11. Characterization of Physical Structure from Measurements of Sound Velocity in Aqueous Solutions of Various Saccharides and Alditols.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David Eugene

    Little basic research has been reported on the physical structure of aqueous solutions of saccharides. Sound velocimeters can be used to study physical structure of solutions, non-destructively. The La Place relationship was used to calculate adiabatic compressibility values for solutions from experimentally determined values for sound velocity and density. Using a sound velocimeter, aqueous solutions of twelve alditols and saccharides were studied at various concentrations and temperatures. Data indicated that over most of the temperature range employed (20 to 70 C) adiabatic compressibility of the solutions was the dominant factor in defining sound velocity through and structural rigidity of solution. As concentration of solute increased, more rigid structures were formed in solution, which caused sound velocity values to increase with increasing concentrations of solute; maximum sound velocity values were obtained at progressively lower temperatures. Analysis of data for sound velocity, density and adiabatic compressibility of various solutions provided partial insight into effects of each solute molecule on structure of solutions. A furanose form in a monosaccharide contributed to a more rigid structure than did a pyranose ring when below 30C. At higher temperatures the pyranose ring provided more rigidity than did the furanose ring. Hydroxyl groups in the equatorial position generally contributed more to rigidity of structure than did OH groups in axial positions. Disaccharides contributed differences from the inherent monosaccharides. A (beta) glycosidic linkage provided more structural rigidity of solution than did a linkage. Among the alditols, mannitol and sorbitol contributed very similar characteristics to solutions. Xylitol, in solution provided less rigidity, density and sound velocity than did mannitol-sorbitol in proportion to the lower molecular weight or xylitol. From the data for velocity of sound through single sugar solutions values for

  12. Improved Ecosystem Predictions of the California Current System via Accurate Light Calculations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    System via Accurate Light Calculations Curtis D. Mobley Sequoia Scientific, Inc. 2700 Richards Road, Suite 107 Bellevue, WA 98005 phone: 425...incorporate extremely fast but accurate light calculations into coupled physical-biological-optical ocean ecosystem models as used for operational three...dimensional ecosystem predictions. Improvements in light calculations lead to improvements in predictions of chlorophyll concentrations and other

  13. Polyurethane/fluor-hydroxyapatite nanocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Part I: morphological, physical, and mechanical characterization.

    PubMed

    Asefnejad, Azadeh; Behnamghader, Aliasghar; Khorasani, Mohammad Taghi; Farsadzadeh, Babak

    2011-01-06

    In this study, new nano-fluor-hydroxyapatite (nFHA)/polyurethane composite scaffolds were fabricated for potential use in bone tissue engineering. Polyester urethane samples were synthesized from polycaprolactone, hexamethylene diisocyanate, and 1,4-butanediol as chain extender. Nano fluor-hydroxyapatite (nFHA) was successfully synthesized by sol-gel method. The solid-liquid phase separation and solvent sublimation methods were used for preparation of the porous composites. Mechanical properties, chemical structure, and morphological characteristics of the samples were investigated by compressive test, Fourier transform infrared, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques, respectively. The effect of nFHA powder content on porosity and pore morphology was investigated. SEM images demonstrated that the scaffolds were constituted of interconnected and homogeneously distributed pores. The pore size of the scaffolds was in the range 50-250 μm. The result obtained in this research revealed that the porosity and pore average size decreased and compressive modulus increased with nFHA percentage. Considering morphological, physical, and mechanical properties, the scaffold with a higher ratio of nFHA has suitable potential use in tissue regeneration.

  14. Argentinean native wood species: Physical and mechanical characterization of some Prosopis species and Acacia aroma (Leguminosae; Mimosoideae).

    PubMed

    Pometti, Carolina L; Pizzo, Benedetto; Brunetti, Michele; Macchioni, Nicola; Ewens, Mauricio; Saidman, Beatriz O

    2009-03-01

    One of the problems in marketing the wood of Prosopis and Acacia is the lack of standardization of its qualities. The aim of this paper was to obtain a preliminary detection of some properties of the wood of four species of the genus Prosopis and one species from Acacia grown in Argentina. To accomplish this objective, the content of extractives and some physical and mechanical characteristics were analyzed. The density rho(12) of all the species indicates that these woods range from heavy to very heavy (>or=0.69g/cm(3)). The total volumetric shrinkage values are low, less than 10%, for all species. The parallel compression strength and the shear strength for all the species indicate a very resistant wood (>or=46.93MPa and >or=18.35MPa, respectively). Brinell hardness was higher than 5kg/mm(2) in all cases. The species with less content of extractives is P. ruscifolia (approximately 9% of anhydrous mass) whereas A. aroma was the one with the greatest content (approximately 25% of anhydrous mass in the heartwood).

  15. Polyurethane/fluor-hydroxyapatite nanocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Part I: morphological, physical, and mechanical characterization

    PubMed Central

    Asefnejad, Azadeh; Behnamghader, Aliasghar; Khorasani, Mohammad Taghi; Farsadzadeh, Babak

    2011-01-01

    In this study, new nano-fluor-hydroxyapatite (nFHA)/polyurethane composite scaffolds were fabricated for potential use in bone tissue engineering. Polyester urethane samples were synthesized from polycaprolactone, hexamethylene diisocyanate, and 1,4-butanediol as chain extender. Nano fluor-hydroxyapatite (nFHA) was successfully synthesized by sol-gel method. The solid–liquid phase separation and solvent sublimation methods were used for preparation of the porous composites. Mechanical properties, chemical structure, and morphological characteristics of the samples were investigated by compressive test, Fourier transform infrared, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques, respectively. The effect of nFHA powder content on porosity and pore morphology was investigated. SEM images demonstrated that the scaffolds were constituted of interconnected and homogeneously distributed pores. The pore size of the scaffolds was in the range 50–250 μm. The result obtained in this research revealed that the porosity and pore average size decreased and compressive modulus increased with nFHA percentage. Considering morphological, physical, and mechanical properties, the scaffold with a higher ratio of nFHA has suitable potential use in tissue regeneration. PMID:21289986

  16. Physical characterization of thin semi-porous poly(L-lactic acid)/poly(ethylene glycol) membranes for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, V; Tchao, R; Jonnalagadda, S

    2007-01-01

    This study examines physical properties of solvent-cast poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA): poly(ethylene glycol) PEG membranes as a function of PEG molecular weight (MW) and incubation in vitro for 6 weeks. PEGs of MW 400, 1450 and 8000 were used. The morphological, thermal, mechanical and permeability properties of the membranes were studied prior to and after 3 and 6 weeks of incubation in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 37 degrees C. The membranes showed a thickness of about 35+/-5 microm and were found to be semi-porous, with a non-porous surface as well as a porous surface with pore-diameters of 0.5-5 microm. The surface pore size was found to be a function of PEG MW used. All membranes were mechanically strong, with elastic moduli and tensile strength of 150-440 MPa and 7-36 MPa, respectively, all through the 6-week incubation period. The lower-MW PEGs plasticized PLLA based on high initial percent elongation; however, the effect was lost after 3 weeks of incubation in PBS. All membranes except those fabricated with PEG 8000 were impermeable for up to 6 weeks of incubation in PBS. Permeability studies showed that only PLLA:PEG 8000 membranes were permeable to methylene blue after 3 weeks of degradation.

  17. Physical characterization of fine particulate matter inside the public transit buses fueled by biodiesel in Toledo, Ohio.

    PubMed

    Shandilya, Kaushik K; Kumar, Ashok

    2011-06-15

    This study presents the physical characteristics of fine particulate matter (PM) collected inside the urban-public transit buses in Toledo, OH. These buses run on 20% biodiesel blended with ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) (B20). For risk analysis, it is crucial to know the modality of the size distribution and the shape factor of PM collected inside the bus. The number-size distribution, microstructure, and aspect ratio of fine PM filter samples collected in the urban-public transit buses were measured for three years (2007-2009), using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX). Only the reproducible results from repeated experiments on ESEM and size distribution obtained by the GRIMM dust monitor were used in this study. The size distribution was found bi-modal in the winter and fall months and was primarily uni-modal during spring and summer. The aspect ratio for different filter samples collected inside the bus range from 2.4 to 3.6 in average value, with standard deviation ranging from 0.9 to 7.4. The square-shaped and oblong-shaped particles represent the single inhalable particle's morphology characteristics in the air of the Toledo transit buses.

  18. Physical, antioxidant and structural characterization of blend films based on hsian-tsao gum (HG) and casein (CAS).

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Wen, Xiao Long; Guo, Shan Guang; Chen, Ming Tsao; Jiang, Ai Min; Lai, Lih-Shiuh

    2015-12-10

    The effects of hsian-tsao gum (HG) addition on the physical properties, antioxidant activities and structure of casein (CAS) film have been investigated. It has been observed that HG addition provided CAS film with better mechanical properties and resistant to moisture, stronger barrier properties against light and higher antioxidant activities than pure CAS film. Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) data indicated that hydrogen bonding interactions and Maillard reactions occurred between CAS and HG, giving rise to a more compact structure than CAS film. The results of X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) indicated that CAS and HG were compatible, and addition of HG destroyed the original crystalline domains of CAS film, and the blend films exhibited higher glass transition temperatures than CAS film. Moreover, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis showed that HG addition significantly changed the mobility of water molecule in CAS film. Especially, ratio of the high mobility water of CAS/HG films significantly decreased as compared to CAS film.

  19. A Tailor-Made Synthetic Polymer for Cell Encapsulation: Design Rationale, Synthesis, Chemical-Physics and Biological Characterizations.

    PubMed

    Gerges, Irini; Tamplenizza, Margherita; Rossi, Eleonora; Tocchio, Alessandro; Martello, Federico; Recordati, Camilla; Kumar, Deepak; Forsyth, Nicholas R; Liu, Yang; Lenardi, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    This study presents a custom-made in situ gelling polymeric precursor for cell encapsulation. Composed of poly((2-hydroxyethyl)methacrylate-co-(3-aminopropyl)methacrylamide) (P(HEMA-co-APM) mother backbone and RGD-mimicking poly(amidoamine) (PAA) moiteis, the comb-like structured polymeric precursor is tailored to gather the advantages of the two families of synthetic polymers, i.e., the good mechanical integrity of PHEMA-based polymers and the biocompatibility and biodegradability of PAAs. The role of P(HEMA-co-APM) in the regulation of the chemico-physical properties of P(HEMA-co-APM)/PAA hydrogels is thoroughly investigated. On the basis of obtained results, namely the capability of maintaining vital NIH3T3 cell line in vitro for 2 d in a 3D cell culture, the in vivo biocompatibility in murine model for 16 d, and the ability of finely tuning mechanical properties and degradation kinetics, it can be assessed that P(HEMA-co-APM)/PAAs offer a cost-effective valid alternative to the so far studied natural polymer-based systems for cell encapsulation.

  20. Search for past life on Mars: Physical and chemical characterization of calcite minerals of biotic and abiotic origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalport, S.; Coll, C.; Cabane, C.; Navarro González, N. G.; Raulin, R.; Vaulay, V.; Ausset, A.; Szopa, S.; McKay, M.

    Several lines of evidence suggest that early Mars once had liquid water on its surface a denser atmosphere and a mild climate Similar environmental conditions led to the origin of life on the Earth more than 3 5 billion years ago consequently life might also have originated on Mars We contend that inorganic compounds could give us interesting clues as to the existence of possible biological activity in future astrobiological missions to Mars Consequently we have investigated the physical and chemical properties of calcite which could be expected on Mars because liquid water was certainly present on the surface of early Mars and carbon dioxide was abundant in its atmosphere Calcite is interesting because on Earth this mineral is produced by abiotic processes as well as by biological activity One may suppose that crystalline defects and trace element in the crystal lattice and the growth speed of biotic calcites must indicate a difference between them and pure abiotic calcites We investigated twelve different terrestrial calcite samples from various origins biotic diagenetic and abiotic The minerals were studied by X-ray diffraction and electron scanning microscopy to determine their mineralogical and chemical composition and differential thermal analysis coupled to thermogravimetric analysis DTA-TG to determine their thermal behavior Our results show that the thermal degradation of abiotic calcite starts at a temperature at least 40oC higher than the degradation temperature of any biotic calcite investigated Consequently in the case of a Martian in-situ

  1. Characterization of the geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils on the Savannah River Site: Field sampling activities

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.L. )

    1992-11-01

    There are 36,000 acres of wetlands on the Savannah River Site (SRS) and an additional 5,000 acres of floodplain. Recent studies of wetland soils near various waste sites at SRS have shown that some wetlands have been contaminated with pollutants resulting from SRS operations. In general, releases of contaminants to wetland areas have been indirect. These releases may have originated at disposal lagoons or waste facilities located in the vicinity of the wetland areas. Transport mechanisms such as surface runoff, soil erosion, sediment transport, and groundwater seepage into downgradient wetland areas are responsible for the indirect discharges to the wetland areas. The SRS determined that a database of background geochemical and physical properties for wetland soils on the SRS was needed to facilitate future remedial investigations, human health and ecological risk assessments, treatability studies, and feasibility studies for the wetland areas. These data are needed for comparison to contaminant data collected from wetland soils that have been affected by contamination from SRS operations. This report describes the efforts associated with the collection of soil cores, preparation of a lithologic log for each core, and the processing and packaging of individual soil samples for shipment to analytical laboratory facilities.

  2. Characterization of the geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils on the Savannah River Site: Field sampling activities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.L.

    1992-11-01

    There are 36,000 acres of wetlands on the Savannah River Site (SRS) and an additional 5,000 acres of floodplain. Recent studies of wetland soils near various waste sites at SRS have shown that some wetlands have been contaminated with pollutants resulting from SRS operations. In general, releases of contaminants to wetland areas have been indirect. These releases may have originated at disposal lagoons or waste facilities located in the vicinity of the wetland areas. Transport mechanisms such as surface runoff, soil erosion, sediment transport, and groundwater seepage into downgradient wetland areas are responsible for the indirect discharges to the wetland areas. The SRS determined that a database of background geochemical and physical properties for wetland soils on the SRS was needed to facilitate future remedial investigations, human health and ecological risk assessments, treatability studies, and feasibility studies for the wetland areas. These data are needed for comparison to contaminant data collected from wetland soils that have been affected by contamination from SRS operations. This report describes the efforts associated with the collection of soil cores, preparation of a lithologic log for each core, and the processing and packaging of individual soil samples for shipment to analytical laboratory facilities.

  3. Physical characterization of succinylated type I collagen by Raman spectra and MALDI-TOF/MS and in vitro evaluation for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ramadhar; Sripriya, R.; Balaji, S.; Senthil Kumar, M.; Sehgal, P. K.

    2011-05-01

    In this study, we report on physical and in vitro biological characterization of succinylated collagen (SC). SC was prepared by succinylation of type I bovine tendon collagen. SC swells and dissolves in physiological pH buffers (pH 7.4) Biocompatibility of SC to collagen for fibroblasts was comparable but L6 myoblasts showed pronounced proliferation and differentiation with SC. Using the MALDI-TOF/MS technique, SC was found with increased molecular mass by 16,359 Da per molecule which corresponds to about 54 succinyl groups covalently linked to the collagen strand. Raman spectroscopy revealed the retention of triple helical structure conformation in the presence of linked succinyl groups. New peaks near 1737, 1675 and 1420 cm -1 and decreased intensities near 2440 and 488 cm -1 provides the most convenient marker bands for succinylation of collagen. The intense band regions near 2856-2934, 2724, and 1445 cm -1 also confirms the existence of succinyl groups.

  4. Synthesis, physical and electrochemical characterization of Gd (III) doped LiMn2O4 cathode material for lithium ion rechargeable batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, Rahul; Ram, Pura; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2015-03-01

    The spinel structured LiMn2-xGdxO4 (x =0.01-0.05) have been synthesized via sol gel method. The physical and electrochemical characterization were carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-Vis spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and charge-discharge studies. The reversibility of synthesized cathode was supported through cyclic voltammetry in 3.0 - 4.5 voltage range. The initial charge discharge capacity of cathode materials was found in range 130-140 mAhg-1. The fabricated coin cell was tested up to 50 charge -discharge cycles with 0.5 C rate. The small amount of rare earth metal, Gd, doping showed improvement in capacity fading compared to LiMn2O4 cathode, offer its applicability for Li-ion rechargeable battery

  5. Physical and Structural Characterization of a Monocrystalline Cu-13.7Al-4.2Ni Alloy Subjected to Thermal Cycling Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Elaine Cristina; Matlakhova, Lioudmila Aleksandrovna; Matlakhov, Anatoliy Nikolaevich; Shigue, Carlos Yujiro; Monteiro, Sérgio Neves

    2014-04-01

    A monocrystalline alloy with nominal 82wt pctCu-13.7wt pctAl-4.2wt pctNi composition and exhibiting reversible martensitic transformation (RMT) was subjected to multiple heating and cooling cycles within the RMT range of critical temperatures. Both untreated and cyclic treated alloy samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and Vickers microhardness. The results indicated that the alloy presents a complex RMT behavior disclosing a sequence of transformation steps: β 1 ↔ R and R ↔ β'1 + γ'1 as well as possible β 1 ↔ β'1 and β'1 ↔ γ'1 direct reactions. The thermal cycling treatment inhibits the development of γ'1 martensite without much change in both the physical and microstructure characteristics. This suggests a good resistance of the alloy to irreversible structural changes.

  6. Physical and biological characterization of a growth-inhibitory activity purified from the neuroepithelioma cell line A673.

    PubMed Central

    Stam, K; Stewart, A A; Qu, G Y; Iwata, K K; Fenyö, D; Chait, B T; Marshak, D R; Haley, J D

    1995-01-01

    Epithelial- and haematopoietic-cell growth-inhibitory activities have been identified in the conditioned medium of the human peripheral neuroepithelioma cell line A673. An A673-cell-derived growth-inhibitory activity was previously fractionated into two distinct components which inhibited the proliferation of human carcinoma and leukaemia cells in culture. One inhibitory activity was shown to comprise interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha). Here, we have purified to homogeneity a distinct activity which inhibited the growth of the epithelial cells in vitro. Using a combination of protein-sequence analysis and mass spectrometry, we demonstrated that biological activity can be assigned to a dimeric protein with a molecular mass of 25,576 (+/- 4) Da and an N-terminal sequence identical with that of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1). Further characterization of the growth inhibitor with TGF-beta-isoform-specific antibodies showed that > 90% of the bioactivity consists of TGF-beta 1 and not TGF-beta 2 or TGF-beta 3. Although A673 cells were growth-inhibited by exogenous TGF-beta 1, we showed that TGF-beta 1 in A673-cell-conditioned media was present in the latent, biologically inactive, form which did not act as an autocrine growth modulator of A673 cells in vitro. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7826358

  7. Physical and chemical characterization of Ag-doped Ti coatings produced by magnetron sputtering of modular targets.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Tobias; Warmuth, Franziska; Werner, Ewald; Hertl, Cornelia; Groll, Jürgen; Gbureck, Uwe; Moseke, Claus

    2014-11-01

    Silver-doped Ti films were produced using a single magnetron sputtering source equipped with a titanium target containing implemented silver modules under variation of bias voltage and substrate temperature. The Ti(Ag) films were characterized regarding their morphology, contact angle, phase composition, silver content and distribution as well as the elution of Ag(+) ions into cell media. SEM and AFM pictures showed that substrate heating during film deposition supported the formation of even and dense surface layers with small roughness values, an effect that could even be enforced, when a substrate bias voltage was applied instead. The deposition of both Ti and Ag was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. ICP-MS and EDX showed a clear correlation between the applied sputtering parameters and the silver content of the coatings. Surface-sensitive XPS measurements revealed that higher substrate temperatures led to an accumulation of Ag in the near-surface region, while the application of a bias voltage had the opposite effect. Additional elution measurements using ICP-MS showed that the release kinetics depended on the amount of silver located at the film surface and hence could be tailored by variation of the sputter parameters.

  8. Photo-electrochemical and physical characterizations of a new single crystal POM-based material. Application in photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meziani, D.; Abdmeziem, K.; Bouacida, S.; Trari, M.

    2016-12-01

    A new inorganic-organic hybrid material [(H2pip)3][α-PW12O40]2·4H2O, prepared by hydrothermal method, was structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The compound based on a Keggin-type polyoxotungstate and piperazine (pip) displays a hybrid framework built from two (α-Keggin)3- polyoxoanions and three (H2pip)2+ hydrogen-bonded fragments, forming 3-D supramolecular architecture. The diffuse reflectance spectrum shows two optical transitions directly (3.27 eV) and indirectly (3.12 eV) allowed. The electrical conductivity follows an exponential law, indicating a semiconducting comportment with activation energy of 14 meV. The Mott-Schottky characteristic, plotted in Na2SO4 (0.5 M) solution indicates n-type conduction with a flat band potential of -0.084 VSCE and electrons density of 4.24 × 1018 cm-3. As application, the photo-degradation of methylene blue (MB) upon UV irradiation was successfully achieved by OH• radicals. The improved activity is attributed to the potentials closeness of the valence and conduction bands with the radical levels.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of physical properties of Gd2O2S:Pr3+ semi-nanoflower phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, A.; Rezaee Ebrahim Saraee, Kh.; Shakur, H. R.; Zamani Zeinali, H.

    2016-05-01

    Pure gadolinium oxysulfide phosphor (Gd2O2S) and trivalent praseodymium-doped gadolinium oxysulfide phosphor (Gd2O2S:Pr3+) scintillators with semi-nanoflower crystalline structures were successfully synthesized through a precipitation method and subsequent calcination treatment as a converter for X-ray imaging detectors. The characterization such as the crystal structures and nanostructure of Gd2O2S:Pr3+ scintillator measured by XRD and FeE-SEM experiment. The optical properties of Gd2O2S:Pr3+ scintillator were studied. Luminescence spectra of Gd2O2S:Pr3+ under 320 nm UV excitation show a green emission at near 511 nm corresponding to the 3P0-3H4 of Pr ions. After scintillation properties of synthesized Gd2O2S:Pr3+ scintillator investigated, Gd2O2S:Pr3+ scintillating film fabricated on a glass substrate by a sedimentation method. X-ray imaging of the fabricated scintillators confirmed that the Gd2O2S:Pr3+ scintillator could be used for radiography applications in which good spatial resolution is needed.

  10. Proteomics Analysis to Identify and Characterize the Biomarkers and Physical Activities of Non-Frail and Frail Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Hung; Liao, Chen-Chung; Huang, Chi-Huang; Tung, Yu-Tang; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Hsu, Mei-Chich; Huang, Chi-Chang

    2017-01-01

    Globally, the proportion of older adults is increasing. Older people face chronic conditions such as sarcopenia and functional decline, which are often associated with disability and frailty. Proteomics assay of potential serum biomarkers of frailty in older adults. Older adults were divided into non-frail and frail groups (n = 6 each; 3 males in each group) in accordance with the Chinese-Canadian Study of Health and Aging Clinical Frailty Scale. Adults were measured for grip power and the 6-min walk test for physical activity, and venous blood was sampled after adults fasted for 8 h. Ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used for proteomics assay. The groups were compared for levels of biomarkers by t test and Pearson correlation analysis. Non-frail and frail subjects had mean age 77.5±0.4 and 77.7±1.6 years, mean height 160.5±1.3 and 156.6±2.9 cm and mean weight 62.5±1.2 and 62.8±2.9 kg, respectively. Physical activity level was lower for frail than non-frail subjects (grip power: 13.8±0.4 vs 26.1±1.2 kg; 6-min walk test: 215.2±17.2 vs 438.3±17.2 m). Among 226 proteins detected, for 31, serum levels were significantly higher for frail than non-frail subjects; serum levels of Ig kappa chain V-III region WOL, COX7A2, and albumin were lower. The serum levels of ANGT, KG and AT were 2.05-, 1.76- and 2.22-fold lower (all p < 0.05; Figure 1A, 2A and 3A) for non-frail than frail subjects and were highly correlated with grip power (Figure 1B, 2B and 3B). Our study found that ANGT, KG and AT levels are known to increase with aging, so degenerated vascular function might be associated with frailty. In total, 226 proteins were revealed proteomics assay; levels of angiotensinogen (ANGT), kininogen-1 (KG) and antithrombin III (AT) were higher in frail than non-frail subjects (11.26±2.21 vs 5.09±0.74; 18.42±1.36 vs 11.64±1.36; 22.23±1.64 vs 9.52±0.95, respectively, p < 0.05). These 3 factors were highly correlated with grip

  11. Identification and characterization of the water gap in the physically dormant seeds of Dodonaea petiolaris: a first report for Sapindaceae

    PubMed Central

    Turner, S. R.; Cook, A.; Baskin, J. M.; Baskin, C. C.; Tuckett, R. E.; Steadman, K. J.; Dixon, K. W.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims The Sapindaceae is one of 17 plant families in which seed dormancy is caused by a water-impermeable seed or fruit coat (physical dormancy, PY). However, until now the water gap in Sapindaceae had not been identified. The primary aim of this study was to identify the water gap in Dodonaea petiolaris (Sapindaceae) seeds and to describe its basic morphology and anatomy. Methods Seed fill, viability, water-uptake (imbibition) and other characteristics were assessed for D. petiolaris seeds. The location and structure of the water gap were investigated using a blocking experiment, time series photography, scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy. Dodonaea petiolaris seeds with PY also were assessed for loss of PY at four ecologically significant temperatures under moist and dry conditions. Seeds of three other species of Sapindaceae were examined for presence of a water gap. Key Results The water gap in D. petiolaris seeds was identified as a small plug in the seed coat adjacent to the hilum and opposite the area where the radicle emerges. The plug was dislodged (i.e. water gap opened = dormancy break) by dipping seeds in boiling water for 2·5 min or by incubating seeds on a moist substrate at 20/35 °C for 24 weeks. Layers of cells in the plug, including palisade and subpalisade, are similar to those in the rest of the seed coat. The same kind of water gap was found in three other species of Sapindaceae, Diplopeltis huegelii, Distichostemon hispidulus and Dodonaea aptera. Conclusions Following dormancy break (opening of water gap), initial uptake of water by the seed occurs only through the water gap. Thus, the plug must be dislodged before the otherwise intact seed can germinate. The anatomy of the plug is similar to water gaps in some of the other plant families with PY. PMID:19620135

  12. Search For Past Life On Mars: Physical And Chemical Characterization Of Calcite Minerals Of Biotic And Abiotic Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalport, Fabien; Coll, P.; Cabane, M.; Person, A.; Navarro-Gonzales, R.; Raulin, F.; Valay, M.; Ausset, P.; Szopa, C.; McKay, C. P.

    2006-09-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that early Mars once had liquid water on its surface, a denser atmosphere and a mild climate. Similar environmental conditions led to the origin of life on the Earth more than 3.5 billion years ago; consequently, life might also have originated on Mars. We contend that inorganic compounds could give us interesting clues as to the existence of possible biological activity in future astrobiological missions to Mars. Consequently, we have investigated the physical and chemical properties of calcite, which could be expected on Mars because liquid water was certainly present on the surface of early Mars and carbon dioxide was abundant in its atmosphere. Calcite is interesting because on Earth this mineral is produced by abiotic processes as well as by biological activity. One may suppose that crystalline defects and trace element in the crystal lattice and the growth speed of biotic calcites must indicate a difference between them and pure abiotic calcites. We investigated twelve different terrestrial calcite samples from various origins: biotic, diagenetic and abiotic. The minerals were studied by X-ray diffraction and electron scanning microscopy to determine their mineralogical and chemical composition, and differential thermal analysis coupled to thermogravimetric analysis (DTA-TG) to determine their thermal behavior. Our results show that the thermal degradation of abiotic calcite starts at a temperature at least 40°C higher than the degradation temperature of any biotic calcite investigated. Consequently, in the case of a Martian in-situ study or in a sample return mission, the analysis of Martian minerals by DTA-TG represents a promising approach to detect evidence of past biological activity on Mars.

  13. Search for past life on Mars: Physical and chemical characterization of minerals of biotic and abiotic origin: part 1 - Calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalport, Fabien; Coll, Patrice; Cabane, Michel; Person, Alain; González, Rafael Navarro; Raulin, Francois; Vaulay, Marie Jo; Ausset, Patrick; McKay, Chris P.; Szopa, Cyril; Zarnecki, John

    2005-12-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that early Mars once had liquid water on its surface, a denser atmosphere and a mild climate. Similar environmental conditions led to the origin of life on the Earth more than 3.5 billion years ago; consequently, life might also have originated on Mars. The Viking landers searched for evidence of organic molecules on the surface of Mars, and found that the Martian soil is depleted in organics at ppb levels at the landing sites. We contend that inorganic compounds could give us interesting clues as to the existence of possible biological activity in future astrobiological missions to Mars. Consequently, we have investigated the physical and chemical properties of calcite, which could be expected on Mars because liquid water was certainly present on the surface of early Mars and carbon dioxide was abundant in its atmosphere. Calcite is interesting because on Earth this mineral is produced by abiotic processes as well as by biological activity. One may suppose that crystalline defects and trace element in the crystal lattice and the growth speed of biotic calcites must indicate a difference between them and pure abiotic calcites. We investigated twelve different terrestrial calcite samples from various origins: biotic, diagenetic and abiotic. The minerals were studied by X-ray diffraction and electron scanning microscopy to determine their mineralogical and chemical composition, and differential thermal analysis coupled to thermogravimetric analysis (DTA-TG) to determine their thermal behavior. Our results show that the thermal degradation of abiotic calcite starts at a temperature at least 40°C higher than the degradation temperature of any biotic calcite investigated. Consequently, in the case of a Martian in-situ study or in a sample return mission, the analysis of Martian minerals by DTA-TG represents a promising approach to detect evidence of past biological activity on Mars.

  14. A novel polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel functionalized with organic boundary lubricant for use as low-friction cartilage substitute: synthesis, physical/chemical, mechanical, and friction characterization.

    PubMed

    Blum, Michelle M; Ovaert, Timothy C

    2012-10-01

    A novel material design was developed by functionalizing polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel with an organic low-friction boundary lubricant (molar ratios of 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 moles of lauroyl chloride). The hydrogels were fabricated using two different techniques. First, the boundary lubricant was initially functionalized to the polymer, then the hydrogels were created by physically crosslinking the reacted polymer. Second, hydrogels were initially created by crosslinking pure polyvinyl alcohol, with the functionalization reaction performed on the fully formed gel. After the reaction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and attenuated total reflectance spectra revealed a clear ester peak, the diminishment of the alcohol peak, and the amplification of the alkyl peaks, which confirmed attachment of the hydrocarbon chains to the polymer. Additional chemical characterization occurred through elemental analysis where an average increase of 22% carbon and 40% hydrogen provided further confirmation of attachment. Physical characterization of the boundary lubricant functionalized hydrogels was performed by water content and contact angle measurements. Water content dependency showed that method 1 had a direct relationship with boundary lubricant concentration, and method 2 displayed an inverse relationship. The contact angle increased as boundary lubricant concentration increased for the pure matrix material for both processing methods, suggesting that the hydrocarbons produced surface properties that mimic natural cartilage, and contact behavior of the biphasic system was dependent on processing method. Friction tests demonstrated a significant decrease in friction coefficient, with a maximum decrease of 70% and a minimum decrease of 24% for boundary lubricant functionalized hydrogels compared with nonfunctionalized polyvinyl alcohol hydrogels.

  15. Characterization of radar (GPR) signatures and physical properties of a near-surface granular stratigraphy in the Valley of Queretaro, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerca, M.; Carreon-Freyre, D.

    2007-05-01

    Coupled use of GPR surveying with three different frequencies (300, 900, and 2000 MHz) and physical attributes determinations in a granular near-surface sequence gives insights into the effects of water content and type to the velocity of EM wave propagation (permittivity). Using known depth reflectors in the estimation of velocities for each frequency allowed obtaining vertical differences in velocity. Characteristic radar signatures were obtained for each of the 5 layers composing the horizontally stratified near-surface sequence studied. The sequence is composed of a cover of organic (0 - 0.5 m) and carbonated (0.5 - 1.0 m) soils over a pyroclastic (1 - 4.5 m), sandy gravel (4.5 - 5.6 m), silty sand (5.6 - 7.5 m), and welded tuff (7.5 - ? m). Selected physical attributes measured in detail each 15 cm of the sequence included grain size, relative strength, bulk dry density, water content (gravimetric and volumetric), specific density, and electrical conductivity. The correlation of physical properties with radargrams show the potential of GPR for characterizing layers with a similar set of interrelated physical attributes. However, the analysis of radar signatures assumes a certain degree of homogeneity in the attributes of a layer and the record of certain attributes depends, at least partially, of the frequency. For instance, small voids at the base of the carbonate soil were recorded as air wave hyperboles only with the 900 MHz frequency. Since no significant water content contrasts are observed in the sequence, the difference in the estimation of velocities of propagation from water content measurements using the Topp equation and the velocities obtained with the known reflector method can be associated to the contribution of dielectric losses. Thus, any model representing the bulk permittivity of clay bearing sequences should consider the effects of conductive losses. In our case, these effects can be related to the presence of different clay materials that

  16. Characterization of optical and micro-physical properties of cirrus clouds using a wideband thermal infrared spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchetti, Luca; Di Natale, Gianluca; Bianchini, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    High-altitude ice clouds such as cirrus clouds play a key role in the Earth's radiation budget since they cover permanently about 20-30% of the surface of the planet, reaching even to 60-70% in the tropics. The modulation of the incoming solar radiation and the outgoing Earth's thermal emission due to cirrus can contribute to heat or to cool the atmosphere, according to their optical properties, which must be characterised with great accuracy and over the whole spectral range involved in the scattering and emission processes. Here we present the infrared measurements over the wide spectral range from 9 to 50 micron performed by the Fourier transform spectrometer REFIR-PAD (Radiation Explorer in Far InfraRed - Prototype for Application and Development) during many field campaigns that have taken place since 2007 from different high-altitude ground-based stations: Testa Grigia Station, Cervinia-Italy, (3480 m asl), Cerro Toco, Atacama-Chile, (5380 m asl), Concordia Base, Dome C-Antarctica (3230 m asl). These measurements show for the first time the spectral effect of cirrus clouds in the long-wave part of the emission spectrum above 15 micron of wavelength. To characterise these measurements over the wide spectral range as a function of the optical properties of ice particles, a model of the radiative transfer, that integrates the well known numerical code LBLRTM, which simulates the radiative transfer in the atmosphere, with a specific code which simulates the propagation of the radiation through the cloud, was developed. The optical properties of clouds have been modelled using the δ-scaled Eddington approximation for a single layer and the Ping Yang's database for the single-scattering properties of ice crystals. The preliminary results of the fit procedure used for the determination of the micro-physical parameters of ice crystals, such as the effective diameter, ice water path, effective temperature and optical thickness will be shown in the presentation. The

  17. Mill profiler machines soft materials accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1966-01-01

    Mill profiler machines bevels, slots, and grooves in soft materials, such as styrofoam phenolic-filled cores, to any desired thickness. A single operator can accurately control cutting depths in contour or straight line work.

  18. Correlating electroluminescence characterization and physics-based models of InGaN/GaN LEDs: Pitfalls and open issues

    SciTech Connect

    Calciati, Marco; Vallone, Marco; Zhou, Xiangyu; Ghione, Giovanni; Goano, Michele Bertazzi, Francesco; Meneghini, Matteo; Meneghesso, Gaudenzio; Zanoni, Enrico; Verzellesi, Giovanni; Zhu, Dandan; Humphreys, Colin

    2014-06-15

    Electroluminescence (EL) characterization of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs), coupled with numerical device models of different sophistication, is routinely adopted not only to establish correlations between device efficiency and structural features, but also to make inferences about the loss mechanisms responsible for LED efficiency droop at high driving currents. The limits of this investigative approach are discussed here in a case study based on a comprehensive set of current- and temperature-dependent EL data from blue LEDs with low and high densities of threading dislocations (TDs). First, the effects limiting the applicability of simpler (closed-form and/or one-dimensional) classes of models are addressed, like lateral current crowding, vertical carrier distribution nonuniformity, and interband transition broadening. Then, the major sources of uncertainty affecting state-of-the-art numerical device simulation are reviewed and discussed, including (i) the approximations in the transport description through the multi-quantum-well active region, (ii) the alternative valence band parametrizations proposed to calculate the spontaneous emission rate, (iii) the difficulties in defining the Auger coefficients due to inadequacies in the microscopic quantum well description and the possible presence of extra, non-Auger high-current-density recombination mechanisms and/or Auger-induced leakage. In the case of the present LED structures, the application of three-dimensional numerical-simulation-based analysis to the EL data leads to an explanation of efficiency droop in terms of TD-related and Auger-like nonradiative losses, with a C coefficient in the 10{sup −30} cm{sup 6}/s range at room temperature, close to the larger theoretical calculations reported so far. However, a study of the combined effects of structural and model uncertainties suggests that the C values thus determined could be overestimated by about an order of magnitude. This preliminary

  19. Introduction of ester and amido functions in tetrairon(III) single-molecule magnets: synthesis and physical characterization.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Douton, Maria Jesus; Cornia, Andrea; Sessoli, Roberta; Sorace, Lorenzo; Barra, Anne-Laure

    2010-07-07

    Tetrairon(III) complexes with a propeller-like structure derived from [Fe(4)(OMe)(6)(dpm)(6)] (1) (Hdpm = 2,2,6,6-tetramethylheptane-3,5-dione) are providing a growing class of Single Molecule Magnets (SMMs) displaying unprecedented synthetic flexibility and ease of functionalization. Herein we report the synthesis, crystal structures and magnetic properties of two novel tetrairon(III) SMMs, [Fe(4)(esterC5)(2)(dpm)(6)] (2) and [Fe(4)(amideC5)(2)(dpm)(6)].Et(2)O.4MeOH (3.Et(2)O.4MeOH), in which functionalization of the cluster core is achieved using ester and amido linkages, respectively. To this aim, two new tripodal ligands were prepared by acylation of pentaerythritol (2,2-bis(hydroxymethyl)propane-1,3-diol) and TRIS (2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)propane-1,3-diol), namely H(3)esterC5 = RC(O)OCH(2)C(CH(2)OH)(3) and H(3)amideC5 = RC(O)NHC(CH(2)OH)(3) with R = n-butyl. The compounds were structurally investigated by single-crystal XRD, which demonstrated coordination of the tripodal ligands to the cluster core. The products display SMM behavior with anisotropy barriers U(eff)/k(B) congruent with 11 K due to a high-spin (S = 5) ground state and an easy axis anisotropy, described by D = -0.421 cm(-1) in 2 and -0.414 cm(-1) in 3.Et(2)O.4MeOH. The departure of U(eff) from the total splitting of the S = 5 ground multiplet, U/k(B) congruent with 15 K, has to be ascribed to the sizeable rhombic anisotropy that characterizes the two compounds (E = 0.021 cm(-1) in 2 and 0.019 cm(-1) in 3.Et(2)O.4MeOH), as confirmed by master matrix calculations of the temperature-dependent relaxation time.

  20. In-situ physical and chemical characterization of the Eyjafjallajökull aerosol plume in the free troposphere over Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrini, S.; Giulianelli, L.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, M. C.; Fuzzi, S.; Cristofanelli, P.; Marinoni, A.; Bonasoni, P.; Chiari, M.; Calzolai, G.; Canepari, S.; Perrino, C.

    2013-08-01

    Continuous measurements of physical and chemical properties at the Mt. Cimone GAW-WMO Global Station (2165 m a.s.l.) allowed the detection of the volcanic aerosol plume resulting from the Eyjafjallajökull eruption of spring 2010. The event affected the site after a transport over a distance of more than 3000 km. Two main transport episodes were detected during the eruption period, showing a volcanic fingerprint discernible against the free tropospheric background conditions typical of the site, the first from 19 to 21 April and the second from 18 to 20 May 2010. The paper reports the modification of aerosol characteristics observed during the two episodes, both characterized by an abrupt increase in fine and, especially, coarse mode particle number. Analysis of major, minor and trace elements by different analytical techniques (Ionic Chromatography, PIXE-PIGE and ICP-MS) were performed on aerosols collected by ground level discrete sampling. The resulting database allows the characterization of aerosol chemical composition during the volcanic plume transport and in background conditions. During the passage of the volcanic plume, the fine fraction was dominated by sulphates, denoting the secondary origin of this mode, mainly resulting from in-plume oxidation of volcanic SO2. By contrast, the coarse fraction was characterized by increased concentration of numerous elements of crustal origin, such as Fe, Ti, Mn, Ca, Na, and Mg, which enter the composition of silicate minerals. Data analysis of selected elements (Ti, Al, Fe, Mn) allowed the estimation of the volcanic plume's contribution to total PM10, resulting in a local enhancement of up to 9.5 μg m-3, i.e. 40% of total PM10, on 18 May, which was the most intense of the two episodes. These results appear significant, especially in the light of the huge distance of Mt. Cimone from the source, confirming the widespread diffusion of the Eyjafjallajokull ashes over Europe.

  1. Identification and characterization of ten new water gaps in seeds and fruits with physical dormancy and classification of water-gap complexes

    PubMed Central

    Gama-Arachchige, N. S.; Baskin, J. M.; Geneve, R. L.; Baskin, C. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Physical dormancy (PY) occurs in seeds or fruits of 18 angiosperm families and is caused by a water-impermeable palisade cell layer(s) in seed or fruit coats. Prior to germination, the seed or fruit coat of species with PY must become permeable in order to imbibe water. Breaking of PY involves formation of a small opening(s) (water gap) in a morpho-anatomically specialized area in seeds or fruits known as the water-gap complex. Twelve different water-gap regions in seven families have previously been characterized. However, the water-gap regions had not been characterized in Cucurbitaceae; clade Cladrastis of Fabaceae; subfamilies Bombacoideae, Brownlowioideae and Bythnerioideae of Malvaceae; Nelumbonaceae; subfamily Sapindoideae of Sapindaceae; Rhamnaceae; or Surianaceae. The primary aims of this study were to identify and describe the water gaps of these taxa and to classify all the known water-gap regions based on their morpho-anatomical features. Methods Physical dormancy in 15 species was broken by exposing seeds or fruits to wet or dry heat under laboratory conditions. Water-gap regions of fruits and seeds were identified and characterized by use of microtome sectioning, light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, dye tracking and blocking experiments. Key Results Ten new water-gap regions were identified in seven different families, and two previously hypothesized regions were confirmed. Water-gap complexes consist of (1) an opening that forms after PY is broken; (2) a specialized structure that occludes the gap; and (3) associated specialized tissues. In some species, more than one opening is involved in the initial imbibition of water. Conclusions Based on morpho-anatomical features, three basic water-gap complexes (Types-I, -II and -III) were identified in species with PY in 16 families. Depending on the number of openings involved in initial imbibition, the water-gap complexes were sub-divided into simple and compound. The

  2. Facies characterization based on physical properties from downhole logging for the sediment record of Lake Van, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgarten, H.; Wonik, T.; Kwiecien, O.

    2014-11-01

    significant depth shifts of up to 2.5 m between the composite profile based on the VCD and the downhole measurements in hole 2D of the Ahlat Ridge, (b) a correlation was difficult to ascertain from the vertical resolution of the downhole logging data and the extremely detailed core description in mm-scale, (c) mixed signals were obtained because of prevailing thin layers and intercalations of different lithotypes and (d) cluster analysis was difficult to perform because the contrast within the input data is too low (possibly background sedimentation) to distinguish between glacial and interglacial deposits. Tephra units are characterized by contrasting properties and differ mainly in their magnetic susceptibility, spectral gamma ray components (uranium, thorium and potassium) and XRF-intensities of calcium and zirconium. Tephra units have been linked to the dominant volcanic composition of the deposited tephra layers and partly to the volcanic sources. Depth trends are derived with prevailing basaltic deposits in the bottom part (128 m-210 m below lake floor) and are gradually outweighed by the highly differentiated (dacitic and rhyolitic/trachytic) products towards the top of the record.

  3. Efficient and accurate computation of the incomplete Airy functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinides, E. D.; Marhefka, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    The incomplete Airy integrals serve as canonical functions for the uniform ray optical solutions to several high-frequency scattering and diffraction problems that involve a class of integrals characterized by two stationary points that are arbitrarily close to one another or to an integration endpoint. Integrals with such analytical properties describe transition region phenomena associated with composite shadow boundaries. An efficient and accurate method for computing the incomplete Airy functions would make the solutions to such problems useful for engineering purposes. In this paper a convergent series solution for the incomplete Airy functions is derived. Asymptotic expansions involving several terms are also developed and serve as large argument approximations. The combination of the series solution with the asymptotic formulae provides for an efficient and accurate computation of the incomplete Airy functions. Validation of accuracy is accomplished using direct numerical integration data.

  4. Accurate phylogenetic classification of DNA fragments based onsequence composition

    SciTech Connect

    McHardy, Alice C.; Garcia Martin, Hector; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Hugenholtz, Philip; Rigoutsos, Isidore

    2006-05-01

    Metagenome studies have retrieved vast amounts of sequenceout of a variety of environments, leading to novel discoveries and greatinsights into the uncultured microbial world. Except for very simplecommunities, diversity makes sequence assembly and analysis a verychallenging problem. To understand the structure a 5 nd function ofmicrobial communities, a taxonomic characterization of the obtainedsequence fragments is highly desirable, yet currently limited mostly tothose sequences that contain phylogenetic marker genes. We show that forclades at the rank of domain down to genus, sequence composition allowsthe very accurate phylogenetic 10 characterization of genomic sequence.We developed a composition-based classifier, PhyloPythia, for de novophylogenetic sequence characterization and have trained it on adata setof 340 genomes. By extensive evaluation experiments we show that themethodis accurate across all taxonomic ranks considered, even forsequences that originate fromnovel organisms and are as short as 1kb.Application to two metagenome datasets 15 obtained from samples ofphosphorus-removing sludge showed that the method allows the accurateclassification at genus level of most sequence fragments from thedominant populations, while at the same time correctly characterizingeven larger parts of the samples at higher taxonomic levels.

  5. Fruit physical characteristics, proximate, mineral and starch characterization of FHIA 19 and FHIA 20 plantain and FHIA 03 cooking banana hybrids.

    PubMed

    Annor, George Amponsah; Asamoah-Bonti, Prudence; Sakyi-Dawson, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Cooking banana and plantain (Musa spp. AAB and ABB groups), have over the years been affected by pest and diseases, resulting in various organizations developing disease resistant hybrids with superior agronomic potential. The characteristics of these improved varieties needs to be studied to ascertain their suitability for use in various food systems. This study aimed at evaluating the physical characteristics, proximate and minerals composition, and characterizing the starch of plantain and a cooking banana hybrid release by Fundación Hondureña de Investigación Agrícola (FHIA), and comparing them to a local landrace in Ghana. FHIA 19 and FHIA 20 plantain, Apentu pa (a local landrace) and FHIA 03 cooking banana hybrid were used for the study. Their physical characteristics, proximate and mineral composition were determined at the proximal, midsection and distal hand positions. Starch granules and cells were then examined under light microscope. Ranges obtained for protein content for FHIA 20, FHIA 03 and FHIA 19 were 3.01-3.40, 2.66-2.91 and 2.81-2.91 %. Potassium was found to be the most abundant mineral in all the cultivars. The highest mean value of 982.5-1013.76 mg/100 g was obtained for FHIA 19. There were significant differences (p < 0.05) in the proximate and mineral composition of the varieties, however no significant difference exited between the hand positions. The largest starch granule size was found in FHIA 19 hybrid. FHIA 03 was also composed predominantly of two types: longitudinal and rounded granules with each type grouped together. The new plantain hybrids compared very well with the local landrace hence making them suitable to be incorporated into local food systems.

  6. Physical Characterization of Tobramycin Inhalation Powder: I. Rational Design of a Stable Engineered-Particle Formulation for Delivery to the Lungs.

    PubMed

    Miller, Danforth P; Tan, Trixie; Tarara, Thomas E; Nakamura, John; Malcolmson, Richard J; Weers, Jeffry G

    2015-08-03

    A spray-dried engineered particle formulation, Tobramycin Inhalation Powder (TIP), was designed through rational selection of formulation composition and process parameters. This PulmoSphere powder comprises small, porous particles with a high drug load. As a drug/device combination, TOBI Podhaler enables delivery of high doses of drug per inhalation, a feature critical for dry powder delivery of anti-infectives for treatment of cystic fibrosis. The objective of this work was to characterize TIP on both the particle and molecular levels using multiple orthogonal physical characterization techniques. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), and Raman measurements show that a TIP particle consists of two phases: amorphous, glassy tobramycin sulfate with a glass transition temperature of about 100 °C and a gel-phase phospholipid (DSPC) with a gel-to-liquid-crystal transition temperature of about 80 °C. This was by design and constituted a rational formulation approach to provide Tg and Tm values that are well above the temperatures used for long-term storage of TIP. Raman and ESCA data provide support for a core/shell particle architecture of TIP. Particle surfaces are enriched with a porous, hydrophobic coating that reduces cohesive forces, improving powder fluidization and dispersibility. The excellent aerosol dispersibility of TIP enables highly efficient delivery of fine particles to the respiratory tract. Collectively, particle engineering has enabled development of TOBI Podhaler, an approved inhaled drug product that meaningfully reduces the treatment burden to cystic fibrosis patients worldwide.

  7. Accurate pointing of tungsten welding electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegelmeier, P.

    1971-01-01

    Thoriated-tungsten is pointed accurately and quickly by using sodium nitrite. Point produced is smooth and no effort is necessary to hold the tungsten rod concentric. The chemically produced point can be used several times longer than ground points. This method reduces time and cost of preparing tungsten electrodes.

  8. Accurate modelling of unsteady flows in collapsible tubes.

    PubMed

    Marchandise, Emilie; Flaud, Patrice

    2010-01-01

    The context of this paper is the development of a general and efficient numerical haemodynamic tool to help clinicians and researchers in understanding of physiological flow phenomena. We propose an accurate one-dimensional Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin (RK-DG) method coupled with lumped parameter models for the boundary conditions. The suggested model has already been successfully applied to haemodynamics in arteries and is now extended for the flow in collapsible tubes such as veins. The main difference with cardiovascular simulations is that the flow may become supercritical and elastic jumps may appear with the numerical consequence that scheme may not remain monotone if no limiting procedure is introduced. We show that our second-order RK-DG method equipped with an approximate Roe's Riemann solver and a slope-limiting procedure allows us to capture elastic jumps accurately. Moreover, this paper demonstrates that the complex physics associated with such flows is more accurately modelled than with traditional methods such as finite difference methods or finite volumes. We present various benchmark problems that show the flexibility and applicability of the numerical method. Our solutions are compared with analytical solutions when they are available and with solutions obtained using other numerical methods. Finally, to illustrate the clinical interest, we study the emptying process in a calf vein squeezed by contracting skeletal muscle in a normal and pathological subject. We compare our results with experimental simulations and discuss the sensitivity to parameters of our model.

  9. Physical and chemical characterization of fly ashes from Swiss waste incineration plants and determination of the ash fraction in the nanometer range.

    PubMed

    Buha, Jelena; Mueller, Nicole; Nowack, Bernd; Ulrich, Andrea; Losert, Sabrina; Wang, Jing

    2014-05-06

    Waste incineration had been identified as an important source of ultrafine air pollutants resulting in elaborated treatment systems for exhaust air. Nowadays, these systems are able to remove almost all ultrafine particles. However, the fate of ultrafine particles caught in the filters has received little attention so far. Based on the use of engineered nano-objects (ENO) and their transfer into the waste stream, it can be expected that not only combustion generated nanoparticles are found in fly ashes but that many ENO finally end up in this matrix. A more detailed characterization of the nanoparticulate fraction of fly ashes is therefore needed. Physical and chemical characterizations were performed for fly ashes from five selected waste incineration plants (WIPs) with different input materials such as municipal waste, wood and sewage sludge. The intrinsic densities of the fly ashes were in the range of 2.7-3.2 g/cm(3). When the fly ash particle became airborne, the effective density depended on the particle size, increasing from 0.7-0.8 g/cm(3) for 100-150 nm to 2 g/cm(3) for 350-500 nm. The fly ash samples were fractionated at 2 μm, yielding fine fractions (<2 μm) and coarse fractions (>2 μm). The size distributions of the fine fractions in the airborne form were further characterized, which allowed calculation of the percentage of the fly ash particles below 100 nm. We found the highest mass-based percentage was about 0.07%; the number percentage in the fine fraction was in the range of 4.8% to 22%. Comparison with modeling results showed that ENO may constitute a considerable part of the fly ash particles below 100 nm. Chemical analyses showed that for the municipal waste samples Ca and Al were present in higher concentrations in the coarse fraction; for the mixed wood and sludge sample the P concentration was higher in the coarse fraction; for most other samples and elements they were enriched in the fine fraction. Electron microscopic images of fly ashes

  10. Materials and electrical characterization of physical vapor deposited La{sub x}Lu{sub 1-x}O{sub 3} thin films on 300 mm silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Edge, L. F.; Vo, T.; Paruchuri, V. K.; Iijima, R.; Bruley, J.; Jordan-Sweet, J.; Linder, B. P.; Kellock, A. J.; Tsunoda, T.; Shinde, S. R.

    2011-03-21

    La{sub x}Lu{sub 1-x}O{sub 3} thin films were deposited on 300 mm silicon wafers by physical vapor deposition and fabricated into field-effect transistors using a gate-first process flow. The films were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, and synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The results show the films remain amorphous even at temperatures of 1000 deg. C. The dielectric properties of La{sub x}Lu{sub 1-x}O{sub 3} (0.125{<=}x{<=}0.875) thin films were evaluated as a function of film composition. The amorphous La{sub x}Lu{sub 1-x}O{sub 3} thin films have a dielectric constant (K) of 23 across the composition range. The inversion thickness (T{sub inv}) of the La{sub x}Lu{sub 1-x}O{sub 3} thin films was scaled to <1.0 nm.

  11. Oleate Coated Magnetic Cores Based on Magnetite, Zn Ferrite and Co Ferrite Nanoparticles - Preparation, Physical Characterization and Biological Impact on Helianthus Annuus Photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ursache-Oprisan, Manuela; Foca-nici, Ecaterina; Cirlescu, Aurelian; Caltun, Ovidiu; Creanga, Dorina

    2010-12-02

    Sodium oleate was used as coating shell for magnetite, Zn ferrite and Co ferrite powders to stabilize them in the form of aqueous magnetic suspensions. The physical characterization was carried out by applying X-ray diffraction and magnetization measurements. Both crystallite size and magnetic core diameter ranged between 7 and 11 nm. The influence of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions (corresponding to magnetic nanoparticle levels of 10{sup -14}-10{sup -15}/cm{sup 3}) on sunflower seedlings was studied considering the changes in the photosynthesis pigment levels. Similar responses were obtained for magnetite and cobalt ferrite nanoparticle treatment consisting in the apparent inhibition of chlorophyll biosynthesis while for zinc ferrite nanoparticles some concentrations seemed to have stimulatory effects on the chlorophylls as well as on the carotene levels. But the chlorophyll ratio was diminished in the case of all three types of magnetic nanoparticles meaning their slight negative effect on the light harvesting complex II (LHC II) from the chloroplast membranes and consequently on the photosynthesis efficiency.

  12. Facile synthesis and physical and spectral characterization of 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-nitrophenol (DBNP): A potentially powerful uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera-Nevares, J.A.; Wyman, J.F.; Minden, D.L. von; Lacy, N.; Macys, D.A. ); Chabinyc, M.L.; Fratini, A.V. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1995-02-01

    The compound 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-nitrophenol (DBNP), a potentially powerful uncoupler of ATP-generating oxidative phosphorylation, has been physically and spectroscopically characterized using X-ray crystallography, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), GC-MS spectrometry, Fourier-transformed IR (FTIR) spectrophotometry, UV-Vis spectrophotometry, and FT [sup 1]H- and [sup 13]C-NMR spectroscopy. However, DBNP is not commercially available; therefore, it had to be synthesized in the laboratory prior to toxicity studies. The DBNP was prepared from 2,6-di-tert-butylphenol (DBP) precursor in hexane through an electrophilic aromatic substitution process using NO[sub 2]. A collective yield of 75% was obtained by using two empirically determined end points that prevented the coprecipitation of reaction by-products and resulted in the formation of DBNP in high purity. Excessive amounts of NO[sub 2] in reaction mixtures resulted in the decomposition of preformed DBNP. With a pK[sub a] value of 6.8 and a higher degree of lipophilicity, DBNP may prove to be a stronger uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation than 2,4-dinitrophenol due to the expected enhancement of passive-diffusion kinetics across biological membranes at the physiological pH of 7.4. The present study is intended to provide analytical toxicologists, industrial hygiene monitors, and other professionals involved in chemical health and safety with a comprehensive source of basic information on the synthesis and analytical chemistry of DBNP.

  13. An accurate metric for the spacetime around rotating neutron stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, George

    2017-01-01

    The problem of having an accurate description of the spacetime around rotating neutron stars is of great astrophysical interest. For astrophysical applications, one needs to have a metric that captures all the properties of the spacetime around a rotating neutron star. Furthermore, an accurate appropriately parameterised metric, i.e., a metric that is given in terms of parameters that are directly related to the physical structure of the neutron star, could be used to solve the inverse problem, which is to infer the properties of the structure of a neutron star from astrophysical observations. In this work we present such an approximate stationary and axisymmetric metric for the exterior of rotating neutron stars, which is constructed using the Ernst formalism and is parameterised by the relativistic multipole moments of the central object. This metric is given in terms of an expansion on the Weyl-Papapetrou coordinates with the multipole moments as free parameters and is shown to be extremely accurate in capturing the physical properties of a neutron star spacetime as they are calculated numerically in general relativity. Because the metric is given in terms of an expansion, the expressions are much simpler and easier to implement, in contrast to previous approaches. For the parameterisation of the metric in general relativity, the recently discovered universal 3-hair relations are used to produce a 3-parameter metric. Finally, a straightforward extension of this metric is given for scalar-tensor theories with a massless scalar field, which also admit a formulation in terms of an Ernst potential.

  14. The FLUKA Code: An Accurate Simulation Tool for Particle Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Julia; Boehlen, Till T.; Cerutti, Francesco; Chin, Mary P. W.; Dos Santos Augusto, Ricardo; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ortega, Pablo G.; Kozłowska, Wioletta; Magro, Giuseppe; Mairani, Andrea; Parodi, Katia; Sala, Paola R.; Schoofs, Philippe; Tessonnier, Thomas; Vlachoudis, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) codes are increasingly spreading in the hadrontherapy community due to their detailed description of radiation transport and interaction with matter. The suitability of a MC code for application to hadrontherapy demands accurate and reliable physical models capable of handling all components of the expected radiation field. This becomes extremely important for correctly performing not only physical but also biologically based dose calculations, especially in cases where ions heavier than protons are involved. In addition, accurate prediction of emerging secondary radiation is of utmost importance in innovative areas of research aiming at in vivo treatment verification. This contribution will address the recent developments of the FLUKA MC code and its practical applications in this field. Refinements of the FLUKA nuclear models in the therapeutic energy interval lead to an improved description of the mixed radiation field as shown in the presented benchmarks against experimental data with both 4He and 12C ion beams. Accurate description of ionization energy losses and of particle scattering and interactions lead to the excellent agreement of calculated depth–dose profiles with those measured at leading European hadron therapy centers, both with proton and ion beams. In order to support the application of FLUKA in hospital-based environments, Flair, the FLUKA graphical interface, has been enhanced with the capability of translating CT DICOM images into voxel-based computational phantoms in a fast and well-structured way. The interface is capable of importing also radiotherapy treatment data described in DICOM RT standard. In addition, the interface is equipped with an intuitive PET scanner geometry generator and automatic recording of coincidence events. Clinically, similar cases will be presented both in terms of absorbed dose and biological dose calculations describing the various available features. PMID:27242956

  15. The FLUKA Code: An Accurate Simulation Tool for Particle Therapy.

    PubMed

    Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Julia; Boehlen, Till T; Cerutti, Francesco; Chin, Mary P W; Dos Santos Augusto, Ricardo; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ortega, Pablo G; Kozłowska, Wioletta; Magro, Giuseppe; Mairani, Andrea; Parodi, Katia; Sala, Paola R; Schoofs, Philippe; Tessonnier, Thomas; Vlachoudis, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) codes are increasingly spreading in the hadrontherapy community due to their detailed description of radiation transport and interaction with matter. The suitability of a MC code for application to hadrontherapy demands accurate and reliable physical models capable of handling all components of the expected radiation field. This becomes extremely important for correctly performing not only physical but also biologically based dose calculations, especially in cases where ions heavier than protons are involved. In addition, accurate prediction of emerging secondary radiation is of utmost importance in innovative areas of research aiming at in vivo treatment verification. This contribution will address the recent developments of the FLUKA MC code and its practical applications in this field. Refinements of the FLUKA nuclear models in the therapeutic energy interval lead to an improved description of the mixed radiation field as shown in the presented benchmarks against experimental data with both (4)He and (12)C ion beams. Accurate description of ionization energy losses and of particle scattering and interactions lead to the excellent agreement of calculated depth-dose profiles with those measured at leading European hadron therapy centers, both with proton and ion beams. In order to support the application of FLUKA in hospital-based environments, Flair, the FLUKA graphical interface, has been enhanced with the capability of translating CT DICOM images into voxel-based computational phantoms in a fast and well-structured way. The interface is capable of importing also radiotherapy treatment data described in DICOM RT standard. In addition, the interface is equipped with an intuitive PET scanner geometry generator and automatic recording of coincidence events. Clinically, similar cases will be presented both in terms of absorbed dose and biological dose calculations describing the various available features.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of cyclic polystyrene using copper-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition coupling - evaluation of physical properties and optimization of cyclization conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elupula, Ravinder

    Polymers with a cyclic topology exhibit a range of unique and potentially useful physical properties, including reduced rates of degradation and increased rates of diffusion in bulk relative to linear analogs. However the synthesis of high purity cyclic polymers, and verification of their structural purity remains challenging. The copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne "click" cyclization route toward cyclic polymers has been used widely, due to its synthetic ease and its compatibility with diverse polymer backbones. Yet unoptimized click cyclization conditions have been observed to generate oligomeric byproducts. In order to optimize these cyclization conditions, and to better understand the structure of the higher molecular weight oligomers, these impurities have been isolated by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and characterized by mass spectrometry (MS). Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-ToF) MS is a particularly valuable characterization tool and was used to determine that the high molecular weight impurities are predominantly cyclic oligomers. It should also be noted that the rapid analysis and small analyte requirements of this MS technique make it particularly attractive as a general tool for elucidating polymer architecture. Ability to tailor the physical properties of polymers by changing the architecture alone has garnered a lot of attention over the past few decades. Compared to their linear analogues, these novel polymer architectures behave completely different in nanoscale regime. Cyclic polymers are especially intriguing since we can compare the differences in the physical properties with that of the linear chains. One of the major physical property changes are T g-confinement effect. Using ATRP and "click chemistry" we have produced highly pure cyclic PS (c-PS) with number-average molecular weight (MW) of 3.4 kg/mol and 9.1 kg/mol. Bulk glass transition temperatures for c-PS were weakly depended on MWs

  17. A robust and accurate formulation of molecular and colloidal electrostatics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; Klaseboer, Evert; Chan, Derek Y C

    2016-08-07

    This paper presents a re-formulation of the boundary integral method for the Debye-Hückel model of molecular and colloidal electrostatics that removes the mathematical singularities that have to date been accepted as an intrinsic part of the conventional boundary integral equation method. The essence of the present boundary regularized integral equation formulation consists of subtracting a known solution from the conventional boundary integral method in such a way as to cancel out the singularities associated with the Green's function. This approach better reflects the non-singular physical behavior of the systems on boundaries with the benefits of the following: (i) the surface integrals can be evaluated accurately using quadrature without any need to devise special numerical integration procedures, (ii) being able to use quadratic or spline function surface elements to represent the surface more accurately and the variation of the functions within each element is represented to a consistent level of precision by appropriate interpolation functions, (iii) being able to calculate electric fields, even at boundaries, accurately and directly from the potential without having to solve hypersingular integral equations and this imparts high precision in calculating the Maxwell stress tensor and consequently, intermolecular or colloidal forces, (iv) a reliable way to handle geometric configurations in which different parts of the boundary can be very close together without being affected by numerical instabilities, therefore potentials, fields, and forces between surfaces can be found accurately at surface separations down to near contact, and (v) having the simplicity of a formulation that does not require complex algorithms to handle singularities will result in significant savings in coding effort and in the reduction of opportunities for coding errors. These advantages are illustrated using examples drawn from molecular and colloidal electrostatics.

  18. A robust and accurate formulation of molecular and colloidal electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiang; Klaseboer, Evert; Chan, Derek Y. C.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a re-formulation of the boundary integral method for the Debye-Hückel model of molecular and colloidal electrostatics that removes the mathematical singularities that have to date been accepted as an intrinsic part of the conventional boundary integral equation method. The essence of the present boundary regularized integral equation formulation consists of subtracting a known solution from the conventional boundary integral method in such a way as to cancel out the singularities associated with the Green's function. This approach better reflects the non-singular physical behavior of the systems on boundaries with the benefits of the following: (i) the surface integrals can be evaluated accurately using quadrature without any need to devise special numerical integration procedures, (ii) being able to use quadratic or spline function surface elements to represent the surface more accurately and the variation of the functions within each element is represented to a consistent level of precision by appropriate interpolation functions, (iii) being able to calculate electric fields, even at boundaries, accurately and directly from the potential without having to solve hypersingular integral equations and this imparts high precision in calculating the Maxwell stress tensor and consequently, intermolecular or colloidal forces, (iv) a reliable way to handle geometric configurations in which different parts of the boundary can be very close together without being affected by numerical instabilities, therefore potentials, fields, and forces between surfaces can be found accurately at surface separations down to near contact, and (v) having the simplicity of a formulation that does not require complex algorithms to handle singularities will result in significant savings in coding effort and in the reduction of opportunities for coding errors. These advantages are illustrated using examples drawn from molecular and colloidal electrostatics.

  19. Feedback about More Accurate versus Less Accurate Trials: Differential Effects on Self-Confidence and Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected by feedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On Day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of…

  20. Fast and Accurate Circuit Design Automation through Hierarchical Model Switching.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Linh; Tagkopoulos, Ilias

    2015-08-21

    In computer-aided biological design, the trifecta of characterized part libraries, accurate models and optimal design parameters is crucial for producing reliable designs. As the number of parts and model complexity increase, however, it becomes exponentially more difficult for any optimization method to search the solution space, hence creating a trade-off that hampers efficient design. To address this issue, we present a hierarchical computer-aided design architecture that uses a two-step approach for biological design. First, a simple model of low computational complexity is used to predict circuit behavior and assess candidate circuit branches through branch-and-bound methods. Then, a complex, nonlinear circuit model is used for a fine-grained search of the reduced solution space, thus achieving more accurate results. Evaluation with a benchmark of 11 circuits and a library of 102 experimental designs with known characterization parameters demonstrates a speed-up of 3 orders of magnitude when compared to other design methods that provide optimality guarantees.

  1. Accurate Guitar Tuning by Cochlear Implant Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  2. New model accurately predicts reformate composition

    SciTech Connect

    Ancheyta-Juarez, J.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E. )

    1994-01-31

    Although naphtha reforming is a well-known process, the evolution of catalyst formulation, as well as new trends in gasoline specifications, have led to rapid evolution of the process, including: reactor design, regeneration mode, and operating conditions. Mathematical modeling of the reforming process is an increasingly important tool. It is fundamental to the proper design of new reactors and revamp of existing ones. Modeling can be used to optimize operating conditions, analyze the effects of process variables, and enhance unit performance. Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo has developed a model of the catalytic reforming process that accurately predicts reformate composition at the higher-severity conditions at which new reformers are being designed. The new AA model is more accurate than previous proposals because it takes into account the effects of temperature and pressure on the rate constants of each chemical reaction.

  3. Accurate colorimetric feedback for RGB LED clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Kwong; Ashdown, Ian

    2006-08-01

    We present an empirical model of LED emission spectra that is applicable to both InGaN and AlInGaP high-flux LEDs, and which accurately predicts their relative spectral power distributions over a wide range of LED junction temperatures. We further demonstrate with laboratory measurements that changes in LED spectral power distribution with temperature can be accurately predicted with first- or second-order equations. This provides the basis for a real-time colorimetric feedback system for RGB LED clusters that can maintain the chromaticity of white light at constant intensity to within +/-0.003 Δuv over a range of 45 degrees Celsius, and to within 0.01 Δuv when dimmed over an intensity range of 10:1.

  4. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    PubMed

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task.

  5. An Accurate, Simplified Model Intrabeam Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, Karl LF

    2002-05-23

    Beginning with the general Bjorken-Mtingwa solution for intrabeam scattering (IBS) we derive an accurate, greatly simplified model of IBS, valid for high energy beams in normal storage ring lattices. In addition, we show that, under the same conditions, a modified version of Piwinski's IBS formulation (where {eta}{sub x,y}{sup 2}/{beta}{sub x,y} has been replaced by {Eta}{sub x,y}) asymptotically approaches the result of Bjorken-Mtingwa.

  6. An accurate registration technique for distorted images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delapena, Michele; Shaw, Richard A.; Linde, Peter; Dravins, Dainis

    1990-01-01

    Accurate registration of International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) images is crucial because the variability of the geometrical distortions that are introduced by the SEC-Vidicon cameras ensures that raw science images are never perfectly aligned with the Intensity Transfer Functions (ITFs) (i.e., graded floodlamp exposures that are used to linearize and normalize the camera response). A technique for precisely registering IUE images which uses a cross correlation of the fixed pattern that exists in all raw IUE images is described.

  7. Syntheses and physical characterization of new aliphatic triblock poly(L-lactide-b-butylene succinate-b-L-lactide)s bearing soft and hard biodegradable building blocks.

    PubMed

    Ba, Chaoyi; Yang, Jing; Hao, Qinghui; Liu, Xiaoyun; Cao, Amin

    2003-01-01

    This study presents chemical syntheses and physical characterization of a new aliphatic poly(L-lactide-b-butylene succinate-b-L-lactide) triblock copolyester with soft and hard biodegradable building blocks. First, poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) prepolymers terminated with hydroxyl functional groups were synthesized through melt polycondensation from succinic acid and 1,4-butanediol. Further, a series of new PLLA-b-PBS-b-PLLA triblock copolyesters bearing various average PLLA block lengths were prepared via ring opening polymerization of L-lactide with the synthesized hydroxyl capped PBS prepolymer (Mn = 4.9 KDa) and stannous octanoate as the macroinitiator and catalyst, respectively. By means of GPC, NMR, FTIR, DSC, TGA, and wide-angle X-ray diffractometer (WAXD), the macromolecular structures and physical properties were intensively studied for these synthesized PBS prepolymer and PLLA-b-PBS-b-PLLA triblock copolyesters. 13C NMR and GPC experimental results confirmed the formation of sequential block structures without any detectable transesterification under the present experimental conditions, and the molecular weights of triblock copolyesters could be readily regulated by adjusting the feeding molar ratio of L-lactide monomer to the PBS macroinitiator. DSC measurements showed all single glass transitions, and their glass transition temperatures were found to be between those of PLLA and PBS, depending on the lengths of PLLA blocks. It was noteworthy that the segmental flexibilities of the hard PLLA blocks were found to be remarkably enhanced by the more flexible PBS block partner, and the PBS and PLLA building blocks were well mixed in the amorphous regions. Results of TGA analyses indicated that thermal degradation and stabilities of the PLLA blocks strongly depended on the average PLLA block lengths of triblock copolyesters. In addition, FTIR and WAXD results showed the coexistence of the assembled PLLA and PBS crystal structures when the average PLLA block

  8. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  9. Physical characterization of the state of motion of the phenalenyl spin probe in cation-exchanged faujasite zeolite supercages with pulsed EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doetschman, D. C.; Dwyer, D. W.; Fox, J. D.; Frederick, C. K.; Scull, S.; Thomas, G. D.; Utterback, S. G.; Wei, J.

    1994-08-01

    The molecular motion of the phenalenyl (PNL) spin probe in the supercages of cation-exchanged X and Y zeolites (faujasites) has been physically characterized by pulsed and continuous wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Both X and Y zeolites, whose cation sites were exchanged with the alkali metal ions, Li +, Na +, K +, Rb + and Cs + were examined. There is a good correspondence between the temperature dependences of the PNL electron spin phase memory time and the CW EPR spectra. Both display evidence of a thermal activation from a stationary, non-rotating molecular state to a low-temperature state of in-plane rotation (Das et al., Chem Phys. 143 (1990) 253). The rate of in-plane rotation is an activated process, with E* | / R=1289 |+- 35 K and 1462 ± 47 K in NaX and KX zeolites, respectively. The rotation appears to be about an axis along which the half-filled, non-bonding π orbital interacts with the exchanged cation in the supercage. Both CW and pulsed EPR also show a higher temperature activation from the in-plane rotating state to an effectively isoptropic state of rotation of PNL in which the PNL-cation bond is thought to be broken, with E* ⊥ / R=2050 ± 110 K, 1956 ± 46K, 1335 ± 97 K in LiX, NaX and KX zeolites, respectively. The strength of the PNL-cation bonding decreases with increasing cation atomic number as indicated by E* ⊥ and the peripheral repulsion (crowding) of PNL increases with cation size as indicated E* |. There are qualitative indications that the binding of PNL to the cations in the Y zeolite is stronger than in the X zeolite.

  10. Recombinant soluble human tissue factor secreted by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and refolded from Escherichia coli inclusion bodies: glycosylation of mutants, activity and physical characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Stone, M J; Ruf, W; Miles, D J; Edgington, T S; Wright, P E

    1995-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is the cell-surface transmembrane receptor that initiates both the extrinsic and intrinsic blood coagulation cascades. The abilities of TF to associate with Factor VIIa and Factor X in a ternary complex and to enable proteolytic activation of Factor X by Factor VIIa reside in the extracellular domain of TF. We describe the expression of the surface domain of TF (truncated TF, tTF) in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli and the biochemical and physical characterization of the recombinant proteins. Wild-type tTF and several glycosylation-site mutants were secreted efficiently by S. cerevisiae under the control of the yeast prepro-alpha-signal sequence; the T13A,N137D double mutant was the most homogeneous variant expressed in milligram quantities. Wild-type tTF was expressed in a non-native state in E. coli inclusion bodies as a fusion protein with a poly(His) leader. The fusion protein could be fully renatured and the leader removed by proteolysis with thrombin; the correct molecular mass (24,729 Da) of the purified protein was confirmed by electrospray mass spectrometry. Recombinant tTFs from yeast, E. coli and Chinese hamster ovary cells were identical in their abilities to bind Factor VIIa, to enhance the catalytic activity of Factor VIIa and to enhance the proteolytic activation of Factor X by Factor VIIa. Furthermore, CD, fluorescence emission and NMR spectra of the yeast and E. coli proteins indicated that these proteins are essentially identical structurally. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7654202

  11. Accurate upwind methods for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1993-01-01

    A new class of piecewise linear methods for the numerical solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations of gas dynamics is presented. These methods are uniformly second-order accurate, and can be considered as extensions of Godunov's scheme. With an appropriate definition of monotonicity preservation for the case of linear convection, it can be shown that they preserve monotonicity. Similar to Van Leer's MUSCL scheme, they consist of two key steps: a reconstruction step followed by an upwind step. For the reconstruction step, a monotonicity constraint that preserves uniform second-order accuracy is introduced. Computational efficiency is enhanced by devising a criterion that detects the 'smooth' part of the data where the constraint is redundant. The concept and coding of the constraint are simplified by the use of the median function. A slope steepening technique, which has no effect at smooth regions and can resolve a contact discontinuity in four cells, is described. As for the upwind step, existing and new methods are applied in a manner slightly different from those in the literature. These methods are derived by approximating the Euler equations via linearization and diagonalization. At a 'smooth' interface, Harten, Lax, and Van Leer's one intermediate state model is employed. A modification for this model that can resolve contact discontinuities is presented. Near a discontinuity, either this modified model or a more accurate one, namely, Roe's flux-difference splitting. is used. The current presentation of Roe's method, via the conceptually simple flux-vector splitting, not only establishes a connection between the two splittings, but also leads to an admissibility correction with no conditional statement, and an efficient approximation to Osher's approximate Riemann solver. These reconstruction and upwind steps result in schemes that are uniformly second-order accurate and economical at smooth regions, and yield high resolution at discontinuities.

  12. Accurate measurement of unsteady state fluid temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaremkiewicz, Magdalena

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, two accurate methods for determining the transient fluid temperature were presented. Measurements were conducted for boiling water since its temperature is known. At the beginning the thermometers are at the ambient temperature and next they are immediately immersed into saturated water. The measurements were carried out with two thermometers of different construction but with the same housing outer diameter equal to 15 mm. One of them is a K-type industrial thermometer widely available commercially. The temperature indicated by the thermometer was corrected considering the thermometers as the first or second order inertia devices. The new design of a thermometer was proposed and also used to measure the temperature of boiling water. Its characteristic feature is a cylinder-shaped housing with the sheath thermocouple located in its center. The temperature of the fluid was determined based on measurements taken in the axis of the solid cylindrical element (housing) using the inverse space marching method. Measurements of the transient temperature of the air flowing through the wind tunnel using the same thermometers were also carried out. The proposed measurement technique provides more accurate results compared with measurements using industrial thermometers in conjunction with simple temperature correction using the inertial thermometer model of the first or second order. By comparing the results, it was demonstrated that the new thermometer allows obtaining the fluid temperature much faster and with higher accuracy in comparison to the industrial thermometer. Accurate measurements of the fast changing fluid temperature are possible due to the low inertia thermometer and fast space marching method applied for solving the inverse heat conduction problem.

  13. Methods for accurate analysis of galaxy clustering on non-linear scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakili, Mohammadjavad

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of galaxy clustering with the low-redshift galaxy surveys provide sensitive probe of cosmology and growth of structure. Parameter inference with galaxy clustering relies on computation of likelihood functions which requires estimation of the covariance matrix of the observables used in our analyses. Therefore, accurate estimation of the covariance matrices serves as one of the key ingredients in precise cosmological parameter inference. This requires generation of a large number of independent galaxy mock catalogs that accurately describe the statistical distribution of galaxies in a wide range of physical scales. We present a fast method based on low-resolution N-body simulations and approximate galaxy biasing technique for generating mock catalogs. Using a reference catalog that was created using the high resolution Big-MultiDark N-body simulation, we show that our method is able to produce catalogs that describe galaxy clustering at a percentage-level accuracy down to highly non-linear scales in both real-space and redshift-space.In most large-scale structure analyses, modeling of galaxy bias on non-linear scales is performed assuming a halo model. Clustering of dark matter halos has been shown to depend on halo properties beyond mass such as halo concentration, a phenomenon referred to as assembly bias. Standard large-scale structure studies assume that halo mass alone is sufficient in characterizing the connection between galaxies and halos. However, modeling of galaxy bias can face systematic effects if the number of galaxies are correlated with other halo properties. Using the Small MultiDark-Planck high resolution N-body simulation and the clustering measurements of Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 main galaxy sample, we investigate the extent to which the dependence of galaxy bias on halo concentration can improve our modeling of galaxy clustering.

  14. Accurate joint space quantification in knee osteoarthritis: a digital x-ray tomosynthesis phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sewell, Tanzania S.; Piacsek, Kelly L.; Heckel, Beth A.; Sabol, John M.

    2011-03-01

    The current imaging standard for diagnosis and monitoring of knee osteoarthritis (OA) is projection radiography. However radiographs may be insensitive to markers of early disease such as osteophytes and joint space narrowing (JSN). Relative to standard radiography, digital X-ray tomosynthesis (DTS) may provide improved visualization of the markers of knee OA without the interference of superimposed anatomy. DTS utilizes a series of low-dose projection images over an arc of +/-20 degrees to reconstruct tomographic images parallel to the detector. We propose that DTS can increase accuracy and precision in JSN quantification. The geometric accuracy of DTS was characterized by quantifying joint space width (JSW) as a function of knee flexion and position using physical and anthropomorphic phantoms. Using a commercially available digital X-ray system, projection and DTS images were acquired for a Lucite rod phantom with known gaps at various source-object-distances, and angles of flexion. Gap width, representative of JSW, was measured using a validated algorithm. Over an object-to-detector-distance range of 5-21cm, a 3.0mm gap width was reproducibly measured in the DTS images, independent of magnification. A simulated 0.50mm (+/-0.13) JSN was quantified accurately (95% CI 0.44-0.56mm) in the DTS images. Angling the rods to represent knee flexion, the minimum gap could be precisely determined from the DTS images and was independent of flexion angle. JSN quantification using DTS was insensitive to distance from patient barrier and flexion angle. Potential exists for the optimization of DTS for accurate radiographic quantification of knee OA independent of patient positioning.

  15. The first accurate description of an aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Wilfried

    2006-12-01

    As technology has advanced, the scientific study of auroral phenomena has increased by leaps and bounds. A look back at the earliest descriptions of aurorae offers an interesting look into how medieval scholars viewed the subjects that we study.Although there are earlier fragmentary references in the literature, the first accurate description of the aurora borealis appears to be that published by the German Catholic scholar Konrad von Megenberg (1309-1374) in his book Das Buch der Natur (The Book of Nature). The book was written between 1349 and 1350.

  16. Determining accurate distances to nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanos, Alceste Zoe

    2005-11-01

    Determining accurate distances to nearby or distant galaxies is a very simple conceptually, yet complicated in practice, task. Presently, distances to nearby galaxies are only known to an accuracy of 10-15%. The current anchor galaxy of the extragalactic distance scale is the Large Magellanic Cloud, which has large (10-15%) systematic uncertainties associated with it, because of its morphology, its non-uniform reddening and the unknown metallicity dependence of the Cepheid period-luminosity relation. This work aims to determine accurate distances to some nearby galaxies, and subsequently help reduce the error in the extragalactic distance scale and the Hubble constant H 0 . In particular, this work presents the first distance determination of the DIRECT Project to M33 with detached eclipsing binaries. DIRECT aims to obtain a new anchor galaxy for the extragalactic distance scale by measuring direct, accurate (to 5%) distances to two Local Group galaxies, M31 and M33, with detached eclipsing binaries. It involves a massive variability survey of these galaxies and subsequent photometric and spectroscopic follow-up of the detached binaries discovered. In this work, I also present a catalog of variable stars discovered in one of the DIRECT fields, M31Y, which includes 41 eclipsing binaries. Additionally, we derive the distance to the Draco Dwarf Spheroidal galaxy, with ~100 RR Lyrae found in our first CCD variability study of this galaxy. A "hybrid" method of discovering Cepheids with ground-based telescopes is described next. It involves applying the image subtraction technique on the images obtained from ground-based telescopes and then following them up with the Hubble Space Telescope to derive Cepheid period-luminosity distances. By re-analyzing ESO Very Large Telescope data on M83 (NGC 5236), we demonstrate that this method is much more powerful for detecting variability, especially in crowded fields. I finally present photometry for the Wolf-Rayet binary WR 20a

  17. New law requires 'medically accurate' lesson plans.

    PubMed

    1999-09-17

    The California Legislature has passed a bill requiring all textbooks and materials used to teach about AIDS be medically accurate and objective. Statements made within the curriculum must be supported by research conducted in compliance with scientific methods, and published in peer-reviewed journals. Some of the current lesson plans were found to contain scientifically unsupported and biased information. In addition, the bill requires material to be "free of racial, ethnic, or gender biases." The legislation is supported by a wide range of interests, but opposed by the California Right to Life Education Fund, because they believe it discredits abstinence-only material.

  18. Nature or Nurture? A Characterization of the Knowledge and Practices of In- and Out-of-field Beginning Secondary Physics Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neakrase, Jennifer Jean

    Previous studies have shown that adequate content knowledge is a necessary, but not sufficient, requirement for affective teaching. While legislation requests teachers to be "highly qualified" in a subject area, such as physics, many teachers are frequently asked to teach in an area when they are not certified through a teaching license to do so. This study uses mixed methods to examine the knowledge of beginning physics teachers. Through semi-structured interviews, classroom observations, and concept maps, the pedagogical content knowledge, subject matter knowledge, and practices of three groups of beginning secondary physics teachers were explored. Data were analyzed qualitatively using cases and quantitatively using descriptive statistics and t-tests, the results of which were combined during the interpretation phase of the research process. The study indicated that, over the first two years of teaching, the in-field group of teachers showed stronger physics content knowledge, a consideration for student difficulties with physics topics, and a positive shift in pedagogical content knowledge impacted by working with students, as compared to the rest of the teachers in the study. This research has implications in the development of secondary physics teachers and in the field of physics education research. Specifically, this research has implications in the physics content support for beginning secondary science teachers, the novice/expert research in physics education research, and the pedagogical preparation of undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty in physics.

  19. Physical Development: Thinking Physically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland, Erik

    2005-01-01

    Children grow and develop physically according to their own experiences, characteristics, and abilities. Physical development is so important and the environment should allow each child to find her space in the sunshine. This can be done by: (1) creating the right outdoor environment; (2) allowing children time to use it; (3) encouraging movement…

  20. Accurate taxonomic assignment of short pyrosequencing reads.

    PubMed

    Clemente, José C; Jansson, Jesper; Valiente, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Ambiguities in the taxonomy dependent assignment of pyrosequencing reads are usually resolved by mapping each read to the lowest common ancestor in a reference taxonomy of all those sequences that match the read. This conservative approach has the drawback of mapping a read to a possibly large clade that may also contain many sequences not matching the read. A more accurate taxonomic assignment of short reads can be made by mapping each read to the node in the reference taxonomy that provides the best precision and recall. We show that given a suffix array for the sequences in the reference taxonomy, a short read can be mapped to the node of the reference taxonomy with the best combined value of precision and recall in time linear in the size of the taxonomy subtree rooted at the lowest common ancestor of the matching sequences. An accurate taxonomic assignment of short reads can thus be made with about the same effi