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Sample records for accurate quantum chemical

  1. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  2. Machine Learning of Parameters for Accurate Semiempirical Quantum Chemical Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of semiempirical quantum chemistry (SQC) methods through the use of machine learning (ML) models for the parameters. For a given class of compounds, ML techniques require sufficiently large training sets to develop ML models that can be used for adapting SQC parameters to reflect changes in molecular composition and geometry. The ML-SQC approach allows the automatic tuning of SQC parameters for individual molecules, thereby improving the accuracy without deteriorating transferability to molecules with molecular descriptors very different from those in the training set. The performance of this approach is demonstrated for the semiempirical OM2 method using a set of 6095 constitutional isomers C7H10O2, for which accurate ab initio atomization enthalpies are available. The ML-OM2 results show improved average accuracy and a much reduced error range compared with those of standard OM2 results, with mean absolute errors in atomization enthalpies dropping from 6.3 to 1.7 kcal/mol. They are also found to be superior to the results from specific OM2 reparameterizations (rOM2) for the same set of isomers. The ML-SQC approach thus holds promise for fast and reasonably accurate high-throughput screening of materials and molecules. PMID:26146493

  3. Machine learning of parameters for accurate semiempirical quantum chemical calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Dral, Pavlo O.; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Thiel, Walter

    2015-04-14

    We investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of semiempirical quantum chemistry (SQC) methods through the use of machine learning (ML) models for the parameters. For a given class of compounds, ML techniques require sufficiently large training sets to develop ML models that can be used for adapting SQC parameters to reflect changes in molecular composition and geometry. The ML-SQC approach allows the automatic tuning of SQC parameters for individual molecules, thereby improving the accuracy without deteriorating transferability to molecules with molecular descriptors very different from those in the training set. The performance of this approach is demonstrated for the semiempiricalmore » OM2 method using a set of 6095 constitutional isomers C7H10O2, for which accurate ab initio atomization enthalpies are available. The ML-OM2 results show improved average accuracy and a much reduced error range compared with those of standard OM2 results, with mean absolute errors in atomization enthalpies dropping from 6.3 to 1.7 kcal/mol. They are also found to be superior to the results from specific OM2 reparameterizations (rOM2) for the same set of isomers. The ML-SQC approach thus holds promise for fast and reasonably accurate high-throughput screening of materials and molecules.« less

  4. Machine learning of parameters for accurate semiempirical quantum chemical calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Dral, Pavlo O.; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Thiel, Walter

    2015-04-14

    We investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of semiempirical quantum chemistry (SQC) methods through the use of machine learning (ML) models for the parameters. For a given class of compounds, ML techniques require sufficiently large training sets to develop ML models that can be used for adapting SQC parameters to reflect changes in molecular composition and geometry. The ML-SQC approach allows the automatic tuning of SQC parameters for individual molecules, thereby improving the accuracy without deteriorating transferability to molecules with molecular descriptors very different from those in the training set. The performance of this approach is demonstrated for the semiempirical OM2 method using a set of 6095 constitutional isomers C7H10O2, for which accurate ab initio atomization enthalpies are available. The ML-OM2 results show improved average accuracy and a much reduced error range compared with those of standard OM2 results, with mean absolute errors in atomization enthalpies dropping from 6.3 to 1.7 kcal/mol. They are also found to be superior to the results from specific OM2 reparameterizations (rOM2) for the same set of isomers. The ML-SQC approach thus holds promise for fast and reasonably accurate high-throughput screening of materials and molecules.

  5. Machine Learning of Parameters for Accurate Semiempirical Quantum Chemical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Dral, Pavlo O; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole; Thiel, Walter

    2015-05-12

    We investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of semiempirical quantum chemistry (SQC) methods through the use of machine learning (ML) models for the parameters. For a given class of compounds, ML techniques require sufficiently large training sets to develop ML models that can be used for adapting SQC parameters to reflect changes in molecular composition and geometry. The ML-SQC approach allows the automatic tuning of SQC parameters for individual molecules, thereby improving the accuracy without deteriorating transferability to molecules with molecular descriptors very different from those in the training set. The performance of this approach is demonstrated for the semiempirical OM2 method using a set of 6095 constitutional isomers C7H10O2, for which accurate ab initio atomization enthalpies are available. The ML-OM2 results show improved average accuracy and a much reduced error range compared with those of standard OM2 results, with mean absolute errors in atomization enthalpies dropping from 6.3 to 1.7 kcal/mol. They are also found to be superior to the results from specific OM2 reparameterizations (rOM2) for the same set of isomers. The ML-SQC approach thus holds promise for fast and reasonably accurate high-throughput screening of materials and molecules.

  6. Toward an Accurate Estimate of the Exfoliation Energy of Black Phosphorus: A Periodic Quantum Chemical Approach.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Giuseppe; Maschio, Lorenzo; Usvyat, Denis; Schütz, Martin; Karttunen, Antti

    2016-01-07

    The black phosphorus (black-P) crystal is formed of covalently bound layers of phosphorene stacked together by weak van der Waals interactions. An experimental measurement of the exfoliation energy of black-P is not available presently, making theoretical studies the most important source of information for the optimization of phosphorene production. Here, we provide an accurate estimate of the exfoliation energy of black-P on the basis of multilevel quantum chemical calculations, which include the periodic local Møller-Plesset perturbation theory of second order, augmented by higher-order corrections, which are evaluated with finite clusters mimicking the crystal. Very similar results are also obtained by density functional theory with the D3-version of Grimme's empirical dispersion correction. Our estimate of the exfoliation energy for black-P of -151 meV/atom is substantially larger than that of graphite, suggesting the need for different strategies to generate isolated layers for these two systems.

  7. Accurate Characterization of the Peptide Linkage in the Gas Phase: a Joint Quantum-Chemical and Rotational Spectroscopy Study of the Glycine Dipeptide Analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Barone, Vincenzo; Largo, Laura; Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L.

    2014-06-01

    Accurate structures of aminoacids in the gas phase have been obtained by joint microwave and quantum-chemical investigations. However, the structure and conformational behavior of α-aminoacids once incorporated into peptide chains are completely different and have not yet been characterized with the same accuracy. To fill this gap, we present here an accurate characterization of the simplest dipeptide analogue (N-acetylglycinamide) involving peptidic bonds. State-of-the-art quantum-chemical computations are complemented by a comprehensive study of the rotational spectrum using a combination of Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy with laser ablation. The coexistence of the C_7 and C_5 conformers has been proved and energetically as well as spectroscopically characterized. This joint theoretical-experimental investigation demonstrated the feasibility of obtaining accurate structures for flexible small biomolecules, thus paving the route to the elucidation of the inherent behavior of peptides.

  8. Quantum Chemical Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The current methods of quantum chemical calculations will be reviewed. The accent will be on the accuracy that can be achieved with these methods. The basis set requirements and computer resources for the various methods will be discussed. The utility of the methods will be illustrated with some examples, which include the calculation of accurate bond energies for SiF$_n$ and SiF$_n^+$ and the modeling of chemical data storage.

  9. Extending the molecular size in accurate quantum-chemical calculations: the equilibrium structure and spectroscopic properties of uracil.

    PubMed

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Barone, Vincenzo

    2011-04-21

    The equilibrium structure of uracil has been investigated using both theoretical and experimental data. With respect to the former, quantum-chemical calculations at the coupled-cluster level in conjunction with a triple-zeta basis set have been carried out. Extrapolation to the basis set limit, performed employing the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, and inclusion of core-correlation and diffuse-function corrections have also been considered. Based on the available rotational constants for various isotopic species together with corresponding computed vibrational corrections, the semi-experimental equilibrium structure of uracil has been determined for the first time. Theoretical and semi-experimental structures have been found in remarkably good agreement, thus pointing out the limitations of previous experimental determinations. Molecular and spectroscopic properties of uracil have then been studied by means of the composite computational approach introduced for the molecular structure evaluation. Among the results achieved, we mention the revision of the dipole moment. On the whole, it has been proved that the computational procedure presented is able to provide parameters with the proper accuracy to support experimental investigations of large molecules of biological interest.

  10. Accurate Evaluation of Quantum Integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, D. C.; Goorvitch, D.; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Combining an appropriate finite difference method with Richardson's extrapolation results in a simple, highly accurate numerical method for solving a Schrodinger's equation. Important results are that error estimates are provided, and that one can extrapolate expectation values rather than the wavefunctions to obtain highly accurate expectation values. We discuss the eigenvalues, the error growth in repeated Richardson's extrapolation, and show that the expectation values calculated on a crude mesh can be extrapolated to obtain expectation values of high accuracy.

  11. Toward Relatively General and Accurate Quantum Chemical Predictions of Solid-State (17)O NMR Chemical Shifts in Various Biologically Relevant Oxygen-Containing Compounds.

    PubMed

    Rorick, Amber; Michael, Matthew A; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Yong

    2015-09-03

    Oxygen is an important element in most biologically significant molecules, and experimental solid-state (17)O NMR studies have provided numerous useful structural probes to study these systems. However, computational predictions of solid-state (17)O NMR chemical shift tensor properties are still challenging in many cases, and in particular, each of the prior computational works is basically limited to one type of oxygen-containing system. This work provides the first systematic study of the effects of geometry refinement, method, and basis sets for metal and nonmetal elements in both geometry optimization and NMR property calculations of some biologically relevant oxygen-containing compounds with a good variety of XO bonding groups (X = H, C, N, P, and metal). The experimental range studied is of 1455 ppm, a major part of the reported (17)O NMR chemical shifts in organic and organometallic compounds. A number of computational factors toward relatively general and accurate predictions of (17)O NMR chemical shifts were studied to provide helpful and detailed suggestions for future work. For the studied kinds of oxygen-containing compounds, the best computational approach results in a theory-versus-experiment correlation coefficient (R(2)) value of 0.9880 and a mean absolute deviation of 13 ppm (1.9% of the experimental range) for isotropic NMR shifts and an R(2) value of 0.9926 for all shift-tensor properties. These results shall facilitate future computational studies of (17)O NMR chemical shifts in many biologically relevant systems, and the high accuracy may also help the refinement and determination of active-site structures of some oxygen-containing substrate-bound proteins.

  12. Beyond transition state theory: accurate description of nuclear quantum effects on the rate and equilibrium constants of chemical reactions using Feynman path integrals.

    PubMed

    Vanícek, Jirí

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear tunneling and other nuclear quantum effects have been shown to play a significant role in molecules as large as enzymes even at physiological temperatures. I discuss how these quantum phenomena can be accounted for rigorously using Feynman path integrals in calculations of the equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects as well as of the temperature dependence of the rate constant. Because these calculations are extremely computationally demanding, special attention is devoted to increasing the computational efficiency by orders of magnitude by employing efficient path integral estimators.

  13. Accurate Variational Description of Adiabatic Quantum Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleo, Giuseppe; Bauer, Bela; Troyer, Matthias

    Adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO) is a quantum computing protocol where a system is driven by a time-dependent Hamiltonian. The initial Hamiltonian has an easily prepared ground-state and the final Hamiltonian encodes some desired optimization problem. An adiabatic time evolution then yields a solution to the optimization problem. Several challenges emerge in the theoretical description of this protocol: on one hand, the exact simulation of quantum dynamics is exponentially complex in the size of the optimization problem. On the other hand, approximate approaches such as tensor network states (TNS) are limited to small instances by the amount of entanglement that can be encoded. I will present here an extension of the time-dependent Variational Monte Carlo approach to problems in AQO. This approach is based on a general class of (Jastrow-Feenberg) entangled states, whose parameters are evolved in time according to a stochastic variational principle. We demonstrate this approach for optimization problems of the Ising spin-glass type. A very good accuracy is achieved when compared to exact time-dependent TNS on small instances. We then apply this approach to larger problems, and discuss the efficiency of the quantum annealing scheme in comparison with its classical counterpart.

  14. Complex Chemical Reaction Networks from Heuristics-Aided Quantum Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Rappoport, Dmitrij; Galvin, Cooper J; Zubarev, Dmitry Yu; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-03-11

    While structures and reactivities of many small molecules can be computed efficiently and accurately using quantum chemical methods, heuristic approaches remain essential for modeling complex structures and large-scale chemical systems. Here, we present a heuristics-aided quantum chemical methodology applicable to complex chemical reaction networks such as those arising in cell metabolism and prebiotic chemistry. Chemical heuristics offer an expedient way of traversing high-dimensional reactive potential energy surfaces and are combined here with quantum chemical structure optimizations, which yield the structures and energies of the reaction intermediates and products. Application of heuristics-aided quantum chemical methodology to the formose reaction reproduces the experimentally observed reaction products, major reaction pathways, and autocatalytic cycles.

  15. Quantum Monte Carlo: Faster, More Reliable, And More Accurate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Amos Gerald

    2010-06-01

    The Schrodinger Equation has been available for about 83 years, but today, we still strain to apply it accurately to molecules of interest. The difficulty is not theoretical in nature, but practical, since we're held back by lack of sufficient computing power. Consequently, effort is applied to find acceptable approximations to facilitate real time solutions. In the meantime, computer technology has begun rapidly advancing and changing the way we think about efficient algorithms. For those who can reorganize their formulas to take advantage of these changes and thereby lift some approximations, incredible new opportunities await. Over the last decade, we've seen the emergence of a new kind of computer processor, the graphics card. Designed to accelerate computer games by optimizing quantity instead of quality in processor, they have become of sufficient quality to be useful to some scientists. In this thesis, we explore the first known use of a graphics card to computational chemistry by rewriting our Quantum Monte Carlo software into the requisite "data parallel" formalism. We find that notwithstanding precision considerations, we are able to speed up our software by about a factor of 6. The success of a Quantum Monte Carlo calculation depends on more than just processing power. It also requires the scientist to carefully design the trial wavefunction used to guide simulated electrons. We have studied the use of Generalized Valence Bond wavefunctions to simply, and yet effectively, captured the essential static correlation in atoms and molecules. Furthermore, we have developed significantly improved two particle correlation functions, designed with both flexibility and simplicity considerations, representing an effective and reliable way to add the necessary dynamic correlation. Lastly, we present our method for stabilizing the statistical nature of the calculation, by manipulating configuration weights, thus facilitating efficient and robust calculations. Our

  16. Quantum mechanical calculations to chemical accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1991-01-01

    The accuracy of current molecular-structure calculations is illustrated with examples of quantum mechanical solutions for chemical problems. Two approaches are considered: (1) the coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) with a perturbational estimate of the contribution of connected triple excitations, or CCDS(T); and (2) the multireference configuration-interaction (MRCI) approach to the correlation problem. The MRCI approach gains greater applicability by means of size-extensive modifications such as the averaged-coupled pair functional approach. The examples of solutions to chemical problems include those for C-H bond energies, the vibrational frequencies of O3, identifying the ground state of Al2 and Si2, and the Lewis-Rayleigh afterglow and the Hermann IR system of N2. Accurate molecular-wave functions can be derived from a combination of basis-set saturation studies and full configuration-interaction calculations.

  17. Quantum-chemical insights from deep tensor neural networks.

    PubMed

    Schütt, Kristof T; Arbabzadah, Farhad; Chmiela, Stefan; Müller, Klaus R; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2017-01-09

    Learning from data has led to paradigm shifts in a multitude of disciplines, including web, text and image search, speech recognition, as well as bioinformatics. Can machine learning enable similar breakthroughs in understanding quantum many-body systems? Here we develop an efficient deep learning approach that enables spatially and chemically resolved insights into quantum-mechanical observables of molecular systems. We unify concepts from many-body Hamiltonians with purpose-designed deep tensor neural networks, which leads to size-extensive and uniformly accurate (1 kcal mol(-1)) predictions in compositional and configurational chemical space for molecules of intermediate size. As an example of chemical relevance, the model reveals a classification of aromatic rings with respect to their stability. Further applications of our model for predicting atomic energies and local chemical potentials in molecules, reliable isomer energies, and molecules with peculiar electronic structure demonstrate the potential of machine learning for revealing insights into complex quantum-chemical systems.

  18. Quantum-chemical insights from deep tensor neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütt, Kristof T.; Arbabzadah, Farhad; Chmiela, Stefan; Müller, Klaus R.; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    Learning from data has led to paradigm shifts in a multitude of disciplines, including web, text and image search, speech recognition, as well as bioinformatics. Can machine learning enable similar breakthroughs in understanding quantum many-body systems? Here we develop an efficient deep learning approach that enables spatially and chemically resolved insights into quantum-mechanical observables of molecular systems. We unify concepts from many-body Hamiltonians with purpose-designed deep tensor neural networks, which leads to size-extensive and uniformly accurate (1 kcal mol-1) predictions in compositional and configurational chemical space for molecules of intermediate size. As an example of chemical relevance, the model reveals a classification of aromatic rings with respect to their stability. Further applications of our model for predicting atomic energies and local chemical potentials in molecules, reliable isomer energies, and molecules with peculiar electronic structure demonstrate the potential of machine learning for revealing insights into complex quantum-chemical systems.

  19. Chemical dynamics in the gas phase: Time-dependent quantum mechanics of chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, S.K.

    1993-12-01

    A major goal of this research is to obtain an understanding of the molecular reaction dynamics of three and four atom chemical reactions using numerically accurate quantum dynamics. This work involves: (i) the development and/or improvement of accurate quantum mechanical methods for the calculation and analysis of the properties of chemical reactions (e.g., rate constants and product distributions), and (ii) the determination of accurate dynamical results for selected chemical systems, which allow one to compare directly with experiment, determine the reliability of the underlying potential energy surfaces, and test the validity of approximate theories. This research emphasizes the use of recently developed time-dependent quantum mechanical methods, i.e. wave packet methods.

  20. Quantum circuit design for accurate simulation of qudit channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Sheng; Sanders, Barry C.

    2015-04-01

    We construct a classical algorithm that designs quantum circuits for algorithmic quantum simulation of arbitrary qudit channels on fault-tolerant quantum computers within a pre-specified error tolerance with respect to diamond-norm distance. The classical algorithm is constructed by decomposing a quantum channel into a convex combination of generalized extreme channels by convex optimization of a set of nonlinear coupled algebraïc equations. The resultant circuit is a randomly chosen generalized extreme channel circuit whose run-time is logarithmic with respect to the error tolerance and quadratic with respect to Hilbert space dimension, which requires only a single ancillary qudit plus classical dits.

  1. Quantum Theory of Fast Chemical Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Light, John C

    2007-07-30

    The aims of the research under this grant were to develop a theoretical understanding and predictive abiility for a variety of processes occurring in the gas phase. These included bimolecular chemical exchange reactions, photodissociation, predissociation resonances, unimolecular reactions and recombination reactions. In general we assumed a knowledge, from quantum chemistry, of the interactions of the atoms and molecular fragments involved. Our focus was primarily on the accurate (quantum) dynamics of small molecular systems. This has been important for many reactions related to combustion and atmospheric chemistry involving light atom transfer reactions and, for example, resonances in dissociation and recombination reactions. The rates of such reactions, as functions of temperature, internal states, and radiation (light), are fundamental for generating models of overall combustion processes. A number of new approaches to these problems were developed inclluding the use of discrete variable representations (DVR's) for evaluating rate constants with the flux-flux correlation approach, finite range approaches to exact quantum scattering calculations, energy selected basis representations, transition state wave packet approaches and improved semiclassical approaches. These (and others) were applied to a number of reactive systems and molecular systems of interest including (many years ago) the isotopic H + H2 exchange reactions, the H2 + OH (and H + H2O) systems, Ozone resonances, van der Waals molecule reactions, etc. A total of 7 graduate students, and 5 post-doctoral Research Associates were supported, at least in part, under this grant and seven papers were published with a total of 10 external collaborators. The majority of the 36 publications under this grant were supported entirely by DOE.

  2. How accurate are the nonlinear chemical Fokker-Planck and chemical Langevin equations?

    PubMed

    Grima, Ramon; Thomas, Philipp; Straube, Arthur V

    2011-08-28

    The chemical Fokker-Planck equation and the corresponding chemical Langevin equation are commonly used approximations of the chemical master equation. These equations are derived from an uncontrolled, second-order truncation of the Kramers-Moyal expansion of the chemical master equation and hence their accuracy remains to be clarified. We use the system-size expansion to show that chemical Fokker-Planck estimates of the mean concentrations and of the variance of the concentration fluctuations about the mean are accurate to order Ω(-3∕2) for reaction systems which do not obey detailed balance and at least accurate to order Ω(-2) for systems obeying detailed balance, where Ω is the characteristic size of the system. Hence, the chemical Fokker-Planck equation turns out to be more accurate than the linear-noise approximation of the chemical master equation (the linear Fokker-Planck equation) which leads to mean concentration estimates accurate to order Ω(-1∕2) and variance estimates accurate to order Ω(-3∕2). This higher accuracy is particularly conspicuous for chemical systems realized in small volumes such as biochemical reactions inside cells. A formula is also obtained for the approximate size of the relative errors in the concentration and variance predictions of the chemical Fokker-Planck equation, where the relative error is defined as the difference between the predictions of the chemical Fokker-Planck equation and the master equation divided by the prediction of the master equation. For dimerization and enzyme-catalyzed reactions, the errors are typically less than few percent even when the steady-state is characterized by merely few tens of molecules.

  3. ACCURATE CHEMICAL MASTER EQUATION SOLUTION USING MULTI-FINITE BUFFERS

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Youfang; Terebus, Anna; Liang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The discrete chemical master equation (dCME) provides a fundamental framework for studying stochasticity in mesoscopic networks. Because of the multi-scale nature of many networks where reaction rates have large disparity, directly solving dCMEs is intractable due to the exploding size of the state space. It is important to truncate the state space effectively with quantified errors, so accurate solutions can be computed. It is also important to know if all major probabilistic peaks have been computed. Here we introduce the Accurate CME (ACME) algorithm for obtaining direct solutions to dCMEs. With multi-finite buffers for reducing the state space by O(n!), exact steady-state and time-evolving network probability landscapes can be computed. We further describe a theoretical framework of aggregating microstates into a smaller number of macrostates by decomposing a network into independent aggregated birth and death processes, and give an a priori method for rapidly determining steady-state truncation errors. The maximal sizes of the finite buffers for a given error tolerance can also be pre-computed without costly trial solutions of dCMEs. We show exactly computed probability landscapes of three multi-scale networks, namely, a 6-node toggle switch, 11-node phage-lambda epigenetic circuit, and 16-node MAPK cascade network, the latter two with no known solutions. We also show how probabilities of rare events can be computed from first-passage times, another class of unsolved problems challenging for simulation-based techniques due to large separations in time scales. Overall, the ACME method enables accurate and efficient solutions of the dCME for a large class of networks. PMID:27761104

  4. ACCURATE CHEMICAL MASTER EQUATION SOLUTION USING MULTI-FINITE BUFFERS.

    PubMed

    Cao, Youfang; Terebus, Anna; Liang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The discrete chemical master equation (dCME) provides a fundamental framework for studying stochasticity in mesoscopic networks. Because of the multi-scale nature of many networks where reaction rates have large disparity, directly solving dCMEs is intractable due to the exploding size of the state space. It is important to truncate the state space effectively with quantified errors, so accurate solutions can be computed. It is also important to know if all major probabilistic peaks have been computed. Here we introduce the Accurate CME (ACME) algorithm for obtaining direct solutions to dCMEs. With multi-finite buffers for reducing the state space by O(n!), exact steady-state and time-evolving network probability landscapes can be computed. We further describe a theoretical framework of aggregating microstates into a smaller number of macrostates by decomposing a network into independent aggregated birth and death processes, and give an a priori method for rapidly determining steady-state truncation errors. The maximal sizes of the finite buffers for a given error tolerance can also be pre-computed without costly trial solutions of dCMEs. We show exactly computed probability landscapes of three multi-scale networks, namely, a 6-node toggle switch, 11-node phage-lambda epigenetic circuit, and 16-node MAPK cascade network, the latter two with no known solutions. We also show how probabilities of rare events can be computed from first-passage times, another class of unsolved problems challenging for simulation-based techniques due to large separations in time scales. Overall, the ACME method enables accurate and efficient solutions of the dCME for a large class of networks.

  5. Enabling quantum communications through accurate photons polarization control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Álvaro J.; Muga, Nelson J.; Silva, Nuno A.; Stojanovic, Aleksandar D.; André, Paulo S.; Pinto, Armando N.; Mora, José; Capmany, José

    2013-11-01

    The rapid increase on the information sharing around the world, leads to an utmost requirement for capacity and bandwidth. However, the need for security in the transmission and storage of information is also of major importance. The use of quantum technologies provides a practical solution for secure communications systems. Quantum key distribution (QKD) was the first practical application of quantum mechanics, and nowadays it is the most developed one. In order to share secret keys between two parties can be used several methods of encoding. Due to its simplicity, the encoding into polarization is one of the most used. However, when we use optical fibers as transmission channels, the polarization suffers random rotations that may change the state of polarization (SOP) of the light initially sent to the fiber to a new one at the output. Thus, in order to enable real-time communication using this encoding method it is required the use of a dynamic control system. We describe a scheme of transmission of quantum information, which is based in the polarization encoding, and that allows to share secret keys through optical fibers without interruption. The dynamic polarization control system used in such scheme is described, both theoretically and experimentally. Their advantages and limitations for the use in quantum communications are presented and discussed.

  6. Chemical accuracy from quantum Monte Carlo for the benzene dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Azadi, Sam; Cohen, R. E.

    2015-09-14

    We report an accurate study of interactions between benzene molecules using variational quantum Monte Carlo (VMC) and diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) methods. We compare these results with density functional theory using different van der Waals functionals. In our quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations, we use accurate correlated trial wave functions including three-body Jastrow factors and backflow transformations. We consider two benzene molecules in the parallel displaced geometry, and find that by highly optimizing the wave function and introducing more dynamical correlation into the wave function, we compute the weak chemical binding energy between aromatic rings accurately. We find optimal VMC and DMC binding energies of −2.3(4) and −2.7(3) kcal/mol, respectively. The best estimate of the coupled-cluster theory through perturbative triplets/complete basis set limit is −2.65(2) kcal/mol [Miliordos et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 7568 (2014)]. Our results indicate that QMC methods give chemical accuracy for weakly bound van der Waals molecular interactions, comparable to results from the best quantum chemistry methods.

  7. Chemical accuracy from quantum Monte Carlo for the benzene dimer.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Sam; Cohen, R E

    2015-09-14

    We report an accurate study of interactions between benzene molecules using variational quantum Monte Carlo (VMC) and diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) methods. We compare these results with density functional theory using different van der Waals functionals. In our quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations, we use accurate correlated trial wave functions including three-body Jastrow factors and backflow transformations. We consider two benzene molecules in the parallel displaced geometry, and find that by highly optimizing the wave function and introducing more dynamical correlation into the wave function, we compute the weak chemical binding energy between aromatic rings accurately. We find optimal VMC and DMC binding energies of -2.3(4) and -2.7(3) kcal/mol, respectively. The best estimate of the coupled-cluster theory through perturbative triplets/complete basis set limit is -2.65(2) kcal/mol [Miliordos et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 7568 (2014)]. Our results indicate that QMC methods give chemical accuracy for weakly bound van der Waals molecular interactions, comparable to results from the best quantum chemistry methods.

  8. Quantum chemical studies of estrogenic compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantum chemical methods are potent tools to provide information on the chemical structure and electronic properties of organic molecules. Modern computational chemistry methods have provided a great deal of insight into the binding of estrogenic compounds to estrogenic receptors (ER), an important ...

  9. Towards accurate quantum simulations of large systems with small computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yonggang

    2017-01-01

    Numerical simulations are important for many systems. In particular, various standard computer programs have been developed for solving the quantum Schrödinger equations. However, the accuracy of these calculations is limited by computer capabilities. In this work, an iterative method is introduced to enhance the accuracy of these numerical calculations, which is otherwise prohibitive by conventional methods. The method is easily implementable and general for many systems.

  10. Towards accurate quantum simulations of large systems with small computers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yonggang

    2017-01-24

    Numerical simulations are important for many systems. In particular, various standard computer programs have been developed for solving the quantum Schrödinger equations. However, the accuracy of these calculations is limited by computer capabilities. In this work, an iterative method is introduced to enhance the accuracy of these numerical calculations, which is otherwise prohibitive by conventional methods. The method is easily implementable and general for many systems.

  11. Towards accurate quantum simulations of large systems with small computers

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yonggang

    2017-01-01

    Numerical simulations are important for many systems. In particular, various standard computer programs have been developed for solving the quantum Schrödinger equations. However, the accuracy of these calculations is limited by computer capabilities. In this work, an iterative method is introduced to enhance the accuracy of these numerical calculations, which is otherwise prohibitive by conventional methods. The method is easily implementable and general for many systems. PMID:28117366

  12. Accurate ab initio prediction of NMR chemical shifts of nucleic acids and nucleic acids/protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Victora, Andrea; Möller, Heiko M.; Exner, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    NMR chemical shift predictions based on empirical methods are nowadays indispensable tools during resonance assignment and 3D structure calculation of proteins. However, owing to the very limited statistical data basis, such methods are still in their infancy in the field of nucleic acids, especially when non-canonical structures and nucleic acid complexes are considered. Here, we present an ab initio approach for predicting proton chemical shifts of arbitrary nucleic acid structures based on state-of-the-art fragment-based quantum chemical calculations. We tested our prediction method on a diverse set of nucleic acid structures including double-stranded DNA, hairpins, DNA/protein complexes and chemically-modified DNA. Overall, our quantum chemical calculations yield highly/very accurate predictions with mean absolute deviations of 0.3–0.6 ppm and correlation coefficients (r2) usually above 0.9. This will allow for identifying misassignments and validating 3D structures. Furthermore, our calculations reveal that chemical shifts of protons involved in hydrogen bonding are predicted significantly less accurately. This is in part caused by insufficient inclusion of solvation effects. However, it also points toward shortcomings of current force fields used for structure determination of nucleic acids. Our quantum chemical calculations could therefore provide input for force field optimization. PMID:25404135

  13. Sensitive chemical compass assisted by quantum criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, C. Y.; Ai, Qing; Quan, H. T.; Sun, C. P.

    2012-02-01

    A radical-pair-based chemical reaction might be used by birds for navigation via the geomagnetic direction. The inherent physical mechanism is that the quantum coherent transition from a singlet state to triplet states of the radical pair could respond to a weak magnetic field and be sensitive to the direction of such a field; this then results in different photopigments to be sensed by the avian eyes. Here, we propose a quantum bionic setup, inspired by the avian compass, as an ultrasensitive probe of a weak magnetic field based on the quantum phase transition of the environments of the two electrons in the radical pair. We prove that the yield of the chemical products via recombination from the singlet state is determined by the Loschmidt echo of the environments with interacting nuclear spins. Thus quantum criticality of environments could enhance the sensitivity of detection of weak magnetic fields.

  14. Quantum-chemical insights from deep tensor neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Schütt, Kristof T.; Arbabzadah, Farhad; Chmiela, Stefan; Müller, Klaus R.; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    Learning from data has led to paradigm shifts in a multitude of disciplines, including web, text and image search, speech recognition, as well as bioinformatics. Can machine learning enable similar breakthroughs in understanding quantum many-body systems? Here we develop an efficient deep learning approach that enables spatially and chemically resolved insights into quantum-mechanical observables of molecular systems. We unify concepts from many-body Hamiltonians with purpose-designed deep tensor neural networks, which leads to size-extensive and uniformly accurate (1 kcal mol−1) predictions in compositional and configurational chemical space for molecules of intermediate size. As an example of chemical relevance, the model reveals a classification of aromatic rings with respect to their stability. Further applications of our model for predicting atomic energies and local chemical potentials in molecules, reliable isomer energies, and molecules with peculiar electronic structure demonstrate the potential of machine learning for revealing insights into complex quantum-chemical systems. PMID:28067221

  15. Fast and accurate predictions of covalent bonds in chemical space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, K. Y. Samuel; Fias, Stijn; Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole

    2016-05-01

    We assess the predictive accuracy of perturbation theory based estimates of changes in covalent bonding due to linear alchemical interpolations among molecules. We have investigated σ bonding to hydrogen, as well as σ and π bonding between main-group elements, occurring in small sets of iso-valence-electronic molecules with elements drawn from second to fourth rows in the p-block of the periodic table. Numerical evidence suggests that first order Taylor expansions of covalent bonding potentials can achieve high accuracy if (i) the alchemical interpolation is vertical (fixed geometry), (ii) it involves elements from the third and fourth rows of the periodic table, and (iii) an optimal reference geometry is used. This leads to near linear changes in the bonding potential, resulting in analytical predictions with chemical accuracy (˜1 kcal/mol). Second order estimates deteriorate the prediction. If initial and final molecules differ not only in composition but also in geometry, all estimates become substantially worse, with second order being slightly more accurate than first order. The independent particle approximation based second order perturbation theory performs poorly when compared to the coupled perturbed or finite difference approach. Taylor series expansions up to fourth order of the potential energy curve of highly symmetric systems indicate a finite radius of convergence, as illustrated for the alchemical stretching of H 2+ . Results are presented for (i) covalent bonds to hydrogen in 12 molecules with 8 valence electrons (CH4, NH3, H2O, HF, SiH4, PH3, H2S, HCl, GeH4, AsH3, H2Se, HBr); (ii) main-group single bonds in 9 molecules with 14 valence electrons (CH3F, CH3Cl, CH3Br, SiH3F, SiH3Cl, SiH3Br, GeH3F, GeH3Cl, GeH3Br); (iii) main-group double bonds in 9 molecules with 12 valence electrons (CH2O, CH2S, CH2Se, SiH2O, SiH2S, SiH2Se, GeH2O, GeH2S, GeH2Se); (iv) main-group triple bonds in 9 molecules with 10 valence electrons (HCN, HCP, HCAs, HSiN, HSi

  16. Fast and accurate predictions of covalent bonds in chemical space.

    PubMed

    Chang, K Y Samuel; Fias, Stijn; Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole

    2016-05-07

    We assess the predictive accuracy of perturbation theory based estimates of changes in covalent bonding due to linear alchemical interpolations among molecules. We have investigated σ bonding to hydrogen, as well as σ and π bonding between main-group elements, occurring in small sets of iso-valence-electronic molecules with elements drawn from second to fourth rows in the p-block of the periodic table. Numerical evidence suggests that first order Taylor expansions of covalent bonding potentials can achieve high accuracy if (i) the alchemical interpolation is vertical (fixed geometry), (ii) it involves elements from the third and fourth rows of the periodic table, and (iii) an optimal reference geometry is used. This leads to near linear changes in the bonding potential, resulting in analytical predictions with chemical accuracy (∼1 kcal/mol). Second order estimates deteriorate the prediction. If initial and final molecules differ not only in composition but also in geometry, all estimates become substantially worse, with second order being slightly more accurate than first order. The independent particle approximation based second order perturbation theory performs poorly when compared to the coupled perturbed or finite difference approach. Taylor series expansions up to fourth order of the potential energy curve of highly symmetric systems indicate a finite radius of convergence, as illustrated for the alchemical stretching of H2 (+). Results are presented for (i) covalent bonds to hydrogen in 12 molecules with 8 valence electrons (CH4, NH3, H2O, HF, SiH4, PH3, H2S, HCl, GeH4, AsH3, H2Se, HBr); (ii) main-group single bonds in 9 molecules with 14 valence electrons (CH3F, CH3Cl, CH3Br, SiH3F, SiH3Cl, SiH3Br, GeH3F, GeH3Cl, GeH3Br); (iii) main-group double bonds in 9 molecules with 12 valence electrons (CH2O, CH2S, CH2Se, SiH2O, SiH2S, SiH2Se, GeH2O, GeH2S, GeH2Se); (iv) main-group triple bonds in 9 molecules with 10 valence electrons (HCN, HCP, HCAs, HSiN, HSi

  17. Fast and accurate calculation of dilute quantum gas using Uehling-Uhlenbeck model equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Ryosuke

    2017-02-01

    The Uehling-Uhlenbeck (U-U) model equation is studied for the fast and accurate calculation of a dilute quantum gas. In particular, the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is used to solve the U-U model equation. DSMC analysis based on the U-U model equation is expected to enable the thermalization to be accurately obtained using a small number of sample particles and the dilute quantum gas dynamics to be calculated in a practical time. Finally, the applicability of DSMC analysis based on the U-U model equation to the fast and accurate calculation of a dilute quantum gas is confirmed by calculating the viscosity coefficient of a Bose gas on the basis of the Green-Kubo expression and the shock layer of a dilute Bose gas around a cylinder.

  18. Chemical application of diffusion quantum Monte Carlo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, P. J.; Lester, W. A., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method gives a stochastic solution to the Schroedinger equation. This approach is receiving increasing attention in chemical applications as a result of its high accuracy. However, reducing statistical uncertainty remains a priority because chemical effects are often obtained as small differences of large numbers. As an example, the single-triplet splitting of the energy of the methylene molecule CH sub 2 is given. The QMC algorithm was implemented on the CYBER 205, first as a direct transcription of the algorithm running on the VAX 11/780, and second by explicitly writing vector code for all loops longer than a crossover length C. The speed of the codes relative to one another as a function of C, and relative to the VAX, are discussed. The computational time dependence obtained versus the number of basis functions is discussed and this is compared with that obtained from traditional quantum chemistry codes and that obtained from traditional computer architectures.

  19. Quantum Brachistochrone Curves as Geodesics: Obtaining Accurate Minimum-Time Protocols for the Control of Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoting; Allegra, Michele; Jacobs, Kurt; Lloyd, Seth; Lupo, Cosmo; Mohseni, Masoud

    2015-05-01

    Most methods of optimal control cannot obtain accurate time-optimal protocols. The quantum brachistochrone equation is an exception, and has the potential to provide accurate time-optimal protocols for a wide range of quantum control problems. So far, this potential has not been realized, however, due to the inadequacy of conventional numerical methods to solve it. Here we show that the quantum brachistochrone problem can be recast as that of finding geodesic paths in the space of unitary operators. We expect this brachistochrone-geodesic connection to have broad applications, as it opens up minimal-time control to the tools of geometry. As one such application, we use it to obtain a fast numerical method to solve the brachistochrone problem, and apply this method to two examples demonstrating its power.

  20. Automated generation of quantum-accurate classical interatomic potentials for metals and semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Aidan; Foiles, Stephen; Schultz, Peter; Swiler, Laura; Trott, Christian; Tucker, Garritt

    2013-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) is a powerful condensed matter simulation tool for bridging between macroscopic continuum models and quantum models (QM) treating a few hundred atoms, but is limited by the accuracy of available interatomic potentials. Sound physical and chemical understanding of these interactions have resulted in a variety of concise potentials for certain systems, but it is difficult to extend them to new materials and properties. The growing availability of large QM data sets has made it possible to use more automated machine-learning approaches. Bartók et al. demonstrated that the bispectrum of the local neighbor density provides good regression surrogates for QM models. We adopt a similar bispectrum representation within a linear regression scheme. We have produced potentials for silicon and tantalum, and we are currently extending the method to III-V compounds. Results will be presented demonstrating the accuracy of these potentials relative to the training data, as well as their ability to accurately predict material properties not explicitly included in the training data. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Dept. of Energy Nat. Nuclear Security Admin. under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. Accurate Calculations of Rotationally Inelastic Scattering Cross Sections Using Mixed Quantum/Classical Theory.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2014-01-16

    For computational treatment of rotationally inelastic scattering of molecules, we propose to use the mixed quantum/classical theory, MQCT. The old idea of treating translational motion classically, while quantum mechanics is used for rotational degrees of freedom, is developed to the new level and is applied to Na + N2 collisions in a broad range of energies. Comparison with full-quantum calculations shows that MQCT accurately reproduces all, even minor, features of energy dependence of cross sections, except scattering resonances at very low energies. The remarkable success of MQCT opens up wide opportunities for computational predictions of inelastic scattering cross sections at higher temperatures and/or for polyatomic molecules and heavier quenchers, which is computationally close to impossible within the full-quantum framework.

  2. How accurate are the European Union's classifications of chemical substances.

    PubMed

    Rudén, Christina; Hansson, Sven Ove

    2003-09-30

    The European Commission has decided on harmonized classifications for a large number of individual chemicals according to its own directive for classification and labeling of dangerous substances. We have compared the harmonized classifications for acute oral toxicity to the acute oral toxicity data available in the RTECS database. Of the 992 substances eligible for this comparison, 15% were assigned a too low danger class and 8% a too high danger class according to the RTECS data. Due to insufficient transparency-scientific documentations of the classification decisions are not available-the causes of this discrepancy can only be hypothesized. We propose that the scientific motivations of future classifications be published and that the apparent over- and underclassifications in the present system be either explained or rectified, according to what are the facts in the matter.

  3. The quantum dynamics of chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuppermann, A.

    1983-03-01

    In this project, we developed accurate and approximate methods for calculating cross sections of elementary reactions. These methods were applied to systems of importance for the fundamental aspects of chemical dynamics and for advanced technologies of interest to the United States Air Force. The application included calculations of three-atom exchange reactions, break-up and three-body recombination collisions and vibrational quenching by reaction. These calculations improved our understanding of such processes and permitted an assessment of some approximate methods.

  4. Accurate polyatomic quantum dynamics studies of combustion reactions. Final progress report, July 1, 1994--June 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.Z.H.

    1998-12-31

    This program is designed to develop accurate yet practical computational methods, primarily based on time-dependent quantum mechanics, for studying the dynamics of polyatomic reactions beyond the atom-diatom systems. Efficient computational methodologies are developed and the applications of these methods to practical chemical reactions relevant to combustion processes are carried out. The program emphasizes the practical aspects of accurate quantum dynamics calculations in order to understand, explain and predict the dynamical properties of important combustion reactions. The aim of this research is to help provide not only qualitative dynamics information but also quantitative prediction of reaction dynamics of combustion reactions at the microscopic level. Through accurate theoretical calculations, the authors wish to be able to quantitatively predict reaction cross sections and rate constants of relatively small gas-phase reactions from first principles that are of direct interest to combustion. The long-term goal of this research is to develop practical computational methods that are capable of quantitatively predicting dynamics of more complex polyatomic gas-phase reactions that are of interest to combustion.

  5. Quantum dynamics of fast chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Light, J.C.

    1993-12-01

    The aims of this research are to explore, develop, and apply theoretical methods for the evaluation of the dynamics of gas phase collision processes, primarily chemical reactions. The primary theoretical tools developed for this work have been quantum scattering theory, both in time dependent and time independent forms. Over the past several years, the authors have developed and applied methods for the direct quantum evaluation of thermal rate constants, applying these to the evaluation of the hydrogen isotopic exchange reactions, applied wave packet propagation techniques to the dissociation of Rydberg H{sub 3}, incorporated optical potentials into the evaluation of thermal rate constants, evaluated the use of optical potentials for state-to-state reaction probability evaluations, and, most recently, have developed quantum approaches for electronically non-adiabatic reactions which may be applied to simplify calculations of reactive, but electronically adiabatic systems. Evaluation of the thermal rate constants and the dissociation of H{sub 3} were reported last year, and have now been published.

  6. Quantum chemical study of methane oxidation species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackels, Charles F.

    1993-01-01

    The research funded by this project has focused on quantum chemical investigations of molecular species thought to be important in the chemistry of the earth's upper and lower atmospheres. The body of this report contains brief discussions of the results of the several phases of this investigation. In many instances these results have been presented at scientific meetings and/or published in refereed journals. Those bibliographic references are given. In addition to the study of specific chemical systems, there were several phases during the course of this investigation where much of the effort went into the development and modification of computer codes necessary to carry out these calculations on the wide range of computer equipment used during this study. This type of code maintenance and development work did not generally result in publications and presentations, but a brief review is given.

  7. Quantum Chemical Strain Analysis For Mechanochemical Processes.

    PubMed

    Stauch, Tim; Dreuw, Andreas

    2017-03-24

    The use of mechanical force to initiate a chemical reaction is an efficient alternative to the conventional sources of activation energy, i.e., heat, light, and electricity. Applications of mechanochemistry in academic and industrial laboratories are diverse, ranging from chemical syntheses in ball mills and ultrasound baths to direct activation of covalent bonds using an atomic force microscope. The vectorial nature of force is advantageous because specific covalent bonds can be preconditioned for rupture by selective stretching. However, the influence of mechanical force on single molecules is still not understood at a fundamental level, which limits the applicability of mechanochemistry. As a result, many chemists still resort to rules of thumb when it comes to conducting mechanochemical syntheses. In this Account, we show that comprehension of mechanochemistry at the molecular level can be tremendously advanced by quantum chemistry, in particular by using quantum chemical force analysis tools. One such tool is the JEDI (Judgement of Energy DIstribution) analysis, which provides a convenient approach to analyze the distribution of strain energy in a mechanically deformed molecule. Based on the harmonic approximation, the strain energy contribution is calculated for each bond length, bond angle and dihedral angle, thus providing a comprehensive picture of how force affects molecules. This Account examines the theoretical foundations of quantum chemical force analysis and provides a critical overview of the performance of the JEDI analysis in various mechanochemical applications. We explain in detail how this analysis tool is to be used to identify the "force-bearing scaffold" of a distorted molecule, which allows both the rationalization and the optimization of diverse mechanochemical processes. More precisely, we show that the inclusion of every bond, bending and torsion of a molecule allows a particularly insightful discussion of the distribution of mechanical

  8. Quantum Chemical Studies of Light Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Curutchet, Carles; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2017-01-25

    The design of optimal light-harvesting (supra)molecular systems and materials is one of the most challenging frontiers of science. Theoretical methods and computational models play a fundamental role in this difficult task, as they allow the establishment of structural blueprints inspired by natural photosynthetic organisms that can be applied to the design of novel artificial light-harvesting devices. Among theoretical strategies, the application of quantum chemical tools represents an important reality that has already reached an evident degree of maturity, although it still has to show its real potentials. This Review presents an overview of the state of the art of this strategy, showing the actual fields of applicability but also indicating its current limitations, which need to be solved in future developments.

  9. Quantum theory of chemical reaction rates

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.H. |

    1994-10-01

    If one wishes to describe a chemical reaction at the most detailed level possible, i.e., its state-to-state differential scattering cross section, then it is necessary to solve the Schroedinger equation to obtain the S-matrix as a function of total energy E and total angular momentum J, in terms of which the cross sections can be calculated as given by equation (1) in the paper. All other physically observable attributes of the reaction can be derived from the cross sections. Often, in fact, one is primarily interested in the least detailed quantity which characterizes the reaction, namely its thermal rate constant, which is obtained by integrating Eq. (1) over all scattering angles, summing over all product quantum states, and Boltzmann-averaging over all initial quantum states of reactants. With the proper weighting factors, all of these averages are conveniently contained in the cumulative reaction probability (CRP), which is defined by equation (2) and in terms of which the thermal rate constant is given by equation (3). Thus, having carried out a full state-to-state scattering calculation to obtain the S-matrix, one can obtain the CRP from Eq. (2), and then rate constant from Eq. (3), but this seems like ``overkill``; i.e., if one only wants the rate constant, it would clearly be desirable to have a theory that allows one to calculate it, or the CRP, more directly than via Eq. (2), yet also correctly, i.e., without inherent approximations. Such a theory is the subject of this paper.

  10. Thermochemistry and Charge Delocalization in Cyclization Reactions Using Accurate Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saritas, Kayahan; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2015-03-01

    Molecules that undergo pericyclic isomerization reactions find interesting optical and energy storage applications, because of their usually high quantum yields, large spectral shifts and small structural changes upon light absorption. These reactions induce a drastic change in the conjugated structure such that substituents that become a part of the conjugated system upon isomerization can play an important role in determining properties such as enthalpy of isomerization and HOMO-LUMO gap. Therefore, theoretical investigations dealing with such systems should be capable of accurately capturing the interplay between electron correlation and exchange effects. In this work, we examine the dihydroazulene isomerization as an example conjugated system. We employ the highly accurate quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method to predict thermochemical properties and to benchmark results from density functional theory (DFT) methods. Although DFT provides sufficient accuracy for similar systems, in this particular system, DFT predictions of ground state and reaction paths are inconsistent and non-systematic errors arise. We present a comparison between QMC and DFT results for enthalpy of isomerization, HOMO-LUMO gap and charge densities with a range of DFT functionals.

  11. A hierarchical approach to accurate predictions of macroscopic thermodynamic behavior from quantum mechanics and molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, Stephen L.

    2005-07-01

    The combination of molecular simulations and potentials obtained from quantum chemistry is shown to be able to provide reasonably accurate thermodynamic property predictions. Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations are used to understand the effects of small perturbations to various regions of the model Lennard-Jones 12-6 potential. However, when the phase behavior and second virial coefficient are scaled by the critical properties calculated for each potential, the results obey a corresponding states relation suggesting a non-uniqueness problem for interaction potentials fit to experimental phase behavior. Several variations of a procedure collectively referred to as quantum mechanical Hybrid Methods for Interaction Energies (HM-IE) are developed and used to accurately estimate interaction energies from CCSD(T) calculations with a large basis set in a computationally efficient manner for the neon-neon, acetylene-acetylene, and nitrogen-benzene systems. Using these results and methods, an ab initio, pairwise-additive, site-site potential for acetylene is determined and then improved using results from molecular simulations using this initial potential. The initial simulation results also indicate that a limited range of energies important for accurate phase behavior predictions. Second virial coefficients calculated from the improved potential indicate that one set of experimental data in the literature is likely erroneous. This prescription is then applied to methanethiol. Difficulties in modeling the effects of the lone pair electrons suggest that charges on the lone pair sites negatively impact the ability of the intermolecular potential to describe certain orientations, but that the lone pair sites may be necessary to reasonably duplicate the interaction energies for several orientations. Two possible methods for incorporating the effects of three-body interactions into simulations within the pairwise-additivity formulation are also developed. A low density

  12. Methods for Efficiently and Accurately Computing Quantum Mechanical Free Energies for Enzyme Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Kearns, F L; Hudson, P S; Boresch, S; Woodcock, H L

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme activity is inherently linked to free energies of transition states, ligand binding, protonation/deprotonation, etc.; these free energies, and thus enzyme function, can be affected by residue mutations, allosterically induced conformational changes, and much more. Therefore, being able to predict free energies associated with enzymatic processes is critical to understanding and predicting their function. Free energy simulation (FES) has historically been a computational challenge as it requires both the accurate description of inter- and intramolecular interactions and adequate sampling of all relevant conformational degrees of freedom. The hybrid quantum mechanical molecular mechanical (QM/MM) framework is the current tool of choice when accurate computations of macromolecular systems are essential. Unfortunately, robust and efficient approaches that employ the high levels of computational theory needed to accurately describe many reactive processes (ie, ab initio, DFT), while also including explicit solvation effects and accounting for extensive conformational sampling are essentially nonexistent. In this chapter, we will give a brief overview of two recently developed methods that mitigate several major challenges associated with QM/MM FES: the QM non-Boltzmann Bennett's acceptance ratio method and the QM nonequilibrium work method. We will also describe usage of these methods to calculate free energies associated with (1) relative properties and (2) along reaction paths, using simple test cases with relevance to enzymes examples.

  13. Tin phase transition in terapascal pressure range described accurately with Quantum Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, Roman; Hood, Randolph; Morales, Miguel

    The accurate prediction of phase transitions is one of the most important research areas in modern materials science. The main workhorse for such calculations, Density functional theory (DFT), employs different forms of approximate exchange-correlation functionals which may lead to overstabilization of one phase compared to another, therefore, predict incorrectly phase transition pressures. A recent example of such deficiency has been demonstrated in Sn: no bcc to hcp phase transition has been observed in Sn when dynamically compressed to 1.2 TPa while DFT predicts a transition to occur at 0.16-0.2 TPa. To overcome the limitations of DFT, we have employed diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) method which treats the many body electron problem directly. In order to get highly accurate results we systematically assess the effect of controllable approximations of DMC such as fixed node approximation, finite-size effects and the use of pseudopotentials. Based on metrologically accurate DMC equation of states we construct the pressure-temperature phase diagram and demonstrate its good agreement with experiment in contrast to DFT calculations.

  14. A time-accurate implicit method for chemical non-equilibrium flows at all speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, Jian-Shun

    1992-01-01

    A new time accurate coupled solution procedure for solving the chemical non-equilibrium Navier-Stokes equations over a wide range of Mach numbers is described. The scheme is shown to be very efficient and robust for flows with velocities ranging from M less than or equal to 10(exp -10) to supersonic speeds.

  15. Quantum chemical characterization of solid acid catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramani, Sriram

    Liquid and solid acids are used as catalysts in many industrially-important petrochemical processes, alternate fuel production methods and synthesis of gasoline octane-number boosters. Liquid acids pose several disadvantages such as health problems, water pollution and high cost of separation from the product stream. While solid acid catalysts do not have any of these disadvantages, their catalytic efficiency is less than that of liquid acids. Thus, a better understanding of the origin and nature of solid acidity is necessary to design solid acids of strength and stability comparable to that of the strong liquid acids in use. In addition, because of the heterogeneous nature of the solid acid, sites the acidity characterization methods used with liquid acids cannot provide a reliable measure of the solid acidity. Ongoing experimental research worldwide to develop a solid acidity scale has been only partly successful. This provides the motivation to use theoretical approaches such as computational chemistry methods to gain insight on the solid acidity, and thus complement the experimental studies. This work employs ab initio quantum mechanical computational chemistry techniques to calculate the electronic properties which provide a fundamental measure of the solid acidity. The objective of this dissertation is to examine the genesis and nature of solid acidity in silica-alumina, supported Mo oxide and sulfated Zr oxide catalysts as a function of their chemical composition and structural and electronic properties. This study also successfully demonstrates a strategy for the development of a solid acidity scale based on the calculated adsorption strength of standard gas-phase molecules on the solid acids.

  16. Fast and accurate quantum molecular dynamics of dense plasmas across temperature regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Sjostrom, Travis; Daligault, Jerome

    2014-10-10

    Here, we develop and implement a new quantum molecular dynamics approximation that allows fast and accurate simulations of dense plasmas from cold to hot conditions. The method is based on a carefully designed orbital-free implementation of density functional theory. The results for hydrogen and aluminum are in very good agreement with Kohn-Sham (orbital-based) density functional theory and path integral Monte Carlo calculations for microscopic features such as the electron density as well as the equation of state. The present approach does not scale with temperature and hence extends to higher temperatures than is accessible in the Kohn-Sham method and lower temperatures than is accessible by path integral Monte Carlo calculations, while being significantly less computationally expensive than either of those two methods.

  17. Fast and accurate quantum molecular dynamics of dense plasmas across temperature regimes

    DOE PAGES

    Sjostrom, Travis; Daligault, Jerome

    2014-10-10

    Here, we develop and implement a new quantum molecular dynamics approximation that allows fast and accurate simulations of dense plasmas from cold to hot conditions. The method is based on a carefully designed orbital-free implementation of density functional theory. The results for hydrogen and aluminum are in very good agreement with Kohn-Sham (orbital-based) density functional theory and path integral Monte Carlo calculations for microscopic features such as the electron density as well as the equation of state. The present approach does not scale with temperature and hence extends to higher temperatures than is accessible in the Kohn-Sham method and lowermore » temperatures than is accessible by path integral Monte Carlo calculations, while being significantly less computationally expensive than either of those two methods.« less

  18. Accurate prediction of the response of freshwater fish to a mixture of estrogenic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Brian, Jayne V; Harris, Catherine A; Scholze, Martin; Backhaus, Thomas; Booy, Petra; Lamoree, Marja; Pojana, Giulio; Jonkers, Niels; Runnalls, Tamsin; Bonfà, Angela; Marcomini, Antonio; Sumpter, John P

    2005-06-01

    Existing environmental risk assessment procedures are limited in their ability to evaluate the combined effects of chemical mixtures. We investigated the implications of this by analyzing the combined effects of a multicomponent mixture of five estrogenic chemicals using vitellogenin induction in male fathead minnows as an end point. The mixture consisted of estradiol, ethynylestradiol, nonylphenol, octylphenol, and bisphenol A. We determined concentration-response curves for each of the chemicals individually. The chemicals were then combined at equipotent concentrations and the mixture tested using fixed-ratio design. The effects of the mixture were compared with those predicted by the model of concentration addition using biomathematical methods, which revealed that there was no deviation between the observed and predicted effects of the mixture. These findings demonstrate that estrogenic chemicals have the capacity to act together in an additive manner and that their combined effects can be accurately predicted by concentration addition. We also explored the potential for mixture effects at low concentrations by exposing the fish to each chemical at one-fifth of its median effective concentration (EC50). Individually, the chemicals did not induce a significant response, although their combined effects were consistent with the predictions of concentration addition. This demonstrates the potential for estrogenic chemicals to act additively at environmentally relevant concentrations. These findings highlight the potential for existing environmental risk assessment procedures to underestimate the hazard posed by mixtures of chemicals that act via a similar mode of action, thereby leading to erroneous conclusions of absence of risk.

  19. Accurate Prediction of the Response of Freshwater Fish to a Mixture of Estrogenic Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Brian, Jayne V.; Harris, Catherine A.; Scholze, Martin; Backhaus, Thomas; Booy, Petra; Lamoree, Marja; Pojana, Giulio; Jonkers, Niels; Runnalls, Tamsin; Bonfà, Angela; Marcomini, Antonio; Sumpter, John P.

    2005-01-01

    Existing environmental risk assessment procedures are limited in their ability to evaluate the combined effects of chemical mixtures. We investigated the implications of this by analyzing the combined effects of a multicomponent mixture of five estrogenic chemicals using vitellogenin induction in male fathead minnows as an end point. The mixture consisted of estradiol, ethynylestradiol, nonylphenol, octylphenol, and bisphenol A. We determined concentration–response curves for each of the chemicals individually. The chemicals were then combined at equipotent concentrations and the mixture tested using fixed-ratio design. The effects of the mixture were compared with those predicted by the model of concentration addition using biomathematical methods, which revealed that there was no deviation between the observed and predicted effects of the mixture. These findings demonstrate that estrogenic chemicals have the capacity to act together in an additive manner and that their combined effects can be accurately predicted by concentration addition. We also explored the potential for mixture effects at low concentrations by exposing the fish to each chemical at one-fifth of its median effective concentration (EC50). Individually, the chemicals did not induce a significant response, although their combined effects were consistent with the predictions of concentration addition. This demonstrates the potential for estrogenic chemicals to act additively at environmentally relevant concentrations. These findings highlight the potential for existing environmental risk assessment procedures to underestimate the hazard posed by mixtures of chemicals that act via a similar mode of action, thereby leading to erroneous conclusions of absence of risk. PMID:15929895

  20. Machine Learning Predictions of Molecular Properties: Accurate Many-Body Potentials and Nonlocality in Chemical Space.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Katja; Biegler, Franziska; Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; Pronobis, Wiktor; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2015-06-18

    Simultaneously accurate and efficient prediction of molecular properties throughout chemical compound space is a critical ingredient toward rational compound design in chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Aiming toward this goal, we develop and apply a systematic hierarchy of efficient empirical methods to estimate atomization and total energies of molecules. These methods range from a simple sum over atoms, to addition of bond energies, to pairwise interatomic force fields, reaching to the more sophisticated machine learning approaches that are capable of describing collective interactions between many atoms or bonds. In the case of equilibrium molecular geometries, even simple pairwise force fields demonstrate prediction accuracy comparable to benchmark energies calculated using density functional theory with hybrid exchange-correlation functionals; however, accounting for the collective many-body interactions proves to be essential for approaching the “holy grail” of chemical accuracy of 1 kcal/mol for both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium geometries. This remarkable accuracy is achieved by a vectorized representation of molecules (so-called Bag of Bonds model) that exhibits strong nonlocality in chemical space. In addition, the same representation allows us to predict accurate electronic properties of molecules, such as their polarizability and molecular frontier orbital energies.

  1. Machine learning predictions of molecular properties: Accurate many-body potentials and nonlocality in chemical space

    DOE PAGES

    Hansen, Katja; Biegler, Franziska; Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; ...

    2015-06-04

    Simultaneously accurate and efficient prediction of molecular properties throughout chemical compound space is a critical ingredient toward rational compound design in chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Aiming toward this goal, we develop and apply a systematic hierarchy of efficient empirical methods to estimate atomization and total energies of molecules. These methods range from a simple sum over atoms, to addition of bond energies, to pairwise interatomic force fields, reaching to the more sophisticated machine learning approaches that are capable of describing collective interactions between many atoms or bonds. In the case of equilibrium molecular geometries, even simple pairwise force fields demonstratemore » prediction accuracy comparable to benchmark energies calculated using density functional theory with hybrid exchange-correlation functionals; however, accounting for the collective many-body interactions proves to be essential for approaching the “holy grail” of chemical accuracy of 1 kcal/mol for both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium geometries. This remarkable accuracy is achieved by a vectorized representation of molecules (so-called Bag of Bonds model) that exhibits strong nonlocality in chemical space. The same representation allows us to predict accurate electronic properties of molecules, such as their polarizability and molecular frontier orbital energies.« less

  2. Machine learning predictions of molecular properties: Accurate many-body potentials and nonlocality in chemical space

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Katja; Biegler, Franziska; Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; Pronobis, Wiktor; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Müller, Klaus -Robert; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2015-06-04

    Simultaneously accurate and efficient prediction of molecular properties throughout chemical compound space is a critical ingredient toward rational compound design in chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Aiming toward this goal, we develop and apply a systematic hierarchy of efficient empirical methods to estimate atomization and total energies of molecules. These methods range from a simple sum over atoms, to addition of bond energies, to pairwise interatomic force fields, reaching to the more sophisticated machine learning approaches that are capable of describing collective interactions between many atoms or bonds. In the case of equilibrium molecular geometries, even simple pairwise force fields demonstrate prediction accuracy comparable to benchmark energies calculated using density functional theory with hybrid exchange-correlation functionals; however, accounting for the collective many-body interactions proves to be essential for approaching the “holy grail” of chemical accuracy of 1 kcal/mol for both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium geometries. This remarkable accuracy is achieved by a vectorized representation of molecules (so-called Bag of Bonds model) that exhibits strong nonlocality in chemical space. The same representation allows us to predict accurate electronic properties of molecules, such as their polarizability and molecular frontier orbital energies.

  3. Semiconductor Quantum Dots in Chemical Sensors and Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Frasco, Manuela F.; Chaniotakis, Nikos

    2009-01-01

    Quantum dots are nanometre-scale semiconductor crystals with unique optical properties that are advantageous for the development of novel chemical sensors and biosensors. The surface chemistry of luminescent quantum dots has encouraged the development of multiple probes based on linked recognition molecules such as peptides, nucleic acids or small-molecule ligands. This review overviews the design of sensitive and selective nanoprobes, ranging from the type of target molecules to the optical transduction scheme. Representative examples of quantum dot-based optical sensors from this fast-moving field have been selected and are discussed towards the most promising directions for future research. PMID:22423206

  4. Spectral neighbor analysis method for automated generation of quantum-accurate interatomic potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.P.; Swiler, L.P.; Trott, C.R.; Foiles, S.M.; Tucker, G.J.

    2015-03-15

    We present a new interatomic potential for solids and liquids called Spectral Neighbor Analysis Potential (SNAP). The SNAP potential has a very general form and uses machine-learning techniques to reproduce the energies, forces, and stress tensors of a large set of small configurations of atoms, which are obtained using high-accuracy quantum electronic structure (QM) calculations. The local environment of each atom is characterized by a set of bispectrum components of the local neighbor density projected onto a basis of hyperspherical harmonics in four dimensions. The bispectrum components are the same bond-orientational order parameters employed by the GAP potential [1]. The SNAP potential, unlike GAP, assumes a linear relationship between atom energy and bispectrum components. The linear SNAP coefficients are determined using weighted least-squares linear regression against the full QM training set. This allows the SNAP potential to be fit in a robust, automated manner to large QM data sets using many bispectrum components. The calculation of the bispectrum components and the SNAP potential are implemented in the LAMMPS parallel molecular dynamics code. We demonstrate that a previously unnoticed symmetry property can be exploited to reduce the computational cost of the force calculations by more than one order of magnitude. We present results for a SNAP potential for tantalum, showing that it accurately reproduces a range of commonly calculated properties of both the crystalline solid and the liquid phases. In addition, unlike simpler existing potentials, SNAP correctly predicts the energy barrier for screw dislocation migration in BCC tantalum.

  5. Spectral neighbor analysis method for automated generation of quantum-accurate interatomic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A. P.; Swiler, L. P.; Trott, C. R.; Foiles, S. M.; Tucker, G. J.

    2015-03-01

    We present a new interatomic potential for solids and liquids called Spectral Neighbor Analysis Potential (SNAP). The SNAP potential has a very general form and uses machine-learning techniques to reproduce the energies, forces, and stress tensors of a large set of small configurations of atoms, which are obtained using high-accuracy quantum electronic structure (QM) calculations. The local environment of each atom is characterized by a set of bispectrum components of the local neighbor density projected onto a basis of hyperspherical harmonics in four dimensions. The bispectrum components are the same bond-orientational order parameters employed by the GAP potential [1]. The SNAP potential, unlike GAP, assumes a linear relationship between atom energy and bispectrum components. The linear SNAP coefficients are determined using weighted least-squares linear regression against the full QM training set. This allows the SNAP potential to be fit in a robust, automated manner to large QM data sets using many bispectrum components. The calculation of the bispectrum components and the SNAP potential are implemented in the LAMMPS parallel molecular dynamics code. We demonstrate that a previously unnoticed symmetry property can be exploited to reduce the computational cost of the force calculations by more than one order of magnitude. We present results for a SNAP potential for tantalum, showing that it accurately reproduces a range of commonly calculated properties of both the crystalline solid and the liquid phases. In addition, unlike simpler existing potentials, SNAP correctly predicts the energy barrier for screw dislocation migration in BCC tantalum.

  6. Approximate but accurate quantum dynamics from the Mori formalism. II. Equilibrium time correlation functions.

    PubMed

    Montoya-Castillo, Andrés; Reichman, David R

    2017-02-28

    The ability to efficiently and accurately calculate equilibrium time correlation functions of many-body condensed phase quantum systems is one of the outstanding problems in theoretical chemistry. The Nakajima-Zwanzig-Mori formalism coupled to the self-consistent solution of the memory kernel has recently proven to be highly successful for the computation of nonequilibrium dynamical averages. Here, we extend this formalism to treat symmetrized equilibrium time correlation functions for the spin-boson model. Following the first paper in this series [A. Montoya-Castillo and D. R. Reichman, J. Chem. Phys. 144, 184104 (2016)], we use a Dyson-type expansion of the projected propagator to obtain a self-consistent solution for the memory kernel that requires only the calculation of normally evolved auxiliary kernels. We employ the approximate mean-field Ehrenfest method to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. Via comparison with numerically exact results for the correlation function Czz(t)=Re⟨σz(0)σz(t)⟩, we show that the current scheme affords remarkable boosts in accuracy and efficiency over bare Ehrenfest dynamics. We further explore the sensitivity of the resulting dynamics to the choice of kernel closures and the accuracy of the initial canonical density operator.

  7. Forming NCO– in Dense Molecular Clouds: Possible Gas-Phase Chemical Paths From Quantum Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The existence of NCO– anions in the interstellar medium (ISM) has been suggested and searched for over the years but without any formal definitive sighting of that molecule. We discuss in this work the possible formation of either NCO– directly or of NCO neutral as a precursor to NCO– formation by electron attachment. We follow simple, gas-phase chemical reactions for which the general features are obtained from accurate quantum calculations. The results are shedding some additional light on the likely presence of this anion in the ISM environment, drawing further information from the specific features of the considered reactions on the additional chemical options that exist for its formation. PMID:26696323

  8. Accurate Intermolecular Potential for the C60 Dimer: The Performance of Different Levels of Quantum Theory.

    PubMed

    Sharapa, Dmitry I; Margraf, Johannes T; Hesselmann, Andreas; Clark, Timothy

    2017-01-10

    The self-assembly of molecular building blocks is a promising route to low-cost nanoelectronic devices. It would be very appealing to use computer-aided design to identify suitable molecules. However, molecular self-assembly is guided by weak interactions, such as dispersion, which have long been notoriously difficult to describe with quantum chemical methods. In recent years, several viable techniques have emerged, ranging from empirical dispersion corrections for DFT to fast perturbation and coupled-cluster theories. In this work, we test these methods for the dimer of the prototypical building block for nanoelectronics, C60-fullerene. Benchmark quality data is obtained from DFT-based symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT), the adiabatic-connection fluctuation dissipation (ACFD) theorem using an adiabatic LDA kernel, and domain-based local pair natural orbital (DLPNO) coupled-pair and coupled-cluster methods. These benchmarks are used to evaluate economical dispersion-corrected DFT methods, double-hybrid DFT functionals, and second-order Møller-Plesset theory. Furthermore, we provide analytical fits to the benchmark interaction curves, which can be used for a coarse-grain description of fullerene self-assembly. These analytical expressions differ significantly from those reported previously based on bulk data.

  9. Assessment of the extended Koopmans' theorem for the chemical reactivity: Accurate computations of chemical potentials, chemical hardnesses, and electrophilicity indices.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Dilan; Bozkaya, Uğur

    2016-01-30

    The extended Koopmans' theorem (EKT) provides a straightforward way to compute ionization potentials and electron affinities from any level of theory. Although it is widely applied to ionization potentials, the EKT approach has not been applied to evaluation of the chemical reactivity. We present the first benchmarking study to investigate the performance of the EKT methods for predictions of chemical potentials (μ) (hence electronegativities), chemical hardnesses (η), and electrophilicity indices (ω). We assess the performance of the EKT approaches for post-Hartree-Fock methods, such as Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, the coupled-electron pair theory, and their orbital-optimized counterparts for the evaluation of the chemical reactivity. Especially, results of the orbital-optimized coupled-electron pair theory method (with the aug-cc-pVQZ basis set) for predictions of the chemical reactivity are very promising; the corresponding mean absolute errors are 0.16, 0.28, and 0.09 eV for μ, η, and ω, respectively.

  10. Quantum chemical parameters in QSAR: what do I use when?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, James P.; Ostrander, Gary K.

    1996-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief overview of the numerous quantum chemical parameters that have been/are currently being used in quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR), along with a representative bibliography. The parameters will be grouped according to their mechanistic interpretations, and representative biological and physical chemical applications will be mentioned. Parmater computation methods and the appropriate software are highlighted, as are sources for software.

  11. Chemical application of diffusion quantum Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, P. J.; Lester, W. A., Jr.

    1983-10-01

    The diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method gives a stochastic solution to the Schroedinger equation. As an example the singlet-triplet splitting of the energy of the methylene molecule CH2 is given. The QMC algorithm was implemented on the CYBER 205, first as a direct transcription of the algorithm running on our VAX 11/780, and second by explicitly writing vector code for all loops longer than a crossover length C. The speed of the codes relative to one another as a function of C, and relative to the VAX is discussed. Since CH2 has only eight electrons, most of the loops in this application are fairly short. The longest inner loops run over the set of atomic basis functions. The CPU time dependence obtained versus the number of basis functions is discussed and compared with that obtained from traditional quantum chemistry codes and that obtained from traditional computer architectures. Finally, preliminary work on restructuring the algorithm to compute the separate Monte Carlo realizations in parallel is discussed.

  12. Remote Chemical Sensing Using Quantum Cascade Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Warren W.; Schultz, John F.

    2003-01-30

    Spectroscopic chemical sensing research at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing advanced sensors for detecting the production of nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons; use of chemical weapons; or the presence of explosives, firearms, narcotics, or other contraband of significance to homeland security in airports, cargo terminals, public buildings, or other sensitive locations. For most of these missions, the signature chemicals are expected to occur in very low concentrations, and in mixture with ambient air or airborne waste streams that contain large numbers of other species that may interfere with spectroscopic detection, or be mistaken for signatures of illicit activity. PNNL’s emphasis is therefore on developing remote and sampling sensors with extreme sensitivity, and resistance to interferents, or selectivity. PNNL’s research activities include: 1. Identification of signature chemicals and quantification of their spectral characteristics, 2. Identification and development of laser and other technologies that enable breakthroughs in sensitivity and selectivity, 3. Development of promising sensing techniques through experimentation and modeling the physical phenomenology and practical engineering limitations affecting their performance, and 4. Development and testing of data collection methods and analysis algorithms. Close coordination of all aspects of the research is important to ensure that all parts are focused on productive avenues of investigation. Close coordination of experimental development and numerical modeling is particularly important because the theoretical component provides understanding and predictive capability, while the experiments validate calculations and ensure that all phenomena and engineering limitations are considered.

  13. Quantum Chemical Approach to Estimating the Thermodynamics of Metabolic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Jinich, Adrian; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Dunn, Ian; Sanchez-Lengeling, Benjamin; Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Noor, Elad; Even, Arren Bar; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-01-01

    Thermodynamics plays an increasingly important role in modeling and engineering metabolism. We present the first nonempirical computational method for estimating standard Gibbs reaction energies of metabolic reactions based on quantum chemistry, which can help fill in the gaps in the existing thermodynamic data. When applied to a test set of reactions from core metabolism, the quantum chemical approach is comparable in accuracy to group contribution methods for isomerization and group transfer reactions and for reactions not including multiply charged anions. The errors in standard Gibbs reaction energy estimates are correlated with the charges of the participating molecules. The quantum chemical approach is amenable to systematic improvements and holds potential for providing thermodynamic data for all of metabolism. PMID:25387603

  14. Quantum chemical approach to estimating the thermodynamics of metabolic reactions.

    PubMed

    Jinich, Adrian; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Dunn, Ian; Sanchez-Lengeling, Benjamin; Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Noor, Elad; Even, Arren Bar; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-11-12

    Thermodynamics plays an increasingly important role in modeling and engineering metabolism. We present the first nonempirical computational method for estimating standard Gibbs reaction energies of metabolic reactions based on quantum chemistry, which can help fill in the gaps in the existing thermodynamic data. When applied to a test set of reactions from core metabolism, the quantum chemical approach is comparable in accuracy to group contribution methods for isomerization and group transfer reactions and for reactions not including multiply charged anions. The errors in standard Gibbs reaction energy estimates are correlated with the charges of the participating molecules. The quantum chemical approach is amenable to systematic improvements and holds potential for providing thermodynamic data for all of metabolism.

  15. Exact geometries from quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Dieter; Kraka, Elfi; He, Yuan

    2001-06-01

    For seventeen molecules, complete basis set (CBS) geometries are obtained for Møller-Plesset perturbation methods at second (MP2), fourth (MP4), and sixth order (MP6) as well as for the Coupled Cluster methods CCD, CCSD, and CCSD( T). The correlation consistent basis sets cc-pVDZ, cc-pVTZ, and cc-pVQZ were systematically applied and calculated geometries extrapolated to the limit of an infinitely large basis set. MP6 equilibrium geometries are more accurate than MP2 or MP4 geometries at the CBS limit and provide AH bond lengths with an accuracy of 0.001 Å. However, AB bonds are always predicted too long because of the lack of sufficient coupling effects between p-electron correlation at MP6. CCSD( T) provides reasonable AB bond lengths although these are in general too short by 0.003 Å. Due to error cancellation very accurate geometries are obtained at the CCSD( T)/cc-pVTZ and CCSD( T)/cc-pVQZ level of theory. With the help of the accurate equilibrium geometries obtained in this work, several experimentally based geometries could be corrected. The effects of HF-optimized basis sets, diffuse functions or the frozen core approximation on geometry optimizations are discussed. It is emphasized that the use of the cc-pVDZ or any other VDZ+P basis set should be avoided in correlation corrected ab initio calculations.

  16. Accurate dispensing of volatile reagents on demand for chemical reactions in EWOD chips

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huijiang; Sadeghi, Saman; Shah, Gaurav J.; Chen, Supin; Keng, Pei Yuin; Kim, Chang-Jin “CJ”; van Dam, R. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Digital microfluidic chips provide a new platform for manipulating chemicals for multi-step chemical synthesis or assays at the microscale. The organic solvents and reagents needed for these applications are often volatile, sensitive to contamination, and wetting, i.e. have contact angles of < 90° even on the highly hydrophobic surfaces (e.g., Teflon® or Cytop®) typically used on digital microfluidic chips. Furthermore, often the applications dictate that the processes are performed in a gas environment, not allowing the use of a filler liquid (e.g., oil). These properties pose challenges for delivering controlled volumes of liquid to the chip. An automated, simple, accurate and reliable method of delivering reagents from sealed, off-chip reservoirs is presented here. This platform overcomes the issues of evaporative losses of volatile solvents, cross-contamination, and flooding of the chip by combining a syringe pump, a simple on-chip liquid detector and a robust interface design. The impedance-based liquid detection requires only minimal added hardware to provide a feedback signal to ensure accurate volumes of volatile solvents are introduced to the chip, independent of time delays between dispensing operations. On-demand dispensing of multiple droplets of acetonitrile, a frequently used but difficult to handle solvent due to its wetting properties and volatility, was demonstrated and used to synthesize the positron emission tomography (PET) probe [18F]FDG reliably. PMID:22825699

  17. Electrochemical and quantum chemical studies on mitomycin and adriamycin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özalp-Yaman, Şeniz; Önal, Ahmet M.; Türker, Lemi

    2003-06-01

    In-situ spectroelectrochemical redox behaviour of two prominent chemotherapeutic agents, mitomycin and adriamycin were studied at constant potential. AM1 (UHF) type quantum chemical calculations on the neutral as well as radical anion and cation forms of mitomycin and adriamycin were performed.

  18. Quantum and semiclassical theories of chemical reaction rates

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.H. |

    1995-09-01

    A rigorous quantum mechanical theory (and a semiclassical approximation thereto) is described for calculating chemical reaction rates ``directly``, i.e., without having to solve the complete state-to-state reactive scattering problem. The approach has many vestiges of transition state theory, for which it may be thought of as the rigorous generalization.

  19. Dynamical mean-field theory from a quantum chemical perspective.

    PubMed

    Zgid, Dominika; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2011-03-07

    We investigate the dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) from a quantum chemical perspective. Dynamical mean-field theory offers a formalism to extend quantum chemical methods for finite systems to infinite periodic problems within a local correlation approximation. In addition, quantum chemical techniques can be used to construct new ab initio Hamiltonians and impurity solvers for DMFT. Here, we explore some ways in which these things may be achieved. First, we present an informal overview of dynamical mean-field theory to connect to quantum chemical language. Next, we describe an implementation of dynamical mean-field theory where we start from an ab initio Hartree-Fock Hamiltonian that avoids double counting issues present in many applications of DMFT. We then explore the use of the configuration interaction hierarchy in DMFT as an approximate solver for the impurity problem. We also investigate some numerical issues of convergence within DMFT. Our studies are carried out in the context of the cubic hydrogen model, a simple but challenging test for correlation methods. Finally, we finish with some conclusions for future directions.

  20. Polynomial-time quantum algorithm for the simulation of chemical dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kassal, Ivan; Jordan, Stephen P; Love, Peter J; Mohseni, Masoud; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2008-12-02

    The computational cost of exact methods for quantum simulation using classical computers grows exponentially with system size. As a consequence, these techniques can be applied only to small systems. By contrast, we demonstrate that quantum computers could exactly simulate chemical reactions in polynomial time. Our algorithm uses the split-operator approach and explicitly simulates all electron-nuclear and interelectronic interactions in quadratic time. Surprisingly, this treatment is not only more accurate than the Born-Oppenheimer approximation but faster and more efficient as well, for all reactions with more than about four atoms. This is the case even though the entire electronic wave function is propagated on a grid with appropriately short time steps. Although the preparation and measurement of arbitrary states on a quantum computer is inefficient, here we demonstrate how to prepare states of chemical interest efficiently. We also show how to efficiently obtain chemically relevant observables, such as state-to-state transition probabilities and thermal reaction rates. Quantum computers using these techniques could outperform current classical computers with 100 qubits.

  1. Investigation of quantum confinement behavior of zinc sulphide quantum dots synthesized via various chemical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Jose, Meera Sakthivel, T. Chandran, Hrisheekesh T. Nivea, R. Gunasekaran, V.

    2014-10-15

    In this work, undoped and Ag-doped ZnS quantum dots were synthesized using various chemical methods. The products were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-visible spectroscopy and Photoluminescence spectroscopy. Our results revealed that the size of the as-prepared samples range from 1–6 nm in diameter and have a cubic zinc-blende structure. Also, we observed the emission of different wavelength of light from different sized quantum dots of the same material due to quantum confinement effect. The results will be presented in detail and ZnS can be a potential candidate for optical device development and applications.

  2. Accurate nonadiabatic quantum dynamics on the cheap: Making the most of mean field theory with master equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Aaron; Brackbill, Nora; Markland, Thomas E.

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we show how Ehrenfest mean field theory can be made both a more accurate and efficient method to treat nonadiabatic quantum dynamics by combining it with the generalized quantum master equation framework. The resulting mean field generalized quantum master equation (MF-GQME) approach is a non-perturbative and non-Markovian theory to treat open quantum systems without any restrictions on the form of the Hamiltonian that it can be applied to. By studying relaxation dynamics in a wide range of dynamical regimes, typical of charge and energy transfer, we show that MF-GQME provides a much higher accuracy than a direct application of mean field theory. In addition, these increases in accuracy are accompanied by computational speed-ups of between one and two orders of magnitude that become larger as the system becomes more nonadiabatic. This combination of quantum-classical theory and master equation techniques thus makes it possible to obtain the accuracy of much more computationally expensive approaches at a cost lower than even mean field dynamics, providing the ability to treat the quantum dynamics of atomistic condensed phase systems for long times.

  3. Accurate nonadiabatic quantum dynamics on the cheap: making the most of mean field theory with master equations.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Aaron; Brackbill, Nora; Markland, Thomas E

    2015-03-07

    In this article, we show how Ehrenfest mean field theory can be made both a more accurate and efficient method to treat nonadiabatic quantum dynamics by combining it with the generalized quantum master equation framework. The resulting mean field generalized quantum master equation (MF-GQME) approach is a non-perturbative and non-Markovian theory to treat open quantum systems without any restrictions on the form of the Hamiltonian that it can be applied to. By studying relaxation dynamics in a wide range of dynamical regimes, typical of charge and energy transfer, we show that MF-GQME provides a much higher accuracy than a direct application of mean field theory. In addition, these increases in accuracy are accompanied by computational speed-ups of between one and two orders of magnitude that become larger as the system becomes more nonadiabatic. This combination of quantum-classical theory and master equation techniques thus makes it possible to obtain the accuracy of much more computationally expensive approaches at a cost lower than even mean field dynamics, providing the ability to treat the quantum dynamics of atomistic condensed phase systems for long times.

  4. Accurate nonadiabatic quantum dynamics on the cheap: Making the most of mean field theory with master equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Aaron; Markland, Thomas E.; Brackbill, Nora

    2015-03-07

    In this article, we show how Ehrenfest mean field theory can be made both a more accurate and efficient method to treat nonadiabatic quantum dynamics by combining it with the generalized quantum master equation framework. The resulting mean field generalized quantum master equation (MF-GQME) approach is a non-perturbative and non-Markovian theory to treat open quantum systems without any restrictions on the form of the Hamiltonian that it can be applied to. By studying relaxation dynamics in a wide range of dynamical regimes, typical of charge and energy transfer, we show that MF-GQME provides a much higher accuracy than a direct application of mean field theory. In addition, these increases in accuracy are accompanied by computational speed-ups of between one and two orders of magnitude that become larger as the system becomes more nonadiabatic. This combination of quantum-classical theory and master equation techniques thus makes it possible to obtain the accuracy of much more computationally expensive approaches at a cost lower than even mean field dynamics, providing the ability to treat the quantum dynamics of atomistic condensed phase systems for long times.

  5. Asymmetric chemical reactions by polarized quantum beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Jun-Ichi; Kobayashi, Kensei

    One of the most attractive hypothesis for the origin of homochirality in terrestrial bio-organic compounds (L-amino acid and D-sugar dominant) is nominated as "Cosmic Scenario"; a chiral impulse from asymmetric excitation sources in space triggered asymmetric reactions on the surfaces of such space materials as meteorites or interstellar dusts prior to the existence of terrestrial life. 1) Effective asymmetric excitation sources in space are proposed as polarized quantum beams, such as circularly polarized light and spin polarized electrons. Circularly polarized light is emitted as synchrotron radiation from tightly captured electrons by intense magnetic field around neutron stars. In this case, either left-or right-handed polarized light can be observed depending on the direction of observation. On the other hand, spin polarized electrons is emitted as beta-ray in beta decay from radioactive nuclei or neutron fireballs in supernova explosion. 2) The spin of beta-ray electrons is longitudinally polarized due to parity non-conservation in the weak interaction. The helicity (the the projection of the spin onto the direction of kinetic momentum) of beta-ray electrons is universally negative (left-handed). For the purpose of verifying the asymmetric structure emergence in bio-organic compounds by polarized quantum beams, we are now carrying out laboratory simulations using circularly polarized light from synchrotron radiation facility or spin polarized electron beam from beta-ray radiation source. 3,4) The target samples are solid film or aqueous solution of racemic amino acids. 1) K.Kobayashi, K.Kaneko, J.Takahashi, Y.Takano, in Astrobiology: from simple molecules to primitive life; Ed. V.Basiuk; American Scientific Publisher: Valencia, 2008. 2) G.A.Gusev, T.Saito, V.A.Tsarev, A.V.Uryson, Origins Life Evol. Biosphere. 37, 259 (2007). 3) J.Takahashi, H.Shinojima, M.Seyama, Y.Ueno, T.Kaneko, K.Kobayashi, H.Mita, M.Adachi, M.Hosaka, M.Katoh, Int. J. Mol. Sci. 10, 3044

  6. Quantum Chemical Topology: Knowledgeable atoms in peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popelier, Paul L. A.

    2012-06-01

    The need to improve atomistic biomolecular force fields remains acute. Fortunately, the abundance of contemporary computing power enables an overhaul of the architecture of current force fields, which typically base their electrostatics on fixed atomic partial charges. We discuss the principles behind the electrostatics of a more realistic force field under construction, called QCTFF. At the heart of QCTFF lies the so-called topological atom, which is a malleable box, whose shape and electrostatics changes in response to a changing environment. This response is captured by a machine learning method called Kriging. Kriging directly predicts each multipole moment of a given atom (i.e. the output) from the coordinates of the nuclei surrounding this atom (i.e. the input). This procedure yields accurate interatomic electrostatic energies, which form the basis for future-proof progress in force field design.

  7. An Efficient and Accurate Quantum Lattice-Gas Model for the Many-Body Schroedinger Wave Equation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    CONTRACT NUMBER AN EFFICIENT AND ACCURATE QUANTUM LATTICE-GAS MODEL FOR THE MANY-BODY SCHROEDINGER WAVE EQUATION 5b. GRANT NUMBER SC. PROGRAM ELEMENT...for simulating the time-dependent evolution of a many-body jiiantum mechanical system of particles governed by the non-relativistic Schroedinger " wave...the numerical dispersion of the simulated wave packets is compared with the analytical solutions. 15. SUBJECT TERM: Schroedinger wave equation

  8. A time-accurate algorithm for chemical non-equilibrium viscous flows at all speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, J.-S.; Chen, K.-H.; Choi, Y.

    1992-01-01

    A time-accurate, coupled solution procedure is described for the chemical nonequilibrium Navier-Stokes equations over a wide range of Mach numbers. This method employs the strong conservation form of the governing equations, but uses primitive variables as unknowns. Real gas properties and equilibrium chemistry are considered. Numerical tests include steady convergent-divergent nozzle flows with air dissociation/recombination chemistry, dump combustor flows with n-pentane-air chemistry, nonreacting flow in a model double annular combustor, and nonreacting unsteady driven cavity flows. Numerical results for both the steady and unsteady flows demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of the present algorithm for Mach numbers ranging from the incompressible limit to supersonic speeds.

  9. Quantum chemical calculations of glycine glutaric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arioǧlu, ćaǧla; Tamer, Ömer; Avci, Davut; Atalay, Yusuf

    2017-02-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of glycine glutaric acid were performed by using B3LYP levels with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The theoretical structural parameters such as bond lengths and bond angles are in a good agreement with the experimental values of the title compound. HOMO and LUMO energies were calculated, and the obtained energy gap shows that charge transfer occurs in the title compound. Vibrational frequencies were calculated and compare with experimental ones. 3D molecular surfaces of the title compound were simulated using the same level and basis set. Finally, the 13C and 1H NMR chemical shift values were calculated by the application of the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method.

  10. Identification of "Known Unknowns" Utilizing Accurate Mass Data and Chemical Abstracts Service Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, James L.; Cleven, Curtis D.; Brown, Stacy D.

    2011-02-01

    In many cases, an unknown to an investigator is actually known in the chemical literature. We refer to these types of compounds as "known unknowns." Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Registry is a particularly good source of these substances as it contains over 54 million entries. Accurate mass measurements can be used to query the CAS Registry by either molecular formulae or average molecular weights. Searching the database by the web-based version of SciFinder is the preferred approach when molecular formulae are available. However, if a definitive molecular formula cannot be ascertained, searching the database with STN Express by average molecular weights is a viable alternative. The results from either approach are refined by employing the number of associated references or minimal sample history as orthogonal filters. These approaches were shown to be successful in identifying "known unknowns" noted in LC-MS and even GC-MS analyses in our laboratory. In addition, they were demonstrated in the identification of a variety of compounds of interest to others.

  11. Mapping the chemical potential landscape of a triple quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broome, M. A.; Gorman, S. K.; Keizer, J. G.; Watson, T. F.; Hile, S. J.; Baker, W. J.; Simmons, M. Y.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the nonequilibrium charge dynamics of a triple quantum dot and demonstrate how electron transport through these systems can give rise to nontrivial tunneling paths. Using a real-time charge sensing method, we establish tunneling pathways taken by particular electrons under well-defined electrostatic configurations. We show how these measurements map to the chemical potentials for different charge states across the system. We use a modified Hubbard Hamiltonian to describes the system dynamics and show is reproduces all experimental observations.

  12. Automated Discovery of New Chemical Reactions and Accurate Calculation of Their Rates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-02

    either experimentally or by using quantum chemistry). 15.  SUBJECT TERMS combustion chemistry, kinetics, reaction pathways 16.  SECURITY CLASSIFICATION...serendipity (either experimentally or by using quantum chemistry). In this project we develop a much more systematic approach, using high...performance computing to search for reactions connecting a specified reactant to each possible product, and using quantum chemistry to determine the reaction

  13. Accurate analysis of electron transfer from quantum dots to metal oxides in quantum dot sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javad Fahimi, Mohammad; Fathi, Davood; Ansari-Rad, Mehdi

    2015-09-01

    Electron transfer rate from quantum dot (QD) to metal oxide (MO) in quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) has an important role in the efficiency. In this work, we analyse the electron transfer rate from CdSe, CdS and CdTe QDs to TiO2, ZnO and SnO2 MOs by extending the related equations with considering various effects, based on the Marcus theory. In this regard, the effects of QD diameter, QD-MO spacing, the crystalline defects, temperature, and the reorganizational energy, on the electron transfer rate are investigated. The results show that, the maximum electron transfer rate is achieved for CdTe QD with the mentioned three MOs. Moreover, in order to direct the designer to reach the appropriate QDs-MOs combinations for obtaining the maximum electron transfer rate, the average electron transfer rate for various combinations is calculated. For the verification of simulation method, a part of work has been compared with the previous experimental and theoretical results, which indicates the correctness of our simulation algorithm.

  14. Hybrid quantum and classical methods for computing kinetic isotope effects of chemical reactions in solutions and in enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiali; Major, Dan T; Fan, Yao; Lin, Yen-Lin; Ma, Shuhua; Wong, Kin-Yiu

    2008-01-01

    A method for incorporating quantum mechanics into enzyme kinetics modeling is presented. Three aspects are emphasized: 1) combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical methods are used to represent the potential energy surface for modeling bond forming and breaking processes, 2) instantaneous normal mode analyses are used to incorporate quantum vibrational free energies to the classical potential of mean force, and 3) multidimensional tunneling methods are used to estimate quantum effects on the reaction coordinate motion. Centroid path integral simulations are described to make quantum corrections to the classical potential of mean force. In this method, the nuclear quantum vibrational and tunneling contributions are not separable. An integrated centroid path integral-free energy perturbation and umbrella sampling (PI-FEP/UM) method along with a bisection sampling procedure was summarized, which provides an accurate, easily convergent method for computing kinetic isotope effects for chemical reactions in solution and in enzymes. In the ensemble-averaged variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling (EA-VTST/MT), these three aspects of quantum mechanical effects can be individually treated, providing useful insights into the mechanism of enzymatic reactions. These methods are illustrated by applications to a model process in the gas phase, the decarboxylation reaction of N-methyl picolinate in water, and the proton abstraction and reprotonation process catalyzed by alanine racemase. These examples show that the incorporation of quantum mechanical effects is essential for enzyme kinetics simulations.

  15. The Bondons: The Quantum Particles of the Chemical Bond

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Mihai V.

    2010-01-01

    By employing the combined Bohmian quantum formalism with the U(1) and SU(2) gauge transformations of the non-relativistic wave-function and the relativistic spinor, within the Schrödinger and Dirac quantum pictures of electron motions, the existence of the chemical field is revealed along the associate bondon particle B̶ characterized by its mass (mB̶), velocity (vB̶), charge (eB̶), and life-time (tB̶). This is quantized either in ground or excited states of the chemical bond in terms of reduced Planck constant ħ, the bond energy Ebond and length Xbond, respectively. The mass-velocity-charge-time quaternion properties of bondons’ particles were used in discussing various paradigmatic types of chemical bond towards assessing their covalent, multiple bonding, metallic and ionic features. The bondonic picture was completed by discussing the relativistic charge and life-time (the actual zitterbewegung) problem, i.e., showing that the bondon equals the benchmark electronic charge through moving with almost light velocity. It carries negligible, although non-zero, mass in special bonding conditions and towards observable femtosecond life-time as the bonding length increases in the nanosystems and bonding energy decreases according with the bonding length-energy relationship Ebond[kcal/mol]×Xbond[A0]=182019, providing this way the predictive framework in which the B̶ particle may be observed. Finally, its role in establishing the virtual states in Raman scattering was also established. PMID:21151435

  16. When do perturbative approaches accurately capture the dynamics of complex quantum systems?

    PubMed Central

    Fruchtman, Amir; Lambert, Neill; Gauger, Erik M.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of higher-dimensional quantum systems embedded in a complex environment remains a significant theoretical challenge. While several approaches yielding numerically converged solutions exist, these are computationally expensive and often provide only limited physical insight. Here we address the question: when do more intuitive and simpler-to-compute second-order perturbative approaches provide adequate accuracy? We develop a simple analytical criterion and verify its validity for the case of the much-studied FMO dynamics as well as the canonical spin-boson model. PMID:27335176

  17. Accurate Semilocal Density Functional for Condensed-Matter Physics and Quantum Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jianmin; Mo, Yuxiang

    2016-08-12

    Most density functionals have been developed by imposing the known exact constraints on the exchange-correlation energy, or by a fit to a set of properties of selected systems, or by both. However, accurate modeling of the conventional exchange hole presents a great challenge, due to the delocalization of the hole. Making use of the property that the hole can be made localized under a general coordinate transformation, here we derive an exchange hole from the density matrix expansion, while the correlation part is obtained by imposing the low-density limit constraint. From the hole, a semilocal exchange-correlation functional is calculated. Our comprehensive test shows that this functional can achieve remarkable accuracy for diverse properties of molecules, solids, and solid surfaces, substantially improving upon the nonempirical functionals proposed in recent years. Accurate semilocal functionals based on their associated holes are physically appealing and practically useful for developing nonlocal functionals.

  18. Accurate Semilocal Density Functional for Condensed-Matter Physics and Quantum Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jianmin; Mo, Yuxiang

    2016-08-01

    Most density functionals have been developed by imposing the known exact constraints on the exchange-correlation energy, or by a fit to a set of properties of selected systems, or by both. However, accurate modeling of the conventional exchange hole presents a great challenge, due to the delocalization of the hole. Making use of the property that the hole can be made localized under a general coordinate transformation, here we derive an exchange hole from the density matrix expansion, while the correlation part is obtained by imposing the low-density limit constraint. From the hole, a semilocal exchange-correlation functional is calculated. Our comprehensive test shows that this functional can achieve remarkable accuracy for diverse properties of molecules, solids, and solid surfaces, substantially improving upon the nonempirical functionals proposed in recent years. Accurate semilocal functionals based on their associated holes are physically appealing and practically useful for developing nonlocal functionals.

  19. Quantum Dynamics of Vinylidene Photodetachment on an Accurate Global Acetylene-Vinylidene Potential Energy Surface.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lifen; Han, Huixian; Ma, Jianyi; Guo, Hua

    2015-08-06

    Vinylidene is a high-energy isomer of acetylene, and the rearrangement of bonds in the two species serves as a prototype for isomerization reactions. Here, a full-dimensional quantum mechanical study of the vinylidene vibration is carried out on a recently developed global acetylene-vinylidene potential energy surface by simulating the photodetachment dynamics of the vinylidene anion. Several low-lying vibrational levels of the anion were first determined on a new ab initio based potential energy surface, and their photoelectron spectra were obtained within the Condon approximation. The vibrational features of the vinylidene isomer are found to agree well with the experiment in both positions and intensities, validating the global acetylene-vinylidene potential energy surface.

  20. Quantum-Mechanical Definition of Atoms and Chemical Bonds in Molecules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    AFRL-RQ-ED-TR-2014-0025 Quantum-Mechanical Definition of Atoms and Chemical Bonds in Molecules P.W. Langhoff J.D. Mills J.A...DATES COVERED (From - To) 15 Oct 2013 - 15 Oct 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quantum-Mechanical Definition of Atoms and Chemical Bonds in Molecules...indistinguishable electrons to particular atomic nuclei in a chemical aggregate has seemingly precluded quantum-mechanical definition of fragment atomic

  1. State Space Truncation with Quantified Errors for Accurate Solutions to Discrete Chemical Master Equation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Youfang; Terebus, Anna; Liang, Jie

    2016-04-01

    The discrete chemical master equation (dCME) provides a general framework for studying stochasticity in mesoscopic reaction networks. Since its direct solution rapidly becomes intractable due to the increasing size of the state space, truncation of the state space is necessary for solving most dCMEs. It is therefore important to assess the consequences of state space truncations so errors can be quantified and minimized. Here we describe a novel method for state space truncation. By partitioning a reaction network into multiple molecular equivalence groups (MEGs), we truncate the state space by limiting the total molecular copy numbers in each MEG. We further describe a theoretical framework for analysis of the truncation error in the steady-state probability landscape using reflecting boundaries. By aggregating the state space based on the usage of a MEG and constructing an aggregated Markov process, we show that the truncation error of a MEG can be asymptotically bounded by the probability of states on the reflecting boundary of the MEG. Furthermore, truncating states of an arbitrary MEG will not undermine the estimated error of truncating any other MEGs. We then provide an overall error estimate for networks with multiple MEGs. To rapidly determine the appropriate size of an arbitrary MEG, we also introduce an a priori method to estimate the upper bound of its truncation error. This a priori estimate can be rapidly computed from reaction rates of the network, without the need of costly trial solutions of the dCME. As examples, we show results of applying our methods to the four stochastic networks of (1) the birth and death model, (2) the single gene expression model, (3) the genetic toggle switch model, and (4) the phage lambda bistable epigenetic switch model. We demonstrate how truncation errors and steady-state probability landscapes can be computed using different sizes of the MEG(s) and how the results validate our theories. Overall, the novel state space

  2. State space truncation with quantified errors for accurate solutions to discrete Chemical Master Equation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Youfang; Terebus, Anna; Liang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The discrete chemical master equation (dCME) provides a general framework for studying stochasticity in mesoscopic reaction networks. Since its direct solution rapidly becomes intractable due to the increasing size of the state space, truncation of the state space is necessary for solving most dCMEs. It is therefore important to assess the consequences of state space truncations so errors can be quantified and minimized. Here we describe a novel method for state space truncation. By partitioning a reaction network into multiple molecular equivalence groups (MEG), we truncate the state space by limiting the total molecular copy numbers in each MEG. We further describe a theoretical framework for analysis of the truncation error in the steady state probability landscape using reflecting boundaries. By aggregating the state space based on the usage of a MEG and constructing an aggregated Markov process, we show that the truncation error of a MEG can be asymptotically bounded by the probability of states on the reflecting boundary of the MEG. Furthermore, truncating states of an arbitrary MEG will not undermine the estimated error of truncating any other MEGs. We then provide an overall error estimate for networks with multiple MEGs. To rapidly determine the appropriate size of an arbitrary MEG, we also introduce an a priori method to estimate the upper bound of its truncation error. This a priori estimate can be rapidly computed from reaction rates of the network, without the need of costly trial solutions of the dCME. As examples, we show results of applying our methods to the four stochastic networks of 1) the birth and death model, 2) the single gene expression model, 3) the genetic toggle switch model, and 4) the phage lambda bistable epigenetic switch model. We demonstrate how truncation errors and steady state probability landscapes can be computed using different sizes of the MEG(s) and how the results validate out theories. Overall, the novel state space

  3. Towards a scalable and accurate quantum approach for describing vibrations of molecule–metal interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Madebene, Bruno; Ulusoy, Inga; Mancera, Luis; Scribano, Yohann; Chulkov, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    Summary We present a theoretical framework for the computation of anharmonic vibrational frequencies for large systems, with a particular focus on determining adsorbate frequencies from first principles. We give a detailed account of our local implementation of the vibrational self-consistent field approach and its correlation corrections. We show that our approach is both robust, accurate and can be easily deployed on computational grids in order to provide an efficient computational tool. We also present results on the vibrational spectrum of hydrogen fluoride on pyrene, on the thiophene molecule in the gas phase, and on small neutral gold clusters. PMID:22003450

  4. Quantum-chemical foundations of the topological substructural molecular design.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Ernesto

    2008-06-12

    The topological substructural molecular design (TOPS-MODE) approach is formulated as a tight-binding quantum-chemical method. The approach is based on certain postulates that permit to express any molecular property as a function of the spectral moments of certain types of molecular and environment-dependent energies. We use several empirical potentials to account for these intrinsic and external molecular energies. We prove that any molecular property expressed in terms of a quantitative structure-property and structure-activity relationships (QSPR/QSAR) model developed by using the TOPS-MODE method can be expressed as a bond additivity function. In addition, such a property can also be expressed as a substructural cluster expansion function. The conditions for such bond contributions being transferable are also analyzed here. Several new statistical-mechanical electronic functions are introduced as well as a bond-bond thermal Green's function or a propagator accounting for the electronic hopping between pairs of bonds. All these new concepts are applied to the development and application of a new QSAR model for describing the toxicity of polyhalogenated-dibenzo-1,4-dioxins. The QSAR model obtained displays a significant robustness and predictability. It permits an easy structural interpretation of the structure-activity relationship in terms of bond additivity functions, which display some resemblances with other theoretical parameters obtained from first principle quantum-chemical methods.

  5. A new extension of the polarizable continuum model: Toward a quantum chemical description of chemical reactions at extreme high pressure.

    PubMed

    Cammi, Roberto

    2015-11-15

    A quantum chemical method for studying potential energy surfaces of reactive molecular systems at extreme high pressures is presented. The method is an extension of the standard Polarizable Continuum Model that is usually used for Quantum Chemical study of chemical reactions at a standard condition of pressure. The physical basis of the method and the corresponding computational protocol are described in necessary detail, and an application of the method to the dimerization of cyclopentadiene (up to 20 GPa) is reported.

  6. Utilizing fast multipole expansions for efficient and accurate quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwörer, Magnus; Lorenzen, Konstantin; Mathias, Gerald; Tavan, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Recently, a novel approach to hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations has been suggested [Schwörer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 138, 244103 (2013)]. Here, the forces acting on the atoms are calculated by grid-based density functional theory (DFT) for a solute molecule and by a polarizable molecular mechanics (PMM) force field for a large solvent environment composed of several 103-105 molecules as negative gradients of a DFT/PMM hybrid Hamiltonian. The electrostatic interactions are efficiently described by a hierarchical fast multipole method (FMM). Adopting recent progress of this FMM technique [Lorenzen et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 3244 (2014)], which particularly entails a strictly linear scaling of the computational effort with the system size, and adapting this revised FMM approach to the computation of the interactions between the DFT and PMM fragments of a simulation system, here, we show how one can further enhance the efficiency and accuracy of such DFT/PMM-MD simulations. The resulting gain of total performance, as measured for alanine dipeptide (DFT) embedded in water (PMM) by the product of the gains in efficiency and accuracy, amounts to about one order of magnitude. We also demonstrate that the jointly parallelized implementation of the DFT and PMM-MD parts of the computation enables the efficient use of high-performance computing systems. The associated software is available online.

  7. Utilizing fast multipole expansions for efficient and accurate quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Schwörer, Magnus; Lorenzen, Konstantin; Mathias, Gerald; Tavan, Paul

    2015-03-14

    Recently, a novel approach to hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations has been suggested [Schwörer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 138, 244103 (2013)]. Here, the forces acting on the atoms are calculated by grid-based density functional theory (DFT) for a solute molecule and by a polarizable molecular mechanics (PMM) force field for a large solvent environment composed of several 10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} molecules as negative gradients of a DFT/PMM hybrid Hamiltonian. The electrostatic interactions are efficiently described by a hierarchical fast multipole method (FMM). Adopting recent progress of this FMM technique [Lorenzen et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 3244 (2014)], which particularly entails a strictly linear scaling of the computational effort with the system size, and adapting this revised FMM approach to the computation of the interactions between the DFT and PMM fragments of a simulation system, here, we show how one can further enhance the efficiency and accuracy of such DFT/PMM-MD simulations. The resulting gain of total performance, as measured for alanine dipeptide (DFT) embedded in water (PMM) by the product of the gains in efficiency and accuracy, amounts to about one order of magnitude. We also demonstrate that the jointly parallelized implementation of the DFT and PMM-MD parts of the computation enables the efficient use of high-performance computing systems. The associated software is available online.

  8. Efficient and accurate evaluation of potential energy matrix elements for quantum dynamics using Gaussian process regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alborzpour, Jonathan P.; Tew, David P.; Habershon, Scott

    2016-11-01

    Solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation using a linear combination of basis functions, such as Gaussian wavepackets (GWPs), requires costly evaluation of integrals over the entire potential energy surface (PES) of the system. The standard approach, motivated by computational tractability for direct dynamics, is to approximate the PES with a second order Taylor expansion, for example centred at each GWP. In this article, we propose an alternative method for approximating PES matrix elements based on PES interpolation using Gaussian process regression (GPR). Our GPR scheme requires only single-point evaluations of the PES at a limited number of configurations in each time-step; the necessity of performing often-expensive evaluations of the Hessian matrix is completely avoided. In applications to 2-, 5-, and 10-dimensional benchmark models describing a tunnelling coordinate coupled non-linearly to a set of harmonic oscillators, we find that our GPR method results in PES matrix elements for which the average error is, in the best case, two orders-of-magnitude smaller and, in the worst case, directly comparable to that determined by any other Taylor expansion method, without requiring additional PES evaluations or Hessian matrices. Given the computational simplicity of GPR, as well as the opportunities for further refinement of the procedure highlighted herein, we argue that our GPR methodology should replace methods for evaluating PES matrix elements using Taylor expansions in quantum dynamics simulations.

  9. Accurate quantum calculation of the bound and resonant rovibrational states of Li-(H2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yingsheng; Poirier, Bill

    2005-03-01

    In a recent paper [B. Poirier, Chem. Phys. 308, 305 (2005)] a full-dimensional quantum method for computing the rovibrational dynamics of triatomic systems was presented, incorporating three key features: (1) exact analytical treatment of Coriolis coupling, (2) three-body "effective potential," and (3) a single bend angle basis for all rotational states. In this paper, these ideas are applied to the Li-(H2) electrostatic complex, to compute all of the rovibrational bound state energies, and a number of resonance energies and widths, to very high accuracy (thousandths of a wave number). This application is very challenging, owing to the long-range nature of the interaction and to narrow level spacings near dissociation. Nevertheless, by combining the present method with a G4 symmetry-adapted phase-space-optimized representation, only modest basis sizes are required for which the matrices are amenable to direct diagonalization. Several new bound levels are reported, as compared with a previous calculation [D. T. Chang, G. Surratt, G. Ristroff, and G. I. Gellene, J. Chem. Phys. 116, 9188 (2002)]. The resonances exhibit a clear-cut separation into shape and Feshbach varieties, with the latter characterized by extremely long lifetimes (microseconds or longer).

  10. Protein structure validation and refinement using amide proton chemical shifts derived from quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Anders S; Linnet, Troels E; Borg, Mikael; Boomsma, Wouter; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Hamelryck, Thomas; Jensen, Jan H

    2013-01-01

    We present the ProCS method for the rapid and accurate prediction of protein backbone amide proton chemical shifts--sensitive probes of the geometry of key hydrogen bonds that determine protein structure. ProCS is parameterized against quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and reproduces high level QM results obtained for a small protein with an RMSD of 0.25 ppm (r = 0.94). ProCS is interfaced with the PHAISTOS protein simulation program and is used to infer statistical protein ensembles that reflect experimentally measured amide proton chemical shift values. Such chemical shift-based structural refinements, starting from high-resolution X-ray structures of Protein G, ubiquitin, and SMN Tudor Domain, result in average chemical shifts, hydrogen bond geometries, and trans-hydrogen bond ((h3)J(NC')) spin-spin coupling constants that are in excellent agreement with experiment. We show that the structural sensitivity of the QM-based amide proton chemical shift predictions is needed to obtain this agreement. The ProCS method thus offers a powerful new tool for refining the structures of hydrogen bonding networks to high accuracy with many potential applications such as protein flexibility in ligand binding.

  11. Protein Structure Validation and Refinement Using Amide Proton Chemical Shifts Derived from Quantum Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Anders S.; Linnet, Troels E.; Borg, Mikael; Boomsma, Wouter; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Hamelryck, Thomas; Jensen, Jan H.

    2013-01-01

    We present the ProCS method for the rapid and accurate prediction of protein backbone amide proton chemical shifts - sensitive probes of the geometry of key hydrogen bonds that determine protein structure. ProCS is parameterized against quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and reproduces high level QM results obtained for a small protein with an RMSD of 0.25 ppm (r = 0.94). ProCS is interfaced with the PHAISTOS protein simulation program and is used to infer statistical protein ensembles that reflect experimentally measured amide proton chemical shift values. Such chemical shift-based structural refinements, starting from high-resolution X-ray structures of Protein G, ubiquitin, and SMN Tudor Domain, result in average chemical shifts, hydrogen bond geometries, and trans-hydrogen bond (h3JNC') spin-spin coupling constants that are in excellent agreement with experiment. We show that the structural sensitivity of the QM-based amide proton chemical shift predictions is needed to obtain this agreement. The ProCS method thus offers a powerful new tool for refining the structures of hydrogen bonding networks to high accuracy with many potential applications such as protein flexibility in ligand binding. PMID:24391900

  12. Graphene-based quantum Hall resistance standards grown by chemical vapor deposition on silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro-Palau, Rebeca; Lafont, Fabien; Kazazis, Dimitris; Michon, Adrien; Couturaud, Olivier; Consejo, Christophe; Jouault, Benoit; Poirier, Wilfrid; Schopfer, Felicien

    2015-03-01

    Replace GaAs-based quantum Hall resistance standards (GaAs-QHRS) by a more convenient one, based on graphene (Gr-QHRS), is an ongoing goal in metrology. The new Gr-QHRS are expected to work in less demanding experimental conditions than GaAs ones. It will open the way to a broad dissemination of quantum standards, potentially towards industrial end-users, and it will support the implementation of a new International System of Units based on fixed fundamental constants. Here, we present accurate quantum Hall resistance measurements in large graphene Hall bars, grown by the hybrid scalable technique of propane/hydrogen chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on silicon carbide (SiC). This new Gr-QHRS shows a relative accuracy of 1 ×10-9 of the Hall resistance under the lowest magnetic field ever achieved in graphene. These experimental conditions surpass those of the most wildely used GaAs-QHRS. These results confirm the promises of graphene for resistance metrology applications and emphasizes the quality of the graphene produced by the CVD on SiC for applications as demanding as the resistance metrology.

  13. Walking in the woods with quantum chemistry--applications of quantum chemical calculations in natural products research.

    PubMed

    Tantillo, Dean J

    2013-08-01

    This Highlight describes applications of quantum chemical calculations to problems in natural products chemistry, including the elucidation of natural product structures (distinguishing between constitutional isomers, distinguishing between diastereomers, and assigning absolute configuration) and determination of reasonable mechanisms for their formation.

  14. Predicting solvent-water partitioning of charged organic species using quantum-chemically estimated Abraham pp-LFER solute parameters.

    PubMed

    Davis, Craig Warren; Di Toro, Dominic M

    2016-12-01

    Methods for obtaining accurate predictions of solvent-water partitioning for neutral organic chemicals (e.g., Kow) are well-established. However, methods that provide comparable accuracy are not available for predicting the solvent-water partitioning of ionic species. Previous methods for addressing charge contributions to solvent-water partitioning rely on charged solute descriptors which are obtained from regressions to neutral species descriptors as well as charged descriptors which are specific to unique charge-functionalities and structural moieties. This paper presents a method for obtaining Abraham poly-parameter linear free energy relationship (pp-LFER) descriptors using quantum chemical calculations and molecular structure, only. The method utilizes a large number of solvent-water systems to overcome large errors in individual quantum chemical computations of ionic solvent-water partition coefficients. The result is a single set of quantum-chemically estimated Abraham solute parameters (QCAP) which are solvent-independent, and can be used to predict the solvent-water partitioning of ionic species. Predictions of solvent-water partition coefficients for ionic species using quantum-chemically estimated Abraham parameters (QCAPs) are shown to provide improved accuracy compared over both existing Absolv-estimated Abraham solute parameters (AAP) as well as direct a priori quantum chemical (QC) calculations for partitioning of anionic solutes in 4 organic solvent-water systems (RMS = 0.740, 2.48 and 0.426 for the Absolv, QC and QCAP methods, respectively). For quaternary amine cations in the octanol-water system the RMS errors of the solvent-water partition coefficients were larger and similar between the two Abraham models (RMSE = 0.997 and 1.16, for the AAP and QCAP methods, respectively). Both methods showed significant improvement over direct QC calculations (RMSE = 2.82).

  15. Benchmark studies of the Bending Corrected Rotating Linear Model (BCRLM) reactive scattering code: Implications for accurate quantum calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, E.F.; Darakjian, Z. . Dept. of Chemistry); Walker, R.B. )

    1990-01-01

    The Bending Corrected Rotating Linear Model (BCRLM), developed by Hayes and Walker, is a simple approximation to the true multidimensional scattering problem for reaction of the type: A + BC {yields} AB + C. While the BCRLM method is simpler than methods designed to obtain accurate three dimensional quantum scattering results, this turns out to be a major advantage in terms of our benchmarking studies. The computer code used to obtain BCRLM scattering results is written for the most part in standard FORTRAN and has been reported to several scalar, vector, and parallel architecture computers including the IBM 3090-600J, the Cray XMP and YMP, the Ardent Titan, IBM RISC System/6000, Convex C-1 and the MIPS 2000. Benchmark results will be reported for each of these machines with an emphasis on comparing the scalar, vector, and parallel performance for the standard code with minimum modifications. Detailed analysis of the mapping of the BCRLM approach onto both shared and distributed memory parallel architecture machines indicates the importance of introducing several key changes in the basic strategy and algorithums used to calculate scattering results. This analysis of the BCRLM approach provides some insights into optimal strategies for mapping three dimensional quantum scattering methods, such as the Parker-Pack method, onto shared or distributed memory parallel computers.

  16. Simulating chemical energies to high precision with fully-scalable quantum algorithms on superconducting qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, Peter; Babbush, Ryan; Kivlichan, Ian; Romero, Jhonathan; McClean, Jarrod; Tranter, Andrew; Barends, Rami; Kelly, Julian; Chen, Yu; Chen, Zijun; Jeffrey, Evan; Fowler, Austin; Megrant, Anthony; Mutus, Josh; Neill, Charles; Quintana, Christopher; Roushan, Pedram; Sank, Daniel; Vainsencher, Amit; Wenner, James; White, Theodore; Love, Peter; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan; Neven, Hartmut; Martinis, John

    Quantum simulations of molecules have the potential to calculate industrially-important chemical parameters beyond the reach of classical methods with relatively modest quantum resources. Recent years have seen dramatic progress both superconducting qubits and quantum chemistry algorithms. Here, we present experimental demonstrations of two fully-scalable algorithms for finding the dissociation energy of hydrogen: the variational quantum eigensolver and iterative phase estimation. This represents the first calculation of a dissociation energy to chemical accuracy with a non-precompiled algorithm. These results show the promise of chemistry as the ``killer app'' for quantum computers, even before the advent of full error-correction.

  17. Response to “Accurate Risk-Based Chemical Screening Relies on Robust Exposure Estimates”

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a correspondence (letter to the editor) with reference to comments by Rudel and Perovich on the article "Integration of Dosimetry, Exposure, and High-Throughput Screening Data in Chemical Toxicity Assessment". Article Reference: SI # 238882

  18. A quantum chemical method for rapid optimization of protein structures.

    PubMed

    Wada, Mitsuhito; Sakurai, Minoru

    2005-01-30

    A quantum chemical method for rapid optimization of protein structures is proposed. In this method, a protein structure is treated as an assembly of amino acid units, and the geometry optimization of each unit is performed with taking the effect of its surrounding environment into account. The optimized geometry of a whole protein is obtained by repeated application of such a local optimization procedure over the entire part of the protein. Here, we implemented this method in the MOPAC program and performed geometry optimization for three different sizes of proteins. Consequently, these results demonstrate that the total energies of the proteins are much efficiently minimized compared with the use of conventional optimization methods, including the MOZYME algorithm (a representative linear-scaling method) with the BFGS routine. The proposed method is superior to the conventional methods in both CPU time and memory requirements.

  19. Quantum Dots Embedded in Graphene Nanoribbons by Chemical Substitution.

    PubMed

    Carbonell-Sanromà, Eduard; Brandimarte, Pedro; Balog, Richard; Corso, Martina; Kawai, Shigeki; Garcia-Lekue, Aran; Saito, Shohei; Yamaguchi, Shigehiro; Meyer, Ernst; Sánchez-Portal, Daniel; Pascual, Jose Ignacio

    2017-01-11

    Bottom-up chemical reactions of selected molecular precursors on a gold surface can produce high quality graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). Here, we report on the formation of quantum dots embedded in an armchair GNR by substitutional inclusion of pairs of boron atoms into the GNR backbone. The boron inclusion is achieved through the addition of a small amount of boron substituted precursors during the formation of pristine GNRs. In the pristine region between two boron pairs, the nanoribbons show a discretization of their valence band into confined modes compatible with a Fabry-Perot resonator. Transport simulations of the scattering properties of the boron pairs reveal that they selectively confine the first valence band of the pristine ribbon while allowing an efficient electron transmission of the second one. Such band-dependent electron scattering stems from the symmetry matching between the electronic wave functions of the states from the pristine nanoribbons and those localized at the boron pairs.

  20. Simulation of chemical isomerization reaction dynamics on a NMR quantum simulator.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dawei; Xu, Nanyang; Xu, Ruixue; Chen, Hongwei; Gong, Jiangbin; Peng, Xinhua; Du, Jiangfeng

    2011-07-08

    Quantum simulation can beat current classical computers with minimally a few tens of qubits. Here we report an experimental demonstration that a small nuclear-magnetic-resonance quantum simulator is already able to simulate the dynamics of a prototype laser-driven isomerization reaction using engineered quantum control pulses. The experimental results agree well with classical simulations. We conclude that the quantum simulation of chemical reaction dynamics not computable on current classical computers is feasible in the near future.

  1. Accurate radiation temperature and chemical potential from quantitative photoluminescence analysis of hot carrier populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibelli, François; Lombez, Laurent; Guillemoles, Jean-François

    2017-02-01

    In order to characterize hot carrier populations in semiconductors, photoluminescence measurement is a convenient tool, enabling us to probe the carrier thermodynamical properties in a contactless way. However, the analysis of the photoluminescence spectra is based on some assumptions which will be discussed in this work. We especially emphasize the importance of the variation of the material absorptivity that should be considered to access accurate thermodynamical properties of the carriers, especially by varying the excitation power. The proposed method enables us to obtain more accurate results of thermodynamical properties by taking into account a rigorous physical description and finds direct application in investigating hot carrier solar cells, which are an adequate concept for achieving high conversion efficiencies with a relatively simple device architecture.

  2. Accurate radiation temperature and chemical potential from quantitative photoluminescence analysis of hot carrier populations.

    PubMed

    Gibelli, François; Lombez, Laurent; Guillemoles, Jean-François

    2017-02-15

    In order to characterize hot carrier populations in semiconductors, photoluminescence measurement is a convenient tool, enabling us to probe the carrier thermodynamical properties in a contactless way. However, the analysis of the photoluminescence spectra is based on some assumptions which will be discussed in this work. We especially emphasize the importance of the variation of the material absorptivity that should be considered to access accurate thermodynamical properties of the carriers, especially by varying the excitation power. The proposed method enables us to obtain more accurate results of thermodynamical properties by taking into account a rigorous physical description and finds direct application in investigating hot carrier solar cells, which are an adequate concept for achieving high conversion efficiencies with a relatively simple device architecture.

  3. Quantum chemical approach for condensed-phase thermochemistry: proposal of a harmonic solvation model.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Hiromi; Ishikawa, Atsushi

    2014-11-07

    We propose a novel quantum chemical method, called the harmonic solvation model (HSM), for calculating thermochemical parameters in the condensed phase, particularly in the liquid phase. The HSM represents translational and rotational motions of a solute as vibrations interacting with a cavity wall of solvent molecules. As examples, the HSM and the ideal-gas model (IGM) were used for the standard formation reaction of liquid water, combustion reactions of liquid formic acid, methanol, and ethanol, vapor-liquid equilibration of water and ethanol, and dissolution of gaseous CO2 in water. The numerical results confirmed the reliability and applicability of the HSM. In particular, the temperature dependence of the Gibbs energy of liquid molecules was accurately reproduced by the HSM; for example, the boiling point of water was reasonably determined using the HSM, whereas the conventional IGM treatment failed to obtain a crossing of the two Gibbs energy curves for gaseous and liquid water.

  4. Quantum chemical approach for condensed-phase thermochemistry: Proposal of a harmonic solvation model

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, Hiromi; Ishikawa, Atsushi

    2014-11-07

    We propose a novel quantum chemical method, called the harmonic solvation model (HSM), for calculating thermochemical parameters in the condensed phase, particularly in the liquid phase. The HSM represents translational and rotational motions of a solute as vibrations interacting with a cavity wall of solvent molecules. As examples, the HSM and the ideal-gas model (IGM) were used for the standard formation reaction of liquid water, combustion reactions of liquid formic acid, methanol, and ethanol, vapor–liquid equilibration of water and ethanol, and dissolution of gaseous CO{sub 2} in water. The numerical results confirmed the reliability and applicability of the HSM. In particular, the temperature dependence of the Gibbs energy of liquid molecules was accurately reproduced by the HSM; for example, the boiling point of water was reasonably determined using the HSM, whereas the conventional IGM treatment failed to obtain a crossing of the two Gibbs energy curves for gaseous and liquid water.

  5. Quantum chemical approach for condensed-phase thermochemistry: Proposal of a harmonic solvation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Hiromi; Ishikawa, Atsushi

    2014-11-01

    We propose a novel quantum chemical method, called the harmonic solvation model (HSM), for calculating thermochemical parameters in the condensed phase, particularly in the liquid phase. The HSM represents translational and rotational motions of a solute as vibrations interacting with a cavity wall of solvent molecules. As examples, the HSM and the ideal-gas model (IGM) were used for the standard formation reaction of liquid water, combustion reactions of liquid formic acid, methanol, and ethanol, vapor-liquid equilibration of water and ethanol, and dissolution of gaseous CO2 in water. The numerical results confirmed the reliability and applicability of the HSM. In particular, the temperature dependence of the Gibbs energy of liquid molecules was accurately reproduced by the HSM; for example, the boiling point of water was reasonably determined using the HSM, whereas the conventional IGM treatment failed to obtain a crossing of the two Gibbs energy curves for gaseous and liquid water.

  6. Quantum chemical calculations predict biological function: The case of T cell receptor interaction with a peptide/MHC class I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipas, Georgios S. E.; Germenis, Anastasios

    2015-02-01

    A combination of atomic correlation statistics and quantum chemical calculations are shown to predict biological function. In the present study, various antigenic peptide-Major Histocompatibility Complex (pMHC) ligands with near-identical stereochemistries, in complexation with the same T cell receptor (TCR), were found to consistently induce distinctly different quantum chemical behavior, directly dependent on the peptide’s electron spin density and intrinsically expressed by the protonation state of the peptide’s N-terminus. Furthermore, the cumulative coordination difference of any variant in respect to the native peptide was found to accurately reflect peptide biological function and immerges as the physical observable which is directly related to the immunological end-effect of pMHC-TCR interaction.

  7. Quantum chemical computational studies on bis-thiourea zinc acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pir, Hacer; Günay, Nergin; Tamer, Ömer; Avci, Davut; Tarcan, Erdoğan; Atalay, Yusuf

    2013-08-01

    In this study, quantum chemical calculations of vibrational spectra, Raman spectra, electronic properties (total energy, dipole moment, electronegativity, chemical hardness and softness), Mulliken atomic charges and thermodynamic parameters of bis-thiourea zinc acetate (BTZA) have been performed using Gaussian 09 program. Additionally, nonlinear optical (NLO), conformational, natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses of BTZA have been carried out using the same program. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule in the ground state have been calculated using Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional method (DFT/B3LYP) with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. In addition, the molecular frontier orbital energies (HOMO, HOMO-1, LUMO and LUMO+1) of the title compound have been calculated at the HF and B3LYP levels. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. Finally, the calculated results were applied to simulate infrared and Raman spectra of the title compound which showed good agreement with the experimental ones.

  8. Quantum Chemical Study of the Thermochemical Properties of Organophosphorous Compounds.

    PubMed

    Khalfa, A; Ferrari, M; Fournet, R; Sirjean, B; Verdier, L; Glaude, P A

    2015-10-22

    Organophosphorous compounds are involved in many toxic compounds such as fungicides, pesticides, or chemical warfare nerve agents. The understanding of the decomposition chemistry of these compounds in the environment is largely limited by the scarcity of thermochemical data. Because of the high toxicity of many of these molecules, experimental determination of their thermochemical properties is very difficult. In this work, standard gas-phase thermodynamic data, i.e., enthalpies of formation (ΔfH298°), standard entropies (S298°), and heat capacities (Cp°(T)), were determined using quantum chemical calculations and more specifically the CBS-QB3 composite method, which was found to be the best compromise between precision and calculation time among high accuracy composite methods. A large number of molecules was theoretically investigated, involving trivalent and pentavalent phosphorus atoms, and C, H, O, N, S, and F atoms. These data were used to propose 83 original groups, used in the semiempirical group contribution method proposed by Benson. Thanks to these latter group values, thermochemical properties of several nerve agents, common pesticides and herbicides have been evaluated. Bond dissociations energies (BDE), useful for the analysis the thermal stability of the compounds, were also determined in several molecules of interest.

  9. Spectroscopic, quantum chemical calculation and molecular docking of dipfluzine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Karnica; Srivastava, Anubha; Tandon, Poonam; Sinha, Kirti; Wang, Jing

    2016-12-01

    Molecular structure and vibrational analysis of dipfluzine (C27H29FN2O) were presented using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The theoretical ground state geometry and electronic structure of dipfluzine are optimized by the DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G (d,p) method and compared with those of the crystal data. The 1D potential energy scan was performed by varying the dihedral angle using B3LYP functional at 6-31G(d,p) level of theory and thus the most stable conformer of the compound were determined. Molecular electrostatic potential surface (MEPS), frontier orbital analysis and electronic reactivity descriptor were used to predict the chemical reactivity of molecule. Energies of intra- and inter-molecular hydrogen bonds in molecule and their electronic aspects were investigated by natural bond orbital (NBO). To find out the anti-apoptotic activity of the title compound molecular docking studies have been performed against protein Fas.

  10. Exploring the role of quantum chemical descriptors in modeling acute toxicity of diverse chemicals to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Reenu; Vikas

    2015-09-01

    Various quantum-mechanically computed molecular and thermodynamic descriptors along with physico-chemical, electrostatic and topological descriptors are compared while developing quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for the acute toxicity of 252 diverse organic chemicals towards Daphnia magna. QSAR models based on the quantum-chemical descriptors, computed with routinely employed advanced semi-empirical and ab-initio methods, along with the electron-correlation contribution (CORR) of the descriptors, are analyzed for the external predictivity of the acute toxicity. The models with reliable internal stability and external predictivity are found to be based on the HOMO energy along with the physico-chemical, electrostatic and topological descriptors. Besides this, the total energy and electron-correlation energy are also observed as highly reliable descriptors, suggesting that the intra-molecular interactions between the electrons play an important role in the origin of the acute toxicity, which is in fact an unexplored phenomenon. The models based on quantum-chemical descriptors such as chemical hardness, absolute electronegativity, standard Gibbs free energy and enthalpy are also observed to be reliable. A comparison of the robust models based on the quantum-chemical descriptors computed with various quantum-mechanical methods suggests that the advanced semi-empirical methods such as PM7 can be more reliable than the ab-initio methods which are computationally more expensive.

  11. Ab initio Quantum Chemical Reaction Kinetics: Recent Applications in Combustion Chemistry (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-28

    Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) June 2015-June 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE AB INITIO QUANTUM CHEMICAL REACTION KINETICS: RECENT APPLICATIONS IN...Unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Briefing Charts presented at 9th Int. Conf. Chemical Kinetics; Ghent, Belgium; 28 Jun 2015. PA#15351. 14. ABSTRACT...ghanshyam.vaghjiani@us.af.mil Ab initio Quantum Chemical Reaction Kinetics: Recent Applications in Combustion Chemistry Ghanshyam L. Vaghjiani* DISTRIBUTION A

  12. Toward the Realization of a Compact Chemical Sensor Platform using Quantum Cascade Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    integration of photoacoustic detection with a microfabricated chemical reactor system. JMEMS 10, 232 (2001). [9] S. L. Firebaugh, K. F. Jensen, M. A...ARL-RP-0550 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Toward the Realization of a Compact Chemical Sensor Platform using Quantum...ARL-RP-0550 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Toward the Realization of a Compact Chemical Sensor Platform using Quantum Cascade

  13. The quantum dynamics of electronically nonadiabatic chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truhlar, Donald G.

    1993-01-01

    Considerable progress was achieved on the quantum mechanical treatment of electronically nonadiabatic collisions involving energy transfer and chemical reaction in the collision of an electronically excited atom with a molecule. In the first step, a new diabatic representation for the coupled potential energy surfaces was created. A two-state diabatic representation was developed which was designed to realistically reproduce the two lowest adiabatic states of the valence bond model and also to have the following three desirable features: (1) it is more economical to evaluate; (2) it is more portable; and (3) all spline fits are replaced by analytic functions. The new representation consists of a set of two coupled diabatic potential energy surfaces plus a coupling surface. It is suitable for dynamics calculations on both the electronic quenching and reaction processes in collisions of Na(3p2p) with H2. The new two-state representation was obtained by a three-step process from a modified eight-state diatomics-in-molecules (DIM) representation of Blais. The second step required the development of new dynamical methods. A formalism was developed for treating reactions with very general basis functions including electronically excited states. Our formalism is based on the generalized Newton, scattered wave, and outgoing wave variational principles that were used previously for reactive collisions on a single potential energy surface, and it incorporates three new features: (1) the basis functions include electronic degrees of freedom, as required to treat reactions involving electronic excitation and two or more coupled potential energy surfaces; (2) the primitive electronic basis is assumed to be diabatic, and it is not assumed that it diagonalizes the electronic Hamiltonian even asymptotically; and (3) contracted basis functions for vibrational-rotational-orbital degrees of freedom are included in a very general way, similar to previous prescriptions for locally

  14. Chemical physics: Quantum control of light-induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, David W.

    2016-07-01

    An investigation of how ultracold molecules are broken apart by light reveals surprising, previously unobserved quantum effects. The work opens up avenues of research in quantum optics. See Letter p.122

  15. Simple and surprisingly accurate approach to the chemical bond obtained from dimensional scaling.

    PubMed

    Svidzinsky, Anatoly A; Scully, Marlan O; Herschbach, Dudley R

    2005-08-19

    We present a new dimensional scaling transformation of the Schrödinger equation for the two electron bond. This yields, for the first time, a good description of the bond via D scaling. There also emerges, in the large-D limit, an intuitively appealing semiclassical picture, akin to a molecular model proposed by Bohr in 1913. In this limit, the electrons are confined to specific orbits in the scaled space, yet the uncertainty principle is maintained. A first-order perturbation correction, proportional to 1/D, substantially improves the agreement with the exact ground state potential energy curve. The present treatment is very simple mathematically, yet provides a strikingly accurate description of the potential curves for the lowest singlet, triplet, and excited states of H2. We find the modified D-scaling method also gives good results for other molecules. It can be combined advantageously with Hartree-Fock and other conventional methods.

  16. Unconditionally stable, second-order accurate schemes for solid state phase transformations driven by mechano-chemical spinodal decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Sagiyama, Koki; Rudraraju, Shiva; Garikipati, Krishna

    2016-09-13

    Here, we consider solid state phase transformations that are caused by free energy densities with domains of non-convexity in strain-composition space; we refer to the non-convex domains as mechano-chemical spinodals. The non-convexity with respect to composition and strain causes segregation into phases with different crystal structures. We work on an existing model that couples the classical Cahn-Hilliard model with Toupin’s theory of gradient elasticity at finite strains. Both systems are represented by fourth-order, nonlinear, partial differential equations. The goal of this work is to develop unconditionally stable, second-order accurate time-integration schemes, motivated by the need to carry out large scale computations of dynamically evolving microstructures in three dimensions. We also introduce reduced formulations naturally derived from these proposed schemes for faster computations that are still second-order accurate. Although our method is developed and analyzed here for a specific class of mechano-chemical problems, one can readily apply the same method to develop unconditionally stable, second-order accurate schemes for any problems for which free energy density functions are multivariate polynomials of solution components and component gradients. Apart from an analysis and construction of methods, we present a suite of numerical results that demonstrate the schemes in action.

  17. Unconditionally stable, second-order accurate schemes for solid state phase transformations driven by mechano-chemical spinodal decomposition

    DOE PAGES

    Sagiyama, Koki; Rudraraju, Shiva; Garikipati, Krishna

    2016-09-13

    Here, we consider solid state phase transformations that are caused by free energy densities with domains of non-convexity in strain-composition space; we refer to the non-convex domains as mechano-chemical spinodals. The non-convexity with respect to composition and strain causes segregation into phases with different crystal structures. We work on an existing model that couples the classical Cahn-Hilliard model with Toupin’s theory of gradient elasticity at finite strains. Both systems are represented by fourth-order, nonlinear, partial differential equations. The goal of this work is to develop unconditionally stable, second-order accurate time-integration schemes, motivated by the need to carry out large scalemore » computations of dynamically evolving microstructures in three dimensions. We also introduce reduced formulations naturally derived from these proposed schemes for faster computations that are still second-order accurate. Although our method is developed and analyzed here for a specific class of mechano-chemical problems, one can readily apply the same method to develop unconditionally stable, second-order accurate schemes for any problems for which free energy density functions are multivariate polynomials of solution components and component gradients. Apart from an analysis and construction of methods, we present a suite of numerical results that demonstrate the schemes in action.« less

  18. An accurate and self-consistent chemical abundance catalogue for the APOGEE/Kepler sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, K.; Masseron, T.; Jofré, P.; Gilmore, G.; Elsworth, Y.; Hekker, S.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The APOGEE survey has obtained high-resolution infrared spectra of more than 100 000 stars. Deriving chemical abundances patterns of these stars is paramount to piecing together the structure of the Milky Way. While the derived chemical abundances have been shown to be precise for most stars, some calibration problems have been reported, in particular for more metal-poor stars. Aims: In this paper, we aim to (1) re-determine the chemical abundances of the APOGEE+Kepler stellar sample (APOKASC) with an independent procedure, line list and line selection, and high-quality surface gravity information from asteroseismology; and (2) extend the abundance catalogue by including abundances that are not currently reported in the most recent APOGEE release (DR12). Methods: We fixed the Teff and log g to those determined using spectrophotometric and asteroseismic techniques, respectively. We made use of the Brussels Automatic Stellar Parameter (BACCHUS) code to derive the metallicity and broadening parameters for the APOKASC sample. In addition, we derived differential abundances with respect to Arcturus. Results: We have validated the BACCHUS code on APOGEE data using several well-known stars, and stars from open and globular clusters. We also provide the abundances of C, N, O, Mg, Ca, Si, Ti, S, Al, Na, Ni, Mn, Fe, K, and V for every star and line, and show the impact of line selection on the final abundances. Improvements have been made for some elements (e.g. Ti, Si, V). Additionally, we measure new abundance ratios not found in the current APOGEE release including P, Cu, Rb, and Yb, which are only upper limits at this time, as well as Co and Cr which are promising. Conclusions: In this paper, we present an independent analysis of the APOKASC sample and provide abundances of up to 21 elements. This catalogue can be used not only to study chemical abundance patterns of the Galaxy but also to train data driven spectral approaches which can improve the abundance

  19. Nuclear Quantum Effects in Liquid Water: A Highly Accurate ab initio Path-Integral Molecular Dynamics Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Distasio, Robert A., Jr.; Santra, Biswajit; Ko, Hsin-Yu; Car, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we report highly accurate ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics (AI-PIMD) simulations on liquid water at ambient conditions utilizing the recently developed PBE0+vdW(SC) exchange-correlation functional, which accounts for exact exchange and a self-consistent pairwise treatment of van der Waals (vdW) or dispersion interactions, combined with nuclear quantum effects (via the colored-noise generalized Langevin equation). The importance of each of these effects in the theoretical prediction of the structure of liquid water will be demonstrated by a detailed comparative analysis of the predicted and experimental oxygen-oxygen (O-O), oxygen-hydrogen (O-H), and hydrogen-hydrogen (H-H) radial distribution functions as well as other structural properties. In addition, we will discuss the theoretically obtained proton momentum distribution, computed using the recently developed Feynman path formulation, in light of the experimental deep inelastic neutron scattering (DINS) measurements. DOE: DE-SC0008626, DOE: DE-SC0005180.

  20. Uncertainty quantification for quantum chemical models of complex reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Proppe, Jonny; Husch, Tamara; Simm, Gregor N; Reiher, Markus

    2016-12-22

    For the quantitative understanding of complex chemical reaction mechanisms, it is, in general, necessary to accurately determine the corresponding free energy surface and to solve the resulting continuous-time reaction rate equations for a continuous state space. For a general (complex) reaction network, it is computationally hard to fulfill these two requirements. However, it is possible to approximately address these challenges in a physically consistent way. On the one hand, it may be sufficient to consider approximate free energies if a reliable uncertainty measure can be provided. On the other hand, a highly resolved time evolution may not be necessary to still determine quantitative fluxes in a reaction network if one is interested in specific time scales. In this paper, we present discrete-time kinetic simulations in discrete state space taking free energy uncertainties into account. The method builds upon thermo-chemical data obtained from electronic structure calculations in a condensed-phase model. Our kinetic approach supports the analysis of general reaction networks spanning multiple time scales, which is here demonstrated for the example of the formose reaction. An important application of our approach is the detection of regions in a reaction network which require further investigation, given the uncertainties introduced by both approximate electronic structure methods and kinetic models. Such cases can then be studied in greater detail with more sophisticated first-principles calculations and kinetic simulations.

  1. Development of a method to accurately calculate the Dpb and quickly predict the strength of a chemical bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xia; Zhao, Dong-Xia; Yang, Zhong-Zhi

    2013-02-01

    A new approach to characterize and measure bond strength has been developed. First, we propose a method to accurately calculate the potential acting on an electron in a molecule (PAEM) at the saddle point along a chemical bond in situ, denoted by Dpb. Then, a direct method to quickly evaluate bond strength is established. We choose some familiar molecules as models for benchmarking this method. As a practical application, the Dpb of base pairs in DNA along C-H and N-H bonds are obtained for the first time. All results show that C7-H of A-T and C8-H of G-C are the relatively weak bonds that are the injured positions in DNA damage. The significance of this work is twofold: (i) A method is developed to calculate Dpb of various sizable molecules in situ quickly and accurately; (ii) This work demonstrates the feasibility to quickly predict the bond strength in macromolecules.

  2. Accurate Dissociation of Chemical Bonds Using DFT-in-DFT Embedding Theory with External Orbital Orthogonality.

    PubMed

    Tamukong, Patrick K; Khait, Yuriy G; Hoffmann, Mark R

    2017-01-12

    Our recent density functional theory (DFT)-in-DFT embedding protocol, which enforces intersubsystem (or external orbital) orthogonality, is used for the first time to investigate covalent bond dissociation and is shown to do so accurately. Full potential energy curves for the dissociation of a H-O bond in H2O and the C-C bond in H3C-CH3 have been constructed using the new embedding method, as have the challenging ionic bonds in LiH and LiF, and were found to match the reference Kohn-Sham (KS)-DFT curves to at least one part in 10(6). The added constraint of external orbital orthogonality allows for the formulation of an embedding protocol that does not rely on approximate kinetic energy functionals for the evaluation of the so-called nonadditive kinetic potential, does not introduce compensatory potentials, and does not require a total system calculation at any stage. The present work extends the demonstrated applicability of the external orthogonality variant of embedding theory by more than a factor of 2 to the interaction strength range of strong single bonds. In particular, it is demonstrated that homolytic cleavage of both covalent and ionic bonds into radicals can be accomplished.

  3. [Study of quantum-pharmacological chemical characteristics of quercetin].

    PubMed

    Zahorodnyĭ, M I

    2007-01-01

    It was established in the previous studies that quercetin prevented the development and caused faster regression of ulcers, petechia and anabroses in rats, which were induced by diclofenac taking. In the group of patients taking diclofenac together with quercetin, the ulcers and dyspeptic events were less found. The application of quercetin normalizes the function and metabolism of cartilage tissue of rabbits with an experimental osteoarthrosis and in patients with osteoartrosis. Quantum-chemical properties of molecule quercetin were studied using the methods of molecular mechanics MM+ and ab initio 6-31G*, and also semiempirical method. The following indices were investigated: distance between atoms (A), the distribution of electronic density of only external valency electrons, distribution of electrostatic potential; common energy of the exertion of molecule (kkal/mmol); binding energy (kkal/mmol); electron energy (kkal/mmol); energy of nucleus-nucleus interaction (kkal/mmol); formation heat (kkal/mmol); atomic charge (eB); value of the dipole moment of molecule (D); localization and energy of highest occupied orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied (LUMO) molecular orbital (eB) of quercetin miolecule; the value of absolute rigidity of chemical structure of bioflavonoid. It was shown, that bioflavonoid quercetin belongs to mild reagents, has nucleophilic properties, can react with alkaline, unsaturated and aromatic compounds,. Polar substitutes in the quercetine molecule influence on the distribution of superficial valency electrons and localization of HOMO and LUMO. The energy value of quercetin LUMO enables us to refer quercetine to the reducing agent and it is illustrated by antioxidant properties of this medicine.

  4. Probing the nature of chemical bonding in uranyl(VI) complexes with quantum chemical methods.

    PubMed

    Vallet, Valérie; Wahlgren, Ulf; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2012-12-20

    To assess the nature of chemical bonds in uranyl(VI) complexes with Lewis base ligands, such as F(-), Cl(-), OH(-), CO(3)(2-), and O(2)(2-), we have used quantum chemical observables, such as the bond distances, the internal symmetric/asymmetric uranyl stretch frequencies, and the electron density with its topology analyzed using the quantum theory of atoms-in-molecules. This analysis confirms that complex formation induces a weakening of the uranium-axial oxygen bond, reflected by the longer U-O(yl) bond distance and reduced uranyl-stretching frequencies. The strength of the ligand-induced effect increases in the order H(2)O < Cl(-) < F(-) < OH(-) < CO(3)(2-) < O(2)(2-). In-depth analysis reveals that the trend across the series does not always reflect an increasing covalent character of the uranyl-ligand bond. By using a point-charge model for the uranyl tetra-fluoride and tetra-chloride complexes, we show that a significant part of the uranyl bond destabilization arises from purely electrostatic interactions, the remaining part corresponding either to charge-transfer from the negatively charged ligands to the uranyl unit or a covalent interaction. The charge-transfer and the covalent interaction are qualitatively different due to the absence of a charge build up in the uranyl-halide bond region in the latter case. In all the charged complexes, the uranyl-ligand bond is best described as an ionic interaction. However, there are covalent contributions in the very stable peroxide complex and, to some extent, also in the carbonate complex. This study demonstrates that it is possible to describe the nature of chemical bond by observables rather than by ad hoc quantities such as atomic populations or molecular orbitals.

  5. Rigorous Ab Initio Quantum Embedding for Quantum Chemistry Using Green's Function Theory: Screened Interaction, Nonlocal Self-Energy Relaxation, Orbital Basis, and Chemical Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Lan, Tran; Kananenka, Alexei A; Zgid, Dominika

    2016-10-11

    We present a detailed discussion of the self-energy embedding theory (SEET), which is a quantum embedding scheme allowing us to describe a chosen subsystem very accurately while keeping the description of the environment at a lower level. We apply SEET to molecular examples where our chosen subsystem is made out of a set of strongly correlated orbitals while the weakly correlated orbitals constitute an environment. Consequently, a highly accurate method is used to calculate the self-energy for the system, while a lower-level method is employed to find the self-energy for the environment. Such a self-energy separation is very general, and to make the SEET procedure applicable to multiple systems, a detailed and practical procedure for the evaluation of the system and environment self-energy is necessary. We list all of the intricacies for one of the possible procedures while focusing our discussion on many practical implementation aspects such as the choice of best orbital basis, impurity solver, and many steps necessary to reach chemical accuracy. Finally, on a set of carefully chosen molecular examples, we demonstrate that SEET, which is a controlled, systematically improvable Green's function method, can be as accurate as established wave function quantum chemistry methods.

  6. Periodic quantum chemical studies on anhydrous and hydrated acid clinoptilolite.

    PubMed

    Valdiviés Cruz, Karell; Lam, Anabel; Zicovich-Wilson, Claudio M

    2014-08-07

    Periodic quantum chemistry methods as implemented in the crystal09 code were considered to study acid clinoptilolite (HEU framework type), both anhydrous and hydrated. The most probable location of acid sites and water molecules together with other structural details has been the object of particular attention. Calculations were performed at hybrid and pristine DFT levels of theory with a VDZP quality basis set in order to compare performances. It arises that PBE0 provides the best agreement with experimental data as concerns structural features and the most stable Al distribution in the framework. The role of the water molecule distribution in the stability of the systems, the most probable structure that they induce in the material, and their eventual influence on further chemical modification processes, such as dealumination, are discussed in detail. Results show that, apart from the usually considered interactions of water molecules with the zeolite framework, that is, a H-bond with Brönsted acid sites and coordination with framework Al as Lewis ones, it is necessary to consider cooperation of other weaker effects so as to fully understand the hydration effect in this kind of materials.

  7. Tuning the Emission Energy of Chemically Doped Graphene Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Noor-Ul-Ain; Eriksson, Martin O.; Schmidt, Susann; Asghar, M.; Lin, Pin-Cheng; Holtz, Per Olof; Syväjärvi, Mikael; Yazdi, G. Reza

    2016-01-01

    Tuning the emission energy of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) and understanding the reason of tunability is essential for the GOD function in optoelectronic devices. Besides material-based challenges, the way to realize chemical doping and band gap tuning also pose a serious challenge. In this study, we tuned the emission energy of GQDs by substitutional doping using chlorine, nitrogen, boron, sodium, and potassium dopants in solution form. Photoluminescence data obtained from (Cl- and N-doped) GQDs and (B-, Na-, and K-doped) GQDs, respectively exhibited red- and blue-shift with respect to the photoluminescence of the undoped GQDs. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that oxygen functional groups were attached to GQDs. We qualitatively correlate red-shift of the photoluminescence with the oxygen functional groups using literature references which demonstrates that more oxygen containing groups leads to the formation of more defect states and is the reason of observed red-shift of luminescence in GQDs. Further on, time resolved photoluminescence measurements of Cl- and N-GQDs demonstrated that Cl substitution in GQDs has effective role in radiative transition whereas in N-GQDs leads to photoluminescence (PL) quenching with non-radiative transition to ground state. Presumably oxidation or reduction processes cause a change of effective size and the bandgap. PMID:28335326

  8. Quantum chemical studies on the reactivity of oxazole derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinzadeh, Behzad; Eskandari, Khalil; Zarandi, Maryam; Asli, Reza

    2016-11-01

    The quantum chemical study of the reactivity of a series of oxazole derivatives substituted at 2, 4, and 5 positions was performed using B3LYP/6-311++G( d, p) and MP2/6-311++G( d, p) levels of theory. Different substituents have been applied to cover a wide range of electronic effects. On the basis of Fukui functions, oxazole derivatives in the gas phase are found to be suitable nucleophilic sites. For the most of studied substituents, it was observed that the calculated Fukui function f k - values at the N-position are small in case of electron-withdrawing substituents, resulting a preferred N-position for hard reactions. In contrast, large f k - values in case of electron-donating groups show a preferred N-position for soft reactions. These two local reactivity descriptors predicted the reactivity of the electron-rich oxazoles sequence to be 2-substituted oxazoles > 5-substituted oxazoles > 4-substituted oxazoles, where due to resonance effect, the reactivity toward electrophilic attack at the pyridine nitrogen atom is enhanced by electron donor substituents.

  9. Detection of chemical clouds using widely tunable quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Anish K.; Kotidis, Petros; Deutsch, Erik R.; Zhu, Ninghui; Norman, Mark; Ye, Jim; Zafiriou, Kostas; Mazurenko, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    Widely tunable quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) spanning the long-wave infrared (LWIR) atmospheric transmission window and an HgCdTe detector were incorporated into a transceiver having a 50-mm-diameter transmit/receive aperture. The transceiver was used in combination with a 50-mm-diameter hollow retro-reflector for the open-path detection of chemical clouds. Two rapidly tunable external-cavity QCLs spanned the wavelength range of 7.5 to 12.8 m. Open-path transmission measurements were made over round-trip path-lengths of up to 562 meters. Freon-132a and other gases were sprayed into the beam path and the concentration-length (CL) product was measured as a function of time. The system exhibited a noise-equivalent concentration (NEC) of 3 ppb for Freon-132a given a round-trip path of 310 meters. Algorithms based on correlation methods were used to both identify the gases and determine their CLproducts as a function of time.

  10. Chemically-mediated quantum criticality in NbFe2

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Aftab; Johnson, Duane

    2011-11-09

    Laves-phase Nb{sub 1+c}Fe{sub 2-c} is a rare itinerant intermetallic compound exhibiting magnetic quantum criticality at c{sub cr} {approx} 1.5% Nb excess; its origin, and how alloying mediates it, remains an enigma. For NbFe{sub 2}, we show that an unconventional band critical point above the Fermi level E{sub F} explains most observations and that chemical alloying mediates access to this unconventional band critical point by an increase in E{sub F} with decreasing electrons (increasing %Nb), counter to rigid-band concepts. We calculate that E{sub F} enters the unconventional band critical point region for c{sub cr} > 1.5% Nb and by 1.74% Nb there is no Nb site-occupation preference between symmetry-distinct Fe sites, i.e., no electron-hopping disorder, making resistivity near constant as observed. At larger Nb (Fe) excess, the ferromagnetic Stoner criterion is satisfied.

  11. Comparison of sugar molecule decomposition through glucose and fructose: a high-level quantum chemical study.

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, R. S.; Curtiss, L. A.

    2012-02-01

    Efficient chemical conversion of biomass is essential to produce sustainable energy and industrial chemicals. Industrial level conversion of glucose to useful chemicals, such as furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural, and levulinic acid, is a major step in the biomass conversion but is difficult because of the formation of undesired products and side reactions. To understand the molecular level reaction mechanisms involved in the decomposition of glucose and fructose, we have carried out high-level quantum chemical calculations [Gaussian-4 (G4) theory]. Selective 1,2-dehydration, keto-enol tautomerization, isomerization, retro-aldol condensation, and hydride shifts of glucose and fructose molecules were investigated. Detailed kinetic and thermodynamic analyses indicate that, for acyclic glucose and fructose molecules, the dehydration and isomerization require larger activation barriers compared to the retro-aldol reaction at 298 K in neutral medium. The retro-aldol reaction results in the formation of C2 and C4 species from glucose and C3 species from fructose. The formation of the most stable C3 species, dihydroxyacetone from fructose, is thermodynamically downhill. The 1,3-hydride shift leads to the cleavage of the C-C bond in the acyclic species; however, the enthalpy of activation is significantly higher (50-55 kcal/mol) than that of the retro-aldol reaction (38 kcal/mol) mainly because of the sterically hindered distorted four-membered transition state compared to the hexa-membered transition state in the retro-aldol reaction. Both tautomerization and dehydration are catalyzed by a water molecule in aqueous medium; however, water has little effect on the retro-aldol reaction. Isomerization of glucose to fructose and glyceraldehyde to dihydroxyacetone proceeds through hydride shifts that require an activation enthalpy of about 40 kcal/mol at 298 K in water medium. This investigation maps out accurate energetics of the decomposition of glucose and fructose molecules

  12. Chemical compass model for avian magnetoreception as a quantum coherent device.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jianming; Plenio, Martin B

    2013-12-06

    It is known that more than 50 species use the Earth's magnetic field for orientation and navigation. Intensive studies, particularly behavior experiments with birds, provide support for a chemical compass based on magnetically sensitive free radical reactions as a source of this sense. However, the fundamental question of how quantum coherence plays an essential role in such a chemical compass model of avian magnetoreception yet remains controversial. Here, we show that the essence of the chemical compass model can be understood in analogy to a quantum interferometer exploiting global quantum coherence rather than any subsystem coherence. Within the framework of quantum metrology, we quantify global quantum coherence and correlate it with the function of chemical magnetoreception. Our results allow us to understand and predict how various factors can affect the performance of a chemical compass from the unique perspective of quantum coherence assisted metrology. This represents a crucial step to affirm a direct connection between quantum coherence and the function of a chemical compass.

  13. New insights for accurate chemically specific measurements of slow diffusing molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jianbo; Madsen, Louis A.

    2013-02-01

    Investigating the myriad features of molecular transport in materials yields fundamental information for understanding processes such as ion conduction, chemical reactions, and phase transitions. Molecular transport especially impacts the performance of ion-containing liquids and polymeric materials when used as electrolytes and separation media, with applications encompassing battery electrolytes, reverse-osmosis membranes, mechanical transducers, and fuel cells. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides a unique probe of molecular translations by allowing measurement of all mobile species via spectral selectivity, access to a broad range of transport coefficients, probing of any material direction, and investigation of variable lengthscales in a material, thus, tying morphology to transport. Here, we present new concepts to test for and guarantee robust diffusion measurements. We first employ a standard pulsed-field-gradient (PFG) calibration protocol using 2H2O and obtain expected results, but we observe crippling artifacts when measuring 1H-glycerol diffusion with the same experimental parameters. A mathematical analysis of 2H2O and glycerol signals in the presence of PFG transients show tight agreement with experimental observations. These analyses lead to our principal findings that (1) negligible artifacts observed with low gyromagnetic ratio (γ) nuclei may become dominant when observing high γ nuclei, and (2) reducing the sample dimension along the gradient direction predictably reduces non-ideal behaviors of NMR signals. We further provide a useful quantitative strategy for error minimization when measuring diffusing species slower than the one used for gradient calibration.

  14. Accurate and efficient quantum chemistry calculations for noncovalent interactions in many-body systems: the XSAPT family of methods.

    PubMed

    Lao, Ka Un; Herbert, John M

    2015-01-15

    We present an overview of "XSAPT", a family of quantum chemistry methods for noncovalent interactions. These methods combine an efficient, iterative, monomer-based approach to computing many-body polarization interactions with a two-body version of symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT). The result is an efficient method for computing accurate intermolecular interaction energies in large noncovalent assemblies such as molecular and ionic clusters, molecular crystals, clathrates, or protein-ligand complexes. As in traditional SAPT, the XSAPT energy is decomposable into physically meaningful components. Dispersion interactions are problematic in traditional low-order SAPT, and two new approaches are introduced here in an attempt to improve this situation: (1) third-generation empirical atom-atom dispersion potentials, and (2) an empirically scaled version of second-order SAPT dispersion. Comparison to high-level ab initio benchmarks for dimers, water clusters, halide-water clusters, a methane clathrate hydrate, and a DNA intercalation complex illustrate both the accuracy of XSAPT-based methods as well as their limitations. The computational cost of XSAPT scales as O(N(3))-O(N(5)) with respect to monomer size, N, depending upon the particular version that is employed, but the accuracy is typically superior to alternative ab initio methods with similar scaling. Moreover, the monomer-based nature of XSAPT calculations makes them trivially parallelizable, such that wall times scale linearly with respect to the number of monomer units. XSAPT-based methods thus open the door to both qualitative and quantitative studies of noncovalent interactions in clusters, biomolecules, and condensed-phase systems.

  15. Self-consistent phonons: An accurate and practical method to account for anharmonic effects in equilibrium properties of general classical or quantum many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Sandra E.; Mandelshtam, Vladimir A.

    2016-12-01

    The self-consistent phonons (SCP) method is a practical approach for computing structural and dynamical properties of a general quantum or classical many-body system while incorporating anharmonic effects. However, a convincing demonstration of the accuracy of SCP and its advantages over the standard harmonic approximation is still lacking. Here we apply SCP to classical Lennard-Jones (LJ) clusters and compare with numerically exact results. The close agreement between the two reveals that SCP accurately describes structural properties of the classical LJ clusters from zero-temperature (where the method is exact) up to the temperatures at which the chosen cluster conformation becomes unstable. Given the similarities between thermal and quantum fluctuations, both physically and within the SCP ansatz, the accuracy of classical SCP over a range of temperatures suggests that quantum SCP is also accurate over a range of quantum de Boer parameter Λ = ℏ / (σ√{ mε }) , which describes the degree of quantum character of the system.

  16. Spectroscopic and quantum chemical analysis of Isonicotinic acid methyl ester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoba, D.; Periandy, S.; Govindarajan, M.; Gayathri, P.

    2015-02-01

    In this present study, an organic compound Isonicotinic acid methyl ester (INAME) was structurally characterized by FTIR, FT-Raman, and NMR and UV spectroscopy. The optimized geometrical parameters and energies of all different and possible conformers of INAME are obtained from Density Functional Theory (DFT) by B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. There are three conformers (SI, SII-1, and SII-2) for this molecule (ground state). The most stable conformer of INAME is SI conformer. The molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of INAME in the ground state have been calculated by using HF and density functional method (B3LYP) 6-311++G (d,p) basis set. Detailed vibrational spectral analysis has been carried out and assignments of the observed fundamental bands have been proposed on the basis of peak positions and relative intensities. The computed vibrational frequencies were compared with the experimental frequencies, which yield good agreement between observed and calculated frequencies. A study on the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies were performed by time independent DFT approach. Besides, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and thermodynamic properties were performed. The electric dipole moment (μ) and first hyper polarizability (β) values of the investigated molecule were computed using ab initio quantum mechanical calculations. The calculated results show that the INAME molecule may have microscopic nonlinear optical (NLO) behavior with non zero values. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated by gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method.

  17. Fast infrared chemical imaging with a quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Kevin; Kenkel, Seth; Liu, Jui-Nung; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-01-06

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging systems are a powerful tool for visualizing molecular microstructure of a sample without the need for dyes or stains. Table-top Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) imaging spectrometers, the current established technology, can record broadband spectral data efficiently but requires scanning the entire spectrum with a low throughput source. The advent of high-intensity, broadly tunable quantum cascade lasers (QCL) has now accelerated IR imaging but results in a fundamentally different type of instrument and approach, namely, discrete frequency IR (DF-IR) spectral imaging. While the higher intensity of the source provides a higher signal per channel, the absence of spectral multiplexing also provides new opportunities and challenges. Here, we couple a rapidly tunable QCL with a high performance microscope equipped with a cooled focal plane array (FPA) detector. Our optical system is conceptualized to provide optimal performance based on recent theory and design rules for high-definition (HD) IR imaging. Multiple QCL units are multiplexed together to provide spectral coverage across the fingerprint region (776.9 to 1904.4 cm(-1)) in our DF-IR microscope capable of broad spectral coverage, wide-field detection, and diffraction-limited spectral imaging. We demonstrate that the spectral and spatial fidelity of this system is at least as good as the best FT-IR imaging systems. Our configuration provides a speedup for equivalent spectral signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared to the best spectral quality from a high-performance linear array system that has 10-fold larger pixels. Compared to the fastest available HD FT-IR imaging system, we demonstrate scanning of large tissue microarrays (TMA) in 3-orders of magnitude smaller time per essential spectral frequency. These advances offer new opportunities for high throughput IR chemical imaging, especially for the measurement of cells and tissues.

  18. Distributed feedback quantum cascade laser arrays for chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Benjamin Guocian

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are unipolar semiconductor lasers based on intersubband transitions in heterostructures. The emission wavelengths of mid-infrared QCLs span from 3 to 24 mum and cover the "fingerprint" region of molecular absorption. This makes QCLs particularly interesting for spectroscopic applications. Single-mode emission is required for most spectroscopic applications. To achieve single-mode emission, QCLs can be made as distributed feedback (DFB) lasers or integrated with an external cavity (EC). EC-QCLs are widely tunable but are cumbersome and complex to build; they require high quality anti-reflection coatings, well-aligned external optical components including a grating for tuning, and piezoelectric controllers. DFB-QCLs are very compact and can be readily micro-fabricated, but a single DFB-QCL has limited tunability of ˜ 10 cm-1. In this thesis, I developed arrays of DFB-QCLs as widely-tunable, single-mode laser sources, and I demonstrated their applications to chemical sensing. I demonstrated a DFB-QCL array with 32 single-mode lasers on a single chip, emitting in a range over 85 cm-1 near 9mum wavelength, operated pulsed at room temperature. The DFB-QCL array can be continuously tuned, since the separation in nominal emission frequencies is small enough that we can use temperature tuning to span the frequency gaps between adjacent lasers in the array. To show the applications for chemical sensing, absorption spectroscopy was performed using the DFB-QCL array; the absorption spectra of several fluids were obtained, with results that were comparable to conventional Fourier transform infrared spectrometers. Achieving overlapped beams at extended distances can be important for a number of applications envisioned for DFB-QCL arrays, particularly remote sensing. Using the technique of spectral beam combining, the total angular divergence of the DFB-QCL array was reduced to less than 2 milliradians, which is 40 times better than without beam

  19. GaN quantum dots as optical transducers for chemical sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Weidemann, O.; Jegert, G.; Stutzmann, M.; Kandaswamy, P. K.; Monroy, E.

    2009-03-16

    GaN/AlN quantum dots were investigated as optical transducers for field effect chemical sensors. The structures were synthesized by molecular-beam epitaxy and covered by a semitransparent catalytic Pt top contact. Due to the thin (3 nm) AlN barriers, the variation of the quantum dot photoluminescence with an external electric field along the [0001] axis is dominated by the tunneling current rather than by the quantum confined Stark effect. An increasing field results in a blueshift of the luminescence and a decreasing intensity. This effect is used to measure the optical response of quantum dot superlattices upon exposure to molecular hydrogen.

  20. Quantum Chemical Benchmarking, Validation, and Prediction of Acidity Constants for Substituted Pyridinium Ions and Pyridinyl Radicals.

    PubMed

    Keith, John A; Carter, Emily A

    2012-09-11

    Sensibly modeling (photo)electrocatalytic reactions involving proton and electron transfer with computational quantum chemistry requires accurate descriptions of protonated, deprotonated, and radical species in solution. Procedures to do this are generally nontrivial, especially in cases that involve radical anions that are unstable in the gas phase. Recently, pyridinium and the corresponding reduced neutral radical have been postulated as key catalysts in the reduction of CO2 to methanol. To assess practical methodologies to describe the acid/base chemistry of these species, we employed density functional theory (DFT) in tandem with implicit solvation models to calculate acidity constants for 22 substituted pyridinium cations and their corresponding pyridinyl radicals in water solvent. We first benchmarked our calculations against experimental pyridinium deprotonation energies in both gas and aqueous phases. DFT with hybrid exchange-correlation functionals provide chemical accuracy for gas-phase data and allow absolute prediction of experimental pKas with unsigned errors under 1 pKa unit. The accuracy of this economical pKa calculation approach was further verified by benchmarking against highly accurate (but very expensive) CCSD(T)-F12 calculations. We compare the relative importance and sensitivity of these energies to selection of solvation model, solvation energy definitions, implicit solvation cavity definition, basis sets, electron densities, model geometries, and mixed implicit/explicit models. After determining the most accurate model to reproduce experimentally-known pKas from first principles, we apply the same approach to predict pKas for radical pyridinyl species that have been proposed relevant under electrochemical conditions. This work provides considerable insight into the pitfalls using continuum solvation models, particularly when used for radical species.

  1. Self-aligned active quantum nanostructures in photonic crystals via selective wet-chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Dong Yoon; Kim, Se-Heon; Huang, Jingqing; Scofield, Adam; Huffaker, Diana; Scherer, Axel

    2013-07-01

    We propose a method of forming quantum-size emitters within a pre-defined photonic crystal in a self-aligned fashion through controlled removal of quantum well layers via selective wet-chemical etching. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our method, we take the example of a two-dimensional photonic crystal slab containing multiple quantum wells at its center. We successfully fabricate vertically stacked quantum nanostructures (or quantum dots) well aligned with respect to the photonic crystal backbone. Micro-photoluminescence measurements performed at 78 K reveal that the radiative transition energy blue-shifts when the lateral dimension reaches less than 100 nm, which is compared with a simple model based on the ‘particle-in-a-box’ picture. The proposed method may find a broad range of applications in photonics and quantum optics, where the coupling between an emitter and an optical mode needs to be maximized.

  2. Self-aligned active quantum nanostructures in photonic crystals via selective wet-chemical etching.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dong Yoon; Kim, Se-Heon; Huang, Jingqing; Scofield, Adam; Huffaker, Diana; Scherer, Axel

    2013-07-05

    We propose a method of forming quantum-size emitters within a pre-defined photonic crystal in a self-aligned fashion through controlled removal of quantum well layers via selective wet-chemical etching. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our method, we take the example of a two-dimensional photonic crystal slab containing multiple quantum wells at its center. We successfully fabricate vertically stacked quantum nanostructures (or quantum dots) well aligned with respect to the photonic crystal backbone. Micro-photoluminescence measurements performed at 78 K reveal that the radiative transition energy blue-shifts when the lateral dimension reaches less than 100 nm, which is compared with a simple model based on the 'particle-in-a-box' picture. The proposed method may find a broad range of applications in photonics and quantum optics, where the coupling between an emitter and an optical mode needs to be maximized.

  3. Discovery of a general method of solving the Schrödinger and dirac equations that opens a way to accurately predictive quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuji, Hiroshi

    2012-09-18

    Just as Newtonian law governs classical physics, the Schrödinger equation (SE) and the relativistic Dirac equation (DE) rule the world of chemistry. So, if we can solve these equations accurately, we can use computation to predict chemistry precisely. However, for approximately 80 years after the discovery of these equations, chemists believed that they could not solve SE and DE for atoms and molecules that included many electrons. This Account reviews ideas developed over the past decade to further the goal of predictive quantum chemistry. Between 2000 and 2005, I discovered a general method of solving the SE and DE accurately. As a first inspiration, I formulated the structure of the exact wave function of the SE in a compact mathematical form. The explicit inclusion of the exact wave function's structure within the variational space allows for the calculation of the exact wave function as a solution of the variational method. Although this process sounds almost impossible, it is indeed possible, and I have published several formulations and applied them to solve the full configuration interaction (CI) with a very small number of variables. However, when I examined analytical solutions for atoms and molecules, the Hamiltonian integrals in their secular equations diverged. This singularity problem occurred in all atoms and molecules because it originates from the singularity of the Coulomb potential in their Hamiltonians. To overcome this problem, I first introduced the inverse SE and then the scaled SE. The latter simpler idea led to immediate and surprisingly accurate solution for the SEs of the hydrogen atom, helium atom, and hydrogen molecule. The free complement (FC) method, also called the free iterative CI (free ICI) method, was efficient for solving the SEs. In the FC method, the basis functions that span the exact wave function are produced by the Hamiltonian of the system and the zeroth-order wave function. These basis functions are called complement

  4. Accurate quantum yields by laser gain vs absorption spectroscopy - Investigation of Br/Br(asterisk) channels in photofragmentation of Br2 and IBr

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haugen, H. K.; Weitz, E.; Leone, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    Various techniques have been used to study photodissociation dynamics of the halogens and interhalogens. The quantum yields obtained by these techniques differ widely. The present investigation is concerned with a qualitatively new approach for obtaining highly accurate quantum yields for electronically excited states. This approach makes it possible to obtain an accuracy of 1 percent to 3 percent. It is shown that measurement of the initial transient gain/absorption vs the final absorption in a single time-resolved signal is a very accurate technique in the study of absolute branching fractions in photodissociation. The new technique is found to be insensitive to pulse and probe laser characteristics, molecular absorption cross sections, and absolute precursor density.

  5. Does a more precise chemical description of protein-ligand complexes lead to more accurate prediction of binding affinity?

    PubMed

    Ballester, Pedro J; Schreyer, Adrian; Blundell, Tom L

    2014-03-24

    Predicting the binding affinities of large sets of diverse molecules against a range of macromolecular targets is an extremely challenging task. The scoring functions that attempt such computational prediction are essential for exploiting and analyzing the outputs of docking, which is in turn an important tool in problems such as structure-based drug design. Classical scoring functions assume a predetermined theory-inspired functional form for the relationship between the variables that describe an experimentally determined or modeled structure of a protein-ligand complex and its binding affinity. The inherent problem of this approach is in the difficulty of explicitly modeling the various contributions of intermolecular interactions to binding affinity. New scoring functions based on machine-learning regression models, which are able to exploit effectively much larger amounts of experimental data and circumvent the need for a predetermined functional form, have already been shown to outperform a broad range of state-of-the-art scoring functions in a widely used benchmark. Here, we investigate the impact of the chemical description of the complex on the predictive power of the resulting scoring function using a systematic battery of numerical experiments. The latter resulted in the most accurate scoring function to date on the benchmark. Strikingly, we also found that a more precise chemical description of the protein-ligand complex does not generally lead to a more accurate prediction of binding affinity. We discuss four factors that may contribute to this result: modeling assumptions, codependence of representation and regression, data restricted to the bound state, and conformational heterogeneity in data.

  6. A combined deuterium NMR and quantum chemical investigation of inequivalent hydrogen bonds in organic solids.

    PubMed

    Webber, Renee; Penner, Glenn H

    2012-01-01

    Deuterium magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations are used to investigate organic solids in which inequivalent hydrogen bonds are present. The use of (2)H MAS allows one to measure the chemical shift, δ, quadrupolar coupling constant, C(Q), and asymmetry in the quadrupolar interaction, η(Q), for each type of hydrogen bond present in the system. Quantum chemical calculations of the magnetic shielding (σ, which can be related to δ) and the electric field gradient (EFG, which can be related to C(Q)) are compared to the experimental results and are discussed with respect to the relative strengths of the hydrogen bonds within each system.

  7. AIScore chemically diverse empirical scoring function employing quantum chemical binding energies of hydrogen-bonded complexes.

    PubMed

    Raub, Stephan; Steffen, Andreas; Kämper, Andreas; Marian, Christel M

    2008-07-01

    In this work we report on a novel scoring function that is based on the LUDI model and focuses on the prediction of binding affinities. AIScore extends the original FlexX scoring function using a chemically diverse set of hydrogen-bonded interactions derived from extensive quantum chemical ab initio calculations. Furthermore, we introduce an algorithmic extension for the treatment of multifurcated hydrogen bonds (XFurcate). Charged and resonance-assisted hydrogen bond energies and hydrophobic interactions as well as a scaling factor for implicit solvation were fitted to experimental data. To this end, we assembled a set of 101 protein-ligand complexes with known experimental binding affinities. Tightly bound water molecules in the active site were considered to be an integral part of the binding pocket. Compared to the original FlexX scoring function, AIScore significantly improves the prediction of the binding free energies of the complexes in their native crystal structures. In combination with XFurcate, AIScore yields a Pearson correlation coefficient of R P = 0.87 on the training set. In a validation run on the PDBbind test set we achieved an R P value of 0.46 for 799 attractively scored complexes, compared to a value of R P = 0.17 and 739 bound complexes obtained with the FlexX original scoring function. The redocking capability of AIScore, on the other hand, does not fully reach the good performance of the original FlexX scoring function. This finding suggests that AIScore should rather be used for postscoring in combination with the standard FlexX incremental ligand construction scheme.

  8. Chemical bonding in TiSb(2) and VSb(2): a quantum chemical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Armbrüster, Marc; Schnelle, Walter; Schwarz, Ulrich; Grin, Yuri

    2007-08-06

    The chemical bonding in the isostructural intermetallic compounds TiSb2 and VSb2, crystallizing in the CuAl2 type, was investigated by means of quantum chemical calculations, particularly the electron localization function (ELF), as well as by Raman spectroscopy, Hall effect and conductivity measurements on oriented single crystals, and high-pressure X-ray powder diffraction. The homogeneity ranges of the compounds were determined by powder X-ray diffraction, WDXS, and DSC measurements. TiSb2 exhibits no significant homogeneity range, while VSb2 shows a small homogeneity range of approximately 0.3 at. %. According to the ELF calculations, the Sb atoms form dumbbells via a two-center two-electron bond, while the T atoms (T = Ti, V) build up chains along the crystallographic c-axis. Both building units are connected by covalent T-Sb-T three-center bonds, thus forming a three-dimensional network. The strength of the bonds involving Sb was determined by fitting a force constant model to the vibrational mode frequencies observed by polarized Raman measurements on oriented single crystals. The resulting bond order of the Sb2 dumbbells is 1, while the strength of the three-center bonds resembles a bond order of 1.5. The weak pressure dependence of the c/a ratio confirms the slightly different bonding picture in TiSb2 compared to that in CuAl2. Electrical transport measurements show the presence of free charge carriers, as well as a metal-like temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity.

  9. Quantum Chemical Studies on Stability and Chemical Activities in Calcium Ion Bound Calmodulin Loops.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Samapan; Ghosh, Mahua; De Raychaudhury, Molly; Chakrabarti, J

    2015-11-19

    Quantum chemical (QC) calculations for macromolecules require truncation of the molecule, highlighting the portion of interest due to heavy computation cost. As a result, an estimation of the effects of truncation is important to interpret the energy spectrum of such calculations. We perform density functional theory based QC calculations on calcium ion bound EF-hand loops of Calmodulin isolated from the crystal structure in an implicit solvent. We find that the terminal contributions of neutral capping are negligible across the entire ground-state energy spectrum. The coordination energy range and the nature of hybridization of the coordination state molecular orbitals remain qualitatively similar across these loops. While the HOMO and LUMO of loops in the N-terminal domain are dominated by the acidic aspartates, and the polar/hydrophobic residues, respectively, these levels of the C-terminal domain loops show strong localized electron density on the phenyl rings of the tyrosines. The Fukui index calculation identifies the hydroxyl oxygen in the phenyl ring of Y99 as a potent nucleophile. Our analysis indicates a general way of interpreting the electronic energy spectra to understand stability and functions of large biomolecules where the truncation of the molecule and, hence, the terminal capping effects are inevitable.

  10. Electronic and rovibrational quantum chemical analysis of C3P-: the next interstellar anion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Lukemire, Joseph A.

    2015-11-01

    C3P- is analogous to the known interstellar anion C3N- with phosphorus replacing nitrogen in a simple step down the periodic table. In this work, it is shown that C3P- is likely to possess a dipole-bound excited state. It has been hypothesized and observationally supported that dipole-bound excited states are an avenue through which anions could be formed in the interstellar medium. Additionally, C3P- has a valence excited state that may lead to further stabilization of this molecule, and C3P- has a larger dipole moment than neutral C3P (˜6 D versus ˜4 D). As such, C3P- is probably a more detectable astromolecule than even its corresponding neutral radical. Highly accurate quantum chemical quartic force fields are also applied to C3P- and its singly 13C substituted isotopologues in order to provide structures, vibrational frequencies, and spectroscopic constants that may aid in its detection.

  11. Wet chemical synthesis of quantum dots for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepeda-Pérez, E. I.; López-Luke, T.; Pérez-Mayen, L.; Hidalgo, Alberto; de la Rosa, E.; Torres-Castro, Alejandro; Ceja-Fdez, Andrea; Vivero-Escoto, Juan; Gonzalez-Yebra, Ana L.

    2015-07-01

    In recent years the use of nanoparticles in medical applications has boomed. This is because the various applications that provide these materials like drug delivery, cancer cell diagnostics and therapeutics [1-5]. Biomedical applications of Quantum Dots (QDs) are focused on molecular imaging and biological sensing due to its optical properties. The size of QDs can be continuously tuned from 2 to 10 nm in diameter, which, after polymer encapsulation, generally increases to 5 - 20 nm diminishing the toxicity. The QDs prepared in our lab have a diameter between 2 to 7 nm. Particles smaller than 5 nm can interact with the cells [2]. Some of the characteristics that distinguish QDs from the commonly used fluorophores are wider range of emission, narrow and more sharply defined emission peak, brighter emission and a higher signal to noise ratio compared with organic dyes [6]. In this paper we will show our progress in the study of the interaction of quantum dots in live cells for image and Raman spectroscopy applications. We will also show the results of the interaction of quantum dots with genomic DNA for diagnostic purposes.

  12. Interfacing the GROMOS (bio)molecular simulation software to quantum-chemical program packages.

    PubMed

    Meier, Katharina; Schmid, Nathan; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2012-10-05

    The newly implemented quantum-chemical/molecular-mechanical (QM/MM) functionality of the Groningen molecular simulation (GROMOS) software for (bio)molecular simulation is described. The implementation scheme is based on direct coupling of the GROMOS C++ software to executables of the quantum-chemical program packages MNDO and TURBOMOLE, allowing for an independent further development of these packages. The new functions are validated for different test systems using program and model testing techniques. The effect of truncating the QM/MM electrostatic interactions at various QM/MM cutoff radii is discussed and the application of semiempirical versus density-functional Hamiltonians for a solute molecule in aqueous solution is compared.

  13. Accurate molecular dynamics and nuclear quantum effects at low cost by multiple steps in real and imaginary time: Using density functional theory to accelerate wavefunction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapil, V.; VandeVondele, J.; Ceriotti, M.

    2016-02-01

    The development and implementation of increasingly accurate methods for electronic structure calculations mean that, for many atomistic simulation problems, treating light nuclei as classical particles is now one of the most serious approximations. Even though recent developments have significantly reduced the overhead for modeling the quantum nature of the nuclei, the cost is still prohibitive when combined with advanced electronic structure methods. Here we present how multiple time step integrators can be combined with ring-polymer contraction techniques (effectively, multiple time stepping in imaginary time) to reduce virtually to zero the overhead of modelling nuclear quantum effects, while describing inter-atomic forces at high levels of electronic structure theory. This is demonstrated for a combination of MP2 and semi-local DFT applied to the Zundel cation. The approach can be seamlessly combined with other methods to reduce the computational cost of path integral calculations, such as high-order factorizations of the Boltzmann operator or generalized Langevin equation thermostats.

  14. Accurate molecular dynamics and nuclear quantum effects at low cost by multiple steps in real and imaginary time: Using density functional theory to accelerate wavefunction methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kapil, V.; Ceriotti, M.; VandeVondele, J.

    2016-02-07

    The development and implementation of increasingly accurate methods for electronic structure calculations mean that, for many atomistic simulation problems, treating light nuclei as classical particles is now one of the most serious approximations. Even though recent developments have significantly reduced the overhead for modeling the quantum nature of the nuclei, the cost is still prohibitive when combined with advanced electronic structure methods. Here we present how multiple time step integrators can be combined with ring-polymer contraction techniques (effectively, multiple time stepping in imaginary time) to reduce virtually to zero the overhead of modelling nuclear quantum effects, while describing inter-atomic forces at high levels of electronic structure theory. This is demonstrated for a combination of MP2 and semi-local DFT applied to the Zundel cation. The approach can be seamlessly combined with other methods to reduce the computational cost of path integral calculations, such as high-order factorizations of the Boltzmann operator or generalized Langevin equation thermostats.

  15. Studies on the Conformational Landscape of Tert-Butyl Acetate Using Microwave Spectroscopy and Quantum Chemical Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, YueYue; Mouhib, Halima; Li, Guohua; Stahl, Wolfgang; Kleiner, Isabelle

    2014-06-01

    The tert-Butyl acetate molecule was studied using a combination of quantum chemical calculations and molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in the 9 to 14 GHz range. Due to its rather rigid frame, the molecule possesses only two different conformers: one of Cs and one of C1 symmetry. According to ab initio calculations, the Cs conformer is 46 kJ/mol lower in energy and is the one observed in the supersonic jet. We report on the structure and dynamics of the most abundant conformer of tert-butyl acetate, with accurate rotational and centrifugal distortion constants. Additionally, the barrier to internal rotation of the acetyl methyl group was determined. Splittings due to the internal rotation of the methyl group of up to 1.3 GHz were observed in the spectrum. Using the programs XIAM and BELGI-Cs, we determine the barrier height to be about 113 cm-1 and compare the molecular parameters obtained from these two codes. Additionally, the experimental rotational constants were used to validate numerous quantum chemical calculations. This study is part of a larger project which aims at determining the lowest energy conformers of organic esters and ketones which are of interest for flavor or perfume synthetic applications Project partly supported by the PHC PROCOPE 25059YB.

  16. Simulating Quantum Chemical Dynamics with Improved Superconducting Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megrant, Anthony E.

    A quantum computer will potentially solve far-reaching problems which are currently intractable on any classical computer. Many technological obstacles have prevented the realization of a quantum computer, the main obstacle being decoherence, which is the loss of quantum information. Decoherence arises from the undesired interaction between qubits and their environment. Isolated qubits have better coherence but are more difficult to control. Superconducting qubits are a promising platform since their macroscopic size allows for easy control and coupling to other qubits. While the coherence of superconducting qubits has substantially improved over the past two decades, further improvements in coherence are required. We have repeatedly and reliably increased the coherence times of superconducting qubits. Currently decoherence in these devices is dominated by coupling to material defects. These defects are present in the dielectrics used to fabricate these devices or introduced during fabrication. Using simpler resonators as a testbed, we individually isolate, characterize, and then improve each step of the more complicated fabrication of superconducting qubits. We increased the quality factor of resonators by a factor of four by first identifying the surfaces and interfaces as a major source of loss and then by optimizing the substrate preparation. Furthermore, we measure and subsequently mitigate additional defect loss, which is dependent on the position of ground plane holes used to limit the loss from magnetic vortices. Implementing these improvements led to an increase of our qubit coherence times by more than an order of magnitude. The progress made in coherence while maintaining a high degree of connectivity and controllability has been directly used in more complex circuits. One such device is a fully connected three qubit ring with both tunable qubit frequencies and adjustable qubit-qubit couplings. The considerable level of control allows us to generate the

  17. Predicting allergic contact dermatitis: a hierarchical structure activity relationship (SAR) approach to chemical classification using topological and quantum chemical descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Subhash C.; Mills, Denise; Hawkins, Douglas M.

    2008-06-01

    A hierarchical classification study was carried out based on a set of 70 chemicals—35 which produce allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) and 35 which do not. This approach was implemented using a regular ridge regression computer code, followed by conversion of regression output to binary data values. The hierarchical descriptor classes used in the modeling include topostructural (TS), topochemical (TC), and quantum chemical (QC), all of which are based solely on chemical structure. The concordance, sensitivity, and specificity are reported. The model based on the TC descriptors was found to be the best, while the TS model was extremely poor.

  18. An efficient matrix product operator representation of the quantum chemical Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Sebastian Reiher, Markus; Dolfi, Michele Troyer, Matthias

    2015-12-28

    We describe how to efficiently construct the quantum chemical Hamiltonian operator in matrix product form. We present its implementation as a density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm for quantum chemical applications. Existing implementations of DMRG for quantum chemistry are based on the traditional formulation of the method, which was developed from the point of view of Hilbert space decimation and attained higher performance compared to straightforward implementations of matrix product based DMRG. The latter variationally optimizes a class of ansatz states known as matrix product states, where operators are correspondingly represented as matrix product operators (MPOs). The MPO construction scheme presented here eliminates the previous performance disadvantages while retaining the additional flexibility provided by a matrix product approach, for example, the specification of expectation values becomes an input parameter. In this way, MPOs for different symmetries — abelian and non-abelian — and different relativistic and non-relativistic models may be solved by an otherwise unmodified program.

  19. Investigation of the ICT state of DPA-DSB using spectroscopic experiments and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xing; Wang, Yang; Liu, Weilong; Yang, Zhenling; Du, Xin; Liu, Yuqiang; Yang, Yanqiang

    2011-01-01

    The excited states of a symmetric D- π-D structure two-photon excited fluorescence material 1,4-di (4'- N, N-diphenylaminostyryl) benzene (DPA-DSB) have been investigated by spectroscopic experiments and quantum chemical calculations. The solvent polarity dependent fluorescence properties indicate that upon photoexcitation, a radiative intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) state is formed resulting from the ICT process. The molecular structure does not have large change during the ICT process, which is confirmed by the quantum chemical calculations performed by G AUSSIAN 03 software. The planar structure of the fluorescent ICT state results in the high fluorescence quantum yield which is important in the two-photon excited fluorescence application.

  20. Physico-chemical mechanism for the vapors sensitivity of photoluminescent InP quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosposito, P.; De Angelis, R.; De Matteis, F.; Hatami, F.; Masselink, W. T.; Zhang, H.; Casalboni, M.

    2016-03-01

    InP/InGaP surface quantum dots are interesting materials for optical chemical sensors since they present an intense emission at room temperature, whose intensity changes rapidly and reversibly depending on the composition of the environmental atmosphere. We present here their emission properties by time resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy investigation and we discuss the physico-chemical mechanism behind their sensitivity to the surrounding atmosphere. Photoluminescence transients in inert atmosphere (N2) and in solvent vapours of methanol, clorophorm, acetone and water were measured. The presence of vapors of clorophorm, acetone and water showed a very weak effect on the transient times, while an increase of up to 15% of the decay time was observed for methanol vapour exposure. On the basis of the vapor molecule nature (polarity, proticity, steric hindrance, etc.) and of the interaction of the vapor molecules with the quantum dots surface a sensing mechanism involving quantum dots non-radiative surface states is proposed.

  1. An efficient matrix product operator representation of the quantum chemical Hamiltonian.

    PubMed

    Keller, Sebastian; Dolfi, Michele; Troyer, Matthias; Reiher, Markus

    2015-12-28

    We describe how to efficiently construct the quantum chemical Hamiltonian operator in matrix product form. We present its implementation as a density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm for quantum chemical applications. Existing implementations of DMRG for quantum chemistry are based on the traditional formulation of the method, which was developed from the point of view of Hilbert space decimation and attained higher performance compared to straightforward implementations of matrix product based DMRG. The latter variationally optimizes a class of ansatz states known as matrix product states, where operators are correspondingly represented as matrix product operators (MPOs). The MPO construction scheme presented here eliminates the previous performance disadvantages while retaining the additional flexibility provided by a matrix product approach, for example, the specification of expectation values becomes an input parameter. In this way, MPOs for different symmetries - abelian and non-abelian - and different relativistic and non-relativistic models may be solved by an otherwise unmodified program.

  2. Error Sensitivity to Environmental Noise in Quantum Circuits for Chemical State Preparation.

    PubMed

    Sawaya, Nicolas P D; Smelyanskiy, Mikhail; McClean, Jarrod R; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2016-07-12

    Calculating molecular energies is likely to be one of the first useful applications to achieve quantum supremacy, performing faster on a quantum than a classical computer. However, if future quantum devices are to produce accurate calculations, errors due to environmental noise and algorithmic approximations need to be characterized and reduced. In this study, we use the high performance qHiPSTER software to investigate the effects of environmental noise on the preparation of quantum chemistry states. We simulated 18 16-qubit quantum circuits under environmental noise, each corresponding to a unitary coupled cluster state preparation of a different molecule or molecular configuration. Additionally, we analyze the nature of simple gate errors in noise-free circuits of up to 40 qubits. We find that, in most cases, the Jordan-Wigner (JW) encoding produces smaller errors under a noisy environment as compared to the Bravyi-Kitaev (BK) encoding. For the JW encoding, pure dephasing noise is shown to produce substantially smaller errors than pure relaxation noise of the same magnitude. We report error trends in both molecular energy and electron particle number within a unitary coupled cluster state preparation scheme, against changes in nuclear charge, bond length, number of electrons, noise types, and noise magnitude. These trends may prove to be useful in making algorithmic and hardware-related choices for quantum simulation of molecular energies.

  3. Recent Results in Quantum Chemical Kinetics from High Resolution Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Quack, Martin

    2007-12-26

    We outline the approach of our group to derive intramolecular kinetic primary processes from high resolution spectroscopy. We then review recent results on intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) and on tunneling processes. Examples are the quantum dynamics of the C-H-chromophore in organic molecules, hydrogen bond dynamics in (HF){sub 2} and stereomutation dynamics in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and related chiral molecules. We finally discuss the time scales for these and further processes which range from 10 fs to more than seconds in terms of successive symmetry breakings, leading to the question of nuclear spin symmetry and parity violation as well as the question of CPT symmetry.

  4. Photosensitization and phototherapy with furocoumarins: A quantum-chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano-Pérez, Juan José; Serrano-Andrés, Luis; Merchán, Manuela

    2008-05-01

    The effect of electromagnetic radiation on biological objects extends from heating to complex photochemistry, and includes DNA alteration, that properly modified in damaged cells may entail beneficial effects. In this regard, psoralen + UV-A (PUVA) therapy, in which furocoumarins, psoralen-like chromophores, are used as photosensitizers and photoreactants with DNA bases, is one of the most promising strategies against a plethora of diseases. Understanding the underlying photochemical mechanisms is crucial to design effective drugs without undesired side effects. We have undertaken a quantum-mechanical study on the photophysics and photochemistry of furocoumarins, analyzing firstly the most efficient way in which the lowest excited triplet state, as protagonist of the photosensitizing action, is populated from the initially promoted singlet states, and secondly the basics of the formation of furocoumarin-DNA photoadducts.

  5. The Molecular Structure of Phenetole Studied by Microwave Spectroscopy and Quantum Chemical Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferres, Lynn; Stahl, Wolfgang; Nguyen, Ha Vinh Lam

    2016-06-01

    A pulsed molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer operating in the frequency range 2 - 26.5 GHz was used to measure the spectrum of phenetole (ethyl phenyl ether or ethoxybenzene, C6H5OC2H5). The conformational landscape is completely determined by the orientations of the phenyl ring and the ethyl group. A two-dimensional potential energy surface was calculated at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. Two conformers were found: The trans conformer has a Cs symmetry, and the gauche conformer has the ethyl group tilted out of the phenyl plane by about 70°. Totally 186 rotational transitions were assigned to the more stable planar trans conformer, and fitted using a semi-rigid rotor model to measurement accuracy of 2 kHz. Highly accurate rotational and centrifugal distortion constants were determined. Several method and basis set combinations were applied to check for convergence and to compare with the experimentally deduced molecular parameters. The inertial defect of the observed conformer Δc = (Ic - Ia - Ib) = -6.718 uÅ2 confirms that the heavy atom skeleton is planar with two pairs of hydrogen atoms out of plane. All lines in the spectrum could be assigned to the trans conformer, which confirms that the gauche conformer cannot be observed under our measurement conditions. In agreement with the rather high torsional barrier of the methyl group (V3 = 1168 wn) calculated by quantum chemical methods, all assigned lines appeared sharp and no signs of splittings were observed for the methyl internal rotation.

  6. TOXICOGENOMIC STUDY OF TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDES AND PERFLUOROALKYL ACIDS IN RAT LIVERS ACCURATELY CATEGORIZES CHEMICALS AND IDENTIFIES MECHANISMS OF TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicogenomic analysis of five environmental chemicals was performed to investigate the ability of genomics to predict toxicity, categorize chemicals, and elucidate mechanisms of toxicity. Three triazole antifungals (myclobutanil, propiconazole, and triadimefon) and two perfluori...

  7. Intrinsic Atomic Orbitals: An Unbiased Bridge between Quantum Theory and Chemical Concepts.

    PubMed

    Knizia, Gerald

    2013-11-12

    Modern quantum chemistry can make quantitative predictions on an immense array of chemical systems. However, the interpretation of those predictions is often complicated by the complex wave function expansions used. Here we show that an exceptionally simple algebraic construction allows for defining atomic core and valence orbitals, polarized by the molecular environment, which can exactly represent self-consistent field wave functions. This construction provides an unbiased and direct connection between quantum chemistry and empirical chemical concepts, and can be used, for example, to calculate the nature of bonding in molecules, in chemical terms, from first principles. In particular, we find consistency with electronegativities (χ), C 1s core-level shifts, resonance substituent parameters (σR), Lewis structures, and oxidation states of transition-metal complexes.

  8. Quantum Theory of Rearrangement Collisions with Applications to Elementary Chemical Reactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Mark Steven

    A three-dimensional, quantum mechanical, coupled channel distorted wave approximation is developed for calculating cross sections for rearrangement collisions between an atom and a diatomic molecule based on the transition (T matrix) formulation of molecular scattering. In this approximation, both entrance and exit channel wave functions are calculated from the inelastic vibrational and rotational close-coupling approximation, and these wave functions are used in the calculation of the T matrix elements for rearrangement. This method allows for the internal states of both the target and product molecule to be dynamically coupled following the motion of the atom, and the wave functions for the exit and entrance channel have the proper asymptotic behavior. Therefore, this method is capable of yielding more accurate results than those from most of the T matrix schemes employed so far. An efficient computational procedure for calculating cross sections is given utilizing parity conservation and by reducing the six-dimensional integral over complex-valued functions to a real-valued three-dimensional integral. Cross sections calculated from this method are presented for the isotopic reactions H+H(,2), D+H(,2), H+H(,2), and Mu+H(,2) using the most accurate available potential surface for energies in the threshold regions of these reactions, and these are compared to other theoretical results when possible. The calculated cross sections for the H+H(,2) reaction are found to be in excellent agreement with the converged close coupling results. Rate constants obtained from the cross sections show the same temperature dependence and are of the same order of magnitude as experimental results; however, the present results are about a factor of 2-3 smaller than the experimental values at lower temperatures for all systems studied. The results of this study indicate that the present method is capable of correctly predicting all reaction attributes of the elementary chemical

  9. An integrated experimental and quantum-chemical investigation on the vibrational spectra of chlorofluoromethane

    PubMed Central

    Charmet, Andrea Pietropolli; Stoppa, Paolo; Tasinato, Nicola; Giorgianni, Santi; Barone, Vincenzo; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien; Cappelli, Chiara; Carnimeo, Ivan; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The vibrational analysis of the gas-phase infrared spectra of chlorofluoromethane (CH2ClF, HCFC-31) was carried out in the range 200 – 6200 cm−1. The assignment of the absorption features in terms of fundamental, overtone, combination and hot bands was performed on the medium-resolution (up to 0.2 cm−1) Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra. From the absorption cross section spectra accurate values of the integrated band intensities were derived and the Global Warming Potential (GWP) of this compound was estimated, thus obtaining values of 323, 83 and 42 on a 20-, 100- and 500- year horizon, respectively. The set of spectroscopic parameters here presented provides the basic data to model the atmospheric behavior of this greenhouse gas. In addition, the obtained vibrational properties were used to benchmark the predictions of state-of-the-art quantum-chemical computational strategies. Extrapolated complete basis set (CBS) limit values for the equilibrium geometry and harmonic force field were obtained at the coupled-cluster singles and doubles level of theory augmented by a perturbative treatment of triple excitations, CCSD(T), in conjunction with a hierarchical series of correlation-consistent basis sets (cc-pVnZ, with n = T, Q and 5), taking also into account the core-valence (CV) correlation effects and the corrections due to diffuse (aug) functions. To obtain the cubic and quartic semi-diagonal force constants, calculations employing second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation (MP2) theory, the double-hybrid DFT functional (B2PLYP) as well as CCSD(T) were performed. For all anharmonic force fields the performances of two different perturbative approaches in computing the vibrational energy levels (i.e., the generalized second order vibrational treatment, GVPT2, and the recently proposed hybrid degeneracy corrected model, HDCPT2) were evaluated and the obtained results allowed us to validate the spectroscopic predictions yielded by the HDCPT2 approach

  10. Chemically Triggered Formation of Two-Dimensional Epitaxial Quantum Dot Superlattices.

    PubMed

    Walravens, Willem; De Roo, Jonathan; Drijvers, Emile; Ten Brinck, Stephanie; Solano, Eduardo; Dendooven, Jolien; Detavernier, Christophe; Infante, Ivan; Hens, Zeger

    2016-07-26

    Two dimensional superlattices of epitaxially connected quantum dots enable size-quantization effects to be combined with high charge carrier mobilities, an essential prerequisite for highly performing QD devices based on charge transport. Here, we demonstrate that surface active additives known to restore nanocrystal stoichiometry can trigger the formation of epitaxial superlattices of PbSe and PbS quantum dots. More specifically, we show that both chalcogen-adding (sodium sulfide) and lead oleate displacing (amines) additives induce small area epitaxial superlattices of PbSe quantum dots. In the latter case, the amine basicity is a sensitive handle to tune the superlattice symmetry, with strong and weak bases yielding pseudohexagonal or quasi-square lattices, respectively. Through density functional theory calculations and in situ titrations monitored by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we link this observation to the concomitantly different coordination enthalpy and ligand displacement potency of the amine. Next to that, an initial ∼10% reduction of the initial ligand density prior to monolayer formation and addition of a mild, lead oleate displacing chemical trigger such as aniline proved key to induce square superlattices with long-range, square micrometer order; an effect that is the more pronounced the larger the quantum dots. Because the approach applies to PbS quantum dots as well, we conclude that it offers a reproducible and rational method for the formation of highly ordered epitaxial quantum dot superlattices.

  11. Quantum-chemical investigations of small molecular anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botschwina, P.; Seeger, S.; Mladenović, M.; Schulz, B.; Horn, M.; Schmatz, S.; Flügge, J.; Oswald, R.

    Dedicated to Dr Gerhard Herzberg on the occasion of his 90th birthday Recent large-scale ab initio calculations for small negative molecular ions are reviewed. Accurate equilibrium geometries are established for several species like NH2-, HCC-, NO2-, CH2N- C5- and C6-. Predictions are made for various spectroscopic properties like vibrational frequencies, rotational constants and infrared intensities. The effects of a shallow energy minimum in the T-shaped configuration on the rovibrational term energies of HCC - are investigated. The calculated vibrational structures of the photoelectron spectra of SiH3- and CH2N - are in very good agreement with the experiment. The present calculations support the assignment of an absorption observed at 608 nm in a neon matrix to the

  12. Quantum photonic base states: concept and molecular modeling. Managing chemical process descriptions beyond semi-classic schemes.

    PubMed

    Tapia, O

    2014-02-01

    Four fundamental aspects bearing on molecular simulations are considered: (1) A different perception of quantum states; mappings from abstract Hilbert space down to laboratory levels; (2) Introduction of photon number Fock space; photonic bases tie together matter-to-photon quantum states: coherent photon-matter states. (3) Chemical tenets framed via photonic-base-states incorporating and defining multi-partite basis sets. (4) Entanglement provides a quantum-physical view connectable to a chemical bond concept. Amplitude modulations of physical quantum states realize (express) chemical change; Feshbach resonance states as a royal path to handle an equivalent to bond breaking/forming by coupling continuum-to-discrete base states. We observe that, for driving chemical processes within photonic framework, microwaves enter not only as heating sources but can act naturally in a quantum physical manner as causes for catalytic activity.

  13. Comparisons of classical chemical dynamics simulations of the unimolecular decomposition of classical and quantum microcanonical ensembles.

    PubMed

    Manikandan, Paranjothy; Hase, William L

    2012-05-14

    Previous studies have shown that classical trajectory simulations often give accurate results for short-time intramolecular and unimolecular dynamics, particularly for initial non-random energy distributions. To obtain such agreement between experiment and simulation, the appropriate distributions must be sampled to choose initial coordinates and momenta for the ensemble of trajectories. If a molecule's classical phase space is sampled randomly, its initial decomposition will give the classical anharmonic microcanonical (RRKM) unimolecular rate constant for its decomposition. For the work presented here, classical trajectory simulations of the unimolecular decomposition of quantum and classical microcanonical ensembles, at the same fixed total energy, are compared. In contrast to the classical microcanonical ensemble, the quantum microcanonical ensemble does not sample the phase space randomly. The simulations were performed for CH(4), C(2)H(5), and Cl(-)---CH(3)Br using both analytic potential energy surfaces and direct dynamics methods. Previous studies identified intrinsic RRKM dynamics for CH(4) and C(2)H(5), but intrinsic non-RRKM dynamics for Cl(-)---CH(3)Br. Rate constants calculated from trajectories obtained by the time propagation of the classical and quantum microcanonical ensembles are compared with the corresponding harmonic RRKM estimates to obtain anharmonic corrections to the RRKM rate constants. The relevance and accuracy of the classical trajectory simulation of the quantum microcanonical ensemble, for obtaining the quantum anharmonic RRKM rate constant, is discussed.

  14. Exploiting Locality in Quantum Computation for Quantum Chemistry.

    PubMed

    McClean, Jarrod R; Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-12-18

    Accurate prediction of chemical and material properties from first-principles quantum chemistry is a challenging task on traditional computers. Recent developments in quantum computation offer a route toward highly accurate solutions with polynomial cost; however, this solution still carries a large overhead. In this Perspective, we aim to bring together known results about the locality of physical interactions from quantum chemistry with ideas from quantum computation. We show that the utilization of spatial locality combined with the Bravyi-Kitaev transformation offers an improvement in the scaling of known quantum algorithms for quantum chemistry and provides numerical examples to help illustrate this point. We combine these developments to improve the outlook for the future of quantum chemistry on quantum computers.

  15. Vibrational spectroscopic studies of Isoleucine by quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Moorthi, P P; Gunasekaran, S; Ramkumaar, G R

    2014-04-24

    In this work, we reported a combined experimental and theoretical study on molecular structure, vibrational spectra and NBO analysis of Isoleucine (2-Amino-3-methylpentanoic acid). The optimized molecular structure, vibrational frequencies, corresponding vibrational assignments, thermodynamics properties, NBO analyses, NMR chemical shifts and ultraviolet-visible spectral interpretation of Isoleucine have been studied by performing MP2 and DFT/cc-pVDZ level of theory. The FTIR, FT-Raman spectra were recorded in the region 4000-400 cm(-1) and 3500-50 cm(-1) respectively. The UV-visible absorption spectra of the compound were recorded in the range of 200-800 nm. Computational calculations at MP2 and B3LYP level with basis set of cc-pVDZ is employed in complete assignments of Isoleucine molecule on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes, calculated using VEDA-4 program. The calculated wavenumbers are compared with the experimental values. The difference between the observed and calculated wavenumber values of most of the fundamentals is very small. (13)C and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and compared with experimental results. The formation of hydrogen bond was investigated in terms of the charge density by the NBO calculations. Based on the UV spectra and TD-DFT calculations, the electronic structure and the assignments of the absorption bands were carried out. Besides, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) were investigated using theoretical calculations.

  16. Accurate Ab Initio Quantum Mechanics Simulations of Bi2Se3 and Bi2Te3 Topological Insulator Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Jason M; Tahir-Kheli, Jamil; Goddard, William A

    2015-10-01

    It has been established experimentally that Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 are topological insulators, with zero band gap surface states exhibiting linear dispersion at the Fermi energy. Standard density functional theory (DFT) methods such as PBE lead to large errors in the band gaps for such strongly correlated systems, while more accurate GW methods are too expensive computationally to apply to the thin films studied experimentally. We show here that the hybrid B3PW91 density functional yields GW-quality results for these systems at a computational cost comparable to PBE. The efficiency of our approach stems from the use of Gaussian basis functions instead of plane waves or augmented plane waves. This remarkable success without empirical corrections of any kind opens the door to computational studies of real chemistry involving the topological surface state, and our approach is expected to be applicable to other semiconductors with strong spin-orbit coupling.

  17. Combined spectroscopic and quantum chemical studies of ezetimibe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, Preeti; Pandey, Jaya; Shimpi, Manishkumar R.; Srivastava, Anubha; Tandon, Poonam; Velaga, Sitaram P.; Sinha, Kirti

    2016-12-01

    Ezetimibe (EZT) is a hypocholesterolemic agent used for the treatment of elevated blood cholesterol levels as it lowers the blood cholesterol by blocking the absorption of cholesterol in intestine. Study aims to combine experimental and computational methods to provide insights into the structural and vibrational spectroscopic properties of EZT which is important for explaining drug substance physical and biological properties. Computational study on molecular properties of ezetimibe is presented using density functional theory (DFT) with B3LYP functional and 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. A detailed vibrational assignment has been done for the observed IR and Raman spectra of EZT. In addition to the conformational study, hydrogen bonding and molecular docking studies have been also performed. For conformational studies, the double well potential energy curves have been plotted for the rotation around the six flexible bonds of the molecule. UV absorption spectrum was examined in methanol solvent and compared with calculated one in solvent environment (IEF-PCM) using TD-DFT/6-31G basis set. HOMO-LUMO energy gap of both the conformers have also been calculated in order to predict its chemical reactivity and stability. The stability of the molecule was also examined by means of natural bond analysis (NBO) analysis. To account for the chemical reactivity and site selectivity of the molecules, molecular electrostatic potential (MEPS) map has been plotted. The combination of experimental and calculated results provide an insight into the structural and vibrational spectroscopic properties of EZT. In order to give an insight for the biological activity of EZT, molecular docking of EZT with protein NPC1L1 has been done.

  18. A DPF Analysis Yields Quantum Mechanically Accurate Analytic Potential Energy Functions for the a ^1Σ^+ and X ^1Σ^+ States of NaH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roy, Robert J.; Walji, Sadru; Sentjens, Katherine

    2013-06-01

    Alkali hydride diatomic molecules have long been the object of spectroscopic studies. However, their small reduced mass makes them species for which the conventional semiclassical-based methods of analysis tend to have the largest errors. To date, the only quantum-mechanically accurate direct-potential-fit (DPF) analysis for one of these molecules was the one for LiH reported by Coxon and Dickinson. The present paper extends this level of analysis to NaH, and reports a DPF analysis of all available spectroscopic data for the A ^1Σ^+-X ^1Σ^+ system of NaH which yields analytic potential energy functions for these two states that account for those data (on average) to within the experimental uncertainties. W.C. Stwalley, W.T. Zemke and S.C. Yang, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data {20}, 153-187 (1991). J.A. Coxon and C.S. Dickinson, J. Chem. Phys. {121}, 8378 (2004).

  19. Accurate quantum wave packet calculations for the F + HCl → Cl + HF reaction on the ground 1(2)A' potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Niyazi; Kłos, Jacek; Alexander, Millard H

    2012-03-14

    We present converged exact quantum wave packet calculations of reaction probabilities, integral cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients for the title reaction. Calculations have been carried out on the ground 1(2)A' global adiabatic potential energy surface of Deskevich et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 224303 (2006)]. Converged wave packet reaction probabilities at selected values of the total angular momentum up to a partial wave of J = 140 with the HCl reagent initially selected in the v = 0, j = 0-16 rovibrational states have been obtained for the collision energy range from threshold up to 0.8 eV. The present calculations confirm an important enhancement of reactivity with rotational excitation of the HCl molecule. First, accurate integral cross sections and rate constants have been calculated and compared with the available experimental data.

  20. Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) Agents: Quantum Chemistry and MRI.

    PubMed

    Li, Jikun; Feng, Xinxin; Zhu, Wei; Oskolkov, Nikita; Zhou, Tianhui; Kim, Boo Kyung; Baig, Noman; McMahon, Michael T; Oldfield, Eric

    2016-01-04

    Diamagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) contrast agents offer an alternative to Gd(3+) -based contrast agents for MRI. They are characterized by containing protons that can rapidly exchange with water and it is advantageous to have these protons resonate in a spectral window that is far removed from water. Herein, we report the first results of DFT calculations of the (1) H nuclear magnetic shieldings in 41 CEST agents, finding that the experimental shifts can be well predicted (R(2) =0.882). We tested a subset of compounds with the best MRI properties for toxicity and for activity as uncouplers, then obtained mice kidney CEST MRI images for three of the most promising leads finding 16 (2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid) to be one of the most promising CEST MRI contrast agents to date. Overall, the results are of interest since they show that (1) H NMR shifts for CEST agents-charged species-can be well predicted, and that several leads have low toxicity and yield good in vivo MR images.

  1. Conformational properties of penicillins: quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamics simulations of benzylpenicillin.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Natalia; Suárez, Dimas; Sordo, Tomás L

    2003-11-30

    Herein, we present theoretical results on the conformational properties of benzylpenicillin, which are characterized by means of quantum chemical calculations (MP2/6-31G* and B3LYP/6-31G*) and classical molecular dynamics simulations (5 ns) both in the gas phase and in aqueous solution. In the gas phase, the benzylpenicillin conformer in which the thiazolidine ring has the carboxylate group oriented axially is the most favored one. Both intramolecular CH. O and dispersion interactions contribute to stabilize the axial conformer with respect to the equatorial one. In aqueous solution, a molecular dynamics simulation predicts a relative population of the axial:equatorial conformers of 0.70:0.30 in consonance with NMR experimental data. Overall, the quantum chemical calculations as well as the simulations give insight into substituent effects, the conformational dynamics of benzylpenicillin, the frequency of ring-puckering motions, and the correlation of side chain and ring-puckering motions.

  2. Combined Docking with Classical Force Field and Quantum Chemical Semiempirical Method PM7

    PubMed Central

    Kutov, D. C.; Sulimov, V. B.

    2017-01-01

    Results of the combined use of the classical force field and the recent quantum chemical PM7 method for docking are presented. Initially the gridless docking of a flexible low molecular weight ligand into the rigid target protein is performed with the energy function calculated in the MMFF94 force field with implicit water solvent in the PCM model. Among several hundred thousand local minima, which are found in the docking procedure, about eight thousand lowest energy minima are chosen and then energies of these minima are recalculated with the recent quantum chemical semiempirical PM7 method. This procedure is applied to 16 test complexes with different proteins and ligands. For almost all test complexes such energy recalculation results in the global energy minimum configuration corresponding to the ligand pose near the native ligand position in the crystalized protein-ligand complex. A significant improvement of the ligand positioning accuracy comparing with MMFF94 energy calculations is demonstrated. PMID:28191015

  3. Catalytic performance of carbon nanotubes in H2O2 decomposition: experimental and quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Voitko, Katerina; Tóth, Ajna; Demianenko, Evgenij; Dobos, Gábor; Berke, Barbara; Bakalinska, Olga; Grebenyuk, Anatolij; Tombácz, Etelka; Kuts, Volodymyr; Tarasenko, Yurij; Kartel, Mykola; László, Krisztina

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic performance of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different surface chemistry was studied in the decomposition reaction of H2O2 at various values of pH and temperature. A comparative analysis of experimental and quantum chemical calculation results is given. It has been shown that both the lowest calculated activation energy (∼18.9 kJ/mol) and the highest rate constant correspond to the N-containing CNT. The calculated chemisorption energy values correlate with the operation stability of MWCNTs. Based on the proposed quantum chemical model it was found that the catalytic activity of carbon materials in electron transfer reactions is controlled by their electron donor capability.

  4. Combined Docking with Classical Force Field and Quantum Chemical Semiempirical Method PM7.

    PubMed

    Sulimov, A V; Kutov, D C; Katkova, E V; Sulimov, V B

    2017-01-01

    Results of the combined use of the classical force field and the recent quantum chemical PM7 method for docking are presented. Initially the gridless docking of a flexible low molecular weight ligand into the rigid target protein is performed with the energy function calculated in the MMFF94 force field with implicit water solvent in the PCM model. Among several hundred thousand local minima, which are found in the docking procedure, about eight thousand lowest energy minima are chosen and then energies of these minima are recalculated with the recent quantum chemical semiempirical PM7 method. This procedure is applied to 16 test complexes with different proteins and ligands. For almost all test complexes such energy recalculation results in the global energy minimum configuration corresponding to the ligand pose near the native ligand position in the crystalized protein-ligand complex. A significant improvement of the ligand positioning accuracy comparing with MMFF94 energy calculations is demonstrated.

  5. Studies on tautomerism in tetrazole: comparison of Hartree Fock and density functional theory quantum chemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurek, A. P.; Sadlej-Sosnowska, N.

    2000-11-01

    A comparison of the ab initio quantum chemical methods: Hartree-Fock (HF) and hybrid density functional theory (DFT)/B3LYP for the treatment of tautomeric equilibria both in the gas phase and in the solution is made. The solvent effects were investigated in terms of the self-consistent reaction field (SCRF). Ionization potentials (IP), calculated by DFT/B3LYP, are also compared with those calculated previously within the HF frame.

  6. The quantum-chemical determination of group contributions to the thermodynamic properties of organophosphorus compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorofeeva, O. V.; Ryzhova, O. N.; Moiseeva, N. F.

    2008-06-01

    The enthalpies of formation, entropies, and heat capacities of 95 organophosphorus derivatives calculated by nonempirical quantum-chemical methods were used to develop the additive method for estimating the thermodynamic properties of these compounds. 86 group contribution values were obtained for estimating the thermodynamic properties of diverse organic derivatives of phosphorus in the oxidation states 3 and 5 (three-and four-coordinate phosphorus atoms).

  7. Quantum chemical predictions of the vibrational spectra of polyatomic molecules. The uracil molecule and two derivatives.

    PubMed

    Palafox, Mauricio Alcolea; Rastogi, V K

    2002-02-01

    This work describes the different scaling procedures used to correct the quantum-chemical theoretical predictions of the IR and Raman vibrational wavenumbers. Examples of each case are shown, with special attention to the uracil molecule and some derivatives. The results obtained with different semiempirical and ab initio methods, and basis sets, are compared and discussed. A comprehensive compendium of the main scale factors and scaling equations available to obtain the scaled wavenumbers is also shown.

  8. The rotational spectra of HD17O and D217O: Experiment and quantum-chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Cazzoli, Gabriele; Gauss, Jürgen

    2012-10-01

    Guided by theoretical predictions, the rotational spectrum of HD17O was recorded and assigned for the first time, while the measurements for D217O were extended up to the THz region. For both isotopic species, a large portion of the rotational spectrum, from 65 GHz (from 200 GHz for the bideuterated isotopologue) up to 1.6 THz, was investigated, thus allowing the accurate determination of the ground-state rotational and centrifugal-distortion constants. Considering that the rotational spectra of water isotopologues are characterized by a very low density of lines and strong centrifugal-distortion effects, the accurate quantum-chemical prediction of the relevant spectroscopic parameters played a crucial role in the line search and assignment as well as in supporting the fitting procedure. In addition to rotational and centrifugal-distortion constants, the knowledge of the oxygen quadrupole-coupling constants was essential, as the corresponding interaction leads to characteristic features (hyperfine structure) that enabled proper line assignments.

  9. Sub-nanometrically resolved chemical mappings of quantum-cascade laser active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantzas, Konstantinos; Beaudoin, Grégoire; Patriarche, Gilles; Largeau, Ludovic; Mauguin, Olivia; Pegolotti, Giulia; Vasanelli, Angela; Calvar, Ariane; Amanti, Maria; Sirtori, Carlo; Sagnes, Isabelle

    2016-05-01

    A procedure that produces sub-nanometrically resolved chemical mappings of MOCVD-grown InGaAs/InAlAs/InP quantum cascade lasers is presented. The chemical mappings reveal that, although the structure is lattice-matched to InP, the InAlAs barriers do not attain the nominal aluminum content—48%—and are, in fact, InGaAlAs quaternaries. This information is used to adjust the aluminum precursor flow and fine-tune the composition of the barriers, resulting in a significant improvement of the fabricated lasers.

  10. Genomic Models of Short-Term Exposure Accurately Predict Long-Term Chemical Carcinogenicity and Identify Putative Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Gusenleitner, Daniel; Auerbach, Scott S.; Melia, Tisha; Gómez, Harold F.; Sherr, David H.; Monti, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite an overall decrease in incidence of and mortality from cancer, about 40% of Americans will be diagnosed with the disease in their lifetime, and around 20% will die of it. Current approaches to test carcinogenic chemicals adopt the 2-year rodent bioassay, which is costly and time-consuming. As a result, fewer than 2% of the chemicals on the market have actually been tested. However, evidence accumulated to date suggests that gene expression profiles from model organisms exposed to chemical compounds reflect underlying mechanisms of action, and that these toxicogenomic models could be used in the prediction of chemical carcinogenicity. Results In this study, we used a rat-based microarray dataset from the NTP DrugMatrix Database to test the ability of toxicogenomics to model carcinogenicity. We analyzed 1,221 gene-expression profiles obtained from rats treated with 127 well-characterized compounds, including genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. We built a classifier that predicts a chemical's carcinogenic potential with an AUC of 0.78, and validated it on an independent dataset from the Japanese Toxicogenomics Project consisting of 2,065 profiles from 72 compounds. Finally, we identified differentially expressed genes associated with chemical carcinogenesis, and developed novel data-driven approaches for the molecular characterization of the response to chemical stressors. Conclusion Here, we validate a toxicogenomic approach to predict carcinogenicity and provide strong evidence that, with a larger set of compounds, we should be able to improve the sensitivity and specificity of the predictions. We found that the prediction of carcinogenicity is tissue-dependent and that the results also confirm and expand upon previous studies implicating DNA damage, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, and regenerative pathology in the response to carcinogen exposure. PMID:25058030

  11. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110–120 kHz), {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow {sup 1}H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) {sup 1}H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic

  12. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110-120 kHz), (1)H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong (1)H-(1)H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow (1)H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) (1)H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about (1)H-(1)H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic-level structural and dynamical

  13. Development of Accurate Chemical Equilibrium Models for the Hanford Waste Tanks: New Thermodynamic Measurements and Model Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Mason, Marvin; Qafoku, Odeta; Xia, Yuanxian; Wang, Zheming; MacLean, Graham

    2003-03-27

    Developing accurate thermodynamic models for predicting the chemistry of the high-level waste tanks at Hanford is an extremely daunting challenge in electrolyte and radionuclide chemistry. These challenges stem from the extremely high ionic strength of the tank waste supernatants, presence of chelating agents in selected tanks, wide temperature range in processing conditions and the presence of important actinide species in multiple oxidation states. This presentation summarizes progress made to date in developing accurate models for these tank waste solutions, how these data are being used at Hanford and the important challenges that remain. New thermodynamic measurements on Sr and actinide complexation with specific chelating agents (EDTA, HEDTA and gluconate) will also be presented.

  14. Magnesium bicarbonate and carbonate interactions in aqueous solutions: An infrared spectroscopic and quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefánsson, Andri; Lemke, Kono H.; Bénézeth, Pascale; Schott, Jacques

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of magnesium with bicarbonate and carbonate ions in aqueous solutions was studied using infrared spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. Using the infrared vibrational bands for HCO3- and CO32- at 1200-1450 cm-1 (δC-OH, vS and v3) together with their molar absorptivity (ε), the concentrations of the HCO3- and CO32- ions and the corresponding Mg ion pairs have been determined. In the absence of Mg2+, measured spectra were accurately reproduced assuming that only HCO3- and CO32- were present in solution. Upon addition of Mg2+ at fixed pH, infrared spectra were observed to shift indicating presence of the MgHCO3+ and MgCO3 (aq) ion pairs. From measurements, the second ionization constant of carbonic acid and the MgHCO3+ and MgCO3 (aq) ion pair formation constants have been obtained, these being logK2 = -10.34 ± 0.04, logKMgHCO3+ = 1.12 ± 0.11 and logKMgCO3 = 2.98 ± 0.06, respectively. To support our experimental infrared measurements and to gain further insight into the molecular nature of the ion pair formation, density functional theory (DFT) calculations with VPT2 anharmonic correction were conducted. The most stable geometries predicted for the MgHCO3+ and MgCO3 (aq) ion pairs were a bi-dentate [MgHCO3]+(H2O)n and a monodentate [MgHCO3]+(OH)(H2O)n complexes, respectively. The predicted frequencies for HCO3-, CO32- and MgHCO3+ were found to shift toward those experimentally measured with an increasing H2O solvation number where possible band shifts were predicted for MgCO3 (aq) relative to CO32-, this being dependent on the exact structure and hydration of the bulk MgCO3 (aq) ion pair. Experimentally, the ion pair formations were found to have insignificant effects on the δC-OH, vS and v3 vibrational frequencies. The speciation of dissolved inorganic carbon may be significantly influenced by ion pair formation, particularly in alkaline solutions where they may be the predominant species.

  15. Chemical basis of Trotter-Suzuki errors in quantum chemistry simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbush, Ryan; McClean, Jarrod; Wecker, Dave; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Wiebe, Nathan

    2015-02-01

    Although the simulation of quantum chemistry is one of the most anticipated applications of quantum computing, the scaling of known upper bounds on the complexity of these algorithms is daunting. Prior work has bounded errors due to discretization of the time evolution (known as "Trotterization") in terms of the norm of the error operator and analyzed scaling with respect to the number of spin orbitals. However, we find that these error bounds can be loose by up to 16 orders of magnitude for some molecules. Furthermore, numerical results for small systems fail to reveal any clear correlation between ground-state error and number of spin orbitals. We instead argue that chemical properties, such as the maximum nuclear charge in a molecule and the filling fraction of orbitals, can be decisive for determining the cost of a quantum simulation. Our analysis motivates several strategies to use classical processing to further reduce the required Trotter step size and estimate the necessary number of steps, without requiring additional quantum resources. Finally, we demonstrate improved methods for state preparation techniques which are asymptotically superior to proposals in the simulation literature.

  16. On the Chemical Basis of Trotter-Suzuki Errors in Quantum Chemistry Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbush, Ryan; McClean, Jarrod; Wecker, Dave; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Wiebe, Nathan

    2015-03-01

    Although the simulation of quantum chemistry is one of the most anticipated applications of quantum computing, the scaling of known upper bounds on the complexity of these algorithms is daunting. Prior work has bounded errors due to Trotterization in terms of the norm of the error operator and analyzed scaling with respect to the number of spin-orbitals. However, we find that these error bounds can be loose by up to sixteen orders of magnitude for some molecules. Furthermore, numerical results for small systems fail to reveal any clear correlation between ground state error and number of spin-orbitals. We instead argue that chemical properties, such as the maximum nuclear charge in a molecule and the filling fraction of orbitals, can be decisive for determining the cost of a quantum simulation. Our analysis motivates several strategies to use classical processing to further reduce the required Trotter step size and to estimate the necessary number of steps, without requiring additional quantum resources. Finally, we demonstrate improved methods for state preparation techniques which are asymptotically superior to proposals in the simulation literature.

  17. The Radical Pair Mechanism and the Avian Chemical Compass: Quantum Coherence and Entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yiteng; Kais, Sabre; Berman, Gennady Petrovich

    2015-02-02

    We review the spin radical pair mechanism which is a promising explanation of avian navigation. This mechanism is based on the dependence of product yields on 1) the hyperfine interaction involving electron spins and neighboring nuclear spins and 2) the intensity and orientation of the geomagnetic field. One surprising result is that even at ambient conditions quantum entanglement of electron spins can play an important role in avian magnetoreception. This review describes the general scheme of chemical reactions involving radical pairs generated from singlet and triplet precursors; the spin dynamics of the radical pairs; and the magnetic field dependence of product yields caused by the radical pair mechanism. The main part of the review includes a description of the chemical compass in birds. We review: the general properties of the avian compass; the basic scheme of the radical pair mechanism; the reaction kinetics in cryptochrome; quantum coherence and entanglement in the avian compass; and the effects of noise. We believe that the quantum avian compass can play an important role in avian navigation and can also provide the foundation for a new generation of sensitive and selective magnetic-sensing nano-devices.

  18. Grid-based methods for biochemical ab initio quantum chemical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, M.E.; Nelson, J.S.; Mori, E.

    1997-01-01

    A initio quantum chemical methods are seeing increased application in a large variety of real-world problems including biomedical applications ranging from drug design to the understanding of environmental mutagens. The vast majority of these quantum chemical methods are {open_quotes}spectral{close_quotes}, that is they describe the charge distribution around the nuclear framework in terms of a fixed analytic basis set. Despite the additional complexity they bring, methods involving grid representations of the electron or solvent charge can provide more efficient schemes for evaluating spectral operators, inexpensive methods for calculating electron correlation, and methods for treating the electrostatic energy of salvation in polar solvents. The advantage of mixed or {open_quotes}pseudospectral{close_quotes} methods is that they allow individual non-linear operators in the partial differential equations, such as coulomb operators, to be calculated in the most appropriate regime. Moreover, these molecular grids can be used to integrate empirical functionals of the electron density. These so-called density functional methods (DFT) are an extremely promising alternative to conventional post-Hartree Fock quantum chemical methods. The introduction of a grid at the molecular solvent-accessible surface allows a very sophisticated treatment of a polarizable continuum solvent model (PCM). Where most PCM approaches use a truncated expansion of the solute`s electric multipole expansion, e.g. net charge (Born model) or dipole moment (Onsager model), such a grid-based boundary-element method (BEM) yields a nearly exact treatment of the solute`s electric field. This report describes the use of both DFT and BEM methods in several biomedical chemical applications.

  19. A quantum chemical study of HOCl-induced transformations of carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Tandarić, Tana; Vrček, Valerije; Šakić, Davor

    2016-11-22

    The antiepileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ) is one of the most persistent pharmaceuticals in the environment. Its chemical fate is influenced by the type of wastewater treatment. This study sets out to determine the degradation mechanism and products in the reaction between CBZ and hypochlorous acid (HOCl), which is the main chlorinating species in water. In the search for the most feasible pathways of HOCl-induced transformations of CBZ, a quantum chemical approach was employed. Chlorination and epoxidation of CBZ are two initial, competitive processes that result in two key intermediates: N-chloramide and 10,11-epoxide. The calculated free energy barriers (ΔG) for these reactions are 105.7 and 95.7 kJ mol(-1) resp., which is in agreement with the experimental energy barrier of 98.2 kJ mol(-1). All transformation products detected in chlorination experiments were located by computational models, and the reaction mechanism underlying their formation was described in detail. Different computational methods (density functional and ab initio theory) were applied, and the double hybrid B2-PLYPD functional was found to be superior in terms of efficiency and accuracy. Of special interest are oxoiminostilbene and formylacridine, which are the final products in the degradation cascade. Their exceptional thermodynamic stability, as predicted by quantum chemical methods, suggests that these structures should be considered as recalcitrants in chlorinated waters. Fruitful interplay between computational models and experimental data proves that the quantum chemical approach can be used as a predictive tool in environmental degradation studies.

  20. A versatile ratiometric nanosensing approach for sensitive and accurate detection of Hg(2+) and biological thiols based on new fluorescent carbon quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huili; Ji, Zhongyin; Chen, Xuejie; Cheng, Anwei; Liu, Shucheng; Gong, Peiwei; Li, Guoliang; Chen, Guang; Sun, Zhiwei; Zhao, Xianen; Cheng, Feng; You, Jinmao

    2017-03-01

    Herein, we first reported a facile synthesis method for fabrication of highly photoluminescent carbon quantum dots (CQDs) using sodium alginate as the carbon source and histidine as both the nitrogen source and functional monomer by one-pot hydrothermal synthesis. The as-prepared CQDs gave a high quantum yield of 32%. By employing the new CQDs and rhodamine B (RhB), we demonstrated a simple, facile, sensitive, and accurate ratiometric sensor for detection of Hg(2+) and biological thiols. The photoluminescence of CQDs in the ratiometric sensor can be selectively and intensively suppressed by Hg(2+) due to strong electrostatic interaction between the surface functional groups of the CQDs and Hg(2+). When glutathione (GSH) was introduced into the "Turn Off" CQDs-RhB-Hg(2+) sensing system, the fluorescence of the CQDs can be recovered rapidly due to the stronger affinity between thiol and Hg(2+), while the fluorescence of the RhB remained constant in this sensing process. Based on the above principle, the ratiometric strategy for detecting Hg(2+) and GSH can be achieved readily, and gives satisfactory limit of detections (LODs) of 30 and 20 nM for Hg(2+) and GSH, respectively. The dual-emission fluorescent CQDs-RhB sensor does not need the complicated molecular design and the synthesis of dual-emission fluorophores. Meanwhile, the feasibility of the proposed method for analysis of water samples, food samples, and biological samples (plasma from mice oxidative stress study) was investigated. The developed ratiometric nanosensor is proven to be facile, with less sample consumption, rapid, lost cost, highly sensitive, and very selective for Hg(2+) and biological thiol detection, which offers a new approach for environmental, food, and biological analysis. Graphical abstract Ratiometric nanosensing approach detection of Hg(2+) and biological thiols.

  1. A chemically driven quantum phase transition in a two-molecule Kondo system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esat, Taner; Lechtenberg, Benedikt; Deilmann, Thorsten; Wagner, Christian; Krüger, Peter; Temirov, Ruslan; Rohlfing, Michael; Anders, Frithjof B.; Tautz, F. Stefan

    2016-09-01

    The magnetic properties of nanostructures that consist of a small number of atoms or molecules are typically determined by magnetic exchange interactions. Here, we show that non-magnetic, chemical interactions can have a similarly decisive effect if spin-moment-carrying orbitals extend in space and therefore allow the direct coupling of magnetic properties to wavefunction overlap and the formation of bonding and antibonding orbitals. We demonstrate this for a dimer of metal-molecule complexes on the Au(111) surface. A changing wavefunction overlap between the two monomers drives the surface-adsorbed dimer through a quantum phase transition from an underscreened triplet to a singlet ground state, with one configuration being located extremely close to a quantum critical point.

  2. Toward Accurate Modelling of Enzymatic Reactions: All Electron Quantum Chemical Analysis combined with QM/MM Calculation of Chorismate Mutase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Toyokazu

    2008-09-01

    To further understand the catalytic role of the protein environment in the enzymatic process, the author has analyzed the reaction mechanism of the Claisen rearrangement of Bacillus subtilis chorismate mutase (BsCM). By introducing a new computational strategy that combines all-electron QM calculations with ab initio QM/MM modelings, it was possible to simulate the molecular interactions between the substrate and the protein environment. The electrostatic nature of the transition state stabilization was characterized by performing all-electron QM calculations based on the fragment molecular orbital technique for the entire enzyme.

  3. Accurate pKa calculation of the conjugate acids of alkanolamines, alkaloids and nucleotide bases by quantum chemical methods.

    PubMed

    Gangarapu, Satesh; Marcelis, Antonius T M; Zuilhof, Han

    2013-04-02

    The pKa of the conjugate acids of alkanolamines, neurotransmitters, alkaloid drugs and nucleotide bases are calculated with density functional methods (B3LYP, M08-HX and M11-L) and ab initio methods (SCS-MP2, G3). Implicit solvent effects are included with a conductor-like polarizable continuum model (CPCM) and universal solvation models (SMD, SM8). G3, SCS-MP2 and M11-L methods coupled with SMD and SM8 solvation models perform well for alkanolamines with mean unsigned errors below 0.20 pKa units, in all cases. Extending this method to the pKa calculation of 35 nitrogen-containing compounds spanning 12 pKa units showed an excellent correlation between experimental and computational pKa values of these 35 amines with the computationally low-cost SM8/M11-L density functional approach.

  4. Toward Accurate Modelling of Enzymatic Reactions: All Electron Quantum Chemical Analysis combined with QM/MM Calculation of Chorismate Mutase

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Toyokazu

    2008-09-17

    To further understand the catalytic role of the protein environment in the enzymatic process, the author has analyzed the reaction mechanism of the Claisen rearrangement of Bacillus subtilis chorismate mutase (BsCM). By introducing a new computational strategy that combines all-electron QM calculations with ab initio QM/MM modelings, it was possible to simulate the molecular interactions between the substrate and the protein environment. The electrostatic nature of the transition state stabilization was characterized by performing all-electron QM calculations based on the fragment molecular orbital technique for the entire enzyme.

  5. Communication: Ro-vibrational control of chemical reactivity in H+CH{sub 4}→ H{sub 2}+CH{sub 3} : Full-dimensional quantum dynamics calculations and a sudden model

    SciTech Connect

    Welsch, Ralph Manthe, Uwe

    2014-08-07

    The mode-selective chemistry of the title reaction is studied by full-dimensional quantum dynamics simulation on an accurate ab initio potential energy surface for vanishing total angular momentum. Using a rigorous transition state based approach and multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree wave packet propagation, initial state-selected reaction probabilities for many ro-vibrational states of methane are calculated. The theoretical results are compared with experimental trends seen in reactions of methane. An intuitive interpretation of the ro-vibrational control of the chemical reactivity provided by a sudden model based on the quantum transition state concept is discussed.

  6. Biomimetic, Mild Chemical Synthesis of CdTe-GSH Quantum Dots with Improved Biocompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Donoso, José M.; Monrás, Juan P.; Bravo, Denisse; Aguirre, Adam; Quest, Andrew F.; Osorio-Román, Igor O.; Aroca, Ricardo F.; Chasteen, Thomas G.; Vásquez, Claudio C.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple applications of nanotechnology, especially those involving highly fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) or quantum dots (QDs) have stimulated the research to develop simple, rapid and environmentally friendly protocols for synthesizing NPs exhibiting novel properties and increased biocompatibility. In this study, a simple protocol for the chemical synthesis of glutathione (GSH)-capped CdTe QDs (CdTe-GSH) resembling conditions found in biological systems is described. Using only CdCl2, K2TeO3 and GSH, highly fluorescent QDs were obtained under pH, temperature, buffer and oxygen conditions that allow microorganisms growth. These CdTe-GSH NPs displayed similar size, chemical composition, absorbance and fluorescence spectra and quantum yields as QDs synthesized using more complicated and expensive methods. CdTe QDs were not freely incorporated into eukaryotic cells thus favoring their biocompatibility and potential applications in biomedicine. In addition, NPs entry was facilitated by lipofectamine, resulting in intracellular fluorescence and a slight increase in cell death by necrosis. Toxicity of the as prepared CdTe QDs was lower than that observed with QDs produced by other chemical methods, probably as consequence of decreased levels of Cd+2 and higher amounts of GSH. We present here the simplest, fast and economical method for CdTe QDs synthesis described to date. Also, this biomimetic protocol favors NPs biocompatibility and helps to establish the basis for the development of new, “greener” methods to synthesize cadmium-containing QDs. PMID:22292028

  7. Include dispersion in quantum chemical modeling of enzymatic reactions: the case of isoaspartyl dipeptidase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Mei; Chen, Shi-Lu

    2015-06-09

    The lack of dispersion in the B3LYP functional has been proposed to be the main origin of big errors in quantum chemical modeling of a few enzymes and transition metal complexes. In this work, the essential dispersion effects that affect quantum chemical modeling are investigated. With binuclear zinc isoaspartyl dipeptidase (IAD) as an example, dispersion is included in the modeling of enzymatic reactions by two different procedures, i.e., (i) geometry optimizations followed by single-point calculations of dispersion (approach I) and (ii) the inclusion of dispersion throughout geometry optimization and energy evaluation (approach II). Based on a 169-atom chemical model, the calculations show a qualitative consistency between approaches I and II in energetics and most key geometries, demonstrating that both approaches are available with the latter preferential since both geometry and energy are dispersion-corrected in approach II. When a smaller model without Arg233 (147 atoms) was used, an inconsistency was observed, indicating that the missing dispersion interactions are essentially responsible for determining equilibrium geometries. Other technical issues and mechanistic characteristics of IAD are also discussed, in particular with respect to the effects of Arg233.

  8. Dual X-ray absorptiometry accurately predicts carcass composition from live sheep and chemical composition of live and dead sheep.

    PubMed

    Pearce, K L; Ferguson, M; Gardner, G; Smith, N; Greef, J; Pethick, D W

    2009-01-01

    Fifty merino wethers (liveweight range from 44 to 81kg, average of 58.6kg) were lot fed for 42d and scanned through a dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) as both a live animal and whole carcass (carcass weight range from 15 to 32kg, average of 22.9kg) producing measures of total tissue, lean, fat and bone content. The carcasses were subsequently boned out into saleable cuts and the weights and yield of boned out muscle, fat and bone recorded. The relationship between chemical lean (protein+water) was highly correlated with DXA carcass lean (r(2)=0.90, RSD=0.674kg) and moderately with DXA live lean (r(2)=0.72, RSD=1.05kg). The relationship between the chemical fat was moderately correlated with DXA carcass fat (r(2)=0.86, RSD=0.42kg) and DXA live fat (r(2)=0.70, RSD=0.71kg). DXA carcass and live animal bone was not well correlated with chemical ash (both r(2)=0.38, RSD=0.3). DXA carcass lean was moderately well predicted from DXA live lean with the inclusion of bodyweight in the regression (r(2)=0.82, RSD=0.87kg). DXA carcass fat was well predicted from DXA live fat (r(2)=0.86, RSD=0.54kg). DXA carcass lean and DXA carcass fat with the inclusion of carcass weight in the regression significantly predicted boned out muscle (r(2)=0.97, RSD=0.32kg) and fat weight, respectively (r(2)=0.92, RSD=0.34kg). The use of DXA live lean and DXA live fat with the inclusion of bodyweight to predict boned out muscle (r(2)=0.83, RSD=0.75kg) and fat (r(2)=0.86, RSD=0.46kg) weight, respectively, was moderate. The use of DXA carcass and live lean and fat to predict boned out muscle and fat yield was not correlated as weight. The future for the DXA will exist in the determination of body composition in live animals and carcasses in research experiments but there is potential for the DXA to be used as an online carcass grading system.

  9. Reassigning the Structures of Natural Products Using NMR Chemical Shifts Computed with Quantum Mechanics: A Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palazzo, Teresa A.; Truong, Tiana T.; Wong, Shirley M. T.; Mack, Emma T.; Lodewyk, Michael W.; Harrison, Jason G.; Gamage, R. Alan; Siegel, Justin B.; Kurth, Mark J.; Tantillo, Dean J.

    2015-01-01

    An applied computational chemistry laboratory exercise is described in which students use modern quantum chemical calculations of chemical shifts to assign the structure of a recently isolated natural product. A pre/post assessment was used to measure student learning gains and verify that students demonstrated proficiency of key learning…

  10. Quantum chemical and spectroscopic analysis of calcium hydroxyapatite and related materials

    SciTech Connect

    Khavryuchenko, V.D. Khavryuchenko, O.V. Lisnyak, V.V.

    2007-02-15

    Amorphous calcium hydroxyapatite was examined by vibrational spectroscopy (Raman and infra-red (IR)) and quantum chemical simulation techniques. The structures and vibrational (IR, Raman and inelastic neutron scattering) spectra of PO{sub 4} {sup 3-} ion, Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, [Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}]{sub 3}, Ca{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}OH, CaHPO{sub 4}, [CaHPO{sub 4}]{sub 2}, Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O, Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O and Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}.3H{sub 2}O clusters were quantum chemically simulated at ab initio and semiempirical levels of approximation. A complete coordinate analysis of the vibrational spectra was performed. The comparison of the theoretically simulated spectra with the experimental ones allows to identify correctly the phase composition of the amorphous calcium hydroxyapatite and related materials. The shape of the bands in the IR spectra of the hydroxoapatite can be used in order to characterize the structural properties of the material, e.g., the PO{sub 4} {sup 3-} ion status, the degree of hydrolysis of the material and the presence of hydrolysis products. - Graphical abstract: The structure of the quantum chemically optimized Ca{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}(OH) cluster, which was used for vibrations spectra simulation.

  11. Quantum-chemical investigation of the structure and electronic absorption spectra of electroluminescent zinc complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaev, B. F.; Baryshnikov, G. V.; Korop, A. A.; Minaeva, V. A.; Kaplunov, M. G.

    2013-01-01

    Using the quantum chemical methods of the density functional theory and of the electron density topological analysis, we have studied the structure of two recently synthesized electroluminescent zinc complexes, one with aminoquinoline ligands and the other with a Schiff base (N,O-donor). The energies and intensities of vertical excitations for the molecules under study have been calculated in terms of the PM3 semiempirical approximation taking into account the configurational interaction between singly excited singlet excited states. Good agreement between calculation results and experimental data on the electron density topological characteristics and on the visible and UV absorption spectra has been obtained.

  12. Quantum chemical prediction of vibrational spectra of large molecular systems with radical or metallic electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimoto, Yoshio; Irle, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Quantum chemical simulation of infrared (IR) and Raman spectra for molecules with open-shell, radical, or multiradical electronic structure represents a major challenge. We report analytic second-order geometrical derivatives of the Mermin free energy for the second-order self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding (DFTB2) method with fractional occupation numbers (FONs). This new method is applied to the evaluation of Nsbnd O radical stretching modes in various open-shell molecules and to the prediction of the evolution of IR and Raman spectra of graphene nanoribbons with increasing molecular size.

  13. On the origin of the gauche effect. A quantum chemical study of 1,2-difluoroethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engkvist, O.; Karlström, G.; Widmark, P.-O.

    1997-01-01

    The conformational equilibrium of 1,2-difluoroethane has been investigated using ab initio quantum chemical calculations at the SCF, MP2 and CCSD(T) levels, with ANO basis sets. The relative stability of the gauche-conformation of 1,2-difluoroethane is found to be a consequence of the nodal structure of the singly occupied orbital in the CFH 2 radical. It is also shown that the nodal structure of the singly occupied orbitals in the CFH biradical can explain the stability of the cis conformation of 1,2-difluoroethene.

  14. Formation and thermodynamics of gaseous germanium and tin vanadates: a mass spectrometric and quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Shugurov, S M; Panin, A I; Lopatin, S I; Emelyanova, K A

    2015-06-07

    The stabilities of gaseous germanium and tin vanadates were confirmed by high temperature mass spectrometry, and its structures were determined by quantum chemical calculations. A number of gas-phase reactions involving these gaseous salts were studied. On the basis of the equilibrium constants, the standard formation enthalpies of gaseous GeV2O6 (-1520 ± 42 kJ mol(-1)) and SnV2O6 (-1520 ± 43 kJ mol(-1)) were determined at a temperature of 298 K.

  15. Nexus between quantum criticality and the chemical potential pinning in high- Tc cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeć, T. K.

    2005-08-01

    For strongly correlated electrons the relation between total number of charge carriers ne and the chemical potential μ reveals for large Coulomb energy the apparently paradoxical pinning of μ within the Mott gap, as observed in high- Tc cuprates. By unraveling consequences of the nontrivial topology of the charge gauge U(1) group and the associated ground state degeneracy we found a close kinship between the pinning of μ and the zero-temperature divergence of the charge compressibility κ˜∂ne/∂μ , which marks a novel quantum criticality governed by topological charges rather than Landau principle of the symmetry breaking.

  16. The IINS/quantum chemical studies of 17α- and 21-hydroxy-derivatives of progesterone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szyczewski, A.; Hołderna-Natkaniec, K.; Natkaniec, I.

    2003-05-01

    The inelastic incoherent neutron scattering and quantum chemical studies have been performed on 17 and 21 hydroxy progesterone and the assignment of internal modes have been proposed in the range up to 700 cm -1. The lattice branch of PDS reveals modes which could be attributed to torsions of rings A and D (cyclohexane and cyclopentane) of the pregnane skeleton. An assignment of the torsional vibrations of methyl groups in the range 150-300 cm -1 and the deformation and out-of plane vibrations of CCOH groups has been proposed. An analysis of the effect of hydrogen bonds on PDS spectra has been performed.

  17. Employment of quantum chemical descriptors for Hammett constants: Revision Suggested for the acetoxy substituent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, Tamara; Kollár, László; Kégl, Tamás

    2013-11-01

    The Hammett para constant (σp) of the acetoxy group has been estimated by applying widely available quantum chemical descriptors, such as NPA charges, Wiberg bond indices, electron densities at bond critical points, as well as electrostatic potential at nuclei. The revised σp value is predicted to be in the range of [-0.08, -0.02]. Direct evaluation of proton transfer free energies between the substituted benzoic acids and the benzoate anion by employing the SMD solvation model resulted in a reasonable linear correlation with the Hammett constants with a prediction of σp = -0.02 for the OAc group.

  18. AFNMR: automated fragmentation quantum mechanical calculation of NMR chemical shifts for biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Swails, Jason; Zhu, Tong; He, Xiao; Case, David A

    2015-10-01

    We evaluate the performance of the automated fragmentation quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach (AF-QM/MM) on the calculation of protein and nucleic acid NMR chemical shifts. The AF-QM/MM approach models solvent effects implicitly through a set of surface charges computed using the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, and it can also be combined with an explicit solvent model through the placement of water molecules in the first solvation shell around the solute; the latter substantially improves the accuracy of chemical shift prediction of protons involved in hydrogen bonding with solvent. We also compare the performance of AF-QM/MM on proteins and nucleic acids with two leading empirical chemical shift prediction programs SHIFTS and SHIFTX2. Although the empirical programs outperform AF-QM/MM in predicting chemical shifts, the differences are in some cases small, and the latter can be applied to chemical shifts on biomolecules which are outside the training set employed by the empirical programs, such as structures containing ligands, metal centers, and non-standard residues. The AF-QM/MM described here is implemented in version 5 of the SHIFTS software, and is fully automated, so that only a structure in PDB format is required as input.

  19. Mechanisms of stochastic focusing and defocusing in biological reaction networks: insight from accurate chemical master equation (ACME) solutions.

    PubMed

    Gursoy, Gamze; Terebus, Anna; Youfang Cao; Jie Liang

    2016-08-01

    Stochasticity plays important roles in regulation of biochemical reaction networks when the copy numbers of molecular species are small. Studies based on Stochastic Simulation Algorithm (SSA) has shown that a basic reaction system can display stochastic focusing (SF) by increasing the sensitivity of the network as a result of the signal noise. Although SSA has been widely used to study stochastic networks, it is ineffective in examining rare events and this becomes a significant issue when the tails of probability distributions are relevant as is the case of SF. Here we use the ACME method to solve the exact solution of the discrete Chemical Master Equations and to study a network where SF was reported. We showed that the level of SF depends on the degree of the fluctuations of signal molecule. We discovered that signaling noise under certain conditions in the same reaction network can lead to a decrease in the system sensitivities, thus the network can experience stochastic defocusing. These results highlight the fundamental role of stochasticity in biological reaction networks and the need for exact computation of probability landscape of the molecules in the system.

  20. Quantum Chemical Simulations Reveal Acetylene-Based Growth Mechanisms in the Chemical Vapor Deposition Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Eres, Gyula; Wang, Ying; Gao, Xingfa; Qian, Hu-Jun; Ohta, Yasuhito; Wu, Xiaona; Morokuma, Keiji; Irle, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Nonequilibrium quantum chemical molecular dynamics (QM/MD) simulation of early stages in the nucleation process of carbon nanotubes from acetylene feedstock on an Fe38 cluster was performed based on the density-functional tight-binding (DFTB) potential. Representative chemical reactions were studied by complimentary static DFTB and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Oligomerization and cross-linking reactions between carbon chains were found as the main reaction pathways similar to that suggested in previous experimental work. The calculations highlight the inhibiting effect of hydrogen for the condensation of carbon ring networks, and a propensity for hydrogen disproportionation, thus enriching the hydrogen content in already hydrogen-rich species and abstracting hydrogen content in already hydrogen-deficient clusters. The ethynyl radical C2H was found as a reactive, yet continually regenerated species, facilitating hydrogen transfer reactions across the hydrocarbon clusters. The nonequilibrium QM/MD simulations show the prevalence of a pentagon-first nucleation mechanism where hydrogen may take the role of one arm of an sp2 carbon Y-junction. The results challenge the importance of the metal carbide formation for SWCNT cap nucleation in the VLS model and suggest possible alternative routes following hydrogen-abstraction acetylene addition (HACA)-like mechanisms commonly discussed in combustion synthesis.

  1. The nature of resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds: a quantum chemical topology perspective.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Vela, José Manuel; Romero-Montalvo, Eduardo; Costales, Aurora; Pendás, Ángel Martín; Rocha-Rinza, Tomás

    2016-10-14

    Resonance Assisted Hydrogen Bonds (RAHBs) are particularly strong H-Bonds (HBs) which are relevant in several fields of chemistry. The traditional explanation for the occurrence of these HBs is built on mesomeric structures evocative of electron delocalisation in the system. Nonetheless, there are several theoretical studies which have found no evidence of such electron delocalisation. We considered the origin of RAHBs by employing Quantum Chemical Topology tools, more specifically, the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) and the Interacting Quantum Atoms energy partition. Our results indicate that the π-conjugated bonds allow for a larger adjustment of electron density throughout the H-bonded system as compared with non-conjugated carbonyl molecules. This rearrangement of charge distribution is a response to the electric field due to the H atom involved in the hydrogen bonding of the considered compounds. As opposed to the usual description of RAHB interactions, these HBs lead to a larger electron localisation in the system, and concomitantly to larger QTAIM charges which in turn lead to stronger electrostatic, polarization and charge transfer components of the interaction. Overall, the results presented here offer a new perspective on the cause of strengthening of these important interactions.

  2. Description of Polar Chemical Bonds from the Quantum Mechanical Interference Perspective.

    PubMed

    Fantuzzi, Felipe; Nascimento, Marco Antonio Chaer

    2014-06-10

    The Generalized Product Function Energy Partitioning (GPF-EP) method has been applied to a set of molecules, AH (A = Li, Be, B, C, N, O, F), CO and LiF with quite different dipole moments, in order to investigate the role played by the quantum interference effect in the formation of polar chemical bonds. The calculations were carried out with GPF wave functions treating all the core electrons as a single Hartree-Fock group and the bonding electrons at the Generalized Valence Bond Perfect-Pairing (GVB-PP) level, with the cc-pVTZ basis set. The results of the energy partitioning into interference and quasi-classical contributions along the respective Potential Energy Surfaces (PES) show that the main contribution to the depth of the potential wells comes from the interference term, which is an indication that all the molecules mentioned above form typical covalent bonds. In all cases, the stabilization promoted by the interference term comes from the kinetic contribution, in agreement with previous results. The analysis of the effect of quantum interference on the electron density reveals that while polarization effects (quasi-classical) tend to displace electronic density from the most polarizable atom toward the less polarizable one, interference (quantum effects) counteracts by displacing electronic density to the bond region, giving rise to the right electronic density and dipole moment.

  3. A generalized quantum chemical approach for elastic and inelastic electron transports in molecular electronics devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jun; Kula, Mathias; Luo, Yi

    2006-01-01

    A generalized quantum chemical approach for electron transport in molecular devices is developed. It allows one to treat devices where the metal electrodes and the molecule are either chemically or physically bonded on equal footing. An extension to include the vibration motions of the molecule has also been implemented which has produced the inelastic electron-tunneling spectroscopy of molecular electronics devices with unprecedented accuracy. Important information about the structure of the molecule and of metal-molecule contacts that are not accessible in the experiment are revealed. The calculated current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of different molecular devices, including benzene-1,4-dithiolate, octanemonothiolate [H(CH2)8S], and octanedithiolate [S(CH2)8S] bonded to gold electrodes, are in very good agreement with experimental measurements.

  4. Microwave, high-resolution infrared, and quantum chemical investigations of CHBrF2: ground and v4 = 1 states.

    PubMed

    Cazzoli, Gabriele; Cludi, Lino; Puzzarini, Cristina; Stoppa, Paolo; Pietropolli Charmet, Andrea; Tasinato, Nicola; Baldacci, Agostino; Baldan, Alessandro; Giorgianni, Santi; Wugt Larsen, René; Stopkowicz, Stella; Gauss, Jürgen

    2011-02-03

    A combined microwave, infrared, and computational investigation of CHBrF(2) is reported. For the vibrational ground state, measurements in the millimeter- and sub-millimeter-wave regions for CH(79)BrF(2) and CH(81)BrF(2) provided rotational and centrifugal-distortion constants up to the sextic terms as well as the hyperfine parameters (quadrupole-coupling and spin-rotation interaction constants) of the bromine nucleus. The determination of the latter was made possible by recording of spectra at sub-Doppler resolution, achieved by means of the Lamb-dip technique, and supporting the spectra analysis by high-level quantum chemical calculations at the coupled-cluster level. In this context, the importance of relativistic effects, which are of the order of 6.5% and included in the present work using second-order direct perturbation theory, needs to be emphasized for accurate predictions of the bromine quadrupole-coupling constants. The infrared measurements focused on the ν(4) fundamental band of CH(79)BrF(2). Fourier transform investigations using a synchrotron radiation source provided the necessary resolution for the observation and analysis of the rotational structure. The spectroscopic parameters of the v(4) = 1 state were found to be close to those of the vibrational ground state, indicating that the ν(4) band is essentially unaffected by perturbations.

  5. Accurate Three States Model for Amino Acids with Two Chemically Coupled Titrating Sites in Explicit Solvent Atomistic Constant pH Simulations and pKa Calculations.

    PubMed

    Dobrev, Plamen; Donnini, Serena; Groenhof, Gerrit; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2017-01-10

    Correct protonation of titratable groups in biomolecules is crucial for their accurate description by molecular dynamics simulations. In the context of constant pH simulations, an additional protonation degree of freedom is introduced for each titratable site, allowing the protonation state to change dynamically with changing structure or electrostatics. Here, we extend previous approaches for an accurate description of chemically coupled titrating sites. A second reaction coordinate is used to switch between two tautomeric states of an amino acid with chemically coupled titratable sites, such as aspartate (Asp), glutamate (Glu), and histidine (His). To this aim, we test a scheme involving three protonation states. To facilitate charge neutrality as required for periodic boundary conditions and Particle Mesh Ewald (PME) electrostatics, titration of each respective amino acid is coupled to a "water" molecule that is charged in the opposite direction. Additionally, a force field modification for Amber99sb is introduced and tested for the description of carboxyl group protonation. Our three states model is tested by titration simulations of Asp, Glu, and His, yielding a good agreement, reproducing the correct geometry of the groups in their different protonation forms. We further show that the ion concentration change due to the neutralizing "water" molecules does not significantly affect the protonation free energies of the titratable groups, suggesting that the three states model provides a good description of biomolecular dynamics at constant pH.

  6. Beyond transition state theory: Rigorous quantum approaches for determining chemical reaction rates

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.H.

    1995-01-01

    Transition state theory (TST) has historically been the most important and widely used theoretical approach for describing the rates of chemical reactions, and for qualitative pictures and order-of-magnitude estimates one does not expect this situation to change. However a rigorous, quantitative treatment of chemical reaction rates must go beyond TST. A rigorous description, for example, must be based on a quantum mechanical description of the molecular system, but the fundamental assumption on which TST is based - namely that the molecular dynamics is {open_quotes}direct,{close_quotes} i.e., that no trajectories re-cross a dividing surface which separates reactants and products (vide infra) - is couched inherently in the language of classical mechanics. There is no unambiguous way to quantize TST, for the various ways of trying to do so invariably require one to introduce additional assumptions about the reaction dynamics. As one tries to eliminate these {open_quotes}additional assumptions{close_quotes} one is driven ultimately to an exact quantum treatment of the reaction dynamics which is then no longer a transition state theory (i.e., approximation) but simply an exact formulation. It is such exact approaches, those without inherent approximations, that are the subject of this chapter.

  7. Quantum chemical study of a derivative of 3-substituted dithiocarbamic flavanone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosav, Steluta; Paduraru, Nicoleta; Maftei, Dan; Birsa, Mihail Lucian; Praisler, Mirela

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this work is to characterize a quite novel 3-dithiocarbamic flavonoid by vibrational spectroscopy in conjunction with Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. Quantum mechanics calculations of energies, geometries and vibrational wavenumbers in the ground state were carried out by using hybrid functional B3LYP with 6-311G(d,p) as basis set. The results indicate a remarkable agreement between the calculated molecular geometries, as well as vibrational frequencies, and the corresponding experimental data. In addition, a complete assignment of all the absorption bands present in the vibrational spectrum has been performed. In order to assess its chemical potential, quantum molecular descriptors characterizing the interactions between the 3-dithiocarbamic flavonoid and its biological receptors have been computed. The frontier molecular orbitals and the HOMO-LUMO energy gap have been used in order to explain the way in which the new molecule can interact with other species and to characterize its molecular chemical stability/reactivity. The molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) map, computed in order to identify the sites of the studied flavonoid that are most likely to interact with electrophilic and nucleophilic species, is discussed.

  8. Conceptual quantum chemical analysis of bonding and noncovalent interactions in the formation of frustrated Lewis pairs.

    PubMed

    Skara, Gabriella; Pinter, Balazs; Top, Jens; Geerlings, Paul; De Proft, Frank; De Vleeschouwer, Freija

    2015-03-27

    The contributions of covalent and noncovalent interactions to the formation of classical adducts of bulky Lewis acids and bases and frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs) were scrutinized by using various conceptual quantum chemical techniques. Significantly negative complexation energies were calculated for fourteen investigated Lewis pairs containing bases and acids with substituents of various sizes. A Ziegler-Rauk-type energy decomposition analysis confirmed that two types of Lewis pairs can be distinguished on the basis of the nature of the primary interactions between reactants; dative-bond formation and concomitant charge transfer from the Lewis base to the acid is the dominant and most stabilizing factor in the formation of Lewis acid-base adducts, whereas weak interactions are the main thermodynamic driving force (>50 %) for FLPs. Moreover, the ease and extent of structural deformation of the monomers appears to be a key component in the formation of the former type of Lewis pairs. A Natural Orbital for Chemical Valence (NOCV) analysis, which was used to visualize and quantify the charge transfer between the base and the acid, clearly showed the importance and lack of this type of interaction for adducts and FLPs, respectively. The Noncovalent Interaction (NCI) method revealed several kinds of weak interactions between the acid and base components, such as dispersion, π-π stacking, C-H⋅⋅⋅π interaction, weak hydrogen bonding, halogen bonding, and weak acid-base interactions, whereas the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) provided further conceptual insight into strong acid-base interactions.

  9. [Terahertz Absorption Spectra Simulation of Glutamine Based on Quantum-Chemical Calculation].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-yao; Zhang, Zhao-hui; Zhao, Xiao-yan; Zhang, Han; Yan, Fang; Qian, Ping

    2015-08-01

    With simulation of absorption spectra in THz region based on quantum-chemical calculation, the THz absorption features of target materials can be assigned with theoretical normal vibration modes. This is necessary for deeply understanding the origin of THz absorption spectra. The reliabilities of simulation results mainly depend on the initial structures and theoretical methods used throughout the calculation. In our study, we utilized THz-TDS to obtain the THz absorption spectrum of solid-state L-glutamine. Then three quantum-chemical calculation schemes with different initial structures commonly used in previous studies were proposed to study the inter-molecular interactions' contribution to the THz absorption of glutamine, containing monomer structure, dimer structure and crystal unit cell structure. After structure optimization and vibration modes' calculation based on density functional theory, the calculation results were converted to absorption spectra by Lorentzian line shape function for visual comparison with experimental spectra. The result of dimmer structure is better than monomer structure in number of absorption features while worse than crystal unit cell structure in position of absorption peaks. With the most reliable simulation result from crystal unit cell calculation, we successfully assigned all three experimental absorption peaks of glutamine ranged from 0.3 to 2.6 THz with overall vibration modes. Our study reveals that the crystal unit cell should be used as initial structure during theoretical simulation of solid-state samples' THz absorption spectrum which comprehensively considers not only the intra-molecular interactions but also inter-molecular interactions.

  10. Coherent chemical kinetics as quantum walks. I. Reaction operators for radical pairs.

    PubMed

    Chia, A; Tan, K C; Pawela, Ł; Kurzyński, P; Paterek, T; Kaszlikowski, D

    2016-03-01

    Classical chemical kinetics uses rate-equation models to describe how a reaction proceeds in time. Such models are sufficient for describing state transitions in a reaction where coherences between different states do not arise, in other words, a reaction that contains only incoherent transitions. A prominent example of a reaction containing coherent transitions is the radical-pair model. The kinetics of such reactions is defined by the so-called reaction operator that determines the radical-pair state as a function of intermediate transition rates. We argue that the well-known concept of quantum walks from quantum information theory is a natural and apt framework for describing multisite chemical reactions. By composing Kraus maps that act only on two sites at a time, we show how the quantum-walk formalism can be applied to derive a reaction operator for the standard avian radical-pair reaction. Our reaction operator predicts the same recombination dephasing rate as the conventional Haberkorn model, which is consistent with recent experiments [K. Maeda et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 234309 (2013)], in contrast to previous work by Jones and Hore [J. A. Jones and P. J. Hore, Chem. Phys. Lett. 488, 90 (2010)]. The standard radical-pair reaction has conventionally been described by either a normalized density operator incorporating both the radical pair and reaction products or a trace-decreasing density operator that considers only the radical pair. We demonstrate a density operator that is both normalized and refers only to radical-pair states. Generalizations to include additional dephasing processes and an arbitrary number of sites are also discussed.

  11. Coherent chemical kinetics as quantum walks. I. Reaction operators for radical pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, A.; Tan, K. C.; Pawela, Ł.; Kurzyński, P.; Paterek, T.; Kaszlikowski, D.

    2016-03-01

    Classical chemical kinetics uses rate-equation models to describe how a reaction proceeds in time. Such models are sufficient for describing state transitions in a reaction where coherences between different states do not arise, in other words, a reaction that contains only incoherent transitions. A prominent example of a reaction containing coherent transitions is the radical-pair model. The kinetics of such reactions is defined by the so-called reaction operator that determines the radical-pair state as a function of intermediate transition rates. We argue that the well-known concept of quantum walks from quantum information theory is a natural and apt framework for describing multisite chemical reactions. By composing Kraus maps that act only on two sites at a time, we show how the quantum-walk formalism can be applied to derive a reaction operator for the standard avian radical-pair reaction. Our reaction operator predicts the same recombination dephasing rate as the conventional Haberkorn model, which is consistent with recent experiments [K. Maeda et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 234309 (2013), 10.1063/1.4844355], in contrast to previous work by Jones and Hore [J. A. Jones and P. J. Hore, Chem. Phys. Lett. 488, 90 (2010), 10.1016/j.cplett.2010.01.063]. The standard radical-pair reaction has conventionally been described by either a normalized density operator incorporating both the radical pair and reaction products or a trace-decreasing density operator that considers only the radical pair. We demonstrate a density operator that is both normalized and refers only to radical-pair states. Generalizations to include additional dephasing processes and an arbitrary number of sites are also discussed.

  12. Degradation of di(2-ethyl hexyl) phthalate by Fusarium culmorum: Kinetics, enzymatic activities and biodegradation pathway based on quantum chemical modelingpathway based on quantum chemical modeling.

    PubMed

    Ahuactzin-Pérez, Miriam; Tlecuitl-Beristain, Saúl; García-Dávila, Jorge; González-Pérez, Manuel; Gutiérrez-Ruíz, María Concepción; Sánchez, Carmen

    2016-10-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a plasticizer widely used in the manufacture of plastics, and it is an environmental contaminant. The specific growth rate (μ), maximum biomass (Xmax), biodegradation constant of DEHP (k), half-life (t1/2) of DEHP biodegradation and removal efficiency of DEHP, esterase and laccase specific activities, and enzymatic yield parameters were evaluated for Fusarium culmorum grown on media containing glucose and different concentrations of DEHP (0, 500 and 1000mg/L). The greatest μ and the largest Xmax occurred in media supplemented with 1000mg of DEHP/L. F. culmorum degraded 95% of the highest amount of DEHP tested (1000mg/L) within 60h of growth. The k and t1/2 were 0.024h(-1) and 28h, respectively, for both DEHP concentrations. The removal efficiency of DEHP was 99.8% and 99.9% for 1000 and 500mg/L, respectively. Much higher specific esterase activity than specific laccase activity was observed in all media tested. The compounds of biodegradation of DEHP were identified by GC-MS. A DEHP biodegradation pathway by F. culmorum was proposed on the basis of the intermolecular flow of electrons of the identified intermediate compounds using quantum chemical modeling. DEHP was fully metabolized by F. culmorum with butanediol as the final product. This fungus offers great potential in bioremediation of environments polluted with DEHP.

  13. Efficient Implementation of Many-body Quantum Chemical Methods on the Intel Xeon Phi Coprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Apra, Edoardo; Klemm, Michael; Kowalski, Karol

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the implementation and performance of the highly accurate CCSD(T) quantum chemistry method on the Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor within the context of the NWChem computational chemistry package. The widespread use of highly correlated methods in electronic structure calculations is contingent upon the interplay between advances in theory and the possibility of utilizing the ever-growing computer power of emerging heterogeneous architectures. We discuss the design decisions of our implementation as well as the optimizations applied to the compute kernels and data transfers between host and coprocessor. We show the feasibility of adopting the Intel Many Integrated Core Architecture and the Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor for developing efficient computational chemistry modeling tools. Remarkable scalability is demonstrated by benchmarks. Our solution scales up to a total of 62560 cores with the concurrent utilization of Intel Xeon processors and Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors.

  14. Quantum Chemical-Based Protocol for the Rational Design of Covalent Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Schirmeister, Tanja; Kesselring, Jochen; Jung, Sascha; Schneider, Thomas H; Weickert, Anastasia; Becker, Johannes; Lee, Wook; Bamberger, Denise; Wich, Peter R; Distler, Ute; Tenzer, Stefan; Johé, Patrick; Hellmich, Ute A; Engels, Bernd

    2016-07-13

    We propose a structure-based protocol for the development of customized covalent inhibitors. Starting from a known inhibitor, in the first and second steps appropriate substituents of the warhead are selected on the basis of quantum mechanical (QM) computations and hybrid approaches combining QM with molecular mechanics (QM/MM). In the third step the recognition unit is optimized using docking approaches for the noncovalent complex. These predictions are finally verified by QM/MM or molecular dynamic simulations. The applicability of our approach is successfully demonstrated by the design of reversible covalent vinylsulfone-based inhibitors for rhodesain. The examples show that our approach is sufficiently accurate to identify compounds with the desired properties but also to exclude nonpromising ones.

  15. Computer simulations of local anesthetic mechanisms: Quantum chemical investigation of procaine

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeremy C; Bondar, A.N.; Suhai, Sandor; Frangopol, P.T.

    2007-02-01

    A description at the atomic level of detail of the interaction between local anesthetics, lipid membranes and membrane proteins, is essential for understanding the mechanism of local anesthesia. The importance of performing computer simulations to decipher the mechanism of local anesthesia is discussed here in the context of the current status of understanding of the local anesthetics action. As a first step towards accurate simulations of the interaction between local anesthetics, proteins, lipid and water molecules, here we use quantum mechanical methods to assess the charge distribution and structural properties of procaine in the presence and in the absence of water molecules. The calculations indicate that, in the absence of hydrogen-bonding water molecules, protonated procaine strongly prefers a compact structure enabled by intramolecular hydrogen bonding. In the presence of water molecules the torsional energy pro?le of procaine is modified, and hydrogen bonding to water molecules is favored relative to intra-molecular hydrogen bonding.

  16. Matching unknown empirical formulas to chemical structure using LC/MS TOF accurate mass and database searching: example of unknown pesticides on tomato skins.

    PubMed

    Thurman, E Michael; Ferrer, Imma; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo Rodriguez

    2005-03-04

    Traditionally, the screening of unknown pesticides in food has been accomplished by GC/MS methods using conventional library searching routines. However, many of the new polar and thermally labile pesticides and their degradates are more readily and easily analyzed by LC/MS methods and no searchable libraries currently exist (with the exception of some user libraries, which are limited). Therefore, there is a need for LC/MS approaches to detect unknown non-target pesticides in food. This report develops an identification scheme using a combination of LC/MS time-of-flight (accurate mass) and LC/MS ion trap MS (MS/MS) with searching of empirical formulas generated through accurate mass and a ChemIndex database or Merck Index database. The approach is different than conventional library searching of fragment ions. The concept here consists of four parts. First is the initial detection of a possible unknown pesticide in actual market-place vegetable extracts (tomato skins) using accurate mass and generating empirical formulas. Second is searching either the Merck Index database on CD (10,000 compounds) or the ChemIndex (77,000 compounds) for possible structures. Third is MS/MS of the unknown pesticide in the tomato-skin extract followed by fragment ion identification using chemical drawing software and comparison with accurate-mass ion fragments. Fourth is the verification with authentic standards, if available. Three examples of unknown, non-target pesticides are shown using a tomato-skin extract from an actual market place sample. Limitations of the approach are discussed including the use of A + 2 isotope signatures, extended databases, lack of authentic standards, and natural product unknowns in food extracts.

  17. Improved performance of nanowire-quantum-dot-polymer solar cells by chemical treatment of the quantum dot with ligand and solvent materials.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, A; Smith, T; Könenkamp, R

    2012-12-07

    We report a nanowire-quantum-dot-polymer solar cell consisting of a chemically treated CdSe quantum dot film deposited on n-type ZnO nanowires. The electron and hole collecting contacts are a fluorine-doped tin-oxide/zinc oxide layer and a P3HT/Au layer. This device architecture allows for enhanced light absorption and an efficient collection of photogenerated carriers. A detailed analysis of the chemical treatment of the quantum dots, their deposition, and the necessary annealing processes are discussed. We find that the surface treatment of CdSe quantum dots with pyridine, and the use of 1,2-ethanedithiol (EDT) ligands, critically improves the device performance. Annealing at 380 °C for 2 h is found to cause a structural conversion of the CdSe from its initial isolated quantum dot arrangement into a polycrystalline film with excellent surface conformality, thereby resulting in a further enhancement of device performance. Moreover, long-term annealing of 24 h leads to additional increases in device efficiency. Our best conversion efficiency reached for this type of cell is 3.4% under 85 mW cm(-2) illumination.

  18. Improved performance of nanowire-quantum-dot-polymer solar cells by chemical treatment of the quantum dot with ligand and solvent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadarajah, A.; Smith, T.; Könenkamp, R.

    2012-12-01

    We report a nanowire-quantum-dot-polymer solar cell consisting of a chemically treated CdSe quantum dot film deposited on n-type ZnO nanowires. The electron and hole collecting contacts are a fluorine-doped tin-oxide/zinc oxide layer and a P3HT/Au layer. This device architecture allows for enhanced light absorption and an efficient collection of photogenerated carriers. A detailed analysis of the chemical treatment of the quantum dots, their deposition, and the necessary annealing processes are discussed. We find that the surface treatment of CdSe quantum dots with pyridine, and the use of 1,2-ethanedithiol (EDT) ligands, critically improves the device performance. Annealing at 380 °C for 2 h is found to cause a structural conversion of the CdSe from its initial isolated quantum dot arrangement into a polycrystalline film with excellent surface conformality, thereby resulting in a further enhancement of device performance. Moreover, long-term annealing of 24 h leads to additional increases in device efficiency. Our best conversion efficiency reached for this type of cell is 3.4% under 85 mW cm-2 illumination.

  19. On the stability of perfluoroalkyl-substituted singlet carbenes: a coupled-cluster quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Rozhenko, Alexander B; Schoeller, Wolfgang W; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2014-02-27

    A series of trifluoromethyl-substituted carbenes R-C(:)-CF3 (R = NMe2, OMe, F, PMe2, P(NMe2)2, P(N(Pr-i)2)2, SMe, Cl); (dimethylamino)(perfluoroalkyl)carbenes Me2N-C(:)-R (R = CF3, C2F5, n-C3F7, i-C3F7, and t-C4F9) and symmetrically substituted carbenes R-C(:)-R (R = NMe2, OMe, F, PMe2, SMe, Cl) have been investigated by means of quantum chemistry methods. Different levels of approximation were used, including the CCSD(T) approach also known in quantum chemistry as the "golden standard", in combination with three different basis sets (TZVP, cc-pVDZ, cc-pVTZ). Relative stabilities of carbenes have been estimated using the differences between the singlet and triplet ground state energies (ΔEST) and energies of the hydrogenation reaction for the singlet and triplet ground states of the carbenes. The latter seem to correlate better with stability of carbenes than the ΔEST values. The (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the methylidene carbon indicate the more high-field chemical shift values in the known, isolable carbenes compared to the unstable ones. This is the first report on the expected chemical shifts in the highly unstable singlet carbenes. Using these criteria, some carbene structures from the studied series (as, for instance, Me2N-C(:)-CF3, Me2N-C(:)-C3F7-i) are proposed as good candidates for the experimental preparation.

  20. A quantitative quantum-chemical analysis tool for the distribution of mechanical force in molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Stauch, Tim; Dreuw, Andreas

    2014-04-07

    The promising field of mechanochemistry suffers from a general lack of understanding of the distribution and propagation of force in a stretched molecule, which limits its applicability up to the present day. In this article, we introduce the JEDI (Judgement of Energy DIstribution) analysis, which is the first quantum chemical method that provides a quantitative understanding of the distribution of mechanical stress energy among all degrees of freedom in a molecule. The method is carried out on the basis of static or dynamic calculations under the influence of an external force and makes use of a Hessian matrix in redundant internal coordinates (bond lengths, bond angles, and dihedral angles), so that all relevant degrees of freedom of a molecule are included and mechanochemical processes can be interpreted in a chemically intuitive way. The JEDI method is characterized by its modest computational effort, with the calculation of the Hessian being the rate-determining step, and delivers, except for the harmonic approximation, exact ab initio results. We apply the JEDI analysis to several example molecules in both static quantum chemical calculations and Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics simulations in which molecules are subject to an external force, thus studying not only the distribution and the propagation of strain in mechanically deformed systems, but also gaining valuable insights into the mechanochemically induced isomerization of trans-3,4-dimethylcyclobutene to trans,trans-2,4-hexadiene. The JEDI analysis can potentially be used in the discussion of sonochemical reactions, molecular motors, mechanophores, and photoswitches as well as in the development of molecular force probes.

  1. A quantitative quantum-chemical analysis tool for the distribution of mechanical force in molecules.

    PubMed

    Stauch, Tim; Dreuw, Andreas

    2014-04-07

    The promising field of mechanochemistry suffers from a general lack of understanding of the distribution and propagation of force in a stretched molecule, which limits its applicability up to the present day. In this article, we introduce the JEDI (Judgement of Energy DIstribution) analysis, which is the first quantum chemical method that provides a quantitative understanding of the distribution of mechanical stress energy among all degrees of freedom in a molecule. The method is carried out on the basis of static or dynamic calculations under the influence of an external force and makes use of a Hessian matrix in redundant internal coordinates (bond lengths, bond angles, and dihedral angles), so that all relevant degrees of freedom of a molecule are included and mechanochemical processes can be interpreted in a chemically intuitive way. The JEDI method is characterized by its modest computational effort, with the calculation of the Hessian being the rate-determining step, and delivers, except for the harmonic approximation, exact ab initio results. We apply the JEDI analysis to several example molecules in both static quantum chemical calculations and Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics simulations in which molecules are subject to an external force, thus studying not only the distribution and the propagation of strain in mechanically deformed systems, but also gaining valuable insights into the mechanochemically induced isomerization of trans-3,4-dimethylcyclobutene to trans,trans-2,4-hexadiene. The JEDI analysis can potentially be used in the discussion of sonochemical reactions, molecular motors, mechanophores, and photoswitches as well as in the development of molecular force probes.

  2. Predicting Michael-acceptor reactivity and toxicity through quantum chemical transition-state calculations.

    PubMed

    Mulliner, Denis; Wondrousch, Dominik; Schüürmann, Gerrit

    2011-12-21

    The electrophilic reactivity of Michael acceptors is an important determinant of their toxicity. For a set of 35 α,β-unsaturated aldehydes, ketones and esters with experimental rate constants of their reaction with glutathione (GSH), k(GSH), quantum chemical transition-state calculations of the corresponding Michael addition of the model nucleophile methane thiol (CH(3)SH) have been performed at the B3LYP/6-31G** level, focusing on the 1,2-olefin addition pathway without and with initial protonation. Inclusion of Boltzmann-weighting of conformational flexibility yields intrinsic reaction barriers ΔE(‡) that for the case of initial protonation correctly reflect the structural variation of k(GSH) across all three compound classes, except that they fail to account for a systematic (essentially incremental) decrease in reactivity upon α-substitution. By contrast, the reduction in k(GSH) through β-substitution is well captured by ΔE(‡). Empirical correction for the α-substitution effect yields a high squared correlation coefficient (r(2) = 0.96) for the quantum chemical prediction of log k(GSH), thus enabling an in silico screening of the toxicity-relevant electrophilicity of α,β-unsaturated carbonyls. The latter is demonstrated through application of the calculation scheme for a larger set of 46 Michael-acceptor aldehydes, ketones and esters with experimental values for their toxicity toward the ciliates Tetrahymena pyriformis in terms of 50% growth inhibition values after 48 h exposure (EC(50)). The developed approach may add in the predictive hazard evaluation of α,β-unsaturated carbonyls such as for the European REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals) Directive, enabling in particular an early identification of toxicity-relevant Michael-acceptor reactivity.

  3. Quantum chemical study of the inhibition of the corrosion of mild steel in H2SO4 by some antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Nnabuk O; Ibok, Udo J; Ebenso, Eno E; El Nemr, Ahmed; El Ashry, El Sayed H

    2009-09-01

    The inhibition efficiency of some antibiotics against mild steel corrosion was studied using weight loss and quantum chemical techniques. Values of inhibition efficiency obtained from weight loss measurements correlated strongly with theoretical values obtained through semi empirical calculations. High correlation coefficients were also obtained between inhibition efficiency of the antibiotics and some quantum chemical parameters, including frontier orbital (E (HOMO) and E (LUMO)), dipole moment, log P, TNC and LSER parameters (critical volume and dipolar-polarisability factor), which indicated that these parameters affect the inhibition efficiency of the compounds. It was also found that quantitative structure activity relation can be used to adequately predict the inhibition effectiveness of these compounds.

  4. Characteristics of the complexing of chitosan with sodium dodecyl sulfate, according to IR spectroscopy data and quantum-chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shilova, S. V.; Romanova, K. A.; Galyametdinov, Yu. G.; Tret'yakova, A. Ya.; Barabanov, V. P.

    2016-06-01

    The complexing of protonated chitosan with dodecyl sulfate ions in water solutions is studied using IR spectroscopy data and quantum-chemical calculations. It is established that the electrostatic interaction between the protonated amino groups of chitosan and dodecyl sulfate ions is apparent in the IR spectrum as a band at 833 cm-1. The need to consider the effect the solvent has on the formation of hydrogen-bound ion pairs [CTS+ ṡ C12H25O 3 - ] is shown via a quantum-chemical simulation of the equilibrium geometry and the energy characteristics of complexing and hydration.

  5. Toward the realization of a compact chemical sensor platform using quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holthoff, Ellen L.; Marcus, Logan S.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2015-05-01

    The Army is investigating several spectroscopic techniques (e.g., infrared spectroscopy) that could allow for an adaptable sensor platform. Traditionally, chemical sensing platforms have been hampered by the opposing concerns of increasing sensor capability while maintaining a minimal package size. Current sensors, although reasonably sized, are geared to more classical chemical threats, and the ability to expand their capabilities to a broader range of emerging threats is uncertain. Recently, photoacoustic spectroscopy, employed in a sensor format, has shown enormous potential to address these ever-changing threats, while maintaining a compact sensor design. In order to realize the advantage of photoacoustic sensor miniaturization, light sources of comparable size are required. Recent research has employed quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in combination with MEMS-scale photoacoustic cell designs. The continuous tuning capability of QCLs over a broad wavelength range in the mid-infrared spectral region greatly expands the number of compounds that can be identified. Results have demonstrated that utilizing a tunable QCL with a MEMS-scale photoacoustic cell produces favorable detection limits (ppb levels) for chemical targets (e.g., dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP), vinyl acetate, 1,4-dioxane). Although our chemical sensing research has benefitted from the broad tuning capabilities of QCLs, the limitations of these sources must be considered. Current commercially available tunable systems are still expensive and obviously geared more toward laboratory operation, not fielding. Although the laser element itself is quite small, the packaging, power supply, and controller remain logistical burdens. Additionally, operational features such as continuous wave (CW) modulation and laser output powers while maintaining wide tunability are not yet ideal for a variety of sensing applications. In this paper, we will discuss our continuing evaluation of QCL technology as it matures

  6. Effect of chemical fixatives on accurate preservation of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis structure in cells prepared by freeze-substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, L.L.; Beveridge, T.J. )

    1990-04-01

    Five chemical fixatives were evaluated for their ability to accurately preserve bacterial ultrastructure during freeze-substitution of select Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis strains. Radioisotopes were specifically incorporated into the peptidoglycan, lipopolysaccharide, and nucleic acids of E. coli SFK11 and W7 and into the peptidoglycan and RNA of B. subtilis 168 and W23. The ease of extraction of radiolabels, as assessed by liquid scintillation counting during all stages of processing for freeze-substitution, was used as an indicator of cell structural integrity and retention of cellular chemical composition. Subsequent visual examination by electron microscopy was used to confirm ultrastructural conformation. The fixatives used were: 2% (wt/vol) osmium tetroxide and 2% (wt/vol) uranyl acetate; 2% (vol/vol) glutaraldehyde and 2% (wt/vol) uranyl acetate; 2% (vol/vol) acrolein and 2% (wt/vol) uranyl acetate; 2% (wt/vol) gallic acid; and 2% (wt/vol) uranyl acetate. All fixatives were prepared in a substitution solvent of anhydrous acetone. Extraction of cellular constituents depended on the chemical fixative used. A combination of 2% osmium tetroxide-2% uranyl acetate or 2% gallic acid alone resulted in optimum fixation as ascertained by least extraction of radiolabels. In both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms, high levels of radiolabel were detected in the processing fluids in which 2% acrolein-2% uranyl acetate, 2% glutaraldehyde-2% uranyl acetate, or 2% uranyl acetate alone were used as fixatives. Ultrastructural variations were observed in cells freeze-substituted in the presence of different chemical fixatives. We recommend the use of osmium tetroxide and uranyl acetate in acetone for routine freeze-substitution of eubacteria, while gallic acid is recommended for use when microanalytical processing necessitates the omission of osmium.

  7. DFT simulation, quantum chemical electronic structure, spectroscopic and structure-activity investigations of 2-benzothiazole acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, V.; Thillai Govindaraja, S.; Jose, Sujin P.; Mohan, S.

    2014-07-01

    The Fourier transform infrared and FT-Raman spectra of 2-benzothiazole acetonitrile (BTAN) have been recorded in the range 4000-450 and 4000-100 cm-1 respectively. The conformational analysis of the compound has been carried out to obtain the stable geometry of the compound. The complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound are carried out using the experimental FTIR and FT-Raman data and quantum chemical studies. The experimental vibrational frequencies are compared with the wavenumbers derived theoretically by B3LYP gradient calculations employing the standard 6-31G**, high level 6-311++G** and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The structural parameters, thermodynamic properties and vibrational frequencies of the normal modes obtained from the B3LYP methods are in good agreement with the experimental data. The 1H (400 MHz; CDCl3) and 13C (100 MHz; CDCl3) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra are also recorded. The electronic properties, the energies of the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals are measured by DFT approach. The kinetic stability of the molecule has been determined from the frontier molecular orbital energy gap. The charges of the atoms and the structure-chemical reactivity relations of the compound are determined by its chemical potential, global hardness, global softness, electronegativity, electrophilicity and local reactivity descriptors by conceptual DFT methods. The non-linear optical properties of the compound have been discussed by measuring the polarisability and hyperpolarisability tensors.

  8. Structure activity studies of an analgesic drug tapentadol hydrochloride by spectroscopic and quantum chemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, V.; Santhanam, R.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.; Yang, Haifeng

    2015-11-01

    Tapentadol is a novel opioid pain reliever drug with a dual mechanism of action, having potency between morphine and tramadol. Quantum chemical calculations have been carried out for tapentadol hydrochloride (TAP.Cl) to determine the properties. The geometry is optimised and the structural properties of the compound were determined from the optimised geometry by B3LYP method using 6-311++G(d,p), 6-31G(d,p) and cc-pVDZ basis sets. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra are recorded in the solid phase in the region of 4000-400 and 4000-100 cm-1, respectively. Frontier molecular orbital energies, LUMO-HOMO energy gap, ionisation potential, electron affinity, electronegativity, hardness and chemical potential are also calculated. The stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions and charge delocalisation has been analysed using NBO analysis. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule are analysed.

  9. Quantum Dot and Polymer Composite Cross-Reactive Array for Chemical Vapor Detection.

    PubMed

    Bright, Collin J; Nallon, Eric C; Polcha, Michael P; Schnee, Vincent P

    2015-12-15

    A cross-reactive chemical sensing array was made from CdSe Quantum Dots (QDs) and five different organic polymers by inkjet printing to create segmented fluorescent composite regions on quartz substrates. The sensor array was challenged with exposures from two sets of analytes, including one set of 14 different functionalized benzenes and one set of 14 compounds related to security concerns, including the explosives trinitrotoluene (TNT) and ammonium nitrate. The array was broadly responsive to analytes with different chemical functionalities due to the multiple sensing mechanisms that altered the QDs' fluorescence. The sensor array displayed excellent discrimination between members within both sets. Classification accuracy of more than 93% was achieved, including the complete discrimination of very similar dinitrobenzene isomers and three halogenated, substituted benzene compounds. The simple fabrication, broad responsivity, and high discrimination capacity of this type of cross-reactive array are ideal qualities for the development of sensors with excellent sensitivity to chemical and explosive threats while maintaining low false alarm rates.

  10. Accurate electronic and chemical properties of 3d transition metal oxides using a calculated linear response U and a DFT + U(V) method.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhongnan; Joshi, Yogesh V; Raman, Sumathy; Kitchin, John R

    2015-04-14

    We validate the usage of the calculated, linear response Hubbard U for evaluating accurate electronic and chemical properties of bulk 3d transition metal oxides. We find calculated values of U lead to improved band gaps. For the evaluation of accurate reaction energies, we first identify and eliminate contributions to the reaction energies of bulk systems due only to changes in U and construct a thermodynamic cycle that references the total energies of unique U systems to a common point using a DFT + U(V) method, which we recast from a recently introduced DFT + U(R) method for molecular systems. We then introduce a semi-empirical method based on weighted DFT/DFT + U cohesive energies to calculate bulk oxidation energies of transition metal oxides using density functional theory and linear response calculated U values. We validate this method by calculating 14 reactions energies involving V, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co oxides. We find up to an 85% reduction of the mean average error (MAE) compared to energies calculated with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional. When our method is compared with DFT + U with empirically derived U values and the HSE06 hybrid functional, we find up to 65% and 39% reductions in the MAE, respectively.

  11. Accurate electronic and chemical properties of 3d transition metal oxides using a calculated linear response U and a DFT + U(V) method

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhongnan; Kitchin, John R.; Joshi, Yogesh V.; Raman, Sumathy

    2015-04-14

    We validate the usage of the calculated, linear response Hubbard U for evaluating accurate electronic and chemical properties of bulk 3d transition metal oxides. We find calculated values of U lead to improved band gaps. For the evaluation of accurate reaction energies, we first identify and eliminate contributions to the reaction energies of bulk systems due only to changes in U and construct a thermodynamic cycle that references the total energies of unique U systems to a common point using a DFT + U(V ) method, which we recast from a recently introduced DFT + U(R) method for molecular systems. We then introduce a semi-empirical method based on weighted DFT/DFT + U cohesive energies to calculate bulk oxidation energies of transition metal oxides using density functional theory and linear response calculated U values. We validate this method by calculating 14 reactions energies involving V, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co oxides. We find up to an 85% reduction of the mean average error (MAE) compared to energies calculated with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional. When our method is compared with DFT + U with empirically derived U values and the HSE06 hybrid functional, we find up to 65% and 39% reductions in the MAE, respectively.

  12. Experimental and Quantum-Chemical Study of Electronically Excited States of Protolytic Isovanillin Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vusovich, O. V.; Tchaikovskaya, O. N.; Sokolova, I. V.; Vasil'eva, N. Yu.

    2014-05-01

    Methods of electronic spectroscopy and quantum chemistry are used to compare protolytic vanillin and isovanillin species. Three protolytic species: anion, cation, and neutral are distinguished in the ground state of the examined molecules. Vanillin and isovanillin in the ground state in water possess identical spectral characteristics: line positions and intensities in the absorption spectra coincide. Minima of the electrostatic potential demonstrate that the deepest isomer minimum is observed on the carbonyl oxygen atom. However, investigations of the fluorescence spectra show that the radiative properties of isomers differ. An analysis of results of quantum-chemical calculations demonstrate that the long-wavelength ππ* transition in the vanillin absorption spectra is formed due to electron charge transfer from the phenol part of the molecule to oxygen atoms of the methoxy and carbonyl groups, and in the isovanillin absorption spectra, it is formed only on the oxygen atom of the methoxy group. The presence of hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in the structure of the examined molecules leads to the fact that isovanillin in the ground S0 state, the same as vanillin, possesses acidic properties, whereas in the excited S1 state, they possess basic properties. A comparison of the рKа values of aqueous solutions demonstrates that vanillin possesses stronger acidic and basic properties in comparison with isovanillin.

  13. Electronically excited states of membrane fluorescent probe 4-dimethylaminochalcone. Results of quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Alexey N; Gularyan, Samvel K; Polyak, Boris M; Sakovich, Ruslan A; Dobretsov, Gennady E; Sarkisov, Oleg M

    2011-05-28

    Quantum-chemical calculations of ground and excited states for membrane fluorescent probe 4-dimethylaminochalcone (DMAC) in vacuum were performed. Optimized geometries and dipole moments for lowest-lying singlet and triplet states were obtained. The nature of these electronic transitions and the relaxation path in the excited states were determined; changes in geometry and charge distribution were assessed. It was shown that in vacuum the lowest existed level is of (n, π*) nature, and the closest to it is the level of (π, π*) nature; the energy gap between them is narrow. This led to an effective (1)(π, π*) →(1)(n, π*) relaxation. After photoexcitation the molecule undergoes significant transformations, including changes in bond orders, pyramidalization angle of the dimethylamino group, and planarity of the molecule. Its dipole moment rises from 5.5 Debye in the ground state to 17.1 Debye in the (1)(π, π*) state, and then falls to 2 Debye in the (1)(n, π*) state. The excited (1)(n, π*) state is a short living state; it has a high probability of intersystem crossing into the (3)(π, π*) triplet state. This relaxation path explains the low quantum yield of DMAC fluorescence in non-polar media. It is possible that (3)(π, π*) is responsible for observed DMAC phosphorescence.

  14. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding in myricetin and myricitrin. Quantum chemical calculations and vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojta, Danijela; Dominković, Katarina; Miljanić, Snežana; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2017-03-01

    The molecular structures of myricetin (3,3‧,4‧,5,5‧,7-hexahydroxyflavone; MCE) and myricitrin (myricetin 3-O-rhamnoside; MCI) are investigated by quantum chemical calculations (B3LYP/6-311G**). Two preferred molecular rotamers of MCI are predicted, corresponding to different conformations of the O-rhamnoside subunit. The rotamers are characterized by different hydrogen bonded cross-links between the hydroxy groups of the rhamnoside substituent and the parent MCE moiety. The predicted OH stretching frequencies are compared with vibrational spectra of MCE and MCI recorded for the sake of this investigation (IR and Raman). In addition, a reassignment of the Cdbnd O stretching bands is suggested.

  15. DFT quantum chemical studies of (E)-4-Bromo- N-(2-chlorobenzylidene)-aniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evecen, Meryem; Tanak, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    The molecular geometry and electronic properties of the Schiff base compound (E)-4-Bromo- N-(2-chlorobenzylidene)-aniline in the ground state have been investigated using the density functional theory method (B3LYP) with 6-31G(d) basis set. Besides, important nonlinear properties such as the electric dipole moment ( μ), polarizability ( α) and the first hyperpolarizability ( β) values of the compound were computed using B3LYP quantum chemical calculation. The first hyperpolarizability of the molecule shows that this compound can be a good candidate as nonlinear optical material. The atomic charges and frontier molecular orbital energies were also performed. In addition to that, the molecular electrostatic potential has been mapped primarily and the intramolecular contacts have been interpreted using natural bond orbital analysis.

  16. Robust large-gap quantum spin Hall insulators in chemically decorated arsenene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongchao; Chen, Li; Shi, Changmin; Wang, Xiaoli; Cui, Guangliang; Zhang, Pinhua; Chen, Yeqing

    2016-03-01

    Based on first-principles calculations, we propose one new category of two-dimensional topological insulators (2D TIs) in chemically functionalized (-CH3 and -OH) arsenene films. The results show that the surface decorated arsenene (AsCH3 and AsOH) films are intrinsic 2D TIs with sizeable bulk gap. The bulk energy gaps are 0.184 eV, and 0.304 eV in AsCH3 and AsOH films, respectively. Such large bulk gaps make them suitable to realize quantum spin Hall effect in an experimentally accessible temperature regime. Topologically helical edge states in these systems are desirable for dissipationless transport. Moreover, we find that the topological properties in these systems are robust against mechanical deformation by exerting biaxial strain. These novel 2D TIs with large bulk gaps are potential candidate in future electronic devices with ultralow dissipation.

  17. Semiempirical Quantum Chemical Calculations Accelerated on a Hybrid Multicore CPU-GPU Computing Platform.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xin; Koslowski, Axel; Thiel, Walter

    2012-07-10

    In this work, we demonstrate that semiempirical quantum chemical calculations can be accelerated significantly by leveraging the graphics processing unit (GPU) as a coprocessor on a hybrid multicore CPU-GPU computing platform. Semiempirical calculations using the MNDO, AM1, PM3, OM1, OM2, and OM3 model Hamiltonians were systematically profiled for three types of test systems (fullerenes, water clusters, and solvated crambin) to identify the most time-consuming sections of the code. The corresponding routines were ported to the GPU and optimized employing both existing library functions and a GPU kernel that carries out a sequence of noniterative Jacobi transformations during pseudodiagonalization. The overall computation times for single-point energy calculations and geometry optimizations of large molecules were reduced by one order of magnitude for all methods, as compared to runs on a single CPU core.

  18. A quantum chemical study on hydrogen radical reactions with methane and silane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kota; Kojima, Kuniharu; Kawasaki, Masashi; Matsuzaki, Yoshio; Hirano, Tsuneo; Nakano, Masatake; Koinuma, Hideomi

    1989-03-01

    A quantum chemical study on the reaction of CH4 , CF4 , SiH4 , and SiF4 with a hydrogen radical is performed on the basis of an ab initio molecular orbital calculation to predict the photochemical reactivity of methane, silane, and their analogues. The transition state geometry of the reactions is determined by employing a 3-21G basis set. The total energies of reactant molecules at the initial, transition, and final states are calculated by employing a 6-31G** basis set. The exponential parts of the rate constants of these reactions determined from these energies on the basis of the transition state theory are in good agreement with the experimentally obtained relative rates of the reaction. The present calculation was consistent with the experimental results of photochemical reactions for methane and silane derivatives.

  19. Ultrasonic photoacoustic spectroscopy of trace hazardous chemicals using quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Deepak; Ghai, Devinder Pal; Soni, R. K.

    2016-12-01

    We report an ultrasonic sensor based on open-cell photoacoustic spectroscopy method for the detection of explosive agents in traces. Experimentally, we recorded photoacoustic spectra of traces of hazardous explosives and molecules. Tunable mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers in the wavelength range 7.0-8.8 μm lying in the molecular fingerprint region are used as optical source. Samples of Pentaerylthirol Tetranitrate (PETN), Tetranitro-triazacyclohexane (RDX), Dinitrotoluene, p-Nitrobenzoic acid and other chemicals like Ibuprofen having quantity 1.0 mg were detected using a custom made photoacoustic cells in both open and closed configurations. The explosive traces were swiped using paper from contaminated surface and detected. Finite element mesh based simulation of photoacoustic cell is carried out for optimization of geometry at ultrasonic frequency (40 kHz). A point sensor based on above approach will be very effective for forensic applications and suspicious material screening.

  20. Quantum chemical studies of Li{sup +} cation binding to polylalkyloxides.

    SciTech Connect

    Redfern, P. C.; Curtiss, L. A.

    2002-08-22

    A quantum chemical study of the binding of Li+ cation to polyalkyloxides has been carried out. The lithium cation interaction with three polyalkyloxides (polyethylene oxide (PEO), polytrimethylene oxide (PTMO), and polypropylene oxide (PPO)) has been investigated using ab initio molecular orbital theory at the HF/6-31G* level with molecular models for the polymers. Coordination by one to six oxygens was considered. In addition, higher level calculations were carried out using G3(MP2) theory for coordination of Li+ by one oxygen. For coordination of lithium by one oxygen, the binding energy ordering is PTMO>PPO>PEO, with PTMO having the largest lithium cation affinity. The same ordering is found for larger coordination numbers with the exception of coordination by six oxygens, where the ordering changes due to the steric interactions.

  1. Rotational isomers, NBO and spectral analyses of N-(2-hydroxyethyl) phthalimide based on quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi, A.; Balachandran, V.

    2013-02-01

    FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of N-(2-hydroxyethyl)phthalimide (NHEP) have been recorded and analyzed. The stable isomer of NHEP is determined. The optimization geometry, intermolecular hydrogen bonding, and harmonic vibrational wavenumber of NHEP have been investigated with the help of B3LYP scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) method. The infrared and Raman spectra were predicted theoretically from the calculated intensities. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis indicates the presence of Cdbnd O⋯H in the molecule. The calculated HOMO and LUMO are important in determining such properties as molecular reactivity. Information about the size, shape, charge density distribution and site of chemical reactivity of the molecule has been obtained by mapping electron density isosurface with electrostatic potential (ESP).

  2. Quantum chemical study on the population of the lowest triplet state of psoralen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano-Pérez, Juan José; Merchán, Manuela; Serrano-Andrés, Luis

    2007-01-01

    The efficient population of the low-lying triplet ππ * state of psoralen is studied with the quantum chemical CASPT2 method. Minima, singlet-triplet crossings, conical intersections, and reaction paths on the low-lying singlet and triplet states hypersurfaces of the system have been computed together with electronic energy gaps and spin-orbit coupling terms. A mechanism is proposed, favorable in the gas phase, for efficient deactivation of the initially populated singlet excited ππ * state, starting with an intersystem crossing with an nπ * triplet state and evolving via a conical intersection toward the final lowest-lying ππ * triplet state, protagonist of the reactivity of psoralen.

  3. Structural and quantum chemical analysis of exciton coupling in homo- and heteroaggregate stacks of merocyanines

    PubMed Central

    Bialas, David; Zitzler-Kunkel, André; Kirchner, Eva; Schmidt, David; Würthner, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Exciton coupling is of fundamental importance and determines functional properties of organic dyes in (opto-)electronic and photovoltaic devices. Here we show that strong exciton coupling is not limited to the situation of equal chromophores as often assumed. Quadruple dye stacks were obtained from two bis(merocyanine) dyes with same or different chromophores, respectively, which dimerize in less-polar solvents resulting in the respective homo- and heteroaggregates. The structures of the quadruple dye stacks were assigned by NMR techniques and unambiguously confirmed by single-crystal X-ray analysis. The heteroaggregate stack formed from the bis(merocyanine) bearing two different chromophores exhibits remarkably different ultraviolet/vis absorption bands compared with those of the homoaggregate of the bis(merocyanine) comprising two identical chromophores. Quantum chemical analysis based on an extension of Kasha's exciton theory appropriately describes the absorption properties of both types of stacks revealing strong exciton coupling also between different chromophores within the heteroaggregate. PMID:27680284

  4. Structural and quantum chemical analysis of exciton coupling in homo- and heteroaggregate stacks of merocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, David; Zitzler-Kunkel, André; Kirchner, Eva; Schmidt, David; Würthner, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Exciton coupling is of fundamental importance and determines functional properties of organic dyes in (opto-)electronic and photovoltaic devices. Here we show that strong exciton coupling is not limited to the situation of equal chromophores as often assumed. Quadruple dye stacks were obtained from two bis(merocyanine) dyes with same or different chromophores, respectively, which dimerize in less-polar solvents resulting in the respective homo- and heteroaggregates. The structures of the quadruple dye stacks were assigned by NMR techniques and unambiguously confirmed by single-crystal X-ray analysis. The heteroaggregate stack formed from the bis(merocyanine) bearing two different chromophores exhibits remarkably different ultraviolet/vis absorption bands compared with those of the homoaggregate of the bis(merocyanine) comprising two identical chromophores. Quantum chemical analysis based on an extension of Kasha's exciton theory appropriately describes the absorption properties of both types of stacks revealing strong exciton coupling also between different chromophores within the heteroaggregate.

  5. Thermochemistry of dihalogen-substituted benzenes: data evaluation using experimental and quantum chemical methods.

    PubMed

    Verevkin, Sergey P; Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Varfolomeev, Mikhail A; Solomonov, Boris N; Zherikova, Kseniya V; Melkhanova, Svetlana V

    2014-12-11

    Temperature dependence of vapor pressures for 12 dihalogen-substituted benzenes (halogen = F, Cl, Br, I) was studied by the transpiration method, and molar vaporization or sublimation enthalpies were derived. These data together with results available in the literature were collected and checked for internal consistency using structure-property correlations. Gas-phase enthalpies of formation of dihalogen-substituted benzenes were calculated by using quantum-chemical methods. Evaluated vaporization enthalpies in combination with gas-phase enthalpies of formation were used for estimation liquid-phase enthalpies of formation of dihalogen-substituted benzenes. Pairwise interactions of halogens on the benzene ring were derived and used for development of simple group additivity procedures for estimation of vaporization enthalpies, gas-phase, and liquid-phase enthalpies of formation of dihalogen-substituted benzenes.

  6. Quantum degenerate Bose-Fermi mixture of chemically different atomic species with widely tunable interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jee Woo; Wu, Cheng-Hsun; Santiago, Ibon; Tiecke, Tobias; Will, Sebastian; Ahmadi, Peyman; Zwierlein, Martin

    2012-06-01

    We have created a quantum degenerate Bose-Fermi mixture of ^23Na and ^40K with widely tunable interactions via broad interspecies Feshbach resonances. Over thirty Feshbach resonances between ^23Na and ^40K were identified, including p-wave multiplet resonances. The large and negative triplet background scattering length between ^23Na and ^40K causes a sharp enhancement of the fermion density in the presence of a Bose condensate. As explained via the asymptotic bound-state model (ABM), this strong background scattering leads to wide Feshbach resonances observed at low magnetic fields. Our work opens up the prospect to create chemically stable, fermionic ground state molecules of ^23Na--^40K where strong, long-range dipolar interactions would set the dominant energy scale.

  7. Quantum degenerate Bose-Fermi mixture of chemically different atomic species with widely tunable interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jee Woo; Wu, Cheng-Hsun; Santiago, Ibon; Tiecke, Tobias; Ahmadi, Peyman; Zwierlein, Martin

    2012-02-01

    We have created a quantum degenerate Bose-Fermi mixture of 23Na and 40K with widely tunable interactions via broad interspecies Feshbach resonances. Twenty Feshbach resonances between 23Na and 40K were identified. The large and negative triplet background scattering length between 23Na and 40K causes a sharp enhancement of the fermion density in the presence of a Bose condensate. As explained via the asymptotic bound-state model (ABM), this strong background scattering leads to a series of wide Feshbach resonances observed at low magnetic fields. Our work opens up the prospect to create chemically stable, fermionic ground state molecules of 23Na-40K where strong, long-range dipolar interactions will set the dominant energy scale.

  8. A quantum chemical perspective on (6-4) photolesion repair by photolyases.

    PubMed

    Dreuw, Andreas; Faraji, Shirin

    2013-12-14

    (6-4)-Photolyases are fascinating enzymes which repair (6-4)-DNA photolesions utilizing light themselves. It is well known that upon initial photo-excitation of an antenna pigment an electron is transferred from an adjacent FADH(-) cofactor to the photolesion initiating repair, i.e. restoration of the original undamaged DNA bases. Concerning the molecular details of this amazing repair mechanism, the early steps of energy transfer and catalytic electron generation are well understood, the terminal repair mechanism, however, is still a matter of ongoing debate. In this perspective article, recent results of quantum chemical investigations are presented, and their meaning for the repair mechanism under natural conditions is outlined. Consequences of natural light conditions, temperature and thermal equilibration are highlighted when issues like the initial protonation state of the relevant histidines and the lesion, or the direction of electron transfer are discussed.

  9. Degradation of Perfluorinated Ether Lubricants on Pure Aluminum Surfaces: Semiempirical Quantum Chemical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaby, Scott M.; Ewing, David W.; Zehe, Michael J.

    1997-01-01

    The AM1 semiempirical quantum chemical method was used to model the interaction of perfluoroethers with aluminum surfaces. Perfluorodimethoxymethane and perfluorodimethyl ether were studied interacting with aluminum surfaces, which were modeled by a five-atom cluster and a nine-atom cluster. Interactions were studied for edge (high index) sites and top (low index) sites of the clusters. Both dissociative binding and nondissociative binding were found, with dissociative binding being stronger. The two different ethers bound and dissociated on the clusters in different ways: perfluorodimethoxymethane through its oxygen atoms, but perfluorodimethyl ether through its fluorine atoms. The acetal linkage of perfluorodimeth-oxymethane was the key structural feature of this molecule in its binding and dissociation on the aluminum surface models. The high-index sites of the clusters caused the dissociation of both ethers. These results are consistent with the experimental observation that perfluorinated ethers decompose in contact with sputtered aluminum surfaces.

  10. Carbamate stabilities of sterically hindered amines from quantum chemical methods: relevance for CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Gangarapu, Satesh; Marcelis, Antonius T M; Zuilhof, Han

    2013-12-02

    The influence of electronic and steric effects on the stabilities of carbamates formed from the reaction of CO2 with a wide range of alkanolamines was investigated by quantum chemical methods. For the calculations, B3LYP, M11-L, MP2, and spin-component-scaled MP2 (SCS-MP2) methods were used, coupled with SMD and SM8 solvation models. A reduction in carbamate stability leads to an increased CO2 absorption capacity of the amine and a reduction of the energy required for solvent regeneration. Important factors for the reduction of the carbamate stability were an increase in steric hindrance around the nitrogen atom, charge on the N atom and intramolecular hydrogen bond strength. The present study indicates that secondary ethanolamines with sterically hindering groups near the N atom show significant potential as candidates for industrial CO2-capture solvents.

  11. Low temperature regulated growth of PbS quantum dots by wet chemical method

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Hitanshu Barman, P. B.; Singh, Ragini Raj; Bind, Umesh Chandra

    2015-08-28

    Narrow size distribution with regulated synthesis of lead sulfide (PbS) quantum dots (QDs) was achieved through wet chemical method. Different concentrations of 2-mercaptoethanol (capping agent) were used for tailoring the QDs size. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the QDs have mean diameters between 6 to 15 nm. The optical absorption spectra were compared to the predictions of a theoretical model for the electronic structure. The theory agrees well with experiment for QDs larger than 7 nm, but for smaller dots there is some deviation from the theoretical predictions. Consequently, the produced particles are having monodispersity, good water solubility, stability and may be good arguments to be biologically compatible due to the use of 2-mercaptoethanol.

  12. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Quantum chemical modelling of electron polarons and excitons in ABO3 perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotomin, E. A.; Eglitis, R. I.; Borstel, G.

    2000-09-01

    Quantum chemical calculations using the intermediate neglect of the differential overlap (INDO) method, combined with the large unit cell periodic model argue for an existence of the self-trapped electrons in KNbO3 and KTaO3 perovskite crystals. An electron in the ground state occupies predominantly t2g orbital of a Nb4+ ion. Its orbital degeneracy is lifted by a combination of the breathing and Jahn-Teller modes where four nearest equatorial O atoms are displaced outwards and two oxygens shift inwards along the z axis. Triplet exciton is shown to be in a good approximation of a pair of nearest Jahn-Teller electron and hole polarons (a bipolaron) which is very likely responsible for the `green' luminescence observed in these crystals.

  13. III-nitride quantum cascade detector grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yu Huang, Tzu-Yung; Badami, Pranav; Gmachl, Claire; Bhat, Rajaram; Zah, Chung-En

    2014-11-03

    Quantum cascade (QC) detectors in the GaN/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N material system grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition are designed, fabricated, and characterized. Only two material compositions, i.e., GaN as wells and Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N as barriers are used in the active layers. The QC detectors operates around 4 μm, with a peak responsivity of up to ∼100 μA/W and a detectivity of up to 10{sup 8} Jones at the background limited infrared performance temperature around 140 K.

  14. Dislocation analysis of InGaN/GaN quantum dots grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Di; Wang, Lai; Hao, Zhi-Biao; Luo, Yi; Sun, Changzheng; Han, Yanjun; Xiong, Bing; Wang, Jian; Li, Hongtao

    2016-11-01

    The dislocations in InGaN/GaN quantum dots grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition were studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy combining the Fourier filtering process. The misfit dislocations were observed in uncapped InGaN/GaN quantum dots. However, for the capped InGaN/GaN quantum dots, the GaN capping layer was found to suppress the generation of misfit dislocations and hence hindered the strain relaxation. Therefore, an overgrowth InGaN layer was used to relieve the strain in InGaN quantum dots and misfit dislocations were correspondingly found in these samples. In addition, defects were observed in low temperature GaN layers which suggested the existence of stacking faults.

  15. Chemical Potential for the Interacting Classical Gas and the Ideal Quantum Gas Obeying a Generalized Exclusion Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevilla, F. J.; Olivares-Quiroz, L.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we address the concept of the chemical potential [mu] in classical and quantum gases towards the calculation of the equation of state [mu] = [mu](n, T) where n is the particle density and "T" the absolute temperature using the methods of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Two cases seldom discussed in elementary textbooks are…

  16. High-School Students' Conceptual Difficulties and Attempts at Conceptual Change: The Case of Basic Quantum Chemical Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaparlis, Georgios; Papaphotis, Georgios

    2009-01-01

    This study tested for deep understanding and critical thinking about basic quantum chemical concepts taught at 12th grade (age 17-18). Our aim was to achieve conceptual change in students. A quantitative study was conducted first (n = 125), and following this 23 selected students took part in semi-structured interviews either individually or in…

  17. Use of external cavity quantum cascade laser compliance voltage in real-time trace gas sensing of multiple chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Kriesel, Jason M.

    2015-02-08

    We describe a prototype trace gas sensor designed for real-time detection of multiple chemicals. The sensor uses an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) swept over its tuning range of 940-1075 cm-1 (9.30-10.7 µm) at a 10 Hz repetition rate.

  18. Chemical processing of three-dimensional graphene networks on transparent conducting electrodes for depleted-heterojunction quantum dot solar cells.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Mahdi; Simchi, Abdolreza; Fan, Zhiyong; Aashuri, Hossein

    2016-01-07

    We present a novel chemical procedure to prepare three-dimensional graphene networks (3DGNs) as a transparent conductive film to enhance the photovoltaic performance of PbS quantum-dot (QD) solar cells. It is shown that 3DGN electrodes enhance electron extraction, yielding a 30% improvement in performance compared with the conventional device.

  19. Biochemical characterization of the castor bean ent-kaurene synthase(-like) family supports quantum chemical view of diterpene cyclization

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Alana J.; Hershey, David M.; Chesnut, Taylor; Xu, Meimei; Peters, Reuben J.

    2014-01-01

    It has become apparent that plants have extensively diversified their arsenal of labdane-related diterpenoids (LRDs), in part via gene duplication and neo-functionalization of the ancestral ent-kaurene synthase (KS) required for gibberellin metabolism. For example, castor bean (Ricinus communis) was previously shown to produce an interesting set of biosynthetically related diterpenes, specifically ent-sandracopimaradiene, ent-beyerene, and ent-trachylobane, in addition to ent-kaurene, using four separate diterpene synthases, albeit these remain unidentified. Notably, despite mechanistic similarity of the underlying reaction to that catalyzed by KSs, ent-beyerene and ent-trachylobane synthases have not yet been identified. Given our interest in LRD biosynthesis, and the recent availability of the castor bean genome sequence, we applied a synthetic biology approach to biochemically characterize the four KS(-like) enzymes [KS(L)s] found in Ricinus communis [i.e., the RcKS(L)s]. In particular, using bacteria engineered to produce the relevant ent-copalyl diphosphate precursor and synthetic genes based on the predicted RcKS(L)s, although this ultimately required correction of a “splicing” error in one of the predicted genes, highlighting the dependence of such a synthetic biology approach on accurate gene sequences. Nevertheless, we can assign each of the four RcKS(L)s to one of the previously observed diterpene synthase activities, providing access to functionally novel enzymes. Intriguingly, the product distribution of the RcKS(L)s seems to support the distinct diterpene synthase reaction mechanism proposed by quantum chemical calculations, rather than the classically proposed pathway. PMID:24810014

  20. Quantum-chemical study of interactions of trans-resveratrol with guanine-thymine dinucleotide and DNA-nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Mikulski, Damian; Szeląg, Małgorzata; Molski, Marcin

    2011-12-01

    Trans-resveratrol, a natural phytoalexin present in red wine and grapes, has gained considerable attention because of its antiproliferative, chemopreventive and proapoptotic activity against human cancer cells. The accurate quantum-chemical computations based on the density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation method (MP2) have been performed for the first time to study interactions of trans-resveratrol with guanine-thymine dinucleotide and DNA-derived nitrogenous bases: adenine, guanine, cytosine and thymine in vacuum and water medium. This compound is found to show high affinity to nitrogenous bases and guanine-thymine dinucleotide. The electrostatic interactions from intermolecular hydrogen bonding increase the stability of complexes studied. In particular, significantly strong hydrogen bonds between 4'-H atom of trans-resveratrol and imidazole nitrogen as well as carbonyl oxygen atoms of nucleobases studied stabilize these systems. The stabilization energies computed reveal that the negatively charged trans-resveratrol-dinucleotide complex is more energetically stable in water medium than in vacuum. MP2 method gives more reliable and significantly high values of stabilization energy of trans-resveratrol-dinucleotide, trans-resveratrol-guanine and trans-resveratrol-thymine complexes than B3LYP exchange-correlation functional because it takes into account London dispersion energy. According to the results, in the presence of trans-resveratrol the 3'-5' phosphodiester bond in dinucleotide can be cleaved and the proton from 4'-OH group of trans-resveratrol migrates to the 3'-O atom of dinucleotide. It is concluded that trans-resveratrol is able to break the DNA strand. Hence, the findings obtained help understand antiproliferative and anticancer properties of this polyphenol.

  1. Biochemical characterization of the castor bean ent-kaurene synthase(-like) family supports quantum chemical view of diterpene cyclization.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alana J; Hershey, David M; Chesnut, Taylor; Xu, Meimei; Peters, Reuben J

    2014-07-01

    It has become apparent that plants have extensively diversified their arsenal of labdane-related diterpenoids (LRDs), in part via gene duplication and neo-functionalization of the ancestral ent-kaurene synthase (KS) required for gibberellin metabolism. For example, castor bean (Ricinus communis) was previously shown to produce an interesting set of biosynthetically related diterpenes, specifically ent-sandracopimaradiene, ent-beyerene, and ent-trachylobane, in addition to ent-kaurene, using four separate diterpene synthases, albeit these remain unidentified. Notably, despite mechanistic similarity of the underlying reaction to that catalyzed by KSs, ent-beyerene and ent-trachylobane synthases have not yet been identified. Given our interest in LRD biosynthesis, and the recent availability of the castor bean genome sequence, a synthetic biology approach was applied to biochemically characterize the four KS(-like) enzymes [KS(L)s] found in Ricinus communis [i.e., the RcKS(L)s]. In particular, using bacteria engineered to produce the relevant ent-copalyl diphosphate precursor and synthetic genes based on the predicted RcKS(L)s, although this ultimately required correction of a "splicing" error in one of the predicted genes, highlighting the dependence of such a synthetic biology approach on accurate gene sequences. Nevertheless, it is possible to assign each of the four RcKS(L)s to one of the previously observed diterpene synthase activities, providing access to functionally enzymes. Intriguingly, the product distribution of the RcKS(L)s seems to support the distinct diterpene synthase reaction mechanism proposed by quantum chemical calculations, rather than the classically proposed pathway.

  2. Adsorption energies of H and H2: a quantum-chemical study1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sil, Milan; Gorai, Prasanta; Das, Ankan; Sahu, Dipen; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2017-02-01

    The chemical composition of interstellar grain mantle is mostly dependent on adsorption energies of the surface species. Since hydrogen is widespread either in atomic or in molecular form, our aim in this work is to review (by quantum chemical calculations) the variation of the adsorption energies of H and H2 depending on the nature of the adsorbents. Choice of absorbents was based on relative abundances of interstellar materials. Since carbonaceous and silicate grains are very abundant, we used them as our absorbents. To save computational time, benzene (smallest structure sample of PAHs) is employed as carbonaceous material and for silicate grain, simple cluster of silicon dioxide (silica) (SiO2)3 is used. Around dense cloud regions, water is the major constituent of a grain mantle, therefore, usage of binding energies with bare grains is immaterial. To mimic the water as the adsorbents, we use a water-cluster ((H2O)6). We found that, for all types of adsorbents considered here, binding energies of H are always lower than those of H2, whereas, some of the experimental values are just the other way around. Assuming a steady state solution to the rate equation method, we also present the H2 formation efficiency window in various cases. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Low-Energy Interactions related to Atmospheric and Extreme Conditions", edited by S. Ptasinska, M. Smialek-Telega, A. Milosavljevic and B. Sivaraman.

  3. Chemically modulated graphene quantum dot for tuning the photoluminescence as novel sensory probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Eunhee; Hwang, Hee Min; Shin, Yonghun; Yoon, Yeoheung; Lee, Hanleem; Yang, Junghee; Bak, Sora; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2016-12-01

    A band gap tuning of environmental-friendly graphene quantum dot (GQD) becomes a keen interest for novel applications such as photoluminescence (PL) sensor. Here, for tuning the band gap of GQD, a hexafluorohydroxypropanyl benzene (HFHPB) group acted as a receptor of a chemical warfare agent was chemically attached on the GQD via the diazonium coupling reaction of HFHPB diazonium salt, providing new HFHPB-GQD material. With a help of the electron withdrawing HFHPB group, the energy band gap of the HFHPB-GQD was widened and its PL decay life time decreased. As designed, after addition of dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP), the PL intensity of HFHPB-GQD sensor sharply increased up to approximately 200% through a hydrogen bond with DMMP. The fast response and short recovery time was proven by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) analysis. This HFHPB-GQD sensor shows highly sensitive to DMMP in comparison with GQD sensor without HFHPB and graphene. In addition, the HFHPB-GQD sensor showed high selectivity only to the phosphonate functional group among many other analytes and also stable enough for real device applications. Thus, the tuning of the band gap of the photoluminescent GQDs may open up new promising strategies for the molecular detection of target substrates.

  4. Spectroscopic studies and quantum chemical investigations of (3,4-dimethoxybenzylidene) propanedinitrile.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ujval; Kumar, Vinay; Singh, Vivek K; Kant, Rajni; Khajuria, Yugal

    2015-04-05

    The Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Ultra-Violet Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy and Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis of (3,4-dimethoxybenzylidene) propanedinitrile have been carried out and investigated using quantum chemical calculations. The molecular geometry, harmonic vibrational frequencies, Mulliken charges, natural atomic charges and thermodynamic properties in the ground state have been investigated by using Hartree Fock Theory (HF) and Density Functional Theory (DFT) using B3LYP functional with 6-311G(d,p) basis set. Both HF and DFT methods yield good agreement with the experimental data. Vibrational modes are assigned with the help of Vibrational Energy Distribution Analysis (VEDA) program. UV-Visible spectrum was recorded in the spectral range of 190-800nm and the results are compared with the calculated values using TD-DFT approach. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions, charge delocalization have been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The results obtained from the studies of Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital (HOMO) and Lowest Unoccupied Molecular Orbital (LUMO) are used to calculate molecular parameters like ionization potential, electron affinity, global hardness, electron chemical potential and global electrophilicity.

  5. Spectroscopic studies and quantum chemical investigations of (3,4-dimethoxybenzylidene) propanedinitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ujval; Kumar, Vinay; Singh, Vivek K.; Kant, Rajni; Khajuria, Yugal

    2015-04-01

    The Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Ultra-Violet Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy and Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis of (3,4-dimethoxybenzylidene) propanedinitrile have been carried out and investigated using quantum chemical calculations. The molecular geometry, harmonic vibrational frequencies, Mulliken charges, natural atomic charges and thermodynamic properties in the ground state have been investigated by using Hartree Fock Theory (HF) and Density Functional Theory (DFT) using B3LYP functional with 6-311G(d,p) basis set. Both HF and DFT methods yield good agreement with the experimental data. Vibrational modes are assigned with the help of Vibrational Energy Distribution Analysis (VEDA) program. UV-Visible spectrum was recorded in the spectral range of 190-800 nm and the results are compared with the calculated values using TD-DFT approach. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions, charge delocalization have been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The results obtained from the studies of Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital (HOMO) and Lowest Unoccupied Molecular Orbital (LUMO) are used to calculate molecular parameters like ionization potential, electron affinity, global hardness, electron chemical potential and global electrophilicity.

  6. a Quantum Chemical Approach to the Determination of the Spin Distribution Within Large Molecular Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cory, Marshall George, Jr.

    Within the last decade the anticipation of some experimentalists for the ability to ascertain the structure of biologically important chemical systems has been realized. The elucidation of the structure of the photosynthetic reaction center of R. Viridis, including some 13,000 atomic centers, is a prime example, and this structure has led to a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of photosynthesis. Along with this increase in structural knowledge, a concurrent increase in the knowledge of the observable properties of such structures has also occurred. Of particular interest to this work are the magnetic properties of these systems, as revealed by Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The magnetic spectra, ESR, of such systems are quite complex and require some effort to understand, and a need for theoretical aids has been expressed. In many cases the ESR signal is the only structural signature available. This work has explored several quantum chemical methods for determining the isotropic hyperfine splitting (hfs) in such systems as those described above. Several semiempirical Self-Consistent Field (SCF) and post-SCF approaches are explored. Two distinct parameterizations of the Intermediate Neglect of Differential Overlap (INDO) approximation are examined for their ability to produce good reference functions. Both Unrestricted Hartree-Fock (UHF) and Restricted Open-Shell Hartree-Fock (ROHF) SCF wavefunctions are investigated, as well as the Configuration Interaction Single replacement (CIS) wavefunction. The results of applying the most promising method to several of the bacteria chlorophyll ions are reported and compared to those observed experimentally.

  7. Chemically modulated graphene quantum dot for tuning the photoluminescence as novel sensory probe

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Eunhee; Hwang, Hee Min; Shin, Yonghun; Yoon, Yeoheung; Lee, Hanleem; Yang, Junghee; Bak, Sora; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2016-01-01

    A band gap tuning of environmental-friendly graphene quantum dot (GQD) becomes a keen interest for novel applications such as photoluminescence (PL) sensor. Here, for tuning the band gap of GQD, a hexafluorohydroxypropanyl benzene (HFHPB) group acted as a receptor of a chemical warfare agent was chemically attached on the GQD via the diazonium coupling reaction of HFHPB diazonium salt, providing new HFHPB-GQD material. With a help of the electron withdrawing HFHPB group, the energy band gap of the HFHPB-GQD was widened and its PL decay life time decreased. As designed, after addition of dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP), the PL intensity of HFHPB-GQD sensor sharply increased up to approximately 200% through a hydrogen bond with DMMP. The fast response and short recovery time was proven by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) analysis. This HFHPB-GQD sensor shows highly sensitive to DMMP in comparison with GQD sensor without HFHPB and graphene. In addition, the HFHPB-GQD sensor showed high selectivity only to the phosphonate functional group among many other analytes and also stable enough for real device applications. Thus, the tuning of the band gap of the photoluminescent GQDs may open up new promising strategies for the molecular detection of target substrates. PMID:27991584

  8. The Quantum-Kinetic Chemical Reaction Model for Navier-Stokes Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallis, Michael A.; Wagnild, Ross M.; Torczynski, John R.

    2013-11-01

    The Quantum-Kinetic chemical reaction model of Bird is formulated as a non-equilibrium chemical reaction model for Navier-Stokes codes. The model is based solely on thermophysical, molecular-level information and is capable of reproducing measured equilibrium reaction rates without using any experimentally measured reaction-rate information. The model recognizes the principal role of vibrational energy in overcoming the reaction energy threshold. The effect of rotational non-equilibrium is introduced as a perturbation to the effect of vibrational non-equilibrium. Since the model uses only molecular-level properties, it is inherently able to predict reaction rates for arbitrary non-equilibrium conditions. This ability is demonstrated in the context of both Navier-Stokes and DSMC codes. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Synthesis, vibrational and quantum chemical investigations of hydrogen bonded complex betaine dihydrogen selenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, V.; Marchewka, Mariusz K.; Kalaivani, M.

    2012-10-01

    The molecular complex of betaine with selenious acid namely, betaine dihydrogen selenite (C5H13NO5Se, BDHSe) was synthesised by the reaction of betaine and SeO2 in a 1:1:1 solution of isopropanol, methanol and water. Crystals were grown from this solution by cooling to 253 K for few days. The complex was formed without accompanying proton transfer from selenious acid molecule to betaine. The complete vibrational assignments and analysis of BDHSe have been performed by FTIR, FT-Raman and far-infrared spectral studies. More support on the experimental findings was added from the quantum chemical studies performed with DFT (B3LYP) method using 6-311++G∗∗, 6-31G∗∗, cc-pVDZ and 3-21G basis sets. The structural parameters, energies, thermodynamic parameters and the NBO charges of BDHSe were determined by the DFT method. The 1H and 13C isotropic chemical shifts (δ ppm) of BDHSe with respect to TMS were also calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and compared with the experimental data. SHG experiment was carried out using Kurtz-Perry powder technique. The efficiency of second harmonic generation for BDHSe was estimated relatively to KDP: deff = 0.97 deff (KDP).

  10. Atomistic-level non-equilibrium model for chemically reactive systems based on steepest-entropy-ascent quantum thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guanchen; Al-Abbasi, Omar; von Spakovsky, Michael R.

    2014-10-01

    This paper outlines an atomistic-level framework for modeling the non-equilibrium behavior of chemically reactive systems. The framework called steepest- entropy-ascent quantum thermodynamics (SEA-QT) is based on the paradigm of intrinsic quantum thermodynamic (IQT), which is a theory that unifies quantum mechanics and thermodynamics into a single discipline with wide applications to the study of non-equilibrium phenomena at the atomistic level. SEA-QT is a novel approach for describing the state of chemically reactive systems as well as the kinetic and dynamic features of the reaction process without any assumptions of near-equilibrium states or weak-interactions with a reservoir or bath. Entropy generation is the basis of the dissipation which takes place internal to the system and is, thus, the driving force of the chemical reaction(s). The SEA-QT non-equilibrium model is able to provide detailed information during the reaction process, providing a picture of the changes occurring in key thermodynamic properties (e.g., the instantaneous species concentrations, entropy and entropy generation, reaction coordinate, chemical affinities, reaction rate, etc). As an illustration, the SEA-QT framework is applied to an atomistic-level chemically reactive system governed by the reaction mechanism F + H2 leftrightarrow FH + H.

  11. Quantum chemical analysis of reaction paths in chorismate mutase: Conformational effects and electrostatic stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szefczyk, Borys; Claeyssens, Frederik; Mulholland, Adrian J.; Sokalski, W. Andrzej

    We have performed a detailed, quantum chemical, decomposition analysis of the physical nature of key interactions in the model enzyme chorismate mutase (CM), for several active conformations produced by high level combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) modeling. In opposition to our previous study, interactions between selected residues in the active site of CM were analysed along the whole reaction path, for several paths. The interaction energy is calculated up to Møller-Plesset second order level of theory and decomposed into physically meaningful components (electrostatic, exchange, delocalization, and electron correlation). This analysis shows, that the dominant interaction is differential stabilization by Arg90: this residue significantly stabilizes the transition state (TS) relative to the substrate in all the paths studied. Interactions in the active site of CM are dominated by the electrostatic component, whereas other components, for example electron correlation, are constant during reaction. Electrostatic effects alone are found to be responsible for lowering the barrier for reaction at the active site. Analysis of four reaction paths derived from QM/MM modeling shows that differences in the height of the barrier are due to differences in the electrostatic interactions of several weakly interacting residues. The influence of conformational effects, such as hydroxyl group rotation in the chorismate/TS, and the distance between Arg90 and the reacting chorismate, have also been analysed. The results show that specific conformations provide better activation barrier lowering. Even small changes in the conformation, like rotation of the hydroxyl group in chorismate (substrate), can significantly alter the activation barrier.0

  12. Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition in silicon/zinc sulfide quantum confined structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretschneider, Eric Colin

    A comprehensive study of low pressure metal-organic chemical vapor deposition growth of zinc sulfide and silicon has been performed. The parameter space for successful deposition of both materials has been investigated and found to overlap, allowing successful deposition of both zinc sulfide and silicon under similar conditions. Undoped and aluminum doped zinc sulfide and silicon films were grown on both (100) and (111) 4sp° off orientation silicon substrates. Diethyl zinc, hydrogen sulfide, triethyl aluminum and disilane where used as precursor materials. It was found that high quality epitaxial zinc sulfide films could be deposited over the temperature range of 300 to 650sp°C. Growth rate was found to be nearly independent of temperature over this temperature range indicating a mass transfer limited growth mechanism. Aluminum doping yielded low resistivity, n-type material. Key parameters affecting the surface roughness of zinc sulfide films were determined using a fractional factorial design. This method increases the efficiency of data collection and allows easy determination of the magnitude of multi-parameter interactions. The parameters studied included substrate orientation, deposition temperature, precursor concentrations, total hydrogen flow and the push flow ratio of the alkyl and hydride injectors. Silicon growth rates varied from 120 to 9000 A/hour at 450 and 600sp° C respectively. A strong temperature dependence of the growth rate was found indicating a reaction limited step with an activation energy of 153.6 ± 18.0 kJ/mol. This agrees well with the energy barrier of 144.3 ± 19.2 kJ/mol for surface diffusion of hydrogen. Quantum mechanical calculations that take into account the differences in effective masses for electrons and holes in silicon and zinc sulfide indicate that the band gap energy of a silicon quantum well shifts into the visible portion of the spectrum for well widths below 20A. Samples containing single and multiple quantum wells

  13. CRITIC2: A program for real-space analysis of quantum chemical interactions in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero-de-la-Roza, A.; Johnson, Erin R.; Luaña, Víctor

    2014-03-01

    We present CRITIC2, a program for the analysis of quantum-mechanical atomic and molecular interactions in periodic solids. This code, a greatly improved version of the previous CRITIC program (Otero-de-la Roza et al., 2009), can: (i) find critical points of the electron density and related scalar fields such as the electron localization function (ELF), Laplacian, … (ii) integrate atomic properties in the framework of Bader’s Atoms-in-Molecules theory (QTAIM), (iii) visualize non-covalent interactions in crystals using the non-covalent interactions (NCI) index, (iv) generate relevant graphical representations including lines, planes, gradient paths, contour plots, atomic basins, … and (v) perform transformations between file formats describing scalar fields and crystal structures. CRITIC2 can interface with the output produced by a variety of electronic structure programs including WIEN2k, elk, PI, abinit, Quantum ESPRESSO, VASP, Gaussian, and, in general, any other code capable of writing the scalar field under study to a three-dimensional grid. CRITIC2 is parallelized, completely documented (including illustrative test cases) and publicly available under the GNU General Public License. Catalogue identifier: AECB_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECB_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: yes No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 11686949 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 337020731 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 and 90. Computer: Workstations. Operating system: Unix, GNU/Linux. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Shared-memory parallelization can be used for most tasks. Classification: 7.3. Catalogue identifier of previous version: AECB_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 157 Nature of problem: Analysis of quantum-chemical

  14. Molecular determinants for ATP-binding in proteins: a data mining and quantum chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Mao, Lisong; Wang, Yanli; Liu, Yuemin; Hu, Xiche

    2004-02-20

    Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) plays an essential role in all forms of life. Molecular recognition of ATP in proteins is a subject of great importance for understanding enzymatic mechanism and for drug design. We have carried out a large-scale data mining of the Protein Data Bank (PDB) to analyze molecular determinants for recognition of the adenine moiety of ATP by proteins. Non-bonded intermolecular interactions (hydrogen bonding, pi-pi stacking interactions, and cation-pi interactions) between adenine base and surrounding residues in its binding pockets are systematically analyzed for 68 non-redundant, high-resolution crystal structures of adenylate-binding proteins. In addition to confirming the importance of the widely known hydrogen bonding, we found out that cation-pi interactions between adenine base and positively charged residues (Lys and Arg) and pi-pi stacking interactions between adenine base and surrounding aromatic residues (Phe, Tyr, Trp) are also crucial for adenine binding in proteins. On average, there exist 2.7 hydrogen bonding interactions, 1.0 pi-pi stacking interactions, and 0.8 cation-pi interactions in each adenylate-binding protein complex. Furthermore, a high-level quantum chemical analysis was performed to analyze contributions of each of the three forms of intermolecular interactions (i.e. hydrogen bonding, pi-pi stacking interactions, and cation-pi interactions) to the overall binding force of the adenine moiety of ATP in proteins. Intermolecular interaction energies for representative configurations of intermolecular complexes were analyzed using the supermolecular approach at the MP2/6-311 + G* level, which resulted in substantial interaction strengths for all the three forms of intermolecular interactions. This work represents a timely undertaking at a historical moment when a large number of X-ray crystallographic structures of proteins with bound ATP ligands have become available, and when high-level quantum chemical analysis of

  15. Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System Applied QSAR with Quantum Chemical Descriptors for Predicting Radical Scavenging Activities of Carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Jhin, Changho; Hwang, Keum Taek

    2015-01-01

    One of the physiological characteristics of carotenoids is their radical scavenging activity. In this study, the relationship between radical scavenging activities and quantum chemical descriptors of carotenoids was determined. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) applied quantitative structure-activity relationship models (QSAR) were also developed for predicting and comparing radical scavenging activities of carotenoids. Semi-empirical PM6 and PM7 quantum chemical calculations were done by MOPAC. Ionisation energies of neutral and monovalent cationic carotenoids and the product of chemical potentials of neutral and monovalent cationic carotenoids were significantly correlated with the radical scavenging activities, and consequently these descriptors were used as independent variables for the QSAR study. The ANFIS applied QSAR models were developed with two triangular-shaped input membership functions made for each of the independent variables and optimised by a backpropagation method. High prediction efficiencies were achieved by the ANFIS applied QSAR. The R-square values of the developed QSAR models with the variables calculated by PM6 and PM7 methods were 0.921 and 0.902, respectively. The results of this study demonstrated reliabilities of the selected quantum chemical descriptors and the significance of QSAR models.

  16. Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System Applied QSAR with Quantum Chemical Descriptors for Predicting Radical Scavenging Activities of Carotenoids

    PubMed Central

    Jhin, Changho; Hwang, Keum Taek

    2015-01-01

    One of the physiological characteristics of carotenoids is their radical scavenging activity. In this study, the relationship between radical scavenging activities and quantum chemical descriptors of carotenoids was determined. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) applied quantitative structure-activity relationship models (QSAR) were also developed for predicting and comparing radical scavenging activities of carotenoids. Semi-empirical PM6 and PM7 quantum chemical calculations were done by MOPAC. Ionisation energies of neutral and monovalent cationic carotenoids and the product of chemical potentials of neutral and monovalent cationic carotenoids were significantly correlated with the radical scavenging activities, and consequently these descriptors were used as independent variables for the QSAR study. The ANFIS applied QSAR models were developed with two triangular-shaped input membership functions made for each of the independent variables and optimised by a backpropagation method. High prediction efficiencies were achieved by the ANFIS applied QSAR. The R-square values of the developed QSAR models with the variables calculated by PM6 and PM7 methods were 0.921 and 0.902, respectively. The results of this study demonstrated reliabilities of the selected quantum chemical descriptors and the significance of QSAR models. PMID:26474167

  17. Ab initio quantum chemical and kinetic modeling study of the pyrolysis kinetics of pyrrole

    SciTech Connect

    Martoprawiro, M.; Bacskay, G.B.; Mackie, J.C.

    1999-05-20

    The five-membered heterocyclic pyrrole moiety is an important structure in coals and derived tars, and the thermal decomposition reactions of pyrrole are important for production of precursors of the oxides of nitrogen, NO{sub x}, in the combustion of coals. The kinetics of pyrolysis of pyrrole have been investigated theoretically by ab initio quantum chemical techniques and by detailed chemical kinetic modeling of previously reported experimental results. The overall kinetics can be successfully modeled by a 117 step kinetic model that gives good agreement with temperature profiles of major products and also provides an acceptable fit for minor products. The thermochemistry and rate parameters of a number of key reactions have been obtained by ab initio calculations carried out at CASSCF, CASPT2, and G2(MP2) levels of theory. Several reaction pathways were investigated. The major product, HCN, arises principally from a hydrogen migration in pyrrole to form a cyclic carbene with the NH bond intact. Ring scission of this carbene leads to an allenic imine precursor of HCN and propyne. This is the decomposition pathway of lowest energy. Pyrolysis is preceded by the facile tautomerization of pyrrole to 2H-pyrrolenine. The latter can undergo CN fission to form an open chain biradical species, which is the precursor of the butenenitrile isomeric products, cis- and trans-crotononitrile and allyl cyanide. The biradical can also undergo facile H-fission to form cyanoallyl radical, which is an important precursor of acetylene, acetonitrile, and acrylonitrile, H{sub 2} also arises principally from H-fission of the biradical.

  18. Quantum chemical and experimental study of 1,2,4-trihydroxy-para-menthane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottmannová, Lenka; Lukeš, Vladimír; Ilčin, Michal; Fodran, Peter; Herich, Peter; Kožíšek, Jozef; Liptaj, Tibor; Klein, Erik

    2013-10-01

    The conformational analysis of the para-menthane (PM) and 1,2,4-trihydroxy-para-menthane (TPM) is performed using the quantum chemical density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio Møller-Plesset perturbation theory up to the second order (MP2). In TPM, three hydroxyl groups generate eight stereoisomers comparing to the four para-menthane stereoisomers. From the thermodynamics point of view, the most preferred conformations show the chair-shaped configuration of the cyclohexane ring. The obtained energy barriers for the isopropyl group rotation in the chair-shaped stereoisomers are between 35 and 45 kJ mol-1. The crystal structure as well as the solvated TPM stereoisomer isolated from the Tea tree oil, Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden & Betche) Cheel, were investigated experimentally. Isolated stereoisomer corresponds to the most energetically preferred conformation and the calculated structural data agree very well with the results from the X-ray and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. Finally, the influence of the conformation and the presence of the intramolecular hydrogen bonds on the homolytic Osbnd H bond dissociation enthalpies and proton affinities were also discussed with respect to the simple alcohols (methanol, iso-propanol, iso-pentanol, tert-butanol, cyclohexanol) and phenol.

  19. Hydration of lanthanide chloride salts: a quantum chemical and classical molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Beuchat, Cesar; Hagberg, Daniel; Spezia, Riccardo; Gagliardi, Laura

    2010-12-02

    We present the results of a quantum chemical and classical molecular dynamics simulation study of some solutions containing chloride salts of La(3+), Gd(3+), and Er(3+) at various concentrations (from 0.05 to 5 M), with the purpose of understanding their structure and dynamics and analyzing how the coordination varies along the lanthanide series. In the La-Cl case, nine water molecules surround the central La(3+) cation in the first solvation shell, and chloride is present only in the second shell for all solutions but the most concentrated one (5 M). In the Gd(3+) case, the coordination number is ∼8.6 for the two lowest concentrations (0.05 and 0.1 M), and then it decreases rapidly. In the Er(3+) case, the coordination number is 7.4 for the two lowest concentrations (0.05 and 0.1 M), and then it decreases. The counterion Cl(-) is not present in the first solvation shell in the La(3+) case for most of the solutions, but it becomes progressively closer to the central cation in the Gd(3+) and Er(3+) cases, even at low concentrations.

  20. Quantum Chemical Insight into the Interactions and Thermodynamics Present in Choline Chloride Based Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Wagle, Durgesh V; Deakyne, Carol A; Baker, Gary A

    2016-07-14

    We report quantum chemical calculations performed on three popular deep eutectic solvents (DESs) in order to elucidate the molecular interactions, charge transfer interactions, and thermodynamics associated with these systems. The DESs studied comprise 1:2 choline chloride/urea (reline), 1:2 choline chloride/ethylene glycol (ethaline), and 1:1 choline chloride/malonic acid (maloline). The excellent correlation between calculated and experimental vibrational spectra allowed for identification of dominant interactions in the DES systems. The DESs were found to be stabilized by both conventional hydrogen bonds and C-H···O/C-H···π interactions between the components. The hydrogen-bonding network established in the DES is clearly distinct from that which exists within the neat hydrogen-bond donor dimer. Charge decomposition analysis indicates significant charge transfer from choline and chloride to the hydrogen-bond donor with a higher contribution from the cation, and a density of states analysis confirms the direction of the charge transfer. Consequently, the sum of the bond orders of the choline-Cl(-) interactions in the DESs correlates directly with the melting temperatures of the DESs, a correlation that offers insight into the effect of the tuning of the choline-Cl(-) interactions by the hydrogen-bond donors on the physical properties of the DESs. Finally, the differences in the vibrational entropy changes upon DES formation are consistent with the trend in the overall entropy changes upon DES formation.

  1. Functionalized tellurols: synthesis, spectroscopic characterization by photoelectron spectroscopy, and quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Khater, Brahim; Guillemin, Jean-Claude; Bajor, Gábor; Veszprémi, Tamás

    2008-03-03

    Ethene-, cyclopropane-, 3-butene-, and cyclopropanemethanetellurol have been synthesized by reaction of tributyltin hydride with the corresponding ditellurides and characterized by 1H, 13C, and 125Te NMR spectroscopy and high-resolution mass spectrometry. The tellurols of this series, with a gradually increasing distance between the tellurium atom and the unsaturated group, have been studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. Two stable conformations of ethenetellurol and cyclopropanetellurol, five of allyltellurol, and four of cyclopropanemethanetellurol were found. In the photoelectron spectrum of vinyltellurol, the huge split between the first two bands indicates a direct interaction between the tellurium lone electron pair and the double bond. In the allyl derivative, a hyperconjugation effect was found for the most stable conformers. In contrast to the vinyl compounds, no direct interaction between the lone electron pair of X (X = O, S, Se, and Te) and the three-membered ring could be observed in the cyclopropyl derivatives. A hyperconjugation-like effect, which is independent of the relative orientation of the X-H group, is found to increase from S to Te. Thus, the type and extent of the interaction between the TeH group and an unsaturated or cyclopropyl moiety are clarified while the first comparison of interactions between the nonradioactive unsaturated chalcogen derivatives is performed.

  2. Quantum chemical and experimental studies on the structure and vibrational spectra of an alkaloid-Corlumine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Rashmi; Joshi, Bhawani Datt; Srivastava, Anubha; Tandon, Poonam; Jain, Sudha

    2014-01-01

    The study concentrates on an important natural product, phthalide isoquinoline alkaloid Corlumine (COR) [(6R)-6-[(1S)-1,2,3,4-Tetrahydro-6,7-dimethoxy-2-methylisoquinolin-1-yl] furo [3,4-e]-1,3-benzodioxol-8(6H)-one] well known to exhibit spasmolytic and GABA antagonist activity. It was fully characterized by a variety of experimental methods including vibrational spectroscopy (IR and Raman), thermal analysis (DSC), UV and SEM. For a better interpretation and analysis of the results quantum chemical calculations employing DFT were also performed. TD-DFT was employed to elucidate electronic properties for both gaseous and solvent environment using IEF-PCM model. Graphical representation of HOMO and LUMO would provide a valuable insight into the nature of reactivity and some of the structural and physical properties of the title molecule. The structure-activity relationship have been interpreted by mapping electrostatic potential surface (MEP), which is valuable information for the quality control of medicines and drug-receptor interactions. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions, charge delocalisation has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Computation of thermodynamical properties would help to have a deep insight into the molecule for further applications.

  3. Quantum chemical insights in energy dissipation and carotenoid radical cation formation in light harvesting complexes.

    PubMed

    Wormit, Michael; Dreuw, Andreas

    2007-06-21

    Light harvesting complexes (LHCs) have been identified in all photosynthetic organisms. To understand their function in light harvesting and energy dissipation, detailed knowledge about possible excitation energy transfer (EET) and electron transfer (ET) processes in these pigment proteins is of prime importance. This again requires the study of electronically excited states of the involved pigment molecules, in LHCs of chlorophylls and carotenoids. This paper represents a critical review of recent quantum chemical calculations on EET and ET processes between pigment pairs relevant for the major LHCs of green plants (LHC-II) and of purple bacteria (LH2). The theoretical methodology for a meaningful investigation of such processes is described in detail, and benefits and limitations of standard methods are discussed. The current status of excited state calculations on chlorophylls and carotenoids is outlined. It is focused on the possibility of EET and ET in the context of chlorophyll fluorescence quenching in LHC-II and carotenoid radical cation formation in LH2. In the context of non-photochemical quenching of green plants, it is shown that replacement of the carotenoid violaxanthin by zeaxanthin in its binding pocket of LHC-II can not result in efficient quenching. In LH2, our computational results give strong evidence that the S(1) states of the carotenoids are involved in carotenoid cation formation. By comparison of theoretical findings with recent experimental data, a general mechanism for carotenoid radical cation formation is suggested.

  4. Characterization of citrate capped gold nanoparticle-quercetin complex: Experimental and quantum chemical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Rajat; Panigrahi, Swati; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay; Chakraborti, Abhay Sankar

    2013-08-01

    Quercetin and several other bioflavonoids possess antioxidant property. These biomolecules can reduce the diabetic complications, but metabolize very easily in the body. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of a flavonoid may further increase its efficacy. Gold nanoparticle is used by different groups as vehicle for drug delivery, as it is least toxic to human body. Prior to search for the enhanced efficacy, the gold nanoparticle-flavonoid complex should be prepared and well characterized. In this article, we report the interaction of gold nanoparticle with quercetin. The interaction is confirmed by different biophysical techniques, such as Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Circular Dichroism (CD), Fourier-Transform InfraRed (FT-IR) spectroscopy and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) and cross checked by quantum chemical calculations. These studies indicate that gold clusters are covered by citrate groups, which are hydrogen bonded to the quercetin molecules in the complex. We have also provided evidences how capping is important in stabilizing the gold nanoparticle and further enhances its interaction with other molecules, such as drugs. Our finding also suggests that gold nanoparticle-quercetin complex can pass through the membranes of human red blood cells.

  5. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding in 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde: IR spectrum and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosavi-Tekyeh, Zainab; Taherian, Fatemeh; Tayyari, Sayyed Faramarz

    2016-05-01

    The structural parameters, and vibrational frequencies of 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5NSA) were studied by the FT-IR and Raman spectra and the quantum chemical calculations carried out at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory in order to investigate the intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IHB) present in its structure. The strength and nature of IHB in the optimized structure of 5NSA were studied in detail by means of the atoms in molecules (AIM) and the natural bond orbital (NBO) approaches. The results obtained were then compared with the corresponding data for its parent molecule, salicylaldehyde (SA). Comparisons made between the geometrical structures for 5NSA and SA, their OH/OD stretching and out-of-plane bending modes, their enthalpies for the hydrogen bond, and their AIM parameters demonstrated a stronger H-bonding in 5NSA compared with that in SA. The calculated binding enthalpy (ΔHbind) for 5NSA was -10.92 kcal mol-1. The observed νOH and γOH appeared at about 3120 cm-1 and 786 cm-1 respectively. The stretching frequency shift of H-bond formation was 426 cm-1 which is consistent with ΔHbind and the strength of H-bond in 5NSA. The delocalization energies and electron delocalization indices derived by the NBO and AIM approaches indicate that the resonance effects were responsible for the stronger IHB in 5NSA than in SA.

  6. Mass spectrometric and quantum chemical determination of proton water clustering equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likholyot, Alexander; Lemke, Kono H.; Hovey, Jamey K.; Seward, Terry M.

    2007-05-01

    We report on the thermochemistry of proton hydration by water in the gas phase both experimentally using high-pressure mass spectrometry (HPMS) and theoretically using multilevel G3, G3B3, CBS-Q, CBS-QB3, CBS/QCI-APNO as well as density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Gas phase hydration enthalpies and entropies for protonated water cluster equilibria with up to 7 waters (i.e., n ⩽ 7H 3O +·(H 2O) n) were observed and exhibited non-monotonic behavior for successive hydration steps as well as enthalpy and entropy anomalies at higher cluster rank numbers. In particular, there is a significant jump in the stepwise enthalpies and entropies of cluster formation for n varying from 6 to 8. This behavior can be successfully interpreted using cluster geometries obtained from quantum chemical calculations by considering the number of additional hydrogen bonds formed at each hydration step and simultaneous weakening of ion-solvent interaction with increasing cluster size. The measured total hydration energy for the attachment of the first six water molecules around the hydronium ion was found to account for more than 60% of total bulk hydration free energy.

  7. Semiempirical Quantum Mechanical Methods for Noncovalent Interactions for Chemical and Biochemical Applications.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Anders S; Kubař, Tomáš; Cui, Qiang; Elstner, Marcus

    2016-05-11

    Semiempirical (SE) methods can be derived from either Hartree-Fock or density functional theory by applying systematic approximations, leading to efficient computational schemes that are several orders of magnitude faster than ab initio calculations. Such numerical efficiency, in combination with modern computational facilities and linear scaling algorithms, allows application of SE methods to very large molecular systems with extensive conformational sampling. To reliably model the structure, dynamics, and reactivity of biological and other soft matter systems, however, good accuracy for the description of noncovalent interactions is required. In this review, we analyze popular SE approaches in terms of their ability to model noncovalent interactions, especially in the context of describing biomolecules, water solution, and organic materials. We discuss the most significant errors and proposed correction schemes, and we review their performance using standard test sets of molecular systems for quantum chemical methods and several recent applications. The general goal is to highlight both the value and limitations of SE methods and stimulate further developments that allow them to effectively complement ab initio methods in the analysis of complex molecular systems.

  8. Semiempirical Quantum Mechanical Methods for Noncovalent Interactions for Chemical and Biochemical Applications

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Semiempirical (SE) methods can be derived from either Hartree–Fock or density functional theory by applying systematic approximations, leading to efficient computational schemes that are several orders of magnitude faster than ab initio calculations. Such numerical efficiency, in combination with modern computational facilities and linear scaling algorithms, allows application of SE methods to very large molecular systems with extensive conformational sampling. To reliably model the structure, dynamics, and reactivity of biological and other soft matter systems, however, good accuracy for the description of noncovalent interactions is required. In this review, we analyze popular SE approaches in terms of their ability to model noncovalent interactions, especially in the context of describing biomolecules, water solution, and organic materials. We discuss the most significant errors and proposed correction schemes, and we review their performance using standard test sets of molecular systems for quantum chemical methods and several recent applications. The general goal is to highlight both the value and limitations of SE methods and stimulate further developments that allow them to effectively complement ab initio methods in the analysis of complex molecular systems. PMID:27074247

  9. Quantum Chemical Study of the Water Exchange Mechanism of the Americyl(VI) Aqua Ion.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, Alberto; Rotzinger, François P

    2016-11-07

    The water exchange reaction of the americyl(VI) aqua ion was investigated with quantum chemical methods, density functional theory (DFT), and wave function theory (WFT). Associative and dissociative substitution mechanisms were studied, whereby DFT produced inaccurate results for the associative mechanism in contrast to WFT. The Gibbs activation energies (ΔG(‡)) for the dissociative (D) and the associative interchange (Ia) mechanisms, computed with WFT taking into account static and dynamic electron correlation, near-degeneracy, and spin-orbit coupling, are equal within the error limits of the calculations. ΔG(‡) for the water exchange of americyl(VI) via the dissociative mechanism is considerably lower than those for uranyl(VI) and plutonyl(VI) (for which the Ia mechanism is preferred) due to ligand-field effects. On the basis of the present computations, it is not possible to distinguish the Ia from the D mechanism for americyl(VI). In contrast to two other theoretical studies, the dissociative mechanism cannot be ruled out.

  10. Silicon Oxysulfide, OSiS: Rotational Spectrum, Quantum-Chemical Calculations, and Equilibrium Structure.

    PubMed

    Thorwirth, Sven; Mück, Leonie Anna; Gauss, Jürgen; Tamassia, Filippo; Lattanzi, Valerio; McCarthy, Michael C

    2011-06-02

    Silicon oxysulfide, OSiS, and seven of its minor isotopic species have been characterized for the first time in the gas phase at high spectral resolution by means of Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. The equilibrium structure of OSiS has been determined from the experimental data using calculated vibration-rotation interaction constants. The structural parameters (rO-Si = 1.5064 Å and rSi-S = 1.9133 Å) are in very good agreement with values from high-level quantum chemical calculations using coupled-cluster techniques together with sophisticated additivity and extrapolation schemes. The bond distances in OSiS are very short in comparison with those in SiO and SiS. This unexpected finding is explained by the partial charges calculated for OSiS via a natural population analysis. The results suggest that electrostatic effects rather than multiple bonding are the key factors in determining bonding in this triatomic molecule. The data presented provide the spectroscopic information needed for radio astronomical searches for OSiS.

  11. Elucidating triplet-sensitized photolysis mechanisms of sulfadiazine and metal ions effects by quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Se; Song, Xuedan; Hao, Ce; Gao, Zhanxian; Chen, Jingwen; Qiu, Jieshan

    2015-03-01

    Sulfadiazine (SDZ) mainly proceeds triplet-sensitized photolysis with dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the aquatic environment. However, the mechanisms underlying the triplet-sensitized photolysis of SDZ with DOM have not been fully worked out. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of triplet-sensitized photolysis of SDZ(0) (neutral form) and SDZ(-) (anionic form) with four DOM analogues, i.e., fluorenone (FL), thioxanthone (TX), 2-acetonaphthone (2-AN), and 4-benzoylbenzoic acid (CBBP), and three metal ions (i.e., Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and Zn(2+)) effects using quantum chemical calculations. Results indicated that the triplet-sensitized photolysis mechanism of SDZ(0) with FL, TX, and 2-AN was hydrogen transfer, and with CBBP was electron transfer along with proton transfer (for complex SDZ(0)-CBBP2) and hydrogen transfer (for complex SDZ(0)-CBBP1). The triplet-sensitized photolysis mechanisms of SDZ(-) with FL, TX, and CBBP was electron transfer along with proton transfer, and with 2-AN was hydrogen transfer. The triplet-sensitized photolysis product of both SDZ(0) and SDZ(-) was a sulfur dioxide extrusion product (4-(2-iminopyrimidine-1(2H)-yl)aniline), but the formation routs of the products for SDZ(0) and SDZ(-) were different. In addition, effects of the metal ions on the triplet-sensitized photolysis of SDZ(0) and SDZ(-) were different. The metal ions promoted the triplet-sensitized photolysis of SDZ(0), but inhibited the triplet-sensitized photolysis of SDZ(-).

  12. The (impossible?) formation of acetaldehyde on the grain surfaces: insights from quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enrique-Romero, J.; Rimola, A.; Ceccarelli, C.; Balucani, N.

    2016-06-01

    Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) have been detected in the interstellar medium (ISM). However, it is not clear whether their synthesis occurs on the icy surfaces of interstellar grains or via a series of gas-phase reactions. As a test case of the COMs synthesis in the ISM, we present new quantum chemical calculations on the formation of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) from the coupling of the HCO and CH3 radicals, both in gas phase and on water ice surfaces. The binding energies of HCO and CH3 on the amorphous water ice were also computed (2333 and 734 K, respectively). Results indicate that, in gas phase, the products could be either CH3CHO, CH4 + CO, or CH3OCH, depending on the relative orientation of the two radicals. However, on the amorphous water ice, only the CH4 + CO product is possible due to the geometrical constraints imposed by the water ice surface. Therefore, acetaldehyde cannot be synthesized by the CH3 + HCO coupling on the icy grains. We discuss the implications of these results and other cases, such as ethylene glycol and dimethyl ether, in which similar situations can occur, suggesting that formation of these molecules on the grain surfaces might be unlikely.

  13. Humic acid metal cation interaction studied by spectromicroscopy techniques in combination with quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Plaschke, M; Rothe, J; Armbruster, M K; Denecke, M A; Naber, A; Geckeis, H

    2010-03-01

    Humic acids (HA) have a high binding capacity towards traces of toxic metal cations, thus affecting their transport in aquatic systems. Eu(III)-HA aggregates are studied by synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the carbon K-edge and laser scanning luminescence microscopy (LSLM) at the (5)D(0) --> (7)F(1,2) fluorescence emission lines. Both methods provide the necessary spatial resolution in the sub-micrometre range to resolve characteristic aggregate morphologies: optically dense zones embedded in a matrix of less dense material in STXM images correspond to areas with increased Eu(III) luminescence yield in the LSLM micrographs. In the C 1s-NEXAFS of metal-loaded polyacrylic acid (PAA), used as a HA model compound, a distinct complexation effect is identified. This effect is similar to trends observed in the dense fraction of HA/metal cation aggregates. The strongest complexation effect is observed for the Zr(IV)-HA/PAA system. This effect is confirmed by quantum chemical calculations performed at the ab initio level for model complexes with different metal centres and complex geometries. Without the high spatial resolution of STXM and LSLM and without the combination of molecular modelling with experimental results, the different zones indicating a ;pseudo'-phase separation into strong complexing domains and weaker complexing domains of HA would never have been identified. This type of strategy can be used to study metal interaction with other organic material.

  14. Acetylene reaction with the Si(111) surface: A semiempirical quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, B.; Carmer, C. S.; Frenklach, M.

    1991-01-01

    The interaction between the acetylene molecule and the Si(111) surface was modeled using the geometry optimization pathway of the Zerner intermediate neglect of differential overlap semiempirical quantum chemical program. The surface was represented by a 49-atom cluster containing four layers of silicon atoms. To determine the effect of the interaction upon the silicon surface, 12 central atoms from the top two layers were allowed to move to stable positions. The geometry of the silicon surface was initially optimized without acetylene, resulting in a significant rearrangement of the mobile atoms. Nine separate calculations were then performed, differing in the initial position and orientation of the acetylene molecule above the surface. The geometry of the resulting surface structures was found to be highly dependent upon the initial placement and orientation of the acetylene. In each case, the acetylene was found to react with the silicon surface by the formation of Si-C bonds. An analysis of the Wiberg bond indices revealed that the initial triple bond between carbon atoms was reduced to approximately a single bond, the exact bond order varying slightly from case to case. It was also found that Si-Si bonds surrounding the reaction site were weakened, and in some cases broken, due to the strain induced by the Si-C bond formation. The degree to which the surfaces were rearranged was found to correlate with the final energies, indicating that the most distorted surfaces were the most energetically favorable.

  15. Quantum-Chemical Investigations on the Structural Variability of Anion-π Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moha, Verena; Giese, Michael; Moha, Richard; Albrecht, Markus; Raabe, Gerhard

    2014-07-01

    The structural versatility of anion-p interactions was investigated computationally. Employing quantum-chemically optimized structures of a series of C6H6-nFn/Br- complexes and the Coulomb law together with the London formula to calculate the electrostatic and the dispersion energy of the interaction between the anion and the π-system led to the result that up to the number of n = 2 due to a significantly repulsive electrostatic energy of interaction the dispersion energy is not sufficient to stabilize such structures in the gas phase where the anion is located above the plane defined by the aromatic ring. The energy surfaces resulting from the interaction of bromide anions with isolated arenes bearing varying numbers of fluorine atoms in different positions of the aromatic ring also show a pronounced dependency on the subsitution pattern of the aromatic system. Depending on the nature of the electron withdrawing group and its position, the energy surface can have a sharply defined energetically low minimum, in which the anion is `fixed'. Other substitution patterns result in very flat energy surfaces, and even a surface with more than two local minima within the scanned area was found. Thus, our study reveals the reason for the experimentally observed structural versatility depending on the substitution pattern in the solid state.

  16. Effect of the Titanium Nanoparticle on the Quantum Chemical Characterization of the Liquid Sodium Nanofluid.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ai; Bonnaud, Patrick; Williams, Mark C; Selvam, Parasuraman; Aoki, Nobutoshi; Miyano, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Akira; Saito, Jun-ichi; Ara, Kuniaki

    2016-04-14

    Suspension state of a titanium nanoparticle in the liquid sodium was quantum chemically characterized by comparing physical characteristics, viz., electronic state, viscosity, and surface tension, with those of liquid sodium. The exterior titanium atoms on the topmost facet of the nanoparticle were found to constitute a stable Na-Ti layer, and the Brownian motion of a titanium nanoparticle could be seen in tandem with the surrounding sodium atoms. An electrochemical gradient due to the differences in electronegativity of both titanium and sodium causes electron flow from liquid sodium atoms to a titanium nanoparticle, Ti + Na → Ti(δ-) + Na(δ+), making the exothermic reaction possible. In other words, the titanium nanoparticle takes a role as electron-reservoir by withdrawing free electrons from sodium atoms and makes liquid sodium electropositive. The remaining electrons in the liquid sodium still make Na-Na bonds and become more stabilized. With increasing size of the titanium nanoparticle, the deeper electrostatic potential, the steeper electric field, and the larger Debye atmosphere are created in the electric double layer shell. Owing to electropositive sodium-to-sodium electrostatic repulsion between the external shells, naked titanium nanoparticles cannot approach each other, thus preventing the agglomeration.

  17. Reaction mechanisms of aqueous monoethanolamine with carbon dioxide: a combined quantum chemical and molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Gyeong S; Stowe, Haley M; Paek, Eunsu; Manogaran, Dhivya

    2015-01-14

    Aqueous monoethanolamine (MEA) has been extensively studied as a solvent for CO2 capture, yet the underlying reaction mechanisms are still not fully understood. Combined ab initio and classical molecular dynamics simulations were performed to revisit and identify key elementary reactions and intermediates in 25-30 wt% aqueous MEA with CO2, by explicitly taking into account the structural and dynamic effects. Using static quantum chemical calculations, we also analyzed in more detail the fundamental interactions involved in the MEA-CO2 reaction. We find that both the CO2 capture by MEA and solvent regeneration follow a zwitterion-mediated two-step mechanism; from the zwitterionic intermediate, the relative probability between deprotonation (carbamate formation) and CO2 removal (MEA regeneration) tends to be determined largely by the interaction between the zwitterion and neighboring H2O molecules. In addition, our calculations clearly demonstrate that proton transfer in the MEA-CO2-H2O solution primarily occurs through H-bonded water bridges, and thus the availability and arrangement of H2O molecules also directly impacts the protonation and/or deprotonation of MEA and its derivatives. This improved understanding should contribute to developing more comprehensive kinetic models for use in modeling and optimizing the CO2 capture process. Moreover, this work highlights the importance of a detailed atomic-level description of the solution structure and dynamics in order to better understand molecular mechanisms underlying the reaction of CO2 with aqueous amines.

  18. Relativistic Multireference Quantum Chemical Study of the Electronic Structure of Actinide Trioxide Molecules.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Attila

    2017-03-17

    Actinide trioxide (AnO3, An = U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm) molecules have been investigated by relativistic multireference quantum chemical calculations with the goal to elucidate their electronic structures. The molecular geometries of the ground and selected excited electronic states have been optimized at the spin-orbit-free complete active space second-order perturbation theory (SF-CASPT2) level. The low-lying vertical excitation states have been computed and characterized by CASPT2 calculations taking into account spin-orbit coupling. The reason for the considerable lengthening of the equatorial An-O bond in AmO3 and CmO3 with respect to the other trioxides has been analyzed on the basis of valence molecular orbitals of the SF ground electronic states. For the bond in question a singly occupied π orbital has been identified, this orbital is doubly occupied in the other (An = U, Np, Pu) trioxides. The clarified electronic structures of the investigated AnO3 molecules confirmed the pentavalent character of Am and Cm in their trioxides in contrast to the hexavalent character of U, Np, and Pu.

  19. The pDynamo Program for Molecular Simulations using Hybrid Quantum Chemical and Molecular Mechanical Potentials.

    PubMed

    Field, Martin J

    2008-07-01

    The pDynamo program has been developed for the simulation of molecular systems using hybrid quantum chemical (QC) and molecular mechanical (MM) potentials. pDynamo is written in a mixture of the computer languages Python and C and is a successor to the previous version of Dynamo, now denoted fDynamo, that was written in Fortran 90 (J. Comput. Chem. 2000, 21, 1088). The current version of Dynamo has a similar range of functionality to the older one but extends it in some significant ways, including the addition of a density functional theory QC capability. This paper gives a general description of pDynamo and outlines some of the advantages and disadvantages that have been encountered in switching computer languages. Some technical aspects of the implementation of pDynamo's algorithms are also discussed and illustrated with the results of example calculations. pDynamo is available on the Web at the address http://www.pdynamo.org and is released under the CeCILL license which is equivalent to the GNU general public license but conforms to the principles of French law.

  20. Fully Coriolis-coupled quantum studies of the H + O2 (upsilon i = 0-2, j i = 0,1) --> OH + O reaction on an accurate potential energy surface: integral cross sections and rate constants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi Ying; Sun, Zhigang; Guo, Hua; Zhang, Dong Hui; Honvault, Pascal; Xie, Daiqian; Lee, Soo-Y

    2008-01-31

    We present accurate quantum calculations of the integral cross section and rate constant for the H + O2 --> OH + O combustion reaction on a recently developed ab initio potential energy surface using parallelized time-dependent and Chebyshev wavepacket methods. Partial wave contributions up to J = 70 were computed with full Coriolis coupling, which enabled us to obtain the initial state-specified integral cross sections up to 2.0 eV of the collision energy and thermal rate constants up to 3000 K. The integral cross sections show a large reaction threshold due to the quantum endothermicity of the reaction, and they monotonically increase with the collision energy. As a result, the temperature dependence of the rate constant is of the Arrhenius type. In addition, it was found that reactivity is enhanced by reactant vibrational excitation. The calculated thermal rate constant shows a significant improvement over that obtained on the DMBE IV potential, but it still underestimates the experimental consensus.

  1. Kinetic-quantum chemical model for catalytic cycles: the Haber-Bosch process and the effect of reagent concentration.

    PubMed

    Kozuch, Sebastian; Shaik, Sason

    2008-07-03

    A combined kinetic-quantum chemical model is developed with the goal of estimating in a straightforward way the turnover frequency (TOF) of catalytic cycles, based on the state energies obtained by quantum chemical calculations. We describe how the apparent activation energy of the whole cycle, so-called energetic span (delta E), is influenced by the energy levels of two species: the TOF determining transition state (TDTS) and the TOF determining intermediate (TDI). Because these key species need not be adjoining states, we conclude that for catalysis there are no rate-determining steps, only rate determining states. In addition, we add here the influence of reactants concentrations. And, finally, the model is applied to the Haber-Bosch process of ammonia synthesis, for which we show how to calculate which catalyst will be the most effective under specific reagents conditions.

  2. A quantum chemical based toxicity study of estimated reduction potential and hydrophobicity in series of nitroaromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Gooch, A; Sizochenko, N; Sviatenko, L; Gorb, L; Leszczynski, J

    2017-02-01

    Nitroaromatic compounds and the products of their degradation are toxic to bacteria, cells and animals. Various studies have been carried out to better understand the mechanism of toxicity of aromatic nitrocompounds and their relationship to humans and the environment. Recent data relate cytotoxicity of nitroaromatic compounds to their single- or two-electron enzymatic reduction. However, mechanisms of animal toxicity could be more complex. This work investigates the estimated reduction and oxidation potentials of 34 nitroaromatic compounds using quantum chemical approaches. All geometries were optimized with density functional theory (DFT) using the solvation model based on density (SMD) and polarizable continuum model (PCM) solvent model protocols. Quantitative structure-activity/property (QSAR/QSPR) models were developed using descriptors obtained from quantum chemical optimizations as well as the DRAGON software program. The QSAR/QSPR equations developed consist of two to four descriptors. Correlations have been identified between electron affinity (ELUMO) and hydrophobicity (log P).

  3. The pyrolysis of 2-methylfuran: a quantum chemical, statistical rate theory and kinetic modelling study.

    PubMed

    Somers, Kieran P; Simmie, John M; Metcalfe, Wayne K; Curran, Henry J

    2014-03-21

    Due to the rapidly growing interest in the use of biomass derived furanic compounds as potential platform chemicals and fossil fuel replacements, there is a simultaneous need to understand the pyrolysis and combustion properties of such molecules. To this end, the potential energy surfaces for the pyrolysis relevant reactions of the biofuel candidate 2-methylfuran have been characterized using quantum chemical methods (CBS-QB3, CBS-APNO and G3). Canonical transition state theory is employed to determine the high-pressure limiting kinetics, k(T), of elementary reactions. Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory with an energy grained master equation is used to compute pressure-dependent rate constants, k(T,p), and product branching fractions for the multiple-well, multiple-channel reaction pathways which typify the pyrolysis reactions of the title species. The unimolecular decomposition of 2-methylfuran is shown to proceed via hydrogen atom transfer reactions through singlet carbene intermediates which readily undergo ring opening to form collisionally stabilised acyclic C5H6O isomers before further decomposition to C1-C4 species. Rate constants for abstraction by the hydrogen atom and methyl radical are reported, with abstraction from the alkyl side chain calculated to dominate. The fate of the primary abstraction product, 2-furanylmethyl radical, is shown to be thermal decomposition to the n-butadienyl radical and carbon monoxide through a series of ring opening and hydrogen atom transfer reactions. The dominant bimolecular products of hydrogen atom addition reactions are found to be furan and methyl radical, 1-butene-1-yl radical and carbon monoxide and vinyl ketene and methyl radical. A kinetic mechanism is assembled with computer simulations in good agreement with shock tube speciation profiles taken from the literature. The kinetic mechanism developed herein can be used in future chemical kinetic modelling studies on the pyrolysis and oxidation of 2-methylfuran

  4. Ab initio quantum-chemical computations of the electronic states in HgBr2 and IBr: Molecules of interest on the Earth's atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Sitkiewicz, Sebastian P; Oliva, Josep M; Dávalos, Juan Z; Notario, Rafael; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Alcoba, Diego R; Oña, Ofelia B; Roca-Sanjuán, Daniel

    2016-12-28

    The electronic states of atmospheric relevant molecules IBr and HgBr2 are reported, within the UV-Vis spectrum range (170nm≤λphoton≤600 nm) by means of the complete-active-space self-consistent field/multi-state complete-active-space second-order perturbation theory/spin-orbit restricted-active-space state-interaction (CASSCF/MS-CASPT2/SO-RASSI) quantum-chemical approach and atomic-natural-orbital relativistic-correlation-consistent (ANO-RCC) basis sets. Several analyses of the methodology were carried out in order to reach converged results and therefore to establish a highly accurate level of theory. Good agreement is found with the experimental data with errors not higher than around 0.1 eV. The presented analyses shall allow upcoming studies aimed to accurately determine the absorption cross sections of interhalogen molecules and compounds with Hg that are relevant to better comprehend the photochemical processes taking place in the atmosphere.

  5. Ab initio quantum-chemical computations of the electronic states in HgBr2 and IBr: Molecules of interest on the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitkiewicz, Sebastian P.; Oliva, Josep M.; Dávalos, Juan Z.; Notario, Rafael; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Alcoba, Diego R.; Oña, Ofelia B.; Roca-Sanjuán, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    The electronic states of atmospheric relevant molecules IBr and HgBr2 are reported, within the UV-Vis spectrum range (170 nm ≤λp h o t o n≤600 nm) by means of the complete-active-space self-consistent field/multi-state complete-active-space second-order perturbation theory/spin-orbit restricted-active-space state-interaction (CASSCF/MS-CASPT2/SO-RASSI) quantum-chemical approach and atomic-natural-orbital relativistic-correlation-consistent (ANO-RCC) basis sets. Several analyses of the methodology were carried out in order to reach converged results and therefore to establish a highly accurate level of theory. Good agreement is found with the experimental data with errors not higher than around 0.1 eV. The presented analyses shall allow upcoming studies aimed to accurately determine the absorption cross sections of interhalogen molecules and compounds with Hg that are relevant to better comprehend the photochemical processes taking place in the atmosphere.

  6. Fe/C interactions during SWNT growth with C2 feedstock molecules: A quantum chemical molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guishan; Irle, Stephan; Morokuma, Keiji

    2006-05-01

    We are presenting the first quantum chemical molecular dynamics (QM/MD) model simulations for iron catalyzed single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) growth based on the density functional tight binding (DFTB) quantum chemical potential. As model systems, open-ended (10,10) armchair tube fragments were selected with 0, 10, and 20 Fe atoms attached in 1,4-positions on the open rims, and ensembles of randomly oriented C2 molecules were included to simulate carbon plasma feedstock molecules. Isokinetic trajectories at 1500 K to 3000 K show that divalent Fe increases the number of coordination partners with carbon and/or Fe, depending on the Fe concentration. Fe/C interactions weaken the tube sidewall due to electron transfer from Fe into antibonding carbon orbitals, and C2 addition occurs mainly in an Fe-C2-Fe bridge addition mechanism, while growth of polyyne chains characteristic for high-temperature carbon systems is suppressed in the presence of Fe on the rims of the growing SWNT. Our findings are the first quantum chemical evidence for the importance of intermetallic interactions during SWNT growth.

  7. Quantum chemical characterization of zwitterionic structures: Supramolecular complexes for modifying the wettability of oil-water-limestone system.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Chavez, Ernesto; Garcia-Quiroz, Alberto; Gonzalez-Garcia, Gerardo; Orozco-Duran, Gabriela E; Zamudio-Rivera, Luis S; Martinez-Magadan, José M; Buenrostro-Gonzalez, Eduardo; Hernandez-Altamirano, Raul

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we present a quantum chemical study pertaining to some supramolecular complexes acting as wettability modifiers of oil-water-limestone system. The complexes studied are derived from zwitterionic liquids of the types N'-alkyl-bis, N-alquenil, N-cycloalkyl, N-amyl-bis-beta amino acid or salts acting as sparkling agents. We studied two molecules of zwitterionic liquids (ZL10 and ZL13), HOMO and LUMO levels, and the energy gap between them, were calculated, as well as the electron affinity (EA) and ionization potential (IP), chemical potential, chemical hardness, chemical electrophilicity index and selectivity descriptors such Fukui indices. In this work, electrochemical comparison was realized with cocamidopropyl betaine (CPB), which is a structure zwitterionic liquid type, nowadays widely applied in enhanced recovery processes.

  8. Structural studies of crystals of organic and organoelement compounds using modern quantum chemical calculations within the framework of the density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korlyukov, Alexander A.; Antipin, Mikhail Yu

    2012-02-01

    The review generalizes the results of structural studies of crystals of organic and organometallic compounds by modern quantum chemical calculations within the framework of the density functional theory reported in the last decade. Features of the software for such calculations are discussed. Examples of the use of quantum chemical calculations for the studies of the electronic structure, spectroscopic and other physicochemical properties of molecular crystals are presented. The bibliography includes 223 references.

  9. Chemically differentiating ascorbate-mediated dissolution of quantum dots in cell culture media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Cheng-Kuan; Sun, Yuh-Chang

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the dynamic dissolution of quantum dots (QDs) in cell culture media, in this study we constructed an online automatic analytical system comprising a sequential in-tube solid phase extraction (SPE) device and an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometer. By means of selectively extracting QDs and cadmium ions (Cd2+) onto the interior surface of the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tube, this novel SPE device could be used to determine the degree of QD dissolution through a simple adjustment of sample acidity. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to exploit PTFE tubing as a selective SPE adsorbent for the online chemical differentiation of QDs and Cd2+ ions with the goal of monitoring the phenomenon of QD dissolution in complicated biological matrices. We confirmed the analytical reliability of this system through comparison of the measured Cd-to-QD ratios to the expected values. When analyzing QDs and Cd2+ ions at picomolar levels, a temporal resolution of 8 min was required to load sufficient amounts of the analytes to meet the sensitivity requirements of the ICP mass spectrometer. To demonstrate the practicability of this developed method, we measured the dynamic variations in the Cd-to-QD705 ratio in the presence of ascorbate as a physiological stimulant to generate reactive oxygen species in cell culture media and trigger the dissolution of QDs; our results suggest that the ascorbate-induced QD dissolution was dependent on the time, treatment concentration, and nature of the biomolecule.To investigate the dynamic dissolution of quantum dots (QDs) in cell culture media, in this study we constructed an online automatic analytical system comprising a sequential in-tube solid phase extraction (SPE) device and an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometer. By means of selectively extracting QDs and cadmium ions (Cd2+) onto the interior surface of the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tube, this novel SPE device could be

  10. Elucidation of Mechanisms and Selectivities of Metal-Catalyzed Reactions using Quantum Chemical Methodology.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Stefano; Kalek, Marcin; Huang, Genping; Himo, Fahmi

    2016-05-17

    Quantum chemical techniques today are indispensable for the detailed mechanistic understanding of catalytic reactions. The development of modern density functional theory approaches combined with the enormous growth in computer power have made it possible to treat quite large systems at a reasonable level of accuracy. Accordingly, quantum chemistry has been applied extensively to a wide variety of catalytic systems. A huge number of problems have been solved successfully, and vast amounts of chemical insights have been gained. In this Account, we summarize some of our recent work in this field. A number of examples concerned with transition metal-catalyzed reactions are selected, with emphasis on reactions with various kinds of selectivities. The discussed cases are (1) copper-catalyzed C-H bond amidation of indoles, (2) iridium-catalyzed C(sp(3))-H borylation of chlorosilanes, (3) vanadium-catalyzed Meyer-Schuster rearrangement and its combination with aldol- and Mannich-type additions, (4) palladium-catalyzed propargylic substitution with phosphorus nucleophiles, (5) rhodium-catalyzed 1:2 coupling of aldehydes and allenes, and finally (6) copper-catalyzed coupling of nitrones and alkynes to produce β-lactams (Kinugasa reaction). First, the methodology adopted in these studies is presented briefly. The electronic structure method in the great majority of these kinds of mechanistic investigations has for the last two decades been based on density functional theory. In the cases discussed here, mainly the B3LYP functional has been employed in conjunction with Grimme's empirical dispersion correction, which has been shown to improve the calculated energies significantly. The effect of the surrounding solvent is described by implicit solvation techniques, and the thermochemical corrections are included using the rigid-rotor harmonic oscillator approximation. The reviewed examples are chosen to illustrate the usefulness and versatility of the adopted methodology in

  11. Quantum chemical calculations and spectroscopic measurements of spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of given uranyl complexes in aqueous solutions with possible environmental and industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Višňak, Jakub; Sobek, Lukáš

    2016-11-01

    A brief introduction into computational methodology and preliminary results for spectroscopic (excitation energies, vibrational frequencies in ground and excited electronic states) and thermodynamic (stability constants, standard enthalpies and entropies of complexation reactions) properties of some 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 uranyl sulphato- and selenato- complexes in aqueos solutions will be given. The relativistic effects are included via Effective Core Potential (ECP), electron correlation via (TD)DFT/B3LYP (dispersion interaction corrected) and solvation is described via explicit inclusion of one hydration sphere beyond the coordinated water molecules. We acknowledge limits of this approximate description - more accurate calculations (ranging from semi-phenomenological two-component spin-orbit coupling up to four-component Dirac-Coulomb-Breit hamiltonian) and Molecular Dynamics simulations are in preparation. The computational results are compared with the experimental results from Time-resolved Laser-induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) and UV-VIS spectroscopic studies (including our original experimental research on this topic). In case of the TRLFS and UV-VIS speciation studies, the problem of complex solution spectra decomposition into individual components is ill-conditioned and hints from theoretical chemistry could be very important. Qualitative agreement between our quantum chemical calculations of the spectroscopic properties and experimental data was achieved. Possible applications for geochemical modelling (e.g. safety studies of nuclear waste repositories, modelling of a future mining site) and analytical chemical studies (including natural samples) are discussed.

  12. Electronic transitions in liquid amides studied by using attenuated total reflection far-ultraviolet spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisawa, Yusuke; Yasunaga, Manaka; Fukuda, Ryoichi; Ehara, Masahiro; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2013-10-01

    Attenuated total reflection far-ultraviolet (ATR-FUV) spectra in the 140-260 nm region were measured for several types of liquid amides (formamide, FA; N-methylformamide, NMF; N-methylacetamide, NMA; N,N-dimethylformamide, NdMF; and N,N-dimethylacetamide, NdMA) to investigate their electronic transitions in the FUV region. The spectra were compared with the corresponding gas-phase spectra to examine the shift in the major absorption band in the 180-200 nm region going from the gas phase to the liquid phase, and it was found that the peak shift was dependent on the particular amide. FA and NMF, which exhibit intermolecular C=O…H-N hydrogen bonding, show a large shift of ˜0.60 eV to lower energy; however, NMA, which also exhibits hydrogen bonding, shows only a small shift. In NdMF and NdMA, C=O groups seem to be coupled, which results in a small peak shift. Two types of quantum chemical calculations, time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and symmetry-adapted-cluster configuration interaction (SAC-CI) method, were performed to elucidate the origin of the shifts and the band assignments. The shift estimated by the monomer and dimer models with TD-DFT reproduced well the observed shift from the gas phase to the liquid phase. This suggests that the intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interaction significantly affects the magnitude of the shift. The many-body effects were also considered using the larger cluster models (trimer to pentamer). The energy shift calculated using SAC-CI with the monomer and the state-specific polarizable continuum model was also accurate, indicating that the nonlinear polarization effect appears to be important. As for the band assignments, it was found that though the major band can be mainly attributed to the π-π* transition, several types of Rydberg transitions also exist in its vicinity and mixing of orbitals with the same symmetry occurs. The number and type of Rydberg transitions in the spectra depend upon the type of amide

  13. Theoretical Prediction of Hydrogen-Bond Basicity pKBHX Using Quantum Chemical Topology Descriptors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen bonding plays an important role in the interaction of biological molecules and their local environment. Hydrogen-bond strengths have been described in terms of basicities by several different scales. The pKBHX scale has been developed with the interests of medicinal chemists in mind. The scale uses equilibrium constants of acid···base complexes to describe basicity and is therefore linked to Gibbs free energy. Site specific data for polyfunctional bases are also available. The pKBHX scale applies to all hydrogen-bond donors (HBDs) where the HBD functional group is either OH, NH, or NH+. It has been found that pKBHX can be described in terms of a descriptor defined by quantum chemical topology, ΔE(H), which is the change in atomic energy of the hydrogen atom upon complexation. Essentially the computed energy of the HBD hydrogen atom correlates with a set of 41 HBAs for five common HBDs, water (r2 = 0.96), methanol (r2 = 0.95), 4-fluorophenol (r2 = 0.91), serine (r2 = 0.93), and methylamine (r2 = 0.97). The connection between experiment and computation was strengthened with the finding that there is no relationship between ΔE(H) and pKBHX when hydrogen fluoride was used as the HBD. Using the methanol model, pKBHX predictions were made for an external set of bases yielding r2 = 0.90. Furthermore, the basicities of polyfunctional bases correlate with ΔE(H), giving r2 = 0.93. This model is promising for the future of computation in fragment-based drug design. Not only has a model been established that links computation to experiment, but the model may also be extrapolated to predict external experimental pKBHX values. PMID:24460383

  14. Molecular structure of gaseous isatin as studied by electron diffraction and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyakov, Alexander V.; Nikolaenko, Kirill O.; Davidovich, Pavel B.; Ivanov, Anatolii D.; Garabadzhiu, Alexander V.; Rykov, Anatolii N.; Shishkov, Igor F.

    2017-03-01

    The molecular structure of isatin, indole-2,3-dione, was studied by gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) and quantum chemical calculations (M062X and MP2 methods with aug-cc-pVTZ basis set). The best fit of the experimental scattering intensities (R-factor = 4.4%) was obtained for a molecular model of Cs symmetry. The structure of the benzene ring deviates from a regular hexagon due to the adjacent pyrrole heterocycle. The small differences between similar geometric parameters were constrained at the values calculated at the M062X level. The experimental structural parameters agree well with the results of theoretical calculations. The bonds in the benzene moiety are in agreement with their standard values. The (Odbnd)Csbnd C(dbnd O) carbon-carbon bond of the pyrrole moiety (1.573(7) Å) is remarkably lengthened in comparison with standard C(sp2)sbnd C(sp2) value, 1.425(11) Å for N-methylpyrrole. According to NBO analysis of isatin, glyoxal and pyrrole-2,3-dione molecules this lengthening cannot be attributed to the steric interactions of Cdbnd O bonds alone and is, mainly, due to the electrostatic repulsion and hyperconjugation that is delocalization of oxygen lone pairs of π-type into the corresponding carbon-carbon antibonding orbital, nπ(O) → σ∗(Csbnd C). Deletion of σ∗(Csbnd C) orbital followed by subsequent geometry optimization led to shortening of the corresponding Csbnd C bond by 0.06 Å. According to different aromaticity descriptors, aromaticity of benzene moiety of isatin is smaller in comparison with benzene molecule. External magnetic field induces diatropic ring current in benzene moiety of isatin.

  15. Octafluorodirhenate(III) Revisited: Solid-State Preparation, Characterization, and Multiconfigurational Quantum Chemical Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Mariappan Balasekaran, Samundeeswari; Todorova, Tanya K.; Pham, Chien Thang; Hartmann, Thomas; Abram, Ulrich; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Poineau, Frederic

    2016-06-06

    A simple method for the high-yield preparation of (NH4)2[Re2F8]· 2H2O has been developed that involves the reaction of (n-Bu4N)2[Re2Cl8] with molten ammonium bifluoride (NH4HF2). Using this method, the new salt [NH4]2[Re2F8]·2H2O was prepared in ~90% yield. The product was characterized in solution by ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) and 19F nuclear magnetic resonance (19F NMR) spectroscopies and in the solid-state by elemental analysis, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Multiconfigurational CASSCF/CASPT2 quantum chemical calculations were performed to investigate the molecular and electronic structure, as well as the electronic absorption spectrum of the [Re2F8] 2- anion. The metal-metal bonding in the Re2 6+ unit was quantified in terms of effective bond order (EBO) and compared to that of its [Re2Cl8] 2- and [Re2Br8] 2- analogues.

  16. Study of polymorphism in imatinib mesylate: A quantum chemical approach using electronic and vibrational spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Anubha; Joshi, B. D.; Tandon, Poonam; Ayala, A. P.; Bansal, A. K.; Grillo, Damián

    2013-02-01

    Imatinib mesylate, 4-(4-methyl-piperazin-1-ylmethyl)-N-u[4-methyl-3-(4-pyridin-3-yl)pyrimidine-2-ylamino)phenyl]benzamide methanesulfonate is a therapeutic drug that is approved for the treatment of chronic myelogeneous leukemia (CML) and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). It is known that imatinib mesylate exists in two polymorphic forms α and β. However, β-form is more stable than the α-form. In this work, we present a detailed vibrational spectroscopic investigation of β-form by using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. These data are supported by quantum mechanical calculations using DFT employing 6-311G(d,p) basis set, which allow us to characterize completely the vibrational spectra of this compound. The FT-IR spectrum of α-form has also been discussed. The importance of hydrogen-bond formation in the molecular packing arrangements of both forms has been examined with the vibrational shifts observed due to polymorphic changes. The red shift of the NH stretching bands in the infrared spectrum from the computed wavenumber indicates the weakening of the NH bond. The UV-vis spectroscopic studies along with the HOMO-LUMO analysis of both polymorphs (α and β) were performed and their chemical activity has been discussed. The TD-DFT method was used to calculate the electronic absorption spectra in the gas phase as well as in the solvent environment using IEF-PCM model and 6-31G basis set. Finally, the results obtained complements to the experimental findings.

  17. Robust scoring functions for protein-ligand interactions with quantum chemical charge models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jui-Chih; Lin, Jung-Hsin; Chen, Chung-Ming; Perryman, Alex L; Olson, Arthur J

    2011-10-24

    Ordinary least-squares (OLS) regression has been used widely for constructing the scoring functions for protein-ligand interactions. However, OLS is very sensitive to the existence of outliers, and models constructed using it are easily affected by the outliers or even the choice of the data set. On the other hand, determination of atomic charges is regarded as of central importance, because the electrostatic interaction is known to be a key contributing factor for biomolecular association. In the development of the AutoDock4 scoring function, only OLS was conducted, and the simple Gasteiger method was adopted. It is therefore of considerable interest to see whether more rigorous charge models could improve the statistical performance of the AutoDock4 scoring function. In this study, we have employed two well-established quantum chemical approaches, namely the restrained electrostatic potential (RESP) and the Austin-model 1-bond charge correction (AM1-BCC) methods, to obtain atomic partial charges, and we have compared how different charge models affect the performance of AutoDock4 scoring functions. In combination with robust regression analysis and outlier exclusion, our new protein-ligand free energy regression model with AM1-BCC charges for ligands and Amber99SB charges for proteins achieve lowest root-mean-squared error of 1.637 kcal/mol for the training set of 147 complexes and 2.176 kcal/mol for the external test set of 1427 complexes. The assessment for binding pose prediction with the 100 external decoy sets indicates very high success rate of 87% with the criteria of predicted root-mean-squared deviation of less than 2 Å. The success rates and statistical performance of our robust scoring functions are only weakly class-dependent (hydrophobic, hydrophilic, or mixed).

  18. Characterization and intramolecular bonding patterns of busulfan: Experimental and quantum chemical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthick, T.; Tandon, Poonam; Singh, Swapnil; Agarwal, Parag; Srivastava, Anubha

    2017-02-01

    The investigations of structural conformers, molecular interactions and vibrational characterization of pharmaceutical drug are helpful to understand their behaviour. In the present work, the 2D potential energy surface (PES) scan has been performed on the dihedral angles C6sbnd O4sbnd S1sbnd C5 and C25sbnd S22sbnd O19sbnd C16 to find the stable conformers of busulfan. In order to show the effects of long range interactions, the structures on the global minima of PES scan have been further optimized by B3LYP/6-311 ++G(d,p) method with and without empirical dispersion functional in Gaussian 09W package. The presence of n → σ* and σ → σ* interactions which lead to stability of the molecule have been predicted by natural bond orbital analysis. The strong and weak hydrogen bonds between the functional groups of busulfan were analyzed using quantum topological atoms in molecules analysis. In order to study the long-range forces, such as van der Waals interactions, steric effect in busulfan, the reduced density gradient as well as isosurface defining these interactions has been plotted using Multiwfn software. The spectroscopic characterization on the solid phase of busulfan has been studied by experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. From the 13C and 1H NMR spectra, the chemical shifts of individual C and H atoms of busulfan have been predicted. The maximum absorption wavelengths corresponding to the electronic transitions between the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of busulfan have been found by UV-vis spectrum.

  19. Facile synthesis of corticosteroids prodrugs from isolated hydrocortisone acetate and their quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, Arun; Singh, Ranvijay Pratap; Prakash, Rohit; Amandeep

    2017-02-01

    In the present research paper corticosteroids prodrugs of hydrocortisone acetate (1) have been synthesized, which was isolated from the flowers of Allamanda Violacea. The hydrocortisone acetate (1) was hydrolyzed to hydrocortisone (2) which was subsequently converted to prednisolone (3). Both the hydrocortisone (1) and prednisolone (2) underwent Steglich esterification with naproxen and Ibuprofen yielding compounds 11, 17 dihydroxy-21-(2-(6-methoxynaphthalene-2yl) propionoxy)-pregn-4-ene-3, 20-dione (4), 11, 17-dihydroxy-21-(2-(4-isobutylphenyl) propionoxy)-pregn-4-ene-3, 20-dione (5), 21-(2-(6-methoxynaphthalene-2-yl) propionoxy) 11,17-di-hydroxy-3,20-diketo-pregn-1,4-diene (6) and 11,17-di-hydroxy-3,20-diketo-pregn-1,4-diene-21-yl-2-(4-isobutylphenyl) propanoate (7). The synthesized compounds have been characterized with the help of spectroscopic techniques like 1H, 13C NMR, FT-IR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Density functional theory (DFT) with B3LYP functional and 6-31G (d, p) basis set has been used for the Quantum chemical calculations. The electronic properties such as frontier orbitals and band gap energies were calculated by TD-DFT approach. Intramolecular interactions have been identified by AIM (Atoms in Molecule) approach and vibrational wavenumbers have been calculated using DFT method. The reactivity and reactive site within the synthesized prodrugs have been examined with the help of reactivity descriptors. Dipole moment, polarizability and first static hyperpolarizability have been calculated to get a better insight of the properties of synthesized prodrugs. The molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) surface analysis has also been carried out.

  20. Synthesis, stereochemistry determination, pharmacological studies and quantum chemical analyses of bisthiazolidinone derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtaque, Md.; Avecilla, Fernando; Hafeez, Zubair Bin; Jahan, Meriyam; Khan, Md. Shahzad; Rizvi, M. Moshahid A.; Khan, Mohd. Shahid; Srivastava, Anurag; Mallik, Anwesha; Verma, Saurabh

    2017-01-01

    A new compound (3) bisthaizolidinone derivative was synthesized by Knoevenagel condensation reaction. The structure of synthesized compound was elucidated by different spectral techniques and X-ray diffraction studies. The stereochemistry of the compound (3) was determined by 1Hsbnd 1H NOESY, 1Hsbnd 1H NMR COSY and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies as (Z, Z)-configuration. The computational quantum chemical studies of compound(3) like, IR, UV, NBO analysis were performed by DFT with Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) exchange-correlation functional in combination with 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. The DNA-binding of compound (3) exhibited a moderate binding constant (Kb = 1 × 105 Lmol-1) with hypochromic shift. The molecular docking displayed good binding affinity -7.18 kcal/mol. The MTT assay of compound (3) was screened against different cancerous cell lines, HepG2, Siha, Hela and MCF-7. Studies against these cell lines depicted that the screened compound (3) showed potent inhibitory activity against HepG2 cell (IC50 = 7.5 μM) followed by MCF-7 (IC50 = 52.0 μM), Siha (IC50 = 66.98 μM), Hela (IC50 = 74.83 μM) cell lines, and non-toxic effect against non-cancerous HEK-293 cells (IC50 = 287.89 μM) at the concentration range (0-300) μM. Furthermore, cell cycle perturbation was performed on HepG2 & Siha cell lines and observed that cells were arrested in G2/M in HepG2, and G0/G1 in Siha cell lines with respect to untreated control. Hence, compound (3) possesses potent anti-cancerous activity against HepG2 cell line.

  1. Revealing halogen bonding interactions with anomeric systems: an ab initio quantum chemical studies.

    PubMed

    Lo, Rabindranath; Ganguly, Bishwajit

    2015-02-01

    A computational study has been performed using MP2 and CCSD(T) methods on a series of O⋯X (X=Br, Cl and I) halogen bonds to evaluate the strength and characteristic of such highly directional noncovalent interactions. The study has been carried out on a series of dimeric complexes formed between interhalogen compounds (such as BrF, BrCl and BrI) and oxygen containing electron donor molecule. The existence and consequences of the anomeric effect of the electron donor molecule has also been investigated through an exploration of halogen bonding interactions in this halogen bonded complexes. The ab initio quantum chemical calculations have been employed to study both the nature and directionality of the halogen molecules toward the sp(3) oxygen atom in anomeric systems. The presence of anomeric nO→σ*CN interaction involves a dominant role for the availability of the axial and equatorial lone pairs of donor O atom to participate with interhalogen compounds in the halogen-bonded complexes. The energy difference between the axial and equatorial conformers with interhalogen compounds reaches up to 4.60 kJ/mol, which however depends upon the interacting halogen atoms and its attaching atoms. The energy decomposition analysis further suggests that the total halogen bond interaction energies are mainly contributed by the attractive electrostatic and dispersion components. The role of substituents attached with the halogen atoms has also been evaluated in this study. With the increase of halogen atom size and the positive nature of σ-hole, the halogen atom interacted more with the electron donor atom and the electrostatic contribution to the total interaction energy enhances appreciably. Further, noncovalent interaction (NCI) studies have been carried out to locate the noncovalent halogen bonding interactions in real space.

  2. Theoretical prediction of hydrogen-bond basicity pKBHX using quantum chemical topology descriptors.

    PubMed

    Green, Anthony J; Popelier, Paul L A

    2014-02-24

    Hydrogen bonding plays an important role in the interaction of biological molecules and their local environment. Hydrogen-bond strengths have been described in terms of basicities by several different scales. The pKBHX scale has been developed with the interests of medicinal chemists in mind. The scale uses equilibrium constants of acid···base complexes to describe basicity and is therefore linked to Gibbs free energy. Site specific data for polyfunctional bases are also available. The pKBHX scale applies to all hydrogen-bond donors (HBDs) where the HBD functional group is either OH, NH, or NH+. It has been found that pKBHX can be described in terms of a descriptor defined by quantum chemical topology, ΔE(H), which is the change in atomic energy of the hydrogen atom upon complexation. Essentially the computed energy of the HBD hydrogen atom correlates with a set of 41 HBAs for five common HBDs, water (r2=0.96), methanol (r2=0.95), 4-fluorophenol (r2=0.91), serine (r2=0.93), and methylamine (r2=0.97). The connection between experiment and computation was strengthened with the finding that there is no relationship between ΔE(H) and pKBHX when hydrogen fluoride was used as the HBD. Using the methanol model, pKBHX predictions were made for an external set of bases yielding r2=0.90. Furthermore, the basicities of polyfunctional bases correlate with ΔE(H), giving r2=0.93. This model is promising for the future of computation in fragment-based drug design. Not only has a model been established that links computation to experiment, but the model may also be extrapolated to predict external experimental pKBHX values.

  3. Thermal Decomposition of NCN: Shock-Tube Study, Quantum Chemical Calculations, and Master-Equation Modeling.

    PubMed

    Busch, Anna; González-García, Núria; Lendvay, György; Olzmann, Matthias

    2015-07-16

    The thermal decomposition of cyanonitrene, NCN, was studied behind reflected shock waves in the temperature range 1790-2960 K at pressures near 1 and 4 bar. Highly diluted mixtures of NCN3 in argon were shock-heated to produce NCN, and concentration-time profiles of C atoms as reaction product were monitored with atomic resonance absorption spectroscopy at 156.1 nm. Calibration was performed with methane pyrolysis experiments. Rate coefficients for the reaction (3)NCN + M → (3)C + N2 + M (R1) were determined from the initial slopes of the C atom concentration-time profiles. Reaction R1 was found to be in the low-pressure regime at the conditions of the experiments. The temperature dependence of the bimolecular rate coefficient can be expressed with the following Arrhenius equation: k1(bim) = (4.2 ± 2.1) × 10(14) exp[-242.3 kJ mol(-1)/(RT)] cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1). The rate coefficients were analyzed by using a master equation with specific rate coefficients from RRKM theory. The necessary molecular data and energies were calculated with quantum chemical methods up to the CCSD(T)/CBS//CCSD/cc-pVTZ level of theory. From the topography of the potential energy surface, it follows that reaction R1 proceeds via isomerization of NCN to CNN and subsequent C-N bond fission along a collinear reaction coordinate without a tight transition state. The calculations reproduce the magnitude and temperature dependence of the rate coefficient and confirm that reaction R1 is in the low-pressure regime under our experimental conditions.

  4. Quantum computation for quantum chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2010-03-01

    Numerically exact simulation of quantum systems on classical computers is in general, an intractable computational problem. Computational chemists have made progress in the development of approximate methods to tackle complex chemical problems. The downside of these approximate methods is that their failure for certain important cases such as long-range charge transfer states in the case of traditional density functional theory. In 1982, Richard Feynman suggested that a quantum device should be able to simulate quantum systems (in our case, molecules) exactly using quantum computers in a tractable fashion. Our group has been working in the development of quantum chemistry algorithms for quantum devices. In this talk, I will describe how quantum computers can be employed to carry out numerically exact quantum chemistry and chemical reaction dynamics calculations, as well as molecular properties. Finally, I will describe our recent experimental quantum computation of the energy of the hydrogen molecule using an optical quantum computer.

  5. Chemical Control of Lead Sulfide Quantum Dot Shape, Self-Assembly, and Charge Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhail, Martin R.

    Lead(II) sulfide quantum dots (PbS QDs) are a promising excitonic material for numerous application that require that control of fluxes of charge and energy at nanoscale interfaces, such as solar energy conversion, photo- and electrocatalysis, light emitting diodes, chemical sensing, single-electron logic elements, field effect transistors, and photovoltaics. PbS QDs are particularly suitable for photonics applications because they exhibit size-tunable band-edge absorption and fluorescence across the entire near-infrared spectrum, undergo efficient multi-exciton generation, exhibit a long radiative lifetime, and possess an eight-fold degenerate ground-state. The effective integration of PbS QDs into these applications requires a thorough understanding of how to control their synthesis, self-assembly, and charge transport phenomena. In this document, I describe a series of experiments to elucidate three levels of chemical control on the emergent properties of PbS QDs: (1) the role of surface chemistry in controlling PbS QD shape during solvothermal synthesis, (2) the role of QD shape and ligand functionalization in self-assembly at a liquid-air interface, and (3) the role of QD packing structure on steady-state conductivity and transient current dynamics. At the synthetic level (1), I show that the final shape and surface chemistry of PbS QDs is highly sensitive to the formation of organosulfur byproducts by commonly used sulfur reagents. The insight into PbS QD growth gained from this work is then developed to controllably tune PbS QD shape from cubic to octahedral to hexapodal while maintaining QD size. At the following level of QD self-assembly (2), I show how QD size and shape dictate packing geometry in extended 2D arrays and how this packing can be controllably interrupted in mixed monolayers. I also study the role of ligand structure on the reorganization of QD arrays at a liquid-air interface and find that the specific packing defects in QD arrays vary

  6. Full-dimensional quantum calculations of vibrational levels of NH4+ and isotopomers on an accurate ab initio potential energy surface

    DOE PAGES

    Hua -Gen Yu; Han, Huixian; Guo, Hua

    2016-03-29

    Vibrational energy levels of the ammonium cation (NH4+) and its deuterated isotopomers are calculated using a numerically exact kinetic energy operator on a recently developed nine-dimensional permutation invariant semiglobal potential energy surface fitted to a large number of high-level ab initio points. Like CH4, the vibrational levels of NH4+ and ND4+ exhibit a polyad structure, characterized by a collective quantum number P = 2(v1 + v3) + v2 + v4. As a result, the low-lying vibrational levels of all isotopomers are assigned and the agreement with available experimental data is better than 1 cm–1.

  7. Virial theorem in the Kohn-Sham density-functional theory formalism: accurate calculation of the atomic quantum theory of atoms in molecules energies.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Juan I; Ayers, Paul W; Götz, Andreas W; Castillo-Alvarado, F L

    2009-07-14

    A new approach for computing the atom-in-molecule [quantum theory of atoms in molecule (QTAIM)] energies in Kohn-Sham density-functional theory is presented and tested by computing QTAIM energies for a set of representative molecules. In the new approach, the contribution for the correlation-kinetic energy (T(c)) is computed using the density-functional theory virial relation. Based on our calculations, it is shown that the conventional approach where atomic energies are computed using only the noninteracting part of the kinetic energy might be in error by hundreds of kJ/mol.

  8. Quantum mechanical model for the anticarcinogenic effect of extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic fields on early chemical hepatocarcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godina-Nava, Juan José; Torres-Vega, Gabino; López-Riquelme, Germán Octavio; López-Sandoval, Eduardo; Samana, Arturo Rodolfo; García Velasco, Fermín; Hernández-Aguilar, Claudia; Domínguez-Pacheco, Arturo

    2017-02-01

    Using the conventional Haberkorn approach, it is evaluated the recombination of the radical pair (RP) singlet spin state to study theoretically the cytoprotective effect of an extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) on early stages of hepatic cancer chemically induced in rats. The proposal is that ELF-EMF modulates the interconversion rate of singlet and triplet spin states of the RP populations modifying the products from the metabolization of carcinogens. Previously, we found that the daily treatment with ELF-EMF 120 Hz inhibited the number and area of preneoplastic lesions in chemical carcinogenesis. The singlet spin population is evaluated diagonalizing the spin density matrix through the Lanczos method in a radical pair mechanism (RPM). Using four values of the interchange energy, we have studied the variations over the singlet population. The low magnetic field effect as a test of the influence over the enzymatic chemical reaction is evaluated calculating the quantum yield. Through a bootstrap technique the range is found for the singlet decay rate for the process. Applying the quantum measurements concept, we addressed the impact toward hepatic cells. The result contributes to improving our understanding of the chemical carcinogenesis process affected by charged particles that damage the DNA.

  9. High Color-Purity Green, Orange, and Red Light-Emitting Didoes Based on Chemically Functionalized Graphene Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Woosung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Ji-Hee; Lee, Taehyung; Do, Sungan; Park, Yoonsang; Jeong, Mun Seok; Lee, Tae-Woo; Rhee, Shi-Woo

    2016-04-01

    Chemically derived graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to date have showed very broad emission linewidth due to many kinds of chemical bondings with different energy levels, which significantly degrades the color purity and color tunability. Here, we show that use of aniline derivatives to chemically functionalize GQDs generates new extrinsic energy levels that lead to photoluminescence of very narrow linewidths. We use transient absorption and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopies to study the electronic structures and related electronic transitions of our GQDs, which reveals that their underlying carrier dynamics is strongly related to the chemical properties of aniline derivatives. Using these functionalized GQDs as lumophores, we fabricate light-emitting didoes (LEDs) that exhibit green, orange, and red electroluminescence that has high color purity. The maximum current efficiency of 3.47 cd A‑1 and external quantum efficiency of 1.28% are recorded with our LEDs; these are the highest values ever reported for LEDs based on carbon-nanoparticle phosphors. This functionalization of GQDs with aniline derivatives represents a new method to fabricate LEDs that produce natural color.

  10. High Color-Purity Green, Orange, and Red Light-Emitting Didoes Based on Chemically Functionalized Graphene Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Woosung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Ji-Hee; Lee, Taehyung; Do, Sungan; Park, Yoonsang; Jeong, Mun Seok; Lee, Tae-Woo; Rhee, Shi-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Chemically derived graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to date have showed very broad emission linewidth due to many kinds of chemical bondings with different energy levels, which significantly degrades the color purity and color tunability. Here, we show that use of aniline derivatives to chemically functionalize GQDs generates new extrinsic energy levels that lead to photoluminescence of very narrow linewidths. We use transient absorption and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopies to study the electronic structures and related electronic transitions of our GQDs, which reveals that their underlying carrier dynamics is strongly related to the chemical properties of aniline derivatives. Using these functionalized GQDs as lumophores, we fabricate light-emitting didoes (LEDs) that exhibit green, orange, and red electroluminescence that has high color purity. The maximum current efficiency of 3.47 cd A−1 and external quantum efficiency of 1.28% are recorded with our LEDs; these are the highest values ever reported for LEDs based on carbon-nanoparticle phosphors. This functionalization of GQDs with aniline derivatives represents a new method to fabricate LEDs that produce natural color. PMID:27048887

  11. Rotational spectra of rare isotopic species of fluoroiodomethane: Determination of the equilibrium structure from rotational spectroscopy and quantum-chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Cazzoli, Gabriele; López, Juan Carlos; Alonso, José Luis; Baldacci, Agostino; Baldan, Alessandro; Stopkowicz, Stella; Cheng, Lan; Gauss, Jürgen

    2012-07-01

    Supported by accurate quantum-chemical calculations, the rotational spectra of the mono- and bi-deuterated species of fluoroiodomethane, CHDFI and CD2FI, as well as of the 13C-containing species, 13CH2FI, were recorded for the first time. Three different spectrometers were employed, a Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer, a millimeter/submillimter-wave spectrometer, and a THz spectrometer, thus allowing to record a huge portion of the rotational spectrum, from 5 GHz up to 1.05 THz, and to accurately determine the ground-state rotational and centrifugal-distortion constants. Sub-Doppler measurements allowed to resolve the hyperfine structure of the rotational spectrum and to determine the complete iodine quadrupole-coupling tensor as well as the diagonal elements of the iodine spin-rotation tensor. The present investigation of rare isotopic species of CH2FI together with the results previously obtained for the main isotopologue [C. Puzzarini, G. Cazzoli, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, A. Baldacci, A. Baldan, S. Stopkowicz, L. Cheng, and J. Gauss, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 174312 (2011);, 10.1063/1.3583498 G. Cazzoli, A. Baldacci, A. Baldan, and C. Puzzarini, Mol. Phys. 109, 2245 (2011)], 10.1080/00268976.2011.609142 enabled us to derive a semi-experimental equilibrium structure for fluoroiodomethane by means of a least-squares fit procedure using the available experimental ground-state rotational constants together with computed vibrational corrections. Problems related to the missing isotopic substitution of fluorine and iodine were overcome thanks to the availability of an accurate theoretical equilibrium geometry (computed at the coupled-cluster singles and doubles level augmented by a perturbative treatment of triple excitations).

  12. Rotational spectra of rare isotopic species of fluoroiodomethane: determination of the equilibrium structure from rotational spectroscopy and quantum-chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Cazzoli, Gabriele; López, Juan Carlos; Alonso, José Luis; Baldacci, Agostino; Baldan, Alessandro; Stopkowicz, Stella; Cheng, Lan; Gauss, Jürgen

    2012-07-14

    Supported by accurate quantum-chemical calculations, the rotational spectra of the mono- and bi-deuterated species of fluoroiodomethane, CHDFI and CD(2)FI, as well as of the (13)C-containing species, (13)CH(2)FI, were recorded for the first time. Three different spectrometers were employed, a Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer, a millimeter/submillimter-wave spectrometer, and a THz spectrometer, thus allowing to record a huge portion of the rotational spectrum, from 5 GHz up to 1.05 THz, and to accurately determine the ground-state rotational and centrifugal-distortion constants. Sub-Doppler measurements allowed to resolve the hyperfine structure of the rotational spectrum and to determine the complete iodine quadrupole-coupling tensor as well as the diagonal elements of the iodine spin-rotation tensor. The present investigation of rare isotopic species of CH(2)FI together with the results previously obtained for the main isotopologue [C. Puzzarini, G. Cazzoli, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, A. Baldacci, A. Baldan, S. Stopkowicz, L. Cheng, and J. Gauss, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 174312 (2011); G. Cazzoli, A. Baldacci, A. Baldan, and C. Puzzarini, Mol. Phys. 109, 2245 (2011)] enabled us to derive a semi-experimental equilibrium structure for fluoroiodomethane by means of a least-squares fit procedure using the available experimental ground-state rotational constants together with computed vibrational corrections. Problems related to the missing isotopic substitution of fluorine and iodine were overcome thanks to the availability of an accurate theoretical equilibrium geometry (computed at the coupled-cluster singles and doubles level augmented by a perturbative treatment of triple excitations).

  13. Demonstration of a rapidly-swept external cavity quantum cascade laser for rapid and sensitive quantification of chemical mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Brumfield, Brian E.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-02-13

    A rapidly-swept external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) system for fast open-path quantification of multiple chemicals and mixtures is presented. The ECQCL system is swept over its entire tuning range (>100 cm-1) at frequencies up to 200 Hz. At 200 Hz the wavelength tuning rate and spectral resolution are 2x104 cm-1/sec and < 0.2 cm-1, respectively. The capability of the current system to quantify changes in chemical concentrations on millesecond timescales is demonstrated at atmospheric pressure using an open-path multi-pass cell. The detection limits for chemicals ranged from ppb to ppm levels depending on the absorption cross-section.

  14. Isolation, characterization, spectroscopic properties and quantum chemical computations of an important phytoalexin resveratrol as antioxidant component from Vitis labrusca L. and their chemical compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güder, Aytaç; Korkmaz, Halil; Gökce, Halil; Alpaslan, Yelda Bingöl; Alpaslan, Gökhan

    2014-12-01

    In this study, isolation and characterization of trans-resveratrol (RES) as an antioxidant compound were carried out from VLE, VLG and VLS. Furthermore, antioxidant activities were evaluated by using six different methods. Finally, total phenolic, flavonoid, ascorbic acid, anthocyanin, lycopene, β-carotene and vitamin E contents were carried out. In addition, the FT-IR, 13C and 1H NMR chemical shifts and UV-vis. spectra of trans-resveratrol were experimentally recorded. Quantum chemical computations such as the molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies, UV-vis. spectroscopic parameters, HOMOs-LUMOs energies, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), natural bond orbitals (NBO) and nonlinear optics (NLO) properties of title molecule have been calculated by using DFT/B3PW91 method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set in ground state for the first time. The obtained results show that the calculated spectroscopic data are in a good agreement with experimental data.

  15. Isolation, characterization, spectroscopic properties and quantum chemical computations of an important phytoalexin resveratrol as antioxidant component from Vitis labrusca L. and their chemical compositions.

    PubMed

    Güder, Aytaç; Korkmaz, Halil; Gökce, Halil; Alpaslan, Yelda Bingöl; Alpaslan, Gökhan

    2014-12-10

    In this study, isolation and characterization of trans-resveratrol (RES) as an antioxidant compound were carried out from VLE, VLG and VLS. Furthermore, antioxidant activities were evaluated by using six different methods. Finally, total phenolic, flavonoid, ascorbic acid, anthocyanin, lycopene, β-carotene and vitamin E contents were carried out. In addition, the FT-IR, (13)C and (1)H NMR chemical shifts and UV-vis. spectra of trans-resveratrol were experimentally recorded. Quantum chemical computations such as the molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies, UV-vis. spectroscopic parameters, HOMOs-LUMOs energies, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), natural bond orbitals (NBO) and nonlinear optics (NLO) properties of title molecule have been calculated by using DFT/B3PW91 method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set in ground state for the first time. The obtained results show that the calculated spectroscopic data are in a good agreement with experimental data.

  16. Enhanced Constraints for Accurate Lower Bounds on Many-Electron Quantum Energies from Variational Two-Electron Reduced Density Matrix Theory.

    PubMed

    Mazziotti, David A

    2016-10-07

    A central challenge of physics is the computation of strongly correlated quantum systems. The past ten years have witnessed the development and application of the variational calculation of the two-electron reduced density matrix (2-RDM) without the wave function. In this Letter we present an orders-of-magnitude improvement in the accuracy of 2-RDM calculations without an increase in their computational cost. The advance is based on a low-rank, dual formulation of an important constraint on the 2-RDM, the T2 condition. Calculations are presented for metallic chains and a cadmium-selenide dimer. The low-scaling T2 condition will have significant applications in atomic and molecular, condensed-matter, and nuclear physics.

  17. Enhanced Constraints for Accurate Lower Bounds on Many-Electron Quantum Energies from Variational Two-Electron Reduced Density Matrix Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazziotti, David A.

    2016-10-01

    A central challenge of physics is the computation of strongly correlated quantum systems. The past ten years have witnessed the development and application of the variational calculation of the two-electron reduced density matrix (2-RDM) without the wave function. In this Letter we present an orders-of-magnitude improvement in the accuracy of 2-RDM calculations without an increase in their computational cost. The advance is based on a low-rank, dual formulation of an important constraint on the 2-RDM, the T 2 condition. Calculations are presented for metallic chains and a cadmium-selenide dimer. The low-scaling T 2 condition will have significant applications in atomic and molecular, condensed-matter, and nuclear physics.

  18. Pure and N-substituted Small Cyclic Hydrocarbon Cations and Anions Synthesis in The Ionosphere of Titan: An Ab-Initio Quantum Chemical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, P. P.

    2015-12-01

    The instruments on board the CASSINI spacecraft observed large carbonaceous molecules in the upper atmosphere of Titan. How these large polyatomic molecules are synthesized in such exotic conditions is, thus far, unknown. Molecular ions, including positive and negative ions, especially large anions, are in abundance in the ionosphere of Titan. Barrier-less ion-molecule interactions may play a major role ­- ions provide electrostatic steering force - in guiding molecules towards each other and initiating reactions. We study these condensation pathways to determine whether they are a viable means of forming large pure hydrocarbon molecules, and nitrogen-containing carbonaceous chains, stacks, and even cyclic compounds. We employ accurate quantum chemical methods to investigate the processes of growth, structures, nature of bonding, mechanisms, and spectroscopic properties of the ensuing ionic products after pairing small carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen-containing molecules with major ions observed in the upper atmosphere of Titan, e.g. C2H5+ and HCNH+, apart from a whole host of small hydrocarbons. We also studied the ion-neutral association pathways involving pure-carbon molecules e.g. acetylene, ethylene and other hydrocarbons, and their dissociation fragments in a plasma discharge. We found the molecular building blocks of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as phenyl cations can form very easily by the combination of smaller hydrocarbons followed by hydrogen loss. We have investigated how nitrogen atoms are incorporated into the carbon ring during growth. Specifically, we explored the mechanisms by which the synthesis of pyrimidine will be feasible in the atmosphere of Titan in conjunction with ion-mobility experiments. Futher, we study the formation process of anions, and study their potential energy surfaces. We have used accurate ab initio coupled cluster theory, Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, density functional theory (DFT), and coupled cluster theory

  19. Prediction of low-field nuclear singlet lifetimes with molecular dynamics and quantum-chemical property surface.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, Pär

    2017-01-25

    Molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry methods are implemented to quantify nuclear spin-1/2 pair singlet-state relaxation rates for three molecular systems at low magnetic field and room temperature. Computational methodology is developed for weak interactions, particularly important for singlet states at low field. These include spin-rotation and spin-internal-motion effects, which describe the coupling of the spin-carrying nuclei to fluctuating local magnetic fields induced by the overall and internal molecular fluctuations, respectively. A high-dimensional tensor property surface using Kriging interpolation is developed to circumvent costly quantum-chemical calculations. Together with the intramolecular dipolar relaxation, all the simulated relaxation mechanisms are accounted for with a common theoretical framework. Comparison with experiment indicates that quantitative accuracy is obtained, sufficient to enable guidance in the molecular design of molecules with long-lived singlet order.

  20. Experimental and quantum chemical studies of a novel synthetic prenylated chalcone

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chalcones are ubiquitous natural compounds with a wide variety of reported biological activities, including antitumoral, antiviral and antimicrobial effects. Furthermore, chalcones are being studied for its potential use in organic electroluminescent devices; therefore the description of their spectroscopic properties is important to elucidate the structure of these molecules. One of the main techniques available for structure elucidation is the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (NMR). Accordingly, the prediction of the NMR spectra in this kind of molecules is necessary to gather information about the influence of substituents on their spectra. Results A novel substituted chalcone has been synthetized. In order to identify the functional groups present in the new synthesized compound and confirm its chemical structure, experimental and theoretical 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR spectra were analyzed. The theoretical molecular structure and NMR spectra were calculated at both the Hartree-Fock and Density Functional (meta: TPSS; hybrid: B3LYP and PBE1PBE; hybrid meta GGA: M05-2X and M06-2X) levels of theory in combination with a 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The structural parameters showed that the best method for geometry optimization was DFT:M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p), whereas the calculated bond angles and bond distances match experimental values of similar chalcone derivatives. The NMR calculations were carried out using the Gauge-Independent Atomic Orbital (GIAO) formalism in a DFT:M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) optimized geometry. Conclusion Considering all HF and DFT methods with GIAO calculations, TPSS and PBE1PBE were the most accurate methods used for calculation of 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR chemical shifts, which was almost similar to the B3LYP functional, followed in order by HF, M05-2X and M06-2X methods. All calculations were done using the Gaussian 09 software package. Theoretical calculations can be used to predict and confirm the structure of substituted chalcones

  1. State-to-state rotational phase coherence effect on the vibration-rotation band shape - An accurate quantum calculation for CO-He

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boissoles, J.; Boulet, C.; Robert, D.; Green, S.

    1989-01-01

    Accurate coupled state calculations of line coupling are performed for infrared lines of carbon monoxide perturbed by helium. Such calculations lead to both real and imaginary line couplings. For the first time, the effect of this imaginary line couplings, connected with state-to-state rotational phase coherences, on infrared band shape, is analyzed. An extension of detailed balance principle to the complex plane is suggested from the present computed off-diagonal cross sections. This allows us to understand the physical mechanism underlying the weak effect of phase coherences on CO-He infrared band shape.

  2. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    Metal atom clusters are studied based on the application of ab initio quantum mechanical approaches. Because these large 'molecular' systems pose special practical computational problems in the application of the quantum mechanical methods, there is a special need to find simplifying techniques that do not compromise the reliability of the calculations. Research is therefore directed towards various aspects of the implementation of the effective core potential technique for the removal of the metal atom core electrons from the calculations.

  3. Chemical potentials and thermodynamic characteristics of ideal Bose- and Fermi-gases in the region of quantum degeneracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikov, A. G.; Sereda, K. V.; Slyusarenko, Yu. V.

    2017-01-01

    Calculations of chemical potentials for ideal monatomic gases with Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac statistics as functions of temperature, across the temperature region that is typical for the collective quantum degeneracy effect, are presented. Numerical calculations are performed without any additional approximations, and explicit dependences of the chemical potentials on temperature are constructed at a fixed density of gas particles. Approximate polynomial dependences of chemical potentials on temperature are obtained that allow for the results to be used in further studies without re-applying the involved numerical methods. The ease of using the obtained representations is demonstrated on examples of deformation of distribution for a population of energy states at low temperatures, and on the impact of quantum statistics (exchange interaction) on the equations of state for ideal gases and some of the thermodynamic properties thereof. The results of this study essentially unify two opposite limiting cases in an intermediate region that are used to describe the equilibrium states of ideal gases, which are well known from university courses on statistical physics, thus adding value from an educational point of view.

  4. Chemically ordered Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N alloys: Spontaneous formation of natural quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, M.; Lymperakis, L.; Neugebauer, J.; Northrup, J.E.; Kirste, L.; Leroux, M.; Grzegory, I.; Porowski, S.; Strunk, H.P.

    2005-01-15

    We combine transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution x-ray diffraction, cathodoluminescence, and photoluminescence experiments with first-principles calculations to study the formation, thermodynamic stability, structural, and optical properties of chemically ordered Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N alloys (0chemically highly sensitive adsorption sites at step edges and that these sites can be used to kinetically engineer chemically ordered Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N alloys. The ordered alloys have unique properties: (i) the band gap is redshifted up to 110 meV with respect to the disordered alloy of the same composition and (ii) the band gap reduction is caused by localization of the band edge wave functions in the GaN layer. Ordered Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N thus can be seen as a natural quantum well structure where electrons and holes are localized and confined in monolayer GaN quantum wells.

  5. XModeScore: a novel method for accurate protonation/tautomer-state determination using quantum-mechanically driven macromolecular X-ray crystallographic refinement

    PubMed Central

    Borbulevych, Oleg; Martin, Roger I.; Tickle, Ian J.; Westerhoff, Lance M.

    2016-01-01

    Gaining an understanding of the protein–ligand complex structure along with the proper protonation and explicit solvent effects can be important in obtaining meaningful results in structure-guided drug discovery and structure-based drug discovery. Unfortunately, protonation and tautomerism are difficult to establish with conventional methods because of difficulties in the experimental detection of H atoms owing to the well known limitations of X-ray crystallography. In the present work, it is demonstrated that semiempirical, quantum-mechanics-based macromolecular crystallographic refinement is sensitive to the choice of a protonation-state/tautomer form of ligands and residues, and can therefore be used to explore potential states. A novel scoring method, called XModeScore, is described which enumerates the possible protomeric/tautomeric modes, refines each mode against X-ray diffraction data with the semiempirical quantum-mechanics (PM6) Hamiltonian and scores each mode using a combination of energetic strain (or ligand strain) and rigorous statistical analysis of the difference electron-density distribution. It is shown that using XModeScore it is possible to consistently distinguish the correct bound protomeric/tautomeric modes based on routine X-ray data, even at lower resolutions of around 3 Å. These X-ray results are compared with the results obtained from much more expensive and laborious neutron diffraction studies for three different examples: tautomerism in the acetazolamide ligand of human carbonic anhydrase II (PDB entries 3hs4 and 4k0s), tautomerism in the 8HX ligand of urate oxidase (PDB entries 4n9s and 4n9m) and the protonation states of the catalytic aspartic acid found within the active site of an aspartic protease (PDB entry 2jjj). In each case, XModeScore applied to the X-ray diffraction data is able to determine the correct protonation state as defined by the neutron diffraction data. The impact of QM-based refinement versus conventional

  6. XModeScore: a novel method for accurate protonation/tautomer-state determination using quantum-mechanically driven macromolecular X-ray crystallographic refinement.

    PubMed

    Borbulevych, Oleg; Martin, Roger I; Tickle, Ian J; Westerhoff, Lance M

    2016-04-01

    Gaining an understanding of the protein-ligand complex structure along with the proper protonation and explicit solvent effects can be important in obtaining meaningful results in structure-guided drug discovery and structure-based drug discovery. Unfortunately, protonation and tautomerism are difficult to establish with conventional methods because of difficulties in the experimental detection of H atoms owing to the well known limitations of X-ray crystallography. In the present work, it is demonstrated that semiempirical, quantum-mechanics-based macromolecular crystallographic refinement is sensitive to the choice of a protonation-state/tautomer form of ligands and residues, and can therefore be used to explore potential states. A novel scoring method, called XModeScore, is described which enumerates the possible protomeric/tautomeric modes, refines each mode against X-ray diffraction data with the semiempirical quantum-mechanics (PM6) Hamiltonian and scores each mode using a combination of energetic strain (or ligand strain) and rigorous statistical analysis of the difference electron-density distribution. It is shown that using XModeScore it is possible to consistently distinguish the correct bound protomeric/tautomeric modes based on routine X-ray data, even at lower resolutions of around 3 Å. These X-ray results are compared with the results obtained from much more expensive and laborious neutron diffraction studies for three different examples: tautomerism in the acetazolamide ligand of human carbonic anhydrase II (PDB entries 3hs4 and 4k0s), tautomerism in the 8HX ligand of urate oxidase (PDB entries 4n9s and 4n9m) and the protonation states of the catalytic aspartic acid found within the active site of an aspartic protease (PDB entry 2jjj). In each case, XModeScore applied to the X-ray diffraction data is able to determine the correct protonation state as defined by the neutron diffraction data. The impact of QM-based refinement versus conventional

  7. First-principles quantum chemistry in the life sciences.

    PubMed

    van Mourik, Tanja

    2004-12-15

    The area of computational quantum chemistry, which applies the principles of quantum mechanics to molecular and condensed systems, has developed drastically over the last decades, due to both increased computer power and the efficient implementation of quantum chemical methods in readily available computer programs. Because of this, accurate computational techniques can now be applied to much larger systems than before, bringing the area of biochemistry within the scope of electronic-structure quantum chemical methods. The rapid pace of progress of quantum chemistry makes it a very exciting research field; calculations that are too computationally expensive today may be feasible in a few months' time! This article reviews the current application of 'first-principles' quantum chemistry in biochemical and life sciences research, and discusses its future potential. The current capability of first-principles quantum chemistry is illustrated in a brief examination of computational studies on neurotransmitters, helical peptides, and DNA complexes.

  8. Accurate macromolecular crystallographic refinement: incorporation of the linear scaling, semiempirical quantum-mechanics program DivCon into the PHENIX refinement package.

    PubMed

    Borbulevych, Oleg Y; Plumley, Joshua A; Martin, Roger I; Merz, Kenneth M; Westerhoff, Lance M

    2014-05-01

    Macromolecular crystallographic refinement relies on sometimes dubious stereochemical restraints and rudimentary energy functionals to ensure the correct geometry of the model of the macromolecule and any covalently bound ligand(s). The ligand stereochemical restraint file (CIF) requires a priori understanding of the ligand geometry within the active site, and creation of the CIF is often an error-prone process owing to the great variety of potential ligand chemistry and structure. Stereochemical restraints have been replaced with more robust functionals through the integration of the linear-scaling, semiempirical quantum-mechanics (SE-QM) program DivCon with the PHENIX X-ray refinement engine. The PHENIX/DivCon package has been thoroughly validated on a population of 50 protein-ligand Protein Data Bank (PDB) structures with a range of resolutions and chemistry. The PDB structures used for the validation were originally refined utilizing various refinement packages and were published within the past five years. PHENIX/DivCon does not utilize CIF(s), link restraints and other parameters for refinement and hence it does not make as many a priori assumptions about the model. Across the entire population, the method results in reasonable ligand geometries and low ligand strains, even when the original refinement exhibited difficulties, indicating that PHENIX/DivCon is applicable to both single-structure and high-throughput crystallography.

  9. Accurate macromolecular crystallographic refinement: incorporation of the linear scaling, semiempirical quantum-mechanics program DivCon into the PHENIX refinement package

    PubMed Central

    Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Plumley, Joshua A.; Martin, Roger I.; Merz, Kenneth M.; Westerhoff, Lance M.

    2014-01-01

    Macromolecular crystallographic refinement relies on sometimes dubious stereochemical restraints and rudimentary energy functionals to ensure the correct geometry of the model of the macromolecule and any covalently bound ligand(s). The ligand stereochemical restraint file (CIF) requires a priori understanding of the ligand geometry within the active site, and creation of the CIF is often an error-prone process owing to the great variety of potential ligand chemistry and structure. Stereochemical restraints have been replaced with more robust functionals through the integration of the linear-scaling, semiempirical quantum-mechanics (SE-QM) program DivCon with the PHENIX X-ray refinement engine. The PHENIX/DivCon package has been thoroughly validated on a population of 50 protein–ligand Protein Data Bank (PDB) structures with a range of resolutions and chemistry. The PDB structures used for the validation were originally refined utilizing various refinement packages and were published within the past five years. PHENIX/DivCon does not utilize CIF(s), link restraints and other parameters for refinement and hence it does not make as many a priori assumptions about the model. Across the entire population, the method results in reasonable ligand geometries and low ligand strains, even when the original refinement exhibited difficulties, indicating that PHENIX/DivCon is applicable to both single-structure and high-throughput crystallography. PMID:24816093

  10. Photocatalytic oxidation dynamics of acetone on TiO 2: tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Chen; Wang, Xiaojing; Agalya, Govindasamy; Koyama, Michihisa; Kubo, Momoji; Miyamoto, Akira

    2005-05-01

    The clarification of the excited states dynamics on TiO 2 surface is important subject for the design of the highly active photocatalysts. In the present study, we applied our novel tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics method to the investigation on the photocatalytic oxidation dynamics of acetone by photogenerated OHrad radicals on the hydrated anatase TiO 2 surface. The elucidated photocatalytic reaction mechanism strongly supports the previous experimental proposal and finally the effectiveness of our new approach for the clarification of the photocatalytic reaction dynamics employing the large simulation model was confirmed.

  11. Parameters for the RM1 Quantum Chemical Calculation of Complexes of the Trications of Thulium, Ytterbium and Lutetium.

    PubMed

    Filho, Manoel A M; Dutra, José Diogo L; Rocha, Gerd B; Simas, Alfredo M; Freire, Ricardo O

    2016-01-01

    The RM1 quantum chemical model for the calculation of complexes of Tm(III), Yb(III) and Lu(III) is advanced. Subsequently, we tested the models by fully optimizing the geometries of 126 complexes. We then compared the optimized structures with known crystallographic ones from the Cambridge Structural Database. Results indicate that, for thulium complexes, the accuracy in terms of the distances between the lanthanide ion and its directly coordinated atoms is about 2%. Corresponding results for ytterbium and lutetium are both 3%, levels of accuracy useful for the design of lanthanide complexes, targeting their countless applications.

  12. Raman analysis of chemical substitution of Cd atoms by Hg in CdSe quantum dots and rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherevkov, Sergei A.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Ushakova, Elena V.; Litvin, Alexander P.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Prudnikau, Anatol V.; Artemyev, Mikhail V.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate nanocrystals of ternary compounds CdXHg1-XSe with 0chemical composition and the frequencies of CdSe-like LO and the HgSe-like TO and LO-modes. It is shown that the crystalline structure of the original CdSe NCs used for Cd/Hg substitution, either zinc blende or wurtzite, strongly affects the structural properties of the resultant CdXHg1-XSe quantum dots and rods.

  13. Quantum chemical approach for condensed-phase thermochemistry (II): Applications to formation and combustion reactions of liquid organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Atsushi; Nakai, Hiromi

    2015-03-01

    The harmonic solvation model (HSM), which was recently developed for evaluating condensed-phase thermodynamics by quantum chemical calculations (Nakai and Ishikawa, 2014), was applied to formation and combustion reactions of simple organic molecules. The conventional ideal gas model (IGM) considerably overestimated the entropies of the liquid molecules. The HSM could significantly improve this overestimation; mean absolute deviations for the Gibbs energies of the formation and combustion reactions were (49.6, 26.7) for the IGM and (9.7, 5.4) for the HSM in kJ/mol.

  14. Parameters for the RM1 Quantum Chemical Calculation of Complexes of the Trications of Thulium, Ytterbium and Lutetium

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Manoel A. M.; Dutra, José Diogo L.; Rocha, Gerd B.; Simas, Alfredo M.

    2016-01-01

    The RM1 quantum chemical model for the calculation of complexes of Tm(III), Yb(III) and Lu(III) is advanced. Subsequently, we tested the models by fully optimizing the geometries of 126 complexes. We then compared the optimized structures with known crystallographic ones from the Cambridge Structural Database. Results indicate that, for thulium complexes, the accuracy in terms of the distances between the lanthanide ion and its directly coordinated atoms is about 2%. Corresponding results for ytterbium and lutetium are both 3%, levels of accuracy useful for the design of lanthanide complexes, targeting their countless applications. PMID:27223475

  15. Micromechanical measurement of beating patterns in the quantum oscillatory chemical potential of InGaAs quantum wells due to spin-orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, Florian Wilde, Marc A.; Heyn, Christian; Hardtdegen, Hilde; Schäpers, Thomas; Grundler, Dirk

    2015-08-31

    The quantum oscillatory magnetization M(B) and chemical potential μ(B) of a two-dimensional (2D) electron system provide important and complementary information about its ground state energy at low temperature T. We developed a technique that provides both quantities in the same cool-down process via a decoupled static operation and resonant excitation of a micromechanical cantilever. On InGaAs/InP heterostructures, we observed beating patterns in both M(B) and μ(B) attributed to spin-orbit interaction. A significantly enhanced sensitivity in μ enabled us to extract Rashba and Dresselhaus parameters with high accuracy. The technique is powerful for detailed investigations on the electronic properties of 2D materials.

  16. Unification of ground-state aromaticity criteria - structure, electron delocalization, and energy - in light of the quantum chemical topology.

    PubMed

    Badri, Zahra; Foroutan-Nejad, Cina

    2016-04-28

    In the present account we investigate a theoretical link between the bond length, electron sharing, and bond energy within the context of quantum chemical topology theories. The aromatic stabilization energy, ASE, was estimated from this theoretical link without using isodesmic reactions for the first time. The ASE values obtained from our method show a meaningful correlation with the number of electrons contributing to the aromaticity. This theoretical link demonstrates that structural, electronic, and energetic criteria of aromaticity - ground-state aromaticity - belong to the same class and guarantees that they assess the same property as aromaticity. Theory suggests that interatomic exchange-correlation potential, obtained from the theory of Interacting Quantum Atoms (IQA), is linearly connected to the delocalization index of Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) and the bond length through a first order approximation. Our study shows that the relationship between energy, structure and electron sharing marginally deviates from the ideal linear form expected from the first order approximation. The observed deviation from linearity was attributed to a different contribution of exchange-correlation to the bond energy for the σ- and π-frameworks. Finally, we proposed two-dimensional energy-structure-based aromaticity indices in analogy to the electron sharing indices of aromaticity.

  17. Prediction of {sup 2}D Rydberg energy levels of {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li based on very accurate quantum mechanical calculations performed with explicitly correlated Gaussian functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bubin, Sergiy; Sharkey, Keeper L.; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2013-04-28

    Very accurate variational nonrelativistic finite-nuclear-mass calculations employing all-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian basis functions are carried out for six Rydberg {sup 2}D states (1s{sup 2}nd, n= 6, Horizontal-Ellipsis , 11) of the {sup 7}Li and {sup 6}Li isotopes. The exponential parameters of the Gaussian functions are optimized using the variational method with the aid of the analytical energy gradient determined with respect to these parameters. The experimental results for the lower states (n= 3, Horizontal-Ellipsis , 6) and the calculated results for the higher states (n= 7, Horizontal-Ellipsis , 11) fitted with quantum-defect-like formulas are used to predict the energies of {sup 2}D 1s{sup 2}nd states for {sup 7}Li and {sup 6}Li with n up to 30.

  18. [Quantum-chemical basics of pharmacokinetics (literary review and own investigations)].

    PubMed

    Chekman, I S; Horchakova, N O; Nebesna, T Iu; Kazakova, O O; Luk"ianchuk, V D; Bielienichev, I F; Zviagintseva, T V; Syrova, H O; Zagorodnyĭ, M I; Kravets', D S

    2012-01-01

    The work is devoted to the use of quantum-pharmacological approaches in pharmacokinetic investigations. The main objective of the pharmacological researches is to find new, more active and less toxic drugs. To date, such a search is carried out empirically. The current approach can not fully meet the needs of medicine in the new drugs, requires considerable time and financial costs and does not meet modern standards of bioethics. Quantum pharmacology leads to the synthesis of drugs with desired properties is much faster and more efficient. Computer prediction of pharmacokinetic and biopharmaceutical properties of biologically active substances can make 50-70% more effective development of original drugs.

  19. Evidence for excited-state intramolecular proton transfer in 4-chlorosalicylic acid from combined experimental and computational studies: Quantum chemical treatment of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Bijan Kumar; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2012-07-01

    The photophysical study of a pharmaceutically important chlorine substituted derivative of salicylic acid viz., 4-chlorosalicylic acid (4ClSA) has been carried out by steady-state absorption, emission and time-resolved emission spectroscopy. A large Stokes shifted emission band with negligible solvent polarity dependence marks the spectroscopic signature of excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) reaction in 4ClSA. Theoretical calculation by ab initio and Density Functional Theory methods yields results consistent with experimental findings. Theoretical potential energy surfaces predict the occurrence of proton transfer in S1-state. Geometrical and energetic criteria, Atoms-In-Molecule topological parameters, Natural Bond Orbital population analysis have been exploited to evaluate the intramolecular hydrogen bond (IMHB) interaction and to explore its directional nature. The inter-correlation between aromaticity and resonance assisted H-bond is also discussed in this context. Our results unveil that the quantum chemical treatment is a more accurate tool to assess hydrogen bonding interaction in comparison to geometrical criteria.

  20. Chemical Reaction CO+OH(•) → CO2+H(•) Autocatalyzed by Carbon Dioxide: Quantum Chemical Study of the Potential Energy Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Masunov, Artëm E; Wait, Elizabeth; Vasu, Subith S

    2016-08-04

    The supercritical carbon dioxide medium, used to increase efficiency in oxy combustion fossil energy technology, may drastically alter both rates and mechanisms of chemical reactions. Here we investigate potential energy surface of the second most important combustion reaction with quantum chemistry methods. Two types of effects are reported: formation of the covalent intermediates and formation of van der Waals complexes by spectator CO2 molecule. While spectator molecule alter the activation barrier only slightly, the covalent bonding opens a new reaction pathway. The mechanism includes sequential covalent binding of CO2 to OH radical and CO molecule, hydrogen transfer from oxygen to carbon atoms, and CH bond dissociation. This reduces the activation barrier by 11 kcal/mol at the rate-determining step and is expected to accelerate the reaction rate. The finding of predicted catalytic effect is expected to play an important role not only in combustion but also in a broad array of chemical processes taking place in supercritical CO2 medium. It may open a new venue for controlling reaction rates for chemical manufacturing.

  1. Chemical reaction CO+OH • → CO2+H• autocatalyzed by carbon dioxide: Quantum chemical study of the potential energy surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Masunov, Artem E.; Wait, Elizabeth; Vasu, Subith S.

    2016-06-28

    The supercritical carbon dioxide medium, used to increase efficiency in oxy combustion fossil energy technology, may drastically alter both rates and mechanisms of chemical reactions. Here we investigate potential energy surface of the second most important combustion reaction with quantum chemistry methods. Two types of effects are reported: formation of the covalent intermediates and formation of van der Waals complexes by spectator CO2 molecule. While spectator molecule alter the activation barrier only slightly, the covalent bonding opens a new reaction pathway. The mechanism includes sequential covalent binding of CO2 to OH radical and CO molecule, hydrogen transfer from oxygen tomore » carbon atoms, and CH bond dissociation. This reduces the activation barrier by 11 kcal/mol at the rate-determining step and is expected to accelerate the reaction rate. The finding of predicted catalytic effect is expected to play an important role not only in combustion but also in a broad array of chemical processes taking place in supercritical CO2 medium. Furthermore, tt may open a new venue for controlling reaction rates for chemical manufacturing.« less

  2. Computational simulation of the effect of quantum chemical parameters on the molecular docking of HMG-CoA reductase drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atlam, Faten M.; Awad, Mohamed K.; El-Bastawissy, Eman A.

    2014-10-01

    Density functional theory (B3LYP-6-31G(d)) was performed to study the effect of molecular and electronic structures, of 2-cyclopropyl-4-thiophenyl-quinoline mevalonolactones as potential hypocholesterolemic inhibitors, on their biological activities and discuss the correlation between the inhibition efficiency and quantum chemical parameters. Molecular docking was performed to investigate the mode of interactions between the investigated inhibitors and the active sites of the target Hydroxymethylglutaryl-Coenzyme A(HMG-CoA) reductase. The results could suggest further structural modifications to discover more potent and selective HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors. The catalytic active sites of HMGR have a positive electrostatic potential which is complemented with a negative electrostatic potential of the investigated drugs to form a stabilized complex. The presence of lipophobic groups, such as quinoline nucleus, cyclopropyl and substituted thiophenyl groups as well as a lactone moiety, is important for binding to the active sites. A good correlation between the experimental and theoretical data confirms that the quantum chemical methods and molecular docking studies are successful tools for enriching screening experiments aimed at the discovery of novel bioactive compounds.

  3. All electron quantum chemical calculation of the entire enzyme system confirms a collective catalytic device in the chorismate mutase reaction.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Toyokazu; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Kitaura, Kazuo

    2006-01-26

    To elucidate the catalytic power of enzymes, we analyzed the reaction profile of Claisen rearrangement of Bacillus subtilis chorismate mutase (BsCM) by all electron quantum chemical calculations using the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of ab initio-based quantum chemical calculations of the entire enzyme system, where we provide a detailed analysis of the catalytic factors that accomplish transition-state stabilization (TSS). FMO calculations deliver an ab initio-level estimate of the intermolecular interaction between the substrate and the amino acid residues of the enzyme. To clarify the catalytic role of Arg90, we calculated the reaction profile of the wild-type BsCM as well as Lys90 and Cit90 mutant BsCMs. Structural refinement and the reaction path determination were performed at the ab initio QM/MM level, and FMO calculations were applied to the QM/MM refined structures. Comparison between three types of reactions established two collective catalytic factors in the BsCM reaction: (1) the hydrogen bonds connecting the Glu78-Arg90-substrate cooperatively control the stability of TS relative to the ES complex and (2) the positive charge on Arg90 polarizes the substrate in the TS region to gain more electrostatic stabilization.

  4. Interplay among electrostatic, dispersion and steric interactions: Spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations of π-hydrogen bonded complexes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sumit; Singh, Santosh Kumar; Vaishnav, Jamuna Kanaram; Hill, J Grant; Das, Aloke

    2017-01-26

    π-hydrogen bonding interactions are ubiquitous in both materials and biology. Despite their relatively weak nature great progress has been made in their investigation by experimental and theoretical methods, but this becomes significantly more complicated when secondary intermolecular interactions are present. In this study the effect of successive methyl substitution on the supramolecular structure and interaction energy of indole⋯methylated benzene (ind⋯n-mb, n = 1-6) complexes is probed through a combination of supersonic jet experiment and benchmark quality quantum chemical calculations. It is demonstrated that additional secondary interactions introduce a subtle interplay among electrostatic and dispersion forces, as well as steric repulsion, which fine-tunes the overall structural motif. Resonant Two-Photon Ionization (R2PI) and IR-UV double resonance spectroscopy techniques were used to probe jet-cooled ind⋯n-mb (n = 2, 3, 6) complexes, with red-shifting of the N-H IR stretching frequency showing that increasing the degree of methyl substitution increases the strength of the primary N-H⋯π interaction. Ab initio harmonic frequency and binding energy calculations confirm this trend for all six complexes. Electronic spectra of the three dimers are broad and structureless, with quantum chemical calculations revealing that this is likely due to multiple tilted conformations of each dimer possessing similar stabilization energies.

  5. Chemical potential for the interacting classical gas and the ideal quantum gas obeying a generalized exclusion principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevilla, F. J.; Olivares-Quiroz, L.

    2012-05-01

    In this work, we address the concept of the chemical potential μ in classical and quantum gases towards the calculation of the equation of state μ = μ(n, T) where n is the particle density and T the absolute temperature using the methods of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Two cases seldom discussed in elementary textbooks are presented with detailed calculations. The first one refers to the explicit calculation of μ for the interacting classical gas exemplified by van der Waals gas. For this purpose, we used the method described by van Kampen (1961 Physica 27 783). The second one refers to the calculation of μ for ideal quantum gases that obey a generalized Pauli's exclusion principle that leads to statistics that go beyond the Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac cases. The audience targeted in this work corresponds mainly to advanced undergraduates and graduate students in the physical-chemical sciences but it is not restricted to them. In regard of this, we have put a special emphasis on showing some additional details of calculations that usually do not appear explicitly in textbooks.

  6. Prediction of Radical Scavenging Activities of Anthocyanins Applying Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) with Quantum Chemical Descriptors

    PubMed Central

    Jhin, Changho; Hwang, Keum Taek

    2014-01-01

    Radical scavenging activity of anthocyanins is well known, but only a few studies have been conducted by quantum chemical approach. The adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) is an effective technique for solving problems with uncertainty. The purpose of this study was to construct and evaluate quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for predicting radical scavenging activities of anthocyanins with good prediction efficiency. ANFIS-applied QSAR models were developed by using quantum chemical descriptors of anthocyanins calculated by semi-empirical PM6 and PM7 methods. Electron affinity (A) and electronegativity (χ) of flavylium cation, and ionization potential (I) of quinoidal base were significantly correlated with radical scavenging activities of anthocyanins. These descriptors were used as independent variables for QSAR models. ANFIS models with two triangular-shaped input fuzzy functions for each independent variable were constructed and optimized by 100 learning epochs. The constructed models using descriptors calculated by both PM6 and PM7 had good prediction efficiency with Q-square of 0.82 and 0.86, respectively. PMID:25153627

  7. Chemical Principles Revisited: Perspectives on the Uncertainty Principle and Quantum Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartell, Lawrence S.

    1985-01-01

    Explicates an approach that not only makes the uncertainty seem more useful to introductory students but also helps convey the real meaning of the term "uncertainty." General topic areas addressed include probability amplitudes, rationale behind the uncertainty principle, applications of uncertainty relations, and quantum processes. (JN)

  8. Reliable but Timesaving: In Search of an Efficient Quantum-chemical Method for the Description of Functional Fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Reis, H; Rasulev, B; Papadopoulos, M G; Leszczynski, J

    2015-01-01

    Fullerene and its derivatives are currently one of the most intensively investigated species in the area of nanomedicine and nanochemistry. Various unique properties of fullerenes are responsible for their wide range applications in industry, biology and medicine. A large pool of functionalized C60 and C70 fullerenes is investigated theoretically at different levels of quantum-mechanical theory. The semiempirial PM6 method, density functional theory with the B3LYP functional, and correlated ab initio MP2 method are employed to compute the optimized structures, and an array of properties for the considered species. In addition to the calculations for isolated molecules, the results of solution calculations are also reported at the DFT level, using the polarizable continuum model (PCM). Ionization potentials (IPs) and electron affinities (EAs) are computed by means of Koopmans' theorem as well as with the more accurate but computationally expensive ΔSCF method. Both procedures yield comparable values, while comparison of IPs and EAs computed with different quantum-mechanical methods shows surprisingly large differences. Harmonic vibrational frequencies are computed at the PM6 and B3LYP levels of theory and compared with each other. A possible application of the frequencies as 3D descriptors in the EVA (EigenVAlues) method is shown. All the computed data are made available, and may be used to replace experimental data in routine applications where large amounts of data are required, e.g. in structure-activity relationship studies of the toxicity of fullerene derivatives.

  9. Sulfate radical oxidation of aromatic contaminants: a detailed assessment of density functional theory and high-level quantum chemical methods.

    PubMed

    Pari, Sangavi; Wang, Inger A; Liu, Haizhou; Wong, Bryan M

    2017-03-22

    Advanced oxidation processes that utilize highly oxidative radicals are widely used in water reuse treatment. In recent years, the application of sulfate radical (SO4˙(-)) as a promising oxidant for water treatment has gained increasing attention. To understand the efficiency of SO4˙(-) in the degradation of organic contaminants in wastewater effluent, it is important to be able to predict the reaction kinetics of various SO4˙(-)-driven oxidation reactions. In this study, we utilize density functional theory (DFT) and high-level wavefunction-based methods (including computationally-intensive coupled cluster methods), to explore the activation energies of SO4˙(-)-driven oxidation reactions on a series of benzene-derived contaminants. These high-level calculations encompass a wide set of reactions including 110 forward/reverse reactions and 5 different computational methods in total. Based on the high-level coupled-cluster quantum calculations, we find that the popular M06-2X DFT functional is significantly more accurate for OH(-) additions than for SO4˙(-) reactions. Most importantly, we highlight some of the limitations and deficiencies of other computational methods, and we recommend the use of high-level quantum calculations to spot-check environmental chemistry reactions that may lie outside the training set of the M06-2X functional, particularly for water oxidation reactions that involve SO4˙(-) and other inorganic species.

  10. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics minimum free-energy path for accurate reaction energetics in solution and enzymes: Sequential sampling and optimization on the potential of mean force surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hao; Lu, Zhenyu; Parks, Jerry M.; Burger, Steven K.; Yang, Weitao

    2008-01-01

    To accurately determine the reaction path and its energetics for enzymatic and solution-phase reactions, we present a sequential sampling and optimization approach that greatly enhances the efficiency of the ab initio quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics minimum free-energy path (QM/MM-MFEP) method. In the QM/MM-MFEP method, the thermodynamics of a complex reaction system is described by the potential of mean force (PMF) surface of the quantum mechanical (QM) subsystem with a small number of degrees of freedom, somewhat like describing a reaction process in the gas phase. The main computational cost of the QM/MM-MFEP method comes from the statistical sampling of conformations of the molecular mechanical (MM) subsystem required for the calculation of the QM PMF and its gradient. In our new sequential sampling and optimization approach, we aim to reduce the amount of MM sampling while still retaining the accuracy of the results by first carrying out MM phase-space sampling and then optimizing the QM subsystem in the fixed-size ensemble of MM conformations. The resulting QM optimized structures are then used to obtain more accurate sampling of the MM subsystem. This process of sequential MM sampling and QM optimization is iterated until convergence. The use of a fixed-size, finite MM conformational ensemble enables the precise evaluation of the QM potential of mean force and its gradient within the ensemble, thus circumventing the challenges associated with statistical averaging and significantly speeding up the convergence of the optimization process. To further improve the accuracy of the QM/MM-MFEP method, the reaction path potential method developed by Lu and Yang [Z. Lu and W. Yang, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 89 (2004)] is employed to describe the QM/MM electrostatic interactions in an approximate yet accurate way with a computational cost that is comparable to classical MM simulations. The new method was successfully applied to two example reaction processes, the

  11. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics minimum free-energy path for accurate reaction energetics in solution and enzymes: Sequential sampling and optimization on the potential of mean force surface

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Hao; Lu Zhenyu; Parks, Jerry M.; Burger, Steven K.; Yang Weitao

    2008-01-21

    To accurately determine the reaction path and its energetics for enzymatic and solution-phase reactions, we present a sequential sampling and optimization approach that greatly enhances the efficiency of the ab initio quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics minimum free-energy path (QM/MM-MFEP) method. In the QM/MM-MFEP method, the thermodynamics of a complex reaction system is described by the potential of mean force (PMF) surface of the quantum mechanical (QM) subsystem with a small number of degrees of freedom, somewhat like describing a reaction process in the gas phase. The main computational cost of the QM/MM-MFEP method comes from the statistical sampling of conformations of the molecular mechanical (MM) subsystem required for the calculation of the QM PMF and its gradient. In our new sequential sampling and optimization approach, we aim to reduce the amount of MM sampling while still retaining the accuracy of the results by first carrying out MM phase-space sampling and then optimizing the QM subsystem in the fixed-size ensemble of MM conformations. The resulting QM optimized structures are then used to obtain more accurate sampling of the MM subsystem. This process of sequential MM sampling and QM optimization is iterated until convergence. The use of a fixed-size, finite MM conformational ensemble enables the precise evaluation of the QM potential of mean force and its gradient within the ensemble, thus circumventing the challenges associated with statistical averaging and significantly speeding up the convergence of the optimization process. To further improve the accuracy of the QM/MM-MFEP method, the reaction path potential method developed by Lu and Yang [Z. Lu and W. Yang, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 89 (2004)] is employed to describe the QM/MM electrostatic interactions in an approximate yet accurate way with a computational cost that is comparable to classical MM simulations. The new method was successfully applied to two example reaction processes, the

  12. Quinoxaline derivatives as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in hydrochloric acid medium: Electrochemical and quantum chemical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olasunkanmi, Lukman O.; Kabanda, Mwadham M.; Ebenso, Eno E.

    2016-02-01

    The corrosion inhibition potential of four quinoxaline derivatives namely, 1-[3-(4-methylphenyl)-5-(quinoxalin-6-yl)-4,5-dihydropyrazol-1-yl]butan-1-one (Me-4-PQPB), 1-(3-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-(quinoxalin-6-yl)-4,5-dihydropyrazol-1-yl)butan-1-one (Mt-4-PQPB), 1-[3-(3-methoxyphenyl)-5-(quinoxalin-6-yl)-4,5-dihydropyrazol-1-yl]butan-1-one (Mt-3-PQPB) and 1-[3-(2H-1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-5-(quinoxalin-6-yl)-4,5-dihydropyrazol-1-yl]butan-1-one (Oxo-1,3-PQPB) was studied for mild steel corrosion in 1 M HCl solution using electrochemical, spectroscopic techniques and quantum chemical calculations. The results of both potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic studies revealed that the compounds are mixed-type inhibitors and the order of corrosion inhibition efficiency at 100 ppm is Me-4-PQPB>Mt-3-PQPB>Oxo-1,3-PQPB>Mt-4-PQPB. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopic analyses confirmed the presence of chemical interactions between the inhibitors and mild steel surface. The adsorption of the inhibitor molecules on mild steel surface was found to be both physisorption and chemisorption but predominantly chemisorption. The experimental data obey Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Scanning electron microscopy studies revealed the formation of protective films of the inhibitors on mild steel surface. Quantum chemical parameters obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations support experimental results.

  13. Synthesis of copper quantum dots by chemical reduction method and tailoring of its band gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhash, P. G.; Nair, Swapna S.

    2016-05-01

    Metallic copper nano particles are synthesized with citric acid and CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) as surfactant and chlorides as precursors. The particle size and surface morphology are analyzed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy. The average size of the nano particle is found to be 3 - 10 nm. The optical absorption characteristics are done by UV-Visible spectrophotometer. From the Tauc plots, the energy band gaps are calculated and because of their smaller size the particles have much higher band gap than the bulk material. The energy band gap is changed from 3.67 eV to 4.27 eV in citric acid coated copper quantum dots and 4.17 eV to 4.52 eV in CTAB coated copper quantum dots.

  14. Experimental and Quantum Chemical Approaches to Develop Highly Selective Nanocatalysts for CO2 -free Power Circulation.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Miho; Ozawa, Nobuki; Kubo, Momoji

    2016-10-01

    Renewable electricity must be utilized to usefully suppress the atmospheric CO2 concentration and slow the progression of global warming. We have thus proposed a new concept involving CO2 -free electric power circulation systems via highly selective electrochemical reactions of alcohol/carboxylic acid redox couples. Design concepts for nanocatalysts able to catalyze highly selective electrochemical reactions are provided from both experimental and quantum mechanical perspectives.

  15. Multi-state Approach to Chemical Reactivity in Fragment Based Quantum Chemistry Calculations.

    PubMed

    Lange, Adrian W; Voth, Gregory A

    2013-09-10

    We introduce a multistate framework for Fragment Molecular Orbital (FMO) quantum mechanical calculations and implement it in the context of protonated water clusters. The purpose of the framework is to address issues of nonuniqueness and dynamic fragmentation in FMO as well as other related fragment methods. We demonstrate that our new approach, Fragment Molecular Orbital Multistate Reactive Molecular Dynamics (FMO-MS-RMD), can improve energetic accuracy and yield stable molecular dynamics for small protonated water clusters undergoing proton transfer reactions.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of CdSe quantum dots dispersed in PVA matrix by chemical route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Zubair M. S. H.; Ganaie, Mohsin; Khan, Shamshad A.; Husain, M.; Zulfequar, M.

    2016-05-01

    CdSe quantum dots using polyvinyl alcohol as a capping agent have been synthesized via a simple heat induced thermolysis technique. The structural analysis of CdSe/PVA thin film was studied by X-ray diffraction, which confirms crystalline nature of the prepared film. The surface morphology and particle size of the prepared sample was studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The SEM studies of CdSe/PVA thin film shows the average size of particles in the form of clusters of several quantum dots in the range of 10-20 nm. The morphology of CdSe/PVA thin film was further examined by TEM. The TEM image shows the fringes of tiny dots with average sizes of 4-7 nm. The optical properties of CdSe/PVA thin film were studied by UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy. The CdSe/PVA quantum dots follow the role of direct transition and the optical band gap is found to be 4.03 eV. From dc conductivity measurement, the observed value of activation energy was found to be 0.71 eV.

  17. PSSP-RFE: accurate prediction of protein structural class by recursive feature extraction from PSI-BLAST profile, physical-chemical property and functional annotations.

    PubMed

    Li, Liqi; Cui, Xiang; Yu, Sanjiu; Zhang, Yuan; Luo, Zhong; Yang, Hua; Zhou, Yue; Zheng, Xiaoqi

    2014-01-01

    Protein structure prediction is critical to functional annotation of the massively accumulated biological sequences, which prompts an imperative need for the development of high-throughput technologies. As a first and key step in protein structure prediction, protein structural class prediction becomes an increasingly challenging task. Amongst most homological-based approaches, the accuracies of protein structural class prediction are sufficiently high for high similarity datasets, but still far from being satisfactory for low similarity datasets, i.e., below 40% in pairwise sequence similarity. Therefore, we present a novel method for accurate and reliable protein structural class prediction for both high and low similarity datasets. This method is based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) in conjunction with integrated features from position-specific score matrix (PSSM), PROFEAT and Gene Ontology (GO). A feature selection approach, SVM-RFE, is also used to rank the integrated feature vectors through recursively removing the feature with the lowest ranking score. The definitive top features selected by SVM-RFE are input into the SVM engines to predict the structural class of a query protein. To validate our method, jackknife tests were applied to seven widely used benchmark datasets, reaching overall accuracies between 84.61% and 99.79%, which are significantly higher than those achieved by state-of-the-art tools. These results suggest that our method could serve as an accurate and cost-effective alternative to existing methods in protein structural classification, especially for low similarity datasets.

  18. Quantum cooperative process in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkel, Robert

    2006-03-01

    A model of a quantum cooperative process has accurately accounted for various quantitative observations.^1 That investigation considered chemical oscillations to be generated by generic quantum oscillators producing discrete quanta with well-defined energy and wavelength. The current work extends the theory by postulating that these oscillations arise from repetitive electron transfers in membranes. We find this produces a limit cycle completely consistent with the hypothetical generic oscillators, accurately reproduces the results of microwave irradiation experiments on yeast, and addresses limits for the smallest possible cell sizes. Questions of coherence in cells and implications for molecular information transfers are briefly considered. ^1R.W. Finkel, J. Theor. Biol. in press.

  19. Quantum chemical studies of some rhodanine azosulpha drugs as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in acidic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebenso, Eno E.; Arslan, Taner; Kandemirli, Fatma; Caner, Necmettin; Love, Ian

    The density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-31G (d,p) and B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) basis set levels and ab initio calculations using the HF/6-31G (d,p) and HF/6-311G(d,p) methods were performed on four rhodanine azosulpha drugs (namely 5-sulfadiazineazo-3-phenyl-2-thioxo-4-thiazolidinone, 5- sulfamethazineazo-3-phenyl-2-thioxo-4-thiazolidinone, 5-sulfadimethoxineazo-3-phenyl-2-thioxo- 4-thiazolidinone, and 5-sulfamethoxazoleazo-3-phenyl-2-thioxo-4-thiazolidinone) used as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in acidic medium to determine the relationship between the molecular structure of the rhodanine azosulpha drugs and inhibition efficiency(%IE). The quantum chemical parameters/descriptors, namely, EHOMO (highest occupied molecular orbital energy), ELUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy), the energy difference (ΔE) between EHOMO and ELUMO, dipole moment (μ), electron affinity (A), ionization potential (I), the absolute electronegativity (X), absolute hardness (η), softness (σ), polarizability (α), the Mulliken charges, and the fraction of electrons (ΔN) transfer from inhibitors to iron, were calculated and correlated with the experimental %IE. Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) approach has been used, and a composite index of some quantum chemical parameters/descriptors was performed to characterize the inhibition performance of the studied molecules. The results showed that the inhibition efficiency (%IE) of the rhodanine azo sulfa drugs studied was closely related to some of the quantum chemical parameters/descriptors but with varying degrees of correlation coefficient (R2). The %IE also increased with the increase in EHOMO and decrease in EHOMO-ELUMO; and the areas containing N atoms are the most possible sites for bonding to the metal iron surface by donating electrons to the metal. The HOMO orbitals consist of 61.73-63.04% double bonded S atom (7(S)), and most of the rest are concentrated on the rhodanine group; so, the

  20. Quantum chemical calculations of interatomic potentials for computer simulation of solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A comprehensive mathematical model by which the collective behavior of a very large number of atoms within a metal or alloy can accurately be simulated was developed. Work was done in order to predict and modify the strength of materials to suit our technological needs. The method developed is useful in studying atomic interactions related to dislocation motion and crack extension.

  1. Demonstration of a rapidly-swept external cavity quantum cascade laser for rapid and sensitive quantification of chemical mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumfield, B. E.; Taubman, M. S.; Phillips, M. C.

    2016-02-01

    A rapidly-swept external-cavity quantum cascade laser with an open-path Herriott cell is used to quantify gas-phase chemical mixtures of D2O and HDO at an update rate of 40 Hz (25 ms measurement time). The chemical mixtures were generated by evaporating D2O liquid near the open-path Herriott cell, allowing the H/D exchange reaction with ambient H2O to produce HDO. Fluctuations in the ratio of D2O and HDO on timescales of < 1 s due to the combined effects of plume transport and the H/D exchange chemical reaction are observed. Based on a noise equivalent concentration analysis of the current system, detection limits of 147.0 ppbv and 151.6 ppbv in a 25 ms measurement time are estimated for D2O and HDO respectively with a 127 m optical path. These detection limits are reduced to 23.0 and 24.0 ppbv with a 1 s averaging time for D2O and HDO respectively. Detection limits < 200 ppbv are also estimated for N2O, F134A, CH4, Acetone, and SO2 for a 25 ms measurement time.

  2. Network-Forming Nanoclusters in Binary As-S/Se Glasses: From Ab Initio Quantum Chemical Modeling to Experimental Evidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyla, M.

    2017-01-01

    Network-forming As2(S/Se)m nanoclusters are employed to recognize expected variations in a vicinity of some remarkable compositions in binary As-Se/S glassy systems accepted as signatures of optimally constrained intermediate topological phases in earlier temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry experiments. The ab initio quantum chemical calculations performed using the cation-interlinking network cluster approach show similar oscillating character in tendency to local chemical decomposition but obvious step-like behavior in preference to global phase separation on boundary chemical compounds (pure chalcogen and stoichiometric arsenic chalcogenides). The onsets of stability are defined for chalcogen-rich glasses, these being connected with As2Se5 ( Z = 2.29) and As2S6 ( Z = 2.25) nanoclusters for As-Se and As-S glasses, respectively. The physical aging effects result preferentially from global phase separation in As-S glass system due to high localization of covalent bonding and local demixing on neighboring As2Sem+1 and As2Sem-1 nanoclusters in As-Se system. These nanoclusters well explain the lower limits of reversibility windows in temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry, but they cannot be accepted as signatures of topological phase transitions in respect to the rigidity theory.

  3. Standoff detection of explosives and chemical agents using broadly tuned external-cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Eric B.; Rayner, Timothy; Weida, Miles; Crivello, Salvatore; Day, Timothy

    2007-10-01

    Civilian soft targets such as transportation systems are being targeted by terrorists using IEDs and suicide bombers. Having the capability to remotely detect explosives, precursors and other chemicals would enable these assets to be protected with minimal interruption of the flow of commerce. Mid-IR laser technology offers the potential to detect explosives and other chemicals in real-time and from a safe standoff distance. While many of these agents possess "fingerprint" signatures in the mid-IR (i.e. in the 3-20 micron regime), their effective interrogation by a practical, field-deployable system has been limited by size, complexity, reliability and cost constraints of the base laser technology. Daylight Solutions has addressed these shortcomings by developing compact, portable, broadly tunable mid-IR laser sources based upon external-cavity quantum cascade technology. This technology is now being applied by Daylight in system level architectures for standoff and remote detection of explosives, precursors and chemical agents. Several of these architectures and predicted levels of performance will be presented.

  4. Suppression of sodium nuclear magnetic resonance double-quantum coherence by chemical shift and relaxation reagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, Robert B.; Huntley, James J. A.; Jin, Haoran; Shapiro, Joseph I.

    1992-12-01

    An investigation into the signal suppression behavior of the paramagnetic shift and relaxation reagents, Dy(P3O10)27- and Gd(P3O10)27-, with regard to their use in the nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of sodium has been performed. Measurements of T1 and T2 relaxation time constants of sodium in normal saline, Krebs-Henseleit buffer, and human blood serum, as a function of concentration of these reagents showed that, although closely coupled in the saline and K-H buffer environments, in plasma T1 and T2 become decoupled, transverse relaxation dominating in comparison to longitudinal relaxation. Linewidth measurements further suggest that relaxation in the plasma milieu is controlled primarily by inherent T2 relaxation, rather than by field inhomogeneity or diffusion effects. Quantitative single-quantum (1Q) and double-quantum (2Q) intensity measurements, biexponential T2 relaxation measurements, and parametric studies of the preparation time of the 2Q pulse sequence, were obtained in suspensions of bovine serum albumin and human erythrocytes. The observed suppression of sodium 2Q coherence by paramagnetic shift and relaxation reagents was found to exhibit a complex behavior in albumin solutions, involving the biexponential T2 decay to be expected during the preparation time of the 2Q filter pulse sequence, as well as the optimum preparation time for production of the double-quantum coherence itself. The controlling factor for both of these effects is the biexponential amplitude function in the expression for the transverse magnetization observed following application of the 2Q pulse sequence. This in turn is determined entirely by the values for the slow and fast components of biexponential relaxation in sodium, which themselves depend upon the concentration of the macromolecular binding sites for quadrupolar interaction. A similar behavior has been observed in suspensions of human erythrocytes.

  5. Vibrational and scaled quantum chemical study of O,O-dimethyl S-methylcarbamoylmethyl phosphorodithioate, dimethoate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Guillermo Diaz; Celis, Freddy; Aracena, Andrés; Campos-Vallette, Marcelo; Aliaga, Alvaro E.; Koch, Rainer

    2012-04-01

    Infrared and Raman spectra of O,O-dimethyl S-methylcarbamoylmethylphosphorodithioate, dimethoate, have been recorded. Density functional theory, DFT, with the B3LYP functional was used for the optimization of the ground state geometry and simulation of the infrared and Raman spectra of this molecule. Calculated geometrical parameters fit very well with the experimental ones. Based on the recorded data, the DFT results and a normal coordinate analysis based on a scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) force field approach, a complete vibrational assignment was made for the first time.

  6. Vibrational and scaled quantum chemical study of O,O-dimethyl S-methylcarbamoylmethyl phosphorodithioate, dimethoate.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Guillermo Diaz; Celis, Freddy; Aracena, Andrés; Campos-Vallette, Marcelo; Aliaga, Alvaro E; Koch, Rainer

    2012-04-01

    Infrared and Raman spectra of O,O-dimethyl S-methylcarbamoylmethylphosphorodithioate, dimethoate, have been recorded. Density functional theory, DFT, with the B3LYP functional was used for the optimization of the ground state geometry and simulation of the infrared and Raman spectra of this molecule. Calculated geometrical parameters fit very well with the experimental ones. Based on the recorded data, the DFT results and a normal coordinate analysis based on a scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) force field approach, a complete vibrational assignment was made for the first time.

  7. The molecular structure of tris(dipivaloylmethanato) thulium: Gas-phase electron diffraction and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimenov, Oleg A.; Belova, Natalya V.; Sliznev, Valery V.

    2017-03-01

    The molecular structure of tris-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-heptane-3,5-dione thulium, or Tm(thd)3, has been studied by gas-phase electron diffraction monitored by mass spectrometry (GED/MS) and quantum chemical (DFT) calculations. Both the DFT(PBE0) calculations and the GED data collected at 400(8) K indicate that the molecules have D3 symmetry with a distorted antiprismatic TmO6 coordination geometry. According to GED refinements the twist angle θ, i.e. the angle of rotation of the upper O3 triangles relative to their position in regular prism is θ = 16.9(2.0)0. This value is close to both the equilibrium value obtained from the DFT calculations and to the thermal average value at the temperature of the GED experiment obtained by integration over the DFT potential energy surface. The bond distances (rh1) in the chelate ring are Tmsbnd O = 2.214(5) Å, Csbnd O = 1.278(4) Å, and Csbnd C = 1.404(3) Å. The DFT calculations yielded structure parameters in close agreement with those found experimentally. As an alternative to conventional Lewis model which was realized in NBO the topological analysis of ρ(r) in the frame of Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecule (QTAIM) was performed.

  8. Nonlinear absorption properties of AlGaAs/GaAs multiple quantum wells grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Hsing-Chung; Kost, A.; Kawase, M.; Hariz, A.; Dapkus, P. Daniel

    1988-01-01

    The nonlinear absorption properties of the excitonic resonances associated with multiple quantum wells (MQWs) in AlGaAs/GaAs grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition are reported. The dependence of the saturation properties on growth parameters, especially growth temperature, and the well width are described. The minimum measured saturation intensity for these materials is 250 W/sq cm, the lowest reported value to date. The low saturation intensities are the result of excellent minority carrier properties. A systematic study of minority carrier lifetimes in quantum wells are reported. Lifetimes range from 50-350 ns depending on growth temperature and well width. When corrected for lateral diffusion effects and the measured minority carrier lifetime, the saturation data suggest that saturation intensities as low as 2.3 W/sq cm can be achieved in this system. The first measurements of the dependence of the exciton area and the magnitude of the excitonic absorption on well width are prsented. The growth of MQW structures on transparent GaP substrates is demonstrated and the electroabsorption properties of these structures are reviewed.

  9. A comparative experimental and quantum chemical study on monomeric and dimeric structures of 3,5-dibromoanthranilic acid.

    PubMed

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Cinar, Mehmet

    2012-10-01

    This study presents the structural and spectroscopic characterization of 3,5-dibromoanthranilic acid with help of experimental techniques (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV, NMR) and quantum chemical calculations. The vibrational spectra of title compound were recorded in solid state with FT-IR and FT-Raman in the range of 4000-400 and 4000-50 cm(-1), respectively. The vibrational frequencies were also computed using B3LYP method of DFT with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The fundamental assignments were done on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) method. The (1)H, (13)C and DEPT NMR spectra were recorded in DMSO solution and calculated by gauge-invariant atomic orbitals (GIAO) method. The UV absorption spectra of the compound were recorded in the range of 200-400 nm in ethanol, water and DMSO solutions. Solvent effects were calculated using time-dependent density functional theory and CIS method. The ground state geometrical structure of compound was predicted by B3LYP method and compared with the crystallographic structure of similar compounds. All calculations were made for monomeric and dimeric structure of compound. Moreover, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and thermodynamic properties were performed. Mulliken atomic charges of neutral and anionic form of the molecule were computed and compared with anthranilic acid.

  10. Accurate fast method with high chemical yield for determination of uranium isotopes (234U, 235U, 238U) in granitic samples using alpha spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guirguis, Laila A.; Farag, Nagdy M.; Salim, Adham K.

    2015-03-01

    The present study aims to use the α-spectroscopy at Nuclear Materials Authority (NMA) of Egypt. A radiochemical technique for analysis uranium isotopes was carried out for ten mineralized granitic samples together with the International standards RGU-1 (IAEA) and St4 (NMA). Several steps of sample preparation, radiochemical separation and source preparation were performed before analysis. Uranium was separated from sample matrix with 0.2 M TOPO in cyclohexane as an extracting agent with a chemical yield 98.95% then uranium was purified from lanthanides and actinides present with 0.2 M TOA in xylene as an extracting agent. The pure fraction was electrodeposited on a mirror-polished copper disc from buffer solution (NaHSO4+H2SO4+NH4OH). Rectangle pt-electrode with an anode-cathode distance of 2 cm was used. Current was 900 mA and the electrodeposition time reach up to 120 min. The achieved results show that the chemical yield ranged between 87.9±6.8 and 98±8.6.

  11. Joint Raman spectroscopic and quantum chemical analysis of the vibrational features of Cs2RuO4

    PubMed Central

    Naji, M; Di Lemma, F; Kovács, A; Beneš, O; Manara, D; Colle, J-Y; Pagliosa, G; Raison, P; Konings, R J M

    2015-01-01

    The Raman spectroscopic characterization of the orthorhombic phase of Cs2RuO4 was carried out by means of group theory and quantum chemical analysis. Multiple models based on ruthenate (VI+) tetrahedra were tested, and characterization of all the active Raman modes was achieved. A comparison of Raman spectra of Cs2RuO4, Cs2MoO4, and Cs2WO4 was also performed. Raman laser heating induced a phase transition from an ordered to a disordered structure. The temperature-phase transition was calculated from the anti-Stokes/Stokes ratio and compared with the ones measured at macroscopic scale. The phase transition is connected with tilting and/or rotations of RuO4 tetrahedra, which lead to a disorder at the RuO4 sites. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Raman Spectroscopy published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26494941

  12. Transportation behavior of alkali ions through a cell membrane ion channel. A quantum chemical description of a simplified isolated model.

    PubMed

    Billes, Ferenc; Mohammed-Ziegler, Ildikó; Mikosch, Hans

    2012-08-01

    Quantum chemical model calculations were carried out for modeling the ion transport through an isolated ion channel of a cell membrane. An isolated part of a natural ion channel was modeled. The model channel was a calixarene derivative, hydrated sodium and potassium ions were the models of the transported ion. The electrostatic potential of the channel and the energy of the channel-ion system were calculated as a function of the alkali ion position. Both attractive and repulsive ion-channel interactions were found. The calculations - namely the dependence of the system energy and the atomic charges of the water molecules with respect to the position of the alkali ion in the channel - revealed the molecular-structural background of the potassium selectivity of this artificial ion channel. It was concluded that the studied ion channel mimics real biological ion channel quite well.

  13. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Visible) and quantum chemical studies of 4-Chloro-3-iodobenzophenone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkata Prasad, K.; Muthu, S.; Santhamma, C.

    2017-01-01

    The vibrational analysis of the substituted Benzophenone molecule 4-Chloro-3-iodobenzophenone (4, 3-ClIBP) is carried out using both FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra and also quantum chemical calculations of the scaled frequencies using the DFT method B3LYP/LanL2DZ basis set. The natural bond orbital analysis of this molecule has been carried out to describe the various intramolecular interactions responsible for the stabilization of the molecule. The HOMO, LUMO energy gap have been computed with the TD-DFT theory and the differences are compared with UV-absorption spectra. The statistical thermodynamic functions are calculated for the range of 100-1000 k. The Fukui functions are evaluated to describe the activity of the sites.

  14. High-efficiency InAs/GaAs quantum dot solar cells by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Katsuaki; Guimard, Denis; Bordel, Damien; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2012-05-01

    We fabricate a high-efficiency InAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD) solar cell. It contains five layers of high-density self-assembled InAs QDs grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition suppressing open-circuit-voltage (VOC) degradation. We develop a dual-layer anti-reflection coating of optimum thicknesses. The resulting cell exhibits efficiencies of 18.7% under AM1.5 G for 1 sun and 19.4% for 2 suns. Concentrator measurements demonstrate the advantage of QD use under concentrated illumination, owing to the significant increase in VOC. We also find a VOC offset of 0.3 V from the QD ground-state transition energies for QD cells, in contrast to 0.4 V for state-of-the-art bulk semiconductor cells.

  15. Quantum-chemical modeling of energy parameters and vibrational spectra of chain and cyclic clusters of monohydric alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, P.; Doroshenko, I.; Pogorelov, V.

    2014-05-01

    The specific peculiarities of alcohols such as heightened viscosity, boiling temperature and surface tension can be explained by the capability of their molecules to form relatively stable associates named clusters due to hydrogen bonding. In present work the stability of different chain-like and cyclic clusters of methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, 1-pentanol and 1-hexanol was investigated by means of quantum-chemical simulation and particular by recently developed DFT exchange-correlation functional M06-2X. The relative stability of the cluster structure was evaluated by the total energy per molecule at low temperatures (where all alcohols exist in solid state) and by the changing of the free Gibbs energy upon cluster formation at the room temperature. For the verification of revealed results the conformity of calculated IR spectra of the most stable cluster structures with the experimental IR spectra at different temperatures was analyzed.

  16. Synthesis, Spectroscopic, Structural and Quantum Chemical Studies of a New Imine Oxime and Its Palladium(II) Complex: Hydrolysis Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Yunus; Yilmaz, Veysel T; Buyukgungor, Orhan

    2016-01-21

    In this work, we report synthesis, crystallographic, spectroscopic and quantum chemical studies of a new imine oxime, namely (4-nitro-phenyl)-(1-phenyl-ethylimino)-acetaldehyde oxime (nppeieoH). Spectroscopic and X-ray diffraction studies showed that nppeieoH is hydrolyzed in aqueous solution, forming nitroisonitrosoacetophenone (ninap) and the hydrolysis product binds to Pd(II) to yield [Pd(nppeieo)(ninap)]. The mechanism of the hydrolysis reaction has been theoretically investigated in detail, using density functional theory (DFT) with the B3LYP method. The vibrational and the electronic spectra of nppeieoH and its Pd(II) complex, the HOMO and LUMO analysis, Mulliken atomic charges and molecular electrostatic potential were also performed. The predicted nonlinear optical properties of both compounds are higher than those of urea.

  17. Atmospheric-pressure epitaxial growth technique of a multiple quantum well by mist chemical vapor deposition based on Leidenfrost droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaharamura, Toshiyuki; Dang, Giang T.; Nitta, Noriko

    2016-10-01

    A multiple quantum well α-Fe2O3/α-Ga2O3 with parallel and coherent formation of uniform and highly single-crystalline layers on a sapphire substrate has been fabricated by open-air atmospheric-pressure solution-processed mist chemical vapor deposition (Mist CVD). This report demonstrates that complicated structures with atomic-level control can be fabricated even in non-vacuum conditions by the Mist CVD. This can be achieved via the precise control of the precursor flow and ambient temperature combined with the formation of mist droplets of the special Leidenfrost state, which increased the atomic migration length by 108 times more than that of traditional vacuum techniques. This work could be a milestone in the transformation from vacuum to non-vacuum thin film deposition techniques towards a green and sustainable industry.

  18. Using quantum chemical modeling and calculations for evaluation of cellulose potential for estrogen micropollutants removal from water effluents.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Amin; Asgarpour Khansary, Milad; Marjani, Azam; Shirazian, Saeed

    2017-03-03

    This paper is devoted to investigate the suitability of cellulose for estrogens micropollutants removal from water effluent. For this purpose, the sorption of eight estrogens including Estradiol, Estrone, Testosterone, Progesterone, Estriol, Mestranol, Ethinylestradiol and Diethylstilbestrol were investigated. The charge density profiles and sorption curves were obtained and discussed using quantum chemical calculations where the Accelrys Materials Studio software and COSMO-SAC model were employed. The geometry optimization of compound molecule and energy minimizations was performed using the Dmol3 Module and density functional theory of generalized gradient approximate and Volsko-Wilk-Nusair functional. We found that cellulose cannot be a reliable choice of sorbent for removal of Estrone and Estradiol, but it is a poor choice of sorbent for removal of Estriol, Ethinylestradiol. Cellulose can be used for Diethylstilbestrol, Mestranol, Testosterone and Progesterone removal from estrogens containing effluents.

  19. In Vivo Anti-Leukemia, Quantum Chemical Calculations and ADMET Investigations of Some Quaternary and Isothiouronium Surfactants

    PubMed Central

    El-Henawy, Ahmed A.; Khowdiary, Manal M.; Badawi, Abdelfattah B.; Soliman, Hussein M.

    2013-01-01

    Anti-leukemia screening of previously prepared isothiouronium and quaternary salts was performed, and some salts exhibited promising activity as anticancer agents. Quantum chemical calculations were utilized to explore the electronic structure and stability of these compounds. Computational studies have been carried out at the PM3 semiempirical molecular orbitals level, to establish the HOMO-LUMO, IP and ESP mapping of these compounds. The ADMET properties were also studied to gain a clear view of the potential oral bioavailability of these compounds. The surface properties calculated included critical micelle concentration (CMC), maximum surface excess (Γmax), minimum surface area (Amin), free energy of micellization (ΔGomic) and adsorption (ΔGoads). PMID:24276171

  20. Quantitative structure-activation barrier relationship modeling for Diels-Alder ligations utilizing quantum chemical structural descriptors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the present study, we show the correlation of quantum chemical structural descriptors with the activation barriers of the Diels-Alder ligations. A set of 72 non-catalysed Diels-Alder reactions were subjected to quantitative structure-activation barrier relationship (QSABR) under the framework of theoretical quantum chemical descriptors calculated solely from the structures of diene and dienophile reactants. Experimental activation barrier data were obtained from literature. Descriptors were computed using Hartree-Fock theory using 6-31G(d) basis set as implemented in Gaussian 09 software. Results Variable selection and model development were carried out by stepwise multiple linear regression methodology. Predictive performance of the quantitative structure-activation barrier relationship (QSABR) model was assessed by training and test set concept and by calculating leave-one-out cross-validated Q2 and predictive R2 values. The QSABR model can explain and predict 86.5% and 80% of the variances, respectively, in the activation energy barrier training data. Alternatively, a neural network model based on back propagation of errors was developed to assess the nonlinearity of the sought correlations between theoretical descriptors and experimental reaction barriers. Conclusions A reasonable predictability for the activation barrier of the test set reactions was obtained, which enabled an exploration and interpretation of the significant variables responsible for Diels-Alder interaction between dienes and dienophiles. Thus, studies in the direction of QSABR modelling that provide efficient and fast prediction of activation barriers of the Diels-Alder reactions turn out to be a meaningful alternative to transition state theory based computation. PMID:24171724

  1. Protonation of base pairs in RNA: context analysis and quantum chemical investigations of their geometries and stabilities.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Mohit; Sharma, Purshotam; Halder, Sukanya; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay; Mitra, Abhijit

    2011-02-17

    Base pairs involving protonated nucleobases play important roles in mediating global macromolecular conformational changes and in facilitation of catalysis in a variety of functional RNA molecules. Here we present our attempts at understanding the role of such base pairs by detecting possible protonated base pairs in the available RNA crystal structures using BPFind software, in their specific structural contexts, and by the characterization of their geometries, interaction energies, and stabilities using advanced quantum chemical computations. We report occurrences of 18 distinct protonated base pair combinations from a representative data set of RNA crystal structures and propose a theoretical model for one putative base pair combination. Optimization of base pair geometries was carried out at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level, and the BSSE corrected interaction energies were calculated at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory. The geometries for each of the base pairs were characterized in terms of H-bonding patterns observed, rmsd values observed on optimization, and base pair geometrical parameters. In addition, the intermolecular interaction in these complexes was also analyzed using Morokuma energy decomposition. The gas phase interaction energies of the base pairs range from -24 to -49 kcal/mol and reveal the dominance of Hartree-Fock component of interaction energy constituting 73% to 98% of the total interaction energy values. On the basis of our combined bioinformatics and quantum chemical analysis of different protonated base pairs, we suggest resolution of structural ambiguities and correlate their geometric and energetic features with their structural and functional roles. In addition, we also examine the suitability of specific base pairs as key elements in molecular switches and as nucleators for higher order structures such as base triplets and quartets.

  2. Chemically doped fluorescent carbon and graphene quantum dots for bioimaging, sensor, catalytic and photoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yan; Guo, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    Doping fluorescent carbon dots (DFCDs) with heteroatoms have recently become of great interest compared to traditional fluorescent materials because it provides a feasible and new way to tune the intrinsic properties of carbon quantum dots (CQDs) and graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to achieve new applications for them in different fields. Since the first report on nitrogen (N) doped GQDs in 2012, more effort is being focused on exploring different procedures for making new types of DFCDs with different heteroatoms. This mini review will summarize recent research progress on DFCDs. It first reviews various doping categories achieved up to now, looking back on the synthesis method and comparing the differences in synthesis approaches between the DFCDs and the undoped ones. Then it focuses on the advances on how the doping affects the optical properties, especially DFCDs doped with N, which have been investigated the most. Finally, different applications of DFCDs involving bio-imaging, sensing, catalysis and photoelectronic devices will be discussed. This review will give new insights into how to use different synthetic methods for tuning the structure of DFCDs, understanding the correlation between the doping and properties, and achieving new applications.

  3. Accurate quantum chemical modelling of the separation of Eu(3+) from Am(3+)/Cm(3+) by liquid-liquid extraction with Cyanex272.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jun; Weissmann, Daniel; Dolg, Michael; Chen, Xuebo

    2015-08-28

    The experimentally observed extraction complexes of trivalent lanthanide Eu(3+) and actinide Am(3+)/Cm(3+) cations with Cyanex272 [bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) phosphinic acid, denoted as HC272] and Cyanex301 [bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) dithiophosphinic acid, denoted as HC301] have been studied by using relativistic energy-consistent 4f- and 5f-in-core pseudopotentials for trivalent f elements, combined with density functional theory and a continuum solvation model. It has been found that, as a result of hydrogen bonding, HC272 exists primarily as a self-associated species, whereas HC301 is preferably a monomer. The calculations show that in case of all three M(3+) (M = Eu, Am, Cm) ions for HC272 the extraction complexes M[H(C272)2]3 are formed prior to M(C272)3, whereas for HC301 the extraction complexes M(C301)3 have priority over M[H(C301)2]3. The calculated M-O and M-S bond lengths and the M-P distances of these preferred extraction complexes agree very well with the available experimental data. The obtained changes of the Gibbs free energies in the liquid-liquid extraction reactions (1): Maqu(3+) + 3(HC272)2,org→ M[H(C272)2]3,org + 3Haqu(+) and (2): Maqu(3+) + 3HC301org→ M(C301)3,org + 3Haqu(+) agree with the experimentally observed thermodynamical priorities of HC272 and HC301, i.e., HC272 prefers Eu(3+) over Am(3+)/Cm(3+) and HC301 prefers Am(3+)/Cm(3+) over Eu(3+). The obtained changes of the Gibbs free energies in reaction (2) (Eu, 68.1 kJ mol(-1); Am, 46.5 kJ mol(-1)) agree quite well with the experimental findings (Eu, 63.3 kJ mol(-1); Am, 44.1 kJ mol(-1)).

  4. Remote explosive and chemical agent detection using broadly tunable mid-infrared external cavity quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, Timothy; Weida, Miles; Pushkarsky, Michael; Day, Timothy

    2007-04-01

    Terrorists both with IEDs and suicide bombers are targeting civilian infrastructures such as transportation systems. Although explosive detection technologies exist and are used effectively in aviation, these technologies do not lend themselves well to protecting open architecture soft targets, as they are focused on a checkpoint form factor that limits throughput. However, remote detection of explosives and other chemicals would enable these kinds of targets to be protected without interrupting the flow of commerce. Tunable mid-IR laser technology offers the opportunity to detect explosives and other chemicals remotely and quickly. Most chemical compounds, including explosives, have their fundamental vibrational modes in the mid-infrared region (3 to 15μm). There are a variety of techniques that focus on examining interactions that have proven effective in the laboratory but could never work in the field due to complexity, size, reliability and cost. Daylight Solutions has solved these problems by integrating quantum cascade gain media into external tunable cavities. This has resulted in miniaturized, broadly tunable mid-IR laser sources. The laser sources have a capability to tune to +/- 5% of their center wavelength, which means they can sweep through an entire absorption spectrum to ensure very good detection and false alarm performance compared with fixed wavelength devices. These devices are also highly portable, operate at room temperature, and generate 10's to 100's of mW in optical power, in pulsed and continuous wave configurations. Daylight Solutions is in the process of developing a variety of standoff explosive and chemical weapon detection systems using this technology.

  5. Quantum Probe and Design for a Chemical Compass with Magnetic Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jianming

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic fields as weak as Earth’s may affect the outcome of certain photochemical reactions that go through a radical pair intermediate. When the reaction environment is anisotropic, this phenomenon can form the basis of a chemical compass and has been proposed as a mechanism for animal magnetoreception. Here, we demonstrate how to optimize the design of a chemical compass with a much better directional sensitivity simply by a gradient field, e.g., from a magnetic nanostructure. We propose an experimental test of these predictions, and suggest design principles for a hybrid metallic-organic chemical compass. In addition to the practical interest in designing a biomimetic weak magnetic field sensor, our result shows that gradient fields can serve as powerful tools to probe spin correlations in radical pair reactions.

  6. Conceptual versus Algorithmic Learning in High School Chemistry: The Case of Basic Quantum Chemical Concepts--Part 2. Students' Common Errors, Misconceptions and Difficulties in Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papaphotis, Georgios; Tsaparlis, Georgios

    2008-01-01

    Part 2 of the findings are presented of a quantitative study (n = 125) on basic quantum chemical concepts taught at twelfth grade (age 17-18 years) in Greece. A paper-and-pencil test of fourteen questions was used that were of two kinds: five questions that tested recall of knowledge or application of algorithmic procedures (type-A questions);…

  7. Conceptual versus Algorithmic Learning in High School Chemistry: The Case of Basic Quantum Chemical Concepts--Part 1. Statistical Analysis of a Quantitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papaphotis, Georgios; Tsaparlis, Georgios

    2008-01-01

    Part 1 of the findings are presented of a quantitative study (n = 125) on basic quantum chemical concepts taught in the twelfth grade (age 17-18 years) in Greece. A paper-and-pencil test of fourteen questions was used. The study compared performance in five questions that tested recall of knowledge or application of algorithmic procedures (type-A…

  8. Application of Quantum Chemical Approximations to Environmental Problems: Prediction of Water Solubility for Nitro Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-10

    V Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry, Department of Molecular Structure, A.V. Bogatsky Physical-Chemical Institute, National Academy of Sciences of...Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Odessa, Ukraine V I C T O R E . K U Z ’ M I N Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry, Department of Molecular Structure...A.V. Bogatsky Physical-Chemical Institute, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Odessa, Ukraine M O H A M M A D Q A S I M U.S. Army ERDC, Vicksburg

  9. Cyclic voltammetry as a sensitive method for in situ probing of chemical transformations in quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Osipovich, Nikolai P; Poznyak, Sergei K; Lesnyak, Vladimir; Gaponik, Nikolai

    2016-04-21

    The application of electrochemical methods for the characterization of colloidal quantum dots (QDs) attracts considerable attention as these methods may allow for monitoring of some crucial parameters, such as energetic levels of conduction and valence bands as well as surface traps and ligands under real conditions of colloidal solution. In the present work we extend the applications of cyclic voltammetry (CV) to in situ monitoring of degradation processes of water-soluble CdTe QDs. This degradation occurs under lowering of pH to the values around 5, i.e. under conditions relevant to bioimaging applications of these QDs, and is accompanied by pronounced changes of their photoluminescence. Observed correlations between characteristic features of CV diagrams and the fluorescence spectra allowed us to propose mechanisms responsible for evolution of the photoluminescence properties as well as degradation pathway of CdTe QDs at low pH.

  10. Determination of enthalpies of formation of energetic molecules with composite quantum chemical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Manaa, M. Riad; Fried, Laurence E.; Kuo, I-Feng W.

    2016-02-01

    We report gas-phase enthalpies of formation for the set of energetic molecules NTO, DADE, LLM-105, TNT, RDX, TATB, HMX, and PETN using the G2, G3, G4, and ccCA-PS3 quantum composite methods. Calculations for HMX and PETN hitherto represent the largest molecules attempted with these methods. G3 and G4 calculations are typically close to one another, with a larger difference found between these methods and ccCA-PS3. Furthermore there is significant uncertainty in experimental values, the mean absolute deviation between the average experimental value and calculations are 12, 6, 7, and 3 kcal/mol for G2, G3, G4, and ccCA-PS3, respectively.

  11. Quantum cascade laser based active hyperspectral imaging for standoff detection of chemicals on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugger, S.; Fuchs, F.; Jarvis, J.; Yang, Q. K.; Rattunde, M.; Ostendorf, R.; Schilling, C.; Driad, R.; Bronner, W.; Aidam, R.; Wagner, J.; Tybussek, T.; Rieblinger, K.

    2016-02-01

    We employ active hyperspectral imaging using tunable mid-infrared (MIR) quantum cascade lasers for contactless identification of solid and liquid contaminations on surfaces. By collecting the backscattered laser radiation with a camera, a hyperspectral data cube, containing the spatially resolved spectral information of the scene is obtained. Data is analyzed using appropriate algorithms to find the target substances even on substrates with a priori unknown spectra. Eye-save standoff detection of residues of explosives and precursors over extended distances is demonstrated and the main purpose of our system. However, it can be applied to any substance with characteristic reflectance / absorbance spectrum. As an example, we present first results of monitoring food quality by distinguishing fresh and mold contaminated peanuts by their MIR backscattering spectrum.

  12. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    The application of ab initio quantum mechanical approaches in the study of metal atom clusters requires simplifying techniques that do not compromise the reliability of the calculations. Various aspects of the implementation of the effective core potential (ECP) technique for the removal of the metal atom core electrons from the calculation were examined. The ECP molecular integral formulae were modified to bring out the shell characteristics as a first step towards fulfilling the increasing need to speed up the computation of the ECP integrals. Work on the relationships among the derivatives of the molecular integrals that extends some of the techniques pioneered by Komornicki for the calculation of the gradients of the electronic energy was completed and a formulation of the ECP approach that quite naturally unifies the various state-of-the-art "shape- and Hamiltonian-consistent" techniques was discovered.

  13. Experimental and quantum chemical study of photochemical properties of 4-hydroxyquinoline.

    PubMed

    Sherin, Peter S; Gritsan, Nina P; Tsentalovich, Yuri P

    2009-11-01

    UV irradiation of aqueous 4-hydroxyquinoline (4HQN) solutions results in the formation of the triplet states with the quantum yields 30%, 35%, and 7.5% in acidic, neutral, and basic solutions, respectively. In neutral solutions, the keto form is the major tautomeric structure for ground, excited singlet and triplet states of 4HQN. Triplet 4HQN reacts with amino acids tryptophan and tyrosine and with antioxidant ascorbate via the mechanism of electron transfer. The individual experimental and calculated UV-Vis spectra of different acid-base forms of 4HQN in the ground and triplet excited states, as well as reduced and oxidized forms of 4HQN, are reported. Under intense laser irradiation 4HQN undergoes biphotonic ionization, the excited singlet state being the precursor for photoionization.

  14. Mixed quantum-classical studies of energy partitioning in unimolecular chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bladow, Landon Lowell

    A mixed quantum-classical reaction path Hamiltonian method is utilized to study the dynamics of unimolecular reactions. The method treats motion along the reaction path classically and treats the transverse vibrations quantum mechanically. The theory leads to equations that predict the disposai of the exit-channel potential energy to product translation and vibration. In addition, vibrational state distributions are obtained for the product normal modes. Vibrational excitation results from the curvature of the minimum energy reaction path. The method is applied to six unimolecular reactions: HF elimination from fluoroethane, 1,1-difluoroethane, 1,1-difluoroethene, and trifluoromethane; and HCl elimination from chloroethane and acetyl chloride. The minimum energy paths were calculated at either the MP2 or B3LYP level of theory. In all cases, the majority of the vibrational excitation of the products occurs in the HX fragment. The results are compared to experimental data and other theoretical results, where available. The best agreement between the experimental and calculated HX vibrational distributions is found for the halogenated ethanes, and the experimental deduction that the majority of the HX vibrational excitation arises from the potential energy release is supported. It is believed that the excess energy provided in experiments contributes to the poorer agreement between experiment and theory observed for HF elimination from 1,1-difluoroethene and trifluoromethane. An attempt is described to incorporate a treatment of the excess energy into the present method. However, the sign of the curvature coupling elements is then found to affect the dynamics. Overall, the method appears to be an efficient dynamical tool for modeling the disposal of the exit-channel potential energy in unimolecular reactions.

  15. Interspecies scaling of urinary excretory amounts of nine drugs belonging to different therapeutic areas with diverse chemical structures - accurate prediction of the human urinary excretory amounts.

    PubMed

    Bhamidipati, Ravi Kanth; Mullangi, Ramesh; Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2017-02-01

    1. The human urinary excretory amounts of total drug (parent + metabolites) were predicted for nine drugs with diverse chemical structures using simple allometry. The drugs used for scaling were cephapirin, olanzapine, labetolol, carisbamate, voriconazole, tofacitinib, nevirapine, ropinirole, and cyclindole. 2. The traditional allometric scaling was attempted using Y = aW(b) relationship. The corresponding predicted urinary amounts were converted into % recovery by using appropriate human dose. Appropriate statistical tests comprising of fold-difference (predicted/observed values) and error calculations (MAE and RMSE) were performed. 3. The interspecies scaling of all nine drugs tested showed excellent correlation (r > 0.9672). The predictions for eight out of nine drugs (exception was cephaphirin) were contained within 0.80-1.25 fold-differences. The MAE and RMSE were within ± 18% and 14.64%, respectively. 4. The present work supported the potential application of prospective allometry scaling to predict the urinary excretory amounts of the total drug and gauge any issues for the renal handling of the total drug.

  16. Potential interstellar noble gas molecules: ArOH+ and NeOH+ rovibrational analysis from quantum chemical quartic force fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theis, Riley A.; Fortenberry, Ryan C.

    2016-03-01

    The discovery of ArH+ in the interstellar medium has shown that noble gas chemistry may be of more chemical significance than previously believed. The present work extends the known chemistry of small noble gas molecules to NeOH+ and ArOH+. Besides their respective neonium and argonium diatomic cation cousins, these hydroxyl cation molecules are the most stable small noble gas molecules analyzed of late. ArOH+ is once again more stable than the neon cation, but both are well-behaved enough for a complete quartic force field analysis of their rovibrational properties. The Ar-O bond in ArOH+ , for instance, is roughly three-quarters of the strength of the Ar-H bond in ArH+ highlighting the rigidity of this system. The rotational constants, geometries, and vibrational frequencies for both molecules and their various isotopologues are computed from ab initio quantum chemical theory at high-level, and it is shown that these cations may form in regions where peroxy or weakly-bound alcohols may be present. The resulting data should be of significant assistance for the laboratory or observational analysis of these potential interstellar molecules.

  17. Very narrow SiGe/Si quantum wells deposited by low-temperature atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Gruetzmacher, D.A.; Sedgwick, T.O.; Northrop, G.A.

    1993-05-01

    The optical, structural, and electrical properties of very narrow SiGe quantum wells grown by {open_quotes}ultra-clean{close_quotes} atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) are investigated. X-ray reflectivity data reveal abrupt interfaces with a root-mean-square roughness of not more than 0.2 nm. For the first time narrow (4.3 meV) excitonic photoluminescence (PL) spectra were obtained from APCVD grown samples containing SiGe wells with 12.5% to 32.5% Ge. For the narrowest wells PL doublets are observed which are attributed to atomic steps at the SiGe/Si interfaces. The Pl and x-ray diffractometry data show that process deposition control for well and barrier width is within the monolayer range. Resonant tunneling diodes fabricated with 2.5-mm-wide Si{sub 0.75}Ge{sub 0.25} wells show world record peak to valley ratios of 4.2. Magneto-transport measurements performed at high magnetic fields of two-dimensional hole gases exhibit pronounced Hall plateaus and well-defined Shubnikov de Hass oscillations, indicating high material quality. The results give evidence that atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition, which relies on gas switching sequences of the reactive gases in a hydrogen ambience, is able to produce interface abruptness comparable if not better than reported by any other technique. 22 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Comparative electron paramagnetic resonance investigation of reduced graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes with different chemical functionalities for quantum dot attachment

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Chuyen V.; Krueger, Michael E-mail: emre.erdem@physchem.uni-freiburg.de; Eck, Michael; Weber, Stefan; Erdem, Emre E-mail: emre.erdem@physchem.uni-freiburg.de

    2014-03-31

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been applied to different chemically treated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A narrow EPR signal is visible at g = 2.0029 in both GO and CNT-Oxide from carbon-related dangling bonds. EPR signals became broader and of lower intensity after oxygen-containing functionalities were reduced and partially transformed into thiol groups to obtain thiol-functionalized reduced GO (TrGO) and thiol-functionalized CNT (CNT-SH), respectively. Additionally, EPR investigation of CdSe quantum dot-TrGO hybrid material reveals complete quenching of the TrGO EPR signal due to direct chemical attachment and electronic coupling. Our work confirms that EPR is a suitable tool to detect spin density changes in different functionalized nanocarbon materials and can contribute to improved understanding of electronic coupling effects in nanocarbon-nanoparticle hybrid nano-composites promising for various electronic and optoelectronic applications.

  19. New insights into the tropospheric oxidation of isoprene: combining field measurements, laboratory studies, chemical modelling and quantum theory.

    PubMed

    Whalley, Lisa; Stone, Daniel; Heard, Dwayne

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter we discuss some of the recent work directed at further understanding the chemistry of our atmosphere in regions of low NO x , such as forests, where there are considerable emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds, for example reactive hydrocarbons such as isoprene. Recent field measurements have revealed some surprising results, for example that OH concentrations are measured to be considerably higher than can be understood using current chemical mechanisms. It has also not proven possible to reconcile field measurements of other species, such as oxygenated VOCs, or emission fluxes of isoprene, using current mechanisms. Several complementary approaches have been brought to bear on formulating a solution to this problem, namely field studies using state-of-the-art instrumentation, chamber studies to isolate sub-sections of the chemistry, laboratory studies to measure rate coefficients, product branching ratios and photochemical yields, the development of ever more detailed chemical mechanisms, and high quality ab initio quantum theory to calculate the energy landscape for relevant reactions and to enable the rates of formation of products and intermediates for previously unknown and unstudied reactions to be predicted. The last few years have seen significant activity in this area, with several contrasting postulates put forward to explain the experimental findings, and here we attempt to synthesise the evidence and ideas.

  20. B36 borophene as an electronic sensor for formaldehyde: Quantum chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahbazi Kootenaei, Amirhossein; Ansari, Goodarz

    2016-08-01

    Pristine carbon nanotubes and graphene show great sensitivity toward several lethal gases but cannot identify some extremely toxic chemicals such as formaldehyde (HCOH). Recent successful synthesis of all-boron graphene-like sheets attracted strong interest in exploring their possible applications. Herein, we inspected the potential application of B36 borophene sheet as a sensor for HCOH detection, using density functional theory computations. Different theoretical levels including B97D and Minnesota 06 functionals with different basis sets were employed. It was predicted that the electrical conductivity of B36 borophene significantly increases at the presence of HCOH molecules, thereby generating an electrical signal. The electrical signal is increased by increasing the number of adsorbed HCOH molecules, indicating that this sensor is sensitive to the concentration (or pressure) of HCOH gas. These results suggest that the pristine borophene may be used in the HCOH chemical sensors.

  1. Theory and Computing of Gas Phase Chemical Reactions: From Exact Quantum to Approximates Dynamical Treatments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-08

    Phys. 110, 5526 (1999); Chem. Phys. 242, 341(1999). [51] R. M. Dreizler and E. K. U. Gross, Density Functional Theory (Springer Verlag, Berlin, 1990...the right hand side member of expression 3 can be derived from the square modulus of the S matrix Theory and Computing of Gas Phase Chemical...deal at the same time with different terms of the electronic functions manifolds (15). In these approaches the Theory and Computing of Gas Phase

  2. Quantum origins of the Iczkowski-Margrave model of chemical potential

    SciTech Connect

    Valone, Steven M

    2010-01-01

    Charge flow in materials is controlled at the atomistic level through some model of the chemical potential, such as the Iczkowski-Margrave (IM) model. This model is built largely on heuristic arguments. Here a model Hamiltonian is constructed at the atomistic level commensurate with the IM model. Essential properties of the model Hamiltonian are presented, including a possible revision of the charge dependence in the IM model. Transitional properties of the model are shown to be central to regulating charge flow.

  3. Probing protein environment in an enzymatic process: All-electron quantum chemical analysis combined with ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical modeling of chorismate mutase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Toyokazu

    2008-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the electronic character of protein environment in enzymatic processes by performing all-electron QM calculations based on the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method. By introducing a new computational strategy combining all-electron QM analysis with ab initio QM/MM modeling, we investigated the details of molecular interaction energy between a reactive substrate and amino acid residues at a catalytic site. For a practical application, we selected the chorismate mutase catalyzed reaction as an example. Because the computational time required to perform all-electron QM reaction path searches was very large, we employed the ab initio QM/MM modeling technique to construct reliable reaction profiles and performed all-electron FMO calculations for the selected geometries. The main focus of the paper is to analyze the details of electrostatic stabilization, which is considered to be the major feature of enzymatic catalyses, and to clarify how the electronic structure of proteins is polarized in response to the change in electron distribution of the substrate. By performing interaction energy decomposition analysis from a quantum chemical viewpoint, we clarified the relationship between the location of amino acid residues on the protein domain and the degree of electronic polarization of each residue. In particular, in the enzymatic transition state, Arg7, Glu78, and Arg90 are highly polarized in response to the delocalized electronic character of the substrate, and as a result, a large amount of electrostatic stabilization energy is stored in the molecular interaction between the enzyme and the substrate and supplied for transition state stabilization.

  4. Probing protein environment in an enzymatic process: All-electron quantum chemical analysis combined with ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical modeling of chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Toyokazu

    2008-09-28

    In this study, we investigated the electronic character of protein environment in enzymatic processes by performing all-electron QM calculations based on the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method. By introducing a new computational strategy combining all-electron QM analysis with ab initio QM/MM modeling, we investigated the details of molecular interaction energy between a reactive substrate and amino acid residues at a catalytic site. For a practical application, we selected the chorismate mutase catalyzed reaction as an example. Because the computational time required to perform all-electron QM reaction path searches was very large, we employed the ab initio QM/MM modeling technique to construct reliable reaction profiles and performed all-electron FMO calculations for the selected geometries. The main focus of the paper is to analyze the details of electrostatic stabilization, which is considered to be the major feature of enzymatic catalyses, and to clarify how the electronic structure of proteins is polarized in response to the change in electron distribution of the substrate. By performing interaction energy decomposition analysis from a quantum chemical viewpoint, we clarified the relationship between the location of amino acid residues on the protein domain and the degree of electronic polarization of each residue. In particular, in the enzymatic transition state, Arg7, Glu78, and Arg90 are highly polarized in response to the delocalized electronic character of the substrate, and as a result, a large amount of electrostatic stabilization energy is stored in the molecular interaction between the enzyme and the substrate and supplied for transition state stabilization.

  5. Tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics simulations for the elucidation of chemical reaction dynamics in SiC etching with SF6/O2 plasma.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroshi; Kuwahara, Takuya; Kawaguchi, Kentaro; Higuchi, Yuji; Ozawa, Nobuki; Kubo, Momoji

    2016-03-21

    We used our etching simulator [H. Ito et al., J. Phys. Chem. C, 2014, 118, 21580-21588] based on tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics (TB-QCMD) to elucidate SiC etching mechanisms. First, the SiC surface is irradiated with SF5 radicals, which are the dominant etchant species in experiments, with the irradiation energy of 300 eV. After SF5 radicals bombard the SiC surface, Si-C bonds dissociate, generating Si-F, C-F, Si-S, and C-S bonds. Then, etching products, such as SiS, CS, SiFx, and CFx (x = 1-4) molecules, are generated and evaporated. In particular, SiFx is the main generated species, and Si atoms are more likely to vaporize than C atoms. The remaining C atoms on SiC generate C-C bonds that may decrease the etching rate. Interestingly, far fewer Si-Si bonds than C-C bonds are generated. We also simulated SiC etching with SF3 radicals. Although the chemical reaction dynamics are similar to etching with SF5 radicals, the etching rate is lower. Next, to clarify the effect of O atom addition on the etching mechanism, we also simulated SiC etching with SF5 and O radicals/atoms. After bombardment with SF5 radicals, Si-C bonds dissociate in a similar way to the etching without O atoms. In addition, O atoms generate many C-O bonds and COy (y = 1-2) molecules, inhibiting the generation of C-C bonds. This indicates that O atom addition improves the removal of C atoms from SiC. However, for a high O concentration, many C-C and Si-Si bonds are generated. When the O atoms dissociate the Si-C bonds and generate dangling bonds, the O atoms terminate only one or two dangling bonds. Moreover, at high O concentrations there are fewer S and F atoms to terminate the dangling bonds than at low O concentration. Therefore, few dangling bonds of dissociated Si and C atoms are terminated, and they form many Si-Si and C-C bonds. Furthermore, we propose that the optimal O concentration is 50-60% because both Si and C atoms generate many etching products producing fewer C

  6. Combined Quantum Chemical/Raman Spectroscopic Analyses of Li+ Cation Solvation: Cyclic Carbonate Solvents - Ethylene Carbonate and Propylene Earbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Joshua L.; Borodin, Oleg; Seo, D. M.; Henderson, Wesley A.

    2014-12-01

    Combined computational/Raman spectroscopic analyses of ethylene carbonate (EC) and propylene carbonate (PC) solvation interactions with lithium salts are reported. It is proposed that previously reported Raman analyses of (EC)n-LiX mixtures have utilized faulty assumptions. In the present studies, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have provided corrections in terms of both the scaling factors for the solvent's Raman band intensity variations and information about band overlap. By accounting for these factors, the solvation numbers obtained from two different EC solvent bands are in excellent agreement with one another. The same analysis for PC, however, was found to be quite challenging. Commercially available PC is a racemic mixture of (S)- and (R)-PC isomers. Based upon the quantum chemistry calculations, each of these solvent isomers may exist as multiple conformers due to a low energy barrier for ring inversion, making deconvolution of the Raman bands daunting and inherently prone to significant error. Thus, Raman spectroscopy is able to accurately determine the extent of the EC...Li+ cation solvation interactions using the provided methodology, but a similar analysis of PC...Li+ cation solvation results in a significant underestimation of the actual solvation numbers.

  7. Molcas 8: New capabilities for multiconfigurational quantum chemical calculations across the periodic table.

    PubMed

    Aquilante, Francesco; Autschbach, Jochen; Carlson, Rebecca K; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Delcey, Mickaël G; De Vico, Luca; Fdez Galván, Ignacio; Ferré, Nicolas; Frutos, Luis Manuel; Gagliardi, Laura; Garavelli, Marco; Giussani, Angelo; Hoyer, Chad E; Li Manni, Giovanni; Lischka, Hans; Ma, Dongxia; Malmqvist, Per Åke; Müller, Thomas; Nenov, Artur; Olivucci, Massimo; Pedersen, Thomas Bondo; Peng, Daoling; Plasser, Felix; Pritchard, Ben; Reiher, Markus; Rivalta, Ivan; Schapiro, Igor; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Stenrup, Michael; Truhlar, Donald G; Ungur, Liviu; Valentini, Alessio; Vancoillie, Steven; Veryazov, Valera; Vysotskiy, Victor P; Weingart, Oliver; Zapata, Felipe; Lindh, Roland

    2016-02-15

    In this report, we summarize and describe the recent unique updates and additions to the Molcas quantum chemistry program suite as contained in release version 8. These updates include natural and spin orbitals for studies of magnetic properties, local and linear scaling methods for the Douglas-Kroll-Hess transformation, the generalized active space concept in MCSCF methods, a combination of multiconfigurational wave functions with density functional theory in the MC-PDFT method, additional methods for computation of magnetic properties, methods for diabatization, analytical gradients of state average complete active space SCF in association with density fitting, methods for constrained fragment optimization, large-scale parallel multireference configuration interaction including analytic gradients via the interface to the Columbus package, and approximations of the CASPT2 method to be used for computations of large systems. In addition, the report includes the description of a computational machinery for nonlinear optical spectroscopy through an interface to the QM/MM package Cobramm. Further, a module to run molecular dynamics simulations is added, two surface hopping algorithms are included to enable nonadiabatic calculations, and the DQ method for diabatization is added. Finally, we report on the subject of improvements with respects to alternative file options and parallelization.

  8. Quantum chemical study on the coordination environment of the catalytic zinc ion in matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Natalia; Suarez, Dimas; Sordo, Tomás L

    2006-11-30

    X-ray analyses of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have shown that the catalytic zinc ion (Zn1) can bind to one to three water molecules in addition to three conserved histidine residues. To estimate the relative stability of the possible Zn1 coordination structures in the active site of the MMPs, we carry out computational analyses on the coordination environment of the Zn1 ion in the gelatinase A enzyme (or matrix metalloproteinase 2; MMP-2). Four-, five-, and six-coordinated complexes representative of the Zn1 site are fully characterized by means of quantum mechanical (QM) methodologies. On one hand, B3LYP/LACVP* minimizations of various cluster models of the MMP-2 active site show that the trigonal bipyramidal geometry is energetically favored in the gas phase and that continuum solvent effects stabilize preferentially the tetrahedral complexes. On the other hand, B3LYP/OPLS-AA hybrid QM/molecular mechanical calculations in the solvated catalytic domain of the MMP-2 enzyme complemented with electrostatic Poisson-Boltzmann calculations show that the mature enzyme presents most likely a Zn1 ion coordinated by three histidine residues and two water molecules, while the active site glutamic acid is negatively charged. In consonance with X-ray diffraction data, other possible Zn1 configurations, a six-coordinated structure with Zn1-water as well as four- and five-coordinated complexes with a Zn1-bound hydroxide, are predicted to be very close in energy.

  9. ORBKIT: A modular python toolbox for cross-platform postprocessing of quantum chemical wavefunction data.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Gunter; Pohl, Vincent; Tremblay, Jean Christophe; Paulus, Beate; Hege, Hans-Christian; Schild, Axel

    2016-06-15

    ORBKIT is a toolbox for postprocessing electronic structure calculations based on a highly modular and portable Python architecture. The program allows computing a multitude of electronic properties of molecular systems on arbitrary spatial grids from the basis set representation of its electronic wavefunction, as well as several grid-independent properties. The required data can be extracted directly from the standard output of a large number of quantum chemistry programs. ORBKIT can be used as a standalone program to determine standard quantities, for example, the electron density, molecular orbitals, and derivatives thereof. The cornerstone of ORBKIT is its modular structure. The existing basic functions can be arranged in an individual way and can be easily extended by user-written modules to determine any other derived quantity. ORBKIT offers multiple output formats that can be processed by common visualization tools (VMD, Molden, etc.). Additionally, ORBKIT possesses routines to order molecular orbitals computed at different nuclear configurations according to their electronic character and to interpolate the wavefunction between these configurations. The program is open-source under GNU-LGPLv3 license and freely available at https://github.com/orbkit/orbkit/. This article provides an overview of ORBKIT with particular focus on its capabilities and applicability, and includes several example calculations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Synthesis, characterization, antibacterial activity and quantum chemical studies of N'-Acetyl propane sulfonic acid hydrazide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alyar, Saliha; Alyar, Hamit; Ozdemir, Ummuhan Ozmen; Sahin, Omer; Kaya, Kerem; Ozbek, Neslihan; Gunduzalp, Ayla Balaban

    2015-08-01

    A new N'-Acetyl propane sulfonic acid hydrazide, C3H7sbnd SO2sbnd NHsbnd NHsbnd COCH3 (Apsh, an sulfon amide compound) has been synthesized for the first time. The structure of Apsh was investigated using elemental analysis, spectral (IR, 1H/13C NMR) measurements. In addition, molecular structure of the Apsh was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique and found that the compound crystallizes in monoclinic, space group P 21/c. 1H and 13C shielding tensors for crystal structure were calculated with GIAO/DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) methods in CDCl3. The structure of Apsh is optimized using Density Functional Theory (DFT) method. The vibrational band assignments were performed at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) theory level combined with scaled quantum mechanics force field (SQMFF) methodology. The theoretical IR frequencies are found to be in good agreement with the experimental IR frequencies. Nonlinear optical (NLO) behaviour of Apsh is also examined by the theoretically predicted values of dipole moment (μ), polarizability (α0) and first hyperpolarizability (βtot). The antibacterial activities of synthesized compound were studied against Gram positive bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 23212, Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 34384, Gram negative bacteria: Eschericha coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 70063 by using microdilution method (as MICs) and disc diffusion method.

  11. Unexpected Giant-Gap Quantum Spin Hall Insulator in Chemically Decorated Plumbene Monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Zhang, Chang-wen; Ji, Wei-xiao; Zhang, Run-wu; Li, Sheng-shi; Yan, Shi-shen; Zhang, Bao-min; Li, Ping; Wang, Pei-ji

    2016-01-01

    Quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect of two-dimensional (2D) materials features edge states that are topologically protected from backscattering by time-reversal symmetry. However, the major obstacles to the application for QSH effect are the lack of suitable QSH insulators with a large bulk gap. Here, we predict a novel class of 2D QSH insulators in X-decorated plumbene monolayers (PbX; X = H, F, Cl, Br, I) with extraordinarily giant bulk gaps from 1.03 eV to a record value of 1.34 eV. The topological characteristic of PbX mainly originates from s-px,y band inversion related to the lattice symmetry, while the effect of spin-orbital coupling (SOC) is only to open up a giant gap. Their QSH states are identified by nontrivial topological invariant Z2 = 1, as well as a single pair of topologically protected helical edge states locating inside the bulk gap. Noticeably, the QSH gaps of PbX are tunable and robust via external strain. We also propose high-dielectric-constant BN as an ideal substrate for the experimental realization of PbX, maintaining its nontrivial topology. These novel QSH insulators with giant gaps are a promising platform to enrich topological phenomena and expand potential applications at high temperature. PMID:26833133

  12. Fluorescent substituted amidines of benzanthrone: Synthesis, spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonta, Svetlana; Utinans, Maris; Kirilov, Georgii; Belyakov, Sergey; Ivanova, Irena; Fleisher, Mendel; Savenkov, Valerij; Kirilova, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Several new substituted amidine derivatives of benzanthrone were synthesized by a condensation reaction from 3-aminobenzo[de]anthracen-7-one and appropriate aromatic and aliphatic amides. The obtained derivatives have a bright yellow or orange fluorescence in organic solvents and in solid state. The novel benzanthrone derivatives were characterized by TLC analysis, 1H NMR, IR, MS, UV/vis, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The solvent effect on photophysical behaviors of these dyes was investigated, and the results showed that the Stoke's shift increased, whereas quantum yield decreased with the growth of the solvent polarity. The structure of some dyes was confirmed by the X-ray single crystal structure analysis. AM1, ZINDO/S and ab initio calculations using Gaussian software were carried out to estimate the electron system of structures. The calculations show planar configurations for the aromatic core of these compounds and two possible orientations of amidine substituents. The calculation results correlate well with red-shifted absorption and emission spectra of compounds.

  13. Non-covalent interactions in ionic liquid ion pairs and ion pair dimers: a quantum chemical calculation analysis.

    PubMed

    Marekha, Bogdan A; Kalugin, Oleg N; Idrissi, Abdenacer

    2015-07-14

    Ionic liquids (ILs) being composed of bulky multiatomic ions reveal a plethora of non-covalent interactions which determine their microscopic structure. In order to establish the main peculiarities of these interactions in an IL-environment, we have performed quantum chemical calculations for a set of representative model molecular clusters. These calculations were coupled with advanced methods of analysis of the electron density distribution, namely, the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) and the non-covalent interaction (NCI; J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2010, 132, 6499) approaches. The former allows for profound quantitative characterization of non-covalent interactions between atoms while the latter gives an overview of spatial extent, delocalization, and relative strength of such interactions. The studied systems consist of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (Bmim(+)) cations and different perfluorinated anions: tetrafluoroborate (BF4(-)), hexafluorophosphate (PF6(-)), trifluoromethanesulfonate (TfO(-)), and bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (TFSI(-)). IL ion pairs and ion pair dimers were considered as model structures for the neat ILs and large aggregates. Weak electrostatic hydrogen bonding was found between the anions and the imidazolium ring hydrogen atoms of cations. Weaker but still appreciable hydrogen bonding was also noted for hydrogen atoms adjacent to the imidazolium ring alkyl groups of Bmim(+). The relative strength of the hydrogen bonding is higher in BmimTfO and BmimBF4 ILs than in BmimPF6 and BmimTFSI, whereas BmimTfO and BmimTFSI reveal higher sensitivity of hydrogen bonding at the different hydrogen atoms of the imidazolium ring.

  14. Spectroscopy of highly luminescent 1,3,5-triazapentadiene complexes of platinum(II) in solution and in the adsorbed and solid states and quantum-chemical interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyalin, G. N.; Litke, S. V.; Gushchin, P. V.; Maslov, V. G.

    2012-02-01

    We have measured the absorption, luminescence, and luminescence excitation spectra, as well as the excited-state lifetimes and luminescence quantum yields, of 1,3,5-triazapentadiene complexes of platinum(II) in a solution, in the solid state, in an adsorbed state on a SiO2 surface, and in a polystyrene matrix at room temperature and at 77 K. We also have performed quantum-chemical calculations of the equilibrium geometry of the ground and excited states of the complexes and of the nature and structure of molecular orbitals.

  15. Assessing the accuracy of protein structures by quantum mechanical computations of 13C(alpha) chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Vila, Jorge A; Scheraga, Harold A

    2009-10-20

    Two major techniques have been used to determine the three-dimensional structures of proteins: X-ray diffraction and NMR spectroscopy. In particular, the validation of NMR-derived protein structures is one of the most challenging problems in NMR spectroscopy. Therefore, researchers have proposed a plethora of methods to determine the accuracy and reliability of protein structures. Despite these proposals, there is a growing need for more sophisticated, physics-based structure validation methods. This approach will enable us to (a) characterize the "quality" of the NMR-derived ensemble as a whole by a single parameter, (b) unambiguously identify flaws in the sequence at a residue level, and (c) provide precise information, such as sets of backbone and side-chain torsional angles, that we can use to detect local flaws. Rather than reviewing all of the existing validation methods, this Account describes the contributions of our research group toward a solution of the long-standing problem of both global and local structure validation of NMR-derived protein structures. We emphasize a recently introduced physics-based methodology that makes use of observed and computed (13)C(alpha) chemical shifts (at the density functional theory (DFT) level of theory) for an accurate validation of protein structures in solution and in crystals. By assessing the ability of computed (13)C(alpha) chemical shifts to reproduce observed (13)C(alpha) chemical shifts of a single structure or ensemble of structures in solution and in crystals, we accomplish a global validation by using the conformationally averaged root-mean-square deviation, ca-rmsd, as a scoring function. In addition, the method enables us to provide local validation by identifying a set of individual amino acid conformations for which the computed and observed (13)C(alpha) chemical shifts do not agree within a certain error range and may represent a nonreliable fold of the protein model. Although it is computationally

  16. Quantum chemical computations, vibrational spectroscopic analysis and antimicrobial studies of 2,3-Pyrazinedicarboxylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaula, T. Joselin; Packiavathi, A.; Manimaran, D.; Joe, I. Hubert; Rastogi, V. K.; Jothy, V. Bena

    2015-03-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations at B3PW91 level with 6-311G (d) basis sets were carried out for 2,3-Pyrazinedicarboxylic acid (PDCA) to analyze in detail the equilibrium geometries and vibrational spectra. Calculations reveal that the optimized geometry closely resembles the experimental XRD data. Vibrational spectra were analyzed on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED) of each vibrational mode, which provides quantitative as well as qualitative interpretation of IR and Raman spectra. Information about size, shape, charge density distribution and site of chemical reactivity of the molecule were obtained by mapping electron density isosurface with the electrostatic potential surface (ESP). Based on optimized ground state geometries, NBO analysis was performed to study donor-acceptor (bond-antibond) interactions. TD-DFT analysis was also performed to calculate energies, oscillator strength of electronic singlet-singlet transitions and the absorption wavelengths. The 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecule in the ground state were calculated by gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and compared with the experimental values. PDCA was screened for its antimicrobial activity and found to exhibit antifungal and antibacterial effects. Molecular docking was also performed for the different receptors.

  17. Removal of selenite from water using a synthetic dithiolate: an experimental and quantum chemical investigation.

    PubMed

    Burriss, Daniel; Zou, Wenli; Cremer, Dieter; Walrod, John; Atwood, David

    2014-04-21

    Combination of the dithiol N,N'-bis(2-mercaptoethyl)isophthalamide, abbreviated as BDTH2 and as 1, with excess H2SeO3 in aqueous acidic (pH ≈ 1) conditions resulted in precipitation of BDT(S-Se-S) (6), with a (77)Se NMR chemical shift of δ = 675 ppm, and oxidized BDT. When the reaction is conducted under basic conditions Se(IV) is reduced to red Se(0) and oxidized 1. No reaction takes place between 1 and selenate (Se(VI)) under acidic or basic conditions. Compound 6 is stable in air but decomposes to red Se(0) and the disulfide BDT(S-S) (9) with heating and in basic solutions. Mechanisms and energetics of the reactions leading to 6 in aqueous solution were unraveled by extensive calculations at the ωB97X-D/aug-cc-pVTZ-PP level of theory. NMR chemical shift calculations with the gauge-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method for dimethyl sulfoxide as solvent confirm the generation of 6 (calculated δ value = 677 ppm). These results define the conditions and limitations of using 1 for the removal of selenite from wastewaters. Compound 6 is a rare example of a bidentate selenium dithiolate and provides insight into biological selenium toxicity.

  18. Development of Accurate Chemical Equilibrium Models for the Hanford Waste Tanks: The System Na-Ca-Sr-OH-CO3-NO3-EDTA-HEDTA-H2O from 25 to 75°C

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Mason, Marvin J.; Qafoku, Odeta; Dixon, David A.

    2005-04-19

    This symposium manuscript describes the development of an accurate aqueous thermodynamic model for predicting the speciation of Sr in the waste tanks at the Hanford site. A systematic approach is described that details the studies performed to define the most important inorganic and organic complexation reactions as well as the effects of other important metal ions that compete with Sr for complexation reactions with the chelates. By using this approach we were able to define a reduced set of inorganic complexation, organic complexation, and competing metal reactions that best represent the much more complex waste tank chemical system. A summary is presented of the final thermodynamic model for the system Na-Ca-Sr-OH-CO3-NO3-EDTA-HEDTA-H2O from 25 to 75 ºC that was previously published in a variety of sources. Previously unpublished experimental data are also given for the competing metal Ni as well for certain chemical systems, Na-Sr-CO3-PO4-H2O, and for the solubility of amorphous iron hydroxide in the presence of several organic chelating agents. These data were not used in model development but were key to the final selection of the specific chemical systems prioritized for detailed study.

  19. Quantum chemical calculations of tryptophan → heme electron and excitation energy transfer rates in myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Suess, Christian J; Hirst, Jonathan D; Besley, Nicholas A

    2017-04-01

    The development of optical multidimensional spectroscopic techniques has opened up new possibilities for the study of biological processes. Recently, ultrafast two-dimensional ultraviolet spectroscopy experiments have determined the rates of tryptophan → heme electron transfer and excitation energy transfer for the two tryptophan residues in myoglobin (Consani et al., Science, 2013, 339, 1586). Here, we show that accurate prediction of these rates can be achieved using Marcus theory in conjunction with time-dependent density functional theory. Key intermediate residues between the donor and acceptor are identified, and in particular the residues Val68 and Ile75 play a critical role in calculations of the electron coupling matrix elements. Our calculations demonstrate how small changes in structure can have a large effect on the rates, and show that the different rates of electron transfer are dictated by the distance between the heme and tryptophan residues, while for excitation energy transfer the orientation of the tryptophan residues relative to the heme is important. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A versatile phenomenological model for the S-shaped temperature dependence of photoluminescence energy for an accurate determination of the exciton localization energy in bulk and quantum well structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, V. K.; Porwal, S.; Singh, S. D.; Sharma, T. K.; Ghosh, Sandip; Oak, S. M.

    2014-02-01

    Temperature dependence of the photoluminescence (PL) peak energy of bulk and quantum well (QW) structures is studied by using a new phenomenological model for including the effect of localized states. In general an anomalous S-shaped temperature dependence of the PL peak energy is observed for many materials which is usually associated with the localization of excitons in band-tail states that are formed due to potential fluctuations. Under such conditions, the conventional models of Varshni, Viña and Passler fail to replicate the S-shaped temperature dependence of the PL peak energy and provide inconsistent and unrealistic values of the fitting parameters. The proposed formalism persuasively reproduces the S-shaped temperature dependence of the PL peak energy and provides an accurate determination of the exciton localization energy in bulk and QW structures along with the appropriate values of material parameters. An example of a strained InAs0.38P0.62/InP QW is presented by performing detailed temperature and excitation intensity dependent PL measurements and subsequent in-depth analysis using the proposed model. Versatility of the new formalism is tested on a few other semiconductor materials, e.g. GaN, nanotextured GaN, AlGaN and InGaN, which are known to have a significant contribution from the localized states. A quantitative evaluation of the fractional contribution of the localized states is essential for understanding the temperature dependence of the PL peak energy of bulk and QW well structures having a large contribution of the band-tail states.

  1. Artificial Force Induced Reaction (AFIR) Method for Exploring Quantum Chemical Potential Energy Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Satoshi; Harabuchi, Yu; Takagi, Makito; Taketsugu, Tetsuya; Morokuma, Keiji

    2016-10-01

    In this account, a technical overview of the artificial force induced reaction (AFIR) method is presented. The AFIR method is one of the automated reaction-path search methods developed by the authors, and has been applied extensively to a variety of chemical reactions, such as organocatalysis, organometallic catalysis, and photoreactions. There are two modes in the AFIR method, i.e., a multicomponent mode and a single-component mode. The former has been applied to bimolecular and multicomponent reactions and the latter to unimolecular isomerization and dissociation reactions. Five numerical examples are presented for an Aldol reaction, a Claisen rearrangement, a Co-catalyzed hydroformylation, a fullerene structure search, and a nonradiative decay path search in an electronically excited naphthalene molecule. Finally, possible applications of the AFIR method are discussed.

  2. Spectroscopic (vibrational, NMR and UV-vis.) and quantum chemical investigations on 4-hexyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Ashgar; Gökce, Halil; Bahçeli, Semiha

    2016-01-05

    In this study, the 4-hexyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde compound as one of the derivatives of vanillin which is a well known flavoring agent, C14H20O3, has been investigated by experimentally and extensively utilizing density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level. In this context, the optimized geometry, vibrational frequencies, (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts, UV-vis. (in gas phase and in methanol solvent) spectra, HOMO-LUMO analysis, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), thermodynamic parameters and atomic charges of 4-hexyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde have been calculated. In addition, theoretically predicted IR, Raman and UV-vis. (in gas phase and in methanol solvent) spectra of the mentioned molecule have been constructed. The results calculated were compared with the experimental data.

  3. Spectroscopic (vibrational, NMR and UV-vis.) and quantum chemical investigations on 4-hexyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Ashgar; Gökce, Halil; Bahçeli, Semiha

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the 4-hexyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde compound as one of the derivatives of vanillin which is a well known flavoring agent, C14H20O3, has been investigated by experimentally and extensively utilizing density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level. In this context, the optimized geometry, vibrational frequencies, 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts, UV-vis. (in gas phase and in methanol solvent) spectra, HOMO-LUMO analysis, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), thermodynamic parameters and atomic charges of 4-hexyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde have been calculated. In addition, theoretically predicted IR, Raman and UV-vis. (in gas phase and in methanol solvent) spectra of the mentioned molecule have been constructed. The results calculated were compared with the experimental data.

  4. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    A decomposition of the molecular energy is presented that is motivated by the atom superposition and electron delocalization physical model of chemical binding. The energy appears in physically transparent form consisting of a classical electrostatic interaction, a zero order two electron exchange interaction, a relaxation energy, and the atomic energies. Detailed formulae are derived in zero and first order of approximation. The formulation extends beyond first order to any chosen level of approximation leading, in principle, to the exact energy. The structure of this energy decomposition lends itself to the fullest utilization of the solutions to the atomic sub problems to simplify the calculation of the molecular energy. If nonlinear relaxation effects remain minor, the molecular energy calculation requires at most the calculation of two center, two electron integrals. This scheme thus affords the prospects of substantially reducing the computational effort required for the calculation of molecular energies.

  5. Spectroscopic and quantum chemical electronic structure investigations of 3,4-dihydrocoumarin and 3-methylcoumarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arivazhagan, M.; Kavitha, R.; Subhasini, V. P.

    2014-09-01

    A complete vibrational analysis of 3,4-dihydrocoumarin and 3-methylcoumarin have been performed according to SQM force field method based on ab initio and DFT calculation 6-311++G(d,p) basis set and their frequencies are compared. The influences of carbon-oxygen bond and methyl group to the vibrational frequencies of the title compounds have been discussed. The pronounced decrease of the lone pair orbital occupancy and the molecular stabilization energy show the hyperconjugation interaction from the NBO analysis. Calculations of molecular orbital geometry show that the visible absorption maxima of DHC and 3MC correspond to the electron transition between frontier orbitals such as translation from HOMO to LUMO. Gauge-including atomic orbital (GIAO) 1H and 13C chemical shift calculations have been calculated. Area of high, neutral and low electrostatic potential is determined for DHC and 3MC.

  6. Spectroscopic and quantum chemical electronic structure investigations of 3,4-dihydrocoumarin and 3-methylcoumarin.

    PubMed

    Arivazhagan, M; Kavitha, R; Subhasini, V P

    2014-09-15

    A complete vibrational analysis of 3,4-dihydrocoumarin and 3-methylcoumarin have been performed according to SQM force field method based on ab initio and DFT calculation 6-311++G(d,p) basis set and their frequencies are compared. The influences of carbon-oxygen bond and methyl group to the vibrational frequencies of the title compounds have been discussed. The pronounced decrease of the lone pair orbital occupancy and the molecular stabilization energy show the hyperconjugation interaction from the NBO analysis. Calculations of molecular orbital geometry show that the visible absorption maxima of DHC and 3MC correspond to the electron transition between frontier orbitals such as translation from HOMO to LUMO. Gauge-including atomic orbital (GIAO) 1H and 13C chemical shift calculations have been calculated. Area of high, neutral and low electrostatic potential is determined for DHC and 3MC.

  7. XRD, vibrational spectra and quantum chemical studies of an anticancer drug: 6-Mercaptopurine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh Kumar, S.; Athimoolam, S.; Sridhar, B.

    2015-07-01

    The single crystal of the hydrated anticancer drug, 6-Mercaptopurine (6-MP), has been grown by slow evaporation technique under room temperature. The structure was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The vibrational spectral analysis was carried out using Laser Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy in the range of 3300-100 and 4000-400 cm-1. The single crystal X-ray studies shows that the crystal packing is dominated by N-H⋯O and O-H⋯N classical hydrogen bonds leading to a hydrogen bonded ensemble. This classical hydrogen bonds were further connected through O-H⋯S hydrogen bond to form two primary ring R44(16) and R44(12) motifs. These two primary ring motifs are interlinked with each other to build a ladder like structure. These ladders are connected through N-H⋯N hydrogen bond along c-axis of the unit cell through chain C(5) motifs. Further, the strength of the hydrogen bonds is studied through vibrational spectral measurements. The shifting of bands due to the intermolecular interactions was also analyzed in the solid crystalline state. Geometrical optimizations of the drug molecule were done by Density Functional Theory (DFT) using the B3LYP function and Hartree-Fock (HF) level with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The optimized molecular geometry and computed vibrational spectra are compared with experimental results which show significant agreement. The natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was carried out to interpret hyperconjugative interaction and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT). The chemical hardness, electro-negativity and chemical potential of the molecule are carried out by HOMO-LUMO plot. In which, the frontier orbitals has lower band gap value indicating the possible pharmaceutical activity of the molecule.

  8. Quantum chemical study of ternary mixtures of: HNO3:H2SO4:H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdes, M. A.; Gómez, P. C.; Gálvez, O.

    2009-04-01

    Water, nitric acid and sulfuric acid are important atmospheric species as individual species and as hydrogen-bonded aggregates involved in many physical-chemical processes both superficial and bulk. The importance of heterogeneous chemical reactions taking place on ice surfaces, either solid water or solid water plus nitric or sulfuric acid, is well established now in relation to the ozone-depleting mechanisms. Also the importance of liquid droplets formed by HNO3.H2SO4.H2O as components of PSC was soon recognized [1-3]. Finally the physical properties of finely divided aqueous systems is an interesting and active field of research in which theoretical information on the microphysical domain systems may help to understand and rationalize the wealth of experimental information. This can also be the initial step in the study of more complex mixtures with higher amounts of water or variable proportions of their constituents. This kind of calculations have been successfully performed in the past[4]. We present here our results on the structure and spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of the energy-lowest lying structures among those thermodynamically stable formed by linking the acids plus water. The calculations have been carried out by means of DFT methods (in particular the successful B3LYP) using different basis sets that contain appropriate sets of polarization and diffuse functions up to quadruple-Z quality (Dunninǵs aug-cc-pVQZ). Careful assessment of the dependability of the methodology used has been carried out. This work has been supported by the Spanish Ministry of Education, Projects FIS2007-61686 and CTQ2008-02578/BQU References: [1] Carslaw, K. S. et al.: Geophys. Res. Lett. 21, 2479-2482, 1994 [2] Drdla, K. Et al. :Geophys. Res. Lett. 21, 2473-2478, 1994 [3] Tabazadeh, A. et al.: Geophys. Res. Lett 21, 1619-1622, 1994 [4] Escribano, R et al.: J. J. Chem. Phys A 2003, 107, 652.

  9. Prediction of polyamide properties using quantum-chemical methods and BP artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinwei; Wang, Xueye; Li, Xiaobing; Yu, Xinliang; Wang, Hanlu

    2006-03-01

    Quantitative structure -property relationships (QSPR) for glass translation temperatures (T (g)), density (rho) and indices of refraction (n) of the polyamides have been determined. All descriptors are calculated from molecular structures at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. These QSPR models are generated by two methods: multiple linear regression (MLR) and error back-propagation artificial neural networks (BPANN). The model obtained by MLR is used for the calculations of T (g) (R (training)=0.9074, SD(training)=22.4687, R (test)=0.8898, SD(test)=23.2417), rho (R (training)=0.9474, SD(training)=0.0422, R (test)=0.8928, SD (test)=0.0422), n (R (training)=0.9298, SD(training)=0.0204, R (test)=0.9095, SD(test)=0.0274). The model obtained by BPANN is used for the calculations of T (g) (R (training)=0.9273, SD(training)=14.8988, R (test)=0.8989, SD(test)=16.4396), rho (R (training)=0.9523, SD(training)=0.0466, R (test)=0.9014, SD(test)=0.0512), n (R (training)=0.9401, SD(training)=0.0131, R (test)=0.9445, SD(test)=0.0179). These results demonstrate that the MLR and BPANN methods can be used to predict T (g), rho and n. The more accurate predicted results are obtained from BPANN. Figure: Experimental vs. calculated n with cross-validation method (BPANN) for the training set of 53 polyamides and the test set of 14 polyamides. Figure Experimental vs. calculated n with cross-validation method (BPANN) for the training set of 53 polyamides and the test set of 14 polyamides. [Figure: see text].

  10. Quantum chemical density functional theory studies on the molecular structure and vibrational spectra of Gallic acid imprinted polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardeshi, Sushma; Dhodapkar, Rita; Kumar, Anupama

    2013-12-01

    Gallic acid (GA) is known by its antioxidant, anticarcinogenic properties and scavenger activity against several types of harmful free radicals. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are used in separation of a pure compound from complex matrices. A stable template-monomer complex generates the MIPs with the highest affinity and selectivity for the template. The quantum chemical computations based on density functional theory (DFT) was used on the template Gallic acid (GA), monomer acrylic acid (AA) and GA-AA complex to study the nature of interactions involved in the GA-AA complex. B3LYP/6-31+G(2d,2p) model chemistry was used to optimize their structures and frequency calculations. The effect of porogen acetonitrile (ACN) on complex formation was included by using polarizable continuum model (PCM). The results demonstrated the formation of a stable GA-AA complex through the intermolecular hydrogen bonding between carboxylic acid groups of GA and AA. The Mulliken atomic charge analysis and simulated vibrational spectra also supported the stable hydrogen bonding interaction between the carboxylic acid groups of GA and AA with minimal interference of porogen ACN. Further, simulations on GA-AA mole ratio revealed that 1:4 GA-AA was optimum for synthesis of MIP for GA.

  11. Structure, vibrations and quantum chemical investigations of hydrogen bonded complex of bis(1-hydroxy-2-methylpropan-2-aminium)selenate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirunarayanan, S.; Arjunan, V.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.

    2017-04-01

    The hydrogen bonded molecular complex bis(1-hydroxy-2-methylpropan-2-aminium)selenate (C8H24N2O6Se) has been prepared by the reaction of 2-amino-2-methyl propanol and selenic acid. The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the intermolecular proton transfer from selenic acid (SeO4H2) to 2-amino-2-methylpropanol results in the formation of bis(1-hydroxy-2-methylpropan-2-aminium)selenate (HMPAS) salt and the fragments are connected through H-bonding and ion pairing. The N-H⋯O and O-H⋯O interactions between 2-amino-2-methylpropanol and selenic acid determine the supramolecular arrangement in three-dimensional space. The salt crystallises in the space group P121/n1 of monoclinic system. The complete vibrational assignments of HMPAS have been performed by FTIR and FT-Raman spectroscopy. The experimental data are correlated with the structural properties namely the energy, thermodynamic parameters, atomic charges, hybridization concepts and vibrational frequencies determined by quantum chemical studies performed with B3LYP method using 6-311++G*, 6-31+G* and 6-31G** basis sets.

  12. Porphyrin-cobaloxime complexes for hydrogen production, a photo- and electrochemical study, coupled with quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Manton, Jennifer C; Long, Conor; Vos, Johannes G; Pryce, Mary T

    2014-03-07

    Two porphyrin-cobaloxime complexes; [{Co(dmgH)2Cl}{MPyTPP}] () and [{Co(dmgH)2Cl}{ZnMPyTPP}] () (dmgH = dimethylglyoxime, MPyTPP = 5-(4-pyridyl)-10,15,20-triphenylporphyrin) have been synthesised as model systems for the generation of hydrogen from water. Although initially envisaged as photocatalytic systems neither complex catalysed the reduction of water to hydrogen following irradiation. However, both complexes are molecular precursors for hydrogen evolution under electrochemical conditions. Turnover numbers for hydrogen production of 1.8 × 10(3) and 5.1 × 10(3) were obtained for and respectively following potentiostatic electrolysis at -1.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl while cobaloxime alone produced a turnover-number of 8.0 × 10(3). The photophysical properties of and were examined to provide an explanation for the lack of photochemical activity. These results, coupled with quantum chemical calculations, confirm that porphyrins fail to act as light-harvesting units for these systems and that the lowest energy excited states are in fact cobaloxime-based rather than porphyrin based.

  13. Importance of cytochromes in cyclization reactions: quantum chemical study on a model reaction of proguanil to cycloguanil.

    PubMed

    Arfeen, Minhajul; Patel, Dhilon S; Abbat, Sheenu; Taxak, Nikhil; Bharatam, Prasad V

    2014-10-30

    Proguanil, an anti-malarial prodrug, undergoes cytochrome P450 catalyzed biotransformation to the pharmacologically active triazine metabolite (cycloguanil), which inhibits plasmodial dihydrofolate reductase. This cyclization is catalyzed by CYP2C19 and many anti-malarial lead compounds are being designed and synthesized to exploit this pathway. Quantum chemical calculations were performed using the model species (Cpd I for active species of cytochrome and N4-isopropyl-N6-methylbiguanide for proguanil) to elucidate the mechanism of the cyclization pathway. The overall reaction involves the loss of a water molecule, and is exothermic by approximately 55 kcal/mol, and involves a barrier of approximately 17 kcal/mol. The plausible reaction pathway involves the initial H-radical abstraction from the isopropyl group by Cpd I, followed by two alternative paths- (i) oxygen rebound to provide hydroxyl derivative and (ii) loss of additional H-radical to yield 1,3,5-triazatriene, which undergoes cyclization. This study helped in understanding the role of the active species of cytochromes in this important cyclization reaction.

  14. Chlorination of N-methylacetamide and amide-containing pharmaceuticals. Quantum-chemical study of the reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Šakić, Davor; Šonjić, Pavica; Tandarić, Tana; Vrček, Valerije

    2014-03-27

    Chlorination of amides is of utmost importance in biochemistry and environmental chemistry. Despite the huge body of data, the mechanism of reaction between amides and hypochlorous acid in aqueous environment remains unclear. In this work, the three different reaction pathways for chlorination of N-methylacetamide by HOCl have been considered: the one-step N-chlorination of the amide, the chlorination via O-chlorinated intermediate, and the N-chlorination of the iminol intermediate. The high-level quantum chemical G3B3 composite procedure, double-hybrid B2-PLYPD, B2K-PLYP methods, and global hybrid M06-2X and BMK methods have been employed. The calculated energy barriers have been compared to the experimental value of ΔG(#)298 ≈ 87 kJ/mol, which corresponds to reaction rate constant k(r) ≈ 0.0036 M(-1) s(-1). Only the mechanism in which the iminol form of N-methylacetamide reacts with HOCl is consistent (ΔG(#)298 = 87.3 kJ/mol at G3B3 level) with experimental results. The analogous reaction mechanism has been calculated as the most favorable pathway in the chlorination of small-sized amides and amide-containing pharmaceuticals: carbamazepine, acetaminophen, and phenytoin. We conclude that the formation of the iminol intermediate followed by its reaction with HOCl is the general mechanism of N-chlorination for a vast array of amides.

  15. A QSAR for the Mutagenic Potencies of Twelve 2-Amino-trimethylimidazopyridine Isomers: Structural, Quantum Chemical,and Hydropathic Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Knize, M G; Hatch, F T; Tanga, M J; Lau, E V; Colvin, M E

    2005-04-23

    An isomeric series of heterocyclic amines related to one found in heated muscle meats was investigated for properties that predict their measured mutagenic potency. Eleven of the 12 possible 2-amino-trimethylimidazopyridine (TMIP) isomers were tested for mutagenic potency in the Ames/Salmonella test with bacterial strain TA98, and resulted in a 600-fold range in potency. Structural, quantum chemical and hydropathic data were calculated on the parent molecules and the corresponding nitrenium ions of all of the tested isomers to establish models for predicting the potency of the unknown isomer. The regression model accounting for the largest fraction of the total variance in mutagenic potency contains four predictor variables: dipole moment, a measure of the gap between amine LUMO and HOMO energies, percent hydrophilic surface, and energy of amine LUMO. The most important determinants of high mutagenic potency in these amines are: (1) a small dipole moment, (2) the combination of b-face ring fusion and N3-methyl group, and (3) a lower calculated energy of the {pi} electron system. Based on predicted potency from the average of five models, the isomer not yet synthesized and tested is expected to have a mutagenic potency of 0.84 revertants/{micro}g in test strain TA98.

  16. Global exploration of isomers and isomerization channels on the quantum chemical potential energy surface of H3 CNO3.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Koichi; Kishimoto, Naoki; Iwamoto, Takeaki; Satoh, Hiroko

    2017-04-15

    Global exploration of isomers and isomerization channels on the quantum chemical potential energy surface (PES) is performed for H3 CNO3 using the Scaled Hypersphere Search-Anharmonic Downward Distortion Following (SHS-ADDF) method. The molecular formula of H3 CNO3 includes functional groups of CH3 , OH, NH2 , COOH, NO, NO2 , and NO3 , which are very important in connection with amino acids and NOx. Geometrical structures and interconversion pathways are disclosed after 18719781 force calculations and 534726 Hessian calculations at the level of B3LYP/6-31G(d). The explored results are confirmed to be valid, especially for the important lower energy regions, by re-optimization at the higher level of B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p). A global reaction route-mapping using SHS-ADDF demonstrates the entire view and undeveloped landscapes on PES of H3 CNO3 . Typical compounds of H3 CNO3 , aminoxy formic acid, hydroxycarbamic acid, aminoperformic acid, hydroxymethyl nitrite, nitromethanol, methyl nitrate, methyl peroxynitrite, and dioxaziridine, are well separated from others by very high energy-barriers. The stable-most conformer of H3 CNO3 is difficult to be determined, because of seven structures existing with nearly the same energies within 5.7 kJ/mol at the level of CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Exciton energy transfer-based quantum dot fluorescence sensing array: "chemical noses" for discrimination of different nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianbo; Li, Gui; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Li, Li; Liu, Wei; Shi, Xing; Guo, Yali

    2015-01-20

    A novel exciton energy transfer-based fluorescence sensing array for the discrimination of different nucleobases was developed through target nucleobase-triggered self-assembly of quantum dots (QDs). Four QD nanoprobes with different ligand receptors, including mercaptoethylamine, N-acetyl-l-cysteine, 2-dimethyl-aminethanethiol, and thioglycolic acid, were created to detect and identify nucleobase targets. These QDs served as both selective recognition scaffolds and signal transduction elements for a biomolecule target. The extent of particle assembly, induced by the analyte-triggered self-assembly of QDs, led to an exciton energy transfer effect between interparticles that gave a readily detectable fluorescence quenching and distinct fluorescence response patterns. These patterns are characteristic for each nucleobase and can be quantitatively differentiated by linear discriminate analysis. Furthermore, a fingerprint-based barcode was established to conveniently discriminate the nucleobases. This pattern sensing was successfully used to identify nucleobase samples at unknown concentrations and five rare bases. In this "chemical noses" strategy, the robust characteristics of QD nanoprobes, coupled with the diversity of surface functionality that can be readily obtained using nanoparticles, provides a simple and label-free biosensing approach that shows great promise for biomedical applications.

  18. Quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling of antioxidant activities of hydroxybenzalacetones using quantum chemical, physicochemical and spatial descriptors.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Indrani; Saha, Achintya; Roy, Kunal

    2009-05-01

    We have modeled antioxidant activities of hydroxybenzalacetones against lipid peroxidation induced by t-butyl hydroperoxide (pC1), gamma-irradiation (pC2) and also their 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity (pC3) using quantitative structure-activity relationship technique. The quantitative structure-activity relationship models were developed using different statistical methods like stepwise multiple linear regression, genetic function approximation and genetic partial least squares with descriptors of different categories (quantum chemical, physicochemical, spatial and substituent constants). The models were validated by internal validation and randomization techniques. The model predictivity was judged on the basis of their cross-validated squared correlation coefficient (Q2) and modified r2 (r m 2) values. The best models for the two responses, pC1 and pC2, were obtained by genetic partial least squares technique while the best model for the third response, pC3, was obtained by genetic function approximation technique. The developed models suggest that the distribution of charges on the phenolic nucleus and the phenolic oxygen as well as the charged surface areas of the molecules together with the geometry and orientation of the substituents significantly influence all the three types of responses (pC1, pC2 and pC3). The developed models may be used to design hydroxybenzalacetones with better antioxidant activities.

  19. Synthesis of a uranyl persulfide complex and quantum chemical studies of formation and topologies of hypothetical uranyl persulfide cage clusters.

    PubMed

    Grant, Daniel J; Weng, Zhehui; Jouffret, Laurent J; Burns, Peter C; Gagliardi, Laura

    2012-07-16

    The compound Na(4)[(UO(2))(S(2))(3)](CH(3)OH)(8) was synthesized at room temperature in an oxygen-free environment. It contains a rare example of the [(UO(2))(S(2))(3)](4-) complex in which a uranyl ion is coordinated by three bidentate persulfide groups. We examined the possible linkage of these units to form nanoscale cage clusters analogous to those formed from uranyl peroxide polyhedra. Quantum chemical calculations at the density functional and multiconfigurational wave function levels show that the uranyl-persulfide-uranyl, U-(S(2))-U, dihedral angles of model clusters are bent due to partial covalent interactions. We propose that this bent interaction will favor assembly of uranyl ions through persulfide bridges into curved structures, potentially similar to the family of nanoscale cage clusters built from uranyl peroxide polyhedra. However, the U-(S(2))-U dihedral angles predicted for several model structures may be too tight for them to self-assemble into cage clusters with fullerene topologies in the absence of other uranyl-ion bridges that adopt a flatter configuration. Assembly of species such as [(UO(2))(S(2))(SH)(4)](4-) or [(UO(2))(S(2))(C(2)O(4))(4)](4-) into fullerene topologies with ~60 vertices may be favored by use of large counterions.

  20. Optical absorption measurements and quantum-chemical simulations of optical properties of novel fluoro derivatives of pyrazoloquinoline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brik, M. G.; Kuznik, W.; Gondek, E.; Kityk, I. V.; Uchacz, T.; Szlachcic, P.; Jarosz, B.; Plucinski, K. J.

    2010-05-01

    The results of experimental research and quantum-chemical simulations of the absorption spectra of 1-(4-fluorophenyl)-3,4-diphenyl, 3-(4-fluorophenyl)-1,4-diphenyl, and 4-(4-fluorophenyl)-1,3-diphenyl-pyrazolo[3,4- b] quinoline are presented. Although the fluorine atom is located on different phenyl rings in these molecules, the absorption spectra do not differ significantly. Semi-empirical AM1, PM3 and RM1 methods, as well as ab initio ADF code-based calculations were used to optimize geometry, calculate the infrared and visible spectra of the afore mentioned compounds and analyze the molecular orbitals schemes. The results of calculations are in good agreement with the experimental data. It was also demonstrated that the positions of the fluorescence maxima depend significantly on the solvent (contrary to the absorption spectra), in which the molecules are embedded, which allows for manipulating with fluorescence properties of the synthesized molecules by changing the solvent.