Science.gov

Sample records for accurate protein quantification

  1. Accurate mass spectrometry based protein quantification via shared peptides.

    PubMed

    Dost, Banu; Bandeira, Nuno; Li, Xiangqian; Shen, Zhouxin; Briggs, Steven P; Bafna, Vineet

    2012-04-01

    In mass spectrometry-based protein quantification, peptides that are shared across different protein sequences are often discarded as being uninformative with respect to each of the parent proteins. We investigate the use of shared peptides which are ubiquitous (~50% of peptides) in mass spectrometric data-sets for accurate protein identification and quantification. Different from existing approaches, we show how shared peptides can help compute the relative amounts of the proteins that contain them. Also, proteins with no unique peptide in the sample can still be analyzed for relative abundance. Our article uses shared peptides in protein quantification and makes use of combinatorial optimization to reduce the error in relative abundance measurements. We describe the topological and numerical properties required for robust estimates, and use them to improve our estimates for ill-conditioned systems. Extensive simulations validate our approach even in the presence of experimental error. We apply our method to a model of Arabidopsis thaliana root knot nematode infection, and investigate the differential role of several protein family members in mediating host response to the pathogen. PMID:22414154

  2. The SILAC Fly Allows for Accurate Protein Quantification in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Sury, Matthias D.; Chen, Jia-Xuan; Selbach, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) is widely used to quantify protein abundance in tissue culture cells. Until now, the only multicellular organism completely labeled at the amino acid level was the laboratory mouse. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most widely used small animal models in biology. Here, we show that feeding flies with SILAC-labeled yeast leads to almost complete labeling in the first filial generation. We used these “SILAC flies” to investigate sexual dimorphism of protein abundance in D. melanogaster. Quantitative proteome comparison of adult male and female flies revealed distinct biological processes specific for each sex. Using a tudor mutant that is defective for germ cell generation allowed us to differentiate between sex-specific protein expression in the germ line and somatic tissue. We identified many proteins with known sex-specific expression bias. In addition, several new proteins with a potential role in sexual dimorphism were identified. Collectively, our data show that the SILAC fly can be used to accurately quantify protein abundance in vivo. The approach is simple, fast, and cost-effective, making SILAC flies an attractive model system for the emerging field of in vivo quantitative proteomics. PMID:20525996

  3. PSAQ™ standards for accurate MS-based quantification of proteins: from the concept to biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Picard, Guillaume; Lebert, Dorothée; Louwagie, Mathilde; Adrait, Annie; Huillet, Céline; Vandenesch, François; Bruley, Christophe; Garin, Jérôme; Jaquinod, Michel; Brun, Virginie

    2012-10-01

    Absolute protein quantification, i.e. determining protein concentrations in biological samples, is essential to our understanding of biological and physiopathological phenomena. Protein quantification methods based on the use of antibodies are very effective and widely used. However, over the last ten years, absolute protein quantification by mass spectrometry has attracted considerable interest, particularly for the study of systems biology and as part of biomarker development. This interest is mainly linked to the high multiplexing capacity of MS analysis, and to the availability of stable-isotope-labelled standards for quantification. This article describes the details of how to produce, control the quality and use a specific type of standard: Protein Standard Absolute Quantification (PSAQ™) standards. These standards are whole isotopically labelled proteins, analogues of the proteins to be assayed. PSAQ standards can be added early during sample treatment, thus they can correct for protein losses during sample prefractionation and for incomplete sample digestion. Because of this, quantification of target proteins is very accurate and precise using these standards. To illustrate the advantages of the PSAQ method, and to contribute to the increase in its use, selected applications in the biomedical field are detailed here. PMID:23019168

  4. Accurate quantification of diffusion and binding kinetics of non-integral membrane proteins by FRAP.

    PubMed

    Berkovich, Ronen; Wolfenson, Haguy; Eisenberg, Sharon; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Weiss, Matthias; Klafter, Joseph; Henis, Yoav I; Urbakh, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Non-integral membrane proteins frequently act as transduction hubs in vital signaling pathways initiated at the plasma membrane (PM). Their biological activity depends on dynamic interactions with the PM, which are governed by their lateral and cytoplasmic diffusion and membrane binding/unbinding kinetics. Accurate quantification of the multiple kinetic parameters characterizing their membrane interaction dynamics has been challenging. Despite a fair number of approximate fitting functions for analyzing fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) data, no approach was able to cope with the full diffusion-exchange problem. Here, we present an exact solution and matlab fitting programs for FRAP with a stationary Gaussian laser beam, allowing simultaneous determination of the membrane (un)binding rates and the diffusion coefficients. To reduce the number of fitting parameters, the cytoplasmic diffusion coefficient is determined separately. Notably, our equations include the dependence of the exchange kinetics on the distribution of the measured protein between the PM and the cytoplasm, enabling the derivation of both k(on) and k(off) without prior assumptions. After validating the fitting function by computer simulations, we confirm the applicability of our approach to live-cell data by monitoring the dynamics of GFP-N-Ras mutants under conditions with different contributions of lateral diffusion and exchange to the FRAP kinetics. PMID:21810156

  5. Automated Selected Reaction Monitoring Software for Accurate Label-Free Protein Quantification

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) is a mass spectrometry method with documented ability to quantify proteins accurately and reproducibly using labeled reference peptides. However, the use of labeled reference peptides becomes impractical if large numbers of peptides are targeted and when high flexibility is desired when selecting peptides. We have developed a label-free quantitative SRM workflow that relies on a new automated algorithm, Anubis, for accurate peak detection. Anubis efficiently removes interfering signals from contaminating peptides to estimate the true signal of the targeted peptides. We evaluated the algorithm on a published multisite data set and achieved results in line with manual data analysis. In complex peptide mixtures from whole proteome digests of Streptococcus pyogenes we achieved a technical variability across the entire proteome abundance range of 6.5–19.2%, which was considerably below the total variation across biological samples. Our results show that the label-free SRM workflow with automated data analysis is feasible for large-scale biological studies, opening up new possibilities for quantitative proteomics and systems biology. PMID:22658081

  6. New capillary gel electrophoresis method for fast and accurate identification and quantification of multiple viral proteins in influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    van Tricht, Ewoud; Geurink, Lars; Pajic, Bojana; Nijenhuis, Johan; Backus, Harold; Germano, Marta; Somsen, Govert W; Sänger-van de Griend, Cari E

    2015-11-01

    Current methods for the identification and/or quantification of viral proteins in influenza virus and virosome samples suffer from long analysis times, limited protein coverage and/or low accuracy and precision. We studied and optimized capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) in order to achieve faster and enhanced characterization and quantification of viral proteins. Sample preparation as well the composition of the gel buffer was investigated in order to achieve adequate protein separation in relatively short times. The total sample preparation (reduction and deglycosylation) could be carried out efficiently within two hours. Hydrodynamic injection, separation voltage, and capillary temperature were optimized in full factorial design. The final method was validated and showed good performance for hemagglutinin fragment 1 (HA1), hemagglutinin fragment 2 (HA2), matrix protein (M) and nucleoprotein (NP). The CGE method allowed identification of different virus strains based on their specific protein profile. B/Brisbane inactivated virus and virosome samples could be analyzed within one day. The CGE results (titers) were comparable to single radial immune-diffusion (SRID), but the method has the advantage of a much faster time to results. CGE analysis of A/Christchurch from upstream process demonstrated the applicability of the method to samples of high complexity. The CGE method could be used in the same analyte concentration range as the RP-HPLC method, but showed better precision and accuracy. Overall, the total analysis time for the CGE method was much shorter, allowing analysis of 100 samples in 4 days instead of 10 days for SRID. PMID:26452923

  7. Statistical Approach to Protein Quantification*

    PubMed Central

    Gerster, Sarah; Kwon, Taejoon; Ludwig, Christina; Matondo, Mariette; Vogel, Christine; Marcotte, Edward M.; Aebersold, Ruedi; Bühlmann, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A major goal in proteomics is the comprehensive and accurate description of a proteome. This task includes not only the identification of proteins in a sample, but also the accurate quantification of their abundance. Although mass spectrometry typically provides information on peptide identity and abundance in a sample, it does not directly measure the concentration of the corresponding proteins. Specifically, most mass-spectrometry-based approaches (e.g. shotgun proteomics or selected reaction monitoring) allow one to quantify peptides using chromatographic peak intensities or spectral counting information. Ultimately, based on these measurements, one wants to infer the concentrations of the corresponding proteins. Inferring properties of the proteins based on experimental peptide evidence is often a complex problem because of the ambiguity of peptide assignments and different chemical properties of the peptides that affect the observed concentrations. We present SCAMPI, a novel generic and statistically sound framework for computing protein abundance scores based on quantified peptides. In contrast to most previous approaches, our model explicitly includes information from shared peptides to improve protein quantitation, especially in eukaryotes with many homologous sequences. The model accounts for uncertainty in the input data, leading to statistical prediction intervals for the protein scores. Furthermore, peptides with extreme abundances can be reassessed and classified as either regular data points or actual outliers. We used the proposed model with several datasets and compared its performance to that of other, previously used approaches for protein quantification in bottom-up mass spectrometry. PMID:24255132

  8. Protein inference: A protein quantification perspective.

    PubMed

    He, Zengyou; Huang, Ting; Liu, Xiaoqing; Zhu, Peijun; Teng, Ben; Deng, Shengchun

    2016-08-01

    In mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics, protein quantification and protein identification are two major computational problems. To quantify the protein abundance, a list of proteins must be firstly inferred from the raw data. Then the relative or absolute protein abundance is estimated with quantification methods, such as spectral counting. Until now, most researchers have been dealing with these two processes separately. In fact, the protein inference problem can be regarded as a special protein quantification problem in the sense that truly present proteins are those proteins whose abundance values are not zero. Some recent published papers have conceptually discussed this possibility. However, there is still a lack of rigorous experimental studies to test this hypothesis. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of using protein quantification methods to solve the protein inference problem. Protein inference methods aim to determine whether each candidate protein is present in the sample or not. Protein quantification methods estimate the abundance value of each inferred protein. Naturally, the abundance value of an absent protein should be zero. Thus, we argue that the protein inference problem can be viewed as a special protein quantification problem in which one protein is considered to be present if its abundance is not zero. Based on this idea, our paper tries to use three simple protein quantification methods to solve the protein inference problem effectively. The experimental results on six data sets show that these three methods are competitive with previous protein inference algorithms. This demonstrates that it is plausible to model the protein inference problem as a special protein quantification task, which opens the door of devising more effective protein inference algorithms from a quantification perspective. The source codes of our methods are available at: http://code.google.com/p/protein-inference/. PMID:26935399

  9. QconCAT: Internal Standard for Protein Quantification.

    PubMed

    Scott, Kerry Bauer; Turko, Illarion V; Phinney, Karen W

    2016-01-01

    Protein quantification based on stable isotope labeling-mass spectrometry involves adding known quantities of stable isotope-labeled internal standards into biological samples. The internal standards are analogous to analyte molecules and quantification is achieved by comparing signals from isotope-labeled and analyte molecules. This methodology is broadly applicable to proteomics research, biomarker discovery and validation, and clinical studies, which require accurate and precise protein abundance measurements. One such internal standard platform for protein quantification is concatenated peptides (QconCAT). This chapter describes a protocol for the design, expression, characterization, and application of the QconCAT strategy for protein quantification. PMID:26791984

  10. Accurate quantification of supercoiled DNA by digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lianhua; Yoo, Hee-Bong; Wang, Jing; Park, Sang-Ryoul

    2016-01-01

    Digital PCR (dPCR) as an enumeration-based quantification method is capable of quantifying the DNA copy number without the help of standards. However, it can generate false results when the PCR conditions are not optimized. A recent international comparison (CCQM P154) showed that most laboratories significantly underestimated the concentration of supercoiled plasmid DNA by dPCR. Mostly, supercoiled DNAs are linearized before dPCR to avoid such underestimations. The present study was conducted to overcome this problem. In the bilateral comparison, the National Institute of Metrology, China (NIM) optimized and applied dPCR for supercoiled DNA determination, whereas Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS) prepared the unknown samples and quantified them by flow cytometry. In this study, several factors like selection of the PCR master mix, the fluorescent label, and the position of the primers were evaluated for quantifying supercoiled DNA by dPCR. This work confirmed that a 16S PCR master mix avoided poor amplification of the supercoiled DNA, whereas HEX labels on dPCR probe resulted in robust amplification curves. Optimizing the dPCR assay based on these two observations resulted in accurate quantification of supercoiled DNA without preanalytical linearization. This result was validated in close agreement (101~113%) with the result from flow cytometry. PMID:27063649

  11. Accurate quantification of supercoiled DNA by digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lianhua; Yoo, Hee-Bong; Wang, Jing; Park, Sang-Ryoul

    2016-01-01

    Digital PCR (dPCR) as an enumeration-based quantification method is capable of quantifying the DNA copy number without the help of standards. However, it can generate false results when the PCR conditions are not optimized. A recent international comparison (CCQM P154) showed that most laboratories significantly underestimated the concentration of supercoiled plasmid DNA by dPCR. Mostly, supercoiled DNAs are linearized before dPCR to avoid such underestimations. The present study was conducted to overcome this problem. In the bilateral comparison, the National Institute of Metrology, China (NIM) optimized and applied dPCR for supercoiled DNA determination, whereas Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS) prepared the unknown samples and quantified them by flow cytometry. In this study, several factors like selection of the PCR master mix, the fluorescent label, and the position of the primers were evaluated for quantifying supercoiled DNA by dPCR. This work confirmed that a 16S PCR master mix avoided poor amplification of the supercoiled DNA, whereas HEX labels on dPCR probe resulted in robust amplification curves. Optimizing the dPCR assay based on these two observations resulted in accurate quantification of supercoiled DNA without preanalytical linearization. This result was validated in close agreement (101~113%) with the result from flow cytometry. PMID:27063649

  12. Accurate 3D quantification of the bronchial parameters in MDCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saragaglia, A.; Fetita, C.; Preteux, F.; Brillet, P. Y.; Grenier, P. A.

    2005-08-01

    The assessment of bronchial reactivity and wall remodeling in asthma plays a crucial role in better understanding such a disease and evaluating therapeutic responses. Today, multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) makes it possible to perform an accurate estimation of bronchial parameters (lumen and wall areas) by allowing a quantitative analysis in a cross-section plane orthogonal to the bronchus axis. This paper provides the tools for such an analysis by developing a 3D investigation method which relies on 3D reconstruction of bronchial lumen and central axis computation. Cross-section images at bronchial locations interactively selected along the central axis are generated at appropriate spatial resolution. An automated approach is then developed for accurately segmenting the inner and outer bronchi contours on the cross-section images. It combines mathematical morphology operators, such as "connection cost", and energy-controlled propagation in order to overcome the difficulties raised by vessel adjacencies and wall irregularities. The segmentation accuracy was validated with respect to a 3D mathematically-modeled phantom of a pair bronchus-vessel which mimics the characteristics of real data in terms of gray-level distribution, caliber and orientation. When applying the developed quantification approach to such a model with calibers ranging from 3 to 10 mm diameter, the lumen area relative errors varied from 3.7% to 0.15%, while the bronchus area was estimated with a relative error less than 5.1%.

  13. Accurate quantification of cells recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage.

    PubMed

    Saltini, C; Hance, A J; Ferrans, V J; Basset, F; Bitterman, P B; Crystal, R G

    1984-10-01

    Quantification of the differential cell count and total number of cells recovered from the lower respiratory tract by bronchoalveolar lavage is a valuable technique for evaluating the alveolitis of patients with inflammatory disorders of the lower respiratory tract. The most commonly used technique for the evaluation of cells recovered by lavage has been to concentrate cells by centrifugation and then to determine total cell number using a hemocytometer and differential cell count from a Wright-Glemsa-stained cytocentrifuge preparation. However, we have noted that the percentage of small cells present in the original cell suspension recovered by lavage is greater than the percentage of lymphocytes identified on cytocentrifuge preparations. Therefore, we developed procedures for determining differential cell counts on lavage cells collected on Millipore filters and stained with hematoxylin-eosin (filter preparations) and compared the results of differential cell counts performed on filter preparations with those obtained using cytocentrifuge preparations. When cells recovered by lavage were collected on filter preparations, accurate differential cell counts were obtained, as confirmed by performing differential cell counts on cell mixtures of known composition, and by comparing differential cell counts obtained using filter preparations stained with hematoxylin-eosin with those obtained using filter preparations stained with a peroxidase cytochemical stain. The morphology of cells displayed on filter preparations was excellent, and interobserver variability in quantitating cell types recovered by lavage was less than 3%.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6385789

  14. Accurate Proteome-wide Label-free Quantification by Delayed Normalization and Maximal Peptide Ratio Extraction, Termed MaxLFQ *

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Jürgen; Hein, Marco Y.; Luber, Christian A.; Paron, Igor; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Mann, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Protein quantification without isotopic labels has been a long-standing interest in the proteomics field. However, accurate and robust proteome-wide quantification with label-free approaches remains a challenge. We developed a new intensity determination and normalization procedure called MaxLFQ that is fully compatible with any peptide or protein separation prior to LC-MS analysis. Protein abundance profiles are assembled using the maximum possible information from MS signals, given that the presence of quantifiable peptides varies from sample to sample. For a benchmark dataset with two proteomes mixed at known ratios, we accurately detected the mixing ratio over the entire protein expression range, with greater precision for abundant proteins. The significance of individual label-free quantifications was obtained via a t test approach. For a second benchmark dataset, we accurately quantify fold changes over several orders of magnitude, a task that is challenging with label-based methods. MaxLFQ is a generic label-free quantification technology that is readily applicable to many biological questions; it is compatible with standard statistical analysis workflows, and it has been validated in many and diverse biological projects. Our algorithms can handle very large experiments of 500+ samples in a manageable computing time. It is implemented in the freely available MaxQuant computational proteomics platform and works completely seamlessly at the click of a button. PMID:24942700

  15. Neutron-encoded protein quantification by peptide carbamylation.

    PubMed

    Ulbrich, Arne; Merrill, Anna E; Hebert, Alexander S; Westphall, Michael S; Keller, Mark P; Attie, Alan D; Coon, Joshua J

    2014-01-01

    We describe a chemical tag for duplex proteome quantification using neutron encoding (NeuCode). The method utilizes the straightforward, efficient, and inexpensive carbamylation reaction. We demonstrate the utility of NeuCode carbamylation by accurately measuring quantitative ratios from tagged yeast lysates mixed in known ratios and by applying this method to quantify differential protein expression in mice fed a either control or high-fat diet. PMID:24178922

  16. Neutron-encoded protein quantification by peptide carbamylation

    PubMed Central

    Ulbrich, Arne; Merrill, Anna E.; Hebert, Alexander S.; Westphall, Michael S.; Keller, Mark P.; Attie, Alan D.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a chemical tag for duplex proteome quantification using neutron encoding (NeuCode). The method utilizes the straightforward, efficient, and inexpensive carbamylation reaction. We demonstrate the utility of NeuCode carbamylation by accurately measuring quantitative ratios from tagged yeast lysates mixed in known ratios and by applying this method to quantify differential protein expression in mice fed a either control or high-fat diet. PMID:24178922

  17. Neutron-Encoded Protein Quantification by Peptide Carbamylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbrich, Arne; Merrill, Anna E.; Hebert, Alexander S.; Westphall, Michael S.; Keller, Mark P.; Attie, Alan D.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a chemical tag for duplex proteome quantification using neutron encoding (NeuCode). The method utilizes the straightforward, efficient, and inexpensive carbamylation reaction. We demonstrate the utility of NeuCode carbamylation by accurately measuring quantitative ratios from tagged yeast lysates mixed in known ratios and by applying this method to quantify differential protein expression in mice fed a either control or high-fat diet.

  18. NMR method for accurate quantification of polysorbate 80 copolymer composition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Wang, Aifa; Meng, Yang; Ning, Tingting; Yang, Huaxin; Ding, Lixia; Xiao, Xinyue; Li, Xiaodong

    2015-10-01

    (13)C NMR spectroscopic integration employing short relaxation delays and a 30° pulse width was evaluated as a quantitative tool for analyzing the components of polysorbate 80. (13)C NMR analysis revealed that commercial polysorbate 80 formulations are a complex oligomeric mixture of sorbitan polyethoxylate esters and other intermediates, such as isosorbide polyethoxylate esters and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) esters. This novel approach facilitates the quantification of the component ratios. In this study, the ratios of the three major oligomers in polysorbate 80 were measured and the PEG series was found to be the major component of commercial polysorbate 80. The degree of polymerization of -CH2CH2O- groups and the ratio of free to bonded -CH2CH2O- end groups, which correlate with the hydrophilic/hydrophobic nature of the polymer, were analyzed, and were suggested to be key factors for assessing the likelihood of adverse biological reactions to polysorbate 80. The (13)C NMR data suggest that the feed ratio of raw materials and reaction conditions in the production of polysorbate 80 are not well controlled. Our results demonstrate that (13)C NMR is a universal, powerful tool for polysorbate analysis. Such analysis is crucial for the synthesis of a high-quality product, and is difficult to obtain by other methods. PMID:26356097

  19. Accurate quantification of astaxanthin from Haematococcus crude extract spectrophotometrically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yeguang; Miao, Fengping; Geng, Yahong; Lu, Dayan; Zhang, Chengwu; Zeng, Mingtao

    2012-07-01

    The influence of alkali on astaxanthin and the optimal working wave length for measurement of astaxanthin from Haematococcus crude extract were investigated, and a spectrophotometric method for precise quantification of the astaxanthin based on the method of Boussiba et al. was established. According to Boussiba's method, alkali treatment destroys chlorophyll. However, we found that: 1) carotenoid content declined for about 25% in Haematococcus fresh cysts and up to 30% in dry powder of Haematococcus broken cysts after alkali treatment; and 2) dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-extracted chlorophyll of green Haematococcus bares little absorption at 520-550 nm. Interestingly, a good linear relationship existed between absorbance at 530 nm and astaxanthin content, while an unknown interference at 540-550 nm was detected in our study. Therefore, with 530 nm as working wavelength, the alkali treatment to destroy chlorophyll was not necessary and the influence of chlorophyll, other carotenoids, and the unknown interference could be avoided. The astaxanthin contents of two samples were measured at 492 nm and 530 nm; the measured values at 530 nm were 2.617 g/100 g and 1.811 g/100 g. When compared with the measured values at 492 nm, the measured values at 530 nm decreased by 6.93% and 11.96%, respectively. The measured values at 530 nm are closer to the true astaxanthin contents in the samples. The data show that 530 nm is the most suitable wave length for spectrophotometric determination to the astaxanthin in Haematococcus crude extract.

  20. Accurate Quantification of Disease Markers in Human Serum Using Iron Oxide Nanoparticle-linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linlin; Tong, Sheng; Zhou, Jun; Bao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and reliable quantification of biomarkers in the blood is essential in disease screening and diagnosis. Here we describe an iron oxide nanoparticle (IONP)-linked immunosorbent assay (ILISA) for detecting biomolecules in human serum. Sandwich ILISA was optimized for the detection of four important serological markers, IgA, IgG, IgM, and C-reactive protein (CRP), and assessed with normal sera, simulated disease-state sera and the serum samples from patients infected with West Nile virus (WNV) or human herpes virus (HHV). Our study shows that using the detection assay formulated with 18.8 nm wüstite nanocrystals, ILISA can achieve sub-picomolar detection sensitivity, and all four markers can be accurately quantified over a large dynamic range. In addition, ILISA is not susceptible to variations in operating procedures and shows better linearity and higher stability compared with ELISA, which facilitates its integration into detection methods suitable for point of care. Our results demonstrate that ILISA is a simple and versatile nanoplatform for highly sensitive and reliable detection of serological biomarkers in biomedical research and clinical applications. PMID:27375784

  1. Accurate Prediction of Docked Protein Structure Similarity.

    PubMed

    Akbal-Delibas, Bahar; Pomplun, Marc; Haspel, Nurit

    2015-09-01

    One of the major challenges for protein-protein docking methods is to accurately discriminate nativelike structures. The protein docking community agrees on the existence of a relationship between various favorable intermolecular interactions (e.g. Van der Waals, electrostatic, desolvation forces, etc.) and the similarity of a conformation to its native structure. Different docking algorithms often formulate this relationship as a weighted sum of selected terms and calibrate their weights against specific training data to evaluate and rank candidate structures. However, the exact form of this relationship is unknown and the accuracy of such methods is impaired by the pervasiveness of false positives. Unlike the conventional scoring functions, we propose a novel machine learning approach that not only ranks the candidate structures relative to each other but also indicates how similar each candidate is to the native conformation. We trained the AccuRMSD neural network with an extensive dataset using the back-propagation learning algorithm. Our method achieved predicting RMSDs of unbound docked complexes with 0.4Å error margin. PMID:26335807

  2. Protein Target Quantification Decision Tree

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Won; You, Jinsam

    2013-01-01

    The utility of mass spectrometry-(MS-) based proteomic platforms and their clinical applications have become an emerging field in proteomics in recent years. Owing to its selectivity and sensitivity, MS has become a key technological platform in proteomic research. Using this platform, a large number of potential biomarker candidates for specific diseases have been reported. However, due to lack of validation, none has been approved for use in clinical settings by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Successful candidate verification and validation will facilitate the development of potential biomarkers, leading to better strategies for disease diagnostics, prognostics, and treatment. With the recent new developments in mass spectrometers, high sensitivity, high resolution, and high mass accuracy can be achieved. This greatly enhances the capabilities of protein biomarker validation. In this paper, we describe and discuss recent developments and applications of targeted proteomics methods for biomarker validation. PMID:23401774

  3. Proximity assays for sensitive quantification of proteins.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Christina; Ruff, David; Kirvell, Sara; Johnson, Gemma; Dhillon, Harvinder S; Bustin, Stephen A

    2015-06-01

    Proximity assays are immunohistochemical tools that utilise two or more DNA-tagged aptamers or antibodies binding in close proximity to the same protein or protein complex. Amplification by PCR or isothermal methods and hybridisation of a labelled probe to its DNA target generates a signal that enables sensitive and robust detection of proteins, protein modifications or protein-protein interactions. Assays can be carried out in homogeneous or solid phase formats and in situ assays can visualise single protein molecules or complexes with high spatial accuracy. These properties highlight the potential of proximity assays in research, diagnostic, pharmacological and many other applications that require sensitive, specific and accurate assessments of protein expression. PMID:27077033

  4. Proximity assays for sensitive quantification of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Christina; Ruff, David; Kirvell, Sara; Johnson, Gemma; Dhillon, Harvinder S.; Bustin, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Proximity assays are immunohistochemical tools that utilise two or more DNA-tagged aptamers or antibodies binding in close proximity to the same protein or protein complex. Amplification by PCR or isothermal methods and hybridisation of a labelled probe to its DNA target generates a signal that enables sensitive and robust detection of proteins, protein modifications or protein–protein interactions. Assays can be carried out in homogeneous or solid phase formats and in situ assays can visualise single protein molecules or complexes with high spatial accuracy. These properties highlight the potential of proximity assays in research, diagnostic, pharmacological and many other applications that require sensitive, specific and accurate assessments of protein expression. PMID:27077033

  5. Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry for Absolute Protein Quantification.

    PubMed

    Manes, Nathan P; Mann, Jessica M; Nita-Lazar, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Absolute quantification of target proteins within complex biological samples is critical to a wide range of research and clinical applications. This protocol provides step-by-step instructions for the development and application of quantitative assays using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry (MS). First, likely quantotypic target peptides are identified based on numerous criteria. This includes identifying proteotypic peptides, avoiding sites of posttranslational modification, and analyzing the uniqueness of the target peptide to the target protein. Next, crude external peptide standards are synthesized and used to develop SRM assays, and the resulting assays are used to perform qualitative analyses of the biological samples. Finally, purified, quantified, heavy isotope labeled internal peptide standards are prepared and used to perform isotope dilution series SRM assays. Analysis of all of the resulting MS data is presented. This protocol was used to accurately assay the absolute abundance of proteins of the chemotaxis signaling pathway within RAW 264.7 cells (a mouse monocyte/macrophage cell line). The quantification of Gi2 (a heterotrimeric G-protein α-subunit) is described in detail. PMID:26325288

  6. Accurate episomal HIV 2-LTR circles quantification using optimized DNA isolation and droplet digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Malatinkova, Eva; Kiselinova, Maja; Bonczkowski, Pawel; Trypsteen, Wim; Messiaen, Peter; Vermeire, Jolien; Verhasselt, Bruno; Vervisch, Karen; Vandekerckhove, Linos; De Spiegelaere, Ward

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In HIV-infected patients on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), the detection of episomal HIV 2-LTR circles is a potential marker for ongoing viral replication. Quantification of 2-LTR circles is based on quantitative PCR or more recently on digital PCR assessment, but is hampered due to its low abundance. Sample pre-PCR processing is a critical step for 2-LTR circles quantification, which has not yet been sufficiently evaluated in patient derived samples. Materials and Methods We compared two sample processing procedures to more accurately quantify 2-LTR circles using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Episomal HIV 2-LTR circles were either isolated by genomic DNA isolation or by a modified plasmid DNA isolation, to separate the small episomal circular DNA from chromosomal DNA. This was performed in a dilution series of HIV-infected cells and HIV-1 infected patient derived samples (n=59). Samples for the plasmid DNA isolation method were spiked with an internal control plasmid. Results Genomic DNA isolation enables robust 2-LTR circles quantification. However, in the lower ranges of detection, PCR inhibition caused by high genomic DNA load substantially limits the amount of sample input and this impacts sensitivity and accuracy. Moreover, total genomic DNA isolation resulted in a lower recovery of 2-LTR templates per isolate, further reducing its sensitivity. The modified plasmid DNA isolation with a spiked reference for normalization was more accurate in these low ranges compared to genomic DNA isolation. A linear correlation of both methods was observed in the dilution series (R2=0.974) and in the patient derived samples with 2-LTR numbers above 10 copies per million peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), (R2=0.671). Furthermore, Bland–Altman analysis revealed an average agreement between the methods within the 27 samples in which 2-LTR circles were detectable with both methods (bias: 0.3875±1.2657 log10). Conclusions 2-LTR circles

  7. Quantification of nitrotyrosine in nitrated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingyi; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    For kinetic studies of protein nitration reactions, we have developed a method for the quantification of nitrotyrosine residues in protein molecules by liquid chromatography coupled to a diode array detector of ultraviolet-visible absorption. Nitrated bovine serum albumin (BSA) and nitrated ovalbumin (OVA) were synthesized and used as standards for the determination of the protein nitration degree (ND), which is defined as the average number of nitrotyrosine residues divided by the total number of tyrosine residues in a protein molecule. The obtained calibration curves of the ratio of chromatographic peak areas of absorbance at 357 and at 280 nm vs. nitration degree are nearly the same for BSA and OVA (relative deviations <5%). They are near-linear at low ND (< 0.1) and can be described by a second-order polynomial fit up to \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document}$$ {\\hbox{ND}} = 0.5\\left( {{R^2} > 0.99} \\right) $$\\end{document}. A change of chromatographic column led to changes in absolute peak areas but not in the peak area ratios and related calibration functions, which confirms the robustness of the analytical method. First results of laboratory experiments confirm that the method is applicable for the investigation of the reaction kinetics of protein nitration. The main advantage over alternative methods is that nitration degrees can be efficiently determined without hydrolysis or digestion of the investigated protein molecules. PMID:20300739

  8. Fast MS/MS acquisition without dynamic exclusion enables precise and accurate quantification of proteome by MS/MS fragment intensity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shen; Wu, Qi; Shan, Yichu; Zhao, Qun; Zhao, Baofeng; Weng, Yejing; Sui, Zhigang; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2016-01-01

    Most currently proteomic studies use data-dependent acquisition with dynamic exclusion to identify and quantify the peptides generated by the digestion of biological sample. Although dynamic exclusion permits more identifications and higher possibility to find low abundant proteins, stochastic and irreproducible precursor ion selection caused by dynamic exclusion limit the quantification capabilities, especially for MS/MS based quantification. This is because a peptide is usually triggered for fragmentation only once due to dynamic exclusion. Therefore the fragment ions used for quantification only reflect the peptide abundances at that given time point. Here, we propose a strategy of fast MS/MS acquisition without dynamic exclusion to enable precise and accurate quantification of proteome by MS/MS fragment intensity. The results showed comparable proteome identification efficiency compared to the traditional data-dependent acquisition with dynamic exclusion, better quantitative accuracy and reproducibility regardless of label-free based quantification or isobaric labeling based quantification. It provides us with new insights to fully explore the potential of modern mass spectrometers. This strategy was applied to the relative quantification of two human disease cell lines, showing great promises for quantitative proteomic applications. PMID:27198003

  9. Simple and accurate quantification of BTEX in ambient air by SPME and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Baimatova, Nassiba; Kenessov, Bulat; Koziel, Jacek A; Carlsen, Lars; Bektassov, Marat; Demyanenko, Olga P

    2016-07-01

    Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) comprise one of the most ubiquitous and hazardous groups of ambient air pollutants of concern. Application of standard analytical methods for quantification of BTEX is limited by the complexity of sampling and sample preparation equipment, and budget requirements. Methods based on SPME represent simpler alternative, but still require complex calibration procedures. The objective of this research was to develop a simpler, low-budget, and accurate method for quantification of BTEX in ambient air based on SPME and GC-MS. Standard 20-mL headspace vials were used for field air sampling and calibration. To avoid challenges with obtaining and working with 'zero' air, slope factors of external standard calibration were determined using standard addition and inherently polluted lab air. For polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber, differences between the slope factors of calibration plots obtained using lab and outdoor air were below 14%. PDMS fiber provided higher precision during calibration while the use of Carboxen/PDMS fiber resulted in lower detection limits for benzene and toluene. To provide sufficient accuracy, the use of 20mL vials requires triplicate sampling and analysis. The method was successfully applied for analysis of 108 ambient air samples from Almaty, Kazakhstan. Average concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and o-xylene were 53, 57, 11 and 14µgm(-3), respectively. The developed method can be modified for further quantification of a wider range of volatile organic compounds in air. In addition, the new method is amenable to automation. PMID:27154647

  10. Accurate joint space quantification in knee osteoarthritis: a digital x-ray tomosynthesis phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sewell, Tanzania S.; Piacsek, Kelly L.; Heckel, Beth A.; Sabol, John M.

    2011-03-01

    The current imaging standard for diagnosis and monitoring of knee osteoarthritis (OA) is projection radiography. However radiographs may be insensitive to markers of early disease such as osteophytes and joint space narrowing (JSN). Relative to standard radiography, digital X-ray tomosynthesis (DTS) may provide improved visualization of the markers of knee OA without the interference of superimposed anatomy. DTS utilizes a series of low-dose projection images over an arc of +/-20 degrees to reconstruct tomographic images parallel to the detector. We propose that DTS can increase accuracy and precision in JSN quantification. The geometric accuracy of DTS was characterized by quantifying joint space width (JSW) as a function of knee flexion and position using physical and anthropomorphic phantoms. Using a commercially available digital X-ray system, projection and DTS images were acquired for a Lucite rod phantom with known gaps at various source-object-distances, and angles of flexion. Gap width, representative of JSW, was measured using a validated algorithm. Over an object-to-detector-distance range of 5-21cm, a 3.0mm gap width was reproducibly measured in the DTS images, independent of magnification. A simulated 0.50mm (+/-0.13) JSN was quantified accurately (95% CI 0.44-0.56mm) in the DTS images. Angling the rods to represent knee flexion, the minimum gap could be precisely determined from the DTS images and was independent of flexion angle. JSN quantification using DTS was insensitive to distance from patient barrier and flexion angle. Potential exists for the optimization of DTS for accurate radiographic quantification of knee OA independent of patient positioning.

  11. A simple and accurate protocol for absolute polar metabolite quantification in cell cultures using quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Goldoni, Luca; Beringhelli, Tiziana; Rocchia, Walter; Realini, Natalia; Piomelli, Daniele

    2016-05-15

    Absolute analyte quantification by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is rarely pursued in metabolomics, even though this would allow researchers to compare results obtained using different techniques. Here we report on a new protocol that permits, after pH-controlled serum protein removal, the sensitive quantification (limit of detection [LOD] = 5-25 μM) of hydrophilic nutrients and metabolites in the extracellular medium of cells in cultures. The method does not require the use of databases and uses PULCON (pulse length-based concentration determination) quantitative NMR to obtain results that are significantly more accurate and reproducible than those obtained by CPMG (Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill) sequence or post-processing filtering approaches. Three practical applications of the method highlight its flexibility under different cell culture conditions. We identified and quantified (i) metabolic differences between genetically engineered human cell lines, (ii) alterations in cellular metabolism induced by differentiation of mouse myoblasts into myotubes, and (iii) metabolic changes caused by activation of neurotransmitter receptors in mouse myoblasts. Thus, the new protocol offers an easily implementable, efficient, and versatile tool for the investigation of cellular metabolism and signal transduction. PMID:26898303

  12. Analysis and accurate quantification of CpG methylation by MALDI mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Tost, Jörg; Schatz, Philipp; Schuster, Matthias; Berlin, Kurt; Gut, Ivo Glynne

    2003-01-01

    As the DNA sequence of the human genome is now nearly finished, the main task of genome research is to elucidate gene function and regulation. DNA methylation is of particular importance for gene regulation and is strongly implicated in the development of cancer. Even minor changes in the degree of methylation can have severe consequences. An accurate quantification of the methylation status at any given position of the genome is a powerful diagnostic indicator. Here we present the first assay for the analysis and precise quantification of methylation on CpG positions in simplex and multiplex reactions based on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ ionisation mass spectrometry detection. Calibration curves for CpGs in two genes were established and an algorithm was developed to account for systematic fluctuations. Regression analysis gave R2 ≥ 0.99 and standard deviation around 2% for the different positions. The limit of detection was ∼5% for the minor isomer. Calibrations showed no significant differences when carried out as simplex or multiplex analyses. All variable parameters were thoroughly investigated, several paraffin-embedded tissue biopsies were analysed and results were verified by established methods like analysis of cloned material. Mass spectrometric results were also compared to chip hybridisation. PMID:12711695

  13. Quantification of chitinase and thaumatin-like proteins in grape juices and wines.

    PubMed

    Le Bourse, D; Conreux, A; Villaume, S; Lameiras, P; Nuzillard, J-M; Jeandet, P

    2011-09-01

    Chitinases and thaumatin-like proteins are important grape proteins as they have a great influence on wine quality. The quantification of these proteins in grape juices and wines, along with their purification, is therefore crucial to study their intrinsic characteristics and the exact role they play in wines. The main isoforms of these two proteins from Chardonnay grape juice were thus purified by liquid chromatography. Two fast protein liquid chromatography (FLPC) steps allowed the fractionation and purification of the juice proteins, using cation exchange and hydrophobic interaction media. A further high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) step was used to achieve higher purity levels. Fraction assessment was achieved by mass spectrometry. Fraction purity was determined by HPLC to detect the presence of protein contaminants, and by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to detect the presence of organic contaminants. Once pure fractions of lyophilized chitinase and thaumatin-like protein were obtained, ultra-HPLC (UHPLC) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) calibration curves were constructed. The quantification of these proteins in different grape juice and wine samples was thus achieved for the first time with both techniques through comparison with the purified protein calibration curve. UHPLC and ELISA showed very consistent results (less than 16% deviation for both proteins) and either could be considered to provide an accurate and reliable quantification of proteins in the oenology field. PMID:21465097

  14. Multiplexed microfluidic quantification of proteins in serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Nitin; Rajauria, Sukumar; Cleland, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    Rapid and low cost immunoassays targeting proteins in blood or other bodily fluids are highly sought after for point-of-care devices and early screening of patients. Immunoturbidimetric assays utilize latex particles functionalized with antibodies, with particle aggregation in the presence of the analyte detected by a change in absorbance. Using a high throughput micro-fluidic particle analyzer based solely on electrical signals (resistive pulse sensing), we are able to accurately quantify the degree of aggregation by analyzing the changes in the particle size distribution. Thus we study the aggregation of streptavidin (SAv) coated beads in the presence of biotinylated bovine serum albumin as a proof-of-principle assay and extract the binding capacity of the SAv beads from the dose-response curve. We also use our aggregation measurement platform to characterize a commercial C-reactive protein (CRP) immunoturbidimetric assay (hsCRP, Diazyme Inc.). We obtain a linear calibration curve as well as a better limit of detection of CRP than that obtained by absorbance measurements. By using different bead sizes functionalized with different antibodies, multiplexed analyte detection is also possible. We demonstrate this by combining the commercial anti-CRP functionalized beads (0.4 microns) with biotin coated beads (1.0 microns), and carry out the simultaneous detection of SAv and CRP in a single sample.

  15. Biomarker Quantification in Unprocessed Human Sera by Using A New Nanomagnetic Protein Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuanpeng; Jing, Ying; Srinivasan, Balasubramanian; Yao, Xiaofeng; Hugger, Marie A.; Xing, Chengguo; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2010-12-01

    Early recognition and prevention of chronic disease, such as lung cancer, require a fast, accurate detection and longitudinal monitoring on potential biomarkers, which could identify the molecule change in the initial stage of the chronic disease. Here we report the realization of specific and accurate quantification of a low-abundance serum protein in unprocessed human sera, using our novel giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensing system with uniform high-magnetic-moment nanoparticles and a competition based detection scheme. Only one antibody is needed for such detection scheme. The quantification of interleukin-6 (IL-6, a low-abundance protein and a potential cancer biomarker), as low as 125 fM IL-6 proteins, directly in 4 μL of unprocessed human sera was demonstrated within 5 minutes by such system. The results nicely differentiate normal individuals and lung cancer patients. This platform has great potential to facilitate the identification and validation of disease biomarkers.

  16. ACCURATE QUANTIFICATION OF DRIED RESIDUE THIN FILMS USING X-RAY FLUORESCENCE

    SciTech Connect

    C. WORLEY; G. HAVRILLA

    2000-09-01

    An XRF specimen preparation method was developed to quantify the concentration of gallium in plutonium metal while minimizing the risk of contaminating the instrument with radioactive material. To ensure that homogeneous specimens are examined, plutonium is dissolved in dilute HCl and HNO{sub 3} prior to analysis. In the preliminary work here, non-radioactive aqueous gallium standards were prepared, and zinc was added as an internal standard to improve the accuracy and precision. Aliquots from these solutions were cast on Mylar XRF films and air dried prior to analysis. Two methods of casting the solutions were evaluated: (1) casting as a thin layer using a surfactant to wet the support film and (2) casting multiple small spots on the support film. Aqueous gallium standards were prepared and cast as dried residue specimens using each method. These specimens were then analyzed, and calibration curves were prepared. Highly linear calibrations were obtained for each preparation method when zinc was used as the internal standard (RMS values {le}1% of the standards concentration range in both cases). Based on this preliminary work, this dried residue process appears very promising for the accurate quantification of gallium in plutonium.

  17. Multiplex immunoassays for quantification of cytokines, growth factors, and other proteins in stem cell communication.

    PubMed

    Valekova, Ivona; Skalnikova, Helena Kupcova; Jarkovska, Karla; Motlik, Jan; Kovarova, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Immunoassays represent valuable and broadly used techniques for detection and quantification of proteins. Thanks to their high sensitivity, such techniques are powerful for analyzing growth factors, trophic factors, angiogenic factors, hormones, cytokines, chemokines, soluble receptors, and other proteins which play key roles in intercellular communication and operate as potent regulators of stem cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, or cell death. Multiplex immunological assays, in contrast to ELISA, offer simultaneous quantification of tens of proteins across multiple samples, and have been developed to save time, costs, and sample volumes. Among them, planar antibody microarrays and xMAP(®) bead-based assays have become particularly popular for characterization of proteins secreted by stem cells, as they are relatively easy, highly accurate, multiplex to a high degree and a broad spectrum of analytes can be measured. Here, we describe protocols for multiplex quantification of secreted proteins using Quantibody(®) microarrays (RayBiotech) and xMAP(®) assays (Luminex and its partners). PMID:25063502

  18. Accurate Determination of Conformational Transitions in Oligomeric Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Hernández, Máximo; Vostrikov, Vitaly V.; Veglia, Gianluigi; De Simone, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    The structural dynamics governing collective motions in oligomeric membrane proteins play key roles in vital biomolecular processes at cellular membranes. In this study, we present a structural refinement approach that combines solid-state NMR experiments and molecular simulations to accurately describe concerted conformational transitions identifying the overall structural, dynamical, and topological states of oligomeric membrane proteins. The accuracy of the structural ensembles generated with this method is shown to reach the statistical error limit, and is further demonstrated by correctly reproducing orthogonal NMR data. We demonstrate the accuracy of this approach by characterising the pentameric state of phospholamban, a key player in the regulation of calcium uptake in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and by probing its dynamical activation upon phosphorylation. Our results underline the importance of using an ensemble approach to characterise the conformational transitions that are often responsible for the biological function of oligomeric membrane protein states. PMID:26975211

  19. Nonparametric Bayesian evaluation of differential protein quantification

    PubMed Central

    Cansizoglu, A. Ertugrul; Käll, Lukas; Steen, Hanno

    2013-01-01

    Arbitrary cutoffs are ubiquitous in quantitative computational proteomics: maximum acceptable MS/MS PSM or peptide q–value, minimum ion intensity to calculate a fold change, the minimum number of peptides that must be available to trust the estimated protein fold change (or the minimum number of PSMs that must be available to trust the estimated peptide fold change), and the “significant” fold change cutoff. Here we introduce a novel experimental setup and nonparametric Bayesian algorithm for determining the statistical quality of a proposed differential set of proteins or peptides. By comparing putatively non-changing case-control evidence to an empirical null distribution derived from a control-control experiment, we successfully avoid some of these common parameters. We then apply our method to evaluating different fold change rules and find that, for our data, a 1.2-fold change is the most permissive of the plausible fold change rules. PMID:24024742

  20. Quantification of protein concentration using UV absorbance and Coomassie dyes.

    PubMed

    Noble, James E

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of a solubilized protein concentration in solution is an important assay in biochemistry research and development labs for applications ranging from enzymatic studies to providing data for biopharmaceutical lot release. Spectrophotometric protein quantification assays are methods that use UV and visible spectroscopy to rapidly determine the concentration of protein, relative to a standard, or using an assigned extinction coefficient. Where multiple samples need measurement, and/or the sample volume and concentration is limited, preparations of the Coomassie dye commonly known as the Bradford assay can be used. PMID:24423263

  1. Accurate Quantification of High Density Lipoprotein Particle Concentration by Calibrated Ion Mobility Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, Patrick M.; Ronsein, Graziella E.; Monette, Jeffrey S.; Pamir, Nathalie; Wimberger, Jake; He, Yi; Anantharamaiah, G.M.; Kim, Daniel Seung; Ranchalis, Jane E.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Vaisar, Tomas; Heinecke, Jay W.

    2015-01-01

    Background It is critical to develop new metrics to determine whether high density lipoprotein (HDL) is cardioprotective in humans. One promising approach is HDL particle concentration (HDL-P) – the size and concentration of HDL in plasma or serum. However, the two methods currently used to determine HDL-P yield concentrations that differ more than 5-fold. We therefore developed and validated an improved approach to quantify HDL-P, termed calibrated ion mobility analysis (calibrated IMA). Methods HDL was isolated from plasma by ultracentrifugation, introduced into the gas phase with electrospray ionization, separated by size, and quantified by particle counting. A calibration curve constructed with purified proteins was used to correct for the ionization efficiency of HDL particles. Results The concentrations of gold nanoparticles and reconstituted HDLs measured by calibrated IMA were indistinguishable from concentrations determined by orthogonal methods. In plasma of control (n=40) and cerebrovascular disease (n=40) subjects, three subspecies of HDL were reproducibility measured, with an estimated total HDL-P of 13.4±2.4 µM (mean±SD). HDL-C accounted for 48% of the variance in HDL-P. HDL-P was significantly lower in subjects with cerebrovascular disease, and this difference remained significant after adjustment for HDL cholesterol levels. Conclusions Calibrated IMA accurately and reproducibly determined the concentration of gold nanoparticles and synthetic HDL, strongly suggesting the method could accurately quantify HDL particle concentration. Importantly, the estimated stoichiometry of apoA-I determined by calibrated IMA was 3–4 per HDL particle, in excellent agreement with current structural models. Furthermore, HDL-P associated with cardiovascular disease status in a clinical population independently of HDL cholesterol. PMID:25225166

  2. Improved quantification of protein in vaccines containing aluminum hydroxide by simple modification of the Lowry method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Naery; Shin, SukJin; Chung, Hye Joo; Kim, Do Keun; Lim, Jong-Mi; Park, Hyunsung; Oh, Ho Jung

    2015-09-22

    Aluminum (Al) components in vaccines are known to act as adsorbents that interfere with accurate protein quantification by the Lowry method. Therefore, certain modifications based on the characteristics and compositions of the vaccine are required for determination of protein contents. We investigated the effects of an additional centrifugal separation and found that protein contents were overestimated by up to 238% without centrifugation through a collaborative study performed with hepatitis B vaccines containing Al. However, addition of a centrifugation step yielded protein concentrations that were similar to the actual values, with small coefficients of variation (CVs). Proficiency testing performed in 11 laboratories showed that four laboratories did not have satisfactory results for vaccines containing aluminum hydroxide, although all laboratories were proficient in protein analysis when samples did not contain aluminum hydroxide. Incomplete resuspension of aluminum hydroxide solution with alkaline copper solution was the major cause of insufficient proficiency in these laboratories. PMID:26275477

  3. A fast and accurate computational approach to protein ionization

    PubMed Central

    Spassov, Velin Z.; Yan, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    We report a very fast and accurate physics-based method to calculate pH-dependent electrostatic effects in protein molecules and to predict the pK values of individual sites of titration. In addition, a CHARMm-based algorithm is included to construct and refine the spatial coordinates of all hydrogen atoms at a given pH. The present method combines electrostatic energy calculations based on the Generalized Born approximation with an iterative mobile clustering approach to calculate the equilibria of proton binding to multiple titration sites in protein molecules. The use of the GBIM (Generalized Born with Implicit Membrane) CHARMm module makes it possible to model not only water-soluble proteins but membrane proteins as well. The method includes a novel algorithm for preliminary refinement of hydrogen coordinates. Another difference from existing approaches is that, instead of monopeptides, a set of relaxed pentapeptide structures are used as model compounds. Tests on a set of 24 proteins demonstrate the high accuracy of the method. On average, the RMSD between predicted and experimental pK values is close to 0.5 pK units on this data set, and the accuracy is achieved at very low computational cost. The pH-dependent assignment of hydrogen atoms also shows very good agreement with protonation states and hydrogen-bond network observed in neutron-diffraction structures. The method is implemented as a computational protocol in Accelrys Discovery Studio and provides a fast and easy way to study the effect of pH on many important mechanisms such as enzyme catalysis, ligand binding, protein–protein interactions, and protein stability. PMID:18714088

  4. Real-time quantification of protein expression at the single-cell level via dynamic protein synthesis translocation reporters

    PubMed Central

    Aymoz, Delphine; Wosika, Victoria; Durandau, Eric; Pelet, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Protein expression is a dynamic process, which can be rapidly induced by extracellular signals. It is widely appreciated that single cells can display large variations in the level of gene induction. However, the variability in the dynamics of this process in individual cells is difficult to quantify using standard fluorescent protein (FP) expression assays, due to the slow maturation of their fluorophore. Here we have developed expression reporters that accurately measure both the levels and dynamics of protein synthesis in live single cells with a temporal resolution under a minute. Our system relies on the quantification of the translocation of a constitutively expressed FP into the nucleus. As a proof of concept, we used these reporters to measure the transient protein synthesis arising from two promoters responding to the yeast hyper osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (pSTL1 and pGPD1). They display distinct expression dynamics giving rise to strikingly different instantaneous expression noise. PMID:27098003

  5. Dielectrophoretic immobilization of proteins: Quantification by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Laux, Eva-Maria; Knigge, Xenia; Bier, Frank F; Wenger, Christian; Hölzel, Ralph

    2015-09-01

    The combination of alternating electric fields with nanometer-sized electrodes allows the permanent immobilization of proteins by dielectrophoretic force. Here, atomic force microscopy is introduced as a quantification method, and results are compared with fluorescence microscopy. Experimental parameters, for example the applied voltage and duration of field application, are varied systematically, and the influence on the amount of immobilized proteins is investigated. A linear correlation to the duration of field application was found by atomic force microscopy, and both microscopical methods yield a square dependence of the amount of immobilized proteins on the applied voltage. While fluorescence microscopy allows real-time imaging, atomic force microscopy reveals immobilized proteins obscured in fluorescence images due to low S/N. Furthermore, the higher spatial resolution of the atomic force microscope enables the visualization of the protein distribution on single nanoelectrodes. The electric field distribution is calculated and compared to experimental results with very good agreement to atomic force microscopy measurements. PMID:26010162

  6. Proteomics technologies for the global identification and quantification of proteins.

    PubMed

    Brewis, Ian A; Brennan, P

    2010-01-01

    This review provides an introduction for the nonspecialist to proteomics and in particular the major approaches available for global protein identification and quantification. Proteomics technologies offer considerable opportunities for improved biological understanding and biomarker discovery. The central platform for proteomics is tandem mass spectrometry (MS) but a number of other technologies, resources, and expertise are absolutely required to perform meaningful experiments. These include protein separation science (and protein biochemistry in general), genomics, and bioinformatics. There are a range of workflows available for protein (or peptide) separation prior to tandem MS and subsequent bioinformatics analysis to achieve protein identifications. The predominant approaches are 2D electrophoresis (2DE) and subsequent MS, liquid chromatography-MS (LC-MS), and GeLC-MS. Beyond protein identification, there are a number of well-established options available for protein quantification. Difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) following 2DE is one option but MS-based methods (most commonly iTRAQ-Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantification or SILAC-Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids) are now the preferred options. Sample preparation is critical to performing good experiments and subcellular fractionation can additionally provide protein localization information compared with whole cell lysates. Differential detergent solubilization is another valid option. With biological fluids, it is possible to remove the most abundant proteins by immunodepletion. Sample enrichment is also used extensively in certain analyses and most commonly in phosphoproteomics with the initial purification of phosphopeptides. Proteomics produces considerable datasets and resources to facilitate the necessary extended analysis of this data are improving all the time. Beyond the opportunities afforded by proteomics there are definite challenges to achieving full proteomic coverage

  7. An on-bacterium flow cytometric immunoassay for protein quantification.

    PubMed

    Lan, Wen-Jun; Lan, Wei; Wang, Hai-Yan; Yan, Lei; Wang, Zhe-Li

    2013-09-01

    The polystyrene bead-based flow cytometric immunoassay has been widely reported. However, the preparation of functional polystyrene bead is still inconvenient. This study describes a simple and easy on-bacterium flow cytometric immunoassay for protein quantification, in which Staphylococcus aureus (SAC) is used as an antibody-antigen carrier to replace the polystyrene bead. The SAC beads were prepared by carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) labeling, paraformaldehyde fixation and antibody binding. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cytokeratin-19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1) proteins were used as models in the test system. Using prepared SAC beads, biotinylated proteins, and streptavidin-phycoerythrin (SA-PE), the on-bacterium flow cytometric immunoassay was validated by quantifying CEA and CYFRA 21-1 in sample. Obtained data demonstrated a concordant result between the logarithm of the protein concentration and the logarithm of the PE mean fluorescence intensity (MFI). The limit of detection (LOD) in this immunoassay was at least 0.25 ng/ml. Precision and accuracy assessments appeared that either the relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) or the relative error (R.E.) was <10%. The comparison between this immunoassay and a polystyrene bead-based flow cytometric immunoassay showed a correlation coefficient of 0.998 for serum CEA or 0.996 for serum CYFRA 21-1. In conclusion, the on-bacterium flow cytometric immunoassay may be of use in the quantification of serum protein. PMID:23739299

  8. Bayesian Proteoform Modeling Improves Protein Quantification of Global Proteomic Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Datta, Susmita; Payne, Samuel H.; Kang, Jiyun; Bramer, Lisa M.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Metz, Thomas O.; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.; Tardiff, Mark F.; McDermott, Jason E.; Pounds, Joel G.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2014-12-01

    As the capability of mass spectrometry-based proteomics has matured, tens of thousands of peptides can be measured simultaneously, which has the benefit of offering a systems view of protein expression. However, a major challenge is that with an increase in throughput, protein quantification estimation from the native measured peptides has become a computational task. A limitation to existing computationally-driven protein quantification methods is that most ignore protein variation, such as alternate splicing of the RNA transcript and post-translational modifications or other possible proteoforms, which will affect a significant fraction of the proteome. The consequence of this assumption is that statistical inference at the protein level, and consequently downstream analyses, such as network and pathway modeling, have only limited power for biomarker discovery. Here, we describe a Bayesian model (BP-Quant) that uses statistically derived peptides signatures to identify peptides that are outside the dominant pattern, or the existence of multiple over-expressed patterns to improve relative protein abundance estimates. It is a research-driven approach that utilizes the objectives of the experiment, defined in the context of a standard statistical hypothesis, to identify a set of peptides exhibiting similar statistical behavior relating to a protein. This approach infers that changes in relative protein abundance can be used as a surrogate for changes in function, without necessarily taking into account the effect of differential post-translational modifications, processing, or splicing in altering protein function. We verify the approach using a dilution study from mouse plasma samples and demonstrate that BP-Quant achieves similar accuracy as the current state-of-the-art methods at proteoform identification with significantly better specificity. BP-Quant is available as a MatLab ® and R packages at https://github.com/PNNL-Comp-Mass-Spec/BP-Quant.

  9. Relative Quantification of Several Plasma Proteins during Liver Transplantation Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Parviainen, Ville; Joenväärä, Sakari; Tukiainen, Eija; Ilmakunnas, Minna; Isoniemi, Helena; Renkonen, Risto

    2011-01-01

    Plasma proteome is widely used in studying changes occurring in human body during disease or other disturbances. Immunological methods are commonly used in such studies. In recent years, mass spectrometry has gained popularity in high-throughput analysis of plasma proteins. In this study, we tested whether mass spectrometry and iTRAQ-based protein quantification might be used in proteomic analysis of human plasma during liver transplantation surgery to characterize changes in protein abundances occurring during early graft reperfusion. We sampled blood from systemic circulation as well as blood entering and exiting the liver. After immunodepletion of six high-abundant plasma proteins, trypsin digestion, iTRAQ labeling, and cation-exchange fractionation, the peptides were analyzed by reverse phase nano-LC-MS/MS. In total, 72 proteins were identified of which 31 could be quantified in all patient specimens collected. Of these 31 proteins, ten, mostly medium-to-high abundance plasma proteins with a concentration range of 50–2000 mg/L, displayed relative abundance change of more than 10%. The changes in protein abundance observed in this study allow further research on the role of several proteins in ischemia-reperfusion injury during liver transplantation and possibly in other surgery. PMID:22187521

  10. Absolute Quantification of Selected Proteins in the Human Osteoarthritic Secretome

    PubMed Central

    Peffers, Mandy J.; Beynon, Robert J.; Clegg, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by a loss of extracellular matrix which is driven by catabolic cytokines. Proteomic analysis of the OA cartilage secretome enables the global study of secreted proteins. These are an important class of molecules with roles in numerous pathological mechanisms. Although cartilage studies have identified profiles of secreted proteins, quantitative proteomics techniques have been implemented that would enable further biological questions to be addressed. To overcome this limitation, we used the secretome from human OA cartilage explants stimulated with IL-1β and compared proteins released into the media using a label-free LC-MS/MS-based strategy. We employed QconCAT technology to quantify specific proteins using selected reaction monitoring. A total of 252 proteins were identified, nine were differentially expressed by IL-1 β stimulation. Selected protein candidates were quantified in absolute amounts using QconCAT. These findings confirmed a significant reduction in TIMP-1 in the secretome following IL-1β stimulation. Label-free and QconCAT analysis produced equivocal results indicating no effect of cytokine stimulation on aggrecan, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, fibromodulin, matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 3 or plasminogen release. This study enabled comparative protein profiling and absolute quantification of proteins involved in molecular pathways pertinent to understanding the pathogenesis of OA. PMID:24132152

  11. Accurate quantification of dystrophin mRNA and exon skipping levels in duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Spitali, Pietro; Heemskerk, Hans; Vossen, Rolf H A M; Ferlini, Alessandra; den Dunnen, Johan T; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2010-09-01

    Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated exon skipping aimed at restoring the reading frame is a promising therapeutic approach for Duchenne muscular dystrophy that is currently tested in clinical trials. Numerous AONs have been tested in (patient-derived) cultured muscle cells and the mdx mouse model. The main outcome to measure AON efficiency is usually the exon-skipping percentage, though different groups use different methods to assess these percentages. Here, we compare a series of techniques to quantify exon skipping levels in AON-treated mdx mouse muscle. We compared densitometry of RT-PCR products on ethidium bromide-stained agarose gels, primary and nested RT-PCR followed by bioanalyzer analysis and melting curve analysis. The digital array system (Fluidigm) allows absolute quantification of skipped vs non-skipped transcripts and was used as a reference. Digital array results show that 1 ng of mdx gastrocnemius muscle-derived mRNA contains approximately 1100 dystrophin transcripts and that 665 transcripts are sufficient to determine exon-skipping levels. Quantification using bioanalyzer or densitometric analysis of primary PCR products resulted in values close to those obtained with digital array. The use of the same technique allows comparison between different groups working on exon skipping in the mdx mouse model. PMID:20458276

  12. Ratiometric Raman Spectroscopy for Quantification of Protein Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Dongping; Yanney, Michael; Zou, Sige; Sygula, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    A novel ratiometric Raman spectroscopic (RMRS) method has been developed for quantitative determination of protein carbonyl levels. Oxidized bovine serum albumin (BSA) and oxidized lysozyme were used as model proteins to demonstrate this method. The technique involves conjugation of protein carbonyls with dinitrophenyl hydrazine (DNPH), followed by drop coating deposition Raman spectral acquisition (DCDR). The RMRS method is easy to implement as it requires only one conjugation reaction, a single spectral acquisition, and does not require sample calibration. Characteristic peaks from both protein and DNPH moieties are obtained in a single spectral acquisition, allowing the protein carbonyl level to be calculated from the peak intensity ratio. Detection sensitivity for the RMRS method is ~0.33 pmol carbonyl/measurement. Fluorescence and/or immunoassay based techniques only detect a signal from the labeling molecule and thus yield no structural or quantitative information for the modified protein while the RMRS technique provides for protein identification and protein carbonyl quantification in a single experiment. PMID:19457432

  13. Three-dimensional dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for the accurate, extensive quantification of microvascular permeability in atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, Claudia; Lobatto, Mark E; Dyvorne, Hadrien; Robson, Philip M; Millon, Antoine; Senders, Max L; Lairez, Olivier; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Coolen, Bram F; Black, Alexandra; Mulder, Willem J M; Fayad, Zahi A

    2015-10-01

    Atherosclerotic plaques that cause stroke and myocardial infarction are characterized by increased microvascular permeability and inflammation. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) has been proposed as a method to quantify vessel wall microvascular permeability in vivo. Until now, most DCE-MRI studies of atherosclerosis have been limited to two-dimensional (2D) multi-slice imaging. Although providing the high spatial resolution required to image the arterial vessel wall, these approaches do not allow the quantification of plaque permeability with extensive anatomical coverage, an essential feature when imaging heterogeneous diseases, such as atherosclerosis. To our knowledge, we present the first systematic evaluation of three-dimensional (3D), high-resolution, DCE-MRI for the extensive quantification of plaque permeability along an entire vascular bed, with validation in atherosclerotic rabbits. We compare two acquisitions: 3D turbo field echo (TFE) with motion-sensitized-driven equilibrium (MSDE) preparation and 3D turbo spin echo (TSE). We find 3D TFE DCE-MRI to be superior to 3D TSE DCE-MRI in terms of temporal stability metrics. Both sequences show good intra- and inter-observer reliability, and significant correlation with ex vivo permeability measurements by Evans Blue near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF). In addition, we explore the feasibility of using compressed sensing to accelerate 3D DCE-MRI of atherosclerosis, to improve its temporal resolution and therefore the accuracy of permeability quantification. Using retrospective under-sampling and reconstructions, we show that compressed sensing alone may allow the acceleration of 3D DCE-MRI by up to four-fold. We anticipate that the development of high-spatial-resolution 3D DCE-MRI with prospective compressed sensing acceleration may allow for the more accurate and extensive quantification of atherosclerotic plaque permeability along an entire vascular bed. We foresee that this approach may allow for

  14. A heme fusion tag for protein affinity purification and quantification

    PubMed Central

    Asher, Wesley B; Bren, Kara L

    2010-01-01

    We report a novel affinity-based purification method for proteins expressed in Escherichia coli that uses the coordination of a heme tag to an l-histidine-immobilized sepharose (HIS) resin. This approach provides an affinity purification tag visible to the eye, facilitating tracking of the protein. We show that azurin and maltose binding protein are readily purified from cell lysate using the heme tag and HIS resin. Mild conditions are used; heme-tagged proteins are bound to the HIS resin in phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, and eluted by adding 200–500 mM imidazole or binding buffer at pH 5 or 8. The HIS resin exhibits a low level of nonspecific binding of untagged cellular proteins for the systems studied here. An additional advantage of the heme tag-HIS method for purification is that the heme tag can be used for protein quantification by using the pyridine hemochrome absorbance method for heme concentration determination. PMID:20665691

  15. Accurate and reliable quantification of total microalgal fuel potential as fatty acid methyl esters by in situ transesterification.

    PubMed

    Laurens, Lieve M L; Quinn, Matthew; Van Wychen, Stefanie; Templeton, David W; Wolfrum, Edward J

    2012-04-01

    In the context of algal biofuels, lipids, or better aliphatic chains of the fatty acids, are perhaps the most important constituents of algal biomass. Accurate quantification of lipids and their respective fuel yield is crucial for comparison of algal strains and growth conditions and for process monitoring. As an alternative to traditional solvent-based lipid extraction procedures, we have developed a robust whole-biomass in situ transesterification procedure for quantification of algal lipids (as fatty acid methyl esters, FAMEs) that (a) can be carried out on a small scale (using 4-7 mg of biomass), (b) is applicable to a range of different species, (c) consists of a single-step reaction, (d) is robust over a range of different temperature and time combinations, and (e) tolerant to at least 50% water in the biomass. Unlike gravimetric lipid quantification, which can over- or underestimate the lipid content, whole biomass transesterification reflects the true potential fuel yield of algal biomass. We report here on the comparison of the yield of FAMEs by using different catalysts and catalyst combinations, with the acid catalyst HCl providing a consistently high level of conversion of fatty acids with a precision of 1.9% relative standard deviation. We investigate the influence of reaction time, temperature, and biomass water content on the measured FAME content and profile for 4 different samples of algae (replete and deplete Chlorella vulgaris, replete Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and replete Nannochloropsis sp.). We conclude by demonstrating a full mass balance closure of all fatty acids around a traditional lipid extraction process. PMID:22349344

  16. Accurate and Reliable Quantification of Total Microalgal Fuel Potential as Fatty Acid Methyl Esters by in situ Transesterfication

    SciTech Connect

    Laurens, L. M. L.; Quinn, M.; Van Wychen, S.; Templeton, D. W.; Wolfrum, E. J.

    2012-04-01

    In the context of algal biofuels, lipids, or better aliphatic chains of the fatty acids, are perhaps the most important constituents of algal biomass. Accurate quantification of lipids and their respective fuel yield is crucial for comparison of algal strains and growth conditions and for process monitoring. As an alternative to traditional solvent-based lipid extraction procedures, we have developed a robust whole-biomass in situ transesterification procedure for quantification of algal lipids (as fatty acid methyl esters, FAMEs) that (a) can be carried out on a small scale (using 4-7 mg of biomass), (b) is applicable to a range of different species, (c) consists of a single-step reaction, (d) is robust over a range of different temperature and time combinations, and (e) tolerant to at least 50% water in the biomass. Unlike gravimetric lipid quantification, which can over- or underestimate the lipid content, whole biomass transesterification reflects the true potential fuel yield of algal biomass. We report here on the comparison of the yield of FAMEs by using different catalysts and catalyst combinations, with the acid catalyst HCl providing a consistently high level of conversion of fatty acids with a precision of 1.9% relative standard deviation. We investigate the influence of reaction time, temperature, and biomass water content on the measured FAME content and profile for 4 different samples of algae (replete and deplete Chlorella vulgaris, replete Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and replete Nannochloropsis sp.). We conclude by demonstrating a full mass balance closure of all fatty acids around a traditional lipid extraction process.

  17. Statistically accurate low-order models for uncertainty quantification in turbulent dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Sapsis, Themistoklis P; Majda, Andrew J

    2013-08-20

    A framework for low-order predictive statistical modeling and uncertainty quantification in turbulent dynamical systems is developed here. These reduced-order, modified quasilinear Gaussian (ROMQG) algorithms apply to turbulent dynamical systems in which there is significant linear instability or linear nonnormal dynamics in the unperturbed system and energy-conserving nonlinear interactions that transfer energy from the unstable modes to the stable modes where dissipation occurs, resulting in a statistical steady state; such turbulent dynamical systems are ubiquitous in geophysical and engineering turbulence. The ROMQG method involves constructing a low-order, nonlinear, dynamical system for the mean and covariance statistics in the reduced subspace that has the unperturbed statistics as a stable fixed point and optimally incorporates the indirect effect of non-Gaussian third-order statistics for the unperturbed system in a systematic calibration stage. This calibration procedure is achieved through information involving only the mean and covariance statistics for the unperturbed equilibrium. The performance of the ROMQG algorithm is assessed on two stringent test cases: the 40-mode Lorenz 96 model mimicking midlatitude atmospheric turbulence and two-layer baroclinic models for high-latitude ocean turbulence with over 125,000 degrees of freedom. In the Lorenz 96 model, the ROMQG algorithm with just a single mode captures the transient response to random or deterministic forcing. For the baroclinic ocean turbulence models, the inexpensive ROMQG algorithm with 252 modes, less than 0.2% of the total, captures the nonlinear response of the energy, the heat flux, and even the one-dimensional energy and heat flux spectra. PMID:23918398

  18. An UPLC-MS/MS method for separation and accurate quantification of tamoxifen and its metabolites isomers.

    PubMed

    Arellano, Cécile; Allal, Ben; Goubaa, Anwar; Roché, Henri; Chatelut, Etienne

    2014-11-01

    A selective and accurate analytical method is needed to quantify tamoxifen and its phase I metabolites in a prospective clinical protocol, for evaluation of pharmacokinetic parameters of tamoxifen and its metabolites in adjuvant treatment of breast cancer. The selectivity of the analytical method is a fundamental criteria to allow the quantification of the main active metabolites (Z)-isomers from (Z)'-isomers. An UPLC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for the quantification of (Z)-tamoxifen, (Z)-endoxifen, (E)-endoxifen, Z'-endoxifen, (Z)'-endoxifen, (Z)-4-hydroxytamoxifen, (Z)-4'-hydroxytamoxifen, N-desmethyl tamoxifen, and tamoxifen-N-oxide. The validation range was set between 0.5ng/mL and 125ng/mL for 4-hydroxytamoxifen and endoxifen isomers, and between 12.5ng/mL and 300ng/mL for tamoxifen, tamoxifen N-desmethyl and tamoxifen-N-oxide. The application to patient plasma samples was performed. PMID:25173109

  19. Recombinant isotope labeled and selenium quantified proteins for absolute protein quantification.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Nico; Winter, Dominic; Lehmann, Wolf D

    2010-03-15

    A novel, widely applicable method for the production of absolutely quantified proteins is described, which can be used as internal standards for quantitative proteomic studies based on mass spectrometry. These standards are recombinant proteins containing an isotope label and selenomethionine. For recombinant protein expression, assembly of expression vectors fitted to cell-free protein synthesis was conducted using the gateway technology which offers fast access to a variety of genes via open reading frame libraries and an easy shuttling of genes between vectors. The proteins are generated by cell-free expression in a medium in which methionine is exchanged against selenomethionine and at least one amino acid is exchanged by a highly stable isotope labeled analogue. After protein synthesis and purification, selenium is used for absolute quantification by element mass spectrometry, while the heavy amino acids in the protein serve as reference in subsequent analyses by LC-ESI-MS or MALDI-MS. Accordingly, these standards are denominated RISQ (for recombinant isotope labeled and selenium quantified) proteins. In this study, a protein was generated containing Lys+6 ([(13)C(6)]-lysine) and Arg+10 ([(13)C(6),(15)N(4)]-arginine) so that each standard tryptic peptide contains a labeled amino acid. Apolipoprotein A1 was synthesized as RISQ protein, and its use as internal standard led to quantification of a reference material within the specified value. Owing to their cell-free expression, RISQ proteins do not contain posttranslational modifications. Thus, correct quantitative data by ESI- or MALDI-MS are restricted to quantifications based on peptides derived from unmodified regions of the analyte protein. Therefore, besides serving as internal standards, RISQ proteins stand out as new tools for quantitative analysis of covalent protein modifications. PMID:20163147

  20. Characterization and quantification of intact 26S proteasome proteins by real-time measurement of intrinsic fluorescence prior to top-down mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Russell, Jason D; Scalf, Mark; Book, Adam J; Ladror, Daniel T; Vierstra, Richard D; Smith, Lloyd M; Coon, Joshua J

    2013-01-01

    Quantification of gas-phase intact protein ions by mass spectrometry (MS) is impeded by highly-variable ionization, ion transmission, and ion detection efficiencies. Therefore, quantification of proteins using MS-associated techniques is almost exclusively done after proteolysis where peptides serve as proxies for estimating protein abundance. Advances in instrumentation, protein separations, and informatics have made large-scale sequencing of intact proteins using top-down proteomics accessible to the proteomics community; yet quantification of proteins using a top-down workflow has largely been unaddressed. Here we describe a label-free approach to determine the abundance of intact proteins separated by nanoflow liquid chromatography prior to MS analysis by using solution-phase measurements of ultraviolet light-induced intrinsic fluorescence (UV-IF). UV-IF is measured directly at the electrospray interface just prior to the capillary exit where proteins containing at least one tryptophan residue are readily detected. UV-IF quantification was demonstrated using commercially available protein standards and provided more accurate and precise protein quantification than MS ion current. We evaluated the parallel use of UV-IF and top-down tandem MS for quantification and identification of protein subunits and associated proteins from an affinity-purified 26S proteasome sample from Arabidopsis thaliana. We identified 26 unique proteins and quantified 13 tryptophan-containing species. Our analyses discovered previously unidentified N-terminal processing of the β6 (PBF1) and β7 (PBG1) subunit - such processing of PBG1 may generate a heretofore unknown additional protease active site upon cleavage. In addition, our approach permitted the unambiguous identification and quantification both isoforms of the proteasome-associated protein DSS1. PMID:23536786

  1. NeuCode Labels for Relative Protein Quantification *

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Anna E.; Hebert, Alexander S.; MacGilvray, Matthew E.; Rose, Christopher M.; Bailey, Derek J.; Bradley, Joel C.; Wood, William W.; El Masri, Marwan; Westphall, Michael S.; Gasch, Audrey P.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a synthesis strategy for the preparation of lysine isotopologues that differ in mass by as little as 6 mDa. We demonstrate that incorporation of these molecules into the proteomes of actively growing cells does not affect cellular proliferation, and we discuss how to use the embedded mass signatures (neutron encoding (NeuCode)) for multiplexed proteome quantification by means of high-resolution mass spectrometry. NeuCode SILAC amalgamates the quantitative accuracy of SILAC with the multiplexing of isobaric tags and, in doing so, offers up new opportunities for biological investigation. We applied NeuCode SILAC to examine the relationship between transcript and protein levels in yeast cells responding to environmental stress. Finally, we monitored the time-resolved responses of five signaling mutants in a single 18-plex experiment. PMID:24938287

  2. Conditional mutual inclusive information enables accurate quantification of associations in gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiujun; Zhao, Juan; Hao, Jin-Kao; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Chen, Luonan

    2015-03-11

    Mutual information (MI), a quantity describing the nonlinear dependence between two random variables, has been widely used to construct gene regulatory networks (GRNs). Despite its good performance, MI cannot separate the direct regulations from indirect ones among genes. Although the conditional mutual information (CMI) is able to identify the direct regulations, it generally underestimates the regulation strength, i.e. it may result in false negatives when inferring gene regulations. In this work, to overcome the problems, we propose a novel concept, namely conditional mutual inclusive information (CMI2), to describe the regulations between genes. Furthermore, with CMI2, we develop a new approach, namely CMI2NI (CMI2-based network inference), for reverse-engineering GRNs. In CMI2NI, CMI2 is used to quantify the mutual information between two genes given a third one through calculating the Kullback-Leibler divergence between the postulated distributions of including and excluding the edge between the two genes. The benchmark results on the GRNs from DREAM challenge as well as the SOS DNA repair network in Escherichia coli demonstrate the superior performance of CMI2NI. Specifically, even for gene expression data with small sample size, CMI2NI can not only infer the correct topology of the regulation networks but also accurately quantify the regulation strength between genes. As a case study, CMI2NI was also used to reconstruct cancer-specific GRNs using gene expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). CMI2NI is freely accessible at http://www.comp-sysbio.org/cmi2ni. PMID:25539927

  3. Conditional mutual inclusive information enables accurate quantification of associations in gene regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiujun; Zhao, Juan; Hao, Jin-Kao; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Chen, Luonan

    2015-01-01

    Mutual information (MI), a quantity describing the nonlinear dependence between two random variables, has been widely used to construct gene regulatory networks (GRNs). Despite its good performance, MI cannot separate the direct regulations from indirect ones among genes. Although the conditional mutual information (CMI) is able to identify the direct regulations, it generally underestimates the regulation strength, i.e. it may result in false negatives when inferring gene regulations. In this work, to overcome the problems, we propose a novel concept, namely conditional mutual inclusive information (CMI2), to describe the regulations between genes. Furthermore, with CMI2, we develop a new approach, namely CMI2NI (CMI2-based network inference), for reverse-engineering GRNs. In CMI2NI, CMI2 is used to quantify the mutual information between two genes given a third one through calculating the Kullback–Leibler divergence between the postulated distributions of including and excluding the edge between the two genes. The benchmark results on the GRNs from DREAM challenge as well as the SOS DNA repair network in Escherichia coli demonstrate the superior performance of CMI2NI. Specifically, even for gene expression data with small sample size, CMI2NI can not only infer the correct topology of the regulation networks but also accurately quantify the regulation strength between genes. As a case study, CMI2NI was also used to reconstruct cancer-specific GRNs using gene expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). CMI2NI is freely accessible at http://www.comp-sysbio.org/cmi2ni. PMID:25539927

  4. Protein quantification by MALDI-selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry using sulfonate derivatized peptides.

    PubMed

    Lesur, Antoine; Varesio, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2010-06-15

    The feasibility of protein absolute quantification with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) using the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) acquisition mode on a triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer (QqQ(LIT)) equipped with a high-frequency laser is demonstrated. A therapeutic human monoclonal antibody (mAb) was used as a model protein, and four tryptic peptides generated by fast tryptic digestion were selected as quantification surrogates. MALDI produces mostly singly charged peptides which hardly fragment under low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID), and therefore the benefits of using 4-sulfophenyl isothiocyanate (SPITC) as a fragmentation enhancer derivatization agent were evaluated. Despite a moderate impact on the sensitivity, the N-terminus sulfonated peptides generate nearly complete y-ion ladders when native peptides produce few fragments. This aspect provides an alternative SRM transition set for each peptide. As a consequence, SRM transitions selectivity can be tuned more easily for peptide quantitation in complex matrices when monitoring several SRM transitions. From a quantitative point of view, the signal response depending on mAb concentration was found to be linear over 2.5 orders of magnitude for the most sensitive peptide, allowing precise and accurate measurement by MALDI-SRM/MS. PMID:20481516

  5. Rapid separation and quantification of major caseins and whey proteins of bovine milk by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Vallejo-Cordoba, B

    1997-01-01

    A rapid capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method was established for separating and quantifying major casein and whey proteins in milk. Optimum sample preparation and electrophoretic conditions in a coated capillary maintained at 40 degrees C allowed accurate and reproducible quantification of milk proteins in a single analysis. Sample and run buffer allowed caseins to be maintained in solution by using a combination of urea and a nonionic detergent in phosphate buffer at pH 2.5. Quantitative CZE protein data were derived by calculating percentages and concentrations (mg/mL) of alpha-casein, beta-casein, alpha-lactalbumin, and beta-lactoglobulin. Calibration curves followed linear relationships with highly significant (p < 0.1) correlation coefficients. Relative standard deviations of less than 0.82 (%) for migration times and 2.18 (%) for percent protein indicated that the technique was reproducible. Electrophoretic protein profiles of fresh bovine milk and rehydrated dry milk showed marked quantitative differences in whey protein concentrations. Whey protein represented 12.37 +/- 0.07% beta-lactoglobulin and 3.05 +/- 0.08% alpha-lactalbumin of total protein in typical fresh milk, while only 1.90 +/- 0.16% beta-lactoglobulin and 0.86 +/- 0.04% alpha-lactalbumin of total protein were detected in a commercial rehydrated milk powder. By quantifying these differences, the established technique may allow the detection of substitution of fresh milk with rehydrated milk powder. The accuracy and reproducibility of the technique permitted the quantitation of individual protein concentrations in milk samples, which agreed with ranges reported in the literature. CZE may be well suited for routine use by dairies and regulatory agencies, since it allows the determination of milk proteins in less than 60 min. PMID:9725120

  6. Comparison of colorimetric methods for the quantification of model proteins in aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Glyk, Anna; Heinisch, Sandra L; Scheper, Thomas; Beutel, Sascha

    2015-05-15

    In the current study, the quantification of different model proteins in the presence of typical aqueous two-phase system components was investigated by using the Bradford and bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assays. Each phase-forming component above 1 and 5 wt% had considerable effects on the protein quantification in both assays, respectively, resulting in diminished protein recoveries/absorption values by increasing poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)/salt concentration and PEG molecular weight. Therefore, a convenient dilution of both components (up to 1 and 5 wt%) before protein quantification is recommended in both assays, respectively, where the BCA assay is favored in comparison with the Bradford assay. PMID:25684109

  7. Quantification of protein interaction kinetics in a micro droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L. L.; Wang, S. P.; Shan, X. N.; Zhang, S. T.; Tao, N. J.

    2015-11-01

    Characterization of protein interactions is essential to the discovery of disease biomarkers, the development of diagnostic assays, and the screening for therapeutic drugs. Conventional flow-through kinetic measurements need relative large amount of sample that is not feasible for precious protein samples. We report a novel method to measure protein interaction kinetics in a single droplet with sub microliter or less volume. A droplet in a humidity-controlled environmental chamber is replacing the microfluidic channels as the reactor for the protein interaction. The binding process is monitored by a surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) system. Association curves are obtained from the average SPR image intensity in the center area of the droplet. The washing step required by conventional flow-through SPR method is eliminated in the droplet method. The association and dissociation rate constants and binding affinity of an antigen-antibody interaction are obtained by global fitting of association curves at different concentrations. The result obtained by this method is accurate as validated by conventional flow-through SPR system. This droplet-based method not only allows kinetic studies for proteins with limited supply but also opens the door for high-throughput protein interaction study in a droplet-based microarray format that enables measurement of many to many interactions on a single chip.

  8. Quantification of protein interaction kinetics in a micro droplet

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, L. L.; Wang, S. P. E-mail: njtao@asu.edu; Shan, X. N.; Tao, N. J. E-mail: njtao@asu.edu; Zhang, S. T.

    2015-11-15

    Characterization of protein interactions is essential to the discovery of disease biomarkers, the development of diagnostic assays, and the screening for therapeutic drugs. Conventional flow-through kinetic measurements need relative large amount of sample that is not feasible for precious protein samples. We report a novel method to measure protein interaction kinetics in a single droplet with sub microliter or less volume. A droplet in a humidity-controlled environmental chamber is replacing the microfluidic channels as the reactor for the protein interaction. The binding process is monitored by a surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) system. Association curves are obtained from the average SPR image intensity in the center area of the droplet. The washing step required by conventional flow-through SPR method is eliminated in the droplet method. The association and dissociation rate constants and binding affinity of an antigen-antibody interaction are obtained by global fitting of association curves at different concentrations. The result obtained by this method is accurate as validated by conventional flow-through SPR system. This droplet-based method not only allows kinetic studies for proteins with limited supply but also opens the door for high-throughput protein interaction study in a droplet-based microarray format that enables measurement of many to many interactions on a single chip.

  9. Accurate quantification of episomal HIV-1 two-long terminal repeat circles by use of optimized DNA isolation and droplet digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Malatinkova, Eva; Kiselinova, Maja; Bonczkowski, Pawel; Trypsteen, Wim; Messiaen, Peter; Vermeire, Jolien; Verhasselt, Bruno; Vervisch, Karen; Vandekerckhove, Linos; De Spiegelaere, Ward

    2015-02-01

    Episomal HIV-1 two-long terminal repeat (2-LTR) circles are considered markers for ongoing viral replication. Two sample processing procedures were compared to accurately quantify 2-LTR in patients by using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Here, we show that plasmid isolation with a spiked non-HIV plasmid for normalization enables more accurate 2-LTR quantification than genomic DNA isolation. PMID:25502524

  10. Accurate Quantification of Episomal HIV-1 Two-Long Terminal Repeat Circles by Use of Optimized DNA Isolation and Droplet Digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Malatinkova, Eva; Kiselinova, Maja; Bonczkowski, Pawel; Trypsteen, Wim; Messiaen, Peter; Vermeire, Jolien; Verhasselt, Bruno; Vervisch, Karen; De Spiegelaere, Ward

    2014-01-01

    Episomal HIV-1 two-long terminal repeat (2-LTR) circles are considered markers for ongoing viral replication. Two sample processing procedures were compared to accurately quantify 2-LTR in patients by using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Here, we show that plasmid isolation with a spiked non-HIV plasmid for normalization enables more accurate 2-LTR quantification than genomic DNA isolation. PMID:25502524

  11. Absolute protein quantification of the yeast chaperome under conditions of heat shock.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Rebecca J; Lawless, Craig; Holman, Stephen W; Lanthaler, Karin; Beynon, Robert J; Grant, Chris M; Hubbard, Simon J; Eyers, Claire E

    2016-08-01

    Chaperones are fundamental to regulating the heat shock response, mediating protein recovery from thermal-induced misfolding and aggregation. Using the QconCAT strategy and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) for absolute protein quantification, we have determined copy per cell values for 49 key chaperones in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under conditions of normal growth and heat shock. This work extends a previous chemostat quantification study by including up to five Q-peptides per protein to improve confidence in protein quantification. In contrast to the global proteome profile of S. cerevisiae in response to heat shock, which remains largely unchanged as determined by label-free quantification, many of the chaperones are upregulated with an average two-fold increase in protein abundance. Interestingly, eight of the significantly upregulated chaperones are direct gene targets of heat shock transcription factor-1. By performing absolute quantification of chaperones under heat stress for the first time, we were able to evaluate the individual protein-level response. Furthermore, this SRM data was used to calibrate label-free quantification values for the proteome in absolute terms, thus improving relative quantification between the two conditions. This study significantly enhances the largely transcriptomic data available in the field and illustrates a more nuanced response at the protein level. PMID:27252046

  12. Accurate quantification of tio2 nanoparticles collected on air filters using a microwave-assisted acid digestion method.

    PubMed

    Mudunkotuwa, Imali A; Anthony, T Renée; Grassian, Vicki H; Peters, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) particles, including nanoparticles with diameters smaller than 100 nm, are used extensively in consumer products. In a 2011 current intelligence bulletin, the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommended methods to assess worker exposures to fine and ultrafine TiO(2) particles and associated occupational exposure limits for these particles. However, there are several challenges and problems encountered with these recommended exposure assessment methods involving the accurate quantitation of titanium dioxide collected on air filters using acid digestion followed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Specifically, recommended digestion methods include the use of chemicals, such as perchloric acid, which are typically unavailable in most accredited industrial hygiene laboratories due to highly corrosive and oxidizing properties. Other alternative methods that are used typically involve the use of nitric acid or combination of nitric acid and sulfuric acid, which yield very poor recoveries for titanium dioxide. Therefore, given the current state of the science, it is clear that a new method is needed for exposure assessment. In this current study, a microwave-assisted acid digestion method has been specifically designed to improve the recovery of titanium in TiO(2) nanoparticles for quantitative analysis using ICP-OES. The optimum digestion conditions were determined by changing several variables including the acids used, digestion time, and temperature. Consequently, the optimized digestion temperature of 210°C with concentrated sulfuric and nitric acid (2:1 v/v) resulted in a recovery of >90% for TiO(2). The method is expected to provide for a more accurate quantification of airborne TiO(2) particles in the workplace environment. PMID:26181824

  13. Accurate quantification of creatinine in serum by coupling a measurement standard to extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Keke; Li, Ming; Li, Hongmei; Li, Mengwan; Jiang, You; Fang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Ambient ionization (AI) techniques have been widely used in chemistry, medicine, material science, environmental science, forensic science. AI takes advantage of direct desorption/ionization of chemicals in raw samples under ambient environmental conditions with minimal or no sample preparation. However, its quantitative accuracy is restricted by matrix effects during the ionization process. To improve the quantitative accuracy of AI, a matrix reference material, which is a particular form of measurement standard, was coupled to an AI technique in this study. Consequently the analyte concentration in a complex matrix can be easily quantified with high accuracy. As a demonstration, this novel method was applied for the accurate quantification of creatinine in serum by using extractive electrospray ionization (EESI) mass spectrometry. Over the concentration range investigated (0.166 ~ 1.617 μg/mL), a calibration curve was obtained with a satisfactory linearity (R2 = 0.994), and acceptable relative standard deviations (RSD) of 4.6 ~ 8.0% (n = 6). Finally, the creatinine concentration value of a serum sample was determined to be 36.18 ± 1.08 μg/mL, which is in excellent agreement with the certified value of 35.16 ± 0.39 μg/mL. PMID:26759071

  14. Supercharging by m-NBA Improves ETD-Based Quantification of Hydroxyl Radical Protein Footprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Li, Zixuan; Xie, Boer; Sharp, Joshua S.

    2015-08-01

    Hydroxyl radical protein footprinting (HRPF) is an MS-based technique for analyzing protein structure based on measuring the oxidation of amino acid side chains by hydroxyl radicals diffusing in solution. Spatial resolution of HRPF is limited by the smallest portion of the protein for which oxidation amounts can be accurately quantitated. Previous work has shown electron transfer dissociation (ETD) to be the most reliable method for quantifying the amount of oxidation of each amino acid side chain in a mixture of peptide oxidation isomers, but efficient ETD requires high peptide charge states, which limits its applicability for HRPF. Supercharging reagents have been used to enhance peptide charge state for ETD analysis, but previous work has shown supercharging reagents to enhance charge state differently for different peptides sequences; it is currently unknown if different oxidation isomers will experience different charge enhancement effects. Here, we report the effect of m-nitrobenzyl alcohol ( m-NBA) on the ETD-based quantification of peptide oxidation. The addition of m-NBA to both a defined mixture of synthetic isomeric oxidized peptides and Robo-1 protein subjected to HRPF increased the abundance of higher charge state ions, improving our ability to perform efficient ETD of the mixture. No differences in the reported quantitation by ETD were noted in the presence or absence of m-NBA, indicating that all oxidation isomers were charge-enhanced to a similar extent. These results indicate the utility of m-NBA for residue-level quantification of peptide oxidation in HRPF and other applications.

  15. Absolute protein quantification of the yeast chaperome under conditions of heat shock

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Rebecca J.; Lawless, Craig; Holman, Stephen W.; Lanthaler, Karin; Beynon, Robert J.; Grant, Chris M.; Hubbard, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    Chaperones are fundamental to regulating the heat shock response, mediating protein recovery from thermal‐induced misfolding and aggregation. Using the QconCAT strategy and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) for absolute protein quantification, we have determined copy per cell values for 49 key chaperones in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under conditions of normal growth and heat shock. This work extends a previous chemostat quantification study by including up to five Q‐peptides per protein to improve confidence in protein quantification. In contrast to the global proteome profile of S. cerevisiae in response to heat shock, which remains largely unchanged as determined by label‐free quantification, many of the chaperones are upregulated with an average two‐fold increase in protein abundance. Interestingly, eight of the significantly upregulated chaperones are direct gene targets of heat shock transcription factor‐1. By performing absolute quantification of chaperones under heat stress for the first time, we were able to evaluate the individual protein‐level response. Furthermore, this SRM data was used to calibrate label‐free quantification values for the proteome in absolute terms, thus improving relative quantification between the two conditions. This study significantly enhances the largely transcriptomic data available in the field and illustrates a more nuanced response at the protein level. PMID:27252046

  16. Quantification of Protein-Lipid Selectivity using FRET: Application to the M13 Major Coat Protein

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Fábio; Loura, Luís M. S.; Koehorst, Rob; Spruijt, Ruud B.; Hemminga, Marcus A.; Fedorov, Alexander; Prieto, Manuel

    2004-01-01

    Quantification of lipid selectivity by membrane proteins has been previously addressed mainly from electron spin resonance studies. We present here a new methodology for quantification of protein-lipid selectivity based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer. A mutant of M13 major coat protein was labeled with 7-diethylamino-3((4′iodoacetyl)amino)phenyl-4-methylcoumarin to be used as the donor in energy transfer studies. Phospholipids labeled with N-(7-nitro-2-1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl) were selected as the acceptors. The dependence of protein-lipid selectivity on both hydrophobic mismatch and headgroup family was determined. M13 major coat protein exhibited larger selectivity toward phospholipids which allow for a better hydrophobic matching. Increased selectivity was also observed for anionic phospholipids and the relative association constants agreed with the ones already presented in the literature and obtained through electron spin resonance studies. This result led us to conclude that fluorescence resonance energy transfer is a promising methodology in protein-lipid selectivity studies. PMID:15240469

  17. PROMALS web server for accurate multiple protein sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Pei, Jimin; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Tang, Ming; Grishin, Nick V

    2007-07-01

    Multiple sequence alignments are essential in homology inference, structure modeling, functional prediction and phylogenetic analysis. We developed a web server that constructs multiple protein sequence alignments using PROMALS, a progressive method that improves alignment quality by using additional homologs from PSI-BLAST searches and secondary structure predictions from PSIPRED. PROMALS shows higher alignment accuracy than other advanced methods, such as MUMMALS, ProbCons, MAFFT and SPEM. The PROMALS web server takes FASTA format protein sequences as input. The output includes a colored alignment augmented with information about sequence grouping, predicted secondary structures and positional conservation. The PROMALS web server is available at: http://prodata.swmed.edu/promals/ PMID:17452345

  18. Quantification of dynamic protein complexes using Renilla luciferase fragment complementation applied to protein kinase A activities in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Stefan, E.; Aquin, S.; Berger, N.; Landry, C. R.; Nyfeler, B.; Bouvier, M.; Michnick, S. W.

    2007-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily represents the most important class of pharmaceutical targets. Therefore, the characterization of receptor cascades and their ligands is a prerequisite to discovering novel drugs. Quantification of agonist-induced second messengers and downstream-coupled kinase activities is central to characterization of GPCRs or other pathways that converge on GPCR-mediated signaling. Furthermore, there is a need for simple, cell-based assays that would report on direct or indirect actions on GPCR-mediated effectors of signaling. More generally, there is a demand for sensitive assays to quantify alterations of protein complexes in vivo. We describe the development of a Renilla luciferase (Rluc)-based protein fragment complementation assay (PCA) that was designed specifically to investigate dynamic protein complexes. We demonstrate these features for GPCR-induced disassembly of protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory and catalytic subunits, a key effector of GPCR signaling. Taken together, our observations show that the PCA allows for direct and accurate measurements of live changes of absolute values of protein complex assembly and disassembly as well as cellular imaging and dynamic localization of protein complexes. Moreover, the Rluc-PCA has a sufficiently high signal-to-background ratio to identify endogenously expressed Gαs protein-coupled receptors. We provide pharmacological evidence that the phosphodiesterase-4 family selectively down-regulates constitutive β-2 adrenergic- but not vasopressin-2 receptor-mediated PKA activities. Our results show that the sensitivity of the Rluc-PCA simplifies the recording of pharmacological profiles of GPCR-based candidate drugs and could be extended to high-throughput screens to identify novel direct modulators of PKA or upstream components of GPCR signaling cascades. PMID:17942691

  19. A Strategy for Accurate Quantification of 5-Methylcytosine and 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine at CpG Sites Within Gene Promoter.

    PubMed

    Qui, Yiping; Yang, Qi; Sui, Fang; Lu, Rong; Dang, Siwen; Ji, Meiju; He, Nongyue; Shi, Bingyin; Hou, Peng

    2015-06-01

    5-Methylcytosine (5mC) can be converted to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) in mammalian DNA by the ten-eleven translocation (TET) enzymes. Traditional bisulfite-based DNA methylation analysis techniques have been widely used in the detection of 5mC. However, they can not discriminate 5hmC from 5mC, leading to overestimate 5mC levels. We here introduce a strategy, combination of selective oxidation and bisulfite pyrosequencing (BS-Pyroseq), for quantification of both 5mC and 5hmC at CpG sites within the promoters of CDH1, DAPK, RARβ and RUNX3 genes in a panel of cell lines and clinical samples. As expected, oxidative bisulfite pyrosequencing (oxBS-Pyroseq) assay decreased overall or site-specific methylation levels of three of these genes in most cell lines as compared with BS-Pyroseq assay. Similarly, decreased overall or site-specific methylation levels of DAPK, RARβ and RUNX3 genes in laryngeal, gastric and thyroid cancer and their matched normal tissues, respectively, were also found by a comparison between these two techniques, particularly in cancerous tissues. In addition, by using this combined strategy and hydroxymethylcytosine DNA immunoprecipitation (hMeDIP) assay, we demonstrated that TET1 up-regulated DAPK expression through promoter demethylation. Collectively, this strategy is easy to establish and accurately discriminates and quantifies 5mC and 5hmC at CpG sites within selected gene promoters. PMID:26353591

  20. Reservoir evaluation of thin-bedded turbidites and hydrocarbon pore thickness estimation for an accurate quantification of resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omoniyi, Bayonle; Stow, Dorrik

    2016-04-01

    One of the major challenges in the assessment of and production from turbidite reservoirs is to take full account of thin and medium-bedded turbidites (<10cm and <30cm respectively). Although such thinner, low-pay sands may comprise a significant proportion of the reservoir succession, they can go unnoticed by conventional analysis and so negatively impact on reserve estimation, particularly in fields producing from prolific thick-bedded turbidite reservoirs. Field development plans often take little note of such thin beds, which are therefore bypassed by mainstream production. In fact, the trapped and bypassed fluids can be vital where maximising field value and optimising production are key business drivers. We have studied in detail, a succession of thin-bedded turbidites associated with thicker-bedded reservoir facies in the North Brae Field, UKCS, using a combination of conventional logs and cores to assess the significance of thin-bedded turbidites in computing hydrocarbon pore thickness (HPT). This quantity, being an indirect measure of thickness, is critical for an accurate estimation of original-oil-in-place (OOIP). By using a combination of conventional and unconventional logging analysis techniques, we obtain three different results for the reservoir intervals studied. These results include estimated net sand thickness, average sand thickness, and their distribution trend within a 3D structural grid. The net sand thickness varies from 205 to 380 ft, and HPT ranges from 21.53 to 39.90 ft. We observe that an integrated approach (neutron-density cross plots conditioned to cores) to HPT quantification reduces the associated uncertainties significantly, resulting in estimation of 96% of actual HPT. Further work will focus on assessing the 3D dynamic connectivity of the low-pay sands with the surrounding thick-bedded turbidite facies.

  1. Improved Identification and Relative Quantification of Sites of Peptide and Protein Oxidation for Hydroxyl Radical Footprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Li, Zixuan; Xie, Boer; Sharp, Joshua S.

    2013-11-01

    Protein oxidation is typically associated with oxidative stress and aging and affects protein function in normal and pathological processes. Additionally, deliberate oxidative labeling is used to probe protein structure and protein-ligand interactions in hydroxyl radical protein footprinting (HRPF). Oxidation often occurs at multiple sites, leading to mixtures of oxidation isomers that differ only by the site of modification. We utilized sets of synthetic, isomeric "oxidized" peptides to test and compare the ability of electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID), as well as nano-ultra high performance liquid chromatography (nanoUPLC) separation, to quantitate oxidation isomers with one oxidation at multiple adjacent sites in mixtures of peptides. Tandem mass spectrometry by ETD generates fragment ion ratios that accurately report on relative oxidative modification extent on specific sites, regardless of the charge state of the precursor ion. Conversely, CID was found to generate quantitative MS/MS product ions only at the higher precursor charge state. Oxidized isomers having multiple sites of oxidation in each of two peptide sequences in HRPF product of protein Robo-1 Ig1-2, a protein involved in nervous system axon guidance, were also identified and the oxidation extent at each residue was quantified by ETD without prior liquid chromatography (LC) separation. ETD has proven to be a reliable technique for simultaneous identification and relative quantification of a variety of functionally different oxidation isomers, and is a valuable tool for the study of oxidative stress, as well as for improving spatial resolution for HRPF studies.

  2. Molecular speciated isotope dilution mass spectrometric methods for accurate, reproducible and direct quantification of reduced, oxidized and total glutathione in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Fahrenholz, Timothy; Wolle, Mesay Mulugeta; Kingston, H M Skip; Faber, Scott; Kern, John C; Pamuku, Matt; Miller, Logan; Chatragadda, Hemasudha; Kogelnik, Andreas

    2015-01-20

    Novel protocols were developed to accurately quantify reduced (GSH), oxidized (GSSG) and total (tGSH) glutathione in biological samples using molecular speciated isotope dilution mass spectrometry (SIDMS). For GSH and GSSG measurement, the sample was spiked with isotopically enriched analogues of the analytes ((310)GSH and (616)GSSG), along with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), and treated with acetonitrile to solubilize the endogenous analytes via protein precipitation and equilibrate them with the spikes. The supernatant was analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and the analytes were quantified with simultaneous tracking and correction for auto-oxidation of GSH to GSSG. For tGSH assay, a (310)GSH-spiked sample was treated with dithiothreitol (DTT) to convert disulfide-bonded glutathione to GSH. After removing the protein, the supernatant was analyzed by LC-MS/MS and the analyte was quantified by single-spiking isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). The mathematical relationships in IDMS and SIDMS quantifications are based on isotopic ratios and do not involve calibration curves. The protocols were validated using spike recovery tests and by analyzing synthetic standard solutions. Red blood cell (RBC) and saliva samples obtained from healthy subjects, and whole blood samples collected and shipped from a remote location were analyzed. The concentrations of tGSH in the RBC and whole blood samples were 2 orders of magnitude higher than those found in saliva. The fractions of GSSG were 0.2-2.2% (RBC and blood) and 15-47% (saliva) of the free glutathione (GSH + 2xGSSG) in the corresponding samples. Up to 3% GSH was auto-oxidized to GSSG during sample workup; the highest oxidations (>1%) were in the saliva samples. PMID:25519489

  3. PET optimization for improved assessment and accurate quantification of {sup 90}Y-microsphere biodistribution after radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Martí-Climent, Josep M. Prieto, Elena; Elosúa, César; Rodríguez-Fraile, Macarena; Domínguez-Prado, Inés; Vigil, Carmen; García-Velloso, María J.; Arbizu, Javier; Peñuelas, Iván; Richter, José A.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: {sup 90}Y-microspheres are widely used for the radioembolization of metastatic liver cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma and there is a growing interest for imaging {sup 90}Y-microspheres with PET. The aim of this study is to evaluate the performance of a current generation PET/CT scanner for {sup 90}Y imaging and to optimize the PET protocol to improve the assessment and the quantification of {sup 90}Y-microsphere biodistribution after radioembolization. Methods: Data were acquired on a Biograph mCT-TrueV scanner with time of flight (TOF) and point spread function (PSF) modeling. Spatial resolution was measured with a{sup 90}Y point source. Sensitivity was evaluated using the NEMA 70 cm line source filled with {sup 90}Y. To evaluate the count rate performance, {sup 90}Y vials with activity ranging from 3.64 to 0.035 GBq were measured in the center of the field of view (CFOV). The energy spectrum was evaluated. Image quality with different reconstructions was studied using the Jaszczak phantom containing six hollow spheres (diameters: 31.3, 28.1, 21.8, 16.1, 13.3, and 10.5 mm), filled with a 207 kBq/ml {sup 90}Y concentration and a 5:1 sphere-to-background ratio. Acquisition time was adjusted to simulate the quality of a realistic clinical PET acquisition of a patient treated with SIR-Spheres{sup ®}. The developed methodology was applied to ten patients after SIR-Spheres{sup ®} treatment acquiring a 10 min per bed PET. Results: The energy spectrum showed the{sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung radiation. The {sup 90}Y transverse resolution, with filtered backprojection reconstruction, was 4.5 mm in the CFOV and degraded to 5.0 mm at 10 cm off-axis. {sup 90}Y absolute sensitivity was 0.40 kcps/MBq in the center of the field of view. Tendency of true and random rates as a function of the {sup 90}Y activity could be accurately described using linear and quadratic models, respectively. Phantom studies demonstrated that, due to low count statistics in {sup 90}Y PET

  4. QuShape: Rapid, accurate, and best-practices quantification of nucleic acid probing information, resolved by capillary electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Karabiber, Fethullah; McGinnis, Jennifer L.; Favorov, Oleg V.; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical probing of RNA and DNA structure is a widely used and highly informative approach for examining nucleic acid structure and for evaluating interactions with protein and small-molecule ligands. Use of capillary electrophoresis to analyze chemical probing experiments yields hundreds of nucleotides of information per experiment and can be performed on automated instruments. Extraction of the information from capillary electrophoresis electropherograms is a computationally intensive multistep analytical process, and no current software provides rapid, automated, and accurate data analysis. To overcome this bottleneck, we developed a platform-independent, user-friendly software package, QuShape, that yields quantitatively accurate nucleotide reactivity information with minimal user supervision. QuShape incorporates newly developed algorithms for signal decay correction, alignment of time-varying signals within and across capillaries and relative to the RNA nucleotide sequence, and signal scaling across channels or experiments. An analysis-by-reference option enables multiple, related experiments to be fully analyzed in minutes. We illustrate the usefulness and robustness of QuShape by analysis of RNA SHAPE (selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension) experiments. PMID:23188808

  5. Mass spectrometry based proteomics for absolute quantification of proteins from tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Hanash, Sam

    2015-01-01

    In-depth quantitative profiling of the proteome and sub-proteomes of tumor cells has relevance to tumor classification, the development of novel therapeutics, and of prognostic and predictive markers and to disease monitoring. In particular the tumor cell surface represents a highly relevant compartment for the development of targeted therapeutics and immunotherapy. We have developed a proteomic platform to profile tumor cells that encompasses enrichment of surface membrane proteins, intact protein fractionation and label-free mass spectrometry based absolute quantification. Here we describe the methodology for capture, identification and quantification of cell surface proteins using biotinylation for labeling of the cell surface, avidin for capture of biotinylated proteins and ion mobility mass spectrometry for protein identification and quantification. PMID:25794949

  6. Sulfur-based absolute quantification of proteins using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun-Seok; Heun Kim, Sook; Jeong, Ji-Seon; Lee, Yong-Moon; Yim, Yong-Hyeon

    2015-10-01

    An element-based reductive approach provides an effective means of realizing International System of Units (SI) traceability for high-purity biological standards. Here, we develop an absolute protein quantification method using double isotope dilution (ID) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) combined with microwave-assisted acid digestion for the first time. We validated the method and applied it to certify the candidate protein certified reference material (CRM) of human growth hormone (hGH). The concentration of hGH was determined by analysing the total amount of sulfur in hGH. Next, the size-exclusion chromatography method was used with ICP-MS to characterize and quantify sulfur-containing impurities. By subtracting the contribution of sulfur-containing impurities from the total sulfur content in the hGH CRM, we obtained a SI-traceable certification value. The quantification result obtained with the present method based on sulfur analysis was in excellent agreement with the result determined via a well-established protein quantification method based on amino acid analysis using conventional acid hydrolysis combined with an ID liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The element-based protein quantification method developed here can be generally used for SI-traceable absolute quantification of proteins, especially pure-protein standards.

  7. Mass spectrometry-based protein identification with accurate statistical significance assignment

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Gelio; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Assigning statistical significance accurately has become increasingly important as metadata of many types, often assembled in hierarchies, are constructed and combined for further biological analyses. Statistical inaccuracy of metadata at any level may propagate to downstream analyses, undermining the validity of scientific conclusions thus drawn. From the perspective of mass spectrometry-based proteomics, even though accurate statistics for peptide identification can now be achieved, accurate protein level statistics remain challenging. Results: We have constructed a protein ID method that combines peptide evidences of a candidate protein based on a rigorous formula derived earlier; in this formula the database P-value of every peptide is weighted, prior to the final combination, according to the number of proteins it maps to. We have also shown that this protein ID method provides accurate protein level E-value, eliminating the need of using empirical post-processing methods for type-I error control. Using a known protein mixture, we find that this protein ID method, when combined with the Sorić formula, yields accurate values for the proportion of false discoveries. In terms of retrieval efficacy, the results from our method are comparable with other methods tested. Availability and implementation: The source code, implemented in C++ on a linux system, is available for download at ftp://ftp.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pub/qmbp/qmbp_ms/RAId/RAId_Linux_64Bit. Contact: yyu@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25362092

  8. Mechanism for accurate, protein-assisted DNA annealing by Deinococcus radiodurans DdrB.

    PubMed

    Sugiman-Marangos, Seiji N; Weiss, Yoni M; Junop, Murray S

    2016-04-19

    Accurate pairing of DNA strands is essential for repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). How cells achieve accurate annealing when large regions of single-strand DNA are unpaired has remained unclear despite many efforts focused on understanding proteins, which mediate this process. Here we report the crystal structure of a single-strand annealing protein [DdrB (DNA damage response B)] in complex with a partially annealed DNA intermediate to 2.2 Å. This structure and supporting biochemical data reveal a mechanism for accurate annealing involving DdrB-mediated proofreading of strand complementarity. DdrB promotes high-fidelity annealing by constraining specific bases from unauthorized association and only releases annealed duplex when bound strands are fully complementary. To our knowledge, this mechanism provides the first understanding for how cells achieve accurate, protein-assisted strand annealing under biological conditions that would otherwise favor misannealing. PMID:27044084

  9. Sequential extractions: A new way for protein quantification-data from peanut allergens.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ningling; Li, Wenying; Wu, Zhihua; Li, Xin; Yang, Anshu; Tong, Ping; Chen, Hongbing

    2015-09-01

    Quantification of certain protein contents in the matrix is essential in protein analyses. The amount of total protein in the matrix can be determined by the Kjeldahl method. However, few methods can quantify certain protein contents in the matrix without extracting all of them in solution. Extracting all of the contents is difficult for proteins, especially relatively insoluble ones. A five-step sequential extraction method was developed for the quantification of certain proteins in defatted peanut flour based on the relationship between the extracted protein contents and the extraction times. The extracted proteins (i.e., total protein, Ara h 1, and Ara h 2) were quantitatively analyzed in each extraction of the same condition. An exponential equation was obtained between the extraction times and the respective amount of extracted protein as well as both the total protein and a particular protein. In particular, the amount of protein extracted each time can be a geometric sequence. If all proteins can be extracted with sufficient extraction times, the protein contents in the peanut matrix can be calculated using a mathematical summation formula. This sum should be all proteins in the matrix. The five-step sequential extraction method can provide a means to quantify certain proteins in the matrix. PMID:26026388

  10. Mass spectrometry-based absolute quantification reveals rhythmic variation of mouse circadian clock proteins.

    PubMed

    Narumi, Ryohei; Shimizu, Yoshihiro; Ukai-Tadenuma, Maki; Ode, Koji L; Kanda, Genki N; Shinohara, Yuta; Sato, Aya; Matsumoto, Katsuhiko; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2016-06-14

    Absolute values of protein expression levels in cells are crucial information for understanding cellular biological systems. Precise quantification of proteins can be achieved by liquid chromatography (LC)-mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of enzymatic digests of proteins in the presence of isotope-labeled internal standards. Thus, development of a simple and easy way for the preparation of internal standards is advantageous for the analyses of multiple target proteins, which will allow systems-level studies. Here we describe a method, termed MS-based Quantification By isotope-labeled Cell-free products (MS-QBiC), which provides the simple and high-throughput preparation of internal standards by using a reconstituted cell-free protein synthesis system, and thereby facilitates both multiplexed and sensitive quantification of absolute amounts of target proteins. This method was applied to a systems-level dynamic analysis of mammalian circadian clock proteins, which consist of transcription factors and protein kinases that govern central and peripheral circadian clocks in mammals. Sixteen proteins from 20 selected circadian clock proteins were successfully quantified from mouse liver over a 24-h time series, and 14 proteins had circadian variations. Quantified values were applied to detect internal body time using a previously developed molecular timetable method. The analyses showed that single time-point data from wild-type mice can predict the endogenous state of the circadian clock, whereas data from clock mutant mice are not applicable because of the disappearance of circadian variation. PMID:27247408

  11. Highly Accurate Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions via Incorporating Evolutionary Information and Physicochemical Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng-Wei; You, Zhu-Hong; Chen, Xing; Gui, Jie; Nie, Ru

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) occur at almost all levels of cell functions and play crucial roles in various cellular processes. Thus, identification of PPIs is critical for deciphering the molecular mechanisms and further providing insight into biological processes. Although a variety of high-throughput experimental techniques have been developed to identify PPIs, existing PPI pairs by experimental approaches only cover a small fraction of the whole PPI networks, and further, those approaches hold inherent disadvantages, such as being time-consuming, expensive, and having high false positive rate. Therefore, it is urgent and imperative to develop automatic in silico approaches to predict PPIs efficiently and accurately. In this article, we propose a novel mixture of physicochemical and evolutionary-based feature extraction method for predicting PPIs using our newly developed discriminative vector machine (DVM) classifier. The improvements of the proposed method mainly consist in introducing an effective feature extraction method that can capture discriminative features from the evolutionary-based information and physicochemical characteristics, and then a powerful and robust DVM classifier is employed. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that DVM model is applied to the field of bioinformatics. When applying the proposed method to the Yeast and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) datasets, we obtain excellent prediction accuracies of 94.35% and 90.61%, respectively. The computational results indicate that our method is effective and robust for predicting PPIs, and can be taken as a useful supplementary tool to the traditional experimental methods for future proteomics research. PMID:27571061

  12. Immunochemical strategy for quantification of G-coupled olfactory receptor proteins on natural nanovesicles.

    PubMed

    Sanmartí-Espinal, Marta; Galve, Roger; Iavicoli, Patrizia; Persuy, Marie-Annick; Pajot-Augy, Edith; Marco, M-Pilar; Samitier, Josep

    2016-03-01

    Cell membrane proteins are involved in a variety of biochemical pathways and therefore constitute important targets for therapy and development of new drugs. Bioanalytical platforms and binding assays using these membrane protein receptors for drug screening or diagnostic require the construction of well-characterized liposome and lipid bilayer arrays that act as support to prevent protein denaturation during biochip processing. Quantification of the protein receptors in the lipid membrane arrays is a key issue in order to produce reproducible and well-characterized chips. Herein, we report a novel immunochemical analytical approach for the quantification of membrane proteins (i.e., G-protein-coupled receptor, GPCR) in nanovesicles (NVs). The procedure allows direct determination of tagged receptors (i.e., c-myc tag) without any previous protein purification or extraction steps. The immunochemical method is based on a microplate ELISA format and quantifies this tag on proteins embedded in NVs with detectability in the picomolar range, using protein bioconjugates as reference standards. The applicability of the method is demonstrated through the quantification of the c-myc-olfactory receptor (OR, c-myc-OR1740) in the cell membrane NVs. The reported method opens the possibility to develop well-characterized drug-screening platforms based on G-coupled proteins embedded on membranes. PMID:26724468

  13. Sensitive and accurate quantification of JAK2 V617F mutation in chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms by droplet digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Waterhouse, Miguel; Follo, Marie; Pfeifer, Dietmar; von Bubnoff, Nikolas; Duyster, Justus; Bertz, Hartmut; Finke, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    The JAK2 V617F mutation can be detected with a high frequency in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). MPN treatment efficiency can be assessed by JAK2 V617F quantification. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) is widely used for JAK2 V617F quantification. Emerging alternative technologies like digital droplet PCR (ddPCR) have been described to overcome inherent qPCR limitations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of ddPCR for JAK2 V617F quantification in patient samples with MPN. Sensitivity and specificity were established by using DNA artificial mixtures. In addition, 101 samples from 59 patients were evaluated for JAK2 V617F mutation. Limit of detection was 0.01 % for both qPCR and ddPCR. The JAK2 V617F mutation was detected in 43 out of 59 patients by both PCR platforms. However, in 14 % of the samples, JAK2 V617F mutation was detected only with ddPCR. This 14 % of discrepant samples were from patients shortly after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Percentage of JAK2 V617F mutation measured by qPCR and ddPCR in clinical samples showed a high degree of correlation (Spearman r: 0.9637 p < 0.001) and an excellent agreement assessed by Bland-Altman analysis. In conclusion, ddPCR is a suitable, precise, and sensitive method for quantification of the JAK 2 V617F mutation. PMID:26931113

  14. Development of a Novel Reference Plasmid for Accurate Quantification of Genetically Modified Kefeng6 Rice DNA in Food and Feed Samples

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiujie; Wan, Yusong

    2013-01-01

    Reference plasmids are an essential tool for the quantification of genetically modified (GM) events. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is the most commonly used method to characterize and quantify reference plasmids. However, the precision of this method is often limited by calibration curves, and qPCR data can be affected by matrix differences between the standards and samples. Here, we describe a digital PCR (dPCR) approach that can be used to accurately measure the novel reference plasmid pKefeng6 and quantify the unauthorized variety of GM rice Kefeng6, eliminating the issues associated with matrix effects in calibration curves. The pKefeng6 plasmid was used as a calibrant for the quantification of Kefeng6 rice by determining the copy numbers of event- (77 bp) and taxon-specific (68 bp) fragments, their ratios, and their concentrations. The plasmid was diluted to five different concentrations. The third sample (S3) was optimized for the quantification range of dPCR according to previous reports. The ratio between the two fragments was 1.005, which closely approximated the value certified by sequencing, and the concentration was found to be 792 copies/μL. This method was precise, with an RSD of ~3%. These findings demonstrate the advantages of using the dPCR method to characterize reference materials. PMID:24324952

  15. A rapid and accurate quantification method for real-time dynamic analysis of cellular lipids during microalgal fermentation processes in Chlorella protothecoides with low field nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Liu, Tingting; Wang, Zejian; Tian, Xiwei; Yang, Yi; Guo, Meijin; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping

    2016-05-01

    The rapid and real-time lipid determination can provide valuable information on process regulation and optimization in the algal lipid mass production. In this study, a rapid, accurate and precise quantification method of in vivo cellular lipids of Chlorella protothecoides using low field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) was newly developed. LF-NMR was extremely sensitive to the algal lipids with the limits of the detection (LOD) of 0.0026g and 0.32g/L in dry lipid samples and algal broth, respectively, as well as limits of quantification (LOQ) of 0.0093g and 1.18g/L. Moreover, the LF-NMR signal was specifically proportional to the cellular lipids of C. protothecoides, thus the superior regression curves existing in a wide detection range from 0.02 to 0.42g for dry lipids and from 1.12 to 8.97gL(-1) of lipid concentration for in vivo lipid quantification were obtained with all R(2) higher than 0.99, irrespective of the lipid content and fatty acids profile variations. The accuracy of this novel method was further verified to be reliable by comparing lipid quantification results to those obtained by GC-MS. And the relative standard deviation (RSD) of LF-NMR results were smaller than 2%, suggesting the precision of this method. Finally, this method was successfully used in the on-line lipid monitoring during the algal lipid fermentation processes, making it possible for better understanding of the lipid accumulation mechanism and dynamic bioprocess control. PMID:26948045

  16. Protein Quantification by Elemental Mass Spectrometry: An Experiment for Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarz, Gunnar; Ickert, Stefanie; Wegner, Nina; Nehring, Andreas; Beck, Sebastian; Tiemann, Ruediger; Linscheid, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    A multiday laboratory experiment was designed to integrate inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) in the context of protein quantification into an advanced practical course in analytical and environmental chemistry. Graduate students were familiar with the analytical methods employed, whereas the combination of bioanalytical assays…

  17. Label-Free Protein Quantification for Plant Golgi Protein Localization and Abundance1[W

    PubMed Central

    Nikolovski, Nino; Shliaha, Pavel V.; Gatto, Laurent; Dupree, Paul; Lilley, Kathryn S.

    2014-01-01

    The proteomic composition of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Golgi apparatus is currently reasonably well documented; however, little is known about the relative abundances between different proteins within this compartment. Accurate quantitative information of Golgi resident proteins is of great importance: it facilitates a better understanding of the biochemical processes that take place within this organelle, especially those of different polysaccharide synthesis pathways. Golgi resident proteins are challenging to quantify because the abundance of this organelle is relatively low within the cell. In this study, an organelle fractionation approach targeting the Golgi apparatus was combined with a label-free quantitative mass spectrometry (data-independent acquisition method using ion mobility separation known as LC-IMS-MSE [or HDMSE]) to simultaneously localize proteins to the Golgi apparatus and assess their relative quantity. In total, 102 Golgi-localized proteins were quantified. These data show that organelle fractionation in conjunction with label-free quantitative mass spectrometry is a powerful and relatively simple tool to access protein organelle localization and their relative abundances. The findings presented open a unique view on the organization of the plant Golgi apparatus, leading toward unique hypotheses centered on the biochemical processes of this organelle. PMID:25122472

  18. A six-plex proteome quantification strategy reveals the dynamics of protein turnover.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangjun; Cheng, Kai; Wei, Xiaoluan; Qin, Hongqiang; Chen, Rui; Liu, Jing; Zou, Hanfa

    2013-01-01

    MS1 full scan based quantification is one of the most popular approaches for large-scale proteome quantification. Typically only three different samples can be differentially labeled and quantified in a single experiment. Here we present a two stages stable isotope labeling strategy which allows six different protein samples (six-plex) to be reliably labeled and simultaneously quantified at MS1 level. Briefly in the first stage, isotope lysine-d0 (K0) and lysine-d4 (K4) are in vivo incorporated into different protein samples during cell culture. Then in the second stage, three of K0 and K4 labeled protein samples are digested by lysine C and in vitro labeled with light (2CH3), medium (2CD2H), and heavy (2(13)CD3) dimethyl groups, respectively. We demonstrated that this six-plex isotope labeling strategy could successfully investigate the dynamics of protein turnover in a high throughput manner. PMID:23661174

  19. Quantification of the environmental impact of different dietary protein choices.

    PubMed

    Reijnders, Lucas; Soret, Sam

    2003-09-01

    Quantitative environmental evaluations of meat, fresh vegetables, and processed protein based on soybeans suggest that the environmental burden of vegetarian foods is usually relatively low when production and processing are considered. The environmental comparison of cheese varieties made from cow milk and directly from lupine and the evaluation of energy inputs in fish protein and vegetable protein also suggest an environmental advantage for vegetarian food. In the evaluation of processed protein food based on soybeans and meat protein, a variety of environmental impacts associated with primary production and processing are a factor 4.4-> 100 to the disadvantage of meat. The comparison of cheese varieties gives differences in specific environmental impacts ranging between a factor 5 and 21. And energy use for fish protein may be up to a factor 14 more than for protein of vegetable origin. Assessment suggests that on average the complete life cycle environmental impact of nonvegetarian meals may be roughly a factor 1.5-2 higher than the effect of vegetarian meals in which meat has been replaced by vegetable protein. Although on average vegetarian diets may well have an environmental advantage, exceptions may also occur. Long-distance air transport, deep-freezing, and some horticultural practices may lead to environmental burdens for vegetarian foods exceeding those for locally produced organic meat. PMID:12936964

  20. Quantification Assays for Total and Polyglutamine-Expanded Huntingtin Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Boogaard, Ivette; Smith, Melanie; Pulli, Kristiina; Szynol, Agnieszka; Albertus, Faywell; Lamers, Marieke B. A. C.; Dijkstra, Sipke; Kordt, Daniel; Reindl, Wolfgang; Herrmann, Frank; McAllister, George; Fischer, David F.; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    The expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in the huntingtin gene, which produces huntingtin protein with an expanded polyglutamine tract, is the cause of Huntington's disease (HD). Recent studies have reported that RNAi suppression of polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin (mutant HTT) in HD animal models can ameliorate disease phenotypes. A key requirement for such preclinical studies, as well as eventual clinical trials, aimed to reduce mutant HTT exposure is a robust method to measure HTT protein levels in select tissues. We have developed several sensitive and selective assays that measure either total human HTT or polyglutamine-expanded human HTT proteins on the electrochemiluminescence Meso Scale Discovery detection platform with an increased dynamic range over other methods. In addition, we have developed an assay to detect endogenous mouse and rat HTT proteins in pre-clinical models of HD to monitor effects on the wild type protein of both allele selective and non-selective interventions. We demonstrate the application of these assays to measure HTT protein in several HD in vitro cellular and in vivo animal model systems as well as in HD patient biosamples. Furthermore, we used purified recombinant HTT proteins as standards to quantitate the absolute amount of HTT protein in such biosamples. PMID:24816435

  1. Quantification of human growth hormone in serum with a labeled protein as an internal standard: essential considerations.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Caroline; Groves, Kate J; Biesenbruch, Sabine; O'Connor, Gavin; Ashcroft, Alison E; Arsene, Cristian; Schulze, Dirk; Quaglia, Milena

    2014-07-01

    To manage and inform diagnostic or therapeutic decisions, measurement results which are accurate, specific, and comparable between laboratories are required. Two challenges associated with this are the definition of the measurand and the commutability of the reference standard used. Once the measurand is defined, the next step in improving standardization is developing traceable quantification methods for proteins in biological fluids. A novel reference method for the quantification of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) in serum has been developed using multistep sample cleanup at the protein level, tryptic digestion, and isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). Critical considerations for using isotopically labeled rhGH as the internal standard are described. A bulk serum sample was prepared at the clinically relevant level of 10 ng/g and quantified using the method described to give results traceable to the International System of Units (SI) with a total measurement uncertainty of <20%. Results compared favorably with an orthogonal traceable method using total tryptic digestion, peptide separation, and isotope dilution mass spectrometry. PMID:24856175

  2. A PROTEIN SWITCH SENSING SYSTEM FOR THE QUANTIFICATION OF SULFATE

    PubMed Central

    Hamorsky, Krystal Teasley; Ensor, Charles Mark; Pasini, Patrizia; Daunert, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    Protein engineering has generated versatile methods and technologies that have been instrumental in advancements in the fields of sensing, therapeutics and diagnostics. Herein, we demonstrate the employment of rational design to engineer a unique bioluminescence-based protein switch. A fusion protein switch combines two totally unrelated proteins, with distinct characteristics, in a manner such that the function of one protein is dependent on another. Herein we report a protein switch sensing system by insertion of the sulfate-binding protein (SBP) into the structure of the photoprotein aequorin (AEQ). In the presence of sulfate, SBP undergoes a conformational change bringing the two segments of AEQ together, “turning on” bioluminescence in a dose-dependent fashion, thus allowing quantitative detection of sulfate. A calibration plot was obtained by correlating the amount of bioluminescence generated with the concentration of sulfate present. The switch demonstrated selectivity and reproducibility, and a detection limit of 1.6 × 10−4 M for sulfate. Moreover, the sensing system was validated by performing sulfate detection in clinical and environmental samples, such as, serum, urine and tap water. The detection limits and working ranges in all three samples fall within the average normal / recommended sulfate levels in the respective matrices. PMID:22067979

  3. Antibody-free PRISM-SRM for multiplexed protein quantification: Is this the new competition for immunoassays in bioanalysis?

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Tujin; Qian, Weijun

    2013-02-01

    Highly sensitive technologies for multiplexed quantification of a large number of candidate proteins will play an increasingly important role in clinical biomarker discovery, systems biology, and general biomedical research. Herein we introduce the new PRISM-SRM technology, which represents a highly sensitive multiplexed quantification technology capable of simultaneous quantification of many low-abundance proteins without the need of affinity reagents. The versatility of antibody-free PRISM-SRM for quantifying various types of targets including protein isoforms, protein modifications, metabolites, and others, thus offering new competition with immunoassays.

  4. Chemical labelling of active serum thioester proteins for quantification.

    PubMed

    Holm, Lotta; Ackland, Gareth L; Edwards, Mark R; Breckenridge, Ross A; Sim, Robert B; Offer, John

    2012-02-01

    The complement serum proteins C3 and C4 and the protease inhibitor α-2 macroglobulin are all members of the C3/α-2M thioester protein family, an evolutionarily ancient and conserved family that contains an intrachain thioester bond. The chemistry of the thioester bond is a key to the function of the thioester proteins. All these proteins function by covalently linking to their target by acyl transfer of the protein via the thioester moiety. We show that the signature thioester bond can be targeted with nucleophiles linked to a bioreporter molecule, site-specifically modifying the whole, intact thioester protein. Conditions were optimised to label selectively and efficiently pull-down unprocessed thioester-containing proteins from serum. We demonstrated pull-down of full-length C3, α-2M and C4 from sera in high salt, using a biotinylated nucleophile and streptavidin-coated resin, confirmed by MALDI-TOF MS identification of the gel bands. The potential for the development of a quantitative method for measuring active C3 in serum was investigated in patient sera pre and post operation. Quantifying active C3 in clinical assays using current methods is difficult. Methods based on antibody detection (e.g. nephelometry) do not distinguish between active C3 and inactive breakdown products. C3-specific haemolytic assays can be used, but these require use of relatively unstable reagents. The current work represents a promising robust, enzyme- and antibody-free chemical method for detecting active thioester proteins in blood, plasma or serum. PMID:21852021

  5. In Situ Quantification of Protein Binding to the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Elizabeth M.; Hennen, Jared; Chen, Yan; Mueller, Joachim D.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a fluorescence-based assay that allows for direct measurement of protein binding to the plasma membrane inside living cells. An axial scan through the cell generates a fluorescence intensity profile that is analyzed to determine the membrane-bound and cytoplasmic concentrations of a peripheral membrane protein labeled by the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The membrane binding curve is constructed by mapping those concentrations for a population of cells with a wide range of protein expression levels, and a fit of the binding curve determines the number of binding sites and the dissociation coefficient. We experimentally verified the technique, using myosin-1C-EGFP as a model system and fit its binding curve. Furthermore, we studied the protein-lipid interactions of the membrane binding domains from lactadherin and phospholipase C-δ1 to evaluate the feasibility of using competition binding experiments to identify specific lipid-protein interactions in living cells. Finally, we applied the technique to determine the lipid specificity, the number of binding sites, and the dissociation coefficient of membrane binding for the Gag matrix domain of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1, which provides insight into early assembly steps of the retrovirus. PMID:26039166

  6. An Overview of Practical Applications of Protein Disorder Prediction and Drive for Faster, More Accurate Predictions.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xin; Gumm, Jordan; Karki, Suman; Eickholt, Jesse; Cheng, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    Protein disordered regions are segments of a protein chain that do not adopt a stable structure. Thus far, a variety of protein disorder prediction methods have been developed and have been widely used, not only in traditional bioinformatics domains, including protein structure prediction, protein structure determination and function annotation, but also in many other biomedical fields. The relationship between intrinsically-disordered proteins and some human diseases has played a significant role in disorder prediction in disease identification and epidemiological investigations. Disordered proteins can also serve as potential targets for drug discovery with an emphasis on the disordered-to-ordered transition in the disordered binding regions, and this has led to substantial research in drug discovery or design based on protein disordered region prediction. Furthermore, protein disorder prediction has also been applied to healthcare by predicting the disease risk of mutations in patients and studying the mechanistic basis of diseases. As the applications of disorder prediction increase, so too does the need to make quick and accurate predictions. To fill this need, we also present a new approach to predict protein residue disorder using wide sequence windows that is applicable on the genomic scale. PMID:26198229

  7. An Overview of Practical Applications of Protein Disorder Prediction and Drive for Faster, More Accurate Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xin; Gumm, Jordan; Karki, Suman; Eickholt, Jesse; Cheng, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    Protein disordered regions are segments of a protein chain that do not adopt a stable structure. Thus far, a variety of protein disorder prediction methods have been developed and have been widely used, not only in traditional bioinformatics domains, including protein structure prediction, protein structure determination and function annotation, but also in many other biomedical fields. The relationship between intrinsically-disordered proteins and some human diseases has played a significant role in disorder prediction in disease identification and epidemiological investigations. Disordered proteins can also serve as potential targets for drug discovery with an emphasis on the disordered-to-ordered transition in the disordered binding regions, and this has led to substantial research in drug discovery or design based on protein disordered region prediction. Furthermore, protein disorder prediction has also been applied to healthcare by predicting the disease risk of mutations in patients and studying the mechanistic basis of diseases. As the applications of disorder prediction increase, so too does the need to make quick and accurate predictions. To fill this need, we also present a new approach to predict protein residue disorder using wide sequence windows that is applicable on the genomic scale. PMID:26198229

  8. Quantification of individual proteins in silicone hydrogel contact lens deposits

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhenjun; Zhu, Hua; Tilia, Daniel; Willcox, Mark D.P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to quantify specific proteins deposited on daily wear silicone hydrogel lenses used in combination with multipurpose disinfecting solutions (MPDSs) by applying multiple-reaction-monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS). Methods Balafilcon A or senofilcon A contact lenses used with different MPDSs on a daily wear schedule were collected. Each worn lens was extracted and then digested with trypsin. MRM-MS was applied to quantify the amounts of lysozyme, lactoferrin, lipocalin-1, proline-rich protein-4, and keratin-1 in the extracts. Results The amount of protein extracted from the contact lenses was affected by the individual wearers, lens material, and type of care system used. Higher amounts of proteins were extracted from lenses after wear when they were used with an MPDS containing polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) and poloxamer 407 compared with MPDSs containing polyquaternium-1 (PQ-1)/alexidine dihydrochloride with Tetronic 904 or PQ-1/ PHMB with poloxamine and sulfobetaine (p<0.05). There was a correlation between the amount of lipocalin-1 or keratin-1 extracted from lenses and symptoms of ocular dryness. Conclusions The MRM-MS technique is a promising approach that could be used to reveal associations of individual proteins deposited on lenses with performance of contact lenses during wear. PMID:23441110

  9. CoMOGrad and PHOG: From Computer Vision to Fast and Accurate Protein Tertiary Structure Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Rezaul; Aziz, Mohd. Momin Al; Shatabda, Swakkhar; Rahman, M. Sohel; Mia, Md. Abul Kashem; Zaman, Farhana; Rakin, Salman

    2015-01-01

    The number of entries in a structural database of proteins is increasing day by day. Methods for retrieving protein tertiary structures from such a large database have turn out to be the key to comparative analysis of structures that plays an important role to understand proteins and their functions. In this paper, we present fast and accurate methods for the retrieval of proteins having tertiary structures similar to a query protein from a large database. Our proposed methods borrow ideas from the field of computer vision. The speed and accuracy of our methods come from the two newly introduced features- the co-occurrence matrix of the oriented gradient and pyramid histogram of oriented gradient- and the use of Euclidean distance as the distance measure. Experimental results clearly indicate the superiority of our approach in both running time and accuracy. Our method is readily available for use from this website: http://research.buet.ac.bd:8080/Comograd/. PMID:26293226

  10. CoMOGrad and PHOG: From Computer Vision to Fast and Accurate Protein Tertiary Structure Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Karim, Rezaul; Aziz, Mohd Momin Al; Shatabda, Swakkhar; Rahman, M Sohel; Mia, Md Abul Kashem; Zaman, Farhana; Rakin, Salman

    2015-01-01

    The number of entries in a structural database of proteins is increasing day by day. Methods for retrieving protein tertiary structures from such a large database have turn out to be the key to comparative analysis of structures that plays an important role to understand proteins and their functions. In this paper, we present fast and accurate methods for the retrieval of proteins having tertiary structures similar to a query protein from a large database. Our proposed methods borrow ideas from the field of computer vision. The speed and accuracy of our methods come from the two newly introduced features- the co-occurrence matrix of the oriented gradient and pyramid histogram of oriented gradient- and the use of Euclidean distance as the distance measure. Experimental results clearly indicate the superiority of our approach in both running time and accuracy. Our method is readily available for use from this website: http://research.buet.ac.bd:8080/Comograd/. PMID:26293226

  11. Digital Quantification of Proteins and mRNA in Single Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Cem; Jordi, Christian A; Zechner, Christoph; Lin, Jing; Bichsel, Colette A; Khammash, Mustafa; Tay, Savaş

    2016-03-17

    Absolute quantification of macromolecules in single cells is critical for understanding and modeling biological systems that feature cellular heterogeneity. Here we show extremely sensitive and absolute quantification of both proteins and mRNA in single mammalian cells by a very practical workflow that combines proximity ligation assay (PLA) and digital PCR. This digital PLA method has femtomolar sensitivity, which enables the quantification of very small protein concentration changes over its entire 3-log dynamic range, a quality necessary for accounting for single-cell heterogeneity. We counted both endogenous (CD147) and exogenously expressed (GFP-p65) proteins from hundreds of single cells and determined the correlation between CD147 mRNA and the protein it encodes. Using our data, a stochastic two-state model of the central dogma was constructed and verified using joint mRNA/protein distributions, allowing us to estimate transcription burst sizes and extrinsic noise strength and calculate the transcription and translation rate constants in single mammalian cells. PMID:26990994

  12. Direct and Absolute Quantification of over 1800 Yeast Proteins via Selected Reaction Monitoring*

    PubMed Central

    Lawless, Craig; Holman, Stephen W.; Brownridge, Philip; Lanthaler, Karin; Harman, Victoria M.; Watkins, Rachel; Hammond, Dean E.; Miller, Rebecca L.; Sims, Paul F. G.; Grant, Christopher M.; Eyers, Claire E.; Beynon, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Defining intracellular protein concentration is critical in molecular systems biology. Although strategies for determining relative protein changes are available, defining robust absolute values in copies per cell has proven significantly more challenging. Here we present a reference data set quantifying over 1800 Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins by direct means using protein-specific stable-isotope labeled internal standards and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry, far exceeding any previous study. This was achieved by careful design of over 100 QconCAT recombinant proteins as standards, defining 1167 proteins in terms of copies per cell and upper limits on a further 668, with robust CVs routinely less than 20%. The selected reaction monitoring-derived proteome is compared with existing quantitative data sets, highlighting the disparities between methodologies. Coupled with a quantification of the transcriptome by RNA-seq taken from the same cells, these data support revised estimates of several fundamental molecular parameters: a total protein count of ∼100 million molecules-per-cell, a median of ∼1000 proteins-per-transcript, and a linear model of protein translation explaining 70% of the variance in translation rate. This work contributes a “gold-standard” reference yeast proteome (including 532 values based on high quality, dual peptide quantification) that can be widely used in systems models and for other comparative studies. PMID:26750110

  13. Validation of a fast and accurate chromatographic method for detailed quantification of vitamin E in green leafy vegetables.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Rebeca; Casal, Susana

    2013-11-15

    Vitamin E analysis in green vegetables is performed by an array of different methods, making it difficult to compare published data or choosing the adequate one for a particular sample. Aiming to achieve a consistent method with wide applicability, the current study reports the development and validation of a fast micro-method for quantification of vitamin E in green leafy vegetables. The methodology uses solid-liquid extraction based on the Folch method, with tocol as internal standard, and normal-phase HPLC with fluorescence detection. A large linear working range was confirmed, being highly reproducible, with inter-day precisions below 5% (RSD). Method sensitivity was established (below 0.02 μg/g fresh weight), and accuracy was assessed by recovery tests (>96%). The method was tested in different green leafy vegetables, evidencing diverse tocochromanol profiles, with variable ratios and amounts of α- and γ-tocopherol, and other minor compounds. The methodology is adequate for routine analyses, with a reduced chromatographic run (<7 min) and organic solvent consumption, and requires only standard chromatographic equipment available in most laboratories. PMID:23790900

  14. Comparison of four digital PCR platforms for accurate quantification of DNA copy number of a certified plasmid DNA reference material

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lianhua; Meng, Ying; Sui, Zhiwei; Wang, Jing; Wu, Liqing; Fu, Boqiang

    2015-01-01

    Digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) is a unique approach to measurement of the absolute copy number of target DNA without using external standards. However, the comparability of different dPCR platforms with respect to measurement of DNA copy number must be addressed before dPCR can be classified fundamentally as an absolute quantification technique. The comparability of four dPCR platforms with respect to accuracy and measurement uncertainty was investigated by using a certified plasmid reference material. Plasmid conformation was found to have a significant effect on droplet-based dPCR (QX100 and RainDrop) not shared with chip-based QuantStudio 12k or BioMark. The relative uncertainty of partition volume was determined to be 0.7%, 0.8%, 2.3% and 2.9% for BioMark, QX100, QuantStudio 12k and RainDrop, respectively. The measurements of the certified pNIM-001 plasmid made using the four dPCR platforms were corrected for partition volume and closely consistent with the certified value within the expended uncertainty. This demonstrated that the four dPCR platforms are of comparable effectiveness in quantifying DNA copy number. These findings provide an independent assessment of this method of determining DNA copy number when using different dPCR platforms and underline important factors that should be taken into consideration in the design of dPCR experiments. PMID:26302947

  15. Quantification of Protein Expression Changes in the Aging Left Ventricle of Rattus norvegicus

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Jennifer E.; Bradshaw, Amy D.; Schwacke, John H.; Baicu, Catalin F.; Zile, Michael R.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2009-01-01

    As the heart ages, electrophysiological and biochemical changes can occur, and the ventricle in many cases loses distensibility, impairing diastolic function. How the proteomic signature of the aged ventricle is unique in comparison to young hearts is still under active investigation. We have undertaken a quantitative proteomics study of aging left ventricles (LVs) utilizing the isobaric Tagging for Relative and Absolute Quantification (iTRAQ) methodology. Differential protein expression was observed for 117 proteins including proteins involved in cell signaling, the immune response, structural proteins, and proteins mediating responses to oxidative stress. For many of these proteins, this is the first report of an association with the aged myocardium. Additionally, two proteins of unknown function were identified. This work serves as the basis for making future comparisons of the aged left ventricle proteome to that of left ventricles obtained from other models of disease and heart failure. PMID:19603826

  16. Highly ordered protein nanorings designed by accurate control of glutathione S-transferase self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yushi; Luo, Quan; Zhang, Wei; Miao, Lu; Xu, Jiayun; Li, Hongbin; Liu, Junqiu

    2013-07-31

    Protein self-assembly into exquisite, complex, yet highly ordered architectures represents the supreme wisdom of nature. However, precise manipulation of protein self-assembly behavior in vitro is a great challenge. Here we report that by taking advantage of the cooperation of metal-ion-chelating interactions and nonspecific protein-protein interactions, we achieved accurate control of the orientation of proteins and their self-assembly into protein nanorings. As a building block, we utilized the C2-symmetric protein sjGST-2His, a variant of glutathione S-transferase from Schistosoma japonicum having two properly oriented His metal-chelating sites on the surface. Through synergic metal-coordination and non-covalent interactions, sjGST-2His self-assembled in a fixed bending manner to form highly ordered protein nanorings. The diameters of the nanorings can be regulated by tuning the strength of the non-covalent interaction network between sjGST-2His interfaces through variation of the ionic strength of the solution. This work provides a de novo design strategy that can be applied in the construction of novel protein superstructures. PMID:23865524

  17. Direct and Absolute Quantification of over 1800 Yeast Proteins via Selected Reaction Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Lawless, Craig; Holman, Stephen W; Brownridge, Philip; Lanthaler, Karin; Harman, Victoria M; Watkins, Rachel; Hammond, Dean E; Miller, Rebecca L; Sims, Paul F G; Grant, Christopher M; Eyers, Claire E; Beynon, Robert J; Hubbard, Simon J

    2016-04-01

    Defining intracellular protein concentration is critical in molecular systems biology. Although strategies for determining relative protein changes are available, defining robust absolute values in copies per cell has proven significantly more challenging. Here we present a reference data set quantifying over 1800Saccharomyces cerevisiaeproteins by direct means using protein-specific stable-isotope labeled internal standards and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry, far exceeding any previous study. This was achieved by careful design of over 100 QconCAT recombinant proteins as standards, defining 1167 proteins in terms of copies per cell and upper limits on a further 668, with robust CVs routinely less than 20%. The selected reaction monitoring-derived proteome is compared with existing quantitative data sets, highlighting the disparities between methodologies. Coupled with a quantification of the transcriptome by RNA-seq taken from the same cells, these data support revised estimates of several fundamental molecular parameters: a total protein count of ∼100 million molecules-per-cell, a median of ∼1000 proteins-per-transcript, and a linear model of protein translation explaining 70% of the variance in translation rate. This work contributes a "gold-standard" reference yeast proteome (including 532 values based on high quality, dual peptide quantification) that can be widely used in systems models and for other comparative studies. PMID:26750110

  18. Ultrasensitive isolation, identification and quantification of DNA-protein adducts by ELISA-based RADAR assay.

    PubMed

    Kiianitsa, Kostantin; Maizels, Nancy

    2014-07-01

    Enzymes that form transient DNA-protein covalent complexes are targets for several potent classes of drugs used to treat infectious disease and cancer, making it important to establish robust and rapid procedures for analysis of these complexes. We report a method for isolation of DNA-protein adducts and their identification and quantification, using techniques compatible with high-throughput screening. This method is based on the RADAR assay for DNA adducts that we previously developed (Kiianitsa and Maizels (2013) A rapid and sensitive assay for DNA-protein covalent complexes in living cells. Nucleic Acids Res., 41:e104), but incorporates three key new steps of broad applicability. (i) Silica-assisted ethanol/isopropanol precipitation ensures reproducible and efficient recovery of DNA and DNA-protein adducts at low centrifugal forces, enabling cell culture and DNA precipitation to be carried out in a single microtiter plate. (ii) Rigorous purification of DNA-protein adducts by a procedure that eliminates free proteins and free nucleic acids, generating samples suitable for detection of novel protein adducts (e.g. by mass spectroscopy). (iii) Identification and quantification of DNA-protein adducts by direct ELISA assay. The ELISA-based RADAR assay can detect Top1-DNA and Top2a-DNA adducts in human cells, and gyrase-DNA adducts in Escherichia coli. This approach will be useful for discovery and characterization of new drugs to treat infectious disease and cancer, and for development of companion diagnostics assays for individualized medicine. PMID:24914050

  19. Mass Spectrometry-based Workflow for Accurate Quantification of Escherichia coli Enzymes: How Proteomics Can Play a Key Role in Metabolic Engineering*

    PubMed Central

    Trauchessec, Mathieu; Jaquinod, Michel; Bonvalot, Aline; Brun, Virginie; Bruley, Christophe; Ropers, Delphine; de Jong, Hidde; Garin, Jérôme; Bestel-Corre, Gwenaëlle; Ferro, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic engineering aims to design high performance microbial strains producing compounds of interest. This requires systems-level understanding; genome-scale models have therefore been developed to predict metabolic fluxes. However, multi-omics data including genomics, transcriptomics, fluxomics, and proteomics may be required to model the metabolism of potential cell factories. Recent technological advances to quantitative proteomics have made mass spectrometry-based quantitative assays an interesting alternative to more traditional immuno-affinity based approaches. This has improved specificity and multiplexing capabilities. In this study, we developed a quantification workflow to analyze enzymes involved in central metabolism in Escherichia coli (E. coli). This workflow combined full-length isotopically labeled standards with selected reaction monitoring analysis. First, full-length 15N labeled standards were produced and calibrated to ensure accurate measurements. Liquid chromatography conditions were then optimized for reproducibility and multiplexing capabilities over a single 30-min liquid chromatography-MS analysis. This workflow was used to accurately quantify 22 enzymes involved in E. coli central metabolism in a wild-type reference strain and two derived strains, optimized for higher NADPH production. In combination with measurements of metabolic fluxes, proteomics data can be used to assess different levels of regulation, in particular enzyme abundance and catalytic rate. This provides information that can be used to design specific strains used in biotechnology. In addition, accurate measurement of absolute enzyme concentrations is key to the development of predictive kinetic models in the context of metabolic engineering. PMID:24482123

  20. Stable isotope dilution HILIC-MS/MS method for accurate quantification of glutamic acid, glutamine, pyroglutamic acid, GABA and theanine in mouse brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Koichi; Miyazaki, Yasuto; Unno, Keiko; Min, Jun Zhe; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed the stable isotope dilution hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) technique for the accurate, reasonable and simultaneous quantification of glutamic acid (Glu), glutamine (Gln), pyroglutamic acid (pGlu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and theanine in mouse brain tissues. The quantification of these analytes was accomplished using stable isotope internal standards and the HILIC separating mode to fully correct the intramolecular cyclization during the electrospray ionization. It was shown that linear calibrations were available with high coefficients of correlation (r(2)  > 0.999, range from 10 pmol/mL to 50 mol/mL). For application of the theanine intake, the determination of Glu, Gln, pGlu, GABA and theanine in the hippocampus and central cortex tissues was performed based on our developed method. In the region of the hippocampus, the concentration levels of Glu and pGlu were significantly reduced during reality-based theanine intake. Conversely, the concentration level of GABA increased. This result showed that transited theanine has an effect on the metabolic balance of Glu analogs in the hippocampus. PMID:26033549

  1. Targeted quantification of low ng/mL level proteins in human serum without immunoaffinity depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Tujin; Sun, Xuefei; Gao, Yuqian; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Zhao, Rui; He, Jintang; Moore, Ronald J.; Kagan, Jacob; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Liu, Alvin Y.; Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi; Camp, David G.; Qian, Weijun

    2013-07-05

    We recently reported an antibody-free targeted protein quantification strategy, termed high-pressure, high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing (PRISM) for achieving significantly enhanced sensitivity using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry. Integrating PRISM with front-end IgY14 immunoaffinity depletion, sensitive detection of targeted proteins at 50-100 pg/mL levels in human blood plasma/serum was demonstrated. However, immunoaffinity depletion is often associated with undesired losses of target proteins of interest. Herein we report further evaluation of PRISM-SRM quantification of low-abundance serum proteins without immunoaffinity depletion and the multiplexing potential of this technique. Limits of quantification (LOQs) at low ng/mL levels with a median CV of ~12% were achieved for proteins spiked into human female serum using as little as 2 µL serum. PRISM-SRM provided up to ~1000-fold improvement in the LOQ when compared to conventional SRM measurements. Multiplexing capability of PRISM-SRM was also evaluated by two sets of serum samples with 6 and 21 target peptides spiked at the low attomole/µL levels. The results from SRM measurements for pooled or post-concatenated samples were comparable to those obtained from individual peptide fractions in terms of signal-to-noise ratios and SRM peak area ratios of light to heavy peptides. PRISM-SRM was applied to measure several ng/mL-level endogenous plasma proteins, including prostate-specific antigen, in clinical patient sera where correlation coefficients > 0.99 were observed between the results from PRISM-SRM and ELISA assays. Our results demonstrate that PRISM-SRM can be successfully used for quantification of low-abundance endogenous proteins in highly complex samples. Moderate throughput (50 samples/week) can be achieved by applying the post-concatenation or fraction multiplexing strategies. We anticipate broad applications for targeted PRISM

  2. Improved Methods of Carnivore Faecal Sample Preservation, DNA Extraction and Quantification for Accurate Genotyping of Wild Tigers

    PubMed Central

    Harika, Katakam; Mahla, Ranjeet Singh; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-invasively collected samples allow a variety of genetic studies on endangered and elusive species. However due to low amplification success and high genotyping error rates fewer samples can be identified up to the individual level. Number of PCRs needed to obtain reliable genotypes also noticeably increase. Methods We developed a quantitative PCR assay to measure and grade amplifiable nuclear DNA in feline faecal extracts. We determined DNA degradation in experimentally aged faecal samples and tested a suite of pre-PCR protocols to considerably improve DNA retrieval. Results Average DNA concentrations of Grade I, II and III extracts were 982pg/µl, 9.5pg/µl and 0.4pg/µl respectively. Nearly 10% of extracts had no amplifiable DNA. Microsatellite PCR success and allelic dropout rates were 92% and 1.5% in Grade I, 79% and 5% in Grade II, and 54% and 16% in Grade III respectively. Our results on experimentally aged faecal samples showed that ageing has a significant effect on quantity and quality of amplifiable DNA (p<0.001). Maximum DNA degradation occurs within 3 days of exposure to direct sunlight. DNA concentrations of Day 1 samples stored by ethanol and silica methods for a month varied significantly from fresh Day 1 extracts (p<0.1 and p<0.001). This difference was not significant when samples were preserved by two-step method (p>0.05). DNA concentrations of fresh tiger and leopard faecal extracts without addition of carrier RNA were 816.5pg/µl (±115.5) and 690.1pg/µl (±207.1), while concentrations with addition of carrier RNA were 49414.5pg/µl (±9370.6) and 20982.7pg/µl (±6835.8) respectively. Conclusions Our results indicate that carnivore faecal samples should be collected as freshly as possible, are better preserved by two-step method and should be extracted with addition of carrier RNA. We recommend quantification of template DNA as this facilitates several downstream protocols. PMID:23071624

  3. Accurate GM atrophy quantification in MS using lesion-filling with co-registered 2D lesion masks☆

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, V.; Ran, N.C.G.; Barkhof, F.; Chard, D.T.; Wheeler-Kingshott, C.A.; Vrenken, H.

    2014-01-01

    Background In multiple sclerosis (MS), brain atrophy quantification is affected by white matter lesions. LEAP and FSL-lesion_filling, replace lesion voxels with white matter intensities; however, they require precise lesion identification on 3DT1-images. Aim To determine whether 2DT2 lesion masks co-registered to 3DT1 images, yield grey and white matter volumes comparable to precise lesion masks. Methods 2DT2 lesion masks were linearly co-registered to 20 3DT1-images of MS patients, with nearest-neighbor (NNI), and tri-linear interpolation. As gold-standard, lesion masks were manually outlined on 3DT1-images. LEAP and FSL-lesion_filling were applied with each lesion mask. Grey (GM) and white matter (WM) volumes were quantified with FSL-FAST, and deep gray matter (DGM) volumes using FSL-FIRST. Volumes were compared between lesion mask types using paired Wilcoxon tests. Results Lesion-filling with gold-standard lesion masks compared to native images reduced GM overestimation by 1.93 mL (p < .001) for LEAP, and 1.21 mL (p = .002) for FSL-lesion_filling. Similar effects were achieved with NNI lesion masks from 2DT2. Global WM underestimation was not significantly influenced. GM and WM volumes from NNI, did not differ significantly from gold-standard. GM segmentation differed between lesion masks in the lesion area, and also elsewhere. Using the gold-standard, FSL-FAST quantified as GM on average 0.4% of the lesion area with LEAP and 24.5% with FSL-lesion_filling. Lesion-filling did not influence DGM volumes from FSL-FIRST. Discussion These results demonstrate that for global GM volumetry, precise lesion masks on 3DT1 images can be replaced by co-registered 2DT2 lesion masks. This makes lesion-filling a feasible method for GM atrophy measurements in MS. PMID:24567908

  4. Interference of salts used on aqueous two-phase systems on the quantification of total proteins.

    PubMed

    Golunski, Simone Maria; Sala, Luisa; Silva, Marceli Fernandes; Dallago, Rogério Marcos; Mulinari, Jéssica; Mossi, Altemir José; Brandelli, Adriano; Kalil, Susana Juliano; Di Luccio, Marco; Treichel, Helen

    2016-02-01

    In this study the interference of potassium phosphate, sodium citrate, sodium chloride and sodium nitrate salts on protein quantification by Bradford's method was assessed. Potassium phosphate and sodium citrate salts are commonly used in aqueous two-phase systems for enzyme purification. Results showed that the presence of potassium phosphate and sodium citrate salts increase the absorbance of the samples, when compared with the samples without any salt. The increase in absorptivity of the solution induces errors on protein quantification, which are propagated to the calculations of specific enzyme activity and consequently on purification factor. The presence of sodium chloride and sodium nitrate practically did not affect the absorbance of inulinase, probably the metals present in the enzyme extract did not interact with the added salts. PMID:26616454

  5. Development and Validation of an Affinity Chromatography-Protein G Method for IgG Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Paradina Fernández, Lesly; Calvo, Loany; Viña, Lisel

    2014-01-01

    Nimotuzumab, an IgG that recognizes the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) overexpressed in some tumors, is used in the treatment of advanced head and neck cancer. For the quantification of this protein in cell culture supernatants, protein G-HPLC affinity chromatography is used due to its high affinity and specificity for antibodies of this class. The technique relies on the comparison of the area under the curve of the elution peak of the samples to be evaluated versus to a calibration curve of well-known concentrations and was validated by assessment of its robustness, specificity, repeatability, intermediate precision, accuracy, linearity, limit of detection, limit of quantification, and range. According to results of the study all validation parameters fulfilled the preestablished acceptance criteria and demonstrated the feasibility of the assay for the analysis of samples of cell culture supernatant as well as drug product. PMID:27379284

  6. Sodium polyanethol sulfonate (SPS) falsifies protein staining and quantification and how to solve this problem.

    PubMed

    Prax, Marcel; Vatani Shahmirzadi, Shideh; Götz, Friedrich

    2015-11-01

    Sodium polyanethol sulfonate (SPS) is an anionic detergent with a broad range of activities and applications. While studying the excretion of cytoplasmic proteins in Staphylococcus aureus SPS was used as cell lysis inhibitor. When investigating the protein pattern of culture supernatants from cells grown in the absence or presence of SPS by Coomassie blue stained polyacrylamide gel the amount of protein bands was significantly decreased in the presence of SPS, suggesting that this effect was due to inhibition of cell lysis. However, various control studies showed that the apparent decreased protein secretion was an artifact due to the interference of SPS with Coomassie blue- and silver-staining. The only alternative method that was uninfluenced by SPS was imidazole-SDS-zinc staining. This is the method of choice particularly when protein interfering compounds are present in the extracts. For protein quantification in liquid samples the bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay appeared to be the method of choice in the presence of SPS. The assay is based on neutral peptide bonds and is therefore rather insensitive to interfering compounds. This study shows that SPS and most likely also related detergents might falsify conventional protein staining and quantification methods. PMID:26456688

  7. Antibody-free, targeted mass-spectrometric approach for quantification of proteins at low picogram per milliliter levels in human plasma/serum

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Tujin; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Sun, Xuefei; Zhao, Rui; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Hossain, Mahmud; Xie, Fang; Wu, Si; Kim, Jong Seo; Jones, Nathaniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Kagan, Jacob; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Tang, Keqi; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2012-09-18

    The detection and quantification of proteins at sub-ng/mL concentrations in plasma/serum is of critical importance for candidate biomarker verification. Sensitive detection of serum proteins has typically been achieved by immunoassays; however, de novo development of antibodies is associated with high cost and long lead time. To address this challenge, we developed an antibody-free strategy, termed high-pressure high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing (PRISM), for achieving accurate detection of proteins at ~50 pg/mL level in plasma/serum using selected reaction monitoring (SRM). This strategy is based on high resolution reversed phase liquid chromatographic separations for analyte enrichment along with intelligent selection of target fractions via on-line SRM monitoring of internal standards and fraction multiplexing prior to SRM quantification. Our work represents a major technological advance for achieving pg/mL level of serum protein quantification without specific affinity reagents and holds great promise for broad applications in biomarker verification and systems biology studies.

  8. The quantification of the histochemical protein staining with 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde (HNA) demonstrating primary amino groups of proteins.

    PubMed

    Nöhammer, G

    1991-01-01

    The usefulness of the HNA-pH4-1d staining, which histochemically demonstrates primary protein amino groups under the conditions used, for the microphotometric quantification of proteins was investigated. A correlation (r = 0.986) has been found between the mean protein contents of fresh frozen and fixed sections prepared from different tissues of rats and the corresponding mean integrated extinction values determined histophotometrically after HNA-pH4-1d staining. A histophotometric extinction of E = 0.284 corresponded to 10(-12) g protein. The mean integrated extinction values determined cytophotometrically of different single cells and nuclei stained using the tetrazonium coupling method for proteins correlated (r = 0.989) with corresponding extinction values measured after HNA-pH4-1d staining. A cytophotometric extinction after HNA-pH4-1d staining of E = 0.130 correspond to 10(-12) g protein. PMID:2048388

  9. Accurate protein structure modeling using sparse NMR data and homologous structure information

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, James M.; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G.; Liu, Gaohua; Rossi, Paolo; Tang, Yuefeng; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Szyperski, Thomas; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Baker, David

    2012-01-01

    While information from homologous structures plays a central role in X-ray structure determination by molecular replacement, such information is rarely used in NMR structure determination because it can be incorrect, both locally and globally, when evolutionary relationships are inferred incorrectly or there has been considerable evolutionary structural divergence. Here we describe a method that allows robust modeling of protein structures of up to 225 residues by combining , 13C, and 15N backbone and 13Cβ chemical shift data, distance restraints derived from homologous structures, and a physically realistic all-atom energy function. Accurate models are distinguished from inaccurate models generated using incorrect sequence alignments by requiring that (i) the all-atom energies of models generated using the restraints are lower than models generated in unrestrained calculations and (ii) the low-energy structures converge to within 2.0 Å backbone rmsd over 75% of the protein. Benchmark calculations on known structures and blind targets show that the method can accurately model protein structures, even with very remote homology information, to a backbone rmsd of 1.2–1.9 Å relative to the conventional determined NMR ensembles and of 0.9–1.6 Å relative to X-ray structures for well-defined regions of the protein structures. This approach facilitates the accurate modeling of protein structures using backbone chemical shift data without need for side-chain resonance assignments and extensive analysis of NOESY cross-peak assignments. PMID:22665781

  10. NanoLuc Complementation Reporter Optimized for Accurate Measurement of Protein Interactions in Cells.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Andrew S; Schwinn, Marie K; Hall, Mary P; Zimmerman, Kris; Otto, Paul; Lubben, Thomas H; Butler, Braeden L; Binkowski, Brock F; Machleidt, Thomas; Kirkland, Thomas A; Wood, Monika G; Eggers, Christopher T; Encell, Lance P; Wood, Keith V

    2016-02-19

    Protein-fragment complementation assays (PCAs) are widely used for investigating protein interactions. However, the fragments used are structurally compromised and have not been optimized nor thoroughly characterized for accurately assessing these interactions. We took advantage of the small size and bright luminescence of NanoLuc to engineer a new complementation reporter (NanoBiT). By design, the NanoBiT subunits (i.e., 1.3 kDa peptide, 18 kDa polypeptide) weakly associate so that their assembly into a luminescent complex is dictated by the interaction characteristics of the target proteins onto which they are appended. To ascertain their general suitability for measuring interaction affinities and kinetics, we determined that their intrinsic affinity (KD = 190 μM) and association constants (kon = 500 M(-1) s(-1), koff = 0.2 s(-1)) are outside of the ranges typical for protein interactions. The accuracy of NanoBiT was verified under defined biochemical conditions using the previously characterized interaction between SME-1 β-lactamase and a set of inhibitor binding proteins. In cells, NanoBiT fusions to FRB/FKBP produced luminescence consistent with the linear characteristics of NanoLuc. Response dynamics, evaluated using both protein kinase A and β-arrestin-2, were rapid, reversible, and robust to temperature (21-37 °C). Finally, NanoBiT provided a means to measure pharmacology of kinase inhibitors known to induce the interaction between BRAF and CRAF. Our results demonstrate that the intrinsic properties of NanoBiT allow accurate representation of protein interactions and that the reporter responds reliably and dynamically in cells. PMID:26569370

  11. Bifunctional Spin Labeling of Muscle Proteins: Accurate Rotational Dynamics, Orientation, and Distance by EPR.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Andrew R; Binder, Benjamin P; McCaffrey, Jesse E; Svensson, Bengt; Thomas, David D

    2015-01-01

    While EPR allows for the characterization of protein structure and function due to its exquisite sensitivity to spin label dynamics, orientation, and distance, these measurements are often limited in sensitivity due to the use of labels that are attached via flexible monofunctional bonds, incurring additional disorder and nanosecond dynamics. In this chapter, we present methods for using a bifunctional spin label (BSL) to measure muscle protein structure and dynamics. We demonstrate that bifunctional attachment eliminates nanosecond internal rotation of the spin label, thereby allowing the accurate measurement of protein backbone rotational dynamics, including microsecond-to-millisecond motions by saturation transfer EPR. BSL also allows for accurate determination of helix orientation and disorder in mechanically and magnetically aligned systems, due to the label's stereospecific attachment. Similarly, labeling with a pair of BSL greatly enhances the resolution and accuracy of distance measurements measured by double electron-electron resonance (DEER). Finally, when BSL is applied to a protein with high helical content in an assembly with high orientational order (e.g., muscle fiber or membrane), two-probe DEER experiments can be combined with single-probe EPR experiments on an oriented sample in a process we call BEER, which has the potential for ab initio high-resolution structure determination. PMID:26477249

  12. Bioprocess monitoring: minimizing sample matrix effects for total protein quantification with bicinchoninic acid assay.

    PubMed

    Reichelt, Wieland N; Waldschitz, Daniel; Herwig, Christoph; Neutsch, Lukas

    2016-09-01

    Determining total protein content is a routine operation in many laboratories. Despite substantial work on assay optimization interferences, the widely used bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay remains widely recognized for its robustness. Especially in the field of bioprocess engineering the inaccuracy caused by interfering substances remains hardly predictable and not well understood. Since the introduction of the assay, sample pre-treatment by trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitation has been indicated as necessary and sufficient to minimize interferences. However, the sample matrix in cultivation media is not only highly complex but also dynamically changing over process time in terms of qualitative and quantitative composition. A significant misestimation of the total protein concentration of bioprocess samples is often observed when following standard work-up schemes such as TCA precipitation, indicating that this step alone is not an adequate means to avoid measurement bias. Here, we propose a modification of the BCA assay, which is less influenced by sample complexity. The dynamically changing sample matrix composition of bioprocessing samples impairs the conventional approach of compensating for interfering substances via a static offset. Hence, we evaluated the use of a correction factor based on an internal spike measurement for the respective samples. Using protein spikes, the accuracy of the BCA protein quantification could be improved fivefold, taking the BCA protein quantification to a level of accuracy comparable to other, more expensive methods. This will allow reducing expensive iterations in bioprocess development to due inaccurate total protein analytics. PMID:27314233

  13. Accurate refinement of docked protein complexes using evolutionary information and deep learning.

    PubMed

    Akbal-Delibas, Bahar; Farhoodi, Roshanak; Pomplun, Marc; Haspel, Nurit

    2016-06-01

    One of the major challenges for protein docking methods is to accurately discriminate native-like structures from false positives. Docking methods are often inaccurate and the results have to be refined and re-ranked to obtain native-like complexes and remove outliers. In a previous work, we introduced AccuRefiner, a machine learning based tool for refining protein-protein complexes. Given a docked complex, the refinement tool produces a small set of refined versions of the input complex, with lower root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD) of atomic positions with respect to the native structure. The method employs a unique ranking tool that accurately predicts the RMSD of docked complexes with respect to the native structure. In this work, we use a deep learning network with a similar set of features and five layers. We show that a properly trained deep learning network can accurately predict the RMSD of a docked complex with 1.40 Å error margin on average, by approximating the complex relationship between a wide set of scoring function terms and the RMSD of a docked structure. The network was trained on 35000 unbound docking complexes generated by RosettaDock. We tested our method on 25 different putative docked complexes produced also by RosettaDock for five proteins that were not included in the training data. The results demonstrate that the high accuracy of the ranking tool enables AccuRefiner to consistently choose the refinement candidates with lower RMSD values compared to the coarsely docked input structures. PMID:26846813

  14. Assessment of RT-qPCR Normalization Strategies for Accurate Quantification of Extracellular microRNAs in Murine Serum

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Thomas C.; Coenen-Stass, Anna M. L.; Wood, Matthew J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular microRNAs (miRNAs) are under investigation as minimally-invasive biomarkers for a wide range of disease conditions. We have recently shown in a mouse model of the progressive muscle-wasting condition Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) that a set of highly elevated serum miRNAs reflects the regenerative status of muscle. These miRNAs are promising biomarkers for monitoring DMD disease progression and the response to experimental therapies. The gold standard miRNA detection methodology is Reverse Transcriptase-quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-qPCR), which typically exhibits high sensitivity and wide dynamic range. Accurate determination of miRNA levels is affected by RT-qPCR normalization method and therefore selection of the optimal strategy is of critical importance. Serum miRNA abundance was measured by RT-qPCR array in 14 week old mice, and by individual RT-qPCR assays in a time course experiment spanning 48 weeks. Here we utilize these two datasets to assess the validity of three miRNA normalization strategies (a) normalization to the average of all Cq values from array experiments, (b) normalization to a stably expressed endogenous reference miRNA, and (c) normalization to an external spike-in synthetic oligonucleotide. Normalization approaches based on endogenous control miRNAs result in an under-estimation of miRNA levels by a factor of ∼2. An increase in total RNA and total miRNA was observed in dystrophic serum which may account for this systematic bias. We conclude that the optimal strategy for this model system is to normalize to a synthetic spike-in control oligonucleotide. PMID:24586621

  15. Continuum descriptions of membranes and their interaction with proteins: Towards chemically accurate models.

    PubMed

    Argudo, David; Bethel, Neville P; Marcoline, Frank V; Grabe, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Biological membranes deform in response to resident proteins leading to a coupling between membrane shape and protein localization. Additionally, the membrane influences the function of membrane proteins. Here we review contributions to this field from continuum elastic membrane models focusing on the class of models that couple the protein to the membrane. While it has been argued that continuum models cannot reproduce the distortions observed in fully-atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, we suggest that this failure can be overcome by using chemically accurate representations of the protein. We outline our recent advances along these lines with our hybrid continuum-atomistic model, and we show the model is in excellent agreement with fully-atomistic simulations of the nhTMEM16 lipid scramblase. We believe that the speed and accuracy of continuum-atomistic methodologies will make it possible to simulate large scale, slow biological processes, such as membrane morphological changes, that are currently beyond the scope of other computational approaches. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov. PMID:26853937

  16. Accurate Quantification of Selenoprotein P (SEPP1) in Plasma Using Isotopically Enriched Seleno-peptides and Species-Specific Isotope Dilution with HPLC Coupled to ICP-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Deitrich, Christian L; Cuello-Nuñez, Susana; Kmiotek, Diana; Torma, Frank Attila; Del Castillo Busto, Maria Estela; Fisicaro, Paola; Goenaga-Infante, Heidi

    2016-06-21

    A novel strategy for the absolute quantification of selenium (Se) included in selenoprotein P (SEPP1), an important biomarker for human nutrition and disease, including diabetes and cancer, is presented here for the first time. It is based on the use of species-specific double isotope dilution mass spectrometry (SSIDA) in combination with HPLC-ICP-MS/MS for the determination of protein bound Se down to the peptide level in a complex plasma matrix with a total content of Se of 105.5 μg kg(-1). The method enabled the selective Se speciation analysis of human plasma samples without the need of extensive cleanup or preconcentration steps as required for traditional protein mass spectrometric approaches. To assess the method accuracy, two plasma reference materials, namely, BCR-637 and SRM1950, for which literature data and a reference value for SEPP1 have been reported, were analyzed using complementary hyphenated methods and the species-specific approach developed in this work. The Se mass fractions obtained via the isotopic ratios (78)Se/(76)Se and (82)Se/(76)Se for each of the Se-peptides, namely, ENLPSLCSUQGLR (ENL) and AEENITESCQUR (AEE) (where U is SeCys), were found to agree within 2.4%. A relative expanded combined uncertainty (k = 2) of 5.4% was achieved for a Se (as SEPP1) mass fraction of approximately 60 μg kg(-1). This work represents a systematic approach to the accurate quantitation of plasma SEPP1 at clinical levels using SSIDA quantification. Such methodology will be invaluable for the certification of reference materials and the provision of reference values to clinical measurements and clinical trials. PMID:27108743

  17. Detection and quantification of proteins in clinical samples using high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gallien, Sebastien; Domon, Bruno

    2015-06-15

    Quantitative proteomics has benefited from the recent development of mass spectrometers capable of high-resolution and accurate-mass (HR/AM) measurements. While targeted experiments are routinely performed on triple quadrupole instruments in selected reaction monitoring (SRM; often referred as multiple reaction monitoring, MRM) mode, the quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometers allow quantification in MS/MS mode, also known as parallel reaction monitoring (PRM). This technique is characterized by higher selectivity and better confidence in the assignment of the precursor and fragment ions, and thus translates into an improved analytical performance. More fundamentally, PRM introduces a change of the overall paradigm of targeted experiments, by the decoupling of the acquisition and data processing. They rely on two distinct steps, with a simplified acquisition method in conjunction with a flexible, iterative, post-acquisition data processing. This account describes in detail the different steps of a PRM experiment, which include the design of the acquisition method, the confirmation of the identity of the analytes founded upon a full MS/MS fragmentation pattern, and the quantification based on the extraction of specific fragment ions (selected post-acquisition) using tight mass tolerance. The different types of PRM experiments, defined as large-scale screening or precise targeted quantification using calibrated internal standards, together with the considerations on the selection of experimental parameters are discussed. PMID:25843604

  18. NMRDSP: an accurate prediction of protein shape strings from NMR chemical shifts and sequence data.

    PubMed

    Mao, Wusong; Cong, Peisheng; Wang, Zhiheng; Lu, Longjian; Zhu, Zhongliang; Li, Tonghua

    2013-01-01

    Shape string is structural sequence and is an extremely important structure representation of protein backbone conformations. Nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts give a strong correlation with the local protein structure, and are exploited to predict protein structures in conjunction with computational approaches. Here we demonstrate a novel approach, NMRDSP, which can accurately predict the protein shape string based on nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts and structural profiles obtained from sequence data. The NMRDSP uses six chemical shifts (HA, H, N, CA, CB and C) and eight elements of structure profiles as features, a non-redundant set (1,003 entries) as the training set, and a conditional random field as a classification algorithm. For an independent testing set (203 entries), we achieved an accuracy of 75.8% for S8 (the eight states accuracy) and 87.8% for S3 (the three states accuracy). This is higher than only using chemical shifts or sequence data, and confirms that the chemical shift and the structure profile are significant features for shape string prediction and their combination prominently improves the accuracy of the predictor. We have constructed the NMRDSP web server and believe it could be employed to provide a solid platform to predict other protein structures and functions. The NMRDSP web server is freely available at http://cal.tongji.edu.cn/NMRDSP/index.jsp. PMID:24376713

  19. NMRDSP: An Accurate Prediction of Protein Shape Strings from NMR Chemical Shifts and Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Wusong; Cong, Peisheng; Wang, Zhiheng; Lu, Longjian; Zhu, Zhongliang; Li, Tonghua

    2013-01-01

    Shape string is structural sequence and is an extremely important structure representation of protein backbone conformations. Nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts give a strong correlation with the local protein structure, and are exploited to predict protein structures in conjunction with computational approaches. Here we demonstrate a novel approach, NMRDSP, which can accurately predict the protein shape string based on nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts and structural profiles obtained from sequence data. The NMRDSP uses six chemical shifts (HA, H, N, CA, CB and C) and eight elements of structure profiles as features, a non-redundant set (1,003 entries) as the training set, and a conditional random field as a classification algorithm. For an independent testing set (203 entries), we achieved an accuracy of 75.8% for S8 (the eight states accuracy) and 87.8% for S3 (the three states accuracy). This is higher than only using chemical shifts or sequence data, and confirms that the chemical shift and the structure profile are significant features for shape string prediction and their combination prominently improves the accuracy of the predictor. We have constructed the NMRDSP web server and believe it could be employed to provide a solid platform to predict other protein structures and functions. The NMRDSP web server is freely available at http://cal.tongji.edu.cn/NMRDSP/index.jsp. PMID:24376713

  20. A systematic approach to the accurate quantification of selenium in serum selenoalbumin by HPLC-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Jitaru, Petru; Goenaga-Infante, Heidi; Vaslin-Reimann, Sophie; Fisicaro, Paola

    2010-01-11

    In this paper, two different methods are for the first time systematically compared for the determination of selenium in human serum selenoalbumin (SeAlb). Firstly, SeAlb was enzymatically hydrolyzed and the resulting selenomethionine (SeMet) was quantified using species-specific isotope dilution (SSID) with reversed phase-HPLC (RP-HPLC) hyphenated to (collision/reaction cell) inductively coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometry (CRC ICP-QMS). In order to assess the enzymatic hydrolysis yield, SeAlb was determined as an intact protein by affinity-HPLC (AF-HPLC) coupled to CRC ICP-QMS. Using this approach, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and selenoprotein P (SelP) (the two selenoproteins present in serum) were also determined within the same chromatographic run. The levels of selenium associated with SeAlb in three serum materials, namely BCR-637, Seronorm level 1 and Seronorm level 2, obtained using both methods were in a good agreement. Verification of the absence of free SeMet, which interferes with the SeAlb determination (down to the amino acid level), in such materials was addressed by analyzing the fraction of GPx, partially purified by AF-HPLC, using RP-HPLC (GPx only) and size exclusion-HPLC (SE-HPLC) coupled to CRC ICP-QMS. The latter methodology was also used for the investigation of the presence of selenium species other than the selenoproteins in the (AF-HPLC) SelP and SeAlb fractions; the same selenium peaks were detected in both control and BCR-637 serum with a difference in age of ca. 12 years. It is also for the first time that the concentrations of selenium associated with SeAlb, GPx and SelP species in such commercially available serums (only certified or having indicative levels of total selenium content) are reported. Such indicative values can be used for reference purposes in future validation of speciation methods for selenium in human serum and/or inter-laboratory comparisons. PMID:20005320

  1. Quantification of the degree of biotinylation of proteins using proteinase K digestion and competition ELISA.

    PubMed

    Rispens, Theo; Ooijevaar-de Heer, Pleuni

    2016-03-01

    Quantification of the degree of biotinylation of proteins is useful to achieve and maintain a high degree of consistency of reagents used in research and diagnostic setting. Unfortunately, existing protocols and commercial kits suffer from a number of shortcomings that limit their usefulness. Here, we describe a simple protocol that overcomes the limitations of current assays. A robust competition ELISA was developed that is easy to carry out, uses no specialized equipment other than a standard plate reader for absorbance measurements and only reagents that are commonly available. The protocol uses a proteinase K digestion step of a sample of biotinylated protein to eliminate multivalency issues and sterical hindrance from bulky proteins. Furthermore, the use of an anti-biotin antibody instead of streptavidin results in a convenient range of sensitivity, avoiding million-fold dilutions that may impair precision. The resulting assay typically consumes about 1 μg of biotinylated protein. PMID:26795634

  2. High-throughput instant quantification of protein expression and purity based on photoactive yellow protein turn off/on label.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngmin; Ganesan, Prabhakar; Ihee, Hyotcherl

    2013-08-01

    Quantifying the concentration and purity of a target protein is essential for high-throughput protein expression test and rapid screening of highly soluble proteins. However, conventional methods such as PAGE and dot blot assay generally involve multiple time-consuming tasks requiring hours or do not allow instant quantification. Here, we demonstrate a new method based on the Photoactive yellow protein turn Off/On Label (POOL) system that can instantly quantify the concentration and purity of a target protein. The main idea of POOL is to use Photoactive Yellow Protein (PYP), or its miniaturized version, as a fusion partner of the target protein. The characteristic blue light absorption and the consequent yellow color of PYP is absent when initially expressed without its chromophore, but can be turned on by binding its chromophore, p-coumaric acid. The appearance of yellow color upon adding a precursor of chromophore to the co-expressed PYP can be used to check the expression amount of the target protein via visual inspection within a few seconds as well as to quantify its concentration and purity with the aid of a spectrometer within a few minutes. The concentrations measured by the POOL method, which usually takes a few minutes, show excellent agreement with those by the BCA Kit, which usually takes ∼1 h. We demonstrate the applicability of POOL in E. coli, insect, and mammalian cells, and for high-throughput protein expression screening. PMID:23740751

  3. Accurate prediction of protein–protein interactions from sequence alignments using a Bayesian method

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Lukas; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2008-01-01

    Accurate and large-scale prediction of protein–protein interactions directly from amino-acid sequences is one of the great challenges in computational biology. Here we present a new Bayesian network method that predicts interaction partners using only multiple alignments of amino-acid sequences of interacting protein domains, without tunable parameters, and without the need for any training examples. We first apply the method to bacterial two-component systems and comprehensively reconstruct two-component signaling networks across all sequenced bacteria. Comparisons of our predictions with known interactions show that our method infers interaction partners genome-wide with high accuracy. To demonstrate the general applicability of our method we show that it also accurately predicts interaction partners in a recent dataset of polyketide synthases. Analysis of the predicted genome-wide two-component signaling networks shows that cognates (interacting kinase/regulator pairs, which lie adjacent on the genome) and orphans (which lie isolated) form two relatively independent components of the signaling network in each genome. In addition, while most genes are predicted to have only a small number of interaction partners, we find that 10% of orphans form a separate class of ‘hub' nodes that distribute and integrate signals to and from up to tens of different interaction partners. PMID:18277381

  4. A multi-objective optimization approach accurately resolves protein domain architectures

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes, J.S.; Vieira, F.R.J.; Zaverucha, G.; Carbone, A.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Given a protein sequence and a number of potential domains matching it, what are the domain content and the most likely domain architecture for the sequence? This problem is of fundamental importance in protein annotation, constituting one of the main steps of all predictive annotation strategies. On the other hand, when potential domains are several and in conflict because of overlapping domain boundaries, finding a solution for the problem might become difficult. An accurate prediction of the domain architecture of a multi-domain protein provides important information for function prediction, comparative genomics and molecular evolution. Results: We developed DAMA (Domain Annotation by a Multi-objective Approach), a novel approach that identifies architectures through a multi-objective optimization algorithm combining scores of domain matches, previously observed multi-domain co-occurrence and domain overlapping. DAMA has been validated on a known benchmark dataset based on CATH structural domain assignments and on the set of Plasmodium falciparum proteins. When compared with existing tools on both datasets, it outperforms all of them. Availability and implementation: DAMA software is implemented in C++ and the source code can be found at http://www.lcqb.upmc.fr/DAMA. Contact: juliana.silva_bernardes@upmc.fr or alessandra.carbone@lip6.fr Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26458889

  5. SIFTER search: a web server for accurate phylogeny-based protein function prediction.

    PubMed

    Sahraeian, Sayed M; Luo, Kevin R; Brenner, Steven E

    2015-07-01

    We are awash in proteins discovered through high-throughput sequencing projects. As only a minuscule fraction of these have been experimentally characterized, computational methods are widely used for automated annotation. Here, we introduce a user-friendly web interface for accurate protein function prediction using the SIFTER algorithm. SIFTER is a state-of-the-art sequence-based gene molecular function prediction algorithm that uses a statistical model of function evolution to incorporate annotations throughout the phylogenetic tree. Due to the resources needed by the SIFTER algorithm, running SIFTER locally is not trivial for most users, especially for large-scale problems. The SIFTER web server thus provides access to precomputed predictions on 16 863 537 proteins from 232 403 species. Users can explore SIFTER predictions with queries for proteins, species, functions, and homologs of sequences not in the precomputed prediction set. The SIFTER web server is accessible at http://sifter.berkeley.edu/ and the source code can be downloaded. PMID:25979264

  6. SIFTER search: a web server for accurate phylogeny-based protein function prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Sahraeian, Sayed M.; Luo, Kevin R.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-05-15

    We are awash in proteins discovered through high-throughput sequencing projects. As only a minuscule fraction of these have been experimentally characterized, computational methods are widely used for automated annotation. Here, we introduce a user-friendly web interface for accurate protein function prediction using the SIFTER algorithm. SIFTER is a state-of-the-art sequence-based gene molecular function prediction algorithm that uses a statistical model of function evolution to incorporate annotations throughout the phylogenetic tree. Due to the resources needed by the SIFTER algorithm, running SIFTER locally is not trivial for most users, especially for large-scale problems. The SIFTER web server thus provides access to precomputed predictions on 16 863 537 proteins from 232 403 species. Users can explore SIFTER predictions with queries for proteins, species, functions, and homologs of sequences not in the precomputed prediction set. Lastly, the SIFTER web server is accessible at http://sifter.berkeley.edu/ and the source code can be downloaded.

  7. SIFTER search: a web server for accurate phylogeny-based protein function prediction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sahraeian, Sayed M.; Luo, Kevin R.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-05-15

    We are awash in proteins discovered through high-throughput sequencing projects. As only a minuscule fraction of these have been experimentally characterized, computational methods are widely used for automated annotation. Here, we introduce a user-friendly web interface for accurate protein function prediction using the SIFTER algorithm. SIFTER is a state-of-the-art sequence-based gene molecular function prediction algorithm that uses a statistical model of function evolution to incorporate annotations throughout the phylogenetic tree. Due to the resources needed by the SIFTER algorithm, running SIFTER locally is not trivial for most users, especially for large-scale problems. The SIFTER web server thus provides access tomore » precomputed predictions on 16 863 537 proteins from 232 403 species. Users can explore SIFTER predictions with queries for proteins, species, functions, and homologs of sequences not in the precomputed prediction set. Lastly, the SIFTER web server is accessible at http://sifter.berkeley.edu/ and the source code can be downloaded.« less

  8. Mitochondrial DNA as a non-invasive biomarker: Accurate quantification using real time quantitative PCR without co-amplification of pseudogenes and dilution bias

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, Afshan N.; Shahni, Rojeen; Rodriguez-de-Ledesma, Ana; Laftah, Abas; Cunningham, Phil

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Mitochondrial dysfunction is central to many diseases of oxidative stress. {yields} 95% of the mitochondrial genome is duplicated in the nuclear genome. {yields} Dilution of untreated genomic DNA leads to dilution bias. {yields} Unique primers and template pretreatment are needed to accurately measure mitochondrial DNA content. -- Abstract: Circulating mitochondrial DNA (MtDNA) is a potential non-invasive biomarker of cellular mitochondrial dysfunction, the latter known to be central to a wide range of human diseases. Changes in MtDNA are usually determined by quantification of MtDNA relative to nuclear DNA (Mt/N) using real time quantitative PCR. We propose that the methodology for measuring Mt/N needs to be improved and we have identified that current methods have at least one of the following three problems: (1) As much of the mitochondrial genome is duplicated in the nuclear genome, many commonly used MtDNA primers co-amplify homologous pseudogenes found in the nuclear genome; (2) use of regions from genes such as {beta}-actin and 18S rRNA which are repetitive and/or highly variable for qPCR of the nuclear genome leads to errors; and (3) the size difference of mitochondrial and nuclear genomes cause a 'dilution bias' when template DNA is diluted. We describe a PCR-based method using unique regions in the human mitochondrial genome not duplicated in the nuclear genome; unique single copy region in the nuclear genome and template treatment to remove dilution bias, to accurately quantify MtDNA from human samples.

  9. DeepQuanTR: MALDI-MS-based label-free quantification of proteins in complex biological samples.

    PubMed

    Fugmann, Tim; Neri, Dario; Roesli, Christoph

    2010-07-01

    The quantification of changes in protein abundance in complex biological specimens is essential for proteomic studies in basic and applied research. Here we report on the development and validation of the DeepQuanTR software for identification and quantification of differentially expressed proteins using LC-MALDI-MS. Following enzymatic digestion, HPLC peptide separation and normalization of MALDI-MS signal intensities to the ones of internal standards, the software extracts peptide features, adjusts differences in HPLC retention times and performs a relative quantification of features. The annotation of multiple peptides to the corresponding parent protein allows the definition of a Protein Quant Value, which is related to protein abundance and which allows inter-sample comparisons. The performance of DeepQuanTR was evaluated by analyzing 24 samples deriving from human serum spiked with different amounts of four proteins and eight complex samples of vascular proteins, derived from surgically resected human kidneys with cancer following ex vivo perfusion with a reactive ester biotin derivative. The identification and experimental validation of proteins, which were differentially regulated in cancerous lesions as compared with normal kidney, was used to demonstrate the power of DeepQuanTR. This software, which can easily be used with established proteomic methodologies, facilitates the relative quantification of proteins derived from a wide variety of different samples. PMID:20455210

  10. Sensitive targeted multiple protein quantification based on elemental detection of quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Montoro Bustos, Antonio R; Garcia-Cortes, Marta; González-Iglesias, Hector; Ruiz Encinar, Jorge; Costa-Fernández, José M; Coca-Prados, Miguel; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2015-06-16

    A generic strategy based on the use of CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots (QDs) as elemental labels for protein quantification, using immunoassays with elemental mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), detection is presented. In this strategy, streptavidin modified QDs (QDs-SA) are bioconjugated to a biotinylated secondary antibody (b-Ab2). After a multi-technique characterization of the synthesized generic platform (QDs-SA-b-Ab2) it was applied to the sequential quantification of five proteins (transferrin, complement C3, apolipoprotein A1, transthyretin and apolipoprotein A4) at different concentration levels in human serum samples. It is shown how this generic strategy does only require the appropriate unlabeled primary antibody for each protein to be detected. Therefore, it introduces a way out to the need for the cumbersome and specific bioconjugation of the QDs to the corresponding specific recognition antibody for every target analyte (protein). Results obtained were validated with those obtained using UV-vis spectrophotometry and commercial ELISA Kits. As expected, ICP-MS offered one order of magnitude lower DL (0.23 fmol absolute for transferrin) than the classical spectrophotometric detection (3.2 fmol absolute). ICP-MS precision and detection limits, however turned out to be compromised by procedural blanks. The full analytical performance of the ICP-MS-based immunoassay proposed was assessed for detection of transferrin (Tf), present at the low ng mL(-1) range in a complex "model" synthetic matrix, where the total protein concentration was 100 μg mL(-1). Finally, ICP-MS detection allowed the quantitative control of all the steps of the proposed immunoassay, by computing mass balances obtained, and the development of a faster indirect immunoassay format where the plate wells were directly coated with the whole protein mixture sample. PMID:26002480

  11. DomHR: Accurately Identifying Domain Boundaries in Proteins Using a Hinge Region Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-yan; Lu, Long-jian; Song, Qi; Yang, Qian-qian; Li, Da-peng; Sun, Jiang-ming; Li, Tong-hua; Cong, Pei-sheng

    2013-01-01

    Motivation The precise prediction of protein domains, which are the structural, functional and evolutionary units of proteins, has been a research focus in recent years. Although many methods have been presented for predicting protein domains and boundaries, the accuracy of predictions could be improved. Results In this study we present a novel approach, DomHR, which is an accurate predictor of protein domain boundaries based on a creative hinge region strategy. A hinge region was defined as a segment of amino acids that covers part of a domain region and a boundary region. We developed a strategy to construct profiles of domain-hinge-boundary (DHB) features generated by sequence-domain/hinge/boundary alignment against a database of known domain structures. The DHB features had three elements: normalized domain, hinge, and boundary probabilities. The DHB features were used as input to identify domain boundaries in a sequence. DomHR used a nonredundant dataset as the training set, the DHB and predicted shape string as features, and a conditional random field as the classification algorithm. In predicted hinge regions, a residue was determined to be a domain or a boundary according to a decision threshold. After decision thresholds were optimized, DomHR was evaluated by cross-validation, large-scale prediction, independent test and CASP (Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction) tests. All results confirmed that DomHR outperformed other well-established, publicly available domain boundary predictors for prediction accuracy. Availability The DomHR is available at http://cal.tongji.edu.cn/domain/. PMID:23593247

  12. Quantification of protein group coherence and pathway assignment using functional association

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genomics and proteomics experiments produce a large amount of data that are awaiting functional elucidation. An important step in analyzing such data is to identify functional units, which consist of proteins that play coherent roles to carry out the function. Importantly, functional coherence is not identical with functional similarity. For example, proteins in the same pathway may not share the same Gene Ontology (GO) terms, but they work in a coordinated fashion so that the aimed function can be performed. Thus, simply applying existing functional similarity measures might not be the best solution to identify functional units in omics data. Results We have designed two scores for quantifying the functional coherence by considering association of GO terms observed in two biological contexts, co-occurrences in protein annotations and co-mentions in literature in the PubMed database. The counted co-occurrences of GO terms were normalized in a similar fashion as the statistical amino acid contact potential is computed in the protein structure prediction field. We demonstrate that the developed scores can identify functionally coherent protein sets, i.e. proteins in the same pathways, co-localized proteins, and protein complexes, with statistically significant score values showing a better accuracy than existing functional similarity scores. The scores are also capable of detecting protein pairs that interact with each other. It is further shown that the functional coherence scores can accurately assign proteins to their respective pathways. Conclusion We have developed two scores which quantify the functional coherence of sets of proteins. The scores reflect the actual associations of GO terms observed either in protein annotations or in literature. It has been shown that they have the ability to accurately distinguish biologically relevant groups of proteins from random ones as well as a good discriminative power for detecting interacting pairs of

  13. Accurate and Efficient Resolution of Overlapping Isotopic Envelopes in Protein Tandem Mass Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Kaijie; Yu, Fan; Fang, Houqin; Xue, Bingbing; Liu, Yan; Tian, Zhixin

    2015-01-01

    It has long been an analytical challenge to accurately and efficiently resolve extremely dense overlapping isotopic envelopes (OIEs) in protein tandem mass spectra to confidently identify proteins. Here, we report a computationally efficient method, called OIE_CARE, to resolve OIEs by calculating the relative deviation between the ideal and observed experimental abundance. In the OIE_CARE method, the ideal experimental abundance of a particular overlapping isotopic peak (OIP) is first calculated for all the OIEs sharing this OIP. The relative deviation (RD) of the overall observed experimental abundance of this OIP relative to the summed ideal value is then calculated. The final individual abundance of the OIP for each OIE is the individual ideal experimental abundance multiplied by 1 + RD. Initial studies were performed using higher-energy collisional dissociation tandem mass spectra on myoglobin (with direct infusion) and the intact E. coli proteome (with liquid chromatographic separation). Comprehensive data at the protein and proteome levels, high confidence and good reproducibility were achieved. The resolving method reported here can, in principle, be extended to resolve any envelope-type overlapping data for which the corresponding theoretical reference values are available. PMID:26439836

  14. Protein Quantification by Derivatization-Free High-Performance Liquid Chromatography of Aromatic Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, Almut

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid analysis is considered to be the gold standard for quantitative peptide and protein analysis. Here, we would like to propose a simple HPLC/UV method based on a reversed-phase separation of the aromatic amino acids tyrosine (Tyr), phenylalanine (Phe), and optionally tryptophan (Trp) without any derivatization. The hydrolysis of the proteins and peptides was performed by an accelerated microwave technique, which needs only 30 minutes. Two internal standard compounds, homotyrosine (HTyr) and 4-fluorophenylalanine (FPhe) were used for calibration. The limit of detection (LOD) was estimated to be 0.05 µM (~10 µg/L) for tyrosine and phenylalanine at 215 nm. The LOD for a protein determination was calculated to be below 16 mg/L (~300 ng BSA absolute). Aromatic amino acid analysis (AAAA) offers excellent accuracy and a precision of about 5% relative standard deviation, including the hydrolysis step. The method was validated with certified reference materials (CRM) of amino acids and of a pure protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA). AAAA can be used for the quantification of aromatic amino acids, isolated peptides or proteins, complex peptide or protein samples, such as serum or milk powder, and peptides or proteins immobilized on solid supports. PMID:27559481

  15. Protein Quantification by Derivatization-Free High-Performance Liquid Chromatography of Aromatic Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Almut; Weller, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid analysis is considered to be the gold standard for quantitative peptide and protein analysis. Here, we would like to propose a simple HPLC/UV method based on a reversed-phase separation of the aromatic amino acids tyrosine (Tyr), phenylalanine (Phe), and optionally tryptophan (Trp) without any derivatization. The hydrolysis of the proteins and peptides was performed by an accelerated microwave technique, which needs only 30 minutes. Two internal standard compounds, homotyrosine (HTyr) and 4-fluorophenylalanine (FPhe) were used for calibration. The limit of detection (LOD) was estimated to be 0.05 µM (~10 µg/L) for tyrosine and phenylalanine at 215 nm. The LOD for a protein determination was calculated to be below 16 mg/L (~300 ng BSA absolute). Aromatic amino acid analysis (AAAA) offers excellent accuracy and a precision of about 5% relative standard deviation, including the hydrolysis step. The method was validated with certified reference materials (CRM) of amino acids and of a pure protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA). AAAA can be used for the quantification of aromatic amino acids, isolated peptides or proteins, complex peptide or protein samples, such as serum or milk powder, and peptides or proteins immobilized on solid supports. PMID:27559481

  16. Neural Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein Is Required for Accurate Chromosome Congression and Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun Joo; Takenawa, Tadaomi

    2011-01-01

    The accurate distribution and segregation of replicated chromosomes through mitosis is crucial for cellular viability and development of organisms. Kinetochores are responsible for the proper congression and segregation of chromosomes. Here, we show that neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) localizes to and forms a complex with kinetochores in mitotic cells. Depletion of NWASP by RNA interference causes chromosome misalignment, prolonged mitosis, and abnormal chromosomal segregation, which is associated with decreased proliferation of N-WASP-deficient cells. N-WASP-deficient cells display defects in the kinetochores recruitment of inner and outer kinetochore components, CENP-A, CENP-E, and Mad2. Live-cell imaging analysis of GFP-α-tubulin revealed that depletion of N-WASP impairs microtubule attachment to chromosomes in mitotic cells. All these results indicate that N-WASP plays a role in efficient assembly of kinetochores and attachment of microtubules to chromosomes, which is essential for accurate chromosome congression and segregation. PMID:21533546

  17. Electrostatics of proteins in dielectric solvent continua. I. An accurate and efficient reaction field description

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Sebastian; Mathias, Gerald; Tavan, Paul

    2014-03-14

    We present a reaction field (RF) method which accurately solves the Poisson equation for proteins embedded in dielectric solvent continua at a computational effort comparable to that of an electrostatics calculation with polarizable molecular mechanics (MM) force fields. The method combines an approach originally suggested by Egwolf and Tavan [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 2039 (2003)] with concepts generalizing the Born solution [Z. Phys. 1, 45 (1920)] for a solvated ion. First, we derive an exact representation according to which the sources of the RF potential and energy are inducible atomic anti-polarization densities and atomic shielding charge distributions. Modeling these atomic densities by Gaussians leads to an approximate representation. Here, the strengths of the Gaussian shielding charge distributions are directly given in terms of the static partial charges as defined, e.g., by standard MM force fields for the various atom types, whereas the strengths of the Gaussian anti-polarization densities are calculated by a self-consistency iteration. The atomic volumes are also described by Gaussians. To account for covalently overlapping atoms, their effective volumes are calculated by another self-consistency procedure, which guarantees that the dielectric function ε(r) is close to one everywhere inside the protein. The Gaussian widths σ{sub i} of the atoms i are parameters of the RF approximation. The remarkable accuracy of the method is demonstrated by comparison with Kirkwood's analytical solution for a spherical protein [J. Chem. Phys. 2, 351 (1934)] and with computationally expensive grid-based numerical solutions for simple model systems in dielectric continua including a di-peptide (Ac-Ala-NHMe) as modeled by a standard MM force field. The latter example shows how weakly the RF conformational free energy landscape depends on the parameters σ{sub i}. A summarizing discussion highlights the achievements of the new theory and of its approximate solution

  18. Electrostatics of proteins in dielectric solvent continua. I. An accurate and efficient reaction field description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Sebastian; Mathias, Gerald; Tavan, Paul

    2014-03-01

    We present a reaction field (RF) method which accurately solves the Poisson equation for proteins embedded in dielectric solvent continua at a computational effort comparable to that of an electrostatics calculation with polarizable molecular mechanics (MM) force fields. The method combines an approach originally suggested by Egwolf and Tavan [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 2039 (2003)] with concepts generalizing the Born solution [Z. Phys. 1, 45 (1920)] for a solvated ion. First, we derive an exact representation according to which the sources of the RF potential and energy are inducible atomic anti-polarization densities and atomic shielding charge distributions. Modeling these atomic densities by Gaussians leads to an approximate representation. Here, the strengths of the Gaussian shielding charge distributions are directly given in terms of the static partial charges as defined, e.g., by standard MM force fields for the various atom types, whereas the strengths of the Gaussian anti-polarization densities are calculated by a self-consistency iteration. The atomic volumes are also described by Gaussians. To account for covalently overlapping atoms, their effective volumes are calculated by another self-consistency procedure, which guarantees that the dielectric function ɛ(r) is close to one everywhere inside the protein. The Gaussian widths σi of the atoms i are parameters of the RF approximation. The remarkable accuracy of the method is demonstrated by comparison with Kirkwood's analytical solution for a spherical protein [J. Chem. Phys. 2, 351 (1934)] and with computationally expensive grid-based numerical solutions for simple model systems in dielectric continua including a di-peptide (Ac-Ala-NHMe) as modeled by a standard MM force field. The latter example shows how weakly the RF conformational free energy landscape depends on the parameters σi. A summarizing discussion highlights the achievements of the new theory and of its approximate solution particularly by

  19. Electrostatics of proteins in dielectric solvent continua. I. An accurate and efficient reaction field description.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Sebastian; Mathias, Gerald; Tavan, Paul

    2014-03-14

    We present a reaction field (RF) method which accurately solves the Poisson equation for proteins embedded in dielectric solvent continua at a computational effort comparable to that of an electrostatics calculation with polarizable molecular mechanics (MM) force fields. The method combines an approach originally suggested by Egwolf and Tavan [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 2039 (2003)] with concepts generalizing the Born solution [Z. Phys. 1, 45 (1920)] for a solvated ion. First, we derive an exact representation according to which the sources of the RF potential and energy are inducible atomic anti-polarization densities and atomic shielding charge distributions. Modeling these atomic densities by Gaussians leads to an approximate representation. Here, the strengths of the Gaussian shielding charge distributions are directly given in terms of the static partial charges as defined, e.g., by standard MM force fields for the various atom types, whereas the strengths of the Gaussian anti-polarization densities are calculated by a self-consistency iteration. The atomic volumes are also described by Gaussians. To account for covalently overlapping atoms, their effective volumes are calculated by another self-consistency procedure, which guarantees that the dielectric function ε(r) is close to one everywhere inside the protein. The Gaussian widths σ(i) of the atoms i are parameters of the RF approximation. The remarkable accuracy of the method is demonstrated by comparison with Kirkwood's analytical solution for a spherical protein [J. Chem. Phys. 2, 351 (1934)] and with computationally expensive grid-based numerical solutions for simple model systems in dielectric continua including a di-peptide (Ac-Ala-NHMe) as modeled by a standard MM force field. The latter example shows how weakly the RF conformational free energy landscape depends on the parameters σ(i). A summarizing discussion highlights the achievements of the new theory and of its approximate solution particularly by

  20. Capillary gel electrophoresis for the quantification and purity determination of recombinant proteins in inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-de la Garza, Carlos E; Perdomo-Abúndez, Francisco C; Campos-García, Víctor R; Pérez, Néstor O; Flores-Ortiz, Luis F; Medina-Rivero, Emilio

    2013-09-01

    In this work, a high-resolution CGE method for quantification and purity determination of recombinant proteins was developed, involving a single-component inclusion bodies (IBs) solubilization solution. Different recombinant proteins expressed as IBs were used to show method capabilities, using recombinant interferon-β 1b as the model protein for method validation. Method linearity was verified in the range from 0.05 to 0.40 mg/mL and a determination coefficient (r(2) ) of 0.99 was obtained. The LOQs and LODs were 0.018 and 0.006 mg/mL, respectively. RSD for protein content repeatability test was 2.29%. In addition, RSD for protein purity repeatability test was 4.24%. Method accuracy was higher than 90%. Specificity was confirmed, as the method was able to separate recombinant interferon-β 1b monomer from other aggregates and impurities. Sample content and purity was demonstrated to be stable for up to 48 h. Overall, this method is suitable for the analysis of recombinant proteins in IBs according to the attributes established on the International Conference for Harmonization guidelines. PMID:23857606

  1. TRIC: an automated alignment strategy for reproducible protein quantification in targeted proteomics.

    PubMed

    Röst, Hannes L; Liu, Yansheng; D'Agostino, Giuseppe; Zanella, Matteo; Navarro, Pedro; Rosenberger, George; Collins, Ben C; Gillet, Ludovic; Testa, Giuseppe; Malmström, Lars; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2016-09-01

    Next-generation mass spectrometric (MS) techniques such as SWATH-MS have substantially increased the throughput and reproducibility of proteomic analysis, but ensuring consistent quantification of thousands of peptide analytes across multiple liquid chromatography-tandem MS (LC-MS/MS) runs remains a challenging and laborious manual process. To produce highly consistent and quantitatively accurate proteomics data matrices in an automated fashion, we developed TRIC (http://proteomics.ethz.ch/tric/), a software tool that utilizes fragment-ion data to perform cross-run alignment, consistent peak-picking and quantification for high-throughput targeted proteomics. TRIC reduced the identification error compared to a state-of-the-art SWATH-MS analysis without alignment by more than threefold at constant recall while correcting for highly nonlinear chromatographic effects. On a pulsed-SILAC experiment performed on human induced pluripotent stem cells, TRIC was able to automatically align and quantify thousands of light and heavy isotopic peak groups. Thus, TRIC fills a gap in the pipeline for automated analysis of massively parallel targeted proteomics data sets. PMID:27479329

  2. High precision quantification of human plasma proteins using the automated SISCAPA Immuno-MS workflow.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Morteza; Leigh Anderson, N; Pope, Matthew E; Yip, Richard; Pearson, Terry W

    2016-09-25

    Efficient robotic workflows for trypsin digestion of human plasma and subsequent antibody-mediated peptide enrichment (the SISCAPA method) were developed with the goal of improving assay precision and throughput for multiplexed protein biomarker quantification. First, an 'addition only' tryptic digestion protocol was simplified from classical methods, eliminating the need for sample cleanup, while improving reproducibility, scalability and cost. Second, methods were developed to allow multiplexed enrichment and quantification of peptide surrogates of protein biomarkers representing a very broad range of concentrations and widely different molecular masses in human plasma. The total workflow coefficients of variation (including the 3 sequential steps of digestion, SISCAPA peptide enrichment and mass spectrometric analysis) for 5 proteotypic peptides measured in 6 replicates of each of 6 different samples repeated over 6 days averaged 3.4% within-run and 4.3% across all runs. An experiment to identify sources of variation in the workflow demonstrated that MRM measurement and tryptic digestion steps each had average CVs of ∼2.7%. Because of the high purity of the peptide analytes enriched by antibody capture, the liquid chromatography step is minimized and in some cases eliminated altogether, enabling throughput levels consistent with requirements of large biomarker and clinical studies. PMID:26772726

  3. Fast and Accurate Discovery of Degenerate Linear Motifs in Protein Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Emmanuel D.; Michnick, Stephen W.

    2014-01-01

    Linear motifs mediate a wide variety of cellular functions, which makes their characterization in protein sequences crucial to understanding cellular systems. However, the short length and degenerate nature of linear motifs make their discovery a difficult problem. Here, we introduce MotifHound, an algorithm particularly suited for the discovery of small and degenerate linear motifs. MotifHound performs an exact and exhaustive enumeration of all motifs present in proteins of interest, including all of their degenerate forms, and scores the overrepresentation of each motif based on its occurrence in proteins of interest relative to a background (e.g., proteome) using the hypergeometric distribution. To assess MotifHound, we benchmarked it together with state-of-the-art algorithms. The benchmark consists of 11,880 sets of proteins from S. cerevisiae; in each set, we artificially spiked-in one motif varying in terms of three key parameters, (i) number of occurrences, (ii) length and (iii) the number of degenerate or “wildcard” positions. The benchmark enabled the evaluation of the impact of these three properties on the performance of the different algorithms. The results showed that MotifHound and SLiMFinder were the most accurate in detecting degenerate linear motifs. Interestingly, MotifHound was 15 to 20 times faster at comparable accuracy and performed best in the discovery of highly degenerate motifs. We complemented the benchmark by an analysis of proteins experimentally shown to bind the FUS1 SH3 domain from S. cerevisiae. Using the full-length protein partners as sole information, MotifHound recapitulated most experimentally determined motifs binding to the FUS1 SH3 domain. Moreover, these motifs exhibited properties typical of SH3 binding peptides, e.g., high intrinsic disorder and evolutionary conservation, despite the fact that none of these properties were used as prior information. MotifHound is available (http://michnick.bcm.umontreal.ca or http

  4. Accurate prediction of helix interactions and residue contacts in membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Hönigschmid, Peter; Frishman, Dmitrij

    2016-04-01

    Accurate prediction of intra-molecular interactions from amino acid sequence is an important pre-requisite for obtaining high-quality protein models. Over the recent years, remarkable progress in this area has been achieved through the application of novel co-variation algorithms, which eliminate transitive evolutionary connections between residues. In this work we present a new contact prediction method for α-helical transmembrane proteins, MemConP, in which evolutionary couplings are combined with a machine learning approach. MemConP achieves a substantially improved accuracy (precision: 56.0%, recall: 17.5%, MCC: 0.288) compared to the use of either machine learning or co-evolution methods alone. The method also achieves 91.4% precision, 42.1% recall and a MCC of 0.490 in predicting helix-helix interactions based on predicted contacts. The approach was trained and rigorously benchmarked by cross-validation and independent testing on up-to-date non-redundant datasets of 90 and 30 experimental three dimensional structures, respectively. MemConP is a standalone tool that can be downloaded together with the associated training data from http://webclu.bio.wzw.tum.de/MemConP. PMID:26851352

  5. Quantification of free cysteines in membrane and soluble proteins using a fluorescent dye and thermal unfolding

    PubMed Central

    Hagelueken, Gregor; Naismith, James H

    2013-01-01

    Cysteine is an extremely useful site for selective attachment of labels to proteins for many applications, including the study of protein structure in solution by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), fluorescence spectroscopy and medical imaging. The demand for quantitative data for these applications means that it is important to determine the extent of the cysteine labeling. The efficiency of labeling is sensitive to the 3D context of cysteine within the protein. Where the label or modification is not directly measurable by optical or magnetic spectroscopy, for example, in cysteine modification to dehydroalanine, assessing labeling efficiency is difficult. We describe a simple assay for determining the efficiency of modification of cysteine residues, which is based on an approach previously used to determine membrane protein stability. The assay involves a reaction between the thermally unfolded protein and a thiol-specific coumarin fluorophore that is only fluorescent upon conjugation with thiols. Monitoring fluorescence during thermal denaturation of the protein in the presence of the dye identifies the temperature at which the maximum fluorescence occurs; this temperature differs among proteins. Comparison of the fluorescence intensity at the identified temperature between modified, unmodified (positive control) and cysteine-less protein (negative control) allows for the quantification of free cysteine. We have quantified both site-directed spin labeling and dehydroalanine formation. The method relies on a commonly available fluorescence 96-well plate reader, which rapidly screens numerous samples within 1.5 h and uses <100 μg of material. The approach is robust for both soluble and detergent-solubilized membrane proteins. PMID:24091556

  6. Rapid and accurate calculation of protein 1H, 13C and 15N chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Neal, Stephen; Nip, Alex M; Zhang, Haiyan; Wishart, David S

    2003-07-01

    A computer program (SHIFTX) is described which rapidly and accurately calculates the diamagnetic 1H, 13C and 15N chemical shifts of both backbone and sidechain atoms in proteins. The program uses a hybrid predictive approach that employs pre-calculated, empirically derived chemical shift hypersurfaces in combination with classical or semi-classical equations (for ring current, electric field, hydrogen bond and solvent effects) to calculate 1H, 13C and 15N chemical shifts from atomic coordinates. The chemical shift hypersurfaces capture dihedral angle, sidechain orientation, secondary structure and nearest neighbor effects that cannot easily be translated to analytical formulae or predicted via classical means. The chemical shift hypersurfaces were generated using a database of IUPAC-referenced protein chemical shifts--RefDB (Zhang et al., 2003), and a corresponding set of high resolution (<2.1 A) X-ray structures. Data mining techniques were used to extract the largest pairwise contributors (from a list of approximately 20 derived geometric, sequential and structural parameters) to generate the necessary hypersurfaces. SHIFTX is rapid (<1 CPU second for a complete shift calculation of 100 residues) and accurate. Overall, the program was able to attain a correlation coefficient (r) between observed and calculated shifts of 0.911 (1Halpha), 0.980 (13Calpha), 0.996 (13Cbeta), 0.863 (13CO), 0.909 (15N), 0.741 (1HN), and 0.907 (sidechain 1H) with RMS errors of 0.23, 0.98, 1.10, 1.16, 2.43, 0.49, and 0.30 ppm, respectively on test data sets. We further show that the agreement between observed and SHIFTX calculated chemical shifts can be an extremely sensitive measure of the quality of protein structures. Our results suggest that if NMR-derived structures could be refined using heteronuclear chemical shifts calculated by SHIFTX, their precision could approach that of the highest resolution X-ray structures. SHIFTX is freely available as a web server at http

  7. Quantitative surface studies of protein adsorption by infrared spectroscopy. II. Quantification of adsorbed and bulk proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, D.J.; Hutson, T.B.; Chittur, K.K.; Gendreau, R.M.

    1987-08-15

    Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectra of surface-adsorbed proteins are correlated with concentration measurements determined by /sup 125/I-labeled proteins. This paper demonstrates that linear correlations between the intensity of the major bands of proteins and the quantity of proteins can be obtained for human albumin and immunoglobulin G up to surface concentrations of approximately 0.25 microgram/cm2. A poorer correlation was observed for human fibrinogen. A linear correlation was also observed between the concentration in the bulk solution and the major bands of albumin up to a concentration of 60 mg/ml.

  8. Fitmunk: improving protein structures by accurate, automatic modeling of side-chain conformations.

    PubMed

    Porebski, Przemyslaw Jerzy; Cymborowski, Marcin; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Minor, Wladek

    2016-02-01

    Improvements in crystallographic hardware and software have allowed automated structure-solution pipelines to approach a near-`one-click' experience for the initial determination of macromolecular structures. However, in many cases the resulting initial model requires a laborious, iterative process of refinement and validation. A new method has been developed for the automatic modeling of side-chain conformations that takes advantage of rotamer-prediction methods in a crystallographic context. The algorithm, which is based on deterministic dead-end elimination (DEE) theory, uses new dense conformer libraries and a hybrid energy function derived from experimental data and prior information about rotamer frequencies to find the optimal conformation of each side chain. In contrast to existing methods, which incorporate the electron-density term into protein-modeling frameworks, the proposed algorithm is designed to take advantage of the highly discriminatory nature of electron-density maps. This method has been implemented in the program Fitmunk, which uses extensive conformational sampling. This improves the accuracy of the modeling and makes it a versatile tool for crystallographic model building, refinement and validation. Fitmunk was extensively tested on over 115 new structures, as well as a subset of 1100 structures from the PDB. It is demonstrated that the ability of Fitmunk to model more than 95% of side chains accurately is beneficial for improving the quality of crystallographic protein models, especially at medium and low resolutions. Fitmunk can be used for model validation of existing structures and as a tool to assess whether side chains are modeled optimally or could be better fitted into electron density. Fitmunk is available as a web service at http://kniahini.med.virginia.edu/fitmunk/server/ or at http://fitmunk.bitbucket.org/. PMID:26894674

  9. Fitmunk: improving protein structures by accurate, automatic modeling of side-chain conformations

    PubMed Central

    Porebski, Przemyslaw Jerzy; Cymborowski, Marcin; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Minor, Wladek

    2016-01-01

    Improvements in crystallographic hardware and software have allowed automated structure-solution pipelines to approach a near-‘one-click’ experience for the initial determination of macromolecular structures. However, in many cases the resulting initial model requires a laborious, iterative process of refinement and validation. A new method has been developed for the automatic modeling of side-chain conformations that takes advantage of rotamer-prediction methods in a crystallographic context. The algorithm, which is based on deterministic dead-end elimination (DEE) theory, uses new dense conformer libraries and a hybrid energy function derived from experimental data and prior information about rotamer frequencies to find the optimal conformation of each side chain. In contrast to existing methods, which incorporate the electron-density term into protein-modeling frameworks, the proposed algorithm is designed to take advantage of the highly discriminatory nature of electron-density maps. This method has been implemented in the program Fitmunk, which uses extensive conformational sampling. This improves the accuracy of the modeling and makes it a versatile tool for crystallographic model building, refinement and validation. Fitmunk was extensively tested on over 115 new structures, as well as a subset of 1100 structures from the PDB. It is demonstrated that the ability of Fitmunk to model more than 95% of side chains accurately is beneficial for improving the quality of crystallographic protein models, especially at medium and low resolutions. Fitmunk can be used for model validation of existing structures and as a tool to assess whether side chains are modeled optimally or could be better fitted into electron density. Fitmunk is available as a web service at http://kniahini.med.virginia.edu/fitmunk/server/ or at http://fitmunk.bitbucket.org/. PMID:26894674

  10. Quantification of protein copy number in single mitochondria: The Bcl-2 family proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaoxiang; Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Shuyue; Zhu, Shaobin; Xu, Jingyi; Zheng, Yan; Han, Jinyan; Zeng, Jin-Zhang; Yan, Xiaomei

    2015-12-15

    Bcl-2 family proteins, represented by antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and proapoptotic protein Bax, are key regulators of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis pathway. To build a quantitative model of how Bcl-2 family protein interactions control mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and subsequent cytochrome c release, it is essential to know the number of proteins in individual mitochondria. Here, we report an effective method to quantify the copy number and distribution of proteins in single mitochondria via immunofluorescent labeling and sensitive detection by a laboratory-built high sensitivity flow cytometer (HSFCM). Mitochondria isolated from HeLa cells were stained with Alexa Fluor 488 (AF488)-labeled monoclonal antibodies specifically targeting Bcl-2 or Bax and with nucleic acid dye. A series of fluorescent nanospheres with fluorescence intensity calibrated in the unit of molecules of equivalent soluble fluorochrome (MESF)-AF488 were used to construct a calibration curve for converting the immunofluorescence of a single mitochondrion to the number of antibodies bound to it and then to the number of proteins per mitochondrion. Under the normal condition, the measured mean copy numbers were 1300 and 220 per mitochondrion for Bcl-2 and Bax, respectively. A significant variation in protein copy number was identified, which ranged from 130 to 6000 (2.5-97.5%) for Bcl-2 and from 65 to 700 (2.5-97.5%) for Bax, respectively. We observed an approximately 4.4 fold increase of Bax copy number per mitochondrion upon 9h of apoptosis stimulation while the abundance of Bcl-2 remained almost unchanged. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of Bcl-2 family protein copy number and variance in single mitochondria. Collectively, we demonstrate that the HSFCM-based immunoassay provides a rapid and sensitive method for determining protein copy number distribution in single mitochondria. PMID:26176207

  11. Absorbance amplification using chromophore-nanoplasmon coupling for ultrasensitive protein quantification.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sujin; Edwards, Lonna; Logan Liu, Gang

    2015-10-01

    A plasmonic nanoscale Lycurgus cup array (nanoLCA), via near-field interaction with chromophores in commercial colorimetric biochemical assays, can drastically enhance assay sensitivity by over 2 orders of magnitude. A 96-microwell plate modified by placing the plasmonic nanoLCA on the well-bottom was used with the commercial Bradford protein quantification assay. Plasmons on the nanoLCA serve as an energy donor to matched resonance chromophores, and the near-field plasmonic energy coupling effect results in an increase in absorbance value at the plasmonic resonance wavelength. Even with a 5.1-fold reduced sample volume, a limit of detection enhancement factor of 200 is accomplished using the nanoLCA compared to using the conventional Bradford assay without plasmon aid. The nanoLCA-microplate sensing platform is readily scalable to 384- or 1536-microwell plates, which further reduces the sensing volume and boosts detection throughput with the enhanced sensitivity. PMID:26284911

  12. Detection and quantification of protein oxidation in sarcopenic models: a mass spectrometry study.

    PubMed

    Pasha, Sabah; Tveen Jensen, Karina; Pitt, Andrew R; Spickett, Corinne M

    2014-10-01

    Oxidised biomolecules in aged tissue could potentially be used as biomarkers for age-related diseases; however, it is still unclear whether they causatively contribute to ageing or are consequences of the ageing process. To assess the potential of using protein oxidation as markers of ageing, mass spectrometry (MS) was employed for the identification and quantification of oxidative modifications in obese (ob/ob) mice. Lean muscle mass and strength is reduced in obesity, representing a sarcopenic model in which the levels of oxidation can be evaluated for different muscular systems including calcium homeostasis, metabolism and contractility. Several oxidised residues were identified by tandem MS (MS/MS) in both muscle homogenate and isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), an organelle that regulates intracellular calcium levels in muscle. These modifications include oxidation of methionine, cysteine, tyrosine, and tryptophan in several proteins such as sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA), glycogen phosphorylase, and myosin. Once modifications had been identified, multiple reaction monitoring MS (MRM) was used to quantify the percentage modification of oxidised residues within the samples. Preliminary data suggests proteins in ob/ob mice are more oxidised than the controls. For example SERCA, which constitutes 60-70% of the SR, had approximately a 2-fold increase in cysteine trioxidation of Cys561 in the obese model when compared to the control. Other obese muscle proteins have also shown a similar increase in oxidation for various residues. Further analysis with complex protein mixtures will determine the potential diagnostic use of MRM experiments for analysing protein oxidation in small biological samples such as muscle needle biopsies. PMID:26461380

  13. Quantification of urinary S- and N-homocysteinylated protein and homocysteine-thiolactone in mice.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, Hieronim

    2016-09-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) and its metabolites Hcy-thiolactone, N-Hcy-protein, and S-Hcy-protein are implicated in vascular and neurological diseases. However, quantification of these metabolites remains challenging. Here I describe streamlined assays for these metabolites based on their conversion to Hcy-thiolactone. Free Hcy-thiolactone is extracted from the urine with chloroform/methanol. Total Hcy is converted to Hcy-thiolactone in the presence of 1 N HCl. Major urinary protein (MUP)-bound S-linked Hcy is liberated from the protein by reduction with dithiothreitol and converted to Hcy-thiolactone. Acid hydrolysis of MUP with 6 N HCl liberates N-linked Hcy as Hcy-thiolactone, which is then extracted with chloroform/methanol. Ferritin is used as an N-Hcy-protein standard and an authentic Hcy-thiolactone is used to monitor the efficiency of extraction. Hcy-thiolactone (free, derived from total Hcy, or from MUP-bound N-linked or S-linked Hcy) is separated by a cation exchange high-performance liquid chromatography, post-column derivatized with o-phthaldialdehyde, and quantified by fluorescence. Using these assays with as little as 2-20 μL of urine I show that MUP carry N-linked and S-linked Hcy and that N-Hcy-MUP and S-Hcy-MUP and Hcy-thiolactone are severely elevated in cystathionine β-synthase-deficient mice. These assays will facilitate examination of the role of protein-related Hcy metabolites in health and disease. PMID:27293214

  14. Quantification of portal-bridging fibrosis area more accurately reflects fibrosis stage and liver stiffness than whole fibrosis or perisinusoidal fibrosis areas in chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Sandrini, Jérémy; Boursier, Jérôme; Chaigneau, Julien; Sturm, Nathalie; Zarski, Jean-Pierre; Le Bail, Brigitte; de Ledinghen, Victor; Calès, Paul; Rousselet, Marie-Christine

    2014-07-01

    Morphometry provides an objective evaluation of fibrosis in liver diseases. We developed an image analysis algorithm using automated thresholding and segmentation to separately quantify the areas and the fractal dimensions of portal-bridging fibrosis and perisinusoidal fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C liver biopsies. We studied 427 digitized liver biopsies and compared the automated measures of the different fibrosis compartments with (1) the Metavir F (fibrosis) and A (activity) histological scores, (2) the digitally assessed area of steatosis, and (3) the liver stiffness measured by elastography (Fibroscan). The perisinusoidal fibrosis area was higher than that of portal fibrosis in stages ≤F2; it reached its highest value in F2 stage and stabilized thereafter. The F3 stage was characterized by equal proportions of portal-bridging and perisinusoidal fibrosis, whereas portal-bridging area was predominant in cirrhosis. Measurement of portal-bridging fibrosis showed highly significantly different values between contiguous F stages; the ratio of portal-bridging fibrosis/perisinusoidal fibrosis displayed less overlap between Metavir stages than did the whole fibrosis area values. Fractal dimension showed that portal-bridging fibrosis tended to display a homogeneous surface-like spatial organization, whereas perisinusoidal fibrosis appeared more heterogeneous according to stage and curvilinear. The portal-bridging fibrosis area was low in cases with low Metavir activity and little steatosis, and became predominant with increasing activity and steatosis. Using stepwise multiple linear regression analysis, the liver stiffness was independently correlated to the portal-bridging fibrosis area (first step, P<0.001), the steatosis area (second step, P<0.001), and the Metavir A grade (third step, P=0.001), but not to the perisinusoidal fibrosis area. Automated quantification in a large cohort of chronic hepatitis C showed that perisinusoidal fibrosis progressively grew in

  15. Quantification of protein secondary structure by (13)C solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Fabiana Diuk; Forato, Lucimara Aparecida; Bernardes Filho, Rubens; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution (13)C solid-state NMR stands out as one of the most promising techniques to solve the structure of insoluble proteins featuring biological and technological importance. The simplest nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy method to quantify the secondary structure of proteins uses the areas of carbonyl and alpha carbon peaks. The quantification obtained by fitting procedures depends on the assignment of the peaks to the structure, type of line shape, number of peaks to be used, and other parameters that are set by the operator. In this paper, we demonstrate that the analysis of (13)C NMR spectra by a pattern recognition method-based on the singular value decomposition (SVD) regression, which does not depend on the operator-shows higher correlation coefficients for α-helix and β-sheet (0.96 and 0.91, respectively) than Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) method. Therefore, the use of (13)C solid-state NMR spectra and SVD is a simple and reliable method for quantifying the secondary structures of insoluble proteins in solid-state. PMID:27068694

  16. Electrochemical lateral flow immunosensor for detection and quantification of dengue NS1 protein.

    PubMed

    Sinawang, Prima Dewi; Rai, Varun; Ionescu, Rodica E; Marks, Robert S

    2016-03-15

    An Electrochemical Lateral Flow Immunosensor (ELFI) is developed combining screen-printed gold electrodes (SPGE) enabling quantification together with the convenience of a lateral flow test strip. A cellulose glassy fiber paper conjugate pad retains the marker immunoelectroactive nanobeads which will bind to the target analyte of interest. The specific immunorecognition event continues to occur along the lateral flow bed until reaching the SPGE-capture antibodies at the end of the cellulosic lateral flow strip. The rationale of the immunoassay consists in the analyte antigen NS1 protein being captured selectively and specifically by the dengue NS1 antibody conjugated onto the immunonanobeads thus forming an immunocomplex. With the aid of a running buffer, the immunocomplexes flow and reach the immuno-conjugated electrode surface and form specific sandwich-type detection due to specific, molecular recognition, while unbound beads move along past the electrodes. The successful sandwich immunocomplex formation is then recorded electrochemically. Specific detection of NS1 is translated into an electrochemical signal contributed by a redox label present on the bead-immobilized detection dengue NS1 antibody while a proportional increase of faradic current is observed with increase in analyte NS1 protein concentration. The first generation ELFI prototype is simply assembled in a cassette and successfully demonstrates wide linear range over a concentration range of 1-25 ng/mL with an ultrasensitive detection limit of 0.5 ng/mL for the qualitative and quantitative detection of analyte dengue NS1 protein. PMID:26433352

  17. Accurate and precise quantification of atmospheric nitrate in streams draining land of various uses by using triple oxygen isotopes as tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunogai, Urumu; Miyauchi, Takanori; Ohyama, Takuya; Komatsu, Daisuke D.; Nakagawa, Fumiko; Obata, Yusuke; Sato, Keiichi; Ohizumi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-06-01

    Land use in a catchment area has significant impacts on nitrate eluted from the catchment, including atmospheric nitrate deposited onto the catchment area and remineralised nitrate produced within the catchment area. Although the stable isotopic compositions of nitrate eluted from a catchment can be a useful tracer to quantify the land use influences on the sources and behaviour of the nitrate, it is best to determine these for the remineralised portion of the nitrate separately from the unprocessed atmospheric nitrate to obtain a more accurate and precise quantification of the land use influences. In this study, we determined the spatial distribution and seasonal variation of stable isotopic compositions of nitrate for more than 30 streams within the same watershed, the Lake Biwa watershed in Japan, in order to use 17O excess (Δ17O) of nitrate as an additional tracer to quantify the mole fraction of atmospheric nitrate accurately and precisely. The stable isotopic compositions, including Δ17O of nitrate, in precipitation (wet deposition; n = 196) sampled at the Sado-seki monitoring station were also determined for 3 years. The deposited nitrate showed large 17O excesses similar to those already reported for midlatitudes: Δ17O values ranged from +18.6 to +32.4 ‰ with a 3-year average of +26.3 ‰. However, nitrate in each inflow stream showed small annual average Δ17O values ranging from +0.5 to +3.1 ‰, which corresponds to mole fractions of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate to total nitrate from (1.8 ± 0.3) to (11.8 ± 1.8) % respectively, with an average for all inflow streams of (5.1 ± 0.5) %. Although the annual average Δ17O values tended to be smaller in accordance with the increase in annual average stream nitrate concentration from 12.7 to 106.2 µmol L-1, the absolute concentrations of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate were almost stable at (2.3 ± 1.1) µmol L-1 irrespective of the changes in population density and land use in each catchment area

  18. Quantification and functional analysis of modular protein evolution in a dense phylogenetic tree.

    PubMed

    Moore, Andrew D; Grath, Sonja; Schüler, Andreas; Huylmans, Ann K; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich

    2013-05-01

    Modularity is a hallmark of molecular evolution. Whether considering gene regulation, the components of metabolic pathways or signaling cascades, the ability to reuse autonomous modules in different molecular contexts can expedite evolutionary innovation. Similarly, protein domains are the modules of proteins, and modular domain rearrangements can create diversity with seemingly few operations in turn allowing for swift changes to an organism's functional repertoire. Here, we assess the patterns and functional effects of modular rearrangements at high resolution. Using a well resolved and diverse group of pancrustaceans, we illustrate arrangement diversity within closely related organisms, estimate arrangement turnover frequency and establish, for the first time, branch-specific rate estimates for fusion, fission, domain addition and terminal loss. Our results show that roughly 16 new arrangements arise per million years and that between 64% and 81% of these can be explained by simple, single-step modular rearrangement events. We find evidence that the frequencies of fission and terminal deletion events increase over time, and that modular rearrangements impact all levels of the cellular signaling apparatus and thus may have strong adaptive potential. Novel arrangements that cannot be explained by simple modular rearrangements contain a significant amount of repeat domains that occur in complex patterns which we term "supra-repeats". Furthermore, these arrangements are significantly longer than those with a single-step rearrangement solution, suggesting that such arrangements may result from multi-step events. In summary, our analysis provides an integrated view and initial quantification of the patterns and functional impact of modular protein evolution in a well resolved phylogenetic tree. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The emerging dynamic view of proteins: Protein plasticity in allostery, evolution and self-assembly. PMID:23376183

  19. Use of ferric thiocyanate derivatization for quantification of polysorbate 80 in high concentration protein formulations.

    PubMed

    Savjani, Nimesh; Babcock, Eugene; Khor, Hui Koon; Raghani, Anil

    2014-12-01

    Quantitation of polysorbate 80 in high protein formulation using solid-phase extraction (SPE) followed by derivatization with cobalt thiocyanate and UV measurement of the complex at 620 nm resulted in lower recovery of polysorbate 80. Dilution of protein samples with water improved the recovery of polysorbate, however, it compromised the sensitivity of the method when cobalt thiocyanate was used for derivatization. The presented work discusses an evaluation of alternative approaches for increasing the sensitivity of the quantitation method for polysorbate using ferric thiocyanate and molybdenum thiocyanate. Ferric thiocyanate complex of polysorbate 80 exhibited the highest sensitivity among the metals thiocyanate evaluated in the current work. The improvement in the sensitivity through derivatization with ferric thiocyanate allowed 10-fold dilution of a 140 mg mL(-1) protein sample without affecting the recovery or compromising the sensitivity of polysorbate 80 quantitation, indicating that this methodology could be used as an alternate approach for the quantitation of polysorbate 80 in high concentration protein formulations. Stability of ferric thiocynate and cobalt thiocyanate complex was also studied. When these complexes were allowed to equilibrate for 1h between an organic layer containing polysorbate/thiocynate complex and an aqueous layer containing un-reacted metal thiocyanate, it resulted in the most reproducible UV absorbance measurements. The SPE method for quantification of polysorbate 80 using ferric thiocyanate for derivatization provided accuracy (% spike recovery) within 107%, reproducibility (%relative standard deviation) less than 11.7%. The method is linear from 0.0001 to 0.008% polysorbate 80 concentrations in the formulations with protein formulations as high as 140 mg mL(-1). PMID:25159444

  20. Accurate and reliable quantification of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D species by liquid chromatography high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry[S

    PubMed Central

    Liebisch, Gerhard; Matysik, Silke

    2015-01-01

    In general, mass spectrometric quantification of small molecules in routine laboratory testing utilizes liquid chromatography coupled to low mass resolution triple-quadrupole mass spectrometers (QQQs). Here we introduce high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (quadrupole-Orbitrap) for the quantification of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D [25(OH)D], a marker of the vitamin D status, because the specificity of 25(OH)D immunoassays is still questionable and mass spectrometric quantification is becoming increasingly important. Liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/HR-MS) was used to quantify 25-hydroxy-cholecalciferol [25(OH)D3], 25-hydroxy-ergocalciferol [25(OH)D2], and their C3-epimers 3-epi-25(OH)D3 and 3-epi-25(OH)D2. The method has a run time of 5 min and was validated according to the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency guidelines. High mass resolution was advantageously applied to separate a quasi-isobaric interference of the internal standard D6-25(OH)D2 with 3-epi-25(OH)D3. All analytes showed an imprecision of below 10% coefficient of variation (CV), trueness between 90% and 110%, and limits of quantification below 10 nM. Concentrations measured by LC-MS/HR-MS are in good agreement with those of the National Institute of Standards and Technology reference methods using LC-MS/MS (QQQ). In conclusion, quantification of 25(OH)D by LC-MS/HR-MS is applicable for routine testing and also holds promise for highly specific quantification of other small molecules. PMID:25833687

  1. Hybrid quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometry analysis with accurate-mass database and parallel reaction monitoring for high-throughput screening and quantification of multi-xenobiotics in honey.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhang, Jinzhen; Jin, Yue; Wang, Lin; Zhao, Wen; Zhang, Wenwen; Zhai, Lifei; Zhang, Yaping; Zhang, Yongxin; Zhou, Jinhui

    2016-01-15

    This study reports a rapid, automated screening and quantification method for the determination of multi-xenobiotic residues in honey using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-Orbitrap) with a user-built accurate-mass database plus parallel reaction monitoring (PRM). The database contains multi-xenobiotic information including formulas, adduct types, theoretical exact mass and retention time, characteristic fragment ions, ion ratios, and mass accuracies. A simple sample preparation method was developed to reduce xenobiotic loss in the honey samples. The screening method was validated based on retention time deviation, mass accuracy via full scan-data-dependent MS/MS (full scan-ddMS2), multi-isotope ratio, characteristic ion ratio, sensitivity, and positive/negative switching performance between the spiked sample and corresponding standard solution. The quantification method based on the PRM mode is a promising new quantitative tool which we validated in terms of selectivity, linearity, recovery (accuracy), repeatability (precision), decision limit (CCα), detection capability (CCβ), matrix effects, and carry-over. The optimized methods proposed in this study enable the automated screening and quantification of 157 compounds in less than 15 min in honey. The results of this study, as they represent a convenient protocol for large-scale screening and quantification, also provide a research approach for analysis of various contaminants in other matrices. PMID:26724099

  2. Counting numbers of synaptic proteins: absolute quantification and single molecule imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Patrizio, Angela; Specht, Christian G

    2016-10-01

    The ability to count molecules is essential to elucidating cellular mechanisms, as these often depend on the absolute numbers and concentrations of molecules within specific compartments. Such is the case at chemical synapses, where the transmission of information from presynaptic to postsynaptic terminals requires complex interactions between small sets of molecules. Be it the subunit stoichiometry specifying neurotransmitter receptor properties, the copy numbers of scaffold proteins setting the limit of receptor accumulation at synapses, or protein packing densities shaping the molecular organization and plasticity of the postsynaptic density, all of these depend on exact quantities of components. A variety of proteomic, electrophysiological, and quantitative imaging techniques have yielded insights into the molecular composition of synaptic complexes. In this review, we compare the different quantitative approaches and consider the potential of single molecule imaging techniques for the quantification of synaptic components. We also discuss specific neurobiological data to contextualize the obtained numbers and to explain how they aid our understanding of synaptic structure and function. PMID:27335891

  3. Quantification of Protein-Induced Membrane Remodeling Kinetics In Vitro with Lipid Multilayer Gratings

    PubMed Central

    Lowry, Troy W.; Hariri, Hanaa; Prommapan, Plengchart; Kusi-Appiah, Aubrey; Vafai, Nicholas; Bienkiewicz, Ewa A.; Van Winkle, David H.; Stagg, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic self-organization of lipids in biological systems is a highly regulated process that enables the compartmentalization of living systems at micro- and nanoscopic scales. Consequently, quantitative methods for assaying the kinetics of supramolecular remodeling such as vesicle formation from planar lipid bilayers or multilayers are needed to understand cellular self-organization. Here, a new nanotechnology-based method for quantitative measurements of lipid–protein interactions is presented and its suitability for quantifying the membrane binding, inflation, and budding activity of the membrane-remodeling protein Sar1 is demonstrated. Lipid multilayer gratings are printed onto surfaces using nanointaglio and exposed to Sar1, resulting in the inflation of lipid multilayers into unilamellar structures, which can be observed in a label-free manner by monitoring the diffracted light. Local variations in lipid multilayer volume on the surface is used to vary substrate availability in a microarray format. A quantitative model is developed that allows quantification of binding affinity (KD) and kinetics (kon and koff). Importantly, this assay is uniquely capable of quantifying membrane remodeling. Upon Sar1-induced inflation of single bilayers from surface supported multilayers, the semicylindrical grating lines are observed to remodel into semispherical buds when a critical radius of curvature is reached. PMID:26649649

  4. Quantification of the transferability of a designed protein specificity switch reveals extensive epistasis in molecular recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Melero, Cristina; Ollikainen, Noah; Harwood, Ian; Karpiak, Joel; Kortemme, Tanja

    2014-10-13

    Re-engineering protein–protein recognition is an important route to dissecting and controlling complex interaction networks. Experimental approaches have used the strategy of “second-site suppressors,” where a functional interaction is inferred between two proteins if a mutation in one protein can be compensated by a mutation in the second. Mimicking this strategy, computational design has been applied successfully to change protein recognition specificity by predicting such sets of compensatory mutations in protein–protein interfaces. To extend this approach, it would be advantageous to be able to “transplant” existing engineered and experimentally validated specificity changes to other homologous protein–protein complexes. Here, we test this strategy by designing a pair of mutations that modulates peptide recognition specificity in the Syntrophin PDZ domain, confirming the designed interaction biochemically and structurally, and then transplanting the mutations into the context of five related PDZ domain–peptide complexes. We find a wide range of energetic effects of identical mutations in structurally similar positions, revealing a dramatic context dependence (epistasis) of designed mutations in homologous protein–protein interactions. To better understand the structural basis of this context dependence, we apply a structure-based computational model that recapitulates these energetic effects and we use this model to make and validate forward predictions. The context dependence of these mutations is captured by computational predictions, our results both highlight the considerable difficulties in designing protein–protein interactions and provide challenging benchmark cases for the development of improved protein modeling and design methods that accurately account for the context.

  5. Quantification of the transferability of a designed protein specificity switch reveals extensive epistasis in molecular recognition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Melero, Cristina; Ollikainen, Noah; Harwood, Ian; Karpiak, Joel; Kortemme, Tanja

    2014-10-13

    Re-engineering protein–protein recognition is an important route to dissecting and controlling complex interaction networks. Experimental approaches have used the strategy of “second-site suppressors,” where a functional interaction is inferred between two proteins if a mutation in one protein can be compensated by a mutation in the second. Mimicking this strategy, computational design has been applied successfully to change protein recognition specificity by predicting such sets of compensatory mutations in protein–protein interfaces. To extend this approach, it would be advantageous to be able to “transplant” existing engineered and experimentally validated specificity changes to other homologous protein–protein complexes. Here, we test thismore » strategy by designing a pair of mutations that modulates peptide recognition specificity in the Syntrophin PDZ domain, confirming the designed interaction biochemically and structurally, and then transplanting the mutations into the context of five related PDZ domain–peptide complexes. We find a wide range of energetic effects of identical mutations in structurally similar positions, revealing a dramatic context dependence (epistasis) of designed mutations in homologous protein–protein interactions. To better understand the structural basis of this context dependence, we apply a structure-based computational model that recapitulates these energetic effects and we use this model to make and validate forward predictions. The context dependence of these mutations is captured by computational predictions, our results both highlight the considerable difficulties in designing protein–protein interactions and provide challenging benchmark cases for the development of improved protein modeling and design methods that accurately account for the context.« less

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Sauvignon Blanc Grape Skin, Pulp and Seed and Relative Quantification of Pathogenesis-Related Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Bin; Harrison, Roland; Morton, James; Deb-Choudhury, Santanu

    2015-01-01

    Thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs) and chitinases are the main constituents of so-called protein hazes which can form in finished white wine and which is a great concern of winemakers. These soluble pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins are extracted from grape berries. However, their distribution in different grape tissues is not well documented. In this study, proteins were first separately extracted from the skin, pulp and seed of Sauvignon Blanc grapes, followed by trypsin digestion and analysis by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). Proteins identified included 75 proteins from Sauvignon Blanc grape skin, 63 from grape pulp and 35 from grape seed, mostly functionally classified as associated with metabolism and energy. Some were present exclusively in specific grape tissues; for example, proteins involved in photosynthesis were only detected in grape skin and proteins found in alcoholic fermentation were only detected in grape pulp. Moreover, proteins identified in grape seed were less diverse than those identified in grape skin and pulp. TLPs and chitinases were identified in both Sauvignon Blanc grape skin and pulp, but not in the seed. To relatively quantify the PR proteins, the protein extracts of grape tissues were seperated by HPLC first and then analysed by SDS-PAGE. The results showed that the protein fractions eluted at 9.3 min and 19.2 min under the chromatographic conditions of this study confirmed that these corresponded to TLPs and chitinases seperately. Thus, the relative quantification of TLPs and chitinases in protein extracts was carried out by comparing the area of corresponding peaks against the area of a thamautin standard. The results presented in this study clearly demonstrated the distribution of haze-forming PR proteins in grape berries, and the relative quantification of TLPs and chitinases could be applied in fast tracking of changes in PR proteins during grape growth and determination of PR

  7. Accurate single-day titration of adenovirus vectors based on equivalence of protein VII nuclear dots and infectious particles

    PubMed Central

    Walkiewicz, Marcin P.; Morral, Nuria; Engel, Daniel A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Protein VII is an abundant component of adenovirus particles and is tightly associated with the viral DNA. It enters the nucleus along with the infecting viral genome and remains bound throughout early phase. Protein VII can be visualized by immunofluorescent staining as discrete dots in the infected cell nucleus. Comparison between protein VII staining and expression of the 72 kDa DNA binding protein revealed a one-to-one correspondence between protein VII dots and infectious viral genomes. A similar relationship was observed for a helper-dependent adenovirus vector expressing green fluorescent protein. This relationship allowed accurate titration of adenovirus preparations, including wild-type and helper-dependent vectors, using a one-day immunofluorescence method. The method can be applied to any adenovirus vector and gives results equivalent to the standard plaque assay. PMID:19406166

  8. FastRNABindR: Fast and Accurate Prediction of Protein-RNA Interface Residues.

    PubMed

    El-Manzalawy, Yasser; Abbas, Mostafa; Malluhi, Qutaibah; Honavar, Vasant

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of biological processes, including regulation of gene expression, protein synthesis, and replication and assembly of many viruses are mediated by RNA-protein interactions. However, experimental determination of the structures of protein-RNA complexes is expensive and technically challenging. Hence, a number of computational tools have been developed for predicting protein-RNA interfaces. Some of the state-of-the-art protein-RNA interface predictors rely on position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM)-based encoding of the protein sequences. The computational efforts needed for generating PSSMs severely limits the practical utility of protein-RNA interface prediction servers. In this work, we experiment with two approaches, random sampling and sequence similarity reduction, for extracting a representative reference database of protein sequences from more than 50 million protein sequences in UniRef100. Our results suggest that random sampled databases produce better PSSM profiles (in terms of the number of hits used to generate the profile and the distance of the generated profile to the corresponding profile generated using the entire UniRef100 data as well as the accuracy of the machine learning classifier trained using these profiles). Based on our results, we developed FastRNABindR, an improved version of RNABindR for predicting protein-RNA interface residues using PSSM profiles generated using 1% of the UniRef100 sequences sampled uniformly at random. To the best of our knowledge, FastRNABindR is the only protein-RNA interface residue prediction online server that requires generation of PSSM profiles for query sequences and accepts hundreds of protein sequences per submission. Our approach for determining the optimal BLAST database for a protein-RNA interface residue classification task has the potential of substantially speeding up, and hence increasing the practical utility of, other amino acid sequence based predictors of protein-protein and protein

  9. FastRNABindR: Fast and Accurate Prediction of Protein-RNA Interface Residues

    PubMed Central

    EL-Manzalawy, Yasser; Abbas, Mostafa; Malluhi, Qutaibah; Honavar, Vasant

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of biological processes, including regulation of gene expression, protein synthesis, and replication and assembly of many viruses are mediated by RNA-protein interactions. However, experimental determination of the structures of protein-RNA complexes is expensive and technically challenging. Hence, a number of computational tools have been developed for predicting protein-RNA interfaces. Some of the state-of-the-art protein-RNA interface predictors rely on position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM)-based encoding of the protein sequences. The computational efforts needed for generating PSSMs severely limits the practical utility of protein-RNA interface prediction servers. In this work, we experiment with two approaches, random sampling and sequence similarity reduction, for extracting a representative reference database of protein sequences from more than 50 million protein sequences in UniRef100. Our results suggest that random sampled databases produce better PSSM profiles (in terms of the number of hits used to generate the profile and the distance of the generated profile to the corresponding profile generated using the entire UniRef100 data as well as the accuracy of the machine learning classifier trained using these profiles). Based on our results, we developed FastRNABindR, an improved version of RNABindR for predicting protein-RNA interface residues using PSSM profiles generated using 1% of the UniRef100 sequences sampled uniformly at random. To the best of our knowledge, FastRNABindR is the only protein-RNA interface residue prediction online server that requires generation of PSSM profiles for query sequences and accepts hundreds of protein sequences per submission. Our approach for determining the optimal BLAST database for a protein-RNA interface residue classification task has the potential of substantially speeding up, and hence increasing the practical utility of, other amino acid sequence based predictors of protein-protein and protein

  10. Quantification of mutant huntingtin protein in cerebrospinal fluid from Huntington’s disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Edward J.; Boggio, Roberto; Langbehn, Douglas; Robertson, Nicola; Haider, Salman; Miller, James R.C.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Leavitt, Blair R.; Kuhn, Rainer; Tabrizi, Sarah J.; Macdonald, Douglas; Weiss, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quantification of disease-associated proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been critical for the study and treatment of several neurodegenerative disorders; however, mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT), the cause of Huntington’s disease (HD), is at very low levels in CSF and, to our knowledge, has never been measured previously. METHODS: We developed an ultrasensitive single-molecule counting (SMC) mHTT immunoassay that was used to quantify mHTT levels in CSF samples from individuals bearing the HD mutation and from control individuals in 2 independent cohorts. RESULTS: This SMC mHTT immunoassay demonstrated high specificity for mHTT, high sensitivity with a femtomolar detection threshold, and a broad dynamic range. Analysis of the CSF samples showed that mHTT was undetectable in CSF from all controls but quantifiable in nearly all mutation carriers. The mHTT concentration in CSF was approximately 3-fold higher in patients with manifest HD than in premanifest mutation carriers. Moreover, mHTT levels increased as the disease progressed and were associated with 5-year onset probability. The mHTT concentration independently predicted cognitive and motor dysfunction. Furthermore, the level of mHTT was associated with the concentrations of tau and neurofilament light chain in the CSF, suggesting a neuronal origin for the detected mHTT. CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated that mHTT can be quantified in CSF from HD patients using the described SMC mHTT immunoassay. Moreover, the level of mHTT detected is associated with proximity to disease onset and diminished cognitive and motor function. The ability to quantify CSF mHTT will facilitate the study of HD, and mHTT quantification could potentially serve as a biomarker for the development and testing of experimental mHTT-lowering therapies for HD. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Not applicable. FUNDING: CHDI Foundation Inc.; Medical Research Council (MRC) UK; National Institutes for Health Research (NIHR); Rosetrees

  11. Toward more accurate ancestral protein genotype-phenotype reconstructions with the use of species tree-aware gene trees.

    PubMed

    Groussin, Mathieu; Hobbs, Joanne K; Szöllősi, Gergely J; Gribaldo, Simonetta; Arcus, Vickery L; Gouy, Manolo

    2015-01-01

    The resurrection of ancestral proteins provides direct insight into how natural selection has shaped proteins found in nature. By tracing substitutions along a gene phylogeny, ancestral proteins can be reconstructed in silico and subsequently synthesized in vitro. This elegant strategy reveals the complex mechanisms responsible for the evolution of protein functions and structures. However, to date, all protein resurrection studies have used simplistic approaches for ancestral sequence reconstruction (ASR), including the assumption that a single sequence alignment alone is sufficient to accurately reconstruct the history of the gene family. The impact of such shortcuts on conclusions about ancestral functions has not been investigated. Here, we show with simulations that utilizing information on species history using a model that accounts for the duplication, horizontal transfer, and loss (DTL) of genes statistically increases ASR accuracy. This underscores the importance of the tree topology in the inference of putative ancestors. We validate our in silico predictions using in vitro resurrection of the LeuB enzyme for the ancestor of the Firmicutes, a major and ancient bacterial phylum. With this particular protein, our experimental results demonstrate that information on the species phylogeny results in a biochemically more realistic and kinetically more stable ancestral protein. Additional resurrection experiments with different proteins are necessary to statistically quantify the impact of using species tree-aware gene trees on ancestral protein phenotypes. Nonetheless, our results suggest the need for incorporating both sequence and DTL information in future studies of protein resurrections to accurately define the genotype-phenotype space in which proteins diversify. PMID:25371435

  12. Accurate prediction of interfacial residues in two-domain proteins using evolutionary information: implications for three-dimensional modeling.

    PubMed

    Bhaskara, Ramachandra M; Padhi, Amrita; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2014-07-01

    With the preponderance of multidomain proteins in eukaryotic genomes, it is essential to recognize the constituent domains and their functions. Often function involves communications across the domain interfaces, and the knowledge of the interacting sites is essential to our understanding of the structure-function relationship. Using evolutionary information extracted from homologous domains in at least two diverse domain architectures (single and multidomain), we predict the interface residues corresponding to domains from the two-domain proteins. We also use information from the three-dimensional structures of individual domains of two-domain proteins to train naïve Bayes classifier model to predict the interfacial residues. Our predictions are highly accurate (∼85%) and specific (∼95%) to the domain-domain interfaces. This method is specific to multidomain proteins which contain domains in at least more than one protein architectural context. Using predicted residues to constrain domain-domain interaction, rigid-body docking was able to provide us with accurate full-length protein structures with correct orientation of domains. We believe that these results can be of considerable interest toward rational protein and interaction design, apart from providing us with valuable information on the nature of interactions. PMID:24375512

  13. LC-MS quantification of protein drugs: validating protein LC-MS methods with predigestion immunocapture.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Jeffrey; Ren, Bailuo; Mao, Yan; Chen, Lin-Zhi; Philip, Elsy

    2016-09-01

    A refinement of protein LC-MS bioanalysis is to use predigestion immunoaffinity capture to extract the drug from matrix prior to digestion. Because of their increased sensitivity, such hybrid assays have been successfully validated and applied to a number of clinical studies; however, they can also be subject to potential interferences from antidrug antibodies, circulating ligands or other matrix components specific to patient populations and/or dosed subjects. The purpose of this paper is to describe validation experiments that measure immunocapture efficiency, digestion efficiency, matrix effect and selectivity/specificity that can be used during method optimization and validation to test the resistance of the method to these potential interferences. The designs and benefits of these experiments are discussed in this report using an actual assay case study. PMID:27532431

  14. Multiplex quantification of protein toxins in human biofluids and food matrices using immunoextraction and high-resolution targeted mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dupré, Mathieu; Gilquin, Benoit; Fenaille, François; Feraudet-Tarisse, Cécile; Dano, Julie; Ferro, Myriam; Simon, Stéphanie; Junot, Christophe; Brun, Virginie; Becher, François

    2015-08-18

    The development of rapid methods for unambiguous identification and precise quantification of protein toxins in various matrices is essential for public health surveillance. Nowadays, analytical strategies classically rely on sensitive immunological assays, but mass spectrometry constitutes an attractive complementary approach thanks to direct measurement and protein characterization ability. We developed here an innovative multiplex immuno-LC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous and specific quantification of the three potential biological warfare agents, ricin, staphylococcal enterotoxin B, and epsilon toxin, in complex human biofluids and food matrices. At least 7 peptides were targeted for each toxin (43 peptides in total) with a quadrupole-Orbitrap high-resolution instrument for exquisite detection specificity. Quantification was performed using stable isotope-labeled toxin standards spiked early in the sample. Lower limits of quantification were determined at or close to 1 ng·mL(-1). The whole process was successfully applied to the quantitative analysis of toxins in complex samples such as milk, human urine, and plasma. Finally, we report new data on toxin stability with no evidence of toxin degradation in milk in a 48 h time frame, allowing relevant quantitative toxin analysis for samples collected in this time range. PMID:26167627

  15. Accurate prediction of cellular co-translational folding indicates proteins can switch from post- to co-translational folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissley, Daniel A.; Sharma, Ajeet K.; Ahmed, Nabeel; Friedrich, Ulrike A.; Kramer, Günter; Bukau, Bernd; O'Brien, Edward P.

    2016-02-01

    The rates at which domains fold and codons are translated are important factors in determining whether a nascent protein will co-translationally fold and function or misfold and malfunction. Here we develop a chemical kinetic model that calculates a protein domain's co-translational folding curve during synthesis using only the domain's bulk folding and unfolding rates and codon translation rates. We show that this model accurately predicts the course of co-translational folding measured in vivo for four different protein molecules. We then make predictions for a number of different proteins in yeast and find that synonymous codon substitutions, which change translation-elongation rates, can switch some protein domains from folding post-translationally to folding co-translationally--a result consistent with previous experimental studies. Our approach explains essential features of co-translational folding curves and predicts how varying the translation rate at different codon positions along a transcript's coding sequence affects this self-assembly process.

  16. Accurate design of co-assembling multi-component protein nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Neil P.; Bale, Jacob B.; Sheffler, William; McNamara, Dan E.; Gonen, Shane; Gonen, Tamir; Yeates, Todd O.; Baker, David

    2014-06-01

    The self-assembly of proteins into highly ordered nanoscale architectures is a hallmark of biological systems. The sophisticated functions of these molecular machines have inspired the development of methods to engineer self-assembling protein nanostructures; however, the design of multi-component protein nanomaterials with high accuracy remains an outstanding challenge. Here we report a computational method for designing protein nanomaterials in which multiple copies of two distinct subunits co-assemble into a specific architecture. We use the method to design five 24-subunit cage-like protein nanomaterials in two distinct symmetric architectures and experimentally demonstrate that their structures are in close agreement with the computational design models. The accuracy of the method and the number and variety of two-component materials that it makes accessible suggest a route to the construction of functional protein nanomaterials tailored to specific applications.

  17. Mass spectrometry-based quantification of myocardial protein adducts with acrolein in an in vivo model of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianyong; Stevens, Jan F.; Maier, Claudia S.

    2012-01-01

    Acrolein exposure leads to the formation of protein-acrolein adducts. Protein modification by acrolein has been associated with various chronic diseases including cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Here we report an analytical strategy that enables the quantification of Michael-type protein adducts of acrolein in mitochondrial proteome samples using liquid chromatography in combination with tandem mass spectrometry and selected ion monitoring (LC-MS/MS SRM) analysis. Our approach combines site-specific identification and relative quantification at the peptide level of protein–acrolein adducts in relation to the unmodified protein thiol pool. Treatment of 3-month old rats with CCl4, an established in vivo model of acute oxidative stress, resulted in significant increases in the ratios of distinct acrolein-adducted peptides to the corresponding unmodified thiol-peptides obtained from proteins that were isolated from cardiac mitochondria. The mitochondrial proteins that were found adducted by acrolein were malate dehydrogenase, NADH dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] flavoprotein 1, cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIb isoform 1, ATP synthase d chain, and ADP/ATP translocase 1. The findings indicate that protein modification by acrolein has potential value as an index of mitochondrial oxidative stress. PMID:21809440

  18. Characterization and quantification of proteins secreted by single human embryos prior to implantation.

    PubMed

    Poli, Maurizio; Ori, Alessandro; Child, Tim; Jaroudi, Souraya; Spath, Katharina; Beck, Martin; Wells, Dagan

    2015-11-01

    The use of in vitro fertilization (IVF) has revolutionized the treatment of infertility and is now responsible for 1-5% of all births in industrialized countries. During IVF, it is typical for patients to generate multiple embryos. However, only a small proportion of them possess the genetic and metabolic requirements needed in order to produce a healthy pregnancy. The identification of the embryo with the greatest developmental capacity represents a major challenge for fertility clinics. Current methods for the assessment of embryo competence are proven inefficient, and the inadvertent transfer of non-viable embryos is the principal reason why most IVF treatments (approximately two-thirds) end in failure. In this study, we investigate how the application of proteomic measurements could improve success rates in clinical embryology. We describe a procedure that allows the identification and quantification of proteins of embryonic origin, present in attomole concentrations in the blastocoel, the enclosed fluid-filled cavity that forms within 5-day-old human embryos. By using targeted proteomics, we demonstrate the feasibility of quantifying multiple proteins in samples derived from single blastocoels and that such measurements correlate with aspects of embryo viability, such as chromosomal (ploidy) status. This study illustrates the potential of high-sensitivity proteomics to measure clinically relevant biomarkers in minute samples and, more specifically, suggests that key aspects of embryo competence could be measured using a proteomic-based strategy, with negligible risk of harm to the living embryo. Our work paves the way for the development of "next-generation" embryo competence assessment strategies, based on functional proteomics. PMID:26471863

  19. Characterization and quantification of proteins secreted by single human embryos prior to implantation

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Maurizio; Ori, Alessandro; Child, Tim; Jaroudi, Souraya; Spath, Katharina; Beck, Martin; Wells, Dagan

    2015-01-01

    The use of in vitro fertilization (IVF) has revolutionized the treatment of infertility and is now responsible for 1–5% of all births in industrialized countries. During IVF, it is typical for patients to generate multiple embryos. However, only a small proportion of them possess the genetic and metabolic requirements needed in order to produce a healthy pregnancy. The identification of the embryo with the greatest developmental capacity represents a major challenge for fertility clinics. Current methods for the assessment of embryo competence are proven inefficient, and the inadvertent transfer of non-viable embryos is the principal reason why most IVF treatments (approximately two-thirds) end in failure. In this study, we investigate how the application of proteomic measurements could improve success rates in clinical embryology. We describe a procedure that allows the identification and quantification of proteins of embryonic origin, present in attomole concentrations in the blastocoel, the enclosed fluid-filled cavity that forms within 5-day-old human embryos. By using targeted proteomics, we demonstrate the feasibility of quantifying multiple proteins in samples derived from single blastocoels and that such measurements correlate with aspects of embryo viability, such as chromosomal (ploidy) status. This study illustrates the potential of high-sensitivity proteomics to measure clinically relevant biomarkers in minute samples and, more specifically, suggests that key aspects of embryo competence could be measured using a proteomic-based strategy, with negligible risk of harm to the living embryo. Our work paves the way for the development of “next-generation” embryo competence assessment strategies, based on functional proteomics. PMID:26471863

  20. VORFFIP-driven dock: V-D2OCK, a fast and accurate protein docking strategy.

    PubMed

    Segura, Joan; Marín-López, Manuel Alejandro; Jones, Pamela F; Oliva, Baldo; Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis

    2015-01-01

    The experimental determination of the structure of protein complexes cannot keep pace with the generation of interactomic data, hence resulting in an ever-expanding gap. As the structural details of protein complexes are central to a full understanding of the function and dynamics of the cell machinery, alternative strategies are needed to circumvent the bottleneck in structure determination. Computational protein docking is a valid and valuable approach to model the structure of protein complexes. In this work, we describe a novel computational strategy to predict the structure of protein complexes based on data-driven docking: VORFFIP-driven dock (V-D2OCK). This new approach makes use of our newly described method to predict functional sites in protein structures, VORFFIP, to define the region to be sampled during docking and structural clustering to reduce the number of models to be examined by users. V-D2OCK has been benchmarked using a validated and diverse set of protein complexes and compared to a state-of-art docking method. The speed and accuracy compared to contemporary tools justifies the potential use of VD2OCK for high-throughput, genome-wide, protein docking. Finally, we have developed a web interface that allows users to browser and visualize V-D2OCK predictions from the convenience of their web-browsers. PMID:25763838

  1. VORFFIP-Driven Dock: V-D2OCK, a Fast and Accurate Protein Docking Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Joan; Marín-López, Manuel Alejandro; Jones, Pamela F.; Oliva, Baldo; Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis

    2015-01-01

    The experimental determination of the structure of protein complexes cannot keep pace with the generation of interactomic data, hence resulting in an ever-expanding gap. As the structural details of protein complexes are central to a full understanding of the function and dynamics of the cell machinery, alternative strategies are needed to circumvent the bottleneck in structure determination. Computational protein docking is a valid and valuable approach to model the structure of protein complexes. In this work, we describe a novel computational strategy to predict the structure of protein complexes based on data-driven docking: VORFFIP-driven dock (V-D2OCK). This new approach makes use of our newly described method to predict functional sites in protein structures, VORFFIP, to define the region to be sampled during docking and structural clustering to reduce the number of models to be examined by users. V-D2OCK has been benchmarked using a validated and diverse set of protein complexes and compared to a state-of-art docking method. The speed and accuracy compared to contemporary tools justifies the potential use of VD2OCK for high-throughput, genome-wide, protein docking. Finally, we have developed a web interface that allows users to browser and visualize V-D2OCK predictions from the convenience of their web-browsers. PMID:25763838

  2. Are current atomistic force fields accurate enough to study proteins in crowded environments?

    PubMed

    Petrov, Drazen; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2014-05-01

    The high concentration of macromolecules in the crowded cellular interior influences different thermodynamic and kinetic properties of proteins, including their structural stabilities, intermolecular binding affinities and enzymatic rates. Moreover, various structural biology methods, such as NMR or different spectroscopies, typically involve samples with relatively high protein concentration. Due to large sampling requirements, however, the accuracy of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in capturing protein behavior at high concentration still remains largely untested. Here, we use explicit-solvent MD simulations and a total of 6.4 µs of simulated time to study wild-type (folded) and oxidatively damaged (unfolded) forms of villin headpiece at 6 mM and 9.2 mM protein concentration. We first perform an exhaustive set of simulations with multiple protein molecules in the simulation box using GROMOS 45a3 and 54a7 force fields together with different types of electrostatics treatment and solution ionic strengths. Surprisingly, the two villin headpiece variants exhibit similar aggregation behavior, despite the fact that their estimated aggregation propensities markedly differ. Importantly, regardless of the simulation protocol applied, wild-type villin headpiece consistently aggregates even under conditions at which it is experimentally known to be soluble. We demonstrate that aggregation is accompanied by a large decrease in the total potential energy, with not only hydrophobic, but also polar residues and backbone contributing substantially. The same effect is directly observed for two other major atomistic force fields (AMBER99SB-ILDN and CHARMM22-CMAP) as well as indirectly shown for additional two (AMBER94, OPLS-AAL), and is possibly due to a general overestimation of the potential energy of protein-protein interactions at the expense of water-water and water-protein interactions. Overall, our results suggest that current MD force fields may distort the

  3. Are Current Atomistic Force Fields Accurate Enough to Study Proteins in Crowded Environments?

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Drazen; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2014-01-01

    The high concentration of macromolecules in the crowded cellular interior influences different thermodynamic and kinetic properties of proteins, including their structural stabilities, intermolecular binding affinities and enzymatic rates. Moreover, various structural biology methods, such as NMR or different spectroscopies, typically involve samples with relatively high protein concentration. Due to large sampling requirements, however, the accuracy of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in capturing protein behavior at high concentration still remains largely untested. Here, we use explicit-solvent MD simulations and a total of 6.4 µs of simulated time to study wild-type (folded) and oxidatively damaged (unfolded) forms of villin headpiece at 6 mM and 9.2 mM protein concentration. We first perform an exhaustive set of simulations with multiple protein molecules in the simulation box using GROMOS 45a3 and 54a7 force fields together with different types of electrostatics treatment and solution ionic strengths. Surprisingly, the two villin headpiece variants exhibit similar aggregation behavior, despite the fact that their estimated aggregation propensities markedly differ. Importantly, regardless of the simulation protocol applied, wild-type villin headpiece consistently aggregates even under conditions at which it is experimentally known to be soluble. We demonstrate that aggregation is accompanied by a large decrease in the total potential energy, with not only hydrophobic, but also polar residues and backbone contributing substantially. The same effect is directly observed for two other major atomistic force fields (AMBER99SB-ILDN and CHARMM22-CMAP) as well as indirectly shown for additional two (AMBER94, OPLS-AAL), and is possibly due to a general overestimation of the potential energy of protein-protein interactions at the expense of water-water and water-protein interactions. Overall, our results suggest that current MD force fields may distort the

  4. Rapid and Thiol-Specific High-Throughput Assay for Simultaneous Relative Quantification of Total Thiols, Protein Thiols, and Nonprotein Thiols in Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Thiol groups in biological molecules play a significant role in various physiological functions and pathological conditions. Thiols are divided into two major groups: protein thiols and nonprotein thiols. Numerous methods have been reported for thiol assays. Most of these methods have been developed for glutathione, the principal nonprotein thiol, despite the fact that cellular protein thiols are more abundant than glutathione. Further, these methods usually involve a process of biological sample preparation followed by a separation method, and they are time-consuming. We reported previously a series of thiol-specific fluorogenic benzofurazan sulfides. These nonfluorescent benzofurazan sulfides react rapidly and specifically with a thiol to form a strong fluorescent thiol adduct. The rapid reaction, thiol-specific and fluorogenic nature of the sulfides successfully yielded an application of one of the sulfides for relative quantitation of total thiols in live cells through fluorescence microscopy. In this work, we employed the same compound to develop the first high-throughput method for simultaneous monitoring of protein thiols, nonprotein thiols, and total thiols in cells in a 96-well plate on a fluorescence microplate reader at λex = 430 nm and λem = 520 nm, respectively. The method is rapid and sensitive, and has been validated by an HPLC thiol assay method. The method can detect thiols with cell concentrations as low as 500 cells/well. We also demonstrated that the method can readily monitor changes in cellular thiol levels. Although the method cannot provide an absolute quantification for thiols because fluorescence intensity of different thiol adducts varies, it provides an accurate measurement of relative quantification, relative to the control. The method will be a valuable tool in thiol-related biomedical/pharmaceutical research. PMID:25423115

  5. Fast and accurate resonance assignment of small-to-large proteins by combining automated and manual approaches.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Markus; Ahlner, Alexandra; Andresen, Cecilia; Marsh, Joseph A; Lundström, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    The process of resonance assignment is fundamental to most NMR studies of protein structure and dynamics. Unfortunately, the manual assignment of residues is tedious and time-consuming, and can represent a significant bottleneck for further characterization. Furthermore, while automated approaches have been developed, they are often limited in their accuracy, particularly for larger proteins. Here, we address this by introducing the software COMPASS, which, by combining automated resonance assignment with manual intervention, is able to achieve accuracy approaching that from manual assignments at greatly accelerated speeds. Moreover, by including the option to compensate for isotope shift effects in deuterated proteins, COMPASS is far more accurate for larger proteins than existing automated methods. COMPASS is an open-source project licensed under GNU General Public License and is available for download from http://www.liu.se/forskning/foass/tidigare-foass/patrik-lundstrom/software?l=en. Source code and binaries for Linux, Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows are available. PMID:25569628

  6. PLIF: A rapid, accurate method to detect and quantitatively assess protein-lipid interactions.

    PubMed

    Ceccato, Laurie; Chicanne, Gaëtan; Nahoum, Virginie; Pons, Véronique; Payrastre, Bernard; Gaits-Iacovoni, Frédérique; Viaud, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are a type of cellular phospholipid that regulate signaling in a wide range of cellular and physiological processes through the interaction between their phosphorylated inositol head group and specific domains in various cytosolic proteins. These lipids also influence the activity of transmembrane proteins. Aberrant phosphoinositide signaling is associated with numerous diseases, including cancer, obesity, and diabetes. Thus, identifying phosphoinositide-binding partners and the aspects that define their specificity can direct drug development. However, current methods are costly, time-consuming, or technically challenging and inaccessible to many laboratories. We developed a method called PLIF (for "protein-lipid interaction by fluorescence") that uses fluorescently labeled liposomes and tethered, tagged proteins or peptides to enable fast and reliable determination of protein domain specificity for given phosphoinositides in a membrane environment. We validated PLIF against previously known phosphoinositide-binding partners for various proteins and obtained relative affinity profiles. Moreover, PLIF analysis of the sorting nexin (SNX) family revealed not only that SNXs bound most strongly to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P or PI3P), which is known from analysis with other methods, but also that they interacted with other phosphoinositides, which had not previously been detected using other techniques. Different phosphoinositide partners, even those with relatively weak binding affinity, could account for the diverse functions of SNXs in vesicular trafficking and protein sorting. Because PLIF is sensitive, semiquantitative, and performed in a high-throughput manner, it may be used to screen for highly specific protein-lipid interaction inhibitors. PMID:27025878

  7. Accurate frequency domain measurement of the best linear time-invariant approximation of linear time-periodic systems including the quantification of the time-periodic distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louarroudi, E.; Pintelon, R.; Lataire, J.

    2014-10-01

    Time-periodic (TP) phenomena occurring, for instance, in wind turbines, helicopters, anisotropic shaft-bearing systems, and cardiovascular/respiratory systems, are often not addressed when classical frequency response function (FRF) measurements are performed. As the traditional FRF concept is based on the linear time-invariant (LTI) system theory, it is only approximately valid for systems with varying dynamics. Accordingly, the quantification of any deviation from this ideal LTI framework is more than welcome. The “measure of deviation” allows us to define the notion of the best LTI (BLTI) approximation, which yields the best - in mean square sense - LTI description of a linear time-periodic LTP system. By taking into consideration the TP effects, it is shown in this paper that the variability of the BLTI measurement can be reduced significantly compared with that of classical FRF estimators. From a single experiment, the proposed identification methods can handle (non-)linear time-periodic [(N)LTP] systems in open-loop with a quantification of (i) the noise and/or the NL distortions, (ii) the TP distortions and (iii) the transient (leakage) errors. Besides, a geometrical interpretation of the BLTI approximation is provided, leading to a framework called vector FRF analysis. The theory presented is supported by numerical simulations as well as real measurements mimicking the well-known mechanical Mathieu oscillator.

  8. How accurate are polymer models in the analysis of Förster resonance energy transfer experiments on proteins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Edward P.; Morrison, Greg; Brooks, Bernard R.; Thirumalai, D.

    2009-03-01

    Single molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments are used to infer the properties of the denatured state ensemble (DSE) of proteins. From the measured average FRET efficiency, ⟨E⟩, the distance distribution P(R ) is inferred by assuming that the DSE can be described as a polymer. The single parameter in the appropriate polymer model (Gaussian chain, wormlike chain, or self-avoiding walk) for P(R ) is determined by equating the calculated and measured ⟨E⟩. In order to assess the accuracy of this "standard procedure," we consider the generalized Rouse model (GRM), whose properties [⟨E⟩ and P(R )] can be analytically computed, and the Molecular Transfer Model for protein L for which accurate simulations can be carried out as a function of guanadinium hydrochloride (GdmCl) concentration. Using the precisely computed ⟨E⟩ for the GRM and protein L, we infer P(R ) using the standard procedure. We find that the mean end-to-end distance can be accurately inferred (less than 10% relative error) using ⟨E⟩ and polymer models for P(R ). However, the value extracted for the radius of gyration (Rg) and the persistence length (lp) are less accurate. For protein L, the errors in the inferred properties increase as the GdmCl concentration increases for all polymer models. The relative error in the inferred Rg and lp, with respect to the exact values, can be as large as 25% at the highest GdmCl concentration. We propose a self-consistency test, requiring measurements of ⟨E⟩ by attaching dyes to different residues in the protein, to assess the validity of describing DSE using the Gaussian model. Application of the self-consistency test to the GRM shows that even for this simple model, which exhibits an order→disorder transition, the Gaussian P(R ) is inadequate. Analysis of experimental data of FRET efficiencies with dyes at several locations for the cold shock protein, and simulations results for protein L, for which accurate FRET

  9. DISPLAR: an accurate method for predicting DNA-binding sites on protein surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Tjong, Harianto; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2007-01-01

    Structural and physical properties of DNA provide important constraints on the binding sites formed on surfaces of DNA-targeting proteins. Characteristics of such binding sites may form the basis for predicting DNA-binding sites from the structures of proteins alone. Such an approach has been successfully developed for predicting protein–protein interface. Here this approach is adapted for predicting DNA-binding sites. We used a representative set of 264 protein–DNA complexes from the Protein Data Bank to analyze characteristics and to train and test a neural network predictor of DNA-binding sites. The input to the predictor consisted of PSI-blast sequence profiles and solvent accessibilities of each surface residue and 14 of its closest neighboring residues. Predicted DNA-contacting residues cover 60% of actual DNA-contacting residues and have an accuracy of 76%. This method significantly outperforms previous attempts of DNA-binding site predictions. Its application to the prion protein yielded a DNA-binding site that is consistent with recent NMR chemical shift perturbation data, suggesting that it can complement experimental techniques in characterizing protein–DNA interfaces. PMID:17284455

  10. A scalable and accurate method for classifying protein-ligand binding geometries using a MapReduce approach.

    PubMed

    Estrada, T; Zhang, B; Cicotti, P; Armen, R S; Taufer, M

    2012-07-01

    We present a scalable and accurate method for classifying protein-ligand binding geometries in molecular docking. Our method is a three-step process: the first step encodes the geometry of a three-dimensional (3D) ligand conformation into a single 3D point in the space; the second step builds an octree by assigning an octant identifier to every single point in the space under consideration; and the third step performs an octree-based clustering on the reduced conformation space and identifies the most dense octant. We adapt our method for MapReduce and implement it in Hadoop. The load-balancing, fault-tolerance, and scalability in MapReduce allow screening of very large conformation spaces not approachable with traditional clustering methods. We analyze results for docking trials for 23 protein-ligand complexes for HIV protease, 21 protein-ligand complexes for Trypsin, and 12 protein-ligand complexes for P38alpha kinase. We also analyze cross docking trials for 24 ligands, each docking into 24 protein conformations of the HIV protease, and receptor ensemble docking trials for 24 ligands, each docking in a pool of HIV protease receptors. Our method demonstrates significant improvement over energy-only scoring for the accurate identification of native ligand geometries in all these docking assessments. The advantages of our clustering approach make it attractive for complex applications in real-world drug design efforts. We demonstrate that our method is particularly useful for clustering docking results using a minimal ensemble of representative protein conformational states (receptor ensemble docking), which is now a common strategy to address protein flexibility in molecular docking. PMID:22658682

  11. PROMALS3D web server for accurate multiple protein sequence and structure alignments.

    PubMed

    Pei, Jimin; Tang, Ming; Grishin, Nick V

    2008-07-01

    Multiple sequence alignments are essential in computational sequence and structural analysis, with applications in homology detection, structure modeling, function prediction and phylogenetic analysis. We report PROMALS3D web server for constructing alignments for multiple protein sequences and/or structures using information from available 3D structures, database homologs and predicted secondary structures. PROMALS3D shows higher alignment accuracy than a number of other advanced methods. Input of PROMALS3D web server can be FASTA format protein sequences, PDB format protein structures and/or user-defined alignment constraints. The output page provides alignments with several formats, including a colored alignment augmented with useful information about sequence grouping, predicted secondary structures and consensus sequences. Intermediate results of sequence and structural database searches are also available. The PROMALS3D web server is available at: http://prodata.swmed.edu/promals3d/. PMID:18503087

  12. Accurate protein-peptide titration experiments by nuclear magnetic resonance using low-volume samples.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Christian; Recht, Raphaël; Quinternet, Marc; de Lamotte, Frederic; Delsuc, Marc-André; Kieffer, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy allows measurements of very accurate values of equilibrium dissociation constants using chemical shift perturbation methods, provided that the concentrations of the binding partners are known with high precision and accuracy. The accuracy and precision of these experiments are improved if performed using individual capillary tubes, a method enabling full automation of the measurement. We provide here a protocol to set up and perform these experiments as well as a robust method to measure peptide concentrations using tryptophan as an internal standard. PMID:25749962

  13. Accurate design of megadalton-scale two-component icosahedral protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Bale, Jacob B; Gonen, Shane; Liu, Yuxi; Sheffler, William; Ellis, Daniel; Thomas, Chantz; Cascio, Duilio; Yeates, Todd O; Gonen, Tamir; King, Neil P; Baker, David

    2016-07-22

    Nature provides many examples of self- and co-assembling protein-based molecular machines, including icosahedral protein cages that serve as scaffolds, enzymes, and compartments for essential biochemical reactions and icosahedral virus capsids, which encapsidate and protect viral genomes and mediate entry into host cells. Inspired by these natural materials, we report the computational design and experimental characterization of co-assembling, two-component, 120-subunit icosahedral protein nanostructures with molecular weights (1.8 to 2.8 megadaltons) and dimensions (24 to 40 nanometers in diameter) comparable to those of small viral capsids. Electron microscopy, small-angle x-ray scattering, and x-ray crystallography show that 10 designs spanning three distinct icosahedral architectures form materials closely matching the design models. In vitro assembly of icosahedral complexes from independently purified components occurs rapidly, at rates comparable to those of viral capsids, and enables controlled packaging of molecular cargo through charge complementarity. The ability to design megadalton-scale materials with atomic-level accuracy and controllable assembly opens the door to a new generation of genetically programmable protein-based molecular machines. PMID:27463675

  14. Measurements of accurate x-ray scattering data of protein solutions using small stationary sample cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Xinguo; Hao Quan

    2009-01-15

    In this paper, we report a method of precise in situ x-ray scattering measurements on protein solutions using small stationary sample cells. Although reduction in the radiation damage induced by intense synchrotron radiation sources is indispensable for the correct interpretation of scattering data, there is still a lack of effective methods to overcome radiation-induced aggregation and extract scattering profiles free from chemical or structural damage. It is found that radiation-induced aggregation mainly begins on the surface of the sample cell and grows along the beam path; the diameter of the damaged region is comparable to the x-ray beam size. Radiation-induced aggregation can be effectively avoided by using a two-dimensional scan (2D mode), with an interval as small as 1.5 times the beam size, at low temperature (e.g., 4 deg. C). A radiation sensitive protein, bovine hemoglobin, was used to test the method. A standard deviation of less than 5% in the small angle region was observed from a series of nine spectra recorded in 2D mode, in contrast to the intensity variation seen using the conventional stationary technique, which can exceed 100%. Wide-angle x-ray scattering data were collected at a standard macromolecular diffraction station using the same data collection protocol and showed a good signal/noise ratio (better than the reported data on the same protein using a flow cell). The results indicate that this method is an effective approach for obtaining precise measurements of protein solution scattering.

  15. LOCUSTRA: accurate prediction of local protein structure using a two-layer support vector machine approach.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Olav; Hansmann, Ulrich H E

    2008-09-01

    Constraint generation for 3d structure prediction and structure-based database searches benefit from fine-grained prediction of local structure. In this work, we present LOCUSTRA, a novel scheme for the multiclass prediction of local structure that uses two layers of support vector machines (SVM). Using a 16-letter structural alphabet from de Brevern et al. (Proteins: Struct., Funct., Bioinf. 2000, 41, 271-287), we assess its prediction ability for an independent test set of 222 proteins and compare our method to three-class secondary structure prediction and direct prediction of dihedral angles. The prediction accuracy is Q16=61.0% for the 16 classes of the structural alphabet and Q3=79.2% for a simple mapping to the three secondary classes helix, sheet, and coil. We achieve a mean phi(psi) error of 24.74 degrees (38.35 degrees) and a median RMSDA (root-mean-square deviation of the (dihedral) angles) per protein chain of 52.1 degrees. These results compare favorably with related approaches. The LOCUSTRA web server is freely available to researchers at http://www.fz-juelich.de/nic/cbb/service/service.php. PMID:18763837

  16. Combining Evolutionary Information and an Iterative Sampling Strategy for Accurate Protein Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Tatjana; Koehler Leman, Julia; Lange, Oliver F.

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has shown that the accuracy of ab initio structure prediction can be significantly improved by integrating evolutionary information in form of intra-protein residue-residue contacts. Following this seminal result, much effort is put into the improvement of contact predictions. However, there is also a substantial need to develop structure prediction protocols tailored to the type of restraints gained by contact predictions. Here, we present a structure prediction protocol that combines evolutionary information with the resolution-adapted structural recombination approach of Rosetta, called RASREC. Compared to the classic Rosetta ab initio protocol, RASREC achieves improved sampling, better convergence and higher robustness against incorrect distance restraints, making it the ideal sampling strategy for the stated problem. To demonstrate the accuracy of our protocol, we tested the approach on a diverse set of 28 globular proteins. Our method is able to converge for 26 out of the 28 targets and improves the average TM-score of the entire benchmark set from 0.55 to 0.72 when compared to the top ranked models obtained by the EVFold web server using identical contact predictions. Using a smaller benchmark, we furthermore show that the prediction accuracy of our method is only slightly reduced when the contact prediction accuracy is comparatively low. This observation is of special interest for protein sequences that only have a limited number of homologs. PMID:26713437

  17. Mathematical model accurately predicts protein release from an affinity-based delivery system.

    PubMed

    Vulic, Katarina; Pakulska, Malgosia M; Sonthalia, Rohit; Ramachandran, Arun; Shoichet, Molly S

    2015-01-10

    Affinity-based controlled release modulates the delivery of protein or small molecule therapeutics through transient dissociation/association. To understand which parameters can be used to tune release, we used a mathematical model based on simple binding kinetics. A comprehensive asymptotic analysis revealed three characteristic regimes for therapeutic release from affinity-based systems. These regimes can be controlled by diffusion or unbinding kinetics, and can exhibit release over either a single stage or two stages. This analysis fundamentally changes the way we think of controlling release from affinity-based systems and thereby explains some of the discrepancies in the literature on which parameters influence affinity-based release. The rate of protein release from affinity-based systems is determined by the balance of diffusion of the therapeutic agent through the hydrogel and the dissociation kinetics of the affinity pair. Equations for tuning protein release rate by altering the strength (KD) of the affinity interaction, the concentration of binding ligand in the system, the rate of dissociation (koff) of the complex, and the hydrogel size and geometry, are provided. We validated our model by collapsing the model simulations and the experimental data from a recently described affinity release system, to a single master curve. Importantly, this mathematical analysis can be applied to any single species affinity-based system to determine the parameters required for a desired release profile. PMID:25449806

  18. Accurate Estimation of Protein Folding and Unfolding Times: Beyond Markov State Models.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Ernesto; Adelman, Joshua L; Zuckerman, Daniel M

    2016-08-01

    Because standard molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are unable to access time scales of interest in complex biomolecular systems, it is common to "stitch together" information from multiple shorter trajectories using approximate Markov state model (MSM) analysis. However, MSMs may require significant tuning and can yield biased results. Here, by analyzing some of the longest protein MD data sets available (>100 μs per protein), we show that estimators constructed based on exact non-Markovian (NM) principles can yield significantly improved mean first-passage times (MFPTs) for protein folding and unfolding. In some cases, MSM bias of more than an order of magnitude can be corrected when identical trajectory data are reanalyzed by non-Markovian approaches. The NM analysis includes "history" information, higher order time correlations compared to MSMs, that is available in every MD trajectory. The NM strategy is insensitive to fine details of the states used and works well when a fine time-discretization (i.e., small "lag time") is used. PMID:27340835

  19. Relative Quantification of Sites of Peptide and Protein Modification Using Size Exclusion Chromatography Coupled with Electron Transfer Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Boer; Sharp, Joshua S.

    2016-04-01

    One difficult problem in the analysis of peptide modifications is quantifying isomeric modifications that differ by the position of the amino acid modified. HPLC separation using C18 reverse phase chromatography coupled with electron transfer dissociation (ETD) in tandem mass spectrometry has recently been shown to be able to relatively quantify how much of a given modification occurs at each amino acid position for isomeric mixtures; however, the resolution of reverse phase chromatography greatly complicates quantification of isomeric modifications by ETD because of the chromatographic separation of peptides with identical modifications at different sequence positions. Using peptide oxidation as a model system, we investigated the use of size exclusion chromatography coupled with ETD fragmentation to separate peptide sequences. This approach allows for the benefits of chromatographic separation of peptide sequences while ensuring co-elution of modification isomers for accurate relative quantification of modifications using standard data-dependent acquisitions. Using this method, the relative amount of modification at each amino acid can be accurately measured from single ETD MS/MS spectra in a standard data-dependent acquisition experiment.

  20. Relative Quantification of Sites of Peptide and Protein Modification Using Size Exclusion Chromatography Coupled with Electron Transfer Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Boer; Sharp, Joshua S

    2016-08-01

    One difficult problem in the analysis of peptide modifications is quantifying isomeric modifications that differ by the position of the amino acid modified. HPLC separation using C18 reverse phase chromatography coupled with electron transfer dissociation (ETD) in tandem mass spectrometry has recently been shown to be able to relatively quantify how much of a given modification occurs at each amino acid position for isomeric mixtures; however, the resolution of reverse phase chromatography greatly complicates quantification of isomeric modifications by ETD because of the chromatographic separation of peptides with identical modifications at different sequence positions. Using peptide oxidation as a model system, we investigated the use of size exclusion chromatography coupled with ETD fragmentation to separate peptide sequences. This approach allows for the benefits of chromatographic separation of peptide sequences while ensuring co-elution of modification isomers for accurate relative quantification of modifications using standard data-dependent acquisitions. Using this method, the relative amount of modification at each amino acid can be accurately measured from single ETD MS/MS spectra in a standard data-dependent acquisition experiment. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27075875

  1. Relative Quantification of Sites of Peptide and Protein Modification Using Size Exclusion Chromatography Coupled with Electron Transfer Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Boer; Sharp, Joshua S.

    2016-08-01

    One difficult problem in the analysis of peptide modifications is quantifying isomeric modifications that differ by the position of the amino acid modified. HPLC separation using C18 reverse phase chromatography coupled with electron transfer dissociation (ETD) in tandem mass spectrometry has recently been shown to be able to relatively quantify how much of a given modification occurs at each amino acid position for isomeric mixtures; however, the resolution of reverse phase chromatography greatly complicates quantification of isomeric modifications by ETD because of the chromatographic separation of peptides with identical modifications at different sequence positions. Using peptide oxidation as a model system, we investigated the use of size exclusion chromatography coupled with ETD fragmentation to separate peptide sequences. This approach allows for the benefits of chromatographic separation of peptide sequences while ensuring co-elution of modification isomers for accurate relative quantification of modifications using standard data-dependent acquisitions. Using this method, the relative amount of modification at each amino acid can be accurately measured from single ETD MS/MS spectra in a standard data-dependent acquisition experiment.

  2. Quantification of Borrelia burgdorferi Membrane Proteins in Human Serum: A New Concept for Detection of Bacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Crystal S F; Anderson, Kyle W; Benitez, Kenia Y Villatoro; Soloski, Mark J; Aucott, John N; Phinney, Karen W; Turko, Illarion V

    2015-11-17

    The Borrelia burgdorferi spirochete is the causative agent of Lyme disease, the most common tick-borne disease in the United States. The low abundance of bacterial proteins in human serum during infection imposes a challenge for early proteomic detection of Lyme disease. To address this challenge, we propose to detect membrane proteins released from bacteria due to disruption of their plasma membrane triggered by the innate immune system. These membrane proteins can be separated from the bulk of serum proteins by high-speed centrifugation causing substantial sample enrichment prior to targeted protein quantification using multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry. This new approach was first applied to detection of B. burgdorferi membrane proteins supplemented in human serum. Our results indicated that detection of B. burgdorferi membrane proteins, which are ≈10(7) lower in abundance than major serum proteins, is feasible. Therefore, quantitative analysis was also carried out for serum samples from three patients with acute Lyme disease. We were able to demonstrate the detection of ospA, the major B. burgdorferi lipoprotein at the level of 4.0 fmol of ospA/mg of serum protein. The results confirm the concept and suggest that the proposed approach can be expanded to detect other bacterial infections in humans, particularly where existing diagnostics are unreliable. PMID:26491962

  3. Accurate in silico identification of protein succinylation sites using an iterative semi-supervised learning technique.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaowei; Ning, Qiao; Chai, Haiting; Ma, Zhiqiang

    2015-06-01

    As a widespread type of protein post-translational modifications (PTMs), succinylation plays an important role in regulating protein conformation, function and physicochemical properties. Compared with the labor-intensive and time-consuming experimental approaches, computational predictions of succinylation sites are much desirable due to their convenient and fast speed. Currently, numerous computational models have been developed to identify PTMs sites through various types of two-class machine learning algorithms. These methods require both positive and negative samples for training. However, designation of the negative samples of PTMs was difficult and if it is not properly done can affect the performance of computational models dramatically. So that in this work, we implemented the first application of positive samples only learning (PSoL) algorithm to succinylation sites prediction problem, which was a special class of semi-supervised machine learning that used positive samples and unlabeled samples to train the model. Meanwhile, we proposed a novel succinylation sites computational predictor called SucPred (succinylation site predictor) by using multiple feature encoding schemes. Promising results were obtained by the SucPred predictor with an accuracy of 88.65% using 5-fold cross validation on the training dataset and an accuracy of 84.40% on the independent testing dataset, which demonstrated that the positive samples only learning algorithm presented here was particularly useful for identification of protein succinylation sites. Besides, the positive samples only learning algorithm can be applied to build predictors for other types of PTMs sites with ease. A web server for predicting succinylation sites was developed and was freely accessible at http://59.73.198.144:8088/SucPred/. PMID:25843215

  4. Accurate determination of the diffusion coefficient of proteins by Fourier analysis with whole column imaging detection.

    PubMed

    Zarabadi, Atefeh S; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2015-02-17

    Analysis in the frequency domain is considered a powerful tool to elicit precise information from spectroscopic signals. In this study, the Fourier transformation technique is employed to determine the diffusion coefficient (D) of a number of proteins in the frequency domain. Analytical approaches are investigated for determination of D from both experimental and data treatment viewpoints. The diffusion process is modeled to calculate diffusion coefficients based on the Fourier transformation solution to Fick's law equation, and its results are compared to time domain results. The simulations characterize optimum spatial and temporal conditions and demonstrate the noise tolerance of the method. The proposed model is validated by its application for the electropherograms from the diffusion path of a set of proteins. Real-time dynamic scanning is conducted to monitor dispersion by employing whole column imaging detection technology in combination with capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF) and the imaging plug flow (iPF) experiment. These experimental techniques provide different peak shapes, which are utilized to demonstrate the Fourier transformation ability in extracting diffusion coefficients out of irregular shape signals. Experimental results confirmed that the Fourier transformation procedure substantially enhanced the accuracy of the determined values compared to those obtained in the time domain. PMID:25607375

  5. Accurate microRNA target prediction correlates with protein repression levels

    PubMed Central

    Maragkakis, Manolis; Alexiou, Panagiotis; Papadopoulos, Giorgio L; Reczko, Martin; Dalamagas, Theodore; Giannopoulos, George; Goumas, George; Koukis, Evangelos; Kourtis, Kornilios; Simossis, Victor A; Sethupathy, Praveen; Vergoulis, Thanasis; Koziris, Nectarios; Sellis, Timos; Tsanakas, Panagiotis; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G

    2009-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs are small endogenously expressed non-coding RNA molecules that regulate target gene expression through translation repression or messenger RNA degradation. MicroRNA regulation is performed through pairing of the microRNA to sites in the messenger RNA of protein coding genes. Since experimental identification of miRNA target genes poses difficulties, computational microRNA target prediction is one of the key means in deciphering the role of microRNAs in development and disease. Results DIANA-microT 3.0 is an algorithm for microRNA target prediction which is based on several parameters calculated individually for each microRNA and combines conserved and non-conserved microRNA recognition elements into a final prediction score, which correlates with protein production fold change. Specifically, for each predicted interaction the program reports a signal to noise ratio and a precision score which can be used as an indication of the false positive rate of the prediction. Conclusion Recently, several computational target prediction programs were benchmarked based on a set of microRNA target genes identified by the pSILAC method. In this assessment DIANA-microT 3.0 was found to achieve the highest precision among the most widely used microRNA target prediction programs reaching approximately 66%. The DIANA-microT 3.0 prediction results are available online in a user friendly web server at PMID:19765283

  6. Accurate prediction of cellular co-translational folding indicates proteins can switch from post- to co-translational folding.

    PubMed

    Nissley, Daniel A; Sharma, Ajeet K; Ahmed, Nabeel; Friedrich, Ulrike A; Kramer, Günter; Bukau, Bernd; O'Brien, Edward P

    2016-01-01

    The rates at which domains fold and codons are translated are important factors in determining whether a nascent protein will co-translationally fold and function or misfold and malfunction. Here we develop a chemical kinetic model that calculates a protein domain's co-translational folding curve during synthesis using only the domain's bulk folding and unfolding rates and codon translation rates. We show that this model accurately predicts the course of co-translational folding measured in vivo for four different protein molecules. We then make predictions for a number of different proteins in yeast and find that synonymous codon substitutions, which change translation-elongation rates, can switch some protein domains from folding post-translationally to folding co-translationally--a result consistent with previous experimental studies. Our approach explains essential features of co-translational folding curves and predicts how varying the translation rate at different codon positions along a transcript's coding sequence affects this self-assembly process. PMID:26887592

  7. Accurate prediction of cellular co-translational folding indicates proteins can switch from post- to co-translational folding

    PubMed Central

    Nissley, Daniel A.; Sharma, Ajeet K.; Ahmed, Nabeel; Friedrich, Ulrike A.; Kramer, Günter; Bukau, Bernd; O'Brien, Edward P.

    2016-01-01

    The rates at which domains fold and codons are translated are important factors in determining whether a nascent protein will co-translationally fold and function or misfold and malfunction. Here we develop a chemical kinetic model that calculates a protein domain's co-translational folding curve during synthesis using only the domain's bulk folding and unfolding rates and codon translation rates. We show that this model accurately predicts the course of co-translational folding measured in vivo for four different protein molecules. We then make predictions for a number of different proteins in yeast and find that synonymous codon substitutions, which change translation-elongation rates, can switch some protein domains from folding post-translationally to folding co-translationally—a result consistent with previous experimental studies. Our approach explains essential features of co-translational folding curves and predicts how varying the translation rate at different codon positions along a transcript's coding sequence affects this self-assembly process. PMID:26887592

  8. Accurate quantification of total chromium and its speciation form Cr(VI) in water by ICP-DRC-IDMS and HPLC/ICP-DRC-IDMS.

    PubMed

    Markiewicz, Barbara; Komorowicz, Izabela; Barałkiewicz, Danuta

    2016-05-15

    Two analytical procedures have been developed for the determination of total chromium (TCr) and its highly toxic species, i.e. Cr(VI) in water samples using the following methods: inductively coupled plasma dynamic reaction cell isotope dilution mass spectrometry (ICP-DRC-IDMS) and high performance liquid chromatography inductively coupled plasma dynamic reaction cell isotope dilution mass spectrometry (HPLC/ICP-DRC-IDMS). Spectral interferences, predominantly occurring in chromium determination, were removed using a dynamic reaction cell (DRC). The presented procedures facilitate the quantification of trace amounts - below 1 µg L(-1) of TCr and individual Cr species - in various water matrices including drinking water and still bottled water with different mineral composition. Special attention has been paid to the adequate preparation of isotopically enriched (53)Cr(VI) standard solution in order to avoid artifacts in chromium speciation. Both procedures were fully validated as well as establishing the traceability and estimation of the uncertainty of measurement were carried out. Application of all of the above mentioned elements and of the isotope dilution technique, which provides the highest quality of metrological traceability, allowed to obtain reliable and high quality results of chromium determination in water samples. Additionally, the comparison of two methods: HPLC/ICP-DRC-MS and HPLC/ICP-DRC-IDMS for Cr(VI) determination, was submitted basing on the validation parameters. As a result, the lower values for these parameters were obtained using the second method. PMID:26992546

  9. Accurate and reproducible detection of proteins in water using an extended-gate type organic transistor biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamiki, Tsukuru; Minami, Tsuyoshi; Kurita, Ryoji; Niwa, Osamu; Wakida, Shin-ichi; Fukuda, Kenjiro; Kumaki, Daisuke; Tokito, Shizuo

    2014-06-01

    In this Letter, we describe an accurate antibody detection method using a fabricated extended-gate type organic field-effect-transistor (OFET), which can be operated at below 3 V. The protein-sensing portion of the designed device is the gate electrode functionalized with streptavidin. Streptavidin possesses high molecular recognition ability for biotin, which specifically allows for the detection of biotinylated proteins. Here, we attempted to detect biotinylated immunoglobulin G (IgG) and observed a shift of threshold voltage of the OFET upon the addition of the antibody in an aqueous solution with a competing bovine serum albumin interferent. The detection limit for the biotinylated IgG was 8 nM, which indicates the potential utility of the designed device in healthcare applications.

  10. Use B-factor related features for accurate classification between protein binding interfaces and crystal packing contacts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Distinction between true protein interactions and crystal packing contacts is important for structural bioinformatics studies to respond to the need of accurate classification of the rapidly increasing protein structures. There are many unannotated crystal contacts and there also exist false annotations in this rapidly expanding volume of data. Previous tools have been proposed to address this problem. However, challenging issues still remain, such as low performance when the training and test data contain mixed interfaces having diverse sizes of contact areas. Methods and results B factor is a measure to quantify the vibrational motion of an atom, a more relevant feature than interface size to characterize protein binding. We propose to use three features related to B factor for the classification between biological interfaces and crystal packing contacts. The first feature is the sum of the normalized B factors of the interfacial atoms in the contact area, the second is the average of the interfacial B factor per residue in the chain, and the third is the average number of interfacial atoms with a negative normalized B factor per residue in the chain. We investigate the distribution properties of these basic features and a compound feature on four datasets of biological binding and crystal packing, and on a protein binding-only dataset with known binding affinity. We also compare the cross-dataset classification performance of these features with existing methods and with a widely-used and the most effective feature interface area. The results demonstrate that our features outperform the interface area approach and the existing prediction methods remarkably for many tests on all of these datasets. Conclusions The proposed B factor related features are more effective than interface area to distinguish crystal packing from biological binding interfaces. Our computational methods have a potential for large-scale and accurate identification of biological

  11. DisoMCS: Accurately Predicting Protein Intrinsically Disordered Regions Using a Multi-Class Conservative Score Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiheng; Yang, Qianqian; Li, Tonghua; Cong, Peisheng

    2015-01-01

    The precise prediction of protein intrinsically disordered regions, which play a crucial role in biological procedures, is a necessary prerequisite to further the understanding of the principles and mechanisms of protein function. Here, we propose a novel predictor, DisoMCS, which is a more accurate predictor of protein intrinsically disordered regions. The DisoMCS bases on an original multi-class conservative score (MCS) obtained by sequence-order/disorder alignment. Initially, near-disorder regions are defined on fragments located at both the terminus of an ordered region connecting a disordered region. Then the multi-class conservative score is generated by sequence alignment against a known structure database and represented as order, near-disorder and disorder conservative scores. The MCS of each amino acid has three elements: order, near-disorder and disorder profiles. Finally, the MCS is exploited as features to identify disordered regions in sequences. DisoMCS utilizes a non-redundant data set as the training set, MCS and predicted secondary structure as features, and a conditional random field as the classification algorithm. In predicted near-disorder regions a residue is determined as an order or a disorder according to the optimized decision threshold. DisoMCS was evaluated by cross-validation, large-scale prediction, independent tests and CASP (Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction) tests. All results confirmed that DisoMCS was very competitive in terms of accuracy of prediction when compared with well-established publicly available disordered region predictors. It also indicated our approach was more accurate when a query has higher homologous with the knowledge database. Availability The DisoMCS is available at http://cal.tongji.edu.cn/disorder/. PMID:26090958

  12. Accurate quantification of sphingosine-1-phosphate in normal and Fabry disease plasma, cells and tissues by LC-MS/MS with (13)C-encoded natural S1P as internal standard.

    PubMed

    Mirzaian, Mina; Wisse, Patrick; Ferraz, Maria J; Marques, André R A; Gabriel, Tanit L; van Roomen, Cindy P A A; Ottenhoff, Roelof; van Eijk, Marco; Codée, Jeroen D C; van der Marel, Gijsbert A; Overkleeft, Herman S; Aerts, Johannes M

    2016-08-01

    We developed a mass spectrometric procedure to quantify sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in biological materials. The use of newly synthesized (13)C5 C18-S1P and commercial C17-S1P as internal standards rendered very similar results with respect to linearity, limit of detection and limit of quantitation. Caution is warranted with determination of plasma S1P levels. Earlier it was reported that S1P is elevated in plasma of Fabry disease patients. We investigated this with the improved quantification. No clear conclusion could be drawn for patient plasma samples given the lack of uniformity of blood collection and plasma preparation. To still obtain insight, plasma and tissues were identically collected from α-galactosidase A deficient Fabry mice and matched control animals. No significant difference was observed in plasma S1P levels. A significant 2.3 fold increase was observed in kidney of Fabry mice, but not in liver and heart. Comparative analysis of S1P in cultured fibroblasts from normal subjects and classically affected Fabry disease males revealed no significant difference. In conclusion, accurate quantification of S1P in biological materials is feasible by mass spectrometry using the internal standards (13)C5 C18-S1P or C17-S1P. Significant local increases of S1P in the kidney might occur in Fabry disease as suggested by the mouse model. PMID:27221202

  13. Accurate ab initio prediction of NMR chemical shifts of nucleic acids and nucleic acids/protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Victora, Andrea; Möller, Heiko M.; Exner, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    NMR chemical shift predictions based on empirical methods are nowadays indispensable tools during resonance assignment and 3D structure calculation of proteins. However, owing to the very limited statistical data basis, such methods are still in their infancy in the field of nucleic acids, especially when non-canonical structures and nucleic acid complexes are considered. Here, we present an ab initio approach for predicting proton chemical shifts of arbitrary nucleic acid structures based on state-of-the-art fragment-based quantum chemical calculations. We tested our prediction method on a diverse set of nucleic acid structures including double-stranded DNA, hairpins, DNA/protein complexes and chemically-modified DNA. Overall, our quantum chemical calculations yield highly/very accurate predictions with mean absolute deviations of 0.3–0.6 ppm and correlation coefficients (r2) usually above 0.9. This will allow for identifying misassignments and validating 3D structures. Furthermore, our calculations reveal that chemical shifts of protons involved in hydrogen bonding are predicted significantly less accurately. This is in part caused by insufficient inclusion of solvation effects. However, it also points toward shortcomings of current force fields used for structure determination of nucleic acids. Our quantum chemical calculations could therefore provide input for force field optimization. PMID:25404135

  14. Accurate ab initio prediction of NMR chemical shifts of nucleic acids and nucleic acids/protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Victora, Andrea; Möller, Heiko M; Exner, Thomas E

    2014-12-16

    NMR chemical shift predictions based on empirical methods are nowadays indispensable tools during resonance assignment and 3D structure calculation of proteins. However, owing to the very limited statistical data basis, such methods are still in their infancy in the field of nucleic acids, especially when non-canonical structures and nucleic acid complexes are considered. Here, we present an ab initio approach for predicting proton chemical shifts of arbitrary nucleic acid structures based on state-of-the-art fragment-based quantum chemical calculations. We tested our prediction method on a diverse set of nucleic acid structures including double-stranded DNA, hairpins, DNA/protein complexes and chemically-modified DNA. Overall, our quantum chemical calculations yield highly/very accurate predictions with mean absolute deviations of 0.3-0.6 ppm and correlation coefficients (r(2)) usually above 0.9. This will allow for identifying misassignments and validating 3D structures. Furthermore, our calculations reveal that chemical shifts of protons involved in hydrogen bonding are predicted significantly less accurately. This is in part caused by insufficient inclusion of solvation effects. However, it also points toward shortcomings of current force fields used for structure determination of nucleic acids. Our quantum chemical calculations could therefore provide input for force field optimization. PMID:25404135

  15. Accuracy and Reproducibility in Quantification of Plasma Protein Concentrations by Mass Spectrometry without the Use of Isotopic Standards

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Gertjan; Woolerton, Yvonne; van Straalen, Jan P.; Vissers, Johannes P. C.; Dekker, Nick; Langridge, James I.; Beynon, Robert J.; Speijer, Dave; Sturk, Auguste; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Quantitative proteomic analysis with mass spectrometry holds great promise for simultaneously quantifying proteins in various biosamples, such as human plasma. Thus far, studies addressing the reproducible measurement of endogenous protein concentrations in human plasma have focussed on targeted analyses employing isotopically labelled standards. Non-targeted proteomics, on the other hand, has been less employed to this end, even though it has been instrumental in discovery proteomics, generating large datasets in multiple fields of research. Results Using a non-targeted mass spectrometric assay (LCMSE), we quantified abundant plasma proteins (43 mg/mL—40 ug/mL range) in human blood plasma specimens from 30 healthy volunteers and one blood serum sample (ProteomeXchange: PXD000347). Quantitative results were obtained by label-free mass spectrometry using a single internal standard to estimate protein concentrations. This approach resulted in quantitative results for 59 proteins (cut off ≥11 samples quantified) of which 41 proteins were quantified in all 31 samples and 23 of these with an inter-assay variability of ≤ 20%. Results for 7 apolipoproteins were compared with those obtained using isotope-labelled standards, while 12 proteins were compared to routine immunoassays. Comparison of quantitative data obtained by LCMSE and immunoassays showed good to excellent correlations in relative protein abundance (r = 0.72–0.96) and comparable median concentrations for 8 out of 12 proteins tested. Plasma concentrations of 56 proteins determined by LCMSE were of similar accuracy as those reported by targeted studies and 7 apolipoproteins quantified by isotope-labelled standards, when compared to reference concentrations from literature. Conclusions This study shows that LCMSE offers good quantification of relative abundance as well as reasonable estimations of concentrations of abundant plasma proteins. PMID:26474480

  16. Identification and quantification of major maillard cross-links in human serum albumin and lens protein. Evidence for glucosepane as the dominant compound.

    PubMed

    Biemel, Klaus M; Friedl, D Alexander; Lederer, Markus O

    2002-07-12

    Glycation reactions leading to protein modifications (advanced glycation end products) contribute to various pathologies associated with the general aging process and long term complications of diabetes. However, only few relevant compounds have so far been detected in vivo. We now report on the first unequivocal identification of the lysine-arginine cross-links glucosepane 5, DOGDIC 6, MODIC 7, and GODIC 8 in human material. For their accurate quantification by coupled liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, (13)C-labeled reference compounds were synthesized independently. Compounds 5-8 are formed via the alpha-dicarbonyl compounds N(6)-(2,3-dihydroxy-5,6-dioxohexyl)-l-lysinate (1a,b), 3-deoxyglucosone (), methylglyoxal (), and glyoxal (), respectively. The protein-bound dideoxyosone 1a,b seems to be of prime significance for cross-linking because it presumably is not detoxified by mammalian enzymes as readily as 2-4. Hence, the follow-up product glucosepane 5 was found to be the dominant compound. Up to 42.3 pmol of 5/mg of protein was identified in human serum albumin of diabetics; the level of 5 correlates markedly with the glycated hemoglobin HbA(1c). In the water-insoluble fraction of lens proteins from normoglycemics, concentration of 5 ranges between 132.3 and 241.7 pmol/mg. The advanced glycoxidation end product GODIC 8 is elevated significantly in brunescent lenses, indicating enhanced oxidative stress in this material. Compounds 5-8 thus appear predestined as markers for pathophysiological processes. PMID:11978796

  17. (1)H MRS in the rat brain under pentobarbital anesthesia: accurate quantification of in vivo spectra in the presence of propylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Iltis, Isabelle; Marjańska, Małgorzata; Du, Fei; Koski, Dee M; Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Ugurbil, Kâmil; Chen, Wei; Henry, Pierre-Gilles

    2008-03-01

    Commercial solutions for pentobarbital anesthesia typically contain water H spectra. The purpose of the present study was to measure the concentration of metabolites in the rat brain in vivo under pentobarbital anesthesia using 1H MRS. Resonances of PG, but not ethanol, were observed in the rat brain. Chemical shifts and J-coupling constants for PG were measured at 37 degrees C and pH 7.1 and used for spectral simulation. Inclusion of the simulated PG spectrum in the basis set for LCModel analysis enabled accurate fitting of in vivo spectra. This work demonstrates that concentration of brain metabolites can be reliably measured using 1H spectroscopy under pentobarbital anesthesia. The chemical shifts and J-coupling values reported here can be used to simulate the spectrum of PG at any field strength, with various pulse sequences. PMID:18224694

  18. A direct droplet digital PCR method for quantification of residual DNA in protein drugs produced in yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Musaddeq; Fantuzzo, Rebecca; Mercorelli, Suzanne; Cullen, Constance

    2016-05-10

    Yeast cells, in particular Pichia pastoris, are the host cell of choice for manufacturing several protein therapeutic agents in the biopharmaceutical industry. Host cell DNA is an impurity of such manufacturing process and the residual DNA after the purification process of the drug must be monitored to ensure drug purity and safety. Currently, real-time PCR (qPCR) based methods are widely employed for quantification of host residual DNA. At the same time the digital PCR technology is coming into prominence with promise of higher sensitivity. Here we report a method where the protein drug is directly added to the droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) reaction including yeast-specific primers and fluorescent-tagged probe and nanoliter-sized droplets are generated. The droplets are then subjected to PCR followed by analysis for fluorescence. This Pichia residual DNA direct ddPCR method for yeast can be used to test higher amount of drug compared to the corresponding qPCR method thereby increasing sensitivity, retaining high precision and accuracy and has a wide linear range of determination. The method has been successfully tested with three batches of a recombinant human IgG1-Fc-based drug (RP-1) and with commercially available human insulin, both manufactured in yeast cells. This method simplifies the residual DNA quantification protocol by eliminating DNA extraction or protease digestion and eliminates use of DNA standards in day-to-day running of the method. PMID:26896631

  19. Accurate prediction for atomic-level protein design and its application in diversifying the near-optimal sequence space.

    PubMed

    Fromer, Menachem; Yanover, Chen

    2009-05-15

    precisely. Examination of the predicted ensembles indicates that, for each structure, the amino acid identity at a majority of positions must be chosen extremely selectively so as to not incur significant energetic penalties. We investigate this high degree of similarity and demonstrate how more diverse near-optimal sequences can be predicted in order to systematically overcome this bottleneck for computational design. Finally, we exploit this in-depth analysis of a collection of the lowest energy sequences to suggest an explanation for previously observed experimental design results. The novel methodologies introduced here accurately portray the sequence space compatible with a protein structure and further supply a scheme to yield heterogeneous low-energy sequences, thus providing a powerful instrument for future work on protein design. PMID:19003998

  20. Accurate mass determination, quantification and determination of detection limits in liquid chromatography-high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry: challenges and practical solutions.

    PubMed

    Vergeynst, Leendert; Van Langenhove, Herman; Joos, Pieter; Demeestere, Kristof

    2013-07-30

    Uniform guidelines for the data processing and validation of qualitative and quantitative multi-residue analysis using full-spectrum high-resolution mass spectrometry are scarce. Through systematic research, optimal mass accuracy and sensitivity are obtained after refining the post-processing of the HRMS data. For qualitative analysis, transforming the raw profile spectra to centroid spectra is recommended resulting in a 2.3 fold improved precision on the accurate mass determination of spectrum peaks. However, processing centroid data for quantitative purposes could lead to signal interruption when too narrow mass windows are applied for the construction of extracted ion chromatograms. Therefore, peak integration on the raw profile data is recommended. An optimal width of the mass window of 50 ppm, which is a trade-off between sensitivity and selectivity, was obtained for a TOF instrument providing a resolving power of 20,000 at full width at half maximum (FWHM). For the validation of HRMS analytical methods, widespread concepts such as the signal-to-noise ratios for the determination of decision limits and detection capabilities have shown to be not always applicable because in some cases almost no noise can be detected anymore. A statistical methodology providing a reliable alternative is extended and applied. PMID:23856232

  1. Complementary mass spectrometric techniques for the quantification of the protein corona: a case study on gold nanoparticles and human serum proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Iglesias, Nerea; Bettmer, Jörg

    2015-08-01

    Once nanoparticles enter a biological system, it is known that their surface is instantly covered by the biomolecules present with preference to proteins. This protein corona has been a subject of numerous studies in order to reveal its composition. Besides that, growing interest exists in its quantitative determination in order to gain a deeper insight into the nature of these nanoparticle-protein bioconjugates. Only a few analytical methods are available nowadays, so the aim of this study is to provide a reliable and alternative methodology for the quantification of the protein corona. The suggested approach is based on the assumption that the total protein content within the corona can be correlated to its sulfur concentration due to the presence of cysteine and methionine as sulfur-containing amino acids. Once the most abundant proteins had been identified with the use of gel electrophoresis with subsequent peptide analysis by electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS), the isolated nanoparticle-protein conjugates were subjected to total analysis of sulfur and the corresponding metal being present in the nanoparticles by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The concept is exemplarily demonstrated on citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles (GNPs) incubated with human serum. Two different purification procedures were tested in order to isolate the sought bioconjugates. 26 most abundant proteins could be identified and an average of approximately 40 S atoms per protein was calculated and used for further studies. ICP-MS analyses of S/Au ratios served for the quantification of the protein corona revealing an absolute number of proteins bound to the incubated GNPs. Two main results could be obtained for this specific system under the chosen experimental conditions: the number of proteins per GNP decreased with their size from 10 nm to 60 nm and the obtained values suggested that the protein corona in this specific case was

  2. Serum protein identification and quantification of the corona of 5, 15 and 80 nm gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäffler, Martin; Semmler-Behnke, Manuela; Sarioglu, Hakan; Takenaka, Shinji; Wenk, Alexander; Schleh, Carsten; Hauck, Stefanie M.; Johnston, Blair D.; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.

    2013-07-01

    When nanoparticles (NP) enter the body they come into contact with body fluids containing proteins which can adsorb to their surface. These proteins may influence the NP interactions with the biological vicinity, eventually determining their biological fate inside the body. Adsorption of the most abundantly binding proteins was studied after an in vitro 24 hr incubation of monodisperse, negatively charged 5, 15 and 80 nm gold spheres (AuNP) in mouse serum by a two-step analysis: proteomic protein identification and quantitative protein biochemistry. The adsorbed proteins were separated from non-adsorbed proteins by centrifugation and gel electrophoresis and identified using a MALDI-TOF-MS-Proteomics-Analyzer. Quantitative analysis of proteins in gel bands by protein densitometry, required the focus on predominantly binding serum proteins. Numerous proteins adsorbed to the AuNP depending on their size, e.g. apolipoproteins or complement C3. The qualitative and quantitative amount of adsorbed proteins differed between 5, 15 and 80 nm AuNP. Band intensities of adsorbed proteins decreased with increasing AuNP sizes based not only on their mass but also on their surface area. Summarizing, the AuNP surface is covered with serum proteins containing transport and immune related proteins among others. Hence, protein binding depends on the size, surface area and curvature of the AuNP.

  3. Unique pentafluorobenzylation and collision-induced dissociation for specific and accurate GC-MS/MS quantification of the catecholamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG) in human urine.

    PubMed

    Zoerner, Alexander A; Heusser, Karsten; Gutzki, Frank M; Mitschke, Anja; Tank, Jens; Stichtenoth, Dirk O; Jordan, Jens; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2011-05-15

    -induced dissociation, and the straightforwardness the present method is highly specific, accurate, precise, and should be useful in clinical settings. PMID:20638915

  4. Characterization and quantification of histidine degradation in therapeutic protein formulations by size exclusion-hydrophilic interaction two dimensional-liquid chromatography with stable-isotope labeling mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunlei; Chen, Sike; Brailsford, John A; Yamniuk, Aaron P; Tymiak, Adrienne A; Zhang, Yingru

    2015-12-24

    Two dimensional liquid chromatography (2D-LC) coupling size exclusion (SEC) and hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) is demonstrated as a useful tool to study polar excipients, such as histidine and its degradant, in protein formulation samples. The SEC-HILIC setup successfully removed interferences from complex sample matrices and enabled accurate mass measurement of the histidine degradation product, which was then determined to be trans-urocanic acid. Because the SEC effluent is a strong solvent for the second dimension HILIC, experimental parameters needed to be carefully chosen, i.e., small transferring loop, fast gradient at high flow rates for the second dimension gradient, in order to mitigate the solvent mismatch and to ensure good peak shapes for HILIC separations. In addition, the generation of trans-urocanic acid was quantified by single heart-cutting SEC-HILIC 2D-LC combined with stable-isotope labeling mass spectrometry. Compared with existing 2D quantification methods, the proposed approach is fast, insensitive to solvent mismatch between dimensions, and tolerant of small retention time shifts in the first dimension. Finally, the first dimension diode array detector was found to be a potential degradation source for photolabile analytes such as trans-urocanic acid. PMID:26674608

  5. SSPaQ: A Subtractive Segmentation Approach for the Exhaustive Parallel Quantification of the Extent of Protein Modification at Every Possible Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabant, Guillaume; Boyer, Alain; Cadene, Martine

    2016-05-01

    Protein modifications, whether chemically induced or post-translational (PTMs), play an essential role for the biological activity of proteins. Understanding biological processes and alterations thereof will rely on the quantification of these modifications on individual residues. Here we present SSPaQ, a subtractive method for the parallel quantification of the extent of modification at each possible site of a protein. The method combines uniform isotopic labeling and proteolysis with MS, followed by a segmentation approach, a powerful tool to refine the quantification of the degree of modification of a peptide to a segment containing a single modifiable amino acid. The strength of this strategy resides in: (1) quantification of all modifiable sites in a protein without prior knowledge of the type(s) of modified residues; (2) insensitivity to changes in the solubility and ionization efficiency of peptides upon modification; and (3) detection of missed cleavages caused by the modification for mitigation. The SSPaQ method was applied to quantify modifications resulting from the interaction of human phosphatidyl ethanolamine binding protein 1 (hPEBP1), a metastasis suppressor gene product, with locostatin, a covalent ligand and antimigratory compound with demonstrated activity towards hPEBP1. Locostatin is shown to react with several residues of the protein. SSPaQ can more generally be applied to induced modification in the context of drugs that covalently bind their target protein. With an alternate front-end protocol, it could also be applied to the quantification of protein PTMs, provided a removal tool is available for that PTM.

  6. SSPaQ: A Subtractive Segmentation Approach for the Exhaustive Parallel Quantification of the Extent of Protein Modification at Every Possible Site.

    PubMed

    Gabant, Guillaume; Boyer, Alain; Cadene, Martine

    2016-08-01

    Protein modifications, whether chemically induced or post-translational (PTMs), play an essential role for the biological activity of proteins. Understanding biological processes and alterations thereof will rely on the quantification of these modifications on individual residues. Here we present SSPaQ, a subtractive method for the parallel quantification of the extent of modification at each possible site of a protein. The method combines uniform isotopic labeling and proteolysis with MS, followed by a segmentation approach, a powerful tool to refine the quantification of the degree of modification of a peptide to a segment containing a single modifiable amino acid. The strength of this strategy resides in: (1) quantification of all modifiable sites in a protein without prior knowledge of the type(s) of modified residues; (2) insensitivity to changes in the solubility and ionization efficiency of peptides upon modification; and (3) detection of missed cleavages caused by the modification for mitigation. The SSPaQ method was applied to quantify modifications resulting from the interaction of human phosphatidyl ethanolamine binding protein 1 (hPEBP1), a metastasis suppressor gene product, with locostatin, a covalent ligand and antimigratory compound with demonstrated activity towards hPEBP1. Locostatin is shown to react with several residues of the protein. SSPaQ can more generally be applied to induced modification in the context of drugs that covalently bind their target protein. With an alternate front-end protocol, it could also be applied to the quantification of protein PTMs, provided a removal tool is available for that PTM. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27245456

  7. SSPaQ: A Subtractive Segmentation Approach for the Exhaustive Parallel Quantification of the Extent of Protein Modification at Every Possible Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabant, Guillaume; Boyer, Alain; Cadene, Martine

    2016-08-01

    Protein modifications, whether chemically induced or post-translational (PTMs), play an essential role for the biological activity of proteins. Understanding biological processes and alterations thereof will rely on the quantification of these modifications on individual residues. Here we present SSPaQ, a subtractive method for the parallel quantification of the extent of modification at each possible site of a protein. The method combines uniform isotopic labeling and proteolysis with MS, followed by a segmentation approach, a powerful tool to refine the quantification of the degree of modification of a peptide to a segment containing a single modifiable amino acid. The strength of this strategy resides in: (1) quantification of all modifiable sites in a protein without prior knowledge of the type(s) of modified residues; (2) insensitivity to changes in the solubility and ionization efficiency of peptides upon modification; and (3) detection of missed cleavages caused by the modification for mitigation. The SSPaQ method was applied to quantify modifications resulting from the interaction of human phosphatidyl ethanolamine binding protein 1 (hPEBP1), a metastasis suppressor gene product, with locostatin, a covalent ligand and antimigratory compound with demonstrated activity towards hPEBP1. Locostatin is shown to react with several residues of the protein. SSPaQ can more generally be applied to induced modification in the context of drugs that covalently bind their target protein. With an alternate front-end protocol, it could also be applied to the quantification of protein PTMs, provided a removal tool is available for that PTM.

  8. Quantification of tunicamycin-induced protein expression and N-glycosylation changes in yeast.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Haopeng; Smeekens, Johanna M; Wu, Ronghu

    2016-06-21

    Tunicamycin is a potent protein N-glycosylation inhibitor that has frequently been used to manipulate protein glycosylation in cells. However, protein expression and glycosylation changes as a result of tunicamycin treatment are still unclear. Using yeast as a model system, we systematically investigated the cellular response to tunicamycin at the proteome and N-glycoproteome levels. By utilizing modern mass spectrometry-based proteomics, we quantified 4259 proteins, which nearly covers the entire yeast proteome. After the three-hour tunicamycin treatment, more than 5% of proteins were down-regulated by at least 2 fold, among which proteins related to several glycan metabolism and glycolysis-related pathways were highly enriched. Furthermore, several proteins in the canonical unfolded protein response pathway were up-regulated because the inhibition of protein N-glycosylation impacts protein folding and trafficking. We also comprehensively quantified protein glycosylation changes in tunicamycin-treated cells, and more than one third of quantified unique glycopeptides (168 of 465 peptides) were down-regulated. Proteins containing down-regulated glycopeptides were related to glycosylation, glycoprotein metabolic processes, carbohydrate processes, and cell wall organization according to gene ontology clustering. The current results provide the first global view of the cellular response to tunicamycin at the proteome and glycoproteome levels. PMID:27007503

  9. The use of label-free mass spectrometry for relative quantification of sarcoplasmic proteins during the processing of dry-cured ham.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Marta; Mora, Leticia; Concepción Aristoy, M; Toldrá, Fidel

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work was to quantify changes in the abundance of the major sarcoplasmic proteins throughout the ham dry-curing process by using a label-free mass spectrometry methodology based on the measurement of mass spectral peak intensities obtained from the extracted ion chromatogram. For this purpose, extraction of sarcoplasmic proteins was followed by trypsin digestion and analysis by nanoliquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (Q/TOF) for the identification and relative quantification of sarcoplasmic proteins through individual quantification of trypsinised peptides. In total, 20 proteins, including 12 glycolytic enzymes, were identified and quantified. The accuracy of the protocol was based on MS/MS replicates, and beta-lactoglobulin protein was used to normalise data and correct possible variations during sample preparation or LC-MS/MS analysis. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics provides precise identification and quantification of proteins in comparison with traditional methodologies based on gel electrophoresis, especially in the case of overlapping proteins. Moreover, the label-free approach used in this study proved to be a simple, fast, reliable method for evaluating proteolytic degradation of sarcoplasmic proteins during the processing of dry-cured ham. PMID:26593512

  10. Antibody-free workflows for protein quantification by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Wilffert, Daniel; Bischoff, Rainer; van de Merbel, Nico C

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-free approaches for quantitative LC-MS/MS-based protein bioanalysis are reviewed and critically evaluated, and compared with the more widely used immunoaffinity-based approaches. Antibody-free workflows will be divided into four groups and discussed in the following order: direct analysis of signature peptides after proteolytic digestion; enrichment of target proteins and signature peptides by fractionated protein precipitation; enrichment of target proteins and signature peptides by reversed-phase and ion-exchange solid-phase extraction; and enrichment of target proteins and signature peptides by (antibody-free) affinity-solid-phase extraction. PMID:25871591

  11. Arginine as an eluent overcomes the hindrance of monoclonal antibody quantification by dextran sulfate in protein A affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bong Gyun; Park, Hong Woo

    2015-01-01

    Analytical chromatography using protein A affinity columns was employed for the fast and simple quantitative analysis of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) from suspension cultures of recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (rCHO) cells. Reliable results could not be obtained from analysis of rCHO cell culture supernatants containing dextran sulfate using elution buffers such as phosphate, glycine, or MgCl2 . These problems increased as the number of analysis and the concentration of dextran sulfate in samples increased. Arginine was identified as an alternative eluent to overcome the hindrance by dextran sulfate. When the samples contain dextran sulfate up to 100 mg/L, the elution buffer containing 0.6-1.0 M arginine at pH 3.0-3.8 is useful for the effective analysis. Reproducible results in the mAb quantification could be obtained by this developed arginine elution buffer from rCHO cell culture supernatants containing dextran sulfate. PMID:26363185

  12. Identification and quantification of calcium-binding proteins in squid axoplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Krinks, M.H.; Klee, C.B.; Pant, H.C.; Gainer, H.

    1988-06-01

    The identities and quantities of calcium-binding proteins were determined in axoplasm isolated from the squid giant axon. /sup 45/Ca-binding assays on nitrocellulose filters containing axoplasm proteins separated by SDS-polyacrylamide electrophoresis revealed 4 major calcium-binding bands. These included the high-molecular-weight (Mr greater than 330 and 220 X 10(3) neurofilament proteins, an unidentified protein band that migrated around Mr 55,000, and a diverse group of proteins that migrated together around Mr 17,000. The low-molecular-weight (Mr 17,000) calcium-binding proteins could be resolved into calmodulin (ca. 120 mumol/kg axoplasm), 2 other Mr 17,000 calcium-binding proteins, and a small amount of calcineurin B. It is estimated that these calcium-binding proteins in squid axoplasm could theoretically bind about 1 mmol Ca/sup 2 +//kg axoplasm. /sup 125/I-Calmodulin overlay and Western blot analyses disclosed a number of calmodulin-binding proteins in axoplasm. These included fodrin, calcineurin A, and Ca/sup 2 +//CaM protein kinase II subunits.

  13. Quantification of the main digestive processes in ruminants: the equations involved in the renewed energy and protein feed evaluation systems.

    PubMed

    Sauvant, D; Nozière, P

    2016-05-01

    The evolution of feeding systems for ruminants towards evaluation of diets in terms of multiple responses requires the updating of the calculation of nutrient supply to the animals to make it more accurate on aggregated units (feed unit, or UF, for energy and protein digestible in the intestine, or PDI, for metabolizable protein) and to allow prediction of absorbed nutrients. The present update of the French system is based on the building and interpretation through meta-analysis of large databases on digestion and nutrition of ruminants. Equations involved in the calculation of UF and PDI have been updated, allowing: (1) prediction of the out flow rate of particles and liquid depending on the level of intake and the proportion of concentrate, and the use of this in the calculation of ruminal digestion of protein and starch from in situ data; (2) the system to take into account the effects of the main factors of digestive interactions (level of intake, proportion of concentrate, rumen protein balance) on organic matter digestibility, energy losses in methane and in urine; (3) more accurate calculation of the energy available in the rumen and the efficiency of its use for the microbial protein synthesis. In this renewed model UF and PDI values of feedstuffs vary depending on diet composition, and intake level. Consequently, standard feed table values can be considered as being only indicative. It is thus possible to predict the nutrient supply on a wider range of diets more accurately and in particular to better integrate energy×protein interactions occurring in the gut. PMID:26696120

  14. Novel isotopic N, N-dimethyl leucine (iDiLeu) reagents enable absolute quantification of peptides and proteins using a standard curve approach

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Tyler; Lietz, Christopher B.; Xiang, Feng; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Absolute quantification of protein targets using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is a key component of candidate biomarker validation. One popular method combines multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) using a triple quadrupole instrument with stable isotope-labeled standards (SIS) for absolute quantification (AQUA). LC-MRM AQUA assays are sensitive and specific, but they are also expensive due to the cost of synthesizing stable isotope peptide standards. While the chemical modification approach using Mass Differential Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantification (mTRAQ) represents a more economical approach when quantifying large numbers of peptides, these reagents are costly and still suffer from lower throughput because only two concentration values per peptide can be obtained in a single LC-MS run. Here, we have developed and applied a set of five novel mass difference reagents, isotopic N,N-dimethyl leucine (iDiLeu). These labels contain an amine reactive group, triazine ester, are cost effective due to their synthetic simplicity, and have increased throughput compared to previous LC-MS quantification methods by allowing construction of a four-point standard curve in one run. iDiLeu-labeled peptides show remarkably similar retention time shifts, slightly lower energy thresholds for higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) fragmentation, and high quantification accuracy for trypsin-digested protein samples (median errors <15%). By spiking in an iDiLeu-labeled neuropeptide, allatostatin, into mouse urine matrix, two quantification methods are validated. The first uses one labeled peptide as an internal standard to normalize labeled peptide peak areas across runs (<19% error) while the second enables standard curve creation and analyte quantification in one run (<8% error). PMID:25377360

  15. Novel isotopic N, N-Dimethyl Leucine (iDiLeu) Reagents Enable Absolute Quantification of Peptides and Proteins Using a Standard Curve Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, Tyler; Lietz, Christopher B.; Xiang, Feng; Li, Lingjun

    2015-01-01

    Absolute quantification of protein targets using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is a key component of candidate biomarker validation. One popular method combines multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) using a triple quadrupole instrument with stable isotope-labeled standards (SIS) for absolute quantification (AQUA). LC-MRM AQUA assays are sensitive and specific, but they are also expensive because of the cost of synthesizing stable isotope peptide standards. While the chemical modification approach using mass differential tags for relative and absolute quantification (mTRAQ) represents a more economical approach when quantifying large numbers of peptides, these reagents are costly and still suffer from lower throughput because only two concentration values per peptide can be obtained in a single LC-MS run. Here, we have developed and applied a set of five novel mass difference reagents, isotopic N, N-dimethyl leucine (iDiLeu). These labels contain an amine reactive group, triazine ester, are cost effective because of their synthetic simplicity, and have increased throughput compared with previous LC-MS quantification methods by allowing construction of a four-point standard curve in one run. iDiLeu-labeled peptides show remarkably similar retention time shifts, slightly lower energy thresholds for higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) fragmentation, and high quantification accuracy for trypsin-digested protein samples (median errors <15%). By spiking in an iDiLeu-labeled neuropeptide, allatostatin, into mouse urine matrix, two quantification methods are validated. The first uses one labeled peptide as an internal standard to normalize labeled peptide peak areas across runs (<19% error), whereas the second enables standard curve creation and analyte quantification in one run (<8% error).

  16. Monitoring and quantification of the protein partition during cytokinesis with fluorescent spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ja-Yun; Lin, Yi-Ting; Wu, Tzong-Yuan; Hsu, I.-Jen

    2009-02-01

    Cytokinesis is a consecutive process during cell division. For systems biological studies, it is important to precisely monitor and quantify proteins in different cell stages and mitosis processes. However, the absolute quantities in living cells are usually difficult to quantify. Fluorescent protein tagged protein is one of the techniques that are usually applied to monitor biological behaviors and phenomena. In this study, an insect cell line, DPnE, which can stably express both green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and red fluorescent protein (DsRed) was established. This dual fluorescent cell line was chosen as a model system to monitor the protein partition during cytokinesis. A spectrum analysis system was established and integrated in an inverted microscope. The two-dimensional distribution of the full fluorescent spectra of the two fluorescent proteins was obtained in a time-lapse series. Furthermore, we also developed an algorithm to analyze the quantities of both fluorescent proteins in the daughter cells and parent cells during the process of cytokinesis, respectively. With this innovative optical system and algorithm, the proteins partition during cytokinesis can be monitored and quantified precisely.

  17. Characterization of Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis for Quantification and Sizing of Submicron Particles of Therapeutic Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chen; Krueger, Aaron B; Barnard, James G; Qi, Wei; Carpenter, John F

    2015-08-01

    Submicron particles may play important roles in therapeutic protein product quality, stability, and adverse effects in patients. However, quantitation of these particles has been challenging. Nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) is capable of both sizing and counting submicron particles. We investigated the effects of product and instrument parameters on NTA results for nanoparticle standards and therapeutic protein samples. To obtain proper particle size distributions, complete tracking numbers of at least 200 and 400 were required for latex nanobeads and protein nanoparticles, respectively. In addition, when set at suboptimal values, the minimum expected particle size parameter led to inaccurate sizing and counting for all particles types investigated. A syringe pump allowed for higher sampling volumes, and results were reproducible for nanoparticle sizing and counts at flow rates ≤7 μL/min. Finally, because therapeutic protein products are being formulated at relatively high protein concentrations, we investigated the effects of protein concentration on nanoparticle characterization. With high protein concentrations, nanoparticle sizing was not affected, whereas particle concentrations were significantly reduced. Linear relationships between particle count and dilution factor were obtained when a high protein concentration formulation was diluted into particle-free solutions at the same protein concentrations, but not when dilutions were made into buffer. PMID:26017684

  18. Increasingly accurate dynamic molecular models of G-protein coupled receptor oligomers: Panacea or Pandora's box for novel drug discovery?

    PubMed Central

    Filizola, Marta

    2009-01-01

    For years conventional drug design at G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) has mainly focused on the inhibition of a single receptor at a usually well-defined ligand-binding site. The recent discovery of more and more physiologically relevant GPCR dimers/oligomers suggests that selectively targeting these complexes or designing small molecules that inhibit receptor-receptor interactions might provide new opportunities for novel drug discovery. To uncover the fundamental mechanisms and dynamics governing GPCR dimerization/oligomerization, it is crucial to understand the dynamic process of receptor-receptor association, and to identify regions that are suitable for selective drug binding. This minireview highlights current progress in the development of increasingly accurate dynamic molecular models of GPCR oligomers based on structural, biochemical, and biophysical information that has recently appeared in the literature. In view of this new information, there has never been a more exciting time for computational research into GPCRs than at present. Information-driven modern molecular models of GPCR complexes are expected to efficiently guide the rational design of GPCR oligomer-specific drugs, possibly allowing researchers to reach for the high-hanging fruits in GPCR drug discovery, i.e. more potent and selective drugs for efficient therapeutic interventions. PMID:19465029

  19. Quantification and Classification of E. coli Proteome Utilization and Unused Protein Costs across Environments.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Edward J; Utrilla, Jose; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2016-06-01

    The costs and benefits of protein expression are balanced through evolution. Expression of un-utilized protein (that have no benefits in the current environment) incurs a quantifiable fitness costs on cellular growth rates; however, the magnitude and variability of un-utilized protein expression in natural settings is unknown, largely due to the challenge in determining environment-specific proteome utilization. We address this challenge using absolute and global proteomics data combined with a recently developed genome-scale model of Escherichia coli that computes the environment-specific cost and utility of the proteome on a per gene basis. We show that nearly half of the proteome mass is unused in certain environments and accounting for the cost of this unused protein expression explains >95% of the variance in growth rates of Escherichia coli across 16 distinct environments. Furthermore, reduction in unused protein expression is shown to be a common mechanism to increase cellular growth rates in adaptive evolution experiments. Classification of the unused protein reveals that the unused protein encodes several nutrient- and stress- preparedness functions, which may convey fitness benefits in varying environments. Thus, unused protein expression is the source of large and pervasive fitness costs that may provide the benefit of hedging against environmental change. PMID:27351952

  20. Kinetic silver staining and quantification of proteins adsorbed to microtiter plates.

    PubMed

    Root, D D; Wang, K

    1993-03-01

    A silver stain was used to detect and quantitate proteins adsorbed to microtiter plate wells. The kinetics of the development of the silver stain were analyzed with an automated microtiter plate reader. The lag time for stain development was found to be a consistent indicator of the amount of protein adsorbed to a microtiter plate well. Protein which was not preadsorbed to the microtiter plate was not effectively stained by silver. Complete adsorption of protein applied to the microtiter plate was possible by drying small amounts of protein in very dilute buffers. Variations in sensitivity for different proteins were less than 30% for the panel of proteins examined. Determinations from kinetic silver staining agreed with those from copper staining for bovine albumin adsorbed to microtiter plates. The precision of kinetic silver staining assay was optimal in the range of 40 to 200 ng per microtiter plate well. In this range, the standard deviations averaged less than 5%. Even smaller amounts of protein can be detected and interpolated down to approximately 10 ng per well. The kinetic silver staining method can be used on standard microtiter plate readers without special filters and is readily adaptable to automated systems. PMID:8470810

  1. Quantification and Classification of E. coli Proteome Utilization and Unused Protein Costs across Environments

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Edward J.; Utrilla, Jose; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2016-01-01

    The costs and benefits of protein expression are balanced through evolution. Expression of un-utilized protein (that have no benefits in the current environment) incurs a quantifiable fitness costs on cellular growth rates; however, the magnitude and variability of un-utilized protein expression in natural settings is unknown, largely due to the challenge in determining environment-specific proteome utilization. We address this challenge using absolute and global proteomics data combined with a recently developed genome-scale model of Escherichia coli that computes the environment-specific cost and utility of the proteome on a per gene basis. We show that nearly half of the proteome mass is unused in certain environments and accounting for the cost of this unused protein expression explains >95% of the variance in growth rates of Escherichia coli across 16 distinct environments. Furthermore, reduction in unused protein expression is shown to be a common mechanism to increase cellular growth rates in adaptive evolution experiments. Classification of the unused protein reveals that the unused protein encodes several nutrient- and stress- preparedness functions, which may convey fitness benefits in varying environments. Thus, unused protein expression is the source of large and pervasive fitness costs that may provide the benefit of hedging against environmental change. PMID:27351952

  2. A Comparative Analysis of Computational Approaches to Relative Protein Quantification Using Peptide Peak Intensities in Label-free LC-MS Proteomics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Matzke, Melissa M.; Brown, Joseph N.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Metz, Thomas O.; Pounds, Joel G.; Rodland, Karin D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Smith, Richard D.; Waters, Katrina M.; McDermott, Jason E.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.

    2013-02-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is widely used to identify and quantify peptides in complex biological samples. In particular, label-free shotgun proteomics is highly effective for the identification of peptides and subsequently obtaining a global protein profile of a sample. As a result, this approach is widely used for discovery studies. Typically, the objective of these discovery studies is to identify proteins that are affected by some condition of interest (e.g. disease, exposure). However, for complex biological samples, label-free LC-MS proteomics experiments measure peptides and do not directly yield protein quantities. Thus, protein quantification must be inferred from one or more measured peptides. In recent years, many computational approaches to relative protein quantification of label-free LC-MS data have been published. In this review, we examine the most commonly employed quantification approaches to relative protein abundance from peak intensity values, evaluate their individual merits, and discuss challenges in the use of the various computational approaches.

  3. Scoliosis quantification: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Kawchuk, Greg; McArthur, Ross

    1997-01-01

    Scoliotic curvatures have long been a focus of attention for clinicians and research scientists alike. The study, treatment and ultimately, the prevention of this prevalent health condition are impeded by the absence of an accurate, reliable, convenient and safe method of scoliosis quantification. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the current methods of scoliosis quantification for clinicians who address this condition in their practices.

  4. Relative quantification of membrane proteins in wild-type and prion protein (PrP)-knockout cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Stella, Roberto; Cifani, Paolo; Peggion, Caterina; Hansson, Karin; Lazzari, Cristian; Bendz, Maria; Levander, Fredrik; Sorgato, Maria Catia; Bertoli, Alessandro; James, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Approximately 25% of eukaryotic proteins possessing homology to at least two transmembrane domains are predicted to be embedded in biological membranes. Nevertheless, this group of proteins is not usually well represented in proteome-wide experiments due to their refractory nature. Here we present a quantitative mass spectrometry-based comparison of membrane protein expression in cerebellar granule neurons grown in primary culture that were isolated from wild-type mice and mice lacking the cellular prion protein. This protein is a cell-surface glycoprotein that is mainly expressed in the central nervous system and is involved in several neurodegenerative disorders, though its physiological role is unclear. We used a low specificity enzyme α-chymotrypsin to digest membrane proteins preparations that had been separated by SDS-PAGE. The resulting peptides were labeled with tandem mass tags and analyzed by MS. The differentially expressed proteins identified using this approach were further analyzed by multiple reaction monitoring to confirm the expression level changes. PMID:22023170

  5. Quantification by PIXE of metallic sites in proteins separated by electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strivay, D.; Schoefs, B.; Weber, G.

    1998-03-01

    Electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gel (PAGE) is widely used in life sciences to determine the molecular weight of proteins in solution by separating them into different bands. By coupling electrophoresis and Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), the nature and the quantity of metals contained in proteins can be investigated. After the electrophoresis, the gel is dried and each track is scanned with a 2.5 MeV proton beam which induces X-ray emission. Analysis of these spectra allows the determination of the metals contained in an electrophoretic band. The metal content in each band is obtained by comparing the characteristic X-ray peak area with those obtained with polyacrylamide gels doped with the same metal. Finally, the relative concentration of each protein is determined by densitometry in order to compute the protein/metal ratio. An example of metallic site determination is presented. This procedure seems to be a very useful multielementary method for the determination of the metal amounts inside proteins after their separation by electrophoresis. Furthermore it allows to check if metals remain bound to proteins.

  6. Quantification of Drive-Response Relationships Between Residues During Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yifei; Im, Wonpil

    2013-01-01

    Mutual correlation and cooperativity are commonly used to describe residue-residue interactions in protein folding/function. However, these metrics do not provide any information on the causality relationships between residues. Such drive-response relationships are poorly studied in protein folding/function and difficult to measure experimentally due to technical limitations. In this study, using the information theory transfer entropy (TE) that provides a direct measurement of causality between two times series, we have quantified the drive-response relationships between residues in the folding/unfolding processes of four small proteins generated by molecular dynamics simulations. Instead of using a time-averaged single TE value, the time-dependent TE is measured with the Q-scores based on residue-residue contacts and with the statistical significance analysis along the folding/unfolding processes. The TE analysis is able to identify the driving and responding residues that are different from the highly correlated residues revealed by the mutual information analysis. In general, the driving residues have more regular secondary structures, are more buried, and show greater effects on the protein stability as well as folding and unfolding rates. In addition, the dominant driving and responding residues from the TE analysis on the whole trajectory agree with those on a single folding event, demonstrating that the drive-response relationships are preserved in the non-equilibrium process. Our study provides detailed insights into the protein folding process and has potential applications in protein engineering and interpretation of time-dependent residue-based experimental observables for protein function. PMID:24223527

  7. Antibody-independent Targeted Quantification of TMPRSS2-ERG Fusion Protein Products in Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jintang; Sun, Xuefei; Shi, Tujin; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Xie, Fang; Zhao, Rui; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Yang, Feng; Kitabayashi, Naoki; Chae, Sung Suk; Rubin, Mark; Siddiqui, Javed; Wei, John; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Kagan, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Camp, David G.

    2014-10-01

    Fusions between the transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2) and ETS related gene (ERG) represent one of the most specific biomarkers that define a distinct molecular subtype of prostate cancer. The studies on TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions have seldom been performed at the protein level, primarily due to the lack of high-quality antibodies or an antibody-independent method that is sufficiently sensitive for detecting the truncated ERG protein products resulting from TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions and alternative splicing. Herein, we applied a recently developed PRISM (high-pressure high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing)-SRM (selected reaction monitoring) strategy for quantifying ERG protein in prostate cancer cell lines and tumors. The highly sensitive PRISM-SRM assays led to confident detection of 6 unique ERG peptides in either the TMPRSS2-ERG positive cell lines or tissues but not in the negative controls, indicating that ERG protein expression is highly correlated with TMPRSS2-ERG gene rearrangements. Significantly, our results demonstrated for the first time that at least two groups of ERG protein isoforms were simultaneously expressed at variable levels in TMPRSS2-ERG positive samples as evidenced by concomitant detection of two mutually exclusive peptides. Three peptides shared across almost all fusion protein products were determined to be the most abundant peptides, and hence can be used as “signature” peptides for detecting ERG overexpression resulting from TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion. These PRISM-SRM assays provide valuable tools for studying TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion protein products, thus improving our understanding of the role of TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in the biology of prostate cancer.

  8. SynPAnal: Software for Rapid Quantification of the Density and Intensity of Protein Puncta from Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Danielson, Eric; Lee, Sang H.

    2014-01-01

    Continuous modification of the protein composition at synapses is a driving force for the plastic changes of synaptic strength, and provides the fundamental molecular mechanism of synaptic plasticity and information storage in the brain. Studying synaptic protein turnover is not only important for understanding learning and memory, but also has direct implication for understanding pathological conditions like aging, neurodegenerative diseases, and psychiatric disorders. Proteins involved in synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity are typically concentrated at synapses of neurons and thus appear as puncta (clusters) in immunofluorescence microscopy images. Quantitative measurement of the changes in puncta density, intensity, and sizes of specific proteins provide valuable information on their function in synaptic transmission, circuit development, synaptic plasticity, and synaptopathy. Unfortunately, puncta quantification is very labor intensive and time consuming. In this article, we describe a software tool designed for the rapid semi-automatic detection and quantification of synaptic protein puncta from 2D immunofluorescence images generated by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The software, dubbed as SynPAnal (for Synaptic Puncta Analysis), streamlines data quantification for puncta density and average intensity, thereby increases data analysis throughput compared to a manual method. SynPAnal is stand-alone software written using the JAVA programming language, and thus is portable and platform-free. PMID:25531531

  9. SynPAnal: software for rapid quantification of the density and intensity of protein puncta from fluorescence microscopy images of neurons.

    PubMed

    Danielson, Eric; Lee, Sang H

    2014-01-01

    Continuous modification of the protein composition at synapses is a driving force for the plastic changes of synaptic strength, and provides the fundamental molecular mechanism of synaptic plasticity and information storage in the brain. Studying synaptic protein turnover is not only important for understanding learning and memory, but also has direct implication for understanding pathological conditions like aging, neurodegenerative diseases, and psychiatric disorders. Proteins involved in synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity are typically concentrated at synapses of neurons and thus appear as puncta (clusters) in immunofluorescence microscopy images. Quantitative measurement of the changes in puncta density, intensity, and sizes of specific proteins provide valuable information on their function in synaptic transmission, circuit development, synaptic plasticity, and synaptopathy. Unfortunately, puncta quantification is very labor intensive and time consuming. In this article, we describe a software tool designed for the rapid semi-automatic detection and quantification of synaptic protein puncta from 2D immunofluorescence images generated by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The software, dubbed as SynPAnal (for Synaptic Puncta Analysis), streamlines data quantification for puncta density and average intensity, thereby increases data analysis throughput compared to a manual method. SynPAnal is stand-alone software written using the JAVA programming language, and thus is portable and platform-free. PMID:25531531

  10. Quantification of protein interactions and solution transport using high-density GMR sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaster, Richard S.; Xu, Liang; Han, Shu-Jen; Wilson, Robert J.; Hall, Drew A.; Osterfeld, Sebastian J.; Yu, Heng; Wang, Shan X.

    2011-05-01

    Monitoring the kinetics of protein interactions on a high-density sensor array is vital to drug development and proteomic analysis. Label-free kinetic assays based on surface plasmon resonance are the current gold standard, but they have poor detection limits, suffer from non-specific binding, and are not amenable to high-throughput analyses. Here, we show that magnetically responsive nanosensors that have been scaled to over 100,000 sensors per cm2 can be used to measure the binding kinetics of various proteins with high spatial and temporal resolution. We present an analytical model that describes the binding of magnetically labelled antibodies to proteins that are immobilized on the sensor surface. This model is able to quantify the kinetics of antibody-antigen binding at sensitivities as low as 20 zeptomoles of solute.

  11. Quantification of DNA-associated proteins inside eukaryotic cells using single-molecule localization microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Etheridge, Thomas J.; Boulineau, Rémi L.; Herbert, Alex; Watson, Adam T.; Daigaku, Yasukazu; Tucker, Jem; George, Sophie; Jönsson, Peter; Palayret, Matthieu; Lando, David; Laue, Ernest; Osborne, Mark A.; Klenerman, David; Lee, Steven F.; Carr, Antony M.

    2014-01-01

    Development of single-molecule localization microscopy techniques has allowed nanometre scale localization accuracy inside cells, permitting the resolution of ultra-fine cell structure and the elucidation of crucial molecular mechanisms. Application of these methodologies to understanding processes underlying DNA replication and repair has been limited to defined in vitro biochemical analysis and prokaryotic cells. In order to expand these techniques to eukaryotic systems, we have further developed a photo-activated localization microscopy-based method to directly visualize DNA-associated proteins in unfixed eukaryotic cells. We demonstrate that motion blurring of fluorescence due to protein diffusivity can be used to selectively image the DNA-bound population of proteins. We designed and tested a simple methodology and show that it can be used to detect changes in DNA binding of a replicative helicase subunit, Mcm4, and the replication sliding clamp, PCNA, between different stages of the cell cycle and between distinct genetic backgrounds. PMID:25106872

  12. Quantification of Protein Interactions and Solution Transport Using High-Density GMR Sensor Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Gaster, Richard S.; Xu, Liang; Han, Shu-Jen; Wilson, Robert J.; Hall, Drew A.; Osterfeld, Sebastian J.; Yu, Heng; Wang, Shan X.

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring the kinetics of protein interactions on a high density sensor array is vital to drug development and proteomic analysis. Label-free kinetic assays based on surface plasmon resonance are the current gold standard, but they have poor detection limits, suffer from non-specific binding, and are not amenable to high throughput analyses. Here we show that magnetically responsive nanosensors that have been scaled to over 100,000 sensors/cm2 can be used to measure the binding kinetics of various proteins with high spatial and temporal resolution. We present an analytical model that describes the binding of magnetically labeled antibodies to proteins that are immobilized on the sensor surface. This model is able to quantify the kinetics of antibody-antigen binding at sensitivities as low as 20 zeptomoles of solute. PMID:21478869

  13. Liquid Nebulization-Ion Mobility Spectrometry Based Quantification of Nanoparticle-Protein Conjugate Formation.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seongho; Oberreit, Derek R; Van Schooneveld, Gary; Hogan, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Despite the importance of examining the formation of nanoparticle-protein conjugates, there is a dearth of routine techniques for nanoparticle-protein conjugate characterization. The most prominent change to a nanoparticle population upon conjugate formation is a shift in the nanoparticle size distribution function. However, commonly employed dynamic light scattering based approaches for size distribution characterization are ineffective for nonmonodisperse samples, and further they are relatively insensitive to size shifts of only several nanometers, which are common during conjugate formation. Conversely, gas phase ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) techniques can be used to reliably examine polydisperse samples, and are sensitive to ∼1 nm size distribution function shifts; the challenge with IMS is to convert nanoparticle-protein conjugates to aerosol particles without bringing about nonspecific aggregation or conjugate formation. Except in limited circumstances, electrospray based aerosolization has proven difficult to apply for this purpose. Here we show that via liquid nebulization (LN) with online, high-flow-rate dilution (with dilution factors up to 10 000) it is possible to aerosolize nanoparticle-protein conjugates, enabling IMS measurements of their conjugate size distribution functions. We specifically employ the LN-IMS system to examine bovine serum albumin binding to gold nanoparticles. Inferred maximum protein surface coverages (∼0.025 nm(-2)) from measurements are shown to be in excellent agreement with reported values for gold from quartz crystal microbalance measurements. It is also shown that LN-IMS measurements can be used to detect size distribution function shifts on the order of 1 nm, even in circumstances where the size distribution function itself has a standard deviation of ∼5 nm. In total, the reported measurements suggest that LN-IMS is a potentially simple and robust technique for nanoparticle-protein conjugate characterization

  14. Proteomic tools for environmental microbiology--a roadmap from sample preparation to protein identification and quantification.

    PubMed

    Wöhlbrand, Lars; Trautwein, Kathleen; Rabus, Ralf

    2013-10-01

    The steadily increasing amount of (meta-)genomic sequence information of diverse organisms and habitats has a strong impact on research in microbial physiology and ecology. In-depth functional understanding of metabolic processes and overall physiological adaptation to environmental changes, however, requires application of proteomics, as the context specific proteome constitutes the true functional output of a cell. Considering the enormous structural and functional diversity of proteins, only rational combinations of various analytical approaches allow a holistic view on the overall state of the cell. Within the past decade, proteomic methods became increasingly accessible to microbiologists mainly due to the robustness of analytical methods (e.g. 2DE), and affordability of mass spectrometers and their relative ease of use. This review provides an overview on the complex portfolio of state-of-the-art proteomics and highlights the basic principles of key methods, ranging from sample preparation of laboratory or environmental samples, via protein/peptide separation (gel-based or gel-free) and different types of mass spectrometric protein/peptide analyses, to protein identification and abundance determination. PMID:23894077

  15. Site-specific mapping and quantification of protein S-sulphenylation in cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Gupta, Vinayak; Carroll, Kate S; Liebler, Daniel C

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine S-sulphenylation provides redox regulation of protein functions, but the global cellular impact of this transient post-translational modification remains unexplored. We describe a chemoproteomic workflow to map and quantify over 1,000 S-sulphenylation sites on more than 700 proteins in intact cells. Quantitative analysis of human cells stimulated with hydrogen peroxide or epidermal growth factor measured hundreds of site selective redox changes. Different cysteines in the same proteins displayed dramatic differences in susceptibility to S-sulphenylation. Newly discovered S-sulphenylations provided mechanistic support for proposed cysteine redox reactions and suggested novel redox mechanisms, including S-sulphenyl-mediated redox regulation of the transcription factor HIF1A by SIRT6. S-sulphenylation is favored at solvent-exposed protein surfaces and is associated with sequence motifs that are distinct from those for other thiol modifications. S-sulphenylations affect regulators of phosphorylation, acetylation and ubiquitylation, which suggest regulatory crosstalk between redox control and signalling pathways. PMID:25175731

  16. Elemental Analysis and Protein Quantification of Raw Natural Rubber of IAC Series 400 Clones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein, nitrogen and sulfur contents were investigated for natural rubber from commercial Hevea, synthetic polyisoprene, and new IAC clones from Mococa city (IAC 405, 406, 410, 413, and 420), Jaú city (IAC 400, 401, 402, and 417), and from RRIM 600 clone (used as a control in both cases). IAC 405 a...

  17. Mechanisms of allosteric gene regulation by NMR quantification of microsecond-millisecond protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kleckner, Ian R; Gollnick, Paul; Foster, Mark P

    2012-01-13

    The trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) is a paradigmatic allosteric protein that regulates the tryptophan biosynthetic genes associated with the trp operon in bacilli. The ring-shaped 11-mer TRAP is activated for recognition of a specific trp-mRNA target by binding up to 11 tryptophan molecules. To characterize the mechanisms of tryptophan-induced TRAP activation, we have performed methyl relaxation dispersion (MRD) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments that probe the time-dependent structure of TRAP in the microsecond-to-millisecond "chemical exchange" time window. We find significant side chain flexibility localized to the RNA and tryptophan binding sites of the apo protein and that these dynamics are dramatically reduced upon ligand binding. Analysis of the MRD NMR data provides insights into the structural nature of transiently populated conformations sampled in solution by apo TRAP. The MRD data are inconsistent with global two-state exchange, indicating that conformational sampling in apo TRAP is asynchronous. These findings imply a temporally heterogeneous population of structures that are incompatible with RNA binding and substantiate the study of TRAP as a paradigm for probing and understanding essential dynamics in allosteric, regulatory proteins. PMID:22115774

  18. A Microfluidic Platform for Real-Time Detection and Quantification of Protein-Ligand Interactions.

    PubMed

    Herling, Therese W; O'Connell, David J; Bauer, Mikael C; Persson, Jonas; Weininger, Ulrich; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Linse, Sara

    2016-05-10

    The key steps in cellular signaling and regulatory pathways rely on reversible noncovalent protein-ligand binding, yet the equilibrium parameters for such events remain challenging to characterize and quantify in solution. Here, we demonstrate a microfluidic platform for the detection of protein-ligand interactions with an assay time on the second timescale and without the requirement for immobilization or the presence of a highly viscous matrix. Using this approach, we obtain absolute values for the electrophoretic mobilities characterizing solvated proteins and demonstrate quantitative comparison of results obtained under different solution conditions. We apply this strategy to characterize the interaction between calmodulin and creatine kinase, which we identify as a novel calmodulin target. Moreover, we explore the differential calcium ion dependence of calmodulin ligand-binding affinities, a system at the focal point of calcium-mediated cellular signaling pathways. We further explore the effect of calmodulin on creatine kinase activity and show that it is increased by the interaction between the two proteins. These findings demonstrate the potential of quantitative microfluidic techniques to characterize binding equilibria between biomolecules under native solution conditions. PMID:27166804

  19. Improved quantification of cottonseed protein and oil content for germplasm screening

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oil and protein stores comprise the majority of mass of cottonseed embryos. A more comprehensive understanding of the relationship between lint quality, lint yield and embryo reserve accumulation will help assist breeders in their efforts to improve seed value. Here we report the improvement of a ra...

  20. A Force-Based, Parallel Assay for the Quantification of Protein-DNA Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Limmer, Katja; Pippig, Diana A.; Aschenbrenner, Daniela; Gaub, Hermann E.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of transcription factor binding to DNA sequences is of utmost importance to understand the intricate regulatory mechanisms that underlie gene expression. Several techniques exist that quantify DNA-protein affinity, but they are either very time-consuming or suffer from possible misinterpretation due to complicated algorithms or approximations like many high-throughput techniques. We present a more direct method to quantify DNA-protein interaction in a force-based assay. In contrast to single-molecule force spectroscopy, our technique, the Molecular Force Assay (MFA), parallelizes force measurements so that it can test one or multiple proteins against several DNA sequences in a single experiment. The interaction strength is quantified by comparison to the well-defined rupture stability of different DNA duplexes. As a proof-of-principle, we measured the interaction of the zinc finger construct Zif268/NRE against six different DNA constructs. We could show the specificity of our approach and quantify the strength of the protein-DNA interaction. PMID:24586920

  1. Composition-Gradient Static Light Scattering and the Quantification of Biomolecular Interactions in Therapeutic Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Some, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    Macromolecular interactions of interest to the pharmaceutical industry cover a variety of phenomena: binding of proteins to form well-defined complexes; reversible and irreversible oligomerization; and non-specific intermolecular interactions. The analysis and manipulation of these phenomena are crucial to the successful development, manufacture, storage and delivery of biological drugs such as antibodies. Light scattering (LS) has proven to be one of the most versatile free-solution and label-free methods for studying proteins and their interactions. Previously limited primarily to assessing molar mass, size and oligomerization state, the recent emergence of automated Composition-Gradient Static Light Scattering (Attri, A.; Minton, A.P. Anal. Biochem. 2005; 346(1), 132--8), or CG-SLS, extends the range of biotech LS applications to equilibrium binding affinity and stoichiometry of bound complexes, kinetics of association and dissociation, and non-specific interactions (attractive and repulsive). In this talk I present progress in CG-SLS for biophysical characterization of pharmaceutical protein-protein interactions. In the drug development phase, CG-SLS studies of antibody-antigen complexes compliments other biomolecular interaction techniques commonly found in the biotech world such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR). In the formulation development stage, long-term stability of drug product is sought. Protein degradation modes include irreversible aggregation, which may lead to adverse physiological effects, and reversible self-association, which affects solution viscosity and hence injectable drug delivery. CG-SLS addresses both of these, the former via determination of virial coefficients, which describe the overall non-specific attraction or repulsion between molecules and may be used to optimize the formulation buffer to minimize aggregation, and the latter by binding affinity and stoichiometry of the associated complexes.

  2. Analytical platform evaluation for quantification of ERG in prostate cancer using protein and mRNA detection methods

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jintang; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Shi, Tujin; Wu, Chaochao; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Gao, Yuqian; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Camp, David G.; Rastogi, Anshu; Tan, Shyh-Han; Yan, Wusheng; Mohamed, Ahmed A.; Huang, Wei; Banerjee, Sreedatta; Kagan, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; McLeod, David; Srivastava, Shiv; Petrovics, Gyorgy; Dobi, Albert; Srinivasan, Alagarsamy

    2015-01-01

    Background: The established methods for detecting prostate cancer (CaP) are based on tests using PSA (blood), PCA3 (urine), and AMACR (tissue) as biomarkers in patient samples. The demonstration of ERG oncoprotein overexpression due to gene fusion in CaP has thus provided ERG as an additional biomarker. Based on this, we hypothesized that ERG protein quantification methods can be of use in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Methods: Therefore, an antibody-free assay for ERG3 protein detection was developed based on PRISM (high-pressure high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing)-SRM (selected reaction monitoring) mass spectrometry. We utilized TMPRSS2-ERG positive VCaP and TMPRSS2-ERG negative LNCaP cells to simulate three different sample types (cells, tissue, and post-DRE urine sediment). Results: Recombinant ERG3 protein spiked into LNCaP cell lysates could be detected at levels as low as 20 pg by PRISM-SRM analysis. The sensitivity of the PRISM-SRM assay was around approximately 10,000 VCaP cells in a mixed cell population model of VCaP and LNCaP cells. Interestingly, ERG protein could be detected in as few as 600 VCaP cells spiked into female urine. The sensitivity of the in-house enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was similar to the PRISM-SRM assay, with detection of 30 pg of purified recombinant ERG3 protein and 10,000 VCaP cells. On the other hand, qRT-PCR exhibited a higher sensitivity, as TMPRSS2-ERG transcripts were detected in as few as 100 VCaP cells, in comparison to NanoString methodologies which detected ERG from 10,000 cells. Conclusions: Based on this data, we propose that the detection of both ERG transcriptional products with RNA-based assays, as well as protein products of ERG using PRISM-SRM assays, may be of clinical value in developing diagnostics and prognostics assays for prostate cancer given their sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility.

  3. Analytical platform evaluation for quantification of ERG in prostate cancer using protein and mRNA detection methods

    DOE PAGESBeta

    He, Jintang; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Shi, Tujin; Wu, Chaochao; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Gao, Yuqian; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; et al

    2015-01-01

    Background: The established methods for detecting prostate cancer (CaP) are based on tests using PSA (blood), PCA3 (urine), and AMACR (tissue) as biomarkers in patient samples. The demonstration of ERG oncoprotein overexpression due to gene fusion in CaP has thus provided ERG as an additional biomarker. Based on this, we hypothesized that ERG protein quantification methods can be of use in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Methods: Therefore, an antibody-free assay for ERG3 protein detection was developed based on PRISM (high-pressure high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing)-SRM (selected reaction monitoring) mass spectrometry. We utilized TMPRSS2-ERG positive VCaP and TMPRSS2-ERGmore » negative LNCaP cells to simulate three different sample types (cells, tissue, and post-DRE urine sediment). Results: Recombinant ERG3 protein spiked into LNCaP cell lysates could be detected at levels as low as 20 pg by PRISM-SRM analysis. The sensitivity of the PRISM-SRM assay was around approximately 10,000 VCaP cells in a mixed cell population model of VCaP and LNCaP cells. Interestingly, ERG protein could be detected in as few as 600 VCaP cells spiked into female urine. The sensitivity of the in-house enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was similar to the PRISM-SRM assay, with detection of 30 pg of purified recombinant ERG3 protein and 10,000 VCaP cells. On the other hand, qRT-PCR exhibited a higher sensitivity, as TMPRSS2-ERG transcripts were detected in as few as 100 VCaP cells, in comparison to NanoString methodologies which detected ERG from 10,000 cells. Conclusions: Based on this data, we propose that the detection of both ERG transcriptional products with RNA-based assays, as well as protein products of ERG using PRISM-SRM assays, may be of clinical value in developing diagnostics and prognostics assays for prostate cancer given their sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility.« less

  4. Multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry for the discovery and quantification of O-GlcNAc-modified proteins.

    PubMed

    Maury, Julien Jean Pierre; Ng, Daniel; Bi, Xuezhi; Bardor, Muriel; Choo, Andre Boon-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is a post-translational modification regulating proteins involved in a variety of cellular processes and diseases. Unfortunately, O-GlcNAc remains challenging to detect and quantify by shotgun mass spectrometry (MS) where it is time-consuming and tedious. Here, we investigate the potential of Multiple Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry (MRM-MS), a targeted MS method, to detect and quantify native O-GlcNAc modified peptides without extensive labeling and enrichment. We report the ability of MRM-MS to detect a standard O-GlcNAcylated peptide and show that the method is robust to quantify the amount of O-GlcNAcylated peptide with a method detection limit of 3 fmol. In addition, when diluted by 100-fold in a trypsin-digested whole cell lysate, the O-GlcNAcylated peptide remains detectable. Next, we apply this strategy to study glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β), a kinase able to compete with O-GlcNAc transferase and modify identical site on proteins. We demonstrate that GSK-3β is itself modified by O-GlcNAc in human embryonic stem cells (hESC). Indeed, by only using gel electrophoresis to grossly enrich GSK-3β from whole cell lysate, we discover by MRM-MS a novel O-GlcNAcylated GSK-3β peptide, bearing 3 potential O-GlcNAcylation sites. We confirm our finding by quantifying the increase of O-GlcNAcylation, following hESC treatment with an O-GlcNAc hydrolase inhibitor. This novel O-GlcNAcylation could potentially be involved in an autoinhibition mechanism. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report utilizing MRM-MS to detect native O-GlcNAc modified peptides. This could potentially facilitate rapid discovery and quantification of new O-GlcNAcylated peptides/proteins. PMID:24144119

  5. Quantification of quaternary structure stability in aggregation-prone proteins under physiological conditions: the transthyretin case.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Lei Z; Reixach, Natàlia

    2014-10-21

    The quaternary structure stability of proteins is typically studied under conditions that accelerate their aggregation/unfolding processes on convenient laboratory time scales. Such conditions include high temperature or pressure, chaotrope-mediated unfolding, or low or high pH. These approaches have the limitation of being nonphysiological and that the concentration of the protein in solution is changing as the reactions proceed. We describe a methodology to define the quaternary structure stability of the amyloidogenic homotetrameric protein transthyretin (TTR) under physiological conditions. This methodology expands from a described approach based on the measurement of the rate of subunit exchange of TTR with a tandem flag-tagged (FT₂) TTR counterpart. We demonstrate that subunit exchange of TTR with FT₂·TTR can be analyzed and quantified using a semi-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis technique. In addition, we biophysically characterized two FT₂·TTR variants derived from wild-type and the amyloidogenic variant Val122Ile TTR, both of which are associated with cardiac amyloid deposition late in life. The FT₂·TTR variants have similar amyloidogenic potential and similar thermodynamic and kinetic stabilities compared to those of their nontagged counterparts. We utilized the methodology to study the potential of the small molecule SOM0226, a repurposed drug under clinical development for the prevention and treatment of the TTR amyloidoses, to stabilize TTR. The results enabled us to characterize the binding energetics of SOM0226 to TTR. The described technique is well-suited to study the quaternary structure of other human aggregation-prone proteins under physiological conditions. PMID:25245430

  6. Quantification of Quaternary Structure Stability in Aggregation-Prone Proteins under Physiological Conditions: The Transthyretin Case

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The quaternary structure stability of proteins is typically studied under conditions that accelerate their aggregation/unfolding processes on convenient laboratory time scales. Such conditions include high temperature or pressure, chaotrope-mediated unfolding, or low or high pH. These approaches have the limitation of being nonphysiological and that the concentration of the protein in solution is changing as the reactions proceed. We describe a methodology to define the quaternary structure stability of the amyloidogenic homotetrameric protein transthyretin (TTR) under physiological conditions. This methodology expands from a described approach based on the measurement of the rate of subunit exchange of TTR with a tandem flag-tagged (FT2) TTR counterpart. We demonstrate that subunit exchange of TTR with FT2·TTR can be analyzed and quantified using a semi-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis technique. In addition, we biophysically characterized two FT2·TTR variants derived from wild-type and the amyloidogenic variant Val122Ile TTR, both of which are associated with cardiac amyloid deposition late in life. The FT2·TTR variants have similar amyloidogenic potential and similar thermodynamic and kinetic stabilities compared to those of their nontagged counterparts. We utilized the methodology to study the potential of the small molecule SOM0226, a repurposed drug under clinical development for the prevention and treatment of the TTR amyloidoses, to stabilize TTR. The results enabled us to characterize the binding energetics of SOM0226 to TTR. The described technique is well-suited to study the quaternary structure of other human aggregation-prone proteins under physiological conditions. PMID:25245430

  7. Quantification of Compactness and Local Order in the Ensemble of the Intrinsically Disordered Protein FCP1.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Eric B; Showalter, Scott A

    2016-09-01

    Intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDRs) partially or completely lack a cooperatively folded structure under native conditions, preventing their equilibrium state from being adequately described by a single structural model. As a direct consequence of their disorder, remarkably few experimental studies have quantified the ensembles IDRs adopt in solution. Here, we conduct unbiased computer simulations of the RAP74 interaction motif from the human phosphatase FCP1 in the unbound state, which provides an ensemble in quantitative agreement with both experimental NMR chemical shift information and small-angle X-ray scattering data. The partially α-helical short linear motif found in the C-terminus of FCP1 has been the subject of extensive biophysical characterization aimed at developing a molecular description for the mechanism of coupled folding and binding and establishing the functional relevance of partial order in the unbound state. The analysis presented here yields a remarkably consistent molecular picture enumerating the diversity of structures present in a "partially formed" helix. Specific interactions, including anticorrelations in backbone dihedral angle fluctuations as well as the transient formation of a helix-stabilizing salt bridge, stabilize the preformed structure in the unbound state. The general consequences of these findings for mechanistic analysis of protein-protein interactions are discussed. PMID:27551949

  8. Female reproductive system of the sugarcane spittlebug Mahanarva fimbriolata (Auchenorrhyncha): vitellogenesis dynamics and protein quantification.

    PubMed

    Caperucci, Débora; Camargo Mathias, Maria Izabel

    2007-01-01

    The present study aimed describing the ovaries of the sugarcane spittlebug Mahanarva fimbriolata which are meroistic telotrophic with nurse cells and oocytes located in the tropharium. SEM revealed paired ovaries located dorsolaterally around the intestine, and oocytes exhibiting shapes ranging from round (less developed) to elliptic (more developed), suggesting a simultaneous, although, asynchronous development. Based on histological data we classified the oocytes in stages from I to V. Stage I oocytes exhibit follicular epithelium with cubic and/or prismatic cells, fine cytoplasmic granules. Stage II oocytes present intercellular spaces in the follicular epithelium due to the incorporation of yolk elements from the hemolymph. Small granules are present in the periphery of oocytes while larger granules are observed in the center. Stage III oocytes are larger and intercellular spaces in the follicular epithelium are evident, as well as the interface between follicular epithelium and oocyte. Yolk granules of different sizes are present in the cytoplasm. During this stage, chorion deposition initiates. Stage IV oocytes exhibit squamous follicular cells and larger intercellular spaces when compared to those observed in the previous stage. The oocyte cytoplasm present granular and viscous yolk, the latter is the result of the breakdown of granules. Stage V oocytes exhibit a follicular epithelium almost completely degenerated, smaller quantities of granular yolk and large amounts of viscous yolk. Based on our findings we established the sequence of yolk deposition in M. fimbriolata oocyte as follows: proteins and lipids, which are first produced by endogenous processes in stages I and II oocytes. Exogenous incorporation begins in stage III. In stages I and II oocytes, lipids are also produced by follicular epithelial cells. The third element to be deposited is polysaccharides, mainly found as complexes. Therefore, the yolk present in the oocytes of this species consists

  9. Quantification of HDL Proteins, Cardiac Events, and Mortality in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Kopecky, Chantal; Genser, Bernd; Drechsler, Christiane; Krane, Vera; Kaltenecker, Christopher C.; Hengstschläger, Markus; März, Winfried; Wanner, Christoph; Säemann, Marcus D.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Impairment of HDL function has been associated with cardiovascular events in patients with kidney failure. The protein composition of HDLs is altered in these patients, presumably compromising the cardioprotective effects of HDLs. This post hoc study assessed the relation of distinct HDL-bound proteins with cardiovascular outcomes in a dialysis population. Design, setting, participants, & measurements The concentrations of HDL-associated serum amyloid A (SAA) and surfactant protein B (SP-B) were measured in 1152 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on hemodialysis participating in The German Diabetes Dialysis Study who were randomly assigned to double-blind treatment of 20 mg atorvastatin daily or matching placebo. The association of SAA(HDL) and SP-B(HDL) with cardiovascular outcomes was assessed in multivariate regression models adjusted for known clinical risk factors. Results High concentrations of SAA(HDL) were significantly and positively associated with the risk of cardiac events (hazard ratio per 1 SD higher, 1.09; 95% confidence interval, 1.01 to 1.19). High concentrations of SP-B(HDL) were significantly associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio per 1 SD higher, 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 1.19). Adjustment for HDL cholesterol did not affect these associations. Conclusions In patients with diabetes on hemodialysis, SAA(HDL) and SP-B(HDL) were related to cardiac events and all-cause mortality, respectively, and they were independent of HDL cholesterol. These findings indicate that a remodeling of the HDL proteome was associated with a higher risk for cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with ESRD. PMID:25424990

  10. Mass spectrometric quantification of amino acid oxidation products in proteins: insights into pathways that promote LDL oxidation in the human artery wall.

    PubMed

    Heinecke, J W

    1999-07-01

    Oxidatively damaged low density lipoprotein (LDL) may play an important role in atherogenesis, but the physiologically relevant pathways have proved difficult to identify. Mass spectrometric quantification of stable compounds that result from specific oxidation reactions represents a powerful approach for investigating such mechanisms. Analysis of protein oxidation products isolated from atherosclerotic lesions implicates tyrosyl radical, reactive nitrogen species, and hypochlorous acid in LDL oxidation in the human artery wall. These observations provide chemical evidence for the reaction pathways that promote LDL oxidation and lesion formation in vivo.--Heinecke, J. W. Mass spectrometric quantification of amino acid oxidation products in proteins: insights into pathways that promote LDL oxidation in the human artery wall. PMID:10385603

  11. PSSP-RFE: accurate prediction of protein structural class by recursive feature extraction from PSI-BLAST profile, physical-chemical property and functional annotations.

    PubMed

    Li, Liqi; Cui, Xiang; Yu, Sanjiu; Zhang, Yuan; Luo, Zhong; Yang, Hua; Zhou, Yue; Zheng, Xiaoqi

    2014-01-01

    Protein structure prediction is critical to functional annotation of the massively accumulated biological sequences, which prompts an imperative need for the development of high-throughput technologies. As a first and key step in protein structure prediction, protein structural class prediction becomes an increasingly challenging task. Amongst most homological-based approaches, the accuracies of protein structural class prediction are sufficiently high for high similarity datasets, but still far from being satisfactory for low similarity datasets, i.e., below 40% in pairwise sequence similarity. Therefore, we present a novel method for accurate and reliable protein structural class prediction for both high and low similarity datasets. This method is based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) in conjunction with integrated features from position-specific score matrix (PSSM), PROFEAT and Gene Ontology (GO). A feature selection approach, SVM-RFE, is also used to rank the integrated feature vectors through recursively removing the feature with the lowest ranking score. The definitive top features selected by SVM-RFE are input into the SVM engines to predict the structural class of a query protein. To validate our method, jackknife tests were applied to seven widely used benchmark datasets, reaching overall accuracies between 84.61% and 99.79%, which are significantly higher than those achieved by state-of-the-art tools. These results suggest that our method could serve as an accurate and cost-effective alternative to existing methods in protein structural classification, especially for low similarity datasets. PMID:24675610

  12. A simplified assay for the quantification of circulating activated protein C.

    PubMed

    Martos, Laura; Bonanad, Santiago; Ramón, Luis A; Cid, Ana-Rosa; Bonet, Elena; Corral, Javier; Miralles, Manuel; España, Francisco; Navarro, Silvia; Medina, Pilar

    2016-08-01

    Available assays for circulating levels of activated protein C (APC) are either time-consuming or difficult to use in a routine laboratory, or have a detection limit above normal levels. We have developed a simplified assay that measures both the in vivo free APC and the in vivo APC complexed to PC inhibitor (PCI). We measured APC levels, with both assays, in 339 plasma samples, 165 from patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) and 174 from healthy individuals. The mean APC level in the 339 samples was 0.038±0.010 nM, using a previous assay that measures only the in vivo APC level, and 0.041±0.010 nM with the present new assay. The coefficient of correlation between assays was r=0.954 (P<0.001). The mean APC level in VTE patients was 0.034±0.009 nM (previous assay) and 0.037±0.009 nM (new assay), significantly lower than those in controls (P<0.001). In both groups there was a significant correlation between the levels obtained by the two assays (P<0.001). These results show that both assays are equivalent, and confirm that the APC level is lower in VTE patients than in healthy individuals. Therefore, the new simplified assay, which measures the sum of circulating free APC and APC complexed to PCI, may be used to estimate the level of circulating APC, and will allow its use in routine laboratories. PMID:27262823

  13. Quantification of a biomarker of acetaminophen protein adducts in human serum by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry: clinical and animal model applications.

    PubMed

    Cook, Sarah F; King, Amber D; Chang, Yan; Murray, Gordon J; Norris, Hye-Ryun K; Dart, Richard C; Green, Jody L; Curry, Steven C; Rollins, Douglas E; Wilkins, Diana G

    2015-03-15

    The aims of this study were to develop, validate, and apply a high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) method for quantification of protein-derived 3-(cystein-S-yl)-acetaminophen (APAP-Cys) in human serum. Formation of acetaminophen (APAP) protein adducts is thought to be a critical, early event in the development of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, and quantification of these protein adducts in human serum represents a valuable tool for assessment of APAP exposure, metabolism, and toxicity. In the reported procedure, serum samples were first dialyzed or passed through gel filtration columns to remove APAP-Cys not covalently bound to proteins. Serum eluates were then subjected to enzymatic protease digestion to liberate protein-bound APAP-Cys. Norbuprenorphine-D3 was utilized as an internal standard (IS). APAP-Cys and IS were recovered from digested serum by protein precipitation with acetonitrile, and sample extracts were analyzed by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. The method was validated by assessment of intra- and inter-assay accuracy and imprecision on two different analytical instrument platforms. APAP-Cys could be accurately quantified from 0.010 to 10μM, and intra- and inter-assay imprecision were <15% on both analytical instruments. APAP-Cys was stable in human serum for three freeze-thaw cycles and for 24h at ambient temperature. Extracted samples were stable when stored in refrigerated autosamplers for the typical duration of analysis or when stored at -20°C for six days. Results from process efficiency and matrix effect experiments indicated adequate recovery from human serum and insignificant ion suppression or enhancement. The utility and sensitivity of the reported procedure were illustrated by analysis of clinical samples collected from subjects taking chronic, therapeutic doses of APAP. Applicability to other biological matrices was also demonstrated by measurement of protein-derived APAP-Cys in plasma

  14. Under proper control, oxidation of proteins with known chemical structure provides an accurate and absolute method for the determination of their molar concentration.

    PubMed

    Guermant, C; Azarkan, M; Smolders, N; Baeyens-Volant, D; Nijs, M; Paul, C; Brygier, J; Vincentelli, J; Looze, Y

    2000-01-01

    Oxidation at 120 degrees C of inorganic and organic (including amino acids, di- and tripeptides) model compounds by K(2)Cr(2)O(7) in the presence of H(2)SO(4) (mass fraction: 0.572), Ag(2)SO(4) (catalyst), and HgSO(4) results in the quantitative conversion of their C-atoms into CO(2) within 24 h or less. Under these stressed, well-defined conditions, the S-atoms present in cysteine and cystine residues are oxidized into SO(3) while, interestingly, the oxidation states of all the other (including the N-) atoms normally present in a protein do remain quite unchanged. When the chemical structure of a given protein is available, the total number of electrons the protein is able to transfer to K(2)Cr(2)O(7) and thereof, the total number of moles of Cr(3+) ions which the protein is able to generate upon oxidation can be accurately calculated. In such cases, unknown protein molar concentrations can thus be determined through straightforward spectrophotometric measurements of Cr(3+) concentrations. The values of molar absorption coefficients for several well-characterized proteins have been redetermined on this basis and observed to be in excellent agreement with the most precise values reported in the literature, which fully assesses the validity of the method. When applied to highly purified proteins of known chemical structure (more generally of known atomic composition), this method is absolute and accurate (+/-1%). Furthermore, it is well adapted to series measurements since available commercial kits for chemical oxygen demand (COD) measurements can readily be adapted to work under the experimental conditions recommended here for the protein assay. PMID:10610688

  15. aPPRove: An HMM-Based Method for Accurate Prediction of RNA-Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein Binding Events.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Thomas; Ruiz, Jaime; Sloan, Daniel B; Ben-Hur, Asa; Boucher, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat containing proteins (PPRs) bind to RNA transcripts originating from mitochondria and plastids. There are two classes of PPR proteins. The [Formula: see text] class contains tandem [Formula: see text]-type motif sequences, and the [Formula: see text] class contains alternating [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] type sequences. In this paper, we describe a novel tool that predicts PPR-RNA interaction; specifically, our method, which we call aPPRove, determines where and how a [Formula: see text]-class PPR protein will bind to RNA when given a PPR and one or more RNA transcripts by using a combinatorial binding code for site specificity proposed by Barkan et al. Our results demonstrate that aPPRove successfully locates how and where a PPR protein belonging to the [Formula: see text] class can bind to RNA. For each binding event it outputs the binding site, the amino-acid-nucleotide interaction, and its statistical significance. Furthermore, we show that our method can be used to predict binding events for [Formula: see text]-class proteins using a known edit site and the statistical significance of aligning the PPR protein to that site. In particular, we use our method to make a conjecture regarding an interaction between CLB19 and the second intronic region of ycf3. The aPPRove web server can be found at www.cs.colostate.edu/~approve. PMID:27560805

  16. aPPRove: An HMM-Based Method for Accurate Prediction of RNA-Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein Binding Events

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Thomas; Ruiz, Jaime; Sloan, Daniel B.; Ben-Hur, Asa; Boucher, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat containing proteins (PPRs) bind to RNA transcripts originating from mitochondria and plastids. There are two classes of PPR proteins. The P class contains tandem P-type motif sequences, and the PLS class contains alternating P, L and S type sequences. In this paper, we describe a novel tool that predicts PPR-RNA interaction; specifically, our method, which we call aPPRove, determines where and how a PLS-class PPR protein will bind to RNA when given a PPR and one or more RNA transcripts by using a combinatorial binding code for site specificity proposed by Barkan et al. Our results demonstrate that aPPRove successfully locates how and where a PPR protein belonging to the PLS class can bind to RNA. For each binding event it outputs the binding site, the amino-acid-nucleotide interaction, and its statistical significance. Furthermore, we show that our method can be used to predict binding events for PLS-class proteins using a known edit site and the statistical significance of aligning the PPR protein to that site. In particular, we use our method to make a conjecture regarding an interaction between CLB19 and the second intronic region of ycf3. The aPPRove web server can be found at www.cs.colostate.edu/~approve. PMID:27560805

  17. freeQuant: A Mass Spectrometry Label-Free Quantification Software Tool for Complex Proteome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenye; Pan, Chao; Duan, Huilong

    2015-01-01

    Study of complex proteome brings forward higher request for the quantification method using mass spectrometry technology. In this paper, we present a mass spectrometry label-free quantification tool for complex proteomes, called freeQuant, which integrated quantification with functional analysis effectively. freeQuant consists of two well-integrated modules: label-free quantification and functional analysis with biomedical knowledge. freeQuant supports label-free quantitative analysis which makes full use of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) spectral count, protein sequence length, shared peptides, and ion intensity. It adopts spectral count for quantitative analysis and builds a new method for shared peptides to accurately evaluate abundance of isoforms. For proteins with low abundance, MS/MS total ion count coupled with spectral count is included to ensure accurate protein quantification. Furthermore, freeQuant supports the large-scale functional annotations for complex proteomes. Mitochondrial proteomes from the mouse heart, the mouse liver, and the human heart were used to evaluate the usability and performance of freeQuant. The evaluation showed that the quantitative algorithms implemented in freeQuant can improve accuracy of quantification with better dynamic range. PMID:26665161

  18. HubAlign: an accurate and efficient method for global alignment of protein–protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Hashemifar, Somaye; Xu, Jinbo

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: High-throughput experimental techniques have produced a large amount of protein–protein interaction (PPI) data. The study of PPI networks, such as comparative analysis, shall benefit the understanding of life process and diseases at the molecular level. One way of comparative analysis is to align PPI networks to identify conserved or species-specific subnetwork motifs. A few methods have been developed for global PPI network alignment, but it still remains challenging in terms of both accuracy and efficiency. Results: This paper presents a novel global network alignment algorithm, denoted as HubAlign, that makes use of both network topology and sequence homology information, based upon the observation that topologically important proteins in a PPI network usually are much more conserved and thus, more likely to be aligned. HubAlign uses a minimum-degree heuristic algorithm to estimate the topological and functional importance of a protein from the global network topology information. Then HubAlign aligns topologically important proteins first and gradually extends the alignment to the whole network. Extensive tests indicate that HubAlign greatly outperforms several popular methods in terms of both accuracy and efficiency, especially in detecting functionally similar proteins. Availability: HubAlign is available freely for non-commercial purposes at http://ttic.uchicago.edu/∼hashemifar/software/HubAlign.zip Contact: jinboxu@gmail.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25161231

  19. Advances in inline quantification of co-eluting proteins in chromatography: Process-data-based model calibration and application towards real-life separation issues.

    PubMed

    Brestrich, Nina; Sanden, Adrian; Kraft, Axel; McCann, Karl; Bertolini, Joseph; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    Pooling decisions in preparative liquid chromatography for protein purification are usually based on univariate UV absorption measurements that are not able to differentiate between product and co-eluting contaminants. This can result in inconsistent pool purities or yields, if there is a batch-to-batch variability of the feedstock. To overcome this analytical bottleneck, a tool for selective inline quantification of co-eluting model proteins using mid-UV absorption spectra and Partial Least Squares Regression (PLS) was presented in a previous study and applied for real-time pooling decisions. In this paper, a process-data-based method for the PLS model calibration will be introduced that allows the application of the tool towards chromatography steps of real-life processes. The process-data-based calibration method uses recorded inline mid-UV absorption spectra that are correlated with offline fraction analytics to calibrate PLS models. In order to generate average spectra from the inline data, a Visual Basic for Application macro was successfully developed. The process-data-based model calibration was established using a ternary model protein system. Afterwards, it was successfully demonstrated in two case studies that the calibration method is applicable towards real-life separation issues. The calibrated PLS models allowed a successful quantification of the co-eluting species in a cation-exchange-based aggregate and fraction removal during the purification of monoclonal antibodies and of co-eluting serum proteins in an anion-exchange-based purification of Cohn supernatant I. Consequently, the presented process-data-based PLS model calibration in combination with the tool for selective inline quantification has a great potential for the monitoring of future chromatography steps and may contribute to manage batch-to-batch variability by real-time pooling decisions. PMID:25683378

  20. Simultaneous quantification of protein phosphorylation sites using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based targeted proteomics: a linear algebra approach for isobaric phosphopeptides.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feifei; Yang, Ting; Sheng, Yuan; Zhong, Ting; Yang, Mi; Chen, Yun

    2014-12-01

    As one of the most studied post-translational modifications (PTM), protein phosphorylation plays an essential role in almost all cellular processes. Current methods are able to predict and determine thousands of phosphorylation sites, whereas stoichiometric quantification of these sites is still challenging. Liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based targeted proteomics is emerging as a promising technique for site-specific quantification of protein phosphorylation using proteolytic peptides as surrogates of proteins. However, several issues may limit its application, one of which relates to the phosphopeptides with different phosphorylation sites and the same mass (i.e., isobaric phosphopeptides). While employment of site-specific product ions allows for these isobaric phosphopeptides to be distinguished and quantified, site-specific product ions are often absent or weak in tandem mass spectra. In this study, linear algebra algorithms were employed as an add-on to targeted proteomics to retrieve information on individual phosphopeptides from their common spectra. To achieve this simultaneous quantification, a LC-MS/MS-based targeted proteomics assay was first developed and validated for each phosphopeptide. Given the slope and intercept of calibration curves of phosphopeptides in each transition, linear algebraic equations were developed. Using a series of mock mixtures prepared with varying concentrations of each phosphopeptide, the reliability of the approach to quantify isobaric phosphopeptides containing multiple phosphorylation sites (≥ 2) was discussed. Finally, we applied this approach to determine the phosphorylation stoichiometry of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) at Ser78 and Ser82 in breast cancer cells and tissue samples. PMID:25403019

  1. Custom 4-Plex DiLeu Isobaric Labels Enable Relative Quantification of Urinary Proteins in Men with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS)

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Tyler; Hao, Ling; Nechyporenko, Anatoliy; Lee, Sanghee; Vezina, Chad M.; Ricke, Will A.; Marker, Paul C.; Bjorling, Dale E.; Bushman, Wade; Li, Lingjun

    2015-01-01

    The relative quantification of proteins using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) has allowed researchers to compile lists of potential disease markers. These complex quantitative workflows often include isobaric labeling of enzymatically-produced peptides to analyze their relative abundances across multiple samples in a single LC-MS run. Recent efforts by our lab have provided scientists with cost-effective alternatives to expensive commercial labels. Although the quantitative performance of these dimethyl leucine (DiLeu) labels has been reported using known ratios of complex protein and peptide standards, their potential in large-scale proteomics studies using a clinically relevant system has never been investigated. Our work rectifies this oversight by implementing 4-plex DiLeu to quantify proteins in the urine of aging human males who suffer from lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Protein abundances in 25 LUTS and 15 control patients were compared, revealing that of the 836 proteins quantified, 50 were found to be differentially expressed (>20% change) and statistically significant (p-value <0.05). Gene ontology (GO) analysis of the differentiated proteins showed that many were involved in inflammatory responses and implicated in fibrosis. While confirmation of individual protein abundance changes would be required to verify protein expression, this study represents the first report using the custom isobaric label, 4-plex DiLeu, to quantify protein abundances in a clinically relevant system. PMID:26267142

  2. A highly accurate protein structural class prediction approach using auto cross covariance transformation and recursive feature elimination.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaowei; Liu, Taigang; Tao, Peiying; Wang, Chunhua; Chen, Lanming

    2015-12-01

    Structural class characterizes the overall folding type of a protein or its domain. Many methods have been proposed to improve the prediction accuracy of protein structural class in recent years, but it is still a challenge for the low-similarity sequences. In this study, we introduce a feature extraction technique based on auto cross covariance (ACC) transformation of position-specific score matrix (PSSM) to represent a protein sequence. Then support vector machine-recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE) is adopted to select top K features according to their importance and these features are input to a support vector machine (SVM) to conduct the prediction. Performance evaluation of the proposed method is performed using the jackknife test on three low-similarity datasets, i.e., D640, 1189 and 25PDB. By means of this method, the overall accuracies of 97.2%, 96.2%, and 93.3% are achieved on these three datasets, which are higher than those of most existing methods. This suggests that the proposed method could serve as a very cost-effective tool for predicting protein structural class especially for low-similarity datasets. PMID:26460680

  3. Accurate prediction of protein secondary structure and solvent accessibility by consensus combiners of sequence and structure information

    PubMed Central

    Pollastri, Gianluca; Martin, Alberto JM; Mooney, Catherine; Vullo, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    Background Structural properties of proteins such as secondary structure and solvent accessibility contribute to three-dimensional structure prediction, not only in the ab initio case but also when homology information to known structures is available. Structural properties are also routinely used in protein analysis even when homology is available, largely because homology modelling is lower throughput than, say, secondary structure prediction. Nonetheless, predictors of secondary structure and solvent accessibility are virtually always ab initio. Results Here we develop high-throughput machine learning systems for the prediction of protein secondary structure and solvent accessibility that exploit homology to proteins of known structure, where available, in the form of simple structural frequency profiles extracted from sets of PDB templates. We compare these systems to their state-of-the-art ab initio counterparts, and with a number of baselines in which secondary structures and solvent accessibilities are extracted directly from the templates. We show that structural information from templates greatly improves secondary structure and solvent accessibility prediction quality, and that, on average, the systems significantly enrich the information contained in the templates. For sequence similarity exceeding 30%, secondary structure prediction quality is approximately 90%, close to its theoretical maximum, and 2-class solvent accessibility roughly 85%. Gains are robust with respect to template selection noise, and significant for marginal sequence similarity and for short alignments, supporting the claim that these improved predictions may prove beneficial beyond the case in which clear homology is available. Conclusion The predictive system are publicly available at the address . PMID:17570843

  4. PSI/TM-Coffee: a web server for fast and accurate multiple sequence alignments of regular and transmembrane proteins using homology extension on reduced databases.

    PubMed

    Floden, Evan W; Tommaso, Paolo D; Chatzou, Maria; Magis, Cedrik; Notredame, Cedric; Chang, Jia-Ming

    2016-07-01

    The PSI/TM-Coffee web server performs multiple sequence alignment (MSA) of proteins by combining homology extension with a consistency based alignment approach. Homology extension is performed with Position Specific Iterative (PSI) BLAST searches against a choice of redundant and non-redundant databases. The main novelty of this server is to allow databases of reduced complexity to rapidly perform homology extension. This server also gives the possibility to use transmembrane proteins (TMPs) reference databases to allow even faster homology extension on this important category of proteins. Aside from an MSA, the server also outputs topological prediction of TMPs using the HMMTOP algorithm. Previous benchmarking of the method has shown this approach outperforms the most accurate alignment methods such as MSAProbs, Kalign, PROMALS, MAFFT, ProbCons and PRALINE™. The web server is available at http://tcoffee.crg.cat/tmcoffee. PMID:27106060

  5. Microdosing of a Carbon-14 Labeled Protein in Healthy Volunteers Accurately Predicts Its Pharmacokinetics at Therapeutic Dosages.

    PubMed

    Vlaming, M L H; van Duijn, E; Dillingh, M R; Brands, R; Windhorst, A D; Hendrikse, N H; Bosgra, S; Burggraaf, J; de Koning, M C; Fidder, A; Mocking, J A J; Sandman, H; de Ligt, R A F; Fabriek, B O; Pasman, W J; Seinen, W; Alves, T; Carrondo, M; Peixoto, C; Peeters, P A M; Vaes, W H J

    2015-08-01

    Preclinical development of new biological entities (NBEs), such as human protein therapeutics, requires considerable expenditure of time and costs. Poor prediction of pharmacokinetics in humans further reduces net efficiency. In this study, we show for the first time that pharmacokinetic data of NBEs in humans can be successfully obtained early in the drug development process by the use of microdosing in a small group of healthy subjects combined with ultrasensitive accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). After only minimal preclinical testing, we performed a first-in-human phase 0/phase 1 trial with a human recombinant therapeutic protein (RESCuing Alkaline Phosphatase, human recombinant placental alkaline phosphatase [hRESCAP]) to assess its safety and kinetics. Pharmacokinetic analysis showed dose linearity from microdose (53 μg) [(14) C]-hRESCAP to therapeutic doses (up to 5.3 mg) of the protein in healthy volunteers. This study demonstrates the value of a microdosing approach in a very small cohort for accelerating the clinical development of NBEs. PMID:25869840

  6. Evaluation of iTRAQ and SWATH-MS for the Quantification of Proteins Associated with Insulin Resistance in Human Duodenal Biopsy Samples

    PubMed Central

    Bourassa, Sylvie; Fournier, Frédéric; Nehmé, Benjamin; Kelly, Isabelle; Tremblay, André; Lemelin, Valéry; Lamarche, Benoit; Couture, Patrick; Droit, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is associated with increased production of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins of intestinal origin. In order to assess whether insulin resistance affects the proteins involved in lipid metabolism, we used two mass spectrometry based quantitative proteomics techniques to compare the intestinal proteome of 14 IR patients to that of 15 insulin sensitive (IS) control patients matched for age and waist circumference. A total of 3886 proteins were identified by the iTRAQ (Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation) mass spectrometry approach and 2290 by the SWATH-MS strategy (Serial Window Acquisition of Theoretical Spectra). Using these two methods, 208 common proteins were identified with a confidence corresponding to FDR < 1%, and quantified with p-value < 0.05. The quantification of those 208 proteins has a Pearson correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.728 across the two techniques. Gene Ontology analyses of the differentially expressed proteins revealed that annotations related to lipid metabolic process and oxidation reduction process are overly represented in the set of under-expressed proteins in IR subjects. Furthermore, both methods quantified proteins of relevance to IR. These data also showed that SWATH-MS is a promising and compelling alternative to iTRAQ for protein quantitation of complex mixtures. PMID:25950531

  7. Dual-label time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay for simultaneous quantification of haptoglobin and C-reactive protein in meat juice from pigs

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Ana M.; Cerón, José J.; Marsilla, Blas A.; Parra, María D.; Martinez-Subiela, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    A new method was developed to simultaneously measure 2 acute-phase proteins (APPs) by time-resolved immunofluorometry. The assay, based on double-label quantification of haptoglobin (Hp) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in meat juice samples from pigs, was constructed by use of a combination of europium and samarium chelate lanthanides as labels. Meat juice samples from 154 pigs were used for analytic and clinical validation of the assay through determination of precision, accuracy, limit of detection, and quantification. The analytic performance of the assay was satisfactory, with good intra-assay and interassay precision and accuracy. The levels of Hp and CRP were increased in the meat juice samples of diseased animals compared with healthy ones. According to the results, higher sensitivity could be achieved if the cut-off values of both proteins were taken into account for clinical relevance rather than used individually. Since the dual assay saved both time and sample, it could be used as a rapid and sensitive screening test in porcine production. PMID:23024456

  8. Validation of a nanoliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the identification and the accurate quantification by isotopic dilution of glutathionylated and cysteinylated precursors of 3-mercaptohexan-1-ol and 4-mercapto-4-methylpentan-2-one in white grape juices.

    PubMed

    Roland, Aurélie; Vialaret, Jérôme; Moniatte, Marc; Rigou, Peggy; Razungles, Alain; Schneider, Rémi

    2010-03-01

    A rapid nanoLC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of glutathionylated and cysteinylated precursors of 3-mercapto-hexan-1-ol (3MH) and 4-methyl-4-mercaptopentan-2-one in grape juice using stable isotope dilution assay (SIDA). The analytes were extracted from must using a cation exchange resin and purified on C18 cartridges. They were chromatographically separated on a reverse phase column and finally analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry in selected reaction monitoring mode (SRM) using deuterated analogues as standards except for glutathionylated conjugate of 4MMP which was analyzed by external calibration. The method was validated according to the International Conference on Harmonization recommendations by determining linearity, accuracy, precision, recovery, matrix effect, repeatability, intermediate reproducibility, LODs and LOQs. Calibration for each precursor was determined by performing Lack-of-Fit test and the best fitting for 3MH precursors was a quadratic model whereas a linear model was better adapted for 4MMP precursors. All calibration curves showed quite satisfactory correlation coefficients (R(2)>0.995 for SIDA quantification and R(2)>0.985 for external calibration). Quantification by SIDA and external calibration allowed a high level of accuracy since the averaged value ranged from 80 to 108%. Quantification of aroma precursors was accurate and reproducible over five days since intermediate precision (same analyst, same sample and same apparatus), which was evaluated by the calculation of RSD was inferior to 16%. Limits of quantification for G3MH and G4MMP were closed to 0.50 and 0.07 nmol/L and as 4.75 and 1.90 nmol/L for Cys3MH and Cys4MMP respectively. This method was applied to the quantification of precursors into several types of grape juices: Melon B., Sauvignon, Riesling and Gewurztraminer. PMID:20122692

  9. BgN-Score and BsN-Score: Bagging and boosting based ensemble neural networks scoring functions for accurate binding affinity prediction of protein-ligand complexes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Accurately predicting the binding affinities of large sets of protein-ligand complexes is a key challenge in computational biomolecular science, with applications in drug discovery, chemical biology, and structural biology. Since a scoring function (SF) is used to score, rank, and identify drug leads, the fidelity with which it predicts the affinity of a ligand candidate for a protein's binding site has a significant bearing on the accuracy of virtual screening. Despite intense efforts in developing conventional SFs, which are either force-field based, knowledge-based, or empirical, their limited predictive power has been a major roadblock toward cost-effective drug discovery. Therefore, in this work, we present novel SFs employing a large ensemble of neural networks (NN) in conjunction with a diverse set of physicochemical and geometrical features characterizing protein-ligand complexes to predict binding affinity. Results We assess the scoring accuracies of two new ensemble NN SFs based on bagging (BgN-Score) and boosting (BsN-Score), as well as those of conventional SFs in the context of the 2007 PDBbind benchmark that encompasses a diverse set of high-quality protein families. We find that BgN-Score and BsN-Score have more than 25% better Pearson's correlation coefficient (0.804 and 0.816 vs. 0.644) between predicted and measured binding affinities compared to that achieved by a state-of-the-art conventional SF. In addition, these ensemble NN SFs are also at least 19% more accurate (0.804 and 0.816 vs. 0.675) than SFs based on a single neural network that has been traditionally used in drug discovery applications. We further find that ensemble models based on NNs surpass SFs based on the decision-tree ensemble technique Random Forests. Conclusions Ensemble neural networks SFs, BgN-Score and BsN-Score, are the most accurate in predicting binding affinity of protein-ligand complexes among the considered SFs. Moreover, their accuracies are even higher

  10. Simplified biased random walk model for RecA-protein-mediated homology recognition offers rapid and accurate self-assembly of long linear arrays of binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Kates-Harbeck, Julian; Tilloy, Antoine; Prentiss, Mara

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by RecA-protein-based homology recognition, we consider the pairing of two long linear arrays of binding sites. We propose a fully reversible, physically realizable biased random walk model for rapid and accurate self-assembly due to the spontaneous pairing of matching binding sites, where the statistics of the searched sample are included. In the model, there are two bound conformations, and the free energy for each conformation is a weakly nonlinear function of the number of contiguous matched bound sites. PMID:23944487

  11. Direct quantification of protein partitioning in oil-in-water emulsion by front-face fluorescence: avoiding the need for centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Granger, C; Barey, P; Toutain, J; Cansell, M

    2005-07-10

    The quantification of proteins adsorbed at the oil-in-water interface is often difficult since it requires separation of fat globules from the aqueous phase that may damage the fat globule size and/or modify the interfacial composition. Front-face fluorescence spectroscopy was used to characterize the protein partitioning between the aqueous and oil phases of emulsions without separating these two phases. Different emulsions based on skim milk powder (SMP), two mono- and di-glyceride (MDG) mixtures (saturated and partially unsaturated), and three fats (hydrogenated and refined coconut oils and refined palm oil) were studied. The impact of an ageing period (24 h at 4 degrees C) was also investigated to typify the first step of ice cream processing. The emulsions were characterized for protein partitioning, immediately following emulsification and after ageing, using the Bradford spectrophotometric method, applied to the aqueous phase recovered after emulsion centrifugation. In parallel, the emulsions were characterized by their tryptophan emission fluorescence spectra. The area of the peaks at 333 nm, of the fourth-derivative fluorescence spectra corresponding to the amount of proteins present in the aqueous phase of emulsions, was well correlated with the Bradford measurements (r2=0.91). This amount was also calculated from the fluorescence calibration curve obtained with SMP in solution. In conclusion, front-face fluorescence spectroscopy appeared to be a powerful and simple technique allowing the quantification of different populations of protein in an emulsified system, i.e., in the aqueous phase and loaded at the fat globule interface. PMID:15946827

  12. Quantification of aggrecan and link-protein mRNA in human articular cartilage of different ages by competitive reverse transcriptase-PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, M C; Dudhia, J; Bayliss, M T

    1996-01-01

    A competitive reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) assay has been developed for the quantification of particular mRNA species in human articular cartilage. Competitor RNA species were synthesized that differed from the amplified target sequence only by the central insertion of an EcoRI restriction site. By using known amounts of synthetic target and competitor RNA, it was shown that competitor RNA molecules designed in this way are reverse-transcribed and amplified with equal efficiency to the target of interest. Furthermore quantification could be performed during the plateau phase of the PCR, which was necessary when using ethidium bromide fluorescence as a detection system. The inhibition of aggrecan and link-protein mRNA expression by interleukin 1 or tumour necrosis factor in monolayers of human articular chondrocytes quantified by this competitive RT-PCR method compared favourably with Northern hybridization studies. The main advantage of this technique is that it can be used to quantify levels of mRNA with RNA extracted directly from 100 mg wet weight of human articular cartilage. Age-related changes in aggrecan and link-protein mRNA were therefore quantified in human articular cartilage directly after dissection from the joint. The concentration of link-protein mRNA was higher in immature cartilage than in mature cartilage when expressed relative to the amount of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA, but no age-related changes were observed in aggrecan mRNA expression. The ratio of aggrecan to link-protein mRNA was higher in mature cartilage than in immature tissue. These age-related differences in the molecular stoichiometry of aggrecan and link-protein mRNA might have implications with respect to the regulation of the formation and the stability of the proteoglycan aggregates in cartilage. PMID:8912686

  13. Building accurate sequence-to-affinity models from high-throughput in vitro protein-DNA binding data using FeatureREDUCE.

    PubMed

    Riley, Todd R; Lazarovici, Allan; Mann, Richard S; Bussemaker, Harmen J

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors are crucial regulators of gene expression. Accurate quantitative definition of their intrinsic DNA binding preferences is critical to understanding their biological function. High-throughput in vitro technology has recently been used to deeply probe the DNA binding specificity of hundreds of eukaryotic transcription factors, yet algorithms for analyzing such data have not yet fully matured. Here, we present a general framework (FeatureREDUCE) for building sequence-to-affinity models based on a biophysically interpretable and extensible model of protein-DNA interaction that can account for dependencies between nucleotides within the binding interface or multiple modes of binding. When training on protein binding microarray (PBM) data, we use robust regression and modeling of technology-specific biases to infer specificity models of unprecedented accuracy and precision. We provide quantitative validation of our results by comparing to gold-standard data when available. PMID:26701911

  14. A new coarse-grained model for E. coli cytoplasm: accurate calculation of the diffusion coefficient of proteins and observation of anomalous diffusion.

    PubMed

    Hasnain, Sabeeha; McClendon, Christopher L; Hsu, Monica T; Jacobson, Matthew P; Bandyopadhyay, Pradipta

    2014-01-01

    A new coarse-grained model of the E. coli cytoplasm is developed by describing the proteins of the cytoplasm as flexible units consisting of one or more spheres that follow Brownian dynamics (BD), with hydrodynamic interactions (HI) accounted for by a mean-field approach. Extensive BD simulations were performed to calculate the diffusion coefficients of three different proteins in the cellular environment. The results are in close agreement with experimental or previously simulated values, where available. Control simulations without HI showed that use of HI is essential to obtain accurate diffusion coefficients. Anomalous diffusion inside the crowded cellular medium was investigated with Fractional Brownian motion analysis, and found to be present in this model. By running a series of control simulations in which various forces were removed systematically, it was found that repulsive interactions (volume exclusion) are the main cause for anomalous diffusion, with a secondary contribution from HI. PMID:25180859

  15. How Iron-Containing Proteins Control Dioxygen Chemistry: A Detailed Atomic Level Description Via Accurate Quantum Chemical and Mixed Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    SciTech Connect

    Friesner, Richard A.; Baik, Mu-Hyun; Gherman, Benjamin F.; Guallar, Victor; Wirstam, Maria E.; Murphy, Robert B.; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2003-03-01

    Over the past several years, rapid advances in computational hardware, quantum chemical methods, and mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) techniques have made it possible to model accurately the interaction of ligands with metal-containing proteins at an atomic level of detail. In this paper, we describe the application of our computational methodology, based on density functional (DFT) quantum chemical methods, to two diiron-containing proteins that interact with dioxygen: methane monooxygenase (MMO) and hemerythrin (Hr). Although the active sites are structurally related, the biological function differs substantially. MMO is an enzyme found in methanotrophic bacteria and hydroxylates aliphatic C-H bonds, whereas Hr is a carrier protein for dioxygen used by a number of marine invertebrates. Quantitative descriptions of the structures and energetics of key intermediates and transition states involved in the reaction with dioxygen are provided, allowing their mechanisms to be compared and contrasted in detail. An in-depth understanding of how the chemical identity of the first ligand coordination shell, structural features, electrostatic and van der Waals interactions of more distant shells control ligand binding and reactive chemistry is provided, affording a systematic analysis of how iron-containing proteins process dioxygen. Extensive contact with experiment is made in both systems, and a remarkable degree of accuracy and robustness of the calculations is obtained from both a qualitative and quantitative perspective.

  16. Accurate small and wide angle x-ray scattering profiles from atomic models of proteins and nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Hung T.; Pabit, Suzette A.; Meisburger, Steve P.; Pollack, Lois; Case, David A.

    2014-12-14

    A new method is introduced to compute X-ray solution scattering profiles from atomic models of macromolecules. The three-dimensional version of the Reference Interaction Site Model (RISM) from liquid-state statistical mechanics is employed to compute the solvent distribution around the solute, including both water and ions. X-ray scattering profiles are computed from this distribution together with the solute geometry. We describe an efficient procedure for performing this calculation employing a Lebedev grid for the angular averaging. The intensity profiles (which involve no adjustable parameters) match experiment and molecular dynamics simulations up to wide angle for two proteins (lysozyme and myoglobin) in water, as well as the small-angle profiles for a dozen biomolecules taken from the BioIsis.net database. The RISM model is especially well-suited for studies of nucleic acids in salt solution. Use of fiber-diffraction models for the structure of duplex DNA in solution yields close agreement with the observed scattering profiles in both the small and wide angle scattering (SAXS and WAXS) regimes. In addition, computed profiles of anomalous SAXS signals (for Rb{sup +} and Sr{sup 2+}) emphasize the ionic contribution to scattering and are in reasonable agreement with experiment. In cases where an absolute calibration of the experimental data at q = 0 is available, one can extract a count of the excess number of waters and ions; computed values depend on the closure that is assumed in the solution of the Ornstein–Zernike equations, with results from the Kovalenko–Hirata closure being closest to experiment for the cases studied here.

  17. Accurate small and wide angle x-ray scattering profiles from atomic models of proteins and nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hung T.; Pabit, Suzette A.; Meisburger, Steve P.; Pollack, Lois; Case, David A.

    2014-12-01

    A new method is introduced to compute X-ray solution scattering profiles from atomic models of macromolecules. The three-dimensional version of the Reference Interaction Site Model (RISM) from liquid-state statistical mechanics is employed to compute the solvent distribution around the solute, including both water and ions. X-ray scattering profiles are computed from this distribution together with the solute geometry. We describe an efficient procedure for performing this calculation employing a Lebedev grid for the angular averaging. The intensity profiles (which involve no adjustable parameters) match experiment and molecular dynamics simulations up to wide angle for two proteins (lysozyme and myoglobin) in water, as well as the small-angle profiles for a dozen biomolecules taken from the BioIsis.net database. The RISM model is especially well-suited for studies of nucleic acids in salt solution. Use of fiber-diffraction models for the structure of duplex DNA in solution yields close agreement with the observed scattering profiles in both the small and wide angle scattering (SAXS and WAXS) regimes. In addition, computed profiles of anomalous SAXS signals (for Rb+ and Sr2+) emphasize the ionic contribution to scattering and are in reasonable agreement with experiment. In cases where an absolute calibration of the experimental data at q = 0 is available, one can extract a count of the excess number of waters and ions; computed values depend on the closure that is assumed in the solution of the Ornstein-Zernike equations, with results from the Kovalenko-Hirata closure being closest to experiment for the cases studied here.

  18. Joint cytokine quantification in two rodent arthritis models: kinetics of expression, correlation of mRNA and protein levels and response to prednisolone treatment.

    PubMed

    Rioja, I; Bush, K A; Buckton, J B; Dickson, M C; Life, P F

    2004-07-01

    Biomarker quantification in disease tissues from animal models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can help to provide insights into the mechanisms of action of novel therapeutic agents. In this study we validated the kinetics of IL-1beta, TNF-alpha and IL-6 mRNA and protein expression levels in joints from DBA/1OlaHsd murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and Lewis rat Streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) TaqMan and Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Prednisolone was used as a reference to investigate any correlation between clinical response and cytokine levels at selected time-points. To our knowledge this is the first report showing a close pattern of expression between mRNA and protein for IL-1beta and IL-6, but not for TNF-alpha, in these two models of RA. The kinetics of expression for these biomarkers suggested that the optimal sampling time-points to study the effect of compounds on both inflammation and cytokine levels were day 4 postonset in CIA and day 3 after i.v challenge in SCW-induced arthritis. Prednisolone reduced joint swelling through a mechanism associated with a reduction in IL-1beta and IL-6 protein and mRNA expression levels. At the investigated time points, protein levels for TNF-alpha in arthritic joints were lower than the lower limit of detection of the ELISA, whereas mRNA levels for this cytokine were reliably detected. These observations suggest that RT-PCR TaqMan is a sensitive technique that can be successfully applied to the quantification of mRNA levels in rodent joints from experimental arthritis models providing insights into mechanisms of action of novel anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:15196245

  19. Quantification of whey proteins by reversed phase-HPLC and effectiveness of mid-infrared spectroscopy for their rapid prediction in sweet whey.

    PubMed

    Sturaro, Alba; De Marchi, Massimo; Masi, Antonio; Cassandro, Martino

    2016-01-01

    In the dairy industry, membrane filtration is used to reduce the amount of whey waste and, simultaneously, to recover whey proteins (WP). The composition of WP can strongly affect the filtration treatment of whey, and rapid determination of WP fractions would be of interest for dairy producers to monitor WP recovery. This study aimed to develop mid-infrared spectroscopy (MIRS) prediction models for the rapid quantification of protein in sweet whey, using a validated rapid reversed phase (RP)-HPLC as a reference method. Quantified WP included α-lactalbumin (α-LA), β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) A and B, bovine serum albumin, caseinomacropeptides, and proteose peptone. Validation of RP-HPLC was performed by calculating the relative standard deviation (RSD) in repeatability and reproducibility tests for WP retention time and peak areas. Samples of liquid whey (n=187) were analyzed by RP-HPLC and scanned through MIRS to collect spectral information (900 to 4,000 cm(-1)); statistical analysis was carried out through partial least squares regression and random cross-validation procedure. Retention times in RP-HPLC method were stable (RSD between 0.03 and 0.80%), whereas the RSD of peak area (from 0.25 to 8.48%) was affected by WP relative abundance. Higher coefficients of determination in validation for MIRS model were obtained for protein fractions present in whey in large amounts, such as β-LG (0.58), total identified WP (0.58), and α-LA (0.56). Results of this study suggest that MIRS is an easy method for rapid quantification of detail protein in sweet whey, even if better resolution was achieved with the method based on RP-HPLC. The prediction of WP in sweet whey by MIRS might be used for screening and for classifying sweet whey according to its total and individual WP contents. PMID:26585472

  20. Quantification of proteins using enhanced etching of Ag coated Au nanorods by the Cu2+/bicinchoninic acid pair with improved sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenqi; Hou, Shuai; Yan, Jiao; Zhang, Hui; Ji, Yinglu; Wu, Xiaochun

    2015-12-01

    Plasmonic nanosensors show great potential in ultrasensitive detection, especially with the plasmon peak position as the detection modality. Herein, a new sensitive but simple total protein quantification method termed the SPR-BCA assay is demonstrated by combining plasmonic nanosensors with protein oxidation by Cu2+. The easy tuning of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) features of plasmonic nanostructures makes them ideal sensing platforms. We found that the Cu2+/bicinchoninic acid (BCA) pair exhibits accelerated etching of Au@Ag nanorods and results in the LSPR peak shift. A linear relationship between Cu2+ and the LSPR shift is found in a double logarithmic coordinate. Such double logarithm relationship is transferred to the concentration of proteins. Theoretical simulation shows that Au nanorods with large aspect ratios and small core sizes show high detection sensitivity. Via optimized sensor design, we achieved an increased sensitivity (the limit of detection was 3.4 ng ml-1) and a wide working range (0.5 to 1000 μg ml-1) compared with the traditional BCA assay. The universal applicability of our method to various proteins further proves its potential in practical applications.Plasmonic nanosensors show great potential in ultrasensitive detection, especially with the plasmon peak position as the detection modality. Herein, a new sensitive but simple total protein quantification method termed the SPR-BCA assay is demonstrated by combining plasmonic nanosensors with protein oxidation by Cu2+. The easy tuning of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) features of plasmonic nanostructures makes them ideal sensing platforms. We found that the Cu2+/bicinchoninic acid (BCA) pair exhibits accelerated etching of Au@Ag nanorods and results in the LSPR peak shift. A linear relationship between Cu2+ and the LSPR shift is found in a double logarithmic coordinate. Such double logarithm relationship is transferred to the concentration of proteins. Theoretical

  1. Label-free Quantification of Proteins in Single Embryonic Cells with Neural Fate in the Cleavage-Stage Frog (Xenopus laevis) Embryo using Capillary Electrophoresis Electrospray Ionization High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry (CE-ESI-HRMS).

    PubMed

    Lombard-Banek, Camille; Reddy, Sushma; Moody, Sally A; Nemes, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Quantification of protein expression in single cells promises to advance a systems-level understanding of normal development. Using a bottom-up proteomic workflow and multiplexing quantification by tandem mass tags, we recently demonstrated relative quantification between single embryonic cells (blastomeres) in the frog (Xenopus laevis) embryo. In this study, we minimize derivatization steps to enhance analytical sensitivity and use label-free quantification (LFQ) for single Xenopus cells. The technology builds on a custom-designed capillary electrophoresis microflow-electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry platform and LFQ by MaxLFQ (MaxQuant). By judiciously tailoring performance to peptide separation, ionization, and data-dependent acquisition, we demonstrate an ∼75-amol (∼11 nm) lower limit of detection and quantification for proteins in complex cell digests. The platform enabled the identification of 438 nonredundant protein groups by measuring 16 ng of protein digest, or <0.2% of the total protein contained in a blastomere in the 16-cell embryo. LFQ intensity was validated as a quantitative proxy for protein abundance. Correlation analysis was performed to compare protein quantities between the embryo and n = 3 different single D11 blastomeres, which are fated to develop into the nervous system. A total of 335 nonredundant protein groups were quantified in union between the single D11 cells spanning a 4 log-order concentration range. LFQ and correlation analysis detected expected proteomic differences between the whole embryo and blastomeres, and also found translational differences between individual D11 cells. LFQ on single cells raises exciting possibilities to study gene expression in other cells and models to help better understand cell processes on a systems biology level. PMID:27317400

  2. Non-Invasive In Vivo Imaging and Quantification of Tumor Growth and Metastasis in Rats Using Cells Expressing Far-Red Fluorescence Protein.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Jon; Vonwil, Daniel; Shastri, V Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive in vivo imaging is emerging as an important tool for basic and preclinical research. Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence dyes and probes have been used for non-invasive optical imaging since in the NIR region absorption and auto fluorescence by body tissue is low, thus permitting for greater penetration depths and high signal to noise ratio. Currently, cell tracking systems rely on labeling cells prior to injection or administering probes targeting the cell population of choice right before imaging. These approaches do not enable imaging of tumor growth, as the cell label is diluted during cell division. In this study we have developed cell lines stably expressing the far-red fluorescence protein E2-Crimson, thus enabling continuous detection and quantification of tumor growth. In a xenograft rat model, we show that E2-Crimson expressing cells can be detected over a 5 week period using optical imaging. Fluorescence intensities correlated with tumor volume and weight and allowed for a reliable and robust quantification of the entire tumor compartment. Using a novel injection regime, the seeding of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells in the lungs in a rat model was established and verified. PMID:26186005

  3. Immunohistochemical Quantification of the Vitamin B12 Transport Protein (TCII), Cell Surface Receptor (TCII-R) and Ki-67 in Human Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Sysel, Annette M.; Valli, Victor E.; Nagle, Ray B.; Bauer, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim Cancer cells have an essential demand for vitamin B12 (cobalamin) to enable cellular replication. The present pilot study quantified the immunohistochemical expression of vitamin B12 transport protein (Transcobalamin II; TCII), cell surface receptor (Transcobalamin II-R; TCII-R) and proliferation protein (Ki-67) in human tumor xenografts. Materials and Methods Tissue microarray slides containing 34 xenograft tumor tissues were immunohistochemically stained using TCN2 (anti-TCII), CD320 (anti-TCII-R) and MIB-1 (anti-Ki-67) antibodies. Representatively stained areas of all slides were digitally imaged and protein expression was quantified using ImageJ software plugins. Results All xenograft tumor tissues stained positively for TCII, TCII-R and Ki-67 proteins; expression varied both within and between tumor types. Correlation between TCII/TCII-R and Ki-67 expression was not significant in xenograft tissues. Conclusion Proliferating cancer cells express measurable levels of TCII and TCII-R. Immunohistochemical quantification of these markers may be useful as a tool for detection of tumors, tailored selection of anti-tumor therapies and surveillance for evidence of recurrent disease. PMID:24122983

  4. Quantification of proteins using enhanced etching of Ag coated Au nanorods by the Cu(2+)/bicinchoninic acid pair with improved sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenqi; Hou, Shuai; Yan, Jiao; Zhang, Hui; Ji, Yinglu; Wu, Xiaochun

    2016-01-14

    Plasmonic nanosensors show great potential in ultrasensitive detection, especially with the plasmon peak position as the detection modality. Herein, a new sensitive but simple total protein quantification method termed the SPR-BCA assay is demonstrated by combining plasmonic nanosensors with protein oxidation by Cu(2+). The easy tuning of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) features of plasmonic nanostructures makes them ideal sensing platforms. We found that the Cu(2+)/bicinchoninic acid (BCA) pair exhibits accelerated etching of Au@Ag nanorods and results in the LSPR peak shift. A linear relationship between Cu(2+) and the LSPR shift is found in a double logarithmic coordinate. Such double logarithm relationship is transferred to the concentration of proteins. Theoretical simulation shows that Au nanorods with large aspect ratios and small core sizes show high detection sensitivity. Via optimized sensor design, we achieved an increased sensitivity (the limit of detection was 3.4 ng ml(-1)) and a wide working range (0.5 to 1000 μg ml(-1)) compared with the traditional BCA assay. The universal applicability of our method to various proteins further proves its potential in practical applications. PMID:26669539

  5. Buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine quantification in human plasma by simple protein precipitation and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lüthi, Guillaume; Blangy, Valeria; Eap, Chin B; Ansermot, Nicolas

    2013-04-15

    A highly sensitive ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method was developed for the quantification of buprenorphine and its major metabolite norbuprenorphine in human plasma. In order to speed up the process and decrease costs, sample preparation was performed by simple protein precipitation with acetonitrile. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first application of this extraction technique for the quantification of buprenorphine in plasma. Matrix effects were strongly reduced and selectivity increased by using an efficient chromatographic separation on a sub-2 μm column (Acquity UPLC BEH C18 1.7 μm, 2.1×50 mm) in 5 min with a gradient of ammonium formate 20 mM pH 3.05 and acetonitrile as mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.4 ml/min. Detection was made using a tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in positive electrospray ionization mode, using multiple reaction monitoring. The procedure was fully validated according to the latest Food and Drug Administration guidelines and the Société Française des Sciences et Techniques Pharmaceutiques. Very good results were obtained by using a stable isotope-labeled internal standard for each analyte, to compensate for the variability due to the extraction and ionization steps. The method was very sensitive with lower limits of quantification of 0.1 ng/ml for buprenorphine and 0.25 ng/ml for norbuprenorphine. The upper limit of quantification was 250 ng/ml for both drugs. Trueness (98.4-113.7%), repeatability (1.9-7.7%), intermediate precision (2.6-7.9%) and internal standard-normalized matrix effects (94-101%) were in accordance with international recommendations. The procedure was successfully used to quantify plasma samples from patients included in a clinical pharmacogenetic study and can be transferred for routine therapeutic drug monitoring in clinical laboratories without further development. PMID:23357637

  6. Label-free single-cell protein quantification using a drop-based mix-and-read system

    PubMed Central

    Abbaspourrad, Alireza; Zhang, Huidan; Tao, Ye; Cui, Naiwen; Asahara, Haruichi; Zhou, Ying; Yue, Dongxian; Koehler, Stephan A.; Ung, Lloyd W.; Heyman, John; Ren, Yukun; Ziblat, Roy; Chong, Shaorong; Weitz, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative protein analysis of single cells is rarely achieved due to technical difficulties of detecting minute amounts of proteins present in one cell. We develop a mix-and-read assay for drop-based label-free protein analysis of single cells. This high-throughput method quantifies absolute, rather than relative, amounts of proteins and does not involve antibody labeling or mass spectrometry. PMID:26234416

  7. Building accurate sequence-to-affinity models from high-throughput in vitro protein-DNA binding data using FeatureREDUCE

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Todd R; Lazarovici, Allan; Mann, Richard S; Bussemaker, Harmen J

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors are crucial regulators of gene expression. Accurate quantitative definition of their intrinsic DNA binding preferences is critical to understanding their biological function. High-throughput in vitro technology has recently been used to deeply probe the DNA binding specificity of hundreds of eukaryotic transcription factors, yet algorithms for analyzing such data have not yet fully matured. Here, we present a general framework (FeatureREDUCE) for building sequence-to-affinity models based on a biophysically interpretable and extensible model of protein-DNA interaction that can account for dependencies between nucleotides within the binding interface or multiple modes of binding. When training on protein binding microarray (PBM) data, we use robust regression and modeling of technology-specific biases to infer specificity models of unprecedented accuracy and precision. We provide quantitative validation of our results by comparing to gold-standard data when available. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06397.001 PMID:26701911

  8. Selected reaction monitoring as an effective method for reliable quantification of disease-associated proteins in maple syrup urine disease.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Guerra, Paula; Birkler, Rune I D; Merinero, Begoña; Ugarte, Magdalena; Gregersen, Niels; Rodríguez-Pombo, Pilar; Bross, Peter; Palmfeldt, Johan

    2014-09-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry can quantitatively measure proteins by specific targeting of peptide sequences, and allows the determination of multiple proteins in one single analysis. Here, we show the feasibility of simultaneous measurements of multiple proteins in mitochondria-enriched samples from cultured fibroblasts from healthy individuals and patients with mutations in branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) complex. BCKDH is a mitochondrial multienzyme complex and its defective activity causes maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), a rare but severe inherited metabolic disorder. Four different genes encode the catalytic subunits of BCKDH: E1α (BCKDHA), E1β (BCKDHB), E2 (DBT), and E3 (DLD). All four proteins were successfully quantified in healthy individuals. However, the E1α and E1β proteins were not detected in patients carrying mutations in one of those genes, whereas mRNA levels were almost unaltered, indicating instability of E1α and E1β monomers. Using SRM we elucidated the protein effects of mutations generating premature termination codons or misfolded proteins. SRM is a complement to transcript level measurements and a valuable tool to shed light on molecular mechanisms and on effects of pharmacological therapies at protein level. SRM is particularly effective for inherited disorders caused by multiple proteins such as defects in multienzyme complexes. PMID:25333063

  9. QUANTIFICATION OF GLIAL FIBRILLARY ACIDIC PROTEIN: COMPARISON OF SLOT-IMMUNOBINDING ASSAYS WITH A NOVEL SANDWICH ELISA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detailed protocols are presented for assaying glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), an astrocyte localized protein rich serves as a quantitative marker of toxicant- induced injury to the central nervous system. wo different solid-phase assay procedures are described: 1) a nitro...

  10. Long-Gradient Separations Coupled with Selected Reaction Monitoring for Highly Sensitive, Large Scale Targeted Protein Quantification in a Single Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Tujin; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Gao, Yuqian; Zhao, Rui; He, Jintang; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Wu, Chaochao; Chambers, Justin L.; Moore, Ronald J.; Kagan, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Liu, Alvin Y.; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2013-10-01

    Long-gradient separations coupled to tandem MS were recently demonstrated to provide a deep proteome coverage for global proteomics; however, such long-gradient separations have not been explored for targeted proteomics. Herein, we investigate the potential performance of the long-gradient separations coupled with selected reaction monitoring (LG-SRM) for targeted protein quantification. Direct comparison of LG-SRM (5 h gradient) and conventional LC-SRM (45 min gradient) showed that the long-gradient separations significantly reduced background interference levels and provided an 8- to 100-fold improvement in LOQ for target proteins in human female serum. Based on at least one surrogate peptide per protein, an LOQ of 10 ng/mL was achieved for the two spiked proteins in non-depleted human serum. The LG-SRM detection of seven out of eight endogenous plasma proteins expressed at ng/mL or sub-ng/mL levels in clinical patient sera was also demonstrated. A correlation coefficient of >0.99 was observed for the results of LG-SRM and ELISA measurements for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in selected patient sera. Further enhancement of LG-SRM sensitivity was achieved by applying front-end IgY14 immunoaffinity depletion. Besides improved sensitivity, LG-SRM offers at least 3 times higher multiplexing capacity than conventional LC-SRM due to ~3-fold increase in average peak widths for a 300-min gradient compared to a 45-min gradient. Therefore, LG-SRM holds great potential for bridging the gap between global and targeted proteomics due to its advantages in both sensitivity and multiplexing capacity.

  11. Identification, quantification, and functional aspects of skeletal muscle protein-carbonylation in vivo during acute oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Fedorova, Maria; Kuleva, Nadezhda; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2010-05-01

    Reactive oxidative species (ROS) play important roles in cellular signaling but can also modify and often functionally inactivate other biomolecules. Thus, cells have developed effective enzymatic and nonenzymatic strategies to scavenge ROS. However, under oxidative stress, ROS production is able to overwhelm the scavenging systems, increasing the levels of functionally impaired proteins. A major class of irreversible oxidative modifications is carbonylation, which refers to reactive carbonyl-groups. In this investigation, we have studied the production and clearance rates for skeletal muscle proteins in a rat model of acute oxidative stress over a time period of 24 h using a gel-based proteomics approach. Optimized ELISA and Western blots with 10-fold improved sensitivities showed that the carbonylation level was stable at 4 nmol per mg protein 3 h following ROS induction. The carbonylation level then increased 3-fold over 6 h and then remained stable. In total, the oxidative stress changed the steady state levels of 20 proteins and resulted in the carbonylation of 38 skeletal muscle proteins. Carbonylation of these proteins followed diverse kinetics with some proteins being highly carbonylated very quickly, whereas others peaked in the 9 h sample or continued to increase up to 24 h after oxidative stress was induced. PMID:20377239

  12. Quantification of horse plasma proteins altered by xylazine using the fluorogenic derivatization-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    MORI, Miwako; ICHIBANGASE, Tomoko; YAMASHITA, Shozo; KIJIMA-SUDA, Isao; KAWAHARA, Masahiro; IMAI, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the doping tests currently used in horse racing, prohibited substances or their metabolites are usually directly detected in urine or blood samples. However, despite their lasting pharmaceutical effects, some prohibited substances are rapidly eliminated from horse urine and blood, making them difficult to detect. Therefore, new indirect biomarkers for doping, such as plasma proteins that are increased by the prohibited substances, have recently attracted much attention. Here, a fluorogenic derivatization-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (FD-LC-MS/MS) method was adopted for horse plasma proteomics analysis, in order to identify plasma proteins whose concentrations were altered in response to xylazine in Thoroughbred horses. Xylazine, which is rapidly absorbed and eliminated and has possibility of the change in the levels of plasma proteins, was selected as a model drug. Of the ten plasma proteins identified, four proteins, including three acute phase proteins (haptoglobin, ceruloplasmin, and α-2-macroglobulin-like), were significantly increased after xylazine administration. Therefore, our present approach might be useful in identifying indirect biomarkers of drug administration. PMID:26858580

  13. A Protein-Corona-Free T(1)-T(2) Dual-Modal Contrast Agent for Accurate Imaging of Lymphatic Tumor Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zijian; Liu, Hanyu; Chi, Xiaoqin; Chen, Jiahe; Wang, Lirong; Sun, Chengjie; Chen, Zhong; Gao, Jinhao

    2015-12-30

    Precise nodal staging is particularly important to guide the treatments and determine the prognosis for cancer patients. However, it is still challenging to noninvasively and precisely detect in-depth tumor metastasis in lymph nodes (LNs) because of the small size and high potential of obtaining pseudopositive results. Herein, we report the rational design of a T1-T2 dual-modal MRI contrast agent for accurate imaging of tumor metastasis in LNs using gadolinium-embedded iron oxide nanoplates (GdIOP). The GdIOP were modulated with suitable size in vivo through surface functionalization by zwitterionic dopamine sulfonate (ZDS) molecules. The efficient uptake of GdIOP@ZDS nanoparticles through drainage effect because of the presence of large amount of macrophages and dendritic cells generates both T1 and T2 contrasts in LNs. In contrast, the low uptake of protein-corona-free GdIOP@ZDS nanoparticles by melanoma B16 tumor cells promises pseudocontrast imaging of potential tumor metastasis in LNs. The combination of T1 and T2 imaging modalities allows self-confirmed detection of a metastatic tumor with about 1.2 mm in the minimal dimension in LNs, which is close to the detection limit of submilimeter level of MRI scans. This study provides an efficient and noninvasive strategy to detect tumor metastasis in LNs with greatly enhanced diagnostic accuracy. PMID:26645884

  14. Spectroscopic characterization of protein-wrapped single-wall carbon nanotubes and quantification of their cellular uptake in multiple cell generations.

    PubMed

    Bertulli, Cristina; Beeson, Harry J; Hasan, Tawfique; Huang, Yan Yan S

    2013-07-01

    We study the spectral characteristics of bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein conjugated single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), and quantify their uptake by macrophages. The binding of BSA onto the SWNT surface is found to change the protein structure and to increase the doping of the nanotubes. The G-band Raman intensity follows a well-defined power law for SWNT concentrations of up to 33 microg ml(-1) in aqueous solutions. Subsequently, in vitro experiments demonstrate that incubation of BSA-SWNT complexes with macrophages affects neither the cellular growth nor the cellular viability over multiple cell generations. Using wide spot Raman spectroscopy as a fast, non-destructive method for statistical quantification, we observe that macrophages effectively uptake BSA-SWNT complexes, with the average number of nanotubes internalized per cell remaining relatively constant over consecutive cell generations. The number of internalized SWNTs is found to be approximately 30 10(6) SWNTs/cell for a 60 mm(-2) seeding density and approximately 100 x 10(6) SWNTs/cell for a 200 mm(-2) seeding density. Our results show that BSA-functionalized SWNTs are an efficient molecular transport system with low cytotoxicity maintained over multiple cell generations. PMID:23735781

  15. Spectroscopic characterization of protein-wrapped single-wall carbon nanotubes and quantification of their cellular uptake in multiple cell generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertulli, Cristina; Beeson, Harry J.; Hasan, Tawfique; Huang, Yan Yan S.

    2013-07-01

    We study the spectral characteristics of bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein conjugated single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), and quantify their uptake by macrophages. The binding of BSA onto the SWNT surface is found to change the protein structure and to increase the doping of the nanotubes. The G-band Raman intensity follows a well-defined power law for SWNT concentrations of up to 33 μg ml-1 in aqueous solutions. Subsequently, in vitro experiments demonstrate that incubation of BSA-SWNT complexes with macrophages affects neither the cellular growth nor the cellular viability over multiple cell generations. Using wide spot Raman spectroscopy as a fast, non-destructive method for statistical quantification, we observe that macrophages effectively uptake BSA-SWNT complexes, with the average number of nanotubes internalized per cell remaining relatively constant over consecutive cell generations. The number of internalized SWNTs is found to be ˜30 × 106 SWNTs/cell for a 60 mm-2 seeding density and ˜100 × 106 SWNTs/cell for a 200 mm-2 seeding density. Our results show that BSA-functionalized SWNTs are an efficient molecular transport system with low cytotoxicity maintained over multiple cell generations.

  16. Accurate prediction of the binding free energy and analysis of the mechanism of the interaction of replication protein A (RPA) with ssDNA.

    PubMed

    Carra, Claudio; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2012-06-01

    The eukaryotic replication protein A (RPA) has several pivotal functions in the cell metabolism, such as chromosomal replication, prevention of hairpin formation, DNA repair and recombination, and signaling after DNA damage. Moreover, RPA seems to have a crucial role in organizing the sequential assembly of DNA processing proteins along single stranded DNA (ssDNA). The strong RPA affinity for ssDNA, K(A) between 10(-9)-10(-10) M, is characterized by a low cooperativity with minor variation for changes on the nucleotide sequence. Recently, new data on RPA interactions was reported, including the binding free energy of the complex RPA70AB with dC(8) and dC(5), which has been estimated to be -10 ± 0.4 kcal mol(-1) and -7 ± 1 kcal mol(-1), respectively. In view of these results we performed a study based on molecular dynamics aimed to reproduce the absolute binding free energy of RPA70AB with the dC(5) and dC(8) oligonucleotides. We used several tools to analyze the binding free energy, rigidity, and time evolution of the complex. The results obtained by MM-PBSA method, with the use of ligand free geometry as a reference for the receptor in the separate trajectory approach, are in excellent agreement with the experimental data, with ±4 kcal mol(-1) error. This result shows that the MM-PB(GB)SA methods can provide accurate quantitative estimates of the binding free energy for interacting complexes when appropriate geometries are used for the receptor, ligand and complex. The decomposition of the MM-GBSA energy for each residue in the receptor allowed us to correlate the change of the affinity of the mutated protein with the ΔG(gas+sol) contribution of the residue considered in the mutation. The agreement with experiment is optimal and a strong change in the binding free energy can be considered as the dominant factor in the loss for the binding affinity resulting from mutation. PMID:22116609

  17. Simple HPLC-UV method for the quantification of metformin in human plasma with one step protein precipitation.

    PubMed

    Chhetri, Himal Paudel; Thapa, Panna; Van Schepdael, Ann

    2014-11-01

    This study presents the optimization of a simple HPLC-UV method for the determination of metformin in human plasma. Ion pair separation followed by UV detection was performed on deproteinized human plasma samples. The separation was carried out on a Discovery Reversed Phase C-18 column (250 × 4.6 mm, 5 μm) with UV detection at 233 nm. The mobile phase contained 34% acetonitrile and 66% aqueous phase. Aqueous phase contained 10 mM KH2PO4 and 10 mM sodium lauryl sulfate. Aqueous phase pH was adjusted to 5.2. The mobile phase was run isocratically. The flow rate of the mobile phase was maintained at 1.3 ml/min. The linearity of the calibration curve was obtained in the concentration range of 0.125-2.5 μg/ml and coefficient of determination (R (2)) was found to be 0.9951. The lowest limit of quantification and detection was 125 and 62 ng/ml respectively. No endogenous substances were found to interfere with the peaks of drug and internal standard. The intra-day and inter-day coefficient of variations was 6.97% or less for all the selected concentrations. The relative errors at all the studied concentrations were 5.60% or less. This method is time efficient and samples are easy to prepare with minimum dilution. So, it can be applied for monitoring metformin in human plasma. PMID:25473337

  18. Simultaneous quantification of oil and protein in cottonseed by low-field time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modification of cottonseed quality traits is likely to be achieved through a combination of genetic modification, manipulation of nutrient allocation and selective breeding. Oil and protein stores comprise the majority of mass of cottonseed embryos. A more comprehensive understanding of the relation...

  19. Proteomics data in support of the quantification of the changes of bovine milk proteins during mammary gland involution.

    PubMed

    Boggs, Irina; Hine, Brad; Smolenksi, Grant; Hettinga, Kasper; Zhang, Lina; Wheeler, Thomas T

    2016-09-01

    Here we provide data from three proteomics techniques; two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) followed by identification of selected spots using PSD MALDI-TOF MS/MS, one-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by LC-MS/MS analysis of gel slices (GeLC) and dimethyl isotopic labelling of tryptic peptides followed by Orbitrap MS/MS (DML), to quantify the changes in the repertoire of bovine milk proteins that occurs after drying off. We analysed skim milk and whey sampled at day 0 and either day 3 or day 8 after drying off. These analyses identified 45 spots by MALDI-TOF, 51 proteins by GeLC and 161 proteins by DML, for which the detailed data work-up is presented as three Excel files. The data supplied in this article supports the accompanying publication "Changes in the repertoire of bovine milk proteins during mammary involution" (Boggs et al., 2015) [1]. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifiers ProteomeXchange: PXD003110 and ProteomeXchange: PXD003011. PMID:27274532

  20. Identification of secreted proteins regulated by cAMP in glioblastoma cells using glycopeptide capture and label-free quantification.

    PubMed

    Hill, Jennifer J; Moreno, Maria J; Lam, Jean C Y; Haqqani, Arsalan S; Kelly, John F

    2009-02-01

    Exposure of glioblastoma U87MG cells to a cAMP analog leads to a decrease in proliferation, invasion, and angiogenic potential. Here, we apply a label-free MS-based approach to identify formerly N-linked glycopeptides that change in abundance upon cAMP treatment. Over 150 unique glycopeptides in three biological repetitions were quantified, leading to the identification of 14 upregulated proteins and 21 downregulated proteins due to cAMP treatment. Of these, eight have been validated, either through comparison with microarray data or by Western blot. We estimate our ability to identify differentially expressed peptides at greater than 85% in a single biological repetition, while the analysis of multiple biological repetitions lowers the false positive rate to approximately 2%. Many of the proteins identified in this study are involved in cell signaling and some, such as Tenascin C, Cathepsin L, Neuroblastoma suppressor of tumorigenicity, and AXL/UFO tyrosine-protein kinase receptor, have been previously shown to be involved in glioblastoma progression. We also identify several semitryptic peptides that increase in abundance upon cAMP treatment, suggesting that cAMP regulates protease activity in these cells. Overall, these results demonstrate the benefits of using a highly specific enrichment method for quantitative proteomic experiments. PMID:19137551

  1. Non-destructive quantification of oil and protein in cottonseed by time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modification of cotton seed quality traits is likely to be achieved through a combination of genetic modification, nutrient allocation, and selective breeding. Oil and protein stores comprise the majority of mass of cottonseed embryos. A more comprehensive understanding of the relationship between f...

  2. Spatial analysis and quantification of the thermodynamic driving forces in protein-ligand binding: binding site variability.

    PubMed

    Raman, E Prabhu; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2015-02-25

    The thermodynamic driving forces behind small molecule-protein binding are still not well-understood, including the variability of those forces associated with different types of ligands in different binding pockets. To better understand these phenomena we calculate spatially resolved thermodynamic contributions of the different molecular degrees of freedom for the binding of propane and methanol to multiple pockets on the proteins Factor Xa and p38 MAP kinase. Binding thermodynamics are computed using a statistical thermodynamics based end-point method applied on a canonical ensemble comprising the protein-ligand complexes and the corresponding free states in an explicit solvent environment. Energetic and entropic contributions of water and ligand degrees of freedom computed from the configurational ensemble provide an unprecedented level of detail into the mechanisms of binding. Direct protein-ligand interaction energies play a significant role in both nonpolar and polar binding, which is comparable to water reorganization energy. Loss of interactions with water upon binding strongly compensates these contributions leading to relatively small binding enthalpies. For both solutes, the entropy of water reorganization is found to favor binding in agreement with the classical view of the "hydrophobic effect". Depending on the specifics of the binding pocket, both energy-entropy compensation and reinforcement mechanisms are observed. It is notable to have the ability to visualize the spatial distribution of the thermodynamic contributions to binding at atomic resolution showing significant differences in the thermodynamic contributions of water to the binding of propane versus methanol. PMID:25625202

  3. Spatial Analysis and Quantification of the Thermodynamic Driving Forces in Protein-Ligand Binding: Binding Site Variability

    PubMed Central

    Raman, E. Prabhu; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamic driving forces behind small molecule-protein binding are still not well understood, including the variability of those forces associated with different types of ligands in different binding pockets. To better understand these phenomena we calculate spatially resolved thermodynamic contributions of the different molecular degrees of freedom for the binding of propane and methanol to multiple pockets on the proteins Factor Xa and p38 MAP kinase. Binding thermodynamics are computed using a statistical thermodynamics based end-point method applied on a canonical ensemble comprising the protein-ligand complexes and the corresponding free states in an explicit solvent environment. Energetic and entropic contributions of water and ligand degrees of freedom computed from the configurational ensemble provides an unprecedented level of detail into the mechanisms of binding. Direct protein-ligand interaction energies play a significant role in both non-polar and polar binding, which is comparable to water reorganization energy. Loss of interactions with water upon binding strongly compensates these contributions leading to relatively small binding enthalpies. For both solutes, the entropy of water reorganization is found to favor binding in agreement with the classical view of the “hydrophobic effect”. Depending on the specifics of the binding pocket, both energy-entropy compensation and reinforcement mechanisms are observed. Notable is the ability to visualize the spatial distribution of the thermodynamic contributions to binding at atomic resolution showing significant differences in the thermodynamic contributions of water to the binding of propane versus methanol. PMID:25625202

  4. Absolute protein quantification of clinically relevant cytochrome P450 enzymes and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases by mass spectrometry-based targeted proteomics.

    PubMed

    Gröer, C; Busch, D; Patrzyk, M; Beyer, K; Busemann, A; Heidecke, C D; Drozdzik, M; Siegmund, W; Oswald, S

    2014-11-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) are major determinants in the pharmacokinetics of most drugs on the market. To investigate their impact on intestinal and hepatic drug metabolism, we developed and validated quantification methods for nine CYP (CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, CYP3A4 and CYP3A5) and four UGT enzymes (UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT2B7 and UGT2B15) that have been shown to be of clinical relevance in human drug metabolism. Protein quantification was performed by targeted proteomics using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based determination of enzyme specific peptides after tryptic digestion using in each case stable isotope labelled peptides as internal standard. The chromatography of the respective peptides was performed with gradient elution using a reversed phase (C18) column (Ascentis(®) Express Peptide ES-C18, 100mm×2.1mm, 2.7μm) and 0.1% formic acid (FA) as well as acetonitrile with 0.1% FA as mobile phases at a flow rate of 300μl/min. The MS/MS detection of all peptides was done simultaneously with a scheduled multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method in the positive mode by monitoring in each case three mass transitions per proteospecific peptide and the internal standard. The assays were validated according to current bioanalytical guidelines with respect to specificity, linearity (0.25-50nM), within-day and between-day accuracy and precision, digestion efficiency as well as stability. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied to determine the CYP and UGT protein amount in human liver and intestinal microsomes. The method was shown to possess sufficient specificity, sensitivity, accuracy, precision and stability to quantify clinically relevant human CYP and UGT enzymes. PMID:25218440

  5. Absolute Quantification of Prion Protein (90-231) Using Stable Isotope-Labeled Chymotryptic Peptide Standards in a LC-MRM AQUA Workflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, Robert; Sheynkman, Gloria; Booth, Clarissa; Smith, Lloyd M.; Pedersen, Joel A.; Li, Lingjun

    2012-09-01

    Substantial evidence indicates that the disease-associated conformer of the prion protein (PrPTSE) constitutes the etiologic agent in prion diseases. These diseases affect multiple mammalian species. PrPTSE has the ability to convert the conformation of the normal prion protein (PrPC) into a β-sheet rich form resistant to proteinase K digestion. Common immunological techniques lack the sensitivity to detect PrPTSE at subfemtomole levels, whereas animal bioassays, cell culture, and in vitro conversion assays offer higher sensitivity but lack the high-throughput the immunological assays offer. Mass spectrometry is an attractive alternative to the above assays as it offers high-throughput, direct measurement of a protein's signature peptide, often with subfemtomole sensitivities. Although a liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring (LC-MRM) method has been reported for PrPTSE, the chemical composition and lack of amino acid sequence conservation of the signature peptide may compromise its accuracy and make it difficult to apply to multiple species. Here, we demonstrate that an alternative protease (chymotrypsin) can produce signature peptides suitable for a LC-MRM absolute quantification (AQUA) experiment. The new method offers several advantages, including: (1) a chymotryptic signature peptide lacking chemically active residues (Cys, Met) that can confound assay accuracy; (2) low attomole limits of detection and quantitation (LOD and LOQ); and (3) a signature peptide retaining the same amino acid sequence across most mammals naturally susceptible to prion infection as well as important laboratory models. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report on the use of a non-tryptic peptide in a LC-MRM AQUA workflow.

  6. Studies on fatty acid-binding proteins. The detection and quantification of the protein from rat liver by using a fluorescent fatty acid analogue.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, T C; Wilton, D C

    1986-01-01

    Fatty acid-binding protein from rat liver is shown to bind the fluorescent fatty acid probe dansyl undecanoic acid. Binding is accompanied by a shift in the fluorescence emission maximum from 550 nm to 500 nm and a 60-fold fluorescence enhancement at 500 nm. These spectral properties have allowed the use of this probe to detect and quantify microgram amounts of liver fatty acid-binding protein during purification procedures. In conjunction with h.p.l.c. the method allows the rapid estimation of liver fatty acid-binding protein in biological samples. The validity of the method is demonstrated by measuring the concentration of fatty acid-binding protein in livers from control and hypolipidaemic-drug-treated rats. The dramatic diurnal rhythm previously reported for this protein [Dempsey (1984) Curr. Top. Cell. Regul. 24, 63-86] was not observed with this method. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3800946

  7. Agouti Revisited: Transcript Quantification of the ASIP Gene in Bovine Tissues Related to Protein Expression and Localization

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Elke; Komolka, Katrin; Kuzinski, Judith; Maak, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    Beside its role in melanogenesis, the agouti signaling protein (ASIP) has been related to obesity. The potentially crucial role in adipocyte development makes it a tempting candidate for economic relevant, fat related traits in farm animals. The objective of our study was to characterize the mRNA expression of different ASIP transcripts and of putative targets in different bovine tissues, as well as to study consequences on protein abundance and localization. ASIP mRNA abundance was determined by RT-qPCR in adipose and further tissues of cattle representing different breeds and crosses. ASIP mRNA was up-regulated more than 9-fold in intramuscular fat of Japanese Black cattle compared to Holstein (p<0.001). Further analyses revealed that a transposon-derived transcript was solely responsible for the increased ASIP mRNA abundance. This transcript was observed in single individuals of different breeds indicating a wide spread occurrence of this insertion at the ASIP locus in cattle. The protein was detected in different adipose tissues, skin, lung and liver, but not in skeletal muscle by Western blot with a bovine-specific ASIP antibody. However, the protein abundance was not related to the observed ASIP mRNA over-expression. Immuno-histochemical analyses revealed a putative nuclear localization of ASIP additionally to the expected cytosolic signal in different cell types. The expression of melanocortin receptors (MCR) 1 to 5 as potential targets for ASIP was analyzed by RT-PCR in subcutaneous fat. Only MC1R and MC4R were detected indicating a similar receptor expression like in human adipose tissue. Our results provide evidence for a widespread expression of ASIP in bovine tissues at mRNA and, for the first time, at protein level. ASIP protein is detectable in adipocytes as well as in further cells of adipose tissue. We generated a basis for a more detailed investigation of ASIP function in peripheral tissues of various mammalian species. PMID:22530003

  8. Agouti revisited: transcript quantification of the ASIP gene in bovine tissues related to protein expression and localization.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Elke; Komolka, Katrin; Kuzinski, Judith; Maak, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    Beside its role in melanogenesis, the agouti signaling protein (ASIP) has been related to obesity. The potentially crucial role in adipocyte development makes it a tempting candidate for economic relevant, fat related traits in farm animals. The objective of our study was to characterize the mRNA expression of different ASIP transcripts and of putative targets in different bovine tissues, as well as to study consequences on protein abundance and localization. ASIP mRNA abundance was determined by RT-qPCR in adipose and further tissues of cattle representing different breeds and crosses. ASIP mRNA was up-regulated more than 9-fold in intramuscular fat of Japanese Black cattle compared to Holstein (p<0.001). Further analyses revealed that a transposon-derived transcript was solely responsible for the increased ASIP mRNA abundance. This transcript was observed in single individuals of different breeds indicating a wide spread occurrence of this insertion at the ASIP locus in cattle. The protein was detected in different adipose tissues, skin, lung and liver, but not in skeletal muscle by Western blot with a bovine-specific ASIP antibody. However, the protein abundance was not related to the observed ASIP mRNA over-expression. Immuno-histochemical analyses revealed a putative nuclear localization of ASIP additionally to the expected cytosolic signal in different cell types. The expression of melanocortin receptors (MCR) 1 to 5 as potential targets for ASIP was analyzed by RT-PCR in subcutaneous fat. Only MC1R and MC4R were detected indicating a similar receptor expression like in human adipose tissue. Our results provide evidence for a widespread expression of ASIP in bovine tissues at mRNA and, for the first time, at protein level. ASIP protein is detectable in adipocytes as well as in further cells of adipose tissue. We generated a basis for a more detailed investigation of ASIP function in peripheral tissues of various mammalian species. PMID:22530003

  9. Identification and relative quantification of proteins in Escherichia coli proteome by "up-front" collision-induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Arike, Liisa; Nahku, Ranno; Borrisova, Maria; Adamberg, Kaarel; Vilu, Raivu

    2010-01-01

    A method for identifying and quantifying proteins with relatively low-cost orthogonal acceleration time-of- flight mass spectrometry (oa-ToF-MS) was tested. Escherichia coli (E. coli) K12 MG1655 cell lysate was separated by 1D gel-electrophoresis; fractions were digested and separated fast and reproducibly by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC). Peptides were identified using oa-ToF-MS to measure exact masses of parent ions and the fragment ions generated by up-front collision-induced dissociation. Fragmentation of all compounds was achieved by rapidly cycling between high- and low values of energy applied to ions. More than 100 proteins from E. coli K12 proteome were identified and relatively quantified. Results were found to correlate with transcriptome data determined by DNA microarrays. PMID:20212332

  10. Real-time PCR quantification of a green fluorescent protein-labeled, genetically engineered Pseudomonas putida strain during 2-chlorobenzoate degradation in soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gejiao; Gentry, Terry J; Grass, Gregor; Josephson, Karen; Rensing, Christopher; Pepper, Ian L

    2004-04-15

    The potential for real-time PCR (RTm-PCR) detection of the genetically engineered strain Pseudomonas putida GN2 was studied during 2-chlorobenzoate (2-CB) degradation in three different soils. The strain contained the constructed plasmid pGN2 which encoded genes for 2-CB oxidation (cbdA) and the green fluorescent protein (gfp). P. putida GN2 numbers were assessed by plating onto 2-CB minimal media and also by RTm-PCR detection of cbdA and gfp. Addition of P. putida GN2 decreased the time required to degrade 2-CB in all tested soils by more than 7 days. The RTm-PCR estimations of P. putida GN2 numbers strongly correlated with those obtained from plate count methods during active 2-CB degradation. However, after 2-CB degradation in the soils had ceased, RTm-PCR estimations of cbdA and gfp genes were generally one order of magnitude lower than those from plate counts. These results indicate the potential for RTm-PCR to rapidly determine degrader numbers in soil following bioaugmentation but also the need to exercise caution when attempting to determine cell numbers of degraders from the RTm-PCR quantification of plasmid encoded genes after substrate is depleted. PMID:15063501

  11. Dystrophin quantification

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Karen; Arechavala-Gomeza, Virginia; Taylor, Laura E.; Vulin, Adeline; Kaminoh, Yuuki; Torelli, Silvia; Feng, Lucy; Janghra, Narinder; Bonne, Gisèle; Beuvin, Maud; Barresi, Rita; Henderson, Matt; Laval, Steven; Lourbakos, Afrodite; Campion, Giles; Straub, Volker; Voit, Thomas; Sewry, Caroline A.; Morgan, Jennifer E.; Flanigan, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We formed a multi-institution collaboration in order to compare dystrophin quantification methods, reach a consensus on the most reliable method, and report its biological significance in the context of clinical trials. Methods: Five laboratories with expertise in dystrophin quantification performed a data-driven comparative analysis of a single reference set of normal and dystrophinopathy muscle biopsies using quantitative immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. We developed standardized protocols and assessed inter- and intralaboratory variability over a wide range of dystrophin expression levels. Results: Results from the different laboratories were highly concordant with minimal inter- and intralaboratory variability, particularly with quantitative immunohistochemistry. There was a good level of agreement between data generated by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, although immunohistochemistry was more sensitive. Furthermore, mean dystrophin levels determined by alternative quantitative immunohistochemistry methods were highly comparable. Conclusions: Considering the biological function of dystrophin at the sarcolemma, our data indicate that the combined use of quantitative immunohistochemistry and Western blotting are reliable biochemical outcome measures for Duchenne muscular dystrophy clinical trials, and that standardized protocols can be comparable between competent laboratories. The methodology validated in our study will facilitate the development of experimental therapies focused on dystrophin production and their regulatory approval. PMID:25355828

  12. Luciferase-based protein-denaturation assay for quantification of radiofrequency field-induced targeted hyperthermia: developing an intracellular thermometer

    PubMed Central

    Raoof, Mustafa; Zhu, Cihui; Kaluarachchi, Warna D.; Curley, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Several studies have reported targeted hyperthermia at the cellular level using remote activation of nanoparticles by radiofrequency waves. To date, methods to quantify intracellular thermal dose have not been reported. In this report we study the relationship between radio wave exposure and luciferase denaturation with and without intracellular nanoparticles. The findings are used to devise a strategy to quantify targeted thermal dose in a primary human liver cancer cell line. Methods Water-bath or non-invasive external RF generator (600W, 13.56 MHz) was used for hyperthermia exposures. Luciferase activity was measured using a bioluminescence assay and viability was assessed using Annexin V-FITC and Propidium iodide staining. Heat shock proteins were analyzed using western-blot analysis Results Duration-dependent luciferase denaturation was observed in SNU449 cells exposed to RF field that preceded measurable loss in viability. Loss of luciferase activity was higher in cetuximab-conjugated gold nanoparticle (C225-AuNP) treated cells. Using a standard curve from water-bath experiments, the intracellular thermal dose was calculated. Cells treated with C225-AuNP accumulated 6.07 times higher intracellular thermal dose than the untreated controls over initial 4 minutes of RF exposure. Conclusions Cancer cells when exposed to an external RF field exhibit dose-dependent protein denaturation. Luciferase denaturation assay can be used to quantify thermal dose delivered after RF exposures to cancer cells with and without nanoparticles. PMID:22515341

  13. Simplified and efficient quantification of low-abundance proteins at very high multiplex via targeted mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Michael W; Keshishian, Hasmik; Mani, D R; Gillette, Michael A; Carr, Steven A

    2014-04-01

    Liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (LC-MRM-MS) of plasma that has been depleted of abundant proteins and fractionated at the peptide level into six to eight fractions is a proven method for quantifying proteins present at low nanogram-per-milliliter levels. A drawback of fraction-MRM is the increased analysis time due to the generation of multiple fractions per biological sample. We now report that the use of heated, long, fused silica columns (>30 cm) packed with 1.9 μm of packing material can reduce or eliminate the need for fractionation prior to LC-MRM-MS without a significant loss of sensitivity or precision relative to fraction-MRM. We empirically determined the optimal column length, temperature, gradient duration, and sample load for such assays and used these conditions to study detection sensitivity and assay precision. In addition to increased peak capacity, longer columns packed with smaller beads tolerated a 4- to 6-fold increase in analyte load without a loss of robustness or reproducibility. The longer columns also provided a 4-fold improvement in median limit-of-quantitation values with increased assay precision relative to the standard 12 cm columns packed with 3 μm material. Overall, the optimized chromatography provided an approximately 3-fold increase in analysis throughput with excellent robustness and less than a 2-fold reduction in quantitative sensitivity relative to fraction-MRM. The value of the system for increased multiplexing was demonstrated by the ability to configure an 800-plex MRM-MS assay, run in a single analysis, comprising 2400 transitions with retention time scheduling to monitor 400 unlabeled and heavy labeled peptide pairs. PMID:24522978

  14. Quantification of Plasmodium falciparum Histidine-Rich Protein-2 in Cerebrospinal Spinal Fluid from Cerebral Malaria Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mikita, Kei; Thakur, Kiran; Anstey, Nicholas M.; Piera, Kim A.; Pardo, Carlos A.; Weinberg, J. Brice; Mukemba, Jackson; Florence, Salvatore; Mwaikambo, Esther D.; Granger, Donald L.; Sullivan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    A cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker for cerebral malaria (CM) has not been validated. We examined the detection, semiquantification, and clinical use of the Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein-2 (PfHRP-2) as a parasite antigen biomarker for CM. The PfHRP-2 was detected in archival CSF samples from CM patients from Tanzania both by a newly developed sensitive and specific immuno-polymerase chain reaction (72 of 73) and by rapid diagnostic tests (62 of 73). The geometric mean PfHRP-2 CSF concentration was 8.76 ng/mL with no differences in those who survived (9.2 ng/mL), those who died (11.1 ng/mL), and those with neurologic sequelae (10.8 ng/mL). All aparasitemic endemic and nonendemic control samples had undetectable CSF PfHRP-2. In a separate group of 11 matched plasma and CSF cerebral malaria patient samples, the ratio of plasma to CSF PfHRP-2 was 175. The CSF PfHRP-2 reflects elevated plasma PfHRP-2 rather than elevated CM-specific CSF ratios, falling short of a validated biomarker. PMID:24980497

  15. Analysis of tandem mass spectra by FTMS for improved large-scale proteomics with superior protein quantification.

    PubMed

    McAlister, Graeme C; Phanstiel, Doug; Wenger, Craig D; Lee, M Violet; Coon, Joshua J

    2010-01-01

    Using a newly developed dual-cell quadrupole linear ion trap-orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer (dcQLT-orbitrap), we demonstrate the utility of collecting high-resolution tandem mass spectral data for large-scale shotgun proteomics. Multiple nanoLC-MS/MS experiments on both an older generation quadrupole linear ion trap-orbitrap hybrid (QLT-orbitrap) and the dcQLT-orbitrap, using both resonant-excitation CAD and beam-type CAD (HCD), were performed. Resulting from various technological advances (e.g., a stacked ring ion guide AP inlet, a dual cell QLT), the dcQLT-orbitrap exhibited increased duty cycle (approximately 1.5-2 times) and sensitivity for both CAD (ion trap detection) and HCD (orbitrap detection) methods. As compared to the older system, the dcQLT-orbitrap produced significantly more unique peptide identifications for both methods (approximately 30% improvement for CAD and approximately 115% improvement for HCD). The sizable improvement of the HCD method on the dcQLT-orbitrap system outperforms the current standard method of CAD with ion trap detection for large-scale analysis. Finally, we demonstrate that the increased HCD performance translates to a direct and substantial improvement in protein quantitation precision using isobaric tags. PMID:19938823

  16. Analysis of tandem mass spectra by FTMS for improved large-scale proteomics with superior protein quantification

    PubMed Central

    McAlister, Graeme C.; Phanstiel, Doug; Wenger, Craig D.; Lee, M. Violet; Coon, Joshua J.

    2009-01-01

    Using a newly developed dual-cell quadrupole linear ion trap-orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer (dcQLT-orbitrap), we demonstrate the utility of collecting high-resolution tandem mass spectral data for large-scale shotgun proteomics. Multiple nanoLC-MS/MS experiments on both an older generation quadrupole linear ion trap-orbitrap hybrid (QLT-orbitrap) and the dcQLT-orbitrap, using both resonant-excitation CAD and beam-type CAD (HCD) were performed. Resulting from various technological advances (e.g., a stacked ring ion guide AP inlet, a dual cell QLT, etc.), the dcQLT-orbitrap exhibited increased duty cycle (~1.5–2×) and sensitivity for both CAD (ion trap detection) and HCD (orbitrap detection) methods. As compared to the older system, the dcQLT-orbitrap produced significantly more unique peptide identification for both methods (~30% improvement for CAD and ~115% improvement for HCD). The sizeable improvement of the HCD method on the dcQLT-orbitrap system, outperforms the current standard method of CAD with ion trap detection for large-scale analysis. Finally, we demonstrate that the increased HCD performance translates to a direct and substantial improvement in protein quantitation precision using isobaric tags. PMID:19938823

  17. Absolute Quantification of Norovirus Capsid Protein in Food, Water, and Soil Using Synthetic Peptides with Electrospray and MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Erica M.; Colquhoun, David R.; Schwab, Kellogg J.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2015-01-01

    Norovirus infections are one of the most prominent public health problems of microbial origin in the U.S. and other industrialized countries. Surveillance is necessary to prevent secondary infection, confirm successful cleanup after outbreaks, and track the causative agent. Quantitative mass spectrometry, based on absolute quantitation with stable-isotope labeled peptides, is a promising tool for norovirus monitoring because of its speed, sensitivity, and robustness in the face of environmental inhibitors. In the current study, we present two new methods for the detection of the norovirus genogroup I capsid protein using electrospray and matrixassisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. The peptide TLDPIEVPLEDVR was used to quantify norovirus-like particles down to 500 attomoles with electrospray and 100 attomoles with MALDI. With MALDI, we also demonstrate a detection limit of 1 femtomole and a quantitative dynamic range of 5 orders of magnitude in the presence of an environmental matrix effect. Due to the rapid processing time and applicability to a wide range of environmental sample types (bacterial lysate, produce, milk, soil, and groundwater), mass spectrometry-based absolute quantitation has a strong potential for use in public health and environmental sciences. PMID:25603302

  18. Absolute quantification of norovirus capsid protein in food, water, and soil using synthetic peptides with electrospray and MALDI mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Erica M; Colquhoun, David R; Schwab, Kellogg J; Halden, Rolf U

    2015-04-01

    Norovirus infections are one of the most prominent public health problems of microbial origin in the U.S. and other industrialized countries. Surveillance is necessary to prevent secondary infection, confirm successful cleanup after outbreaks, and track the causative agent. Quantitative mass spectrometry, based on absolute quantitation with stable-isotope labeled peptides, is a promising tool for norovirus monitoring because of its speed, sensitivity, and robustness in the face of environmental inhibitors. In the current study, we present two new methods for the detection of the norovirus genogroup I capsid protein using electrospray and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. The peptide TLDPIEVPLEDVR was used to quantify norovirus-like particles down to 500 attomoles with electrospray and 100 attomoles with MALDI. With MALDI, we also demonstrate a detection limit of 1 femtomole and a quantitative dynamic range of 5 orders of magnitude in the presence of an environmental matrix effect. Due to the rapid processing time and applicability to a wide range of environmental sample types (bacterial lysate, produce, milk, soil, and groundwater), mass spectrometry-based absolute quantitation has a strong potential for use in public health and environmental sciences. PMID:25603302

  19. A New Sandwich ELISA for Quantification of Thymidine Kinase 1 Protein Levels in Sera from Dogs with Different Malignancies Can Aid in Disease Management

    PubMed Central

    Jagarlamudi, Kiran Kumar; Moreau, Laura; Westberg, Sara; Rönnberg, Henrik; Eriksson, Staffan

    2015-01-01

    Thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) is a DNA precursor enzyme whose expression is closely correlated with cell proliferation and cell turnover. Sensitive serum TK1 activity assays have been used for monitoring and prognosis of hematological malignancies in both humans and dogs. Here we describe the development of a specific sandwich TK1-ELISA for the quantification of TK1 protein levels in sera from dogs with different malignancies. A combination of rabbit polyclonal anti-dog TK1 antibody and a mouse monoclonal anti-human TK1 antibody was used. Different concentrations of recombinant canine TK1 was used as standard. Clinical evaluation of the ELISA was done by using sera from 42 healthy dogs, 43 dogs with hematological tumors and 55 with solid tumors. An established [3H]-dThd phosphorylation assay was used to determine the TK1 activity levels in the same sera. The mean TK1 activities in dogs with hematological tumors were significantly higher than those found in healthy dogs. In agreement with earlier studies, no significant difference was observed in serum TK1 activities between healthy dogs and dogs with solid tumors. However, the mean TK1 protein levels determined by new TK1-ELISA were significantly higher not only in hematological tumors but also in solid tumors compared to healthy dogs (mean ± SD = 1.30 ± 1.16, 0.67 ± 0.55 and 0.27± 0.10 ng/mL, respectively). Moreover, TK1-ELISA had significantly higher ability to distinguish lymphoma cases from healthy based on receiver operating characteristic analyses (area under the curve, AUC, of 0.96) to that of the activity assay (AUC, 0.84). Furthermore, fluctuations in TK1 protein levels during the course of chemotherapy in dogs with lymphoma closely associated with clinical outcome. Overall, the TK1-ELISA showed significant linear correlation with the TK1 activity assay (rs = 0.6, p<0.0001). Thus, the new TK1-ELISA has sufficient sensitivity and specificity for routine clinical use in veterinary oncology. PMID:26366881

  20. UHPLC-MS/MS method with protein precipitation extraction for the simultaneous quantification of ten antihypertensive drugs in human plasma from resistant hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    De Nicolò, Amedeo; Avataneo, Valeria; Rabbia, Franco; Bonifacio, Gabriele; Cusato, Jessica; Tomasello, Cristina; Perlo, Elisa; Mulatero, Paolo; Veglio, Franco; Di Perri, Giovanni; D'Avolio, Antonio

    2016-09-10

    Today the management of resistant hypertension is a critical health problem: the main difficulty on this field is the discrimination of cases of poor therapeutic adherence from cases of real resistance. This gives rise to the need of high throughput and reliable quantification methods for the Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM) of antihypertensive drugs. The aim of this work was the development and validation of a UHPLC-Tandem mass spectrometry assay for this application and its use in plasma from patients with resistant hypertension. The novelty of this method resides in the ability to simultaneously quantify a wide panel of antihypertensive drugs: amlodipine, atenolol, clonidine, chlortalidone, doxazosin, hydrochlorothiazide, nifedipine, olmesartan, ramipril and telmisartan. Moreover, this method stands out for its simplicity and cheapness, resulting feasible for clinical routine. Both standards and quality controls were prepared in human plasma. After the addition of internal standard, each sample underwent protein precipitation with acetonitrile and was then dried. Extracts were resuspended in water:acetonitrile 90:10 (0.05% formic acid) and then injected into the chromatographic system. Chromatographic separation was performed on an Acquity(®) UPLC HSS T3 1.8μm 2.1×150mm column, with a gradient of water and acetonitrile, both added with 0.05% formic acid. Accuracy, intra-day and inter-day precision fitted FDA guidelines for all analytes, while matrix effects and recoveries resulted stable between samples for each analyte. Finally, we tested this method by monitoring plasma concentrations in 22 hypertensive patients with good results. This simple analytical method could represent a useful tool for the management of antihypertensive therapy. PMID:27497654

  1. Toward quantification of protein backbone–backbone hydrogen bonding energies: An energetic analysis of an amide-to-ester mutation in an α-helix within a protein

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jianmin; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2008-01-01

    Amide-to-ester backbone mutagenesis enables a specific backbone–backbone hydrogen bond (H-bond) in a protein to be eliminated in order to quantify its energetic contribution to protein folding. To extract a H-bonding free energy from an amide-to-ester perturbation free energy (ΔG folding,wt − ΔG folding,mut), it is necessary to correct for the putative introduction of a lone pair–lone pair electrostatic repulsion, as well as for the transfer free energy differences that may arise between the all amide sequence and the predominantly amide sequence harboring an ester bond. Mutation of the 9–10 amide bond within the V9F variant of the predominantly helical villin headpiece subdomain (HP35) to an ester or an E-olefin backbone bond results in a less stable but defined wild-type fold, an attribute required for this study. Comparing the folding free energies of the ester and E-olefin mutants, with correction for the desolvation free energy differences (ester and E-olefin) and the loss of an n-to-π* interaction (E-olefin), yields an experimentally based estimate of +0.4 kcal/mol for the O–O repulsion energy in an α-helical context, analogous to our previous experimentally based estimate of the O–O repulsion free energy in the context of a β-sheet. The small O–O repulsion energy indicates that amide-to-ester perturbation free energies can largely be attributed to the deletion of the backbone H-bonds after correction for desolvation differences. Quantitative evaluation of H-bonding in an α-helix should now be possible, an important step toward deciphering the balance of forces that enable spontaneous protein folding. PMID:18434500

  2. Inclusion of a non-immunoglobulin binding protein in two-site ELISA for quantification of human serum proteins without interference by heterophilic serum antibodies.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Mårten; Rönnmark, Jenny; Areström, Iréne; Nygren, Per Ake; Ahlborg, Niklas

    2003-12-01

    Measurement of human serum molecules with two-site ELISA can be biased by the presence of human heterophilic anti-animal immunoglobulin antibodies (HAIA) that cause false-positive signals by cross-linking the monoclonal (mAb) and/or polyclonal antibodies (pAb) used for the pre- (capture) and post-analyte steps (detection). To evaluate a novel ELISA format designed to avoid interference by HAIA, a target-specific non-immunoglobulin (Ig) affinity protein (affibody) was used to replace one of the antibodies. First, a human IgA-binding affibody (Z(IgA)) selected by phage display technology from a combinatorial library of a single Staphylococcus aureus protein A domain was used. The detection range of IgA standard using an ELISA based on Z(IgA) for capture and goat pAb against IgA (pAb(IgA)) for detection was comparable with that of using pAb(IgA) for both capture and detection. Secondly, another affibody (Z(Apo)) was combined with mAb and used to detect recombinant human apolipoprotein A-1. The affibody/antibody ELISAs were also used to quantify human serum levels of IgA and apolipoprotein A1. To verify that human serum did not cause false-positive signals in the affibody/antibody ELISA format, the ability of human serum to cross-link affibodies, mAb (mouse or rat) and/or pAb (goat) displaying non-matched specificities was assessed; affibodies and antibodies were not cross-linked whereas all combinations of mAb and/or pAb were cross-linked. The combination of affibodies and antibodies for analysis of human serum molecules represents a novel two-site ELISA format which precludes false-positive signals caused by HAIA. PMID:14659914

  3. Accurate prediction of protein structural classes by incorporating predicted secondary structure information into the general form of Chou's pseudo amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Kong, Liang; Zhang, Lichao; Lv, Jinfeng

    2014-03-01

    Extracting good representation from protein sequence is fundamental for protein structural classes prediction tasks. In this paper, we propose a novel and powerful method to predict protein structural classes based on the predicted secondary structure information. At the feature extraction stage, a 13-dimensional feature vector is extracted to characterize general contents and spatial arrangements of the secondary structural elements of a given protein sequence. Specially, four segment-level features are designed to elevate discriminative ability for proteins from the α/β and α+β classes. After the features are extracted, a multi-class non-linear support vector machine classifier is used to implement protein structural classes prediction. We report extensive experiments comparing the proposed method to the state-of-the-art in protein structural classes prediction on three widely used low-similarity benchmark datasets: FC699, 1189 and 640. Our method achieves competitive performance on prediction accuracies, especially for the overall prediction accuracies which have exceeded the best reported results on all of the three datasets. PMID:24316044

  4. Quantitative Assessment of Protein Structural Models by Comparison of H/D Exchange MS Data with Exchange Behavior Accurately Predicted by DXCOREX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tong; Pantazatos, Dennis; Li, Sheng; Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Hilser, Vincent J.; Woods, Virgil L.

    2012-01-01

    Peptide amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS) data are often used to qualitatively support models for protein structure. We have developed and validated a method (DXCOREX) by which exchange data can be used to quantitatively assess the accuracy of three-dimensional (3-D) models of protein structure. The method utilizes the COREX algorithm to predict a protein's amide hydrogen exchange rates by reference to a hypothesized structure, and these values are used to generate a virtual data set (deuteron incorporation per peptide) that can be quantitatively compared with the deuteration level of the peptide probes measured by hydrogen exchange experimentation. The accuracy of DXCOREX was established in studies performed with 13 proteins for which both high-resolution structures and experimental data were available. The DXCOREX-calculated and experimental data for each protein was highly correlated. We then employed correlation analysis of DXCOREX-calculated versus DXMS experimental data to assess the accuracy of a recently proposed structural model for the catalytic domain of a Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2. The model's calculated exchange behavior was highly correlated with the experimental exchange results available for the protein, supporting the accuracy of the proposed model. This method of analysis will substantially increase the precision with which experimental hydrogen exchange data can help decipher challenging questions regarding protein structure and dynamics.

  5. Asymmetric Flow-Field Flow Fractionation Hyphenated ICP-MS as an Alternative to Cloud Point Extraction for Quantification of Silver Nanoparticles and Silver Speciation: Application for Nanoparticles with a Protein Corona.

    PubMed

    Mudalige, Thilak K; Qu, Haiou; Linder, Sean W

    2015-07-21

    Production and application of nanoparticles in consumer products is at an all-time high due to the emerging field of nanotechnology. Direct detection and quantification of trace levels of nanoparticles within consumer products is very challenging and problematic. Although multiple methodologies are available for this purpose, each method has its own set of limitations. Herein, we developed an analytical platform consisting of asymmetric flow-field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) for the speciation and quantification of silver ions and silver nanoparticles at the ng/kg level (ppt). AF4 is utilized to concentrate the nanoparticles, and ICP-MS acts as the detector. The protein corona that forms upon exposure of nanoparticles to bovine serum albumin was utilized as a nanoparticle stabilization and AF4 recovery enhancement mechanism. Speciation of silver ions and nanoparticles was achieved with the assistance of penicillamine as a complexation ligand. The effect of nanoparticle size, surface coating, and ionization state toward the detection and quantification of the developed methodology was evaluated. The detection limit was found to be 4 ng/kg with the application of a 5 mL sample loop. Further application of this developed methodology on environmentally relevant samples was demonstrated by the analysis of Arkansas River water spiked with silver nanoparticles and nanoparticle spiked into humic acid solution (50 mg/L) at an environmentally relevant level. PMID:26095720

  6. Development of a Novel Cross-linking Strategy for Fast and Accurate Identification of Cross-linked Peptides of Protein Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Athit; Chiu, Chi-li; Vellucci, Danielle; Yang, Yingying; Patel, Vishal R.; Guan, Shenheng; Randall, Arlo; Baldi, Pierre; Rychnovsky, Scott D.; Huang, Lan

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of elaborate structures of protein complexes is fundamental for understanding their functions and regulations. Although cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) has been presented as a feasible strategy for structural elucidation of large multisubunit protein complexes, this method has proven challenging because of technical difficulties in unambiguous identification of cross-linked peptides and determination of cross-linked sites by MS analysis. In this work, we developed a novel cross-linking strategy using a newly designed MS-cleavable cross-linker, disuccinimidyl sulfoxide (DSSO). DSSO contains two symmetric collision-induced dissociation (CID)-cleavable sites that allow effective identification of DSSO-cross-linked peptides based on their distinct fragmentation patterns unique to cross-linking types (i.e. interlink, intralink, and dead end). The CID-induced separation of interlinked peptides in MS/MS permits MS3 analysis of single peptide chain fragment ions with defined modifications (due to DSSO remnants) for easy interpretation and unambiguous identification using existing database searching tools. Integration of data analyses from three generated data sets (MS, MS/MS, and MS3) allows high confidence identification of DSSO cross-linked peptides. The efficacy of the newly developed DSSO-based cross-linking strategy was demonstrated using model peptides and proteins. In addition, this method was successfully used for structural characterization of the yeast 20 S proteasome complex. In total, 13 non-redundant interlinked peptides of the 20 S proteasome were identified, representing the first application of an MS-cleavable cross-linker for the characterization of a multisubunit protein complex. Given its effectiveness and simplicity, this cross-linking strategy can find a broad range of applications in elucidating the structural topology of proteins and protein complexes. PMID:20736410

  7. A strategy for absolute proteome quantification with mass spectrometry by hierarchical use of peptide-concatenated standards.

    PubMed

    Kito, Keiji; Okada, Mitsuhiro; Ishibashi, Yuko; Okada, Satoshi; Ito, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    The accurate and precise absolute abundance of proteins can be determined using mass spectrometry by spiking the sample with stable isotope-labeled standards. In this study, we developed a strategy of hierarchical use of peptide-concatenated standards (PCSs) to quantify more proteins over a wider dynamic range. Multiple primary PCSs were used for quantification of many target proteins. Unique "ID-tag peptides" were introduced into individual primary PCSs, allowing us to monitor the exact amounts of individual PCSs using a "secondary PCS" in which all "ID-tag peptides" were concatenated. Furthermore, we varied the copy number of the "ID-tag peptide" in each PCS according to a range of expression levels of target proteins. This strategy accomplished absolute quantification over a wider range than that of the measured ratios. The quantified abundance of budding yeast proteins showed a high reproducibility for replicate analyses and similar copy numbers per cell for ribosomal proteins, demonstrating the accuracy and precision of this strategy. A comparison with the absolute abundance of transcripts clearly indicated different post-transcriptional regulation of expression for specific functional groups. Thus, the approach presented here is a faithful method for the absolute quantification of proteomes and provides insights into biological mechanisms, including the regulation of expressed protein abundance. PMID:27030420

  8. Separation and quantification of microalgal carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Templeton, David W; Quinn, Matthew; Van Wychen, Stefanie; Hyman, Deborah; Laurens, Lieve M L

    2012-12-28

    Structural carbohydrates can constitute a large fraction of the dry weight of algal biomass and thus accurate identification and quantification is important for summative mass closure. Two limitations to the accurate characterization of microalgal carbohydrates are the lack of a robust analytical procedure to hydrolyze polymeric carbohydrates to their respective monomers and the subsequent identification and quantification of those monosaccharides. We address the second limitation, chromatographic separation of monosaccharides, here by identifying optimum conditions for the resolution of a synthetic mixture of 13 microalgae-specific monosaccharides, comprised of 8 neutral, 2 amino sugars, 2 uronic acids and 1 alditol (myo-inositol as an internal standard). The synthetic 13-carbohydrate mix showed incomplete resolution across 11 traditional high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods, but showed improved resolution and accurate quantification using anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC) as well as alditol acetate derivatization followed by gas chromatography (for the neutral- and amino-sugars only). We demonstrate the application of monosaccharide quantification using optimized chromatography conditions after sulfuric acid analytical hydrolysis for three model algae strains and compare the quantification and complexity of monosaccharides in analytical hydrolysates relative to a typical terrestrial feedstock, sugarcane bagasse. PMID:23177152

  9. A 3D Time-Shared NOESY Experiment Designed to Provide Optimal Resolution for Accurate Assignment of NMR Distance Restraints in Large Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Subrata H; Harden, Bradley J

    2014-01-01

    Structure determination of proteins by solution NMR has become an established method, but challenges increase steeply with the size of proteins. Notably spectral crowding and signal overlap impair the analysis of cross-peaks in NOESY spectra that provide distance restraints for structural models. An optimal spectral resolution can alleviate overlap but requires prohibitively long experimental time with existing methods. Here we present a time-shared 3D experiment optimized for large proteins that provides 15N and 13C dispersed NOESY spectra in a single measurement. NOESY correlations appear in the detected dimension and hence benefit from the highest resolution achievable of all dimensions without increase in experimental time. By design, this experiment is inherently optimal for non-uniform sampling acquisition when compared to current alternatives. Thus, 15N and 13C dispersed NOESY spectra with ultra-high resolution in all dimensions were acquired in parallel within about 4 days instead of 80 days for a 52 kDa monomeric protein at a concentration of 350 μM. PMID:25381567

  10. Fast and accurate method for identifying high-quality protein-interaction modules by clique merging and its application to yeast.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Liu, Song; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2006-04-01

    Molecular networks in cells are organized into functional modules, where genes in the same module interact densely with each other and participate in the same biological process. Thus, identification of modules from molecular networks is an important step toward a better understanding of how cells function through the molecular networks. Here, we propose a simple, automatic method, called MC(2), to identify functional modules by enumerating and merging cliques in the protein-interaction data from large-scale experiments. Application of MC(2) to the S. cerevisiae protein-interaction data produces 84 modules, whose sizes range from 4 to 69 genes. The majority of the discovered modules are significantly enriched with a highly specific process term (at least 4 levels below root) and a specific cellular component in Gene Ontology (GO) tree. The average fraction of genes with the most enriched GO term for all modules is 82% for specific biological processes and 78% for specific cellular components. In addition, the predicted modules are enriched with coexpressed proteins. These modules are found to be useful for annotating unknown genes and uncovering novel functions of known genes. MC(2) is efficient, and takes only about 5 min to identify modules from the current yeast gene interaction network with a typical PC (Intel Xeon 2.5 GHz CPU and 512 MB memory). The CPU time of MC(2) is affordable (12 h) even when the number of interactions is increased by a factor of 10. MC(2) and its results are publicly available on http://theory.med.buffalo.edu/MC2. PMID:16602686

  11. Quantification of gel-separated proteins and their phosphorylation sites by LC-MS using unlabeled internal standards: analysis of phosphoprotein dynamics in a B cell lymphoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Cutillas, Pedro R; Geering, Barbara; Waterfield, Mike D; Vanhaesebroeck, Bart

    2005-08-01

    simple LC-MS method for quantification of gel-separated proteins and their phosphorylation sites and for quantitative profiling of biological systems. PMID:15879432

  12. First application of a microsphere-based immunoassay to the detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs): quantification of Cry1Ab protein in genetically modified maize.

    PubMed

    Fantozzi, Anna; Ermolli, Monica; Marini, Massimiliano; Scotti, Domenico; Balla, Branko; Querci, Maddalena; Langrell, Stephen R H; Van den Eede, Guy

    2007-02-21

    An innovative covalent microsphere immunoassay, based on the usage of fluorescent beads coupled to a specific antibody, was developed for the quantification of the endotoxin Cry1Ab present in MON810 and Bt11 genetically modified (GM) maize lines. In particular, a specific protocol was developed to assess the presence of Cry1Ab in a very broad range of GM maize concentrations, from 0.1 to 100% [weight of genetically modified organism (GMO)/weight]. Test linearity was achieved in the range of values from 0.1 to 3%, whereas fluorescence signal increased following a nonlinear model, reaching a plateau at 25%. The limits of detection and quantification were equal to 0.018 and 0.054%, respectively. The present study describes the first application of quantitative high-throughput immunoassays in GMO analysis. PMID:17300145

  13. Accurate measurements of dynamics and reproducibility in small genetic networks

    PubMed Central

    Dubuis, Julien O; Samanta, Reba; Gregor, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Quantification of gene expression has become a central tool for understanding genetic networks. In many systems, the only viable way to measure protein levels is by immunofluorescence, which is notorious for its limited accuracy. Using the early Drosophila embryo as an example, we show that careful identification and control of experimental error allows for highly accurate gene expression measurements. We generated antibodies in different host species, allowing for simultaneous staining of four Drosophila gap genes in individual embryos. Careful error analysis of hundreds of expression profiles reveals that less than ∼20% of the observed embryo-to-embryo fluctuations stem from experimental error. These measurements make it possible to extract not only very accurate mean gene expression profiles but also their naturally occurring fluctuations of biological origin and corresponding cross-correlations. We use this analysis to extract gap gene profile dynamics with ∼1 min accuracy. The combination of these new measurements and analysis techniques reveals a twofold increase in profile reproducibility owing to a collective network dynamics that relays positional accuracy from the maternal gradients to the pair-rule genes. PMID:23340845

  14. Quantitative Proteome Analysis of Human Plasma Following in vivo Lipopolysaccharide Administration using O-16/O-18 Labeling and the Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Weijun; Monroe, Matthew E.; Liu, Tao; Jacobs, Jon M.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Shen, Yufeng; Moore, Ronald J.; Anderson, David J.; Zhang, Rui; Calvano, Steven E.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-05-01

    Identification of novel diagnostic or therapeutic biomarkers from human blood plasma would benefit significantly from quantitative measurements of the proteome constituents over a range of physiological conditions. We describe here an initial demonstration of proteome-wide quantitative analysis of human plasma. The approach utilizes post-digestion trypsin-catalyzed 16O/18O labeling, two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC)-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance ((FTICR) mass spectrometry, and the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag strategy for identification and quantification of peptides/proteins from complex samples. A peptide mass and time tag database was initially generated using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) following extensive multidimensional LC separations and the database serves as a ‘look-up’ table for peptide identification. The mass and time tag database contains >8,000 putative identified peptides, which yielded 938 confident plasma protein identifications. The quantitative approach was applied to the comparative analyses of plasma samples from an individual prior to and 9 hours after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration without depletion of high abundant proteins. Accurate quantification of changes in protein abundance was demonstrated with both 1:1 labeling of control plasma and the comparison between the plasma samples following LPS administration. A total of 429 distinct plasma proteins were quantified from the comparative analyses and the protein abundances for 28 proteins were observed to be significantly changed following LPS administration, including several known inflammatory response mediators.

  15. Continuous nanoflow-scanning electrochemical microscopy: voltammetric characterization and application for accurate and reproducible imaging of enzyme-labeled protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Kai, Tianhan; Chen, Shu; Monterroso, Estuardo; Zhou, Feimeng

    2015-04-21

    The coupling of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) to a continuous nanoflow (CNF) system is accomplished with the use of a microconcentric ring electrode/injector probe. The gold microring electrode encapsulated by a glass sheath is robust and can be beveled and polished. The CNF system, comprising a precision gas displacement pump and a rotary valve, is capable of delivering solution to the center of the SECM probe in the range of 1-150 nL/min. Major advantages of the CNF-SECM imaging mode over the conventional SECM generation/collection (G/C) mode include higher imaging resolution, immunity from interferences by species in the bulk solution or at other sites of the substrate, elimination of the feedback current that could interfere with the G/C data interpretation, and versatility of initiating surface reactions/processes via introducing different reactants into the flowing stream. Parameters such as flow rates, probe/substrate separations, and collection efficiencies are examined and optimized. Higher resolution, reproducibility, and accuracy are demonstrated through the application of CNF-SECM to horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-amplified imaging of protein microarrays. By flowing H2O2 and ferrocenemethanol through the injector and detecting the surface-generated ferriceniummethanol, human IgG spots covered with HPR-labeled antihuman IgG can be detected in the range of 13 nM-1.333 μM with a detection limit of 3.0 nM. In addition, consistent images of microarray spots for selective and high-density detection of analytes can be attained. PMID:25831146

  16. Accurate measurements of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled proteins using multi-dimensional four-oscillating field solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Straasø, Lasse Arnt; Nielsen, Jakob Toudahl; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Khaneja, Navin

    2014-09-21

    Application of sets of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C internuclear distance restraints constitutes a typical key element in determining the structure of peptides and proteins by magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Accurate measurements of the structurally highly important {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled peptides and proteins, however, pose a big challenge due to the problem of dipolar truncation. Here, we present novel two-dimensional (2D) solid-state NMR experiments capable of extracting distances between carbonyl ({sup 13}C′) and aliphatic ({sup 13}C{sub aliphatic}) spins with high accuracy. The method is based on an improved version of the four-oscillating field (FOLD) technique [L. A. Straasø, M. Bjerring, N. Khaneja, and N. C. Nielsen, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 225103 (2009)] which circumvents the problem of dipolar truncation, thereby offering a base for accurate extraction of internuclear distances in many-spin systems. The ability to extract reliable accurate distances is demonstrated using one- and two-dimensional variants of the FOLD experiment on uniformly {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled-L-isoleucine. In a more challenging biological application, FOLD 2D experiments are used to determine a large number of {sup 13}C′-{sup 13}C{sub aliphatic} distances in amyloid fibrils formed by the SNNFGAILSS fibrillating core of the human islet amyloid polypeptide with uniform {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeling on the FGAIL fragment.

  17. Network-Based Isoform Quantification with RNA-Seq Data for Cancer Transcriptome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Chang, Jae-Woong; Lin, Lilong; Minn, Kay; Wu, Baolin; Chien, Jeremy; Yong, Jeongsik; Zheng, Hui; Kuang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput mRNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) is widely used for transcript quantification of gene isoforms. Since RNA-Seq data alone is often not sufficient to accurately identify the read origins from the isoforms for quantification, we propose to explore protein domain-domain interactions as prior knowledge for integrative analysis with RNA-Seq data. We introduce a Network-based method for RNA-Seq-based Transcript Quantification (Net-RSTQ) to integrate protein domain-domain interaction network with short read alignments for transcript abundance estimation. Based on our observation that the abundances of the neighboring isoforms by domain-domain interactions in the network are positively correlated, Net-RSTQ models the expression of the neighboring transcripts as Dirichlet priors on the likelihood of the observed read alignments against the transcripts in one gene. The transcript abundances of all the genes are then jointly estimated with alternating optimization of multiple EM problems. In simulation Net-RSTQ effectively improved isoform transcript quantifications when isoform co-expressions correlate with their interactions. qRT-PCR results on 25 multi-isoform genes in a stem cell line, an ovarian cancer cell line, and a breast cancer cell line also showed that Net-RSTQ estimated more consistent isoform proportions with RNA-Seq data. In the experiments on the RNA-Seq data in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), the transcript abundances estimated by Net-RSTQ are more informative for patient sample classification of ovarian cancer, breast cancer and lung cancer. All experimental results collectively support that Net-RSTQ is a promising approach for isoform quantification. Net-RSTQ toolbox is available at http://compbio.cs.umn.edu/Net-RSTQ/. PMID:26699225

  18. Network-Based Isoform Quantification with RNA-Seq Data for Cancer Transcriptome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Chang, Jae-Woong; Lin, Lilong; Minn, Kay; Wu, Baolin; Chien, Jeremy; Yong, Jeongsik; Zheng, Hui; Kuang, Rui

    2015-12-01

    High-throughput mRNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) is widely used for transcript quantification of gene isoforms. Since RNA-Seq data alone is often not sufficient to accurately identify the read origins from the isoforms for quantification, we propose to explore protein domain-domain interactions as prior knowledge for integrative analysis with RNA-Seq data. We introduce a Network-based method for RNA-Seq-based Transcript Quantification (Net-RSTQ) to integrate protein domain-domain interaction network with short read alignments for transcript abundance estimation. Based on our observation that the abundances of the neighboring isoforms by domain-domain interactions in the network are positively correlated, Net-RSTQ models the expression of the neighboring transcripts as Dirichlet priors on the likelihood of the observed read alignments against the transcripts in one gene. The transcript abundances of all the genes are then jointly estimated with alternating optimization of multiple EM problems. In simulation Net-RSTQ effectively improved isoform transcript quantifications when isoform co-expressions correlate with their interactions. qRT-PCR results on 25 multi-isoform genes in a stem cell line, an ovarian cancer cell line, and a breast cancer cell line also showed that Net-RSTQ estimated more consistent isoform proportions with RNA-Seq data. In the experiments on the RNA-Seq data in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), the transcript abundances estimated by Net-RSTQ are more informative for patient sample classification of ovarian cancer, breast cancer and lung cancer. All experimental results collectively support that Net-RSTQ is a promising approach for isoform quantification. Net-RSTQ toolbox is available at http://compbio.cs.umn.edu/Net-RSTQ/. PMID:26699225

  19. Quantification of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-protein adducts in the in vivo gastric digesta of mini-pigs using a GC-MS/MS method with accuracy profile validation.

    PubMed

    Delosière, Mylène; Santé-Lhoutellier, Véronique; Chantelauze, Céline; Durand, Denys; Thomas, Agnès; Joly, Charlotte; Pujos-Guillot, Estelle; Rémond, Didier; Comte, Blandine; Gladine, Cécile; Guy, Alexandre; Durand, Thierry; Laurentie, Michel; Dufour, Claire

    2016-08-10

    Hydroxyalkenals are lipid oxidation end-products resulting from the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). This study aimed at quantifying the production of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-protein adducts (HNE-P) via Michael addition from n-6 PUFA oxidation in the gastric digesta of mini-pigs after the consumption of meat-based meals with different plant antioxidant contents. Using the accuracy profile procedure, we validated an extraction protocol for the quantification of HNE-P by GC-MS/MS in gastric contents. The formation of HNE-P in the gastric compartment was observed for the first time, with concentrations ranging from less than 0.52 to 1.33 nmol HNE-P per 500 mg digesta. Nevertheless, most gastric HNE-P levels were below the limit of quantification of 0.52 nmol HNE-P per 500 mg digesta. In this animal study, the protective effect of plant antioxidant sources on HNE-P formation was not evidenced contrasting with the results using TBARS as markers. PMID:27418316

  20. Multidimensional Separation Using HILIC and SCX Pre-fractionation for RP LC-MS/MS Platform with Automated Exclusion List-based MS Data Acquisition with Increased Protein Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu; Meng, Zhen; Edman-Woolcott, Maria; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F; Zandi, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based proteomics is one of the most widely used analytical platforms for global protein discovery and quantification. One of the challenges is the difficulty of identifying low abundance biomarker proteins from limited biological samples. Extensive fractionation could expand proteomics dynamic range, however, at the cost of high sample and time consumption. Extensive fractionation would increase the sample need and the labeling cost. Also quantitative proteomics depending on high resolution MS have the limitation of spectral acquisition speed. Those practical problems hinder the in-depth quantitative proteomics analysis such as tandem mass tag (TMT) experiments. We found the joint use of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and strong cation exchange Chromatography (SCX) prefractionation at medium level could improve MS/MS efficiency, increase proteome coverage, shorten analysis time and save valuable samples. In addition, we scripted a program, Exclusion List Convertor (ELC), which automates and streamlines data acquisition workflow using the precursor ion exclusion (PIE) method. PIE reduces redundancy of high abundance MS/MS analyses by running replicates of the sample. The precursor ions detected in the initial run(s) are excluded for MS/MS in the subsequent run. We compared PIE methods with standard data dependent acquisition (DDA) methods running replicates without PIE for their effectiveness in quantifying TMT-tagged peptides and proteins in mouse tears. We quantified a total of 845 proteins and 1401 peptides using the PIE workflow, while the DDA method only resulted in 347 proteins and 731 peptides. This represents a 144% increase of protein identifications as a result of PIE analysis. PMID:26807013

  1. Quantification of soy protein using the isotope method (δ(13)C and δ(15)N) for commercial brands of beef hamburger.

    PubMed

    Ducatti, Rhani; de Almeida Nogueira Pinto, José Paes; Sartori, Maria Márcia Pereira; Ducatti, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    Hamburgers (beef patties) may be adulterated through the overuse of protein extenders. Among vegetables, soy protein is the best substitute for animal protein. These ingredients help to reduce the cost of producing a final product, and they maximize profits for fraudulent industries. Moreover, the ingestion of soy or other non-meat proteins by allergic individuals may present a health risk. In addition, monitoring by supervisory bodies is hampered by a lack of appropriate analytical methodologies. Within this context, the aim of this study was to determine and quantify the levels of added soy protein by determination of (15)N and (13)C stable isotopes. A total of 100 beef hamburger samples from 10 commercial brands were analyzed. Only three samples of the G brand were within the standards set the Brazilian legislation. The remaining 97 samples from 10 commercial brands contained >4% soy protein; therefore, they are adulterated and not in compliance with the current legislation. PMID:27501234

  2. Grading More Accurately

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rom, Mark Carl

    2011-01-01

    Grades matter. College grading systems, however, are often ad hoc and prone to mistakes. This essay focuses on one factor that contributes to high-quality grading systems: grading accuracy (or "efficiency"). I proceed in several steps. First, I discuss the elements of "efficient" (i.e., accurate) grading. Next, I present analytical results…

  3. Software-assisted serum metabolite quantification using NMR.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young-Sang; Hyeon, Jin-Seong; Hwang, Geum-Sook

    2016-08-31

    The goal of metabolomics is to analyze a whole metabolome under a given set of conditions, and accurate and reliable quantitation of metabolites is crucial. Absolute concentration is more valuable than relative concentration; however, the most commonly used method in NMR-based serum metabolic profiling, bin-based and full data point peak quantification, provides relative concentration levels of metabolites and are not reliable when metabolite peaks overlap in a spectrum. In this study, we present the software-assisted serum metabolite quantification (SASMeQ) method, which allows us to identify and quantify metabolites in NMR spectra using Chenomx software. This software uses the ERETIC2 utility from TopSpin to add a digitally synthesized peak to a spectrum. The SASMeQ method will advance NMR-based serum metabolic profiling by providing an accurate and reliable method for absolute quantification that is superior to bin-based quantification. PMID:27506360

  4. Novel Accurate Bacterial Discrimination by MALDI-Time-of-Flight MS Based on Ribosomal Proteins Coding in S10-spc-alpha Operon at Strain Level S10-GERMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Hiroto; Hotta, Yudai; Sato, Hiroaki

    2013-08-01

    Matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is one of the most widely used mass-based approaches for bacterial identification and classification because of the simple sample preparation and extremely rapid analysis within a few minutes. To establish the accurate MALDI-TOF MS bacterial discrimination method at strain level, the ribosomal subunit proteins coded in the S 10-spc-alpha operon, which encodes half of the ribosomal subunit protein and is highly conserved in eubacterial genomes, were selected as reliable biomarkers. This method, named the S10-GERMS method, revealed that the strains of genus Pseudomonas were successfully identified and discriminated at species and strain levels, respectively; therefore, the S10-GERMS method was further applied to discriminate the pathovar of P. syringae. The eight selected biomarkers (L24, L30, S10, S12, S14, S16, S17, and S19) suggested the rapid discrimination of P. syringae at the strain (pathovar) level. The S10-GERMS method appears to be a powerful tool for rapid and reliable bacterial discrimination and successful phylogenetic characterization. In this article, an overview of the utilization of results from the S10-GERMS method is presented, highlighting the characterization of the Lactobacillus casei group and discrimination of the bacteria of genera Bacillus and Sphingopyxis despite only two and one base difference in the 16S rRNA gene sequence, respectively.

  5. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  6. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  7. Neutron-encoded mass signatures for multiplexed proteome quantification.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Alexander S; Merrill, Anna E; Bailey, Derek J; Still, Amelia J; Westphall, Michael S; Strieter, Eric R; Pagliarini, David J; Coon, Joshua J

    2013-04-01

    We describe a protein quantification method called neutron encoding that exploits the subtle mass differences caused by nuclear binding energy variation in stable isotopes. These mass differences are synthetically encoded into amino acids and incorporated into yeast and mouse proteins via metabolic labeling. Mass spectrometry analysis with high mass resolution (>200,000) reveals the isotopologue-embedded peptide signals, permitting quantification. Neutron encoding will enable highly multiplexed proteome analysis with excellent dynamic range and accuracy. PMID:23435260

  8. Representative Amino Acid Side-Chain Interactions in Protein-DNA Complexes: A Comparison of Highly Accurate Correlated Ab Initio Quantum Mechanical Calculations and Efficient Approaches for Applications to Large Systems.

    PubMed

    Hostaš, Jiří; Jakubec, Dávid; Laskowski, Roman A; Gnanasekaran, Ramachandran; Řezáč, Jan; Vondrášek, Jiří; Hobza, Pavel

    2015-09-01

    Representative pairs of amino acid side chains and nucleic acid bases extracted from available high-quality structures of protein-DNA complexes were analyzed using a range of computational methods. CCSD(T)/CBS interaction energies were calculated for the chosen 272 pairs. These reference interaction energies were used to test the MP2.5/CBS, MP2.X/CBS, MP2-F12, DFT-D3, PM6, and Amber force field methods. Method MP2.5 provided excellent agreement with reference data (root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 0.11 kcal/mol), which is more than 1 order of magnitude faster than the CCSD(T) method. When MP2-F12 and MP2.5 were combined, the results were within reasonable accuracy (0.20 kcal/mol), with a computational savings of almost 2 orders of magnitude. Therefore, this method is a promising tool for accurate calculations of interaction energies in protein-DNA motifs of up to ∼100 atoms, for which CCSD(T)/CBS benchmark calculations are not feasible. B3-LYP-D3 calculated with def2-TZVPP and def2-QZVP basis sets yielded sufficiently good results with a reasonably small RMSE. This method provided better results for neutral systems, whereas positively charged species exhibited the worst agreement with the benchmark data. The Amber force field yielded unbalanced results-performing well for systems containing nonpolar amino acids but severely underestimating interaction energies for charged complexes. The semiempirical PM6 method with corrections for hydrogen bonding and dispersion energy (PM6-D3H4) exhibited considerably smaller error than the Amber force field, which makes it an effective tool for modeling extended protein-ligand complexes (of up to 10,000 atoms). PMID:26575904

  9. Quantification and modification of the equilibrium dynamics and mechanics of a viral capsid lattice self-assembled as a protein nanocoating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valbuena, Alejandro; Mateu, Mauricio G.

    2015-09-01

    Self-assembling, protein-based bidimensional lattices are being developed as functionalizable, highly ordered biocoatings for multiple applications in nanotechnology and nanomedicine. Unfortunately, protein assemblies are soft materials that may be too sensitive to mechanical disruption, and their intrinsic conformational dynamism may also influence their applicability. Thus, it may be critically important to characterize, understand and manipulate the mechanical features and dynamic behavior of protein assemblies in order to improve their suitability as nanomaterials. In this study, the capsid protein of the human immunodeficiency virus was induced to self-assemble as a continuous, single layered, ordered nanocoating onto an inorganic substrate. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to quantify the mechanical behavior and the equilibrium dynamics (``breathing'') of this virus-based, self-assembled protein lattice in close to physiological conditions. The results uniquely provided: (i) evidence that AFM can be used to directly visualize in real time and quantify slow breathing motions leading to dynamic disorder in protein nanocoatings and viral capsid lattices; (ii) characterization of the dynamics and mechanics of a viral capsid lattice and protein-based nanocoating, including flexibility, mechanical strength and remarkable self-repair capacity after mechanical damage; (iii) proof of principle that chemical additives can modify the dynamics and mechanics of a viral capsid lattice or protein-based nanocoating, and improve their applied potential by increasing their mechanical strength and elasticity. We discuss the implications for the development of mechanically resistant and compliant biocoatings precisely organized at the nanoscale, and of novel antiviral agents acting on fundamental physical properties of viruses.Self-assembling, protein-based bidimensional lattices are being developed as functionalizable, highly ordered biocoatings for multiple applications

  10. Quantification and modification of the equilibrium dynamics and mechanics of a viral capsid lattice self-assembled as a protein nanocoating.

    PubMed

    Valbuena, Alejandro; Mateu, Mauricio G

    2015-09-28

    Self-assembling, protein-based bidimensional lattices are being developed as functionalizable, highly ordered biocoatings for multiple applications in nanotechnology and nanomedicine. Unfortunately, protein assemblies are soft materials that may be too sensitive to mechanical disruption, and their intrinsic conformational dynamism may also influence their applicability. Thus, it may be critically important to characterize, understand and manipulate the mechanical features and dynamic behavior of protein assemblies in order to improve their suitability as nanomaterials. In this study, the capsid protein of the human immunodeficiency virus was induced to self-assemble as a continuous, single layered, ordered nanocoating onto an inorganic substrate. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to quantify the mechanical behavior and the equilibrium dynamics ("breathing") of this virus-based, self-assembled protein lattice in close to physiological conditions. The results uniquely provided: (i) evidence that AFM can be used to directly visualize in real time and quantify slow breathing motions leading to dynamic disorder in protein nanocoatings and viral capsid lattices; (ii) characterization of the dynamics and mechanics of a viral capsid lattice and protein-based nanocoating, including flexibility, mechanical strength and remarkable self-repair capacity after mechanical damage; (iii) proof of principle that chemical additives can modify the dynamics and mechanics of a viral capsid lattice or protein-based nanocoating, and improve their applied potential by increasing their mechanical strength and elasticity. We discuss the implications for the development of mechanically resistant and compliant biocoatings precisely organized at the nanoscale, and of novel antiviral agents acting on fundamental physical properties of viruses. PMID:26302823

  11. Quantitative Proteome Analysis of Human Plasma Following in vivo Lipopolysaccharide Administration using 16O/18O Labeling and the Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Wei-Jun; Monroe, Matthew E.; Liu, Tao; Jacobs, Jon M.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Shen, Yufeng; Moore, Ronald J.; Anderson, David J.; Zhang, Rui; Calvano, Steve E.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Identification of novel diagnostic or therapeutic biomarkers from human blood plasma would benefit significantly from quantitative measurements of the proteome constituents over a range of physiological conditions. Herein we describe an initial demonstration of proteome-wide quantitative analysis of human plasma. The approach utilizes post-digestion trypsin-catalyzed 16O/18O peptide labeling, two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC)-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance ((FTICR) mass spectrometry, and the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag strategy to identify and quantify peptides/proteins from complex samples. A peptide accurate mass and LC-elution time AMT tag database was initially generated using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) following extensive multidimensional LC separations to provide the basis for subsequent peptide identifications. The AMT tag database contains >8,000 putative identified peptides, providing 938 confident plasma protein identifications. The quantitative approach was applied without depletion for high abundant proteins for comparative analyses of plasma samples from an individual prior to and 9 h after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. Accurate quantification of changes in protein abundance was demonstrated by both 1:1 labeling of control plasma and the comparison between the plasma samples following LPS administration. A total of 429 distinct plasma proteins were quantified from the comparative analyses and the protein abundances for 25 proteins, including several known inflammatory response mediators, were observed to change significantly following LPS administration. PMID:15753121

  12. Assays for Determination of Protein Concentration.

    PubMed

    Olson, Bradley J S C

    2016-01-01

    Biochemical analysis of proteins relies on accurate quantification of protein concentration. Detailed in this appendix are some commonly used methods for protein analysis, e.g., Lowry, Bradford, bicinchoninic acid (BCA), UV spectroscopic, and 3-(4-carboxybenzoyl)quinoline-2-carboxaldehyde (CBQCA) assays. The primary focus of this report is assay selection, emphasizing sample and buffer compatibility. The fundamentals of generating protein assay standard curves and of data processing are considered, as are high-throughput adaptations of the more commonly used protein assays. Also included is a rapid, inexpensive, and reliable BCA assay of total protein in SDS-PAGE sample buffer that is used for equal loading of SDS-PAGE gels. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27248579

  13. The quantification of lipid and protein oxidation in stallion spermatozoa and seminal plasma: seasonal distinctions and correlations with DNA strand breaks, classical seminal parameters and stallion fertility.

    PubMed

    Morte, Maria Inês; Rodrigues, Ana Margarida; Soares, Diana; Rodrigues, Ana Sofia; Gamboa, Sandra; Ramalho-Santos, João

    2008-06-01

    The goal of this work was to correlate oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage with classic semen parameters in spermatozoa and seminal plasma of fertile and subfertile stallions. Oxidation was measured in both lipids and proteins, using the thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) assay and the DNPH carbonyl groups assay, respectively. Sperm DNA damage was monitored using the TUNEL assay. These parameters were monitored in samples obtained during the breeding and the non-breeding seasons. In general, fertile stallions showed better classical semen parameters, and those parameters improved from the non-breeding to the breeding season, although an increase in sperm production was accompanied by a decrease in the semen quality from subfertile stallions in the breeding season. In terms of oxidation levels we found that there were clear differences whether lipids or proteins were considered. In the breeding season there seemed to be a tendency towards normalizing lipid oxidation in spermatozoa and seminal plasma, and protein oxidation in the seminal plasma, of both fertile and subfertile animals. Thus, differences monitored in the non-breeding season were no longer visible. Interestingly, a higher level of protein oxidation was found in the sperm of fertile animals in the breeding season. Considering that there were positive correlations between sperm protein oxidation and sperm motility and vitality, these results suggests that the oxidation of semen proteins may be important for sperm function. On the other hand, lipid oxidation in the seminal plasma seemed to be a general indicator for sperm damage. In the non-breeding season positive correlations between lipid and protein oxidation levels in both sperm and seminal plasma and several defects in sperm function were found, but only for subfertile animals, thus suggesting that lipid and protein oxidation may aid in the identification of subfertile stallions during the non

  14. Immunohistochemical quantification of the cobalamin transport protein, cell surface receptor and Ki-67 in naturally occurring canine and feline malignant tumors and in adjacent normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Sysel, Annette M.; Valli, Victor E.; Bauer, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells have an obligate need for cobalamin (vitamin B12) to enable DNA synthesis necessary for cellular replication. This study quantified the immunohistochemical expression of the cobalamin transport protein (transcobalamin II; TCII), cell surface receptor (transcobalamin II-R; TCII-R) and proliferation protein (Ki-67) in naturally occurring canine and feline malignant tumors, and compared these results to expression in corresponding adjacent normal tissues. All malignant tumor tissues stained positively for TCII, TCII-R and Ki-67 proteins; expression varied both within and between tumor types. Expression of TCII, TCII-R and Ki-67 was significantly higher in malignant tumor tissues than in corresponding adjacent normal tissues in both species. There was a strong correlation between TCII and TCII-R expression, and a modest correlation between TCII-R and Ki-67 expression in both species; a modest association between TCII and Ki-67 expression was present in canine tissues only. These results demonstrate a quantifiable, synchronous up-regulation of TCII and TCII-R expression by proliferating canine and feline malignant tumors. The potential to utilize these proteins as biomarkers to identify neoplastic tissues, streamline therapeutic options, evaluate response to anti-tumor therapy and monitor for recurrent disease has important implications in the advancement of cancer management for both human and companion animal patients. PMID:25633912

  15. Accurate measurement of time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itano, Wayne M.; Ramsey, Norman F.

    1993-07-01

    The paper discusses current methods for accurate measurements of time by conventional atomic clocks, with particular attention given to the principles of operation of atomic-beam frequency standards, atomic hydrogen masers, and atomic fountain and to the potential use of strings of trapped mercury ions as a time device more stable than conventional atomic clocks. The areas of application of the ultraprecise and ultrastable time-measuring devices that tax the capacity of modern atomic clocks include radio astronomy and tests of relativity. The paper also discusses practical applications of ultraprecise clocks, such as navigation of space vehicles and pinpointing the exact position of ships and other objects on earth using the GPS.

  16. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  17. Liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometric assay for simultaneous quantification of compound 97/78 and its in vivo metabolite 97/63, a novel trioxane antimalarial, in human plasma and its application to a protein binding study.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Hari Narayan; Gautam, Nagsen; Singh, Shio Kumar

    2011-01-01

    A sensitive, selective and specific LC-MS/ MS assay for simultaneous quantification of compound 97/78 and its active in vivo metabolite 97/63, a novel 1,2,4-trioxane antimalarial, in human plasma has been developed and validated using alpha-arteether as internal standard (IS). Extraction from plasma involves a simple protein precipitation method. The analytes were chromatographed on a Columbus C18 column with guard by isocratic elution with acetonitrile:ammonium acetate buffer (10 mM, pH 4.0) (80:20 v/v) as mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.45 mL min(-1) and analyzed in multiple reaction-monitoring (MRM) positive ion mode. The chromatographic run time was 4.0 min. The weighted (1/x2) calibration curves were linear over a range of 1.56-200 ng mL(-1) with correlation coefficients > 0.998. For both analytes, the limit of detection (LOD) and lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) were 0.5 ng mL(-1) and 1.56 ng mL(-1), respectively. The recovery of 97/78, 97/63 and IS from spiked control samples were > 90% and their matrix suppression obtained were < 8 %. The accuracy (% bias) and precision (%RSD) for both analytes were < 6.78%. Both analytes were stable after three freeze-thaw cycles (% deviation < 12.80), long-term for 30 days in plasma at -60 degrees C (% deviation < 14.38), for 8 h on bench top in plasma at ambient temperature (% deviation < 1.52) and also in the auto-sampler for 12 h (% deviation < 3.9%). The validated method was successfully applied to a protein binding study of compound 97/78 and metabolite 97/63 in human plasma. Furthermore, the validated method will be applicable to pharmacokinetics, bioavailability and metabolism in various clinical phases and in drug interaction studies. PMID:21899212

  18. Detection and quantification of chimerism by droplet digital PCR.

    PubMed

    George, David; Czech, Juliann; John, Bobby; Yu, Min; Jennings, Lawrence J

    2013-01-01

    Accurate quantification of chimerism and microchimerism is proving to be increasingly valuable for hematopoietic cell transplantation as well as non-transplant conditions. However, methods that are available to quantify low-level chimerism lack accuracy. Therefore, we developed and validated a method for quantifying chimerism based on digital PCR technology. We demonstrate accurate quantification that far exceeds what is possible with analog qPCR down to 0.01% with the potential to go even lower. Also, this method is inherently more informative than qPCR. We expect the advantages of digital PCR will make it the preferred method for chimerism analysis. PMID:23974275

  19. Sensitive quantification of PEGylated compounds by second-generation anti-poly(ethylene glycol) monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Cheng; Chen, Bing-Mae; Chuang, Kuo-Hsiang; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Roffler, Steve R

    2010-07-21

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is often attached to compounds to increase serum half-life, reduce immunogenicity, and enhance bioavailability. Accurate and sensitive quantification of PEG conjugates is critical for product development, pharmacokinetic measurements, and efficacy studies. However, PEGylated compounds can be difficult to quantify due to epitope masking by PEG. We previously generated two monoclonal antibodies to PEG (AGP3, IgM and E11, IgG) for quantitative detection of PEGylated proteins. We now report the identification of two second-generation mAbs to PEG (AGP4, IgM and 3.3, IgG) that bind to the repeating subunits of the PEG backbone and facilitate more sensitive quantification of a wider range of PEGylated compounds. A sandwich ELISA in which AGP4/3.3-biotin was employed as the capture/detection antibodies allowed quantification of PEG-Qdot 525 with 14-50-fold greater sensitivity than the original AGP3/E11 combination. Pegasys (PEG-interferon alpha-2a), PEG-Intron (PEG-interferon alpha-2b), Neulasta (PEG-G-CSF), and Lipo-Dox (PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin) could also be quantified with low ng/mL detection limits. The assay tolerated the presence of 50% human serum or 20% free PEG molecules. These new anti-PEG antibodies appear useful for qualitative and quantitative analysis of a wide range of PEGylated compounds. PMID:20536171

  20. Quantification of HER2 by Targeted Mass Spectrometry in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE) Breast Cancer Tissues.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Carine; Tille, Jean-Christophe; Lamerz, Jens; Kux van Geijtenbeek, Sabine; McKee, Thomas A; Venturi, Miro; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Hochstrasser, Denis; Cutler, Paul; Lescuyer, Pierre; Ducret, Axel

    2015-10-01

    The ability to accurately quantify proteins in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues using targeted mass spectrometry opens exciting perspectives for biomarker discovery. We have developed and evaluated a selectedreaction monitoring assay for the human receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-2 (HER2) in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded breast tumors. Peptide candidates were identified using an untargeted mass spectrometry approach in relevant cell lines. A multiplexed assay was developed for the six best candidate peptides and evaluated for linearity, precision and lower limit of quantification. Results showed a linear response over a calibration range of 0.012 to 100 fmol on column (R(2): 0.99-1.00).The lower limit of quantification was 0.155 fmol on column for all peptides evaluated. The six HER2 peptides were quantified by selected reaction monitoring in a cohort of 40 archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissues from women with invasive breast carcinomas, which showed different levels of HER2 gene amplification as assessed by standard methods used in clinical pathology. The amounts of the six HER2 peptides were highly and significantly correlated with each other, indicating that peptide levels can be used as surrogates of protein amounts in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. After normalization for sample size, selected reaction monitoring peptide measurements were able to correctly predict 90% of cases based on HER2 amplification as defined by the American Society of Clinical Oncology and College of American Pathologists. In conclusion, the developed assay showed good analytical performance and a high agreement with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization data. This study demonstrated that selected reaction monitoring allows to accurately quantify protein expression in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues and represents therefore a powerful approach for biomarker discovery studies. The untargeted mass spectrometry

  1. Quantification of kinetic changes in protein tyrosine phosphorylation and cytosolic Ca²⁺ concentration in boar spermatozoa during cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, A; Siqueira, A P; Hossain, M S; Johannisson, A; Eriksson, I; Wallgren, M; Bergqvist, A S

    2012-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation in sperm is associated with capacitation in several mammalian species. Although tyrosine phosphorylated proteins have been demonstrated in cryopreserved sperm, indicating capacitation-like changes during cryopreservation, these changes have not yet been quantified objectively. We monitored tyrosine phosphorylation, intracellular calcium and sperm kinematics throughout the cryopreservation process, and studied the relationships among them in boar spermatozoa. Sperm kinetics changed significantly during cryopreservation: curvilinear velocity, average path velocity and straight line velocity all decreased significantly (P < 0.05). While the percentage of sperm with high intracellular calcium declined (P < 0.05), global phosphorylation increased significantly (P < 0.01). Specifically, cooling to 5 °C induced phosphorylation in the spermatozoa. After cooling, a 32-kDa protein not observed in fresh semen appeared and was consistently present throughout the cryopreservation process. While the level of expression of this phosphoprotein decreased after addition of the second extender, frozen-thawed spermatozoa showed an increased expression. The proportion of sperm cells with phosphorylation in the acrosomal area also increased significantly (P < 0.05) during cryopreservation, indicating that phosphorylation might be associated with capacitation-like changes. These results provide the first quantitative evidence of dynamic changes in the subpopulation of boar spermatozoa undergoing tyrosine phosphorylation during cryopreservation. PMID:22541541

  2. Neuroanatomical localization and quantification of amyloid precursor protein mRNA by in situ hybridization in the brains of normal, aneuploid, and lesioned mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bendotti, C.; Forloni, G.L.; Morgan, R.A.; O'Hara, B.F.; Oster-Granite, M.L.; Reeves, R.H.; Gearhart, J.D.; Coyle, J.T. )

    1988-05-01

    Amyloid precursor protein mRNA was localized in frozen sections from normal and experimentally lesioned adult mouse brain and from normal and aneuploid fetal mouse brain by in situ hybridization with a {sup 35}S-labeled mouse cDNA probe. The highest levels of hybridization in adult brain were associated with neurons, primarily in telencephalic structures. The dense labeling associated with hippocampal pyramidal cells was reduced significantly when the cells were eliminated by injection of the neurotoxin ibotenic acid but was not affected when electrolytic lesions were placed in the medial septum. Since the gene encoding amyloid precursor protein has been localized to mouse chromosome 16, the authors also examined the expression of this gene in the brains of mouse embryos with trisomy 16 and trisomy 19 at 15 days of gestation. RNA gel blot analysis and in situ hybridization showed a marked increase in amyloid precursor protein mRNA in the trisomy 16 mouse head and brain when compared with euploid littermates or with trisomy 19 mice.

  3. Quantification of PEGylated proteases with varying degree of conjugation in mixtures: An analytical protocol combining protein precipitation and capillary gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Josefine; Busch, Markus; Baumann, Pascal; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    PEGylation, i.e. the covalent attachment of chemically activated polyethylene glycol (PEG) to proteins, is a technique commonly used in biopharmaceutical industry to improve protein stability, pharmacokinetics and resistance to proteolytic degradation. Therefore, PEGylation represents a valuable strategy to reduce autocatalysis of biopharmaceutical relevant proteases during production, purification and storage. In case of non-specific random conjugation the existence of more than one accessible binding site results in conjugates which vary in position and number of attached PEG molecules. These conjugates may differ considerably in their physicochemical properties. Optimizing the reaction conditions with respect to the degree of PEGylation (number of linked PEG molecules) using high-throughput screening (HTS) technologies requires a fast and reliable analytical method which allows stopping the reaction at defined times. In this study an analytical protocol for PEGylated proteases is proposed combining preservation of sample composition by trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitation with high-throughput capillary gel electrophoresis (HT-CGE). The well-studied protein hen egg-white lysozyme served as a model system for validating the newly developed analytical protocol for 10kDa mPEG-aldehyde conjugates. PEGamer species were purified by chromatographic separation for calibrating the HT-CGE system. In a case study, the serine protease Savinase(®) which is highly sensitive to autocatalysis was randomly modified with 5kDa and 10kDa mPEG-aldehyde and analyzed. Using the presented TCA protocol baseline separation between PEGamer species was achieved allowing for the analysis of heterogeneous PEGamer mixtures while preventing protease autocatalysis. PMID:27521256

  4. Multiple vitellogenins and product yolk proteins in European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax): Molecular characterization, quantification in plasma, liver and ovary, and maturational proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ozlem; Prat, Francisco; Ibáñez, A Jose; Köksoy, Sadi; Amano, Haruna; Sullivan, Craig V

    2016-01-01

    Three complete vitellogenin (Vtg) polypeptides of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), an acanthomorph teleost spawning pelagic eggs in seawater, were deduced from cDNA and identified as VtgAa, VtgAb and VtgC based on current Vtg nomenclature and phylogeny. Label free quantitative mass spectrometry verified the presence of the three sea bass Vtgs or their product yolk proteins (YPs) in liver, plasma and ovary of postvitellogenic females. As evidenced by normalized spectral counts, VtgAb-derived protein was 2- to 5-fold more abundant, depending on sample type, than for VtgAa, while VtgC-derived protein was less abundant, albeit only 3-fold lower than for VtgAb in the ovary. Western blotting with Vtg type-specific antisera raised against corresponding gray mullet (Mugil cephalus) lipovitellins (Lvs) detected all three types of sea bass Vtg in the blood plasma of gravid females and/or estrogenized males and showed that all three forms of sea bass Lv undergo limited partial degradation during oocyte maturation. The comparatively high levels of VtgC-derived YPs in fully-grown oocytes and the maturational proteolysis of all three types of Lv differ from what has been reported for other teleosts spawning pelagic eggs in seawater but are similar to recent findings for two species of North American Moronidae, the striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and white perch (Morone americana), which spawn pelagic and demersal eggs, respectively in fresh water. Together with the high Vtg sequence homologies and virtually identical structural features of each type of Vtg between species, these findings indicate that the moronid multiple Vtg systems do not substantially vary with reproductive environment. PMID:26643259

  5. Quantification of nonclassicality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrke, C.; Sperling, J.; Vogel, W.

    2012-11-01

    To quantify single-mode nonclassicality, we start from an operational approach. A positive semidefinite observable is introduced to describe a measurement setup. The quantification is based on the negativity of the normally ordered version of this observable. Perfect operational quantumness corresponds to the quantum-noise-free measurement of the chosen observable. Surprisingly, even moderately squeezed states may exhibit perfect quantumness for a properly designed measurement. The quantification is also considered from an axiomatic viewpoint, based on the algebraic structure of the quantum states and the quantum superposition principle. Basic conclusions from both approaches are consistent with this fundamental principle of the quantum world.

  6. Quantification of the N-glycosylated Secretome by Super-SILAC During Breast Cancer Progression and in Human Blood Samples*

    PubMed Central

    Boersema, Paul J.; Geiger, Tamar; Wiśniewski, Jacek R.; Mann, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Cells secrete a large number of proteins to communicate with their surroundings. Furthermore, plasma membrane proteins and intracellular proteins can be released into the extracellular space by regulated or non-regulated processes. Here, we profiled the supernatant of 11 cell lines that are representative of different stages of breast cancer development by specifically capturing N-glycosylated peptides using the N-glyco FASP technology. For accurate quantification we developed a super-SILAC mix from several labeled breast cancer cell lines and used it as an internal standard for all samples. In total, 1398 unique N-glycosylation sites were identified and quantified. Enriching for N-glycosylated peptides focused the analysis on classically secreted and membrane proteins. N-glycosylated secretome profiles correctly clustered the different cell lines to their respective cancer stage, suggesting that biologically relevant differences were detected. Five different profiles of glycoprotein dynamics during cancer development were detected, and they contained several proteins with known roles in breast cancer. We then used the super-SILAC mix in plasma, which led to the quantification of a large number of the previously identified N-glycopeptides in this important body fluid. The combination of quantifying the secretome of cancer cell lines and of human plasma with a super-SILAC approach appears to be a promising new approach for finding markers of disease. PMID:23090970

  7. Quantification of allergenic bovine milk α(S1)-casein in baked goods using an intact ¹⁵N-labeled protein internal standard.

    PubMed

    Newsome, G Asher; Scholl, Peter F

    2013-06-19

    Intact bovine ¹⁵N-α(S1)-casein was used as an internal standard in a selected reaction monitoring (SRM) assay for milk protein in baked food samples containing fats, sugar, and gums. Effects on SRM results of sample matrix composition in two biscuit recipes containing nonfat dry milk (NFDM) were studied, including samples from a milk allergen ELISA proficiency trial. Following extraction of defatted samples with carbohydrate-degrading enzymes and acid precipitation of casein, the SRM assay exhibited an LOQ of <3 ppm NFDM with 60-80% recovery. NFDM levels measured by the SRM assay were 1.7-2.5 times greater than median levels determined by ELISA. Differences were observed in the α(S1)-casein interpeptide SRM ion abundance profile between recipes and after baking. ¹⁵N-α(S1)-Casein increases SRM analysis accuracy by correcting for extraction recovery but does not eliminate underestimation of allergen concentrations due to baking-related milk protein transformation (modifications). PMID:22670623

  8. ELISA-PLA: A novel hybrid platform for the rapid, highly sensitive and specific quantification of proteins and post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Tong, Qing-He; Tao, Tao; Xie, Li-Qi; Lu, Hao-Jie

    2016-06-15

    Detection of low-abundance proteins and their post-translational modifications (PTMs) remains a great challenge. A conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is not sensitive enough to detect low-abundance PTMs and suffers from nonspecific detection. Herein, a rapid, highly sensitive and specific platform integrating ELISA with a proximity ligation assay (PLA), termed ELISA-PLA, was developed. Using ELISA-PLA, the specificity was improved by the simultaneous and proximate recognition of targets through multiple probes, and the sensitivity was significantly improved by rolling circle amplification (RCA). For GFP, the limit of detection (LOD) was decreased by two orders of magnitude compared to that of ELISA. Using site-specific phospho-antibody and pan-specific phospho-antibody, ELISA-PLA was successfully applied to quantify the phosphorylation dynamics of ERK1/2 and the overall tyrosine phosphorylation level of ERK1/2, respectively. ELISA-PLA was also used to quantify the O-GlcNAcylation of AKT, c-Fos, CREB and STAT3, which is faster and more sensitive than the conventional immunoprecipitation and western blotting (IP-WB) method. As a result, the sample consumption of ELISA-PLA was reduced 40-fold compared to IP-WB. Therefore, ELISA-PLA could be a promising platform for the rapid, sensitive and specific detection of proteins and PTMs. PMID:26866564

  9. Quantification of ecotoxicological tests based on bioluminescence using Polaroid film.

    PubMed

    Tamminen, Manu V; Virta, Marko P J

    2007-01-01

    Assays based on the measurement of bacterial luminescence are widely used in ecotoxicology. Bacterial strains responding either to general toxicity or specific pollutants are rapid, cost-effective and easy to use. However, quantification of the signal requires relatively expensive instrumentation. We show here that the detection of luminescence of BioTox, a Vibrio fischeri-based toxicity test, and of a specific recombinant bacterial strain for arsenic determination, is possible using common Polaroid film. The exposed films can be used for visual or computer-assisted quantification of the signal. Qualitative visual comparison to standards can be used in the rapid and relatively accurate estimation of toxicity or pollutant concentration. The computer-assisted method significantly improves the accuracy and quantification of the results. The results obtained by computer-assisted quantification were in good agreement with the values obtained with a luminometer. PMID:16949132

  10. Adaptive Fourier modeling for quantification of tremor.

    PubMed

    Riviere, C N; Reich, S G; Thakor, N V

    1997-06-01

    A new computational method for quantification of tremor, the weighted frequency Fourier linear combiner (WFLC), is presented. This technique rapidly determines the frequency and amplitude of tremor by adjusting its filter weights according to a gradient search method. It provides continual tracking of frequency and amplitude modulations over the course of a test. By quantifying time-varying characteristics, the WFLC assists in correctly interpreting the results of spectral analysis, particularly for recordings exhibiting multiple spectral peaks. It therefore supplements spectral analysis, providing a more accurate picture of tremor than spectral analysis alone. The method has been incorporated into a desktop tremor measurement system to provide clinically useful analysis of tremor recorded during handwriting and drawing using a digitizing tablet. Simulated data clearly demonstrate tracking of variations in frequency and amplitude. Clinical recordings then show specific examples of quantification of time-varying aspects of tremor. PMID:9210577

  11. Comparison of microvolume DNA quantification methods for use with volume-sensitive environmental DNA extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate DNA concentration estimates from environmental samples using minimal sample volumes are essential for most downstream applications. To compare the efficacy of microvolume quantification methods, DNA was extracted from soil, compost, and pure culture samples, and quantified using two absorba...

  12. Statistical Quantification of Methylation Levels by Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guodong; Yi, Nengjun; Absher, Devin; Zhi, Degui

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Recently, next-generation sequencing-based technologies have enabled DNA methylation profiling at high resolution and low cost. Methyl-Seq and Reduced Representation Bisulfite Sequencing (RRBS) are two such technologies that interrogate methylation levels at CpG sites throughout the entire human genome. With rapid reduction of sequencing costs, these technologies will enable epigenotyping of large cohorts for phenotypic association studies. Existing quantification methods for sequencing-based methylation profiling are simplistic and do not deal with the noise due to the random sampling nature of sequencing and various experimental artifacts. Therefore, there is a need to investigate the statistical issues related to the quantification of methylation levels for these emerging technologies, with the goal of developing an accurate quantification method. Methods In this paper, we propose two methods for Methyl-Seq quantification. The first method, the Maximum Likelihood estimate, is both conceptually intuitive and computationally simple. However, this estimate is biased at extreme methylation levels and does not provide variance estimation. The second method, based on Bayesian hierarchical model, allows variance estimation of methylation levels, and provides a flexible framework to adjust technical bias in the sequencing process. Results We compare the previously proposed binary method, the Maximum Likelihood (ML) method, and the Bayesian method. In both simulation and real data analysis of Methyl-Seq data, the Bayesian method offers the most accurate quantification. The ML method is slightly less accurate than the Bayesian method. But both our proposed methods outperform the original binary method in Methyl-Seq. In addition, we applied these quantification methods to simulation data and show that, with sequencing depth above 40–300 (which varies with different tissue samples) per cleavage site, Methyl-Seq offers a comparable quantification

  13. Identification of the major capsid protein of erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV) and development of quantitative real-time PCR assays for quantification of ENV DNA.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Maureen K; Pearman-Gillman, Schuyler; Thompson, Rachel L; Gregg, Jacob L; Hart, Lucas M; Winton, James R; Emmenegger, Eveline J; Hershberger, Paul K

    2016-07-01

    Viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) is a disease of marine and anadromous fish that is caused by the erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV), which was recently identified as a novel member of family Iridoviridae by next-generation sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of the ENV DNA polymerase grouped ENV with other erythrocytic iridoviruses from snakes and lizards. In the present study, we identified the gene encoding the ENV major capsid protein (MCP) and developed a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay targeting this gene. Phylogenetic analysis of the MCP gene sequence supported the conclusion that ENV does not group with any of the currently described iridovirus genera. Because there is no information regarding genetic variation of the MCP gene across the reported host and geographic range for ENV, we also developed a second qPCR assay for a more conserved ATPase-like gene region. The MCP and ATPase qPCR assays demonstrated good analytical and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity based on samples from laboratory challenges of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii The qPCR assays had similar diagnostic sensitivity and specificity as light microscopy of stained blood smears for the presence of intraerythrocytic inclusion bodies. However, the qPCR assays may detect viral DNA early in infection prior to the formation of inclusion bodies. Both qPCR assays appear suitable for viral surveillance or as a confirmatory test for ENV in Pacific herring from the Salish Sea. PMID:27154315

  14. Identification of the major capsid protein of erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV) and development of quantitative real-time PCR assays for quantification of ENV DNA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Pearman-Gillman, Schuyler; Thompson, Rachel L.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Hart, Lucas M.; Winton, James R.; Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Hershberger, Paul K.

    2016-01-01

    Viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) is a disease of marine and anadromous fish that is caused by the erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV), which was recently identified as a novel member of family Iridoviridae by next-generation sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of the ENV DNA polymerase grouped ENV with other erythrocytic iridoviruses from snakes and lizards. In the present study, we identified the gene encoding the ENV major capsid protein (MCP) and developed a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay targeting this gene. Phylogenetic analysis of the MCP gene sequence supported the conclusion that ENV does not group with any of the currently described iridovirus genera. Because there is no information regarding genetic variation of the MCP gene across the reported host and geographic range for ENV, we also developed a second qPCR assay for a more conserved ATPase-like gene region. The MCP and ATPase qPCR assays demonstrated good analytical and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity based on samples from laboratory challenges of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii. The qPCR assays had similar diagnostic sensitivity and specificity as light microscopy of stained blood smears for the presence of intraerythrocytic inclusion bodies. However, the qPCR assays may detect viral DNA early in infection prior to the formation of inclusion bodies. Both qPCR assays appear suitable for viral surveillance or as a confirmatory test for ENV in Pacific herring from the Salish Sea.

  15. Quantification of Wheat Grain Arabinoxylans Using a Phloroglucinol Colorimetric Assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arabinoxylans (AX) play a critical role in end-use quality and nutrition of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). An efficient, accurate method of AX quantification is desirable as AX plays an important role in processing, end use quality and human health. The objective of this work was to evaluate a stand...

  16. Centerline optimization using vessel quantification model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wenli; Dachille, Frank; Meissner, Michael

    2005-04-01

    An accurate and reproducible centerline is needed in many vascular applications, such as virtual angioscopy, vessel quantification, and surgery planning. This paper presents a progressive optimization algorithm to refine a centerline after it is extracted. A new centerline model definition is proposed that allows quantifiable minimum cross-sectional area. A centerline is divided into a number of segments. Each segment corresponds to a local generalized cylinder. A reference frame (cross-section) is set up at the center point of each cylinder. The position and the orientation of the cross-section are optimized within each cylinder by finding the minimum cross-sectional area. All local-optimized center points are approximated by a NURBS curve globally, and the curve is re-sampled to the refined set of center points. This refinement iteration, local optimization plus global approximation, converges to the optimal centerline, yielding a smooth and accurate central axis curve. The application discussed in this paper is vessel quantification and virtual angioscopy. However, the algorithm is a general centerline refinement method that can be applied to other applications that need accurate and reproducible centerlines.

  17. Dynamic quantification of intracellular calcium and protein tyrosine phosphorylation in cryopreserved boar spermatozoa during short-time incubation with oviductal fluid.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, A; González, R; Johannisson, A; Berqvist, A-S

    2014-11-01

    Freshly ejaculated boar spermatozoa require several hours of exposure to capacitating conditions to undergo capacitation. We hypothesized that cryopreserved boar spermatozoa might elicit a capacitation response after a relatively shorter time of exposure to capacitating conditions. Washed, frozen-thawed boar spermatozoa were incubated separately with pre-ovulatory isthmic oviductal fluid (EODF), post-ovulatory ODF (MODF), capacitation medium (CM), and noncapacitating medium (NCM) for 60 minutes. Aliquots of spermatozoa were taken at 0, 5, 15, 30, and 60 minutes during incubation and sperm kinematics, intracellular calcium [Ca2(+)]i content, and protein tyrosine phosphorylation (PTP) were studied. The proportion of motile spermatozoa increased significantly after 5 minutes of incubation with EODF. A similar increase was not observed in the other groups. During the initial 5 minutes of incubation, the proportion of spermatozoa with high [Ca(2+)]i decreased significantly in all four groups. The proportion of tyrosine phosphorylated spermatozoa increased from 6.49 ± 1.93% to 15.42 ± 3.58% and 18.41 ± 1.57% in EODF and MODF groups, respectively, at 5 minutes of incubation. Neither CM nor NCM elicited any immediate effect on PTP in spermatozoa. There was a positive and significant correlation between [Ca(2+)]i and sperm motility (P = 0.009). It may be concluded that frozen-thawed boar spermatozoa undergo capacitation-associated changes after a relatively short exposure to EODF, and there are some subpopulations of spermatozoa that undergo PTP despite possessing low [Ca(2+)]i. PMID:25175760

  18. Quantification of factors influencing fluorescent protein expression using RMCE to generate an allelic series in the ROSA26 locus in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sara X.; Osipovich, Anna B.; Ustione, Alessandro; Potter, Leah A.; Hipkens, Susan; Gangula, Rama; Yuan, Weiping; Piston, David W.; Magnuson, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Fluorescent proteins (FPs) have great utility in identifying specific cell populations and in studying cellular dynamics in the mouse. To quantify the factors that determine both the expression and relative brightness of FPs in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and in mice, we generated eight different FP-expressing ROSA26 alleles using recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE). These alleles enabled us to analyze the effects on FP expression of a translational enhancer and different 3′-intronic and/or polyadenylation sequences, as well as the relative brightness of five different FPs, without the confounding position and copy number effects that are typically associated with randomly inserted transgenes. We found that the expression of a given FP can vary threefold or more depending on the genetic features present in the allele. The optimal FP expression cassette contained both a translational enhancer sequence in the 5′-untranslated region (UTR) and an intron-containing rabbit β-globin sequence within the 3′-UTR. The relative expressed brightness of individual FPs varied up to tenfold. Of the five different monomeric FPs tested, Citrine (YFP) was the brightest, followed by Apple, eGFP, Cerulean (CFP) and Cherry. Generation of a line of Cherry-expressing mice showed that there was a 30-fold variation of Cherry expression among different tissues and that there was a punctate expression pattern within cells of all tissues examined. This study should help investigators make better-informed design choices when expressing FPs in mESCs and mice. PMID:21324933

  19. Quantification of Cysteinyl-S-Nitrosylation by Fluorescence in Unbiased Proteomic Studies*

    PubMed Central

    Wiktorowicz, John E.; Stafford, Susan; Rea, Harriet; Urvil, Petri; Soman, Kizhake; Kurosky, Alexander; Perez-Polo, J. Regino; Savidge, Tor C.

    2011-01-01

    Cysteinyl-S-nitrosylation has emerged as an important post-translational modification affecting protein function in health and disease. Great emphasis has been placed on global, unbiased quantification of S-nitrosylated proteins due to physiologic and oxidative stimuli. However, current strategies have been hampered by sample loss and altered protein electrophoretic mobility. Here, we describe a novel quantitative approach that combines accurate, sensitive fluorescence modification of cysteine S-nitrosylation that leaves electrophoretic mobility unaffected (SNOFlo), and introduce unique concepts for measuring changes in S-nitrosylation status relative to protein abundance. Its efficacy in defining the functional S-nitrosoproteome is demonstrated in two diverse biological applications: an in vivo rat hypoxia-ischemia reperfusion model, and antimicrobial S-nitrosoglutathione-driven transnitrosylation of an enteric microbial pathogen. The suitability of this approach for investigating endogenous S-nitrosylation is further demonstrated using Ingenuity Pathways analysis that identified nervous system and cellular development networks as the top two networks. Functional analysis of differentially S-nitrosylated proteins indicated their involvement in apoptosis, branching morphogenesis of axons, cortical neurons, and sympathetic neurites, neurogenesis, and calcium signaling. Major abundance changes were also observed for fibrillar proteins known to be stress-responsive in neurons and glia. Thus, both examples demonstrate the technique’s power in confirming the widespread involvement of S-nitrosylation in hypoxia-ischemia/reperfusion injury and in antimicrobial host responses. PMID:21615140

  20. Accurate measurement of methyl 13C chemical shifts by solid-state NMR for the determination of protein side chain conformation: the influenza a M2 transmembrane peptide as an example.

    PubMed

    Hong, Mei; Mishanina, Tatiana V; Cady, Sarah D

    2009-06-10

    The use of side chain methyl (13)C chemical shifts for the determination of the rotameric conformation of Val and Leu residues in proteins by solid-state NMR spectroscopy is described. Examination of the solution NMR stereospecifically assigned methyl groups shows significant correlation between the difference in the two methyl carbons' chemical shifts and the side chain conformation. It is found that alpha-helical and beta-sheet backbones cause different side chain methyl chemical shift trends. In alpha-helical Leu's, a relatively large absolute methyl (13)C shift difference of 2.89 ppm is found for the most populated mt rotamer (chi(1) = -60 degrees, chi(2) = 180 degrees), while a much smaller value of 0.73 ppm is found for the next populated tp rotamer (chi(1) = 180 degrees, chi(2) = 60 degrees). For alpha-helical Val residues, the dominant t rotamer (chi(1) = 180 degrees) has more downfield Cgamma2 chemical shifts than Cgamma1 by 1.71 ppm, while the next populated m rotamer (chi(1) = -60 degrees) shows the opposite trend of more downfield Cgamma1 chemical shift by 1.23 ppm. These significantly different methyl (13)C chemical shifts exist despite the likelihood of partial rotameric averaging at ambient temperature. We show that these conformation-dependent methyl (13)C chemical shifts can be utilized for side chain structure determination once the methyl (13)C resonances are accurately measured by double-quantum (DQ) filtered 2D correlation experiments, most notably the dipolar DQ to single-quantum (SQ) correlation technique. The advantage of the DQ-SQ correlation experiment over simple 2D SQ-SQ correlation experiments is demonstrated on the transmembrane peptide of the influenza A M2 proton channel. The methyl chemical shifts led to predictions of the side chain rotameric states for several Val and Leu residues in this tetrameric helical bundle. The predicted Val rotamers were further verified by dipolar correlation experiments that directly measure the chi(1

  1. Using Fluorescent Protein Fusions to Study Protein Subcellular Localization and Dynamics in Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong; Gao, Caiji; Zhao, Qiong; Jiang, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Studies of protein subcellular localization and dynamics are helpful in understanding the cellular functions of proteins in an organism. In the past decade, the use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a fusion tag has dramatically extended our knowledge in this field. Transient expression and stable transformation of GFP-tagged proteins have been wildly used to study protein localization in vivo in different systems. Although GFP-based tags provide a fast and convenient way to characterize protein properties in living cells, several reports have demonstrated that GFP fusions might not accurately reflect the localization of the native protein as GFP tags may alter the protein properties. To facilitate proper usage of GFP tags in plant cell biology study, we describe detailed protocols to identify possible inhibitory effects of fluorescent tags on protein subcellular localization and to determine if a fluorescently tagged protein is localized to the correct subcellular compartment. Using Arabidopsis Endomembrane protein 12 (EMP12) as an example, we first show the possible inhibitory effect of GFP tags on proper protein localization and then describe the immunofluorescence labeling method to verify the correct localization of GFP fusion proteins. Next, a method is presented using the ImageJ program with the Pearson-Spearman correlation (PSC) colocalization plug-in for statistical quantification of colocalization ratios of two fluorophores. Finally we provide a detailed method for protein dynamics studies using spinning disk confocal microscopy in Arabidopsis cells. PMID:27515077

  2. Quantificational logic of context

    SciTech Connect

    Buvac, Sasa

    1996-12-31

    In this paper we extend the Propositional Logic of Context, to the quantificational (predicate calculus) case. This extension is important in the declarative representation of knowledge for two reasons. Firstly, since contexts are objects in the semantics which can be denoted by terms in the language and which can be quantified over, the extension enables us to express arbitrary first-order properties of contexts. Secondly, since the extended language is no longer only propositional, we can express that an arbitrary predicate calculus formula is true in a context. The paper describes the syntax and the semantics of a quantificational language of context, gives a Hilbert style formal system, and outlines a proof of the system`s completeness.

  3. Detection and quantification of plasma amyloid-β by selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Seok; Ahn, Hee-Sung; Cho, Soo Min; Lee, Ji Eun; Kim, YoungSoo; Lee, Cheolju

    2014-08-20

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) in human plasma was detected and quantified by an antibody-free method, selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (SRM-MS) in the current study. Due to its low abundance, SRM-based quantification in 10 μL plasma was a challenge. Prior to SRM analysis, human plasma proteins as a whole were digested by trypsin and high pH reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) was used to fractionate the tryptic digests and to collect peptides, Aβ(1-5), Aβ(6-16), Aβ(17-28) and Aβ(29-40(42)) of either Aβ(1-40) or Aβ(1-42). Among those peptides, Aβ(17-28) was selected as a surrogate to measure the total Aβ level. Human plasma samples obtained from triplicate sample preparations were analyzed, obtaining 4.20 ng mL(-1) with a CV of 25.3%. Triplicate measurements for each sample preparation showed CV of <5%. Limit of quantification was obtained as 132 pM, which corresponded to 570 pg mL(-1) of Aβ(1-40). Until now, most quantitative measurements of Aβ in plasma or cerebrospinal fluid have required antibody-based immunoassays. Since quantification of Aβ by immunoassays is highly dependent on the extent of epitope exposure due to aggregation or plasma protein binding, it is difficult to accurately measure the actual concentration of Aβ in plasma. Our diagnostic method based on SRM using a surrogate peptide of Aβ is promising in that actual amounts of total Aβ can be measured regardless of the conformational status of the biomarker. PMID:25086887

  4. Peptide Biosynthesis with Stable Isotope Labeling from a Cell-free Expression System for Targeted Proteomics with Absolute Quantification.

    PubMed

    Xian, Feng; Zi, Jin; Wang, Quanhui; Lou, Xiaomin; Sun, Haidan; Lin, Liang; Hou, Guixue; Rao, Weiqiao; Yin, Changcheng; Wu, Lin; Li, Shuwei; Liu, Siqi

    2016-08-01

    Because of its specificity and sensitivity, targeted proteomics using mass spectrometry for multiple reaction monitoring is a powerful tool to detect and quantify pre-selected peptides from a complex background and facilitates the absolute quantification of peptides using isotope-labeled forms as internal standards. How to generate isotope-labeled peptides remains an urgent challenge for accurately quantitative targeted proteomics on a large scale. Herein, we propose that isotope-labeled peptides fused with a quantitative tag could be synthesized through an expression system in vitro, and the homemade peptides could be enriched by magnetic beads with tag-affinity and globally quantified based on the corresponding multiple reaction monitoring signals provided by the fused tag. An Escherichia coli cell-free protein expression system, protein synthesis using recombinant elements, was adopted for the synthesis of isotope-labeled peptides fused with Strep-tag. Through a series of optimizations, we enabled efficient expression of the labeled peptides such that, after Strep-Tactin affinity enrichment, the peptide yield was acceptable in scale for quantification, and the peptides could be completely digested by trypsin to release the Strep-tag for quantification. Moreover, these recombinant peptides could be employed in the same way as synthetic peptides for multiple reaction monitoring applications and are likely more economical and useful in a laboratory for the scale of targeted proteomics. As an application, we synthesized four isotope-labeled glutathione S-transferase (GST) peptides and added them to mouse sera pre-treated with GST affinity resin as internal standards. A quantitative assay of the synthesized GST peptides confirmed the absolute GST quantification in mouse sera to be measurable and reproducible. PMID:27234506

  5. Systematic Assessment of RNA-Seq Quantification Tools Using Simulated Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Chandramohan, Raghu; Wu, Po-Yen; Phan, John H.; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) technology has emerged as the preferred method for quantification of gene and isoform expression. Numerous RNA-seq quantification tools have been proposed and developed, bringing us closer to developing expression-based diagnostic tests based on this technology. However, because of the rapidly evolving technologies and algorithms, it is essential to establish a systematic method for evaluating the quality of RNA-seq quantification. We investigate how different RNA-seq experimental designs (i.e., variations in sequencing depth and read length) affect various quantification algorithms (i.e., HTSeq, Cufflinks, and MISO). Using simulated data, we evaluate the quantification tools based on four metrics, namely: (1) total number of usable fragments for quantification, (2) detection of genes and isoforms, (3) correlation, and (4) accuracy of expression quantification with respect to the ground truth. Results show that Cufflinks is able to use the largest number of fragments for quantification, leading to better detection of genes and isoforms. However, HTSeq produces more accurate expression estimates. Moreover, each quantification algorithm is affected differently by varying sequencing depth and read length, suggesting that the selection of quantification algorithms should be application-dependent.

  6. Quantification of Osteon Morphology Using Geometric Histomorphometrics.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Scott; Cunningham, Craig; Felts, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Many histological methods in forensic anthropology utilize combinations of traditional histomorphometric parameters which may not accurately describe the morphology of microstructural features. Here, we report the novel application of a geometric morphometric method suitable when considering structures without anatomically homologous landmarks for the quantification of complete secondary osteon size and morphology. The method is tested for its suitability in the measurement of intact secondary osteons using osteons digitized from transverse femoral diaphyseal sections prepared from two human individuals. The results of methodological testing demonstrate the efficacy of the technique when applied to intact secondary osteons. In providing accurate characterization of micromorphology within the robust mathematical framework of geometric morphometrics, this method may surpass traditional histomorphometric variables currently employed in forensic research and practice. A preliminary study of the intersectional histomorphometric variation within the femoral diaphysis is made using this geometric histomorphometric method to demonstrate its potential. PMID:26478136

  7. Practical quantification of necrosis in histological whole-slide images.

    PubMed

    Homeyer, André; Schenk, Andrea; Arlt, Janine; Dahmen, Uta; Dirsch, Olaf; Hahn, Horst K

    2013-06-01

    Since the histological quantification of necrosis is a common task in medical research and practice, we evaluate different image analysis methods for quantifying necrosis in whole-slide images. In a practical usage scenario, we assess the impact of different classification algorithms and feature sets on both accuracy and computation time. We show how a well-chosen combination of multiresolution features and an efficient postprocessing step enables the accurate quantification necrosis in gigapixel images in less than a minute. The results are general enough to be applied to other areas of histological image analysis as well. PMID:23796718

  8. nagnag: Identification and quantification of NAGNAG alternative splicing using RNA-Seq data.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaoyan; Sablok, Gaurav; Feng, Gang; Ma, Jiaxin; Zhao, Hongwei; Sun, Xiaoyong

    2015-07-01

    Regulation of proteome diversity by alternative splicing has been widely demonstrated in plants and animals. NAGNAG splicing, which was recently defined as a tissue specific event, results in the production of two distinct isoforms that are distinguished by three nucleotides (NAG) as a consequence of the intron proximal or distal to the splice site. Since the NAGNAG mechanism is not well characterized, tools for the identification and quantification of NAGNAG splicing events remain under-developed. Here we report nagnag, an R-based NAGNAG splicing detection tool, which accurately identifies and quantifies NAGNAG splicing events using RNA-Seq. Overall, nagnag produces user-friendly visualization reports and highlights differences between the DNA/RNA/protein across the identified isoforms of the reported gene. The package is available on https://sourceforge.net/projects/nagnag/files/; or http://genome.sdau.edu.cn/research/software/nagnag.html. PMID:26028313

  9. Quantitative real-time PCR as a sensitive protein-protein interaction quantification method and a partial solution for non-accessible autoactivator and false-negative molecule analysis in the yeast two-hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Maier, Richard H; Maier, Christina J; Hintner, Helmut; Bauer, Johann W; Onder, Kamil

    2012-12-01

    Many functional proteomic experiments make use of high-throughput technologies such as mass spectrometry combined with two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and the yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system. Currently there are even automated versions of the Y2H system available that can be used for proteome-wide research. The Y2H system has the capacity to deliver a profusion of Y2H positive colonies from a single library screen. However, subsequent analysis of these numerous primary candidates with complementary methods can be overwhelming. Therefore, a method to select the most promising candidates with strong interaction properties might be useful to reduce the number of candidates requiring further analysis. The method described here offers a new way of quantifying and rating the performance of positive Y2H candidates. The novelty lies in the detection and measurement of mRNA expression instead of proteins or conventional Y2H genetic reporters. This method correlates well with the direct genetic reporter readouts usually used in the Y2H system, and has greater sensitivity for detecting and quantifying protein-protein interactions (PPIs) than the conventional Y2H system, as demonstrated by detection of the Y2H false-negative PPI of RXR/PPARG. Approximately 20% of all proteins are not suitable for the Y2H system, the so-called autoactivators. A further advantage of this method is the possibility to evaluate molecules that usually cannot be analyzed in the Y2H system, exemplified by a VDR-LXXLL motif peptide interaction. PMID:22982175

  10. Simple quantification of in planta fungal biomass.

    PubMed

    Ayliffe, Michael; Periyannan, Sambasivam K; Feechan, Angela; Dry, Ian; Schumann, Ulrike; Lagudah, Evans; Pryor, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    An accurate assessment of the disease resistance status of plants to fungal pathogens is an essential requirement for the development of resistant crop plants. Many disease resistance phenotypes are partial rather than obvious immunity and are frequently scored using subjective qualitative estimates of pathogen development or plant disease symptoms. Here we report a method for the accurate comparison of total fungal biomass in plant tissues. This method, called the WAC assay, is based upon the specific binding of the plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin to fungal chitin. The assay is simple, high-throughput, and sensitive enough to discriminate between single Puccinia graminis f.sp tritici infection sites on a wheat leaf segment. It greatly lends itself to replication as large volumes of tissue can be pooled from independent experiments and assayed to provide truly representative quantification, or, alternatively, fungal growth on a single, small leaf segment can be quantified. In addition, as the assay is based upon a microscopic technique, pathogen infection sites can also be examined at high magnification prior to quantification if desired and average infection site areas are determined. Previously, we have demonstrated the application of the WAC assay for quantifying the growth of several different pathogen species in both glasshouse grown material and large-scale field plots. Details of this method are provided within. PMID:24643560

  11. Are Quasi-Steady-State Approximated Models Suitable for Quantifying Intrinsic Noise Accurately?

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Dola; Kar, Sandip

    2015-01-01

    Large gene regulatory networks (GRN) are often modeled with quasi-steady-state approximation (QSSA) to reduce the huge computational time required for intrinsic noise quantification using Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA). However, the question still remains whether the stochastic QSSA model measures the intrinsic noise as accurately as the SSA performed for a detailed mechanistic model or not? To address this issue, we have constructed mechanistic and QSSA models for few frequently observed GRNs exhibiting switching behavior and performed stochastic simulations with them. Our results strongly suggest that the performance of a stochastic QSSA model in comparison to SSA performed for a mechanistic model critically relies on the absolute values of the mRNA and protein half-lives involved in the corresponding GRN. The extent of accuracy level achieved by the stochastic QSSA model calculations will depend on the level of bursting frequency generated due to the absolute value of the half-life of either mRNA or protein or for both the species. For the GRNs considered, the stochastic QSSA quantifies the intrinsic noise at the protein level with greater accuracy and for larger combinations of half-life values of mRNA and protein, whereas in case of mRNA the satisfactory accuracy level can only be reached for limited combinations of absolute values of half-lives. Further, we have clearly demonstrated that the abundance levels of mRNA and protein hardly matter for such comparison between QSSA and mechanistic models. Based on our findings, we conclude that QSSA model can be a good choice for evaluating intrinsic noise for other GRNs as well, provided we make a rational choice based on experimental half-life values available in literature. PMID:26327626

  12. NNLOPS accurate associated HW production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astill, William; Bizon, Wojciech; Re, Emanuele; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2016-06-01

    We present a next-to-next-to-leading order accurate description of associated HW production consistently matched to a parton shower. The method is based on reweighting events obtained with the HW plus one jet NLO accurate calculation implemented in POWHEG, extended with the MiNLO procedure, to reproduce NNLO accurate Born distributions. Since the Born kinematics is more complex than the cases treated before, we use a parametrization of the Collins-Soper angles to reduce the number of variables required for the reweighting. We present phenomenological results at 13 TeV, with cuts suggested by the Higgs Cross section Working Group.

  13. Isobaric Labeling-Based Relative Quantification in Shotgun Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry plays a key role in relative quantitative comparisons of proteins in order to understand their functional role in biological systems upon perturbation. In this review, we review studies that examine different aspects of isobaric labeling-based relative quantification for shotgun proteomic analysis. In particular, we focus on different types of isobaric reagents and their reaction chemistry (e.g., amine-, carbonyl-, and sulfhydryl-reactive). Various factors, such as ratio compression, reporter ion dynamic range, and others, cause an underestimation of changes in relative abundance of proteins across samples, undermining the ability of the isobaric labeling approach to be truly quantitative. These factors that affect quantification and the suggested combinations of experimental design and optimal data acquisition methods to increase the precision and accuracy of the measurements will be discussed. Finally, the extended application of isobaric labeling-based approach in hyperplexing strategy, targeted quantification, and phosphopeptide analysis are also examined. PMID:25337643

  14. How to accurately bypass damage

    PubMed Central

    Broyde, Suse; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation can cause cancer through DNA damage — specifically, by linking adjacent thymine bases. Crystal structures show how the enzyme DNA polymerase η accurately bypasses such lesions, offering protection. PMID:20577203

  15. Multiplexed quantification for data-independent acquisition.

    PubMed

    Minogue, Catherine E; Hebert, Alexander S; Rensvold, Jarred W; Westphall, Michael S; Pagliarini, David J; Coon, Joshua J

    2015-03-01

    Data-independent acquisition (DIA) strategies provide a sensitive and reproducible alternative to data-dependent acquisition (DDA) methods for large-scale quantitative proteomic analyses. Unfortunately, DIA methods suffer from incompatibility with common multiplexed quantification methods, specifically stable isotope labeling approaches such as isobaric tags and stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). Here we expand the use of neutron-encoded (NeuCode) SILAC to DIA applications (NeuCoDIA), producing a strategy that enables multiplexing within DIA scans without further convoluting the already complex MS(2) spectra. We demonstrate duplex NeuCoDIA analysis of both mixed-ratio (1:1 and 10:1) yeast and mouse embryo myogenesis proteomes. Analysis of the mixed-ratio yeast samples revealed the strong accuracy and precision of our NeuCoDIA method, both of which were comparable to our established MS(1)-based quantification approach. NeuCoDIA also uncovered the dynamic protein changes that occur during myogenic differentiation, demonstrating the feasibility of this methodology for biological applications. We consequently establish DIA quantification of NeuCode SILAC as a useful and practical alternative to DDA-based approaches. PMID:25621425

  16. Multiplexed Quantification for Data-Independent Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Minogue, Catherine E.; Hebert, Alexander S.; Rensvold, Jarred W.; Westphall, Michael S.; Pagliarini, David J.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    Data-independent acquisition (DIA) strategies provide a sensitive and reproducible alternative to data-dependent acquisition (DDA) methods for large-scale quantitative proteomic analyses. Unfortunately, DIA methods suffer from incompatibility with common multiplexed quantification methods, specifically stable isotope labeling approaches such as isobaric tags and stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). Here we expand the use of neutron-encoded (NeuCode) SILAC to DIA applications (NeuCoDIA), producing a strategy that enables multiplexing within DIA scans without further convoluting the already complex MS2 spectra. We demonstrate duplex NeuCoDIA analysis of both mixed-ratio (1:1 and 10:1) yeast and mouse embryo myogenesis proteomes. Analysis of the mixed-ratio yeast samples revealed the strong accuracy and precision of our NeuCoDIA method, both of which were comparable to our established MS1-based quantification approach. NeuCoDIA also uncovered the dynamic protein changes that occur during myogenic differentiation, demonstrating the feasibility of this methodology for biological applications. We consequently establish DIA quantification of NeuCode SILAC as a useful and practical alternative to DDA-based approaches. PMID:25621425

  17. Accurate Evaluation of Quantum Integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, David C.; Goorvitch, D.

    1994-01-01

    Combining an appropriate finite difference method with Richardson's extrapolation results in a simple, highly accurate numerical method for solving a Schr\\"{o}dinger's equation. Important results are that error estimates are provided, and that one can extrapolate expectation values rather than the wavefunctions to obtain highly accurate expectation values. We discuss the eigenvalues, the error growth in repeated Richardson's extrapolation, and show that the expectation values calculated on a crude mesh can be extrapolated to obtain expectation values of high accuracy.

  18. Radiation dose determines the method for quantification of DNA double strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Bulat, Tanja; Keta, Otilija; Korićanac, Lela; Žakula, Jelena; Petrović, Ivan; Ristić-Fira, Aleksandra; Todorović, Danijela

    2016-03-01

    Ionizing radiation induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) that trigger phosphorylation of the histone protein H2AX (γH2AX). Immunofluorescent staining visualizes formation of γH2AX foci, allowing their quantification. This method, as opposed to Western blot assay and Flow cytometry, provides more accurate analysis, by showing exact position and intensity of fluorescent signal in each single cell. In practice there are problems in quantification of γH2AX. This paper is based on two issues: the determination of which technique should be applied concerning the radiation dose, and how to analyze fluorescent microscopy images obtained by different microscopes. HTB140 melanoma cells were exposed to γ-rays, in the dose range from 1 to 16 Gy. Radiation effects on the DNA level were analyzed at different time intervals after irradiation by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy. Immunochemically stained cells were visualized with two types of microscopes: AxioVision (Zeiss, Germany) microscope, comprising an ApoTome software, and AxioImagerA1 microscope (Zeiss, Germany). Obtained results show that the level of γH2AX is time and dose dependent. Immunofluorescence microscopy provided better detection of DSBs for lower irradiation doses, while Western blot analysis was more reliable for higher irradiation doses. AxioVision microscope containing ApoTome software was more suitable for the detection of γH2AX foci. PMID:26959322

  19. Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells in the body. They are macromolecules that comprise 1 or more chains of amino acids that vary in their sequence and length and are folded into specific 3-dimensional structures. The sizes and conformations of proteins, therefor...

  20. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  1. Detection of cyclic di-AMP using a competitive ELISA with a unique pneumococcal cyclic di-AMP binding protein.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Adam J; Zhang, Yang; Metzger, Dennis W; Bai, Guangchun

    2014-12-01

    Cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP) is a recently recognized bacterial signaling molecule. In this study, a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the quantification of c-di-AMP was developed using a novel pneumococcal c-di-AMP binding protein (CabP). With this method, c-di-AMP concentrations in biological samples can be quickly and accurately quantified. PMID:25239824

  2. Reproducible and Consistent Quantification of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteome by SWATH-mass spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Selevsek, Nathalie; Chang, Ching-Yun; Gillet, Ludovic C.; Navarro, Pedro; Bernhardt, Oliver M.; Reiter, Lukas; Cheng, Lin-Yang; Vitek, Olga; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2015-01-01

    Targeted mass spectrometry by selected reaction monitoring (S/MRM) has proven to be a suitable technique for the consistent and reproducible quantification of proteins across multiple biological samples and a wide dynamic range. This performance profile is an important prerequisite for systems biology and biomedical research. However, the method is limited to the measurements of a few hundred peptides per LC-MS analysis. Recently, we introduced SWATH-MS, a combination of data independent acquisition and targeted data analysis that vastly extends the number of peptides/proteins quantified per sample, while maintaining the favorable performance profile of S/MRM. Here we applied the SWATH-MS technique to quantify changes over time in a large fraction of the proteome expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in response to osmotic stress. We sampled cell cultures in biological triplicates at six time points following the application of osmotic stress and acquired single injection data independent acquisition data sets on a high-resolution 5600 tripleTOF instrument operated in SWATH mode. Proteins were quantified by the targeted extraction and integration of transition signal groups from the SWATH-MS datasets for peptides that are proteotypic for specific yeast proteins. We consistently identified and quantified more than 15,000 peptides and 2500 proteins across the 18 samples. We demonstrate high reproducibility between technical and biological replicates across all time points and protein abundances. In addition, we show that the abundance of hundreds of proteins was significantly regulated upon osmotic shock, and pathway enrichment analysis revealed that the proteins reacting to osmotic shock are mainly involved in the carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Overall, this study demonstrates the ability of SWATH-MS to efficiently generate reproducible, consistent, and quantitatively accurate measurements of a large fraction of a proteome across multiple samples. PMID

  3. Reproducible and consistent quantification of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteome by SWATH-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Selevsek, Nathalie; Chang, Ching-Yun; Gillet, Ludovic C; Navarro, Pedro; Bernhardt, Oliver M; Reiter, Lukas; Cheng, Lin-Yang; Vitek, Olga; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2015-03-01

    Targeted mass spectrometry by selected reaction monitoring (S/MRM) has proven to be a suitable technique for the consistent and reproducible quantification of proteins across multiple biological samples and a wide dynamic range. This performance profile is an important prerequisite for systems biology and biomedical research. However, the method is limited to the measurements of a few hundred peptides per LC-MS analysis. Recently, we introduced SWATH-MS, a combination of data independent acquisition and targeted data analysis that vastly extends the number of peptides/proteins quantified per sample, while maintaining the favorable performance profile of S/MRM. Here we applied the SWATH-MS technique to quantify changes over time in a large fraction of the proteome expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in response to osmotic stress. We sampled cell cultures in biological triplicates at six time points following the application of osmotic stress and acquired single injection data independent acquisition data sets on a high-resolution 5600 tripleTOF instrument operated in SWATH mode. Proteins were quantified by the targeted extraction and integration of transition signal groups from the SWATH-MS datasets for peptides that are proteotypic for specific yeast proteins. We consistently identified and quantified more than 15,000 peptides and 2500 proteins across the 18 samples. We demonstrate high reproducibility between technical and biological replicates across all time points and protein abundances. In addition, we show that the abundance of hundreds of proteins was significantly regulated upon osmotic shock, and pathway enrichment analysis revealed that the proteins reacting to osmotic shock are mainly involved in the carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Overall, this study demonstrates the ability of SWATH-MS to efficiently generate reproducible, consistent, and quantitatively accurate measurements of a large fraction of a proteome across multiple samples. PMID

  4. Quantification of Human Kallikrein-Related Peptidases in Biological Fluids by Multiplatform Targeted Mass Spectrometry Assays.

    PubMed

    Karakosta, Theano D; Soosaipillai, Antoninus; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Batruch, Ihor; Drabovich, Andrei P

    2016-09-01

    Human kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) are a group of 15 secreted serine proteases encoded by the largest contiguous cluster of protease genes in the human genome. KLKs are involved in coordination of numerous physiological functions including regulation of blood pressure, neuronal plasticity, skin desquamation, and semen liquefaction, and thus represent promising diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Until now, quantification of KLKs in biological and clinical samples was accomplished by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Here, we developed multiplex targeted mass spectrometry assays for the simultaneous quantification of all 15 KLKs. Proteotypic peptides for each KLK were carefully selected based on experimental data and multiplexed in single assays. Performance of assays was evaluated using three different mass spectrometry platforms including triple quadrupole, quadrupole-ion trap, and quadrupole-orbitrap instruments. Heavy isotope-labeled synthetic peptides with a quantifying tag were used for absolute quantification of KLKs in sweat, cervico-vaginal fluid, seminal plasma, and blood serum, with limits of detection ranging from 5 to 500 ng/ml. Analytical performance of assays was evaluated by measuring endogenous KLKs in relevant biological fluids, and results were compared with selected ELISAs. The multiplex targeted proteomic assays were demonstrated to be accurate, reproducible, sensitive, and specific alternatives to antibody-based assays. Finally, KLK4, a highly prostate-specific protein and a speculated biomarker of prostate cancer, was unambiguously detected and quantified by immunoenrichment-SRM assay in seminal plasma and blood serum samples from individuals with confirmed prostate cancer and negative biopsy. Mass spectrometry revealed exclusively the presence of a secreted isoform and thus unequivocally resolved earlier disputes about KLK4 identity in seminal plasma. Measurements of KLK4 in either 41 seminal plasma or 58 blood serum samples

  5. Quantification of chemical gaseous plumes on hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Sidi

    The passive remote chemical plume quantification problem may be approached from multiple aspects, corresponding to a variety of physical effects that may be exploited. Accordingly, a diversity of statistical quantification algorithms has been proposed in the literature. The ultimate performance and algorithmic complexity of each is influenced by the assumptions made about the scene, which may include the presence of ancillary measurements or particular background/plume features that may or may not be present. In this work, we evaluate and investigate the advantages and limitations of a number of quantification algorithms that span a variety of such assumptions. With these in-depth insights we gain, a new quantification algorithm is proposed for single gas quantification which is superior to all state-of-the-art algorithms in every almost every aspects including applicability, accuracy, and efficiency. The new method, called selected-band algorithm, achieves its superior performance through an accurate estimation of the unobservable off-plume radiance. The reason why off-plume radiance is recoverable relies on a common observation that most chemical gases only exhibit strong absorptive behavior in certain spectral bands. Those spectral bands where the gas absorption is almost zero or small are ideal to carry out background estimation. In this thesis, the new selected-band algorithm is first derived from its favorable narrow-band sharp-featured gas and then extended to an iterative algorithm that suits all kinds of gases. The performance improvement is verified by simulated data for a variety of experimental settings.

  6. GMO quantification: valuable experience and insights for the future.

    PubMed

    Milavec, Mojca; Dobnik, David; Yang, Litao; Zhang, Dabing; Gruden, Kristina; Zel, Jana

    2014-10-01

    Cultivation and marketing of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) have been unevenly adopted worldwide. To facilitate international trade and to provide information to consumers, labelling requirements have been set up in many countries. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is currently the method of choice for detection, identification and quantification of GMOs. This has been critically assessed and the requirements for the method performance have been set. Nevertheless, there are challenges that should still be highlighted, such as measuring the quantity and quality of DNA, and determining the qPCR efficiency, possible sequence mismatches, characteristics of taxon-specific genes and appropriate units of measurement, as these remain potential sources of measurement uncertainty. To overcome these problems and to cope with the continuous increase in the number and variety of GMOs, new approaches are needed. Statistical strategies of quantification have already been proposed and expanded with the development of digital PCR. The first attempts have been made to use new generation sequencing also for quantitative purposes, although accurate quantification of the contents of GMOs using this technology is still a challenge for the future, and especially for mixed samples. New approaches are needed also for the quantification of stacks, and for potential quantification of organisms produced by new plant breeding techniques. PMID:25182968

  7. Accurate measurement of reduced glutathione in gamma-glutamyltransferase-rich brain microvessel fractions.

    PubMed

    Maguin Gaté, Katy; Lartaud, Isabelle; Giummelly, Philippe; Legrand, Romain; Pompella, Alfonso; Leroy, Pierre

    2011-01-19

    Investigation of the redox status in the cerebral circulation is of great importance in order to evaluate intensity of oxidative stress-related diseases and the corresponding therapeutic effects. Changes in levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) are a major indicator of oxidative stress conditions. However, an important limitation for measurement of GSH as a biomarker is the possible presence in samples of gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activity, i.e., the enzyme catalysing GSH breakdown. An accurate assay for the measurement of GSH in rat brain microvessels was developed, taking into account the high GGT activity expressed in this tissue compartment. Based on a sensitive fluorescence-based microtiter plate method using 2,3-naphthalenedicarboxyaldehyde as GSH-selective fluorogenic probe, the assay was applied to brain microvessels isolated from individual male Wistar rats. Pooling of microvessel fractions from several animals, as required by other procedures, could thus be avoided. In order to prevent GSH consumption via GGT activity, serine-boric acid complex (SBC) was added as inhibitor all along the microvessels isolation process. In the absence of GGT inhibition GSH in isolated brain microvessels was below the limit of quantification. Addition of SBC almost completely suppressed GGT activity, thus allowing GSH quantification (4.4±1.6 nmol.mg(-1) protein, n=3). Following the administration of a GSH depletor (diethyl maleate, 1g.kg(-1), i.p.), decreased GSH levels were measured in liver, brain tissue and brain microvessels as well, thus confirming the reliability of the method for safe GSH measurements in small-sized, individual samples presenting high GGT activity. PMID:21047497

  8. Colorimetric Quantification and in Situ Detection of Collagen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esteban, Francisco J.; del Moral, Maria L.; Sanchez-Lopez, Ana M.; Blanco, Santos; Jimenez, Ana; Hernandez, Raquel; Pedrosa, Juan A.; Peinado, Maria A.

    2005-01-01

    A simple multidisciplinary and inexpensive laboratory exercise is proposed, in which the undergraduate student may correlate biochemical and anatomical findings. The entire practical session can be completed in one 2.5-3 hour laboratory period, and consists of the quantification of collagen and total protein content from tissue sections--without…

  9. The variability of manual and computer assisted quantification of multiple sclerosis lesion volumes.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J R; Karlik, S J; Lee, D H; Eliasziw, M; Rice, G P; Fenster, A

    1996-01-01

    The high resolution and excellent soft tissue contrast of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have enabled direct, noninvasive visualization of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) lesions in vivo. This has allowed the quantification of changes in the appearance of lesions in MR exams to be used as a measure of disease state. Nevertheless, accurate quantification techniques are subject to inter- and intra-operator variability, which may hinder monitoring of disease progression. We have developed a computer program to assist an experienced operator in the quantification of MS lesions in standard spin-echo MR exams. The accuracy of assisted and manual quantification under known conditions was studied using exams of a test phantom, while inter- and intra-operator reliability and variability were studied using exams of a MS patient. Results from the phantom study show that accuracy is improved by assisted quantification. The patient exam results indicate that assisted quantification reduced inter-operator variability from 0.34 to 0.17 cm3, and reduced intra-operator variability from 0.23 to 0.15 cm3. In addition, the minimum significant change between two successive measurements of lesion volume by the same operator was 0.64 cm3 for manual quantification and 0.42 cm3 for assisted quantification. For two different operators making successive measurements, the minimum significant change was 0.94 cm3 for manual quantification, but only 0.47 cm3 for assisted quantification. Finally, the number of lesions to be monitored for an average change in volume at a given power and significance level was reduced by a factor of 2-4 by assisted quantification. These results suggest that assisted quantification may have practical applications in clinical trials, especially those that are large, multicenter, or extended over time, and therefore require lesion measurements by one or more operators. PMID:8700036

  10. Quantification of viable helminth eggs in samples of sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Maria Carolina Vieira da; Barés, Monica Eboly; Braga, Maria Cristina Borba

    2016-10-15

    For the application of sewage sludge as fertilizer, it is of fundamental importance the absence of pathogenic organisms, such as viable helminth eggs. Thus, the quantification of these organisms has to be carried out by means of the application of reliable and accurate methodologies. Nevertheless, until the present date, there is no consensus with regard to the adoption of a universal methodology for the detection and quantification of viable helminth eggs. It is therefore necessary to instigate a debate on the different protocols currently in use, as well as to assemble relevant information in order to assist in the development of a more comprehensive and accurate method to quantify viable helminth eggs in samples of sewage sludge and its derivatives. PMID:27470467

  11. Advancing agricultural greenhouse gas quantification*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olander, Lydia; Wollenberg, Eva; Tubiello, Francesco; Herold, Martin

    2013-03-01

    descriptive trends are sufficient or an understanding of drivers and causes are needed. While there are certainly similar needs across uses and users, the necessary methods, data, and models for quantifying GHGs may vary. Common challenges for quantification noted in an informal survey of users of GHG information by Olander et al (2013) include the following. 3.1. Need for user-friendly methods that work across scales, regions, and systems Much of the data gathered and models developed by the research community provide high confidence in data or indicators computed at one place or for one issue, thus they are relevant for only specific uses, not transparent, or not comparable. These research approaches need to be translated to practitioners though the development of farmer friendly, transparent, comparable, and broadly applicable methods. Many users noted the need for quantification data and methods that work and are accurate across region and scales. One of the interviewed users, Charlotte Streck, summed it up nicely: 'A priority would be to produce comparable datasets for agricultural GHG emissions of particular agricultural practices for a broad set of countries ... with a gradual increase in accuracy'. 3.2. Need for lower cost, feasible approaches Concerns about cost and complexity of existing quantification methods were raised by a number of users interviewed in the survey. In the field it is difficult to measure changes in GHGs from agricultural management due to spatial and temporal variability, and the scale of the management-induced changes relative to background pools and fluxes. Many users noted data gaps and inconsistencies and insufficient technical capacity and infrastructure to generate necessary information, particularly in developing countries. The need for creative approaches for data collection and analysis, such as crowd sourcing and mobile technology, were noted. 3.3. Need for methods that can crosswalk between emission-reduction strategy and inventories

  12. Neutron-encoded mass signatures for multi-plexed proteome quantification

    PubMed Central

    Hebert, Alexander S; Merrill, Anna E; Bailey, Derek J; Still, Amelia J; Westphall, Michael S; Streiter, Eric R; Pagliarini, David J; Coon, Joshua J

    2013-01-01

    We describe a protein quantification method that exploits the subtle mass differences caused by neutron-binding energy variation in stable isotopes. These mass differences are synthetically encoded into amino acids and incorporated into yeast and mouse proteins with metabolic labeling; analysis with high mass resolution (>100,000) reveals the isotopologue-embedded peptide signals permitting quantification. We conclude neutron encoding will enable high levels of multi-plexing (> 10) with high dynamic range and accuracy. PMID:23435260

  13. RANTES and MIP-1beta mRNA expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: transcript quantification using NASBA technology.

    PubMed

    Romano, J W; Shurtliff, R N; Lee, E M; Cornelison, R; Than, S; Kaplan, M H; Ginocchio, C C

    2001-09-01

    The importance of chemokines in the immune response, as well as in a range of specific disease states, is becoming increasingly apparent. The role of CC- (or beta-) chemokines and their receptors in the pathology and mechanisms of HIV-1 infection has served to intensify interest in these factors. Although the functionality of these factors resides in their protein forms, assays for the detection and quantification of these protein factors in clinical samples are not readily available. Consequently, we designed NASBA-based assays for the quantification of the mRNA encoding two members of the CC-chemokine family: RANTES and MIP-1beta. The NASBA-based assays are extremely sensitive, accurate, and reproducible across a dynamic range of at least four orders of magnitude. Inter-assay performance is comparable to intra-assay performance. We applied these methods to the analysis of normal human PBMC and PBMC from HIV-1 infected individuals. Although MIP-1beta mRNA levels are higher than RANTES levels in both populations, RANTES levels in HIV-1+ patients are higher than in normal individuals. The utility of these assays in longitudinal studies of specific subpopulations of cells, as well as their potential use in clinical diagnostics, is discussed. PMID:11470292

  14. A quick colorimetric method for total lipid quantification in microalgae.

    PubMed

    Byreddy, Avinesh R; Gupta, Adarsha; Barrow, Colin J; Puri, Munish

    2016-06-01

    Discovering microalgae with high lipid productivity are among the key milestones for achieving sustainable biodiesel production. Current methods of lipid quantification are time intensive and costly. A rapid colorimetric method based on sulfo-phospho-vanillin (SPV) reaction was developed for the quantification of microbial lipids to facilitate screening for lipid producing microalgae. This method was successfully tested on marine thraustochytrid strains and vegetable oils. The colorimetric method results correlated well with gravimetric method estimates. The new method was less time consuming than gravimetric analysis and is quantitative for lipid determination, even in the presence of carbohydrates, proteins and glycerol. PMID:27050419

  15. Virus detection and quantification using electrical parameters

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Al; Mustafa, Farah; Ali, Lizna M.; Rizvi, Tahir A.

    2014-01-01

    Here we identify and quantitate two similar viruses, human and feline immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and FIV), suspended in a liquid medium without labeling, using a semiconductor technique. The virus count was estimated by calculating the impurities inside a defined volume by observing the change in electrical parameters. Empirically, the virus count was similar to the absolute value of the ratio of the change of the virus suspension dopant concentration relative to the mock dopant over the change in virus suspension Debye volume relative to mock Debye volume. The virus type was identified by constructing a concentration-mobility relationship which is unique for each kind of virus, allowing for a fast (within minutes) and label-free virus quantification and identification. For validation, the HIV and FIV virus preparations were further quantified by a biochemical technique and the results obtained by both approaches corroborated well. We further demonstrate that the electrical technique could be applied to accurately measure and characterize silica nanoparticles that resemble the virus particles in size. Based on these results, we anticipate our present approach to be a starting point towards establishing the foundation for label-free electrical-based identification and quantification of an unlimited number of viruses and other nano-sized particles. PMID:25355078

  16. Concurrent quantification of multiple nanoparticle bound states

    PubMed Central

    Rauwerdink, Adam M.; Weaver, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The binding of nanoparticles to in vivo targets impacts their use for medical imaging, therapy, and the study of diseases and disease biomarkers. Though an array of techniques can detect binding in vitro, the search for a robust in vivo method continues. The spectral response of magnetic nanoparticles can be influenced by a variety of changes in their physical environment including viscosity and binding. Here, the authors show that nanoparticles in these different environmental states produce spectral responses, which are sufficiently unique to allow for simultaneous quantification of the proportion of nanoparticles within each state. Methods: The authors measured the response to restricted Brownian motion using an array of magnetic nanoparticle designs. With a chosen optimal particle type, the authors prepared particle samples in three distinct environmental states. Various combinations of particles within these three states were measured concurrently and the authors attempted to solve for the quantity of particles within each physical state. Results: The authors found the spectral response of the nanoparticles to be sufficiently unique to allow for accurate quantification of up to three bound states with errors on the order of 1.5%. Furthermore, the authors discuss numerous paths for translating these measurements to in vivo applications. Conclusions: Multiple nanoparticle environmental states can be concurrently quantified using the spectral response of the particles. Such an ability, if translated to the in vivo realm, could provide valuable information about the fate of nanoparticles in vivo or i