Science.gov

Sample records for accurate physical models

  1. Physical and Numerical Model Studies of Cross-flow Turbines Towards Accurate Parameterization in Array Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnik, M.; Bachant, P.

    2014-12-01

    Cross-flow turbines, often referred to as vertical-axis turbines, show potential for success in marine hydrokinetic (MHK) and wind energy applications, ranging from small- to utility-scale installations in tidal/ocean currents and offshore wind. As turbine designs mature, the research focus is shifting from individual devices to the optimization of turbine arrays. It would be expensive and time-consuming to conduct physical model studies of large arrays at large model scales (to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers), and hence numerical techniques are generally better suited to explore the array design parameter space. However, since the computing power available today is not sufficient to conduct simulations of the flow in and around large arrays of turbines with fully resolved turbine geometries (e.g., grid resolution into the viscous sublayer on turbine blades), the turbines' interaction with the energy resource (water current or wind) needs to be parameterized, or modeled. Models used today--a common model is the actuator disk concept--are not able to predict the unique wake structure generated by cross-flow turbines. This wake structure has been shown to create "constructive" interference in some cases, improving turbine performance in array configurations, in contrast with axial-flow, or horizontal axis devices. Towards a more accurate parameterization of cross-flow turbines, an extensive experimental study was carried out using a high-resolution turbine test bed with wake measurement capability in a large cross-section tow tank. The experimental results were then "interpolated" using high-fidelity Navier--Stokes simulations, to gain insight into the turbine's near-wake. The study was designed to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers for the results to be Reynolds number independent with respect to turbine performance and wake statistics, such that they can be reliably extrapolated to full scale and used for model validation. The end product of

  2. Towards more accurate wind and solar power prediction by improving NWP model physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Andrea; Köhler, Carmen; von Schumann, Jonas; Ritter, Bodo

    2014-05-01

    The growing importance and successive expansion of renewable energies raise new challenges for decision makers, economists, transmission system operators, scientists and many more. In this interdisciplinary field, the role of Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) is to reduce the errors and provide an a priori estimate of remaining uncertainties associated with the large share of weather-dependent power sources. For this purpose it is essential to optimize NWP model forecasts with respect to those prognostic variables which are relevant for wind and solar power plants. An improved weather forecast serves as the basis for a sophisticated power forecasts. Consequently, a well-timed energy trading on the stock market, and electrical grid stability can be maintained. The German Weather Service (DWD) currently is involved with two projects concerning research in the field of renewable energy, namely ORKA*) and EWeLiNE**). Whereas the latter is in collaboration with the Fraunhofer Institute (IWES), the project ORKA is led by energy & meteo systems (emsys). Both cooperate with German transmission system operators. The goal of the projects is to improve wind and photovoltaic (PV) power forecasts by combining optimized NWP and enhanced power forecast models. In this context, the German Weather Service aims to improve its model system, including the ensemble forecasting system, by working on data assimilation, model physics and statistical post processing. This presentation is focused on the identification of critical weather situations and the associated errors in the German regional NWP model COSMO-DE. First steps leading to improved physical parameterization schemes within the NWP-model are presented. Wind mast measurements reaching up to 200 m height above ground are used for the estimation of the (NWP) wind forecast error at heights relevant for wind energy plants. One particular problem is the daily cycle in wind speed. The transition from stable stratification during

  3. Towards a More Accurate Solar Power Forecast By Improving NWP Model Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, C.; Lee, D.; Steiner, A.; Ritter, B.

    2014-12-01

    The growing importance and successive expansion of renewable energies raise new challenges for decision makers, transmission system operators, scientists and many more. In this interdisciplinary field, the role of Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) is to reduce the uncertainties associated with the large share of weather-dependent power sources. Precise power forecast, well-timed energy trading on the stock market, and electrical grid stability can be maintained. The research project EWeLiNE is a collaboration of the German Weather Service (DWD), the Fraunhofer Institute (IWES) and three German transmission system operators (TSOs). Together, wind and photovoltaic (PV) power forecasts shall be improved by combining optimized NWP and enhanced power forecast models. The conducted work focuses on the identification of critical weather situations and the associated errors in the German regional NWP model COSMO-DE. Not only the representation of the model cloud characteristics, but also special events like Sahara dust over Germany and the solar eclipse in 2015 are treated and their effect on solar power accounted for. An overview of the EWeLiNE project and results of the ongoing research will be presented.

  4. Rapid Bayesian point source inversion using pattern recognition --- bridging the gap between regional scaling relations and accurate physical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, A. P.; Kaeufl, P.; De Wit, R. W. L.; Trampert, J.

    2014-12-01

    Obtaining knowledge about source parameters in (near) real-time during or shortly after an earthquake is essential for mitigating damage and directing resources in the aftermath of the event. Therefore, a variety of real-time source-inversion algorithms have been developed over recent decades. This has been driven by the ever-growing availability of dense seismograph networks in many seismogenic areas of the world and the significant advances in real-time telemetry. By definition, these algorithms rely on short time-windows of sparse, local and regional observations, resulting in source estimates that are highly sensitive to observational errors, noise and missing data. In order to obtain estimates more rapidly, many algorithms are either entirely based on empirical scaling relations or make simplifying assumptions about the Earth's structure, which can in turn lead to biased results. It is therefore essential that realistic uncertainty bounds are estimated along with the parameters. A natural means of propagating probabilistic information on source parameters through the entire processing chain from first observations to potential end users and decision makers is provided by the Bayesian formalism.We present a novel method based on pattern recognition allowing us to incorporate highly accurate physical modelling into an uncertainty-aware real-time inversion algorithm. The algorithm is based on a pre-computed Green's functions database, containing a large set of source-receiver paths in a highly heterogeneous crustal model. Unlike similar methods, which often employ a grid search, we use a supervised learning algorithm to relate synthetic waveforms to point source parameters. This training procedure has to be performed only once and leads to a representation of the posterior probability density function p(m|d) --- the distribution of source parameters m given observations d --- which can be evaluated quickly for new data.Owing to the flexibility of the pattern

  5. Characterising molecules for fundamental physics: an accurate spectroscopic model of methyltrioxorhenium derived from new infrared and millimetre-wave measurements.

    PubMed

    Asselin, Pierre; Berger, Yann; Huet, Thérèse R; Margulès, Laurent; Motiyenko, Roman; Hendricks, Richard J; Tarbutt, Michael R; Tokunaga, Sean K; Darquié, Benoît

    2017-02-08

    Precise spectroscopic analysis of polyatomic molecules enables many striking advances in physical chemistry and fundamental physics. We use several new high-resolution spectroscopic devices to improve our understanding of the rotational and rovibrational structure of methyltrioxorhenium (MTO), the achiral parent of a family of large oxorhenium compounds that are ideal candidate species for a planned measurement of parity violation in chiral molecules. Using millimetre-wave and infrared spectroscopy in a pulsed supersonic jet, a cryogenic buffer gas cell, and room temperature absorption cells, we probe the ground state and the Re[double bond, length as m-dash]O antisymmetric and symmetric stretching excited states of both CH3(187)ReO3 and CH3(185)ReO3 isotopologues in the gas phase with unprecedented precision. By extending the rotational spectra to the 150-300 GHz range, we characterize the ground state rotational and hyperfine structure up to J = 43 and K = 41, resulting in refinements to the rotational, quartic and hyperfine parameters, and the determination of sextic parameters and a centrifugal distortion correction to the quadrupolar hyperfine constant. We obtain rovibrational data for temperatures between 6 and 300 K in the 970-1015 cm(-1) range, at resolutions down to 8 MHz and accuracies of 30 MHz. We use these data to determine more precise excited-state rotational, Coriolis and quartic parameters, as well as the ground-state centrifugal distortion parameter DK of the (187)Re isotopologue. We also account for hyperfine structure in the rovibrational transitions and hence determine the upper state rhenium atom quadrupole coupling constant eQq'.

  6. Accurate Scientific Visualization in Research and Physics Teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendler, Tim

    2011-10-01

    Accurate visualization is key in the expression and comprehension of physical principles. Many 3D animation software packages come with built-in numerical methods for a variety of fundamental classical systems. Scripting languages give access to low-level computational functionality, thereby revealing a virtual physics laboratory for teaching and research. Specific examples will be presented: Galilean relativistic hair, energy conservation in complex systems, scattering from a central force, and energy transfer in bi-molecular reactions.

  7. Pre-Modeling Ensures Accurate Solid Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gow, George

    2010-01-01

    Successful solid modeling requires a well-organized design tree. The design tree is a list of all the object's features and the sequential order in which they are modeled. The solid-modeling process is faster and less prone to modeling errors when the design tree is a simple and geometrically logical definition of the modeled object. Few high…

  8. New model accurately predicts reformate composition

    SciTech Connect

    Ancheyta-Juarez, J.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E. )

    1994-01-31

    Although naphtha reforming is a well-known process, the evolution of catalyst formulation, as well as new trends in gasoline specifications, have led to rapid evolution of the process, including: reactor design, regeneration mode, and operating conditions. Mathematical modeling of the reforming process is an increasingly important tool. It is fundamental to the proper design of new reactors and revamp of existing ones. Modeling can be used to optimize operating conditions, analyze the effects of process variables, and enhance unit performance. Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo has developed a model of the catalytic reforming process that accurately predicts reformate composition at the higher-severity conditions at which new reformers are being designed. The new AA model is more accurate than previous proposals because it takes into account the effects of temperature and pressure on the rate constants of each chemical reaction.

  9. An Accurate, Simplified Model Intrabeam Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, Karl LF

    2002-05-23

    Beginning with the general Bjorken-Mtingwa solution for intrabeam scattering (IBS) we derive an accurate, greatly simplified model of IBS, valid for high energy beams in normal storage ring lattices. In addition, we show that, under the same conditions, a modified version of Piwinski's IBS formulation (where {eta}{sub x,y}{sup 2}/{beta}{sub x,y} has been replaced by {Eta}{sub x,y}) asymptotically approaches the result of Bjorken-Mtingwa.

  10. A quick accurate model of nozzle backflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuharski, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Backflow from nozzles is a major source of contamination on spacecraft. If the craft contains any exposed high voltages, the neutral density produced by the nozzles in the vicinity of the craft needs to be known in order to assess the possibility of Paschen breakdown or the probability of sheath ionization around a region of the craft that collects electrons for the plasma. A model for backflow has been developed for incorporation into the Environment-Power System Analysis Tool (EPSAT) which quickly estimates both the magnitude of the backflow and the species makeup of the flow. By combining the backflow model with the Simons (1972) model for continuum flow it is possible to quickly estimate the density of each species from a nozzle at any position in space. The model requires only a few physical parameters of the nozzle and the gas as inputs and is therefore ideal for engineering applications.

  11. Accurate modelling of unsteady flows in collapsible tubes.

    PubMed

    Marchandise, Emilie; Flaud, Patrice

    2010-01-01

    The context of this paper is the development of a general and efficient numerical haemodynamic tool to help clinicians and researchers in understanding of physiological flow phenomena. We propose an accurate one-dimensional Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin (RK-DG) method coupled with lumped parameter models for the boundary conditions. The suggested model has already been successfully applied to haemodynamics in arteries and is now extended for the flow in collapsible tubes such as veins. The main difference with cardiovascular simulations is that the flow may become supercritical and elastic jumps may appear with the numerical consequence that scheme may not remain monotone if no limiting procedure is introduced. We show that our second-order RK-DG method equipped with an approximate Roe's Riemann solver and a slope-limiting procedure allows us to capture elastic jumps accurately. Moreover, this paper demonstrates that the complex physics associated with such flows is more accurately modelled than with traditional methods such as finite difference methods or finite volumes. We present various benchmark problems that show the flexibility and applicability of the numerical method. Our solutions are compared with analytical solutions when they are available and with solutions obtained using other numerical methods. Finally, to illustrate the clinical interest, we study the emptying process in a calf vein squeezed by contracting skeletal muscle in a normal and pathological subject. We compare our results with experimental simulations and discuss the sensitivity to parameters of our model.

  12. Accurate spectral modeling for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Gupta, S. K.

    1977-01-01

    Direct line-by-line integration and quasi-random band model techniques are employed to calculate the spectral transmittance and total band absorptance of 4.7 micron CO, 4.3 micron CO2, 15 micron CO2, and 5.35 micron NO bands. Results are obtained for different pressures, temperatures, and path lengths. These are compared with available theoretical and experimental investigations. For each gas, extensive tabulations of results are presented for comparative purposes. In almost all cases, line-by-line results are found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental values. The range of validity of other models and correlations are discussed.

  13. Defining allowable physical property variations for high accurate measurements on polymer parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, A.; Sonne, M. R.; Madruga, D. G.; De Chiffre, L.; Hattel, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    Measurement conditions and material properties have a significant impact on the dimensions of a part, especially for polymers parts. Temperature variation causes part deformations that increase the uncertainty of the measurement process. Current industrial tolerances of a few micrometres demand high accurate measurements in non-controlled ambient. Most of polymer parts are manufactured by injection moulding and their inspection is carried out after stabilization, around 200 hours. The overall goal of this work is to reach ±5μm in uncertainty measurements a polymer products which is a challenge in today`s production and metrology environments. The residual deformations in polymer products at room temperature after injection molding are important when micrometer accuracy needs to be achieved. Numerical modelling can give a valuable insight to what is happening in the polymer during cooling down after injection molding. In order to obtain accurate simulations, accurate inputs to the model are crucial. In reality however, the material and physical properties will have some variations. Although these variations may be small, they can act as a source of uncertainty for the measurement. In this paper, we investigated how big the variation in material and physical properties are allowed in order to reach the 5 μm target on the uncertainty.

  14. How accurate are physical property estimation programs for organosilicon compounds?

    PubMed

    Boethling, Robert; Meylan, William

    2013-11-01

    Organosilicon compounds are important in chemistry and commerce, and nearly 10% of new chemical substances for which premanufacture notifications are processed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) contain silicon (Si). Yet, remarkably few measured values are submitted for key physical properties, and the accuracy of estimation programs such as the Estimation Programs Interface (EPI) Suite and the SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry (SPARC) system is largely unknown. To address this issue, the authors developed an extensive database of measured property values for organic compounds containing Si and evaluated the performance of no-cost estimation programs for several properties of importance in environmental assessment. These included melting point (mp), boiling point (bp), vapor pressure (vp), water solubility, n-octanol/water partition coefficient (log KOW ), and Henry's law constant. For bp and the larger of 2 vp datasets, SPARC, MPBPWIN, and the USEPA's Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (TEST) had similar accuracy. For log KOW and water solubility, the authors tested 11 and 6 no-cost estimators, respectively. The best performers were Molinspiration and WSKOWWIN, respectively. The TEST's consensus mp method outperformed that of MPBPWIN by a considerable margin. Generally, the best programs estimated the listed properties of diverse organosilicon compounds with accuracy sufficient for chemical screening. The results also highlight areas where improvement is most needed.

  15. Accurate Semilocal Density Functional for Condensed-Matter Physics and Quantum Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jianmin; Mo, Yuxiang

    2016-08-12

    Most density functionals have been developed by imposing the known exact constraints on the exchange-correlation energy, or by a fit to a set of properties of selected systems, or by both. However, accurate modeling of the conventional exchange hole presents a great challenge, due to the delocalization of the hole. Making use of the property that the hole can be made localized under a general coordinate transformation, here we derive an exchange hole from the density matrix expansion, while the correlation part is obtained by imposing the low-density limit constraint. From the hole, a semilocal exchange-correlation functional is calculated. Our comprehensive test shows that this functional can achieve remarkable accuracy for diverse properties of molecules, solids, and solid surfaces, substantially improving upon the nonempirical functionals proposed in recent years. Accurate semilocal functionals based on their associated holes are physically appealing and practically useful for developing nonlocal functionals.

  16. Accurate Semilocal Density Functional for Condensed-Matter Physics and Quantum Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jianmin; Mo, Yuxiang

    2016-08-01

    Most density functionals have been developed by imposing the known exact constraints on the exchange-correlation energy, or by a fit to a set of properties of selected systems, or by both. However, accurate modeling of the conventional exchange hole presents a great challenge, due to the delocalization of the hole. Making use of the property that the hole can be made localized under a general coordinate transformation, here we derive an exchange hole from the density matrix expansion, while the correlation part is obtained by imposing the low-density limit constraint. From the hole, a semilocal exchange-correlation functional is calculated. Our comprehensive test shows that this functional can achieve remarkable accuracy for diverse properties of molecules, solids, and solid surfaces, substantially improving upon the nonempirical functionals proposed in recent years. Accurate semilocal functionals based on their associated holes are physically appealing and practically useful for developing nonlocal functionals.

  17. Physical modelling in biomechanics.

    PubMed Central

    Koehl, M A R

    2003-01-01

    Physical models, like mathematical models, are useful tools in biomechanical research. Physical models enable investigators to explore parameter space in a way that is not possible using a comparative approach with living organisms: parameters can be varied one at a time to measure the performance consequences of each, while values and combinations not found in nature can be tested. Experiments using physical models in the laboratory or field can circumvent problems posed by uncooperative or endangered organisms. Physical models also permit some aspects of the biomechanical performance of extinct organisms to be measured. Use of properly scaled physical models allows detailed physical measurements to be made for organisms that are too small or fast to be easily studied directly. The process of physical modelling and the advantages and limitations of this approach are illustrated using examples from our research on hydrodynamic forces on sessile organisms, mechanics of hydraulic skeletons, food capture by zooplankton and odour interception by olfactory antennules. PMID:14561350

  18. Fast Physically Accurate Rendering of Multimodal Signatures of Distributed Fracture in Heterogeneous Materials.

    PubMed

    Visell, Yon

    2015-04-01

    This paper proposes a fast, physically accurate method for synthesizing multimodal, acoustic and haptic, signatures of distributed fracture in quasi-brittle heterogeneous materials, such as wood, granular media, or other fiber composites. Fracture processes in these materials are challenging to simulate with existing methods, due to the prevalence of large numbers of disordered, quasi-random spatial degrees of freedom, representing the complex physical state of a sample over the geometric volume of interest. Here, I develop an algorithm for simulating such processes, building on a class of statistical lattice models of fracture that have been widely investigated in the physics literature. This algorithm is enabled through a recently published mathematical construction based on the inverse transform method of random number sampling. It yields a purely time domain stochastic jump process representing stress fluctuations in the medium. The latter can be readily extended by a mean field approximation that captures the averaged constitutive (stress-strain) behavior of the material. Numerical simulations and interactive examples demonstrate the ability of these algorithms to generate physically plausible acoustic and haptic signatures of fracture in complex, natural materials interactively at audio sampling rates.

  19. Physically Accurate Soil Freeze-Thaw Processes in a Global Land Surface Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, M.; Haverd, V.

    2013-12-01

    Transfer of energy and moisture in frozen soil, and hence the active layer depth, are strongly influenced by the soil freezing curve which specifies liquid moisture content as a function of temperature. However, the curve is typically not represented in global land surface models, with less physically-based approximations being used instead. In this work, we develop a physically accurate model of soil freeze-thaw processes, suitable for use in a global land surface scheme. We incorporated soil freeze-thaw processes into an existing detailed model for the transfer of heat, liquid water and water vapor in soils, including isotope diagnostics - Soil-Litter-Iso (SLI, Haverd & Cuntz 2010), which has been used successfully for water and carbon balances of the Australian continent (Haverd et al. 2013). A unique feature of SLI is that fluxes of energy and moisture are coupled using a single system of linear equations. The extension to include freeze-thaw processes and snow maintains this elegant coupling, requiring only coefficients in the linear equations to be modified. No impedance factor for hydraulic conductivity is needed because of the formulation by matric flux potential rather than pressure head. Iterations are avoided which results in the same computational speed as without freezing. The extended model is evaluated extensively in stand-alone mode (against theoretical predictions, lab experiments and field data) and as part of the CABLE global land surface scheme. SLI accurately solves the classical Stefan problem of a homogeneous medium undergoing a phase change. The model also accurately reproduces the freezing front, which is observed in laboratory experiments (Hansson et al. 2004). SLI was further tested against observations at a permafrost site in Tibet (Weismüller et al. 2011). It reproduces seasonal thawing and freezing of the active layer to within 3 K of the observed soil temperature and to within 10% of the observed volumetric liquid soil moisture

  20. Physically Accurate Soil Freeze-Thaw Processes in a Global Land Surface Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, Matthias; Haverd, Vanessa

    2014-05-01

    Transfer of energy and moisture in frozen soil, and hence the active layer depth, are strongly influenced by the soil freezing curve which specifies liquid moisture content as a function of temperature. However, the curve is typically not represented in global land surface models, with less physically-based approximations being used instead. In this work, we develop a physically accurate model of soil freeze-thaw processes, suitable for use in a global land surface scheme. We incorporated soil freeze-thaw processes into an existing detailed model for the transfer of heat, liquid water and water vapor in soils, including isotope diagnostics - Soil-Litter-Iso (SLI, Haverd & Cuntz 2010), which has been used successfully for water and carbon balances of the Australian continent (Haverd et al. 2013). A unique feature of SLI is that fluxes of energy and moisture are coupled using a single system of linear equations. The extension to include freeze-thaw processes and snow maintains this elegant coupling, requiring only coefficients in the linear equations to be modified. No impedance factor for hydraulic conductivity is needed because of the formulation by matric flux potential rather than pressure head. Iterations are avoided which results in the same computational speed as without freezing. The extended model is evaluated extensively in stand-alone mode (against theoretical predictions, lab experiments and field data) and as part of the CABLE global land surface scheme. SLI accurately solves the classical Stefan problem of a homogeneous medium undergoing a phase change. The model also accurately reproduces the freezing front, which is observed in laboratory experiments (Hansson et al. 2004). SLI was further tested against observations at a permafrost site in Tibet (Weismüller et al. 2011). It reproduces seasonal thawing and freezing of the active layer to within 3 K of the observed soil temperature and to within 10% of the observed volumetric liquid soil moisture

  1. An Accurate and Dynamic Computer Graphics Muscle Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, David Asher

    1997-01-01

    A computer based musculo-skeletal model was developed at the University in the departments of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering. This model accurately represents human shoulder kinematics. The result of this model is the graphical display of bones moving through an appropriate range of motion based on inputs of EMGs and external forces. The need existed to incorporate a geometric muscle model in the larger musculo-skeletal model. Previous muscle models did not accurately represent muscle geometries, nor did they account for the kinematics of tendons. This thesis covers the creation of a new muscle model for use in the above musculo-skeletal model. This muscle model was based on anatomical data from the Visible Human Project (VHP) cadaver study. Two-dimensional digital images from the VHP were analyzed and reconstructed to recreate the three-dimensional muscle geometries. The recreated geometries were smoothed, reduced, and sliced to form data files defining the surfaces of each muscle. The muscle modeling function opened these files during run-time and recreated the muscle surface. The modeling function applied constant volume limitations to the muscle and constant geometry limitations to the tendons.

  2. An accurate halo model for fitting non-linear cosmological power spectra and baryonic feedback models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, A. J.; Peacock, J. A.; Heymans, C.; Joudaki, S.; Heavens, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    We present an optimized variant of the halo model, designed to produce accurate matter power spectra well into the non-linear regime for a wide range of cosmological models. To do this, we introduce physically motivated free parameters into the halo-model formalism and fit these to data from high-resolution N-body simulations. For a variety of Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) and wCDM models, the halo-model power is accurate to ≃ 5 per cent for k ≤ 10h Mpc-1 and z ≤ 2. An advantage of our new halo model is that it can be adapted to account for the effects of baryonic feedback on the power spectrum. We demonstrate this by fitting the halo model to power spectra from the OWLS (OverWhelmingly Large Simulations) hydrodynamical simulation suite via parameters that govern halo internal structure. We are able to fit all feedback models investigated at the 5 per cent level using only two free parameters, and we place limits on the range of these halo parameters for feedback models investigated by the OWLS simulations. Accurate predictions to high k are vital for weak-lensing surveys, and these halo parameters could be considered nuisance parameters to marginalize over in future analyses to mitigate uncertainty regarding the details of feedback. Finally, we investigate how lensing observables predicted by our model compare to those from simulations and from HALOFIT for a range of k-cuts and feedback models and quantify the angular scales at which these effects become important. Code to calculate power spectra from the model presented in this paper can be found at https://github.com/alexander-mead/hmcode.

  3. Local Debonding and Fiber Breakage in Composite Materials Modeled Accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2001-01-01

    A prerequisite for full utilization of composite materials in aerospace components is accurate design and life prediction tools that enable the assessment of component performance and reliability. Such tools assist both structural analysts, who design and optimize structures composed of composite materials, and materials scientists who design and optimize the composite materials themselves. NASA Glenn Research Center's Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC) software package (http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/LPB/mac) addresses this need for composite design and life prediction tools by providing a widely applicable and accurate approach to modeling composite materials. Furthermore, MAC/GMC serves as a platform for incorporating new local models and capabilities that are under development at NASA, thus enabling these new capabilities to progress rapidly to a stage in which they can be employed by the code's end users.

  4. An Accurate Temperature Correction Model for Thermocouple Hygrometers 1

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Michael J.; Cass, Alfred; de Jager, James M.

    1982-01-01

    Numerous water relation studies have used thermocouple hygrometers routinely. However, the accurate temperature correction of hygrometer calibration curve slopes seems to have been largely neglected in both psychrometric and dewpoint techniques. In the case of thermocouple psychrometers, two temperature correction models are proposed, each based on measurement of the thermojunction radius and calculation of the theoretical voltage sensitivity to changes in water potential. The first model relies on calibration at a single temperature and the second at two temperatures. Both these models were more accurate than the temperature correction models currently in use for four psychrometers calibrated over a range of temperatures (15-38°C). The model based on calibration at two temperatures is superior to that based on only one calibration. The model proposed for dewpoint hygrometers is similar to that for psychrometers. It is based on the theoretical voltage sensitivity to changes in water potential. Comparison with empirical data from three dewpoint hygrometers calibrated at four different temperatures indicates that these instruments need only be calibrated at, e.g. 25°C, if the calibration slopes are corrected for temperature. PMID:16662241

  5. An accurate temperature correction model for thermocouple hygrometers.

    PubMed

    Savage, M J; Cass, A; de Jager, J M

    1982-02-01

    Numerous water relation studies have used thermocouple hygrometers routinely. However, the accurate temperature correction of hygrometer calibration curve slopes seems to have been largely neglected in both psychrometric and dewpoint techniques.In the case of thermocouple psychrometers, two temperature correction models are proposed, each based on measurement of the thermojunction radius and calculation of the theoretical voltage sensitivity to changes in water potential. The first model relies on calibration at a single temperature and the second at two temperatures. Both these models were more accurate than the temperature correction models currently in use for four psychrometers calibrated over a range of temperatures (15-38 degrees C). The model based on calibration at two temperatures is superior to that based on only one calibration.The model proposed for dewpoint hygrometers is similar to that for psychrometers. It is based on the theoretical voltage sensitivity to changes in water potential. Comparison with empirical data from three dewpoint hygrometers calibrated at four different temperatures indicates that these instruments need only be calibrated at, e.g. 25 degrees C, if the calibration slopes are corrected for temperature.

  6. More-Accurate Model of Flows in Rocket Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, Ashvin; Chenoweth, James; Brinckman, Kevin; Dash, Sanford

    2011-01-01

    An improved computational model for simulating flows in liquid-propellant injectors in rocket engines has been developed. Models like this one are needed for predicting fluxes of heat in, and performances of, the engines. An important part of predicting performance is predicting fluctuations of temperature, fluctuations of concentrations of chemical species, and effects of turbulence on diffusion of heat and chemical species. Customarily, diffusion effects are represented by parameters known in the art as the Prandtl and Schmidt numbers. Prior formulations include ad hoc assumptions of constant values of these parameters, but these assumptions and, hence, the formulations, are inaccurate for complex flows. In the improved model, these parameters are neither constant nor specified in advance: instead, they are variables obtained as part of the solution. Consequently, this model represents the effects of turbulence on diffusion of heat and chemical species more accurately than prior formulations do, and may enable more-accurate prediction of mixing and flows of heat in rocket-engine combustion chambers. The model has been implemented within CRUNCH CFD, a proprietary computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer program, and has been tested within that program. The model could also be implemented within other CFD programs.

  7. Accurate measurements of the acoustical physical constants of synthetic alpha-quartz for SAW devices.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Juin-ichi; Takanaga, Izumi; Nishiyama, Shouichi

    2002-01-01

    Accurate measurements of the acoustical physical constants (elastic constants, piezoelectric constants, dielectric constants, and density) of commercially available and widely used surface acoustic wave (SAW)-grade synthetic a-quartz are reported. The propagation directions and modes of bulk waves optimal for accurately determining the constants were selected through numerical calculations, and three principal X-, Y-, and Z-cut specimens and several rotated Y-cut specimens were prepared from a single crystal ingot to determine the constants and to confirm their accuracy. All of the constants were determined through highly accurate measurements of the longitudinal velocities, shear velocities, dielectric constants, and density. The velocity values measured for the specimens that were not used to determine the constants agreed well with those calculated from the determined constants, within a difference of +/- 0.20 m/s (+/- 0.004%).

  8. Fast and Accurate Circuit Design Automation through Hierarchical Model Switching.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Linh; Tagkopoulos, Ilias

    2015-08-21

    In computer-aided biological design, the trifecta of characterized part libraries, accurate models and optimal design parameters is crucial for producing reliable designs. As the number of parts and model complexity increase, however, it becomes exponentially more difficult for any optimization method to search the solution space, hence creating a trade-off that hampers efficient design. To address this issue, we present a hierarchical computer-aided design architecture that uses a two-step approach for biological design. First, a simple model of low computational complexity is used to predict circuit behavior and assess candidate circuit branches through branch-and-bound methods. Then, a complex, nonlinear circuit model is used for a fine-grained search of the reduced solution space, thus achieving more accurate results. Evaluation with a benchmark of 11 circuits and a library of 102 experimental designs with known characterization parameters demonstrates a speed-up of 3 orders of magnitude when compared to other design methods that provide optimality guarantees.

  9. Etch modeling for accurate full-chip process proximity correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, Daniel F.; Shiely, James P.

    2005-05-01

    The challenges of the 65 nm node and beyond require new formulations of the compact convolution models used in OPC. In addition to simulating more optical and resist effects, these models must accommodate pattern distortions due to etch which can no longer be treated as small perturbations on photo-lithographic effects. (Methods for combining optical and process modules while optimizing the speed/accuracy tradeoff were described in "Advanced Model Formulations for Optical and Process Proximity Correction", D. Beale et al, SPIE 2004.) In this paper, we evaluate new physics-based etch model formulations that differ from the convolution-based process models used previously. The new models are expressed within the compact modeling framework described by J. Stirniman et al. in SPIE, vol. 3051, p469, 1997, and thus can be used for high-speed process simulation during full-chip OPC.

  10. Accurate pressure gradient calculations in hydrostatic atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, John J.; Mendez-Nunez, Luis R.; Tanrikulu, Saffet

    1987-01-01

    A method for the accurate calculation of the horizontal pressure gradient acceleration in hydrostatic atmospheric models is presented which is especially useful in situations where the isothermal surfaces are not parallel to the vertical coordinate surfaces. The present method is shown to be exact if the potential temperature lapse rate is constant between the vertical pressure integration limits. The technique is applied to both the integration of the hydrostatic equation and the computation of the slope correction term in the horizontal pressure gradient. A fixed vertical grid and a dynamic grid defined by the significant levels in the vertical temperature distribution are employed.

  11. Mouse models of human AML accurately predict chemotherapy response

    PubMed Central

    Zuber, Johannes; Radtke, Ina; Pardee, Timothy S.; Zhao, Zhen; Rappaport, Amy R.; Luo, Weijun; McCurrach, Mila E.; Yang, Miao-Miao; Dolan, M. Eileen; Kogan, Scott C.; Downing, James R.; Lowe, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    The genetic heterogeneity of cancer influences the trajectory of tumor progression and may underlie clinical variation in therapy response. To model such heterogeneity, we produced genetically and pathologically accurate mouse models of common forms of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and developed methods to mimic standard induction chemotherapy and efficiently monitor therapy response. We see that murine AMLs harboring two common human AML genotypes show remarkably diverse responses to conventional therapy that mirror clinical experience. Specifically, murine leukemias expressing the AML1/ETO fusion oncoprotein, associated with a favorable prognosis in patients, show a dramatic response to induction chemotherapy owing to robust activation of the p53 tumor suppressor network. Conversely, murine leukemias expressing MLL fusion proteins, associated with a dismal prognosis in patients, are drug-resistant due to an attenuated p53 response. Our studies highlight the importance of genetic information in guiding the treatment of human AML, functionally establish the p53 network as a central determinant of chemotherapy response in AML, and demonstrate that genetically engineered mouse models of human cancer can accurately predict therapy response in patients. PMID:19339691

  12. Mouse models of human AML accurately predict chemotherapy response.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Johannes; Radtke, Ina; Pardee, Timothy S; Zhao, Zhen; Rappaport, Amy R; Luo, Weijun; McCurrach, Mila E; Yang, Miao-Miao; Dolan, M Eileen; Kogan, Scott C; Downing, James R; Lowe, Scott W

    2009-04-01

    The genetic heterogeneity of cancer influences the trajectory of tumor progression and may underlie clinical variation in therapy response. To model such heterogeneity, we produced genetically and pathologically accurate mouse models of common forms of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and developed methods to mimic standard induction chemotherapy and efficiently monitor therapy response. We see that murine AMLs harboring two common human AML genotypes show remarkably diverse responses to conventional therapy that mirror clinical experience. Specifically, murine leukemias expressing the AML1/ETO fusion oncoprotein, associated with a favorable prognosis in patients, show a dramatic response to induction chemotherapy owing to robust activation of the p53 tumor suppressor network. Conversely, murine leukemias expressing MLL fusion proteins, associated with a dismal prognosis in patients, are drug-resistant due to an attenuated p53 response. Our studies highlight the importance of genetic information in guiding the treatment of human AML, functionally establish the p53 network as a central determinant of chemotherapy response in AML, and demonstrate that genetically engineered mouse models of human cancer can accurately predict therapy response in patients.

  13. Simple Mathematical Models Do Not Accurately Predict Early SIV Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Noecker, Cecilia; Schaefer, Krista; Zaccheo, Kelly; Yang, Yiding; Day, Judy; Ganusov, Vitaly V.

    2015-01-01

    Upon infection of a new host, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replicates in the mucosal tissues and is generally undetectable in circulation for 1–2 weeks post-infection. Several interventions against HIV including vaccines and antiretroviral prophylaxis target virus replication at this earliest stage of infection. Mathematical models have been used to understand how HIV spreads from mucosal tissues systemically and what impact vaccination and/or antiretroviral prophylaxis has on viral eradication. Because predictions of such models have been rarely compared to experimental data, it remains unclear which processes included in these models are critical for predicting early HIV dynamics. Here we modified the “standard” mathematical model of HIV infection to include two populations of infected cells: cells that are actively producing the virus and cells that are transitioning into virus production mode. We evaluated the effects of several poorly known parameters on infection outcomes in this model and compared model predictions to experimental data on infection of non-human primates with variable doses of simian immunodifficiency virus (SIV). First, we found that the mode of virus production by infected cells (budding vs. bursting) has a minimal impact on the early virus dynamics for a wide range of model parameters, as long as the parameters are constrained to provide the observed rate of SIV load increase in the blood of infected animals. Interestingly and in contrast with previous results, we found that the bursting mode of virus production generally results in a higher probability of viral extinction than the budding mode of virus production. Second, this mathematical model was not able to accurately describe the change in experimentally determined probability of host infection with increasing viral doses. Third and finally, the model was also unable to accurately explain the decline in the time to virus detection with increasing viral dose. These results

  14. Turbulence Models for Accurate Aerothermal Prediction in Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang-Hong; Wu, Yi-Zao; Wang, Jiang-Feng

    Accurate description of the aerodynamic and aerothermal environment is crucial to the integrated design and optimization for high performance hypersonic vehicles. In the simulation of aerothermal environment, the effect of viscosity is crucial. The turbulence modeling remains a major source of uncertainty in the computational prediction of aerodynamic forces and heating. In this paper, three turbulent models were studied: the one-equation eddy viscosity transport model of Spalart-Allmaras, the Wilcox k-ω model and the Menter SST model. For the k-ω model and SST model, the compressibility correction, press dilatation and low Reynolds number correction were considered. The influence of these corrections for flow properties were discussed by comparing with the results without corrections. In this paper the emphasis is on the assessment and evaluation of the turbulence models in prediction of heat transfer as applied to a range of hypersonic flows with comparison to experimental data. This will enable establishing factor of safety for the design of thermal protection systems of hypersonic vehicle.

  15. Generating Facial Expressions Using an Anatomically Accurate Biomechanical Model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tim; Hung, Alice; Mithraratne, Kumar

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a computational framework for modelling the biomechanics of human facial expressions. A detailed high-order (Cubic-Hermite) finite element model of the human head was constructed using anatomical data segmented from magnetic resonance images. The model includes a superficial soft-tissue continuum consisting of skin, the subcutaneous layer and the superficial Musculo-Aponeurotic system. Embedded within this continuum mesh, are 20 pairs of facial muscles which drive facial expressions. These muscles were treated as transversely-isotropic and their anatomical geometries and fibre orientations were accurately depicted. In order to capture the relative composition of muscles and fat, material heterogeneity was also introduced into the model. Complex contact interactions between the lips, eyelids, and between superficial soft tissue continuum and deep rigid skeletal bones were also computed. In addition, this paper investigates the impact of incorporating material heterogeneity and contact interactions, which are often neglected in similar studies. Four facial expressions were simulated using the developed model and the results were compared with surface data obtained from a 3D structured-light scanner. Predicted expressions showed good agreement with the experimental data.

  16. Inverter Modeling For Accurate Energy Predictions Of Tracking HCPV Installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, J.; Jensen, S.; McDonald, Mark

    2010-10-01

    High efficiency high concentration photovoltaic (HCPV) solar plants of megawatt scale are now operational, and opportunities for expanded adoption are plentiful. However, effective bidding for sites requires reliable prediction of energy production. HCPV module nameplate power is rated for specific test conditions; however, instantaneous HCPV power varies due to site specific irradiance and operating temperature, and is degraded by soiling, protective stowing, shading, and electrical connectivity. These factors interact with the selection of equipment typically supplied by third parties, e.g., wire gauge and inverters. We describe a time sequence model accurately accounting for these effects that predicts annual energy production, with specific reference to the impact of the inverter on energy output and interactions between system-level design decisions and the inverter. We will also show two examples, based on an actual field design, of inverter efficiency calculations and the interaction between string arrangements and inverter selection.

  17. ACCURATE LOW-MASS STELLAR MODELS OF KOI-126

    SciTech Connect

    Feiden, Gregory A.; Chaboyer, Brian; Dotter, Aaron

    2011-10-10

    The recent discovery of an eclipsing hierarchical triple system with two low-mass stars in a close orbit (KOI-126) by Carter et al. appeared to reinforce the evidence that theoretical stellar evolution models are not able to reproduce the observational mass-radius relation for low-mass stars. We present a set of stellar models for the three stars in the KOI-126 system that show excellent agreement with the observed radii. This agreement appears to be due to the equation of state implemented by our code. A significant dispersion in the observed mass-radius relation for fully convective stars is demonstrated; indicative of the influence of physics currently not incorporated in standard stellar evolution models. We also predict apsidal motion constants for the two M dwarf companions. These values should be observationally determined to within 1% by the end of the Kepler mission.

  18. Accurate SHAPE-directed RNA secondary structure modeling, including pseudoknots

    PubMed Central

    Hajdin, Christine E.; Bellaousov, Stanislav; Huggins, Wayne; Leonard, Christopher W.; Mathews, David H.; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    A pseudoknot forms in an RNA when nucleotides in a loop pair with a region outside the helices that close the loop. Pseudoknots occur relatively rarely in RNA but are highly overrepresented in functionally critical motifs in large catalytic RNAs, in riboswitches, and in regulatory elements of viruses. Pseudoknots are usually excluded from RNA structure prediction algorithms. When included, these pairings are difficult to model accurately, especially in large RNAs, because allowing this structure dramatically increases the number of possible incorrect folds and because it is difficult to search the fold space for an optimal structure. We have developed a concise secondary structure modeling approach that combines SHAPE (selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension) experimental chemical probing information and a simple, but robust, energy model for the entropic cost of single pseudoknot formation. Structures are predicted with iterative refinement, using a dynamic programming algorithm. This melded experimental and thermodynamic energy function predicted the secondary structures and the pseudoknots for a set of 21 challenging RNAs of known structure ranging in size from 34 to 530 nt. On average, 93% of known base pairs were predicted, and all pseudoknots in well-folded RNAs were identified. PMID:23503844

  19. Towards Accurate Molecular Modeling of Plastic Bonded Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantawansri, T. L.; Andzelm, J.; Taylor, D.; Byrd, E.; Rice, B.

    2010-03-01

    There is substantial interest in identifying the controlling factors that influence the susceptibility of polymer bonded explosives (PBXs) to accidental initiation. Numerous Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of PBXs using the COMPASS force field have been reported in recent years, where the validity of the force field in modeling the solid EM fill has been judged solely on its ability to reproduce lattice parameters, which is an insufficient metric. Performance of the COMPASS force field in modeling EMs and the polymeric binder has been assessed by calculating structural, thermal, and mechanical properties, where only fair agreement with experimental data is obtained. We performed MD simulations using the COMPASS force field for the polymer binder hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene and five EMs: cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine, 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetra-azacyclo-octane, 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexantirohexaazazisowurzitane, 2,4,6-trinitro-1,3,5-benzenetriamine, and pentaerythritol tetranitate. Predicted EM crystallographic and molecular structural parameters, as well as calculated properties for the binder will be compared with experimental results for different simulation conditions. We also present novel simulation protocols, which improve agreement between experimental and computation results thus leading to the accurate modeling of PBXs.

  20. Personalized Orthodontic Accurate Tooth Arrangement System with Complete Teeth Model.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Cheng, Xiaosheng; Dai, Ning; Liu, Yi; Fan, Qilei; Hou, Yulin; Jiang, Xiaotong

    2015-09-01

    The accuracy, validity and lack of relation information between dental root and jaw in tooth arrangement are key problems in tooth arrangement technology. This paper aims to describe a newly developed virtual, personalized and accurate tooth arrangement system based on complete information about dental root and skull. Firstly, a feature constraint database of a 3D teeth model is established. Secondly, for computed simulation of tooth movement, the reference planes and lines are defined by the anatomical reference points. The matching mathematical model of teeth pattern and the principle of the specific pose transformation of rigid body are fully utilized. The relation of position between dental root and alveolar bone is considered during the design process. Finally, the relative pose relationships among various teeth are optimized using the object mover, and a personalized therapeutic schedule is formulated. Experimental results show that the virtual tooth arrangement system can arrange abnormal teeth very well and is sufficiently flexible. The relation of position between root and jaw is favorable. This newly developed system is characterized by high-speed processing and quantitative evaluation of the amount of 3D movement of an individual tooth.

  1. Cabin Environment Physics Risk Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattenberger, Christopher J.; Mathias, Donovan Leigh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a Cabin Environment Physics Risk (CEPR) model that predicts the time for an initial failure of Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) functionality to propagate into a hazardous environment and trigger a loss-of-crew (LOC) event. This physics-of failure model allows a probabilistic risk assessment of a crewed spacecraft to account for the cabin environment, which can serve as a buffer to protect the crew during an abort from orbit and ultimately enable a safe return. The results of the CEPR model replace the assumption that failure of the crew critical ECLSS functionality causes LOC instantly, and provide a more accurate representation of the spacecraft's risk posture. The instant-LOC assumption is shown to be excessively conservative and, moreover, can impact the relative risk drivers identified for the spacecraft. This, in turn, could lead the design team to allocate mass for equipment to reduce overly conservative risk estimates in a suboptimal configuration, which inherently increases the overall risk to the crew. For example, available mass could be poorly used to add redundant ECLSS components that have a negligible benefit but appear to make the vehicle safer due to poor assumptions about the propagation time of ECLSS failures.

  2. Accurate protein structure modeling using sparse NMR data and homologous structure information.

    PubMed

    Thompson, James M; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G; Liu, Gaohua; Rossi, Paolo; Tang, Yuefeng; Mills, Jeffrey L; Szyperski, Thomas; Montelione, Gaetano T; Baker, David

    2012-06-19

    While information from homologous structures plays a central role in X-ray structure determination by molecular replacement, such information is rarely used in NMR structure determination because it can be incorrect, both locally and globally, when evolutionary relationships are inferred incorrectly or there has been considerable evolutionary structural divergence. Here we describe a method that allows robust modeling of protein structures of up to 225 residues by combining (1)H(N), (13)C, and (15)N backbone and (13)Cβ chemical shift data, distance restraints derived from homologous structures, and a physically realistic all-atom energy function. Accurate models are distinguished from inaccurate models generated using incorrect sequence alignments by requiring that (i) the all-atom energies of models generated using the restraints are lower than models generated in unrestrained calculations and (ii) the low-energy structures converge to within 2.0 Å backbone rmsd over 75% of the protein. Benchmark calculations on known structures and blind targets show that the method can accurately model protein structures, even with very remote homology information, to a backbone rmsd of 1.2-1.9 Å relative to the conventional determined NMR ensembles and of 0.9-1.6 Å relative to X-ray structures for well-defined regions of the protein structures. This approach facilitates the accurate modeling of protein structures using backbone chemical shift data without need for side-chain resonance assignments and extensive analysis of NOESY cross-peak assignments.

  3. Physical models of cognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zak, Michail

    1994-05-01

    This paper presents and discusses physical models for simulating some aspects of neural intelligence, and, in particular, the process of cognition. The main departure from the classical approach here is in utilization of a terminal version of classical dynamics introduced by the author earlier. Based upon violations of the Lipschitz condition at equilibrium points, terminal dynamics attains two new fundamental properties: it is spontaneous and nondeterministic. Special attention is focused on terminal neurodynamics as a particular architecture of terminal dynamics which is suitable for modeling of information flows. Terminal neurodynamics possesses a well-organized probabilistic structure which can be analytically predicted, prescribed, and controlled, and therefore which presents a powerful tool for modeling real-life uncertainties. Two basic phenomena associated with random behavior of neurodynamic solutions are exploited. The first one is a stochastic attractor—a stable stationary stochastic process to which random solutions of a closed system converge. As a model of the cognition process, a stochastic attractor can be viewed as a universal tool for generalization and formation of classes of patterns. The concept of stochastic attractor is applied to model a collective brain paradigm explaining coordination between simple units of intelligence which perform a collective task without direct exchange of information. The second fundamental phenomenon discussed is terminal chaos which occurs in open systems. Applications of terminal chaos to information fusion as well as to explanation and modeling of coordination among neurons in biological systems are discussed. It should be emphasized that all the models of terminal neurodynamics are implementable in analog devices, which means that all the cognition processes discussed in the paper are reducible to the laws of Newtonian mechanics.

  4. Physical Models of Cognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses physical models for simulating some aspects of neural intelligence, and, in particular, the process of cognition. The main departure from the classical approach here is in utilization of a terminal version of classical dynamics introduced by the author earlier. Based upon violations of the Lipschitz condition at equilibrium points, terminal dynamics attains two new fundamental properties: it is spontaneous and nondeterministic. Special attention is focused on terminal neurodynamics as a particular architecture of terminal dynamics which is suitable for modeling of information flows. Terminal neurodynamics possesses a well-organized probabilistic structure which can be analytically predicted, prescribed, and controlled, and therefore which presents a powerful tool for modeling real-life uncertainties. Two basic phenomena associated with random behavior of neurodynamic solutions are exploited. The first one is a stochastic attractor ; a stable stationary stochastic process to which random solutions of a closed system converge. As a model of the cognition process, a stochastic attractor can be viewed as a universal tool for generalization and formation of classes of patterns. The concept of stochastic attractor is applied to model a collective brain paradigm explaining coordination between simple units of intelligence which perform a collective task without direct exchange of information. The second fundamental phenomenon discussed is terminal chaos which occurs in open systems. Applications of terminal chaos to information fusion as well as to explanation and modeling of coordination among neurons in biological systems are discussed. It should be emphasized that all the models of terminal neurodynamics are implementable in analog devices, which means that all the cognition processes discussed in the paper are reducible to the laws of Newtonian mechanics.

  5. 5D model for accurate representation and visualization of dynamic cardiac structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-te; Robb, Richard A.

    2000-05-01

    Accurate cardiac modeling is challenging due to the intricate structure and complex contraction patterns of myocardial tissues. Fast imaging techniques can provide 4D structural information acquired as a sequence of 3D images throughout the cardiac cycle. To mode. The beating heart, we created a physics-based surface model that deforms between successive time point in the cardiac cycle. 3D images of canine hearts were acquired during one complete cardiac cycle using the DSR and the EBCT. The left ventricle of the first time point is reconstructed as a triangular mesh. A mass-spring physics-based deformable mode,, which can expand and shrink with local contraction and stretching forces distributed in an anatomically accurate simulation of cardiac motion, is applied to the initial mesh and allows the initial mesh to deform to fit the left ventricle in successive time increments of the sequence. The resulting 4D model can be interactively transformed and displayed with associated regional electrical activity mapped onto anatomic surfaces, producing a 5D model, which faithfully exhibits regional cardiac contraction and relaxation patterns over the entire heart. The model faithfully represents structural changes throughout the cardiac cycle. Such models provide the framework for minimizing the number of time points required to usefully depict regional motion of myocardium and allow quantitative assessment of regional myocardial motion. The electrical activation mapping provides spatial and temporal correlation within the cardiac cycle. In procedures which as intra-cardiac catheter ablation, visualization of the dynamic model can be used to accurately localize the foci of myocardial arrhythmias and guide positioning of catheters for optimal ablation.

  6. Monte Carlo modeling provides accurate calibration factors for radionuclide activity meters.

    PubMed

    Zagni, F; Cicoria, G; Lucconi, G; Infantino, A; Lodi, F; Marengo, M

    2014-12-01

    Accurate determination of calibration factors for radionuclide activity meters is crucial for quantitative studies and in the optimization step of radiation protection, as these detectors are widespread in radiopharmacy and nuclear medicine facilities. In this work we developed the Monte Carlo model of a widely used activity meter, using the Geant4 simulation toolkit. More precisely the "PENELOPE" EM physics models were employed. The model was validated by means of several certified sources, traceable to primary activity standards, and other sources locally standardized with spectrometry measurements, plus other experimental tests. Great care was taken in order to accurately reproduce the geometrical details of the gas chamber and the activity sources, each of which is different in shape and enclosed in a unique container. Both relative calibration factors and ionization current obtained with simulations were compared against experimental measurements; further tests were carried out, such as the comparison of the relative response of the chamber for a source placed at different positions. The results showed a satisfactory level of accuracy in the energy range of interest, with the discrepancies lower than 4% for all the tested parameters. This shows that an accurate Monte Carlo modeling of this type of detector is feasible using the low-energy physics models embedded in Geant4. The obtained Monte Carlo model establishes a powerful tool for first instance determination of new calibration factors for non-standard radionuclides, for custom containers, when a reference source is not available. Moreover, the model provides an experimental setup for further research and optimization with regards to materials and geometrical details of the measuring setup, such as the ionization chamber itself or the containers configuration.

  7. MODELING PHYSICAL HABITAT PARAMETERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Salmonid populations can be affected by alterations in stream physical habitat. Fish productivity is determined by the stream's physical habitat structure ( channel form, substrate distribution, riparian vegetation), water quality, flow regime and inputs from the watershed (sedim...

  8. Evolutionary Industrial Physical Model Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrascal, Alberto; Alberdi, Amaia

    Both complexity and lack of knowledge associated to physical processes makes physical models design an arduous task. Frequently, the only available information about the physical processes are the heuristic data obtained from experiments or at best a rough idea on what are the physical principles and laws that underlie considered physical processes. Then the problem is converted to find a mathematical expression which fits data. There exist traditional approaches to tackle the inductive model search process from data, such as regression, interpolation, finite element method, etc. Nevertheless, these methods either are only able to solve a reduced number of simple model typologies, or the given black-box solution does not contribute to clarify the analyzed physical process. In this paper a hybrid evolutionary approach to search complex physical models is proposed. Tests carried out on a real-world industrial physical process (abrasive water jet machining) demonstrate the validity of this approach.

  9. Clarifying types of uncertainty: when are models accurate, and uncertainties small?

    PubMed

    Cox, Louis Anthony Tony

    2011-10-01

    Professor Aven has recently noted the importance of clarifying the meaning of terms such as "scientific uncertainty" for use in risk management and policy decisions, such as when to trigger application of the precautionary principle. This comment examines some fundamental conceptual challenges for efforts to define "accurate" models and "small" input uncertainties by showing that increasing uncertainty in model inputs may reduce uncertainty in model outputs; that even correct models with "small" input uncertainties need not yield accurate or useful predictions for quantities of interest in risk management (such as the duration of an epidemic); and that accurate predictive models need not be accurate causal models.

  10. Accurate Modeling of Scaffold Hopping Transformations in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingle; Deng, Yuqing; Wu, Yujie; Kim, Byungchan; LeBard, David N; Wandschneider, Dan; Beachy, Mike; Friesner, Richard A; Abel, Robert

    2017-01-10

    The accurate prediction of protein-ligand binding free energies remains a significant challenge of central importance in computational biophysics and structure-based drug design. Multiple recent advances including the development of greatly improved protein and ligand molecular mechanics force fields, more efficient enhanced sampling methods, and low-cost powerful GPU computing clusters have enabled accurate and reliable predictions of relative protein-ligand binding free energies through the free energy perturbation (FEP) methods. However, the existing FEP methods can only be used to calculate the relative binding free energies for R-group modifications or single-atom modifications and cannot be used to efficiently evaluate scaffold hopping modifications to a lead molecule. Scaffold hopping or core hopping, a very common design strategy in drug discovery projects, is critical not only in the early stages of a discovery campaign where novel active matter must be identified but also in lead optimization where the resolution of a variety of ADME/Tox problems may require identification of a novel core structure. In this paper, we introduce a method that enables theoretically rigorous, yet computationally tractable, relative protein-ligand binding free energy calculations to be pursued for scaffold hopping modifications. We apply the method to six pharmaceutically interesting cases where diverse types of scaffold hopping modifications were required to identify the drug molecules ultimately sent into the clinic. For these six diverse cases, the predicted binding affinities were in close agreement with experiment, demonstrating the wide applicability and the significant impact Core Hopping FEP may provide in drug discovery projects.

  11. Building Mental Models by Dissecting Physical Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srivastava, Anveshna

    2016-01-01

    When students build physical models from prefabricated components to learn about model systems, there is an implicit trade-off between the physical degrees of freedom in building the model and the intensity of instructor supervision needed. Models that are too flexible, permitting multiple possible constructions require greater supervision to…

  12. New process model proves accurate in tests on catalytic reformer

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Ancheyta-Juarez, J. )

    1994-07-25

    A mathematical model has been devised to represent the process that takes place in a fixed-bed, tubular, adiabatic catalytic reforming reactor. Since its development, the model has been applied to the simulation of a commercial semiregenerative reformer. The development of mass and energy balances for this reformer led to a model that predicts both concentration and temperature profiles along the reactor. A comparison of the model's results with experimental data illustrates its accuracy at predicting product profiles. Simple steps show how the model can be applied to simulate any fixed-bed catalytic reformer.

  13. Towards an Accurate Performance Modeling of Parallel SparseFactorization

    SciTech Connect

    Grigori, Laura; Li, Xiaoye S.

    2006-05-26

    We present a performance model to analyze a parallel sparseLU factorization algorithm on modern cached-based, high-end parallelarchitectures. Our model characterizes the algorithmic behavior bytakingaccount the underlying processor speed, memory system performance, aswell as the interconnect speed. The model is validated using theSuperLU_DIST linear system solver, the sparse matrices from realapplications, and an IBM POWER3 parallel machine. Our modelingmethodology can be easily adapted to study performance of other types ofsparse factorizations, such as Cholesky or QR.

  14. How Accurate Is A Hydraulic Model? | Science Inventory | US ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Symposium paper Network hydraulic models are widely used, but their overall accuracy is often unknown. Models are developed to give utilities better insight into system hydraulic behavior, and increasingly the ability to predict the fate and transport of chemicals. Without an accessible and consistent means of validating a given model against the system it is meant to represent, the value of those supposed benefits should be questioned. Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) databases, though ubiquitous, are underused data sources for this type of task. Integrating a network model with a measurement database would offer professionals the ability to assess the model’s assumptions in an automated fashion by leveraging enormous amounts of data.

  15. Modeling for accurate dimensional scanning electron microscope metrology: then and now.

    PubMed

    Postek, Michael T; Vladár, András E

    2011-01-01

    A review of the evolution of modeling for accurate dimensional scanning electron microscopy is presented with an emphasis on developments in the Monte Carlo technique for modeling the generation of the electrons used for imaging and measurement. The progress of modeling for accurate metrology is discussed through a schematic technology timeline. In addition, a discussion of a future vision for accurate SEM dimensional metrology and the requirements to achieve it are presented.

  16. Accurate two-equation modelling of falling film flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruyer-Quil, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The low-dimensional modeling of the wave dynamics of a falling liquid film on an inclined plane is revisited. The advantages and shortcomings of existing modelling approaches: weighted residual method, center-manifold analysis, consistent Saint-Venant approach are discussed and contrasted. A novel formulation of a two-equation consistent model is proposed. The proposed formulation cures the principal limitations of previous approaches: (i) apart from surface tension terms, it admits a conservative form which enables to make use of efficient numerical schemes, (ii) it recovers with less than 1 percent of error the asymptotic speed of solitary waves in the inertial regime found by DNS, (iii) it adequately captures the velocity field under the waves and in particular the wall drag. Research supported by Insitut Universitaire de France.

  17. Building accurate geometric models from abundant range imaging information

    SciTech Connect

    Diegert, C.; Sackos, J.; Nellums, R.

    1997-05-01

    The authors define two simple metrics for accuracy of models built from range imaging information. They apply the metric to a model built from a recent range image taken at the Laser Radar Development and Evaluation Facility (LDERF), Eglin AFB, using a Scannerless Range Imager (SRI) from Sandia National Laboratories. They also present graphical displays of the residual information produced as a byproduct of this measurement, and discuss mechanisms that these data suggest for further improvement in the performance of this already impressive SRI.

  18. Magnetic field models of nine CP stars from "accurate" measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glagolevskij, Yu. V.

    2013-01-01

    The dipole models of magnetic fields in nine CP stars are constructed based on the measurements of metal lines taken from the literature, and performed by the LSD method with an accuracy of 10-80 G. The model parameters are compared with the parameters obtained for the same stars from the hydrogen line measurements. For six out of nine stars the same type of structure was obtained. Some parameters, such as the field strength at the poles B p and the average surface magnetic field B s differ considerably in some stars due to differences in the amplitudes of phase dependences B e (Φ) and B s (Φ), obtained by different authors. It is noted that a significant increase in the measurement accuracy has little effect on the modelling of the large-scale structures of the field. By contrast, it is more important to construct the shape of the phase dependence based on a fairly large number of field measurements, evenly distributed by the rotation period phases. It is concluded that the Zeeman component measurement methods have a strong effect on the shape of the phase dependence, and that the measurements of the magnetic field based on the lines of hydrogen are more preferable for modelling the large-scale structures of the field.

  19. Accurate first principles model potentials for intermolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Mark S; Smith, Quentin A; Xu, Peng; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V

    2013-01-01

    The general effective fragment potential (EFP) method provides model potentials for any molecule that is derived from first principles, with no empirically fitted parameters. The EFP method has been interfaced with most currently used ab initio single-reference and multireference quantum mechanics (QM) methods, ranging from Hartree-Fock and coupled cluster theory to multireference perturbation theory. The most recent innovations in the EFP model have been to make the computationally expensive charge transfer term much more efficient and to interface the general EFP dispersion and exchange repulsion interactions with QM methods. Following a summary of the method and its implementation in generally available computer programs, these most recent new developments are discussed.

  20. Accurate numerical solutions for elastic-plastic models. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Schreyer, H. L.; Kulak, R. F.; Kramer, J. M.

    1980-03-01

    The accuracy of two integration algorithms is studied for the common engineering condition of a von Mises, isotropic hardening model under plane stress. Errors in stress predictions for given total strain increments are expressed with contour plots of two parameters: an angle in the pi plane and the difference between the exact and computed yield-surface radii. The two methods are the tangent-predictor/radial-return approach and the elastic-predictor/radial-corrector algorithm originally developed by Mendelson. The accuracy of a combined tangent-predictor/radial-corrector algorithm is also investigated.

  1. Accurate Force Field Development for Modeling Conjugated Polymers.

    PubMed

    DuBay, Kateri H; Hall, Michelle Lynn; Hughes, Thomas F; Wu, Chuanjie; Reichman, David R; Friesner, Richard A

    2012-11-13

    The modeling of the conformational properties of conjugated polymers entails a unique challenge for classical force fields. Conjugation imposes strong constraints upon bond rotation. Planar configurations are favored, but the concomitantly shortened bond lengths result in moieties being brought into closer proximity than usual. The ensuing steric repulsions are particularly severe in the presence of side chains, straining angles, and stretching bonds to a degree infrequently found in nonconjugated systems. We herein demonstrate the resulting inaccuracies by comparing the LMP2-calculated inter-ring torsion potentials for a series of substituted stilbenes and bithiophenes to those calculated using standard classical force fields. We then implement adjustments to the OPLS-2005 force field in order to improve its ability to model such systems. Finally, we show the impact of these changes on the dihedral angle distributions, persistence lengths, and conjugation length distributions observed during molecular dynamics simulations of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) and poly 3-hexylthiophene (P3HT), two of the most widely used conjugated polymers.

  2. Development and application of accurate analytical models for single active electron potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Michelle; Jaron-Becker, Agnieszka; Becker, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    The single active electron (SAE) approximation is a theoretical model frequently employed to study scenarios in which inner-shell electrons may productively be treated as frozen spectators to a physical process of interest, and accurate analytical approximations for these potentials are sought as a useful simulation tool. Density function theory is often used to construct a SAE potential, requiring that a further approximation for the exchange correlation functional be enacted. In this study, we employ the Krieger, Li, and Iafrate (KLI) modification to the optimized-effective-potential (OEP) method to reduce the complexity of the problem to the straightforward solution of a system of linear equations through simple arguments regarding the behavior of the exchange-correlation potential in regions where a single orbital dominates. We employ this method for the solution of atomic and molecular potentials, and use the resultant curve to devise a systematic construction for highly accurate and useful analytical approximations for several systems. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (Grant No. DE-FG02-09ER16103), and the U.S. National Science Foundation (Graduate Research Fellowship, Grants No. PHY-1125844 and No. PHY-1068706).

  3. Magnetic gaps in organic tri-radicals: From a simple model to accurate estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Vincenzo; Cacelli, Ivo; Ferretti, Alessandro; Prampolini, Giacomo

    2017-03-01

    The calculation of the energy gap between the magnetic states of organic poly-radicals still represents a challenging playground for quantum chemistry, and high-level techniques are required to obtain accurate estimates. On these grounds, the aim of the present study is twofold. From the one side, it shows that, thanks to recent algorithmic and technical improvements, we are able to compute reliable quantum mechanical results for the systems of current fundamental and technological interest. From the other side, proper parameterization of a simple Hubbard Hamiltonian allows for a sound rationalization of magnetic gaps in terms of basic physical effects, unraveling the role played by electron delocalization, Coulomb repulsion, and effective exchange in tuning the magnetic character of the ground state. As case studies, we have chosen three prototypical organic tri-radicals, namely, 1,3,5-trimethylenebenzene, 1,3,5-tridehydrobenzene, and 1,2,3-tridehydrobenzene, which differ either for geometric or electronic structure. After discussing the differences among the three species and their consequences on the magnetic properties in terms of the simple model mentioned above, accurate and reliable values for the energy gap between the lowest quartet and doublet states are computed by means of the so-called difference dedicated configuration interaction (DDCI) technique, and the final results are discussed and compared to both available experimental and computational estimates.

  4. Modeling Physical Objects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    of the conference will be published by Oxford University Press . At the ASME Conference on Design Automation in Chicago. D. Dmtta and I presented... University Press , 1991. .1. Jung-Hong (’huang, "Surface Approximations in Geometric Modeling," PhD Diss., Dept. of ComIp. Sci., Purdue University: Rept. CER-90-37. September 1990. 3 ...utoination. Chicago, 1990: (with D. Dutta). 3. "How to Construct the Skeleton of CSG Objects," Proc. ,Ith JA1A Con!. Math. of Suifaces. Oxford

  5. Accurate integral equation theory for the central force model of liquid water and ionic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiye, Toshiko; Haymet, A. D. J.

    1988-10-01

    The atom-atom pair correlation functions and thermodynamics of the central force model of water, introduced by Lemberg, Stillinger, and Rahman, have been calculated accurately by an integral equation method which incorporates two new developments. First, a rapid new scheme has been used to solve the Ornstein-Zernike equation. This scheme combines the renormalization methods of Allnatt, and Rossky and Friedman with an extension of the trigonometric basis-set solution of Labik and co-workers. Second, by adding approximate ``bridge'' functions to the hypernetted-chain (HNC) integral equation, we have obtained predictions for liquid water in which the hydrogen bond length and number are in good agreement with ``exact'' computer simulations of the same model force laws. In addition, for dilute ionic solutions, the ion-oxygen and ion-hydrogen coordination numbers display both the physically correct stoichiometry and good agreement with earlier simulations. These results represent a measurable improvement over both a previous HNC solution of the central force model and the ex-RISM integral equation solutions for the TIPS and other rigid molecule models of water.

  6. Physical Modeling of Microtubules Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allain, Pierre; Kervrann, Charles

    2014-10-01

    Microtubules (MT) are highly dynamic tubulin polymers that are involved in many cellular processes such as mitosis, intracellular cell organization and vesicular transport. Nevertheless, the modeling of cytoskeleton and MT dynamics based on physical properties is difficult to achieve. Using the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, we propose to model the rigidity of microtubules on a physical basis using forces, mass and acceleration. In addition, we link microtubules growth and shrinkage to the presence of molecules (e.g. GTP-tubulin) in the cytosol. The overall model enables linking cytosol to microtubules dynamics in a constant state space thus allowing usage of data assimilation techniques.

  7. Optimal Cluster Mill Pass Scheduling With an Accurate and Rapid New Strip Crown Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Arif S.; Grandhi, Ramana V.; Zipf, Mark E.

    2007-05-01

    Besides the requirement to roll coiled sheet at high levels of productivity, the optimal pass scheduling of cluster-type reversing cold mills presents the added challenge of assigning mill parameters that facilitate the best possible strip flatness. The pressures of intense global competition, and the requirements for increasingly thinner, higher quality specialty sheet products that are more difficult to roll, continue to force metal producers to commission innovative flatness-control technologies. This means that during the on-line computerized set-up of rolling mills, the mathematical model should not only determine the minimum total number of passes and maximum rolling speed, it should simultaneously optimize the pass-schedule so that desired flatness is assured, either by manual or automated means. In many cases today, however, on-line prediction of strip crown and corresponding flatness for the complex cluster-type rolling mills is typically addressed either by trial and error, by approximate deflection models for equivalent vertical roll-stacks, or by non-physical pattern recognition style models. The abundance of the aforementioned methods is largely due to the complexity of cluster-type mill configurations and the lack of deflection models with sufficient accuracy and speed for on-line use. Without adequate assignment of the pass-schedule set-up parameters, it may be difficult or impossible to achieve the required strip flatness. In this paper, we demonstrate optimization of cluster mill pass-schedules using a new accurate and rapid strip crown model. This pass-schedule optimization includes computations of the predicted strip thickness profile to validate mathematical constraints. In contrast to many of the existing methods for on-line prediction of strip crown and flatness on cluster mills, the demonstrated method requires minimal prior tuning and no extensive training with collected mill data. To rapidly and accurately solve the multi-contact problem

  8. Standard Model of Particle Physics--a health physics perspective.

    PubMed

    Bevelacqua, J J

    2010-11-01

    The Standard Model of Particle Physics is reviewed with an emphasis on its relationship to the physics supporting the health physics profession. Concepts important to health physics are emphasized and specific applications are presented. The capability of the Standard Model to provide health physics relevant information is illustrated with application of conservation laws to neutron and muon decay and in the calculation of the neutron mean lifetime.

  9. Physical activity intensity can be accurately monitored by smartphone global positioning system 'app'.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Brett Ashley; Bruce, Lyndell; Benson, Amanda Clare

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring physical activity is important to better individualise health and fitness benefits. This study assessed the concurrent validity of a smartphone global positioning system (GPS) 'app' and a sport-specific GPS device with a similar sampling rate, to measure physical activity components of speed and distance, compared to a higher sampling sport-specific GPS device. Thirty-eight (21 female, 17 male) participants, mean age of 24.68, s = 6.46 years, completed two 2.400 km trials around an all-weather athletics track wearing GPSports Pro™ (PRO), GPSports WiSpi™ (WISPI) and an iPhone™ with a Motion X GPS™ 'app' (MOTIONX). Statistical agreement, assessed using t-tests and Bland-Altman plots, indicated an (mean; 95% LOA) underestimation of 2% for average speed (0.126 km·h(-1); -0.389 to 0.642; p < .001), 1.7% for maximal speed (0.442 km·h(-1); -2.676 to 3.561; p = .018) and 1.9% for distance (0.045 km; -0.140 to 0.232; p < .001) by MOTIONX compared to that measured by PRO. In contrast, compared to PRO, WISPI overestimated average speed (0.232 km·h(-1); -0.376 to 0.088; p < .001) and distance (0.083 km; -0.129 to -0.038; p < .001) by 3.5% whilst underestimating maximal speed by 2.5% (0.474 km·h(-1); -1.152 to 2.099; p < .001). Despite the statistically significant difference, the MOTIONX measures intensity of physical activity, with a similar error as WISPI, to an acceptable level for population-based monitoring in unimpeded open-air environments. This presents a low-cost, minimal burden opportunity to remotely monitor physical activity participation to improve the prescription of exercise as medicine.

  10. [Accurate assessment of heart murmurs in children: thorough medical history and physical examination required].

    PubMed

    Brus, F; Vandewall, M; Molenschot, M M C; van Setten, P A; Landstra, A M

    2006-07-08

    4 children, boys aged 12, 5, 1.5 and 11 years, had a heart murmur. The 12-year-old boy could also not finish a football match and appeared to have atrioseptal defects (ASD). The 1.5-year-old boy had pulmonary symptoms that were not responsive to asthma medication; he also had ASD. The 11-year-old boy had had chest pain and pressure following exertion for 2 years; he appeared to have an aortic stenosis. Symptoms disappeared in all 3 patients after surgical correction. In the 5-year-old asymptomatic boy the murmur was deemed to be innocent following medical history and physical examination. Children frequently have heart murmurs. Most heart murmurs are innocent but some are caused by heart defects. Careful evaluation of the medical history and physical examination are critical in the differentiation of innocent and pathological heart murmurs. Routine supplementary diagnostic tests in children with heart murmurs are of limited value and are often misleading. One should inquire about specific and nonspecific symptoms and also perform systematic inspection, palpation and auscultation to identify any characteristics that suggest a heart murmur caused by a heart defect.

  11. Accelerator physics and modeling: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1991-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Physics of high brightness beams; radio frequency beam conditioner for fast-wave free-electron generators of coherent radiation; wake-field and space-charge effects on high brightness beams. Calculations and measured results for BNL-ATF; non-linear orbit theory and accelerator design; general problems of modeling for accelerators; development and application of dispersive soft ferrite models for time-domain simulation; and bunch lengthening in the SLC damping rings.

  12. Accelerator physics and modeling: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1991-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Physics of high brightness beams; radio frequency beam conditioner for fast-wave free-electron generators of coherent radiation; wake-field and space-charge effects on high brightness beams. Calculations and measured results for BNL-ATF; non-linear orbit theory and accelerator design; general problems of modeling for accelerators; development and application of dispersive soft ferrite models for time-domain simulation; and bunch lengthening in the SLC damping rings.

  13. A physical model for dementia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotolongo-Costa, O.; Gaggero-Sager, L. M.; Becker, J. T.; Maestu, F.; Sotolongo-Grau, O.

    2017-04-01

    Aging associated brain decline often result in some kind of dementia. Even when this is a complex brain disorder a physical model can be used in order to describe its general behavior. A probabilistic model for the development of dementia is obtained and fitted to some experimental data obtained from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. It is explained how dementia appears as a consequence of aging and why it is irreversible.

  14. Building mental models by dissecting physical models.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anveshna

    2016-01-01

    When students build physical models from prefabricated components to learn about model systems, there is an implicit trade-off between the physical degrees of freedom in building the model and the intensity of instructor supervision needed. Models that are too flexible, permitting multiple possible constructions require greater supervision to ensure focused learning; models that are too constrained require less supervision, but can be constructed mechanically, with little to no conceptual engagement. We propose "model-dissection" as an alternative to "model-building," whereby instructors could make efficient use of supervisory resources, while simultaneously promoting focused learning. We report empirical results from a study conducted with biology undergraduate students, where we demonstrate that asking them to "dissect" out specific conceptual structures from an already built 3D physical model leads to a significant improvement in performance than asking them to build the 3D model from simpler components. Using questionnaires to measure understanding both before and after model-based interventions for two cohorts of students, we find that both the "builders" and the "dissectors" improve in the post-test, but it is the latter group who show statistically significant improvement. These results, in addition to the intrinsic time-efficiency of "model dissection," suggest that it could be a valuable pedagogical tool.

  15. Creation of Anatomically Accurate Computer-Aided Design (CAD) Solid Models from Medical Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, John E.; Graham, R. Scott; Samareh, Jamshid A.; Oberlander, Eric J.; Broaddus, William C.

    1999-01-01

    Most surgical instrumentation and implants used in the world today are designed with sophisticated Computer-Aided Design (CAD)/Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) software. This software automates the mechanical development of a product from its conceptual design through manufacturing. CAD software also provides a means of manipulating solid models prior to Finite Element Modeling (FEM). Few surgical products are designed in conjunction with accurate CAD models of human anatomy because of the difficulty with which these models are created. We have developed a novel technique that creates anatomically accurate, patient specific CAD solids from medical images in a matter of minutes.

  16. Structure-based constitutive model can accurately predict planar biaxial properties of aortic wall tissue.

    PubMed

    Polzer, S; Gasser, T C; Novak, K; Man, V; Tichy, M; Skacel, P; Bursa, J

    2015-03-01

    Structure-based constitutive models might help in exploring mechanisms by which arterial wall histology is linked to wall mechanics. This study aims to validate a recently proposed structure-based constitutive model. Specifically, the model's ability to predict mechanical biaxial response of porcine aortic tissue with predefined collagen structure was tested. Histological slices from porcine thoracic aorta wall (n=9) were automatically processed to quantify the collagen fiber organization, and mechanical testing identified the non-linear properties of the wall samples (n=18) over a wide range of biaxial stretches. Histological and mechanical experimental data were used to identify the model parameters of a recently proposed multi-scale constitutive description for arterial layers. The model predictive capability was tested with respect to interpolation and extrapolation. Collagen in the media was predominantly aligned in circumferential direction (planar von Mises distribution with concentration parameter bM=1.03 ± 0.23), and its coherence decreased gradually from the luminal to the abluminal tissue layers (inner media, b=1.54 ± 0.40; outer media, b=0.72 ± 0.20). In contrast, the collagen in the adventitia was aligned almost isotropically (bA=0.27 ± 0.11), and no features, such as families of coherent fibers, were identified. The applied constitutive model captured the aorta biaxial properties accurately (coefficient of determination R(2)=0.95 ± 0.03) over the entire range of biaxial deformations and with physically meaningful model parameters. Good predictive properties, well outside the parameter identification space, were observed (R(2)=0.92 ± 0.04). Multi-scale constitutive models equipped with realistic micro-histological data can predict macroscopic non-linear aorta wall properties. Collagen largely defines already low strain properties of media, which explains the origin of wall anisotropy seen at this strain level. The structure and mechanical

  17. Fast and accurate calculation of dilute quantum gas using Uehling-Uhlenbeck model equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Ryosuke

    2017-02-01

    The Uehling-Uhlenbeck (U-U) model equation is studied for the fast and accurate calculation of a dilute quantum gas. In particular, the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is used to solve the U-U model equation. DSMC analysis based on the U-U model equation is expected to enable the thermalization to be accurately obtained using a small number of sample particles and the dilute quantum gas dynamics to be calculated in a practical time. Finally, the applicability of DSMC analysis based on the U-U model equation to the fast and accurate calculation of a dilute quantum gas is confirmed by calculating the viscosity coefficient of a Bose gas on the basis of the Green-Kubo expression and the shock layer of a dilute Bose gas around a cylinder.

  18. An efficient and accurate model of the coax cable feeding structure for FEM simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Jian; Volakis, John L.

    1995-01-01

    An efficient and accurate coax cable feed model is proposed for microstrip or cavity-backed patch antennas in the context of a hybrid finite element method (FEM). A TEM mode at the cavity-cable junction is assumed for the FEM truncation and system excitation. Of importance in this implementation is that the cavity unknowns are related to the model fields by enforcing an equipotential condition rather than field continuity. This scheme proved quite accurate and may be applied to other decomposed systems as a connectivity constraint. Comparisons of our predictions with input impedance measurements are presented and demonstrate the substantially improved accuracy of the proposed model.

  19. Physics model for wringing of wet cloth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dany Rahmayanti, Handika; Utami, Fisca Dian; Abdullah, Mikrajuddin

    2016-11-01

    One activity that has been performed by human beings for a long time is washing clothes. Before the invention of the washing machine, clothes were washed by hand and then wrung before drying in the open air. When observed carefully, the wringing of cloth presents some interesting phenomena. However, there are no reports on the physical modelling of this very old activity. This paper reports a simple model to explain the discharge of water from clothes when squeezed. A simple tool was also designed to retrieve data to confirm the theory. We found that the theoretical predictions accurately explained the experimental results. The experiments were conducted on two types of cloth: towels and batik cloth. We also obtained a universal curve to which all the data converged.

  20. High precision modeling for fundamental physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rievers, Benny; Nesemann, Leo; Costea, Adrian; Andres, Michael; Stephan, Ernst P.; Laemmerzahl, Claus

    With growing experimental accuracies and high precision requirements for fundamental physics space missions the needs for accurate numerical modeling techniques are increasing. Motivated by the challenge of length stability in cavities and optical resonators we propose the develop-ment of a high precision modeling tool for the simulation of thermomechanical effects up to a numerical precision of 10-20 . Exemplary calculations for simplified test cases demonstrate the general feasibility of high precision calculations and point out the high complexity of the task. A tool for high precision analysis of complex geometries will have to use new data types, advanced FE solver routines and implement new methods for the evaluation of numerical precision.

  1. 2016 KIVA-hpFE Development: A Robust and Accurate Engine Modeling Software

    SciTech Connect

    Carrington, David Bradley; Waters, Jiajia

    2016-10-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory and its collaborators are facilitating engine modeling by improving accuracy and robustness of the modeling, and improving the robustness of software. We also continue to improve the physical modeling methods. We are developing and implementing new mathematical algorithms, those that represent the physics within an engine. We provide software that others may use directly or that they may alter with various models e.g., sophisticated chemical kinetics, different turbulent closure methods or other fuel injection and spray systems.

  2. Quantitatively accurate activity measurements with a dedicated cardiac SPECT camera: Physical phantom experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pourmoghaddas, Amir Wells, R. Glenn

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Recently, there has been increased interest in dedicated cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scanners with pinhole collimation and improved detector technology due to their improved count sensitivity and resolution over traditional parallel-hole cameras. With traditional cameras, energy-based approaches are often used in the clinic for scatter compensation because they are fast and easily implemented. Some of the cardiac cameras use cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) detectors which can complicate the use of energy-based scatter correction (SC) due to the low-energy tail—an increased number of unscattered photons detected with reduced energy. Modified energy-based scatter correction methods can be implemented, but their level of accuracy is unclear. In this study, the authors validated by physical phantom experiments the quantitative accuracy and reproducibility of easily implemented correction techniques applied to {sup 99m}Tc myocardial imaging with a CZT-detector-based gamma camera with multiple heads, each with a single-pinhole collimator. Methods: Activity in the cardiac compartment of an Anthropomorphic Torso phantom (Data Spectrum Corporation) was measured through 15 {sup 99m}Tc-SPECT acquisitions. The ratio of activity concentrations in organ compartments resembled a clinical {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi scan and was kept consistent across all experiments (1.2:1 heart to liver and 1.5:1 heart to lung). Two background activity levels were considered: no activity (cold) and an activity concentration 1/10th of the heart (hot). A plastic “lesion” was placed inside of the septal wall of the myocardial insert to simulate the presence of a region without tracer uptake and contrast in this lesion was calculated for all images. The true net activity in each compartment was measured with a dose calibrator (CRC-25R, Capintec, Inc.). A 10 min SPECT image was acquired using a dedicated cardiac camera with CZT detectors (Discovery NM530c, GE

  3. Bayesian parameter estimation of a k-ε model for accurate jet-in-crossflow simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Jaideep; Lefantzi, Sophia; Arunajatesan, Srinivasan; Dechant, Lawrence

    2016-05-31

    Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes models are not very accurate for high-Reynolds-number compressible jet-in-crossflow interactions. The inaccuracy arises from the use of inappropriate model parameters and model-form errors in the Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes model. In this study, the hypothesis is pursued that Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes predictions can be significantly improved by using parameters inferred from experimental measurements of a supersonic jet interacting with a transonic crossflow.

  4. Improving light propagation Monte Carlo simulations with accurate 3D modeling of skin tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Paquit, Vincent C; Price, Jeffery R; Meriaudeau, Fabrice; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present a 3D light propagation model to simulate multispectral reflectance images of large skin surface areas. In particular, we aim to simulate more accurately the effects of various physiological properties of the skin in the case of subcutaneous vein imaging compared to existing models. Our method combines a Monte Carlo light propagation model, a realistic three-dimensional model of the skin using parametric surfaces and a vision system for data acquisition. We describe our model in detail, present results from the Monte Carlo modeling and compare our results with those obtained with a well established Monte Carlo model and with real skin reflectance images.

  5. An accurate elasto-plastic frictional tangential force displacement model for granular-flow simulations: Displacement-driven formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang; Vu-Quoc, Loc

    2007-07-01

    We present in this paper the displacement-driven version of a tangential force-displacement (TFD) model that accounts for both elastic and plastic deformations together with interfacial friction occurring in collisions of spherical particles. This elasto-plastic frictional TFD model, with its force-driven version presented in [L. Vu-Quoc, L. Lesburg, X. Zhang. An accurate tangential force-displacement model for granular-flow simulations: contacting spheres with plastic deformation, force-driven formulation, Journal of Computational Physics 196(1) (2004) 298-326], is consistent with the elasto-plastic frictional normal force-displacement (NFD) model presented in [L. Vu-Quoc, X. Zhang. An elasto-plastic contact force-displacement model in the normal direction: displacement-driven version, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, Series A 455 (1991) 4013-4044]. Both the NFD model and the present TFD model are based on the concept of additive decomposition of the radius of contact area into an elastic part and a plastic part. The effect of permanent indentation after impact is represented by a correction to the radius of curvature. The effect of material softening due to plastic flow is represented by a correction to the elastic moduli. The proposed TFD model is accurate, and is validated against nonlinear finite element analyses involving plastic flows in both the loading and unloading conditions. The proposed consistent displacement-driven, elasto-plastic NFD and TFD models are designed for implementation in computer codes using the discrete-element method (DEM) for granular-flow simulations. The model is shown to be accurate and is validated against nonlinear elasto-plastic finite-element analysis.

  6. Accurate modeling of high-repetition rate ultrashort pulse amplification in optical fibers

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Robert; Zeil, Peter; Malmström, Mikael; Laurell, Fredrik; Pasiskevicius, Valdas

    2016-01-01

    A numerical model for amplification of ultrashort pulses with high repetition rates in fiber amplifiers is presented. The pulse propagation is modeled by jointly solving the steady-state rate equations and the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which allows accurate treatment of nonlinear and dispersive effects whilst considering arbitrary spatial and spectral gain dependencies. Comparison of data acquired by using the developed model and experimental results prove to be in good agreement. PMID:27713496

  7. A Multivariate Model of Physics Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Farley, John

    2013-01-01

    A model of expertise in physics problem solving was tested on undergraduate science, physics, and engineering majors enrolled in an introductory-level physics course. Structural equation modeling was used to test hypothesized relationships among variables linked to expertise in physics problem solving including motivation, metacognitive planning,…

  8. Whole muscle length-tension relationships are accurately modeled as scaled sarcomeres in rabbit hindlimb muscles.

    PubMed

    Winters, Taylor M; Takahashi, Mitsuhiko; Lieber, Richard L; Ward, Samuel R

    2011-01-04

    An a priori model of the whole active muscle length-tension relationship was constructed utilizing only myofilament length and serial sarcomere number for rabbit tibialis anterior (TA), extensor digitorum longus (EDL), and extensor digitorum II (EDII) muscles. Passive tension was modeled with a two-element Hill-type model. Experimental length-tension relations were then measured for each of these muscles and compared to predictions. The model was able to accurately capture the active-tension characteristics of experimentally-measured data for all muscles (ICC=0.88 ± 0.03). Despite their varied architecture, no differences in predicted versus experimental correlations were observed among muscles. In addition, the model demonstrated that excursion, quantified by full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) of the active length-tension relationship, scaled linearly (slope=0.68) with normalized muscle fiber length. Experimental and theoretical FWHM values agreed well with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.99 (p<0.001). In contrast to active tension, the passive tension model deviated from experimentally-measured values and thus, was not an accurate predictor of passive tension (ICC=0.70 ± 0.07). These data demonstrate that modeling muscle as a scaled sarcomere provides accurate active functional but not passive functional predictions for rabbit TA, EDL, and EDII muscles and call into question the need for more complex modeling assumptions often proposed.

  9. Development of transfer standard devices for ensuring the accurate calibration of ultrasonic physical therapy machines in clinical use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hekkenberg, R. T.; Richards, A.; Beissner, K.; Zeqiri, B.; Prout, G.; Cantrall, Ch; Bezemer, R. A.; Koch, Ch; Hodnett, M.

    2004-01-01

    Physical therapy ultrasound is widely applied to patients. However, many devices do not comply with the relevant standard stating that the actual power output shall be within +/-20% of the device indication. Extreme cases have been reported: from delivering effectively no ultrasound or operating at maximum power at all powers indicated. This can potentially lead to patient injury as well as mistreatment. The present European (EC) project is an ongoing attempt to improve the quality of the treatment of patients being treated with ultrasonic physical-therapy. A Portable ultrasound Power Standard (PPS) is being developed and accurately calibrated. The PPS includes: Ultrasound transducers (including one exhibiting an unusual output) and a driver for the ultrasound transducers that has calibration and proficiency test functions. Also included with the PPS is a Cavitation Detector to determine the onset of cavitation occurring within the propagation medium. The PPS will be suitable for conducting in-the-field accreditation (proficiency testing and calibration). In order to be accredited it will be important to be able to show traceability of the calibration, the calibration process and qualification of testing staff. The clinical user will benefit from traceability because treatments will be performed more reliably.

  10. Fast and accurate focusing analysis of large photon sieve using pinhole ring diffraction model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Lingjie; Wu, Yanxiong; Zhang, Jizhen; Qu, Hemeng

    2015-06-10

    In this paper, we developed a pinhole ring diffraction model for the focusing analysis of a large photon sieve. Instead of analyzing individual pinholes, we discuss the focusing of all of the pinholes in a single ring. An explicit equation for the diffracted field of individual pinhole ring has been proposed. We investigated the validity range of this generalized model and analytically describe the sufficient conditions for the validity of this pinhole ring diffraction model. A practical example and investigation reveals the high accuracy of the pinhole ring diffraction model. This simulation method could be used for fast and accurate focusing analysis of a large photon sieve.

  11. Development of modified cable models to simulate accurate neuronal active behaviors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In large network and single three-dimensional (3-D) neuron simulations, high computing speed dictates using reduced cable models to simulate neuronal firing behaviors. However, these models are unwarranted under active conditions and lack accurate representation of dendritic active conductances that greatly shape neuronal firing. Here, realistic 3-D (R3D) models (which contain full anatomical details of dendrites) of spinal motoneurons were systematically compared with their reduced single unbranched cable (SUC, which reduces the dendrites to a single electrically equivalent cable) counterpart under passive and active conditions. The SUC models matched the R3D model's passive properties but failed to match key active properties, especially active behaviors originating from dendrites. For instance, persistent inward currents (PIC) hysteresis, frequency-current (FI) relationship secondary range slope, firing hysteresis, plateau potential partial deactivation, staircase currents, synaptic current transfer ratio, and regional FI relationships were not accurately reproduced by the SUC models. The dendritic morphology oversimplification and lack of dendritic active conductances spatial segregation in the SUC models caused significant underestimation of those behaviors. Next, SUC models were modified by adding key branching features in an attempt to restore their active behaviors. The addition of primary dendritic branching only partially restored some active behaviors, whereas the addition of secondary dendritic branching restored most behaviors. Importantly, the proposed modified models successfully replicated the active properties without sacrificing model simplicity, making them attractive candidates for running R3D single neuron and network simulations with accurate firing behaviors. The present results indicate that using reduced models to examine PIC behaviors in spinal motoneurons is unwarranted. PMID:25277743

  12. Modeling QCD for Hadron Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Tandy, P. C.

    2011-10-24

    We review the approach to modeling soft hadron physics observables based on the Dyson-Schwinger equations of QCD. The focus is on light quark mesons and in particular the pseudoscalar and vector ground states, their decays and electromagnetic couplings. We detail the wide variety of observables that can be correlated by a ladder-rainbow kernel with one infrared parameter fixed to the chiral quark condensate. A recently proposed novel perspective in which the quark condensate is contained within hadrons and not the vacuum is mentioned. The valence quark parton distributions, in the pion and kaon, as measured in the Drell Yan process, are investigated with the same ladder-rainbow truncation of the Dyson-Schwinger and Bethe-Salpeter equations.

  13. Accurate path integration in continuous attractor network models of grid cells.

    PubMed

    Burak, Yoram; Fiete, Ila R

    2009-02-01

    Grid cells in the rat entorhinal cortex display strikingly regular firing responses to the animal's position in 2-D space and have been hypothesized to form the neural substrate for dead-reckoning. However, errors accumulate rapidly when velocity inputs are integrated in existing models of grid cell activity. To produce grid-cell-like responses, these models would require frequent resets triggered by external sensory cues. Such inadequacies, shared by various models, cast doubt on the dead-reckoning potential of the grid cell system. Here we focus on the question of accurate path integration, specifically in continuous attractor models of grid cell activity. We show, in contrast to previous models, that continuous attractor models can generate regular triangular grid responses, based on inputs that encode only the rat's velocity and heading direction. We consider the role of the network boundary in the integration performance of the network and show that both periodic and aperiodic networks are capable of accurate path integration, despite important differences in their attractor manifolds. We quantify the rate at which errors in the velocity integration accumulate as a function of network size and intrinsic noise within the network. With a plausible range of parameters and the inclusion of spike variability, our model networks can accurately integrate velocity inputs over a maximum of approximately 10-100 meters and approximately 1-10 minutes. These findings form a proof-of-concept that continuous attractor dynamics may underlie velocity integration in the dorsolateral medial entorhinal cortex. The simulations also generate pertinent upper bounds on the accuracy of integration that may be achieved by continuous attractor dynamics in the grid cell network. We suggest experiments to test the continuous attractor model and differentiate it from models in which single cells establish their responses independently of each other.

  14. Accurate modeling of size and strain broadening in the Rietveld refinement: The {open_quotes}double-Voigt{close_quotes} approach

    SciTech Connect

    Balzar, D.; Ledbetter, H.

    1995-12-31

    In the {open_quotes}double-Voigt{close_quotes} approach, an exact Voigt function describes both size- and strain-broadened profiles. The lattice strain is defined in terms of physically credible mean-square strain averaged over a distance in the diffracting domains. Analysis of Fourier coefficients in a harmonic approximation for strain coefficients leads to the Warren-Averbach method for the separation of size and strain contributions to diffraction line broadening. The model is introduced in the Rietveld refinement program in the following way: Line widths are modeled with only four parameters in the isotropic case. Varied parameters are both surface- and volume-weighted domain sizes and root-mean-square strains averaged over two distances. Refined parameters determine the physically broadened Voigt line profile. Instrumental Voigt line profile parameters are added to obtain the observed (Voigt) line profile. To speed computation, the corresponding pseudo-Voigt function is calculated and used as a fitting function in refinement. This approach allows for both fast computer code and accurate modeling in terms of physically identifiable parameters.

  15. Can phenological models predict tree phenology accurately under climate change conditions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuine, Isabelle; Bonhomme, Marc; Legave, Jean Michel; García de Cortázar-Atauri, Inaki; Charrier, Guillaume; Lacointe, André; Améglio, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    The onset of the growing season of trees has been globally earlier by 2.3 days/decade during the last 50 years because of global warming and this trend is predicted to continue according to climate forecast. The effect of temperature on plant phenology is however not linear because temperature has a dual effect on bud development. On one hand, low temperatures are necessary to break bud dormancy, and on the other hand higher temperatures are necessary to promote bud cells growth afterwards. Increasing phenological changes in temperate woody species have strong impacts on forest trees distribution and productivity, as well as crops cultivation areas. Accurate predictions of trees phenology are therefore a prerequisite to understand and foresee the impacts of climate change on forests and agrosystems. Different process-based models have been developed in the last two decades to predict the date of budburst or flowering of woody species. They are two main families: (1) one-phase models which consider only the ecodormancy phase and make the assumption that endodormancy is always broken before adequate climatic conditions for cell growth occur; and (2) two-phase models which consider both the endodormancy and ecodormancy phases and predict a date of dormancy break which varies from year to year. So far, one-phase models have been able to predict accurately tree bud break and flowering under historical climate. However, because they do not consider what happens prior to ecodormancy, and especially the possible negative effect of winter temperature warming on dormancy break, it seems unlikely that they can provide accurate predictions in future climate conditions. It is indeed well known that a lack of low temperature results in abnormal pattern of bud break and development in temperate fruit trees. An accurate modelling of the dormancy break date has thus become a major issue in phenology modelling. Two-phases phenological models predict that global warming should delay

  16. Final Report for "Accurate Numerical Models of the Secondary Electron Yield from Grazing-incidence Collisions".

    SciTech Connect

    Seth A Veitzer

    2008-10-21

    Effects of stray electrons are a main factor limiting performance of many accelerators. Because heavy-ion fusion (HIF) accelerators will operate in regimes of higher current and with walls much closer to the beam than accelerators operating today, stray electrons might have a large, detrimental effect on the performance of an HIF accelerator. A primary source of stray electrons is electrons generated when halo ions strike the beam pipe walls. There is some research on these types of secondary electrons for the HIF community to draw upon, but this work is missing one crucial ingredient: the effect of grazing incidence. The overall goal of this project was to develop the numerical tools necessary to accurately model the effect of grazing incidence on the behavior of halo ions in a HIF accelerator, and further, to provide accurate models of heavy ion stopping powers with applications to ICF, WDM, and HEDP experiments.

  17. Accurate and efficient halo-based galaxy clustering modelling with simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zheng; Guo, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Small- and intermediate-scale galaxy clustering can be used to establish the galaxy-halo connection to study galaxy formation and evolution and to tighten constraints on cosmological parameters. With the increasing precision of galaxy clustering measurements from ongoing and forthcoming large galaxy surveys, accurate models are required to interpret the data and extract relevant information. We introduce a method based on high-resolution N-body simulations to accurately and efficiently model the galaxy two-point correlation functions (2PCFs) in projected and redshift spaces. The basic idea is to tabulate all information of haloes in the simulations necessary for computing the galaxy 2PCFs within the framework of halo occupation distribution or conditional luminosity function. It is equivalent to populating galaxies to dark matter haloes and using the mock 2PCF measurements as the model predictions. Besides the accurate 2PCF calculations, the method is also fast and therefore enables an efficient exploration of the parameter space. As an example of the method, we decompose the redshift-space galaxy 2PCF into different components based on the type of galaxy pairs and show the redshift-space distortion effect in each component. The generalizations and limitations of the method are discussed.

  18. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-10-29

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson's ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers.

  19. Physics modeling support contract: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-30

    This document is the final report for the Physics Modeling Support contract between TRW, Inc. and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for fiscal year 1987. It consists of following projects: TIBER physics modeling and systems code development; advanced blanket modeling task; time dependent modeling; and free electron maser for TIBER II.

  20. Using a highly accurate self-stop Cu-CMP model in the design flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izuha, Kyoko; Sakairi, Takashi; Shibuki, Shunichi; Bora, Monalisa; Hatem, Osama; Ghulghazaryan, Ruben; Strecker, Norbert; Wilson, Jeff; Takeshita, Noritsugu

    2010-03-01

    An accurate model for the self-stop copper chemical mechanical polishing (Cu-CMP) process has been developed using CMP modeling technology from Mentor Graphics. This technology was applied on data from Sony to create and optimize copper electroplating (ECD), Cu-CMP, and barrier metal polishing (BM-CMP) process models. These models take into account layout pattern dependency, long range diffusion and planarization effects, as well as microloading from local pattern density. The developed ECD model accurately predicted erosion and dishing over the entire range of width and space combinations present on the test chip. Then, the results of the ECD model were used as an initial structure to model the Cu-CMP step. Subsequently, the result of Cu-CMP was used for the BM-CMP model creation. The created model was successful in reproducing the measured data, including trends for a broad range of metal width and densities. Its robustness is demonstrated by the fact that it gives acceptable prediction of final copper thickness data although the calibration data included noise from line scan measurements. Accuracy of the Cu-CMP model has a great impact on the prediction results for BM-CMP. This is a critical feature for the modeling of high precision CMP such as self-stop Cu-CMP. Finally, the developed model could successfully extract planarity hotspots that helped identify potential problems in production chips before they were manufactured. The output thickness values of metal and dielectric can be used to drive layout enhancement tools and improve the accuracy of timing analysis.

  1. Coarse-grained red blood cell model with accurate mechanical properties, rheology and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fedosov, Dmitry A; Caswell, Bruce; Karniadakis, George E

    2009-01-01

    We present a coarse-grained red blood cell (RBC) model with accurate and realistic mechanical properties, rheology and dynamics. The modeled membrane is represented by a triangular mesh which incorporates shear inplane energy, bending energy, and area and volume conservation constraints. The macroscopic membrane elastic properties are imposed through semi-analytic theory, and are matched with those obtained in optical tweezers stretching experiments. Rheological measurements characterized by time-dependent complex modulus are extracted from the membrane thermal fluctuations, and compared with those obtained from the optical magnetic twisting cytometry results. The results allow us to define a meaningful characteristic time of the membrane. The dynamics of RBCs observed in shear flow suggests that a purely elastic model for the RBC membrane is not appropriate, and therefore a viscoelastic model is required. The set of proposed analyses and numerical tests can be used as a complete model testbed in order to calibrate the modeled viscoelastic membranes to accurately represent RBCs in health and disease.

  2. Communication: Accurate higher-order van der Waals coefficients between molecules from a model dynamic multipole polarizability

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Jianmin; Rappe, Andrew M.

    2016-01-21

    Due to the absence of the long-range van der Waals (vdW) interaction, conventional density functional theory (DFT) often fails in the description of molecular complexes and solids. In recent years, considerable progress has been made in the development of the vdW correction. However, the vdW correction based on the leading-order coefficient C{sub 6} alone can only achieve limited accuracy, while accurate modeling of higher-order coefficients remains a formidable task, due to the strong non-additivity effect. Here, we apply a model dynamic multipole polarizability within a modified single-frequency approximation to calculate C{sub 8} and C{sub 10} between small molecules. We find that the higher-order vdW coefficients from this model can achieve remarkable accuracy, with mean absolute relative deviations of 5% for C{sub 8} and 7% for C{sub 10}. Inclusion of accurate higher-order contributions in the vdW correction will effectively enhance the predictive power of DFT in condensed matter physics and quantum chemistry.

  3. Yield-Ensuring DAC-Embedded Opamp Design Based on Accurate Behavioral Model Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Yeong-Shin; Nguyen, Hoai-Nam; Ryu, Seung-Tak; Lee, Sang-Gug

    An accurate behavioral model of a DAC-embedded opamp (DAC-opamp) is developed for a yield-ensuring LCD column driver design. A lookup table for the V-I curve of the unit differential pair in the DAC-opamp is extracted from a circuit simulation and is later manipulated through a random error insertion. Virtual ground assumption simplifies the output voltage estimation algorithm. The developed behavioral model of a 5-bit DAC-opamp shows good agreement with the circuit level simulation with less than 5% INL difference.

  4. Time resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy with geometrically accurate models for bulk parameter recovery

    PubMed Central

    Guggenheim, James A.; Bargigia, Ilaria; Farina, Andrea; Pifferi, Antonio; Dehghani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    A novel straightforward, accessible and efficient approach is presented for performing hyperspectral time-domain diffuse optical spectroscopy to determine the optical properties of samples accurately using geometry specific models. To allow bulk parameter recovery from measured spectra, a set of libraries based on a numerical model of the domain being investigated is developed as opposed to the conventional approach of using an analytical semi-infinite slab approximation, which is known and shown to introduce boundary effects. Results demonstrate that the method improves the accuracy of derived spectrally varying optical properties over the use of the semi-infinite approximation. PMID:27699137

  5. Body charge modelling for accurate simulation of small-signal behaviour in floating body SOI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, James; Redman-White, William; D'Halleweyn, Nele V.; Easson, Craig A.; Uren, Michael J.

    2002-04-01

    We show that careful modelling of body node elements in floating body PD-SOI MOSFET compact models is required in order to obtain accurate small-signal simulation results in the saturation region. The body network modifies the saturation output conductance of the device via the body-source transconductance, resulting in a pole/zero pair being introduced in the conductance-frequency response. We show that neglecting the presence of body charge in the saturation region can often yield inaccurate values for the body capacitances, which in turn can adversely affect the modelling of the output conductance above the pole/zero frequency. We conclude that the underlying cause of this problem is the use of separate models for the intrinsic and extrinsic capacitances. Finally, we present a simple saturation body charge model which can greatly improve small-signal simulation accuracy for floating body devices.

  6. Physical modeling of Tibetan bowls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, Jose; Inacio, Octavio

    2004-05-01

    Tibetan bowls produce rich penetrating sounds, used in musical contexts and to induce a state of relaxation for meditation or therapy purposes. To understand the dynamics of these instruments under impact and rubbing excitation, we developed a simulation method based on the modal approach, following our previous papers on physical modeling of plucked/bowed strings and impacted/bowed bars. This technique is based on a compact representation of the system dynamics, in terms of the unconstrained bowl modes. Nonlinear contact/friction interaction forces, between the exciter (puja) and the bowl, are computed at each time step and projected on the bowl modal basis, followed by step integration of the modal equations. We explore the behavior of two different-sized bowls, for extensive ranges of excitation conditions (contact/friction parameters, normal force, and tangential puja velocity). Numerical results and experiments show that various self-excited motions may arise depending on the playing conditions and, mainly, on the contact/friction interaction parameters. Indeed, triggering of a given bowl modal frequency mainly depends on the puja material. Computed animations and experiments demonstrate that self-excited modes spin, following the puja motion. Accordingly, the sensed pressure field pulsates, with frequency controlled by the puja spinning velocity and the spatial pattern of the singing mode.

  7. Physical modeling of Tibetan bowls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, Jose; Inacio, Octavio

    2001-05-01

    Tibetan bowls produce rich penetrating sounds, used in musical contexts and to induce a state of relaxation for meditation or therapy purposes. To understand the dynamics of these instruments under impact and rubbing excitation, we developed a simulation method based on the modal approach, following our previous papers on physical modeling of plucked/bowed strings and impacted/bowed bars. This technique is based on a compact representation of the system dynamics, in terms of the unconstrained bowl modes. Nonlinear contact/friction interaction forces, between the exciter (puja) and the bowl, are computed at each time step and projected on the bowl modal basis, followed by step integration of the modal equations. We explore the behavior of two different-sized bowls, for extensive ranges of excitation conditions (contact/friction parameters, normal force, and tangential puja velocity). Numerical results and experiments show that various self-excited motions may arise depending on the playing conditions and, mainly, on the contact/friction interaction parameters. Indeed, triggering of a given bowl modal frequency mainly depends on the puja material. Computed animations and experiments demonstrate that self-excited modes spin, following the puja motion. Accordingly, the sensed pressure field pulsates, with frequency controlled by the puja spinning velocity and the spatial pattern of the singing mode.

  8. NUMERICAL MODELING OF FINE SEDIMENT PHYSICAL PROCESSES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, David H.

    1985-01-01

    Fine sediment in channels, rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters undergo several physical processes including flocculation, floc disruption, deposition, bed consolidation, and resuspension. This paper presents a conceptual model and reviews mathematical models of these physical processes. Several general fine sediment models that simulate some of these processes are reviewed. These general models do not directly simulate flocculation and floc disruption, but the conceptual model and existing functions are shown to adequately model these two processes for one set of laboratory data.

  9. Accurate prediction of wall shear stress in a stented artery: newtonian versus non-newtonian models.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Juan; Mongrain, Rosaire; Bertrand, Olivier F

    2011-07-01

    A significant amount of evidence linking wall shear stress to neointimal hyperplasia has been reported in the literature. As a result, numerical and experimental models have been created to study the influence of stent design on wall shear stress. Traditionally, blood has been assumed to behave as a Newtonian fluid, but recently that assumption has been challenged. The use of a linear model; however, can reduce computational cost, and allow the use of Newtonian fluids (e.g., glycerine and water) instead of a blood analog fluid in an experimental setup. Therefore, it is of interest whether a linear model can be used to accurately predict the wall shear stress caused by a non-Newtonian fluid such as blood within a stented arterial segment. The present work compares the resulting wall shear stress obtained using two linear and one nonlinear model under the same flow waveform. All numerical models are fully three-dimensional, transient, and incorporate a realistic stent geometry. It is shown that traditional linear models (based on blood's lowest viscosity limit, 3.5 Pa s) underestimate the wall shear stress within a stented arterial segment, which can lead to an overestimation of the risk of restenosis. The second linear model, which uses a characteristic viscosity (based on an average strain rate, 4.7 Pa s), results in higher wall shear stress levels, but which are still substantially below those of the nonlinear model. It is therefore shown that nonlinear models result in more accurate predictions of wall shear stress within a stented arterial segment.

  10. Accurate halo-model matter power spectra with dark energy, massive neutrinos and modified gravitational forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, A. J.; Heymans, C.; Lombriser, L.; Peacock, J. A.; Steele, O. I.; Winther, H. A.

    2016-06-01

    We present an accurate non-linear matter power spectrum prediction scheme for a variety of extensions to the standard cosmological paradigm, which uses the tuned halo model previously developed in Mead et al. We consider dark energy models that are both minimally and non-minimally coupled, massive neutrinos and modified gravitational forces with chameleon and Vainshtein screening mechanisms. In all cases, we compare halo-model power spectra to measurements from high-resolution simulations. We show that the tuned halo-model method can predict the non-linear matter power spectrum measured from simulations of parametrized w(a) dark energy models at the few per cent level for k < 10 h Mpc-1, and we present theoretically motivated extensions to cover non-minimally coupled scalar fields, massive neutrinos and Vainshtein screened modified gravity models that result in few per cent accurate power spectra for k < 10 h Mpc-1. For chameleon screened models, we achieve only 10 per cent accuracy for the same range of scales. Finally, we use our halo model to investigate degeneracies between different extensions to the standard cosmological model, finding that the impact of baryonic feedback on the non-linear matter power spectrum can be considered independently of modified gravity or massive neutrino extensions. In contrast, considering the impact of modified gravity and massive neutrinos independently results in biased estimates of power at the level of 5 per cent at scales k > 0.5 h Mpc-1. An updated version of our publicly available HMCODE can be found at https://github.com/alexander-mead/hmcode.

  11. Accurate modeling of switched reluctance machine based on hybrid trained WNN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shoujun; Ge, Lefei; Ma, Shaojie; Zhang, Man

    2014-04-01

    According to the strong nonlinear electromagnetic characteristics of switched reluctance machine (SRM), a novel accurate modeling method is proposed based on hybrid trained wavelet neural network (WNN) which combines improved genetic algorithm (GA) with gradient descent (GD) method to train the network. In the novel method, WNN is trained by GD method based on the initial weights obtained per improved GA optimization, and the global parallel searching capability of stochastic algorithm and local convergence speed of deterministic algorithm are combined to enhance the training accuracy, stability and speed. Based on the measured electromagnetic characteristics of a 3-phase 12/8-pole SRM, the nonlinear simulation model is built by hybrid trained WNN in Matlab. The phase current and mechanical characteristics from simulation under different working conditions meet well with those from experiments, which indicates the accuracy of the model for dynamic and static performance evaluation of SRM and verifies the effectiveness of the proposed modeling method.

  12. A hamster model for Marburg virus infection accurately recapitulates Marburg hemorrhagic fever

    PubMed Central

    Marzi, Andrea; Banadyga, Logan; Haddock, Elaine; Thomas, Tina; Shen, Kui; Horne, Eva J.; Scott, Dana P.; Feldmann, Heinz; Ebihara, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Marburg virus (MARV), a close relative of Ebola virus, is the causative agent of a severe human disease known as Marburg hemorrhagic fever (MHF). No licensed vaccine or therapeutic exists to treat MHF, and MARV is therefore classified as a Tier 1 select agent and a category A bioterrorism agent. In order to develop countermeasures against this severe disease, animal models that accurately recapitulate human disease are required. Here we describe the development of a novel, uniformly lethal Syrian golden hamster model of MHF using a hamster-adapted MARV variant Angola. Remarkably, this model displayed almost all of the clinical features of MHF seen in humans and non-human primates, including coagulation abnormalities, hemorrhagic manifestations, petechial rash, and a severely dysregulated immune response. This MHF hamster model represents a powerful tool for further dissecting MARV pathogenesis and accelerating the development of effective medical countermeasures against human MHF. PMID:27976688

  13. A hamster model for Marburg virus infection accurately recapitulates Marburg hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Marzi, Andrea; Banadyga, Logan; Haddock, Elaine; Thomas, Tina; Shen, Kui; Horne, Eva J; Scott, Dana P; Feldmann, Heinz; Ebihara, Hideki

    2016-12-15

    Marburg virus (MARV), a close relative of Ebola virus, is the causative agent of a severe human disease known as Marburg hemorrhagic fever (MHF). No licensed vaccine or therapeutic exists to treat MHF, and MARV is therefore classified as a Tier 1 select agent and a category A bioterrorism agent. In order to develop countermeasures against this severe disease, animal models that accurately recapitulate human disease are required. Here we describe the development of a novel, uniformly lethal Syrian golden hamster model of MHF using a hamster-adapted MARV variant Angola. Remarkably, this model displayed almost all of the clinical features of MHF seen in humans and non-human primates, including coagulation abnormalities, hemorrhagic manifestations, petechial rash, and a severely dysregulated immune response. This MHF hamster model represents a powerful tool for further dissecting MARV pathogenesis and accelerating the development of effective medical countermeasures against human MHF.

  14. Accurate modeling of switched reluctance machine based on hybrid trained WNN

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Shoujun Ge, Lefei; Ma, Shaojie; Zhang, Man

    2014-04-15

    According to the strong nonlinear electromagnetic characteristics of switched reluctance machine (SRM), a novel accurate modeling method is proposed based on hybrid trained wavelet neural network (WNN) which combines improved genetic algorithm (GA) with gradient descent (GD) method to train the network. In the novel method, WNN is trained by GD method based on the initial weights obtained per improved GA optimization, and the global parallel searching capability of stochastic algorithm and local convergence speed of deterministic algorithm are combined to enhance the training accuracy, stability and speed. Based on the measured electromagnetic characteristics of a 3-phase 12/8-pole SRM, the nonlinear simulation model is built by hybrid trained WNN in Matlab. The phase current and mechanical characteristics from simulation under different working conditions meet well with those from experiments, which indicates the accuracy of the model for dynamic and static performance evaluation of SRM and verifies the effectiveness of the proposed modeling method.

  15. Feasibility study for image guided kidney surgery: assessment of required intraoperative surface for accurate image to physical space registrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benincasa, Anne B.; Clements, Logan W.; Herrell, S. Duke; Chang, Sam S.; Cookson, Michael S.; Galloway, Robert L.

    2006-03-01

    Currently, the removal of kidney tumor masses uses only direct or laparoscopic visualizations, resulting in prolonged procedure and recovery times and reduced clear margin. Applying current image guided surgery (IGS) techniques, as those used in liver cases, to kidney resections (nephrectomies) presents a number of complications. Most notably is the limited field of view of the intraoperative kidney surface, which constrains the ability to obtain a surface delineation that is geometrically descriptive enough to drive a surface-based registration. Two different phantom orientations were used to model the laparoscopic and traditional partial nephrectomy views. For the laparoscopic view, fiducial point sets were compiled from a CT image volume using anatomical features such as the renal artery and vein. For the traditional view, markers attached to the phantom set-up were used for fiducials and targets. The fiducial points were used to perform a point-based registration, which then served as a guide for the surface-based registration. Laser range scanner (LRS) obtained surfaces were registered to each phantom surface using a rigid iterative closest point algorithm. Subsets of each phantom's LRS surface were used in a robustness test to determine the predictability of their registrations to transform the entire surface. Results from both orientations suggest that about half of the kidney's surface needs to be obtained intraoperatively for accurate registrations between the image surface and the LRS surface, suggesting the obtained kidney surfaces were geometrically descriptive enough to perform accurate registrations. This preliminary work paves the way for further development of kidney IGS systems.

  16. Beyond Ellipse(s): Accurately Modelling the Isophotal Structure of Galaxies with ISOFIT and CMODEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciambur, B. C.

    2015-09-01

    This work introduces a new fitting formalism for isophotes that enables more accurate modeling of galaxies with non-elliptical shapes, such as disk galaxies viewed edge-on or galaxies with X-shaped/peanut bulges. Within this scheme, the angular parameter that defines quasi-elliptical isophotes is transformed from the commonly used, but inappropriate, polar coordinate to the “eccentric anomaly.” This provides a superior description of deviations from ellipticity, better capturing the true isophotal shape. Furthermore, this makes it possible to accurately recover both the surface brightness profile, using the correct azimuthally averaged isophote, and the two-dimensional model of any galaxy: the hitherto ubiquitous, but artificial, cross-like features in residual images are completely removed. The formalism has been implemented into the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility tasks Ellipse and Bmodel to create the new tasks “Isofit,” and “Cmodel.” The new tools are demonstrated here with application to five galaxies, chosen to be representative case-studies for several areas where this technique makes it possible to gain new scientific insight. Specifically: properly quantifying boxy/disky isophotes via the fourth harmonic order in edge-on galaxies, quantifying X-shaped/peanut bulges, higher-order Fourier moments for modeling bars in disks, and complex isophote shapes. Higher order (n > 4) harmonics now become meaningful and may correlate with structural properties, as boxyness/diskyness is known to do. This work also illustrates how the accurate construction, and subtraction, of a model from a galaxy image facilitates the identification and recovery of over-lapping sources such as globular clusters and the optical counterparts of X-ray sources.

  17. BEYOND ELLIPSE(S): ACCURATELY MODELING THE ISOPHOTAL STRUCTURE OF GALAXIES WITH ISOFIT AND CMODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Ciambur, B. C.

    2015-09-10

    This work introduces a new fitting formalism for isophotes that enables more accurate modeling of galaxies with non-elliptical shapes, such as disk galaxies viewed edge-on or galaxies with X-shaped/peanut bulges. Within this scheme, the angular parameter that defines quasi-elliptical isophotes is transformed from the commonly used, but inappropriate, polar coordinate to the “eccentric anomaly.” This provides a superior description of deviations from ellipticity, better capturing the true isophotal shape. Furthermore, this makes it possible to accurately recover both the surface brightness profile, using the correct azimuthally averaged isophote, and the two-dimensional model of any galaxy: the hitherto ubiquitous, but artificial, cross-like features in residual images are completely removed. The formalism has been implemented into the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility tasks Ellipse and Bmodel to create the new tasks “Isofit,” and “Cmodel.” The new tools are demonstrated here with application to five galaxies, chosen to be representative case-studies for several areas where this technique makes it possible to gain new scientific insight. Specifically: properly quantifying boxy/disky isophotes via the fourth harmonic order in edge-on galaxies, quantifying X-shaped/peanut bulges, higher-order Fourier moments for modeling bars in disks, and complex isophote shapes. Higher order (n > 4) harmonics now become meaningful and may correlate with structural properties, as boxyness/diskyness is known to do. This work also illustrates how the accurate construction, and subtraction, of a model from a galaxy image facilitates the identification and recovery of over-lapping sources such as globular clusters and the optical counterparts of X-ray sources.

  18. A multiscale red blood cell model with accurate mechanics, rheology, and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fedosov, Dmitry A; Caswell, Bruce; Karniadakis, George Em

    2010-05-19

    Red blood cells (RBCs) have highly deformable viscoelastic membranes exhibiting complex rheological response and rich hydrodynamic behavior governed by special elastic and bending properties and by the external/internal fluid and membrane viscosities. We present a multiscale RBC model that is able to predict RBC mechanics, rheology, and dynamics in agreement with experiments. Based on an analytic theory, the modeled membrane properties can be uniquely related to the experimentally established RBC macroscopic properties without any adjustment of parameters. The RBC linear and nonlinear elastic deformations match those obtained in optical-tweezers experiments. The rheological properties of the membrane are compared with those obtained in optical magnetic twisting cytometry, membrane thermal fluctuations, and creep followed by cell recovery. The dynamics of RBCs in shear and Poiseuille flows is tested against experiments and theoretical predictions, and the applicability of the latter is discussed. Our findings clearly indicate that a purely elastic model for the membrane cannot accurately represent the RBC's rheological properties and its dynamics, and therefore accurate modeling of a viscoelastic membrane is necessary.

  19. Accurate physical laws can permit new standard units: The two laws F→=ma→ and the proportionality of weight to mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saslow, Wayne M.

    2014-04-01

    Three common approaches to F→=ma→ are: (1) as an exactly true definition of force F→ in terms of measured inertial mass m and measured acceleration a→; (2) as an exactly true axiom relating measured values of a→, F→ and m; and (3) as an imperfect but accurately true physical law relating measured a→ to measured F→, with m an experimentally determined, matter-dependent constant, in the spirit of the resistance R in Ohm's law. In the third case, the natural units are those of a→ and F→, where a→ is normally specified using distance and time as standard units, and F→ from a spring scale as a standard unit; thus mass units are derived from force, distance, and time units such as newtons, meters, and seconds. The present work develops the third approach when one includes a second physical law (again, imperfect but accurate)—that balance-scale weight W is proportional to m—and the fact that balance-scale measurements of relative weight are more accurate than those of absolute force. When distance and time also are more accurately measurable than absolute force, this second physical law permits a shift to standards of mass, distance, and time units, such as kilograms, meters, and seconds, with the unit of force—the newton—a derived unit. However, were force and distance more accurately measurable than time (e.g., time measured with an hourglass), this second physical law would permit a shift to standards of force, mass, and distance units such as newtons, kilograms, and meters, with the unit of time—the second—a derived unit. Therefore, the choice of the most accurate standard units depends both on what is most accurately measurable and on the accuracy of physical law.

  20. Evaluating a Model of Youth Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitzler, Carrie D.; Lytle, Leslie A.; Erickson, Darin J.; Barr-Anderson, Daheia; Sirard, John R.; Story, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between social influences, self-efficacy, enjoyment, and barriers and physical activity. Methods: Structural equation modeling examined relationships between parent and peer support, parent physical activity, individual perceptions, and objectively measured physical activity using accelerometers among a…

  1. What input data are needed to accurately model electromagnetic fields from mobile phone base stations?

    PubMed

    Beekhuizen, Johan; Kromhout, Hans; Bürgi, Alfred; Huss, Anke; Vermeulen, Roel

    2015-01-01

    The increase in mobile communication technology has led to concern about potential health effects of radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) from mobile phone base stations. Different RF-EMF prediction models have been applied to assess population exposure to RF-EMF. Our study examines what input data are needed to accurately model RF-EMF, as detailed data are not always available for epidemiological studies. We used NISMap, a 3D radio wave propagation model, to test models with various levels of detail in building and antenna input data. The model outcomes were compared with outdoor measurements taken in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Results showed good agreement between modelled and measured RF-EMF when 3D building data and basic antenna information (location, height, frequency and direction) were used: Spearman correlations were >0.6. Model performance was not sensitive to changes in building damping parameters. Antenna-specific information about down-tilt, type and output power did not significantly improve model performance compared with using average down-tilt and power values, or assuming one standard antenna type. We conclude that 3D radio wave propagation modelling is a feasible approach to predict outdoor RF-EMF levels for ranking exposure levels in epidemiological studies, when 3D building data and information on the antenna height, frequency, location and direction are available.

  2. A mathematical recursive model for accurate description of the phase behavior in the near-critical region by Generalized van der Waals Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jibeom; Jeon, Joonhyeon

    2015-01-01

    Recently, related studies on Equation Of State (EOS) have reported that generalized van der Waals (GvdW) shows poor representations in the near critical region for non-polar and non-sphere molecules. Hence, there are still remains a problem of GvdW parameters to minimize loss in describing saturated vapor densities and vice versa. This paper describes a recursive model GvdW (rGvdW) for an accurate representation of pure fluid materials in the near critical region. For the performance evaluation of rGvdW in the near critical region, other EOS models are also applied together with two pure molecule group: alkane and amine. The comparison results show rGvdW provides much more accurate and reliable predictions of pressure than the others. The calculating model of EOS through this approach gives an additional insight into the physical significance of accurate prediction of pressure in the nearcritical region.

  3. Accurate verification of the conserved-vector-current and standard-model predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Sirlin, A.; Zucchini, R.

    1986-10-20

    An approximate analytic calculation of O(Z..cap alpha../sup 2/) corrections to Fermi decays is presented. When the analysis of Koslowsky et al. is modified to take into account the new results, it is found that each of the eight accurately studied scrFt values differs from the average by approx. <1sigma, thus significantly improving the comparison of experiments with conserved-vector-current predictions. The new scrFt values are lower than before, which also brings experiments into very good agreement with the three-generation standard model, at the level of its quantum corrections.

  4. The effects of video modeling with voiceover instruction on accurate implementation of discrete-trial instruction.

    PubMed

    Vladescu, Jason C; Carroll, Regina; Paden, Amber; Kodak, Tiffany M

    2012-01-01

    The present study replicates and extends previous research on the use of video modeling (VM) with voiceover instruction to train staff to implement discrete-trial instruction (DTI). After staff trainees reached the mastery criterion when teaching an adult confederate with VM, they taught a child with a developmental disability using DTI. The results showed that the staff trainees' accurate implementation of DTI remained high, and both child participants acquired new skills. These findings provide additional support that VM may be an effective method to train staff members to conduct DTI.

  5. Double Cluster Heads Model for Secure and Accurate Data Fusion in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jun-Song; Liu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Secure and accurate data fusion is an important issue in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) and has been extensively researched in the literature. In this paper, by combining clustering techniques, reputation and trust systems, and data fusion algorithms, we propose a novel cluster-based data fusion model called Double Cluster Heads Model (DCHM) for secure and accurate data fusion in WSNs. Different from traditional clustering models in WSNs, two cluster heads are selected after clustering for each cluster based on the reputation and trust system and they perform data fusion independently of each other. Then, the results are sent to the base station where the dissimilarity coefficient is computed. If the dissimilarity coefficient of the two data fusion results exceeds the threshold preset by the users, the cluster heads will be added to blacklist, and the cluster heads must be reelected by the sensor nodes in a cluster. Meanwhile, feedback is sent from the base station to the reputation and trust system, which can help us to identify and delete the compromised sensor nodes in time. Through a series of extensive simulations, we found that the DCHM performed very well in data fusion security and accuracy. PMID:25608211

  6. Fast and accurate computation of system matrix for area integral model-based algebraic reconstruction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shunli; Zhang, Dinghua; Gong, Hao; Ghasemalizadeh, Omid; Wang, Ge; Cao, Guohua

    2014-11-01

    Iterative algorithms, such as the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART), are popular for image reconstruction. For iterative reconstruction, the area integral model (AIM) is more accurate for better reconstruction quality than the line integral model (LIM). However, the computation of the system matrix for AIM is more complex and time-consuming than that for LIM. Here, we propose a fast and accurate method to compute the system matrix for AIM. First, we calculate the intersection of each boundary line of a narrow fan-beam with pixels in a recursive and efficient manner. Then, by grouping the beam-pixel intersection area into six types according to the slopes of the two boundary lines, we analytically compute the intersection area of the narrow fan-beam with the pixels in a simple algebraic fashion. Overall, experimental results show that our method is about three times faster than the Siddon algorithm and about two times faster than the distance-driven model (DDM) in computation of the system matrix. The reconstruction speed of our AIM-based ART is also faster than the LIM-based ART that uses the Siddon algorithm and DDM-based ART, for one iteration. The fast reconstruction speed of our method was accomplished without compromising the image quality.

  7. Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements in Anatomically-Accurate Models of the Mammalian Nasal Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumple, C.; Richter, J.; Craven, B. A.; Krane, M.

    2012-11-01

    A summary of the research being carried out by our multidisciplinary team to better understand the form and function of the nose in different mammalian species that include humans, carnivores, ungulates, rodents, and marine animals will be presented. The mammalian nose houses a convoluted airway labyrinth, where two hallmark features of mammals occur, endothermy and olfaction. Because of the complexity of the nasal cavity, the anatomy and function of these upper airways remain poorly understood in most mammals. However, recent advances in high-resolution medical imaging, computational modeling, and experimental flow measurement techniques are now permitting the study of airflow and respiratory and olfactory transport phenomena in anatomically-accurate reconstructions of the nasal cavity. Here, we focus on efforts to manufacture transparent, anatomically-accurate models for stereo particle image velocimetry (SPIV) measurements of nasal airflow. Challenges in the design and manufacture of index-matched anatomical models are addressed and preliminary SPIV measurements are presented. Such measurements will constitute a validation database for concurrent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of mammalian respiration and olfaction. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  8. Accurate simulation of transient landscape evolution by eliminating numerical diffusion: the TTLEM 1.0 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Govers, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    Landscape evolution models (LEMs) allow the study of earth surface responses to changing climatic and tectonic forcings. While much effort has been devoted to the development of LEMs that simulate a wide range of processes, the numerical accuracy of these models has received less attention. Most LEMs use first-order accurate numerical methods that suffer from substantial numerical diffusion. Numerical diffusion particularly affects the solution of the advection equation and thus the simulation of retreating landforms such as cliffs and river knickpoints. This has potential consequences for the integrated response of the simulated landscape. Here we test a higher-order flux-limiting finite volume method that is total variation diminishing (TVD-FVM) to solve the partial differential equations of river incision and tectonic displacement. We show that using the TVD-FVM to simulate river incision significantly influences the evolution of simulated landscapes and the spatial and temporal variability of catchment-wide erosion rates. Furthermore, a two-dimensional TVD-FVM accurately simulates the evolution of landscapes affected by lateral tectonic displacement, a process whose simulation was hitherto largely limited to LEMs with flexible spatial discretization. We implement the scheme in TTLEM (TopoToolbox Landscape Evolution Model), a spatially explicit, raster-based LEM for the study of fluvially eroding landscapes in TopoToolbox 2.

  9. Accurate method for including solid-fluid boundary interactions in mesoscopic model fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Berkenbos, A. Lowe, C.P.

    2008-04-20

    Particle models are attractive methods for simulating the dynamics of complex mesoscopic fluids. Many practical applications of this methodology involve flow through a solid geometry. As the system is modeled using particles whose positions move continuously in space, one might expect that implementing the correct stick boundary condition exactly at the solid-fluid interface is straightforward. After all, unlike discrete methods there is no mapping onto a grid to contend with. In this article we describe a method that, for axisymmetric flows, imposes both the no-slip condition and continuity of stress at the interface. We show that the new method then accurately reproduces correct hydrodynamic behavior right up to the location of the interface. As such, computed flow profiles are correct even using a relatively small number of particles to model the fluid.

  10. A stochastic model of kinetochore-microtubule attachment accurately describes fission yeast chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Gay, Guillaume; Courtheoux, Thibault; Reyes, Céline; Tournier, Sylvie; Gachet, Yannick

    2012-03-19

    In fission yeast, erroneous attachments of spindle microtubules to kinetochores are frequent in early mitosis. Most are corrected before anaphase onset by a mechanism involving the protein kinase Aurora B, which destabilizes kinetochore microtubules (ktMTs) in the absence of tension between sister chromatids. In this paper, we describe a minimal mathematical model of fission yeast chromosome segregation based on the stochastic attachment and detachment of ktMTs. The model accurately reproduces the timing of correct chromosome biorientation and segregation seen in fission yeast. Prevention of attachment defects requires both appropriate kinetochore orientation and an Aurora B-like activity. The model also reproduces abnormal chromosome segregation behavior (caused by, for example, inhibition of Aurora B). It predicts that, in metaphase, merotelic attachment is prevented by a kinetochore orientation effect and corrected by an Aurora B-like activity, whereas in anaphase, it is corrected through unbalanced forces applied to the kinetochore. These unbalanced forces are sufficient to prevent aneuploidy.

  11. Cumulative atomic multipole moments complement any atomic charge model to obtain more accurate electrostatic properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokalski, W. A.; Shibata, M.; Ornstein, R. L.; Rein, R.

    1992-01-01

    The quality of several atomic charge models based on different definitions has been analyzed using cumulative atomic multipole moments (CAMM). This formalism can generate higher atomic moments starting from any atomic charges, while preserving the corresponding molecular moments. The atomic charge contribution to the higher molecular moments, as well as to the electrostatic potentials, has been examined for CO and HCN molecules at several different levels of theory. The results clearly show that the electrostatic potential obtained from CAMM expansion is convergent up to R-5 term for all atomic charge models used. This illustrates that higher atomic moments can be used to supplement any atomic charge model to obtain more accurate description of electrostatic properties.

  12. The importance of accurate muscle modelling for biomechanical analyses: a case study with a lizard skull

    PubMed Central

    Gröning, Flora; Jones, Marc E. H.; Curtis, Neil; Herrel, Anthony; O'Higgins, Paul; Evans, Susan E.; Fagan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Computer-based simulation techniques such as multi-body dynamics analysis are becoming increasingly popular in the field of skull mechanics. Multi-body models can be used for studying the relationships between skull architecture, muscle morphology and feeding performance. However, to be confident in the modelling results, models need to be validated against experimental data, and the effects of uncertainties or inaccuracies in the chosen model attributes need to be assessed with sensitivity analyses. Here, we compare the bite forces predicted by a multi-body model of a lizard (Tupinambis merianae) with in vivo measurements, using anatomical data collected from the same specimen. This subject-specific model predicts bite forces that are very close to the in vivo measurements and also shows a consistent increase in bite force as the bite position is moved posteriorly on the jaw. However, the model is very sensitive to changes in muscle attributes such as fibre length, intrinsic muscle strength and force orientation, with bite force predictions varying considerably when these three variables are altered. We conclude that accurate muscle measurements are crucial to building realistic multi-body models and that subject-specific data should be used whenever possible. PMID:23614944

  13. Digitalized accurate modeling of SPCB with multi-spiral surface based on CPC algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yanhua; Gu, Lizhi

    2015-09-01

    The main methods of the existing multi-spiral surface geometry modeling include spatial analytic geometry algorithms, graphical method, interpolation and approximation algorithms. However, there are some shortcomings in these modeling methods, such as large amount of calculation, complex process, visible errors, and so on. The above methods have, to some extent, restricted the design and manufacture of the premium and high-precision products with spiral surface considerably. This paper introduces the concepts of the spatially parallel coupling with multi-spiral surface and spatially parallel coupling body. The typical geometry and topological features of each spiral surface forming the multi-spiral surface body are determined, by using the extraction principle of datum point cluster, the algorithm of coupling point cluster by removing singular point, and the "spatially parallel coupling" principle based on the non-uniform B-spline for each spiral surface. The orientation and quantitative relationships of datum point cluster and coupling point cluster in Euclidean space are determined accurately and in digital description and expression, coupling coalescence of the surfaces with multi-coupling point clusters under the Pro/E environment. The digitally accurate modeling of spatially parallel coupling body with multi-spiral surface is realized. The smooth and fairing processing is done to the three-blade end-milling cutter's end section area by applying the principle of spatially parallel coupling with multi-spiral surface, and the alternative entity model is processed in the four axis machining center after the end mill is disposed. And the algorithm is verified and then applied effectively to the transition area among the multi-spiral surface. The proposed model and algorithms may be used in design and manufacture of the multi-spiral surface body products, as well as in solving essentially the problems of considerable modeling errors in computer graphics and

  14. Can a Global Model Accurately Simulate Land-Atmosphere Interactions under Climate Change Conditions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C., VI; Wang, K.

    2015-12-01

    Surface air temperature (Ta) is largely determined by surface net radiation (Rn) and its partitioning into latent (LE) and sensible heat fluxes (H). Existing model evaluations of the absolute values of these fluxes are less helpful because the evaluation results are a blending of inconsistent spatial scales, inaccurate model forcing data and inaccurate parameterizations. This study further evaluates the relationship of LE and H with Rn and environmental parameters, including Ta, relative humidity (RH) and wind speed (WS), using ERA-interim reanalysis data at a grid of 0.125°×0.125° with measurements at AmeriFlux sites from 1998 to 2012. The results demonstrate that ERA-Interim can reproduce the absolute values of environmental parameters, radiation and turbulent fluxes rather accurately. The model performs well in simulating the correlation of LE and H to Rn, except for the notable correlation overestimation of H against Rn over high-density vegetation (e.g., deciduous broadleaf forest (DBF), grassland (GRA) and cropland (CRO)). The sensitivity of LE to Rn in the model is similar to the observations, but that of H to Rn is overestimated by 24.2%. In regions with high-density vegetation, the correlation coefficient between H and Ta is overestimated by more than 0.2, whereas that between H and WS is underestimated by more than 0.43. The sensitivity of H to Ta is overestimated by 0.72 Wm-2 °C-1, whereas that of H to WS in the model is underestimated by 16.15 Wm-2/(ms-1) over all of the sites. Considering both LE and H, the model cannot accurately capture the response of the evaporative fraction (EF=LE/(LE+H)) to Rn and the environmental parameters.

  15. Towards an accurate understanding of UHMWPE visco-dynamic behaviour for numerical modelling of implants.

    PubMed

    Quinci, Federico; Dressler, Matthew; Strickland, Anthony M; Limbert, Georges

    2014-04-01

    Considerable progress has been made in understanding implant wear and developing numerical models to predict wear for new orthopaedic devices. However any model of wear could be improved through a more accurate representation of the biomaterial mechanics, including time-varying dynamic and inelastic behaviour such as viscosity and plastic deformation. In particular, most computational models of wear of UHMWPE implement a time-invariant version of Archard's law that links the volume of worn material to the contact pressure between the metal implant and the polymeric tibial insert. During in-vivo conditions, however, the contact area is a time-varying quantity and is therefore dependent upon the dynamic deformation response of the material. From this observation one can conclude that creep deformations of UHMWPE may be very important to consider when conducting computational wear analyses, in stark contrast to what can be found in the literature. In this study, different numerical modelling techniques are compared with experimental creep testing on a unicondylar knee replacement system in a physiologically representative context. Linear elastic, plastic and time-varying visco-dynamic models are benchmarked using literature data to predict contact deformations, pressures and areas. The aim of this study is to elucidate the contributions of viscoelastic and plastic effects on these surface quantities. It is concluded that creep deformations have a significant effect on the contact pressure measured (experiment) and calculated (computational models) at the surface of the UHMWPE unicondylar insert. The use of a purely elastoplastic constitutive model for UHMWPE lead to compressive deformations of the insert which are much smaller than those predicted by a creep-capturing viscoelastic model (and those measured experimentally). This shows again the importance of including creep behaviour into a constitutive model in order to predict the right level of surface deformation

  16. Models in biology: ‘accurate descriptions of our pathetic thinking’

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this essay I will sketch some ideas for how to think about models in biology. I will begin by trying to dispel the myth that quantitative modeling is somehow foreign to biology. I will then point out the distinction between forward and reverse modeling and focus thereafter on the former. Instead of going into mathematical technicalities about different varieties of models, I will focus on their logical structure, in terms of assumptions and conclusions. A model is a logical machine for deducing the latter from the former. If the model is correct, then, if you believe its assumptions, you must, as a matter of logic, also believe its conclusions. This leads to consideration of the assumptions underlying models. If these are based on fundamental physical laws, then it may be reasonable to treat the model as ‘predictive’, in the sense that it is not subject to falsification and we can rely on its conclusions. However, at the molecular level, models are more often derived from phenomenology and guesswork. In this case, the model is a test of its assumptions and must be falsifiable. I will discuss three models from this perspective, each of which yields biological insights, and this will lead to some guidelines for prospective model builders. PMID:24886484

  17. Validation of an Accurate Three-Dimensional Helical Slow-Wave Circuit Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.

    1997-01-01

    The helical slow-wave circuit embodies a helical coil of rectangular tape supported in a metal barrel by dielectric support rods. Although the helix slow-wave circuit remains the mainstay of the traveling-wave tube (TWT) industry because of its exceptionally wide bandwidth, a full helical circuit, without significant dimensional approximations, has not been successfully modeled until now. Numerous attempts have been made to analyze the helical slow-wave circuit so that the performance could be accurately predicted without actually building it, but because of its complex geometry, many geometrical approximations became necessary rendering the previous models inaccurate. In the course of this research it has been demonstrated that using the simulation code, MAFIA, the helical structure can be modeled with actual tape width and thickness, dielectric support rod geometry and materials. To demonstrate the accuracy of the MAFIA model, the cold-test parameters including dispersion, on-axis interaction impedance and attenuation have been calculated for several helical TWT slow-wave circuits with a variety of support rod geometries including rectangular and T-shaped rods, as well as various support rod materials including isotropic, anisotropic and partially metal coated dielectrics. Compared with experimentally measured results, the agreement is excellent. With the accuracy of the MAFIA helical model validated, the code was used to investigate several conventional geometric approximations in an attempt to obtain the most computationally efficient model. Several simplifications were made to a standard model including replacing the helical tape with filaments, and replacing rectangular support rods with shapes conforming to the cylindrical coordinate system with effective permittivity. The approximate models are compared with the standard model in terms of cold-test characteristics and computational time. The model was also used to determine the sensitivity of various

  18. Algal productivity modeling: a step toward accurate assessments of full-scale algal cultivation.

    PubMed

    Béchet, Quentin; Chambonnière, Paul; Shilton, Andy; Guizard, Guillaume; Guieysse, Benoit

    2015-05-01

    A new biomass productivity model was parameterized for Chlorella vulgaris using short-term (<30 min) oxygen productivities from algal microcosms exposed to 6 light intensities (20-420 W/m(2)) and 6 temperatures (5-42 °C). The model was then validated against experimental biomass productivities recorded in bench-scale photobioreactors operated under 4 light intensities (30.6-74.3 W/m(2)) and 4 temperatures (10-30 °C), yielding an accuracy of ± 15% over 163 days of cultivation. This modeling approach addresses major challenges associated with the accurate prediction of algal productivity at full-scale. Firstly, while most prior modeling approaches have only considered the impact of light intensity on algal productivity, the model herein validated also accounts for the critical impact of temperature. Secondly, this study validates a theoretical approach to convert short-term oxygen productivities into long-term biomass productivities. Thirdly, the experimental methodology used has the practical advantage of only requiring one day of experimental work for complete model parameterization. The validation of this new modeling approach is therefore an important step for refining feasibility assessments of algae biotechnologies.

  19. Modelling the physics in iterative reconstruction for transmission computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nuyts, Johan; De Man, Bruno; Fessler, Jeffrey A.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Beekman, Freek J.

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in iterative reconstruction (IR) as a key tool to improve quality and increase applicability of X-ray CT imaging. IR has the ability to significantly reduce patient dose, it provides the flexibility to reconstruct images from arbitrary X-ray system geometries and it allows to include detailed models of photon transport and detection physics, to accurately correct for a wide variety of image degrading effects. This paper reviews discretisation issues and modelling of finite spatial resolution, Compton scatter in the scanned object, data noise and the energy spectrum. Widespread implementation of IR with highly accurate model-based correction, however, still requires significant effort. In addition, new hardware will provide new opportunities and challenges to improve CT with new modelling. PMID:23739261

  20. Accurate modeling of fluorescence line narrowing difference spectra: Direct measurement of the single-site fluorescence spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reppert, Mike; Naibo, Virginia; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2010-07-01

    Accurate lineshape functions for modeling fluorescence line narrowing (FLN) difference spectra (ΔFLN spectra) in the low-fluence limit are derived and examined in terms of the physical interpretation of various contributions, including photoproduct absorption and emission. While in agreement with the earlier results of Jaaniso [Proc. Est. Acad. Sci., Phys., Math. 34, 277 (1985)] and Fünfschilling et al. [J. Lumin. 36, 85 (1986)], the derived formulas differ substantially from functions used recently [e.g., M. Rätsep et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 479, 140 (2009)] to model ΔFLN spectra. In contrast to traditional FLN spectra, it is demonstrated that for most physically reasonable parameters, the ΔFLN spectrum reduces simply to the single-site fluorescence lineshape function. These results imply that direct measurement of a bulk-averaged single-site fluorescence lineshape function can be accomplished with no complicated extraction process or knowledge of any additional parameters such as site distribution function shape and width. We argue that previous analysis of ΔFLN spectra obtained for many photosynthetic complexes led to strong artificial lowering of apparent electron-phonon coupling strength, especially on the high-energy side of the pigment site distribution function.

  1. Accurately modeling Gaussian beam propagation in the context of Monte Carlo techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokr, Brett H.; Winblad, Aidan; Bixler, Joel N.; Elpers, Gabriel; Zollars, Byron; Scully, Marlan O.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Thomas, Robert J.

    2016-03-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are widely considered to be the gold standard for studying the propagation of light in turbid media. However, traditional Monte Carlo methods fail to account for diffraction because they treat light as a particle. This results in converging beams focusing to a point instead of a diffraction limited spot, greatly effecting the accuracy of Monte Carlo simulations near the focal plane. Here, we present a technique capable of simulating a focusing beam in accordance to the rules of Gaussian optics, resulting in a diffraction limited focal spot. This technique can be easily implemented into any traditional Monte Carlo simulation allowing existing models to be converted to include accurate focusing geometries with minimal effort. We will present results for a focusing beam in a layered tissue model, demonstrating that for different scenarios the region of highest intensity, thus the greatest heating, can change from the surface to the focus. The ability to simulate accurate focusing geometries will greatly enhance the usefulness of Monte Carlo for countless applications, including studying laser tissue interactions in medical applications and light propagation through turbid media.

  2. Accurate model of electron beam profiles with emittance effects for pierce guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Peng; Wang, Guangqiang; Wang, Jianguo; Wang, Dongyang; Li, Shuang

    2016-09-01

    Accurate prediction of electron beam profile is one of the key objectives of electron optics, and the basis for design of the practical electron gun. In this paper, an improved model describing electron beam in Pierce gun with both space charge effects and emittance effects is proposed. The theory developed by Cutler and Hines is still applied for the accelerating region of the Pierce gun, while the motion equations of the electron beams in the anode aperture and drift tunnel are improved by modifying electron optics theory with emittance. As a result, a more universal and accurate formula of the focal length of the lens for the electron beam with both effects is derived for the anode aperture with finite dimension, and a modified universal spread curve considering beam emittance is introduced in drift tunnel region. Based on these improved motion equations of the electron beam, beam profiles with space charge effects and emittance effects can be theoretically predicted, which are subsequently approved to agree well with the experimentally measured ones. The developed model here is helpful to design more applicable Pierce guns at high frequencies.

  3. Accurate and scalable social recommendation using mixed-membership stochastic block models

    PubMed Central

    Godoy-Lorite, Antonia; Moore, Cristopher

    2016-01-01

    With increasing amounts of information available, modeling and predicting user preferences—for books or articles, for example—are becoming more important. We present a collaborative filtering model, with an associated scalable algorithm, that makes accurate predictions of users’ ratings. Like previous approaches, we assume that there are groups of users and of items and that the rating a user gives an item is determined by their respective group memberships. However, we allow each user and each item to belong simultaneously to mixtures of different groups and, unlike many popular approaches such as matrix factorization, we do not assume that users in each group prefer a single group of items. In particular, we do not assume that ratings depend linearly on a measure of similarity, but allow probability distributions of ratings to depend freely on the user’s and item’s groups. The resulting overlapping groups and predicted ratings can be inferred with an expectation-maximization algorithm whose running time scales linearly with the number of observed ratings. Our approach enables us to predict user preferences in large datasets and is considerably more accurate than the current algorithms for such large datasets. PMID:27911773

  4. A Biomechanical Model of the Scapulothoracic Joint to Accurately Capture Scapular Kinematics during Shoulder Movements

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Ajay; Matias, Ricardo; Veloso, António P.; Delp, Scott L.

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of shoulder mechanics combined with the movement of skin relative to the scapula makes it difficult to measure shoulder kinematics with sufficient accuracy to distinguish between symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. Multibody skeletal models can improve motion capture accuracy by reducing the space of possible joint movements, and models are used widely to improve measurement of lower limb kinematics. In this study, we developed a rigid-body model of a scapulothoracic joint to describe the kinematics of the scapula relative to the thorax. This model describes scapular kinematics with four degrees of freedom: 1) elevation and 2) abduction of the scapula on an ellipsoidal thoracic surface, 3) upward rotation of the scapula normal to the thoracic surface, and 4) internal rotation of the scapula to lift the medial border of the scapula off the surface of the thorax. The surface dimensions and joint axes can be customized to match an individual’s anthropometry. We compared the model to “gold standard” bone-pin kinematics collected during three shoulder tasks and found modeled scapular kinematics to be accurate to within 2mm root-mean-squared error for individual bone-pin markers across all markers and movement tasks. As an additional test, we added random and systematic noise to the bone-pin marker data and found that the model reduced kinematic variability due to noise by 65% compared to Euler angles computed without the model. Our scapulothoracic joint model can be used for inverse and forward dynamics analyses and to compute joint reaction loads. The computational performance of the scapulothoracic joint model is well suited for real-time applications; it is freely available for use with OpenSim 3.2, and is customizable and usable with other OpenSim models. PMID:26734761

  5. Fractional Order Modeling of Atmospheric Turbulence - A More Accurate Modeling Methodology for Aero Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2014-01-01

    The presentation covers a recently developed methodology to model atmospheric turbulence as disturbances for aero vehicle gust loads and for controls development like flutter and inlet shock position. The approach models atmospheric turbulence in their natural fractional order form, which provides for more accuracy compared to traditional methods like the Dryden model, especially for high speed vehicle. The presentation provides a historical background on atmospheric turbulence modeling and the approaches utilized for air vehicles. This is followed by the motivation and the methodology utilized to develop the atmospheric turbulence fractional order modeling approach. Some examples covering the application of this method are also provided, followed by concluding remarks.

  6. Making it Easy to Construct Accurate Hydrological Models that Exploit High Performance Computers (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kees, C. E.; Farthing, M. W.; Terrel, A.; Certik, O.; Seljebotn, D.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation will focus on two barriers to progress in the hydrological modeling community, and research and development conducted to lessen or eliminate them. The first is a barrier to sharing hydrological models among specialized scientists that is caused by intertwining the implementation of numerical methods with the implementation of abstract numerical modeling information. In the Proteus toolkit for computational methods and simulation, we have decoupled these two important parts of computational model through separate "physics" and "numerics" interfaces. More recently we have begun developing the Strong Form Language for easy and direct representation of the mathematical model formulation in a domain specific language embedded in Python. The second major barrier is sharing ANY scientific software tools that have complex library or module dependencies, as most parallel, multi-physics hydrological models must have. In this setting, users and developer are dependent on an entire distribution, possibly depending on multiple compilers and special instructions depending on the environment of the target machine. To solve these problem we have developed, hashdist, a stateless package management tool and a resulting portable, open source scientific software distribution.

  7. Accurate Cold-Test Model of Helical TWT Slow-Wave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Dayton, James A., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Recently, a method has been established to accurately calculate cold-test data for helical slow-wave structures using the three-dimensional electromagnetic computer code, MAFIA. Cold-test parameters have been calculated for several helical traveling-wave tube (TWT) slow-wave circuits possessing various support rod configurations, and results are presented here showing excellent agreement with experiment. The helical models include tape thickness, dielectric support shapes and material properties consistent with the actual circuits. The cold-test data from this helical model can be used as input into large-signal helical TWT interaction codes making it possible, for the first time, to design a complete TWT via computer simulation.

  8. Fast and Accurate Prediction of Numerical Relativity Waveforms from Binary Black Hole Coalescences Using Surrogate Models.

    PubMed

    Blackman, Jonathan; Field, Scott E; Galley, Chad R; Szilágyi, Béla; Scheel, Mark A; Tiglio, Manuel; Hemberger, Daniel A

    2015-09-18

    Simulating a binary black hole coalescence by solving Einstein's equations is computationally expensive, requiring days to months of supercomputing time. Using reduced order modeling techniques, we construct an accurate surrogate model, which is evaluated in a millisecond to a second, for numerical relativity (NR) waveforms from nonspinning binary black hole coalescences with mass ratios in [1, 10] and durations corresponding to about 15 orbits before merger. We assess the model's uncertainty and show that our modeling strategy predicts NR waveforms not used for the surrogate's training with errors nearly as small as the numerical error of the NR code. Our model includes all spherical-harmonic _{-2}Y_{ℓm} waveform modes resolved by the NR code up to ℓ=8. We compare our surrogate model to effective one body waveforms from 50M_{⊙} to 300M_{⊙} for advanced LIGO detectors and find that the surrogate is always more faithful (by at least an order of magnitude in most cases).

  9. Construction of feasible and accurate kinetic models of metabolism: A Bayesian approach

    PubMed Central

    Saa, Pedro A.; Nielsen, Lars K.

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic models are essential to quantitatively understand and predict the behaviour of metabolic networks. Detailed and thermodynamically feasible kinetic models of metabolism are inherently difficult to formulate and fit. They have a large number of heterogeneous parameters, are non-linear and have complex interactions. Many powerful fitting strategies are ruled out by the intractability of the likelihood function. Here, we have developed a computational framework capable of fitting feasible and accurate kinetic models using Approximate Bayesian Computation. This framework readily supports advanced modelling features such as model selection and model-based experimental design. We illustrate this approach on the tightly-regulated mammalian methionine cycle. Sampling from the posterior distribution, the proposed framework generated thermodynamically feasible parameter samples that converged on the true values, and displayed remarkable prediction accuracy in several validation tests. Furthermore, a posteriori analysis of the parameter distributions enabled appraisal of the systems properties of the network (e.g., control structure) and key metabolic regulations. Finally, the framework was used to predict missing allosteric interactions. PMID:27417285

  10. Comprehensive Physical Education Program Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamiya, Artie

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, the Wake County Public School System (North Carolina) received $1.3 million as one of 237 national winners of the $70 million federal Carol M. White Physical Education Program (PEP) Grant competition. The PEP Grant program is funded by the U.S. Department of Education and provides monies to school districts able to demonstrate the…

  11. Fitmunk: improving protein structures by accurate, automatic modeling of side-chain conformations.

    PubMed

    Porebski, Przemyslaw Jerzy; Cymborowski, Marcin; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Minor, Wladek

    2016-02-01

    Improvements in crystallographic hardware and software have allowed automated structure-solution pipelines to approach a near-`one-click' experience for the initial determination of macromolecular structures. However, in many cases the resulting initial model requires a laborious, iterative process of refinement and validation. A new method has been developed for the automatic modeling of side-chain conformations that takes advantage of rotamer-prediction methods in a crystallographic context. The algorithm, which is based on deterministic dead-end elimination (DEE) theory, uses new dense conformer libraries and a hybrid energy function derived from experimental data and prior information about rotamer frequencies to find the optimal conformation of each side chain. In contrast to existing methods, which incorporate the electron-density term into protein-modeling frameworks, the proposed algorithm is designed to take advantage of the highly discriminatory nature of electron-density maps. This method has been implemented in the program Fitmunk, which uses extensive conformational sampling. This improves the accuracy of the modeling and makes it a versatile tool for crystallographic model building, refinement and validation. Fitmunk was extensively tested on over 115 new structures, as well as a subset of 1100 structures from the PDB. It is demonstrated that the ability of Fitmunk to model more than 95% of side chains accurately is beneficial for improving the quality of crystallographic protein models, especially at medium and low resolutions. Fitmunk can be used for model validation of existing structures and as a tool to assess whether side chains are modeled optimally or could be better fitted into electron density. Fitmunk is available as a web service at http://kniahini.med.virginia.edu/fitmunk/server/ or at http://fitmunk.bitbucket.org/.

  12. Fitmunk: improving protein structures by accurate, automatic modeling of side-chain conformations

    PubMed Central

    Porebski, Przemyslaw Jerzy; Cymborowski, Marcin; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Minor, Wladek

    2016-01-01

    Improvements in crystallographic hardware and software have allowed automated structure-solution pipelines to approach a near-‘one-click’ experience for the initial determination of macromolecular structures. However, in many cases the resulting initial model requires a laborious, iterative process of refinement and validation. A new method has been developed for the automatic modeling of side-chain conformations that takes advantage of rotamer-prediction methods in a crystallographic context. The algorithm, which is based on deterministic dead-end elimination (DEE) theory, uses new dense conformer libraries and a hybrid energy function derived from experimental data and prior information about rotamer frequencies to find the optimal conformation of each side chain. In contrast to existing methods, which incorporate the electron-density term into protein-modeling frameworks, the proposed algorithm is designed to take advantage of the highly discriminatory nature of electron-density maps. This method has been implemented in the program Fitmunk, which uses extensive conformational sampling. This improves the accuracy of the modeling and makes it a versatile tool for crystallographic model building, refinement and validation. Fitmunk was extensively tested on over 115 new structures, as well as a subset of 1100 structures from the PDB. It is demonstrated that the ability of Fitmunk to model more than 95% of side chains accurately is beneficial for improving the quality of crystallographic protein models, especially at medium and low resolutions. Fitmunk can be used for model validation of existing structures and as a tool to assess whether side chains are modeled optimally or could be better fitted into electron density. Fitmunk is available as a web service at http://kniahini.med.virginia.edu/fitmunk/server/ or at http://fitmunk.bitbucket.org/. PMID:26894674

  13. Towards an accurate model of redshift-space distortions: a bivariate Gaussian description for the galaxy pairwise velocity distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Davide; Chiesa, Matteo; Guzzo, Luigi

    2016-10-01

    As a step towards a more accurate modelling of redshift-space distortions (RSD) in galaxy surveys, we develop a general description of the probability distribution function of galaxy pairwise velocities within the framework of the so-called streaming model. For a given galaxy separation , such function can be described as a superposition of virtually infinite local distributions. We characterize these in terms of their moments and then consider the specific case in which they are Gaussian functions, each with its own mean μ and variance σ2. Based on physical considerations, we make the further crucial assumption that these two parameters are in turn distributed according to a bivariate Gaussian, with its own mean and covariance matrix. Tests using numerical simulations explicitly show that with this compact description one can correctly model redshift-space distorsions on all scales, fully capturing the overall linear and nonlinear dynamics of the galaxy flow at different separations. In particular, we naturally obtain Gaussian/exponential, skewed/unskewed distribution functions, depending on separation as observed in simulations and data. Also, the recently proposed single-Gaussian description of redshift-space distortions is included in this model as a limiting case, when the bivariate Gaussian is collapsed to a two-dimensional Dirac delta function. More work is needed, but these results indicate a very promising path to make definitive progress in our program to improve RSD estimators.

  14. A Simple and Accurate Model to Predict Responses to Multi-electrode Stimulation in the Retina.

    PubMed

    Maturana, Matias I; Apollo, Nicholas V; Hadjinicolaou, Alex E; Garrett, David J; Cloherty, Shaun L; Kameneva, Tatiana; Grayden, David B; Ibbotson, Michael R; Meffin, Hamish

    2016-04-01

    Implantable electrode arrays are widely used in therapeutic stimulation of the nervous system (e.g. cochlear, retinal, and cortical implants). Currently, most neural prostheses use serial stimulation (i.e. one electrode at a time) despite this severely limiting the repertoire of stimuli that can be applied. Methods to reliably predict the outcome of multi-electrode stimulation have not been available. Here, we demonstrate that a linear-nonlinear model accurately predicts neural responses to arbitrary patterns of stimulation using in vitro recordings from single retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) stimulated with a subretinal multi-electrode array. In the model, the stimulus is projected onto a low-dimensional subspace and then undergoes a nonlinear transformation to produce an estimate of spiking probability. The low-dimensional subspace is estimated using principal components analysis, which gives the neuron's electrical receptive field (ERF), i.e. the electrodes to which the neuron is most sensitive. Our model suggests that stimulation proportional to the ERF yields a higher efficacy given a fixed amount of power when compared to equal amplitude stimulation on up to three electrodes. We find that the model captures the responses of all the cells recorded in the study, suggesting that it will generalize to most cell types in the retina. The model is computationally efficient to evaluate and, therefore, appropriate for future real-time applications including stimulation strategies that make use of recorded neural activity to improve the stimulation strategy.

  15. A Simple and Accurate Model to Predict Responses to Multi-electrode Stimulation in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Maturana, Matias I.; Apollo, Nicholas V.; Hadjinicolaou, Alex E.; Garrett, David J.; Cloherty, Shaun L.; Kameneva, Tatiana; Grayden, David B.; Ibbotson, Michael R.; Meffin, Hamish

    2016-01-01

    Implantable electrode arrays are widely used in therapeutic stimulation of the nervous system (e.g. cochlear, retinal, and cortical implants). Currently, most neural prostheses use serial stimulation (i.e. one electrode at a time) despite this severely limiting the repertoire of stimuli that can be applied. Methods to reliably predict the outcome of multi-electrode stimulation have not been available. Here, we demonstrate that a linear-nonlinear model accurately predicts neural responses to arbitrary patterns of stimulation using in vitro recordings from single retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) stimulated with a subretinal multi-electrode array. In the model, the stimulus is projected onto a low-dimensional subspace and then undergoes a nonlinear transformation to produce an estimate of spiking probability. The low-dimensional subspace is estimated using principal components analysis, which gives the neuron’s electrical receptive field (ERF), i.e. the electrodes to which the neuron is most sensitive. Our model suggests that stimulation proportional to the ERF yields a higher efficacy given a fixed amount of power when compared to equal amplitude stimulation on up to three electrodes. We find that the model captures the responses of all the cells recorded in the study, suggesting that it will generalize to most cell types in the retina. The model is computationally efficient to evaluate and, therefore, appropriate for future real-time applications including stimulation strategies that make use of recorded neural activity to improve the stimulation strategy. PMID:27035143

  16. Accurate modeling of F-region electron densities. Annual progress report, 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    In the past year, the authors have made considerable progress in a number of areas including algorithm development, completion of two major case studies, and the development of a new EUV flux model. As a result, there has been a major improvement in the ability to model global emissions in support of NASA's imaging plans. Activity highlights include the following: developed a new algorithm to allow physical models to reproduce observed NmF2; investigated the relationship between NmF2 and F10.7 at Millstone Hill during 1990; developed a new solar EUV flux model; statistical survey of anomalously high nighttime electron T(sub e) at Millstone Hill; conducted a case study of the March 1990 magnetic storm; and conducted a comparison between theory and data of magnetically quiet behavior of the winter ionosphere at Millstone Hill.

  17. Exchange-Hole Dipole Dispersion Model for Accurate Energy Ranking in Molecular Crystal Structure Prediction.

    PubMed

    Whittleton, Sarah R; Otero-de-la-Roza, A; Johnson, Erin R

    2017-02-14

    Accurate energy ranking is a key facet to the problem of first-principles crystal-structure prediction (CSP) of molecular crystals. This work presents a systematic assessment of B86bPBE-XDM, a semilocal density functional combined with the exchange-hole dipole moment (XDM) dispersion model, for energy ranking using 14 compounds from the first five CSP blind tests. Specifically, the set of crystals studied comprises 11 rigid, planar compounds and 3 co-crystals. The experimental structure was correctly identified as the lowest in lattice energy for 12 of the 14 total crystals. One of the exceptions is 4-hydroxythiophene-2-carbonitrile, for which the experimental structure was correctly identified once a quasi-harmonic estimate of the vibrational free-energy contribution was included, evidencing the occasional importance of thermal corrections for accurate energy ranking. The other exception is an organic salt, where charge-transfer error (also called delocalization error) is expected to cause the base density functional to be unreliable. Provided the choice of base density functional is appropriate and an estimate of temperature effects is used, XDM-corrected density-functional theory is highly reliable for the energetic ranking of competing crystal structures.

  18. Fast and accurate analytical model to solve inverse problem in SHM using Lamb wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddar, Banibrata; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Lamb wave propagation is at the center of attention of researchers for structural health monitoring of thin walled structures. This is due to the fact that Lamb wave modes are natural modes of wave propagation in these structures with long travel distances and without much attenuation. This brings the prospect of monitoring large structure with few sensors/actuators. However the problem of damage detection and identification is an "inverse problem" where we do not have the luxury to know the exact mathematical model of the system. On top of that the problem is more challenging due to the confounding factors of statistical variation of the material and geometric properties. Typically this problem may also be ill posed. Due to all these complexities the direct solution of the problem of damage detection and identification in SHM is impossible. Therefore an indirect method using the solution of the "forward problem" is popular for solving the "inverse problem". This requires a fast forward problem solver. Due to the complexities involved with the forward problem of scattering of Lamb waves from damages researchers rely primarily on numerical techniques such as FEM, BEM, etc. But these methods are slow and practically impossible to be used in structural health monitoring. We have developed a fast and accurate analytical forward problem solver for this purpose. This solver, CMEP (complex modes expansion and vector projection), can simulate scattering of Lamb waves from all types of damages in thin walled structures fast and accurately to assist the inverse problem solver.

  19. Ab initio calculations to support accurate modelling of the rovibronic spectroscopy calculations of vanadium monoxide (VO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKemmish, Laura K.; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    Accurate knowledge of the rovibronic near-infrared and visible spectra of vanadium monoxide (VO) is very important for studies of cool stellar and hot planetary atmospheres. Here, the required ab initio dipole moment and spin-orbit coupling curves for VO are produced. This data forms the basis of a new VO line list considering 13 different electronic states and containing over 277 million transitions. Open shell transition, metal diatomics are challenging species to model through ab initio quantum mechanics due to the large number of low-lying electronic states, significant spin-orbit coupling and strong static and dynamic electron correlation. Multi-reference configuration interaction methodologies using orbitals from a complete active space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) calculation are the standard technique for these systems. We use different state-specific or minimal-state CASSCF orbitals for each electronic state to maximise the calculation accuracy. The off-diagonal dipole moment controls the intensity of electronic transitions. We test finite-field off-diagonal dipole moments, but found that (1) the accuracy of the excitation energies were not sufficient to allow accurate dipole moments to be evaluated and (2) computer time requirements for perpendicular transitions were prohibitive. The best off-diagonal dipole moments are calculated using wavefunctions with different CASSCF orbitals.

  20. Modeling methodology for the accurate and prompt prediction of symptomatic events in chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Pagán, Josué; Risco-Martín, José L; Moya, José M; Ayala, José L

    2016-08-01

    Prediction of symptomatic crises in chronic diseases allows to take decisions before the symptoms occur, such as the intake of drugs to avoid the symptoms or the activation of medical alarms. The prediction horizon is in this case an important parameter in order to fulfill the pharmacokinetics of medications, or the time response of medical services. This paper presents a study about the prediction limits of a chronic disease with symptomatic crises: the migraine. For that purpose, this work develops a methodology to build predictive migraine models and to improve these predictions beyond the limits of the initial models. The maximum prediction horizon is analyzed, and its dependency on the selected features is studied. A strategy for model selection is proposed to tackle the trade off between conservative but robust predictive models, with respect to less accurate predictions with higher horizons. The obtained results show a prediction horizon close to 40min, which is in the time range of the drug pharmacokinetics. Experiments have been performed in a realistic scenario where input data have been acquired in an ambulatory clinical study by the deployment of a non-intrusive Wireless Body Sensor Network. Our results provide an effective methodology for the selection of the future horizon in the development of prediction algorithms for diseases experiencing symptomatic crises.

  1. Efficient and Accurate Explicit Integration Algorithms with Application to Viscoplastic Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, Vinod K.

    1994-01-01

    Several explicit integration algorithms with self-adative time integration strategies are developed and investigated for efficiency and accuracy. These algorithms involve the Runge-Kutta second order, the lower Runge-Kutta method of orders one and two, and the exponential integration method. The algorithms are applied to viscoplastic models put forth by Freed and Verrilli and Bodner and Partom for thermal/mechanical loadings (including tensile, relaxation, and cyclic loadings). The large amount of computations performed showed that, for comparable accuracy, the efficiency of an integration algorithm depends significantly on the type of application (loading). However, in general, for the aforementioned loadings and viscoplastic models, the exponential integration algorithm with the proposed self-adaptive time integration strategy worked more (or comparably) efficiently and accurately than the other integration algorithms. Using this strategy for integrating viscoplastic models may lead to considerable savings in computer time (better efficiency) without adversely affecting the accuracy of the results. This conclusion should encourage the utilization of viscoplastic models in the stress analysis and design of structural components.

  2. Accurate and fast simulation of channel noise in conductance-based model neurons by diffusion approximation.

    PubMed

    Linaro, Daniele; Storace, Marco; Giugliano, Michele

    2011-03-01

    Stochastic channel gating is the major source of intrinsic neuronal noise whose functional consequences at the microcircuit- and network-levels have been only partly explored. A systematic study of this channel noise in large ensembles of biophysically detailed model neurons calls for the availability of fast numerical methods. In fact, exact techniques employ the microscopic simulation of the random opening and closing of individual ion channels, usually based on Markov models, whose computational loads are prohibitive for next generation massive computer models of the brain. In this work, we operatively define a procedure for translating any Markov model describing voltage- or ligand-gated membrane ion-conductances into an effective stochastic version, whose computer simulation is efficient, without compromising accuracy. Our approximation is based on an improved Langevin-like approach, which employs stochastic differential equations and no Montecarlo methods. As opposed to an earlier proposal recently debated in the literature, our approximation reproduces accurately the statistical properties of the exact microscopic simulations, under a variety of conditions, from spontaneous to evoked response features. In addition, our method is not restricted to the Hodgkin-Huxley sodium and potassium currents and is general for a variety of voltage- and ligand-gated ion currents. As a by-product, the analysis of the properties emerging in exact Markov schemes by standard probability calculus enables us for the first time to analytically identify the sources of inaccuracy of the previous proposal, while providing solid ground for its modification and improvement we present here.

  3. A General Pairwise Interaction Model Provides an Accurate Description of In Vivo Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Santolini, Marc; Mora, Thierry; Hakim, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    The identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) on genomic DNA is of crucial importance for understanding and predicting regulatory elements in gene networks. TFBS motifs are commonly described by Position Weight Matrices (PWMs), in which each DNA base pair contributes independently to the transcription factor (TF) binding. However, this description ignores correlations between nucleotides at different positions, and is generally inaccurate: analysing fly and mouse in vivo ChIPseq data, we show that in most cases the PWM model fails to reproduce the observed statistics of TFBSs. To overcome this issue, we introduce the pairwise interaction model (PIM), a generalization of the PWM model. The model is based on the principle of maximum entropy and explicitly describes pairwise correlations between nucleotides at different positions, while being otherwise as unconstrained as possible. It is mathematically equivalent to considering a TF-DNA binding energy that depends additively on each nucleotide identity at all positions in the TFBS, like the PWM model, but also additively on pairs of nucleotides. We find that the PIM significantly improves over the PWM model, and even provides an optimal description of TFBS statistics within statistical noise. The PIM generalizes previous approaches to interdependent positions: it accounts for co-variation of two or more base pairs, and predicts secondary motifs, while outperforming multiple-motif models consisting of mixtures of PWMs. We analyse the structure of pairwise interactions between nucleotides, and find that they are sparse and dominantly located between consecutive base pairs in the flanking region of TFBS. Nonetheless, interactions between pairs of non-consecutive nucleotides are found to play a significant role in the obtained accurate description of TFBS statistics. The PIM is computationally tractable, and provides a general framework that should be useful for describing and predicting TFBSs beyond

  4. Application of thin plate splines for accurate regional ionosphere modeling with multi-GNSS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krypiak-Gregorczyk, Anna; Wielgosz, Pawel; Borkowski, Andrzej

    2016-04-01

    GNSS-derived regional ionosphere models are widely used in both precise positioning, ionosphere and space weather studies. However, their accuracy is often not sufficient to support precise positioning, RTK in particular. In this paper, we presented new approach that uses solely carrier phase multi-GNSS observables and thin plate splines (TPS) for accurate ionospheric TEC modeling. TPS is a closed solution of a variational problem minimizing both the sum of squared second derivatives of a smoothing function and the deviation between data points and this function. This approach is used in UWM-rt1 regional ionosphere model developed at UWM in Olsztyn. The model allows for providing ionospheric TEC maps with high spatial and temporal resolutions - 0.2x0.2 degrees and 2.5 minutes, respectively. For TEC estimation, EPN and EUPOS reference station data is used. The maps are available with delay of 15-60 minutes. In this paper we compare the performance of UWM-rt1 model with IGS global and CODE regional ionosphere maps during ionospheric storm that took place on March 17th, 2015. During this storm, the TEC level over Europe doubled comparing to earlier quiet days. The performance of the UWM-rt1 model was validated by (a) comparison to reference double-differenced ionospheric corrections over selected baselines, and (b) analysis of post-fit residuals to calibrated carrier phase geometry-free observational arcs at selected test stations. The results show a very good performance of UWM-rt1 model. The obtained post-fit residuals in case of UWM maps are lower by one order of magnitude comparing to IGS maps. The accuracy of UWM-rt1 -derived TEC maps is estimated at 0.5 TECU. This may be directly translated to the user positioning domain.

  5. Accurate force fields and methods for modelling organic molecular crystals at finite temperatures.

    PubMed

    Nyman, Jonas; Pundyke, Orla Sheehan; Day, Graeme M

    2016-06-21

    We present an assessment of the performance of several force fields for modelling intermolecular interactions in organic molecular crystals using the X23 benchmark set. The performance of the force fields is compared to several popular dispersion corrected density functional methods. In addition, we present our implementation of lattice vibrational free energy calculations in the quasi-harmonic approximation, using several methods to account for phonon dispersion. This allows us to also benchmark the force fields' reproduction of finite temperature crystal structures. The results demonstrate that anisotropic atom-atom multipole-based force fields can be as accurate as several popular DFT-D methods, but have errors 2-3 times larger than the current best DFT-D methods. The largest error in the examined force fields is a systematic underestimation of the (absolute) lattice energy.

  6. Accurate Modeling of Organic Molecular Crystals by Dispersion-Corrected Density Functional Tight Binding (DFTB).

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Grimme, Stefan

    2014-06-05

    The ambitious goal of organic crystal structure prediction challenges theoretical methods regarding their accuracy and efficiency. Dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) in principle is applicable, but the computational demands, for example, to compute a huge number of polymorphs, are too high. Here, we demonstrate that this task can be carried out by a dispersion-corrected density functional tight binding (DFTB) method. The semiempirical Hamiltonian with the D3 correction can accurately and efficiently model both solid- and gas-phase inter- and intramolecular interactions at a speed up of 2 orders of magnitude compared to DFT-D. The mean absolute deviations for interaction (lattice) energies for various databases are typically 2-3 kcal/mol (10-20%), that is, only about two times larger than those for DFT-D. For zero-point phonon energies, small deviations of <0.5 kcal/mol compared to DFT-D are obtained.

  7. SMARTIES: Spheroids Modelled Accurately with a Robust T-matrix Implementation for Electromagnetic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerville, W. R. C.; Auguié, B.; Le Ru, E. C.

    2016-03-01

    SMARTIES calculates the optical properties of oblate and prolate spheroidal particles, with comparable capabilities and ease-of-use as Mie theory for spheres. This suite of MATLAB codes provides a fully documented implementation of an improved T-matrix algorithm for the theoretical modelling of electromagnetic scattering by particles of spheroidal shape. Included are scripts that cover a range of scattering problems relevant to nanophotonics and plasmonics, including calculation of far-field scattering and absorption cross-sections for fixed incidence orientation, orientation-averaged cross-sections and scattering matrix, surface-field calculations as well as near-fields, wavelength-dependent near-field and far-field properties, and access to lower-level functions implementing the T-matrix calculations, including the T-matrix elements which may be calculated more accurately than with competing codes.

  8. Development of Accurate Chemical Equilibrium Models for the Hanford Waste Tanks: New Thermodynamic Measurements and Model Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Mason, Marvin; Qafoku, Odeta; Xia, Yuanxian; Wang, Zheming; MacLean, Graham

    2003-03-27

    Developing accurate thermodynamic models for predicting the chemistry of the high-level waste tanks at Hanford is an extremely daunting challenge in electrolyte and radionuclide chemistry. These challenges stem from the extremely high ionic strength of the tank waste supernatants, presence of chelating agents in selected tanks, wide temperature range in processing conditions and the presence of important actinide species in multiple oxidation states. This presentation summarizes progress made to date in developing accurate models for these tank waste solutions, how these data are being used at Hanford and the important challenges that remain. New thermodynamic measurements on Sr and actinide complexation with specific chelating agents (EDTA, HEDTA and gluconate) will also be presented.

  9. Accurate Time-Dependent Traveling-Wave Tube Model Developed for Computational Bit-Error-Rate Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.

    2001-01-01

    The phenomenal growth of the satellite communications industry has created a large demand for traveling-wave tubes (TWT's) operating with unprecedented specifications requiring the design and production of many novel devices in record time. To achieve this, the TWT industry heavily relies on computational modeling. However, the TWT industry's computational modeling capabilities need to be improved because there are often discrepancies between measured TWT data and that predicted by conventional two-dimensional helical TWT interaction codes. This limits the analysis and design of novel devices or TWT's with parameters differing from what is conventionally manufactured. In addition, the inaccuracy of current computational tools limits achievable TWT performance because optimized designs require highly accurate models. To address these concerns, a fully three-dimensional, time-dependent, helical TWT interaction model was developed using the electromagnetic particle-in-cell code MAFIA (Solution of MAxwell's equations by the Finite-Integration-Algorithm). The model includes a short section of helical slow-wave circuit with excitation fed by radiofrequency input/output couplers, and an electron beam contained by periodic permanent magnet focusing. A cutaway view of several turns of the three-dimensional helical slow-wave circuit with input/output couplers is shown. This has been shown to be more accurate than conventionally used two-dimensional models. The growth of the communications industry has also imposed a demand for increased data rates for the transmission of large volumes of data. To achieve increased data rates, complex modulation and multiple access techniques are employed requiring minimum distortion of the signal as it is passed through the TWT. Thus, intersymbol interference (ISI) becomes a major consideration, as well as suspected causes such as reflections within the TWT. To experimentally investigate effects of the physical TWT on ISI would be

  10. Oxygen-enhanced MRI accurately identifies, quantifies, and maps tumor hypoxia in preclinical cancer models

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, James PB; Boult, Jessica KR; Jamin, Yann; Babur, Muhammad; Finegan, Katherine G; Williams, Kaye J; Little, Ross A; Jackson, Alan; Parker, Geoff JM; Reynolds, Andrew R; Waterton, John C; Robinson, Simon P

    2015-01-01

    There is a clinical need for non-invasive biomarkers of tumor hypoxia for prognostic and predictive studies, radiotherapy planning and therapy monitoring. Oxygen enhanced MRI (OE-MRI) is an emerging imaging technique for quantifying the spatial distribution and extent of tumor oxygen delivery in vivo. In OE-MRI, the longitudinal relaxation rate of protons (ΔR1) changes in proportion to the concentration of molecular oxygen dissolved in plasma or interstitial tissue fluid. Therefore, well-oxygenated tissues show positive ΔR1. We hypothesized that the fraction of tumor tissue refractory to oxygen challenge (lack of positive ΔR1, termed “Oxy-R fraction”) would be a robust biomarker of hypoxia in models with varying vascular and hypoxic features. Here we demonstrate that OE-MRI signals are accurate, precise and sensitive to changes in tumor pO2 in highly vascular 786-0 renal cancer xenografts. Furthermore, we show that Oxy-R fraction can quantify the hypoxic fraction in multiple models with differing hypoxic and vascular phenotypes, when used in combination with measurements of tumor perfusion. Finally, Oxy-R fraction can detect dynamic changes in hypoxia induced by the vasomodulator agent hydralazine. In contrast, more conventional biomarkers of hypoxia (derived from blood oxygenation-level dependent MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI) did not relate to tumor hypoxia consistently. Our results show that the Oxy-R fraction accurately quantifies tumor hypoxia non-invasively and is immediately translatable to the clinic. PMID:26659574

  11. Discrete state model and accurate estimation of loop entropy of RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Lin, Ming; Chen, Rong; Wang, Wei; Liang, Jie

    2008-03-28

    Conformational entropy makes important contribution to the stability and folding of RNA molecule, but it is challenging to either measure or compute conformational entropy associated with long loops. We develop optimized discrete k-state models of RNA backbone based on known RNA structures for computing entropy of loops, which are modeled as self-avoiding walks. To estimate entropy of hairpin, bulge, internal loop, and multibranch loop of long length (up to 50), we develop an efficient sampling method based on the sequential Monte Carlo principle. Our method considers excluded volume effect. It is general and can be applied to calculating entropy of loops with longer length and arbitrary complexity. For loops of short length, our results are in good agreement with a recent theoretical model and experimental measurement. For long loops, our estimated entropy of hairpin loops is in excellent agreement with the Jacobson-Stockmayer extrapolation model. However, for bulge loops and more complex secondary structures such as internal and multibranch loops, we find that the Jacobson-Stockmayer extrapolation model has large errors. Based on estimated entropy, we have developed empirical formulae for accurate calculation of entropy of long loops in different secondary structures. Our study on the effect of asymmetric size of loops suggest that loop entropy of internal loops is largely determined by the total loop length, and is only marginally affected by the asymmetric size of the two loops. Our finding suggests that the significant asymmetric effects of loop length in internal loops measured by experiments are likely to be partially enthalpic. Our method can be applied to develop improved energy parameters important for studying RNA stability and folding, and for predicting RNA secondary and tertiary structures. The discrete model and the program used to calculate loop entropy can be downloaded at http://gila.bioengr.uic.edu/resources/RNA.html.

  12. Random generalized linear model: a highly accurate and interpretable ensemble predictor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ensemble predictors such as the random forest are known to have superior accuracy but their black-box predictions are difficult to interpret. In contrast, a generalized linear model (GLM) is very interpretable especially when forward feature selection is used to construct the model. However, forward feature selection tends to overfit the data and leads to low predictive accuracy. Therefore, it remains an important research goal to combine the advantages of ensemble predictors (high accuracy) with the advantages of forward regression modeling (interpretability). To address this goal several articles have explored GLM based ensemble predictors. Since limited evaluations suggested that these ensemble predictors were less accurate than alternative predictors, they have found little attention in the literature. Results Comprehensive evaluations involving hundreds of genomic data sets, the UCI machine learning benchmark data, and simulations are used to give GLM based ensemble predictors a new and careful look. A novel bootstrap aggregated (bagged) GLM predictor that incorporates several elements of randomness and instability (random subspace method, optional interaction terms, forward variable selection) often outperforms a host of alternative prediction methods including random forests and penalized regression models (ridge regression, elastic net, lasso). This random generalized linear model (RGLM) predictor provides variable importance measures that can be used to define a “thinned” ensemble predictor (involving few features) that retains excellent predictive accuracy. Conclusion RGLM is a state of the art predictor that shares the advantages of a random forest (excellent predictive accuracy, feature importance measures, out-of-bag estimates of accuracy) with those of a forward selected generalized linear model (interpretability). These methods are implemented in the freely available R software package randomGLM. PMID:23323760

  13. Morphometric analysis of Russian Plain's small lakes on the base of accurate digital bathymetric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumenko, Mikhail; Guzivaty, Vadim; Sapelko, Tatiana

    2016-04-01

    Lake morphometry refers to physical factors (shape, size, structure, etc) that determine the lake depression. Morphology has a great influence on lake ecological characteristics especially on water thermal conditions and mixing depth. Depth analyses, including sediment measurement at various depths, volumes of strata and shoreline characteristics are often critical to the investigation of biological, chemical and physical properties of fresh waters as well as theoretical retention time. Management techniques such as loading capacity for effluents and selective removal of undesirable components of the biota are also dependent on detailed knowledge of the morphometry and flow characteristics. During the recent years a lake bathymetric surveys were carried out by using echo sounder with a high bottom depth resolution and GPS coordinate determination. Few digital bathymetric models have been created with 10*10 m spatial grid for some small lakes of Russian Plain which the areas not exceed 1-2 sq. km. The statistical characteristics of the depth and slopes distribution of these lakes calculated on an equidistant grid. It will provide the level-surface-volume variations of small lakes and reservoirs, calculated through combination of various satellite images. We discuss the methodological aspects of creating of morphometric models of depths and slopes of small lakes as well as the advantages of digital models over traditional methods.

  14. Are Physical Education Majors Models for Fitness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamla, James; Snyder, Ben; Tanner, Lori; Wash, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    The National Association of Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) (2002) has taken a firm stance on the importance of adequate fitness levels of physical education teachers stating that they have the responsibility to model an active lifestyle and to promote fitness behaviors. Since the NASPE declaration, national initiatives like Let's Move…

  15. Development of a Fast and Accurate PCRTM Radiative Transfer Model in the Solar Spectral Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xu; Yang, Qiguang; Li, Hui; Jin, Zhonghai; Wu, Wan; Kizer, Susan; Zhou, Daniel K.; Yang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    A fast and accurate principal component-based radiative transfer model in the solar spectral region (PCRTMSOLAR) has been developed. The algorithm is capable of simulating reflected solar spectra in both clear sky and cloudy atmospheric conditions. Multiple scattering of the solar beam by the multilayer clouds and aerosols are calculated using a discrete ordinate radiative transfer scheme. The PCRTM-SOLAR model can be trained to simulate top-of-atmosphere radiance or reflectance spectra with spectral resolution ranging from 1 cm(exp -1) resolution to a few nanometers. Broadband radiances or reflectance can also be calculated if desired. The current version of the PCRTM-SOLAR covers a spectral range from 300 to 2500 nm. The model is valid for solar zenith angles ranging from 0 to 80 deg, the instrument view zenith angles ranging from 0 to 70 deg, and the relative azimuthal angles ranging from 0 to 360 deg. Depending on the number of spectral channels, the speed of the current version of PCRTM-SOLAR is a few hundred to over one thousand times faster than the medium speed correlated-k option MODTRAN5. The absolute RMS error in channel radiance is smaller than 10(exp -3) mW/cm)exp 2)/sr/cm(exp -1) and the relative error is typically less than 0.2%.

  16. Development of a fast and accurate PCRTM radiative transfer model in the solar spectral region.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Yang, Qiguang; Li, Hui; Jin, Zhonghai; Wu, Wan; Kizer, Susan; Zhou, Daniel K; Yang, Ping

    2016-10-10

    A fast and accurate principal component-based radiative transfer model in the solar spectral region (PCRTM-SOLAR) has been developed. The algorithm is capable of simulating reflected solar spectra in both clear sky and cloudy atmospheric conditions. Multiple scattering of the solar beam by the multilayer clouds and aerosols are calculated using a discrete ordinate radiative transfer scheme. The PCRTM-SOLAR model can be trained to simulate top-of-atmosphere radiance or reflectance spectra with spectral resolution ranging from 1  cm-1 resolution to a few nanometers. Broadband radiances or reflectance can also be calculated if desired. The current version of the PCRTM-SOLAR covers a spectral range from 300 to 2500 nm. The model is valid for solar zenith angles ranging from 0 to 80 deg, the instrument view zenith angles ranging from 0 to 70 deg, and the relative azimuthal angles ranging from 0 to 360 deg. Depending on the number of spectral channels, the speed of the current version of PCRTM-SOLAR is a few hundred to over one thousand times faster than the medium speed correlated-k option MODTRAN5. The absolute RMS error in channel radiance is smaller than 10-3  mW/cm2/sr/cm-1 and the relative error is typically less than 0.2%.

  17. Accurate Models of Formation Enthalpy Created using Machine Learning and Voronoi Tessellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Logan; Liu, Rosanne; Krishna, Amar; Hegde, Vinay; Agrawal, Ankit; Choudhary, Alok; Wolverton, Chris

    Several groups in the past decade have used high-throughput Density Functional Theory to predict the properties of hundreds of thousands of compounds. These databases provide the unique capability of being able to quickly query the properties of many compounds. Here, we explore how these datasets can also be used to create models that can predict the properties of compounds at rates several orders of magnitude faster than DFT. Our method relies on using Voronoi tessellations to derive attributes that quantitatively characterize the local environment around each atom, which then are used as input to a machine learning model. In this presentation, we will discuss the application of this technique to predicting the formation enthalpy of compounds using data from the Open Quantum Materials Database (OQMD). To date, we have found that this technique can be used to create models that are about twice as accurate as those created using the Coulomb Matrix and Partial Radial Distribution approaches and are equally as fast to evaluate.

  18. A murine model of neurofibromatosis type 2 that accurately phenocopies human schwannoma formation

    PubMed Central

    Gehlhausen, Jeffrey R.; Park, Su-Jung; Hickox, Ann E.; Shew, Matthew; Staser, Karl; Rhodes, Steven D.; Menon, Keshav; Lajiness, Jacquelyn D.; Mwanthi, Muithi; Yang, Xianlin; Yuan, Jin; Territo, Paul; Hutchins, Gary; Nalepa, Grzegorz; Yang, Feng-Chun; Conway, Simon J.; Heinz, Michael G.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Yates, Charles W.; Wade Clapp, D.

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder resulting from germline mutations in the NF2 gene. Bilateral vestibular schwannomas, tumors on cranial nerve VIII, are pathognomonic for NF2 disease. Furthermore, schwannomas also commonly develop in other cranial nerves, dorsal root ganglia and peripheral nerves. These tumors are a major cause of morbidity and mortality, and medical therapies to treat them are limited. Animal models that accurately recapitulate the full anatomical spectrum of human NF2-related schwannomas, including the characteristic functional deficits in hearing and balance associated with cranial nerve VIII tumors, would allow systematic evaluation of experimental therapeutics prior to clinical use. Here, we present a genetically engineered NF2 mouse model generated through excision of the Nf2 gene driven by Cre expression under control of a tissue-restricted 3.9kbPeriostin promoter element. By 10 months of age, 100% of Postn-Cre; Nf2flox/flox mice develop spinal, peripheral and cranial nerve tumors histologically identical to human schwannomas. In addition, the development of cranial nerve VIII tumors correlates with functional impairments in hearing and balance, as measured by auditory brainstem response and vestibular testing. Overall, the Postn-Cre; Nf2flox/flox tumor model provides a novel tool for future mechanistic and therapeutic studies of NF2-associated schwannomas. PMID:25113746

  19. Accurate, full chip 3D electromagnetic field model for non-Manhattan mask corners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Michael; Clifford, Chris; Oliver, Michael; Fryer, David; Tejnil, Edita; Adam, Kostas

    2015-03-01

    The physical process of mask manufacturing produces absorber geometry with significantly less than 90 degree fidelity at corners. The non-Manhattan mask geometry is an essential contributor to the aerial image and resulting patterning performance through focus. Current state of the art models for corner rounding employ "chopping" a 90 degree mask corner, replacing the corner with a small 45 degree edge. In this paper, a methodology is presented to approximate the impact of 3D EMF effects introduced by corners with rounded edges. The approach is integrated into a full chip 3D mask simulation methodology based on the Domain Decomposition Method (DDM) with edge to edge crosstalk correction.

  20. Accurate state estimation from uncertain data and models: an application of data assimilation to mathematical models of human brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Data assimilation refers to methods for updating the state vector (initial condition) of a complex spatiotemporal model (such as a numerical weather model) by combining new observations with one or more prior forecasts. We consider the potential feasibility of this approach for making short-term (60-day) forecasts of the growth and spread of a malignant brain cancer (glioblastoma multiforme) in individual patient cases, where the observations are synthetic magnetic resonance images of a hypothetical tumor. Results We apply a modern state estimation algorithm (the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter), previously developed for numerical weather prediction, to two different mathematical models of glioblastoma, taking into account likely errors in model parameters and measurement uncertainties in magnetic resonance imaging. The filter can accurately shadow the growth of a representative synthetic tumor for 360 days (six 60-day forecast/update cycles) in the presence of a moderate degree of systematic model error and measurement noise. Conclusions The mathematical methodology described here may prove useful for other modeling efforts in biology and oncology. An accurate forecast system for glioblastoma may prove useful in clinical settings for treatment planning and patient counseling. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Anthony Almudevar, Tomas Radivoyevitch, and Kristin Swanson (nominated by Georg Luebeck). PMID:22185645

  1. Fast and Accurate Radiative Transfer Calculations Using Principal Component Analysis for (Exo-)Planetary Retrieval Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopparla, P.; Natraj, V.; Shia, R. L.; Spurr, R. J. D.; Crisp, D.; Yung, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    Radiative transfer (RT) computations form the engine of atmospheric retrieval codes. However, full treatment of RT processes is computationally expensive, prompting usage of two-stream approximations in current exoplanetary atmospheric retrieval codes [Line et al., 2013]. Natraj et al. [2005, 2010] and Spurr and Natraj [2013] demonstrated the ability of a technique using principal component analysis (PCA) to speed up RT computations. In the PCA method for RT performance enhancement, empirical orthogonal functions are developed for binned sets of inherent optical properties that possess some redundancy; costly multiple-scattering RT calculations are only done for those few optical states corresponding to the most important principal components, and correction factors are applied to approximate radiation fields. Kopparla et al. [2015, in preparation] extended the PCA method to a broadband spectral region from the ultraviolet to the shortwave infrared (0.3-3 micron), accounting for major gas absorptions in this region. Here, we apply the PCA method to a some typical (exo-)planetary retrieval problems. Comparisons between the new model, called Universal Principal Component Analysis Radiative Transfer (UPCART) model, two-stream models and line-by-line RT models are performed, for spectral radiances, spectral fluxes and broadband fluxes. Each of these are calculated at the top of the atmosphere for several scenarios with varying aerosol types, extinction and scattering optical depth profiles, and stellar and viewing geometries. We demonstrate that very accurate radiance and flux estimates can be obtained, with better than 1% accuracy in all spectral regions and better than 0.1% in most cases, as compared to a numerically exact line-by-line RT model. The accuracy is enhanced when the results are convolved to typical instrument resolutions. The operational speed and accuracy of UPCART can be further improved by optimizing binning schemes and parallelizing the codes, work

  2. Bridging physics and biology teaching through modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskinson, Anne-Marie; Couch, Brian A.; Zwickl, Benjamin M.; Hinko, Kathleen A.; Caballero, Marcos D.

    2014-05-01

    As the frontiers of biology become increasingly interdisciplinary, the physics education community has engaged in ongoing efforts to make physics classes more relevant to life science majors. These efforts are complicated by the many apparent differences between these fields, including the types of systems that each studies, the behavior of those systems, the kinds of measurements that each makes, and the role of mathematics in each field. Nonetheless, physics and biology are both sciences that rely on observations and measurements to construct models of the natural world. In this article, we propose that efforts to bridge the teaching of these two disciplines must emphasize shared scientific practices, particularly scientific modeling. We define modeling using language common to both disciplines and highlight how an understanding of the modeling process can help reconcile apparent differences between the teaching of physics and biology. We elaborate on how models can be used for explanatory, predictive, and functional purposes and present common models from each discipline demonstrating key modeling principles. By framing interdisciplinary teaching in the context of modeling, we aim to bridge physics and biology teaching and to equip students with modeling competencies applicable in any scientific discipline.

  3. Modeling Physics with Easy Java Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christian, Wolfgang; Esquembre, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    Modeling has been shown to correct weaknesses of traditional instruction by engaging students in the design of physical models to describe, explain, and predict phenomena. Although the modeling method can be used without computers, the use of computers allows students to study problems that are difficult and time consuming, to visualize their…

  4. The trinucleons: Physical observables and model properties

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, B.F.

    1992-01-01

    Our progress in understanding the properties of {sup 3}H and {sup 3}He in terms of a nonrelativistic Hamiltonian picture employing realistic nuclear forces is reviewed. Trinucleon model properties are summarized for a number of contemporary force models, and predictions for physical observables are presented. Disagreement between theoretical model results and experimental results are highlighted.

  5. The trinucleons: Physical observables and model properties

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, B.F.

    1992-05-01

    Our progress in understanding the properties of {sup 3}H and {sup 3}He in terms of a nonrelativistic Hamiltonian picture employing realistic nuclear forces is reviewed. Trinucleon model properties are summarized for a number of contemporary force models, and predictions for physical observables are presented. Disagreement between theoretical model results and experimental results are highlighted.

  6. A Physical Model for Estimating Body Fat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-11-01

    U.&. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Natimnl Technical InWsrmatlg. Su,~ic AD-A034 111 A PHYSICAL MODEL FOR ESTIMATING BODY FAT SCHOOL OF AEROSPACE MEDICINE...PERIOD COVEREO A PHYSICAL MODEL FOR ESTIMATING BODY FAT Interim May 1972-May 1976 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) -. CONTRACT OR...human subjects. The fat mass of seven body compartments is estimated and summed to obtain an esti- mate of the total body fat . Measurements were made

  7. Kinase-kernel models: accurate in silico screening of 4 million compounds across the entire human kinome.

    PubMed

    Martin, Eric; Mukherjee, Prasenjit

    2012-01-23

    Reliable in silico prediction methods promise many advantages over experimental high-throughput screening (HTS): vastly lower time and cost, affinity magnitude estimates, no requirement for a physical sample, and a knowledge-driven exploration of chemical space. For the specific case of kinases, given several hundred experimental IC(50) training measurements, the empirically parametrized profile-quantitative structure-activity relationship (profile-QSAR) and surrogate AutoShim methods developed at Novartis can predict IC(50) with a reliability approaching experimental HTS. However, in the absence of training data, prediction is much harder. The most common a priori prediction method is docking, which suffers from many limitations: It requires a protein structure, is slow, and cannot predict affinity. (1) Highly accurate profile-QSAR (2) models have now been built for roughly 100 kinases covering most of the kinome. Analyzing correlations among neighboring kinases shows that near neighbors share a high degree of SAR similarity. The novel chemogenomic kinase-kernel method reported here predicts activity for new kinases as a weighted average of predicted activities from profile-QSAR models for nearby neighbor kinases. Three different factors for weighting the neighbors were evaluated: binding site sequence identity to the kinase neighbors, similarity of the training set for each neighbor model to the compound being predicted, and accuracy of each neighbor model. Binding site sequence identity was by far most important, followed by chemical similarity. Model quality had almost no relevance. The median R(2) = 0.55 for kinase-kernel interpolations on 25% of the data of each set held out from method optimization for 51 kinase assays, approached the accuracy of median R(2) = 0.61 for the trained profile-QSAR predictions on the same held out 25% data of each set, far faster and far more accurate than docking. Validation on the full data sets from 18 additional kinase assays

  8. Eclipsing Binaries as Astrophysical Laboratories: CM Draconis - Accurate Absolute Physical Properties of Low Mass Stars and an Independent Estimate of the Primordial Helium Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCook, G. P.; Guinan, E. F.; Saumon, D.; Kang, Y. W.

    1997-05-01

    CM Draconis (Gl 630.1; Vmax = +12.93) is an important eclipsing binary consisting of two dM4.5e stars with an orbital period of 1.2684 days. This binary is a high velocity star (s= 164 km/s) and the brighter member of a common proper motion pair with a cool faint white dwarf companion (LP 101-16). CM Dra and its white dwarf companion were once considered by Zwicky to belong to a class of "pygmy stars", but they turned out to be ordinary old, cool white dwarfs or faint red dwarfs. Lacy (ApJ 218,444L) determined the first orbital and physical properties of CM Dra from the analysis of his light and radial velocity curves. In addition to providing directly measured masses, radii, and luminosities for low mass stars, CM Dra was also recognized by Lacy and later by Paczynski and Sienkiewicz (ApJ 286,332) as an important laboratory for cosmology, as a possible old Pop II object where it may be possible to determine the primordial helium abundance. Recently, Metcalfe et al.(ApJ 456,356) obtained accurate RV measures for CM Dra and recomputed refined elements along with its helium abundance. Starting in 1995, we have been carrying out intensive RI photoelectric photometry of CM Dra to obtain well defined, accurate light curves so that its fundamental properties can be improved, and at the same time, to search for evidence of planets around the binary from planetary transit eclipses. During 1996 and 1997 well defined light curves were secured and these were combined with the RV measures of Metcalfe et al. (1996) to determine the orbital and physical parameters of the system, including a refined orbital period. A recent version of the Wilson-Devinney program was used to analyze the data. New radii, masses, mean densities, Teff, and luminosities were found as well as a re-determination of the helium abundance (Y). The results of the recent analyses of the light and RV curves will be presented and modelling results discussed. This research is supported by NSF grants AST-9315365

  9. The Standard Model of Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detmold, William

    2015-04-01

    At its core, nuclear physics, which describes the properties and interactions of hadrons, such as protons and neutrons, and atomic nuclei, arises from the Standard Model of particle physics. However, the complexities of nuclei result in severe computational difficulties that have historically prevented the calculation of central quantities in nuclear physics directly from this underlying theory. The availability of petascale (and prospect of exascale) high performance computing is changing this situation by enabling us to extend the numerical techniques of lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (LQCD), applied successfully in particle physics, to the more intricate dynamics of nuclear physics. In this talk, I will discuss this revolution and the emerging understanding of hadrons and nuclei within the Standard Model.

  10. Developing + Using Models in Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Todd; Neilson, Drew; Oh, Phil Seok

    2013-01-01

    Of the eight practices of science identified in "A Framework for K-12 Science Education" (NRC 2012), helping students develop and use models has been identified by many as an anchor (Schwarz and Passmore 2012; Windschitl 2012). In instruction, disciplinary core ideas, crosscutting concepts, and scientific practices can be meaningfully…

  11. Physics of the Quark Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Robert D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the charge independence, wavefunctions, magnetic moments, and high-energy scattering of hadrons on the basis of group theory and nonrelativistic quark model with mass spectrum calculated by first-order perturbation theory. The presentation is explainable to advanced undergraduate students. (CC)

  12. New possibilities of accurate particle characterisation by applying direct boundary models to analytical centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Walter, Johannes; Thajudeen, Thaseem; Süss, Sebastian; Segets, Doris; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2015-04-21

    Analytical centrifugation (AC) is a powerful technique for the characterisation of nanoparticles in colloidal systems. As a direct and absolute technique it requires no calibration or measurements of standards. Moreover, it offers simple experimental design and handling, high sample throughput as well as moderate investment costs. However, the full potential of AC for nanoparticle size analysis requires the development of powerful data analysis techniques. In this study we show how the application of direct boundary models to AC data opens up new possibilities in particle characterisation. An accurate analysis method, successfully applied to sedimentation data obtained by analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) in the past, was used for the first time in analysing AC data. Unlike traditional data evaluation routines for AC using a designated number of radial positions or scans, direct boundary models consider the complete sedimentation boundary, which results in significantly better statistics. We demonstrate that meniscus fitting, as well as the correction of radius and time invariant noise significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratio and prevents the occurrence of false positives due to optical artefacts. Moreover, hydrodynamic non-ideality can be assessed by the residuals obtained from the analysis. The sedimentation coefficient distributions obtained by AC are in excellent agreement with the results from AUC. Brownian dynamics simulations were used to generate numerical sedimentation data to study the influence of diffusion on the obtained distributions. Our approach is further validated using polystyrene and silica nanoparticles. In particular, we demonstrate the strength of AC for analysing multimodal distributions by means of gold nanoparticles.

  13. Accurate modeling of cache replacement policies in a Data-Grid.

    SciTech Connect

    Otoo, Ekow J.; Shoshani, Arie

    2003-01-23

    Caching techniques have been used to improve the performance gap of storage hierarchies in computing systems. In data intensive applications that access large data files over wide area network environment, such as a data grid,caching mechanism can significantly improve the data access performance under appropriate workloads. In a data grid, it is envisioned that local disk storage resources retain or cache the data files being used by local application. Under a workload of shared access and high locality of reference, the performance of the caching techniques depends heavily on the replacement policies being used. A replacement policy effectively determines which set of objects must be evicted when space is needed. Unlike cache replacement policies in virtual memory paging or database buffering, developing an optimal replacement policy for data grids is complicated by the fact that the file objects being cached have varying sizes and varying transfer and processing costs that vary with time. We present an accurate model for evaluating various replacement policies and propose a new replacement algorithm referred to as ''Least Cost Beneficial based on K backward references (LCB-K).'' Using this modeling technique, we compare LCB-K with various replacement policies such as Least Frequently Used (LFU), Least Recently Used (LRU), Greedy DualSize (GDS), etc., using synthetic and actual workload of accesses to and from tertiary storage systems. The results obtained show that (LCB-K) and (GDS) are the most cost effective cache replacement policies for storage resource management in data grids.

  14. An accurate numerical solution to the Saint-Venant-Hirano model for mixed-sediment morphodynamics in rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stecca, Guglielmo; Siviglia, Annunziato; Blom, Astrid

    2016-07-01

    We present an accurate numerical approximation to the Saint-Venant-Hirano model for mixed-sediment morphodynamics in one space dimension. Our solution procedure originates from the fully-unsteady matrix-vector formulation developed in [54]. The principal part of the problem is solved by an explicit Finite Volume upwind method of the path-conservative type, by which all the variables are updated simultaneously in a coupled fashion. The solution to the principal part is embedded into a splitting procedure for the treatment of frictional source terms. The numerical scheme is extended to second-order accuracy and includes a bookkeeping procedure for handling the evolution of size stratification in the substrate. We develop a concept of balancedness for the vertical mass flux between the substrate and active layer under bed degradation, which prevents the occurrence of non-physical oscillations in the grainsize distribution of the substrate. We suitably modify the numerical scheme to respect this principle. We finally verify the accuracy in our solution to the equations, and its ability to reproduce one-dimensional morphodynamics due to streamwise and vertical sorting, using three test cases. In detail, (i) we empirically assess the balancedness of vertical mass fluxes under degradation; (ii) we study the convergence to the analytical linearised solution for the propagation of infinitesimal-amplitude waves [54], which is here employed for the first time to assess a mixed-sediment model; (iii) we reproduce Ribberink's E8-E9 flume experiment [46].

  15. Accurate prediction of the refractive index of polymers using first principles and data modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Mohammad Atif Faiz; Cheng, Chong; Hachmann, Johannes

    Organic polymers with a high refractive index (RI) have recently attracted considerable interest due to their potential application in optical and optoelectronic devices. The ability to tailor the molecular structure of polymers is the key to increasing the accessible RI values. Our work concerns the creation of predictive in silico models for the optical properties of organic polymers, the screening of large-scale candidate libraries, and the mining of the resulting data to extract the underlying design principles that govern their performance. This work was set up to guide our experimentalist partners and allow them to target the most promising candidates. Our model is based on the Lorentz-Lorenz equation and thus includes the polarizability and number density values for each candidate. For the former, we performed a detailed benchmark study of different density functionals, basis sets, and the extrapolation scheme towards the polymer limit. For the number density we devised an exceedingly efficient machine learning approach to correlate the polymer structure and the packing fraction in the bulk material. We validated the proposed RI model against the experimentally known RI values of 112 polymers. We could show that the proposed combination of physical and data modeling is both successful and highly economical to characterize a wide range of organic polymers, which is a prerequisite for virtual high-throughput screening.

  16. Accurate numerical forward model for optimal retracking of SIRAL2 SAR echoes over open ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phalippou, L.; Demeestere, F.

    2011-12-01

    The SAR mode of SIRAL-2 on board Cryosat-2 has been designed to measure primarily sea-ice and continental ice (Wingham et al. 2005). In 2005, K. Raney (KR, 2005) pointed out the improvements brought by SAR altimeter for open ocean. KR results were mostly based on 'rule of thumb' considerations on speckle noise reduction due to the higher PRF and to speckle decorrelation after SAR processing. In 2007, Phalippou and Enjolras (PE,2007) provided the theoretical background for optimal retracking of SAR echoes over ocean with a focus on the forward modelling of the power-waveforms. The accuracies of geophysical parameters (range, significant wave heights, and backscattering coefficient) retrieved from SAR altimeter data were derived accounting for SAR echo shape and speckle noise accurate modelling. The step forward to optimal retracking using numerical forward model (NFM) was also pointed out. NFM of the power waveform avoids analytical approximation, a warranty to minimise the geophysical dependent biases in the retrieval. NFM have been used for many years, in operational meteorology in particular, for retrieving temperature and humidity profiles from IR and microwave radiometers as the radiative transfer function is complex (Eyre, 1989). So far this technique was not used in the field of ocean conventional altimetry as analytical models (e.g. Brown's model for instance) were found to give sufficient accuracy. However, although NFM seems desirable even for conventional nadir altimetry, it becomes inevitable if one wish to process SAR altimeter data as the transfer function is too complex to be approximated by a simple analytical function. This was clearly demonstrated in PE 2007. The paper describes the background to SAR data retracking over open ocean. Since PE 2007 improvements have been brought to the forward model and it is shown that the altimeter on-ground and in flight characterisation (e.g antenna pattern range impulse response, azimuth impulse response

  17. Accurate De Novo Prediction of Protein Contact Map by Ultra-Deep Learning Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Zhang, Renyu

    2017-01-01

    Motivation Protein contacts contain key information for the understanding of protein structure and function and thus, contact prediction from sequence is an important problem. Recently exciting progress has been made on this problem, but the predicted contacts for proteins without many sequence homologs is still of low quality and not very useful for de novo structure prediction. Method This paper presents a new deep learning method that predicts contacts by integrating both evolutionary coupling (EC) and sequence conservation information through an ultra-deep neural network formed by two deep residual neural networks. The first residual network conducts a series of 1-dimensional convolutional transformation of sequential features; the second residual network conducts a series of 2-dimensional convolutional transformation of pairwise information including output of the first residual network, EC information and pairwise potential. By using very deep residual networks, we can accurately model contact occurrence patterns and complex sequence-structure relationship and thus, obtain higher-quality contact prediction regardless of how many sequence homologs are available for proteins in question. Results Our method greatly outperforms existing methods and leads to much more accurate contact-assisted folding. Tested on 105 CASP11 targets, 76 past CAMEO hard targets, and 398 membrane proteins, the average top L long-range prediction accuracy obtained by our method, one representative EC method CCMpred and the CASP11 winner MetaPSICOV is 0.47, 0.21 and 0.30, respectively; the average top L/10 long-range accuracy of our method, CCMpred and MetaPSICOV is 0.77, 0.47 and 0.59, respectively. Ab initio folding using our predicted contacts as restraints but without any force fields can yield correct folds (i.e., TMscore>0.6) for 203 of the 579 test proteins, while that using MetaPSICOV- and CCMpred-predicted contacts can do so for only 79 and 62 of them, respectively. Our contact

  18. PHYSICAL MODELING OF CONTRACTED FLOW.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Jonathan K.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments on steady flow over uniform grass roughness through centered single-opening contractions were conducted in the Flood Plain Simulation Facility at the U. S. Geological Survey's Gulf Coast Hydroscience Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. The experimental series was designed to provide data for calibrating and verifying two-dimensional, vertically averaged surface-water flow models used to simulate flow through openings in highway embankments across inundated flood plains. Water-surface elevations, point velocities, and vertical velocity profiles were obtained at selected locations for design discharges ranging from 50 to 210 cfs. Examples of observed water-surface elevations and velocity magnitudes at basin cross-sections are presented.

  19. SPARC: Mass Models for 175 Disk Galaxies with Spitzer Photometry and Accurate Rotation Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelli, Federico; McGaugh, Stacy S.; Schombert, James M.

    2016-12-01

    We introduce SPARC (Spitzer Photometry and Accurate Rotation Curves): a sample of 175 nearby galaxies with new surface photometry at 3.6 μm and high-quality rotation curves from previous H i/Hα studies. SPARC spans a broad range of morphologies (S0 to Irr), luminosities (∼5 dex), and surface brightnesses (∼4 dex). We derive [3.6] surface photometry and study structural relations of stellar and gas disks. We find that both the stellar mass–H i mass relation and the stellar radius–H i radius relation have significant intrinsic scatter, while the H i mass–radius relation is extremely tight. We build detailed mass models and quantify the ratio of baryonic to observed velocity (V bar/V obs) for different characteristic radii and values of the stellar mass-to-light ratio (ϒ⋆) at [3.6]. Assuming ϒ⋆ ≃ 0.5 M ⊙/L ⊙ (as suggested by stellar population models), we find that (i) the gas fraction linearly correlates with total luminosity (ii) the transition from star-dominated to gas-dominated galaxies roughly corresponds to the transition from spiral galaxies to dwarf irregulars, in line with density wave theory; and (iii) V bar/V obs varies with luminosity and surface brightness: high-mass, high-surface-brightness galaxies are nearly maximal, while low-mass, low-surface-brightness galaxies are submaximal. These basic properties are lost for low values of ϒ⋆ ≃ 0.2 M ⊙/L ⊙ as suggested by the DiskMass survey. The mean maximum-disk limit in bright galaxies is ϒ⋆ ≃ 0.7 M ⊙/L ⊙ at [3.6]. The SPARC data are publicly available and represent an ideal test bed for models of galaxy formation.

  20. Modeling of Non-Gravitational Forces for Precise and Accurate Orbit Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackel, Stefan; Gisinger, Christoph; Steigenberger, Peter; Balss, Ulrich; Montenbruck, Oliver; Eineder, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Remote sensing satellites support a broad range of scientific and commercial applications. The two radar imaging satellites TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X provide spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and interferometric SAR data with a very high accuracy. The precise reconstruction of the satellite's trajectory is based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements from a geodetic-grade dual-frequency Integrated Geodetic and Occultation Receiver (IGOR) onboard the spacecraft. The increasing demand for precise radar products relies on validation methods, which require precise and accurate orbit products. An analysis of the orbit quality by means of internal and external validation methods on long and short timescales shows systematics, which reflect deficits in the employed force models. Following the proper analysis of this deficits, possible solution strategies are highlighted in the presentation. The employed Reduced Dynamic Orbit Determination (RDOD) approach utilizes models for gravitational and non-gravitational forces. A detailed satellite macro model is introduced to describe the geometry and the optical surface properties of the satellite. Two major non-gravitational forces are the direct and the indirect Solar Radiation Pressure (SRP). The satellite TerraSAR-X flies on a dusk-dawn orbit with an altitude of approximately 510 km above ground. Due to this constellation, the Sun almost constantly illuminates the satellite, which causes strong across-track accelerations on the plane rectangular to the solar rays. The indirect effect of the solar radiation is called Earth Radiation Pressure (ERP). This force depends on the sunlight, which is reflected by the illuminated Earth surface (visible spectra) and the emission of the Earth body in the infrared spectra. Both components of ERP require Earth models to describe the optical properties of the Earth surface. Therefore, the influence of different Earth models on the orbit quality is assessed. The scope of

  1. Coarse-grained, foldable, physical model of the polypeptide chain

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Promita; Zuckermann, Ronald N.

    2013-01-01

    Although nonflexible, scaled molecular models like Pauling–Corey’s and its descendants have made significant contributions in structural biology research and pedagogy, recent technical advances in 3D printing and electronics make it possible to go one step further in designing physical models of biomacromolecules: to make them conformationally dynamic. We report here the design, construction, and validation of a flexible, scaled, physical model of the polypeptide chain, which accurately reproduces the bond rotational degrees of freedom in the peptide backbone. The coarse-grained backbone model consists of repeating amide and α-carbon units, connected by mechanical bonds (corresponding to φ and ψ) that include realistic barriers to rotation that closely approximate those found at the molecular scale. Longer-range hydrogen-bonding interactions are also incorporated, allowing the chain to readily fold into stable secondary structures. The model is easily constructed with readily obtainable parts and promises to be a tremendous educational aid to the intuitive understanding of chain folding as the basis for macromolecular structure. Furthermore, this physical model can serve as the basis for linking tangible biomacromolecular models directly to the vast array of existing computational tools to provide an enhanced and interactive human–computer interface. PMID:23898168

  2. Modelling Mathematical Reasoning in Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhden, Olaf; Karam, Ricardo; Pietrocola, Maurício; Pospiech, Gesche

    2012-04-01

    Many findings from research as well as reports from teachers describe students' problem solving strategies as manipulation of formulas by rote. The resulting dissatisfaction with quantitative physical textbook problems seems to influence the attitude towards the role of mathematics in physics education in general. Mathematics is often seen as a tool for calculation which hinders a conceptual understanding of physical principles. However, the role of mathematics cannot be reduced to this technical aspect. Hence, instead of putting mathematics away we delve into the nature of physical science to reveal the strong conceptual relationship between mathematics and physics. Moreover, we suggest that, for both prospective teaching and further research, a focus on deeply exploring such interdependency can significantly improve the understanding of physics. To provide a suitable basis, we develop a new model which can be used for analysing different levels of mathematical reasoning within physics. It is also a guideline for shifting the attention from technical to structural mathematical skills while teaching physics. We demonstrate its applicability for analysing physical-mathematical reasoning processes with an example.

  3. Do modelled or satellite-based estimates of surface solar irradiance accurately describe its temporal variability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengulescu, Marc; Blanc, Philippe; Boilley, Alexandre; Wald, Lucien

    2017-02-01

    This study investigates the characteristic time-scales of variability found in long-term time-series of daily means of estimates of surface solar irradiance (SSI). The study is performed at various levels to better understand the causes of variability in the SSI. First, the variability of the solar irradiance at the top of the atmosphere is scrutinized. Then, estimates of the SSI in cloud-free conditions as provided by the McClear model are dealt with, in order to reveal the influence of the clear atmosphere (aerosols, water vapour, etc.). Lastly, the role of clouds on variability is inferred by the analysis of in-situ measurements. A description of how the atmosphere affects SSI variability is thus obtained on a time-scale basis. The analysis is also performed with estimates of the SSI provided by the satellite-derived HelioClim-3 database and by two numerical weather re-analyses: ERA-Interim and MERRA2. It is found that HelioClim-3 estimates render an accurate picture of the variability found in ground measurements, not only globally, but also with respect to individual characteristic time-scales. On the contrary, the variability found in re-analyses correlates poorly with all scales of ground measurements variability.

  4. Accurate two-dimensional model of an arrayed-waveguide grating demultiplexer and optimal design based on the reciprocity theory.

    PubMed

    Dai, Daoxin; He, Sailing

    2004-12-01

    An accurate two-dimensional (2D) model is introduced for the simulation of an arrayed-waveguide grating (AWG) demultiplexer by integrating the field distribution along the vertical direction. The equivalent 2D model has almost the same accuracy as the original three-dimensional model and is more accurate for the AWG considered here than the conventional 2D model based on the effective-index method. To further improve the computational efficiency, the reciprocity theory is applied to the optimal design of a flat-top AWG demultiplexer with a special input structure.

  5. Accurate, full-chip, three-dimensional electromagnetic field model for non-Manhattan mask corners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Michael C.; Clifford, Chris; Oliver, Mike; Fryer, David; Tejnil, Edita; Adam, Kostas

    2016-04-01

    The physical process of mask manufacturing produces absorber geometry with significant deviations from the 90-deg corners, which are typically assumed in the mask design. The non-Manhattan mask geometry is an essential contributor to the aerial image and resulting patterning performance through focus. Current state-of-the-art models for corner rounding employ "chopping" a 90-deg mask corner, replacing the corner with a small 45-deg edge. A methodology is presented to approximate the impact of three-dimensional (3-D) EMF effects introduced by corners with rounded edges. The approach is integrated into a full-chip 3-D mask simulation methodology based on the domain decomposition method with edge to edge crosstalk correction.

  6. Physical Modelling of Sedimentary Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Yuen, David A.

    2003-04-24

    The main goals of the first three years have been achieved, i.e., the development of particle-based and continuum-based algorithms for cross-scaleup-scale analysis of complex fluid flows. The U. Minnesota team has focused on particle-based methods, wavelets (Rustad et al., 2001) and visualization and has had great success with the dissipative and fluid particle dynamics algorithms, as applied to colloidal, polymeric and biological systems, wavelet filtering and visualization endeavors. We have organized two sessions in nonlinear geophysics at the A.G.U. Fall Meeting (2000,2002), which have indeed synergetically stimulated the community and promoted cross-disciplinary efforts in the geosciences. The LANL team has succeeded with continuum-based algorithms, in particular, fractal interpolating functions (fif). These have been applied to 1-D flow and transport equations (Travis, 2000; 2002) as a proof of principle, providing solutions that capture dynamics at all scales. In addition, the fif representations can be integrated to provide sub-grid-scale homogenization, which can be used in more traditional finite difference or finite element solutions of porous flow and transport. Another useful tool for fluid flow problems is the ability to solve inverse problems, that is, given present-time observations of a fluid flow, what was the initial state of that fluid system? We have demonstrated this capability for a large-scale problem of 3-D flow in the Earth's crust (Bunge, Hagelberg & Travis, 2002). Use of the adjoint method for sensitivity analysis (Marchuk, 1995) to compute derivatives of models makes the large-scale inversion feasible in 4-D, , space and time. Further, a framework for simulating complex fluid flow in the Earth's crust has been implemented (Dutrow et al, 2001). The remaining task of the first three-year campaign is to extend the implementation of the fif formalism to our 2-D and 3-D computer codes, which is straightforward, but involved.

  7. Toward accurate tooth segmentation from computed tomography images using a hybrid level set model

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Yangzhou; Zhao, Qunfei; Xia, Zeyang E-mail: jing.xiong@siat.ac.cn; Hu, Ying; Xiong, Jing E-mail: jing.xiong@siat.ac.cn; Zhang, Jianwei

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: A three-dimensional (3D) model of the teeth provides important information for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. Tooth segmentation is an essential step in generating the 3D digital model from computed tomography (CT) images. The aim of this study is to develop an accurate and efficient tooth segmentation method from CT images. Methods: The 3D dental CT volumetric images are segmented slice by slice in a two-dimensional (2D) transverse plane. The 2D segmentation is composed of a manual initialization step and an automatic slice by slice segmentation step. In the manual initialization step, the user manually picks a starting slice and selects a seed point for each tooth in this slice. In the automatic slice segmentation step, a developed hybrid level set model is applied to segment tooth contours from each slice. Tooth contour propagation strategy is employed to initialize the level set function automatically. Cone beam CT (CBCT) images of two subjects were used to tune the parameters. Images of 16 additional subjects were used to validate the performance of the method. Volume overlap metrics and surface distance metrics were adopted to assess the segmentation accuracy quantitatively. The volume overlap metrics were volume difference (VD, mm{sup 3}) and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC, %). The surface distance metrics were average symmetric surface distance (ASSD, mm), RMS (root mean square) symmetric surface distance (RMSSSD, mm), and maximum symmetric surface distance (MSSD, mm). Computation time was recorded to assess the efficiency. The performance of the proposed method has been compared with two state-of-the-art methods. Results: For the tested CBCT images, the VD, DSC, ASSD, RMSSSD, and MSSD for the incisor were 38.16 ± 12.94 mm{sup 3}, 88.82 ± 2.14%, 0.29 ± 0.03 mm, 0.32 ± 0.08 mm, and 1.25 ± 0.58 mm, respectively; the VD, DSC, ASSD, RMSSSD, and MSSD for the canine were 49.12 ± 9.33 mm{sup 3}, 91.57 ± 0.82%, 0.27 ± 0.02 mm, 0

  8. Three dimensional printing as an effective method of producing anatomically accurate models for studies in thermal ecology.

    PubMed

    Watson, Charles M; Francis, Gamal R

    2015-07-01

    Hollow copper models painted to match the reflectance of the animal subject are standard in thermal ecology research. While the copper electroplating process results in accurate models, it is relatively time consuming, uses caustic chemicals, and the models are often anatomically imprecise. Although the decreasing cost of 3D printing can potentially allow the reproduction of highly accurate models, the thermal performance of 3D printed models has not been evaluated. We compared the cost, accuracy, and performance of both copper and 3D printed lizard models and found that the performance of the models were statistically identical in both open and closed habitats. We also find that 3D models are more standard, lighter, durable, and inexpensive, than the copper electroformed models.

  9. Accurate early-time and late-time modeling of countercurrent spontaneous imbibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, Rafael; Doster, Florian; Geiger, Sebastian

    2016-08-01

    Spontaneous countercurrent imbibition into a finite porous medium is an important physical mechanism for many applications, included but not limited to irrigation, CO2 storage, and oil recovery. Symmetry considerations that are often valid in fractured porous media allow us to study the process in a one-dimensional domain. In 1-D, for incompressible fluids and homogeneous rocks, the onset of imbibition can be captured by self-similar solutions and the imbibed volume scales with √t. At later times, the imbibition rate decreases and the finite size of the medium has to be taken into account. This requires numerical solutions. Here we present a new approach to approximate the whole imbibition process semianalytically. The onset is captured by a semianalytical solution. We also provide an a priori estimate of the time until which the imbibed volume scales with √t. This time is significantly longer than the time it takes until the imbibition front reaches the model boundary. The remainder of the imbibition process is obtained from a self-similarity solution. We test our approach against numerical solutions that employ parametrizations relevant for oil recovery and CO2 sequestration. We show that this concept improves common first-order approaches that heavily underestimate early-time behavior and note that it can be readily included into dual-porosity models.

  10. Visualization of cardiac dynamics using physics-based deformable model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-te; Robb, Richard A.

    2000-04-01

    Modeling of moving anatomic structures is complicated by the complexity of motion intrinsic and extrinsic to the structures. However when motion is cyclical, such as in heart, effective dynamic modeling can be approached using modern fast imaging techniques, which provide 3D structural data. Data may be acquired as a sequence of 3D volume images throughout the cardiac cycle. To model the intricate non- linear motion of the heart, we created a physics-based surface model which can realistically deform between successive time points in the cardiac cycle, yielding a dynamic 4D model of cardiac motion. Sequences of fifteen 3D volume images of intact canine beating hearts were acquired during compete cardiac cycles using the Dynamic Spatial Reconstructor and the Electron Beam CT. The chambers of the heart were segmented at successive time points, typically at 1/15-second intervals. The left ventricle of the first item point was reconstructed as an initial triangular mesh. A mass-spring physics-based deformable model, which can expand and shrink with local contraction and stretching forces distributed in an anatomically accurate simulation of cardiac motion, was applied to the initial mesh and allowed the initial mesh to deform to fit the left ventricle in successive time increments of the sequence. The resultant 4D model can be interactively transformed and displayed with associated regional electrical activity mapped onto the anatomic surfaces, producing a 5D mode, which faithfully exhibits regional cardiac contraction and relaxation patterns over the entire heart. For acquisition systems that may provide only limited 4D data, the model can provide interpolated anatomic shape between time points. This physics-based deformable model accurately represents dynamic cardiac structural changes throughout the cardiac cycle. Such models provides the framework for minimizing the number of time points required to usefully depict regional motion of myocardium and allowing

  11. Composing Models of Geographic Physical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, Barbara; Frank, Andrew U.

    Processes are central for geographic information science; yet geographic information systems (GIS) lack capabilities to represent process related information. A prerequisite to including processes in GIS software is a general method to describe geographic processes independently of application disciplines. This paper presents such a method, namely a process description language. The vocabulary of the process description language is derived formally from mathematical models. Physical processes in geography can be described in two equivalent languages: partial differential equations or partial difference equations, where the latter can be shown graphically and used as a method for application specialists to enter their process models. The vocabulary of the process description language comprises components for describing the general behavior of prototypical geographic physical processes. These process components can be composed by basic models of geographic physical processes, which is shown by means of an example.

  12. Simplified models for LHC new physics searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Daniele; Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Arora, Sanjay; Bai, Yang; Baumgart, Matthew; Berger, Joshua; Buckley, Matthew; Butler, Bart; Chang, Spencer; Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Cheung, Clifford; Sekhar Chivukula, R.; Cho, Won Sang; Cotta, Randy; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; El Hedri, Sonia; Essig (Editor, Rouven; Evans, Jared A.; Fitzpatrick, Liam; Fox, Patrick; Franceschini, Roberto; Freitas, Ayres; Gainer, James S.; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Gregoire, Thomas; Gripaios, Ben; Gunion, Jack; Han, Tao; Haas, Andy; Hansson, Per; Hewett, JoAnne; Hits, Dmitry; Hubisz, Jay; Izaguirre, Eder; Kaplan, Jared; Katz, Emanuel; Kilic, Can; Kim, Hyung-Do; Kitano, Ryuichiro; Koay, Sue Ann; Ko, Pyungwon; Krohn, David; Kuflik, Eric; Lewis, Ian; Lisanti (Editor, Mariangela; Liu, Tao; Liu, Zhen; Lu, Ran; Luty, Markus; Meade, Patrick; Morrissey, David; Mrenna, Stephen; Nojiri, Mihoko; Okui, Takemichi; Padhi, Sanjay; Papucci, Michele; Park, Michael; Park, Myeonghun; Perelstein, Maxim; Peskin, Michael; Phalen, Daniel; Rehermann, Keith; Rentala, Vikram; Roy, Tuhin; Ruderman, Joshua T.; Sanz, Veronica; Schmaltz, Martin; Schnetzer, Stephen; Schuster (Editor, Philip; Schwaller, Pedro; Schwartz, Matthew D.; Schwartzman, Ariel; Shao, Jing; Shelton, Jessie; Shih, David; Shu, Jing; Silverstein, Daniel; Simmons, Elizabeth; Somalwar, Sunil; Spannowsky, Michael; Spethmann, Christian; Strassler, Matthew; Su, Shufang; Tait (Editor, Tim; Thomas, Brooks; Thomas, Scott; Toro (Editor, Natalia; Volansky, Tomer; Wacker (Editor, Jay; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Yavin, Itay; Yu, Felix; Zhao, Yue; Zurek, Kathryn; LHC New Physics Working Group

    2012-10-01

    This document proposes a collection of simplified models relevant to the design of new-physics searches at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the characterization of their results. Both ATLAS and CMS have already presented some results in terms of simplified models, and we encourage them to continue and expand this effort, which supplements both signature-based results and benchmark model interpretations. A simplified model is defined by an effective Lagrangian describing the interactions of a small number of new particles. Simplified models can equally well be described by a small number of masses and cross-sections. These parameters are directly related to collider physics observables, making simplified models a particularly effective framework for evaluating searches and a useful starting point for characterizing positive signals of new physics. This document serves as an official summary of the results from the ‘Topologies for Early LHC Searches’ workshop, held at SLAC in September of 2010, the purpose of which was to develop a set of representative models that can be used to cover all relevant phase space in experimental searches. Particular emphasis is placed on searches relevant for the first ˜50-500 pb-1 of data and those motivated by supersymmetric models. This note largely summarizes material posted at http://lhcnewphysics.org/, which includes simplified model definitions, Monte Carlo material, and supporting contacts within the theory community. We also comment on future developments that may be useful as more data is gathered and analyzed by the experiments.

  13. Simplified Models for LHC New Physics Searches

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Daniele; Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Arora, Sanjay; Bai, Yang; Baumgart, Matthew; Berger, Joshua; Buckley, Matthew; Butler, Bart; Chang, Spencer; Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Cheung, Clifford; Chivukula, R.Sekhar; Cho, Won Sang; Cotta, Randy; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; El Hedri, Sonia; Essig, Rouven,; Evans, Jared A.; Fitzpatrick, Liam; Fox, Patrick; Franceschini, Roberto; /more authors..

    2012-06-01

    This document proposes a collection of simplified models relevant to the design of new-physics searches at the LHC and the characterization of their results. Both ATLAS and CMS have already presented some results in terms of simplified models, and we encourage them to continue and expand this effort, which supplements both signature-based results and benchmark model interpretations. A simplified model is defined by an effective Lagrangian describing the interactions of a small number of new particles. Simplified models can equally well be described by a small number of masses and cross-sections. These parameters are directly related to collider physics observables, making simplified models a particularly effective framework for evaluating searches and a useful starting point for characterizing positive signals of new physics. This document serves as an official summary of the results from the 'Topologies for Early LHC Searches' workshop, held at SLAC in September of 2010, the purpose of which was to develop a set of representative models that can be used to cover all relevant phase space in experimental searches. Particular emphasis is placed on searches relevant for the first {approx} 50-500 pb{sup -1} of data and those motivated by supersymmetric models. This note largely summarizes material posted at http://lhcnewphysics.org/, which includes simplified model definitions, Monte Carlo material, and supporting contacts within the theory community. We also comment on future developments that may be useful as more data is gathered and analyzed by the experiments.

  14. Model reduction in the physical coordinate system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yae, K. Harold; Joeng, K. Y.

    1989-01-01

    In the dynamics modeling of a flexible structure, finite element analysis employs reduction techniques, such as Guyan's reduction, to remove some of the insignificant physical coordinates, thus producing a dynamics model that has smaller mass and stiffness matrices. But this reduction is limited in the sense that it removes certain degrees of freedom at a node points themselves in the model. From the standpoint of linear control design, the resultant model is still too large despite the reduction. Thus, some form of the model reduction is frequently used in control design by approximating a large dynamical system with a fewer number of state variables. However, a problem arises from the placement of sensors and actuators in the reduced model, because a model usually undergoes, before being reduced, some form of coordinate transformations that do not preserve the physical meanings of the states. To correct such a problem, a method is developed that expresses a reduced model in terms of a subset of the original states. The proposed method starts with a dynamic model that is originated and reduced in finite element analysis. Then the model is converted to the state space form, and reduced again by the internal balancing method. At this point, being in the balanced coordinate system, the states in the reduced model have no apparent resemblance to those of the original model. Through another coordinate transformation that is developed, however, this reduced model is expressed by a subset of the original states.

  15. Physical and stochastic models of earthquake clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Console, Rodolfo; Murru, Maura; Catalli, Flaminia

    2006-04-01

    The phenomenon of earthquake clustering, i.e., the increase of occurrence probability for seismic events close in space and time to other previous earthquakes, has been modeled both by statistical and physical processes. From a statistical viewpoint the so-called epidemic model (ETAS) introduced by Ogata in 1988 and its variations have become fairly well known in the seismological community. Tests on real seismicity and comparison with a plain time-independent Poissonian model through likelihood-based methods have reliably proved their validity. On the other hand, in the last decade many papers have been published on the so-called Coulomb stress change principle, based on the theory of elasticity, showing qualitatively that an increase of the Coulomb stress in a given area is usually associated with an increase of seismic activity. More specifically, the rate-and-state theory developed by Dieterich in the '90s has been able to give a physical justification to the phenomenon known as Omori law. According to this law, a mainshock is followed by a series of aftershocks whose frequency decreases in time as an inverse power law. In this study we give an outline of the above-mentioned stochastic and physical models, and build up an approach by which these models can be merged in a single algorithm and statistically tested. The application to the seismicity of Japan from 1970 to 2003 shows that the new model incorporating the physical concept of the rate-and-state theory performs not worse than the purely stochastic model with two free parameters only. The numerical results obtained in these applications are related to physical characters of the model as the stress change produced by an earthquake close to its edges and to the A and σ parameters of the rate-and-state constitutive law.

  16. The development and verification of a highly accurate collision prediction model for automated noncoplanar plan delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Tran, Angelia; Nguyen, Dan; Cao, Minsong; Ruan, Dan; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Significant dosimetric benefits had been previously demonstrated in highly noncoplanar treatment plans. In this study, the authors developed and verified an individualized collision model for the purpose of delivering highly noncoplanar radiotherapy and tested the feasibility of total delivery automation with Varian TrueBeam developer mode. Methods: A hand-held 3D scanner was used to capture the surfaces of an anthropomorphic phantom and a human subject, which were positioned with a computer-aided design model of a TrueBeam machine to create a detailed virtual geometrical collision model. The collision model included gantry, collimator, and couch motion degrees of freedom. The accuracy of the 3D scanner was validated by scanning a rigid cubical phantom with known dimensions. The collision model was then validated by generating 300 linear accelerator orientations corresponding to 300 gantry-to-couch and gantry-to-phantom distances, and comparing the corresponding distance measurements to their corresponding models. The linear accelerator orientations reflected uniformly sampled noncoplanar beam angles to the head, lung, and prostate. The distance discrepancies between measurements on the physical and virtual systems were used to estimate treatment-site-specific safety buffer distances with 0.1%, 0.01%, and 0.001% probability of collision between the gantry and couch or phantom. Plans containing 20 noncoplanar beams to the brain, lung, and prostate optimized via an in-house noncoplanar radiotherapy platform were converted into XML script for automated delivery and the entire delivery was recorded and timed to demonstrate the feasibility of automated delivery. Results: The 3D scanner measured the dimension of the 14 cm cubic phantom within 0.5 mm. The maximal absolute discrepancy between machine and model measurements for gantry-to-couch and gantry-to-phantom was 0.95 and 2.97 cm, respectively. The reduced accuracy of gantry-to-phantom measurements was

  17. The development and verification of a highly accurate collision prediction model for automated noncoplanar plan delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Tran, Angelia; Nguyen, Dan; Cao, Minsong; Ruan, Dan; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Significant dosimetric benefits had been previously demonstrated in highly noncoplanar treatment plans. In this study, the authors developed and verified an individualized collision model for the purpose of delivering highly noncoplanar radiotherapy and tested the feasibility of total delivery automation with Varian TrueBeam developer mode. Methods: A hand-held 3D scanner was used to capture the surfaces of an anthropomorphic phantom and a human subject, which were positioned with a computer-aided design model of a TrueBeam machine to create a detailed virtual geometrical collision model. The collision model included gantry, collimator, and couch motion degrees of freedom. The accuracy of the 3D scanner was validated by scanning a rigid cubical phantom with known dimensions. The collision model was then validated by generating 300 linear accelerator orientations corresponding to 300 gantry-to-couch and gantry-to-phantom distances, and comparing the corresponding distance measurements to their corresponding models. The linear accelerator orientations reflected uniformly sampled noncoplanar beam angles to the head, lung, and prostate. The distance discrepancies between measurements on the physical and virtual systems were used to estimate treatment-site-specific safety buffer distances with 0.1%, 0.01%, and 0.001% probability of collision between the gantry and couch or phantom. Plans containing 20 noncoplanar beams to the brain, lung, and prostate optimized via an in-house noncoplanar radiotherapy platform were converted into XML script for automated delivery and the entire delivery was recorded and timed to demonstrate the feasibility of automated delivery. Results: The 3D scanner measured the dimension of the 14 cm cubic phantom within 0.5 mm. The maximal absolute discrepancy between machine and model measurements for gantry-to-couch and gantry-to-phantom was 0.95 and 2.97 cm, respectively. The reduced accuracy of gantry-to-phantom measurements was

  18. The effect of repeated physical disturbance on soft tissue decomposition--are taphonomic studies an accurate reflection of decomposition?

    PubMed

    Adlam, Rachel E; Simmons, Tal

    2007-09-01

    Although the relationship between decomposition and postmortem interval has been well studied, almost no studies examined the potential effects of physical disturbance occurring as a result of data collection procedures. This study compares physically disturbed rabbit carcasses with a series of undisturbed carcasses to assess the presence and magnitude of any effects resulting from repetitive disturbance. Decomposition was scored using visual assessment of soft tissue changes, and numerical data such as weight loss and carcass temperature were recorded. The effects of disturbance over time on weight loss, carcass temperature, soil pH and decomposition were studied. In addition, this study aimed to validate some of the anecdotal evidence regarding decomposition. Results indicate disturbance significantly inversely affects both weight loss and carcass temperature. No differences were apparent between groups for soil pH change or overall decomposition stage. An insect-mediated mechanism for the disturbance effect is suggested, along with indications as to why this effect may be cancelled when scoring overall decomposition.

  19. Comparing the standards of one metabolic equivalent of task in accurately estimating physical activity energy expenditure based on acceleration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dohyun; Lee, Jongshill; Park, Hoon Ki; Jang, Dong Pyo; Song, Soohwa; Cho, Baek Hwan; Jung, Yoo-Suk; Park, Rae-Woong; Joo, Nam-Seok; Kim, In Young

    2016-08-24

    The purpose of the study is to analyse how the standard of resting metabolic rate (RMR) affects estimation of the metabolic equivalent of task (MET) using an accelerometer. In order to investigate the effect on estimation according to intensity of activity, comparisons were conducted between the 3.5 ml O2 · kg(-1) · min(-1) and individually measured resting VO2 as the standard of 1 MET. MET was estimated by linear regression equations that were derived through five-fold cross-validation using 2 types of MET values and accelerations; the accuracy of estimation was analysed through cross-validation, Bland and Altman plot, and one-way ANOVA test. There were no significant differences in the RMS error after cross-validation. However, the individual RMR-based estimations had as many as 0.5 METs of mean difference in modified Bland and Altman plots than RMR of 3.5 ml O2 · kg(-1) · min(-1). Finally, the results of an ANOVA test indicated that the individual RMR-based estimations had less significant differences between the reference and estimated values at each intensity of activity. In conclusion, the RMR standard is a factor that affects accurate estimation of METs by acceleration; therefore, RMR requires individual specification when it is used for estimation of METs using an accelerometer.

  20. Topos models for physics and topos theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolters, Sander

    2014-08-01

    What is the role of topos theory in the topos models for quantum theory as used by Isham, Butterfield, Döring, Heunen, Landsman, Spitters, and others? In other words, what is the interplay between physical motivation for the models and the mathematical framework used in these models? Concretely, we show that the presheaf topos model of Butterfield, Isham, and Döring resembles classical physics when viewed from the internal language of the presheaf topos, similar to the copresheaf topos model of Heunen, Landsman, and Spitters. Both the presheaf and copresheaf models provide a "quantum logic" in the form of a complete Heyting algebra. Although these algebras are natural from a topos theoretic stance, we seek a physical interpretation for the logical operations. Finally, we investigate dynamics. In particular, we describe how an automorphism on the operator algebra induces a homeomorphism (or isomorphism of locales) on the associated state spaces of the topos models, and how elementary propositions and truth values transform under the action of this homeomorphism. Also with dynamics the focus is on the internal perspective of the topos.

  1. Topos models for physics and topos theory

    SciTech Connect

    Wolters, Sander

    2014-08-15

    What is the role of topos theory in the topos models for quantum theory as used by Isham, Butterfield, Döring, Heunen, Landsman, Spitters, and others? In other words, what is the interplay between physical motivation for the models and the mathematical framework used in these models? Concretely, we show that the presheaf topos model of Butterfield, Isham, and Döring resembles classical physics when viewed from the internal language of the presheaf topos, similar to the copresheaf topos model of Heunen, Landsman, and Spitters. Both the presheaf and copresheaf models provide a “quantum logic” in the form of a complete Heyting algebra. Although these algebras are natural from a topos theoretic stance, we seek a physical interpretation for the logical operations. Finally, we investigate dynamics. In particular, we describe how an automorphism on the operator algebra induces a homeomorphism (or isomorphism of locales) on the associated state spaces of the topos models, and how elementary propositions and truth values transform under the action of this homeomorphism. Also with dynamics the focus is on the internal perspective of the topos.

  2. Access Nets: Modeling Access to Physical Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohardt, Robert; Chang, Bor-Yuh Evan; Sankaranarayanan, Sriram

    Electronic, software-managed mechanisms using, for example, radio-frequency identification (RFID) cards, enable great flexibility in specifying access control policies to physical spaces. For example, access rights may vary based on time of day or could differ in normal versus emergency situations. With such fine-grained control, understanding and reasoning about what a policy permits becomes surprisingly difficult requiring knowledge of permission levels, spatial layout, and time. In this paper, we present a formal modeling framework, called AccessNets, suitable for describing a combination of access permissions, physical spaces, and temporal constraints. Furthermore, we provide evidence that model checking techniques are effective in reasoning about physical access control policies. We describe our results from a tool that uses reachability analysis to validate security policies.

  3. Physical models of tissue in shear fields.

    PubMed

    Carstensen, Edwin L; Parker, Kevin J

    2014-04-01

    This review considers three general classes of physical as opposed to phenomenological models of the shear elasticity of tissues. The first is simple viscoelasticity. This model has a special role in elastography because it is the language in which experimental and clinical data are communicated. The second class of models involves acoustic relaxation, in which the medium contains inner time-dependent systems that are driven through the external bulk medium. Hysteresis, the phenomenon characterizing the third class of models, involves losses that are related to strain rather than time rate of change of strain. In contrast to the vast efforts given to tissue characterization through their bulk moduli over the last half-century, similar research using low-frequency shear data is in its infancy. Rather than a neat summary of existing facts, this essay is a framework for hypothesis generation-guessing what physical mechanisms give tissues their shear properties.

  4. Dilution physics modeling: Dissolution/precipitation chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Y.; Reid, H.C.; Trent, D.S.

    1995-09-01

    This report documents progress made to date on integrating dilution/precipitation chemistry and new physical models into the TEMPEST thermal-hydraulics computer code. Implementation of dissolution/precipitation chemistry models is necessary for predicting nonhomogeneous, time-dependent, physical/chemical behavior of tank wastes with and without a variety of possible engineered remediation and mitigation activities. Such behavior includes chemical reactions, gas retention, solids resuspension, solids dissolution and generation, solids settling/rising, and convective motion of physical and chemical species. Thus this model development is important from the standpoint of predicting the consequences of various engineered activities, such as mitigation by dilution, retrieval, or pretreatment, that can affect safe operations. The integration of a dissolution/precipitation chemistry module allows the various phase species concentrations to enter into the physical calculations that affect the TEMPEST hydrodynamic flow calculations. The yield strength model of non-Newtonian sludge correlates yield to a power function of solids concentration. Likewise, shear stress is concentration-dependent, and the dissolution/precipitation chemistry calculations develop the species concentration evolution that produces fluid flow resistance changes. Dilution of waste with pure water, molar concentrations of sodium hydroxide, and other chemical streams can be analyzed for the reactive species changes and hydrodynamic flow characteristics.

  5. Is scintillometer measurement accurate enough for evaluating remote sensing based energy balance ET models?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The three evapotranspiration (ET) measurement/retrieval techniques used in this study, lysimeter, scintillometer and remote sensing vary in their level of complexity, accuracy, resolution and applicability. The lysimeter with its point measurement is the most accurate and direct method to measure ET...

  6. Accurate Modeling of Stability and Control Properties for Fighter Aircraft from CFD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    accurately placed and calibrated , etc. The results of the wind tunnel test must then be properly filtered and scaled to the proper size while taking...1 1.2 Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.2.1 Wind Tunnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2...analysis, wind tunnel testing, flight testing, and Com- putational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Analytical analysis includes linear aerodynamic techniques

  7. A thermodynamic model of physical gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yonghao; Solis, Francisco J.; Jiang, Hanqing

    2010-12-01

    Physical gels are characterized by dynamic cross-links that are constantly created and broken, changing its state between solid and liquid under influence of environmental factors. This restructuring ability of physical gels makes them an important class of materials with many applications, such as in drug delivery. In this article, we present a thermodynamic model for physical gels that considers both the elastic properties of the network and the transient nature of the cross-links. The cross-links' reformation is captured through a connectivity tensor M at the microscopic level. The macroscopic quantities, such as the volume fraction of the monomer ϕ, number of monomers per cross-link s, and the number of cross-links per volume q, are defined by statistic averaging. A mean-field energy functional for the gel is constructed based on these variables. The equilibrium equations and the stress are obtained at the current state. We study the static thermodynamic properties of physical gels predicted by the model. We discuss the problems of un-constrained swelling and stress driven phase transitions of physical gels and describe the conditions under which these phenomena arise as functions of the bond activation energy Ea, polymer/solvent interaction parameter χ, and external stress p.

  8. Service Learning In Physics: The Consultant Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, David

    2005-04-01

    Each year thousands of students across the country and across the academic disciplines participate in service learning. Unfortunately, with no clear model for integrating community service into the physics curriculum, there are very few physics students engaged in service learning. To overcome this shortfall, a consultant based service-learning program has been developed and successfully implemented at Saint Anselm College (SAC). As consultants, students in upper level physics courses apply their problem solving skills in the service of others. Most recently, SAC students provided technical and managerial support to a group from Girl's Inc., a national empowerment program for girls in high-risk, underserved areas, who were participating in the national FIRST Lego League Robotics competition. In their role as consultants the SAC students provided technical information through brainstorming sessions and helped the girls stay on task with project management techniques, like milestone charting. This consultant model of service-learning, provides technical support to groups that may not have a great deal of resources and gives physics students a way to improve their interpersonal skills, test their technical expertise, and better define the marketable skill set they are developing through the physics curriculum.

  9. Multiscale physics-based modeling of friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriten, Melih

    Frictional contacts between solids exist in nature and in a wide range of engineering applications. Friction causes energy loss, and it is the main source of wear and surface degradation which limits the lifetime of mechanical systems. Yet, friction is needed to walk, run, accelerate, slow down or stop moving systems. Whether desirable or not, friction is a very complex physical phenomenon. The behavior of systems with friction is nonlinear, and the physical mechanisms governing friction behavior span a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. A thorough study of friction should employ experimentalists and theoreticians in chemistry, materials science, tribology, mechanics, dynamics, and structural engineering. High spatial and temporal resolutions are required to capture and model essential physics of a frictional contact. However, such a detailed model is impractical in large-scale structural dynamics simulations; especially since frictional contacts can be numerous in a given application. Reduced-order models (ROMs) achieve broader applicability by compromising several aspects and accounting for the important physics. Hence, rather simple Coulomb friction is still the most ubiquitous model in the modeling and simulation literature. As an alternative, a reduced-order friction model built-up from micromechanics of surfaces is proposed in this work. Continuum-scale formulation of pre-sliding friction behavior is combined with material-strength-based friction coefficients to develop a physics-based friction model at asperity-scale. Then, the statistical summation technique is utilized to build a multiscale modeling framework. A novel joint fretting setup is designed for friction experiments in a practical setting, and the developed models are tested. Both asperity and rough surface friction models show good agreement with experimental data. The influences of materials, surface roughness and contact contamination on the friction are also studied. Finally, the

  10. Transforming teacher knowledge: Modeling instruction in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabot, Lloyd H.

    I show that the Modeling physics curriculum is readily accommodated by most teachers in favor of traditional didactic pedagogies. This is so, at least in part, because Modeling focuses on a small set of connected models embedded in a self-consistent theoretical framework and thus is closely congruent with human cognition in this context which is to generate mental models of physical phenomena as both predictive and explanatory devices. Whether a teacher fully implements the Modeling pedagogy depends on the depth of the teacher's commitment to inquiry-based instruction, specifically Modeling instruction, as a means of promoting student understanding of Newtonian mechanics. Moreover, this commitment trumps all other characteristics: teacher educational background, content coverage issues, student achievement data, district or state learning standards, and district or state student assessments. Indeed, distinctive differences exist in how Modeling teachers deliver their curricula and some teachers are measurably more effective than others in their delivery, but they all share an unshakable belief in the efficacy of inquiry-based, constructivist-oriented instruction. The Modeling Workshops' pedagogy, duration, and social interactions impacts teachers' self-identification as members of a professional community. Finally, I discuss the consequences my research may have for the Modeling Instruction program designers and for designers of professional development programs generally.

  11. Investigations of physical model of biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkov, Kirill G.; Kisselev, Gennady L.; Loschenov, Victor B.

    1996-12-01

    Physical model of a biological tissue for comparison with earlier created mathematical model of a biological tissue and researches of distribution photosensitizer in a depth was created and investigated. Mathematical model is based on granulated representation of optical medium. The model of a biological tissue was created on the basis of enough thin layers of a special material. For fluorescence excitation laser sources with a various wavelength were used. For investigation of scattering and fluorescent signal laser- fiber spectrum-analyzer LESA-5 was applied. Water solution of aluminum phthalocyanine and oil solution of zinc phthalocyanine were used for receiving of fluorescent signal. Created samples have certain absorbing and fluorescent properties. Scattering properties of samples are close to scattering properties of real human skin. By virtue of layered structure the model permits to simulate as a biological tissue without photosensitizer accumulation in it, as tissue with photosensitizer accumulation with certain distribution in a depth. Dependence of fields distribution on a surface was investigated at change of parameters of a model. Essential changes of distribution on a surface depending on the characteristics of model was revealed. The space and angular characteristics was investigated also. The investigations with physical model correspond to predicted results of theoretical model.

  12. Improving Throughput of the ACME Climate Model by Parallel Splitting Atmospheric Physics and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, P.; Taylor, M.

    2015-12-01

    If fluid dynamics and atmospheric physics parameterizations were computed in parallel, they could be calculated simultaneously on separate cores of a supercomputer. This would greatly increase model throughput for high-resolution simulations. Additionally, because atmospheric physics is embarrassingly parallel, more sophisticated physics parameterizations could be used without slowing simulations down by simply increasing the number of cores used. The downside to this approach is that it increases time-truncation error. In this presentation, we demonstrate that parallel splitting the ACME model and using a smaller timestep for physics results in faster, more accurate solutions.

  13. Modeling quantum physics with machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Bezanilla, Alejandro; Arsenault, Louis-Francois; Millis, Andrew; Littlewood, Peter; von Lilienfeld, Anatole

    2014-03-01

    Machine Learning (ML) is a systematic way of inferring new results from sparse information. It directly allows for the resolution of computationally expensive sets of equations by making sense of accumulated knowledge and it is therefore an attractive method for providing computationally inexpensive 'solvers' for some of the important systems of condensed matter physics. In this talk a non-linear regression statistical model is introduced to demonstrate the utility of ML methods in solving quantum physics related problem, and is applied to the calculation of electronic transport in 1D channels. DOE contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  14. Physics Beyond the Standard Model: Supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Nojiri, M.M.; Plehn, T.; Polesello, G.; Alexander, John M.; Allanach, B.C.; Barr, Alan J.; Benakli, K.; Boudjema, F.; Freitas, A.; Gwenlan, C.; Jager, S.; /CERN /LPSC, Grenoble

    2008-02-01

    This collection of studies on new physics at the LHC constitutes the report of the supersymmetry working group at the Workshop 'Physics at TeV Colliders', Les Houches, France, 2007. They cover the wide spectrum of phenomenology in the LHC era, from alternative models and signatures to the extraction of relevant observables, the study of the MSSM parameter space and finally to the interplay of LHC observations with additional data expected on a similar time scale. The special feature of this collection is that while not each of the studies is explicitly performed together by theoretical and experimental LHC physicists, all of them were inspired by and discussed in this particular environment.

  15. Modelling the Physical System of Belawan Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarigan, A. P. M.; Swandana, D.; Isma, F.

    2017-03-01

    Belawan estuary represents one of the most complex and fascinating mixed environments of sea and land, where not only habitat of rich biodiversity but also international seaport infrastructure are at stake. It is therefore a matter of considerable importance to understand the physical system which characterizes the dynamics of the estuarine water. The purpose of this study is to model the changing water depths, tidal currents, salt, temperature and sediment concentration over a long stretch of Belawan estuary on an hourly basis. The first essential step is to define the bathymetry based on which other physical parameters are simulated. The study is accomplished by building working computer modules which simplify and model the systems complexities. It should be noted that model validation and improvement is the subject of the next study.

  16. Modelling Students' Construction of Energy Models in Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devi, Roshni; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examines students' construction of experimentation models for physics theories in energy storage, transformation, and transfers involving electricity and mechanics. Student problem solving dialogs and artificial intelligence modeling of these processes is analyzed. Construction of models established relations between elements with linear causal…

  17. Development of Fast Deterministic Physically Accurate Solvers for Kinetic Collision Integral for Applications of Near Space Flight and Control Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-31

    Modernization Program Office 10501 Furnace Road Suite 101 Lorton, VA 22079 HPCMP, PETTT DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release: distribution unlimited...Technology Transfer, and Training (PETTT) Program High Performance Computing Modernization Program (HPCMP) Contract No.: GS04T09DBC0017 Government...has potential to address the following problems pertaining to the Space and Astrophysical Sciences area: (1) modeling of near-space vehicle

  18. The Resolution Dependence of Model Physics: Illustrations from Nonhydrostatic Model Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Joon-Hee; Arakawa, Akio

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to gain insight into the resolution dependence of model physics, the parameterization of moist convection in particular, which is required for accurately predicting large-scale features of the atmosphere. To achieve this goal, experiments using a two-dimensional nonhydrostatic model with different resolutions are conducted under various idealized tropical conditions. For control experiments (CONTROL), the model is run as a cloud-system-resolving model (CSRM). Next, a “large-scale dynamics model” (LSDM) is introduced as a diagnostic tool, which is a coarser-resolution version of the same model but with only partial or no physics. Then, the LSDM is applied to an ensemble of realizations selected from CONTROL and a “required parameterized source” (RPS) is identified for the results of the LSDM to become consistent with CONTROL as far as the resolvable scales are concerned.The analysis of RPS diagnosed in this way confirms that RPS is highly resolution dependent in the range of typical resolutions of mesoscale models even in ensemble/space averages, while “real source” (RS) is not. The time interval of implementing model physics also matters for RPS. It is emphasized that model physics in future prediction models should automatically produce these resolution dependencies so that the need for retuning parameterizations as resolution changes can be minimized.

  19. Performance results of HESP physical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanumolu, Anantha; Thirupathi, Sivarani; Jones, Damien; Giridhar, Sunetra; Grobler, Deon; Jakobsson, Robert

    2017-02-01

    As a continuation to the published work on model based calibration technique with HESP(Hanle Echelle Spectrograph) as a case study, in this paper we present the performance results of the technique. We also describe how the open parameters were chosen in the model for optimization, the glass data accuracy and handling the discrepancies. It is observed through simulations that the discrepancies in glass data can be identified but not quantifiable. So having an accurate glass data is important which is possible to obtain from the glass manufacturers. The model's performance in various aspects is presented using the ThAr calibration frames from HESP during its pre-shipment tests. Accuracy of model predictions and its wave length calibration comparison with conventional empirical fitting, the behaviour of open parameters in optimization, model's ability to track instrumental drifts in the spectrum and the double fibres performance were discussed. It is observed that the optimized model is able to predict to a high accuracy the drifts in the spectrum from environmental fluctuations. It is also observed that the pattern in the spectral drifts across the 2D spectrum which vary from image to image is predictable with the optimized model. We will also discuss the possible science cases where the model can contribute.

  20. Physics-based analytical model for ferromagnetic single electron transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamshidnezhad, K.; Sharifi, M. J.

    2017-03-01

    A physically based compact analytical model is proposed for a ferromagnetic single electron transistor (FSET). This model is based on the orthodox theory and solves the master equation, spin conservation equation, and charge neutrality equation simultaneously. The model can be applied to both symmetric and asymmetric devices and does not introduce any limitation on the applied bias voltages. This feature makes the model suitable for both analog and digital applications. To verify the accuracy of the model, its results regarding a typical FSET in both low and high voltage regimes are compared with the existing numerical results. Moreover, the model's results of a parallel configuration FSET, where no spin accumulation exists in the island, are compared with the results obtained from a Monte Carlo simulation using SIMON. These two comparisons show that our model is valid and accurate. As another comparison, the model is compared analytically with an existing model for a double barrier ferromagnetic junction (having no gate). This also verifies the accuracy of the model.

  1. Accurate ampacity determination: Temperature-Sag Model for operational real time ratings

    SciTech Connect

    Seppa, T.O.

    1995-07-01

    This report presents a method for determining transmission line ratings based on the relationship between the conductor`s temperature and its sag. The method is based on the Ruling Span principle and the use of transmission line tension monitoring systems. The report also presents a method of accurately calibrating the final sag of the conductor and determining the actual Ruling Span length of the line sections between deadend structures. Main error sources for two other real time methods are also examined.

  2. A Critical Review for Developing Accurate and Dynamic Predictive Models Using Machine Learning Methods in Medicine and Health Care.

    PubMed

    Alanazi, Hamdan O; Abdullah, Abdul Hanan; Qureshi, Kashif Naseer

    2017-04-01

    Recently, Artificial Intelligence (AI) has been used widely in medicine and health care sector. In machine learning, the classification or prediction is a major field of AI. Today, the study of existing predictive models based on machine learning methods is extremely active. Doctors need accurate predictions for the outcomes of their patients' diseases. In addition, for accurate predictions, timing is another significant factor that influences treatment decisions. In this paper, existing predictive models in medicine and health care have critically reviewed. Furthermore, the most famous machine learning methods have explained, and the confusion between a statistical approach and machine learning has clarified. A review of related literature reveals that the predictions of existing predictive models differ even when the same dataset is used. Therefore, existing predictive models are essential, and current methods must be improved.

  3. Simplified risk score models accurately predict the risk of major in-hospital complications following percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Resnic, F S; Ohno-Machado, L; Selwyn, A; Simon, D I; Popma, J J

    2001-07-01

    The objectives of this analysis were to develop and validate simplified risk score models for predicting the risk of major in-hospital complications after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the era of widespread stenting and use of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists. We then sought to compare the performance of these simplified models with those of full logistic regression and neural network models. From January 1, 1997 to December 31, 1999, data were collected on 4,264 consecutive interventional procedures at a single center. Risk score models were derived from multiple logistic regression models using the first 2,804 cases and then validated on the final 1,460 cases. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for the risk score model that predicted death was 0.86 compared with 0.85 for the multiple logistic model and 0.83 for the neural network model (validation set). For the combined end points of death, myocardial infarction, or bypass surgery, the corresponding areas under the ROC curves were 0.74, 0.78, and 0.81, respectively. Previously identified risk factors were confirmed in this analysis. The use of stents was associated with a decreased risk of in-hospital complications. Thus, risk score models can accurately predict the risk of major in-hospital complications after PCI. Their discriminatory power is comparable to those of logistic models and neural network models. Accurate bedside risk stratification may be achieved with these simple models.

  4. Dynamic inverse models in human-cyber-physical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Ryan M.; Scobee, Dexter R. R.; Burden, Samuel A.; Sastry, S. Shankar

    2016-05-01

    Human interaction with the physical world is increasingly mediated by automation. This interaction is characterized by dynamic coupling between robotic (i.e. cyber) and neuromechanical (i.e. human) decision-making agents. Guaranteeing performance of such human-cyber-physical systems will require predictive mathematical models of this dynamic coupling. Toward this end, we propose a rapprochement between robotics and neuromechanics premised on the existence of internal forward and inverse models in the human agent. We hypothesize that, in tele-robotic applications of interest, a human operator learns to invert automation dynamics, directly translating from desired task to required control input. By formulating the model inversion problem in the context of a tracking task for a nonlinear control system in control-a_ne form, we derive criteria for exponential tracking and show that the resulting dynamic inverse model generally renders a portion of the physical system state (i.e., the internal dynamics) unobservable from the human operator's perspective. Under stability conditions, we show that the human can achieve exponential tracking without formulating an estimate of the system's state so long as they possess an accurate model of the system's dynamics. These theoretical results are illustrated using a planar quadrotor example. We then demonstrate that the automation can intervene to improve performance of the tracking task by solving an optimal control problem. Performance is guaranteed to improve under the assumption that the human learns and inverts the dynamic model of the altered system. We conclude with a discussion of practical limitations that may hinder exact dynamic model inversion.

  5. Electromagnetic physics models for parallel computing architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Amadio, G.; Ananya, A.; Apostolakis, J.; Aurora, A.; Bandieramonte, M.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Bianchini, C.; Brun, R.; Canal, P.; Carminati, F.; Duhem, L.; Elvira, D.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Goulas, I.; Iope, R.; Jun, S. Y.; Lima, G.; Mohanty, A.; Nikitina, T.; Novak, M.; Pokorski, W.; Ribon, A.; Seghal, R.; Shadura, O.; Vallecorsa, S.; Wenzel, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-11-21

    The recent emergence of hardware architectures characterized by many-core or accelerated processors has opened new opportunities for concurrent programming models taking advantage of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. GeantV, a next generation detector simulation, has been designed to exploit both the vector capability of mainstream CPUs and multi-threading capabilities of coprocessors including NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. The characteristics of these architectures are very different in terms of the vectorization depth and type of parallelization needed to achieve optimal performance. In this paper we describe implementation of electromagnetic physics models developed for parallel computing architectures as a part of the GeantV project. Finally, the results of preliminary performance evaluation and physics validation are presented as well.

  6. Electromagnetic physics models for parallel computing architectures

    DOE PAGES

    Amadio, G.; Ananya, A.; Apostolakis, J.; ...

    2016-11-21

    The recent emergence of hardware architectures characterized by many-core or accelerated processors has opened new opportunities for concurrent programming models taking advantage of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. GeantV, a next generation detector simulation, has been designed to exploit both the vector capability of mainstream CPUs and multi-threading capabilities of coprocessors including NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. The characteristics of these architectures are very different in terms of the vectorization depth and type of parallelization needed to achieve optimal performance. In this paper we describe implementation of electromagnetic physics models developed for parallel computing architectures as a part ofmore » the GeantV project. Finally, the results of preliminary performance evaluation and physics validation are presented as well.« less

  7. Electromagnetic Physics Models for Parallel Computing Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amadio, G.; Ananya, A.; Apostolakis, J.; Aurora, A.; Bandieramonte, M.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Bianchini, C.; Brun, R.; Canal, P.; Carminati, F.; Duhem, L.; Elvira, D.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Goulas, I.; Iope, R.; Jun, S. Y.; Lima, G.; Mohanty, A.; Nikitina, T.; Novak, M.; Pokorski, W.; Ribon, A.; Seghal, R.; Shadura, O.; Vallecorsa, S.; Wenzel, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-10-01

    The recent emergence of hardware architectures characterized by many-core or accelerated processors has opened new opportunities for concurrent programming models taking advantage of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. GeantV, a next generation detector simulation, has been designed to exploit both the vector capability of mainstream CPUs and multi-threading capabilities of coprocessors including NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. The characteristics of these architectures are very different in terms of the vectorization depth and type of parallelization needed to achieve optimal performance. In this paper we describe implementation of electromagnetic physics models developed for parallel computing architectures as a part of the GeantV project. Results of preliminary performance evaluation and physics validation are presented as well.

  8. Accurate alignment of functional EPI data to anatomical MRI using a physics-based distortion model.

    PubMed

    Studholme, C; Constable, R T; Duncan, J S

    2000-11-01

    Mapping of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to conventional anatomical MRI is a valuable step in the interpretation of fMRI activations. One of the main limits on the accuracy of this alignment arises from differences in the geometric distortion induced by magnetic field inhomogeneity. This paper describes an approach to the registration of echo planar image (EPI) data to conventional anatomical images which takes into account this difference in geometric distortion. We make use of an additional spin echo EPI image and use the known signal conservation in spin echo distortion to derive a specialized multimodality nonrigid registration algorithm. We also examine a plausible modification using log-intensity evaluation of the criterion to provide increased sensitivity in areas of low EPI signal. A phantom-based imaging experiment is used to evaluate the behavior of the different criteria, comparing nonrigid displacement estimates to those provided by a imagnetic field mapping acquisition. The algorithm is then applied to a range of nine brain imaging studies illustrating global and local improvement in the anatomical alignment and localization of fMRI activations.

  9. Bottom-up coarse-grained models that accurately describe the structure, pressure, and compressibility of molecular liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Nicholas J. H.; Noid, W. G.

    2015-12-28

    The present work investigates the capability of bottom-up coarse-graining (CG) methods for accurately modeling both structural and thermodynamic properties of all-atom (AA) models for molecular liquids. In particular, we consider 1, 2, and 3-site CG models for heptane, as well as 1 and 3-site CG models for toluene. For each model, we employ the multiscale coarse-graining method to determine interaction potentials that optimally approximate the configuration dependence of the many-body potential of mean force (PMF). We employ a previously developed “pressure-matching” variational principle to determine a volume-dependent contribution to the potential, U{sub V}(V), that approximates the volume-dependence of the PMF. We demonstrate that the resulting CG models describe AA density fluctuations with qualitative, but not quantitative, accuracy. Accordingly, we develop a self-consistent approach for further optimizing U{sub V}, such that the CG models accurately reproduce the equilibrium density, compressibility, and average pressure of the AA models, although the CG models still significantly underestimate the atomic pressure fluctuations. Additionally, by comparing this array of models that accurately describe the structure and thermodynamic pressure of heptane and toluene at a range of different resolutions, we investigate the impact of bottom-up coarse-graining upon thermodynamic properties. In particular, we demonstrate that U{sub V} accounts for the reduced cohesion in the CG models. Finally, we observe that bottom-up coarse-graining introduces subtle correlations between the resolution, the cohesive energy density, and the “simplicity” of the model.

  10. Video Analysis and Modeling in Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Doug

    2008-03-01

    The Tracker video analysis program allows users to overlay simple dynamical models on a video clip. Video modeling offers advantages over both traditional video analysis and animation-only modeling. In traditional video analysis, for example, students measure ``g'' by tracking a dropped or tossed ball, constructing a position or velocity vs. time graph, and interpreting the graphs to obtain initial conditions and acceleration. In video modeling, by contrast, the students interactively construct theoretical force expressions and define initial conditions for a dynamical particle model that synchs with and draws itself on the video. The behavior of the model is thus compared directly with that of the real-world motion. Tracker uses the Open Source Physics code library so sophisticated models are possible. I will demonstrate and compare video modeling with video analysis and I will discuss the advantages of video modeling over animation-only modeling. The Tracker video analysis program is available at: http://www.cabrillo.edu/˜dbrown/tracker/.

  11. Statistical Physics of Pairwise Probability Models

    PubMed Central

    Roudi, Yasser; Aurell, Erik; Hertz, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Statistical models for describing the probability distribution over the states of biological systems are commonly used for dimensional reduction. Among these models, pairwise models are very attractive in part because they can be fit using a reasonable amount of data: knowledge of the mean values and correlations between pairs of elements in the system is sufficient. Not surprisingly, then, using pairwise models for studying neural data has been the focus of many studies in recent years. In this paper, we describe how tools from statistical physics can be employed for studying and using pairwise models. We build on our previous work on the subject and study the relation between different methods for fitting these models and evaluating their quality. In particular, using data from simulated cortical networks we study how the quality of various approximate methods for inferring the parameters in a pairwise model depends on the time bin chosen for binning the data. We also study the effect of the size of the time bin on the model quality itself, again using simulated data. We show that using finer time bins increases the quality of the pairwise model. We offer new ways of deriving the expressions reported in our previous work for assessing the quality of pairwise models. PMID:19949460

  12. Low order physical models of vertical axis wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Anna; Dabiri, John; Koseff, Jeffrey

    2016-11-01

    In order to examine the ability of low-order physical models of vertical axis wind turbines to accurately reproduce key flow characteristics, experiments were conducted on rotating turbine models, rotating solid cylinders, and stationary porous flat plates (of both uniform and non-uniform porosities). From examination of the patterns of mean flow, the wake turbulence spectra, and several quantitative metrics, it was concluded that the rotating cylinders represent a reasonably accurate analog for the rotating turbines. In contrast, from examination of the patterns of mean flow, it was found that the porous flat plates represent only a limited analog for rotating turbines (for the parameters examined). These findings have implications for both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations, which have previously used analogous low order models in order to reduce experimental/computational costs. NSF GRF and SGF to A.C; ONR N000141211047 and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Grant GBMF2645 to J.D.; and the Bob and Norma Street Environmental Fluid Mechanics Laboratory at Stanford University.

  13. Generomak: Fusion physics, engineering and costing model

    SciTech Connect

    Delene, J.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Sheffield, J.; Dory, R.A.

    1988-06-01

    A generic fusion physics, engineering and economics model (Generomak) was developed as a means of performing consistent analysis of the economic viability of alternative magnetic fusion reactors. The original Generomak model developed at Oak Ridge by Sheffield was expanded for the analyses of the Senior Committee on Environmental Safety and Economics of Magnetic Fusion Energy (ESECOM). This report describes the Generomak code as used by ESECOM. The input data used for each of the ten ESECOM fusion plants and the Generomak code output for each case is given. 14 refs., 3 figs., 17 tabs.

  14. Physical models of polarization mode dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Menyuk, C.R.; Wai, P.K.A.

    1995-12-31

    The effect of randomly varying birefringence on light propagation in optical fibers is studied theoretically in the parameter regime that will be used for long-distance communications. In this regime, the birefringence is large and varies very rapidly in comparison to the nonlinear and dispersive scale lengths. We determine the polarization mode dispersion, and we show that physically realistic models yield the same result for polarization mode dispersion as earlier heuristic models that were introduced by Poole. We also prove an ergodic theorem.

  15. Effective and accurate approach for modeling of commensurate–incommensurate transition in krypton monolayer on graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Ustinov, E. A.

    2014-10-07

    Commensurate–incommensurate (C-IC) transition of krypton molecular layer on graphite received much attention in recent decades in theoretical and experimental researches. However, there still exists a possibility of generalization of the phenomenon from thermodynamic viewpoint on the basis of accurate molecular simulation. Recently, a new technique was developed for analysis of two-dimensional (2D) phase transitions in systems involving a crystalline phase, which is based on accounting for the effect of temperature and the chemical potential on the lattice constant of the 2D layer using the Gibbs–Duhem equation [E. A. Ustinov, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 074706 (2014)]. The technique has allowed for determination of phase diagrams of 2D argon layers on the uniform surface and in slit pores. This paper extends the developed methodology on systems accounting for the periodic modulation of the substrate potential. The main advantage of the developed approach is that it provides highly accurate evaluation of the chemical potential of crystalline layers, which allows reliable determination of temperature and other parameters of various 2D phase transitions. Applicability of the methodology is demonstrated on the krypton–graphite system. Analysis of phase diagram of the krypton molecular layer, thermodynamic functions of coexisting phases, and a method of prediction of adsorption isotherms is considered accounting for a compression of the graphite due to the krypton–carbon interaction. The temperature and heat of C-IC transition has been reliably determined for the gas–solid and solid–solid system.

  16. Effective and accurate approach for modeling of commensurate-incommensurate transition in krypton monolayer on graphite.

    PubMed

    Ustinov, E A

    2014-10-07

    Commensurate-incommensurate (C-IC) transition of krypton molecular layer on graphite received much attention in recent decades in theoretical and experimental researches. However, there still exists a possibility of generalization of the phenomenon from thermodynamic viewpoint on the basis of accurate molecular simulation. Recently, a new technique was developed for analysis of two-dimensional (2D) phase transitions in systems involving a crystalline phase, which is based on accounting for the effect of temperature and the chemical potential on the lattice constant of the 2D layer using the Gibbs-Duhem equation [E. A. Ustinov, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 074706 (2014)]. The technique has allowed for determination of phase diagrams of 2D argon layers on the uniform surface and in slit pores. This paper extends the developed methodology on systems accounting for the periodic modulation of the substrate potential. The main advantage of the developed approach is that it provides highly accurate evaluation of the chemical potential of crystalline layers, which allows reliable determination of temperature and other parameters of various 2D phase transitions. Applicability of the methodology is demonstrated on the krypton-graphite system. Analysis of phase diagram of the krypton molecular layer, thermodynamic functions of coexisting phases, and a method of prediction of adsorption isotherms is considered accounting for a compression of the graphite due to the krypton-carbon interaction. The temperature and heat of C-IC transition has been reliably determined for the gas-solid and solid-solid system.

  17. Statistical physical models of cellular motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banigan, Edward J.

    Cellular motility is required for a wide range of biological behaviors and functions, and the topic poses a number of interesting physical questions. In this work, we construct and analyze models of various aspects of cellular motility using tools and ideas from statistical physics. We begin with a Brownian dynamics model for actin-polymerization-driven motility, which is responsible for cell crawling and "rocketing" motility of pathogens. Within this model, we explore the robustness of self-diffusiophoresis, which is a general mechanism of motility. Using this mechanism, an object such as a cell catalyzes a reaction that generates a steady-state concentration gradient that propels the object in a particular direction. We then apply these ideas to a model for depolymerization-driven motility during bacterial chromosome segregation. We find that depolymerization and protein-protein binding interactions alone are sufficient to robustly pull a chromosome, even against large loads. Next, we investigate how forces and kinetics interact during eukaryotic mitosis with a many-microtubule model. Microtubules exert forces on chromosomes, but since individual microtubules grow and shrink in a force-dependent way, these forces lead to bistable collective microtubule dynamics, which provides a mechanism for chromosome oscillations and microtubule-based tension sensing. Finally, we explore kinematic aspects of cell motility in the context of the immune system. We develop quantitative methods for analyzing cell migration statistics collected during imaging experiments. We find that during chronic infection in the brain, T cells run and pause stochastically, following the statistics of a generalized Levy walk. These statistics may contribute to immune function by mimicking an evolutionarily conserved efficient search strategy. Additionally, we find that naive T cells migrating in lymph nodes also obey non-Gaussian statistics. Altogether, our work demonstrates how physical

  18. Accurate, precise, and efficient theoretical methods to calculate anion-π interaction energies in model structures.

    PubMed

    Mezei, Pál D; Csonka, Gábor I; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Sun, Jianwei

    2015-01-13

    A correct description of the anion-π interaction is essential for the design of selective anion receptors and channels and important for advances in the field of supramolecular chemistry. However, it is challenging to do accurate, precise, and efficient calculations of this interaction, which are lacking in the literature. In this article, by testing sets of 20 binary anion-π complexes of fluoride, chloride, bromide, nitrate, or carbonate ions with hexafluorobenzene, 1,3,5-trifluorobenzene, 2,4,6-trifluoro-1,3,5-triazine, or 1,3,5-triazine and 30 ternary π-anion-π' sandwich complexes composed from the same monomers, we suggest domain-based local-pair natural orbital coupled cluster energies extrapolated to the complete basis-set limit as reference values. We give a detailed explanation of the origin of anion-π interactions, using the permanent quadrupole moments, static dipole polarizabilities, and electrostatic potential maps. We use symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) to calculate the components of the anion-π interaction energies. We examine the performance of the direct random phase approximation (dRPA), the second-order screened exchange (SOSEX), local-pair natural-orbital (LPNO) coupled electron pair approximation (CEPA), and several dispersion-corrected density functionals (including generalized gradient approximation (GGA), meta-GGA, and double hybrid density functional). The LPNO-CEPA/1 results show the best agreement with the reference results. The dRPA method is only slightly less accurate and precise than the LPNO-CEPA/1, but it is considerably more efficient (6-17 times faster) for the binary complexes studied in this paper. For 30 ternary π-anion-π' sandwich complexes, we give dRPA interaction energies as reference values. The double hybrid functionals are much more efficient but less accurate and precise than dRPA. The dispersion-corrected double hybrid PWPB95-D3(BJ) and B2PLYP-D3(BJ) functionals perform better than the GGA and meta

  19. How to Construct More Accurate Student Models: Comparing and Optimizing Knowledge Tracing and Performance Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gong, Yue; Beck, Joseph E.; Heffernan, Neil T.

    2011-01-01

    Student modeling is a fundamental concept applicable to a variety of intelligent tutoring systems (ITS). However, there is not a lot of practical guidance on how to construct and train such models. This paper compares two approaches for student modeling, Knowledge Tracing (KT) and Performance Factors Analysis (PFA), by evaluating their predictive…

  20. A new model of physical evolution of Jupiter-family comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickman, H.; Szutowicz, S.; Wójcikowski, K.

    2014-07-01

    We aim to find the statistical physical lifetimes of Jupiter Family comets. For this purpose, we try to model the processes that govern the dynamical and physical evolution of comets. We pay special attention to physical evolution; attempts at such modelling have been made before, but we propose a more accurate model, which will include more physical effects. The model is tested on a sample of fictitious comets based on real Jupiter Family comets with some orbital elements changed to a state before the capture by Jupiter. We model four different physical effects: erosion by sublimation, dust mantling, rejuvenation (mantle blow-off), and splitting. While for sublimation and splitting there already are some models, like di Sisto et. al. (2009), and we only wish to make them more accurate, dust mantling and rejuvenation have not been included in previous, statistical physical evolution models. Each of these effects depends on one or more tunable parameters, which we establish by choosing the model that best fits the observed comet sample in a way similar to di Sisto et. al. (2009). In contrast to di Sisto et. al., our comparison also involves the observed active fractions vs. nuclear radii.

  1. Models in Physics, Models for Physics Learning, and Why the Distinction May Matter in the Case of Electric Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Christina

    2008-01-01

    Models are important both in the development of physics itself and in teaching physics. Historically, the consensus models of physics have come to embody particular ontological assumptions and epistemological commitments. Educators have generally assumed that the consensus models of physics, which have stood the test of time, will also work well…

  2. Beyond the standard model of particle physics.

    PubMed

    Virdee, T S

    2016-08-28

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and its experiments were conceived to tackle open questions in particle physics. The mechanism of the generation of mass of fundamental particles has been elucidated with the discovery of the Higgs boson. It is clear that the standard model is not the final theory. The open questions still awaiting clues or answers, from the LHC and other experiments, include: What is the composition of dark matter and of dark energy? Why is there more matter than anti-matter? Are there more space dimensions than the familiar three? What is the path to the unification of all the fundamental forces? This talk will discuss the status of, and prospects for, the search for new particles, symmetries and forces in order to address the open questions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Unifying physics and technology in light of Maxwell's equations'.

  3. Shape Models and Physical Properties of Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana-Ros, T.; Dudziński, G.; Bartczak, P.

    Despite the large amount of high quality data generated in recent space encounters with asteroids, the majority of our knowledge about these objects comes from ground based observations. Asteroids travelling in orbits that are potentially hazardous for the Earth form an especially interesting group to be studied. In order to predict their orbital evolution, it is necessary to investigate their physical properties. This paper briefly describes the data requirements and different techniques used to solve the lightcurve inversion problem. Although photometry is the most abundant type of observational data, models of asteroids can be obtained using various data types and techniques. We describe the potential of radar imaging and stellar occultation timings to be combined with disk-integrated photometry in order to reveal information about physical properties of asteroids.

  4. Towards more accurate isoscapes encouraging results from wine, water and marijuana data/model and model/model comparisons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, J. B.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Cerling, T.

    2006-12-01

    Understanding how the biosphere responds to change it at the heart of biogeochemistry, ecology, and other Earth sciences. The dramatic increase in human population and technological capacity over the past 200 years or so has resulted in numerous, simultaneous changes to biosphere structure and function. This, then, has lead to increased urgency in the scientific community to try to understand how systems have already responded to these changes, and how they might do so in the future. Since all biospheric processes exhibit some patchiness or patterns over space, as well as time, we believe that understanding the dynamic interactions between natural systems and human technological manipulations can be improved if these systems are studied in an explicitly spatial context. We present here results of some of our efforts to model the spatial variation in the stable isotope ratios (δ2H and δ18O) of plants over large spatial extents, and how these spatial model predictions compare to spatially explicit data. Stable isotopes trace and record ecological processes and as such, if modeled correctly over Earth's surface allow us insights into changes in biosphere states and processes across spatial scales. The data-model comparisons show good agreement, in spite of the remaining uncertainties (e.g., plant source water isotopic composition). For example, inter-annual changes in climate are recorded in wine stable isotope ratios. Also, a much simpler model of leaf water enrichment driven with spatially continuous global rasters of precipitation and climate normals largely agrees with complex GCM modeling that includes leaf water δ18O. Our results suggest that modeling plant stable isotope ratios across large spatial extents may be done with reasonable accuracy, including over time. These spatial maps, or isoscapes, can now be utilized to help understand spatially distributed data, as well as to help guide future studies designed to understand ecological change across

  5. Accurate and efficient modeling of global seismic wave propagation for an attenuative Earth model including the center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokuni, Genti; Takenaka, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    We propose a method for modeling global seismic wave propagation through an attenuative Earth model including the center. This method enables accurate and efficient computations since it is based on the 2.5-D approach, which solves wave equations only on a 2-D cross section of the whole Earth and can correctly model 3-D geometrical spreading. We extend a numerical scheme for the elastic waves in spherical coordinates using the finite-difference method (FDM), to solve the viscoelastodynamic equation. For computation of realistic seismic wave propagation, incorporation of anelastic attenuation is crucial. Since the nature of Earth material is both elastic solid and viscous fluid, we should solve stress-strain relations of viscoelastic material, including attenuative structures. These relations represent the stress as a convolution integral in time, which has had difficulty treating viscoelasticity in time-domain computation such as the FDM. However, we now have a method using so-called memory variables, invented in the 1980s, followed by improvements in Cartesian coordinates. Arbitrary values of the quality factor (Q) can be incorporated into the wave equation via an array of Zener bodies. We also introduce the multi-domain, an FD grid of several layers with different grid spacings, into our FDM scheme. This allows wider lateral grid spacings with depth, so as not to perturb the FD stability criterion around the Earth center. In addition, we propose a technique to avoid the singularity problem of the wave equation in spherical coordinates at the Earth center. We develop a scheme to calculate wavefield variables on this point, based on linear interpolation for the velocity-stress, staggered-grid FDM. This scheme is validated through a comparison of synthetic seismograms with those obtained by the Direct Solution Method for a spherically symmetric Earth model, showing excellent accuracy for our FDM scheme. As a numerical example, we apply the method to simulate seismic

  6. Improving the physics models in the Space Weather Modeling Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, G.; Fang, F.; Frazin, R. A.; Gombosi, T. I.; Ilie, R.; Liemohn, M. W.; Manchester, W. B.; Meng, X.; Pawlowski, D. J.; Ridley, A. J.; Sokolov, I.; van der Holst, B.; Vichare, G.; Yigit, E.; Yu, Y.; Buzulukova, N.; Fok, M. H.; Glocer, A.; Jordanova, V. K.; Welling, D. T.; Zaharia, S. G.

    2010-12-01

    The success of physics based space weather forecasting depends on several factors: we need sufficient amount and quality of timely observational data, we have to understand the physics of the Sun-Earth system well enough, we need sophisticated computational models, and the models have to run faster than real time on the available computational resources. This presentation will focus on a single ingredient, the recent improvements of the mathematical and numerical models in the Space Weather Modeling Framework. We have developed a new physics based CME initiation code using flux emergence from the convection zone solving the equations of radiative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Our new lower corona and solar corona models use electron heat conduction, Alfven wave heating, and boundary conditions based on solar tomography. We can obtain a physically consistent solar wind model from the surface of the Sun all the way to the L1 point without artificially changing the polytropic index. The global magnetosphere model can now solve the multi-ion MHD equations and take into account the oxygen outflow from the polar wind model. We have also added the options of solving for Hall MHD and anisotropic pressure. Several new inner magnetosphere models have been added to the framework: CRCM, HEIDI and RAM-SCB. These new models resolve the pitch angle distribution of the trapped particles. The upper atmosphere model GITM has been improved by including a self-consistent equatorial electrodynamics and the effects of solar flares. This presentation will very briefly describe the developments and highlight some results obtained with the improved and new models.

  7. THE IMPACT OF ACCURATE EXTINCTION MEASUREMENTS FOR X-RAY SPECTRAL MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Randall K.; Valencic, Lynne A.; Corrales, Lia

    2016-02-20

    Interstellar extinction includes both absorption and scattering of photons from interstellar gas and dust grains, and it has the effect of altering a source's spectrum and its total observed intensity. However, while multiple absorption models exist, there are no useful scattering models in standard X-ray spectrum fitting tools, such as XSPEC. Nonetheless, X-ray halos, created by scattering from dust grains, are detected around even moderately absorbed sources, and the impact on an observed source spectrum can be significant, if modest, compared to direct absorption. By convolving the scattering cross section with dust models, we have created a spectral model as a function of energy, type of dust, and extraction region that can be used with models of direct absorption. This will ensure that the extinction model is consistent and enable direct connections to be made between a source's X-ray spectral fits and its UV/optical extinction.

  8. Development of accurate waveform models for eccentric compact binaries with numerical relativity simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta, Eliu; Agarwal, Bhanu; Chua, Alvin; George, Daniel; Haas, Roland; Hinder, Ian; Kumar, Prayush; Moore, Christopher; Pfeiffer, Harald

    2017-01-01

    We recently constructed an inspiral-merger-ringdown (IMR) waveform model to describe the dynamical evolution of compact binaries on eccentric orbits, and used this model to constrain the eccentricity with which the gravitational wave transients currently detected by LIGO could be effectively recovered with banks of quasi-circular templates. We now present the second generation of this model, which is calibrated using a large catalog of eccentric numerical relativity simulations. We discuss the new features of this model, and show that its enhance accuracy makes it a powerful tool to detect eccentric signals with LIGO.

  9. Accurate crab cavity modeling for the high luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brett, D. R.; Appleby, R. B.; De Maria, R.; Garcia, J. Barranco; Garcia, R. Tomás; Hall, B.; Burt, G.

    2014-10-01

    As part of the Large Hadron Collider high luminosity upgrade it is proposed to include crab cavities in the lattice in order to enhance the luminosity. For one proposed cavity design the dynamics of the cavity is considered in terms of its impact upon the dynamic aperture of the machine. Taylor maps of the cavity are created and used to perform this analysis with a full assessment of their validity. Furthermore from these Taylor maps, symplectic methods are developed further, guided by the knowledge gained in the study of the physics contained in them.

  10. An Efficient and Accurate Quantum Lattice-Gas Model for the Many-Body Schroedinger Wave Equation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    CONTRACT NUMBER AN EFFICIENT AND ACCURATE QUANTUM LATTICE-GAS MODEL FOR THE MANY-BODY SCHROEDINGER WAVE EQUATION 5b. GRANT NUMBER SC. PROGRAM ELEMENT...for simulating the time-dependent evolution of a many-body jiiantum mechanical system of particles governed by the non-relativistic Schroedinger " wave...the numerical dispersion of the simulated wave packets is compared with the analytical solutions. 15. SUBJECT TERM: Schroedinger wave equation

  11. Dissecting new physics models through kinematic edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Abhishek M.; Maitra, Ushoshi

    2017-02-01

    Kinematic edges in the invariant mass distributions of different final state particles are typically a signal of new physics. In this work we propose a scenario wherein these edges could be utilized in discriminating between different classes of models. To this effect, we consider the resonant production of a heavy Higgs like resonance (H1) as a case study. Such states are a characteristic feature of many new physics scenarios beyond the standard model (SM). In the event of a discovery, it is essential to identify the true nature of the underlying theory. In this work we propose a channel, H1→t2t , where t2 is a vectorlike gauge singlet top-partner that decays into W b , Z t , h t . Invariant mass distributions constructed out of these final states are characterized by the presence of kinematic edges, which are unique to the topology under consideration. Further, since all the final state particles are SM states, the position in the edges of these invariant mass distributions can be used to exclusively determine the masses of the resonances. Observation of these features are meant to serve as a trigger, thereby mandating a more detailed analysis in a particular direction of parameter space. The absence of these edge like features, in the specific invariant mass distributions considered here, in minimal versions of supersymmetric models (MSSM) also serves as a harbinger of such non-MSSM-like scenarios.

  12. Efficient and accurate local model for colorimetric characterization of liquid-crystal displays.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wenhai; Xu, Haisong; Gong, Rui

    2012-01-01

    Taking the chromaticity inconstancy of LCDs and the inverse efficiency into account, a novel local colorimetric characterization model was developed in this Letter. Rather than dividing the device color space into many subspaces to refine the chromaticity description as existent local models, the proposed model tailored the transformation relationship uniquely for each characterized color with look-up tables and a local chromaticity matrix. Based on this model, the characterization task could be efficiently accomplished within a few steps for either the forward or the inverse transformation. Test experiments on several commercial LCDs indicated that the average color difference between the estimated and measured tristimulus values could be achieved in a low level of about 0.4 CIEDE2000 units, effectively demonstrating the proposed model.

  13. Active appearance model and deep learning for more accurate prostate segmentation on MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ruida; Roth, Holger R.; Lu, Le; Wang, Shijun; Turkbey, Baris; Gandler, William; McCreedy, Evan S.; Agarwal, Harsh K.; Choyke, Peter; Summers, Ronald M.; McAuliffe, Matthew J.

    2016-03-01

    Prostate segmentation on 3D MR images is a challenging task due to image artifacts, large inter-patient prostate shape and texture variability, and lack of a clear prostate boundary specifically at apex and base levels. We propose a supervised machine learning model that combines atlas based Active Appearance Model (AAM) with a Deep Learning model to segment the prostate on MR images. The performance of the segmentation method is evaluated on 20 unseen MR image datasets. The proposed method combining AAM and Deep Learning achieves a mean Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) of 0.925 for whole 3D MR images of the prostate using axial cross-sections. The proposed model utilizes the adaptive atlas-based AAM model and Deep Learning to achieve significant segmentation accuracy.

  14. Accurate coarse-grained models for mixtures of colloids and linear polymers under good-solvent conditions

    SciTech Connect

    D’Adamo, Giuseppe; Pelissetto, Andrea; Pierleoni, Carlo

    2014-12-28

    A coarse-graining strategy, previously developed for polymer solutions, is extended here to mixtures of linear polymers and hard-sphere colloids. In this approach, groups of monomers are mapped onto a single pseudoatom (a blob) and the effective blob-blob interactions are obtained by requiring the model to reproduce some large-scale structural properties in the zero-density limit. We show that an accurate parametrization of the polymer-colloid interactions is obtained by simply introducing pair potentials between blobs and colloids. For the coarse-grained (CG) model in which polymers are modelled as four-blob chains (tetramers), the pair potentials are determined by means of the iterative Boltzmann inversion scheme, taking full-monomer (FM) pair correlation functions at zero-density as targets. For a larger number n of blobs, pair potentials are determined by using a simple transferability assumption based on the polymer self-similarity. We validate the model by comparing its predictions with full-monomer results for the interfacial properties of polymer solutions in the presence of a single colloid and for thermodynamic and structural properties in the homogeneous phase at finite polymer and colloid density. The tetramer model is quite accurate for q ≲ 1 (q=R{sup ^}{sub g}/R{sub c}, where R{sup ^}{sub g} is the zero-density polymer radius of gyration and R{sub c} is the colloid radius) and reasonably good also for q = 2. For q = 2, an accurate coarse-grained description is obtained by using the n = 10 blob model. We also compare our results with those obtained by using single-blob models with state-dependent potentials.

  15. Physics-based prognostic modelling of filter clogging phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eker, Omer F.; Camci, Fatih; Jennions, Ian K.

    2016-06-01

    In industry, contaminant filtration is a common process to achieve a desired level of purification, since contaminants in liquids such as fuel may lead to performance drop and rapid wear propagation. Generally, clogging of filter phenomena is the primary failure mode leading to the replacement or cleansing of filter. Cascading failures and weak performance of the system are the unfortunate outcomes due to a clogged filter. Even though filtration and clogging phenomena and their effects of several observable parameters have been studied for quite some time in the literature, progression of clogging and its use for prognostics purposes have not been addressed yet. In this work, a physics based clogging progression model is presented. The proposed model that bases on a well-known pressure drop equation is able to model three phases of the clogging phenomena, last of which has not been modelled in the literature yet. In addition, the presented model is integrated with particle filters to predict the future clogging levels and to estimate the remaining useful life of fuel filters. The presented model has been implemented on the data collected from an experimental rig in the lab environment. In the rig, pressure drop across the filter, flow rate, and filter mesh images are recorded throughout the accelerated degradation experiments. The presented physics based model has been applied to the data obtained from the rig. The remaining useful lives of the filters used in the experimental rig have been reported in the paper. The results show that the presented methodology provides significantly accurate and precise prognostic results.

  16. Physical model studies of water column separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autrique, R.; Rodal, E.; Sánchez, A.; Carmona, L.

    2012-11-01

    Results of physical model studies of water column separation following an upstream valve closure in a horizontal pipe are presented, using three dimensionless parameters: the magnitude of the transient, M, or the ratio between the Joukowsky pressure and the initial absolute head; ΔHr, or the ratio between the maximum overpressure and the Joukowsky pressure, and tcr, the duration of the vapor cavity relative to the pipeline period. Conclusions are derived, aiming to a better understanding of water column separation extreme pressures and to the establishment of useful preliminary design guidelines.

  17. Physical modeling synthesis of recorder sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, Hiroko; Kishi, Kenshi; Nakamura, Isao

    2003-04-01

    A time-domain simulation of the soprano baroque recorder based on the digital waveguide model (DWM) and an air reed model is introduced. The air reed model is developed upon the negative acoustic displacement model (NADM), which was proposed for the organ flue-pipe simulation [Adachi, Proc. of ISMA 1997, pp. 251-260], based on the semiempirical model by Fletcher [Fletcher and Rossing, The Physics of Musical Instruments, 2nd ed. (Springer, Berlin, 2000)]. Two models are proposed to couple DWM and NADM. The jet amplification coefficient is remodeled for the application of NADM for the recorder, regarding the recent experimental reports [Yoshikawa and Arimoto, Proc. of ISMA 2001, pp. 309-312]. The simulation results are presented in terms of the mode transient characteristics and the spectral characteristics of the synthesized sounds. They indicate that the NADM is not sufficient to describe the realistic mode transient of the recorder, while the synthesized sounds maintained almost resemble timbre to the recorder sounds.

  18. Simplified versus geometrically accurate models of forefoot anatomy to predict plantar pressures: A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Telfer, Scott; Erdemir, Ahmet; Woodburn, James; Cavanagh, Peter R

    2016-01-25

    Integration of patient-specific biomechanical measurements into the design of therapeutic footwear has been shown to improve clinical outcomes in patients with diabetic foot disease. The addition of numerical simulations intended to optimise intervention design may help to build on these advances, however at present the time and labour required to generate and run personalised models of foot anatomy restrict their routine clinical utility. In this study we developed second-generation personalised simple finite element (FE) models of the forefoot with varying geometric fidelities. Plantar pressure predictions from barefoot, shod, and shod with insole simulations using simplified models were compared to those obtained from CT-based FE models incorporating more detailed representations of bone and tissue geometry. A simplified model including representations of metatarsals based on simple geometric shapes, embedded within a contoured soft tissue block with outer geometry acquired from a 3D surface scan was found to provide pressure predictions closest to the more complex model, with mean differences of 13.3kPa (SD 13.4), 12.52kPa (SD 11.9) and 9.6kPa (SD 9.3) for barefoot, shod, and insole conditions respectively. The simplified model design could be produced in <1h compared to >3h in the case of the more detailed model, and solved on average 24% faster. FE models of the forefoot based on simplified geometric representations of the metatarsal bones and soft tissue surface geometry from 3D surface scans may potentially provide a simulation approach with improved clinical utility, however further validity testing around a range of therapeutic footwear types is required.

  19. Accurate Sloshing Modes Modeling: A New Analytical Solution and its Consequences on Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonidou, Luc-Olivier; Desmariaux, Jean

    2014-06-01

    This study addresses the issue of sloshing modes modeling for GNC analyses purposes. On European launchers, equivalent mechanical systems are commonly used for modeling sloshing effects on launcher dynamics. The representativeness of such a methodology is discussed here. First an exact analytical formulation of the launcher dynamics fitted with sloshing modes is proposed and discrepancies with equivalent mechanical system approach are emphasized. Then preliminary comparative GNC analyses are performed using the different models of dynamics in order to evaluate the impact of the aforementioned discrepancies from GNC standpoint. Special attention is paid to system stability.

  20. Generalized Stoner-Wohlfarth model accurately describing the switching processes in pseudo-single ferromagnetic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Cimpoesu, Dorin Stoleriu, Laurentiu; Stancu, Alexandru

    2013-12-14

    We propose a generalized Stoner-Wohlfarth (SW) type model to describe various experimentally observed angular dependencies of the switching field in non-single-domain magnetic particles. Because the nonuniform magnetic states are generally characterized by complicated spin configurations with no simple analytical description, we maintain the macrospin hypothesis and we phenomenologically include the effects of nonuniformities only in the anisotropy energy, preserving as much as possible the elegance of SW model, the concept of critical curve and its geometric interpretation. We compare the results obtained with our model with full micromagnetic simulations in order to evaluate the performance and limits of our approach.

  1. Empirical approaches to more accurately predict benthic-pelagic coupling in biogeochemical ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, Andy; Stolpovsky, Konstantin; Wallmann, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    The recycling and burial of biogenic material in the sea floor plays a key role in the regulation of ocean chemistry. Proper consideration of these processes in ocean biogeochemical models is becoming increasingly recognized as an important step in model validation and prediction. However, the rate of organic matter remineralization in sediments and the benthic flux of redox-sensitive elements are difficult to predict a priori. In this communication, examples of empirical benthic flux models that can be coupled to earth system models to predict sediment-water exchange in the open ocean are presented. Large uncertainties hindering further progress in this field include knowledge of the reactivity of organic carbon reaching the sediment, the importance of episodic variability in bottom water chemistry and particle rain rates (for both the deep-sea and margins) and the role of benthic fauna. How do we meet the challenge?

  2. A Two-Phase Space Resection Model for Accurate Topographic Reconstruction from Lunar Imagery with PushbroomScanners

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xuemiao; Zhang, Huaidong; Han, Guoqiang; Kwan, Kin Chung; Pang, Wai-Man; Fang, Jiaming; Zhao, Gansen

    2016-01-01

    Exterior orientation parameters’ (EOP) estimation using space resection plays an important role in topographic reconstruction for push broom scanners. However, existing models of space resection are highly sensitive to errors in data. Unfortunately, for lunar imagery, the altitude data at the ground control points (GCPs) for space resection are error-prone. Thus, existing models fail to produce reliable EOPs. Motivated by a finding that for push broom scanners, angular rotations of EOPs can be estimated independent of the altitude data and only involving the geographic data at the GCPs, which are already provided, hence, we divide the modeling of space resection into two phases. Firstly, we estimate the angular rotations based on the reliable geographic data using our proposed mathematical model. Then, with the accurate angular rotations, the collinear equations for space resection are simplified into a linear problem, and the global optimal solution for the spatial position of EOPs can always be achieved. Moreover, a certainty term is integrated to penalize the unreliable altitude data for increasing the error tolerance. Experimental results evidence that our model can obtain more accurate EOPs and topographic maps not only for the simulated data, but also for the real data from Chang’E-1, compared to the existing space resection model. PMID:27077855

  3. A Weibull statistics-based lignocellulose saccharification model and a built-in parameter accurately predict lignocellulose hydrolysis performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingyu; Han, Lijuan; Liu, Shasha; Zhao, Xuebing; Yang, Jinghua; Loh, Soh Kheang; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Chenxi; Fang, Xu

    2015-09-01

    Renewable energy from lignocellulosic biomass has been deemed an alternative to depleting fossil fuels. In order to improve this technology, we aim to develop robust mathematical models for the enzymatic lignocellulose degradation process. By analyzing 96 groups of previously published and newly obtained lignocellulose saccharification results and fitting them to Weibull distribution, we discovered Weibull statistics can accurately predict lignocellulose saccharification data, regardless of the type of substrates, enzymes and saccharification conditions. A mathematical model for enzymatic lignocellulose degradation was subsequently constructed based on Weibull statistics. Further analysis of the mathematical structure of the model and experimental saccharification data showed the significance of the two parameters in this model. In particular, the λ value, defined the characteristic time, represents the overall performance of the saccharification system. This suggestion was further supported by statistical analysis of experimental saccharification data and analysis of the glucose production levels when λ and n values change. In conclusion, the constructed Weibull statistics-based model can accurately predict lignocellulose hydrolysis behavior and we can use the λ parameter to assess the overall performance of enzymatic lignocellulose degradation. Advantages and potential applications of the model and the λ value in saccharification performance assessment were discussed.

  4. A Two-Phase Space Resection Model for Accurate Topographic Reconstruction from Lunar Imagery with PushbroomScanners.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuemiao; Zhang, Huaidong; Han, Guoqiang; Kwan, Kin Chung; Pang, Wai-Man; Fang, Jiaming; Zhao, Gansen

    2016-04-11

    Exterior orientation parameters' (EOP) estimation using space resection plays an important role in topographic reconstruction for push broom scanners. However, existing models of space resection are highly sensitive to errors in data. Unfortunately, for lunar imagery, the altitude data at the ground control points (GCPs) for space resection are error-prone. Thus, existing models fail to produce reliable EOPs. Motivated by a finding that for push broom scanners, angular rotations of EOPs can be estimated independent of the altitude data and only involving the geographic data at the GCPs, which are already provided, hence, we divide the modeling of space resection into two phases. Firstly, we estimate the angular rotations based on the reliable geographic data using our proposed mathematical model. Then, with the accurate angular rotations, the collinear equations for space resection are simplified into a linear problem, and the global optimal solution for the spatial position of EOPs can always be achieved. Moreover, a certainty term is integrated to penalize the unreliable altitude data for increasing the error tolerance. Experimental results evidence that our model can obtain more accurate EOPs and topographic maps not only for the simulated data, but also for the real data from Chang'E-1, compared to the existing space resection model.

  5. Modelling biological complexity: a physical scientist's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Coveney, Peter V; Fowler, Philip W

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the modern approaches of complexity and self-organization to understanding dynamical systems and how these concepts can inform current interest in systems biology. From the perspective of a physical scientist, it is especially interesting to examine how the differing weights given to philosophies of science in the physical and biological sciences impact the application of the study of complexity. We briefly describe how the dynamics of the heart and circadian rhythms, canonical examples of systems biology, are modelled by sets of nonlinear coupled differential equations, which have to be solved numerically. A major difficulty with this approach is that all the parameters within these equations are not usually known. Coupled models that include biomolecular detail could help solve this problem. Coupling models across large ranges of length- and time-scales is central to describing complex systems and therefore to biology. Such coupling may be performed in at least two different ways, which we refer to as hierarchical and hybrid multiscale modelling. While limited progress has been made in the former case, the latter is only beginning to be addressed systematically. These modelling methods are expected to bring numerous benefits to biology, for example, the properties of a system could be studied over a wider range of length- and time-scales, a key aim of systems biology. Multiscale models couple behaviour at the molecular biological level to that at the cellular level, thereby providing a route for calculating many unknown parameters as well as investigating the effects at, for example, the cellular level, of small changes at the biomolecular level, such as a genetic mutation or the presence of a drug. The modelling and simulation of biomolecular systems is itself very computationally intensive; we describe a recently developed hybrid continuum-molecular model, HybridMD, and its associated molecular insertion algorithm, which point the way towards the

  6. Modelling biological complexity: a physical scientist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Coveney, Peter V; Fowler, Philip W

    2005-09-22

    We discuss the modern approaches of complexity and self-organization to understanding dynamical systems and how these concepts can inform current interest in systems biology. From the perspective of a physical scientist, it is especially interesting to examine how the differing weights given to philosophies of science in the physical and biological sciences impact the application of the study of complexity. We briefly describe how the dynamics of the heart and circadian rhythms, canonical examples of systems biology, are modelled by sets of nonlinear coupled differential equations, which have to be solved numerically. A major difficulty with this approach is that all the parameters within these equations are not usually known. Coupled models that include biomolecular detail could help solve this problem. Coupling models across large ranges of length- and time-scales is central to describing complex systems and therefore to biology. Such coupling may be performed in at least two different ways, which we refer to as hierarchical and hybrid multiscale modelling. While limited progress has been made in the former case, the latter is only beginning to be addressed systematically. These modelling methods are expected to bring numerous benefits to biology, for example, the properties of a system could be studied over a wider range of length- and time-scales, a key aim of systems biology. Multiscale models couple behaviour at the molecular biological level to that at the cellular level, thereby providing a route for calculating many unknown parameters as well as investigating the effects at, for example, the cellular level, of small changes at the biomolecular level, such as a genetic mutation or the presence of a drug. The modelling and simulation of biomolecular systems is itself very computationally intensive; we describe a recently developed hybrid continuum-molecular model, HybridMD, and its associated molecular insertion algorithm, which point the way towards the

  7. Dynamic saturation in Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers: accurate model, role of carrier density, and slow light.

    PubMed

    Berger, Perrine; Alouini, Mehdi; Bourderionnet, Jérôme; Bretenaker, Fabien; Dolfi, Daniel

    2010-01-18

    We developed an improved model in order to predict the RF behavior and the slow light properties of the SOA valid for any experimental conditions. It takes into account the dynamic saturation of the SOA, which can be fully characterized by a simple measurement, and only relies on material fitting parameters, independent of the optical intensity and the injected current. The present model is validated by showing a good agreement with experiments for small and large modulation indices.

  8. Accurate 3D Modeling of Breast Deformation for Temporal Mammogram Registration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT In this research project, we have developed mathematical model of breast deformation to simulate breast compression during...proposed to simulate and analyze breast deformation that can significantly improve the accuracy of matching in temporal mammograms and thus, the...performance of diagnosis and treatment. In this research project, we have developed a mathematical model of breast deformation to simulate breast

  9. Accurate model annotation of a near-atomic resolution cryo-EM map

    PubMed Central

    Hryc, Corey F.; Chen, Dong-Hua; Afonine, Pavel V.; Jakana, Joanita; Wang, Zhao; Haase-Pettingell, Cameron; Jiang, Wen; Adams, Paul D.; King, Jonathan A.; Schmid, Michael F.; Chiu, Wah

    2017-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) has been used to determine the atomic coordinates (models) from density maps of biological assemblies. These models can be assessed by their overall fit to the experimental data and stereochemical information. However, these models do not annotate the actual density values of the atoms nor their positional uncertainty. Here, we introduce a computational procedure to derive an atomic model from a cryo-EM map with annotated metadata. The accuracy of such a model is validated by a faithful replication of the experimental cryo-EM map computed using the coordinates and associated metadata. The functional interpretation of any structural features in the model and its utilization for future studies can be made in the context of its measure of uncertainty. We applied this protocol to the 3.3-Å map of the mature P22 bacteriophage capsid, a large and complex macromolecular assembly. With this protocol, we identify and annotate previously undescribed molecular interactions between capsid subunits that are crucial to maintain stability in the absence of cementing proteins or cross-linking, as occur in other bacteriophages. PMID:28270620

  10. Statistical tests with accurate size and power for balanced linear mixed models.

    PubMed

    Muller, Keith E; Edwards, Lloyd J; Simpson, Sean L; Taylor, Douglas J

    2007-08-30

    The convenience of linear mixed models for Gaussian data has led to their widespread use. Unfortunately, standard mixed model tests often have greatly inflated test size in small samples. Many applications with correlated outcomes in medical imaging and other fields have simple properties which do not require the generality of a mixed model. Alternately, stating the special cases as a general linear multivariate model allows analysing them with either the univariate or multivariate approach to repeated measures (UNIREP, MULTIREP). Even in small samples, an appropriate UNIREP or MULTIREP test always controls test size and has a good power approximation, in sharp contrast to mixed model tests. Hence, mixed model tests should never be used when one of the UNIREP tests (uncorrected, Huynh-Feldt, Geisser-Greenhouse, Box conservative) or MULTIREP tests (Wilks, Hotelling-Lawley, Roy's, Pillai-Bartlett) apply. Convenient methods give exact power for the uncorrected and Box conservative tests. Simulations demonstrate that new power approximations for all four UNIREP tests eliminate most inaccuracy in existing methods. In turn, free software implements the approximations to give a better choice of sample size. Two repeated measures power analyses illustrate the methods. The examples highlight the advantages of examining the entire response surface of power as a function of sample size, mean differences, and variability.

  11. Single Neuron Optimization as a Basis for Accurate Biophysical Modeling: The Case of Cerebellar Granule Cells.

    PubMed

    Masoli, Stefano; Rizza, Martina F; Sgritta, Martina; Van Geit, Werner; Schürmann, Felix; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2017-01-01

    In realistic neuronal modeling, once the ionic channel complement has been defined, the maximum ionic conductance (Gi-max) values need to be tuned in order to match the firing pattern revealed by electrophysiological recordings. Recently, selection/mutation genetic algorithms have been proposed to efficiently and automatically tune these parameters. Nonetheless, since similar firing patterns can be achieved through different combinations of Gi-max values, it is not clear how well these algorithms approximate the corresponding properties of real cells. Here we have evaluated the issue by exploiting a unique opportunity offered by the cerebellar granule cell (GrC), which is electrotonically compact and has therefore allowed the direct experimental measurement of ionic currents. Previous models were constructed using empirical tuning of Gi-max values to match the original data set. Here, by using repetitive discharge patterns as a template, the optimization procedure yielded models that closely approximated the experimental Gi-max values. These models, in addition to repetitive firing, captured additional features, including inward rectification, near-threshold oscillations, and resonance, which were not used as features. Thus, parameter optimization using genetic algorithms provided an efficient modeling strategy for reconstructing the biophysical properties of neurons and for the subsequent reconstruction of large-scale neuronal network models.

  12. Accurate model annotation of a near-atomic resolution cryo-EM map.

    PubMed

    Hryc, Corey F; Chen, Dong-Hua; Afonine, Pavel V; Jakana, Joanita; Wang, Zhao; Haase-Pettingell, Cameron; Jiang, Wen; Adams, Paul D; King, Jonathan A; Schmid, Michael F; Chiu, Wah

    2017-03-21

    Electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) has been used to determine the atomic coordinates (models) from density maps of biological assemblies. These models can be assessed by their overall fit to the experimental data and stereochemical information. However, these models do not annotate the actual density values of the atoms nor their positional uncertainty. Here, we introduce a computational procedure to derive an atomic model from a cryo-EM map with annotated metadata. The accuracy of such a model is validated by a faithful replication of the experimental cryo-EM map computed using the coordinates and associated metadata. The functional interpretation of any structural features in the model and its utilization for future studies can be made in the context of its measure of uncertainty. We applied this protocol to the 3.3-Å map of the mature P22 bacteriophage capsid, a large and complex macromolecular assembly. With this protocol, we identify and annotate previously undescribed molecular interactions between capsid subunits that are crucial to maintain stability in the absence of cementing proteins or cross-linking, as occur in other bacteriophages.

  13. Single Neuron Optimization as a Basis for Accurate Biophysical Modeling: The Case of Cerebellar Granule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Masoli, Stefano; Rizza, Martina F.; Sgritta, Martina; Van Geit, Werner; Schürmann, Felix; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2017-01-01

    In realistic neuronal modeling, once the ionic channel complement has been defined, the maximum ionic conductance (Gi-max) values need to be tuned in order to match the firing pattern revealed by electrophysiological recordings. Recently, selection/mutation genetic algorithms have been proposed to efficiently and automatically tune these parameters. Nonetheless, since similar firing patterns can be achieved through different combinations of Gi-max values, it is not clear how well these algorithms approximate the corresponding properties of real cells. Here we have evaluated the issue by exploiting a unique opportunity offered by the cerebellar granule cell (GrC), which is electrotonically compact and has therefore allowed the direct experimental measurement of ionic currents. Previous models were constructed using empirical tuning of Gi-max values to match the original data set. Here, by using repetitive discharge patterns as a template, the optimization procedure yielded models that closely approximated the experimental Gi-max values. These models, in addition to repetitive firing, captured additional features, including inward rectification, near-threshold oscillations, and resonance, which were not used as features. Thus, parameter optimization using genetic algorithms provided an efficient modeling strategy for reconstructing the biophysical properties of neurons and for the subsequent reconstruction of large-scale neuronal network models. PMID:28360841

  14. A Fibre-Reinforced Poroviscoelastic Model Accurately Describes the Biomechanical Behaviour of the Rat Achilles Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Heuijerjans, Ashley; Matikainen, Marko K.; Julkunen, Petro; Eliasson, Pernilla; Aspenberg, Per; Isaksson, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Background Computational models of Achilles tendons can help understanding how healthy tendons are affected by repetitive loading and how the different tissue constituents contribute to the tendon’s biomechanical response. However, available models of Achilles tendon are limited in their description of the hierarchical multi-structural composition of the tissue. This study hypothesised that a poroviscoelastic fibre-reinforced model, previously successful in capturing cartilage biomechanical behaviour, can depict the biomechanical behaviour of the rat Achilles tendon found experimentally. Materials and Methods We developed a new material model of the Achilles tendon, which considers the tendon’s main constituents namely: water, proteoglycan matrix and collagen fibres. A hyperelastic formulation of the proteoglycan matrix enabled computations of large deformations of the tendon, and collagen fibres were modelled as viscoelastic. Specimen-specific finite element models were created of 9 rat Achilles tendons from an animal experiment and simulations were carried out following a repetitive tensile loading protocol. The material model parameters were calibrated against data from the rats by minimising the root mean squared error (RMS) between experimental force data and model output. Results and Conclusions All specimen models were successfully fitted to experimental data with high accuracy (RMS 0.42-1.02). Additional simulations predicted more compliant and soft tendon behaviour at reduced strain-rates compared to higher strain-rates that produce a stiff and brittle tendon response. Stress-relaxation simulations exhibited strain-dependent stress-relaxation behaviour where larger strains produced slower relaxation rates compared to smaller strain levels. Our simulations showed that the collagen fibres in the Achilles tendon are the main load-bearing component during tensile loading, where the orientation of the collagen fibres plays an important role for the tendon

  15. Semi-Empirical Modeling of SLD Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, William B.; Potapczuk, Mark G.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of supercooled large droplets (SLD) in icing have been an area of much interest in recent years. As part of this effort, the assumptions used for ice accretion software have been reviewed. A literature search was performed to determine advances from other areas of research that could be readily incorporated. Experimental data in the SLD regime was also analyzed. A semi-empirical computational model is presented which incorporates first order physical effects of large droplet phenomena into icing software. This model has been added to the LEWICE software. Comparisons are then made to SLD experimental data that has been collected to date. Results will be presented for the comparison of water collection efficiency, ice shape and ice mass.

  16. Enhancing the Fever Workup Utilizing a Multi-Technique Modeling Approach to Diagnose Infections More Accurately

    PubMed Central

    Fadlalla, Adam M.A.; Golob, Joseph F.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Differentiation between infectious and non-infectious etiologies of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in trauma patients remains elusive. We hypothesized that mathematical modeling in combination with computerized clinical decision support would assist with this differentiation. The purpose of this study was to determine the capability of various mathematical modeling techniques to predict infectious complications in critically ill trauma patients and compare the performance of these models with a standard fever workup practice (identifying infections on the basis of fever or leukocytosis). Methods An 18-mo retrospective database was created using information collected daily from critically ill trauma patients admitted to an academic surgical and trauma intensive care unit. Two hundred forty-three non-infected patient-days were chosen randomly to combine with the 243 infected-days, which created a modeling sample of 486 patient-days. Utilizing ten variables known to be associated with infectious complications, decision trees, neural networks, and logistic regression analysis models were created to predict the presence of urinary tract infections (UTIs), bacteremia, and respiratory tract infections (RTIs). The data sample was split into a 70% training set and a 30% testing set. Models were compared by calculating sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, overall accuracy, and discrimination. Results Decision trees had the best modeling performance, with a sensitivity of 83%, an accuracy of 82%, and a discrimination of 0.91 for identifying infections. Both neural networks and decision trees outperformed logistic regression analysis. A second analysis was performed utilizing the same 243 infected days and only those non-infected patient-days associated with negative microbiologic cultures (n = 236). Decision trees again had the best modeling performance for infection identification, with a

  17. Computational methods toward accurate RNA structure prediction using coarse-grained and all-atom models.

    PubMed

    Krokhotin, Andrey; Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2015-01-01

    Computational methods can provide significant insights into RNA structure and dynamics, bridging the gap in our understanding of the relationship between structure and biological function. Simulations enrich and enhance our understanding of data derived on the bench, as well as provide feasible alternatives to costly or technically challenging experiments. Coarse-grained computational models of RNA are especially important in this regard, as they allow analysis of events occurring in timescales relevant to RNA biological function, which are inaccessible through experimental methods alone. We have developed a three-bead coarse-grained model of RNA for discrete molecular dynamics simulations. This model is efficient in de novo prediction of short RNA tertiary structure, starting from RNA primary sequences of less than 50 nucleotides. To complement this model, we have incorporated additional base-pairing constraints and have developed a bias potential reliant on data obtained from hydroxyl probing experiments that guide RNA folding to its correct state. By introducing experimentally derived constraints to our computer simulations, we are able to make reliable predictions of RNA tertiary structures up to a few hundred nucleotides. Our refined model exemplifies a valuable benefit achieved through integration of computation and experimental methods.

  18. Physics-based models of the plasmasphere

    SciTech Connect

    Jordanova, Vania K; Pierrard, Vivane; Goldstein, Jerry; Andr'e, Nicolas; Lemaire, Joseph F; Liemohn, Mike W; Matsui, H

    2008-01-01

    We describe recent progress in physics-based models of the plasmasphere using the Auid and the kinetic approaches. Global modeling of the dynamics and inAuence of the plasmasphere is presented. Results from global plasmasphere simulations are used to understand and quantify (i) the electric potential pattern and evolution during geomagnetic storms, and (ii) the inAuence of the plasmasphere on the excitation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (ElvIIC) waves a.nd precipitation of energetic ions in the inner magnetosphere. The interactions of the plasmasphere with the ionosphere a.nd the other regions of the magnetosphere are pointed out. We show the results of simulations for the formation of the plasmapause and discuss the inAuence of plasmaspheric wind and of ultra low frequency (ULF) waves for transport of plasmaspheric material. Theoretical formulations used to model the electric field and plasma distribution in the plasmasphere are given. Model predictions are compared to recent CLUSTER and MAGE observations, but also to results of earlier models and satellite observations.

  19. 3-D physical models of amitosis (cytokinesis).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kang; Zou, Changhua

    2005-01-01

    Based on Newton's laws, extended Coulomb's law and published biological data, we develop our 3-D physical models of natural and normal amitosis (cytokinesis), for prokaryotes (bacterial cells) in M phase. We propose following hypotheses: Chromosome rings exclusion: No normally and naturally replicated chromosome rings (RCR) can occupy the same prokaryote, a bacterial cell. The RCR produce spontaneous and strong electromagnetic fields (EMF), that can be alternated environmentally, in protoplasm and cortex. The EMF is approximately a repulsive quasi-static electric (slowly variant and mostly electric) field (EF). The EF forces between the RCR are strong enough, and orderly accumulate contractile proteins that divide the procaryotes in the cell cortex of division plane or directly split the cell compartment envelope longitudinally. The radial component of the EF forces could also make furrows or cleavages of procaryotes. The EF distribution controls the protoplasm partition and completes the amitosis (cytokinesis). After the cytokinesis, the spontaneous and strong EF disappear because the net charge accumulation becomes weak, in the protoplasm. The exclusion is because the two sets of informative objects (RCR) have identical DNA codes information and they are electro magnetically identical, therefore they repulse from each other. We also compare divisions among eukaryotes, prokaryotes, mitochondria and chloroplasts and propose our hypothesis: The principles of our models are applied to divisions of mitochondria and chloroplasts of eucaryotes too because these division mechanisms are closer than others in a view of physics. Though we develop our model using 1 division plane (i.e., 1 cell is divided into 2 cells) as an example, the principle of our model is applied to the cases with multiple division planes (i.e., 1 cell is divided into multiple cells) too.

  20. Propulsion Physics Using the Chameleon Density Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    2011-01-01

    To grow as a space faring race, future spaceflight systems will require a new theory of propulsion. Specifically one that does not require mass ejection without limiting the high thrust necessary to accelerate within or beyond our solar system and return within a normal work period or lifetime. The Chameleon Density Model (CDM) is one such model that could provide new paths in propulsion toward this end. The CDM is based on Chameleon Cosmology a dark matter theory; introduced by Khrouy and Weltman in 2004. Chameleon as it is hidden within known physics, where the Chameleon field represents a scalar field within and about an object; even in the vacuum. The CDM relates to density changes in the Chameleon field, where the density changes are related to matter accelerations within and about an object. These density changes in turn change how an object couples to its environment. Whereby, thrust is achieved by causing a differential in the environmental coupling about an object. As a demonstration to show that the CDM fits within known propulsion physics, this paper uses the model to estimate the thrust from a solid rocket motor. Under the CDM, a solid rocket constitutes a two body system, i.e., the changing density of the rocket and the changing density in the nozzle arising from the accelerated mass. Whereby, the interactions between these systems cause a differential coupling to the local gravity environment of the earth. It is shown that the resulting differential in coupling produces a calculated value for the thrust near equivalent to the conventional thrust model used in Sutton and Ross, Rocket Propulsion Elements. Even though imbedded in the equations are the Universe energy scale factor, the reduced Planck mass and the Planck length, which relates the large Universe scale to the subatomic scale.

  1. A cortico-subcortical model for generation of spatially accurate sequential saccades.

    PubMed

    Dominey, P F; Arbib, M A

    1992-01-01

    This article provides a systems framework for the analysis of cortical and subcortical interactions in the control of saccadic eye movements, A major thesis of this model is that a topography of saccade direction and amplitude is preserved through multiple projections between brain regions until they are finally transformed into a temporal pattern of activity that drives the eyes to the target. The control of voluntary saccades to visual and remembered targets is modeled in terms of interactions between posterior parietal cortex, frontal eye fields, the basal ganglia (caudate and substantia nigra), superior colliculus, mediodorsal thalamus, and the saccade generator of the brainstem. Interactions include the modulation of eye movement motor error maps by topographic inhibitory projections, dynamic remapping of spatial target representations in saccade motor error maps, and sustained neural activity that embodies spatial memory. Models of these mechanisms implemented in our Neural Simulation Language simulate behavior and neural activity described in the literature, and suggest new experiments.

  2. An accurate, fast and stable material model for shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junker, Philipp

    2014-10-01

    Shape memory alloys possess several features that make them interesting for industrial applications. However, due to their complex and thermo-mechanically coupled behavior, direct use of shape memory alloys in engineering construction is problematic. There is thus a demand for tools to achieve realistic, predictive simulations that are numerically robust when computing complex, coupled load states, are fast enough to calculate geometries of industrial interest, and yield realistic and reliable results without the use of fitting curves. In this paper a new and numerically fast material model for shape memory alloys is presented. It is based solely on energetic quantities, which thus creates a quite universal approach. In the beginning, a short derivation is given before it is demonstrated how this model can be easily calibrated by means of tension tests. Then, several examples of engineering applications under mechanical and thermal loads are presented to demonstrate the numerical stability and high computation speed of the model.

  3. Detailed Physical Trough Model for NREL's Solar Advisor Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, M. J.; Blair, N.; Dobos, A.

    2010-10-01

    Solar Advisor Model (SAM) is a free software package made available by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Sandia National Laboratory, and the US Department of Energy. SAM contains hourly system performance and economic models for concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, photovoltaic, solar hot-water, and generic fuel-use technologies. Versions of SAM prior to 2010 included only the parabolic trough model based on Excelergy. This model uses top-level empirical performance curves to characterize plant behavior, and thus is limited in predictive capability for new technologies or component configurations. To address this and other functionality challenges, a new trough model; derived from physical first principles was commissioned to supplement the Excelergy-based empirical model. This new 'physical model' approaches the task of characterizing the performance of the whole parabolic trough plant by replacing empirical curve-fit relationships with more detailed calculations where practical. The resulting model matches the annual performance of the SAM empirical model (which has been previously verified with plant data) while maintaining run-times compatible with parametric analysis, adding additional flexibility in modeled system configurations, and providing more detailed performance calculations in the solar field, power block, piping, and storage subsystems.

  4. Improved image quality in pinhole SPECT by accurate modeling of the point spread function in low magnification systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pino, Francisco; Roé, Nuria; Aguiar, Pablo; Falcon, Carles; Ros, Domènec; Pavía, Javier

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has become an important noninvasive imaging technique in small-animal research. Due to the high resolution required in small-animal SPECT systems, the spatially variant system response needs to be included in the reconstruction algorithm. Accurate modeling of the system response should result in a major improvement in the quality of reconstructed images. The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess the impact that an accurate modeling of spatially variant collimator/detector response has on image-quality parameters, using a low magnification SPECT system equipped with a pinhole collimator and a small gamma camera. Methods: Three methods were used to model the point spread function (PSF). For the first, only the geometrical pinhole aperture was included in the PSF. For the second, the septal penetration through the pinhole collimator was added. In the third method, the measured intrinsic detector response was incorporated. Tomographic spatial resolution was evaluated and contrast, recovery coefficients, contrast-to-noise ratio, and noise were quantified using a custom-built NEMA NU 4–2008 image-quality phantom. Results: A high correlation was found between the experimental data corresponding to intrinsic detector response and the fitted values obtained by means of an asymmetric Gaussian distribution. For all PSF models, resolution improved as the distance from the point source to the center of the field of view increased and when the acquisition radius diminished. An improvement of resolution was observed after a minimum of five iterations when the PSF modeling included more corrections. Contrast, recovery coefficients, and contrast-to-noise ratio were better for the same level of noise in the image when more accurate models were included. Ring-type artifacts were observed when the number of iterations exceeded 12. Conclusions: Accurate modeling of the PSF improves resolution, contrast, and recovery

  5. Numerical Computation of a Continuous-thrust State Transition Matrix Incorporating Accurate Hardware and Ephemeris Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Donald; Conway, Bruce; Englander, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    A significant body of work exists showing that providing a nonlinear programming (NLP) solver with expressions for the problem constraint gradient substantially increases the speed of program execution and can also improve the robustness of convergence, especially for local optimizers. Calculation of these derivatives is often accomplished through the computation of spacecraft's state transition matrix (STM). If the two-body gravitational model is employed as is often done in the context of preliminary design, closed form expressions for these derivatives may be provided. If a high fidelity dynamics model, that might include perturbing forces such as the gravitational effect from multiple third bodies and solar radiation pressure is used then these STM's must be computed numerically. We present a method for the power hardward model and a full ephemeris model. An adaptive-step embedded eight order Dormand-Prince numerical integrator is discussed and a method for the computation of the time of flight derivatives in this framework is presented. The use of these numerically calculated derivatieves offer a substantial improvement over finite differencing in the context of a global optimizer. Specifically the inclusion of these STM's into the low thrust missiondesign tool chain in use at NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center allows for an increased preliminary mission design cadence.

  6. Advancements and challenges in generating accurate animal models of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Pasek, Raymond C; Gannon, Maureen

    2013-12-01

    The maintenance of glucose homeostasis during pregnancy is critical to the health and well-being of both the mother and the developing fetus. Strikingly, approximately 7% of human pregnancies are characterized by insufficient insulin production or signaling, resulting in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). In addition to the acute health concerns of hyperglycemia, women diagnosed with GDM during pregnancy have an increased incidence of complications during pregnancy as well as an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D) later in life. Furthermore, children born to mothers diagnosed with GDM have increased incidence of perinatal complications, including hypoglycemia, respiratory distress syndrome, and macrosomia, as well as an increased risk of being obese or developing T2D as adults. No single environmental or genetic factor is solely responsible for the disease; instead, a variety of risk factors, including weight, ethnicity, genetics, and family history, contribute to the likelihood of developing GDM, making the generation of animal models that fully recapitulate the disease difficult. Here, we discuss and critique the various animal models that have been generated to better understand the etiology of diabetes during pregnancy and its physiological impacts on both the mother and the fetus. Strategies utilized are diverse in nature and include the use of surgical manipulation, pharmacological treatment, nutritional manipulation, and genetic approaches in a variety of animal models. Continued development of animal models of GDM is essential for understanding the consequences of this disease as well as providing insights into potential treatments and preventative measures.

  7. Developing an Accurate CFD Based Gust Model for the Truss Braced Wing Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    The increased flexibility of long endurance aircraft having high aspect ratio wings necessitates attention to gust response and perhaps the incorporation of gust load alleviation. The design of civil transport aircraft with a strut or truss-braced high aspect ratio wing furthermore requires gust response analysis in the transonic cruise range. This requirement motivates the use of high fidelity nonlinear computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for gust response analysis. This paper presents the development of a CFD based gust model for the truss braced wing aircraft. A sharp-edged gust provides the gust system identification. The result of the system identification is several thousand time steps of instantaneous pressure coefficients over the entire vehicle. This data is filtered and downsampled to provide the snapshot data set from which a reduced order model is developed. A stochastic singular value decomposition algorithm is used to obtain a proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). The POD model is combined with a convolution integral to predict the time varying pressure coefficient distribution due to a novel gust profile. Finally the unsteady surface pressure response of the truss braced wing vehicle to a one-minus-cosine gust, simulated using the reduced order model, is compared with the full CFD.

  8. Towards Relaxing the Spherical Solar Radiation Pressure Model for Accurate Orbit Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachut, M.; Bennett, J.

    2016-09-01

    The well-known cannonball model has been used ubiquitously to capture the effects of atmospheric drag and solar radiation pressure on satellites and/or space debris for decades. While it lends itself naturally to spherical objects, its validity in the case of non-spherical objects has been debated heavily for years throughout the space situational awareness community. One of the leading motivations to improve orbit predictions by relaxing the spherical assumption, is the ongoing demand for more robust and reliable conjunction assessments. In this study, we explore the orbit propagation of a flat plate in a near-GEO orbit under the influence of solar radiation pressure, using a Lambertian BRDF model. Consequently, this approach will account for the spin rate and orientation of the object, which is typically determined in practice using a light curve analysis. Here, simulations will be performed which systematically reduces the spin rate to demonstrate the point at which the spherical model no longer describes the orbital elements of the spinning plate. Further understanding of this threshold would provide insight into when a higher fidelity model should be used, thus resulting in improved orbit propagations. Therefore, the work presented here is of particular interest to organizations and researchers that maintain their own catalog, and/or perform conjunction analyses.

  9. The Effects of Video Modeling with Voiceover Instruction on Accurate Implementation of Discrete-Trial Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vladescu, Jason C.; Carroll, Regina; Paden, Amber; Kodak, Tiffany M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study replicates and extends previous research on the use of video modeling (VM) with voiceover instruction to train staff to implement discrete-trial instruction (DTI). After staff trainees reached the mastery criterion when teaching an adult confederate with VM, they taught a child with a developmental disability using DTI. The…

  10. Accurate 2D/3D electromagnetic modeling for time-domain airborne EM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, C.; Hodges, G.

    2012-12-01

    The existing industry software cannot deliver correct results for 3D time-domain airborne EM responses. In this paper, starting from the Fourier transform and convolution, we compare the stability of different modeling techniques and analyze the reason for instable calculations of the time-domain airborne EM responses. We find that the singularity of the impulse responses of EM systems at very early time that are used in the convolution is responsible for the instability of the modeling (Fig.1). Based on this finding, we put forward an algorithm that uses step response rather than impulse response of the airborne EM system for the convolution and create a stable algorithm that delivers precise results and maintains well the integral/derivative relationship between the magnetic field B and the magnetic induction dB/dt. A three-step transformation procedure for the modeling is proposed: 1) output the frequency-domain EM response data from the existing software; 2) transform into step-response by digital Fourier/Hankel transform; 3) convolve the step response with the transmitting current or its derivatives. The method has proved to be working very well (Fig. 2). The algorithm can be extended to the modeling of other time-domain ground and airborne EM system responses.Fig. 1: Comparison of impulse and step responses for an airborne EM system Fig. 2: Bz and dBz/dt calculated from step (middle panel) and impulse responses (lower panel) for the same 3D model as in Fig.1.

  11. Statistically accurate low-order models for uncertainty quantification in turbulent dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Sapsis, Themistoklis P; Majda, Andrew J

    2013-08-20

    A framework for low-order predictive statistical modeling and uncertainty quantification in turbulent dynamical systems is developed here. These reduced-order, modified quasilinear Gaussian (ROMQG) algorithms apply to turbulent dynamical systems in which there is significant linear instability or linear nonnormal dynamics in the unperturbed system and energy-conserving nonlinear interactions that transfer energy from the unstable modes to the stable modes where dissipation occurs, resulting in a statistical steady state; such turbulent dynamical systems are ubiquitous in geophysical and engineering turbulence. The ROMQG method involves constructing a low-order, nonlinear, dynamical system for the mean and covariance statistics in the reduced subspace that has the unperturbed statistics as a stable fixed point and optimally incorporates the indirect effect of non-Gaussian third-order statistics for the unperturbed system in a systematic calibration stage. This calibration procedure is achieved through information involving only the mean and covariance statistics for the unperturbed equilibrium. The performance of the ROMQG algorithm is assessed on two stringent test cases: the 40-mode Lorenz 96 model mimicking midlatitude atmospheric turbulence and two-layer baroclinic models for high-latitude ocean turbulence with over 125,000 degrees of freedom. In the Lorenz 96 model, the ROMQG algorithm with just a single mode captures the transient response to random or deterministic forcing. For the baroclinic ocean turbulence models, the inexpensive ROMQG algorithm with 252 modes, less than 0.2% of the total, captures the nonlinear response of the energy, the heat flux, and even the one-dimensional energy and heat flux spectra.

  12. Computer Integrated Manufacturing: Physical Modelling Systems Design. A Personal View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Richard

    A computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM) Physical Modeling Systems Design project was undertaken in a time of rapid change in the industrial, business, technological, training, and educational areas in Australia. A specification of a manufacturing physical modeling system was drawn up. Physical modeling provides a flexibility and configurability…

  13. Tactile Teaching: Exploring Protein Structure/Function Using Physical Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Tim; Morris, Jennifer; Colton, Shannon; Batiza, Ann; Patrick, Michael; Franzen, Margaret; Goodsell, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The technology now exists to construct physical models of proteins based on atomic coordinates of solved structures. We review here our recent experiences in using physical models to teach concepts of protein structure and function at both the high school and the undergraduate levels. At the high school level, physical models are used in a…

  14. A parallel high-order accurate finite element nonlinear Stokes ice sheet model and benchmark experiments: A PARALLEL FEM STOKES ICE SHEET MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Leng, Wei; Ju, Lili; Gunzburger, Max; Price, Stephen; Ringler, Todd

    2012-01-04

    The numerical modeling of glacier and ice sheet evolution is a subject of growing interest, in part because of the potential for models to inform estimates of global sea level change. This paper focuses on the development of a numerical model that determines the velocity and pressure fields within an ice sheet. Our numerical model features a high-fidelity mathematical model involving the nonlinear Stokes system and combinations of no-sliding and sliding basal boundary conditions, high-order accurate finite element discretizations based on variable resolution grids, and highly scalable parallel solution strategies, all of which contribute to a numerical model that can achieve accurate velocity and pressure approximations in a highly efficient manner. We demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of our model by analytical solution tests, established ice sheet benchmark experiments, and comparisons with other well-established ice sheet models.

  15. Using the Bifocal Modeling Framework to Resolve "Discrepant Events" Between Physical Experiments and Virtual Models in Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blikstein, Paulo; Fuhrmann, Tamar; Salehi, Shima

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate an approach to supporting students' learning in science through a combination of physical experimentation and virtual modeling. We present a study that utilizes a scientific inquiry framework, which we call "bifocal modeling," to link student-designed experiments and computer models in real time. In this study, a group of high school students designed computer models of bacterial growth with reference to a simultaneous physical experiment they were conducting, and were able to validate the correctness of their model against the results of their experiment. Our findings suggest that as the students compared their virtual models with physical experiments, they encountered "discrepant events" that contradicted their existing conceptions and elicited a state of cognitive disequilibrium. This experience of conflict encouraged students to further examine their ideas and to seek more accurate explanations of the observed natural phenomena, improving the design of their computer models.

  16. Accurate dynamic power estimation for CMOS combinational logic circuits with real gate delay model.

    PubMed

    Fadl, Omnia S; Abu-Elyazeed, Mohamed F; Abdelhalim, Mohamed B; Amer, Hassanein H; Madian, Ahmed H

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic power estimation is essential in designing VLSI circuits where many parameters are involved but the only circuit parameter that is related to the circuit operation is the nodes' toggle rate. This paper discusses a deterministic and fast method to estimate the dynamic power consumption for CMOS combinational logic circuits using gate-level descriptions based on the Logic Pictures concept to obtain the circuit nodes' toggle rate. The delay model for the logic gates is the real-delay model. To validate the results, the method is applied to several circuits and compared against exhaustive, as well as Monte Carlo, simulations. The proposed technique was shown to save up to 96% processing time compared to exhaustive simulation.

  17. An accurate two-phase approximate solution to the acute viral infection model

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, Alan S

    2009-01-01

    During an acute viral infection, virus levels rise, reach a peak and then decline. Data and numerical solutions suggest the growth and decay phases are linear on a log scale. While viral dynamic models are typically nonlinear with analytical solutions difficult to obtain, the exponential nature of the solutions suggests approximations can be found. We derive a two-phase approximate solution to the target cell limited influenza model and illustrate the accuracy using data and previously established parameter values of six patients infected with influenza A. For one patient, the subsequent fall in virus concentration was not consistent with our predictions during the decay phase and an alternate approximation is derived. We find expressions for the rate and length of initial viral growth in terms of the parameters, the extent each parameter is involved in viral peaks, and the single parameter responsible for virus decay. We discuss applications of this analysis in antiviral treatments and investigating host and virus heterogeneities.

  18. Fuzzy modelling of Atlantic salmon physical habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Hilaire, André; Mocq, Julien; Cunjak, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Fish habitat models typically attempt to quantify the amount of available river habitat for a given fish species for various flow and hydraulic conditions. To achieve this, information on the preferred range of values of key physical habitat variables (e.g. water level, velocity, substrate diameter) for the targeted fishs pecies need to be modelled. In this context, we developed several habitat suitability indices sets for three Atlantic salmon life stages (young-of-the-year (YOY), parr, spawning adults) with the help of fuzzy logic modeling. Using the knowledge of twenty-seven experts, from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, we defined fuzzy sets of four variables (depth, substrate size, velocity and Habitat Suitability Index, or HSI) and associated fuzzy rules. When applied to the Romaine River (Canada), median curves of standardized Weighted Usable Area (WUA) were calculated and a confidence interval was obtained by bootstrap resampling. Despite the large range of WUA covered by the expert WUA curves, confidence intervals were relatively narrow: an average width of 0.095 (on a scale of 0 to 1) for spawning habitat, 0.155 for parr rearing habitat and 0.160 for YOY rearing habitat. When considering an environmental flow value corresponding to 90% of the maximum reached by WUA curve, results seem acceptable for the Romaine River. Generally, this proposed fuzzy logic method seems suitable to model habitat availability for the three life stages, while also providing an estimate of uncertainty in salmon preferences.

  19. A Physical Model for Gravitation and Inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasor, Ned

    2011-11-01

    A physical/analytical model of gravitation and inertia is described. The model is based on proportional expansion of the universe and its contents, along with special relativistic time delay within nucleons. An expression of the gravitational constant G is derived from the model in terms of fundamental constants and properties without adjustable parameters, [ G=he^2c^2 1pt 1ptτu(mpme)^3/2=6.67x10-8cm^3g.s^2 ] where h = Planck constant, e = electronic charge, c = speed of light, mp and me are the nucleonic and electronic masses, and τu= age of the universe. The value τu = 13.6 Gy that corresponds with the accepted value of G shown is within the uncertainty of the empirical value ofτu currently estimated from cosmic ray background and other astronomical data. A modified Newtonian dynamics and other relationships derived from the model are consistent quantitatively and functionally with a variety of observed astronomical data, some of which have been considered previously to be anomalous or based on dark matter.

  20. Robust and Accurate Modeling Approaches for Migraine Per-Patient Prediction from Ambulatory Data.

    PubMed

    Pagán, Josué; De Orbe, M Irene; Gago, Ana; Sobrado, Mónica; Risco-Martín, José L; Mora, J Vivancos; Moya, José M; Ayala, José L

    2015-06-30

    Migraine is one of the most wide-spread neurological disorders, and its medical treatment represents a high percentage of the costs of health systems. In some patients, characteristic symptoms that precede the headache appear. However, they are nonspecific, and their prediction horizon is unknown and pretty variable; hence, these symptoms are almost useless for prediction, and they are not useful to advance the intake of drugs to be effective and neutralize the pain. To solve this problem, this paper sets up a realistic monitoring scenario where hemodynamic variables from real patients are monitored in ambulatory conditions with a wireless body sensor network (WBSN). The acquired data are used to evaluate the predictive capabilities and robustness against noise and failures in sensors of several modeling approaches. The obtained results encourage the development of per-patient models based on state-space models (N4SID) that are capable of providing average forecast windows of 47 min and a low rate of false positives.

  1. Robust and Accurate Modeling Approaches for Migraine Per-Patient Prediction from Ambulatory Data

    PubMed Central

    Pagán, Josué; Irene De Orbe, M.; Gago, Ana; Sobrado, Mónica; Risco-Martín, José L.; Vivancos Mora, J.; Moya, José M.; Ayala, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is one of the most wide-spread neurological disorders, and its medical treatment represents a high percentage of the costs of health systems. In some patients, characteristic symptoms that precede the headache appear. However, they are nonspecific, and their prediction horizon is unknown and pretty variable; hence, these symptoms are almost useless for prediction, and they are not useful to advance the intake of drugs to be effective and neutralize the pain. To solve this problem, this paper sets up a realistic monitoring scenario where hemodynamic variables from real patients are monitored in ambulatory conditions with a wireless body sensor network (WBSN). The acquired data are used to evaluate the predictive capabilities and robustness against noise and failures in sensors of several modeling approaches. The obtained results encourage the development of per-patient models based on state-space models (N4SID) that are capable of providing average forecast windows of 47 min and a low rate of false positives. PMID:26134103

  2. Accurate 3d Textured Models of Vessels for the Improvement of the Educational Tools of a Museum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soile, S.; Adam, K.; Ioannidis, C.; Georgopoulos, A.

    2013-02-01

    Besides the demonstration of the findings, modern museums organize educational programs which aim to experience and knowledge sharing combined with entertainment rather than to pure learning. Toward that effort, 2D and 3D digital representations are gradually replacing the traditional recording of the findings through photos or drawings. The present paper refers to a project that aims to create 3D textured models of two lekythoi that are exhibited in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens in Greece; on the surfaces of these lekythoi scenes of the adventures of Odysseus are depicted. The project is expected to support the production of an educational movie and some other relevant interactive educational programs for the museum. The creation of accurate developments of the paintings and of accurate 3D models is the basis for the visualization of the adventures of the mythical hero. The data collection was made by using a structured light scanner consisting of two machine vision cameras that are used for the determination of geometry of the object, a high resolution camera for the recording of the texture, and a DLP projector. The creation of the final accurate 3D textured model is a complicated and tiring procedure which includes the collection of geometric data, the creation of the surface, the noise filtering, the merging of individual surfaces, the creation of a c-mesh, the creation of the UV map, the provision of the texture and, finally, the general processing of the 3D textured object. For a better result a combination of commercial and in-house software made for the automation of various steps of the procedure was used. The results derived from the above procedure were especially satisfactory in terms of accuracy and quality of the model. However, the procedure was proved to be time consuming while the use of various software packages presumes the services of a specialist.

  3. Compass models: Theory and physical motivations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussinov, Zohar; van den Brink, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Compass models are theories of matter in which the couplings between the internal spin (or other relevant field) components are inherently spatially (typically, direction) dependent. A simple illustrative example is furnished by the 90° compass model on a square lattice in which only couplings of the form τixτjx (where {τia}a denote Pauli operators at site i ) are associated with nearest-neighbor sites i and j separated along the x axis of the lattice while τiyτjy couplings appear for sites separated by a lattice constant along the y axis. Similar compass-type interactions can appear in diverse physical systems. For instance, compass models describe Mott insulators with orbital degrees of freedom where interactions sensitively depend on the spatial orientation of the orbitals involved as well as the low-energy effective theories of frustrated quantum magnets, and a host of other systems such as vacancy centers, and cold atomic gases. The fundamental interdependence between internal (spin, orbital, or other) and external (i.e., spatial) degrees of freedom which underlies compass models generally leads to very rich behaviors, including the frustration of (semi-)classical ordered states on nonfrustrated lattices, and to enhanced quantum effects, prompting, in certain cases, the appearance of zero-temperature quantum spin liquids. As a consequence of these frustrations, new types of symmetries and their associated degeneracies may appear. These intermediate symmetries lie midway between the extremes of global symmetries and local gauge symmetries and lead to effective dimensional reductions. In this article, compass models are reviewed in a unified manner, paying close attention to exact consequences of these symmetries and to thermal and quantum fluctuations that stabilize orders via order-out-of-disorder effects. This is complemented by a survey of numerical results. In addition to reviewing past works, a number of other models are introduced and new results

  4. Can an Atmospherically Forced Ocean Model Accurately Simulate Sea Surface Temperature During ENSO Events?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Mateger, Herley E. Hurlburt, Alan J. Walloraft H a inleficed to offer this paper to the (Nanm of Confe ounce) (Dafe. P/ace and Classification of...temperature during ENSO events? By A. BIROL KARA.HARLEY E. HURLBURT*. CHARLIE N. BARRON. ALAN J. WALLCRAFT andE. JOSEPH METZGER, Naval Research...Quantifying SST errors from an OGCM in relation to atmospheric forcing variables. Ocean Modell. 29, 43-57. Urge. W. G., McWilliams , J. C. and Doney. S. C

  5. Generation of Accurate Lateral Boundary Conditions for a Surface-Water Groundwater Interaction Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khambhammettu, P.; Tsou, M.; Panday, S. M.; Kool, J.; Wei, X.

    2010-12-01

    The 106 mile long Peace River in Florida flows south from Lakeland to Charlotte Harbor and has a drainage basin of approximately 2,350 square miles. A long-term decline in stream flows and groundwater potentiometric levels has been observed in the region. Long-term trends in rainfall, along with effects of land use changes on runoff, surface-water storage, recharge and evapotranspiration patterns, and increased groundwater and surface-water withdrawals have contributed to this decline. The South West Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) has funded the development of the Peace River Integrated Model (PRIM) to assess the effects of land use, water use, and climatic changes on stream flows and to evaluate the effectiveness of various management alternatives for restoring stream flows. The PRIM was developed using MODHMS, a fully integrated surface-water groundwater flow and transport simulator developed by HydroGeoLogic, Inc. The development of the lateral boundary conditions (groundwater inflow and outflow) for the PRIM in both historical and predictive contexts is discussed in this presentation. Monthly-varying specified heads were used to define the lateral boundary conditions for the PRIM. These head values were derived from the coarser Southern District Groundwater Model (SDM). However, there were discrepancies between the simulated SDM heads and measured heads: the likely causes being spatial (use of a coarser grid) and temporal (monthly average pumping rates and recharge rates) approximations in the regional SDM. Finer re-calibration of the SDM was not feasible, therefore, an innovative approach was adopted to remove the discrepancies. In this approach, point discrepancies/residuals between the observed and simulated heads were kriged with an appropriate variogram to generate a residual surface. This surface was then added to the simulated head surface of the SDM to generate a corrected head surface. This approach preserves the trends associated with

  6. Considering mask pellicle effect for more accurate OPC model at 45nm technology node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ching-Heng; Liu, Qingwei; Zhang, Liguo

    2008-11-01

    Now it comes to the 45nm technology node, which should be the first generation of the immersion micro-lithography. And the brand-new lithography tool makes many optical effects, which can be ignored at 90nm and 65nm nodes, now have significant impact on the pattern transmission process from design to silicon. Among all the effects, one that needs to be pay attention to is the mask pellicle effect's impact on the critical dimension variation. With the implement of hyper-NA lithography tools, light transmits the mask pellicle vertically is not a good approximation now, and the image blurring induced by the mask pellicle should be taken into account in the computational microlithography. In this works, we investigate how the mask pellicle impacts the accuracy of the OPC model. And we will show that considering the extremely tight critical dimension control spec for 45nm generation node, to take the mask pellicle effect into the OPC model now becomes necessary.

  7. Accurate modeling of SiPM detectors coupled to FE electronics for timing performance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciciriello, F.; Corsi, F.; Licciulli, F.; Marzocca, C.; Matarrese, G.; Del Guerra, A.; Bisogni, M. G.

    2013-08-01

    It has already been shown how the shape of the current pulse produced by a SiPM in response to an incident photon is sensibly affected by the characteristics of the front-end electronics (FEE) used to read out the detector. When the application requires to approach the best theoretical time performance of the detection system, the influence of all the parasitics associated to the coupling SiPM-FEE can play a relevant role and must be adequately modeled. In particular, it has been reported that the shape of the current pulse is affected by the parasitic inductance of the wiring connection between SiPM and FEE. In this contribution, we extend the validity of a previously presented SiPM model to account for the wiring inductance. Various combinations of the main performance parameters of the FEE (input resistance and bandwidth) have been simulated in order to evaluate their influence on the time accuracy of the detection system, when the time pick-off of each single event is extracted by means of a leading edge discriminator (LED) technique.

  8. A Holoinformational Model of the Physical Observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biase, Francisco Di

    2013-09-01

    The author proposes a holoinformational view of the observer based, on the holonomic theory of brain/mind function and quantum brain dynamics developed by Karl Pribram, Sir John Eccles, R.L. Amoroso, Hameroff, Jibu and Yasue, and in the quantumholographic and holomovement theory of David Bohm. This conceptual framework is integrated with nonlocal information properties of the Quantum Field Theory of Umesawa, with the concept of negentropy, order, and organization developed by Shannon, Wiener, Szilard and Brillouin, and to the theories of self-organization and complexity of Prigogine, Atlan, Jantsch and Kauffman. Wheeler's "it from bit" concept of a participatory universe, and the developments of the physics of information made by Zureck and others with the concepts of statistical entropy and algorithmic entropy, related to the number of bits being processed in the mind of the observer are also considered. This new synthesis gives a self-organizing quantum nonlocal informational basis for a new model of awareness in a participatory universe. In this synthesis, awareness is conceived as meaningful quantum nonlocal information interconnecting the brain and the cosmos, by a holoinformational unified field (integrating nonlocal holistic (quantum) and local (Newtonian). We propose that the cosmology of the physical observer is this unified nonlocal quantum-holographic cosmos manifesting itself through awareness, interconnected in a participatory holistic and indivisible way the human mind-brain to all levels of the self-organizing holographic anthropic multiverse.

  9. A 1/8° coupled biochemical-physical Indian Ocean Regional Model: Physical results and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ke; Derada, Sergio; Xue, Huijie; Xiu, Peng; Chai, Fei; Xie, Qiang; Wang, Dongxiao

    2015-08-01

    A coupled physical-biochemical Indian Ocean Regional Model (IORM), based on the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) and the Carbon Silicate Nitrogen Ecosystem (CoSiNE) model was configured with the primary objective of providing an accurate estimate of the oceanic physical state along with the biochemical processes simulated by CoSiNE to understand the variability in the Indian Ocean (IO). The model did not assimilate any data; instead, weak relaxation of temperature and salinity was implemented to keep the model stable in the long-term simulations. In this study, the skill of the IORM in simulating physical states in the IO was evaluated. Basin-scale surface circulation and cross-sectional transports were compared to observations, which demonstrated that the model replicated most of the observed features with reasonably good accuracy. Consistency and biases in the upper ocean temperature, salinity, and mixed layer depth were also analyzed. Lastly, the seasonality in the IO, its response to monsoonal forcing, and the evolution and dynamics of surface and subsurface dipole events were examined. The IORM reproduced most of the dynamic features including Ekman pumping, wave propagation, and climate variability at both annual and interannual time scales. The internal ocean dynamics and behavior of the modeled sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) suggest a coupled ocean/atmosphere instability that will require further research, including sensitivity experiments to realize improvements in model parameterization.

  10. TRIM—3D: a three-dimensional model for accurate simulation of shallow water flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casulli, Vincenzo; Bertolazzi, Enrico; Cheng, Ralph T.

    1993-01-01

    A semi-implicit finite difference formulation for the numerical solution of three-dimensional tidal circulation is discussed. The governing equations are the three-dimensional Reynolds equations in which the pressure is assumed to be hydrostatic. A minimal degree of implicitness has been introduced in the finite difference formula so that the resulting algorithm permits the use of large time steps at a minimal computational cost. This formulation includes the simulation of flooding and drying of tidal flats, and is fully vectorizable for an efficient implementation on modern vector computers. The high computational efficiency of this method has made it possible to provide the fine details of circulation structure in complex regions that previous studies were unable to obtain. For proper interpretation of the model results suitable interactive graphics is also an essential tool.

  11. Secular Orbit Evolution in Systems with a Strong External Perturber - A Simple and Accurate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade-Ines, Eduardo; Eggl, Siegfried

    2017-04-01

    We present a semi-analytical correction to the seminal solution for the secular motion of a planet’s orbit under gravitational influence of an external perturber derived by Heppenheimer. A comparison between analytical predictions and numerical simulations allows us to determine corrective factors for the secular frequency and forced eccentricity in the coplanar restricted three-body problem. The correction is given in the form of a polynomial function of the system’s parameters that can be applied to first-order forced eccentricity and secular frequency estimates. The resulting secular equations are simple, straight forward to use, and improve the fidelity of Heppenheimers solution well beyond higher-order models. The quality and convergence of the corrected secular equations are tested for a wide range of parameters and limits of its applicability are given.

  12. A microbial clock provides an accurate estimate of the postmortem interval in a mouse model system

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Jessica L; Wegener Parfrey, Laura; Gonzalez, Antonio; Lauber, Christian L; Knights, Dan; Ackermann, Gail; Humphrey, Gregory C; Gebert, Matthew J; Van Treuren, Will; Berg-Lyons, Donna; Keepers, Kyle; Guo, Yan; Bullard, James; Fierer, Noah; Carter, David O; Knight, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Establishing the time since death is critical in every death investigation, yet existing techniques are susceptible to a range of errors and biases. For example, forensic entomology is widely used to assess the postmortem interval (PMI), but errors can range from days to months. Microbes may provide a novel method for estimating PMI that avoids many of these limitations. Here we show that postmortem microbial community changes are dramatic, measurable, and repeatable in a mouse model system, allowing PMI to be estimated within approximately 3 days over 48 days. Our results provide a detailed understanding of bacterial and microbial eukaryotic ecology within a decomposing corpse system and suggest that microbial community data can be developed into a forensic tool for estimating PMI. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01104.001 PMID:24137541

  13. Biomechanical modeling provides more accurate data for neuronavigation than rigid registration

    PubMed Central

    Garlapati, Revanth Reddy; Roy, Aditi; Joldes, Grand Roman; Wittek, Adam; Mostayed, Ahmed; Doyle, Barry; Warfield, Simon Keith; Kikinis, Ron; Knuckey, Neville; Bunt, Stuart; Miller, Karol

    2015-01-01

    It is possible to improve neuronavigation during image-guided surgery by warping the high-quality preoperative brain images so that they correspond with the current intraoperative configuration of the brain. In this work, the accuracy of registration results obtained using comprehensive biomechanical models is compared to the accuracy of rigid registration, the technology currently available to patients. This comparison allows us to investigate whether biomechanical modeling provides good quality image data for neuronavigation for a larger proportion of patients than rigid registration. Preoperative images for 33 cases of neurosurgery were warped onto their respective intraoperative configurations using both biomechanics-based method and rigid registration. We used a Hausdorff distance-based evaluation process that measures the difference between images to quantify the performance of both methods of registration. A statistical test for difference in proportions was conducted to evaluate the null hypothesis that the proportion of patients for whom improved neuronavigation can be achieved, is the same for rigid and biomechanics-based registration. The null hypothesis was confidently rejected (p-value<10−4). Even the modified hypothesis that less than 25% of patients would benefit from the use of biomechanics-based registration was rejected at a significance level of 5% (p-value = 0.02). The biomechanics-based method proved particularly effective for cases experiencing large craniotomy-induced brain deformations. The outcome of this analysis suggests that our nonlinear biomechanics-based methods are beneficial to a large proportion of patients and can be considered for use in the operating theatre as one possible method of improving neuronavigation and surgical outcomes. PMID:24460486

  14. A new method based on the subpixel Gaussian model for accurate estimation of asteroid coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savanevych, V. E.; Briukhovetskyi, O. B.; Sokovikova, N. S.; Bezkrovny, M. M.; Vavilova, I. B.; Ivashchenko, Yu. M.; Elenin, L. V.; Khlamov, S. V.; Movsesian, Ia. S.; Dashkova, A. M.; Pogorelov, A. V.

    2015-08-01

    We describe a new iteration method to estimate asteroid coordinates, based on a subpixel Gaussian model of the discrete object image. The method operates by continuous parameters (asteroid coordinates) in a discrete observational space (the set of pixel potentials) of the CCD frame. In this model, the kind of coordinate distribution of the photons hitting a pixel of the CCD frame is known a priori, while the associated parameters are determined from a real digital object image. The method that is developed, which is flexible in adapting to any form of object image, has a high measurement accuracy along with a low calculating complexity, due to the maximum-likelihood procedure that is implemented to obtain the best fit instead of a least-squares method and Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for minimization of the quadratic form. Since 2010, the method has been tested as the basis of our Collection Light Technology (COLITEC) software, which has been installed at several observatories across the world with the aim of the automatic discovery of asteroids and comets in sets of CCD frames. As a result, four comets (C/2010 X1 (Elenin), P/2011 NO1(Elenin), C/2012 S1 (ISON) and P/2013 V3 (Nevski)) as well as more than 1500 small Solar system bodies (including five near-Earth objects (NEOs), 21 Trojan asteroids of Jupiter and one Centaur object) have been discovered. We discuss these results, which allowed us to compare the accuracy parameters of the new method and confirm its efficiency. In 2014, the COLITEC software was recommended to all members of the Gaia-FUN-SSO network for analysing observations as a tool to detect faint moving objects in frames.

  15. Effects of model physics on hypoxia simulations for the northern Gulf of Mexico: A model intercomparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fennel, Katja; Laurent, Arnaud; Hetland, Robert; Justić, Dubravko; Ko, Dong S.; Lehrter, John; Murrell, Michael; Wang, Lixia; Yu, Liuqian; Zhang, Wenxia

    2016-08-01

    A large hypoxic zone forms every summer on the Texas-Louisiana Shelf in the northern Gulf of Mexico due to nutrient and freshwater inputs from the Mississippi/Atchafalaya River System. Efforts are underway to reduce the extent of hypoxic conditions through reductions in river nutrient inputs, but the response of hypoxia to such nutrient load reductions is difficult to predict because biological responses are confounded by variability in physical processes. The objective of this study is to identify the major physical model aspects that matter for hypoxia simulation and prediction. In order to do so, we compare three different circulation models (ROMS, FVCOM, and NCOM) implemented for the northern Gulf of Mexico, all coupled to the same simple oxygen model, with observations and against each other. By using a highly simplified oxygen model, we eliminate the potentially confounding effects of a full biogeochemical model and can isolate the effects of physical features. In a systematic assessment, we found that (1) model-to-model differences in bottom water temperatures result in differences in simulated hypoxia because temperature influences the uptake rate of oxygen by the sediments (an important oxygen sink in this system), (2) vertical stratification does not explain model-to-model differences in hypoxic conditions in a straightforward way, and (3) the thickness of the bottom boundary layer, which sets the thickness of the hypoxic layer in all three models, is key to determining the likelihood of a model to generate hypoxic conditions. These results imply that hypoxic area, the commonly used metric in the northern Gulf which ignores hypoxic layer thickness, is insufficient for assessing a model's ability to accurately simulate hypoxia, and that hypoxic volume needs to be considered as well.

  16. The human skin/chick chorioallantoic membrane model accurately predicts the potency of cosmetic allergens.

    PubMed

    Slodownik, Dan; Grinberg, Igor; Spira, Ram M; Skornik, Yehuda; Goldstein, Ronald S

    2009-04-01

    The current standard method for predicting contact allergenicity is the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA). Public objection to the use of animals in testing of cosmetics makes the development of a system that does not use sentient animals highly desirable. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of the chick egg has been extensively used for the growth of normal and transformed mammalian tissues. The CAM is not innervated, and embryos are sacrificed before the development of pain perception. The aim of this study was to determine whether the sensitization phase of contact dermatitis to known cosmetic allergens can be quantified using CAM-engrafted human skin and how these results compare with published EC3 data obtained with the LLNA. We studied six common molecules used in allergen testing and quantified migration of epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) as a measure of their allergic potency. All agents with known allergic potential induced statistically significant migration of LC. The data obtained correlated well with published data for these allergens generated using the LLNA test. The human-skin CAM model therefore has great potential as an inexpensive, non-radioactive, in vivo alternative to the LLNA, which does not require the use of sentient animals. In addition, this system has the advantage of testing the allergic response of human, rather than animal skin.

  17. A Conceptual Model of Observed Physical Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, Dean A.

    2015-01-01

    Physical literacy is a concept that is gaining greater acceptance around the world with the United Nations Educational, Cultural, and Scientific Organization (2013) recognizing it as one of several central tenets in a quality physical education framework. However, previous attempts to understand progression in physical literacy learning have been…

  18. Antenna modeling considerations for accurate SAR calculations in human phantoms in close proximity to GSM cellular base station antennas.

    PubMed

    van Wyk, Marnus J; Bingle, Marianne; Meyer, Frans J C

    2005-09-01

    International bodies such as International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) and the Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineering (IEEE) make provision for human exposure assessment based on SAR calculations (or measurements) and basic restrictions. In the case of base station exposure this is mostly applicable to occupational exposure scenarios in the very near field of these antennas where the conservative reference level criteria could be unnecessarily restrictive. This study presents a variety of critical aspects that need to be considered when calculating SAR in a human body close to a mobile phone base station antenna. A hybrid FEM/MoM technique is proposed as a suitable numerical method to obtain accurate results. The verification of the FEM/MoM implementation has been presented in a previous publication; the focus of this study is an investigation into the detail that must be included in a numerical model of the antenna, to accurately represent the real-world scenario. This is accomplished by comparing numerical results to measurements for a generic GSM base station antenna and appropriate, representative canonical and human phantoms. The results show that it is critical to take the disturbance effect of the human phantom (a large conductive body) on the base station antenna into account when the antenna-phantom spacing is less than 300 mm. For these small spacings, the antenna structure must be modeled in detail. The conclusion is that it is feasible to calculate, using the proposed techniques and methodology, accurate occupational compliance zones around base station antennas based on a SAR profile and basic restriction guidelines.

  19. Toward a mineral physics reference model for the Moon's core.

    PubMed

    Antonangeli, Daniele; Morard, Guillaume; Schmerr, Nicholas C; Komabayashi, Tetsuya; Krisch, Michael; Fiquet, Guillaume; Fei, Yingwei

    2015-03-31

    The physical properties of iron (Fe) at high pressure and high temperature are crucial for understanding the chemical composition, evolution, and dynamics of planetary interiors. Indeed, the inner structures of the telluric planets all share a similar layered nature: a central metallic core composed mostly of iron, surrounded by a silicate mantle, and a thin, chemically differentiated crust. To date, most studies of iron have focused on the hexagonal closed packed (hcp, or ε) phase, as ε-Fe is likely stable across the pressure and temperature conditions of Earth's core. However, at the more moderate pressures characteristic of the cores of smaller planetary bodies, such as the Moon, Mercury, or Mars, iron takes on a face-centered cubic (fcc, or γ) structure. Here we present compressional and shear wave sound velocity and density measurements of γ-Fe at high pressures and high temperatures, which are needed to develop accurate seismic models of planetary interiors. Our results indicate that the seismic velocities proposed for the Moon's inner core by a recent reanalysis of Apollo seismic data are well below those of γ-Fe. Our dataset thus provides strong constraints to seismic models of the lunar core and cores of small telluric planets. This allows us to propose a direct compositional and velocity model for the Moon's core.

  20. The Role of Various Curriculum Models on Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culpepper, Dean O.; Tarr, Susan J.; Killion, Lorraine E.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers have suggested that physical education curricula can be highly effective in increasing physical activity levels at school (Sallis & Owen, 1999). The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of various curriculum models on physical activity. Total steps were measured on 1,111 subjects and three curriculum models were studied…

  1. Models Based Practices in Physical Education: A Sociocritical Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landi, Dillon; Fitzpatrick, Katie; McGlashan, Hayley

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we reflect on models-based practices in physical education using a sociocritical lens. Drawing links between neoliberal moves in education, and critical approaches to the body and physicality, we take a view that models are useful tools that are worth integrating into physical education, but we are apprehensive to suggest they…

  2. A Structural Equation Model of Conceptual Change in Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Sinatra, Gale M.

    2011-01-01

    A model of conceptual change in physics was tested on introductory-level, college physics students. Structural equation modeling was used to test hypothesized relationships among variables linked to conceptual change in physics including an approach goal orientation, need for cognition, motivation, and course grade. Conceptual change in physics…

  3. A Structural Equation Model of Expertise in College Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Carr, Martha

    2009-01-01

    A model of expertise in physics was tested on a sample of 374 college students in 2 different level physics courses. Structural equation modeling was used to test hypothesized relationships among variables linked to expert performance in physics including strategy use, pictorial representation, categorization skills, and motivation, and these…

  4. Models for Curriculum and Pedagogy in Elementary School Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulinna, Pamela Hodges

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review current models for curriculum and pedagogy used in elementary school physical education programs. Historically, physical educators have developed and used a multiactivity curriculum in order to educate students through physical movement. More recently, a variety of alternative curricular models have been…

  5. Kaon physics: Probing the standard model and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Tschirhart, R.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    The status and prospects of current and future kaon physics experiments is discussed. Both precision measurements and the search for and measurement of ultra-rare decays are powerful probes of many models of new physics beyond the Standard Model. The physics reach of these experiments is briefly discussed.

  6. Physical modeling of transverse drainage mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, J. C.; Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2005-12-01

    Streams that incise across bedrock highlands such as anticlines, upwarps, cuestas, or horsts are termed transverse drainages. Their relevance today involves such diverse matters as highway and dam construction decisions, location of wildlife corridors, better-informed sediment budgets, and detailed studies into developmental histories of late Cenozoic landscapes. The transient conditions responsible for transverse drainage incision have been extensively studied on a case-by-case basis, and the dominate mechanisms proposed include: antecedence, superimposition, overflow, and piracy. Modeling efforts have been limited to antecedence, and such the specific erosional conditions required for transverse drainage incision, with respect to the individual mechanisms, remains poorly understood. In this study, fifteen experiments attempted to simulate the four mechanisms and constructed on a 9.15 m long, 2.1 m wide, and 0.45 m deep stream table. Experiments lasted between 50 and 220 minutes. The stream table was filled with seven tons of sediment consisting of a silt and clay (30%) and a fine to coarse sand (70%) mixture. The physical models highlighted the importance of downstream aggradation with regard to antecedent incision versus possible defeat and diversion. The overflow experiments indicate that retreating knickpoints across a basin outlet produce a high probability of downstream flooding when associated with a deep lake. Misters used in a couple of experiments illustrate a potential complication with regard to headward erosion driven piracy. Relatively level asymmetrically sloped ridges allow for the drainage divide across the ridge to retreat from headward erosion, but hindered when the ridge's apex undulates or when symmetrically sloped. Although these physical models cannot strictly simulate natural transverse drainages, the observed processes, their development over time, and resultant landforms roughly emulate their natural counterparts. Proposed originally from

  7. Rolling mill optimization using an accurate and rapid new model for mill deflection and strip thickness profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Arif Sultan

    This work presents improved technology for attaining high-quality rolled metal strip. The new technology is based on an innovative method to model both the static and dynamic characteristics of rolling mill deflection, and it applies equally to both cluster-type and non cluster-type rolling mill configurations. By effectively combining numerical Finite Element Analysis (FEA) with analytical solid mechanics, the devised approach delivers a rapid, accurate, flexible, high-fidelity model useful for optimizing many important rolling parameters. The associated static deflection model enables computation of the thickness profile and corresponding flatness of the rolled strip. Accurate methods of predicting the strip thickness profile and strip flatness are important in rolling mill design, rolling schedule set-up, control of mill flatness actuators, and optimization of ground roll profiles. The corresponding dynamic deflection model enables solution of the standard eigenvalue problem to determine natural frequencies and modes of vibration. The presented method for solving the roll-stack deflection problem offers several important advantages over traditional methods. In particular, it includes continuity of elastic foundations, non-iterative solution when using pre-determined elastic foundation moduli, continuous third-order displacement fields, simple stress-field determination, the ability to calculate dynamic characteristics, and a comparatively faster solution time. Consistent with the most advanced existing methods, the presented method accommodates loading conditions that represent roll crowning, roll bending, roll shifting, and roll crossing mechanisms. Validation of the static model is provided by comparing results and solution time with large-scale, commercial finite element simulations. In addition to examples with the common 4-high vertical stand rolling mill, application of the presented method to the most complex of rolling mill configurations is demonstrated

  8. Fast and Accurate Hybrid Stream PCRTMSOLAR Radiative Transfer Model for Reflected Solar Spectrum Simulation in the Cloudy Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Qiguang; Liu, Xu; Wu, Wan; Kizer, Susan; Baize, Rosemary R.

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid stream PCRTM-SOLAR model has been proposed for fast and accurate radiative transfer simulation. It calculates the reflected solar (RS) radiances with a fast coarse way and then, with the help of a pre-saved matrix, transforms the results to obtain the desired high accurate RS spectrum. The methodology has been demonstrated with the hybrid stream discrete ordinate (HSDO) radiative transfer (RT) model. The HSDO method calculates the monochromatic radiances using a 4-stream discrete ordinate method, where only a small number of monochromatic radiances are simulated with both 4-stream and a larger N-stream (N = 16) discrete ordinate RT algorithm. The accuracy of the obtained channel radiance is comparable to the result from N-stream moderate resolution atmospheric transmission version 5 (MODTRAN5). The root-mean-square errors are usually less than 5x10(exp -4) mW/sq cm/sr/cm. The computational speed is three to four-orders of magnitude faster than the medium speed correlated-k option MODTRAN5. This method is very efficient to simulate thousands of RS spectra under multi-layer clouds/aerosols and solar radiation conditions for climate change study and numerical weather prediction applications.

  9. Combining Structural Modeling with Ensemble Machine Learning to Accurately Predict Protein Fold Stability and Binding Affinity Effects upon Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Lopez, Sebastian; Kim, Philip M.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in sequencing have led to a rapid accumulation of mutations, some of which are associated with diseases. However, to draw mechanistic conclusions, a biochemical understanding of these mutations is necessary. For coding mutations, accurate prediction of significant changes in either the stability of proteins or their affinity to their binding partners is required. Traditional methods have used semi-empirical force fields, while newer methods employ machine learning of sequence and structural features. Here, we show how combining both of these approaches leads to a marked boost in accuracy. We introduce ELASPIC, a novel ensemble machine learning approach that is able to predict stability effects upon mutation in both, domain cores and domain-domain interfaces. We combine semi-empirical energy terms, sequence conservation, and a wide variety of molecular details with a Stochastic Gradient Boosting of Decision Trees (SGB-DT) algorithm. The accuracy of our predictions surpasses existing methods by a considerable margin, achieving correlation coefficients of 0.77 for stability, and 0.75 for affinity predictions. Notably, we integrated homology modeling to enable proteome-wide prediction and show that accurate prediction on modeled structures is possible. Lastly, ELASPIC showed significant differences between various types of disease-associated mutations, as well as between disease and common neutral mutations. Unlike pure sequence-based prediction methods that try to predict phenotypic effects of mutations, our predictions unravel the molecular details governing the protein instability, and help us better understand the molecular causes of diseases. PMID:25243403

  10. Skin mechanics measured in vivo using torsion: a new and accurate model more sensitive to age, sex and moisturizing treatment.

    PubMed

    Salter, D C; McArthur, H C; Crosse, J E; Dickens, A D

    1993-10-01

    Summary Measurements of skin mechanics are required to understand better cracking and flaking of the epidermis and loss of 'elasticity'with age in the dermis. Improvements in torsional testing are described here. The resulting data was fitted to algebraic models, the parameters of which can serve both as a concise description of the responses and as a means of relating them to skin structure and physiology. This investigation looks into the suitability of seven such algebraic models. Five of the models examined here appear to be new. Using the commercially available Dia-Stron DTM Torque Meter with our own software, model parameters were studied as indicators of the effects of age and sex in 41 people, and of skin moisturizing treatments in a further 10 people. The two models in the literature were both found to be substantially less accurate and sensitive representations of experimental data than one of the new models proposed here based on the Weibull distribution. This 'WB model'was consistently the one best able to distinguish differences and detect changes which were statistically significant. The WB model appears to be the most powerful and efficient available. Use of this model makes it possible to demonstrate in vivo a statistically significant mechanical difference between male and pre-menopausal female skin using only one parameter (p= 0.0163, with 18 males and 19 females) and to demonstrate a statistically significant mechanical difference between successive decades of age in female skin using only one parameter (p= 0.0124, n= 24). The two parameters of the model most sensitive to skin structure, function and treatment have been combined to form the axes of a 'Skin condition chart'. Any person can be located on this chart at a point indicating their overall skin condition in mechanical terms and any changes in that condition can be clearly demonstrated by movement across the plot.

  11. Accurate and efficient prediction of fine-resolution hydrologic and carbon dynamic simulations from coarse-resolution models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pau, George Shu Heng; Shen, Chaopeng; Riley, William J.; Liu, Yaning

    2016-02-01

    The topography, and the biotic and abiotic parameters are typically upscaled to make watershed-scale hydrologic-biogeochemical models computationally tractable. However, upscaling procedure can produce biases when nonlinear interactions between different processes are not fully captured at coarse resolutions. Here we applied the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition Mapping Method (PODMM) to downscale the field solutions from a coarse (7 km) resolution grid to a fine (220 m) resolution grid. PODMM trains a reduced-order model (ROM) with coarse-resolution and fine-resolution solutions, here obtained using PAWS+CLM, a quasi-3-D watershed processes model that has been validated for many temperate watersheds. Subsequent fine-resolution solutions were approximated based only on coarse-resolution solutions and the ROM. The approximation errors were efficiently quantified using an error estimator. By jointly estimating correlated variables and temporally varying the ROM parameters, we further reduced the approximation errors by up to 20%. We also improved the method's robustness by constructing multiple ROMs using different set of variables, and selecting the best approximation based on the error estimator. The ROMs produced accurate downscaling of soil moisture, latent heat flux, and net primary production with O(1000) reduction in computational cost. The subgrid distributions were also nearly indistinguishable from the ones obtained using the fine-resolution model. Compared to coarse-resolution solutions, biases in upscaled ROM solutions were reduced by up to 80%. This method has the potential to help address the long-standing spatial scaling problem in hydrology and enable long-time integration, parameter estimation, and stochastic uncertainty analysis while accurately representing the heterogeneities.

  12. A mixed model reduction method for preserving selected physical information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Gangtie

    2017-03-01

    A new model reduction method in the frequency domain is presented. By mixedly using the model reduction techniques from both the time domain and the frequency domain, the dynamic model is condensed to selected physical coordinates, and the contribution of slave degrees of freedom is taken as a modification to the model in the form of effective modal mass of virtually constrained modes. The reduced model can preserve the physical information related to the selected physical coordinates such as physical parameters and physical space positions of corresponding structure components. For the cases of non-classical damping, the method is extended to the model reduction in the state space but still only contains the selected physical coordinates. Numerical results are presented to validate the method and show the effectiveness of the model reduction.

  13. Accurate Characterization of Ion Transport Properties in Binary Symmetric Electrolytes Using In Situ NMR Imaging and Inverse Modeling.

    PubMed

    Sethurajan, Athinthra Krishnaswamy; Krachkovskiy, Sergey A; Halalay, Ion C; Goward, Gillian R; Protas, Bartosz

    2015-09-17

    We used NMR imaging (MRI) combined with data analysis based on inverse modeling of the mass transport problem to determine ionic diffusion coefficients and transference numbers in electrolyte solutions of interest for Li-ion batteries. Sensitivity analyses have shown that accurate estimates of these parameters (as a function of concentration) are critical to the reliability of the predictions provided by models of porous electrodes. The inverse modeling (IM) solution was generated with an extension of the Planck-Nernst model for the transport of ionic species in electrolyte solutions. Concentration-dependent diffusion coefficients and transference numbers were derived using concentration profiles obtained from in situ (19)F MRI measurements. Material properties were reconstructed under minimal assumptions using methods of variational optimization to minimize the least-squares deviation between experimental and simulated concentration values with uncertainty of the reconstructions quantified using a Monte Carlo analysis. The diffusion coefficients obtained by pulsed field gradient NMR (PFG-NMR) fall within the 95% confidence bounds for the diffusion coefficient values obtained by the MRI+IM method. The MRI+IM method also yields the concentration dependence of the Li(+) transference number in agreement with trends obtained by electrochemical methods for similar systems and with predictions of theoretical models for concentrated electrolyte solutions, in marked contrast to the salt concentration dependence of transport numbers determined from PFG-NMR data.

  14. Integration of Advanced Probabilistic Analysis Techniques with Multi-Physics Models

    SciTech Connect

    Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit; none,; Flanagan, George F.; Poore III, Willis P.; Muhlheim, Michael David

    2014-07-30

    An integrated simulation platform that couples probabilistic analysis-based tools with model-based simulation tools can provide valuable insights for reactive and proactive responses to plant operating conditions. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the benefits of a partial implementation of the Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Detailed Framework Specification through the coupling of advanced PRA capabilities and accurate multi-physics plant models. Coupling a probabilistic model with a multi-physics model will aid in design, operations, and safety by providing a more accurate understanding of plant behavior. This represents the first attempt at actually integrating these two types of analyses for a control system used for operations, on a faster than real-time basis. This report documents the development of the basic communication capability to exchange data with the probabilistic model using Reliability Workbench (RWB) and the multi-physics model using Dymola. The communication pathways from injecting a fault (i.e., failing a component) to the probabilistic and multi-physics models were successfully completed. This first version was tested with prototypic models represented in both RWB and Modelica. First, a simple event tree/fault tree (ET/FT) model was created to develop the software code to implement the communication capabilities between the dynamic-link library (dll) and RWB. A program, written in C#, successfully communicates faults to the probabilistic model through the dll. A systems model of the Advanced Liquid-Metal Reactor–Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module (ALMR-PRISM) design developed under another DOE project was upgraded using Dymola to include proper interfaces to allow data exchange with the control application (ConApp). A program, written in C+, successfully communicates faults to the multi-physics model. The results of the example simulation were successfully plotted.

  15. Insights on the role of accurate state estimation in coupled model parameter estimation by a conceptual climate model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaolin; Zhang, Shaoqing; Lin, Xiaopei; Li, Mingkui

    2017-03-01

    The uncertainties in values of coupled model parameters are an important source of model bias that causes model climate drift. The values can be calibrated by a parameter estimation procedure that projects observational information onto model parameters. The signal-to-noise ratio of error covariance between the model state and the parameter being estimated directly determines whether the parameter estimation succeeds or not. With a conceptual climate model that couples the stochastic atmosphere and slow-varying ocean, this study examines the sensitivity of state-parameter covariance on the accuracy of estimated model states in different model components of a coupled system. Due to the interaction of multiple timescales, the fast-varying atmosphere with a chaotic nature is the major source of the inaccuracy of estimated state-parameter covariance. Thus, enhancing the estimation accuracy of atmospheric states is very important for the success of coupled model parameter estimation, especially for the parameters in the air-sea interaction processes. The impact of chaotic-to-periodic ratio in state variability on parameter estimation is also discussed. This simple model study provides a guideline when real observations are used to optimize model parameters in a coupled general circulation model for improving climate analysis and predictions.

  16. Physics beyond the Standard Model from hydrogen spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubachs, W.; Koelemeij, J. C. J.; Eikema, K. S. E.; Salumbides, E. J.

    2016-02-01

    Spectroscopy of hydrogen can be used for a search into physics beyond the Standard Model. Differences between the absorption spectra of the Lyman and Werner bands of H2 as observed at high redshift and those measured in the laboratory can be interpreted in terms of possible variations of the proton-electron mass ratio μ =mp /me over cosmological history. Investigation of ten such absorbers in the redshift range z = 2.0 -4.2 yields a constraint of | Δμ / μ | < 5 ×10-6 at 3σ. Observation of H2 from the photospheres of white dwarf stars inside our Galaxy delivers a constraint of similar magnitude on a dependence of μ on a gravitational potential 104 times as strong as on the Earth's surface. While such astronomical studies aim at finding quintessence in an indirect manner, laboratory precision measurements target such additional quantum fields in a direct manner. Laser-based precision measurements of dissociation energies, vibrational splittings and rotational level energies in H2 molecules and their deuterated isotopomers HD and D2 produce values for the rovibrational binding energies fully consistent with quantum ab initio calculations including relativistic and quantum electrodynamical (QED) effects. Similarly, precision measurements of high-overtone vibrational transitions of HD+ ions, captured in ion traps and sympathetically cooled to mK temperatures, also result in transition frequencies fully consistent with calculations including QED corrections. Precision measurements of inter-Rydberg transitions in H2 can be extrapolated to yield accurate values for level splittings in the H2+ -ion. These comprehensive results of laboratory precision measurements on neutral and ionic hydrogen molecules can be interpreted to set bounds on the existence of possible fifth forces and of higher dimensions, phenomena describing physics beyond the Standard Model.

  17. A Physically Based Model for Air-Lift Pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FrançOis, Odile; Gilmore, Tyler; Pinto, Michael J.; Gorelick, Steven M.

    1996-08-01

    A predictive, physically based model for pumping water from a well using air injection (air-lift pumping) was developed for the range of flow rates that we explored in a series of laboratory experiments. The goal was to determine the air flow rate required to pump a specific flow rate of water in a given well, designed for in-well air stripping of volatile organic compounds from an aquifer. The model was validated against original laboratory data as well as data from the literature. A laboratory air-lift system was constructed that consisted of a 70-foot-long (21-m-long) pipe, 5.5 inches (14 cm) inside diameter, in which an air line of 1.3 inches (3.3 cm) outside diameter was placed with its bottom at different elevations above the base of the long pipe. Experiments were conducted for different levels of submergence, with water-pumping rates ranging from 5 to 70 gallons/min (0.32-4.4 L/s), and air flow ranging from 7 to 38 standard cubic feet/min (0.2-1.1 m3 STP/min). The theoretical approach adopted in the model was based on an analysis of the system as a one-dimensional two-phase flow problem. The expression for the pressure gradient includes inertial energy terms, friction, and gas expansion versus elevation. Data analysis revealed that application of the usual drift-flux model to estimate the air void fraction is not adequate for the observed flow patterns: either slug or churn flow. We propose a modified drift-flux model that accurately predicts air-lift pumping requirements for a range of conditions representative of in-well air-stripping operations.

  18. Tool for physics beyond the standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newby, Christopher A.

    The standard model (SM) of particle physics is a well studied theory, but there are hints that the SM is not the final story. What the full picture is, no one knows, but this thesis looks into three methods useful for exploring a few of the possibilities. To begin I present a paper by Spencer Chang, Nirmal Raj, Chaowaroj Wanotayaroj, and me, that studies the Higgs boson. The scalar particle first seen in 2012 may be the vanilla SM version, but there is some evidence that its couplings are different than predicted. By means of increasing the Higgs' coupling to vector bosons and fermions, we can be more consistent with the data. Next, in a paper by Spencer Chang, Gabriel Barello, and me, we elaborate on a tool created to study dark matter (DM) direct detection. The original work by Anand. et al. focused on elastic dark matter, whereas we extended this work to include the in elastic case, where different DM mass states enter and leave the collision. We also examine several direct detection experiments with our new framework to see if DAMA's modulation can be explained while avoiding the strong constraints imposed by the other experiments. We find that there are several operators that can do this. Finally, in a paper by Spencer Chang, Gabriel Barello, and me, we study an interesting phenomenon know as kinetic mixing, where two gauge bosons can share interactions with particles even though these particles aren't charged under both gauge groups. This, in and of itself, is not new, but we discuss a different method of obtaining this mixing where instead of mixing between two Abelian groups one of the groups is Nonabelian. Using this we then see that there is an inherent mass scale in the mixing strength; something that is absent in the Abelian-Abelian case. Furthermore, if the Nonabelian symmetry is the SU(2)L of the SM then the mass scale of the physics responsible for the mixing is about 1 TeV, right around the sweet spot for detection at the LHC. This dissertation

  19. Engaging Students In Modeling Instruction for Introductory Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewe, Eric

    2016-05-01

    Teaching introductory physics is arguably one of the most important things that a physics department does. It is the primary way that students from other science disciplines engage with physics and it is the introduction to physics for majors. Modeling instruction is an active learning strategy for introductory physics built on the premise that science proceeds through the iterative process of model construction, development, deployment, and revision. We describe the role that participating in authentic modeling has in learning and then explore how students engage in this process in the classroom. In this presentation, we provide a theoretical background on models and modeling and describe how these theoretical elements are enacted in the introductory university physics classroom. We provide both quantitative and video data to link the development of a conceptual model to the design of the learning environment and to student outcomes. This work is supported in part by DUE #1140706.

  20. Modelling Mathematical Reasoning in Physics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhden, Olaf; Karam, Ricardo; Pietrocola, Mauricio; Pospiech, Gesche

    2012-01-01

    Many findings from research as well as reports from teachers describe students' problem solving strategies as manipulation of formulas by rote. The resulting dissatisfaction with quantitative physical textbook problems seems to influence the attitude towards the role of mathematics in physics education in general. Mathematics is often seen as a…

  1. Development of physical and mathematical models for the Porous Ceramic Tube Plant Nutrification System (PCTPNS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsao, D. Teh-Wei; Okos, M. R.; Sager, J. C.; Dreschel, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    A physical model of the Porous Ceramic Tube Plant Nutrification System (PCTPNS) was developed through microscopic observations of the tube surface under various operational conditions. In addition, a mathematical model of this system was developed which incorporated the effects of the applied suction pressure, surface tension, and gravitational forces as well as the porosity and physical dimensions of the tubes. The flow of liquid through the PCTPNS was thus characterized for non-biological situations. One of the key factors in the verification of these models is the accurate and rapid measurement of the 'wetness' or holding capacity of the ceramic tubes. This study evaluated a thermistor based moisture sensor device and recommendations for future research on alternative sensing devices are proposed. In addition, extensions of the physical and mathematical models to include the effects of plant physiology and growth are also discussed for future research.

  2. A linear dispersion relation for the hybrid kinetic-ion/fluid-electron model of plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Told, D.; Cookmeyer, J.; Astfalk, P.; Jenko, F.

    2016-07-01

    A dispersion relation for a commonly used hybrid model of plasma physics is developed, which combines fully kinetic ions and a massless-electron fluid description. Although this model and variations of it have been used to describe plasma phenomena for about 40 years, to date there exists no general dispersion relation to describe the linear wave physics contained in the model. Previous efforts along these lines are extended here to retain arbitrary wave propagation angles, temperature anisotropy effects, as well as additional terms in the generalized Ohm’s law which determines the electric field. A numerical solver for the dispersion relation is developed, and linear wave physics is benchmarked against solutions of a full Vlasov-Maxwell dispersion relation solver. This work opens the door to a more accurate interpretation of existing and future wave and turbulence simulations using this type of hybrid model.

  3. Teacher Fidelity to One Physical Education Curricular Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kloeppel, Tiffany; Kulinna, Pamela Hodges; Stylianou, Michalis; van der Mars, Hans

    2013-01-01

    This study addressed teachers' fidelity to one Physical Education curricular model. The theoretical framework guiding this study included professional development and fidelity to curricular models. In this study, teachers' fidelity to the Dynamic Physical Education (DPE) curricular model was measured for high and nonsupport district groups.…

  4. A method for simple and accurate estimation of fog deposition in a mountain forest using a meteorological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katata, Genki; Kajino, Mizuo; Hiraki, Takatoshi; Aikawa, Masahide; Kobayashi, Tomiki; Nagai, Haruyasu

    2011-10-01

    To apply a meteorological model to investigate fog occurrence, acidification and deposition in mountain forests, the meteorological model WRF was modified to calculate fog deposition accurately by the simple linear function of fog deposition onto vegetation derived from numerical experiments using the detailed multilayer atmosphere-vegetation-soil model (SOLVEG). The modified version of WRF that includes fog deposition (fog-WRF) was tested in a mountain forest on Mt. Rokko in Japan. fog-WRF provided a distinctly better prediction of liquid water content of fog (LWC) than the original version of WRF. It also successfully simulated throughfall observations due to fog deposition inside the forest during the summer season that excluded the effect of forest edges. Using the linear relationship between fog deposition and altitude given by the fog-WRF calculations and the data from throughfall observations at a given altitude, the vertical distribution of fog deposition can be roughly estimated in mountain forests. A meteorological model that includes fog deposition will be useful in mapping fog deposition in mountain cloud forests.

  5. High Fidelity Non-Gravitational Force Models for Precise and Accurate Orbit Determination of TerraSAR-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackel, Stefan; Montenbruck, Oliver; Steigenberger, -Peter; Eineder, Michael; Gisinger, Christoph

    Remote sensing satellites support a broad range of scientific and commercial applications. The two radar imaging satellites TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X provide spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and interferometric SAR data with a very high accuracy. The increasing demand for precise radar products relies on sophisticated validation methods, which require precise and accurate orbit products. Basically, the precise reconstruction of the satellite’s trajectory is based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements from a geodetic-grade dual-frequency receiver onboard the spacecraft. The Reduced Dynamic Orbit Determination (RDOD) approach utilizes models for the gravitational and non-gravitational forces. Following a proper analysis of the orbit quality, systematics in the orbit products have been identified, which reflect deficits in the non-gravitational force models. A detailed satellite macro model is introduced to describe the geometry and the optical surface properties of the satellite. Two major non-gravitational forces are the direct and the indirect Solar Radiation Pressure (SRP). Due to the dusk-dawn orbit configuration of TerraSAR-X, the satellite is almost constantly illuminated by the Sun. Therefore, the direct SRP has an effect on the lateral stability of the determined orbit. The indirect effect of the solar radiation principally contributes to the Earth Radiation Pressure (ERP). The resulting force depends on the sunlight, which is reflected by the illuminated Earth surface in the visible, and the emission of the Earth body in the infrared spectra. Both components of ERP require Earth models to describe the optical properties of the Earth surface. Therefore, the influence of different Earth models on the orbit quality is assessed within the presentation. The presentation highlights the influence of non-gravitational force and satellite macro models on the orbit quality of TerraSAR-X.

  6. Physical activity for people with a disability: a conceptual model.

    PubMed

    van der Ploeg, Hidde P; van der Beek, Allard J; van der Woude, Luc H V; van Mechelen, Willem

    2004-01-01

    The promotion of a physically active lifestyle has become an important issue in health policy in first-world countries. A physically active lifestyle is accompanied by several fitness and health benefits. Individuals with a disability can particularly benefit from an active lifestyle: not only does it reduce the risk for secondary health problems, but all levels of functioning can be influenced positively. The objective of this article is to propose a conceptual model that describes the relationships between physical activity behaviour, its determinants and functioning of people with a disability. The literature was systematically searched for articles considering physical activity and disability, and models relating both topics were looked for in particular. No models were found relating physical activity behaviour, its determinants and functioning in people with a disability. Consequently, a new model, the Physical Activity for people with a Disability (PAD) model, was constructed based on existing models of disability and models of determinants of physical activity behaviour. The starting point was the new WHO Model of Functioning and Disability, part of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), which describes the multidimensional aspects of functioning and disability. Physical activity behaviour and its determinants were integrated into the ICF model. The factors determining physical activity were based mainly on those used in the Attitude, Social influence and self-Efficacy (ASE) model. The proposed model can be used as a theoretical framework for future interventions and research on physical activity promotion in the population of people with a disability. The model currently forms the theoretical basis for a large physical activity promotion trial in ten Dutch rehabilitation centres.

  7. Bio-inspired evolutionary oral tract shape modeling for physical modeling vocal synthesis.

    PubMed

    Howard, David M; Tyrrell, Andy M; Murphy, Damian T; Cooper, Crispin; Mullen, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Physical modeling using digital waveguide mesh (DWM) models is an audio synthesis method that has been shown to produce an acoustic output in music synthesis applications that is often described as being "organic," "warm," or "intimate." This paper describes work that takes its inspiration from physical modeling music synthesis and applies it to speech synthesis through a physical modeling mesh model of the human oral tract. Oral tract shapes are found using a computational technique based on the principles of biological evolution. Essential to successful speech synthesis using this method is accurate measurements of the cross-sectional area of the human oral tract, and these are usually derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, such images are nonideal, because of the lengthy exposure time (relative to the time of articulation of speech sounds) required, the local ambient acoustic noise associated with the MRI machine itself and the required supine position for the subject. An alternative method is described where a bio-inspired computing technique that simulates the process of evolution is used to evolve oral tract shapes. This technique is able to produce appropriate oral tract shapes for open vowels using acoustic and excitation data from two adult males and two adult females, but shapes for close vowels that are less appropriate. This technique has none of the drawbacks associated with MRI, because all it requires from the subject is an acoustic and electrolaryngograph (or electroglottograph) recording. Appropriate oral tract shapes do enable the model to produce excellent quality synthetic speech for vowel sounds, and sounds that involve dynamic oral tract shape changes, such as diphthongs, can also be synthesized using an impedance mapped technique. Efforts to improve performance by reducing mesh quantization for close vowels had little effect, and further work is required.

  8. Do inverse ecosystem models accurately reconstruct plankton trophic flows? Comparing two solution methods using field data from the California Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stukel, Michael R.; Landry, Michael R.; Ohman, Mark D.; Goericke, Ralf; Samo, Ty; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia R.

    2012-03-01

    Despite the increasing use of linear inverse modeling techniques to elucidate fluxes in undersampled marine ecosystems, the accuracy with which they estimate food web flows has not been resolved. New Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) solution methods have also called into question the biases of the commonly used L2 minimum norm (L 2MN) solution technique. Here, we test the abilities of MCMC and L 2MN methods to recover field-measured ecosystem rates that are sequentially excluded from the model input. For data, we use experimental measurements from process cruises of the California Current Ecosystem (CCE-LTER) Program that include rate estimates of phytoplankton and bacterial production, micro- and mesozooplankton grazing, and carbon export from eight study sites varying from rich coastal upwelling to offshore oligotrophic conditions. Both the MCMC and L 2MN methods predicted well-constrained rates of protozoan and mesozooplankton grazing with reasonable accuracy, but the MCMC method overestimated primary production. The MCMC method more accurately predicted the poorly constrained rate of vertical carbon export than the L 2MN method, which consistently overestimated export. Results involving DOC and bacterial production were equivocal. Overall, when primary production is provided as model input, the MCMC method gives a robust depiction of ecosystem processes. Uncertainty in inverse ecosystem models is large and arises primarily from solution under-determinacy. We thus suggest that experimental programs focusing on food web fluxes expand the range of experimental measurements to include the nature and fate of detrital pools, which play large roles in the model.

  9. Prognostic breast cancer signature identified from 3D culture model accurately predicts clinical outcome across independent datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Katherine J.; Patrick, Denis R.; Bissell, Mina J.; Fournier, Marcia V.

    2008-10-20

    One of the major tenets in breast cancer research is that early detection is vital for patient survival by increasing treatment options. To that end, we have previously used a novel unsupervised approach to identify a set of genes whose expression predicts prognosis of breast cancer patients. The predictive genes were selected in a well-defined three dimensional (3D) cell culture model of non-malignant human mammary epithelial cell morphogenesis as down-regulated during breast epithelial cell acinar formation and cell cycle arrest. Here we examine the ability of this gene signature (3D-signature) to predict prognosis in three independent breast cancer microarray datasets having 295, 286, and 118 samples, respectively. Our results show that the 3D-signature accurately predicts prognosis in three unrelated patient datasets. At 10 years, the probability of positive outcome was 52, 51, and 47 percent in the group with a poor-prognosis signature and 91, 75, and 71 percent in the group with a good-prognosis signature for the three datasets, respectively (Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, p<0.05). Hazard ratios for poor outcome were 5.5 (95% CI 3.0 to 12.2, p<0.0001), 2.4 (95% CI 1.6 to 3.6, p<0.0001) and 1.9 (95% CI 1.1 to 3.2, p = 0.016) and remained significant for the two larger datasets when corrected for estrogen receptor (ER) status. Hence the 3D-signature accurately predicts breast cancer outcome in both ER-positive and ER-negative tumors, though individual genes differed in their prognostic ability in the two subtypes. Genes that were prognostic in ER+ patients are AURKA, CEP55, RRM2, EPHA2, FGFBP1, and VRK1, while genes prognostic in ER patients include ACTB, FOXM1 and SERPINE2 (Kaplan-Meier p<0.05). Multivariable Cox regression analysis in the largest dataset showed that the 3D-signature was a strong independent factor in predicting breast cancer outcome. The 3D-signature accurately predicts breast cancer outcome across multiple datasets and holds prognostic

  10. Theory of bi-molecular association dynamics in 2D for accurate model and experimental parameterization of binding rates

    PubMed Central

    Yogurtcu, Osman N.; Johnson, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of association between diffusing and reacting molecular species are routinely quantified using simple rate-equation kinetics that assume both well-mixed concentrations of species and a single rate constant for parameterizing the binding rate. In two-dimensions (2D), however, even when systems are well-mixed, the assumption of a single characteristic rate constant for describing association is not generally accurate, due to the properties of diffusional searching in dimensions d ≤ 2. Establishing rigorous bounds for discriminating between 2D reactive systems that will be accurately described by rate equations with a single rate constant, and those that will not, is critical for both modeling and experimentally parameterizing binding reactions restricted to surfaces such as cellular membranes. We show here that in regimes of intrinsic reaction rate (ka) and diffusion (D) parameters ka/D > 0.05, a single rate constant cannot be fit to the dynamics of concentrations of associating species independently of the initial conditions. Instead, a more sophisticated multi-parametric description than rate-equations is necessary to robustly characterize bimolecular reactions from experiment. Our quantitative bounds derive from our new analysis of 2D rate-behavior predicted from Smoluchowski theory. Using a recently developed single particle reaction-diffusion algorithm we extend here to 2D, we are able to test and validate the predictions of Smoluchowski theory and several other theories of reversible reaction dynamics in 2D for the first time. Finally, our results also mean that simulations of reactive systems in 2D using rate equations must be undertaken with caution when reactions have ka/D > 0.05, regardless of the simulation volume. We introduce here a simple formula for an adaptive concentration dependent rate constant for these chemical kinetics simulations which improves on existing formulas to better capture non-equilibrium reaction dynamics from dilute

  11. A comprehensive physics-based model encompassing variable surface resistance and underlying physics of ionic polymer-metal composite actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Qi; Palmre, Viljar; Stalbaum, Tyler; Kim, Kwang J.

    2015-09-01

    The ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) is an emerging smart material in actuation and sensing applications, such as artificial muscles, underwater actuators, and advanced medical devices. However, the effect of the change in surface electrode properties on the actuating of IPMC has not been well studied. To address this problem, we theoretically predict and experimentally investigate the dynamic electro-mechanical response of the IPMC thin-strip actuator. A model of the IPMC actuator is proposed based on the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations for ion transport and charge dynamics in the polymer membrane, while a physical model for the change of surface resistance of the electrodes of the IPMC due to deformation is also incorporated. By incorporating these two models, a complete, dynamic, physics-based model for IPMC actuators is presented. To verify the model, IPMC samples were prepared and experiments were conducted. The results show that the theoretical model can accurately predict the actuating performance of IPMC actuators over a range of dynamic conditions. Additionally, the charge dynamics inside the polymer during the oscillation of the IPMC is presented. It is also shown that the charge at the boundary mainly affects the induced stress of the IPMC. The current study is beneficial for the comprehensive understanding of the surface electrode effect on the performance of IPMC actuators.

  12. A physical model for measuring thermally-induced block displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakun-Mazor, Dagan; Feldhiem, Aviran; Keissar, Yuval; Hatzor, Yossef H.

    2016-04-01

    A new model for thermally-induced block displacement in discontinuous rock slopes has been recently suggested. The model consists of a discrete block that is separated from the rock mass by a tension crack and rests on an inclined plane. The tension crack is filled with a wedge block or rock fragments. Irreversible block sliding is assumed to develop in response to climatic thermal fluctuations and consequent contraction and expansion of the sliding block material. While a tentative analytical solution for this model is already available, we are exploring here the possibility of obtaining such a permanent, thermally-induced, rock block displacement, under fully controlled conditions at the laboratory, and the sensitivity of the mechanism to geometry, mechanical properties, and temperature fluctuations. A large scale concrete physical model (50x150x60 cm^3) is being examined in a Climate-Controlled Room (CCR). The CCR permits accurate control of ambient temperature from 5 to 45 Celsius degrees. The permanent plastic displacement is being measured using four displacement transducers and a high resolution (29M pixel) visual range camera. A series of thermocouples measure the heating front inside the sliding block, hence thermal diffusivity is evaluated from the measured thermal gradient and heat flow. In order to select the appropriate concrete mixture, the mechanical and thermo-physical properties of concrete samples are determined in the lab. Friction angle and shear stiffness of the sliding interface are determined utilizing a hydraulic, servo-controlled direct shear apparatus. Uniaxial compression tests are performed to determine the uniaxial compressive strength, Young's modulus and Poison's ratio of the intact block material using a stiff triaxial load frame. Thermal conductivity and linear thermal expansion coefficient are determined experimentally using a self-constructed measuring system. Due to the fact that this experiment is still in progress, preliminary

  13. TOWARD EFFICIENT RIPARIAN RESTORATION: INTEGRATING ECONOMIC, PHYSICAL, AND BIOLOGICAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper integrates economic, biological, and physical models to determine the efficient combination and spatial allocation of conservation efforts for water quality protection and salmonid habitat enhancement in the Grande Ronde basin, Oregon. The integrated modeling system co...

  14. An accurate locally active memristor model for S-type negative differential resistance in NbO{sub x}

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Gary A.; Musunuru, Srinitya; Zhang, Jiaming; Lee, James; Hsieh, Cheng-Chih; Jackson, Warren; Jeon, Yoocharn; Henze, Dick; Li, Zhiyong; Stanley Williams, R.; Vandenberghe, Ken

    2016-01-11

    A number of important commercial applications would benefit from the introduction of easily manufactured devices that exhibit current-controlled, or “S-type,” negative differential resistance (NDR). A leading example is emerging non-volatile memory based on crossbar array architectures. Due to the inherently linear current vs. voltage characteristics of candidate non-volatile memristor memory elements, individual memory cells in these crossbar arrays can be addressed only if a highly non-linear circuit element, termed a “selector,” is incorporated in the cell. Selectors based on a layer of niobium oxide sandwiched between two electrodes have been investigated by a number of groups because the NDR they exhibit provides a promisingly large non-linearity. We have developed a highly accurate compact dynamical model for their electrical conduction that shows that the NDR in these devices results from a thermal feedback mechanism. A series of electrothermal measurements and numerical simulations corroborate this model. These results reveal that the leakage currents can be minimized by thermally isolating the selector or by incorporating materials with larger activation energies for electron motion.

  15. X-ray and microwave emissions from the July 19, 2012 solar flare: Highly accurate observations and kinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsyk, P. A.; Somov, B. V.

    2016-08-01

    The M7.7 solar flare of July 19, 2012, at 05:58 UT was observed with high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolutions in the hard X-ray and optical ranges. The flare occurred at the solar limb, which allowed us to see the relative positions of the coronal and chromospheric X-ray sources and to determine their spectra. To explain the observations of the coronal source and the chromospheric one unocculted by the solar limb, we apply an accurate analytical model for the kinetic behavior of accelerated electrons in a flare. We interpret the chromospheric hard X-ray source in the thick-target approximation with a reverse current and the coronal one in the thin-target approximation. Our estimates of the slopes of the hard X-ray spectra for both sources are consistent with the observations. However, the calculated intensity of the coronal source is lower than the observed one by several times. Allowance for the acceleration of fast electrons in a collapsing magnetic trap has enabled us to remove this contradiction. As a result of our modeling, we have estimated the flux density of the energy transferred by electrons with energies above 15 keV to be ˜5 × 1010 erg cm-2 s-1, which exceeds the values typical of the thick-target model without a reverse current by a factor of ˜5. To independently test the model, we have calculated the microwave spectrum in the range 1-50 GHz that corresponds to the available radio observations.

  16. An Empirical-Mathematical Modelling Approach to Upper Secondary Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angell, Carl; Kind, Per Morten; Henriksen, Ellen K.; Guttersrud, Oystein

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we describe a teaching approach focusing on modelling in physics, emphasizing scientific reasoning based on empirical data and using the notion of multiple representations of physical phenomena as a framework. We describe modelling activities from a project (PHYS 21) and relate some experiences from implementation of the modelling…

  17. Modeling the Discrimination Power of Physics Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesic, Vanes

    2011-01-01

    For the purposes of tailoring physics instruction in accordance with the needs and abilities of the students it is useful to explore the knowledge structure of students of different ability levels. In order to precisely differentiate the successive, characteristic states of student achievement it is necessary to use test items that possess…

  18. Testing a Theoretical Model of Immigration Transition and Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sun Ju; Im, Eun-Ok

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to develop a theoretical model to explain the relationships between immigration transition and midlife women's physical activity and test the relationships among the major variables of the model. A theoretical model, which was developed based on transitions theory and the midlife women's attitudes toward physical activity theory, consists of 4 major variables, including length of stay in the United States, country of birth, level of acculturation, and midlife women's physical activity. To test the theoretical model, a secondary analysis with data from 127 Hispanic women and 123 non-Hispanic (NH) Asian women in a national Internet study was used. Among the major variables of the model, length of stay in the United States was negatively associated with physical activity in Hispanic women. Level of acculturation in NH Asian women was positively correlated with women's physical activity. Country of birth and level of acculturation were significant factors that influenced physical activity in both Hispanic and NH Asian women. The findings support the theoretical model that was developed to examine relationships between immigration transition and physical activity; it shows that immigration transition can play an essential role in influencing health behaviors of immigrant populations in the United States. The NH theoretical model can be widely used in nursing practice and research that focus on immigrant women and their health behaviors. Health care providers need to consider the influences of immigration transition to promote immigrant women's physical activity.

  19. Simple universal models capture all classical spin physics.

    PubMed

    De las Cuevas, Gemma; Cubitt, Toby S

    2016-03-11

    Spin models are used in many studies of complex systems because they exhibit rich macroscopic behavior despite their microscopic simplicity. Here, we prove that all the physics of every classical spin model is reproduced in the low-energy sector of certain "universal models," with at most polynomial overhead. This holds for classical models with discrete or continuous degrees of freedom. We prove necessary and sufficient conditions for a spin model to be universal and show that one of the simplest and most widely studied spin models, the two-dimensional Ising model with fields, is universal. Our results may facilitate physical simulations of Hamiltonians with complex interactions.

  20. Teacher Fidelity to a Physical Education Curricular Model and Physical Activity Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stylianou, Michalis; Kloeppel, Tiffany; Kulinna, Pamela; van der Mars, Han

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was informed by the bodies of literature emphasizing the role of physical education in promoting physical activity (PA) and addressing teacher fidelity to curricular models. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare student PA levels, lesson context, and teacher PA promotion behavior among classes where teachers were…

  1. Physics Beyond the Standard Model from Molecular Hydrogen Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubachs, Wim; Salumbides, Edcel John; Bagdonaite, Julija

    2015-06-01

    The spectrum of molecular hydrogen can be measured in the laboratory to very high precision using advanced laser and molecular beam techniques, as well as frequency-comb based calibration [1,2]. The quantum level structure of this smallest neutral molecule can now be calculated to very high precision, based on a very accurate (10-15 precision) Born-Oppenheimer potential [3] and including subtle non-adiabatic, relativistic and quantum electrodynamic effects [4]. Comparison between theory and experiment yields a test of QED, and in fact of the Standard Model of Physics, since the weak, strong and gravitational forces have a negligible effect. Even fifth forces beyond the Standard Model can be searched for [5]. Astronomical observation of molecular hydrogen spectra, using the largest telescopes on Earth and in space, may reveal possible variations of fundamental constants on a cosmological time scale [6]. A study has been performed at a 'look-back' time of 12.5 billion years [7]. In addition the possible dependence of a fundamental constant on a gravitational field has been investigated from observation of molecular hydrogen in the photospheres of white dwarfs [8]. The latter involves a test of the Einsteins equivalence principle. [1] E.J. Salumbides et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 143005 (2011). [2] G. Dickenson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 193601 (2013). [3] K. Pachucki, Phys. Rev. A82, 032509 (2010). [4] J. Komasa et al., J. Chem. Theory Comp. 7, 3105 (2011). [5] E.J. Salumbides et al., Phys. Rev. D87, 112008 (2013). [6] F. van Weerdenburg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 180802 (2011). [7] J. Badonaite et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 071301 (2015). [8] J. Bagdonaite et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 123002 (2014).

  2. A Support Vector Machine model for the prediction of proteotypic peptides for accurate mass and time proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Cannon, William R.; Oehmen, Christopher S.; Shah, Anuj R.; Gurumoorthi, Vidhya; Lipton, Mary S.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2008-07-01

    Motivation: The standard approach to identifying peptides based on accurate mass and elution time (AMT) compares these profiles obtained from a high resolution mass spectrometer to a database of peptides previously identified from tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) studies. It would be advantageous, with respect to both accuracy and cost, to only search for those peptides that are detectable by MS (proteotypic). Results: We present a Support Vector Machine (SVM) model that uses a simple descriptor space based on 35 properties of amino acid content, charge, hydrophilicity, and polarity for the quantitative prediction of proteotypic peptides. Using three independently derived AMT databases (Shewanella oneidensis, Salmonella typhimurium, Yersinia pestis) for training and validation within and across species, the SVM resulted in an average accuracy measure of ~0.8 with a standard deviation of less than 0.025. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these results are achievable with a small set of 12 variables and can achieve high proteome coverage. Availability: http://omics.pnl.gov/software/STEPP.php

  3. Accurate segmentation of partially overlapping cervical cells based on dynamic sparse contour searching and GVF snake model.

    PubMed

    Guan, Tao; Zhou, Dongxiang; Liu, Yunhui

    2015-07-01

    Overlapping cells segmentation is one of the challenging topics in medical image processing. In this paper, we propose to approximately represent the cell contour as a set of sparse contour points, which can be further partitioned into two parts: the strong contour points and the weak contour points. We consider the cell contour extraction as a contour points locating problem and propose an effective and robust framework for segmentation of partially overlapping cells in cervical smear images. First, the cell nucleus and the background are extracted by a morphological filtering-based K-means clustering algorithm. Second, a gradient decomposition-based edge enhancement method is developed for enhancing the true edges belonging to the center cell. Then, a dynamic sparse contour searching algorithm is proposed to gradually locate the weak contour points in the cell overlapping regions based on the strong contour points. This algorithm involves the least squares estimation and a dynamic searching principle, and is thus effective to cope with the cell overlapping problem. Using the located contour points, the Gradient Vector Flow Snake model is finally employed to extract the accurate cell contour. Experiments have been performed on two cervical smear image datasets containing both single cells and partially overlapping cells. The high accuracy of the cell contour extraction result validates the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  4. Benchmark studies of the Bending Corrected Rotating Linear Model (BCRLM) reactive scattering code: Implications for accurate quantum calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, E.F.; Darakjian, Z. . Dept. of Chemistry); Walker, R.B. )

    1990-01-01

    The Bending Corrected Rotating Linear Model (BCRLM), developed by Hayes and Walker, is a simple approximation to the true multidimensional scattering problem for reaction of the type: A + BC {yields} AB + C. While the BCRLM method is simpler than methods designed to obtain accurate three dimensional quantum scattering results, this turns out to be a major advantage in terms of our benchmarking studies. The computer code used to obtain BCRLM scattering results is written for the most part in standard FORTRAN and has been reported to several scalar, vector, and parallel architecture computers including the IBM 3090-600J, the Cray XMP and YMP, the Ardent Titan, IBM RISC System/6000, Convex C-1 and the MIPS 2000. Benchmark results will be reported for each of these machines with an emphasis on comparing the scalar, vector, and parallel performance for the standard code with minimum modifications. Detailed analysis of the mapping of the BCRLM approach onto both shared and distributed memory parallel architecture machines indicates the importance of introducing several key changes in the basic strategy and algorithums used to calculate scattering results. This analysis of the BCRLM approach provides some insights into optimal strategies for mapping three dimensional quantum scattering methods, such as the Parker-Pack method, onto shared or distributed memory parallel computers.

  5. Full-waveform modeling of Zero-Offset Electromagnetic Induction for Accurate Characterization of Subsurface Electrical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadas, D.; André, F.; Vereecken, H.; Lambot, S.

    2009-04-01

    singularities. We tested the model in controlled laboratory conditions for EMI measurements at different heights above a copper sheet, playing the role of a perfect electrical conductor. Good agreement was obtained between the measurements and the model, especially for the resonance frequency of the loop antenna. The loop antenna height could be retrieved by inversion of the Green's function. For practical applications, the method is still limited by the low sensitivity of the antenna with respect to the dynamic range of the VNA. Once this will be resolved, we believe that the proposed method should be very flexible and promising for accurate, multi-frequency EMI data inversion.

  6. Anatomically accurate high resolution modeling of human whole heart electromechanics: A strongly scalable algebraic multigrid solver method for nonlinear deformation.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Christoph M; Neic, Aurel; Liebmann, Manfred; Prassl, Anton J; Niederer, Steven A; Haase, Gundolf; Plank, Gernot

    2016-01-15

    Electromechanical (EM) models of the heart have been used successfully to study fundamental mechanisms underlying a heart beat in health and disease. However, in all modeling studies reported so far numerous simplifications were made in terms of representing biophysical details of cellular function and its heterogeneity, gross anatomy and tissue microstructure, as well as the bidirectional coupling between electrophysiology (EP) and tissue distension. One limiting factor is the employed spatial discretization methods which are not sufficiently flexible to accommodate complex geometries or resolve heterogeneities, but, even more importantly, the limited efficiency of the prevailing solver techniques which are not sufficiently scalable to deal with the incurring increase in degrees of freedom (DOF) when modeling cardiac electromechanics at high spatio-temporal resolution. This study reports on the development of a novel methodology for solving the nonlinear equation of finite elasticity using human whole organ models of cardiac electromechanics, discretized at a high para-cellular resolution. Three patient-specific, anatomically accurate, whole heart EM models were reconstructed from magnetic resonance (MR) scans at resolutions of 220 μm, 440 μm and 880 μm, yielding meshes of approximately 184.6, 24.4 and 3.7 million tetrahedral elements and 95.9, 13.2 and 2.1 million displacement DOF, respectively. The same mesh was used for discretizing the governing equations of both electrophysiology (EP) and nonlinear elasticity. A novel algebraic multigrid (AMG) preconditioner for an iterative Krylov solver was developed to deal with the resulting computational load. The AMG preconditioner was designed under the primary objective of achieving favorable strong scaling characteristics for both setup and solution runtimes, as this is key for exploiting current high performance computing hardware. Benchmark results using the 220 μm, 440 μm and 880 μm meshes demonstrate

  7. Anatomically accurate high resolution modeling of human whole heart electromechanics: A strongly scalable algebraic multigrid solver method for nonlinear deformation

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, Christoph M.; Neic, Aurel; Liebmann, Manfred; Prassl, Anton J.; Niederer, Steven A.; Haase, Gundolf; Plank, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    Electromechanical (EM) models of the heart have been used successfully to study fundamental mechanisms underlying a heart beat in health and disease. However, in all modeling studies reported so far numerous simplifications were made in terms of representing biophysical details of cellular function and its heterogeneity, gross anatomy and tissue microstructure, as well as the bidirectional coupling between electrophysiology (EP) and tissue distension. One limiting factor is the employed spatial discretization methods which are not sufficiently flexible to accommodate complex geometries or resolve heterogeneities, but, even more importantly, the limited efficiency of the prevailing solver techniques which are not sufficiently scalable to deal with the incurring increase in degrees of freedom (DOF) when modeling cardiac electromechanics at high spatio-temporal resolution. This study reports on the development of a novel methodology for solving the nonlinear equation of finite elasticity using human whole organ models of cardiac electromechanics, discretized at a high para-cellular resolution. Three patient-specific, anatomically accurate, whole heart EM models were reconstructed from magnetic resonance (MR) scans at resolutions of 220 μm, 440 μm and 880 μm, yielding meshes of approximately 184.6, 24.4 and 3.7 million tetrahedral elements and 95.9, 13.2 and 2.1 million displacement DOF, respectively. The same mesh was used for discretizing the governing equations of both electrophysiology (EP) and nonlinear elasticity. A novel algebraic multigrid (AMG) preconditioner for an iterative Krylov solver was developed to deal with the resulting computational load. The AMG preconditioner was designed under the primary objective of achieving favorable strong scaling characteristics for both setup and solution runtimes, as this is key for exploiting current high performance computing hardware. Benchmark results using the 220 μm, 440 μm and 880 μm meshes demonstrate

  8. Anatomically accurate high resolution modeling of human whole heart electromechanics: A strongly scalable algebraic multigrid solver method for nonlinear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustin, Christoph M.; Neic, Aurel; Liebmann, Manfred; Prassl, Anton J.; Niederer, Steven A.; Haase, Gundolf; Plank, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    Electromechanical (EM) models of the heart have been used successfully to study fundamental mechanisms underlying a heart beat in health and disease. However, in all modeling studies reported so far numerous simplifications were made in terms of representing biophysical details of cellular function and its heterogeneity, gross anatomy and tissue microstructure, as well as the bidirectional coupling between electrophysiology (EP) and tissue distension. One limiting factor is the employed spatial discretization methods which are not sufficiently flexible to accommodate complex geometries or resolve heterogeneities, but, even more importantly, the limited efficiency of the prevailing solver techniques which is not sufficiently scalable to deal with the incurring increase in degrees of freedom (DOF) when modeling cardiac electromechanics at high spatio-temporal resolution. This study reports on the development of a novel methodology for solving the nonlinear equation of finite elasticity using human whole organ models of cardiac electromechanics, discretized at a high para-cellular resolution. Three patient-specific, anatomically accurate, whole heart EM models were reconstructed from magnetic resonance (MR) scans at resolutions of 220 μm, 440 μm and 880 μm, yielding meshes of approximately 184.6, 24.4 and 3.7 million tetrahedral elements and 95.9, 13.2 and 2.1 million displacement DOF, respectively. The same mesh was used for discretizing the governing equations of both electrophysiology (EP) and nonlinear elasticity. A novel algebraic multigrid (AMG) preconditioner for an iterative Krylov solver was developed to deal with the resulting computational load. The AMG preconditioner was designed under the primary objective of achieving favorable strong scaling characteristics for both setup and solution runtimes, as this is key for exploiting current high performance computing hardware. Benchmark results using the 220 μm, 440 μm and 880 μm meshes demonstrate

  9. Physical consistency in modeling interplanetary magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Y.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Roberts, D. A.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1990-01-01

    The validity of the Velli, Grappin and Mangeney (1989) model is evaluated. It is argued that the model is incorrect because it mixes different dynamical models, assumes weak nonlinearities, makes predictions that vary with observations, and violates causality. It is proposed that self-similar behavior in the coronal source region of the magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations cause the Kolmogorov-like spectra.

  10. Genomic inference accurately predicts the timing and severity of a recent bottleneck in a non-model insect population

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Rajiv C.; Garud, Nandita R.; Kelley, Joanna L.; Boggs, Carol L.; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of molecular data from natural populations has allowed researchers to answer diverse ecological questions that were previously intractable. In particular, ecologists are often interested in the demographic history of populations, information that is rarely available from historical records. Methods have been developed to infer demographic parameters from genomic data, but it is not well understood how inferred parameters compare to true population history or depend on aspects of experimental design. Here we present and evaluate a method of SNP discovery using RNA-sequencing and demographic inference using the program δaδi, which uses a diffusion approximation to the allele frequency spectrum to fit demographic models. We test these methods in a population of the checkerspot butterfly Euphydryas gillettii. This population was intentionally introduced to Gothic, Colorado in 1977 and has since experienced extreme fluctuations including bottlenecks of fewer than 25 adults, as documented by nearly annual field surveys. Using RNA-sequencing of eight individuals from Colorado and eight individuals from a native population in Wyoming, we generate the first genomic resources for this system. While demographic inference is commonly used to examine ancient demography, our study demonstrates that our inexpensive, all-in-one approach to marker discovery and genotyping provides sufficient data to accurately infer the timing of a recent bottleneck. This demographic scenario is relevant for many species of conservation concern, few of which have sequenced genomes. Our results are remarkably insensitive to sample size or number of genomic markers, which has important implications for applying this method to other non-model systems. PMID:24237665

  11. Accurate Monte Carlo modeling of cyclotrons for optimization of shielding and activation calculations in the biomedical field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Infantino, Angelo; Marengo, Mario; Baschetti, Serafina; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Longo Vaschetto, Vittorio; Lucconi, Giulia; Massucci, Piera; Vichi, Sara; Zagni, Federico; Mostacci, Domiziano

    2015-11-01

    Biomedical cyclotrons for production of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) radionuclides and radiotherapy with hadrons or ions are widely diffused and established in hospitals as well as in industrial facilities and research sites. Guidelines for site planning and installation, as well as for radiation protection assessment, are given in a number of international documents; however, these well-established guides typically offer analytic methods of calculation of both shielding and materials activation, in approximate or idealized geometry set up. The availability of Monte Carlo codes with accurate and up-to-date libraries for transport and interactions of neutrons and charged particles at energies below 250 MeV, together with the continuously increasing power of nowadays computers, makes systematic use of simulations with realistic geometries possible, yielding equipment and site specific evaluation of the source terms, shielding requirements and all quantities relevant to radiation protection. In this work, the well-known Monte Carlo code FLUKA was used to simulate two representative models of cyclotron for PET radionuclides production, including their targetry; and one type of proton therapy cyclotron including the energy selection system. Simulations yield estimates of various quantities of radiological interest, including the effective dose distribution around the equipment, the effective number of neutron produced per incident proton and the activation of target materials, the structure of the cyclotron, the energy degrader, the vault walls and the soil. The model was validated against experimental measurements and comparison with well-established reference data. Neutron ambient dose equivalent H*(10) was measured around a GE PETtrace cyclotron: an average ratio between experimental measurement and simulations of 0.99±0.07 was found. Saturation yield of 18F, produced by the well-known 18O(p,n)18F reaction, was calculated and compared with the IAEA recommended

  12. Statistical-physical model for foliage clutter in ultra-wideband synthetic aperture radar images.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Amit; Chellappa, Rama

    2003-01-01

    Analyzing foliage-penetrating (FOPEN) ultra-wideband synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images is a challenging problem owing to the noisy and impulsive nature of foliage clutter. Indeed, many target-detection algorithms for FOPEN SAR data are characterized by high false-alarm rates. In this work, a statistical-physical model for foliage clutter is proposed that explains the presence of outliers in the data and suggests the use of symmetric alpha-stable (SalphaS) distributions for accurate clutter modeling. Furthermore, with the use of general assumptions of the noise sources and propagation conditions, the proposed model relates the parameters of the SalphaS model to physical parameters such as the attenuation coefficient and foliage density.

  13. Implementing a modeling software for animated protein-complex interactions using a physics simulation library.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Yutaka; Ito, Shuntaro; Konagaya, Akihiko

    2014-12-01

    To better understand the behaviors and structural dynamics of proteins within a cell, novel software tools are being developed that can create molecular animations based on the findings of structural biology. This study proposes our method developed based on our prototypes to detect collisions and examine the soft-body dynamics of molecular models. The code was implemented with a software development toolkit for rigid-body dynamics simulation and a three-dimensional graphics library. The essential functions of the target software system included the basic molecular modeling environment, collision detection in the molecular models, and physical simulations of the movement of the model. Taking advantage of recent software technologies such as physics simulation modules and interpreted scripting language, the functions required for accurate and meaningful molecular animation were implemented efficiently.

  14. Efficient Modeling of PIN Diode Switches Employing Time-Domain Electromagnetic-Physics-Based Simulators

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, Y.A.; Spencer, J.E.; El-Ghazaly, S.M.; Goodnick, S.M.; /Arizona State U.

    2005-09-20

    This paper presents an efficient full-wave time-domain simulator for accurate modeling of PIN diode switches. An equivalent circuit of the PIN diode is extracted under different bias conditions using a drift-diffusion physical model. Net recombination is modeled using a Shockley-Read-Hall process, while generation is assumed to be dominated by impact ionization. The device physics is coupled to Maxwell's equations using extended-FDTD formulism. A complete set of results is presented for the on and off states of the PIN switch. The results are validated through comparison with independent measurements, where good agreement is observed. Using this modeling approach, it is demonstrated that one can efficiently optimize PIN switches for better performance.

  15. Models in Physics, Models for Physics Learning, and Why the Distinction may Matter in the Case of Electric Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Christina

    2008-11-01

    Models are important both in the development of physics itself and in teaching physics. Historically, the consensus models of physics have come to embody particular ontological assumptions and epistemological commitments. Educators have generally assumed that the consensus models of physics, which have stood the test of time, will also work well as teaching models, and for many topics this assumption is at least unproblematic and in many cases productive. However, in the case of electric circuits the consensus models are highly abstract and consequently inaccessible to beginning learners. Certain historically derived analogues for the consensus models are accepted in texts, but these are demonstrably ineffective for helping learners grasp the fundamental concepts of electric circuits. While awareness of other models circulates informally in the teaching community, these are not well documented in the science education literature and rarely referred to in authoritative texts, possibly because the models do not share the ontological assumptions and epistemological commitments that characterise consensus models. Consequently these models have not been subjected to a disciplined critique of their effectiveness for teaching purposes. In this paper I use criteria drawn from the science education literature to reflect on why I have found particular models valuable in teaching electric circuits. These criteria contrast with the epistemological and ontological features that characterise the consensus models of science, and my reflection leads me to attend explicitly to the ways in which meanings are created within physics. This suggests that all models, whether consensus models or not, can be used more knowingly for important educational ends.

  16. Flare models. [solar physics current status review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of solar flare modeling is reviewed. Primary and secondary observational features that a proposed flare model should be capable of explaining are discussed, including energy storage and release, particle acceleration, mass ejection, heating of the temperature minimum region, X-ray, EUV, UV, visible and radio emission and mass flow. Consideration is then given to the twisted flux tube paramagnetic recombination model of Gold and Hoyle (1960), the current model of Alfven and Carlqvist (1967), closed current-sheet models such as those of Syrovatskii (1966, 1969, 1977) and Uchida and Sakurai (1977), open-field models such as those of Carmichael (1964) and Barnes and Sturrock (1972), the emerging flux model of Heyvaerts and Priest (1974, 1977, 1978) and the loop-flare models of Spicer (1977) and Colgate (1978). It is noted that no one model can yet account for all the observational features, and that there may turn out to be several types of flare, each requiring its own explanation.

  17. Population Synthesis in the Blue. IV. Accurate Model Predictions for Lick Indices and UBV Colors in Single Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavon, Ricardo P.

    2007-07-01

    We present a new set of model predictions for 16 Lick absorption line indices from Hδ through Fe5335 and UBV colors for single stellar populations with ages ranging between 1 and 15 Gyr, [Fe/H] ranging from -1.3 to +0.3, and variable abundance ratios. The models are based on accurate stellar parameters for the Jones library stars and a new set of fitting functions describing the behavior of line indices as a function of effective temperature, surface gravity, and iron abundance. The abundances of several key elements in the library stars have been obtained from the literature in order to characterize the abundance pattern of the stellar library, thus allowing us to produce model predictions for any set of abundance ratios desired. We develop a method to estimate mean ages and abundances of iron, carbon, nitrogen, magnesium, and calcium that explores the sensitivity of the various indices modeled to those parameters. The models are compared to high-S/N data for Galactic clusters spanning the range of ages, metallicities, and abundance patterns of interest. Essentially all line indices are matched when the known cluster parameters are adopted as input. Comparing the models to high-quality data for galaxies in the nearby universe, we reproduce previous results regarding the enhancement of light elements and the spread in the mean luminosity-weighted ages of early-type galaxies. When the results from the analysis of blue and red indices are contrasted, we find good consistency in the [Fe/H] that is inferred from different Fe indices. Applying our method to estimate mean ages and abundances from stacked SDSS spectra of early-type galaxies brighter than L*, we find mean luminosity-weighed ages of the order of ~8 Gyr and iron abundances slightly below solar. Abundance ratios, [X/Fe], tend to be higher than solar and are positively correlated with galaxy luminosity. Of all elements, nitrogen is the more strongly correlated with galaxy luminosity, which seems to indicate

  18. Representing Watersheds with Physics Based Distributed Hydrologic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downer, C. W.; Ogden, F. L.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrologic models are useful tools for representing watershed response, helping to understand the dominant hydrologic processes in the watershed, and for estimating system response under different forcing, climatic, or physical conditions in the watershed. Model skill in predicting system response is most often demonstrated by history matching. Useful models for predicting system response under varying conditions must include the dominant processes controlling the system response. While many types of hydrologic models are capable of simulating watershed response, physics- based models are capable of simulating the actual physical conditions and responses within the watershed. There are a variety of physics-based hydrologic models available to the practicing community. Like simpler models, these models vary in formulation and complexity. Many of these models, such as the US Army of Corps of Engineers Gridded Surface Subsurface Hydrologic Analysis (GSSHA) model, allow flexibility in terms of both processes simulated and the formulation used to approximate the process. This flexibility allows the user to build the model according to his or her understanding or conceptualization, of the system, including processes that are thought to be important to system response. This also allows the user to use more rigorous methods of simulating critical processes and less rigorous methods of simulating non-critical processes or when data limitations preclude the use of more rigorous methods. In this presentation we will discuss how physics based models can, and have, been used to describe various hydrologic systems to both represent the physical processes in the system and the system response. Using examples from a variety of applications we will demonstrate and discuss the utility of utilizing a flexible physics-based model design for realizing watershed conceptualizations for hydrologic analysis.

  19. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Jolley; R. Jarek; P. Mariner

    2004-02-09

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

  20. Physically representative atomistic modeling of atomic-scale friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yalin

    interesting physical process is buried between the two contact interfaces, thus makes a direct measurement more difficult. Atomistic simulation is able to simulate the process with the dynamic information of each single atom, and therefore provides valuable interpretations for experiments. In this, we will systematically to apply Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation to optimally model the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) measurement of atomic friction. Furthermore, we also employed molecular dynamics simulation to correlate the atomic dynamics with the friction behavior observed in experiments. For instance, ParRep dynamics (an accelerated molecular dynamic technique) is introduced to investigate velocity dependence of atomic friction; we also employ MD simulation to "see" how the reconstruction of gold surface modulates the friction, and the friction enhancement mechanism at a graphite step edge. Atomic stick-slip friction can be treated as a rate process. Instead of running a direction simulation of the process, we can apply transition state theory to predict its property. We will have a rigorous derivation of velocity and temperature dependence of friction based on the Prandtl-Tomlinson model as well as transition theory. A more accurate relation to prediction velocity and temperature dependence is obtained. Furthermore, we have included instrumental noise inherent in AFM measurement to interpret two discoveries in experiments, suppression of friction at low temperature and the attempt frequency discrepancy between AFM measurement and theoretical prediction. We also discuss the possibility to treat wear as a rate process.

  1. A new expression of Ns versus Ef to an accurate control charge model for AlGaAs/GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouneb, I.; Kerrour, F.

    2016-03-01

    Semi-conductor components become the privileged support of information and communication, particularly appreciation to the development of the internet. Today, MOS transistors on silicon dominate largely the semi-conductors market, however the diminution of transistors grid length is not enough to enhance the performances and respect Moore law. Particularly, for broadband telecommunications systems, where faster components are required. For this reason, alternative structures proposed like hetero structures IV-IV or III-V [1] have been.The most effective components in this area (High Electron Mobility Transistor: HEMT) on IIIV substrate. This work investigates an approach for contributing to the development of a numerical model based on physical and numerical modelling of the potential at heterostructure in AlGaAs/GaAs interface. We have developed calculation using projective methods allowed the Hamiltonian integration using Green functions in Schrodinger equation, for a rigorous resolution “self coherent” with Poisson equation. A simple analytical approach for charge-control in quantum well region of an AlGaAs/GaAs HEMT structure was presented. A charge-control equation, accounting for a variable average distance of the 2-DEG from the interface was introduced. Our approach which have aim to obtain ns-Vg characteristics is mainly based on: A new linear expression of Fermi-level variation with two-dimensional electron gas density in high electron mobility and also is mainly based on the notion of effective doping and a new expression of AEc

  2. Quantum-like Probabilistic Models Outside Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    We present a quantum-like (QL) model in that contexts (complexes of e.g. mental, social, biological, economic or even political conditions) are represented by complex probability amplitudes. This approach gives the possibility to apply the mathematical quantum formalism to probabilities induced in any domain of science. In our model quantum randomness appears not as irreducible randomness (as it is commonly accepted in conventional quantum mechanics, e.g. by von Neumann and Dirac), but as a consequence of obtaining incomplete information about a system. We pay main attention to the QL description of processing of incomplete information. Our QL model can be useful in cognitive, social and political sciences as well as economics and artificial intelligence. In this paper we consider in a more detail one special application — QL modeling of brain's functioning. The brain is modeled as a QL-computer.

  3. Hidden sector DM models and Higgs physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, P.

    2014-06-24

    We present an extension of the standard model to dark sector with an unbroken local dark U(1){sub X} symmetry. Including various singlet portal interactions provided by the standard model Higgs, right-handed neutrinos and kinetic mixing, we show that the model can address most of phenomenological issues (inflation, neutrino mass and mixing, baryon number asymmetry, dark matter, direct/indirect dark matter searches, some scale scale puzzles of the standard collisionless cold dark matter, vacuum stability of the standard model Higgs potential, dark radiation) and be regarded as an alternative to the standard model. The Higgs signal strength is equal to one as in the standard model for unbroken U(1){sub X} case with a scalar dark matter, but it could be less than one independent of decay channels if the dark matter is a dark sector fermion or if U(1){sub X} is spontaneously broken, because of a mixing with a new neutral scalar boson in the models.

  4. Early Childhood Educators' Experience of an Alternative Physical Education Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsangaridou, Niki; Genethliou, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Alternative instructional and curricular models are regarded as more comprehensive and suitable approaches to providing quality physical education (Kulinna 2008; Lund and Tannehill 2010; McKenzie and Kahan 2008; Metzler 2011; Quay and Peters 2008). The purpose of this study was to describe the impact of the Early Steps Physical Education…

  5. A Model of Physical Performance for Occupational Tasks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Joyce

    This report acknowledges the problems faced by industrial/organizational psychologists who must make personnel decisions involving physically demanding jobs. The scarcity of criterion-related validation studies and the difficulty of generalizing validity are considered, and a model of physical performance that builds on Fleishman's (1984)…

  6. An accurate, simple prognostic model consisting of age, JAK2, CALR, and MPL mutation status for patients with primary myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rozovski, Uri; Verstovsek, Srdan; Manshouri, Taghi; Dembitz, Vilma; Bozinovic, Ksenija; Newberry, Kate; Zhang, Ying; Bove, Joseph E.; Pierce, Sherry; Kantarjian, Hagop; Estrov, Zeev

    2017-01-01

    In most patients with primary myelofibrosis, one of three mutually exclusive somatic mutations is detected. In approximately 60% of patients, the Janus kinase 2 gene is mutated, in 20%, the calreticulin gene is mutated, and in 5%, the myeloproliferative leukemia virus gene is mutated. Although patients with mutated calreticulin or myeloproliferative leukemia genes have a favorable outcome, and those with none of these mutations have an unfavorable outcome, prognostication based on mutation status is challenging due to the heterogeneous survival of patients with mutated Janus kinase 2. To develop a prognostic model based on mutation status, we screened primary myelofibrosis patients seen at the MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA, between 2000 and 2013 for the presence of Janus kinase 2, calreticulin, and myeloproliferative leukemia mutations. Of 344 primary myelofibrosis patients, Janus kinase 2V617F was detected in 226 (66%), calreticulin mutation in 43 (12%), and myeloproliferative leukemia mutation in 16 (5%); 59 patients (17%) were triple-negatives. A 50% cut-off dichotomized Janus kinase 2-mutated patients into those with high Janus kinase 2V617F allele burden and favorable survival and those with low Janus kinase 2V617F allele burden and unfavorable survival. Patients with a favorable mutation status (high Janus kinase 2V617F allele burden/myeloproliferative leukemia/calreticulin mutation) and aged 65 years or under had a median survival of 126 months. Patients with one risk factor (low Janus kinase 2V617F allele burden/triple-negative or age >65 years) had an intermediate survival duration, and patients aged over 65 years with an adverse mutation status (low Janus kinase 2V617F allele burden or triple-negative) had a median survival of only 35 months. Our simple and easily applied age- and mutation status-based scoring system accurately predicted the survival of patients with primary myelofibrosis. PMID:27686378

  7. A Physically Based Coupled Chemical and Physical Weathering Model for Simulating Soilscape Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willgoose, G. R.; Welivitiya, D.; Hancock, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    A critical missing link in existing landscape evolution models is a dynamic soil evolution models where soils co-evolve with the landform. Work by the authors over the last decade has demonstrated a computationally manageable model for soil profile evolution (soilscape evolution) based on physical weathering. For chemical weathering it is clear that full geochemistry models such as CrunchFlow and PHREEQC are too computationally intensive to be couplable to existing soilscape and landscape evolution models. This paper presents a simplification of CrunchFlow chemistry and physics that makes the task feasible, and generalises it for hillslope geomorphology applications. Results from this simplified model will be compared with field data for soil pedogenesis. Other researchers have previously proposed a number of very simple weathering functions (e.g. exponential, humped, reverse exponential) as conceptual models of the in-profile weathering process. The paper will show that all of these functions are possible for specific combinations of in-soil environmental, geochemical and geologic conditions, and the presentation will outline the key variables controlling which of these conceptual models can be realistic models of in-profile processes and under what conditions. The presentation will finish by discussing the coupling of this model with a physical weathering model, and will show sample results from our SSSPAM soilscape evolution model to illustrate the implications of including chemical weathering in the soilscape evolution model.

  8. Physical Model Study of Cross Vanes and Ice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    model using natural sand bed material of comparable density to the full-scale bed material. For open channel flow, Froude Number similitude equates... similitude relation- ships, which are accurate for scaling gravity-dominated open-channel flow parameters such as depth and velocity, apply less well to

  9. Reconfigurable Special Test Circuit of physics-based IGBT models parameter extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Marco A.; Claudio, Abraham; Cotorogea, Maria; González, Leobardo H.; Aguayo, Jesús

    2010-11-01

    Physics-based models of power electronic devices are the most accurate for circuit simulation purposes. However, many parameters of such models are related to device physics and structure and are not directly available for the user. The IGBT is still the most used power semiconductor device for applications at medium power and frequency ranges, due to its good compromise between on-state loss, switching loss, and ease of control. This paper presents a procedure for extracting the most important parameters of the IGBT, with physical background and electrical measurements. The goal is to develop a deeply understanding of the device-structure and to simulate correctly both steady-state and transient period with any circuit simulation software without the IGBT model provided by the manufacturer. The method consists of seven test setups and seven algorithms for extracting 13 physical and structural parameters needed in most physics-based IGBT models; by using only one Reconfigurable Special Test Circuit in order to achieve the different test setups conditions.

  10. Propulsion Physics Under the Changing Density Field Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    2011-01-01

    To grow as a space faring race, future spaceflight systems will requires new propulsion physics. Specifically a propulsion physics model that does not require mass ejection without limiting the high thrust necessary to accelerate within or beyond our solar system and return within a normal work period or lifetime. In 2004 Khoury and Weltman produced a density dependent cosmology theory they called Chameleon Cosmology, as at its nature, it is hidden within known physics. This theory represents a scalar field within and about an object, even in the vacuum. Whereby, these scalar fields can be viewed as vacuum energy fields with definable densities that permeate all matter; having implications to dark matter/energy with universe acceleration properties; implying a new force mechanism for propulsion physics. Using Chameleon Cosmology, the author has developed a new propulsion physics model, called the Changing Density Field (CDF) Model. This model relates to density changes in these density fields, where the density field density changes are related to the acceleration of matter within an object. These density changes in turn change how an object couples to the surrounding density fields. Whereby, thrust is achieved by causing a differential in the coupling to these density fields about an object. Since the model indicates that the density of the density field in an object can be changed by internal mass acceleration, even without exhausting mass, the CDF model implies a new propellant-less propulsion physics model

  11. Distances in spaces of physical models: partition functions versus spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelissen, Gunther; Kontogeorgis, Aristides

    2017-01-01

    We study the relation between convergence of partition functions (seen as general Dirichlet series) and convergence of spectra and their multiplicities. We describe applications to convergence in physical models, e.g., related to topology change and averaging in cosmology.

  12. A hybrid (numerical-physical) model of the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, G; Kozarski, M; De Lazzari, C; Clemente, F; Merolli, M; Tosti, G; Guaragno, M; Mimmo, R; Ambrosi, D; Glapinski, J

    2001-07-01

    Hydraulic models of the circulation are used to test mechanical devices and for training and research purposes; when compared to numerical models, however, they are not flexible enough and rather expensive. The solution proposed here is to merge the characteristics and the flexibility of numerical models with the functions of physical models. The result is a hybrid model with numerical and physical sections connected by an electro-hydraulic interface - which is to some extent the main problem since the numerical model can be easily changed or modified. The concept of hybrid model is applied to the representation of ventricular function by a variable elastance numerical model. This prototype is an open loop circuit and the physical section is built out of a reservoir (atrium) and a modified windkessel (arterial tree). The corresponding equations are solved numerically using the variables (atrial and arterial pressures) coming from the physical circuit. Ventricular output flow is the computed variable and is sent to a servo amplifier connected to a DC motor-gear pump system. The gear pump, behaving roughly as a flow source, is the interface to the physical circuit. Results obtained under different hemodynamic conditions demonstrate the behaviour of the ventricular model on the pressure-volume plane and the time course of output flow and arterial pressure.

  13. Evaluation and development of physically-based embankment breach models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The CEATI Dam Safety Interest Group (DSIG) working group on embankment erosion and breach modelling has evaluated three physically-based numerical models used to simulate embankment erosion and breach development. The three models identified by the group were considered to be good candidates for fu...

  14. Kinetic exchange models: From molecular physics to social science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patriarca, Marco; Chakraborti, Anirban

    2013-08-01

    We discuss several multi-agent models that have their origin in the kinetic exchange theory of statistical mechanics and have been recently applied to a variety of problems in the social sciences. This class of models can be easily adapted for simulations in areas other than physics, such as the modeling of income and wealth distributions in economics and opinion dynamics in sociology.

  15. Harmony Theory: Problem Solving, Parallel Cognitive Models, and Thermal Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smolensky, Paul; Riley, Mary S.

    This document consists of three papers. The first, "A Parallel Model of (Sequential) Problem Solving," describes a parallel model designed to solve a class of relatively simple problems from elementary physics and discusses implications for models of problem-solving in general. It is shown that one of the most salient features of problem…

  16. Accurate Modelling of a Flexible-Link Planar Mechanism by Means of a Linearized Model in the State-Space Form for Design of a Vibration Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GASPARETTO, A.

    2001-02-01

    Vibration control of flexible link mechanisms with more than two flexible links is still an open question, mainly because defining a model that is adequate for the designing of a controller is a rather difficult task. In this work, an accurate dynamic non-linear model of a flexible-link planar mechanism is presented. In order to bring the system into a form that is suitable for the design of a vibration controller, the model is then linearized about an operating point, so as to achieve a linear model of the system in the standard state-space form of system theory. The linear model obtained, which is valid for whatever planar mechanism with any number of flexible link, is then applied to a four-bar planar linkage. Extensive simulation is carried out, aimed at comparing the system dynamic evolution, both in the open- and in the closed-loop case, using the non-linear model and the linearized one. The results prove that the error made by using the linearized system instead of the non-linear one is small. Therefore, it can be concluded that the model proposed in this work can constitute an effective basis for designing and testing many types of vibration controllers for flexible planar mechanisms.

  17. The type IIP supernova 2012aw in M95: Hydrodynamical modeling of the photospheric phase from accurate spectrophotometric monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Dall'Ora, M.; Botticella, M. T.; Della Valle, M.; Pumo, M. L.; Zampieri, L.; Tomasella, L.; Cappellaro, E.; Benetti, S.; Pignata, G.; Bufano, F.; Bayless, A. J.; Pritchard, T. A.; Taubenberger, S.; Benitez, S.; Kotak, R.; Inserra, C.; Fraser, M.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Haislip, J. B.; Harutyunyan, A.; and others

    2014-06-01

    We present an extensive optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic campaign of the Type IIP supernova SN 2012aw. The data set densely covers the evolution of SN 2012aw shortly after the explosion through the end of the photospheric phase, with two additional photometric observations collected during the nebular phase, to fit the radioactive tail and estimate the {sup 56}Ni mass. Also included in our analysis is the previously published Swift UV data, therefore providing a complete view of the ultraviolet-optical-infrared evolution of the photospheric phase. On the basis of our data set, we estimate all the relevant physical parameters of SN 2012aw with our radiation-hydrodynamics code: envelope mass M {sub env} ∼ 20 M {sub ☉}, progenitor radius R ∼ 3 × 10{sup 13} cm (∼430 R {sub ☉}), explosion energy E ∼ 1.5 foe, and initial {sup 56}Ni mass ∼0.06 M {sub ☉}. These mass and radius values are reasonably well supported by independent evolutionary models of the progenitor, and may suggest a progenitor mass higher than the observational limit of 16.5 ± 1.5 M {sub ☉} of the Type IIP events.

  18. Validation and upgrading of physically based mathematical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Ronald

    1992-01-01

    The validation of the results of physically-based mathematical models against experimental results was discussed. Systematic techniques are used for: (1) isolating subsets of the simulator mathematical model and comparing the response of each subset to its experimental response for the same input conditions; (2) evaluating the response error to determine whether it is the result of incorrect parameter values, incorrect structure of the model subset, or unmodeled external effects of cross coupling; and (3) modifying and upgrading the model and its parameter values to determine the most physically appropriate combination of changes.

  19. Characterizing, modeling, and addressing gender disparities in introductory college physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kost-Smith, Lauren Elizabeth

    2011-12-01

    The underrepresentation and underperformance of females in physics has been well documented and has long concerned policy-makers, educators, and the physics community. In this thesis, we focus on gender disparities in the first- and second-semester introductory, calculus-based physics courses at the University of Colorado. Success in these courses is critical for future study and careers in physics (and other sciences). Using data gathered from roughly 10,000 undergraduate students, we identify and model gender differences in the introductory physics courses in three areas: student performance, retention, and psychological factors. We observe gender differences on several measures in the introductory physics courses: females are less likely to take a high school physics course than males and have lower standardized mathematics test scores; males outscore females on both pre- and post-course conceptual physics surveys and in-class exams; and males have more expert-like attitudes and beliefs about physics than females. These background differences of males and females account for 60% to 70% of the gender gap that we observe on a post-course survey of conceptual physics understanding. In analyzing underlying psychological factors of learning, we find that female students report lower self-confidence related to succeeding in the introductory courses (self-efficacy) and are less likely to report seeing themselves as a "physics person". Students' self-efficacy beliefs are significant predictors of their performance, even when measures of physics and mathematics background are controlled, and account for an additional 10% of the gender gap. Informed by results from these studies, we implemented and tested a psychological, self-affirmation intervention aimed at enhancing female students' performance in Physics 1. Self-affirmation reduced the gender gap in performance on both in-class exams and the post-course conceptual physics survey. Further, the benefit of the self

  20. Physically-based in silico light sheet microscopy for visualizing fluorescent brain models

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background We present a physically-based computational model of the light sheet fluorescence microscope (LSFM). Based on Monte Carlo ray tracing and geometric optics, our method simulates the operational aspects and image formation process of the LSFM. This simulated, in silico LSFM creates synthetic images of digital fluorescent specimens that can resemble those generated by a real LSFM, as opposed to established visualization methods producing visually-plausible images. We also propose an accurate fluorescence rendering model which takes into account the intrinsic characteristics of fluorescent dyes to simulate the light interaction with fluorescent biological specimen. Results We demonstrate first results of our visualization pipeline to a simplified brain tissue model reconstructed from the somatosensory cortex of a young rat. The modeling aspects of the LSFM units are qualitatively analysed, and the results of the fluorescence model were quantitatively validated against the fluorescence brightness equation and characteristic emission spectra of different fluorescent dyes. AMS subject classification Modelling and simulation PMID:26329404

  1. Physically-based strength model of tantalum incorporating effects of temperature, strain rate and pressure

    DOE PAGES

    Lim, Hojun; Battaile, Corbett C.; Brown, Justin L.; ...

    2016-06-14

    In this work, we develop a tantalum strength model that incorporates e ects of temperature, strain rate and pressure. Dislocation kink-pair theory is used to incorporate temperature and strain rate e ects while the pressure dependent yield is obtained through the pressure dependent shear modulus. Material constants used in the model are parameterized from tantalum single crystal tests and polycrystalline ramp compression experiments. It is shown that the proposed strength model agrees well with the temperature and strain rate dependent yield obtained from polycrystalline tantalum experiments. Furthermore, the model accurately reproduces the pressure dependent yield stresses up to 250 GPa.more » The proposed strength model is then used to conduct simulations of a Taylor cylinder impact test and validated with experiments. This approach provides a physically-based multi-scale strength model that is able to predict the plastic deformation of polycrystalline tantalum through a wide range of temperature, strain and pressure regimes.« less

  2. Physically-based strength model of tantalum incorporating effects of temperature, strain rate and pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Hojun; Battaile, Corbett C.; Brown, Justin L.; Weinberger, Christopher R.

    2016-06-14

    In this work, we develop a tantalum strength model that incorporates e ects of temperature, strain rate and pressure. Dislocation kink-pair theory is used to incorporate temperature and strain rate e ects while the pressure dependent yield is obtained through the pressure dependent shear modulus. Material constants used in the model are parameterized from tantalum single crystal tests and polycrystalline ramp compression experiments. It is shown that the proposed strength model agrees well with the temperature and strain rate dependent yield obtained from polycrystalline tantalum experiments. Furthermore, the model accurately reproduces the pressure dependent yield stresses up to 250 GPa. The proposed strength model is then used to conduct simulations of a Taylor cylinder impact test and validated with experiments. This approach provides a physically-based multi-scale strength model that is able to predict the plastic deformation of polycrystalline tantalum through a wide range of temperature, strain and pressure regimes.

  3. The Physics of the Vicsek model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginelli, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    In these lecture notes, prepared for the Microswimmers Summer School 2015 at Forschungszentrum Jülich, I discuss the well known Vicsek model for collective motion and its main properties. In particular, I discuss its algorithmic implementation and the basic properties of its universality class. I present results from numerical simulations and insist on the role played by symmetries and conservation laws. Analytical arguments are presented in an accessible and simplified way, but ample references are given for more advanced readings.

  4. Physical models have gender‐specific effects on student understanding of protein structure–function relationships

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Michelle A.; Chang, Wesley S.; Dent, Erik W.; Nordheim, Erik V.; Franzen, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Understanding how basic structural units influence function is identified as a foundational/core concept for undergraduate biological and biochemical literacy. It is essential for students to understand this concept at all size scales, but it is often more difficult for students to understand structure–function relationships at the molecular level, which they cannot as effectively visualize. Students need to develop accurate, 3‐dimensional mental models of biomolecules to understand how biomolecular structure affects cellular functions at the molecular level, yet most traditional curricular tools such as textbooks include only 2‐dimensional representations. We used a controlled, backward design approach to investigate how hand‐held physical molecular model use affected students' ability to logically predict structure–function relationships. Brief (one class period) physical model use increased quiz score for females, whereas there was no significant increase in score for males using physical models. Females also self‐reported higher learning gains in their understanding of context‐specific protein function. Gender differences in spatial visualization may explain the gender‐specific benefits of physical model use observed. © 2016 The Authors Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):326–335, 2016. PMID:26923186

  5. Accurate Spectral Fits of Jupiter's Great Red Spot: VIMS Visual Spectra Modelled with Chromophores Created by Photolyzed Ammonia Reacting with Acetyleneχ±

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baines, Kevin; Sromovsky, Lawrence A.; Fry, Patrick M.; Carlson, Robert W.; Momary, Thomas W.

    2016-10-01

    We report results incorporating the red-tinted photochemically-generated aerosols of Carlson et al (2016, Icarus 274, 106-115) in spectral models of Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS). Spectral models of the 0.35-1.0-micron spectrum show good agreement with Cassini/VIMS near-center-meridian and near-limb GRS spectra for model morphologies incorporating an optically-thin layer of Carlson (2016) aerosols at high altitudes, either at the top of the tropospheric GRS cloud, or in a distinct stratospheric haze layer. Specifically, a two-layer "crème brûlée" structure of the Mie-scattering Carlson et al (2016) chromophore attached to the top of a conservatively scattering (hereafter, "white") optically-thick cloud fits the spectra well. Currently, best agreement (reduced χ2 of 0.89 for the central-meridian spectrum) is found for a 0.195-0.217-bar, 0.19 ± 0.02 opacity layer of chromophores with mean particle radius of 0.14 ± 0.01 micron. As well, a structure with a detached stratospheric chromophore layer ~0.25 bar above a white tropospheric GRS cloud provides a good spectral match (reduced χ2 of 1.16). Alternatively, a cloud morphology with the chromophore coating white particles in a single optically- and physically-thick cloud (the "coated-shell model", initially explored by Carlson et al 2016) was found to give significantly inferior fits (best reduced χ2 of 2.9). Overall, we find that models accurately fit the GRS spectrum if (1) most of the optical depth of the chromophore is in a layer near the top of the main cloud or in a distinct separated layer above it, but is not uniformly distributed within the main cloud, (2) the chromophore consists of relatively small, 0.1-0.2-micron-radius particles, and (3) the chromophore layer optical depth is small, ~ 0.1-0.2. Thus, our analysis supports the exogenic origin of the red chromophore consistent with the Carlson et al (2016) photolytic production mechanism rather than an endogenic origin, such as upwelling of material

  6. A physical corrosion model for bioabsorbable metal stents.

    PubMed

    Grogan, J A; Leen, S B; McHugh, P E

    2014-05-01

    Absorbable metal stents (AMSs) are an emerging technology in the treatment of heart disease. Computational modelling of AMS performance will facilitate the development of this technology. In this study a physical corrosion model is developed for AMSs based on the finite element method and adaptive meshing. The model addresses a gap between currently available phenomenological corrosion models for AMSs and physical corrosion models that have been developed for more simple geometries than those of a stent. The model developed in this study captures the changing surface of a corroding three-dimensional AMS structure for the case of diffusion-controlled corrosion. Comparisons are made between model predictions and those of previously developed phenomenological corrosion models for AMSs in terms of predicted device geometry and mechanical performance during corrosion. Relationships between alloy solubility and diffusivity in the corrosion environment and device performance during corrosion are also investigated.

  7. PREFACE: Physics-Based Mathematical Models for Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voon, Lok C. Lew Yan; Melnik, Roderick; Willatzen, Morten

    2008-03-01

    in the cross-disciplinary research area: low-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures. Since the main properties of two-dimensional heterostructures (such as quantum wells) are now quite well understood, there has been a consistently growing interest in the mathematical physics community to further dimensionality reduction of semiconductor structures. Experimental achievements in realizing one-dimensional and quasi-zero-dimensional heterostructures have opened new opportunities for theory and applications of such low-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures. One of the most important implications of this process has been a critical re-examining of assumptions under which traditional quantum mechanical models have been derived in this field. Indeed, the formation of LDSNs, in particular quantum dots, is a competition between the surface energy in the structure and strain energy. However, current models for bandstructure calculations use quite a simplified analysis of strain relaxation effects, although such effects are in the heart of nanostructure formation. By now, it has been understood that traditional models in this field may not be adequate for modeling realistic objects based on LDSNs due to neglecting many effects that may profoundly influence optoelectronic properties of the nanostructures. Among such effects are electromechanical effects, including strain relaxation, piezoelectric effect, spontaneous polarization, and higher order nonlinear effects. Up to date, major efforts have been concentrated on the analysis of idealized, isolated quantum dots, while a typical self-assembled semiconductor quantum dot nanostructure is an array (or a molecule) of many individual quantum dots sitting on the same `substrate' known as the wetting layer. Each such dot contains several hundred thousand atoms. In order to account for quantum effects accurately in a situation like that, attempts can be made to apply ab initio or atomistic methodologies, but then one would face a

  8. Internal Physical Features of a Land Surface Model Employing a Tangent Linear Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Runhua; Cohn, Stephen E.; daSilva, Arlindo; Joiner, Joanna; Houser, Paul R.

    1997-01-01

    The Earth's land surface, including its biomass, is an integral part of the Earth's weather and climate system. Land surface heterogeneity, such as the type and amount of vegetative covering., has a profound effect on local weather variability and therefore on regional variations of the global climate. Surface conditions affect local weather and climate through a number of mechanisms. First, they determine the re-distribution of the net radiative energy received at the surface, through the atmosphere, from the sun. A certain fraction of this energy increases the surface ground temperature, another warms the near-surface atmosphere, and the rest evaporates surface water, which in turn creates clouds and causes precipitation. Second, they determine how much rainfall and snowmelt can be stored in the soil and how much instead runs off into waterways. Finally, surface conditions influence the near-surface concentration and distribution of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide. The processes through which these mechanisms interact with the atmosphere can be modeled mathematically, to within some degree of uncertainty, on the basis of underlying physical principles. Such a land surface model provides predictive capability for surface variables including ground temperature, surface humidity, and soil moisture and temperature. This information is important for agriculture and industry, as well as for addressing fundamental scientific questions concerning global and local climate change. In this study we apply a methodology known as tangent linear modeling to help us understand more deeply, the behavior of the Mosaic land surface model, a model that has been developed over the past several years at NASA/GSFC. This methodology allows us to examine, directly and quantitatively, the dependence of prediction errors in land surface variables upon different vegetation conditions. The work also highlights the importance of accurate soil moisture information. Although surface

  9. "Let's get physical": advantages of a physical model over 3D computer models and textbooks in learning imaging anatomy.

    PubMed

    Preece, Daniel; Williams, Sarah B; Lam, Richard; Weller, Renate

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) information plays an important part in medical and veterinary education. Appreciating complex 3D spatial relationships requires a strong foundational understanding of anatomy and mental 3D visualization skills. Novel learning resources have been introduced to anatomy training to achieve this. Objective evaluation of their comparative efficacies remains scarce in the literature. This study developed and evaluated the use of a physical model in demonstrating the complex spatial relationships of the equine foot. It was hypothesized that the newly developed physical model would be more effective for students to learn magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) anatomy of the foot than textbooks or computer-based 3D models. Third year veterinary medicine students were randomly assigned to one of three teaching aid groups (physical model; textbooks; 3D computer model). The comparative efficacies of the three teaching aids were assessed through students' abilities to identify anatomical structures on MR images. Overall mean MRI assessment scores were significantly higher in students utilizing the physical model (86.39%) compared with students using textbooks (62.61%) and the 3D computer model (63.68%) (P < 0.001), with no significant difference between the textbook and 3D computer model groups (P = 0.685). Student feedback was also more positive in the physical model group compared with both the textbook and 3D computer model groups. Our results suggest that physical models may hold a significant advantage over alternative learning resources in enhancing visuospatial and 3D understanding of complex anatomical architecture, and that 3D computer models have significant limitations with regards to 3D learning.

  10. PSSP-RFE: accurate prediction of protein structural class by recursive feature extraction from PSI-BLAST profile, physical-chemical property and functional annotations.

    PubMed

    Li, Liqi; Cui, Xiang; Yu, Sanjiu; Zhang, Yuan; Luo, Zhong; Yang, Hua; Zhou, Yue; Zheng, Xiaoqi

    2014-01-01

    Protein structure prediction is critical to functional annotation of the massively accumulated biological sequences, which prompts an imperative need for the development of high-throughput technologies. As a first and key step in protein structure prediction, protein structural class prediction becomes an increasingly challenging task. Amongst most homological-based approaches, the accuracies of protein structural class prediction are sufficiently high for high similarity datasets, but still far from being satisfactory for low similarity datasets, i.e., below 40% in pairwise sequence similarity. Therefore, we present a novel method for accurate and reliable protein structural class prediction for both high and low similarity datasets. This method is based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) in conjunction with integrated features from position-specific score matrix (PSSM), PROFEAT and Gene Ontology (GO). A feature selection approach, SVM-RFE, is also used to rank the integrated feature vectors through recursively removing the feature with the lowest ranking score. The definitive top features selected by SVM-RFE are input into the SVM engines to predict the structural class of a query protein. To validate our method, jackknife tests were applied to seven widely used benchmark datasets, reaching overall accuracies between 84.61% and 99.79%, which are significantly higher than those achieved by state-of-the-art tools. These results suggest that our method could serve as an accurate and cost-effective alternative to existing methods in protein structural classification, especially for low similarity datasets.

  11. Progress in Hadronic Physics Modelling in Geant4

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolakis, John; Folger, Gunter; Grichine, Vladimir; Heikkinen, Aatos; Howard, Alexander; Ivanchenko, Vladimir; Kaitaniemi, Pekka; Koi, Tatsumi; Kosov, Mikhail; Quesada, Jose Manuel; Ribon, Alberto; Uzhinsky, Vladimir; Wright, Dennis; /SLAC

    2011-11-28

    Geant4 offers a set of models to simulate hadronic showers in calorimeters. Recent improvements to several models relevant to the modelling of hadronic showers are discussed. These include improved cross sections, a revision of the FTF model, the addition of quasi-elastic scattering to the QGS model, and enhancements in the nuclear precompound and de-excitation models. The validation of physics models against thin target experiments has been extended especially in the energy region 10 GeV and below. Examples of new validation results are shown.

  12. Modeling the soil system: Bridging the gap between pedology and soil-water physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braudeau, Erik; Mohtar, Rabi H.

    2009-05-01

    The biological and geochemical processes in soil such as organic matter mineralization, microbiological activity, and plant alimentation can be accurately assessed and modeled only with the knowledge of the thermodynamic status of the soil medium where these processes take place. However, current soil water models do not define and characterize the soil structure or the thermodynamic state of the soil water interacting with this structure. This article presents a new paradigm in characterizing and modeling the organized soil medium and the physical properties resulting from this organization. It describes a framework of the modeling approach as a contribution to the General Systems theory. The basic concept of Representative Elementary Volume (REV) in soil physics and hydrology was transformed into the concept of Structure Representative Volume (SREV) which takes into account the hierarchical organization of the structured soil medium. The pedostructure is defined as the SREV of the soil medium and this concept is at the basis of the new paradigm including variables, equations, parameters, and units in soil physics, in a similar way that the REV is at the basis of the continuous porous media mechanics applied to soils. The paradigm allows for a thermodynamic characterization of the structured soil medium with respect to soil water content then bridging the gap between pedology and soil physics. We show that the two points of view (REV and SREV) are complementary and must be used in the scaling of information. This approach leads to a new dimension in soil-water properties characterization that ensures a physically based modeling of processes in soil and the transfer of information from the physical scale of processes (pedostructure or laboratory measurements scale) to the application scale of the other disciplines (modeling and mapping scale).

  13. Applying Transtheoretical Model to Promote Physical Activities Among Women

    PubMed Central

    Pirzadeh, Asiyeh; Mostafavi, Firoozeh; Ghofranipour, Fazllolah; Feizi, Awat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Physical activity is one of the most important indicators of health in communities but different studies conducted in the provinces of Iran showed that inactivity is prevalent, especially among women. Objectives: Inadequate regular physical activities among women, the importance of education in promoting the physical activities, and lack of studies on the women using transtheoretical model, persuaded us to conduct this study with the aim of determining the application of transtheoretical model in promoting the physical activities among women of Isfahan. Materials and Methods: This research was a quasi-experimental study which was conducted on 141 women residing in Isfahan, Iran. They were randomly divided into case and control groups. In addition to the demographic information, their physical activities and the constructs of the transtheoretical model (stages of change, processes of change, decisional balance, and self-efficacy) were measured at 3 time points; preintervention, 3 months, and 6 months after intervention. Finally, the obtained data were analyzed through t test and repeated measures ANOVA test using SPSS version 16. Results: The results showed that education based on the transtheoretical model significantly increased physical activities in 2 aspects of intensive physical activities and walking, in the case group over the time. Also, a high percentage of people have shown progress during the stages of change, the mean of the constructs of processes of change, as well as pros and cons. On the whole, a significant difference was observed over the time in the case group (P < 0.01). Conclusions: This study showed that interventions based on the transtheoretical model can promote the physical activity behavior among women. PMID:26834796

  14. Beyond Standard Model Physics: At the Frontiers of Cosmology and Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Suarez, Alejandro O.

    I begin to write this thesis at a time of great excitement in the field of cosmology and particle physics. The aim of this thesis is to study and search for beyond the standard model (BSM) physics in the cosmological and high energy particle fields. There are two main questions, which this thesis aims to address: 1) what can we learn about the inflationary epoch utilizing the pioneer gravitational wave detector Adv. LIGO?, and 2) what are the dark matter particle properties and interactions with the standard model particles?. This thesis will focus on advances in answering both questions.

  15. Technical Manual for the SAM Physical Trough Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, M. J.; Gilman, P.

    2011-06-01

    NREL, in conjunction with Sandia National Lab and the U.S Department of Energy, developed the System Advisor Model (SAM) analysis tool for renewable energy system performance and economic analysis. This paper documents the technical background and engineering formulation for one of SAM's two parabolic trough system models in SAM. The Physical Trough model calculates performance relationships based on physical first principles where possible, allowing the modeler to predict electricity production for a wider range of component geometries than is possible in the Empirical Trough model. This document describes the major parabolic trough plant subsystems in detail including the solar field, power block, thermal storage, piping, auxiliary heating, and control systems. This model makes use of both existing subsystem performance modeling approaches, and new approaches developed specifically for SAM.

  16. Model Rocketry in the 21st-Century Physics Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, Ken

    2004-10-01

    Model rocketry has changed since my introduction to it as an eighth-grade student. Two of these changes are important for the use of rocketry in the physics classroom. First, simulation software, which is relatively inexpensive and very powerful, allows students to create and fly virtual models of their rocket designs. Second, lightweight and sophisticated electronics2 are available for logging flight data and for controlling flight operations such as deploying parachutes. In this technology-rich context, designing, building, and flying model rockets can capture the interest of today's physics students.

  17. High Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-07-28

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space, and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the US Department of Energy's SciDAC program has produced accelerator-modeling tools that have been employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. The authors discuss the Synergia framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. Our authors present Synergia's design principles and its performance on HPC platforms.

  18. High Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    DOE PAGES

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-07-28

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space, and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the US Department of Energy's SciDAC program has produced accelerator-modeling tools that have been employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. The authors discuss the Synergia framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable ofmore » handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. Our authors present Synergia's design principles and its performance on HPC platforms.« less

  19. Physical Models of Galaxy Formation in a Cosmological Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerville, Rachel S.; Davé, Romeel

    2015-08-01

    Modeling galaxy formation in a cosmological context presents one of the greatest challenges in astrophysics today due to the vast range of scales and numerous physical processes involved. Here we review the current status of models that employ two leading techniques to simulate the physics of galaxy formation: semianalytic models and numerical hydrodynamic simulations. We focus on a set of observational targets that describe the evolution of the global and structural properties of galaxies from roughly cosmic high noon (z â¼ 2-3) to the present. Although minor discrepancies remain, overall, models show remarkable convergence among different methods and make predictions that are in qualitative agreement with observations. Modelers have converged on a core set of physical processes that are critical for shaping galaxy properties. This core set includes cosmological accretion, strong stellar-driven winds that are more efficient at low masses, black hole feedback that preferentially suppresses star formation at high masses, and structural and morphological evolution through merging and environmental processes. However, all cosmological models currently adopt phenomenological implementations of many of these core processes, which must be tuned to observations. Many details of how these diverse processes interact within a hierarchical structure formation setting remain poorly understood. Emerging multiscale simulations are helping to bridge the gap between stellar and cosmological scales, placing models on a firmer, more physically grounded footing. Concurrently, upcoming telescope facilities will provide new challenges and constraints for models, particularly by directly constraining inflows and outflows through observations of gas in and around galaxies.

  20. Partial Possible Models: An Approach To Interpret Students' Physical Representation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camacho, Fernando Flores; Cazares, Leticia Gallegos

    1998-01-01

    Illustrates the construction of conceptual models on pressure and flotation using high school students' previous ideas on these concepts. Identifies three models and uses them to analyze students' ideas about physical phenomena and to recognize the inferential structure they use. Contains 28 references. (DDR)

  1. Rock.XML - Towards a library of rock physics models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Erling Hugo; Hauge, Ragnar; Ulvmoen, Marit; Johansen, Tor Arne; Drottning, Åsmund

    2016-08-01

    Rock physics modelling provides tools for correlating physical properties of rocks and their constituents to the geophysical observations we measure on a larger scale. Many different theoretical and empirical models exist, to cover the range of different types of rocks. However, upon reviewing these, we see that they are all built around a few main concepts. Based on this observation, we propose a format for digitally storing the specifications for rock physics models which we have named Rock.XML. It does not only contain data about the various constituents, but also the theories and how they are used to combine these building blocks to make a representative model for a particular rock. The format is based on the Extensible Markup Language XML, making it flexible enough to handle complex models as well as scalable towards extending it with new theories and models. This technology has great advantages as far as documenting and exchanging models in an unambiguous way between people and between software. Rock.XML can become a platform for creating a library of rock physics models; making them more accessible to everyone.

  2. Investigating Student Understanding of Quantum Physics: Spontaneous Models of Conductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittmann, Michael C.; Steinberg, Richard N.; Redish, Edward F.

    2002-01-01

    Investigates student reasoning about models of conduction. Reports that students often are unable to account for the existence of free electrons in a conductor and create models that lead to incorrect predictions and responses contradictory to expert descriptions of the physics involved. (Contains 36 references.) (Author/YDS)

  3. A numerical model to simulate physical states of snowpack for climate studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niwano, M.; Aoki, T.; Kuchiki, K.; Hosaka, M.; Kodama, Y.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, several physically based snow albedo models for general circulation models (GCMs) have been developed to improve the accuracy of climate simulations. Since these snow albedo models generally require snow grain size or specific surface area of snow as an input parameter, internal physical states of snowpack should also be calculated accurately in GCMs. For this reason, we developed a multilayered physical snowpack model named Snow Metamorphism and Albedo Process (SMAP) model. SMAP model takes energy balance, mass balance, snow settlement, phase changes, water percolation, and snow metamorphism into account. We validated SMAP model using meteorological and snow impurities (black carbon and dust) data measured during 2007-2009 winters (November to April) at Sapporo, Japan. The root mean square error (RMSE) values of snow depth were 0.064 m for 2007-2008 winter and 0.075 m for 2008-2009 winter. The RMSE values of shortwave albedo were 0.051 for 2007-2008 winter and 0.084 for 2008-2009. Although the RMSE value of shortwave albedo during 2008-2009 winter was somewhat large, it was attributed to an error that SMAP model could not simulate rapid complete melting. In fact, we obtained the RMSE value of 0.048 from 1 January to 15 March, 2009 when simulated snowpack continuously survived whole time. These results confirm that SMAP model can be used for climate simulations as well as studies on snow physical processes. Using SMAP model, we investigated the effects of snow impurities on snowmelt at Sapporo by means of "pure snow experiment". We found that snowpack durations at Sapporo were shortened by 19 days during 2007-2008 winter and 16 days during 2008-2009 winter by the forcing of snow impurities.

  4. A physical model of Titan's aerosols.

    PubMed

    Toon, O B; McKay, C P; Griffith, C A; Turco, R P

    1992-01-01

    Microphysical simulations of Titan's stratospheric haze show that aerosol microphysics is linked to organized dynamical processes. The detached haze layer may be a manifestation of 1 cm sec-1 vertical velocities at altitudes above 300 km. The hemispherical asymmetry in the visible albedo may be caused by 0.05 cm sec-1 vertical velocities at altitudes of 150 to 200 km, we predict contrast reversal beyond 0.6 micrometer. Tomasko and Smith's (1982, Icarus 51, 65-95) model, in which a layer of large particles above 220 km altitude is responsible for the high forward scattering observed by Rages and Pollack (1983, Icarus 55, 50-62), is a natural outcome of the detached haze layer being produced by rising motions if aerosol mass production occurs primarily below the detached haze layer. The aerosol's electrical charge is critical for the particle size and optical depth of the haze. The geometric albedo, particularly in the ultraviolet and near infrared, requires that the particle size be near 0.15 micrometer down to altitudes below 100 km, which is consistent with polarization observations (Tomasko and Smith 1982, West and Smith 1991, Icarus 90, 330-333). Above about 400 km and below about 150 km Yung et al.'s (1984, Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 55, 465-506) diffusion coefficients are too small. Dynamical processes control the haze particles below about 150 km. The relatively large eddy diffusion coefficients in the lower stratosphere result in a vertically extensive region with nonuniform mixing ratios of condensable gases, so that most hydrocarbons may condense very near the tropopause rather than tens of kilometers above it. The optical depths of hydrocarbon clouds are probably less than one, requiring that abundant gases such as ethane condense on a subset of the haze particles to create relatively large, rapidly removed particles. The wavelength dependence of the optical radius is calculated for use in analyzing observations of the geometric albedo. The lower

  5. Female role models in physics education in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chormaic, Síle Nic; Fee, Sandra; Tobin, Laura; Hennessy, Tara

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we consider the statistics on undergraduate student representation in Irish universities and look at student numbers in secondary (high) schools in one region in Ireland. There seems to be no significant change in female participation in physics from 2002 to 2011. Additionally, we have studied the influence of an educator's gender on the prevalence of girls studying physics in secondary schools in Co. Louth, Ireland, and at the postgraduate level in Irish universities. It would appear that strong female role models have a positive influence and lead to an increase in girls' participation in physics.

  6. Physical and numerical modeling of Joule-heated melters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyler, L. L.; Skarda, R. J.; Crowder, R. S., III; Trent, D. S.; Reid, C. R.; Lessor, D. L.

    1985-10-01

    The Joule-heated ceramic-lined melter is an integral part of the high level waste immobilization process under development by the US Department of Energy. Scaleup and design of this waste glass melting furnace requires an understanding of the relationships between melting cavity design parameters and the furnace performance characteristics such as mixing, heat transfer, and electrical requirements. Developing empirical models of these relationships through actual melter testing with numerous designs would be a very costly and time consuming task. Additionally, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been developing numerical models that simulate a Joule-heated melter for analyzing melter performance. This report documents the method used and results of this modeling effort. Numerical modeling results are compared with the more conventional, physical modeling results to validate the approach. Also included are the results of numerically simulating an operating research melter at PNL. Physical Joule-heated melters modeling results used for qualiying the simulation capabilities of the melter code included: (1) a melter with a single pair of electrodes and (2) a melter with a dual pair (two pairs) of electrodes. The physical model of the melter having two electrode pairs utilized a configuration with primary and secondary electrodes. The principal melter parameters (the ratio of power applied to each electrode pair, modeling fluid depth, electrode spacing) were varied in nine tests of the physical model during FY85. Code predictions were made for five of these tests. Voltage drops, temperature field data, and electric field data varied in their agreement with the physical modeling results, but in general were judged acceptable.

  7. Physical and numerical modeling of Joule-heated melters

    SciTech Connect

    Eyler, L.L.; Skarda, R.J.; Crowder, R.S. III; Trent, D.S.; Reid, C.R.; Lessor, D.L.

    1985-10-01

    The Joule-heated ceramic-lined melter is an integral part of the high level waste immobilization process under development by the US Department of Energy. Scaleup and design of this waste glass melting furnace requires an understanding of the relationships between melting cavity design parameters and the furnace performance characteristics such as mixing, heat transfer, and electrical requirements. Developing empirical models of these relationships through actual melter testing with numerous designs would be a very costly and time consuming task. Additionally, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been developing numerical models that simulate a Joule-heated melter for analyzing melter performance. This report documents the method used and results of this modeling effort. Numerical modeling results are compared with the more conventional, physical modeling results to validate the approach. Also included are the results of numerically simulating an operating research melter at PNL. Physical Joule-heated melters modeling results used for qualiying the simulation capabilities of the melter code included: (1) a melter with a single pair of electrodes and (2) a melter with a dual pair (two pairs) of electrodes. The physical model of the melter having two electrode pairs utilized a configuration with primary and secondary electrodes. The principal melter parameters (the ratio of power applied to each electrode pair, modeling fluid depth, electrode spacing) were varied in nine tests of the physical model during FY85. Code predictions were made for five of these tests. Voltage drops, temperature field data, and electric field data varied in their agreement with the physical modeling results, but in general were judged acceptable. 14 refs., 79 figs., 17 tabs.

  8. Efficient physics-based predictive 3D image modeling and simulation of optical atmospheric refraction phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Colin N.; Hammel, Stephen M.; Tsintikidis, Dimitris

    2016-09-01

    We present some preliminary results and discussion of our ongoing effort to develop a prototype volumetric atmospheric optical refraction simulator which uses 3D nonlinear ray-tracing and state-of-art physics-based rendering techniques. The tool will allow simulation of optical curved-ray propagation through nonlinear refractivity gradient profiles in volumetric atmospheric participating media, and the generation of radiometrically accurate images of the resulting atmospheric refraction phenomena, including inferior and superior mirages, over-the-horizon viewing conditions, looming and sinking, towering and stooping of distant objects. The ability to accurately model and predict atmospheric optical refraction conditions and phenomena is important in both defense and commercial applications. Our nonlinear refractive ray-trace method is currently CPU-parallelized and is well-suited for GPU compute implementation.

  9. Coupling ocean colour remote sensing data into physical-ecosystem models: mapping uncertainty distributions from space.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, David; Twardowski, Mike; Trees, Chuck; Sanjuan-Calzado, Violeta

    2013-04-01

    Ocean colour remote sensing (OCRS) has transformed our understanding of complex feedback processes linking physical forcing events to biogeochemical responses. With continuous daily global coverage extending beyond the last decade, OCRS has become established as an essential global climate variable with potential use as a sensitive indicator of regional and global response to changing climate. There is increasing focus on use of OCRS data for validation and assimilation into coupled physical-ecosystem models for both environmental and operational applications. It is therefore essential that OCRS data products are not only optimised for maximum accuracy, but are also provided to end users with appropriate uncertainties. A simple spectral deconvolution model will be presented along with a new bootstrap approach for estimating product uncertainties. This approach can be adapted for both remote sensing and in situ data, opening up the possibility of mapping uncertainty distributions in 3-D for the first time, and can be applied to other established OCRS data products, including the existent historic data set. Ecosystem models seek to reproduce and predict ocean biogeochemical processes, where the models are constrained by physical parameters such as: wind, currents, density and light. The hydrographic aspects of marine ecosystems can generally be defined through ocean circulation models, which are largely independent of the ecosystem itself. The physical optics determining the light environment, on the other hand, are two-way coupled with ecosystem models since light interacts with seawater and suspended constituents. The Optical Physical and Ecosystem Regional Assessment (OPERA) model proposes a more comprehensive and challenging approach, where all optical interactions occurring within the volume of water are taken into account, thus providing a more accurate definition of light dependent processes.

  10. Coupling ocean colour remote sensing data into physical-ecosystem models: mapping uncertainty distributions from space.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, David; Twardowski, Mike; Trees, Chuck; Sanjuan Calzado, Violeta

    2014-05-01

    Ocean colour remote sensing (OCRS) has transformed our understanding of complex feedback processes linking physical forcing events to biogeochemical responses. With continuous daily global coverage extending beyond the last decade, OCRS has become established as an essential global climate variable with potential use as a sensitive indicator of regional and global response to changing climate. There is increasing focus on use of OCRS data for validation and assimilation into coupled physical-ecosystem models for both environmental and operational applications. It is therefore essential that OCRS data products are not only optimised for maximum accuracy, but are also provided to end users with appropriate uncertainties. A simple spectral deconvolution model will be presented along with a new bootstrap approach for estimating product uncertainties. This approach can be adapted for both remote sensing and in situ data, opening up the possibility of mapping uncertainty distributions in 3-D for the first time, and can be applied to other established OCRS data products, including the existent historic data set. Ecosystem models seek to reproduce and predict ocean biogeochemical processes, where the models are constrained by physical parameters such as: wind, currents, density and light. The hydrographic aspects of marine ecosystems can generally be defined through ocean circulation models, which are largely independent of the ecosystem itself. The physical optics determining the light environment, on the other hand, are two-way coupled with ecosystem models since light interacts with seawater and suspended constituents. The Optical Physical and Ecosystem Regional Assessment (OPERA) model proposes a more comprehensive and challenging approach, where all optical interactions occurring within the volume of water are taken into account, thus providing a more accurate definition of light dependent processes.

  11. A physical data model for fields and agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Kor; de Bakker, Merijn; Karssenberg, Derek

    2016-04-01

    Two approaches exist in simulation modeling: agent-based and field-based modeling. In agent-based (or individual-based) simulation modeling, the entities representing the system's state are represented by objects, which are bounded in space and time. Individual objects, like an animal, a house, or a more abstract entity like a country's economy, have properties representing their state. In an agent-based model this state is manipulated. In field-based modeling, the entities representing the system's state are represented by fields. Fields capture the state of a continuous property within a spatial extent, examples of which are elevation, atmospheric pressure, and water flow velocity. With respect to the technology used to create these models, the domains of agent-based and field-based modeling have often been separate worlds. In environmental modeling, widely used logical data models include feature data models for point, line and polygon objects, and the raster data model for fields. Simulation models are often either agent-based or field-based, even though the modeled system might contain both entities that are better represented by individuals and entities that are better represented by fields. We think that the reason for this dichotomy in kinds of models might be that the traditional object and field data models underlying those models are relatively low level. We have developed a higher level conceptual data model for representing both non-spatial and spatial objects, and spatial fields (De Bakker et al. 2016). Based on this conceptual data model we designed a logical and physical data model for representing many kinds of data, including the kinds used in earth system modeling (e.g. hydrological and ecological models). The goal of this work is to be able to create high level code and tools for the creation of models in which entities are representable by both objects and fields. Our conceptual data model is capable of representing the traditional feature data

  12. A Goddard Multi-Scale Modeling System with Unified Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.K.; Anderson, D.; Atlas, R.; Chern, J.; Houser, P.; Hou, A.; Lang, S.; Lau, W.; Peters-Lidard, C.; Kakar, R.; Kumar, S.; Lapenta, W.; Li, X.; Matsui, T.; Rienecker, M.; Shen, B.W.; Shi, J.J.; Simpson, J.; Zeng, X.

    2008-01-01

    Numerical cloud resolving models (CRMs), which are based the non-hydrostatic equations of motion, have been extensively applied to cloud-scale and mesoscale processes during the past four decades. Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that CRMs agree with observations in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Cloud resolving models now provide statistical information useful for developing more realistic physically based parameterizations for climate models and numerical weather prediction models. It is also expected that Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) and regional scale model can be run in grid size similar to cloud resolving model through nesting technique. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a szrper-parameterization or multi-scale modeling -framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign can provide initial conditions as well as validation through utilizing the Earth Satellite simulators. At Goddard, we have developed a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics. The modeling system consists a coupled GCM-CRM (or MMF); a state-of-the-art weather research forecast model (WRF) and a cloud-resolving model (Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model). In these models, the same microphysical schemes (2ICE, several 3ICE), radiation (including explicitly calculated cloud optical properties), and surface models are applied. In addition, a comprehensive unified Earth Satellite

  13. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  14. A Physical Model of Electron Radiation Belts of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzato, L.; Sicard-Piet, A.; Bourdarie, S.

    2012-04-01

    Radiation belts causes irreversible damages on on-board instruments materials. That's why for two decades, ONERA proposes studies about radiation belts of magnetized planets. First, in the 90's, the development of a physical model, named Salammbô, carried out a model of the radiation belts of the Earth. Then, for few years, analysis of the magnetosphere of Jupiter and in-situ data (Pioneer, Voyager, Galileo) allow to build a physical model of the radiation belts of Jupiter. Enrolling on the Cassini age and thanks to all information collected, this study permits to adapt Salammbô jovian radiation belts model to the case of Saturn environment. Indeed, some physical processes present in the kronian magnetosphere are similar to those present in the magnetosphere of Jupiter (radial diffusion; interaction of energetic electrons with rings, moons, atmosphere; synchrotron emission). However, some physical processes have to be added to the kronian model (compared to the jovian model) because of the particularity of the magnetosphere of Saturn: interaction of energetic electrons with neutral particles from Enceladus, and wave-particle interaction. This last physical process has been studied in details with the analysis of CASSINI/RPWS (Radio and Plasma Waves Science) data. The major importance of the wave particles interaction is now well known in the case of the radiation belts of the Earth but it is important to investigate on its role in the case of Saturn. So, importance of each physical process has been studied and analysis of Cassini MIMI-LEMMS and CAPS data allows to build a model boundary condition (at L = 6). Finally, results of this study lead to a kronian electrons radiation belts model including radial diffusion, interactions of energetic electrons with rings, moons and neutrals particles and wave-particle interaction (interactions of electrons with atmosphere particles and synchrotron emission are too weak to be taken into account in this model). Then, to

  15. A Review of Wearable Technologies for Elderly Care that Can Accurately Track Indoor Position, Recognize Physical Activities and Monitor Vital Signs in Real Time

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhihua; Yang, Zhaochu; Dong, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Rapid growth of the aged population has caused an immense increase in the demand for healthcare services. Generally, the elderly are more prone to health problems compared to other age groups. With effective monitoring and alarm systems, the adverse effects of unpredictable events such as sudden illnesses, falls, and so on can be ameliorated to some extent. Recently, advances in wearable and sensor technologies have improved the prospects of these service systems for assisting elderly people. In this article, we review state-of-the-art wearable technologies that can be used for elderly care. These technologies are categorized into three types: indoor positioning, activity recognition and real time vital sign monitoring. Positioning is the process of accurate localization and is particularly important for elderly people so that they can be found in a timely manner. Activity recognition not only helps ensure that sudden events (e.g., falls) will raise alarms but also functions as a feasible way to guide people’s activities so that they avoid dangerous behaviors. Since most elderly people suffer from age-related problems, some vital signs that can be monitored comfortably and continuously via existing techniques are also summarized. Finally, we discussed a series of considerations and future trends with regard to the construction of “smart clothing” system. PMID:28208620

  16. A Review of Wearable Technologies for Elderly Care that Can Accurately Track Indoor Position, Recognize Physical Activities and Monitor Vital Signs in Real Time.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihua; Yang, Zhaochu; Dong, Tao

    2017-02-10

    Rapid growth of the aged population has caused an immense increase in the demand for healthcare services. Generally, the elderly are more prone to health problems compared to other age groups. With effective monitoring and alarm systems, the adverse effects of unpredictable events such as sudden illnesses, falls, and so on can be ameliorated to some extent. Recently, advances in wearable and sensor technologies have improved the prospects of these service systems for assisting elderly people. In this article, we review state-of-the-art wearable technologies that can be used for elderly care. These technologies are categorized into three types: indoor positioning, activity recognition and real time vital sign monitoring. Positioning is the process of accurate localization and is particularly important for elderly people so that they can be found in a timely manner. Activity recognition not only helps ensure that sudden events (e.g., falls) will raise alarms but also functions as a feasible way to guide people's activities so that they avoid dangerous behaviors. Since most elderly people suffer from age-related problems, some vital signs that can be monitored comfortably and continuously via existing techniques are also summarized. Finally, we discussed a series of considerations and future trends with regard to the construction of "smart clothing" system.

  17. Combined physical and chemical nonequilibrium transport model for solution conduits.

    PubMed

    Field, Malcolm S; Leij, Feike J

    2014-02-01

    Solute transport in karst aquifers is primarily constrained to relatively complex and inaccessible solution conduits where transport is often rapid, turbulent, and at times constrictive. Breakthrough curves generated from tracer tests in solution conduits are typically positively-skewed with long tails evident. Physical nonequilibrium models to fit breakthrough curves for tracer tests in solution conduits are now routinely employed. Chemical nonequilibrium processes are likely important interactions, however. In addition to partitioning between different flow domains, there may also be equilibrium and nonequilibrium partitioning between the aqueous and solid phases. A combined physical and chemical nonequilibrium (PCNE) model was developed for an instantaneous release similar to that developed by Leij and Bradford (2009) for a pulse release. The PCNE model allows for partitioning open space in solution conduits into mobile and immobile flow regions with first-order mass transfer between the two regions to represent physical nonequilibrium in the conduit. Partitioning between the aqueous and solid phases proceeds either as an equilibrium process or as a first-order process and represents chemical nonequilibrium for both the mobile and immobile regions. Application of the model to three example breakthrough curves demonstrates the applicability of the combined physical and chemical nonequilibrium model to tracer tests conducted in karst aquifers, with exceptionally good model fits to the data. The three models, each from a different state in the United States, exhibit very different velocities, dispersions, and other transport properties with most of the transport occurring via the fraction of mobile water. Fitting the model suggests the potentially important interaction of physical and chemical nonequilibrium processes.

  18. Climate model forecast biases assessed with a perturbed physics ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulholland, David P.; Haines, Keith; Sparrow, Sarah N.; Wallom, David

    2016-10-01

    Perturbed physics ensembles have often been used to analyse long-timescale climate model behaviour, but have been used less often to study model processes on shorter timescales. We combine a transient perturbed physics ensemble with a set of initialised forecasts to deduce regional process errors present in the standard HadCM3 model, which cause the model to drift in the early stages of the forecast. First, it is shown that the transient drifts in the perturbed physics ensembles can be used to recover quantitatively the parameters that were perturbed. The parameters which exert most influence on the drifts vary regionally, but upper ocean mixing and atmospheric convective processes are particularly important on the 1-month timescale. Drifts in the initialised forecasts are then used to recover the `equivalent parameter perturbations', which allow identification of the physical processes that may be at fault in the HadCM3 representation of the real world. Most parameters show positive and negative adjustments in different regions, indicating that standard HadCM3 values represent a global compromise. The method is verified by correcting an unusually widespread positive bias in the strength of wind-driven ocean mixing, with forecast drifts reduced in a large number of areas as a result. This method could therefore be used to improve the skill of initialised climate model forecasts by reducing model biases through regional adjustments to physical processes, either by tuning or targeted parametrisation refinement. Further, such regionally tuned models might also significantly outperform standard climate models, with global parameter configurations, in longer-term climate studies.

  19. A mathematical look at a physical power prediction model

    SciTech Connect

    Landberg, L.

    1997-12-31

    This paper takes a mathematical look at a physical model used to predict the power produced from wind farms. The reason is to see whether simple mathematical expressions can replace the original equations, and to give guidelines as to where the simplifications can be made and where they can not. This paper shows that there is a linear dependence between the geostrophic wind and the wind at the surface, but also that great care must be taken in the selection of the models since physical dependencies play a very important role, e.g. through the dependence of the turning of the wind on the wind speed.

  20. Laser induced x-ray `RADAR' particle physics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockley, D.; Deas, R.; Moss, R.; Wilson, L. A.; Rusby, D.; Neely, D.

    2016-05-01

    The technique of high-power laser-induced plasma acceleration can be used to generate a variety of diverse effects including the emission of X-rays, electrons, neutrons, protons and radio-frequency radiation. A compact variable source of this nature could support a wide range of potential applications including single-sided through-barrier imaging, cargo and vehicle screening, infrastructure inspection, oncology and structural failure analysis. This paper presents a verified particle physics simulation which replicates recent results from experiments conducted at the Central Laser Facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), Didcot, UK. The RAL experiment demonstrated the generation of backscattered X-rays from test objects via the bremsstrahlung of an incident electron beam, the electron beam itself being produced by Laser Wakefield Acceleration. A key initial objective of the computer simulation was to inform the experimental planning phase on the predicted magnitude of the backscattered X-rays likely from the test objects. This objective was achieved and the computer simulation was used to show the viability of the proposed concept (Laser-induced X-ray `RADAR'). At the more advanced stages of the experimental planning phase, the simulation was used to gain critical knowledge of where it would be technically feasible to locate key diagnostic equipment within the experiment. The experiment successfully demonstrated the concept of X-ray `RADAR' imaging, achieved by using the accurate timing information of the backscattered X-rays relative to the ultra-short laser pulse used to generate the electron beam. By using fast response X-ray detectors it was possible to derive range information for the test objects being scanned. An X-ray radar `image' (equivalent to a RADAR B-scan slice) was produced by combining individual X-ray temporal profiles collected at different points along a horizontal distance line scan. The same image formation process was used to generate

  1. Finite Element Modelling of a Field-Sensed Magnetic Suspended System for Accurate Proximity Measurement Based on a Sensor Fusion Algorithm with Unscented Kalman Filter.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Amor; Sarjaš, Andrej

    2016-09-15

    The presented paper describes accurate distance measurement for a field-sensed magnetic suspension system. The proximity measurement is based on a Hall effect sensor. The proximity sensor is installed directly on the lower surface of the electro-magnet, which means that it is very sensitive to external magnetic influences and disturbances. External disturbances interfere with the information signal and reduce the usability and reliability of the proximity measurements and, consequently, the whole application operation. A sensor fusion algorithm is deployed for the aforementioned reasons. The sensor fusion algorithm is based on the Unscented Kalman Filter, where a nonlinear dynamic model was derived with the Finite Element Modelling approach. The advantage of such modelling is a more accurate dynamic model parameter estimation, especially in the case when the real structure, materials and dimensions of the real-time application are known. The novelty of the paper is the design of a compact electro-magnetic actuator with a built-in low cost proximity sensor for accurate proximity measurement of the magnetic object. The paper successively presents a modelling procedure with the finite element method, design and parameter settings of a sensor fusion algorithm with Unscented Kalman Filter and, finally, the implementation procedure and results of real-time operation.

  2. Finite Element Modelling of a Field-Sensed Magnetic Suspended System for Accurate Proximity Measurement Based on a Sensor Fusion Algorithm with Unscented Kalman Filter

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Amor; Sarjaš, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    The presented paper describes accurate distance measurement for a field-sensed magnetic suspension system. The proximity measurement is based on a Hall effect sensor. The proximity sensor is installed directly on the lower surface of the electro-magnet, which means that it is very sensitive to external magnetic influences and disturbances. External disturbances interfere with the information signal and reduce the usability and reliability of the proximity measurements and, consequently, the whole application operation. A sensor fusion algorithm is deployed for the aforementioned reasons. The sensor fusion algorithm is based on the Unscented Kalman Filter, where a nonlinear dynamic model was derived with the Finite Element Modelling approach. The advantage of such modelling is a more accurate dynamic model parameter estimation, especially in the case when the real structure, materials and dimensions of the real-time application are known. The novelty of the paper is the design of a compact electro-magnetic actuator with a built-in low cost proximity sensor for accurate proximity measurement of the magnetic object. The paper successively presents a modelling procedure with the finite element method, design and parameter settings of a sensor fusion algorithm with Unscented Kalman Filter and, finally, the implementation procedure and results of real-time operation. PMID:27649197

  3. Problems with heterogeneity in physically based agricultural catchment models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Jeppe Rølmer; Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Hansen, Søren; Ernstsen, Vibeke

    2007-08-01

    SummaryLumped conceptual rainfall-runoff models and physically based distributed models are being used successfully for simulating daily discharge at catchment scale. Physically based models are more desirable for simulation of the fate of agrochemicals (e.g. nitrate) because they rely on physical equations for flow and transport. The literature shows that the average response (e.g. percolation and leaching) at field scale can be simulated successfully by using effective or standard values in the parameterisation of these models. However, in areas characterised by a high degree of spatial variability the physically based models sometimes fail to simulate the discharge dynamics at catchment scale properly possibly due to the lack of representation of sub-grid variability. This paper presents an agricultural physically based distributed model concept which included 3561 combinations of root zone simulations of percolation and leaching that was distributed within a 622 km 2 catchment according to land use, climate, soil types, etc. This was thought to account for all heterogeneity within the catchment but did not. It was shown that a much simpler model with less than 100 combinations of root zone calculations partially including important variability at the catchment scale could simulate discharge equally well and in some cases better than the complex one. The most important parameter heterogeneity to include in the conceptualisation step apparently was sub-grid variation of soil physical parameters and variability of crop growth. The variation of crop growth was forced by restricting the rooting depth which potentially lumped other heterogeneities into this property. The results also suggest that the groundwater table that constitutes the lower boundary condition in the unsaturated zone is another important factor. However, this was difficult to examine because of the modelling approach that did not feature feedback from the saturated to the unsaturated zone. A list

  4. Filamentous Phages As a Model System in Soft Matter Physics

    PubMed Central

    Dogic, Zvonimir

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous phages have unique physical properties, such as uniform particle lengths, that are not found in other model systems of rod-like colloidal particles. Consequently, suspensions of such phages provided powerful model systems that have advanced our understanding of soft matter physics in general and liquid crystals in particular. We described some of these advances. In particular we briefly summarize how suspensions of filamentous phages have provided valuable insight into the field of colloidal liquid crystals. We also describe recent experiments on filamentous phages that have elucidated a robust pathway for assembly of 2D membrane-like materials. Finally, we outline unique structural properties of filamentous phages that have so far remained largely unexplored yet have the potential to further advance soft matter physics and material science. PMID:27446051

  5. Filamentous Phages As a Model System in Soft Matter Physics.

    PubMed

    Dogic, Zvonimir

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous phages have unique physical properties, such as uniform particle lengths, that are not found in other model systems of rod-like colloidal particles. Consequently, suspensions of such phages provided powerful model systems that have advanced our understanding of soft matter physics in general and liquid crystals in particular. We described some of these advances. In particular we briefly summarize how suspensions of filamentous phages have provided valuable insight into the field of colloidal liquid crystals. We also describe recent experiments on filamentous phages that have elucidated a robust pathway for assembly of 2D membrane-like materials. Finally, we outline unique structural properties of filamentous phages that have so far remained largely unexplored yet have the potential to further advance soft matter physics and material science.

  6. Evaluating performances of simplified physically based landslide susceptibility models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capparelli, Giovanna; Formetta, Giuseppe; Versace, Pasquale

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall induced shallow landslides cause significant damages involving loss of life and properties. Prediction of shallow landslides susceptible locations is a complex task that involves many disciplines: hydrology, geotechnical science, geomorphology, and statistics. Usually to accomplish this task two main approaches are used: statistical or physically based model. This paper presents a package of GIS based models for landslide susceptibility analysis. It was integrated in the NewAge-JGrass hydrological model using the Object Modeling System (OMS) modeling framework. The package includes three simplified physically based models for landslides susceptibility analysis (M1, M2, and M3) and a component for models verifications. It computes eight goodness of fit indices (GOF) by comparing pixel-by-pixel model results and measurements data. Moreover, the package integration in NewAge-JGrass allows the use of other components such as geographic information system tools to manage inputs-output processes, and automatic calibration algorithms to estimate model parameters. The system offers the possibility to investigate and fairly compare the quality and the robustness of models and models parameters, according a procedure that includes: i) model parameters estimation by optimizing each of the GOF index separately, ii) models evaluation in the ROC plane by using each of the optimal parameter set, and iii) GOF robustness evaluation by assessing their sensitivity to the input parameter variation. This procedure was repeated for all three models. The system was applied for a case study in Calabria (Italy) along the Salerno-Reggio Calabria highway, between Cosenza and Altilia municipality. The analysis provided that among all the optimized indices and all the three models, Average Index (AI) optimization coupled with model M3 is the best modeling solution for our test case. This research was funded by PON Project No. 01_01503 "Integrated Systems for Hydrogeological Risk

  7. Physics-driven CFD modeling of complex anatomical cardiovascular flows-a TCPC case study.

    PubMed

    Pekkan, Kerem; de Zélicourt, Diane; Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Frakes, David; Fogel, Mark A; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2005-03-01

    Recent developments in medical image acquisition combined with the latest advancements in numerical methods for solving the Navier-Stokes equations have created unprecedented opportunities for developing simple and reliable computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools for meeting patient-specific surgical planning objectives. However, for CFD to reach its full potential and gain the trust and confidence of medical practitioners, physics-driven numerical modeling is required. This study reports on the experience gained from an ongoing integrated CFD modeling effort aimed at developing an advanced numerical simulation tool capable of accurately predicting flow characteristics in an anatomically correct total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC). An anatomical intra-atrial TCPC model is reconstructed from a stack of magnetic resonance (MR) images acquired in vivo. An exact replica of the computational geometry was built using transparent rapid prototyping. Following the same approach as in earlier studies on idealized models, flow structures, pressure drops, and energy losses were assessed both numerically and experimentally, then compared. Numerical studies were performed with both a first-order accurate commercial software and a recently developed, second-order accurate, in-house flow solver. The commercial CFD model could, with reasonable accuracy, capture global flow quantities of interest such as control volume power losses and pressure drops and time-averaged flow patterns. However, for steady inflow conditions, both flow visualization experiments and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements revealed unsteady, complex, and highly 3D flow structures, which could not be captured by this numerical model with the available computational resources and additional modeling efforts that are described. Preliminary time-accurate computations with the in-house flow solver were shown to capture for the first time these complex flow features and yielded solutions in good

  8. Constitutive Modeling and Testing of Polymer Matrix Composites Incorporating Physical Aging at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veazie, David R.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced polymer matrix composites (PMC's) are desirable for structural materials in diverse applications such as aircraft, civil infrastructure and biomedical implants because of their improved strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight ratios. For example, the next generation military and commercial aircraft requires applications for high strength, low weight structural components subjected to elevated temperatures. A possible disadvantage of polymer-based composites is that the physical and mechanical properties of the matrix often change significantly over time due to the exposure of elevated temperatures and environmental factors. For design, long term exposure (i.e. aging) of PMC's must be accounted for through constitutive models in order to accurately assess the effects of aging on performance, crack initiation and remaining life. One particular aspect of this aging process, physical aging, is considered in this research.

  9. A Systematic Review of Human Bat Rabies Virus Variant Cases: Evaluating Unprotected Physical Contact with Claws and Teeth in Support of Accurate Risk Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Campagnolo, Enzo R.; Long, Jonah; Rupprecht, Charles E.

    2016-01-01

    In the United States and Canada, the most recent documented cases of rabies have been attributed to bat rabies viruses (RABV). We undertook this systematic review in an effort to summarize and enhance understanding of the risk of infection for individuals who have been potentially exposed to a suspect or confirmed rabid bat. United States rabies surveillance summaries documented a total of 41 human bat-rabies virus variant verified non-transplant cases between 1990 and 2015. All cases were fatal. Seven (17.1%) of 41 cases reported a bite from a bat. Ten (24.3%) cases had unprotected physical contact (UPC); these included seven cases that had a bat land or crawl on them (contact with claws) and one case that touched a bat’s teeth. Seven (17.1%) cases had probable UPC. Insectivorous bat teeth are extremely sharp and highly efficient for predation upon arthropod prey. Bats also have sharp claws on the end of their thumbs and feet. One of the most common bat RABV variants has an ability to replicate in non-neural cells. Questioning individuals about unprotected contact with bat teeth and claws (including a bat landing or crawling on a person) may help identify additional exposures. PMID:27459720

  10. The Coupled Chemical and Physical Dynamics Model of MALDI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knochenmuss, Richard

    2016-06-01

    The coupled physical and chemical dynamics model of ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) has reproduced and explained a wide variety of MALDI phenomena. The rationale behind and elements of the model are reviewed, including the photophysics, kinetics, and thermodynamics of primary and secondary reaction steps. Experimental results are compared with model predictions to illustrate the foundations of the model, coupling of ablation and ionization, differences between and commonalities of matrices, secondary charge transfer reactions, ionization in both polarities, fluence and concentration dependencies, and suppression and enhancement effects.

  11. Simplified physically based model of earthen embankment breaching

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simplified physically based model has been developed to simulate the breaching processes of homogenous and composite earthen embankments owing to overtopping and piping. The breach caused by overtopping flow is approximated as a flat broad-crested weir with a trapezoidal cross section, downstream ...

  12. Aspects of the Cognitive Model of Physics Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brekke, Stewart E.

    Various aspects of the cognitive model of physics problem solving are discussed in detail including relevant cues, encoding, memory, and input stimuli. The learning process involved in the recognition of familiar and non-familiar sensory stimuli is highlighted. Its four components include selection, acquisition, construction, and integration. The…

  13. Advanced Ground Systems Maintenance Physics Models for Diagnostics Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harp, Janicce Leshay

    2014-01-01

    The project will use high-fidelity physics models and simulations to simulate real-time operations of cryogenic and systems and calculate the status/health of the systems. The project enables the delivery of system health advisories to ground system operators. The capability will also be used to conduct planning and analysis of cryogenic system operations.

  14. Project Physics Tests 5, Models of the Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    Test items relating to Project Physics Unit 5 are presented in this booklet. Included are 70 multiple-choice and 23 problem-and-essay questions. Concepts of atomic model are examined on aspects of relativistic corrections, electron emission, photoelectric effects, Compton effect, quantum theories, electrolysis experiments, atomic number and mass,…

  15. Project Physics Text 5, Models of the Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    Basic atomic theories are presented in this fifth unit of the Project Physics text for use by senior high students. Chemical basis of atomic models in the early years of the 18th Century is discussed n connection with Dalton's theory, atomic properties, and periodic tables. The discovery of electrons is described by using cathode rays, Millikan's…

  16. PHYSICAL AND NUMERICAL MODELING OF ASD EXHAUST DISPERSION AROUND HOUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the use of a wind tunnel to physically model the dispersion of exhaust plumes from active soil depressurization (ASD) radon mitigation systems in houses. he testing studied the effects of exhaust location (grade level vs. above the eave), as house height, roo...

  17. Physical-scale models of engineered log jams in rivers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stream restoration and river engineering projects are employing engineered log jams increasingly for stabilization and in-stream improvements. To further advance the design of these structures and their morphodynamic effects on corridors, the basis for physical-scale models of rivers with engineere...

  18. The Role of Computer-Aided Modelling in Learning Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niedderer, H.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Described is how an iconic model building software can be used to help students gain a deeper qualitative conceptual understanding of physics concepts. The program, STELLA, links research about misconceptions and new teaching strategies with the use of modern information technology tools. (31 references) (KR)

  19. Childhood physical abuse and midlife physical health: testing a multi-pathway life course model.

    PubMed

    Springer, Kristen W

    2009-07-01

    Although prior research has established that childhood abuse adversely affects midlife physical health, it is unclear how abuse continues to harm health decades after the abuse has ended. In this project, I assess four life course pathways (health behaviors, cognition, mental health, and social relation) that plausibly link childhood physical abuse to three midlife physical health outcomes (bronchitis diagnosis, ulcer diagnosis, and general physical health). These three outcomes are etiologically distinct, leading to unique testable hypotheses. Multivariate models controlling for childhood background and early adversity were estimated using data from over 3000 respondents in the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, USA. The results indicate that midlife social relations and cognition do not function as pathways for any outcome. However, smoking is a crucial pathway connecting childhood abuse with bronchitis; mental health is important for ulcers; and BMI, smoking, and mental health are paramount for general physical health. These findings suggest that abuse survivors' coping mechanisms can lead to an array of midlife health problems. Furthermore, the results validate the use of etiologically distinct outcomes for understanding plausible causal pathways when using cross-sectional data.

  20. Dynamic force matching: Construction of dynamic coarse-grained models with realistic short time dynamics and accurate long time dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davtyan, Aram; Voth, Gregory A.; Andersen, Hans C.

    2016-12-01

    We recently developed a dynamic force matching technique for converting a coarse-grained (CG) model of a molecular system, with a CG potential energy function, into a dynamic CG model with realistic dynamics [A. Davtyan et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 154104 (2015)]. This is done by supplementing the model with additional degrees of freedom, called "fictitious particles." In that paper, we tested the method on CG models in which each molecule is coarse-grained into one CG point particle, with very satisfactory results. When the method was applied to a CG model of methanol that has two CG point particles per molecule, the results were encouraging but clearly required improvement. In this paper, we introduce a new type (called type-3) of fictitious particle that exerts forces on the center of mass of two CG sites. A CG model constructed using type-3 fictitious particles (as well as type-2 particles previously used) gives a much more satisfactory dynamic model for liquid methanol. In particular, we were able to construct a CG model that has the same self-diffusion coefficient and the same rotational relaxation time as an all-atom model of liquid methanol. Type-3 particles and generalizations of it are likely to be useful in converting more complicated CG models into dynamic CG models.