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Sample records for accurate radiative transfer

  1. Accurate radiative transfer calculations for layered media.

    PubMed

    Selden, Adrian C

    2016-07-01

    Simple yet accurate results for radiative transfer in layered media with discontinuous refractive index are obtained by the method of K-integrals. These are certain weighted integrals applied to the angular intensity distribution at the refracting boundaries. The radiative intensity is expressed as the sum of the asymptotic angular intensity distribution valid in the depth of the scattering medium and a transient term valid near the boundary. Integrated boundary equations are obtained, yielding simple linear equations for the intensity coefficients, enabling the angular emission intensity and the diffuse reflectance (albedo) and transmittance of the scattering layer to be calculated without solving the radiative transfer equation directly. Examples are given of half-space, slab, interface, and double-layer calculations, and extensions to multilayer systems are indicated. The K-integral method is orders of magnitude more accurate than diffusion theory and can be applied to layered scattering media with a wide range of scattering albedos, with potential applications to biomedical and ocean optics. PMID:27409700

  2. GORRAM: Introducing accurate operational-speed radiative transfer Monte Carlo solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buras-Schnell, Robert; Schnell, Franziska; Buras, Allan

    2016-06-01

    We present a new approach for solving the radiative transfer equation in horizontally homogeneous atmospheres. The motivation was to develop a fast yet accurate radiative transfer solver to be used in operational retrieval algorithms for next generation meteorological satellites. The core component is the program GORRAM (Generator Of Really Rapid Accurate Monte-Carlo) which generates solvers individually optimized for the intended task. These solvers consist of a Monte Carlo model capable of path recycling and a representative set of photon paths. Latter is generated using the simulated annealing technique. GORRAM automatically takes advantage of limitations on the variability of the atmosphere. Due to this optimization the number of photon paths necessary for accurate results can be reduced by several orders of magnitude. For the shown example of a forward model intended for an aerosol satellite retrieval, comparison with an exact yet slow solver shows that a precision of better than 1% can be achieved with only 36 photons. The computational time is at least an order of magnitude faster than any other type of radiative transfer solver. Merely the lookup table approach often used in satellite retrieval is faster, but on the other hand suffers from limited accuracy. This makes GORRAM-generated solvers an eligible candidate as forward model in operational-speed retrieval algorithms and data assimilation applications. GORRAM also has the potential to create fast solvers of other integrable equations.

  3. Phase-function normalization for accurate analysis of ultrafast collimated radiative transfer.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Brian; Guo, Zhixiong

    2012-04-20

    The scattering of radiation from collimated irradiation is accurately treated via normalization of phase function. This approach is applicable to any numerical method with directional discretization. In this study it is applied to the transient discrete-ordinates method for ultrafast collimated radiative transfer analysis in turbid media. A technique recently developed by the authors, which conserves a phase-function asymmetry factor as well as scattered energy for the Henyey-Greenstein phase function in steady-state diffuse radiative transfer analysis, is applied to the general Legendre scattering phase function in ultrafast collimated radiative transfer. Heat flux profiles in a model tissue cylinder are generated for various phase functions and compared to those generated when normalization of the collimated phase function is neglected. Energy deposition in the medium is also investigated. Lack of conservation of scattered energy and the asymmetry factor for the collimated scattering phase function causes overpredictions in both heat flux and energy deposition for highly anisotropic scattering media. In addition, a discussion is presented to clarify the time-dependent formulation of divergence of radiative heat flux. PMID:22534933

  4. A novel approach for accurate radiative transfer in cosmological hydrodynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, Margarita; Springel, Volker

    2011-08-01

    accurately deal with non-equilibrium effects. We discuss several tests of the new method, including shadowing configurations in two and three dimensions, ionized sphere expansion in static and dynamic density fields and the ionization of a cosmological density field. The tests agree favourably with analytical expectations and results based on other numerical radiative transfer approximations.

  5. Fast and Accurate Radiative Transfer Calculations Using Principal Component Analysis for Climate Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopparla, P.; Natraj, V.; Spurr, R. J. D.; Shia, R. L.; Yung, Y. L.

    2014-12-01

    Radiative transfer (RT) computations are an essential component of energy budget calculations in climate models. However, full treatment of RT processes is computationally expensive, prompting usage of 2-stream approximations in operational climate models. This simplification introduces errors of the order of 10% in the top of the atmosphere (TOA) fluxes [Randles et al., 2013]. Natraj et al. [2005, 2010] and Spurr and Natraj [2013] demonstrated the ability of a technique using principal component analysis (PCA) to speed up RT simulations. In the PCA method for RT performance enhancement, empirical orthogonal functions are developed for binned sets of inherent optical properties that possess some redundancy; costly multiple-scattering RT calculations are only done for those (few) optical states corresponding to the most important principal components, and correction factors are applied to approximate radiation fields. Here, we extend the PCA method to a broadband spectral region from the ultraviolet to the shortwave infrared (0.3-3 micron), accounting for major gas absorptions in this region. Comparisons between the new model, called Universal Principal Component Analysis model for Radiative Transfer (UPCART), 2-stream models (such as those used in climate applications) and line-by-line RT models are performed, in order for spectral radiances, spectral fluxes and broadband fluxes. Each of these are calculated at the TOA for several scenarios with varying aerosol types, extinction and scattering optical depth profiles, and solar and viewing geometries. We demonstrate that very accurate radiative forcing estimates can be obtained, with better than 1% accuracy in all spectral regions and better than 0.1% in most cases as compared to an exact line-by-line RT model. The model is comparable in speeds to 2-stream models, potentially rendering UPCART useful for operational General Circulation Models (GCMs). The operational speed and accuracy of UPCART can be further

  6. A fast and accurate PCA based radiative transfer model: Extension to the broadband shortwave region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopparla, Pushkar; Natraj, Vijay; Spurr, Robert; Shia, Run-Lie; Crisp, David; Yung, Yuk L.

    2016-04-01

    Accurate radiative transfer (RT) calculations are necessary for many earth-atmosphere applications, from remote sensing retrieval to climate modeling. A Principal Component Analysis (PCA)-based spectral binning method has been shown to provide an order of magnitude increase in computational speed while maintaining an overall accuracy of 0.01% (compared to line-by-line calculations) over narrow spectral bands. In this paper, we have extended the PCA method for RT calculations over the entire shortwave region of the spectrum from 0.3 to 3 microns. The region is divided into 33 spectral fields covering all major gas absorption regimes. We find that the RT performance runtimes are shorter by factors between 10 and 100, while root mean square errors are of order 0.01%.

  7. Global climate modeling of Saturn's atmosphere: fast and accurate radiative transfer and exploration of seasonal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerlet, Sandrine; Spiga, A.; Sylvestre, M.; Fouchet, T.; Millour, E.; Wordsworth, R.; Leconte, J.; Forget, F.

    2013-10-01

    Recent observations of Saturn’s stratospheric thermal structure and composition revealed new phenomena: an equatorial oscillation in temperature, reminiscent of the Earth's Quasi-Biennal Oscillation ; strong meridional contrasts of hydrocarbons ; a warm “beacon” associated with the powerful 2010 storm. Those signatures cannot be reproduced by 1D photochemical and radiative models and suggest that atmospheric dynamics plays a key role. This motivated us to develop a complete 3D General Circulation Model (GCM) for Saturn, based on the LMDz hydrodynamical core, to explore the circulation, seasonal variability, and wave activity in Saturn's atmosphere. In order to closely reproduce Saturn's radiative forcing, a particular emphasis was put in obtaining fast and accurate radiative transfer calculations. Our radiative model uses correlated-k distributions and spectral discretization tailored for Saturn's atmosphere. We include internal heat flux, ring shadowing and aerosols. We will report on the sensitivity of the model to spectral discretization, spectroscopic databases, and aerosol scenarios (varying particle sizes, opacities and vertical structures). We will also discuss the radiative effect of the ring shadowing on Saturn's atmosphere. We will present a comparison of temperature fields obtained with this new radiative equilibrium model to that inferred from Cassini/CIRS observations. In the troposphere, our model reproduces the observed temperature knee caused by heating at the top of the tropospheric aerosol layer. In the lower stratosphere (20mbar radiative heating/cooling by trace

  8. Fast and Accurate Radiative Transfer Calculations Using Principal Component Analysis for (Exo-)Planetary Retrieval Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopparla, P.; Natraj, V.; Shia, R. L.; Spurr, R. J. D.; Crisp, D.; Yung, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    Radiative transfer (RT) computations form the engine of atmospheric retrieval codes. However, full treatment of RT processes is computationally expensive, prompting usage of two-stream approximations in current exoplanetary atmospheric retrieval codes [Line et al., 2013]. Natraj et al. [2005, 2010] and Spurr and Natraj [2013] demonstrated the ability of a technique using principal component analysis (PCA) to speed up RT computations. In the PCA method for RT performance enhancement, empirical orthogonal functions are developed for binned sets of inherent optical properties that possess some redundancy; costly multiple-scattering RT calculations are only done for those few optical states corresponding to the most important principal components, and correction factors are applied to approximate radiation fields. Kopparla et al. [2015, in preparation] extended the PCA method to a broadband spectral region from the ultraviolet to the shortwave infrared (0.3-3 micron), accounting for major gas absorptions in this region. Here, we apply the PCA method to a some typical (exo-)planetary retrieval problems. Comparisons between the new model, called Universal Principal Component Analysis Radiative Transfer (UPCART) model, two-stream models and line-by-line RT models are performed, for spectral radiances, spectral fluxes and broadband fluxes. Each of these are calculated at the top of the atmosphere for several scenarios with varying aerosol types, extinction and scattering optical depth profiles, and stellar and viewing geometries. We demonstrate that very accurate radiance and flux estimates can be obtained, with better than 1% accuracy in all spectral regions and better than 0.1% in most cases, as compared to a numerically exact line-by-line RT model. The accuracy is enhanced when the results are convolved to typical instrument resolutions. The operational speed and accuracy of UPCART can be further improved by optimizing binning schemes and parallelizing the codes, work

  9. A Novel Iterative Scheme for the Very Fast and Accurate Solution of Non-LTE Radiative Transfer Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo Bueno, J.; Fabiani Bendicho, P.

    1995-12-01

    Iterative schemes based on Gauss-Seidel (G-S) and optimal successive over-relaxation (SOR) iteration are shown to provide a dramatic increase in the speed with which non-LTE radiation transfer (RT) problems can be solved. The convergence rates of these new RT methods are identical to those of upper triangular nonlocal approximate operator splitting techniques, but the computing time per iteration and the memory requirements are similar to those of a local operator splitting method. In addition to these properties, both methods are particularly suitable for multidimensional geometry, since they neither require the actual construction of nonlocal approximate operators nor the application of any matrix inversion procedure. Compared with the currently used Jacobi technique, which is based on the optimal local approximate operator (see Olson, Auer, & Buchler 1986), the G-S method presented here is faster by a factor 2. It gives excellent smoothing of the high-frequency error components, which makes it the iterative scheme of choice for multigrid radiative transfer. This G-S method can also be suitably combined with standard acceleration techniques to achieve even higher performance. Although the convergence rate of the optimal SOR scheme developed here for solving non-LTE RT problems is much higher than G-S, the computing time per iteration is also minimal, i.e., virtually identical to that of a local operator splitting method. While the conventional optimal local operator scheme provides the converged solution after a total CPU time (measured in arbitrary units) approximately equal to the number n of points per decade of optical depth, the time needed by this new method based on the optimal SOR iterations is only √n/2√2. This method is competitive with those that result from combining the above-mentioned Jacobi and G-S schemes with the best acceleration techniques. Contrary to what happens with the local operator splitting strategy currently in use, these novel

  10. An accurate radiative transfer model for use in the direct physical inversion of HIRS2 and MSU temperature sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, J.; Rosenfield, J.; Reuter, D.

    1983-01-01

    The direct computation of atmospheric transmittance and clear column radiances for the channels of HIRS2 and MSU as a function of atmospheric and surface conditions is described in detail. A comparison is made between the observations and the calculated radiances derived from colocated oceanic radiosondes. It is found that under clear conditions, calculated brightness temperatures for the HIRS2 have a standard deviation of the order of 0.7 C compared with observations, whereas MSU channels have a standard deviation of approximately 1 C. In some channels, small biases are found that can be removed by an empirical 'tuning' with coefficients that can be successfully transferred from one season to another. Less satisfactory agreement is obtained from a comparison of calculations with 'reconstructed' clear radiances, which are used in analyzing sounding data under partially cloudy conditions.

  11. Thermal radiation heat transfer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Howell, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    A comprehensive discussion of heat transfer by thermal radiation is presented, including the radiative behavior of materials, radiation between surfaces, and gas radiation. Among the topics considered are property prediction by electromagnetic theory, the observed properties of solid materials, radiation in the presence of other modes of energy transfer, the equations of transfer for an absorbing-emitting gas, and radiative transfer in scattering and absorbing media. Also considered are radiation exchange between black isothermal surfaces, radiation exchange in enclosures composed of diffuse gray surfaces and in enclosures having some specularly reflecting surfaces, and radiation exchange between nondiffuse nongray surfaces. The use of the Monte Carlo technique in solving radiant-exchange problems and problems of radiative transfer through absorbing-emitting media is explained.

  12. Radiative Transfer: Methods and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Bernhard; Emde, Claudia; Buras, Robert; Kylling, Arve

    Solar and terrestrial radiation is the driver of atmospheric dynamics and chemistry and can be exploited by remote sensing algorithms to determine atmospheric composition. For this purpose, accurate radiative transfer models are needed. Here, a modern radiative transfer tool developed over many years at the Institute of Atmospheric Physics is explained. As an application, the remote sensing of cloud microphysics using the angular distribution of reflected solar radiance in the rainbow and backscatter glory is shown, with special emphasis on the polarization of radiation.

  13. Remote balance weighs accurately amid high radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggenberger, D. N.; Shuck, A. B.

    1969-01-01

    Commercial beam-type balance, modified and outfitted with electronic controls and digital readout, can be remotely controlled for use in high radiation environments. This allows accurate weighing of breeder-reactor fuel pieces when they are radioactively hot.

  14. Atmospheric Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perliski, Lori

    Because radiative transfer cuts across many scientific disciplines with applications including remote sensing, climate, atmospheric chemistry, and photobiology, there is a need for comprehensive books on this subject that can appeal to a wide readership. While Atmospheric Radiative Transfer takes strides toward filling this niche by addressing a broad range of topics, it is dry reading and suffers from lack of detail. The book was based on a graduate-level course taught at the University of Sciences and Technologies in Lille, France, and indeed, the text reads much like an expanded outline perhaps derived from lecture notes.Part one deals with general radiative transfer, and part two covers Earth's radiation budget, the climate system, and remote sensing techniques. The radiative transfer equation and solutions for absorbing and scattering atmospheres are discussed as are the details of absorption, such as energy levels, line strengths, line intensities, equivalent widths, and weak- and strong-line limits.

  15. Numerical Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang

    2009-07-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. Operator Perturbation: 1. Survey of operator perturbation methods W. Kalkofen; 2. Line formation in expanding atmospheres: multilevel calculations using approximate lambda operators W. R. Hamann; 3. Stellar atmospheres in non-LTE: model construction and line formation calculations using approximate lambda operators K. Werner; 4. Acceleration of convergence L. H. Auer; 5. Line formation in a time-dependent atmosphere W. Kalkofen; 6. Iterative solution of multilevel transfer problems Eugene H. Avrett and Rudolf Loeser; 7. An algorithm for the simultaneous solution of thousands of transfer equations under global constraints Lawrence S. Anderson; 8. Operator perturbation for differential equations W. Kalkofen; Part II. Polarised Radiation: 9. A gentle introduction to polarised radiative transfer David E. Rees; 10. Non-LTE polarised radiative transfer in special lines David E. Rees and Graham A. Murphy; 11. Transfer of polarised radiation using 4x4 matrices E. Landi Degli'Innocenti; 12. Radiative transfer in the presence of strong magnetic fields A. A. van Ballegooijen; 13. An integral operator technique of radiative transfer in spherical symmetry A. Peraiah; 14. Discrete ordinate matrix method M. Schmidt and R. Wehrse.

  16. Numerical Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang

    1988-01-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. Operator Perturbation: 1. Survey of operator perturbation methods W. Kalkofen; 2. Line formation in expanding atmospheres: multilevel calculations using approximate lambda operators W. R. Hamann; 3. Stellar atmospheres in non-LTE: model construction and line formation calculations using approximate lambda operators K. Werner; 4. Acceleration of convergence L. H. Auer; 5. Line formation in a time-dependent atmosphere W. Kalkofen; 6. Iterative solution of multilevel transfer problems Eugene H. Avrett and Rudolf Loeser; 7. An algorithm for the simultaneous solution of thousands of transfer equations under global constraints Lawrence S. Anderson; 8. Operator perturbation for differential equations W. Kalkofen; Part II. Polarised Radiation: 9. A gentle introduction to polarised radiative transfer David E. Rees; 10. Non-LTE polarised radiative transfer in special lines David E. Rees and Graham A. Murphy; 11. Transfer of polarised radiation using 4x4 matrices E. Landi Degli'Innocenti; 12. Radiative transfer in the presence of strong magnetic fields A. A. van Ballegooijen; 13. An integral operator technique of radiative transfer in spherical symmetry A. Peraiah; 14. Discrete ordinate matrix method M. Schmidt and R. Wehrse.

  17. Utrecht Radiative Transfer Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutten, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    The Utrecht course ``The Generation and Transport of Radiation'' teaches basic radiative transfer to second-year students. It is a much-expanded version of the first chapter of Rybicki & Lightman's ``Radiative Processes in Astrophysics''. After this course, students understand why intensity is measured per steradian, have an Eddington-Barbier feel for optically thick line formation, and know that scattering upsets LTE. The text is a computer-aided translation by Ruth Peterson of my 1992 Dutch-language course. My aim is to rewrite this course in non-computer English and make it web-available at some time. In the meantime, copies of the Peterson translation are made yearly at Uppsala -- ask them, not me. Eventually it should become a textbook. The Utrecht course ``Radiative Transfer in Stellar Atmospheres'' is a 30-hour course for third-year students. It treats NLTE line formation in plane-parallel stellar atmospheres at a level intermediate between the books by Novotny and Boehm-Vitense, and Mihalas' ``Stellar Atmospheres''. After this course, students appreciate that epsilon is small, that radiation can heat or cool, and that computers have changed the field. This course is web-available since 1995 and is regularly improved -- but remains incomplete. Eventually it should become a textbook. The three Utrecht exercise sets ``Stellar Spectra A: Basic Line Formation'', ``Stellar Spectra B: LTE Line Formation'', and ``Stellar Spectra C: NLTE Line Formation'' are IDL-based computer exercises for first-year, second-year, and third-year students, respectively. They treat spectral classification, Saha-Boltzmann population statistics, the curve of growth, the FAL-C solar atmosphere model, the role of H-minus in the solar continuum, LTE formation of Fraunhofer lines, inversion tactics, the Feautrier method, classical lambda iteration, and ALI computation. The first two sets are web-available since 1998; the third will follow. Acknowledgement. Both courses owe much to previous

  18. Radiative Transfer in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziani, L.; Aiello, S.; Belleni-Morante, A.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.

    2008-09-01

    Abstract Protoplanetary disks are the precursors of planetary systems. All building materials needed to assembly the planetary systems are supplied by these reservoirs, including many organic molecules [1,2]. Thus, the physical and chemical properties in Protoplanetary disks set the boundary conditions for the formation and evolution of planets and other solar system bodies. In standard radiative scenario structure and chemistry of protoplanetary disks depend strongly on the nature of central star around which they formed. The dust temperature is manly set by the stellar luminosity, while the chemistry of the whole disk depends on the UV and X ray fluxes [3,4,6,8]. Therefore, a knowledge as accurate as possible of the radiative transfer (RT) inside disks is a prerequisite for their modelling. Actually, real disks are complex, stratified and inhomogeneous environments requiring a detailed dust mixture modelling and the ability to follow the radiation transfer across radial and vertical gradients. Different energetic processes as the mass accretion processes onto the star surface, the viscous dissipative heating dominating the midplane region, and the flared atmospheres radiation reprocessing, have a significant role in the disk structuring [4,5,8]. During the last 10 years many authors suggested various numerical and analytical techniques to resolve the disk temperature structure providing vertical temperature profiles and disk SED databases [4,6]. In this work we present the results of our semi analytical and numerical model solving the radiative transfer problem in two separate interesting disk regions: 1) Disk atmospheres at large radius, r > 10 AU. 2) Vertical disk structure over 1 < r < 10 AU and 10 < r < 100 AU. A simplified analytical approach based on P-N approximation [7] for a rectified disk surface (suitable for limited range of r) is compared and contrasted with a more accurate Monte Carlo integration [5]. Our code can handle arbitrary dust

  19. LRAT: Lightning Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phanord, Dieudonne D.

    1993-01-01

    In this report, we extend to cloud physics the work done for single and multiple scattering of electromagnetic waves. We consider the scattering of light, visible or infrared, by a spherical cloud represented by a statistically homogeneous ensemble of configurations of N identical spherical water droplets whose centers are uniformly distributed in its volume V. The ensemble is specified by the average number rho of scatterers in unit volume and by rho f(R) with f(R) as the distribution function for separations R of pairs. The incident light, vector-phi(sub 0) a plane electromagnetic wave with harmonic time dependence, is from outside the cloud. The propagation parameter kappa(sub 0) and the index of refraction eta(sub 0) determine physically the medium outside the distribution of scatterers. We solve the interior problem separately to obtain the bulk parameters for the scatterer equivalent to the ensemble of spherical droplets. With the interior solution or the equivalent medium approach, the multiple scattering problem is reduced to that of an equivalent single scatterer excited from outside illumination. A dispersion relation which determines the bulk propagation parameter K and the bulk index of refraction eta of the cloud is given in terms of the vector equivalent scattering amplitude vector-G and the dyadic scattering amplitude tilde-g of the single object in isolation. Based on this transfer model we will have the ability to consider clouds composed of inhomogeneous distribution of water and/or ice particles and we will be able to take into account particle size distributions within the cloud. We will also be able to study the effects of cloud composition (i.e., particle shape, size, composition, orientation, location) on the polarization of the single or the multiple scattered waves. Finally, this study will provide a new starting point for studying the problem of lightning radiative transfer.

  20. Accurate momentum transfer cross section for the attractive Yukawa potential

    SciTech Connect

    Khrapak, S. A.

    2014-04-15

    Accurate expression for the momentum transfer cross section for the attractive Yukawa potential is proposed. This simple analytic expression agrees with the numerical results better than to within ±2% in the regime relevant for ion-particle collisions in complex (dusty) plasmas.

  1. Spectrally Invariant Approximation within Atmospheric Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Chiu, J. C.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2011-01-01

    Certain algebraic combinations of single scattering albedo and solar radiation reflected from, or transmitted through, vegetation canopies do not vary with wavelength. These spectrally invariant relationships are the consequence of wavelength independence of the extinction coefficient and scattering phase function in vegetation. In general, this wavelength independence does not hold in the atmosphere, but in cloud-dominated atmospheres the total extinction and total scattering phase function vary only weakly with wavelength. This paper identifies the atmospheric conditions under which the spectrally invariant approximation can accurately describe the extinction and scattering properties of cloudy atmospheres. The validity of the assumptions and the accuracy of the approximation are tested with 1D radiative transfer calculations using publicly available radiative transfer models: Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer (DISORT) and Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART). It is shown for cloudy atmospheres with cloud optical depth above 3, and for spectral intervals that exclude strong water vapor absorption, that the spectrally invariant relationships found in vegetation canopy radiative transfer are valid to better than 5%. The physics behind this phenomenon, its mathematical basis, and possible applications to remote sensing and climate are discussed.

  2. The Greenhouse Effect - Determination From Accurate Surface Longwave Radiation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipona, R.

    Longwave radiation measurements have been drastically improved in recent years. Uncertainty levels down to s2 Wm-2 are realistic and achieved during long-term ´ longwave irradiance measurements. Longwave downward irradiance measurements together with temperature and humidity measurements at the station are used to sepa- rate clear-sky from cloudy-sky situations. Longwave net radiation separated between clear-sky and all-sky situations allows to determine the longwave cloud radiative forc- ing at the station. For clear-sky situations radiative transfer models demonstrate a lin- ear relation between longwave downward radiation and the greenhouse radiative flux. Clear-sky longwave radiation, temperature and humidity for different atmospheres and different altitudes were modeled with the MODTRAN radiative transfer code and compared to longwave radiation, temperature and humidity measured at 4 radiation stations of the Alpine Surface Radiation Budget (ASRB) network at similar altitude and with corresponding atmospheres. At the 11 ASRB stations the clear-sky green- house effect was determined by using clear-sky longwave downward measurements and MODTRAN model calculations. The all-sky greenhouse effect was determined by adding the longwave cloud radiative forcing to the clear-sky greenhouse radiative flux. The altitude dependence of annual and seasonal mean values of the greenhouse effect will be shown for the altitude range of 400 to 3600 meter a.s.l. in the Alps.

  3. Auroral resonance line radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Gladstone, G.R. )

    1992-02-01

    A model is developed for simulating the two-dimensional radiative transfer of resonance line emissions in auroras. The method of solution utilizes Fourier decomposition of the horizontal dependence in the intensity field so that the two-dimensional problem becomes a set of one-dimensional problems having different horizontal wavenumbers. The individual one-dimensional problems are solved for using a Feautrier-type solution of the differential-integral form of the radiative transfer equation. In the limit as the horizontal wavenumber becomes much larger than the local line-center extinction coefficient, the scattering integral becomes considerably simplified, and the final source function is evaluated in closed form. The two-dimensional aspects of the model are tested against results for nonresonance radiative transfer studies, and the resonance line part of the model is tested against results of existing plane-parallel resonance line radiative transfer codes. Finally, the model is used to simulate the intensity field of O{sub I} 1,304{angstrom} for hard and soft auroras of various Gaussian horizontal widths. The results demonstrate the importance of considering the effects of two-dimensional radiative transfer when analyzing auroral resonance line data.

  4. A spectroscopic transfer standard for accurate atmospheric CO measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwaboh, Javis A.; Li, Gang; Serdyukov, Anton; Werhahn, Olav; Ebert, Volker

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO) is a precursor of essential climate variables and has an indirect effect for enhancing global warming. Accurate and reliable measurements of atmospheric CO concentration are becoming indispensable. WMO-GAW reports states a compatibility goal of ±2 ppb for atmospheric CO concentration measurements. Therefore, the EMRP-HIGHGAS (European metrology research program - high-impact greenhouse gases) project aims at developing spectroscopic transfer standards for CO concentration measurements to meet this goal. A spectroscopic transfer standard would provide results that are directly traceable to the SI, can be very useful for calibration of devices operating in the field, and could complement classical gas standards in the field where calibration gas mixtures in bottles often are not accurate, available or stable enough [1][2]. Here, we present our new direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (dTDLAS) sensor capable of performing absolute ("calibration free") CO concentration measurements, and being operated as a spectroscopic transfer standard. To achieve the compatibility goal stated by WMO for CO concentration measurements and ensure the traceability of the final concentration results, traceable spectral line data especially line intensities with appropriate uncertainties are needed. Therefore, we utilize our new high-resolution Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy CO line data for the 2-0 band, with significantly reduced uncertainties, for the dTDLAS data evaluation. Further, we demonstrate the capability of our sensor for atmospheric CO measurements, discuss uncertainty calculation following the guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM) principles and show that CO concentrations derived using the sensor, based on the TILSAM (traceable infrared laser spectroscopic amount fraction measurement) method, are in excellent agreement with gravimetric values. Acknowledgement Parts of this work have been

  5. Radiative transfer in spherical atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, W.; Wehrse, R.

    1984-01-01

    A method for defining spherical model atmospheres in radiative/convective and hydrostatic equilibrium is presented. A finite difference form is found for the transfer equation and a matrix operator is developed as the discrete space analog (in curvilinear coordinates) of a formal integral in plane geometry. Pressure is treated as a function of temperature. Flux conservation is maintained within the energy equation, although the correct luminosity transport must be assigned for any given level of the atmosphere. A perturbed integral operator is used in a complete linearization of the transfer and constraint equations. Finally, techniques for generating stable solutions in economical computer time are discussed.

  6. RRTM: A rapid radiative transfer model

    SciTech Connect

    Mlawer, E.J.; Taubman, S.J.; Clough, S.A.

    1996-04-01

    A rapid radiative transfer model (RRTM) for the calculation of longwave clear-sky fluxes and cooling rates has been developed. The model, which uses the correlated-k method, is both accurate and computationally fast. The foundation for RRTM is the line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) from which the relevant k-distributions are obtained. LBLRTM, which has been extensively validated against spectral observations e.g., the high-resolution sounder and the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer, is used to validate the flux and cooling rate results from RRTM. Validations of RRTM`s results have been performed for the tropical, midlatitude summer, and midlatitude winter atmospheres, as well as for the four Intercomparison of Radiation Codes in Climate Models (ICRCCM) cases from the Spectral Radiance Experiment (SPECTRE). Details of some of these validations are presented below. RRTM has the identical atmospheric input module as LBLRTM, facilitating intercomparisons with LBLRTM and application of the model at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed sites.

  7. Radiative Transfer Under Inhomogeneous Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendicho, P. Fabiani

    1998-06-01

    We present, for the first time, three dimensional (3D) radiative transfer (RT) results with realistic atomic models (multilevel) and without using the local thermodinamical equilibrium approximation (non-LTE). We have developed a new code based on efficient iterative methods (Trujillo Bueno, and Fabiani Bendicho 1995; Fabiani Bendicho, Trujillo Bueno and Auer 1997) characterized by a very high convergence rate. With this 3D multilevel code and using a schematic atmospheric model we are able to demonstrate that one may need self-consistent multidimensional RT calculations in order to interpret high spatial resolution solar spectroscopic observations.

  8. Radiative transfer in dusty nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dana, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of dust scattering on observable optical and infrared parameters, and the accuracy of approximate solutions were examined. The equation of radiative transfer in a static and homogeneous, but not necessarily uniform, distribution gas and dust around a central empty core with a point source of energy at its center was solved. The dust properties were characterized by a phenomenological extinction cross section, albedo and parameters describing the anisotropy of dust scattering. For ultraviolet photons, ionization equilibrium equations for the gas were solved, and for infrared photons a self-consistent dust temperature was calculated. Ray tracing was used to solve for the angular dependence of the intensity.

  9. Radiative transfer effects in primordial hydrogen recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Ali-Haiemoud, Yacine; Hirata, Christopher M.; Grin, Daniel

    2010-12-15

    The calculation of a highly accurate cosmological recombination history has been the object of particular attention recently, as it constitutes the major theoretical uncertainty when predicting the angular power spectrum of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. Lyman transitions, in particular the Lyman-{alpha} line, have long been recognized as one of the bottlenecks of recombination, due to their very low escape probabilities. The Sobolev approximation does not describe radiative transfer in the vicinity of Lyman lines to a sufficient degree of accuracy, and several corrections have already been computed in other works. In this paper, we compute the impact of some radiative transfer effects that were previously ignored, or for which previous treatments were incomplete. First, the effect of Thomson scattering in the vicinity of the Lyman-{alpha} line is evaluated, using a full redistribution kernel incorporated into a radiative transfer code. The effect of feedback of distortions generated by the optically thick deuterium Lyman-{alpha} line blueward of the hydrogen line is investigated with an analytic approximation. It is shown that both effects are negligible during cosmological hydrogen recombination. Second, the importance of high-lying, nonoverlapping Lyman transitions is assessed. It is shown that escape from lines above Ly{gamma} and frequency diffusion in Ly{beta} and higher lines can be neglected without loss of accuracy. Third, a formalism generalizing the Sobolev approximation is developed to account for the overlap of the high-lying Lyman lines, which is shown to lead to negligible changes to the recombination history. Finally, the possibility of a cosmological hydrogen recombination maser is investigated. It is shown that there is no such maser in the purely radiative treatment presented here.

  10. Accurate Satellite-Derived Estimates of Tropospheric Ozone Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, Joanna; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Vasilkov, Alexander P.; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Platnick, Steven; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Levelt, Pieternel F.

    2008-01-01

    Estimates of the radiative forcing due to anthropogenically-produced tropospheric O3 are derived primarily from models. Here, we use tropospheric ozone and cloud data from several instruments in the A-train constellation of satellites as well as information from the GEOS-5 Data Assimilation System to accurately estimate the instantaneous radiative forcing from tropospheric O3 for January and July 2005. We improve upon previous estimates of tropospheric ozone mixing ratios from a residual approach using the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) by incorporating cloud pressure information from OMI. Since we cannot distinguish between natural and anthropogenic sources with the satellite data, our estimates reflect the total forcing due to tropospheric O3. We focus specifically on the magnitude and spatial structure of the cloud effect on both the shortand long-wave radiative forcing. The estimates presented here can be used to validate present day O3 radiative forcing produced by models.

  11. Prediction of radiative heat transfer in rectangular enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Jamaluddin, A.S.; Smith, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Discrete ordinates solutions of the radiative transport equation have been obtained for two- and three-dimensional rectangular enclosures using the S/sub 2/ and S/sub 4/ approximations. Limited evaluations indicate that both S/sub 2/ and S/sub 4/ are suitable for predicting radiative transfer in two-dimensional enclosures. However, for the three-dimensional enclosures the S/sub 2/ approximation is found inadequate. It is inferred that S/sub 4/ or higher order approximations should be used to accurately predict radiative heat transfer in three-dimensional rectangular enclosures.

  12. Combination of TWSTFT and GNSS for accurate UTC time transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z.; Petit, G.

    2009-06-01

    The international UTC/TAI time and frequency transfer network is based on two independent space techniques: Two-Way Satellite Time and Frequency Transfer (TWSTFT) and Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). The network is highly redundant. In fact, 28% of the national time laboratories, which contribute 88% of the total atomic clock weight and all the primary frequency standards to UTC/TAI, operate both techniques. This redundancy is not fully used in UTC/TAI generation. We propose a combination that keeps the advantages of TWSTFT and GNSS and offers a new and effective strategy to improve UTC/TAI in terms of accuracy, stability and robustness. We focus on the combination of two BIPM routine products, TWSTFT and GPS PPP (time transfer using the precise point positioning technique), but the proposed method can be used for any carrier phase-based GNSS product.

  13. Stochastic Radiative transfer and real cloudiness

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, F.

    1995-09-01

    Plane-parallel radiative transfer modeling of clouds in GCMs is thought to be an inadequate representation of the effects of real cloudiness. A promising new approach for studying the effects of cloud horizontal inhomogeneity is stochastic radiative transfer, which computes the radiative effects of ensembles of cloud structures described by probability distributions. This approach is appropriate because cloud information is inherently statistical, and it is the mean radiative effect of complex 3D cloud structure that is desired. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  14. A study of Monte Carlo radiative transfer through fractal clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Gautier, C.; Lavallec, D.; O`Hirok, W.; Ricchiazzi, P.

    1996-04-01

    An understanding of radiation transport (RT) through clouds is fundamental to studies of the earth`s radiation budget and climate dynamics. The transmission through horizontally homogeneous clouds has been studied thoroughly using accurate, discreet ordinates radiative transfer models. However, the applicability of these results to general problems of global radiation budget is limited by the plane parallel assumption and the fact that real clouds fields show variability, both vertically and horizontally, on all size scales. To understand how radiation interacts with realistic clouds, we have used a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model to compute the details of the photon-cloud interaction on synthetic cloud fields. Synthetic cloud fields, generated by a cascade model, reproduce the scaling behavior, as well as the cloud variability observed and estimated from cloud satellite data.

  15. BART: Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer fitting code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubillos, Patricio; Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Rojo, Patricio; Lust, Nate; Bowman, Oliver; Stemm, Madison; Foster, Andrew; Loredo, Thomas J.; Fortney, Jonathan; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2016-08-01

    BART implements a Bayesian, Monte Carlo-driven, radiative-transfer scheme for extracting parameters from spectra of planetary atmospheres. BART combines a thermochemical-equilibrium code, a one-dimensional line-by-line radiative-transfer code, and the Multi-core Markov-chain Monte Carlo statistical module to constrain the atmospheric temperature and chemical-abundance profiles of exoplanets.

  16. Automated generation of highly accurate, efficient and transferable pseudopotentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, R. A.; Brock, C. N.; Paikoff, B. C.; Tackett, A. R.; Walker, D. G.

    2015-11-01

    A multi-objective genetic algorithm (MOGA) was used to automate a search for optimized pseudopotential parameters. Pseudopotentials were generated using the atomPAW program and density functional theory (DFT) simulations were conducted using the pwPAW program. The optimized parameters were the cutoff radius and projector energies for the s and p orbitals. The two objectives were low pseudopotential error and low computational work requirements. The error was determined from (1) the root mean square difference between the all-electron and pseudized-electron log derivative, (2) the calculated lattice constant versus reference data of Holzwarth et al., and (3) the calculated bulk modulus versus reference potentials. The computational work was defined as the number of flops required to perform the DFT simulation. Pseudopotential transferability was encouraged by optimizing each element in different lattices: (1) nitrogen in GaN, AlN, and YN, (2) oxygen in NO, ZnO, and SiO4, and (3) fluorine in LiF, NaF, and KF. The optimal solutions were equivalent in error and required significantly less computational work than the reference data. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that the combination of MOGA and ab-initio simulations is a powerful tool that can generate a set of transferable potentials with a trade-off between accuracy (error) and computational efficiency (work).

  17. One-way radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Rodríguez, Pedro; Ilan, Boaz; Kim, Arnold D.

    2016-06-01

    We introduce the one-way radiative transfer equation (RTE) for modeling the transmission of a light beam incident normally on a slab composed of a uniform forward-peaked scattering medium. Unlike the RTE, which is formulated as a boundary value problem, the one-way RTE is formulated as an initial value problem. Consequently, the one-way RTE is much easier to solve. We discuss the relation of the one-way RTE to the Fokker-Planck, small-angle, and Fermi pencil beam approximations. Then, we validate the one-way RTE through systematic comparisons with RTE simulations for both the Henyey-Greenstein and screened Rutherford scattering phase functions over a broad range of albedo, anisotropy factor, optical thickness, and refractive index values. We find that the one-way RTE gives very good approximations for a broad range of optical property values for thin to moderately thick media that have moderately to sharply forward-peaked scattering. Specifically, we show that the error made by the one-way RTE decreases monotonically as the anisotropic factor increases and as the albedo increases. On the other hand, the error increases monotonically as the optical thickness increases and the refractive index mismatch at the boundary increases.

  18. Radiative heat transfer in porous uranium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, S.L.

    1992-12-01

    Due to low thermal conductivity and high emissivity of UO{sub 2}, it has been suggested that radiative heat transfer may play a significant role in heat transfer through pores of UO{sub 2} fuel. This possibility was computationally investigated and contribution of radiative heat transfer within pores to overall heat transport in porous UO{sub 2} quantified. A repeating unit cell was developed to model approximately a porous UO{sub 2} fuel system, and the heat transfer through unit cells representing a wide variety of fuel conditions was calculated using a finite element computer program. Conduction through solid fuel matrix as wekk as pore gas, and radiative exchange at pore surface was incorporated. A variety of pore compositions were investigated: porosity, pore size, shape and orientation, temperature, and temperature gradient. Calculations were made in which pore surface radiation was both modeled and neglected. The difference between yielding the integral contribution of radiative heat transfer mechanism to overall heat transport. Results indicate that radiative component of heat transfer within pores is small for conditions representative of light water reactor fuel, typically less than 1% of total heat transport. It is much larger, however, for conditions present in liquid metal fast breeder reactor fuel; during restructuring of this fuel type early in life, the radiative heat transfer mode was shown to contribute as much as 10-20% of total heat transport in hottest regions of fuel.

  19. Spectrally-Invariant Approximation Within Atmospheric Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Chiu, J. C.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2011-01-01

    Certain algebraic combinations of single scattering albedo and solar radiation reflected from, or transmitted through, vegetation canopies do not vary with wavelength. These "spectrally invariant relationships" are the consequence of wavelength independence of the extinction coefficient and scattering phase function in vegetation. In general, this wavelength independence does not hold in the atmosphere, but in clouddominated atmospheres the total extinction and total scattering phase function vary only weakly with wavelength. This paper identifies the atmospheric conditions under which the spectrally invariant approximation can accurately describe the extinction. and scattering properties of cloudy atmospheres. The validity of the assumptions and the accuracy of the approximation are tested with ID radiative transfer calculations using publicly available radiative transfer models: Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer (DISORT) and Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART). It is shown for cloudy atmospheres with cloud optical depth above 3, and for spectral intervals that exclude strong water vapor absorption, that the spectrally invariant relationships found in vegetation canopy radiative transfer are valid to better than 5%. The physics behind this phenomenon, its mathematical basis, and possible applications to remote sensing and climate are discussed.

  20. Radiative Transfer on Mesoscopic Spatial Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Adam Ronald

    Accurate predictions of light transport produced by illumination of turbid media such as biological tissues, cloudy atmospheres, terrestrial surfaces, and soft matter is essential in many applications including remote sensing, functional optical imaging, realistic image synthesis, and materials characterization. The inability to model light transport on mesoscopic scales limits the spatial resolution and information content that can be extracted from optical measurements. While effective approaches exist to model light transport in singly- and diffusely-scattering regimes, modeling light propagation over the mesoscopic spatial scales remains an important challenge. Radiative transfer on these scales must account for the complete 5-dimensional spatial and angular distributions of the radiant field. Here, we present novel stochastic and analytic methods to analyze and predict light propagation in turbid media generated by collimated illumination on mesoscopic scales. We also consider coupled transport problems, resulting from illumination and detection, to facilitate measurement design and inverse problems. Specifically, we introduce a coupled Forward-Adjoint Monte Carlo (cFAMC) method that leverages generalized optical reciprocity to enable the computation of spatially-resolved distributions of light interrogation for specific source-detector pairs. cFAMC can aid the design of optical diagnostic measurements by tailoring the light field to interrogate specific sub-volumes of interest. We use cFAMC to examine the effects of angular resolution on the resulting interrogation distributions and analyze a diagnostically-relevant compact fiber probe design for the detection of epithelial precancer. While Monte Carlo simulation is considered a gold standard method to solve the equation of radiative transfer (ERT), it is computationally expensive. Thus, methods to obtain ERT solutions at lower computational cost are valuable. We introduce a general analytical framework to

  1. Validation of the Poisson Stochastic Radiative Transfer Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhuravleva, Tatiana; Marshak, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    A new approach to validation of the Poisson stochastic radiative transfer method is proposed. In contrast to other validations of stochastic models, the main parameter of the Poisson model responsible for cloud geometrical structure - cloud aspect ratio - is determined entirely by matching measurements and calculations of the direct solar radiation. If the measurements of the direct solar radiation is unavailable, it was shown that there is a range of the aspect ratios that allows the stochastic model to accurately approximate the average measurements of surface downward and cloud top upward fluxes. Realizations of the fractionally integrated cascade model are taken as a prototype of real measurements.

  2. Radiative transfer of visible radiation in turbid atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, G.; Tanaka, M.

    1974-01-01

    Methods are presented for solving radiative transfer problems; they include the doubling method and the closely related matrix method, iterative method, Chandrasekhar's method of discrete ordinates, and Monte Carlo method. To consider radiation transport through turbid atmosphere, an atmospheric model was developed characterizing aerosols by parameters. Intensity and polarization of radiation in turbid atmospheres is discussed, as well as lower atmospheric heating due to solar radiation absorption by aerosols.

  3. Easy Accurate Transfer of the Sculpted Soft Tissue Contours to the Working Cast: A Clinical Tip.

    PubMed

    Jambhekar, Shantanu S; Kheur, Mohit G; Matani, Jay; Sethi, Sumit

    2014-12-01

    Tooth replacement in the esthetic zone presents a myriad of challenges for the clinician. An ovate pontic accurately duplicates the emergence profile of the natural tooth it replaces in order to provide an esthetic, yet cleansable prosthesis. The accurate transfer of this sculpted tissue beneath the pontic of the provisional restoration is critical to provide the dental laboratory technician with the necessary information to fabricate a definitive restoration with an appropriate emergence profile. This article presents an innovative, simple and convenient impression technique for easy and accurate transfer of the tissue contours to the working cast, avoiding tissue collapse and tissue compression produced due to the impression material. PMID:26199543

  4. Radiation heat transfer shapefactors for combustion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, A. F.; Johansson, O.; Abrous, A.

    1987-01-01

    The computation of radiation heat transfer through absorbing media is commonly done through the zoning method which relies upon values of the geometric mean transmittance and absorptance. The computation of these values is difficult and expensive, particularly if many spectral bands are used. This paper describes the extension of a scan line algorithm, based upon surface-surface radiation, to the computation of surface-gas and gas-gas radiation transmittances.

  5. Radiative Transfer In Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beloborodov, Andrei

    We propose to develop state-of-the-art numerical tools for radiative transfer calculations in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We will investigate two problems: (1) Production and heating of photons at the early (opaque) stage of the explosion, which controls the brightness and spectral shape of the jet photospheric emission. (2) Transfer of GRB radiation through the external blast wave. Our recent results suggest that this transfer generates the GeV flash observed in GRBs, providing key information on the explosion and its progenitor. We will test our models against observations.

  6. Discrete Space Theory of Radiative Transfer: Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M. Srinivasa

    2010-06-01

    The method of obtaining the solution of radiative transfer equation using discrete space theory (DST) is described with (1) interaction principle for different geometries (2) star product (3) calculation of radiation field at internal points. Some of the important steps to obtain the solution of radiative transfer equation in spherical symmetry are also mentioned. Applications of DST are discussed with their results in two cases (a) study of reflection effect in close binary systems and (b) to compute KI 769.9 nm emission line profiles from N-type stars.

  7. Discrete Space Theory of Radiative Transfer: Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M. Srinivasa

    The method of obtaining the solution of radiative transfer equation using discrete space theory (DST) is described with (1) interaction principle for different geometries (2) star product (3) calculation of radiation field at internal points. Some of the important steps to obtain the solution of radiative transfer equation in spherical symmetry are also mentioned. Applications of DST are discussed with their results in two cases (a) study of reflection effect in close binary systems and (b) to compute KI 769.9 nm emission line profiles from N-type stars.

  8. Nonaxisymmetric radiative transfer in cylindrical enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Moder, J.P.; Lee, H.S.; Chai, J.C.; Parthasarathy, G.; Patankar, S.V.

    1996-12-31

    A finite-volume method for radiative transfer in cylindrical enclosures is presented. Angular redistribution terms in the equation of transfer are avoided by defining radiation directions in terms of angular coordinates measured with respect to Cartesian base vectors; this definition of radiation directions can result in control angles which overlap control-volume faces, depending on the type of spatial and angular grids used in the azimuthal direction. A simple treatment for such control-angle overlaps is presented which is also applicable to nonorthogonal curvilinear spatial-coordinates. A comparison of the present procedure with other similar methods is given. Solutions are presented for axisymmetric transfer through a cylinder and nonaxisymmetric transfer through two- and three-dimensional annular sectors. Results show that the procedure produces reasonable solutions for transparent and participating media in axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric cylindrical enclosures.

  9. Transient radiative transfer through scattering absorbing media

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, K.; Kumar, S.

    1996-12-31

    This paper outlines the formulation of the different methods for determining transient radiative transfer through scattering absorbing media. A boundary driven radiative problem is considered in a one-dimensional plane-parallel slab. The different methods of solving the transient radiative transfer equation include the P{sub 1}, P{sub 3}, and P{sub 5} approximations, two-flux method, and eight, twelve and sixteen discrete ordinates methods. In addition, the general transient radiative transfer equation is also solved by direct numerical integration without any simplifying assumptions. Different orders of approximation for the phase function are considered as is a parametric analysis of the different parameters such as the scattering albedo and optical depth is performed. The propagation speed obtained and the magnitude of the transmitted and back-scattered fluxes for different models obtained are a function of the approximation used to represent the intensity distribution.

  10. Radiative transfer model: matrix operator method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q; Ruprecht, E

    1996-07-20

    A radiative transfer model, the matrix operator method, is discussed here. The matrix operator method is applied to a plane-parallel atmosphere within three spectral ranges: the visible, the infrared, and the microwave. For a homogeneous layer with spherical scattering, the radiative transfer equation can be solved analytically. The vertically inhomogeneous atmosphere can be subdivided into a set of homogeneous layers. The solution of the radiative transfer equation for the vertically inhomogeneous atmosphere is obtained recurrently from the analytical solutions for the subdivided layers. As an example for the application of the matrix operator method, the effects of the cirrus and the stratocumulus clouds on the net radiation at the surface and at the top of the atmosphere are investigated. The relationship between the polarization in the microwave range and the rain rates is also studied. Copies of the FORTRAN program and the documentation of the FORTRAN program on a diskette are available. PMID:21102832

  11. Session on modeling of radiative transfer processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flatau, Piotr

    1993-01-01

    The session on modeling of radiative transfer processes is reviewed. Six critical issues surfaced in the discussion concerning scale-interactive radiative processes relevent to the mesoscale convective systems (MCS's). These issues are the need to expand basic knowledge of how MCS's influence climate through extensive cloud shields and increased humidity in the upper troposphere; to improve radiation parameterizations used in mesoscale and General Circulation Model (GCM) models; to improve our basic understanding of the influence of radiation on MCS dynamics due to diabatic heating, production of condensate, and vertical and horizontal heat fluxes; to quantify our understanding of radiative impacts of MCS's on the surface and free atmosphere energy budgets; to quantify and identify radiative and microphysical processes important in the evolution of MCS's; and to improve the capability to remotely sense MCS radiative properties from space and ground-based systems.

  12. Radiative transfer in moving media : basic mathematical methods for radiative transfer in spherically symmetrical moving media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, K. K., Wilson, S. J.

    The advancement of observational techniques over the years has led to the discovery of a large number of stars exhibiting complex spectral structures, thus necessitating the search for new techniques and methods to study radiative transfer in such stars with moving envelopes. This led to the introduction of the concept of "photon escape probability" and the wisdom of expressing the transfer equations in "comoving frames" (CMF). Radiative transfer problems in spherically moving media form a branch of mathematical physics which uses mathematics of a very distinctive kind. Radiative Transfer in Moving Media records the basic mathematical methodologies, both analytical and numerical, developed for solving radiation transfer problems in spherically symmetric moving media, in the consideration of macroscopic velocity fields only. Part I contains the basic notions of radiation-matter interaction in participating media and constructs the relevant transfer equations to be solved in the subsequent chapters. Part II considers the basic mathematical methods for solving the transfer problems in extensive moving atmospheres when it is observed in the lab frame. Part III introduces the analytical and numerical methods for solving radiative transfer problems in spherically symmetric moving atmospheres when expressed in the comoving frame. This book is addressed to graduate students and researchers in Astrophysics, in particular to those studying radiative transfer in stellar atmospheres.

  13. An Improved Radiative Transfer Model for Climate Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Sokolik, Irina N.; Clough, Shepard A.; Toon, Owen B.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a radiative transfer model that has been developed to accurately predict the atmospheric radiant flux in both the infrared and the solar spectrum with a minimum of computational effort. The model is designed to be included in numerical climate models To assess the accuracy of the model, the results are compared to other more detailed models for several standard cases in the solar and thermal spectrum. As the thermal spectrum has been treated in other publications, we focus here on the solar part of the spectrum. We perform several example calculations focussing on the question of absorption of solar radiation by gases and aerosols.

  14. Accurate bs and w testing important for crude-oil custody transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J. )

    1990-11-12

    This paper discusses how monitoring crude-oil sediment and water content at the field production site is essential in accurate crude-oil custody transfer operations. This is accomplished by manual methods, or on-line devices like capacitance, density, or energy-absorption analyzers. For custody-transfer purposes, sediment and water is determined by a test which follows one of the API manuals of petroleum measurement standards (MPMS). Typically, this test is conducted in the field by the field centrifuge method which, if performed properly, yields very accurate results. Laboratory tests can be performed, but sample handling becomes even more critical.

  15. Cirrus microphysics and radiative transfer: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinne, Stefan A.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    1990-01-01

    During the Cirrus Intensive Field Operations of FIRE, data collected by the NCAR King Air in the vicinity of Wausau, WI on October 28 were selected to study the influence of cirrus cloud microphysics on radiative transfer and the role of microphysical approximations in radiative transfer models. The instrumentation of the King Air provided, aside from temperature and wind data, up-and downwelling broadband solar and infrared fluxes as well as detailed microphysical data. The aircraft data, supplied every second, are averaged over the 7 legs to represent the properties for that altitude. The resulting vertical profiles, however, suffer from the fact that each leg represents a different cloud column path. Based on the measured microphysical data particle size distributions of equivalent spheres for each cloud level are developed. Accurate radiative transfer calculations are performed, incorporating atmospheric and radiative data from the ground and the stratosphere. Comparing calculated to the measured up- and downwelling fluxes at the seven cloud levels for both the averaged and the three crossover data will help to assess the validity of particle size and shape approximation as they are frequently used to model cirrus clouds. Once agreement is achieved the model results may be applied to determine, in comparison to a cloudfree case, the influence of this particular cirrus on the radiation budget of the earth atmosphere system.

  16. Lattice Boltzmann method for one-dimensional vector radiative transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Yi, Hongliang; Tan, Heping

    2016-02-01

    A one-dimensional vector radiative transfer (VRT) model based on lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) that considers polarization using four Stokes parameters is developed. The angular space is discretized by the discrete-ordinates approach, and the spatial discretization is conducted by LBM. LBM has such attractive properties as simple calculation procedure, straightforward and efficient handing of boundary conditions, and capability of stable and accurate simulation. To validate the performance of LBM for vector radiative transfer, four various test problems are examined. The first case investigates the non-scattering thermal-emitting atmosphere with no external collimated solar. For the other three cases, the external collimated solar and three different scattering types are considered. Particularly, the LBM is extended to solve VRT in the atmospheric aerosol system where the scattering function contains singularities and the hemisphere space distributions for the Stokes vector are presented and discussed. The accuracy and computational efficiency of this algorithm are discussed. Numerical results show that the LBM is accurate, flexible and effective to solve one-dimensional polarized radiative transfer problems. PMID:26906779

  17. Radiation-induced hydrogen transfer in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyurin, Yu I.; Vlasov, V. A.; Dolgov, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents processes of hydrogen (deuterium) diffusion and release from hydrogen-saturated condensed matters in atomic, molecular and ionized states under the influence of the electron beam and X-ray radiation in the pre-threshold region. The dependence is described between the hydrogen isotope release intensity and the current density and the electron beam energy affecting sample, hydrogen concentration in the material volume and time of radiation exposure to the sample. The energy distribution of the emitted positive ions of hydrogen isotopes is investigated herein. Mechanisms of radiation-induced hydrogen transfer in condensed matters are suggested.

  18. 2-DUST: Dust radiative transfer code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueta, Toshiya; Meixner, Margaret

    2016-04-01

    2-DUST is a general-purpose dust radiative transfer code for an axisymmetric system that reveals the global energetics of dust grains in the shell and the 2-D projected morphologies of the shell that are strongly dependent on the mixed effects of the axisymmetric dust distribution and inclination angle. It can be used to model a variety of axisymmetric astronomical dust systems.

  19. Accurate and transferable extended Hückel-type tight-binding parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdá, J.; Soria, F.

    2000-03-01

    We show how the simple extended Hückel theory can be easily parametrized in order to yield accurate band structures for bulk materials, while the resulting optimized atomic orbital basis sets present good transferability properties. The number of parameters involved is exceedingly small, typically ten or eleven per structural phase. We apply the method to almost fifty elemental and compound bulk phases.

  20. ACCURATE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS IN A NATURALLY-ASPIRATED RADIATION SHIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.

    2009-09-09

    Experiments and calculations were conducted with a 0.13 mm fine wire thermocouple within a naturally-aspirated Gill radiation shield to assess and improve the accuracy of air temperature measurements without the use of mechanical aspiration, wind speed or radiation measurements. It was found that this thermocouple measured the air temperature with root-mean-square errors of 0.35 K within the Gill shield without correction. A linear temperature correction was evaluated based on the difference between the interior plate and thermocouple temperatures. This correction was found to be relatively insensitive to shield design and yielded an error of 0.16 K for combined day and night observations. The correction was reliable in the daytime when the wind speed usually exceeds 1 m s{sup -1} but occasionally performed poorly at night during very light winds. Inspection of the standard deviation in the thermocouple wire temperature identified these periods but did not unambiguously locate the most serious events. However, estimates of sensor accuracy during these periods is complicated by the much larger sampling volume of the mechanically-aspirated sensor compared with the naturally-aspirated sensor and the presence of significant near surface temperature gradients. The root-mean-square errors therefore are upper limits to the aspiration error since they include intrinsic sensor differences and intermittent volume sampling differences.

  1. Can radiation therapy treatment planning system accurately predict surface doses in postmastectomy radiation therapy patients?

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Sharon; Back, Michael; Tan, Poh Wee; Lee, Khai Mun; Baggarley, Shaun; Lu, Jaide Jay

    2012-07-01

    Skin doses have been an important factor in the dose prescription for breast radiotherapy. Recent advances in radiotherapy treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and new treatment schemes such as hypofractionated breast therapy have made the precise determination of the surface dose necessary. Detailed information of the dose at various depths of the skin is also critical in designing new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of surface dose calculation by a clinically used treatment planning system and those measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) in a customized chest wall phantom. This study involved the construction of a chest wall phantom for skin dose assessment. Seven TLDs were distributed throughout each right chest wall phantom to give adequate representation of measured radiation doses. Point doses from the CMS Xio Registered-Sign treatment planning system (TPS) were calculated for each relevant TLD positions and results correlated. There were no significant difference between measured absorbed dose by TLD and calculated doses by the TPS (p > 0.05 (1-tailed). Dose accuracy of up to 2.21% was found. The deviations from the calculated absorbed doses were overall larger (3.4%) when wedges and bolus were used. 3D radiotherapy TPS is a useful and accurate tool to assess the accuracy of surface dose. Our studies have shown that radiation treatment accuracy expressed as a comparison between calculated doses (by TPS) and measured doses (by TLD dosimetry) can be accurately predicted for tangential treatment of the chest wall after mastectomy.

  2. SGPGET: AN SBDART Module for Aerosol Radiative Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    McComiskey, A.; Ricchiazzi, P.; Ogren, J.A.; Dutton, E.

    2005-03-18

    Quantification of the aerosol direct effect and climate sensitivity requires accurate estimates of optical properties as inputs to a radiative transfer model. Long-term measurements of aerosol properties at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site can be used as an improvement over a best guess or global average for optical properties (e.g., asymmetry factor of 0.7) used in Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) products such as the Broadband Heating Rate Profile VAP. To make this information readily available to the ARM community and others, an add-on module for a commonly used radiative transfer model, SBDART (Ricchiazzi et al. 1998), is being developed. A look up table and algorithm will provide aerosol related model inputs including aerosol optical and atmospheric state properties at high temporal resolution. These inputs can be used in conjunction with any mode of operation and with any other information, for example, cloud properties, in SBDART or any other radiative transfer model. Aerosol properties measured at three visible wavelengths are extrapolated so that flux calculations can be made in any desired wavelength across the shortwave spectrum. Several sources of uncertainty contribute to degraded accuracy of the aerosol property estimation. The effect of these uncertainties is shown through error analysis and comparisons of modeled and observed surface irradiance. A module is also being developed for the North Slope of Alaska site.

  3. CRASH3: cosmological radiative transfer through metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziani, L.; Maselli, A.; Ciardi, B.

    2013-05-01

    Here we introduce CRASH3, the latest release of the 3D radiative transfer code CRASH. In its current implementation, CRASH3 integrates into the reference algorithm the code CLOUDY to evaluate the ionization states of metals, self-consistently with the radiative transfer through H and He. The feedback of the heavy elements on the calculation of the gas temperature is also taken into account, making CRASH3 the first 3D code for cosmological applications which treats self-consistently the radiative transfer through an inhomogeneous distribution of metal-enriched gas with an arbitrary number of point sources and/or a background radiation. The code has been tested in idealized configurations, as well as in a more realistic case of multiple sources embedded in a polluted cosmic web. Through these validation tests, the new method has been proven to be numerically stable and convergent. We have studied the dependence of the results on a number of physical quantities such as the source characteristics (spectral range and shape, intensity), the metal composition, the gas number density and metallicity.

  4. Infrared radiative energy transfer in gaseous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1991-01-01

    Analyses and numerical procedures are presented to investigate the radiative interactions in various energy transfer processes in gaseous systems. Both gray and non-gray radiative formulations for absorption and emission by molecular gases are presented. The gray gas formulations are based on the Planck mean absorption coefficient and the non-gray formulations are based on the wide band model correlations for molecular absorption. Various relations for the radiative flux and divergence of radiative flux are developed. These are useful for different flow conditions and physical problems. Specific plans for obtaining extensive results for different cases are presented. The procedure developed was applied to several realistic problems. Results of selected studies are presented.

  5. Modeling of Radiative Transfer in Protostellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VonAllmen, Paul; Turner, Neal

    2007-01-01

    This program implements a spectral line, radiative transfer tool for interpreting Spitzer Space Telescope observations by matching them with models of protostellar disks for improved understanding of planet and star formation. The Spitzer Space Telescope detects gas phase molecules in the infrared spectra of protostellar disks, with spectral lines carrying information on the chemical composition of the material from which planets form. Input to the software includes chemical models developed at JPL. The products are synthetic images and spectra for comparison with Spitzer measurements. Radiative transfer in a protostellar disk is primarily affected by absorption and emission processes in the dust and in molecular gases such as H2, CO, and HCO. The magnitude of the optical absorption and emission is determined by the population of the electronic, vibrational, and rotational energy levels. The population of the molecular level is in turn determined by the intensity of the radiation field. Therefore, the intensity of the radiation field and the population of the molecular levels are inter-dependent quantities. To meet the computational challenges of solving for the coupled radiation field and electronic level populations in disks having wide ranges of optical depths and spatial scales, the tool runs in parallel on the JPL Dell Cluster supercomputer with C++ and Fortran compiler with a Message Passing Interface. Because this software has been developed on a distributed computing platform, the modeling of systems previously beyond the reach of available computational resources is possible.

  6. Radiative transfer in realistic planetary atmospheres. [bibliographies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plass, G. N.; Kattawar, G. W.

    1982-01-01

    Some 40 publications that appeared in scientific journals from 1973 to 1981 as well as 45 scientific reports issued during the grant period are listed by title. Topics cover the development of a matrix operator theory of radiative transfer which made possible the exact model calculations of the radiance as a function of height in planetary atmospheres; calculation of the Mie phase matrix for various types of particles as well as for radiance and polarization in planetary atmospheres; analysis of high dispersion spectroscopic observations of Venus; calculation of curves of growth for Venus; the development of a theory for calculating radiative transfer in spherical shell atmospheres; investigations of zonal winds on Venus; and examination of Rayleigh scattering.

  7. Introductory Tools for Radiative Transfer Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, D.; Kuai, L.; Natraj, V.; Yung, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Satellite data are currently so voluminous that, despite their unprecedented quality and potential for scientific application, only a small fraction is analyzed due to two factors: researchers' computational constraints and a relatively small number of researchers actively utilizing the data. Ultimately it is hoped that the terabytes of unanalyzed data being archived can receive scientific scrutiny but this will require a popularization of the methods associated with the analysis. Since a large portion of complexity is associated with the proper implementation of the radiative transfer model, it is reasonable and appropriate to make the model as accessible as possible to general audiences. Unfortunately, the algorithmic and conceptual details that are necessary for state-of-the-art analysis also tend to frustrate the accessibility for those new to remote sensing. Several efforts have been made to have web- based radiative transfer calculations, and these are useful for limited calculations, but analysis of more than a few spectra requires the utilization of home- or server-based computing resources. We present a system that is designed to allow for easier access to radiative transfer models with implementation on a home computing platform in the hopes that this system can be utilized in and expanded upon in advanced high school and introductory college settings. This learning-by-doing process is aided through the use of several powerful tools. The first is a wikipedia-style introduction to the salient features of radiative transfer that references the seminal works in the field and refers to more complicated calculations and algorithms sparingly5. The second feature is a technical forum, commonly referred to as a tiki-wiki, that addresses technical and conceptual questions through public postings, private messages, and a ranked searching routine. Together, these tools may be able to facilitate greater interest in the field of remote sensing.

  8. ASIMUT on line radiative transfer code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandaele, A. C.; Neary, L.; Robert, S.; Letocart, V.; Giuranna, M.; Kasaba, Y.

    2015-10-01

    The CROSS DRIVE project aims to develop an innovative collaborative workspace infrastructure for space missions that will allow distributed scientific and engineering teams to collectively analyse and interpret scientific data as well as execute operations of planetary spacecraft. ASIMUT will be one of the tools that will be made available to the users. Here we describe this radiative transfer code and how it will be integrated into the virtual environment developed within CROSS DRIVE.

  9. Enhancing radiative energy transfer through thermal extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yixuan; Liu, Baoan; Shen, Sheng; Yu, Zongfu

    2016-06-01

    Thermal radiation plays an increasingly important role in many emerging energy technologies, such as thermophotovoltaics, passive radiative cooling and wearable cooling clothes [1]. One of the fundamental constraints in thermal radiation is the Stefan-Boltzmann law, which limits the maximum power of far-field radiation to P0 = σT4S, where σ is the Boltzmann constant, S and T are the area and the temperature of the emitter, respectively (Fig. 1a). In order to overcome this limit, it has been shown that near-field radiations could have an energy density that is orders of magnitude greater than the Stefan-Boltzmann law [2-7]. Unfortunately, such near-field radiation transfer is spatially confined and cannot carry radiative heat to the far field. Recently, a new concept of thermal extraction was proposed [8] to enhance far-field thermal emission, which, conceptually, operates on a principle similar to oil immersion lenses and light extraction in light-emitting diodes using solid immersion lens to increase light output [62].Thermal extraction allows a blackbody to radiate more energy to the far field than the apparent limit of the Stefan-Boltzmann law without breaking the second law of thermodynamics. Thermal extraction works by using a specially designed thermal extractor to convert and guide the near-field energy to the far field, as shown in Fig. 1b. The same blackbody as shown in Fig. 1a is placed closely below the thermal extractor with a spacing smaller than the thermal wavelength. The near-field coupling transfers radiative energy with a density greater than σT4. The thermal extractor, made from transparent and high-index or structured materials, does not emit or absorb any radiation. It transforms the near-field energy and sends it toward the far field. As a result, the total amount of far-field radiative heat dissipated by the same blackbody is greatly enhanced above SσT4, where S is the area of the emitter. This paper will review the progress in thermal

  10. Numerical Investigation of Radiative Heat Transfer in Laser Induced Air Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, J.; Chen, Y. S.; Wang, T. S.; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Radiative heat transfer is one of the most important phenomena in the laser induced plasmas. This study is intended to develop accurate and efficient methods for predicting laser radiation absorption and plasma radiative heat transfer, and investigate the plasma radiation effects in laser propelled vehicles. To model laser radiation absorption, a ray tracing method along with the Beer's law is adopted. To solve the radiative transfer equation in the air plasmas, the discrete transfer method (DTM) is selected and explained. The air plasma radiative properties are predicted by the LORAN code. To validate the present nonequilibrium radiation model, several benchmark problems are examined and the present results are found to match the available solutions. To investigate the effects of plasma radiation in laser propelled vehicles, the present radiation code is coupled into a plasma aerodynamics code and a selected problem is considered. Comparisons of results at different cases show that plasma radiation plays a role of cooling plasma and it lowers the plasma temperature by about 10%. This change in temperature also results in a reduction of the coupling coefficient by about 10-20%. The present study indicates that plasma radiation modeling is very important for accurate modeling of aerodynamics in a laser propelled vehicle.

  11. Extending generalized Kubelka-Munk to three-dimensional radiative transfer.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Christopher; Kim, Arnold D

    2015-08-10

    The generalized Kubelka-Munk (gKM) approximation is a linear transformation of the double spherical harmonics of order one (DP1) approximation of the radiative transfer equation. Here, we extend the gKM approximation to study problems in three-dimensional radiative transfer. In particular, we derive the gKM approximation for the problem of collimated beam propagation and scattering in a plane-parallel slab composed of a uniform absorbing and scattering medium. The result is an 8×8 system of partial differential equations that is much easier to solve than the radiative transfer equation. We compare the solutions of the gKM approximation with Monte Carlo simulations of the radiative transfer equation to identify the range of validity for this approximation. We find that the gKM approximation is accurate for isotropic scattering media that are sufficiently thick and much less accurate for anisotropic, forward-peaked scattering media. PMID:26368374

  12. Critical ingredients of Type Ia supernova radiative-transfer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John; Blondin, Stéphane; Khokhlov, Alexei

    2014-07-01

    We explore the physics of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) light curves and spectra using the 1D non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) time-dependent radiative-transfer code CMFGEN. Rather than adjusting ejecta properties to match observations, we select as input one `standard' 1D Chandrasekhar-mass delayed-detonation hydrodynamical model, and then explore the sensitivity of radiation and gas properties of the ejecta on radiative-transfer modelling assumptions. The correct computation of SN Ia radiation is not exclusively a solution to an `opacity problem', characterized by the treatment of a large number of lines. We demonstrate that the key is to identify and treat important atomic processes consistently. This is not limited to treating line blanketing in non-LTE. We show that including forbidden-line transitions of metals, and in particular Co, is increasingly important for the temperature and ionization of the gas beyond maximum light. Non-thermal ionization and excitation are also critical since they affect the colour evolution and the ΔM15 decline rate of our model. While impacting little the bolometric luminosity, a more complete treatment of decay routes leads to enhanced line blanketing, e.g. associated with 48Ti in the U and B bands. Overall, we find that SN Ia radiation properties are influenced in a complicated way by the atomic data we employ, so that obtaining converged results is a real challenge. Nonetheless, with our fully fledged CMFGEN model, we obtain good agreement with the golden standard Type Ia SN 2005cf in the optical and near-IR, from 5 to 60 d after explosion, suggesting that assuming spherical symmetry is not detrimental to SN Ia radiative-transfer modelling at these times. Multi-D effects no doubt matter, but they are perhaps less important than accurately treating the non-LTE processes that are crucial to obtain reliable temperature and ionization structures.

  13. Principles of Invariance in Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peraiah, A.

    1999-09-01

    We have reviewed the principle of invariance, its applications and its usefulness for obtaining the radiation field in semi-infinite and finite atmospheres. Various laws of scattering in dispersive media and the consequent radiation field are studied. The H-functions and X- and Y-functions in semi-infinite and finite media respectively are derived in a few cases. The Discrete Space Theory (DST) which is a general form of the Principle of Invariance is described. The method of addition of layers with general properties, is shown to describe all the properties of multiple scattering. A few examples of the application of DST such as polarization, line formation in expanding stellar atmospheres, etc., and a numerical analysis of DST are presented. Other developments in the theory of radiative transfer are briefly described.

  14. Radiation heat transfer within an optical fiber draw tower furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Issa, J.; Jaluria, Y.; Polymeropoulos, C.E.; Yin, Z.

    1995-12-31

    Study of the thermal transport and material flow processes associated with the drawing of optical fiber in a graphite draw furnace requires modeling of the heat transfer from the furnace wall. Previous work has shown that accurate knowledge of the furnace heater element axial temperature distribution is essential for proper modeling of the radiative transfer process. The present work is aimed at providing this information, as well as generating a set of data for the study of radiation exchange in the furnace cavity. The experimental procedure involved measuring the centerline temperature distribution in graphite and fused silica rods inserted into an optical fiber draw tower furnace. The temperature measurements were then used along with a model for radiative-convective heat transfer in the furnace in order to obtain the furnace temperature profile. This is an inverse problem since the centerline temperature in the rod is known whereas the furnace thermal conditions are not. The results obtained showed that the furnace temperature distribution was independent of rod material and size. The shape of the computed temperature distributions suggest that they can be well represented by a Gaussian function.

  15. A Radiation Transfer Solver for Athena Using Short Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Shane W.; Stone, James M.; Jiang, Yan-Fei

    2012-03-01

    We describe the implementation of a module for the Athena magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code that solves the time-independent, multi-frequency radiative transfer (RT) equation on multidimensional Cartesian simulation domains, including scattering and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) effects. The module is based on well known and well tested algorithms developed for modeling stellar atmospheres, including the method of short characteristics to solve the RT equation, accelerated Lambda iteration to handle scattering and non-LTE effects, and parallelization via domain decomposition. The module serves several purposes: it can be used to generate spectra and images, to compute a variable Eddington tensor (VET) for full radiation MHD simulations, and to calculate the heating and cooling source terms in the MHD equations in flows where radiation pressure is small compared with gas pressure. For the latter case, the module is combined with the standard MHD integrators using operator splitting: we describe this approach in detail, including a new constraint on the time step for stability due to radiation diffusion modes. Implementation of the VET method for radiation pressure dominated flows is described in a companion paper. We present results from a suite of test problems for both the RT solver itself and for dynamical problems that include radiative heating and cooling. These tests demonstrate that the radiative transfer solution is accurate and confirm that the operator split method is stable, convergent, and efficient for problems of interest. We demonstrate there is no need to adopt ad hoc assumptions of questionable accuracy to solve RT problems in concert with MHD: the computational cost for our general-purpose module for simple (e.g., LTE gray) problems can be comparable to or less than a single time step of Athena's MHD integrators, and only few times more expensive than that for more general (non-LTE) problems.

  16. A RADIATION TRANSFER SOLVER FOR ATHENA USING SHORT CHARACTERISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Shane W.; Stone, James M.; Jiang Yanfei

    2012-03-01

    We describe the implementation of a module for the Athena magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code that solves the time-independent, multi-frequency radiative transfer (RT) equation on multidimensional Cartesian simulation domains, including scattering and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) effects. The module is based on well known and well tested algorithms developed for modeling stellar atmospheres, including the method of short characteristics to solve the RT equation, accelerated Lambda iteration to handle scattering and non-LTE effects, and parallelization via domain decomposition. The module serves several purposes: it can be used to generate spectra and images, to compute a variable Eddington tensor (VET) for full radiation MHD simulations, and to calculate the heating and cooling source terms in the MHD equations in flows where radiation pressure is small compared with gas pressure. For the latter case, the module is combined with the standard MHD integrators using operator splitting: we describe this approach in detail, including a new constraint on the time step for stability due to radiation diffusion modes. Implementation of the VET method for radiation pressure dominated flows is described in a companion paper. We present results from a suite of test problems for both the RT solver itself and for dynamical problems that include radiative heating and cooling. These tests demonstrate that the radiative transfer solution is accurate and confirm that the operator split method is stable, convergent, and efficient for problems of interest. We demonstrate there is no need to adopt ad hoc assumptions of questionable accuracy to solve RT problems in concert with MHD: the computational cost for our general-purpose module for simple (e.g., LTE gray) problems can be comparable to or less than a single time step of Athena's MHD integrators, and only few times more expensive than that for more general (non-LTE) problems.

  17. The Havemann-Taylor Fast Radiative Transfer Code: Exact fast radiative transfer for scattering atmospheres using Principal Components (PCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havemann, Stephan; Thelen, Jean-Claude; Taylor, Jonathan P.; Keil, Andreas

    2009-03-01

    The Havemann-Taylor Fast Radiative Transfer Code (HT-FRTC) has been developed for the simulation of highly spectrally resolved measurements from satellite based (i.e. Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)) and airborne (i.e. Atmospheric Research Interferometer Evaluation System (ARIES)) instruments. The use of principle components enables the calculation of a complete spectrum in less than a second. The principal compoents are derived from a diverse training set of atmospheres and surfaces and contain their spectral characteristics in a highly compressed form. For any given atmosphere/surface, the HT-FRTC calculates the weightings (also called scores) of a few hundred principal components based on selected monochromatic radiative transfer calculations, which is far cheaper than thousands of channel radiance calculations. By intercomparison with line-by-line and other fast models the HT-FRTC has been shown to be accurate. The HT-FRTC has been successfully applied to simultaneous variational retrievals of atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles, surface temperature and surface emissivity over land. This is the subject of another presentation at this conference. The HT-FRTC has now also been extended to include an exact treatment of scattering by aerosols/clouds. The radiative transfer problem is solved using a discrete ordinate method (DISORT). Modelling results at high-spectral resolution for non-clear sky atmospheres obtained with the HT-FRTC are presented.

  18. Composite biasing in Monte Carlo radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baes, Maarten; Gordon, Karl D.; Lunttila, Tuomas; Bianchi, Simone; Camps, Peter; Juvela, Mika; Kuiper, Rolf

    2016-05-01

    Biasing or importance sampling is a powerful technique in Monte Carlo radiative transfer, and can be applied in different forms to increase the accuracy and efficiency of simulations. One of the drawbacks of the use of biasing is the potential introduction of large weight factors. We discuss a general strategy, composite biasing, to suppress the appearance of large weight factors. We use this composite biasing approach for two different problems faced by current state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes: the generation of photon packages from multiple components, and the penetration of radiation through high optical depth barriers. In both cases, the implementation of the relevant algorithms is trivial and does not interfere with any other optimisation techniques. Through simple test models, we demonstrate the general applicability, accuracy and efficiency of the composite biasing approach. In particular, for the penetration of high optical depths, the gain in efficiency is spectacular for the specific problems that we consider: in simulations with composite path length stretching, high accuracy results are obtained even for simulations with modest numbers of photon packages, while simulations without biasing cannot reach convergence, even with a huge number of photon packages.

  19. Solutions of radiative heat transfer in nonhomogeneous participating media using the quadrature method

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S.H.; Wu, C.Y.; Hsu, P.

    1996-12-31

    This work considers radiative heat transfer in a three-dimensional, rectangular, scattering medium exposed to diffuse radiation. Applying the quadrature method with singularity subtraction to the exact integral equations in terms of the moments of intensity can generate highly accurate solutions, and so the method is adopted in this work. The example solutions provided are for radiative equilibrium in homogeneous absorbing-emitting media, and for radiative transfer in nonhomogeneous absorbing-scattering (isotropic and linearly anisotropic) media with non-reflecting surfaces. To validate the solutions, the present results are compared with the solutions obtained by the YIX method and other methods.

  20. A first-order radiative transfer model for microwave radiometry of forest canopies at L-band

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, a first-order radiative transfer (RT) model is developed to more accurately account for vegetation canopy scattering by modifying the basic radiative transfer model (the zero-order RT solution). In order to optimally utilize microwave radiometric data in soil moisture (SM) retrievals ...

  1. Analysis for radiative heat transfer in a circulating fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, F.R.; Couturier, M.F.; Poolpol, S.

    1995-12-31

    The radiative heat transfer from the particles within a circulating fluidized bed has been determined for a number of different assumptions. Based on temperature profiles measured in an operating circulating fluidized bed burning coal, a procedure for predicting the radiative transfer from the solid particles to a cold wall is recommended. The radiative transfer from the solid particles to a cold wall makes up approximately 50% of the total heat transfer to the wall in a circulating fluidized bed combustor.

  2. Radiative transfer of HCN: interpreting observations of hyperfine anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, A. M.; Loughnane, R. M.; Redman, M. P.; Wiles, B.; Guegan, N.; Barrett, J.; Keto, E. R.

    2016-07-01

    Molecules with hyperfine splitting of their rotational line spectra are useful probes of optical depth, via the relative line strengths of their hyperfine components. The hyperfine splitting is particularly advantageous in interpreting the physical conditions of the emitting gas because with a second rotational transition, both gas density and temperature can be derived. For HCN however, the relative strengths of the hyperfine lines are anomalous. They appear in ratios which can vary significantly from source to source, and are inconsistent with local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). This is the HCN hyperfine anomaly, and it prevents the use of simple LTE models of HCN emission to derive reliable optical depths. In this paper, we demonstrate how to model HCN hyperfine line emission, and derive accurate line ratios, spectral line shapes and optical depths. We show that by carrying out radiative transfer calculations over each hyperfine level individually, as opposed to summing them over each rotational level, the anomalous hyperfine emission emerges naturally. To do this requires not only accurate radiative rates between hyperfine states, but also accurate collisional rates. We investigate the effects of different sets of hyperfine collisional rates, derived via the proportional method and through direct recoupling calculations. Through an extensive parameter sweep over typical low-mass star-forming conditions, we show the HCN line ratios to be highly variable to optical depth. We also reproduce an observed effect whereby the red-blue asymmetry of the hyperfine lines (an infall signature) switches sense within a single rotational transition.

  3. Studies of radiative transfer in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Schloerb, F. P.

    1984-01-01

    Progress is reported in modeling cometary emission in the 18-cm OH transition with specific application and predictions for Comet Halley. Radiative transfer is also being studied in rough and porous media. The kinematics of the cold, dark interstellar cloud Li34N were examined, and CO monitoring of Venus and Mars continues. Analysis of 3.4 mm maps of the lunar surface shows thermal anomalies associated with such surface features as the Crater Copernicus, Mare Imbrium, Mare Nubium, Mare Serenitatis, and Mare Tranquillatis.

  4. Diffusion model for lightning radiative transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.; Solakiewicz, Richard J.; Phanord, Dieudonne D.; Blakeslee, Richard J.

    1994-01-01

    A one-speed Boltzmann transport theory, with diffusion approximations, is applied to study the radiative transfer properties of lightning in optically thick thunderclouds. Near-infrared (lambda = 0.7774 micrometers) photons associated with a prominent oxygen emission triplet in the lightning spectrum are considered. Transient and spatially complex lightning radiation sources are placed inside a rectangular parallelepiped thundercloud geometry and the effects of multiple scattering are studied. The cloud is assumed to be composed of a homogeneous collection of identical spherical water droplets, each droplet a nearly conservative, anisotropic scatterer. Conceptually, we treat the thundercloud like a nuclear reactor, with photons replaced by neutrons, and utilize standard one-speed neutron diffusion techniques common in nuclear reactor analyses. Valid analytic results for the intensity distribution (expanded in spherical harmonics) are obtained for regions sufficiently far from sources. Model estimates of the arrival-time delay and pulse width broadening of lightning signals radiated from within the cloud are determined and the results are in good agreement with both experimental data and previous Monte Carlo estimates. Additional model studies of this kind will be used to study the general information content of cloud top lightning radiation signatures.

  5. Precise and Accurate Measurements of Strong-Field Photoionization and a Transferable Laser Intensity Calibration Standard.

    PubMed

    Wallace, W C; Ghafur, O; Khurmi, C; Sainadh U, Satya; Calvert, J E; Laban, D E; Pullen, M G; Bartschat, K; Grum-Grzhimailo, A N; Wells, D; Quiney, H M; Tong, X M; Litvinyuk, I V; Sang, R T; Kielpinski, D

    2016-07-29

    Ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is a fundamental process in many fields of research, especially in the emerging field of attosecond science. So far, demonstrably accurate data have only been acquired for atomic hydrogen (H), a species that is accessible to few investigators. Here, we present measurements of the ionization yield for argon, krypton, and xenon with percent-level accuracy, calibrated using H, in a laser regime widely used in attosecond science. We derive a transferable calibration standard for laser peak intensity, accurate to 1.3%, that is based on a simple reference curve. In addition, our measurements provide a much needed benchmark for testing models of ionization in noble-gas atoms, such as the widely employed single-active electron approximation. PMID:27517769

  6. Precise and Accurate Measurements of Strong-Field Photoionization and a Transferable Laser Intensity Calibration Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, W. C.; Ghafur, O.; Khurmi, C.; Sainadh U, Satya; Calvert, J. E.; Laban, D. E.; Pullen, M. G.; Bartschat, K.; Grum-Grzhimailo, A. N.; Wells, D.; Quiney, H. M.; Tong, X. M.; Litvinyuk, I. V.; Sang, R. T.; Kielpinski, D.

    2016-07-01

    Ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is a fundamental process in many fields of research, especially in the emerging field of attosecond science. So far, demonstrably accurate data have only been acquired for atomic hydrogen (H), a species that is accessible to few investigators. Here, we present measurements of the ionization yield for argon, krypton, and xenon with percent-level accuracy, calibrated using H, in a laser regime widely used in attosecond science. We derive a transferable calibration standard for laser peak intensity, accurate to 1.3%, that is based on a simple reference curve. In addition, our measurements provide a much needed benchmark for testing models of ionization in noble-gas atoms, such as the widely employed single-active electron approximation.

  7. Accurate transfer of soft tissue morphology with interim prosthesis to definitive cast.

    PubMed

    Noh, Kwantae; Kwon, Kung-Rock; Kim, Hyeong-Seob; Kim, Duck-Su; Pae, Ahran

    2014-02-01

    With conventional fixed dental prostheses, the interim restoration is a valuable diagnostic tool in the evaluation of esthetics and function. To achieve predictable definitive esthetic results, information about the subgingival and the supragingival contour of a properly designed restoration should be communicated to the dental laboratory technician. The technique described enables the accurate transfer of the soft tissue morphology developed with an interim prosthesis to the definitive cast. This modified definitive cast allows the dental laboratory technician to fabricate a restoration with an emergence profile identical to that of the interim prosthesis. PMID:24286639

  8. Accurate Full-Field Thermochromic Liquid Crystal Thermography for the Study of Instantaneous Turbulent Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatino, D. R.; Praisner, T. J.; Smith, C. R.

    1998-11-01

    The color change of thermochromic liquid crystals with temperature can be effectively utilized as full-field surface temperature sensors to investigate the fundamental structure of wall turbulence. In order to accurately quantify turbulent heat transfer behavior, a new technique has been developed for the calibration of wide-band micro-encapsulated thermochromic liquid crystals. Lighting/viewing arrangements are described and evaluated for ease of implementation and accuracy of the displayed color. This new technique employs images recorded in-situ with the test surface systematically exposed to a series of uniform temperature conditions spanning the bandwidth of the liquid crystals. This sequence of images is used to generate point-wise color/temperature calibration curves for the entire surface. Experimental results will be presented illustrating the application of the technique for assessment of spatial/temporal surface heat transfer behavior due to selected turbulent flows in a water channel

  9. Radiative energy transfer in disordered photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Erementchouk, M V; Deych, L I; Noh, H; Cao, H; Lisyansky, A A

    2009-04-29

    The difficulty of description of the radiative transfer in disordered photonic crystals arises from the necessity to consider on an equal footing the wave scattering by periodic modulations of the dielectric function and by its random inhomogeneities. We resolve this difficulty by approaching this problem from the standpoint of the general multiple scattering theory in media with an arbitrary regular profile of the dielectric function. We use the general asymptotic solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation in order to show that for a sufficiently weak disorder the diffusion limit in disordered photonic crystals is presented by incoherent superpositions of the modes of the ideal structure with weights inversely proportional to the respective group velocities. The radiative transfer and the diffusion equations are derived as a relaxation of long scale deviations from this limiting distribution. In particular, it is shown that in general the diffusion is anisotropic unless the crystal has sufficiently rich symmetry, say, the square lattice in 2D or the cubic lattice in 3D. In this case, the diffusion is isotropic and only in this case can the effect of the disorder be characterized by a single mean free path depending on frequency. PMID:21825416

  10. Radiative Transfer and Retrievals in EOF Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen; Smith, William L.; Schluessel, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) is a hyperspectral sensor with 8461 spectral channels and a nominal spectral resolution of 0.25 cm(sup -1). It is computationally intensive to perform radiative transfer calculations and inversions using all these channels. We will present a Principal Component-based Radiative Transfer Model (PCRTM) and a retrieval algorithm which perform all the necessary calculations in EOF domain. Since the EOFs are orthogonal to each other, only about 100 principal components are needed to represent the information content of the 8461 channels. The PCRTM provides the EOF coefficients and associated derivatives with respect to atmospheric and surface parameters needed by the inversion algorithm. The inversion algorithm is based on a non-linear Levenberg-Marquardt method with climatology covariance and a priori information as constraints. The retrieved parameters include atmospheric temperature, moisture and ozone profiles, cloud parameters, surface skin temperature, and surface emissivities. To make the retrieval system even more compact and stable. The atmospheric vertical profiles are compressed into the EOF space as well. The surface emissivities are also compressed into EOF space.

  11. Microwave radiative transfer studies of precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bringi, V. N.; Vivekanandan, J.; Turk, F. Joseph

    1993-01-01

    Since the deployment of the DMSP SSM/I microwave imagers in 1987, increased utilization of passive microwave radiometry throughout the 10 - 100 GHz spectrum has occurred for measurement of atmospheric constituents and terrestrial surfaces. Our efforts have focused on observations and analysis of the microwave radiative transfer behavior of precipitating clouds. We have focused particular attention on combining both aircraft and SSM/I radiometer imagery with ground-based multiparameter radar observations. As part of this and the past NASA contract, we have developed a multi-stream, polarized radiative transfer model which incorporates scattering. The model has the capability to be initialized with cloud model output or multiparameter radar products. This model provides the necessary 'link' between the passive microwave radiometer and active microwave radar observations. This unique arrangement has allowed the brightness temperatures (TB) to be compared against quantities such as rainfall, liquid/ice water paths, and the vertical structure of the cloud. Quantification of the amounts of ice and water in precipitating clouds is required for understanding of the global energy balance.

  12. A rapid radiative transfer model for reflection of solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiang, X.; Smith, E. A.; Justus, C. G.

    1994-01-01

    A rapid analytical radiative transfer model for reflection of solar radiation in plane-parallel atmospheres is developed based on the Sobolev approach and the delta function transformation technique. A distinct advantage of this model over alternative two-stream solutions is that in addition to yielding the irradiance components, which turn out to be mathematically equivalent to the delta-Eddington approximation, the radiance field can also be expanded in a mathematically consistent fashion. Tests with the model against a more precise multistream discrete ordinate model over a wide range of input parameters demonstrate that the new approximate method typically produces average radiance differences of less than 5%, with worst average differences of approximately 10%-15%. By the same token, the computational speed of the new model is some tens to thousands times faster than that of the more precise model when its stream resolution is set to generate precise calculations.

  13. Radiative energy transfer in molecular gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1992-01-01

    Basic formulations, analyses, and numerical procedures are presented to study radiative interactions in gray as well as nongray gases under different physical and flow conditions. After preliminary fluid-dynamical considerations, essential governing equations for radiative transport are presented that are applicable under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. Auxiliary relations for relaxation times and spectral absorption models are also provided. For specific applications, several simple gaseous systems are analyzed. The first system considered consists of a gas bounded by two parallel plates having the same temperature. Within the gas there is a uniform heat source per unit volume. For this system, both vibrational nonequilibrium effects and radiation conduction interactions are studied. The second system consists of fully developed laminar flow and heat transfer in a parallel plate duct under the boundary condition of a uniform surface heat flux. For this system, effects of gray surface emittance are studied. With the single exception of a circular geometry, the third system is considered identical to the second system. Here, the influence of nongray walls is also studied.

  14. Accurate Time/Frequency Transfer Method Using Bi-Directional WDM Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imaoka, Atsushi; Kihara, Masami

    1996-01-01

    An accurate time transfer method is proposed using b-directional wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) signal transmission along a single optical fiber. This method will be used in digital telecommunication networks and yield a time synchronization accuracy of better than 1 ns for long transmission lines over several tens of kilometers. The method can accurately measure the difference in delay between two wavelength signals caused by the chromatic dispersion of the fiber in conventional simple bi-directional dual-wavelength frequency transfer methods. We describe the characteristics of this difference in delay and then show that the accuracy of the delay measurements can be obtained below 0.1 ns by transmitting 156 Mb/s times reference signals of 1.31 micrometer and 1.55 micrometers along a 50 km fiber using the proposed method. The sub-nanosecond delay measurement using the simple bi-directional dual-wavelength transmission along a 100 km fiber with a wavelength spacing of 1 nm in the 1.55 micrometer range is also shown.

  15. A stochastic formation of radiative transfer in clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, G.L.; Gabriel, P.M.

    1993-03-01

    The research carried out under this award dealt with issues involving deterministic radiative transfer, remote sensing, Stochastic radiative transfer, and parameterization of cloud optical properties. A number of different forms of radiative transfer models in one, two, and three dimensions were developed in an attempt to build an understanding of the radiative transfer in clouds with realistic spatial structure and to determine the key geometrical parameter that influence this transfer. The research conducted also seeks to assess the relative importance of these geometrical effects in contrast to microphysical effects of clouds. The main conclusion of the work is that geometry has a profound influence on all aspects of radiative transfer and the interpretation of this transfer. We demonstrate how this geometry can influence estimate of particle effective radius to the 30-50% level and also how geometry can significantly bias the remote sensing of cloud optical depth.

  16. Planetary Atmosphere Dynamics and Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, David H.

    1996-01-01

    This research program has dealt with two projects in the field of planetary atmosphere dynamics and radiative energy transfer, one theoretical and one experimental. The first project, in radiative energy transfer, incorporated the capability to isolate and quantify the contribution of individual atmospheric components to the Venus radiative balance and thermal structure to greatly improve the current understanding of the radiative processes occurring within the Venus atmosphere. This is possible by varying the mixing ratios of each gas species, and the location, number density and aerosol size distributions of the clouds. This project was a continuation of the work initiated under a 1992 University Consortium Agreement. Under the just completed grant, work has continued on the use of a convolution-based algorithm that provided the capability to calculate the k coefficients of a gas mixture at different temperatures, pressures and spectral intervals from the separate k-distributions of the individual gas species. The second primary goal of this research dealt with the Doppler wind retrieval for the Successful Galileo Jupiter probe mission in December, 1995. In anticipation of the arrival of Galileo at Jupiter, software development continued to read the radioscience and probe/orbiter trajectory data provided by the Galileo project and required for Jupiter zonal wind measurements. Sample experiment radioscience data records and probe/orbiter trajectory data files provided by the Galileo Radioscience and Navigation teams at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, respectively, were used for the first phase of the software development. The software to read the necessary data records was completed in 1995. The procedure by which the wind retrieval takes place begins with initial consistency checks of the raw data, preliminary data reductions, wind recoveries, iterative reconstruction of the probe descent profile, and refined wind recoveries. At each stage of the wind recovery

  17. Development of highly accurate approximate scheme for computing the charge transfer integral.

    PubMed

    Pershin, Anton; Szalay, Péter G

    2015-08-21

    The charge transfer integral is a key parameter required by various theoretical models to describe charge transport properties, e.g., in organic semiconductors. The accuracy of this important property depends on several factors, which include the level of electronic structure theory and internal simplifications of the applied formalism. The goal of this paper is to identify the performance of various approximate approaches of the latter category, while using the high level equation-of-motion coupled cluster theory for the electronic structure. The calculations have been performed on the ethylene dimer as one of the simplest model systems. By studying different spatial perturbations, it was shown that while both energy split in dimer and fragment charge difference methods are equivalent with the exact formulation for symmetrical displacements, they are less efficient when describing transfer integral along the asymmetric alteration coordinate. Since the "exact" scheme was found computationally expensive, we examine the possibility to obtain the asymmetric fluctuation of the transfer integral by a Taylor expansion along the coordinate space. By exploring the efficiency of this novel approach, we show that the Taylor expansion scheme represents an attractive alternative to the "exact" calculations due to a substantial reduction of computational costs, when a considerably large region of the potential energy surface is of interest. Moreover, we show that the Taylor expansion scheme, irrespective of the dimer symmetry, is very accurate for the entire range of geometry fluctuations that cover the space the molecule accesses at room temperature. PMID:26298117

  18. Development of highly accurate approximate scheme for computing the charge transfer integral

    SciTech Connect

    Pershin, Anton; Szalay, Péter G.

    2015-08-21

    The charge transfer integral is a key parameter required by various theoretical models to describe charge transport properties, e.g., in organic semiconductors. The accuracy of this important property depends on several factors, which include the level of electronic structure theory and internal simplifications of the applied formalism. The goal of this paper is to identify the performance of various approximate approaches of the latter category, while using the high level equation-of-motion coupled cluster theory for the electronic structure. The calculations have been performed on the ethylene dimer as one of the simplest model systems. By studying different spatial perturbations, it was shown that while both energy split in dimer and fragment charge difference methods are equivalent with the exact formulation for symmetrical displacements, they are less efficient when describing transfer integral along the asymmetric alteration coordinate. Since the “exact” scheme was found computationally expensive, we examine the possibility to obtain the asymmetric fluctuation of the transfer integral by a Taylor expansion along the coordinate space. By exploring the efficiency of this novel approach, we show that the Taylor expansion scheme represents an attractive alternative to the “exact” calculations due to a substantial reduction of computational costs, when a considerably large region of the potential energy surface is of interest. Moreover, we show that the Taylor expansion scheme, irrespective of the dimer symmetry, is very accurate for the entire range of geometry fluctuations that cover the space the molecule accesses at room temperature.

  19. Some speed-up strategies for solving inverse radiative transfer problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favennec, Y.; Le Hardy, D.; Dubot, F.; Rousseau, B.; Rousse, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    Inversion based on the radiative transfer equation (RTE) is generally highly CPU time consuming because the forward model itself is complicated to solve when the space dimension is greater than one, and because the inversion is based on a large number of forward model runs until convergence is reached. The goal of this paper is to set up some speed-up strategies specific of inversion when radiative transfer problems are dealt with. More specifically, the accurate identification of the volumetric radiative properties i.e. both the absorption and scattering coefficients is the objective of this study.

  20. Plasma effects in high frequency radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, C.T.

    1981-02-08

    This paper is intended as a survey of collective plasma processes which can affect the transfer of high frequency radiation in a hot dense plasma. We are rapidly approaching an era when this subject will become important in the laboratory. For pedagogical reasons we have chosen to examine plasma processes by relating them to a particular reference plasma which will consist of fully ionized carbon at a temperature kT=1 KeV (10/sup 70/K) and an electron density N = 3 x 10/sup 23/cm/sup -3/, (which corresponds to a mass density rho = 1 gm/cm/sup 3/ and an ion density N/sub i/ = 5 x 10/sup 22/ cm/sup -3/). We will consider the transport in such a plasma of photons ranging from 1 eV to 1 KeV in energy. Such photons will probably be frequently used as diagnostic probes of hot dense laboratory plasmas.

  1. Radiative Transfer Simulations of Infrared Dark Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlyuchenkov, Yaroslav; Wiebe, Dmitry; Fateeva, Anna; Vasyunina, Tatiana

    2011-04-01

    The determination of prestellar core structure is often based on observations of (sub)millimeter dust continuum. However, recently the Spitzer Space Telescope provided us with IR images of many objects not only in emission but also in absorption. We developed a technique to reconstruct the density and temperature distributions of protostellar objects based on radiation transfer (RT) simulations both in mm and IR wavelengths. Best-fit model parameters are obtained with the genetic algorithm. We apply the method to two cores of Infrared Dark Clouds and show that their observations are better reproduced by a model with an embedded heating source despite the lack of 70 μm emission in one of these cores. Thus, the starless nature of massive cores can only be established with the careful case-by-case RT modeling.

  2. Multiple powder diffraction data for an accurate charge density study using synchrotron radiation x-ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Hidetaka; Nishibori, Eiji

    2016-04-01

    In recent years multiple synchrotron radiation (SR) powder x-ray diffraction profiles have been successfully applied to advanced structural studies such as an accurate charge density study and a structure determination from powder diffraction. The results have been presented with several examples. Abilities and future prospects have been discussed using state of the art powder diffraction data.

  3. Flare loop radiative hydrodynamics. III - Nonlocal radiative transfer effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, R. C.; Fisher, G. H.; Mcclymont, A. N.

    1983-01-01

    The study has three goals. The first is to demonstrate that processes exist whose intrinsic nonlocal nature cannot be represented by local approximations. The second is to elucidate the physical nature and origins of these nonlocal processes. The third is to suggest that the methods and results described here may prove useful in constructing semiempirical models of the chromosphere by means more efficient than trial and error. Matrices are computed that describe the effect of a temperature perturbation at an arbitrary point in the loop on density, hydrogen ionized fraction, total radiative loss rate, and radiative loss rate of selected hydrogen lines and continua at all other points. It is found that the dominant nonlocal radiative transfer effects can be separated into flux divergence coefficient effects and upper level population effects. The former are most important when the perturbation takes place in a region of significant opacity. Upper level population effects arise in both optically thick and thin regions in response to nonlocal density, ionization, and interlocking effects.

  4. Simulation of solar radiative transfer in cumulus clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Zuev, V.E.; Titov, G.A.

    1996-04-01

    This work presents a 3-D model of radiative transfer which is used to study the relationship between the spatial distribution of cumulus clouds and fluxes (albedo and transmittance) of visible solar radiation.

  5. Radiative transfer code SHARM for atmospheric and terrestrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyapustin, A. I.

    2005-12-01

    An overview of the publicly available radiative transfer Spherical Harmonics code (SHARM) is presented. SHARM is a rigorous code, as accurate as the Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer (DISORT) code, yet faster. It performs simultaneous calculations for different solar zenith angles, view zenith angles, and view azimuths and allows the user to make multiwavelength calculations in one run. The Δ-M method is implemented for calculations with highly anisotropic phase functions. Rayleigh scattering is automatically included as a function of wavelength, surface elevation, and the selected vertical profile of one of the standard atmospheric models. The current version of the SHARM code does not explicitly include atmospheric gaseous absorption, which should be provided by the user. The SHARM code has several built-in models of the bidirectional reflectance of land and wind-ruffled water surfaces that are most widely used in research and satellite data processing. A modification of the SHARM code with the built-in Mie algorithm designed for calculations with spherical aerosols is also described.

  6. Lattice Boltzmann model for a steady radiative transfer equation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hong-Liang; Yao, Feng-Ju; Tan, He-Ping

    2016-08-01

    A complete lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) is proposed for the steady radiative transfer equation (RTE). The RTE can be regarded as a pure convection equation with a source term. To derive the expressions for the equilibrium distribution function and the relaxation time, an artificial isotropic diffusion term is introduced to form a convection-diffusion equation. When the dimensionless relaxation time has a value of 0.5, the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) is exactly applicable to the original steady RTE. We also perform a multiscale analysis based on the Chapman-Enskog expansion to recover the macroscopic RTE from the mesoscopic LBE. The D2Q9 model is used to solve the LBE, and the numerical results obtained by the LBM are comparable to the results obtained by other methods or analytical solutions, which demonstrates that the proposed model is highly accurate and stable in simulating multidimensional radiative transfer. In addition, we find that the convergence rate of the LBM depends on the transport properties of RTE: for diffusion-dominated RTE with a large optical thickness, the LBM shows a second-order convergence rate in space, while for convection-dominated RTE with a small optical thickness, a lower convergence rate is observed. PMID:27627417

  7. Radiative Transfer Theory Verified by Controlled Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Goldstein, Dennis H.; Chowdhary, Jacek; Lompado, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    We report the results of high-accuracy controlled laboratory measurements of the Stokes reflection matrix for suspensions of submicrometer-sized latex particles in water and compare them with the results of a numerically exact computer solution of the vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE). The quantitative performance of the VRTE is monitored by increasing the volume packing density of the latex particles from 2 to 10. Our results indicate that the VRTE can be applied safely to random particulate media with packing densities up to 2. VRTE results for packing densities of the order of 5 should be taken with caution, whereas the polarized bidirectional reflectivity of suspensions with larger packing densities cannot be accurately predicted. We demonstrate that a simple modification of the phase matrix entering the VRTE based on the so-called static structure factor can be a promising remedy that deserves further examination.

  8. Radiative transfer theory verified by controlled laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Mishchenko, Michael I; Goldstein, Dennis H; Chowdhary, Jacek; Lompado, Arthur

    2013-09-15

    We report the results of high-accuracy controlled laboratory measurements of the Stokes reflection matrix for suspensions of submicrometer-sized latex particles in water and compare them with the results of a numerically exact computer solution of the vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE). The quantitative performance of the VRTE is monitored by increasing the volume packing density of the latex particles from 2% to 10%. Our results indicate that the VRTE can be applied safely to random particulate media with packing densities up to ∼2%. VRTE results for packing densities of the order of 5% should be taken with caution, whereas the polarized bidirectional reflectivity of suspensions with larger packing densities cannot be accurately predicted. We demonstrate that a simple modification of the phase matrix entering the VRTE based on the so-called static structure factor can be a promising remedy that deserves further examination. PMID:24104804

  9. A discretization of the multigroup PN radiative transfer equation on general meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermeline, F.

    2016-05-01

    We propose and study a finite volume method of discrete duality type for discretizing the multigroup PN approximation of radiative transfer equation on general meshes. This method is second order-accurate on a very large variety of meshes, stable under a Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition and it preserves naturally the diffusion asymptotic limit.

  10. Numerical Radiative Transfer and the Hydrogen Reionization of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, M.

    2011-03-01

    One of the most interesting questions in cosmology is to understand how the Universe evolved from its nearly uniform and simple state briefly after the Big Bang to the complex state we see around us today. In particular, we would like to explain how galaxies have formed, and why they have the properties that we observe in the local Universe. Computer simulations play a highly important role in studying these questions, because they allow one to follow the dynamical equations of gravity and hydrodynamics well into the non-linear regime of the growth of cosmic structures. The current generation of simulation codes for cosmological structure formation calculates the self-gravity of dark matter and cosmic gas, and the fluid dynamics of the cosmic gas, but radiation processes are typically not taken into account, or only at the level of a spatially uniform, externally imposed background field. However, we know that the radiation field has been highly inhomogeneous during certain phases of the growth of structure, and may have in fact provided important feedback effects for galaxy formation. In particular, it is well established that the diffuse gas in the universe was nearly fully neutral after recombination at very high redshift, but today this gas is highly ionized. Sometime during the evolution, a transition to the ionized state must have occurred, a process we refer to as reionization. The UV radiation responsible for this reionization is now permeating the universe and may in part explain why small dwarf galaxies have so low luminosities. It is therefore clear that accurate and self-consistent studies of galaxy formation and of the dynamics of the reionization process should ideally be done with simulation codes that directly include a treatment of radiative transfer, and that account for all relevant source and sink terms of the radiation. We present a novel numerical implementation of radiative transfer in the cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH

  11. Radiative Transfer Modeling and Retrievals for Advanced Hyperspectral Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Smith, William L., Sr.; Mango, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    A novel radiative transfer model and a physical inversion algorithm based on principal component analysis will be presented. Instead of dealing with channel radiances, the new approach fits principal component scores of these quantities. Compared to channel-based radiative transfer models, the new approach compresses radiances into a much smaller dimension making both forward modeling and inversion algorithm more efficient.

  12. Polar firn layering in radiative transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linow, Stefanie; Hoerhold, Maria

    2016-04-01

    For many applications in the geosciences, remote sensing is the only feasible method of obtaining data from large areas with limited accessibility. This is especially true for the cryosphere, where light conditions and cloud coverage additionally limit the use of optical sensors. Here, instruments operating at microwave frequencies become important, for instance in polar snow parameters / SWE (snow water equivalent) mapping. However, the interaction between snow and microwave radiation is a complex process and still not fully understood. RT (radiative transfer) models to simulate snow-microwave interaction are available, but they require a number of input parameters such as microstructure and density, which are partly ill-constrained. The layering of snow and firn introduces an additional degree of complexity, as all snow parameters show a strong variability with depth. Many studies on RT modeling of polar firn deal with layer variability by using statistical properties derived from previous measurements, such as the standard deviations of density and microstructure, to configure model input. Here, the variability of microstructure parameters, such as density and particle size, are usually assumed to be independent of each other. However, in the case of the firn pack of the polar ice sheets, we observe that microstructure evolution depends on environmental parameters, such as temperature and snow deposition. Accordingly, density and microstructure evolve together within the snow and firn. Based on CT (computer tomography) microstructure measurements of antarctic firn, we can show that: first, the variability of density and effective grain size are linked and can thus be implemented in the RT models as a coupled set of parameters. Second, the magnitude of layering is captured by the measured standard deviation. Based on high-resolution density measurements of an Antarctic firn core, we study the effect of firn layering at different microwave wavelengths. By means of

  13. Radiative transfer during the reflooding step of a LOCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérardin, J.; Seiler, N.; Ruyer, P.; Boulet, P.

    2013-10-01

    Within the evaluation of the heat transfer downstream a quench front during the reflood phase of a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in a nuclear power plant, a numerical study has been conducted on radiative transfer through a vapor-droplet medium. The non-grey behavior of the medium is obvious since it can be optically thin or thick depending on the wavelength. A six wide bands model has been tested, providing a satisfactory accuracy for the description of the radiative properties. Once the radiative properties of the medium computed, they have been introduced in a model solving the radiative heat transfer based on the Improved Differential Approximation. The fluxes and the flux divergence have been computed on a geometry characteristic of the reactor core showing that radiative transfer plays a relevant role, quite as important as convective heat transfer.

  14. Radiative Forcing by Long-Lived Greenhouse Gases: Calculations with the AER Radiative Transfer Models

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, William; Iacono, Michael J.; Delamere, Jennifer S.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Shephard, Mark W.; Clough, Shepard A.; Collins, William D.

    2008-04-01

    A primary component of the observed, recent climate change is the radiative forcing from increased concentrations of long-lived greenhouse gases (LLGHGs). Effective simulation of anthropogenic climate change by general circulation models (GCMs) is strongly dependent on the accurate representation of radiative processes associated with water vapor, ozone and LLGHGs. In the context of the increasing application of the Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) radiation models within the GCM community, their capability to calculate longwave and shortwave radiative forcing for clear sky scenarios previously examined by the radiative transfer model intercomparison project (RTMIP) is presented. Forcing calculations with the AER line-by-line (LBL) models are very consistent with the RTMIP line-by-line results in the longwave and shortwave. The AER broadband models, in all but one case, calculate longwave forcings within a range of -0.20 to 0.23 W m{sup -2} of LBL calculations and shortwave forcings within a range of -0.16 to 0.38 W m{sup -2} of LBL results. These models also perform well at the surface, which RTMIP identified as a level at which GCM radiation models have particular difficulty reproducing LBL fluxes. Heating profile perturbations calculated by the broadband models generally reproduce high-resolution calculations within a few hundredths K d{sup -1} in the troposphere and within 0.15 K d{sup -1} in the peak stratospheric heating near 1 hPa. In most cases, the AER broadband models provide radiative forcing results that are in closer agreement with high 20 resolution calculations than the GCM radiation codes examined by RTMIP, which supports the application of the AER models to climate change research.

  15. Studies of radiative transfer in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Schloerb, F. P.

    1986-01-01

    Schloerb and Claussen continued their analysis of the very high quality data set obtained on the 18 centimeter OH line from the Comet P/Halley with the NRAO 43 meter antenna. The high spectral resolution (0.22 km/sec) and high signal-to-noise of the OH spectra make them ideal for the study of kinematics in the coma. Synthetic profiles were initiated for comparison with the data. A vectorial model was developed using the Monte Carlo techniques originated by Combi and Delsemme. Analysis of the millimeter wavelength observations of HCN emission from P/Halley obtained throughout much of the recent apparition were continued using the University of Massachusetts 14 millimeter-wavelength (FCRAO) antenna. A detailed analysis of the HCN lineshpaes was performed over the last six months. The excitation of HCN in the coma was studied to obtain a detailed match to the observed spectra. The passive millimeter wave radiometer was used to probe the physical and chemical nature of comets from spacecraft. Work was continued on an improved theory of radiative transfer for rough and porous surfaces, such as the regoliths of satellites, asteroids, and comets.

  16. Radiation Heat Transfer Between Diffuse-Gray Surfaces Using Higher Order Finite Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Dana C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents recent work on developing methods for analyzing radiation heat transfer between diffuse-gray surfaces using p-version finite elements. The work was motivated by a thermal analysis of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) wing structure which showed the importance of radiation heat transfer throughout the structure. The analysis also showed that refining the finite element mesh to accurately capture the temperature distribution on the internal structure led to very large meshes with unacceptably long execution times. Traditional methods for calculating surface-to-surface radiation are based on assumptions that are not appropriate for p-version finite elements. Two methods for determining internal radiation heat transfer are developed for one and two-dimensional p-version finite elements. In the first method, higher-order elements are divided into a number of sub-elements. Traditional methods are used to determine radiation heat flux along each sub-element and then mapped back to the parent element. In the second method, the radiation heat transfer equations are numerically integrated over the higher-order element. Comparisons with analytical solutions show that the integration scheme is generally more accurate than the sub-element method. Comparison to results from traditional finite elements shows that significant reduction in the number of elements in the mesh is possible using higher-order (p-version) finite elements.

  17. Wavelets in the solution of nongray radiative heat transfer equation

    SciTech Connect

    Bayazitoglu, Y.; Wang, B.Y.

    1996-12-31

    The wavelet basis functions are introduced into the radiative transfer equation in the frequency domain. The intensity of radiation is expanded in terms of Daubechies` wrapped around wavelet functions. It is shown that the wavelet basis approach to modeling nongrayness can be incorporated into any solution method for the equation of transfer. In this paper the resulting system of equations is solved for the one-dimensional radiative equilibrium problem using the P-N approximation.

  18. SHDOM: Spherical Harmonic Discrete Ordinate Method for atmospheric radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, K. Franklin

    2015-08-01

    The Spherical Harmonic Discrete Ordinate Method (SHDOM) radiative transfer model computes polarized monochromatic or spectral band radiative transfer in a one, two, or three-dimensional medium for either collimated solar and/or thermal emission sources of radiation. The model is written in a variant of Fortran 77 and in Fortran90 and requires a Fortran 90 compiler. Also included are programs for generating the optical property files input to SHDOM from physical properties of water cloud particles and aerosols.

  19. Application of ray tracing in radiation heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Joseph F.

    1993-01-01

    This collection of presentation figures displays the capabilities of ray tracing for radiation propagation calculations as compared to an analytical approach. The goal is to introduce the terminology and solution process used in ray tracing, and provide insight into radiation heat transfer principles and analysis tools. A thermal analysis working environment is introduced that solves demanding radiation heat transfer problems based on ray tracing. This information may serve as a reference for designing and building ones own analysis environment.

  20. Radiative heat transfer in the extreme near field.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeongtae; Song, Bai; Fernández-Hurtado, Víctor; Lee, Woochul; Jeong, Wonho; Cui, Longji; Thompson, Dakotah; Feist, Johannes; Reid, M T Homer; García-Vidal, Francisco J; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2015-12-17

    Radiative transfer of energy at the nanometre length scale is of great importance to a variety of technologies including heat-assisted magnetic recording, near-field thermophotovoltaics and lithography. Although experimental advances have enabled elucidation of near-field radiative heat transfer in gaps as small as 20-30 nanometres (refs 4-6), quantitative analysis in the extreme near field (less than 10 nanometres) has been greatly limited by experimental challenges. Moreover, the results of pioneering measurements differed from theoretical predictions by orders of magnitude. Here we use custom-fabricated scanning probes with embedded thermocouples, in conjunction with new microdevices capable of periodic temperature modulation, to measure radiative heat transfer down to gaps as small as two nanometres. For our experiments we deposited suitably chosen metal or dielectric layers on the scanning probes and microdevices, enabling direct study of extreme near-field radiation between silica-silica, silicon nitride-silicon nitride and gold-gold surfaces to reveal marked, gap-size-dependent enhancements of radiative heat transfer. Furthermore, our state-of-the-art calculations of radiative heat transfer, performed within the theoretical framework of fluctuational electrodynamics, are in excellent agreement with our experimental results, providing unambiguous evidence that confirms the validity of this theory for modelling radiative heat transfer in gaps as small as a few nanometres. This work lays the foundations required for the rational design of novel technologies that leverage nanoscale radiative heat transfer. PMID:26641312

  1. Evaluation of multi-dimensional flux models for radiative transfer in cylindrical combustion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selcuk, Nevin

    1993-02-01

    Four flux-type models for radiative heat transfer in cylindrical configurations were applied to the prediction of radiative flux density and source term of a cylindrical enclosure problem based on data reported previously on a pilot-scale experimental combustor with steep temperature gradients. The models, which are Schuster-Hamaker type four-flux model derived by Lockwood and Spalding, two Schuster-Schwarzschild type four-flux models derived by Siddall and Selcuk and Richter and Quack and spherical harmonics approximation, were evaluated from the viewpoint of predictive accuracy by comparing their predictions with exact solutions produced previously. The comparisons showed that spherical harmonics approximation produces more accurate results than the other models with respect to the radiative energy source term and that the four-flux models of Lockwood and Spalding and Siddall and Selcuk for isotropic radiation field are more accurate with respect to the prediction of radiative flux density to the side wall.

  2. Study on radiation transfer in human skin for cosmetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Jun; Kawamura, Ayumu; Miura, Yoshimasa; Takata, Sadaki; Ogawa, Katsuki

    2005-06-01

    In order to design cosmetics producing the optical properties that are required for a beautiful skin, the radiation transfer in the skin has been numerically investigated by the Monte Carlo method and the effects of skin texture and cosmetics on the radiation transfer have been empirically investigated using an artificial skin. The numerical analysis showed that the total internal reflection suppresses large portion of radiation going out through the skin surface Additionally, the experimental study revealed that skin texture and cosmetics not only diffusely reflect the incoming radiation, but also lead the internally reflected radiation to the outside of the skin.

  3. Application of the spectrally integrated Voigt function to line-by-line radiative transfer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quine, B. M.; Abrarov, S. M.

    2013-09-01

    We show that a new approach based on the spectrally integrated Voigt function (SIVF) enables the computation of line-by-line (LBL) radiative transfer at reduced spectral resolution without loss of accuracy. The algorithm provides rapid and accurate computation of area under the Voigt function in a way that preserves spectral radiance and, consequently, radiant intensity. The error analysis we provide shows the high-accuracy of the proposed SIVF approximations. A comparison of the performance of the method with that of the traditional LBL approach is presented. Motivations for the use and advantage of the SIVF as a replacement for conventional line function computations in radiative transfer are discussed.

  4. Numerical system utilising a Monte Carlo calculation method for accurate dose assessment in radiation accidents.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, F; Endo, A

    2007-01-01

    A system utilising radiation transport codes has been developed to derive accurate dose distributions in a human body for radiological accidents. A suitable model is quite essential for a numerical analysis. Therefore, two tools were developed to setup a 'problem-dependent' input file, defining a radiation source and an exposed person to simulate the radiation transport in an accident with the Monte Carlo calculation codes-MCNP and MCNPX. Necessary resources are defined by a dialogue method with a generally used personal computer for both the tools. The tools prepare human body and source models described in the input file format of the employed Monte Carlo codes. The tools were validated for dose assessment in comparison with a past criticality accident and a hypothesized exposure. PMID:17510203

  5. Martian Radiative Transfer Modeling Using the Optimal Spectral Sampling Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eluszkiewicz, J.; Cady-Pereira, K.; Uymin, G.; Moncet, J.-L.

    2005-01-01

    The large volume of existing and planned infrared observations of Mars have prompted the development of a new martian radiative transfer model that could be used in the retrievals of atmospheric and surface properties. The model is based on the Optimal Spectral Sampling (OSS) method [1]. The method is a fast and accurate monochromatic technique applicable to a wide range of remote sensing platforms (from microwave to UV) and was originally developed for the real-time processing of infrared and microwave data acquired by instruments aboard the satellites forming part of the next-generation global weather satellite system NPOESS (National Polarorbiting Operational Satellite System) [2]. As part of our on-going research related to the radiative properties of the martian polar caps, we have begun the development of a martian OSS model with the goal of using it to perform self-consistent atmospheric corrections necessary to retrieve caps emissivity from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) spectra. While the caps will provide the initial focus area for applying the new model, it is hoped that the model will be of interest to the wider Mars remote sensing community.

  6. Radiative transfer in atmosphere-sea ice-ocean system

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Z.; Stamnes, K.; Weeks, W.F.; Tsay, S.C.

    1996-04-01

    Radiative energy is critical in controlling the heat and mass balance of sea ice, which significantly affects the polar climate. In the polar oceans, light transmission through the atmosphere and sea ice is essential to the growth of plankton and algae and, consequently, to the microbial community both in the ice and in the ocean. Therefore, the study of radiative transfer in the polar atmosphere, sea ice, and ocean system is of particular importance. Lacking a properly coupled radiative transfer model for the atmosphere-sea ice-ocean system, a consistent study of the radiative transfer in the polar atmosphere, snow, sea ice, and ocean system has not been undertaken before. The radiative transfer processes in the atmosphere and in the ice and ocean have been treated separately. Because the radiation processes in the atmosphere, sea ice, and ocean depend on each other, this separate treatment is inconsistent. To study the radiative interaction between the atmosphere, clouds, snow, sea ice, and ocean, a radiative transfer model with consistent treatment of radiation in the coupled system is needed and is under development.

  7. Radiation heat transfer in two-phase media

    SciTech Connect

    Adzerikho, K.S.

    1988-05-01

    The state of the art of approximate and numerical methods of the theory of radiation heat transfer is analyzed. The principles for producing engineering methods of computing the radiation heat-transfer characteristics in power plants are examined. These principles include: the integration of the transport equation, computing the radiation heat transfer in nonisothermal two-phase media bounded by emitting and reflecting surfaces, the thermal efficiency of screens as a function of the optical properties of the boundary surfaces and the furnace medium, the scattering processes, temperature distribution, and a program NOTAK in the FORTRAN-IV language.

  8. A hybrid transport-diffusion model for radiative transfer in absorbing and scattering media

    SciTech Connect

    Roger, M.; Caliot, C.; Crouseilles, N.; Coelho, P.J.

    2014-10-15

    A new multi-scale hybrid transport-diffusion model for radiative transfer is proposed in order to improve the efficiency of the calculations close to the diffusive regime, in absorbing and strongly scattering media. In this model, the radiative intensity is decomposed into a macroscopic component calculated by the diffusion equation, and a mesoscopic component. The transport equation for the mesoscopic component allows to correct the estimation of the diffusion equation, and then to obtain the solution of the linear radiative transfer equation. In this work, results are presented for stationary and transient radiative transfer cases, in examples which concern solar concentrated and optical tomography applications. The Monte Carlo and the discrete-ordinate methods are used to solve the mesoscopic equation. It is shown that the multi-scale model allows to improve the efficiency of the calculations when the medium is close to the diffusive regime. The proposed model is a good alternative for radiative transfer at the intermediate regime where the macroscopic diffusion equation is not accurate enough and the radiative transfer equation requires too much computational effort.

  9. A hybrid transport-diffusion model for radiative transfer in absorbing and scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roger, M.; Caliot, C.; Crouseilles, N.; Coelho, P. J.

    2014-10-01

    A new multi-scale hybrid transport-diffusion model for radiative transfer is proposed in order to improve the efficiency of the calculations close to the diffusive regime, in absorbing and strongly scattering media. In this model, the radiative intensity is decomposed into a macroscopic component calculated by the diffusion equation, and a mesoscopic component. The transport equation for the mesoscopic component allows to correct the estimation of the diffusion equation, and then to obtain the solution of the linear radiative transfer equation. In this work, results are presented for stationary and transient radiative transfer cases, in examples which concern solar concentrated and optical tomography applications. The Monte Carlo and the discrete-ordinate methods are used to solve the mesoscopic equation. It is shown that the multi-scale model allows to improve the efficiency of the calculations when the medium is close to the diffusive regime. The proposed model is a good alternative for radiative transfer at the intermediate regime where the macroscopic diffusion equation is not accurate enough and the radiative transfer equation requires too much computational effort.

  10. A second order radiative transfer equation and its solution by meshless method with application to strongly inhomogeneous media

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J.M.; Tan, J.Y.; Liu, L.H.

    2013-01-01

    A new second order form of radiative transfer equation (named MSORTE) is proposed, which overcomes the singularity problem of a previously proposed second order radiative transfer equation [J.E. Morel, B.T. Adams, T. Noh, J.M. McGhee, T.M. Evans, T.J. Urbatsch, Spatial discretizations for self-adjoint forms of the radiative transfer equations, J. Comput. Phys. 214 (1) (2006) 12-40 (where it was termed SAAI), J.M. Zhao, L.H. Liu, Second order radiative transfer equation and its properties of numerical solution using finite element method, Numer. Heat Transfer B 51 (2007) 391-409] in dealing with inhomogeneous media where some locations have very small/zero extinction coefficient. The MSORTE contains a naturally introduced diffusion (or second order) term which provides better numerical property than the classic first order radiative transfer equation (RTE). The stability and convergence characteristics of the MSORTE discretized by central difference scheme is analyzed theoretically, and the better numerical stability of the second order form radiative transfer equations than the RTE when discretized by the central difference type method is proved. A collocation meshless method is developed based on the MSORTE to solve radiative transfer in inhomogeneous media. Several critical test cases are taken to verify the performance of the presented method. The collocation meshless method based on the MSORTE is demonstrated to be capable of stably and accurately solve radiative transfer in strongly inhomogeneous media, media with void region and even with discontinuous extinction coefficient.

  11. Extended emission wavelength of random dye lasers by exploiting radiative and non-radiative energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan Ismail, Wan Zakiah; Goldys, Ewa M.; Dawes, Judith M.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate long-wavelength operation (>700 nm) of random dye lasers (using a methylene blue dye) with the addition of rhodamine 6G and titania, enabled by radiative and non-radiative energy transfer. The pump energy is efficiently absorbed and transferred to the acceptors, to support lasing in random dye lasers in the near infrared. The optimum random laser performance with the highest emission intensity and the lowest lasing threshold was achieved for a concentration of methylene blue as the acceptor equal to 6× the concentration of rhodamine 6G (donor). Excessive levels of methylene blue increased the lasing threshold and broadened the methylene blue emission linewidth due to dye quenching from re-absorption. This is due to competition between the donor emission and energy transfer and between absorption loss and fluorescence quenching. The radiative and non-radiative energy transfer is analyzed as a function of the acceptor concentration and pump energy density, with consideration of the spectral overlap. The dependence of the radiative and non-radiative transfer efficiency on the acceptor concentration is obtained, and the energy transfer parameters, including the radiative and non-radiative energy transfer rate constants ( K R and K NR), are investigated using Stern-Volmer analysis. The analysis indicates that radiative energy transfer is the dominant energy transfer mechanism in this system.

  12. An accurate parameterization of the infrared radiative properties of cirrus clouds for climate models

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Q.; Sun, W.B.; Yang, P.

    1998-09-01

    An accurate parameterization is presented for the infrared radiative properties of cirrus clouds. For the single-scattering calculations, a composite scheme is developed for randomly oriented hexagonal ice crystals by comparing results from Mie theory, anomalous diffraction theory (ADT), the geometric optics method (GOM), and the finite-difference time domain technique. This scheme employs a linear combination of single-scattering properties from the Mie theory, ADT, and GOM, which is accurate for a wide range of size parameters. Following the approach of Q. Fu, the extinction coefficient, absorption coefficient, and asymmetry factor are parameterized as functions of the cloud ice water content and generalized effective size (D{sub ge}). The present parameterization of the single-scattering properties of cirrus clouds is validated by examining the bulk radiative properties for a wide range of atmospheric conditions. Compared with reference results, the typical relative error in emissivity due to the parameterization is {approximately}2.2%. The accuracy of this parameterization guarantees its reliability in applications to climate models. The present parameterization complements the scheme for the solar radiative properties of cirrus clouds developed by Q. Fu for use in numerical models.

  13. Heat transfer including radiation and slag particles evolution in MHD channel-I

    SciTech Connect

    Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

    1980-01-01

    Accurate estimates of convective and radiative heat transfer in the magnetohydrodynamic channel are provided. Calculations performed for a base load-size channel indicate that heat transfer by gas radiation almost equals that by convection for smooth walls, and amounts to 70% as much as the convective heat transfer for rough walls. Carbon dioxide, water vapor, and potassium atoms are the principal participating gases. The evolution of slag particles by homogeneous nucleation and condensation is also investigated. The particle-size spectrum so computed is later utilized to analyze the radiation enhancement by slag particles in the MHD diffuser. The impact of the slag particle spectrum on the selection of a workable and design of an efficient seed collection system is discussed.

  14. grtrans: Polarized general relativistic radiative transfer via ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, Jason

    2016-05-01

    grtrans calculates ray tracing radiative transfer in the Kerr metric, including the full treatment of polarised radiative transfer and parallel transport along geodesics, for comparing theoretical models of black hole accretion flows and jets with observations. The code is written in Fortran 90 and parallelizes with OpenMP; the full code and several components have Python interfaces. grtrans includes Geokerr (ascl:1011.015) and requires cfitsio (ascl:1010.001) and pyfits (ascl:1207.009).

  15. Discrete diffusion Monte Carlo for frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffrey D; Kelly, Thompson G; Urbatish, Todd J

    2010-11-17

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations. In this paper, we develop an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo. With a frequency-dependent test problem, we confirm the increased efficiency of our new DDMC technique.

  16. grtrans: Polarized general relativistic radiative transfer via ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, Jason

    2016-05-01

    grtrans calculates ray tracing radiative transfer in the Kerr metric, including the full treatment of polarised radiative transfer and parallel transport along geodesics, for comparing theoretical models of black hole accretion flows and jets with observations. The code is written in Fortran 90 and parallelizes with OpenMP; the full code and several components have Python interfaces. grtrans requires Geokerr (ascl:1011.015), cfitsio (ascl:1010.001), and pyfits (ascl:1207.009).

  17. Effect of radiation heat transfer on thermal diffusivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, N.

    1990-03-01

    Experimental data on thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of a semitransparent material generally include an error due to the radiation heat transfer. This error varies in accordance with the experimental conditions such as the temperature level of the sample and the measuring method. In this paper, research on the influence of radiation heat transfer on thermal diffusivity are reviewed, and as an example, the method to correct the radiation component in the apparent thermal diffusivity measured by the stepwise heating technique is presented. The transient heat transfer by simultaneous thermal conduction and radiation in a semitransparent material is analyzed when the front surface is subjected to stepwise heating. The apparent thermal diffusivity, which includes the radiation component, is calculated for various parameters.

  18. COMPARING THE EFFECT OF RADIATIVE TRANSFER SCHEMES ON CONVECTION SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, Joel D.; Basu, Sarbani; Demarque, Pierre

    2012-11-10

    We examine the effect of different radiative transfer schemes on the properties of three-dimensional (3D) simulations of near-surface stellar convection in the superadiabatic layer, where energy transport transitions from fully convective to fully radiative. We employ two radiative transfer schemes that fundamentally differ in the way they cover the 3D domain. The first solver approximates domain coverage with moments, while the second solver samples the 3D domain with ray integrations. By comparing simulations that differ only in their respective radiative transfer methods, we are able to isolate the effect that radiative efficiency has on the structure of the superadiabatic layer. We find the simulations to be in good general agreement, but they show distinct differences in the thermal structure in the superadiabatic layer and atmosphere.

  19. General Relativistic Radiative Transfer: Applications to Black-Hole Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Kinwah; Fuerst, Steven V.; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Lee, Khee-Gan

    2007-01-01

    We present general relativistic radiation transfer formulations which include opacity effects due to absorption, emission and scattering explicitly. We consider a moment expansions for the transfer in the presence of scattering. The formulation is applied to calculation emissions from accretion and outflows in black-hole systems. Cases with thin accretion disks and accretion tori are considered. Effects, such as emission anisotropy, non-stationary flows and geometrical self-occultation are investigated. Polarisation transfer in curved space-time is discussed qualitatively.

  20. RRTMGP: A fast and accurate radiation code for the next decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlawer, E. J.; Pincus, R.; Wehe, A.; Delamere, J.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric radiative processes are key drivers of the Earth's climate and must be accurately represented in global circulations models (GCMs) to allow faithful simulations of the planet's past, present, and future. The radiation code RRTMG is widely utilized by global modeling centers for both climate and weather predictions, but it has become increasingly out-of-date. The code's structure is not well suited for the current generation of computer architectures and its stored absorption coefficients are not consistent with the most recent spectroscopic information. We are developing a new broadband radiation code for the current generation of computational architectures. This code, called RRTMGP, will be a completely restructured and modern version of RRTMG. The new code preserves the strengths of the existing RRTMG parameterization, especially the high accuracy of the k-distribution treatment of absorption by gases, but the entire code is being rewritten to provide highly efficient computation across a range of architectures. Our redesign includes refactoring the code into discrete kernels corresponding to fundamental computational elements (e.g. gas optics), optimizing the code for operating on multiple columns in parallel, simplifying the subroutine interface, revisiting the existing gas optics interpolation scheme to reduce branching, and adding flexibility with respect to run-time choices of streams, need for consideration of scattering, aerosol and cloud optics, etc. The result of the proposed development will be a single, well-supported and well-validated code amenable to optimization across a wide range of platforms. Our main emphasis is on highly-parallel platforms including Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) and Many-Integrated-Core processors (MICs), which experience shows can accelerate broadband radiation calculations by as much as a factor of fifty. RRTMGP will provide highly efficient and accurate radiative fluxes calculations for coupled global

  1. Thermal radiation heat transfer (3rd revised and enlarged edition)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Robert; Howell, John R.

    This book first reviews the overall aspects and background information related to thermal radiation heat transfer and incorporates new general information, advances in analytical and computational techniques, and new reference material. Coverage focuses on radiation from opaque surfaces, radiation interchange between various types of surfaces enclosing a vacuum or transparent medium, and radiation including the effects of partially transmitting media, such as combustion gases, soot, or windows. Boundary conditions and multiple layers are discussed with information on radiation in materials with nonunity refractive indices.

  2. Radiative Transfer Reconsidered as a Quantum Kinetic Theory Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosato, J.

    2015-12-01

    We revisit the radiative transfer theory from first principles approach, inspired from quantum kinetic theory. The radiation field is described within the second quantization formalism. A master equation for the radiation density operator is derived and transformed into a balance relation in the phase space, which involves nonlocal terms owing to radiation coherence. In a perturbative framework, we focus on the lowest order term in ℏ-expansion and show that the radiation coherence results in an alteration of the photon group velocity. An application to the formation of hydrogen lines in stellar atmospheres is performed as an illustration.

  3. Radiation Transfer in the Atmosphere: Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, M.; Travis, L.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    Sunlight illuminating the Earth's atmosphere is scattered by gas molecules and suspended particles, giving rise to blue skies, white clouds, and optical displays such as rainbows and halos. By scattering and absorbing the shortwave solar radiation and the longwave radiation emitted by the underlying surface, cloud and aerosol particles strongly affect the radiation budget of the terrestrial climate system. As a consequence of the dependence of scattering characteristics on particle size, morphology, and composition, scattered light can be remarkably rich in information on particle properties and thus provides a sensitive tool for remote retrievals of macro- and microphysical parameters of clouds and aerosols.

  4. Algorithmic vs. finite difference Jacobians for infrared atmospheric radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Franz; Gimeno García, Sebastián; Vasquez, Mayte; Xu, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Jacobians, i.e. partial derivatives of the radiance and transmission spectrum with respect to the atmospheric state parameters to be retrieved from remote sensing observations, are important for the iterative solution of the nonlinear inverse problem. Finite difference Jacobians are easy to implement, but computationally expensive and possibly of dubious quality; on the other hand, analytical Jacobians are accurate and efficient, but the implementation can be quite demanding. GARLIC, our "Generic Atmospheric Radiation Line-by-line Infrared Code", utilizes algorithmic differentiation (AD) techniques to implement derivatives w.r.t. atmospheric temperature and molecular concentrations. In this paper, we describe our approach for differentiation of the high resolution infrared and microwave spectra and provide an in-depth assessment of finite difference approximations using "exact" AD Jacobians as a reference. The results indicate that the "standard" two-point finite differences with 1 K and 1% perturbation for temperature and volume mixing ratio, respectively, can exhibit substantial errors, and central differences are significantly better. However, these deviations do not transfer into the truncated singular value decomposition solution of a least squares problem. Nevertheless, AD Jacobians are clearly recommended because of the superior speed and accuracy.

  5. A Unified Microwave Radiative Transfer Model with Jacobian for General Stratified Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Miao

    A unified microwave radiative transfer (UMRT) model is developed for rapid, stable and accurate level-centric calculation of the thermal radiation emitted from any geophysical medium comprised of planar layers of either densely or tenuously distributed, moderately sized spherical scatterers. The formulation includes rapid calculation of the tangent linear relationship (i.e., Jacobian) between the observed brightness temperature and any relevant radiative and geophysical layer parameters, such as the scattering and absorption coefficients, temperature, temperature lapse rate, and medium layer thickness. UMRT employs a rapid multistream scattering-based discrete ordinate eigenanalysis solution with a layer-adding algorithm stabilized by incorporating symmetrization of the discretized differential radiative transfer equations and analytical diagonalization and factorization of the resulting symmetric and positive definite matrices. It is based on the discrete ordinate tangent linear radiative transfer model of Voronovich et al. (2004), but extended to include both Mie and dense media scattering theories and employ refractive layers. Other nontrivial extensions are: 1) exact modeling of linearized temperature profiles and resulting radiation streams across medium layers, 2) compensation for refracted radiation streams using Snell's law, the Fresnel reflectivity and transmissivity coefficients, and a cubic spline interpolation matrix, and 3) seamless calculation of associated Jacobians for both sparse and dense medium parameters. Details of the UMRT Jacobian formulation are presented. The entire formulation has been programmed in Matlab and validated through both energy conservation and numerical Jacobian intercomparisons. Comparisons of the upwelling brightness temperatures over dry snow and ice from simulations and field measurements are presented and discussed.

  6. Radiative heat transfer in low-dimensional systems -- microscopic mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Lilia; Phan, Anh; Drosdoff, David

    2013-03-01

    Radiative heat transfer between objects can increase dramatically at sub-wavelength scales. Exploring ways to modulate such transport between nano-systems is a key issue from fundamental and applied points of view. We advance the theoretical understanding of radiative heat transfer between nano-objects by introducing a microscopic model, which takes into account the individual atoms and their atomic polarizabilities. This approach is especially useful to investigate nano-objects with various geometries and give a detailed description of the heat transfer distribution. We employ this model to study the heat exchange in graphene nanoribbon/substrate systems. Our results for the distance separations, substrates, and presence of extended or localized defects enable making predictions for tailoring the radiative heat transfer at the nanoscale. Financial support from the Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-06ER46297 is acknowledged.

  7. Additional correction for energy transfer efficiency calculation in filter-based Förster resonance energy transfer microscopy for more accurate results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuansheng; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2010-03-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy is commonly used to monitor protein interactions with filter-based imaging systems, which require spectral bleedthrough (or cross talk) correction to accurately measure energy transfer efficiency (E). The double-label (donor+acceptor) specimen is excited with the donor wavelength, the acceptor emission provided the uncorrected FRET signal and the donor emission (the donor channel) represents the quenched donor (qD), the basis for the E calculation. Our results indicate this is not the most accurate determination of the quenched donor signal as it fails to consider the donor spectral bleedthrough (DSBT) signals in the qD for the E calculation, which our new model addresses, leading to a more accurate E result. This refinement improves E comparisons made with lifetime and spectral FRET imaging microscopy as shown here using several genetic (FRET standard) constructs, where cerulean and venus fluorescent proteins are tethered by different amino acid linkers.

  8. An Iterative Phase-Space Explicit Discontinuous Galerkin Method for Stellar Radiative Transfer in Extended Atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    de Almeida, V.F.

    2004-01-28

    A phase-space discontinuous Galerkin (PSDG) method is presented for the solution of stellar radiative transfer problems. It allows for greater adaptivity than competing methods without sacrificing generality. The method is extensively tested on a spherically symmetric, static, inverse-power-law scattering atmosphere. Results for different sizes of atmospheres and intensities of scattering agreed with asymptotic values. The exponentially decaying behavior of the radiative field in the diffusive-transparent transition region and the forward peaking behavior at the surface of extended atmospheres were accurately captured. The integrodifferential equation of radiation transfer is solved iteratively by alternating between the radiative pressure equation and the original equation with the integral term treated as an energy density source term. In each iteration, the equations are solved via an explicit, flux-conserving, discontinuous Galerkin method. Finite elements are ordered in wave fronts perpendicularly to the characteristic curves so that elemental linear algebraic systems are solved quickly by sweeping the phase space element by element. Two implementations of a diffusive boundary condition at the origin are demonstrated wherein the finite discontinuity in the radiative intensity is accurately captured by the proposed method. This allows for a consistent mechanism to preserve photon luminosity. The method was proved to be robust and fast, and a case is made for the adequacy of parallel processing. In addition to classical two-dimensional plots, results of normalized radiative intensity were mapped onto a log-polar surface exhibiting all distinguishing features of the problem studied.

  9. A Fast Radiative Transfer Parameterization Under Cloudy Condition in Solar Spectral Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Liu, X.; Yang, P.; Wang, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) system, which is proposed and developed by NASA, will directly measure the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (IR), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (RS), and radio occultation (RO). IR, RS, and RO measurements provide information on the most critical but least understood climate forcings, responses, and feedbacks associated with the vertical distribution of atmospheric temperature and water vapor, broadband reflected and emitted radiative fluxes, cloud properties, surface albedo, and surface skin temperature. To perform Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSE) for long term climate observations, accurate and fast radiative transfer models are needed. The principal component-based radiative transfer model (PCRTM) is one of the efforts devoted to the development of fast radiative transfer models for simulating radiances and reflecatance observed by various hyperspectral instruments. Retrieval algorithm based on PCRTM forward model has been developed for AIRS, NAST, IASI, and CrIS. It is very fast and very accurate relative to the training radiative transfer model. In this work, we are extending PCRTM to UV-VIS-near IR spectral region. To implement faster cloudy radiative transfer calculations, we carefully investigated the radiative transfer process under cloud condition. The cloud bidirectional reflectance was parameterized based on off-line 36-stream multiple scattering calculations while few other lookup tables were generated to describe the effective transmittance and reflectance of the cloud-clear-sky coupling system in solar spectral region. The bidirectional reflectance or the irradiance measured by satellite may be calculated using a simple fast radiative transfer model providing the type of cloud (ice or water), optical depth of the cloud, optical depth of both atmospheric trace gases above and below clouds, particle size of the cloud, as well

  10. A Model of Radiative and Conductive Energy Transfer in Planetary Regoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hapke, Bruce

    1996-01-01

    The thermal regime in planetary regoliths involves three processes: propagation of visible radiation, propagation of thermal radiation, and thermal conduction. The equations of radiative transfer and heat conduction are formulated for particulate media composed of anisotropically scattering particles. Although the equations are time dependent, only steady state problems are considered in this paper. Using the two-stream approximation, solutions are obtained for two cases: a layer of powder heated from below and an infinitely thick regolith illuminated by visible radiation. Radiative conductivity, subsurface temperature gradients, and the solid state greenhouse effect all appear intrinsically in the solutions without ad hoc additions. Although the equations are nonlinear, approximate analytic solutions that are accurate to a few percent are obtained. Analytic expressions are given for the temperature distribution, the optical and thermal radiance distributions, the hemispherical albedo, the hemispherical emissivity, and the directional emissivity. Additional applications of the new model to three problems of interest in planetary regoliths are presented by Hapke.

  11. 3D Radiative Transfer in Cloudy Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Davis, Anthony

    Developments in three-dimensional cloud radiation over the past few decades are assessed and distilled into this contributed volume. Chapters are authored by subject-matter experts who address a broad audience of graduate students, researchers, and anyone interested in cloud-radiation processes in the solar and infrared spectral regions. After two introductory chapters and a section on the fundamental physics and computational techniques, the volume extensively treats two main application areas: the impact of clouds on the Earth's radiation budget, which is an essential aspect of climate modeling; and remote observation of clouds, especially with the advanced sensors on current and future satellite missions. http://www.springeronline.com/alert/article?a=3D1_1fva7w_1j826l_41z_6

  12. Light-Cone Effect of Radiation Fields in Cosmological Radiative Transfer Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kyungjin

    2015-02-01

    We present a novel method to implement time-delayed propagation of radiation fields in cosmo-logical radiative transfer simulations. Time-delayed propagation of radiation fields requires construction of retarded-time fields by tracking the location and lifetime of radiation sources along the corresponding light-cones. Cosmological radiative transfer simulations have, until now, ignored this "light-cone effect" or implemented ray-tracing methods that are computationally demanding. We show that radiative trans-fer calculation of the time-delayed fields can be easily achieved in numerical simulations when periodic boundary conditions are used, by calculating the time-discretized retarded-time Green's function using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) method and convolving it with the source distribution. We also present a direct application of this method to the long-range radiation field of Lyman-Werner band photons, which is important in the high-redshift astrophysics with first stars.

  13. Toward a new radiative-transfer-based model for remote sensing of terrestrial surface albedo.

    PubMed

    Cui, Shengcheng; Zhen, Xiaobing; Wang, Zhen; Yang, Shizhi; Zhu, WenYue; Li, Xuebin; Huang, Honghua; Wei, Heli

    2015-08-15

    This Letter formulates a simple yet accurate radiative-transfer-based theoretical model to characterize the fraction of radiation reflected by terrestrial surfaces. Emphasis is placed on the concept of inhomogeneous distribution of the diffuse sky radiation function (DSRF) and multiple interaction effects (MIE). Neglecting DSRF and MIE produces a -1.55% mean relative bias in albedo estimates. The presented model can elucidate the impact of DSRF on the surface volume scattering and geometry-optical scattering components, respectively, especially for slant illuminations with solar zenith angles (SZA) larger than 50°. Particularly striking in the comparisons between our model and ground-based observations is the achievement of the agreement level, indicating that our model can effectively resolve the longstanding issue in accurately estimating albedo at extremely large SZAs and is promising for land-atmosphere interactions studies. PMID:26274674

  14. User's Manual: Routines for Radiative Heat Transfer and Thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risch, Timothy K.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the intensity and spectral distribution of radiation emanating from a heated surface has applications in many areas of science and engineering. Areas of research in which the quantification of spectral radiation is used routinely include thermal radiation heat transfer, infrared signature analysis, and radiation thermometry. In the analysis of radiation, it is helpful to be able to predict the radiative intensity and the spectral distribution of the emitted energy. Presented in this report is a set of routines written in Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington) and incorporating functions specific to Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington) that are useful for predicting the radiative behavior of heated surfaces. These routines include functions for calculating quantities of primary importance to engineers and scientists. In addition, the routines also provide the capability to use such information to determine surface temperatures from spectral intensities and for calculating the sensitivity of the surface temperature measurements to unknowns in the input parameters.

  15. Radiative interactions in transient energy transfer in gaseous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.

    1985-01-01

    Analyses and numerical procedures are presented to investigate the radiative interactions in transient energy transfer processes in gaseous systems. The nongray radiative formulations are based on the wide-band model correlations for molecular absorption. Various relations for the radiative flux are developed; these are useful for different flow conditions and physical problems. Specific plans for obtaining extensive results for different cases are presented. The methods presented in this study can be extended easily to investigate the radiative interactions in realistic flows of hydrogen-air species in the scramjet engine.

  16. Heat Transfer Analysis of a Closed Brayton Cycle Space Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical analysis of the heat transfer processes taking place in a radiator for a closed cycle gas turbine (CCGT), also referred to as a Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) space power system. The resulting equations and relationships have been incorporated into a radiator sub-routine of a numerical triple objective CCGT optimization program to determine operating conditions yielding maximum cycle efficiency, minimum radiator area and minimum overall systems mass. Study results should be of interest to numerical modeling of closed cycle Brayton space power systems and to the design of fluid cooled radiators in general.

  17. Radiation Heat Transfer Procedures for Space-Related Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chai, John C.

    2000-01-01

    Over the last contract year, a numerical procedure for combined conduction-radiation heat transfer using unstructured grids has been developed. As a result of this research, one paper has been published in the Numerical Heat Transfer Journal. One paper has been accepted for presentation at the International Center for Heat and Mass Transfer's International Symposium on Computational Heat Transfer to be held in Australia next year. A journal paper is under review by my NASA's contact. A conference paper for the ASME National Heat Transfer conference is under preparation. In summary, a total of four (4) papers (two journal and two conference) have been published, accepted or are under preparation. There are two (2) to three (3) more papers to be written for the project. In addition to the above publications, one book chapter, one journal paper and six conference papers have been published as a result of this project. Over the last contract year, the research project resulted in one Ph.D. thesis and partially supported another Ph.D. student. My NASA contact and myself have formulated radiation heat transfer procedures for materials with different indices of refraction and for combined conduction-radiation heat transfer. We are trying to find other applications for the procedures developed under this grant.

  18. Partial moment entropy approximation to radiative heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Martin . E-mail: frank@mathematik.uni-kl.de; Dubroca, Bruno . E-mail: Bruno.Dubroca@math.u-bordeaux.fr; Klar, Axel . E-mail: klar@mathematik.uni-kl.de

    2006-10-10

    We extend the half moment entropy closure for the radiative heat transfer equations presented in Dubroca and Klar [B. Dubroca, A. Klar, Half moment closure for radiative transfer equations, J. Comput. Phys. 180 (2002) 584-596] and Turpault et al. [R. Turpault, M. Frank, B. Dubroca, A. Klar, Multigroup half space moment approximations to the radiative heat transfer equations, J. Comput. Phys. 198 (2004) 363-371] to multi-D. To that end, we consider a partial moment system with general partitions of the unit sphere closed by an entropy minimization principle. We give physical and mathematical reasons for this choice of model and study its properties. Several numerical examples in different physical regimes are presented.

  19. Radiative transfer theory for polarimetric remote sensing of pine forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, C. C.; Han, H. C.; Shin, Robert T.; Kong, Jin AU; Beaudoin, A.; Letoan, T.

    1992-01-01

    The radiative transfer theory is applied to interpret polarimetric radar backscatter from pine forest with clustered vegetation structures. To take into account the clustered structures with the radiative transfer theory, the scattering function of each cluster is calculated by incorporating the phase interference of scattered fields from each component. Subsequently, the resulting phase matrix is used in the radiative transfer equations to evaluate the polarimetric backscattering coefficients from random medium layers embedded with vegetation clusters. Upon including the multi-scale structures, namely, trunks, primary and secondary branches, as well as needles, we interpret and simulate the polarimetric radar responses from pine forest for different frequencies and looking angles. The preliminary results are shown to be in good agreement with the measured backscattering coefficients at the Landes maritime pine forest during the MAESTRO-1 experiment.

  20. Estimation of radiative heat transfer using a geometric human model.

    PubMed

    Kakuta, N; Yokoyama, S; Nakamura, M; Mabuchi, K

    2001-03-01

    In order to provide a detailed estimate of radiative heat transfer between a human body and its surrounding environment, we have developed a geometric model of a human form and an algorithm. The model closely resembles the actual shape of a human body and is composed of small quadrilateral surfaces. Dealing with an object or a space with an arbitrary shape, the developed algorithm can judge efficiently whether there is an obstruction between a pair of surfaces. As a result, the angle factors between a pair of surfaces that only occur during radiative heat transfer can be defined. The distribution of the radiative heat transfer rates shows the characteristics of body shape and variations in posture. PMID:11327500

  1. Efficient Approximation of Head-Related Transfer Functions in Subbands for Accurate Sound Localization

    PubMed Central

    Marelli, Damián; Baumgartner, Robert; Majdak, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) describe the acoustic filtering of incoming sounds by the human morphology and are essential for listeners to localize sound sources in virtual auditory displays. Since rendering complex virtual scenes is computationally demanding, we propose four algorithms for efficiently representing HRTFs in subbands, i.e., as an analysis filterbank (FB) followed by a transfer matrix and a synthesis FB. All four algorithms use sparse approximation procedures to minimize the computational complexity while maintaining perceptually relevant HRTF properties. The first two algorithms separately optimize the complexity of the transfer matrix associated to each HRTF for fixed FBs. The other two algorithms jointly optimize the FBs and transfer matrices for complete HRTF sets by two variants. The first variant aims at minimizing the complexity of the transfer matrices, while the second one does it for the FBs. Numerical experiments investigate the latency-complexity trade-off and show that the proposed methods offer significant computational savings when compared with other available approaches. Psychoacoustic localization experiments were modeled and conducted to find a reasonable approximation tolerance so that no significant localization performance degradation was introduced by the subband representation. PMID:26681930

  2. Many-body radiative heat transfer theory.

    PubMed

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe; Biehs, Svend-Age; Joulain, Karl

    2011-09-01

    In this Letter, an N-body theory for the radiative heat exchange in thermally nonequilibrated discrete systems of finite size objects is presented. We report strong exaltation effects of heat flux which can be explained only by taking into account the presence of many-body interactions. Our theory extends the standard Polder and van Hove stochastic formalism used to evaluate heat exchanges between two objects isolated from their environment to a collection of objects in mutual interaction. It gives a natural theoretical framework to investigate the photon heat transport properties of complex systems at the mesoscopic scale. PMID:22026672

  3. Radiative heat transfer in coal furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1992-01-01

    A hybrid technique has been developed to solve three-dimensional spectral radiation transport equations for absorbing, emitting and anisotropically scattering media. An optimal mix of computational speed and accuracy is obtained by combining the discrete ordinate method (S{sub 4}), modified differential approximation (MDA) and P{sub 1} approximation for use in different range of optical thicknesses. The technique is used in conjunction with a char burnout model and spectroscopic data for H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, CO, char, soot and ash to determine the influence of ash composition, ash content and coal preparation on furnace heat absorption.

  4. Radiative heat transfer in coal furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1992-09-01

    A hybrid technique has been developed to solve three-dimensional spectral radiation transport equations for absorbing, emitting and anisotropically scattering media. An optimal mix of computational speed and accuracy is obtained by combining the discrete ordinate method (S{sub 4}), modified differential approximation (MDA) and P{sub 1} approximation for use in different range of optical thicknesses. The technique is used in conjunction with a char burnout model and spectroscopic data for H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, CO, char, soot and ash to determine the influence of ash composition, ash content and coal preparation on furnace heat absorption.

  5. Combined conduction and radiation heat transfer in concentric cylindrical media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, D. K.

    1987-01-01

    The exact radiative transfer expressions for gray and nongray gases which are absorbing, emitting and nonscattering, contained between infinitely long concentric cylinders with black surfaces, are given in local thermodynamic equilibrium. Resulting energy equations due to the combination of conduction and radiation modes of heat transfer, under steady state conditions for gray and nongray media, are solved numerically using the undetermined parameters method. A single 4.3-micron band of CO2 is considered for the nongray problems. The present solutions for gray and nongray gases obtained in the plane-parallel limit (radius ratio approaches to one) are compared with the plane-parallel results reported in the literature.

  6. Computation of Radiation Heat Transfer in Aeroengine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patankar, S. V.

    1996-01-01

    In this report the highlights of the research completed for the NASA are summarized. This research has been completed in the form of two Ph.D. theses by Chai (1994) and Parthasarathy (1996). Readers are referred to these theses for a complete details of the work and lists of references. In the following sections, first objectives of this research are introduced, then the finite-volume method for radiation heat transfer is described, and finally computations of radiative heat transfer in non-gray participating media is presented.

  7. A simplified scheme for computing radiation transfer in the troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katayama, A.

    1973-01-01

    A scheme is presented, for the heating of clear and cloudy air by solar and infrared radiation transfer, designed for use in tropospheric general circulation models with coarse vertical resolution. A bulk transmission function is defined for the infrared transfer. The interpolation factors, required for computing the bulk transmission function, are parameterized as functions of such physical parameters as the thickness of the layer, the pressure, and the mixing ratio at a reference level. The computation procedure for solar radiation is significantly simplified by the introduction of two basic concepts. The first is that the solar radiation spectrum can be divided into a scattered part, for which Rayleigh scattering is significant but absorption by water vapor is negligible, and an absorbed part for which absorption by water vapor is significant but Rayleigh scattering is negligible. The second concept is that of an equivalent cloud water vapor amount which absorbs the same amount of radiation as the cloud.

  8. Theory of heat transfer and hydraulic resistance of oil radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mariamov, N B

    1942-01-01

    In the present report the coefficients of heat transfer and hydraulic resistance are theoretically obtained for the case of laminar flow of a heated viscous liquid in a narrow rectangular channel. The results obtained are applied to the computation of oil radiators, which to a first approximation may be considered as made up of a system of such channels. In conclusion, a comparison is given of the theoretical with the experimental results obtained from tests on airplane oil radiators.

  9. Modelling of Radiation Heat Transfer in Reacting Hot Gas Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thellmann, A.; Mundt, C.

    2009-01-01

    In this work the interaction between a turbulent flow including chemical reactions and radiation transport is investigated. As a first step, the state-of-the art radiation models P1 based on the moment method and Discrete Transfer Model (DTM) based on the discrete ordinate method are used in conjunction with the CFD code ANSYS CFX. The absorbing and emitting medium (water vapor) is modeled by Weighted Sum of Gray Gases. For the chemical reactions the standard Eddy dissipation model combined with the two equation turbulence model k-epsilon is employed. A demonstration experiment is identified which delivers temperature distribution, species concentration and radiative intensity distribution in the investigated combustion enclosure. The simulation results are compared with the experiment and reveals that the P1 model predicts the location of the maximal radiation intensity unphysically. On the other hand the DTM model does better but over predicts the maximum value of the radiation intensity. This radiation sensitivity study is a first step on the way to identify a suitable radiation transport and spectral model in order to implement both in an existing 3D Navier-Stokes Code. Including radiation heat transfer we intend to investigate the influence on the overall energy balance in a hydrogen/oxygen rocket combustion chamber.

  10. Subgrid-scale model for radiative transfer in turbulent participating media

    SciTech Connect

    Soucasse, L.; Rivière, Ph.; École Centrale Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes, F-92290 Châtenay-Malabry ; Soufiani, A.

    2014-01-15

    The simulation of turbulent flows of radiating gases, taking into account all turbulence length scales with an accurate radiation transport solver, is computationally prohibitive for high Reynolds or Rayleigh numbers. This is particularly the case when the small structures are not optically thin. We develop in this paper a radiative transfer subgrid model suitable for the coupling with direct numerical simulations of turbulent radiating fluid flows. Owing to the linearity of the Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE), the emission source term is spatially filtered to define large-scale and subgrid-scale radiation intensities. The large-scale or filtered intensity is computed with a standard ray tracing method on a coarse grid, and the subgrid intensity is obtained analytically (in Fourier space) from the Fourier transform of the subgrid emission source term. A huge saving of computational time is obtained in comparison with direct ray tracing applied on the fine mesh. Model accuracy is checked for three 3D fluctuating temperature fields. The first field is stochastically generated and allows us to discuss the effects of the filtering level and of the optical thicknesses of the whole medium, of the integral length scale, and of the cutoff wave length. The second and third cases correspond respectively to turbulent natural convection of humid air in a cubical box, and to the flow of hot combustion products inside a channel. In all cases, the achieved accuracy on radiative powers and wall fluxes is about a few percents.

  11. Principal Component-Based Radiative Transfer Model (PCRTM) for Hyperspectral Sensors. Part I; Theoretical Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen

    2005-01-01

    Modern infrared satellite sensors such as Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CrIS), Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES), Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) are capable of providing high spatial and spectral resolution infrared spectra. To fully exploit the vast amount of spectral information from these instruments, super fast radiative transfer models are needed. This paper presents a novel radiative transfer model based on principal component analysis. Instead of predicting channel radiance or transmittance spectra directly, the Principal Component-based Radiative Transfer Model (PCRTM) predicts the Principal Component (PC) scores of these quantities. This prediction ability leads to significant savings in computational time. The parameterization of the PCRTM model is derived from properties of PC scores and instrument line shape functions. The PCRTM is very accurate and flexible. Due to its high speed and compressed spectral information format, it has great potential for super fast one-dimensional physical retrievals and for Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) large volume radiance data assimilation applications. The model has been successfully developed for the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System Airborne Sounder Testbed - Interferometer (NAST-I) and AIRS instruments. The PCRTM model performs monochromatic radiative transfer calculations and is able to include multiple scattering calculations to account for clouds and aerosols.

  12. Polarized multi-dimensional radiative transfer using the discrete ordinates method

    SciTech Connect

    Haferman, J.L.; Smith, T.F.; Krajewski, W.F.

    1996-11-01

    A polarized multi-dimensional radiative transfer model based on the discrete-ordinates method is developed. The model solves the monochromatic vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE) that considers polarization using the four Stokes parameters. For the VRTE, the intensity of the scalar radiative transfer equation is replaced by the Stokes intensity vector; the position-dependent scalar extinction coefficient is replaced by a direction- and position-dependent 4 x 4 extinction matrix; the position-dependent scalar absorption coefficient is replaced by a direction- and position-dependent emission vector; and the scalar phase function is replaced by a scattering phase matrix. The model is capable of solving the VRTE in anisotropically scattering one-, two-, or three-dimensional Cartesian geometries. The model is validated for one-dimensional polarized radiative transfer by comparing its results to several benchmark cases available in the literature. The model results are accurate so long as a quadrature set is chosen so that all phase functions used for a given problem normalize to unity. The model has been developed using a parallel computing paradigm, where each Stokes parameter is solved for on a separate computer processing unit.

  13. Two-dimensional radiative transfer in cloudy atmospheres - The spherical harmonic spatial grid method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, K. F.

    1993-01-01

    A new two-dimensional monochromatic method that computes the transfer of solar or thermal radiation through atmospheres with arbitrary optical properties is described. The model discretizes the radiative transfer equation by expanding the angular part of the radiance field in a spherical harmonic series and representing the spatial part with a discrete grid. The resulting sparse coupled system of equations is solved iteratively with the conjugate gradient method. A Monte Carlo model is used for extensive verification of outgoing flux and radiance values from both smooth and highly variable (multifractal) media. The spherical harmonic expansion naturally allows for different levels of approximation, but tests show that the 2D equivalent of the two-stream approximation is poor at approximating variations in the outgoing flux. The model developed here is shown to be highly efficient so that media with tens of thousands of grid points can be computed in minutes. The large improvement in efficiency will permit quick, accurate radiative transfer calculations of realistic cloud fields and improve our understanding of the effect of inhomogeneity on radiative transfer in cloudy atmospheres.

  14. Vector radiative transfer in a multilayer medium by natural element method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Kim, Yong-Jun; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2016-04-01

    The vector radiative transfer problem in a vertically multilayer scattering medium with spatial changes in the index of refraction is solved by the natural element method (NEM). The top boundary of the multilayer medium is irradiated by a collimated beam. In our model, the angular space is discretized by the discrete ordinates approach, and the spatial discretization is conducted by the Galerkin weighted residuals approach. In the solution procedure, the collimated component for the Stokes parameters is first solved by NEM, and then it is embedded into the vector radiative transfer equation for the diffuse component as a source term. To keep the consistency of the directions in all the layers, angular interpolation of the Stokes parameters at the interfaces is adopted. The NEM approach for the collimated component is first validated. Then, the classical coupled atmosphere-water system irradiated by different states of collimated beam is examined to verify the numerical performance of the method. Numerical results show that the NEM is accurate, flexible, and effective in solving polarized radiative transfer in a multilayer medium. Finally, polarized radiative transfer in a four-layer system is investigated and analyzed. PMID:27140767

  15. Super-Eddington radiation transfer in soft gamma repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, Andrew

    1994-12-01

    Bursts from soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) have been shown to be super-Eddington by a factor of 1000 and have been persuasively associated with compact objects. Super-Eddington radiation transfer on the surface of a strongly magnetic (greater than or equal to 1013 G) neutron star is studied and related to the observational constraints on SGRs. In strong magnetic fields, Thompson scattering is suppressed in one polarization state, so super-Eddington fluxes can be radiated while the plasma remains in hydrostatic equilibrium. We discuss a model which offers a somewhat natural explanation for the observation that the energy spectra of bursts with varying intensity are similar. The radiation produced is found to be linearly polarized to one part in 1000 in a direction determined by the local magnetic field, and intensity variations between bursts are understood as a change in the radiating area on the source. The net polarization is inversely correlated with burst intensity. Further, it is shown that for radiation transfer calculations in limit of superstrong magnetic fields, it is sufficient to solve the radiation transfer for the low opacity state rather than the coupled equations for both. With this approximation, standard stellar atmosphere techniques are utilized to calculate the model energy spectrum.

  16. Comparison of vibration dissociation coupling and radiative heat transfer models for AOTV/AFE flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.; Bobskill, Glenn J.; Greendyke, Robert B.

    1988-01-01

    A series of detailed studies comparing various vibration dissociation coupling models, reaction systems and rates, and radiative heating models has been conducted for the nonequilibrium stagnation region of an AFE/AOTV vehicle. Atomic and molecular nonequilibrium radiation correction factors have been developed and applied to various absorption coefficient step models, and a modified vibration dissociation coupling model has been shown to yield good vibration/electronic temperature and concentration profiles. While results indicate sensitivity to the choice of vibration dissociation coupling model and to the nitrogen electron impact ionization rate, by proper combinations accurate flowfield and radiative heating results can be obtained. These results indicate that nonequilibrium effects significantly affect the flowfield and the radiative heat transfer. However, additional work is needed in ionization chemistry and absorption coefficient modeling.

  17. ASME Heat Transfer Division: Proceedings. Volume 1: Heat transfer in microgravity systems, radiative heat transfer and radiative heat transfer in low-temperature environments, and thermal contact conductance and inverse problems in heat transfer; HTD-Volume 332

    SciTech Connect

    Gopinath, A.; Sadhal, S.S.; Jones, P.D.; Seyed-Yagoobi, J.; Woodbury, K.A.

    1996-12-31

    In the first section on heat transfer in microgravity, the papers cover phase-change phenomena and thermocapillary flows and surface effects. In the second section, several papers cover solution methods for radiative heat transfer while the rest cover heat transfer in low-temperature environments. The last section covers papers containing valuable information for thermal contact conductance of various materials plus papers on inverse problems in heat transfer. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this volume.

  18. Mesoscopic near-field radiative heat transfer at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maasilta, Ilari; Geng, Zhuoran; Chaudhuri, Saumyadip; Koppinen, Panu

    2015-03-01

    Near-field radiative heat transfer has mostly been discussed at room temperatures and/or macroscopic scale geometries. Here, we discuss our recent theoretical and experimental advances in understanding near-field transfer at ultra-low temperatures below 1K. As the thermal wavelengths increase with lowering temperature, we show that with sensitive tunnel junction bolometers it is possible to study near-field transfer up to distances ~ 10 μm currently, even though the power levels are low. In addition, these type of experiments correspond to the extreme near-field limit, as the near-field region starts at ~ mm distances at 0.1 K, and could have theoretical power enhancement factors of the order of 1010. Preliminary results on heat transfer between two parallel metallic wires are presented. We also comment on possible areas were such heat transfer might be relevant, such as densely packed arrays of low-temperature detectors.

  19. Performance tuning Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme on Intel Xeon Phi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielikainen, Jarno; Huang, Bormin; Huang, Allen H.

    2015-10-01

    Next-generation mesoscale numerical weather prediction system, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, is a designed for dual use for forecasting and research. WRF offers multiple physics options that can be combined in any way. One of the physics options is radiance computation. The major source for energy for the earth's climate is solar radiation. Thus, it is imperative to accurately model horizontal and vertical distribution of the heating. Goddard solar radiative transfer model includes the absorption duo to water vapor,ozone, ozygen, carbon dioxide, clouds and aerosols. The model computes the interactions among the absorption and scattering by clouds, aerosols, molecules and surface. Finally, fluxes are integrated over the entire longwave spectrum.In this paper, we present our results of optimizing the Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme on Intel Many Integrated Core Architecture (MIC) hardware. The Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor is the first product based on Intel MIC architecture, and it consists of up to 61 cores connected by a high performance on-die bidirectional interconnect. The coprocessor supports all important Intel development tools. Thus, the development environment is familiar one to a vast number of CPU developers. Although, getting a maximum performance out of MICs will require using some novel optimization techniques. Those optimization techniques are discusses in this paper. The optimizations improved the performance of the original Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme on Xeon Phi 7120P by a factor of 2.2x. Furthermore, the same optimizations improved the performance of the Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme on a dual socket configuration of eight core Intel Xeon E5-2670 CPUs by a factor of 2.1x compared to the original Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme code.

  20. Modeling the physical structure of star-forming regions with LIME, a 3D radiative transfer code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quénard, D.; Bottinelli, S.; Caux, E.

    2016-05-01

    The ability to predict line emission is crucial in order to make a comparison with observations. From LTE to full radiative transfer codes, the goal is always to derive the most accurately possible the physical properties of the source. Non-LTE calculations can be very time consuming but are needed in most of the cases since many studied regions are far from LTE.

  1. An asymptotic preserving unified gas kinetic scheme for gray radiative transfer equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wenjun; Jiang, Song; Xu, Kun

    2015-03-15

    The solutions of radiative transport equations can cover both optical thin and optical thick regimes due to the large variation of photon's mean-free path and its interaction with the material. In the small mean free path limit, the nonlinear time-dependent radiative transfer equations can converge to an equilibrium diffusion equation due to the intensive interaction between radiation and material. In the optical thin limit, the photon free transport mechanism will emerge. In this paper, we are going to develop an accurate and robust asymptotic preserving unified gas kinetic scheme (AP-UGKS) for the gray radiative transfer equations, where the radiation transport equation is coupled with the material thermal energy equation. The current work is based on the UGKS framework for the rarefied gas dynamics [14], and is an extension of a recent work [12] from a one-dimensional linear radiation transport equation to a nonlinear two-dimensional gray radiative system. The newly developed scheme has the asymptotic preserving (AP) property in the optically thick regime in the capturing of diffusive solution without using a cell size being smaller than the photon's mean free path and time step being less than the photon collision time. Besides the diffusion limit, the scheme can capture the exact solution in the optical thin regime as well. The current scheme is a finite volume method. Due to the direct modeling for the time evolution solution of the interface radiative intensity, a smooth transition of the transport physics from optical thin to optical thick can be accurately recovered. Many numerical examples are included to validate the current approach.

  2. A stable and high-order accurate conjugate heat transfer problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindström, Jens; Nordström, Jan

    2010-08-01

    This paper analyzes well-posedness and stability of a conjugate heat transfer problem in one space dimension. We study a model problem for heat transfer between a fluid and a solid. The energy method is used to derive boundary and interface conditions that make the continuous problem well-posed and the semi-discrete problem stable. The numerical scheme is implemented using 2nd-, 3rd- and 4th-order finite difference operators on Summation-By-Parts (SBP) form. The boundary and interface conditions are implemented weakly. We investigate the spectrum of the spatial discretization to determine which type of coupling that gives attractive convergence properties. The rate of convergence is verified using the method of manufactured solutions.

  3. A polarized Radiative Transfer model based on successive order of scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Minzheng; Min, Qilong; Lü, Daren

    2010-07-01

    Based on Successive Order of Scattering approach, a full Vector Radiative Transfer model (SOSVRT) for vertically inhomogeneous plane-parallel media has been developed. To overcome the computational burdens of convergence, a simple approximation technique by truncating scattering orders with a geometric series is used to reduce computational time. Analytical Fourier decomposition of phase matrix with three symmetry relationships and two mutual inverse operators have been implemented to further improve the computational efficiency. To improve the accuracy, a post-processing procedure is implemented to accurately interpolate the Stokes vector at arbitrary angles. Comparisons with the benchmarks for an atmosphere of randomly orientated oblate spheroids show excellent agreement for each Stokes parameter (within 0.1%). SOSVRT has been tested for different atmospheric condition against RT3, which is based on doubling-adding method, and the results prove that SOSVRT is accurate and much more efficient in vector radiative transfer modeling, especially for optical thin atmosphere, which is the most common case in polarized radiative transfer simulations. SOSVRT is written in Fortran 90 and the code is freely accessible by contacting the author.

  4. A modular radiative transfer program for gas filter correlation radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casas, J. C.; Campbell, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    The fundamentals of a computer program, simulated monochromatic atmospheric radiative transfer (SMART), which calculates atmospheric path transmission, solar radiation, and thermal radiation in the 4.6 micrometer spectral region, are described. A brief outline of atmospheric absorption properties and line by line transmission calculations is explained in conjunction with an outline of the SMART computational procedures. Program flexibility is demonstrated by simulating the response of a gas filter correlation radiometer as one example of an atmospheric infrared sensor. Program limitations, input data requirements, program listing, and comparison of SMART transmission calculations are presented.

  5. Fractional integration and radiative transfer in a multifractal atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Naud, C.; Schertzer, D.; Lovejoy, S.

    1996-04-01

    Recently, Cess et al. (1995) and Ramathan et al. (1995) cited observations which exhibit an anomalous absorption of cloudy skies in comparison with the value predicted by usual models and which thus introduce large uncertainties for climatic change assessments. These observation raise questions concerning the way general circulation models have been tuned for decades, relying on classical methods, of both radiative transfer and dynamical modeling. The observations also tend to demonstrate that homogeneous models are simply not relevant in relating the highly variable properties of clouds and radiation fields. However smoothed, the intensity of cloud`s multi-scattered radiation fields reflect this extreme variability.

  6. A hybrid approach for rapid, accurate, and direct kilovoltage radiation dose calculations in CT voxel space

    SciTech Connect

    Kouznetsov, Alexei; Tambasco, Mauro

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate a fast and accurate method that uses computed tomography (CT) voxel data to estimate absorbed radiation dose at a point of interest (POI) or series of POIs from a kilovoltage (kV) imaging procedure. Methods: The authors developed an approach that computes absorbed radiation dose at a POI by numerically evaluating the linear Boltzmann transport equation (LBTE) using a combination of deterministic and Monte Carlo (MC) techniques. This hybrid approach accounts for material heterogeneity with a level of accuracy comparable to the general MC algorithms. Also, the dose at a POI is computed within seconds using the Intel Core i7 CPU 920 2.67 GHz quad core architecture, and the calculations are performed using CT voxel data, making it flexible and feasible for clinical applications. To validate the method, the authors constructed and acquired a CT scan of a heterogeneous block phantom consisting of a succession of slab densities: Tissue (1.29 cm), bone (2.42 cm), lung (4.84 cm), bone (1.37 cm), and tissue (4.84 cm). Using the hybrid transport method, the authors computed the absorbed doses at a set of points along the central axis and x direction of the phantom for an isotropic 125 kVp photon spectral point source located along the central axis 92.7 cm above the phantom surface. The accuracy of the results was compared to those computed with MCNP, which was cross-validated with EGSnrc, and served as the benchmark for validation. Results: The error in the depth dose ranged from -1.45% to +1.39% with a mean and standard deviation of -0.12% and 0.66%, respectively. The error in the x profile ranged from -1.3% to +0.9%, with standard deviations of -0.3% and 0.5%, respectively. The number of photons required to achieve these results was 1x10{sup 6}. Conclusions: The voxel-based hybrid method evaluates the LBTE rapidly and accurately to estimate the absorbed x-ray dose at any POI or series of POIs from a kV imaging procedure.

  7. Debris disk radiative transfer simulation tool (DDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, S.; Hillenbrand, L. A.

    2005-10-01

    A WWW interface for the simulation of spectral energy distributions of optically thin dust configurations with an embedded radiative source is presented. The density distribution, radiative source, and dust parameters can be selected either from an internal database or defined by the user. This tool is optimized for studying circumstellar debris disks where large grains (a ≫1 μm) are expected to determine the far-infrared through millimeter dust reemission spectral energy distribution. The tool is available at http://aida28.mpia-hd.mpg.de/~swolf/dds. Catalogue identifier:ADVV Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVV Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions:none Computers:PC with Intel(R) XEON(TM) 2.80 GHz processor Operating systems or monitors under which the program has been tested:SUSE Linux 9.1 Programming language used:Fortran 90 (for the main program; furthermore Perl, CGI and HTML) Memory required to execute with typical data:108 words No. of bits in a word:8 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:44 636 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4 806 280 Distribution format:tar.gz Nature of the physical problem:Simulation of scattered light and thermal reemission in arbitrary optically dust distributions with spherical, homogeneous grains where the dust parameters (optical properties, sublimation temperature, grain size) and SED of the illuminating/heating radiative source can be arbitrarily defined (example application: [S. Wolf, L.A. Hillenbrand, Astrophys. J. 596 (2003) 603]). The program is optimized for studying circumstellar debris disks where large grains (i.e. with large size parameters) are expected to determine the far-infrared through millimeter dust reemission spectral energy distribution. Method of solution:Calculation of the dust temperature distribution and dust reemission and scattering spectrum in the

  8. An asymptotic preserving unified gas kinetic scheme for frequency-dependent radiative transfer equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenjun; Jiang, Song; Xu, Kun; Li, Shu

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an extension of previous work (Sun et al., 2015 [22]) of the unified gas kinetic scheme (UGKS) for the gray radiative transfer equations to the frequency-dependent (multi-group) radiative transfer system. Different from the gray radiative transfer equations, where the optical opacity is only a function of local material temperature, the simulation of frequency-dependent radiative transfer is associated with additional difficulties from the frequency-dependent opacity. For the multiple frequency radiation, the opacity depends on both the spatial location and the frequency. For example, the opacity is typically a decreasing function of frequency. At the same spatial region the transport physics can be optically thick for the low frequency photons, and optically thin for high frequency ones. Therefore, the optical thickness is not a simple function of space location. In this paper, the UGKS for frequency-dependent radiative system is developed. The UGKS is a finite volume method and the transport physics is modeled according to the ratio of the cell size to the photon's frequency-dependent mean free path. When the cell size is much larger than the photon's mean free path, a diffusion solution for such a frequency radiation will be obtained. On the other hand, when the cell size is much smaller than the photon's mean free path, a free transport mechanism will be recovered. In the regime between the above two limits, with the variation of the ratio between the local cell size and photon's mean free path, the UGKS provides a smooth transition in the physical and frequency space to capture the corresponding transport physics accurately. The seemingly straightforward extension of the UGKS from the gray to multiple frequency radiation system is due to its intrinsic consistent multiple scale transport modeling, but it still involves lots of work to properly discretize the multiple groups in order to design an asymptotic preserving (AP) scheme in all

  9. An accurate parameterization of the radiative properties of water clouds suitable for use in climate models

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Y.X.; Stamnes, K. )

    1993-04-01

    A new parameterization of the radiative Properties of water clouds is presented. Cloud optical properties for valent radius throughout the solar and both solar and terrestrial spectra and for cloud equivalent radii in the range 2.5-60 [mu]m are calculated from Mie theory. It is found that cloud optical properties depend mainly on equivalent radius throughout the solar and terrestrial spectrum and are insensitive to the details of the droplet size distribution, such as shape, skewness, width, and modality (single or bimodal). This suggests that in cloud models, aimed at predicting the evolution of cloud microphysics with climate change, it is sufficient to determine the third and the second moments of the size distribution (the ratio of which determines the equivalent radius). It also implies that measurements of the cloud liquid water content and the extinction coefficient are sufficient to determine cloud optical properties experimentally (i.e., measuring the complete droplet size distribution is not required). Based on the detailed calculations, the optical properties are parameterized as a function of cloud liquid water path and equivalent cloud droplet radius by using a nonlinear least-square fitting. The parameterization is performed separately for the range of radii 2.5-12 [mu]m, 12-30,[mu]m, and 30-60 [mu]m. Cloud heating and cooling rates are computed from this parameterization by using a comprehensive radiation model. Comparison with similar results obtained from exact Mie scattering calculations shows that this parameterization yields very accurate results and that it is several thousand times faster. This parameterization separates the dependence of cloud optical properties on droplet size and liquid water content, and is suitable for inclusion into climate models. 22 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Radiative transfer simulations of magnetar flare beaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Putten, T.; Watts, A. L.; Baring, M. G.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetar giant flares show oscillatory modulations in the tails of their light curves, which can only be explained via some form of beaming. The fireball model for magnetar bursts has been used successfully to fit the phase-averaged light curves of the tails of giant flares, but so far no attempts have been made to fit the pulsations. We present a relatively simple numerical model to simulate beaming of magnetar flare emission. In our simulations, radiation escapes from the base of a fireball trapped in a dipolar magnetic field, and is scattered through the optically thick magnetosphere of the magnetar until it escapes. Beaming is provided by the presence of a relativistic outflow, as well as by the geometry of the system. We find that a simple picture for the relativistic outflow is enough to create the pulse fraction and sharp peaks observed in pulse profiles of magnetar flares, while without a relativistic outflow the beaming is insufficient to explain giant flare rotational modulations.

  11. Radiative transfer simulations of magnetar flare beaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Putten, T.; Watts, A. L.; Baring, M. G.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetar giant flares show oscillatory modulations in the tails of their light curves, which can only be explained via some form of beaming. The fireball model for magnetar bursts has been used successfully to fit the phase-averaged light curves of the tails of giant flares, but so far no attempts have been made to fit the pulsations. We present a relatively simple numerical model to simulate beaming of magnetar flare emission. In our simulations, radiation escapes from the base of a fireball trapped in a dipolar magnetic field, and is scattered through the optically thick magnetosphere of the magnetar until it escapes. Beaming is provided by the presence of a relativistic outflow, as well as by the geometry of the system. We find that a simple picture for the relativistic outflow is enough to create the pulse fraction and sharp peaks observed in pulse profiles of magnetar flares, while without a relativistic outflow the beaming is insufficient to explain giant flare rotational modulations.

  12. One-dimensional transient radiative transfer by lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Yi, Hongliang; Tan, Heping

    2013-10-21

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is extended to solve transient radiative transfer in one-dimensional slab containing scattering media subjected to a collimated short laser irradiation. By using a fully implicit backward differencing scheme to discretize the transient term in the radiative transfer equation, a new type of lattice structure is devised. The accuracy and computational efficiency of this algorithm are examined firstly. Afterwards, effects of the medium properties such as the extinction coefficient, the scattering albedo and the anisotropy factor, and the shapes of laser pulse on time-resolved signals of transmittance and reflectance are investigated. Results of the present method are found to compare very well with the data from the literature. For an oblique incidence, the LBM results in this paper are compared with those by Monte Carlo method generated by ourselves. In addition, transient radiative transfer in a two-Layer inhomogeneous media subjected to a short square pulse irradiation is investigated. At last, the LBM is further extended to study the transient radiative transfer in homogeneous medium with a refractive index discontinuity irradiated by the short pulse laser. Several trends on the time-resolved signals different from those for refractive index of 1 (i.e. refractive-index-matched boundary) are observed and analysed. PMID:24150298

  13. RADMC: A 2-D Continuum Radiative Transfer Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dullemond, C. P.

    2011-08-01

    RADMC is a 2-D Monte-Carlo code for dust continuum radiative transfer circumstellar disks and envelopes. It is based on the method of Bjorkman & Wood (ApJ 2001, 554, 615), but with several modifications to produce smoother results with fewer photon packages.

  14. Radiation effects in low-thrust orbit transfers

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, James E.

    1998-01-15

    A low-thrust orbit transfer vehicle (OTV) and its payload must be designed to survive in the near-Earth radiation environment for a much longer duration than a conventional upper stage. This paper examines the effects of natural radiation on OTV's using data that have become available since 1991 from the CRRES and APEX satellites. Dose rates for microelectronics in LEO-to-GEO missions are calculated for spiral orbit raising and for multi-impulse transfers. Semiconductor devices that are shielded by less than 2.5 mm of aluminum (0.69 g/cm{sup 2}) are inappropriate for spiral transfers, because they require hardness levels >100 krad (Si). Shield thicknesses of 6-12 mm reduce this requirement to about 10 krad (Si), which is still an order of magnitude higher than the radiation dose in a 10-year mission at GEO with similar shielding. The dose for a multi-impulse LEO-to-GEO transfer is about 10 times smaller than for a spiral transfer. Estimates of single event upset rates and photovoltaic array degradation are also provided.

  15. HELIOS: A new open-source radiative transfer code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Matej; Grosheintz, Luc; Lukas Grimm, Simon; Mendonça, João; Kitzmann, Daniel; Heng, Kevin

    2015-12-01

    I present the new open-source code HELIOS, developed to accurately describe radiative transfer in a wide variety of irradiated atmospheres. We employ a one-dimensional multi-wavelength two-stream approach with scattering. Written in Cuda C++, HELIOS uses the GPU’s potential of massive parallelization and is able to compute the TP-profile of an atmosphere in radiative equilibrium and the subsequent emission spectrum in a few minutes on a single computer (for 60 layers and 1000 wavelength bins).The required molecular opacities are obtained with the recently published code HELIOS-K [1], which calculates the line shapes from an input line list and resamples the numerous line-by-line data into a manageable k-distribution format. Based on simple equilibrium chemistry theory [2] we combine the k-distribution functions of the molecules H2O, CO2, CO & CH4 to generate a k-table, which we then employ in HELIOS.I present our results of the following: (i) Various numerical tests, e.g. isothermal vs. non-isothermal treatment of layers. (ii) Comparison of iteratively determined TP-profiles with their analytical parametric prescriptions [3] and of the corresponding spectra. (iii) Benchmarks of TP-profiles & spectra for various elemental abundances. (iv) Benchmarks of averaged TP-profiles & spectra for the exoplanets GJ1214b, HD189733b & HD209458b. (v) Comparison with secondary eclipse data for HD189733b, XO-1b & Corot-2b.HELIOS is being developed, together with the dynamical core THOR and the chemistry solver VULCAN, in the group of Kevin Heng at the University of Bern as part of the Exoclimes Simulation Platform (ESP) [4], which is an open-source project aimed to provide community tools to model exoplanetary atmospheres.-----------------------------[1] Grimm & Heng 2015, ArXiv, 1503.03806[2] Heng, Lyons & Tsai, Arxiv, 1506.05501Heng & Lyons, ArXiv, 1507.01944[3] e.g. Heng, Mendonca & Lee, 2014, ApJS, 215, 4H[4] exoclime.net

  16. Optical and radiative-transfer properties of mixed atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degheidy, A. R.; Sallah, M.; Elgarayhi, A.; Shaaban, S. M.

    2015-04-01

    The optical and radiative-transfer properties of mixed atmospheric aerosols have been investigated. The aerosol medium is considered as a plane-parallel anisotropic scattering medium with diffusive reflecting boundaries and containing an internal radiation source. The basic components are defined by their complex refractive index, a lognormal size distribution and humidity dependence in hygroscopic particles. The aerosol particles are assumed to be spherical, so the scattering parameters in the form of single scattering albedo, asymmetry factor, scattering, absorption, extinction efficiencies and linear anisotropic coefficient are calculated using the Mie theory. The calculations have been performed for individual aerosol particles, internal and external mixing media. Radiation transfer problem through the considered aerosol medium has been solved in terms of the solution of the corresponding source-free problem with simple boundary conditions. For the solution of the source-free problem, the Variational Pomraning-Eddington technique has been employed. The variation of the radiative-transfer properties (partial radiative fluxes at the medium boundaries) have been calculated and represented graphically for the different aerosols with their different mixing states. A comparison of the obtained results versus available published data has been performed and a very good agreement was observed.

  17. Relativistic radiative transfer and relativistic plane-parallel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2015-04-01

    Relativistic radiative transfer and relativistic plane-parallel flows accelerated from their base like accretion disk winds are numerically examined under the special relativistic treatment. We first solve the relativistic transfer equation iteratively, using a given velocity field, and obtain specific intensities as well as moment quantities. Using the obtained flux, we then solve the hydrodynamical equation, and obtain the new velocity field and the mass-loss rate as an eigen value. We repeat these double-iteration processes until both the intensity and velocity profiles converge. Under this double iteration, we solve the relativistic radiative transfer equation and relativistic flows in the vertical direction, simultaneously. The flows are gradually accelerated, as the optical depth decreases towards the surface. The mass-loss rate dot{J} is roughly expressed in terms of the optical depth τb and terminal speed βs of the flow as dot{J} ˜ 10 τ_b β _s^{-3/4}.

  18. Radiative transfer in a polluted urban planetary boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viskanta, R.; Johnson, R. O.; Bergstrom, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Radiative transfer in a polluted urban atmosphere is studied using a dynamic model. The diurnal nature of radiative transfer for summer conditions is simulated for an urban area 40 km in extent and the effects of various parameters arising in the problem are investigated. The results of numerical computations show that air pollution has the potential of playing a major role in the radiative regime of the urban area. Absorption of solar energy by aerosols in realistic models of urban atmosphere are of the same order of magnitude as that due to water vapor. The predicted effect of the air pollution aerosol in the city is to warm the earth-atmosphere system, and the net effect of gaseous pollutant is to warm the surface and cool the planetary boundary layer, particularly near the top.

  19. A Thermokinetic Approach to Radiative Heat Transfer at the Nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Madrid, Agustín; Lapas, Luciano C.; Rubí, J. Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Radiative heat exchange at the nanoscale presents a challenge for several areas due to its scope and nature. Here, we provide a thermokinetic description of microscale radiative energy transfer including phonon-photon coupling manifested through a non-Debye relaxation behavior. We show that a lognormal-like distribution of modes of relaxation accounts for this non-Debye relaxation behavior leading to the thermal conductance. We also discuss the validity of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. The general expression for the thermal conductance we obtain fits existing experimental results with remarkable accuracy. Accordingly, our approach offers an overall explanation of radiative energy transfer through micrometric gaps regardless of geometrical configurations and distances. PMID:23527019

  20. Realistic three-dimensional radiative transfer simulations of observed precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, I. S.; Bettenhausen, M. H.

    2013-12-01

    Remote sensing observations of precipitation typically utilize a number of instruments on various platforms. Ground validation campaigns incorporate ground-based and airborne measurements to characterize and study precipitating clouds, while the precipitation measurement constellation envisioned by the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission includes measurements from differing space-borne instruments. In addition to disparities such as frequency channel selection and bandwidth, measurement geometry and resolution differences between observing platforms result in inherent inconsistencies between data products. In order to harmonize measurements from multiple passive radiometers, a framework is required that addresses these differences. To accomplish this, we have implemented a flexible three-dimensional radiative transfer model. As its core, the radiative transfer model uses the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS) version 2 to solve the radiative transfer equation in three dimensions using Monte Carlo integration. Gaseous absorption is computed with MonoRTM and formatted into look-up tables for rapid processing. Likewise, scattering properties are pre-computed using a number of publicly available codes, such as T-Matrix and DDSCAT. If necessary, a melting layer model can be applied to the input profiles. Gaussian antenna beams estimate the spatial resolutions of the passive measurements, and realistic bandpass characteristics can be included to properly account for the spectral response of the simulated instrument. This work presents three-dimensional simulations of WindSat brightness temperatures for an oceanic rain event sampled by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The 2B-31 combined Precipitation Radar / TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) retrievals provide profiles that are the input to the radiative transfer model. TMI brightness temperatures are also simulated. Comparisons between monochromatic, pencil beam simulations and

  1. A Fast Infrared Radiative Transfer Model for Overlapping Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niu, Jianguo; Yang, Ping; Huang, Huang-Lung; Davies, James E.; Li, Jun; Baum, Bryan A.; Hu, Yong X.

    2006-01-01

    A fast infrared radiative transfer model (FIRTM2) appropriate for application to both single-layered and overlapping cloud situations is developed for simulating the outgoing infrared spectral radiance at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). In FIRTM2 a pre-computed library of cloud reflectance and transmittance values is employed to account for one or two cloud layers, whereas the background atmospheric optical thickness due to gaseous absorption can be computed from a clear-sky radiative transfer model. FIRTM2 is applicable to three atmospheric conditions: 1) clear-sky, 2) single-layered ice or water cloud, and 3) two simultaneous cloud layers in a column (e.g., ice cloud overlying water cloud). Moreover, FIRTM2 outputs the derivatives (i.e., Jacobians) of the TOA brightness temperature with respect to cloud optical thickness and effective particle size. Sensitivity analyses have been carried out to assess the performance of FIRTM2 for two spectral regions, namely the longwave (LW) band (587.3 - 1179.5/cm) and the short-to-medium wave (SMW) band (1180.1 - 2228.9/cm). The assessment is carried out in terms of brightness temperature differences (BTD) between FIRTM2 and the well-known discrete ordinates radiative transfer model (DISORT), henceforth referred to as BTD (F-D). The BTD (F-D) values for single-layered clouds are generally less than 0.8 K. For the case of two cloud layers (specifically ice cloud over water cloud), the BTD(F-D) values are also generally less than 0.8 K except for the SMW band for the case of a very high altitude (>15 km) cloud comprised of small ice particles. Note that for clear-sky atmospheres, FIRTM2 reduces to the clear-sky radiative transfer model that is incorporated into FIRTM2, and the errors in this case are essentially those of the clear-sky radiative transfer model.

  2. Coupling radiative heat transfer in participating media with other heat transfer modes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tencer, John; Howell, John R.

    2015-09-28

    The common methods for finding the local radiative flux divergence in participating media through solution of the radiative transfer equation are outlined. The pros and cons of each method are discussed in terms of their speed, ability to handle spectral properties and scattering phenomena, as well as their accuracy in different ranges of media transport properties. The suitability of each method for inclusion in the energy equation to efficiently solve multi-mode thermal transfer problems is discussed. Lastly, remaining topics needing research are outlined.

  3. Radiation transfer in plant canopies - Scattering of solar radiation and canopy reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verstraete, Michel M.

    1988-01-01

    The one-dimensional vertical model of radiation transfer in a plant canopy described by Verstraete (1987) is extended to account for the transfer of diffuse radiation. This improved model computes the absorption and scattering of both visible and near-infrared radiation in a multilayer canopy as a function of solar position and leaf orientation distribution. Multiple scattering is allowed, and the spectral reflectance of the vegetation stand is predicted. The results of the model are compared to those of other models and actual observations.

  4. Cloud Property Retrieval and 3D Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert F.

    2003-01-01

    Cloud thickness and photon mean-free-path together determine the scale of "radiative smoothing" of cloud fluxes and radiances. This scale is observed as a change in the spatial spectrum of cloud radiances, and also as the "halo size" seen by off beam lidar such as THOR and WAIL. Such of beam lidar returns are now being used to retrieve cloud layer thickness and vertical scattering extinction profile. We illustrate with recent measurements taken at the Oklahoma ARM site, comparing these to the-dependent 3D simulations. These and other measurements sensitive to 3D transfer in clouds, coupled with Monte Carlo and other 3D transfer methods, are providing a better understanding of the dependence of radiation on cloud inhomogeneity, and to suggest new retrieval algorithms appropriate for inhomogeneous clouds. The international "Intercomparison of 3D Radiation Codes" or I3RC, program is coordinating and evaluating the variety of 3D radiative transfer methods now available, and to make them more widely available. Information is on the Web at: http://i3rc.gsfc.nasa.gov/. Input consists of selected cloud fields derived from data sources such as radar, microwave and satellite, and from models involved in the GEWEX Cloud Systems Studies. Output is selected radiative quantities that characterize the large-scale properties of the fields of radiative fluxes and heating. Several example cloud fields will be used to illustrate. I3RC is currently implementing an "open source" 3d code capable of solving the baseline cases. Maintenance of this effort is one of the goals of a new 3DRT Working Group under the International Radiation Commission. It is hoped that the 3DRT WG will include active participation by land and ocean modelers as well, such as 3D vegetation modelers participating in RAMI.

  5. Application of Stochastic Radiative Transfer Theory to the ARM Cloud-Radiative Parameterization Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Dana E. Veron

    2012-04-09

    This project had two primary goals: (1) development of stochastic radiative transfer as a parameterization that could be employed in an AGCM environment, and (2) exploration of the stochastic approach as a means for representing shortwave radiative transfer through mixed-phase layer clouds. To achieve these goals, climatology of cloud properties was developed at the ARM CART sites, an analysis of the performance of the stochastic approach was performed, a simple stochastic cloud-radiation parameterization for an AGCM was developed and tested, a statistical description of Arctic mixed phase clouds was developed and the appropriateness of stochastic approach for representing radiative transfer through mixed-phase clouds was assessed. Significant progress has been made in all of these areas and is detailed in the final report.

  6. Application of Stochastic Radiative Transfer Theory to the ARM Cloud-Radiative Parameterization Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Veron, Dana E

    2009-03-12

    This project had two primary goals: 1) development of stochastic radiative transfer as a parameterization that could be employed in an AGCM environment, and 2) exploration of the stochastic approach as a means for representing shortwave radiative transfer through mixed-phase layer clouds. To achieve these goals, an analysis of the performance of the stochastic approach was performed, a simple stochastic cloud-radiation parameterization for an AGCM was developed and tested, a statistical description of Arctic mixed phase clouds was developed and the appropriateness of stochastic approach for representing radiative transfer through mixed-phase clouds was assessed. Significant progress has been made in all of these areas and is detailed below.

  7. On the derivation of vector radiative transfer equation for polarized radiative transport in graded index media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. M.; Tan, J. Y.; Liu, L. H.

    2012-02-01

    Light transport in graded index media follows a curved trajectory determined by Fermat's principle. Besides the effect of variation of the refractive index on the transport of radiative intensity, the curved ray trajectory will induce geometrical effects on the transport of polarization ellipse. This paper presents a complete derivation of vector radiative transfer equation for polarized radiation transport in absorption, emission and scattering graded index media. The derivation is based on the analysis of the conserved quantities for polarized light transport along curved trajectory and a novel approach. The obtained transfer equation can be considered as a generalization of the classic vector radiative transfer equation that is only valid for uniform refractive index media. Several variant forms of the transport equation are also presented, which include the form for Stokes parameters defined with a fixed reference and the Eulerian forms in the ray coordinate and in several common orthogonal coordinate systems.

  8. Radiative heat transfer between two dielectric-filled metal gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, J.; Dyakov, S. A.; Yan, M.

    2016-04-01

    Nanoscale surface corrugation is known to be able to drastically enhance radiative heat transfer between two metal plates. Here we numerically calculate the radiative heat transfer between two dielectric-filled metal gratings at dissimilar temperatures based on a scattering approach. It is demonstrated that, compared to unfilled metal gratings, the heat flux for a fixed geometry can be further enhanced, by up to 650% for the geometry separated by a vacuum gap of g =1 μ m and temperature values concerned in our study. The enhancement in radiative heat transfer is found to depend on refractive index of the filling dielectric, the specific grating temperatures, and naturally the gap size between the two gratings. The enhancement can be understood through examining the transmission factor spectra, especially the spectral locations of the spoof surface plasmon polariton modes. Of more practical importance, it's shown that the radiative heat flux can exceed that between two planar SiC plates with same thickness, separation, and temperature settings over a wide temperature range. This reaffirms that one can harness rich electromagnetic modal properties in nanostructured materials for efficient thermal management at nanoscale.

  9. Accurate patient dosimetry of kilovoltage cone-beam CT in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, George X.; Duggan, Dennis M.; Coffey, Charles W.

    2008-03-15

    The increased utilization of x-ray imaging in image-guided radiotherapy has dramatically improved the radiation treatment and the lives of cancer patients. Daily imaging procedures, such as cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), for patient setup may significantly increase the dose to the patient's normal tissues. This study investigates the dosimetry from a kilovoltage (kV) CBCT for real patient geometries. Monte Carlo simulations were used to study the kV beams from a Varian on-board imager integrated into the Trilogy accelerator. The Monte Carlo calculated results were benchmarked against measurements and good agreement was obtained. The authors developed a novel method to calibrate Monte Carlo simulated beams with measurements using an ionization chamber in which the air-kerma calibration factors are obtained from an Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory. The authors have introduced a new Monte Carlo calibration factor, f{sub MCcal}, which is determined from the calibration procedure. The accuracy of the new method was validated by experiment. When a Monte Carlo simulated beam has been calibrated, the simulated beam can be used to accurately predict absolute dose distributions in the irradiated media. Using this method the authors calculated dose distributions to patient anatomies from a typical CBCT acquisition for different treatment sites, such as head and neck, lung, and pelvis. Their results have shown that, from a typical head and neck CBCT, doses to soft tissues, such as eye, spinal cord, and brain can be up to 8, 6, and 5 cGy, respectively. The dose to the bone, due to the photoelectric effect, can be as much as 25 cGy, about three times the dose to the soft tissue. The study provides detailed information on the additional doses to the normal tissues of a patient from a typical kV CBCT acquisition. The methodology of the Monte Carlo beam calibration developed and introduced in this study allows the user to calculate both relative and absolute

  10. Radiative heat transfer in 2D Dirac materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rodriguez-López, Pablo; Tse, Wang -Kong; Dalvit, Diego A. R.

    2015-05-12

    We compute the radiative heat transfer between two sheets of 2D Dirac materials, including topological Chern insulators and graphene, within the framework of the local approximation for the optical response of these materials. In this approximation, which neglects spatial dispersion, we derive both numerically and analytically the short-distance asymptotic of the near-field heat transfer in these systems, and show that it scales as the inverse of the distance between the two sheets. In conclusion, we discuss the limitations to the validity of this scaling law imposed by spatial dispersion in 2D Dirac materials.

  11. SPHRAY: A Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Ray Tracer for Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altay, Gabriel; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Pelupessy, Inti

    2011-03-01

    SPHRAY, a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) ray tracer, is designed to solve the 3D, time dependent, radiative transfer (RT) equations for arbitrary density fields. The SPH nature of SPHRAY makes the incorporation of separate hydrodynamics and gravity solvers very natural. SPHRAY relies on a Monte Carlo (MC) ray tracing scheme that does not interpolate the SPH particles onto a grid but instead integrates directly through the SPH kernels. Given initial conditions and a description of the sources of ionizing radiation, the code will calculate the non-equilibrium ionization state (HI, HII, HeI, HeII, HeIII, e) and temperature (internal energy/entropy) of each SPH particle. The sources of radiation can include point like objects, diffuse recombination radiation, and a background field from outside the computational volume. The MC ray tracing implementation allows for the quick introduction of new physics and is parallelization friendly. A quick Axis Aligned Bounding Box (AABB) test taken from computer graphics applications allows for the acceleration of the raytracing component. We present the algorithms used in SPHRAY and verify the code by performing all the test problems detailed in the recent Radiative Transfer Comparison Project of Iliev et. al. The Fortran 90 source code for SPHRAY and example SPH density fields are made available online.

  12. Fire Intensity Data for Validation of the Radiative Transfer Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchat, Thomas K.; Jernigan, Dann A.

    2016-01-01

    A set of experiments and test data are outlined in this report that provides radiation intensity data for the validation of models for the radiative transfer equation. The experiments were performed with lightly-sooting liquid hydrocarbon fuels that yielded fully turbulent fires 2 m diameter). In addition, supplemental measurements of air flow and temperature, fuel temperature and burn rate, and flame surface emissive power, wall heat, and flame height and width provide a complete set of boundary condition data needed for validation of models used in fire simulations.

  13. Preliminary results of a three-dimensional radiative transfer model

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hirok, W.

    1995-09-01

    Clouds act as the primary modulator of the Earth`s radiation at the top of the atmosphere, within the atmospheric column, and at the Earth`s surface. They interact with both shortwave and longwave radiation, but it is primarily in the case of shortwave where most of the uncertainty lies because of the difficulties in treating scattered solar radiation. To understand cloud-radiative interactions, radiative transfer models portray clouds as plane-parallel homogeneous entities to ease the computational physics. Unfortunately, clouds are far from being homogeneous, and large differences between measurement and theory point to a stronger need to understand and model cloud macrophysical properties. In an attempt to better comprehend the role of cloud morphology on the 3-dimensional radiation field, a Monte Carlo model has been developed. This model can simulate broadband shortwave radiation fluxes while incorporating all of the major atmospheric constituents. The model is used to investigate the cloud absorption anomaly where cloud absorption measurements exceed theoretical estimates and to examine the efficacy of ERBE measurements and cloud field experiments. 3 figs.

  14. Backward and Forward Monte Carlo Method in Polarized Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Huang; Guo-Dong, Shi; Ke-Yong, Zhu

    2016-03-01

    In general, the Stocks vector cannot be calculated in reverse in the vector radiative transfer. This paper presents a novel backward and forward Monte Carlo simulation strategy to study the vector radiative transfer in the participated medium. A backward Monte Carlo process is used to calculate the ray trajectory and the endpoint of the ray. The Stocks vector is carried out by a forward Monte Carlo process. A one-dimensional graded index semi-transparent medium was presented as the physical model and the thermal emission consideration of polarization was studied in the medium. The solution process to non-scattering, isotropic scattering, and the anisotropic scattering medium, respectively, is discussed. The influence of the optical thickness and albedo on the Stocks vector are studied. The results show that the U, V-components of the apparent Stocks vector are very small, but the Q-component of the apparent Stocks vector is relatively larger, which cannot be ignored.

  15. Spatial-multiblock procedure for radiation heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, J.C.; Moder, J.P.

    1996-12-31

    A spatial-multiblock procedure for radiation heat transfer is presented in this article. The proposed procedure is applicable to isothermal or nonisothermal, absorbing, emitting and scattering of transparent media with black or reflecting walls. Although not shown in this article, the procedure is also applicable to nongray conditions. The proposed procedure can be used with the discrete ordinates method and the finite volume method. The heat transfer rate, net radiation power and other full-range and half-range moments are conserved between spatial blocks by the proposed procedure. The utilities of the proposed procedure are shown using four sample problems. The solutions indicate that the multiblock procedure can reproduce the results of a single-block procedure even when very coarse spatial grids are used in the multiblock procedure.

  16. Application of nonlinear Krylov acceleration to radiative transfer problems

    SciTech Connect

    Till, A. T.; Adams, M. L.; Morel, J. E.

    2013-07-01

    The iterative solution technique used for radiative transfer is normally nested, with outer thermal iterations and inner transport iterations. We implement a nonlinear Krylov acceleration (NKA) method in the PDT code for radiative transfer problems that breaks nesting, resulting in more thermal iterations but significantly fewer total inner transport iterations. Using the metric of total inner transport iterations, we investigate a crooked-pipe-like problem and a pseudo-shock-tube problem. Using only sweep preconditioning, we compare NKA against a typical inner / outer method employing GMRES / Newton and find NKA to be comparable or superior. Finally, we demonstrate the efficacy of applying diffusion-based preconditioning to grey problems in conjunction with NKA. (authors)

  17. Radiative transfer theory for polarimetric remote sensing of pine forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, C. C.; Han, H. C.; Shin, R. T.; Kong, J. A.; Beaudoin, A.; Le Toan, T.

    1992-01-01

    The radiative transfer theory is applied to interpret polarimetric radar backscatter from pine forest with clustered vegetation structures. The scattering function of each cluster is calculated by incorporating the phase interference of scattered fields from each component. The resulting phase matrix is used in the radiative transfer equations to evaluate the polarimetric backscattering coefficients from random medium layers embedded with vegetation clusters. Upon including multiscale structures (trunks, primary and secondary branches, and needles), polarimetric radar responses from pine forest for different frequencies and looking angles are interpreted and simulated. Preliminary results are shown to be in good agreement with the measured backscattering coefficients at the Landes maritime pine forest during the MAESTRO-1 experiment.

  18. Study of multi-dimensional radiative energy transfer in molecular gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Jiwen; Tiwari, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method (MCM) is applied to analyze radiative heat transfer in nongray gases. The nongray model employed is based on the statistical arrow band model with an exponential-tailed inverse intensity distribution. Consideration of spectral correlation results in some distinguishing features of the Monte Carlo formulations. Validation of the Monte Carlo formulations has been conducted by comparing results of this method with other solutions. Extension of a one-dimensional problem to a multi-dimensional problem requires some special treatments in the Monte Carlo analysis. Use of different assumptions results in different sets of Monte Carlo formulations. The nongray narrow band formulations provide the most accurate results.

  19. Radiative transfer in dusty nebulae. III - The effects of dust albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.; Dana, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of an albedo of internal dust, such as ionization structure and temperature of dust grain, were studied by the quasi-diffusion method with an iterative technique for solving the radiative heat transfer equations. It was found that the generalized on-the-spot approximation solution is adequate for most astrophysical applications for a zero albedo; for a nonzero albedo, the Eddington approximation is more accurate. The albedo increases the average energy of the diffuse photons, increasing the ionization level of hydrogen and heavy elements if the Eddington approximation is applied; the dust thermal gradient is reduced so that the infrared spectrum approaches blackbody spectrum with an increasing albedo.

  20. Hierarchical octree and k-d tree grids for 3D radiative transfer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saftly, W.; Baes, M.; Camps, P.

    2014-01-01

    of k-d trees and the proposed combination of criteria to set up hierarchical grids for 3D radiative transfer. These recipes are straightforward for implementing and should help to develop faster and more accurate 3D radiative transfer codes.

  1. Mode-Specific Tunneling Splittings for a Sequential Double-Hydrogen Transfer Case: An Accurate Quantum Mechanical Scheme.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yinghui; Bian, Wensheng

    2015-05-21

    We present the first accurate quantum dynamics calculations of mode-specific tunneling splittings in a sequential double-hydrogen transfer process. This is achieved in the vinylidene-acetylene system, the simplest molecular system of this kind, and by large-scale parallel computations with an efficient theoretical scheme developed by us. In our scheme, basis functions are customized for the hydrogen transfer process; a 4-dimensional basis contraction strategy is combined with the preconditioned inexact spectral transform method; efficient parallel implementation is achieved. Mode-specific permutation tunneling splittings of vinylidene states are reported and tremendous mode-specific promotion effects are revealed; in particular, the CH2 rock mode enhances the ground-state splitting by a factor of 10(3). We find that the ground-state vinylidene has a reversible-isomerization time of 622 ps, much longer than all previous estimates. Our calculations also shed light on the importance of the deep intermediate well and vibrational excitation in the double-hydrogen transfer processes. PMID:26263255

  2. 3D Thermal Infrared Radiative Transfer in Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W.; Liou, K.; Hall, A.

    2007-12-01

    We developed a 3D Monte Carlo photon tracing program for radiative transfer in inhomogeneous and irregular terrain coupled with the correlated k-distribution method for gaseous absorption in the atmosphere for the calculation of broadband thermal infrared (IR) fluxes at mountain surfaces. The thermal IR radiative transfer program includes emission from the atmosphere to the surface and vice versa as well as emissions between mountain surfaces. Both the atmosphere and the land surface are discretized by using finite cubic cells characterized by the spectral optical properties of molecules and background aerosols (absorption coefficient, single-scattering albedo, and scattering phase function) and terrain configuration (albedo, elevation, slope, and orientation). The emissivity of gases is parameterized in terms of the vertical optical depth of cubic cell. We selected an area of 100×100 km2 in the Tibetan Plateau near Lhasa city with a horizontal resolution of 1 km2 and used the surface temperature and albedo available from MODIS/Terra dataset for this study. We show that surface temperature is the dominating factor in radiative transfer calculations and that subgrid variability of the net surface IR flux distribution relative to a flat surface (1D) with average elevation and temperature can be as large as 50 W/m2 at cold mountain surfaces.

  3. TWILIGHT: A Cellular Framework for Three-Dimensional Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatami, David; Madore, Barry

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new framework for solving three-dimensional radiative transfer of arbitrary geometries, including a full characterisation of the wavelength-dependent anisotropic scattering, absorption, and thermal reemission of light by dust. By adopting a cellular approach to discretising the light and dust, the problem can be efficiently solved through a fully deterministic iterative process. As a proof of concept we present TWILIGHT, our implementation of the cellular approach, in order to demonstrate and benchmark the new method. TWILIGHT simultaneously renders over one hundred unique images of a given environment with no additional slowdown, enabling a close study of inclination effects of three-dimensional dust geometries. In addition to qualitative rendering tests, TWILIGHT is successfully tested against two Monte-Carlo radiative transfer benchmarks, producing similar brightness profiles at varying inclinations. With the proof-of-concept established, we describe the improvements and current developments underway using the cellular framework, including a technique to resolve the subgrid physics of dust radiative transfer from micron-scale grain models to kiloparsec-sized dust environments.

  4. Interpreting snowpack radiometry using currently existing microwave radiative transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Do-Hyuk; Tang, Shurun; Kim, Edward J.

    2015-10-01

    A radiative transfer model (RTM) to calculate the snow brightness temperatures (Tb) is a critical element in terrestrial snow parameter retrieval from microwave remote sensing observations. The RTM simulates the Tb based on a layered snow by solving a set of microwave radiative transfer equations. Even with the same snow physical inputs to drive the RTM, currently existing models such as Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS), Dense Media Radiative Transfer (DMRT-QMS), and Helsinki University of Technology (HUT) models produce different Tb responses. To backwardly invert snow physical properties from the Tb, differences from RTMs are first to be quantitatively explained. To this end, this initial investigation evaluates the sources of perturbations in these RTMs, and reveals the equations where the variations are made among the three models. Modelling experiments are conducted by providing the same but gradual changes in snow physical inputs such as snow grain size, and snow density to the 3 RTMs. Simulations are conducted with the frequencies consistent with the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer- E (AMSR-E) at 6.9, 10.7, 18.7, 23.8, 36.5, and 89.0 GHz. For realistic simulations, the 3 RTMs are simultaneously driven by the same snow physics model with the meteorological forcing datasets and are validated against the snow insitu samplings from the CLPX (Cold Land Processes Field Experiment) 2002-2003, and NoSREx (Nordic Snow Radar Experiment) 2009-2010.

  5. Interpreting snowpack radiometry using currently existing microwave radiative transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, D. H.; Tan, S.; Kim, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    A radiative transfer model (RTM) to calculate a snow brightness temperature (Tb) is a critical element to retrieve terrestrial snow from microwave remote sensing observations. The RTM simulates the Tb based on a layered snow by solving a set of microwave radiative transfer formulas. Even with the same snow physical inputs used for the RTM, currently existing models such as Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS), Dense Media Radiative Transfer (DMRT-Tsang), and Helsinki University of Technology (HUT) models produce different Tb responses. To backwardly invert snow physical properties from the Tb, the differences from the RTMs are to be quantitatively explained. To this end, the paper evaluates the sources of perturbations in the RTMs, and reveals the equations where the variations are made among three models. Investigations are conducted by providing the same but gradual changes in snow physical inputs such as snow grain size, and snow density to the 3 RTMs. Simulations are done with the frequencies consistent with the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-E (AMSR-E) at 6.9, 10.7, 18.7, 23.8, 36.5, and 89.0 GHz. For realistic simulations, the 3 RTMs are simultaneously driven by the same snow physics model with the meteorological forcing datasets and are validated from the snow core samplings from the CLPX (Cold Land Processes Field Experiment) 2002-2003, and NoSREx (Nordic Snow Radar Experiment) 2009-2010.

  6. Millimeter wave radiative transfer studies for precipitation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vivekanandan, J.; Evans, Frank

    1989-01-01

    Scattering calculations using the discrete dipole approximation and vector radiative transfer calculations were performed to model multiparameter radar return and passive microwave emission for a simple model of a winter storm. The issue of dendrite riming was addressed by computing scattering properties of thin ice disks with varying bulk density. It was shown that C-band multiparameter radar contains information about particle density and the number concentration of the ice particles. The radiative transfer modeling indicated that polarized multifrequency passive microwave emission may be used to infer some properties of ice hydrometers. Detailed radar modeling and vector radiative transfer modeling is in progress to enhance the understanding of simultaneous radar and radiometer measurements, as in the case of the proposed TRMM field program. A one-dimensional cloud model will be used to simulate the storm structure in detail and study the microphysics, such as size and density. Multifrequency polarized radiometer measurements from the SSMI satellite instrument will be analyzed in relation to dual-frequency and dual-polarization radar measurements.

  7. Radiative Heat Transfer in a Hydrous Transition Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S.; Bina, C. R.; Jacobsen, S. D.; Goncharov, A. F.

    2012-12-01

    The structure and dynamics of Earth's interior depend crucially upon heat flow and thus upon the thermal conductivity of its constituents. The bulk thermal conductivity has two components: lattice conductivity (klat) and radiative conductivity (krad) [1,2]. Whereas lattice conductivity is governed by phonon propagation, radiative conductivity arises from heat transport by emission and absorption of photons. The latter, therefore, can be indirectly measured by analyzing the visible and infrared (VIS-IR) regions of a material's optical absorption spectrum. Thermal conductivity in the mantle is controlled by temperature, pressure, the electronic structure and concentration of transition metal ions (such as iron), and the water content of the material [1,3]. The radiative component has generally been assumed to be negligible, as most ferromagnesian minerals become opaque in the VIS-IR range at high pressures due to intensification and red-shift of electronic charge-transfer bands [4, 5]. However, more recent studies have suggested that mantle minerals may, in fact, remain relatively transparent at high pressures, thereby allowing for a potentially significant contribution to thermal conductivity from the radiative component [6]. We measured optical absorbance spectra of hydrous wadsleyite and hydrous ringwoodite at simultaneous high-pressure and high-temperature conditions up to 26 GPa and 823 K in order to determine their radiative conductivities and to study the potential influence of hydration in the transition zone on thermal conductivity of the mantle. We report radiative thermal conductivities of 1.5 ± 0.2 Wm-1K-1 for hydrous wadsleyite and 1.2 ± 0.1 Wm-1K-1 for hydrous ringwoodite at transition zone conditions. The analytically derived radiative thermal conductivities of anhydrous wadsleyite and ringwoodite are 2.1 ± 0.2 Wm-1K-1 and 1.6 ± 0.2 Wm-1K-1, respectively. Our results imply that a water content of ~1 wt% H2O lowers the thermal radiative conductivity

  8. Radiative heat transfer in rocket thrust chambers and nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammad, K. J.; Naraghi, M. H. N.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical models based on the discrete exchange factor (DEF) and the zonal methods for radiative analysis of rocket engines containing a radiatively participating medium have been developed. These models implement a new technique for calculating the direct exchange factors to account for possible blockage by the nozzle throat. Given the gas and surface temperature distributions, engine geometry, and radiative properties, the models compute the wall radiative heat fluxes at different axial positions. The results of sample calculations for a typical rocket engine (engine 700 at NASA), which uses RP-1 (a kerosene-type propellant), are presented for a wide range of surface and gas properties. It is found that the heat transfer by radiation can reach up to 50 percent of that due to convection. The maximum radiative heat flux is at the inner side of the engine, where the gas temperature is the highest. While the results of both models are in excellent agreement, the computation time of the DEF method is found to be much smaller.

  9. IPRT polarized radiative transfer model intercomparison project - Phase A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emde, Claudia; Barlakas, Vasileios; Cornet, Céline; Evans, Frank; Korkin, Sergey; Ota, Yoshifumi; Labonnote, Laurent C.; Lyapustin, Alexei; Macke, Andreas; Mayer, Bernhard; Wendisch, Manfred

    2015-10-01

    The polarization state of electromagnetic radiation scattered by atmospheric particles such as aerosols, cloud droplets, or ice crystals contains much more information about the optical and microphysical properties than the total intensity alone. For this reason an increasing number of polarimetric observations are performed from space, from the ground and from aircraft. Polarized radiative transfer models are required to interpret and analyse these measurements and to develop retrieval algorithms exploiting polarimetric observations. In the last years a large number of new codes have been developed, mostly for specific applications. Benchmark results are available for specific cases, but not for more sophisticated scenarios including polarized surface reflection and multi-layer atmospheres. The International Polarized Radiative Transfer (IPRT) working group of the International Radiation Commission (IRC) has initiated a model intercomparison project in order to fill this gap. This paper presents the results of the first phase A of the IPRT project which includes ten test cases, from simple setups with only one layer and Rayleigh scattering to rather sophisticated setups with a cloud embedded in a standard atmosphere above an ocean surface. All scenarios in the first phase A of the intercomparison project are for a one-dimensional plane-parallel model geometry. The commonly established benchmark results are available at the IPRT website.

  10. A fast radiative transfer model for SSMIS upper atmosphere sounding channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yong; Weng, Fuzhong; Liu, Quanhua; van Delst, Paul

    2007-06-01

    Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) on board the Defense Meteorology Satellite Program (DMSP) F-16 satellite probes the atmospheric temperature from surface to 100 km. SSMIS channels 19-22 are significantly affected by Zeeman splitting, which is dependent on the Earth's magnetic field. Thus, in satellite data assimilation or retrieval systems, SSMIS brightness temperatures and their Jacobians (or gradient with respect to temperature) must be computed with a fast radiative transfer (RT) scheme that takes into account the Zeeman-splitting effect. In this study, an averaged transmittance within the channel frequency passbands is parameterized and predicted with atmospheric temperature, geomagnetic field strength, and the angle between the geomagnetic field vector and the electromagnetic wave propagation direction. The coefficients of predictors are trained with a line-by-line (LBL) radiative transfer model that accurately computes the monochromatic transmittances at fine frequency steps within each passband. The new radiative transfer scheme is compared to the results from the line-by-line model for the dependent and independent data sets. It is shown that the differences between the two models are well below the instrument noise levels but the new scheme is much faster. It is also shown that the SSMIS measurements agree well with the simulations that are based on the atmospheric profiles from the sounding of the atmosphere using broadband emission radiometry (SABER) on the Thermosphere-lonosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics satellite and the COSPAR international reference atmosphere (CIRA) model.

  11. Radiative transfer in disc galaxies - V. The accuracy of the KB approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dukhang; Baes, Maarten; Seon, Kwang-Il; Camps, Peter; Verstocken, Sam; Han, Wonyong

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the accuracy of an approximate radiative transfer technique that was first proposed by Kylafis & Bahcall (hereafter the KB approximation) and has been popular in modelling dusty late-type galaxies. We compare realistic galaxy models calculated with the KB approximation with those of a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer code SKIRT. The SKIRT code fully takes into account of the contribution of multiple scattering whereas the KB approximation calculates only single scattered intensity and multiple scattering components are approximated. We find that the KB approximation gives fairly accurate results if optically thin, face-on galaxies are considered. However, for highly inclined (i ≳ 85°) and/or optically thick (central face-on optical depth ≳ 1) galaxy models, the approximation can give rise to substantial errors, sometimes, up to ≳ 40%. Moreover, it is also found that the KB approximation is not always physical, sometimes producing infinite intensities at lines of sight with high optical depth in edge-on galaxy models. There is no "simple recipe" to correct the errors of the KB approximation that is universally applicable to any galaxy models. Therefore, it is recommended that the full radiative transfer calculation be used, even though it's slower than the KB approximation.

  12. Three-Dimensional Radiative Transfer on a Massively Parallel Computer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vath, Horst Michael

    1994-01-01

    We perform three-dimensional radiative transfer calculations on the MasPar MP-1, which contains 8192 processors and is a single instruction multiple data (SIMD) machine, an example of the new generation of massively parallel computers. To make radiative transfer calculations efficient, we must re-consider the numerical methods and methods of storage of data that have been used with serial machines. We developed a numerical code which efficiently calculates images and spectra of astrophysical systems as seen from different viewing directions and at different wavelengths. We use this code to examine a number of different astrophysical systems. First we image the HI distribution of model galaxies. Then we investigate the galaxy NGC 5055, which displays a radial asymmetry in its optical appearance. This can be explained by the presence of dust in the outer HI disk far beyond the optical disk. As the formation of dust is connected to the presence of stars, the existence of dust in outer regions of this galaxy could have consequences for star formation at a time when this galaxy was just forming. Next we use the code for polarized radiative transfer. We first discuss the numerical computation of the required cyclotron opacities and use them to calculate spectra of AM Her systems, binaries containing accreting magnetic white dwarfs. Then we obtain spectra of an extended polar cap. Previous calculations did not consider the three -dimensional extension of the shock. We find that this results in a significant underestimate of the radiation emitted in the shock. Next we calculate the spectrum of the intermediate polar RE 0751+14. For this system we obtain a magnetic field of ~10 MG, which has consequences for the evolution of intermediate polars. Finally we perform 3D radiative transfer in NLTE in the two-level atom approximation. To solve the transfer equation in this case, we adapt the short characteristic method and examine different acceleration methods to obtain the

  13. How accurate are polymer models in the analysis of Förster resonance energy transfer experiments on proteins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Edward P.; Morrison, Greg; Brooks, Bernard R.; Thirumalai, D.

    2009-03-01

    Single molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments are used to infer the properties of the denatured state ensemble (DSE) of proteins. From the measured average FRET efficiency, ⟨E⟩, the distance distribution P(R ) is inferred by assuming that the DSE can be described as a polymer. The single parameter in the appropriate polymer model (Gaussian chain, wormlike chain, or self-avoiding walk) for P(R ) is determined by equating the calculated and measured ⟨E⟩. In order to assess the accuracy of this "standard procedure," we consider the generalized Rouse model (GRM), whose properties [⟨E⟩ and P(R )] can be analytically computed, and the Molecular Transfer Model for protein L for which accurate simulations can be carried out as a function of guanadinium hydrochloride (GdmCl) concentration. Using the precisely computed ⟨E⟩ for the GRM and protein L, we infer P(R ) using the standard procedure. We find that the mean end-to-end distance can be accurately inferred (less than 10% relative error) using ⟨E⟩ and polymer models for P(R ). However, the value extracted for the radius of gyration (Rg) and the persistence length (lp) are less accurate. For protein L, the errors in the inferred properties increase as the GdmCl concentration increases for all polymer models. The relative error in the inferred Rg and lp, with respect to the exact values, can be as large as 25% at the highest GdmCl concentration. We propose a self-consistency test, requiring measurements of ⟨E⟩ by attaching dyes to different residues in the protein, to assess the validity of describing DSE using the Gaussian model. Application of the self-consistency test to the GRM shows that even for this simple model, which exhibits an order→disorder transition, the Gaussian P(R ) is inadequate. Analysis of experimental data of FRET efficiencies with dyes at several locations for the cold shock protein, and simulations results for protein L, for which accurate FRET

  14. Multi-Group Reductions of LTE Air Plasma Radiative Transfer in Cylindrical Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scoggins, James; Magin, Thierry Edouard Bertran; Wray, Alan; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2013-01-01

    Air plasma radiation in Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) within cylindrical geometries is studied with an application towards modeling the radiative transfer inside arc-constrictors, a central component of constricted-arc arc jets. A detailed database of spectral absorption coefficients for LTE air is formulated using the NEQAIR code developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The database stores calculated absorption coefficients for 1,051,755 wavelengths between 0.04 µm and 200 µm over a wide temperature (500K to 15 000K) and pressure (0.1 atm to 10.0 atm) range. The multi-group method for spectral reduction is studied by generating a range of reductions including pure binning and banding reductions from the detailed absorption coefficient database. The accuracy of each reduction is compared to line-by-line calculations for cylindrical temperature profiles resembling typical profiles found in arc-constrictors. It is found that a reduction of only 1000 groups is sufficient to accurately model the LTE air radiation over a large temperature and pressure range. In addition to the reduction comparison, the cylindrical-slab formulation is compared with the finite-volume method for the numerical integration of the radiative flux inside cylinders with varying length. It is determined that cylindrical-slabs can be used to accurately model most arc-constrictors due to their high length to radius ratios.

  15. Direct transfer of solar radiation to high temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahou, Maryam; Andrews, John; Rosengarten, Gary

    2013-12-01

    This paper reviews the different methods of directly transferring solar radiation from concentrated solar collectors to medium to high temperature thermal absorbers, at temperatures ranging from 100 to 400°. These methods are divided into four main categories associated with the radiation transfer medium: optical fibres, photonic crystal fibres, metal waveguides and light guides. The reviewed methods are novel compared to most rooftop solar concentrators that have a receiver and a thermal storage unit coupled by heat transfer fluids. Bundled optical fibres have the capability of transferring concentrated solar energy across the full wavelength spectrum with the maximum optical efficiency. In this study two different types of optical bundle, including hard polymer cladding silica (HPCS) and polymer clad silica (PCS) fibres are introduced which offer a broad spectrum transmission range from 300 to 1700 nm, low levels of losses through attenuation and the best resistance to heating. These fibres are able to transmit about 94% of the solar radiation over a distance of 10 m. The main parameters that determine the overall efficiency of the system are the concentration ratio, the acceptance angle of the fibres, and the matching of the diameter of the focus spot of the concentrator and the internal diameter of the fibre. In order to maximize the coupling efficiency of the system, higher levels of concentration are required which can be achieved through lenses or other non-imaging concentrators. However, these additional components add to the cost and complexity of the system. To avoid this problem we use tapered bundles of optical fibres that enhance the coupling efficiency by increasing the acceptance angle and consequently the coupling efficiency of the system.

  16. Three Dimensional Atmospheric Radiative Transfer-Applications and Methods Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert F.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We review applications of 3D radiative transfer in the atmosphere, emphasizing the wide spectrum of scales important to remote sensing and modeling of cloud fields, and the characteristic scales introduced into observed radiances and fluxes by the distribution of photon pathlengths at conservative and absorbing wavelengths. We define the "plane-parallel bias", which is a measure of the importance of 3D cloud structure in large-scale models, and the "independent pixel errors" that quantify the significance of 3D effects in remote sensing, and emphasize their relative magnitude and scale dependence. A variety of approaches in current use in 3D radiative transfer, and issues of speed, accuracy, and flexibility are summarized. We also describe a recently initiated "International Intercomparison of 3-Dimensional Radiation Codes", or I3RC. I3RC is a 3-phase effort that has as its goals to: (1) understand the errors and limits of 3D methods; (2) provide "baseline" cases for future 3D code development; (3) promote sharing of 3D tools; (4) derive guidelines for 3D tool selection; and (5) improve atmospheric science education in 3D radiative transfer. Selected results from Phases 1 and 2 of I3RC are discussed. These are taken from five cloud fields: a 1D field of bar clouds, a 2D radar-derived field, a 3D Landsat-derived field, a stratiform cloud from the model of C. Moeng, and a convective cloud from the model of B. Stevens. Computations have been carried out for three monochromatic wavelengths (one conservative, one absorptive, and one thermal) and two solar zenith angles (0, 60 degrees).

  17. Radiative transfer in CO2-rich atmospheres: 1. Collisional line mixing implies a colder early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozak, N.; Aharonson, O.; Halevy, I.

    2016-06-01

    Fast and accurate radiative transfer methods are essential for modeling CO2-rich atmospheres, relevant to the climate of early Earth and Mars, present-day Venus, and some exoplanets. Although such models already exist, their accuracy may be improved as better theoretical and experimental constraints become available. Here we develop a unidimensional radiative transfer code for CO2-rich atmospheres, using the correlated k approach and with a focus on modeling early Mars. Our model differs from existing models in that it includes the effects of CO2 collisional line mixing in the calculation of the line-by-line absorption coefficients. Inclusion of these effects results in model atmospheres that are more transparent to infrared radiation and, therefore, in colder surface temperatures at radiative-convective equilibrium, compared with results of previous studies. Inclusion of water vapor in the model atmosphere results in negligible warming due to the low atmospheric temperatures under a weaker early Sun, which translate into climatically unimportant concentrations of water vapor. Overall, the results imply that sustained warmth on early Mars would not have been possible with an atmosphere containing only CO2 and water vapor, suggesting that other components of the early Martian climate system are missing from current models or that warm conditions were not long lived.

  18. Evaluating radiative transfer schemes treatment of vegetation canopy architecture in land surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braghiere, Renato; Quaife, Tristan; Black, Emily

    2016-04-01

    Incoming shortwave radiation is the primary source of energy driving the majority of the Earth's climate system. The partitioning of shortwave radiation by vegetation into absorbed, reflected, and transmitted terms is important for most of biogeophysical processes, including leaf temperature changes and photosynthesis, and it is currently calculated by most of land surface schemes (LSS) of climate and/or numerical weather prediction models. The most commonly used radiative transfer scheme in LSS is the two-stream approximation, however it does not explicitly account for vegetation architectural effects on shortwave radiation partitioning. Detailed three-dimensional (3D) canopy radiative transfer schemes have been developed, but they are too computationally expensive to address large-scale related studies over long time periods. Using a straightforward one-dimensional (1D) parameterisation proposed by Pinty et al. (2006), we modified a two-stream radiative transfer scheme by including a simple function of Sun zenith angle, so-called "structure factor", which does not require an explicit description and understanding of the complex phenomena arising from the presence of vegetation heterogeneous architecture, and it guarantees accurate simulations of the radiative balance consistently with 3D representations. In order to evaluate the ability of the proposed parameterisation in accurately represent the radiative balance of more complex 3D schemes, a comparison between the modified two-stream approximation with the "structure factor" parameterisation and state-of-art 3D radiative transfer schemes was conducted, following a set of virtual scenarios described in the RAMI4PILPS experiment. These experiments have been evaluating the radiative balance of several models under perfectly controlled conditions in order to eliminate uncertainties arising from an incomplete or erroneous knowledge of the structural, spectral and illumination related canopy characteristics typical

  19. Radiative transfer in dusty nebulae. III. The effects of dust albedo

    SciTech Connect

    Petrosian, V.; Dana, R.A.

    1980-11-01

    The effects of an albedo of dust internal to nebulae on the observable parameters of the nebulae, such as ionization structure and temperature of dust grain have been investigated. We have used the quasi-diffusion method which entails an iterative procedure for solution of the radiative transfer equations to determine the accuracy of less-complicated, but approximate, solutions such as the Eddington approximation, a modified Eddington approximation, the on-the-spot approximation, and the generalized on-the-spot appproximation of Paper I. It is found that for zero albedo the generalized on-the-spot approximation is sufficiently accurate for most astrophysical applications. Similarly, for nonzero albedo the Eddington approximation gives accurate results, and the additional accuracy achieved through the modification of this approximation is, in most cases, negligible.

  20. Research on high-order approximation of radiative transfer equation for image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wenjuan; Gao, Feng; Wu, Linhui; Yi, Xi; Zhu, Pingping; Zhao, Huijuan

    2011-03-01

    In this article, we derive the two-dimensional spherical harmonics equations to three-order (P3) of Radiative Transfer Equation for anisotropic scattering. We also solved this equations using Galerkin finite element method and compared the solutions with the first-order diffusion equation and Monte Carlo simulation. the benchmark problems are tested, and we found that the developed three-order model with high absorb coefficient is able to significantly improve the diffusion solution in circle geometry, and the radiance distribution close to light source is more accurate. It is significant for accurate modeling of light propagation in small tissue geometries in small animal imaging. Then, the inverse model for the simultaneous reconstruction of the absorption images is proposed based on P3 equations, and the feasibility and effectiveness of this method are proved by the simulation.

  1. PORTA: A Massively Parallel Code for 3D Non-LTE Polarized Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štěpán, J.

    2014-10-01

    The interpretation of the Stokes profiles of the solar (stellar) spectral line radiation requires solving a non-LTE radiative transfer problem that can be very complex, especially when the main interest lies in modeling the linear polarization signals produced by scattering processes and their modification by the Hanle effect. One of the main difficulties is due to the fact that the plasma of a stellar atmosphere can be highly inhomogeneous and dynamic, which implies the need to solve the non-equilibrium problem of generation and transfer of polarized radiation in realistic three-dimensional stellar atmospheric models. Here we present PORTA, a computer program we have developed for solving, in three-dimensional (3D) models of stellar atmospheres, the problem of the generation and transfer of spectral line polarization taking into account anisotropic radiation pumping and the Hanle and Zeeman effects in multilevel atoms. The numerical method of solution is based on a highly convergent iterative algorithm, whose convergence rate is insensitive to the grid size, and on an accurate short-characteristics formal solver of the Stokes-vector transfer equation which uses monotonic Bezier interpolation. In addition to the iterative method and the 3D formal solver, another important feature of PORTA is a novel parallelization strategy suitable for taking advantage of massively parallel computers. Linear scaling of the solution with the number of processors allows to reduce the solution time by several orders of magnitude. We present useful benchmarks and a few illustrations of applications using a 3D model of the solar chromosphere resulting from MHD simulations. Finally, we present our conclusions with a view to future research. For more details see Štěpán & Trujillo Bueno (2013).

  2. Three Dimensional Radiative Transfer In Tropical Deep Convective Clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Giuseppe, F.

    In this study the focus is on the interaction between short-wave radiation with a field of tropical deep convective events generated using a 3D cloud resolving model (CRM) to assess the significance of 3D radiative transport (3DRT). It is not currently un- derstood what magnitude of error is involved when a two stream approximation is used to describe the radiative transfer through such a cloud field. It seems likely that deep convective clouds could be the most complex to represent, and that the error in neglecting horizontal transport could be relevant in these cases. The field here con- sidered has an extention of roughly 90x90 km, approximately equivalent to the grid box dimension of many global models. The 3DRT results are compared both with the calculations obtained by an Independent Pixel Approximation (IPA) approch and by the Plane Parallel radiative scheme (PP) implemented in ECMWF's Forecast model. The differences between the three calculations are used to assess both problems in current GCM's representation of radiative heating and inaccuracies in the dynamical response of CRM simulations due to the Independent Column Approximation (ICA). The understanding of the mechanisms involved in the main 3DRT/1D differences is the starting point for the future attempt to develop a parameterization procedure.

  3. Clouds Radiative Transfer Study at Microwave Region-RTM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heredia, S. D.; Masuelli, S.; Caranti, G. M.; Jones, L.

    2011-12-01

    The objective of the recently launched SAC-D/Aquarius satellite mission is to globally and indirectly measure certain geophysical parameters such as: sea surface salinity (Sal), column water vapor (CWV), column liquid water (CLW), rain rate (RR), wind speed (WS), wind direction (WD), ice concentration (SIC) and others. On board the satellite there are several instruments designed for specific purposes like the passive microwave sensor MWR (Fig. 1) whose specifications are shown in Table 1. The aim of the latter is to determine the following parameters: CWV, CLW, RR, WS, WD and SIC. The MWR sensor measures brightness temperatures at two frequencies: 23.8 and 36.5GHz. In the case of 36.5GHz, it measures both polarizations (vertical and horizontal) while for 23.8GHz it only measures the horizontal component. Since this sensor measures brightness temperatures and not geophysical variables, it is necessary to establish a relationship that links both. These relationships are determined by radiative transfer models (RTM). In remote sensing there are two types of models, namely: Forward and Inverse Model. The radiative transfer model in the forward direction obtains brightness temperatures for a given configuration within the pixel (geophysical variables). The most important applications of these models are: * Simulator Development: spectral bands selection to meet the high-level requirements within the expected error. * Intercalibration: in the calculation of corrections due to differences in incidence angles and frequencies between sensors involved in this process. * Inverse Radiative Transfer Models to obtain geophysical variables from brightness temperatures. In this paper, we developed a module that simulates the interaction of radiation with cloud droplets and raindrops. These modules were incorporated into a radiative transfer model from CFRSL (Central Florida Remote Sensing Lab) to calculate the brightness temperatures that would measure a passive microwave sensor

  4. Three-dimensional radiative transfer on a massively parallel computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vath, H. M.

    1994-04-01

    We perform 3D radiative transfer calculations in non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) in the simple two-level atom approximation on the Mas-Par MP-1, which contains 8192 processors and is a single instruction multiple data (SIMD) machine, an example of the new generation of massively parallel computers. On such a machine, all processors execute the same command at a given time, but on different data. To make radiative transfer calculations efficient, we must re-consider the numerical methods and storage of data. To solve the transfer equation, we adopt the short characteristic method and examine different acceleration methods to obtain the source function. We use the ALI method and test local and non-local operators. Furthermore, we compare the Ng and the orthomin methods of acceleration. We also investigate the use of multi-grid methods to get fast solutions for the NLTE case. In order to test these numerical methods, we apply them to two problems with and without periodic boundary conditions.

  5. An accurate and linear-scaling method for calculating charge-transfer excitation energies and diabatic couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Pavanello, Michele; Van Voorhis, Troy; Visscher, Lucas; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2013-02-07

    Quantum-mechanical methods that are both computationally fast and accurate are not yet available for electronic excitations having charge transfer character. In this work, we present a significant step forward towards this goal for those charge transfer excitations that take place between non-covalently bound molecules. In particular, we present a method that scales linearly with the number of non-covalently bound molecules in the system and is based on a two-pronged approach: The molecular electronic structure of broken-symmetry charge-localized states is obtained with the frozen density embedding formulation of subsystem density-functional theory; subsequently, in a post-SCF calculation, the full-electron Hamiltonian and overlap matrix elements among the charge-localized states are evaluated with an algorithm which takes full advantage of the subsystem DFT density partitioning technique. The method is benchmarked against coupled-cluster calculations and achieves chemical accuracy for the systems considered for intermolecular separations ranging from hydrogen-bond distances to tens of Angstroms. Numerical examples are provided for molecular clusters comprised of up to 56 non-covalently bound molecules.

  6. A New Look into the Effect of Large Drops on Radiative Transfer Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that a cloudy atmosphere absorbs more solar radiation than any current 1D or 3D radiation model can predict. The excess absorption is not large, perhaps 10-15 W/sq m or less, but any such systematic bias is of concern since radiative transfer models are assumed to be sufficiently accurate for remote sensing applications and climate modeling. The most natural explanation would be that models do not capture real 3D cloud structure and, as a consequence, their photon path lengths are too short. However, extensive calculations, using increasingly realistic 3D cloud structures, failed to produce photon paths long enough to explain the excess absorption. Other possible explanations have also been unsuccessful so, at this point, conventional models seem to offer no solution to this puzzle. The weakest link in conventional models is the way a size distribution of cloud particles is mathematically handled. Basically, real particles are replaced with a single average particle. This "ensemble assumption" assumes that all particle sizes are well represented in any given elementary volume. But the concentration of larger particles can be so low that this assumption is significantly violated. We show how a different mathematical route, using the concept of a cumulative distribution, avoids the ensemble assumption. The cumulative distribution has jumps, or steps, corresponding to the rarer sizes. These jumps result in an additional term, a kind of Green's function, in the solution of the radiative transfer equation. Solving the cloud radiative transfer equation with the measured particle distributions, described in a cumulative rather than an ensemble fashion, may lead to increased cloud absorption of the magnitude observed.

  7. Accurate computation of the radiation from simple antennas using the finite-difference time-domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, James G.; Smith, Glenn S.; Scott, Waymond R., Jr.

    1990-07-01

    Two antennas are considered, a cylindrical monopole and a conical monopole. Both are driven through an image plane from a coaxial transmission line. Each of these antennas corresponds to a well-posed theoretical electromagnetic boundary value problem and a realizable experimental model. These antennas are analyzed by a straightforward application of the time-domain finite-difference method. The computed results for these antennas are shown to be in excellent agreement with accurate experimental measurements for both the time domain and the frequency domain. The graphical displays presented for the transient near-zone and far-zone radiation from these antennas provide physical insight into the radiation process.

  8. Computing Radiative Transfer in a 3D Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Allmen, Paul; Lee, Seungwon

    2012-01-01

    A package of software computes the time-dependent propagation of a narrow laser beam in an arbitrary three- dimensional (3D) medium with absorption and scattering, using the transient-discrete-ordinates method and a direct integration method. Unlike prior software that utilizes a Monte Carlo method, this software enables simulation at very small signal-to-noise ratios. The ability to simulate propagation of a narrow laser beam in a 3D medium is an improvement over other discrete-ordinate software. Unlike other direct-integration software, this software is not limited to simulation of propagation of thermal radiation with broad angular spread in three dimensions or of a laser pulse with narrow angular spread in two dimensions. Uses for this software include (1) computing scattering of a pulsed laser beam on a material having given elastic scattering and absorption profiles, and (2) evaluating concepts for laser-based instruments for sensing oceanic turbulence and related measurements of oceanic mixed-layer depths. With suitable augmentation, this software could be used to compute radiative transfer in ultrasound imaging in biological tissues, radiative transfer in the upper Earth crust for oil exploration, and propagation of laser pulses in telecommunication applications.

  9. Conjugate conductive, convective, and radiative heat transfer in rocket engines

    SciTech Connect

    Naraghi, M.H.N.; DeLise, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    A comprehensive conductive, convective and radiative model for thermal analysis of rocket thrust chambers and nozzles is presented. In this model, the rocket thrust chamber and nozzle are subdivided into a number of stations along the longitudinal direction. At each station a finite element scheme is used to evaluate wall temperature distribution. The hot-gas-side convective heat transport is evaluated by numerically solving the compressible boundary layer equations and the radiative fluxes are evaluated by implementing an exchange factor scheme. The convective heat flux in the cooling channel is modeled based on the existing closed form correlations for rocket cooling channels. The conductive, convective and radiative processes are conjugated through an iterative procedure. The hot-gas-side heat transfer coefficients evaluated based on this model are compared to the experimental results reported in the literature. The computed convective heat transfer coefficients agree very well with experimental data for most of the engine except the throat where a discrepancy of approximately 20% exists. The model is applied to a typical regeneratively cooled rocket engine and the resulting wall temperature and heat flux distribution are presented.

  10. Finite-element algorithm for radiative transfer in vertically inhomogeneous media: numerical scheme and applications.

    PubMed

    Kisselev, V B; Roberti, L; Perona, G

    1995-12-20

    The recently developed finite-element method for solution of the radiative transfer equation has been extended to compute the full azimuthal dependence of the radiance in a vertically inhomogeneous plane-parallel medium. The physical processes that are included in the algorithm are multiple scattering and bottom boundary bidirectional reflectivity. The incident radiation is a parallel flux on the top boundary that is characteristic for illumination of the atmosphere by the Sun in the UV, visible, and near-infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The theoretical basis is presented together with a number of applications to realistic atmospheres. The method is shown to be accurate even with a low number of grid points for most of the considered situations. The FORTRAN code for this algorithm is developed and is available for applications. PMID:21068966

  11. Finite-element algorithm for radiative transfer in vertically inhomogeneous media: numerical scheme and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisselev, Viatcheslav B.; Roberti, Laura; Perona, Giovanni

    1995-12-01

    The recently developed finite-element method for solution of the radiative transfer equation has been extended to compute the full azimuthal dependence of the radiance in a vertically inhomogeneous plane-parallel medium. The physical processes that are included in the algorithm are multiple scattering and bottom boundary bidirectional reflectivity. The incident radiation is a parallel flux on the top boundary that is characteristic for illumination of the atmosphere by the Sun in the UV, visible, and near-infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The theoretical basis is presented together with a number of applications to realistic atmospheres. The method is shown to be accurate even with a low number of grid points for most of the considered situations. The fortran code for this algorithm is developed and is available for applications.

  12. Spectral Invariant Approximation within Atmospheric Radiative Transfer; Applications to EarthCare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Certain algebraic combinations of single-scattering albedo and solar radiation reflected from, or transmitted through, vegetation canopies do not vary with wavelength. These "spectrally-invariant relationships" are the consequence of wavelength independence of the extinction coefficient and scattering phase function in vegetation. In general, this wavelength-independence does not hold in the atmosphere, but in cloud-dominated atmospheres the total extinction and total scattering phase function vary only weakly with wavelength. We identify the conditions under which the spectrally-invariant approximation can accurately describe the extinction and scattering properties of cloudy atmospheres. Validity of the assumptions and accuracy of the approximation is tested with radiative transfer calculations. We discuss the physics behind this phenomenon and possible applications to remote sensing, climate, and the EarthCare, mission in particular.

  13. Heat Transfer Issues in Thin-Film Thermal Radiation Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Mamadou Y.

    1999-01-01

    The Thermal Radiation Group at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University has been working closely with scientists and engineers at NASA's Langley Research Center to develop accurate analytical and numerical models suitable for designing next generation thin-film thermal radiation detectors for earth radiation budget measurement applications. The current study provides an analytical model of the notional thermal radiation detector that takes into account thermal transport phenomena, such as the contact resistance between the layers of the detector, and is suitable for use in parameter estimation. It was found that the responsivity of the detector can increase significantly due to the presence of contact resistance between the layers of the detector. Also presented is the effect of doping the thermal impedance layer of the detector with conducting particles in order to electrically link the two junctions of the detector. It was found that the responsivity and the time response of the doped detector decrease significantly in this case. The corresponding decrease of the electrical resistance of the doped thermal impedance layer is not sufficient to significantly improve the electrical performance of the detector. Finally, the "roughness effect" is shown to be unable to explain the decrease in the thermal conductivity often reported for thin-film layers.

  14. Radiative transfer in cylindrical threads with incident radiation. II. 2D azimuth-dependent case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouttebroze, P.

    2005-05-01

    A method is proposed for the solution of NLTE radiative transfer equations in long cylinders with an external incident radiation that varies with direction. This method is designed principally for the modelling of elongated structures imbedded in the solar corona (loops, prominence threads). The radiative transfer problem under consideration is a 2D one, since the source functions and absorption coefficients vary with both distance to axis and azimuth. The method is based on the general principles of finite-differences and accelerated Λ-iteration. A Fourier series is used for interpolation in azimuth. The method is applied to a line emitted by a two-level atom with complete frequency redistribution. Convergence properties of the method and influence of the inclination angle on the source function are discussed.

  15. Radiative transfer of X-rays in the solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, L. W.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of resonance scattering of X-ray emission lines in the solar corona is investigated. For the resonance lines of some helium-like ions, significant optical depths are reached over distances small compared with the size of typical coronal features. A general integral equation for the transfer of resonance-line radiation under solar coronal conditions is derived. This expression is in a form useful for modeling the complex three-dimensional temperature and density structure of coronal active regions. The transfer equation is then cast in a form illustrating the terms which give rise to the attenuation or enhancement of the resonance-line intensity. The source function for helium-like oxygen (O VII) under coronal conditions is computed and discussed in terms of the relative importance of scattering.

  16. Comparison of vibrational conductivity and radiative energy transfer methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bot, A.

    2005-05-01

    This paper is concerned with the comparison of two methods well suited for the prediction of the wideband response of built-up structures subjected to high-frequency vibrational excitation. The first method is sometimes called the vibrational conductivity method and the second one is rather known as the radiosity method in the field of acoustics, or the radiative energy transfer method. Both are based on quite similar physical assumptions i.e. uncorrelated sources, mean response and high-frequency excitation. Both are based on analogies with some equations encountered in the field of heat transfer. However these models do not lead to similar results. This paper compares the two methods. Some numerical simulations on a pair of plates joined along one edge are provided to illustrate the discussion.

  17. Global sensitivity analysis of the radiative transfer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelam, Maheshwari; Mohanty, Binayak P.

    2015-04-01

    With the recently launched Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, it is very important to have a complete understanding of the radiative transfer model for better soil moisture retrievals and to direct future research and field campaigns in areas of necessity. Because natural systems show great variability and complexity with respect to soil, land cover, topography, precipitation, there exist large uncertainties and heterogeneities in model input factors. In this paper, we explore the possibility of using global sensitivity analysis (GSA) technique to study the influence of heterogeneity and uncertainties in model inputs on zero order radiative transfer (ZRT) model and to quantify interactions between parameters. GSA technique is based on decomposition of variance and can handle nonlinear and nonmonotonic functions. We direct our analyses toward growing agricultural fields of corn and soybean in two different regions, Iowa, USA (SMEX02) and Winnipeg, Canada (SMAPVEX12). We noticed that, there exists a spatio-temporal variation in parameter interactions under different soil moisture and vegetation conditions. Radiative Transfer Model (RTM) behaves more non-linearly in SMEX02 and linearly in SMAPVEX12, with average parameter interactions of 14% in SMEX02 and 5% in SMAPVEX12. Also, parameter interactions increased with vegetation water content (VWC) and roughness conditions. Interestingly, soil moisture shows an exponentially decreasing sensitivity function whereas parameters such as root mean square height (RMS height) and vegetation water content show increasing sensitivity with 0.05 v/v increase in soil moisture range. Overall, considering the SMAPVEX12 fields to be water rich environment (due to higher observed SM) and SMEX02 fields to be energy rich environment (due to lower SM and wide ranges of TSURF), our results indicate that first order as well as interactions between the parameters change with water and energy rich environments.

  18. A multilevel method for conductive-radiative heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Banoczi, J.M.; Kelley, C.T.

    1996-12-31

    We present a fast multilevel algorithm for the solution of a system of nonlinear integro-differential equations that model steady-state combined radiative-conductive heat transfer. The equations can be formulated as a compact fixed point problem with a fixed point map that requires both a solution of the linear transport equation and the linear heat equation for its evaluation. We use fast transport solvers developed by the second author, to construct an efficient evaluation of the fixed point map and then apply the Atkinson-Brakhage, method, with Newton-GMRES as the coarse mesh solver, to the full nonlinear system.

  19. Peregrinations through topics in light scattering and radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattawar, George W.

    2016-07-01

    In this van de Hulst essay, I have taken the liberty to present a journey through some topics in light scattering and radiative transfer which I feel were major contributions to the field but the number of topics I would like to cover is far more numerous than I have the time or the space to present. I also wanted to share with the reader some heartwarming memories I have of my wonderful friend and truly distinguished colleague Hendrik Christoffel van de Hulst (affectionately known to his colleagues as "Henk") whom I consider to be one of the preeminent scientists of his era.

  20. Radiative Transfer and Absorbing Structures in the Transition Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plovanic, Jacob; Kankelborg, C. C.

    2012-05-01

    A fully satisfactory explanation for the anomalous He II 304 Å intensity in the solar transition region has yet to be offered. As an extension of previous work, we use a full radiative transfer code to build a more consistent model of the transition region that allows the He II line to form with low filling factor and low opacity. Our results are constrained by the quiet sun center-to-limb profile of He II 304 Å obtained from the MOSES sounding rocket mission and by AIA full-disk data.

  1. 3D Monte Carlo radiation transfer modelling of photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, C. Louise; Christison, Craig; Brown, C. Tom A.; Wood, Kenneth; Valentine, Ronan M.; Moseley, Harry

    2015-06-01

    The effects of ageing and skin type on Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) for different treatment methods have been theoretically investigated. A multilayered Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer model is presented where both daylight activated PDT and conventional PDT are compared. It was found that light penetrates deeper through older skin with a lighter complexion, which translates into a deeper effective treatment depth. The effect of ageing was found to be larger for darker skin types. The investigation further strengthens the usage of daylight as a potential light source for PDT where effective treatment depths of about 2 mm can be achieved.

  2. The diffusion approximation. An application to radiative transfer in clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arduini, R. F.; Barkstrom, B. R.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown how the radiative transfer equation reduces to the diffusion equation. To keep the mathematics as simple as possible, the approximation is applied to a cylindrical cloud of radius R and height h. The diffusion equation separates in cylindrical coordinates and, in a sample calculation, the solution is evaluated for a range of cloud radii with cloud heights of 0.5 km and 1.0 km. The simplicity of the method and the speed with which solutions are obtained give it potential as a tool with which to study the effects of finite-sized clouds on the albedo of the earth-atmosphere system.

  3. Odyssey: Ray tracing and radiative transfer in Kerr spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Hung-Yi; Yun, Kiyun; Younsi, Ziri; Yoon, Suk-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Odyssey is a GPU-based General Relativistic Radiative Transfer (GRRT) code for computing images and/or spectra in Kerr metric describing the spacetime around a rotating black hole. Odyssey is implemented in CUDA C/C++. For flexibility, the namespace structure in C++ is used for different tasks; the two default tasks presented in the source code are the redshift of a Keplerian disk and the image of a Keplerian rotating shell at 340GHz. Odyssey_Edu, an educational software package for visualizing the ray trajectories in the Kerr spacetime that uses Odyssey, is also available.

  4. A field test of a simple stochastic radiative transfer model

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, N.

    1995-09-01

    The problem of determining the effect of clouds on the radiative energy balance of the globe is of well-recognized importance. One can in principle solve the problem for any given configuration of clouds using numerical techniques. This knowledge is not useful however, because of the amount of input data and computer resources required. Besides, we need only the average of the resulting solution over the grid scale of a general circulation model (GCM). Therefore, we are interested in estimating the average of the solutions of such fine-grained problems using only coarse grained data, a science or art called stochastic radiation transfer. Results of the described field test indicate that the stochastic description is a somewhat better fit to the data than is a fractional cloud cover model, but more data are needed. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  5. Radiative transfer for a three-dimensional raining cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haferman, J. L.; Krajewski, W. F.; Smith, T. F.; Sanchez, A.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite-sensor-based microwave brightness temperatures for a three-dimensional raining cloud over a reflecting surface are computed by using a radiative transfer model based on the discrete-ordinates solution procedure. The three-dimensional model applied to a plane layer is validated by comparison with results from a one-dimensional model that is available in the literature. Results examining the effects of cloud height, rainfall rate, surface reflectance, rainfall footprint area, and satellite viewing position on one- and three-dimensional brightness temperature calculations are reported. The numerical experiments indicate that, under certain conditions, three-dimensional effects are significant in the analysis of satellite-sensor-based rainfall retrieval algorithms. The results point to the need to consider carefully three-dimensional effects as well as surface reflectance effects when interpreting satellite-measured radiation data.

  6. Analytical properties of the radiance in atmospheric radiative transfer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    It is demonstrated mathematically strictly that state density functions, as the radiance (specific intensity), exist to describe certain state properties of transported photons on microscopic and the state of the radiation field on macroscopic scale, which have independent physical meanings. Analytical properties as boundedness, continuity, differentiability and integrability of these functions to describe the photon transport are discussed. It is shown that the density functions may be derived based on the assumption of photons as real particles of non-zero and finite size, independently of usual electrodynamics, and certain historically postulated functional relationships between them were proved, that is, these functions can be derived mathematically strictly and consistently within the framework of the theory of the phenomenological radiative transfer if one takes the theory seriously by really assuming photons as particles. In this sense these functions may be treated as fundamental physical quantities within the scope of this theory, if one considers the possibility of the existence of photons.

  7. The Chandrasekhar method and its applications to atmospheric radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Stamnes, K.

    1994-12-31

    Problems involving radiation and particle transport in a host medium require solution of the linear (or linearized) Boltzmann equation. A convenient strategy for solving such problems is to apply a multigroup procedure in which the problem is reformulated as a series of one-group problems in such a way that each one-group problem may be cast into a form identical to the monochromatic radiative transfer equation. In essence, Chandrasekhar`s method consists of converting the integro-differential equation for the resulting one-group problem into a system of coupled differential equations for which eigensolutions are sought. The basic method is well described in Chandrasekhar`s classic text in which applications to simple problems were used to demonstrate the potential power of the method before the advent of the modern computer.

  8. II. The Second Law in Relation to Thermal Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesudason, Christopher G.

    2011-12-01

    Planck introduced the quantum hypothesis from his Blackbody radiation studies, where he and subsequent workers opined that classical mechanics and electrodynamical theories could not account for the phenomenon. Hence a statistical mechanics with an appropriate Second law entropy was invented and coupled to the First law to account for quantum effects. Here, as an academic exercise we derive the quantum of energy by considering two structures, that of the dipole oscillators on a 2-D surface and the scattering of radiation into the 3-D cavity. Previous derivations are briefly cited and reviewed where none followed this approach. One prediction from this first order Brownian motion development is that a 2-D sheet of oscillators should emit radiation largely with energy density factor T1 of the Kelvin temperature T, rather than that deduced as T4 from detailed balance. Preliminary measurements conducted here seemed to verify the the T1 density. The first order theory also admits a possibility of nonlinear quanta and the consequences are explored briefly. It was noticed in passing during the experimentation that certain bodies suspended in a vacuum exhibited small persistent temperature differentials. A Second law statement is presented for such cases and consequences explored for processes that are not coupled by Newtonian momentum energy transfer mechanisms, such as for the radiation field as deduced by Planck. The different forms of heat transfer due to different laws (e.g. gravity waves and electromagnetic waves) are strictly separable and cannot be confused or forced to an equivalence. We generalize on the Zeroth law, the Kirchoff law and postulate an appropriate entropy form due to these generalizations.

  9. Radiative Transfer, Black Hole Growth, AGN Feedback in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    We have performed 3D hydrodynamic simulations of black hole fueling and AGN feedback using a novel method for treating the radial forces on interstellar gas due to absorption of photons by dust grains. The method provides a solution to the radiative transfer equation and hence computes forces on the gas self-consistently by first solving for the radiation field taking into account radiation sources, absorption, and scattering. The algorithm gives the correct behavior in all of the relevant limits (dominated by the central point source; dominated by the distributed isotropic source; optically thin; optically thick to UV/optical; optically thick to IR) and reasonably interpolates between the limits when necessary. The simulations allow us to study gas flows and feedback processes over length scales from ~1 pc to ~100 kpc. We find that the dynamics and final state of simulations are measurably but only moderately affected by radiative forces on dust, even when assumptions about the dust-to-gas ratio are varied from zero to a value appropriate for the Milky Way. In simulations with high gas densities designed to mimic ULIRGs with a star formation rate of several hundred solar masses per year, dust makes a more substantial contribution to the dynamics and outcome of the simulation.

  10. Radiative properties and heat transfer analysis of fibrous insulations

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, H.Y.

    1986-01-01

    The spectral radiative properties of pink fiberglass insulation were determined from monochromatic directional-hemispherical reflectance or monochromatic specular reflectance data coupled with an analytical model in the wavelength range of 3 to 80 microns. The fiberglass samples were 3.18 cm square with thicknesses varying from 0.10 to 1.28 cm. Three types of spectral data were recorded for the two sets of samples. First, normal transmittance measurements in the wavelength range of 2.5-40 microns were made with a Perkin-Elmer M521 infrared grating spectrophotometer. Second, the Willey 318S Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) was utilized to measure the directional-hemispherical reflectance in the wavelength range of 3-20 microns. The nonlinear least squares approach coupled with Chandrasekhar's discrete ordinate method for isotropic and anisotropic radiative transport was used in determining the radiative properties. Third, the specular reflectance at an incidence angle of 16 degrees was measured with a Digilab FTS-20 in the wavelength range of 3-80 microns. A method to invert the radiation properties from the experimental data was developed. Typical residential attic fiberglass insulation was chosen for the heat transfer analysis; results are compared to experimental data.

  11. Accurate dose assessment system for an exposed person utilising radiation transport calculation codes in emergency response to a radiological accident.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, F; Shigemori, Y; Seki, A

    2009-01-01

    A system has been developed to assess radiation dose distribution inside the body of exposed persons in a radiological accident by utilising radiation transport calculation codes-MCNP and MCNPX. The system consists mainly of two parts, pre-processor and post-processor of the radiation transport calculation. Programs for the pre-processor are used to set up a 'problem-dependent' input file, which defines the accident condition and dosimetric quantities to be estimated. The program developed for the post-processor part can effectively indicate dose information based upon the output file of the code. All of the programs in the dosimetry system can be executed with a generally used personal computer and accurately give the dose profile to an exposed person in a radiological accident without complicated procedures. An experiment using a physical phantom was carried out to verify the availability of the dosimetry system with the developed programs in a gamma ray irradiation field. PMID:19181661

  12. A transition radiation detector for RHIC featuring accurate tracking and dE/dx particle identification

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, E.; Lissauer, D.; McCorkle, S.; Polychronakos, V.; Takai, H.; Chi, C.Y.; Nagamiya, S.; Sippach, W.; Toy, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.F.; Wiggins, C.; Willis, W.; Cherniatin, V.; Dolgoshein, B.; Bennett, M.; Chikanian, A.; Kumar, S.; Mitchell, J.T.; Pope, K.

    1991-12-31

    We describe the results of a test ran involving a Transition Radiation Detector that can both distinguish electrons from pions which momenta greater titan 0.7 GeV/c and simultaneously track particles passing through the detector. The particle identification is accomplished through a combination of the detection of Transition Radiation from the electron and the differences in electron and pion energy loss (dE/dx) in the detector. The dE/dx particle separation is most, efficient below 2 GeV/c while particle ID utilizing Transition Radiation effective above 1.5 GeV/c. Combined, the electron-pion separation is-better than 5 {times} 10{sup 2}. The single-wire, track-position resolution for the TRD is {approximately}230 {mu}m.

  13. Energy Transfer Based Nanocomposite Scintillator for Radiation Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Soha; Sahi, Sunil; Chen, Wei; Ma, Lun; Kenarangui, Rasool

    2014-09-01

    Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum yield and size dependent emission, nanoparticles have attracted interested in various field of research. Here, we have studies the nanoparticles for radiation detection. We have synthesized nanoparticles of Cerium fluoride (CeF3), Zinc Oxide (ZnO), Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), Copper complex and Zinc sulfide (ZnS). We have used Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) principle to enhance the luminescence properties of nanocomposite scintillator. Nanocomposites scintillators are structurally characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Optical properties are studied using Photoluminescence, UV-Visible and X-ray. Enhancements in the luminescence are observed under UV and X-ray excitation. Preliminary studies shows nanocomposite scintillators are promising for radiation detection. Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum

  14. Development of an efficient solution method for solving the radiative heat transfer equation

    SciTech Connect

    Xing Ouyang; Minardi, A.; Kassab, A.

    1996-12-31

    The radiative heat transfer equation in a participating medium is a Fredholm integral equation of the second kind whose kernels are formally singular at the position where the incident radiation is to be determined. A general method is developed to remove this singularity by capitalizing on the mutual interactions between the source function and the exponential integral appearing in the kernel. The method is based on an interpolation of the unknown source functions, and the analytical integration of the resulting product in the integrand (source function expansion multiplied by the known exponential integral). As such, the method is considered semi-analytical. The method is superior to traditional solution techniques which employ quadratures approximating both the unknown and known functions appearing in the integrand, and which consequently, have numerical difficulties in addressing singularities. The general approach is presented in detail for one-dimensional problems, and extensions to two-dimensional enclosures are also given. One and two-dimensional numerical examples are considered, comparing the predictions to benchmark work. The method is shown to be computationally efficient and highly accurate. In comparison with traditional quadrature based techniques, the method readily handles the singularity of the exponential integral of first order at zero, converges rapidly under grid refinement, and provides superior prediction for radiative heat transfer. The technique is shown to be valid for a wide range of values of the scattering albedo and optical thickness. The proposed technique could be applied to a wide range of conservation problems which lend themselves to an integral formulation.

  15. Modeling Recollision and Escape Probabilities [|#11#|]USING the Stochastic Radiative Transfer Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Schull, M. A.; Samanta, A.; Myneni, R. B.; Knyazikhin, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The concept of canopy spectral invariants expresses the observation that simple algebraic combinations of leaf and canopy spectral reflectance become wavelength independent and determine two canopy structure specific variables - the recollision and escape probabilities. These variables specify an accurate relationship between the spectral response of a vegetation canopy to incident solar radiation at the leaf and the canopy scale. They are sensitive to important structural features of the canopy such as forest cover, tree density, leaf area index, crown geometry, forest type and stand age. The canopy spectral invariant behavior is a very strong effect clearly seen in optical remote sensing data. The relative simplicity of retrieving the spectral invariants however is accompanied by considerable difficulties in their interpretations due to the lack of models for these parameters. We use the stochastic radiative transfer equation to relate the spectral invariants to the 3D canopy structure. Stochastic radiative transfer model treats the vegetation canopy as a stochastic medium. It expresses the 3D spatial correlation with the use of the pair correlation function, which plays a key role in measuring the spatial correlation of the 3D canopy structure over a wide range of scales. Data analysis from a simulated single bush to the comprehensive forest canopy is presented for both passive and active (lidar) remote sensing domain.

  16. Modeling the Impact of Vegetation Structure on Canopy Radiative Transfer for a Global Vegetation Dynamic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni-Meister, W.; Kiang, N.; Yang, W.

    2007-12-01

    The transmission of light through plant canopies results in vertical profiles of light intensity that affect the photosynthetic activity and gas exchange of plants, their competition for light, and the canopy energy balance. The accurate representation of the canopy light profile is then important for predicting ecological dynamics. The study presents a simple canopy radiative transfer scheme to characterize the impact of the horizontal and vertical vegetation structure heterogeneity on light profiles. Actual vertical foliage profile and a clumping factor which are functions of tree geometry, size and density and foliage density are used to characterize the vertical and horizontal vegetation structure heterogeneity. The simple scheme is evaluated using the ground and airborne lidar data collected in deciduous and coniferous forests and was also compared with the more complex Geometric Optical and Radiative Transfer (GORT) model and the two-stream scheme currently being used to describe light interactions with vegetation canopy in most GCMs. The simple modeled PAR profiles match well with the ground data, lidar and full GORT model prediction, it performs much better than the simple Beer's&plaw used in two stream scheme. This scheme will have the same computation cost as the current scheme being used in GCMs, but provides better photosynthesis, radiative fluxes and surface albedo estimates, thus is suitable for a global vegetation dynamic model embedded in GCMs.

  17. Third Radiation Transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) exercise: Documenting progress in canopy reflectance models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widlowski, J.-L.; Taberner, M.; Pinty, B.; Bruniquel-Pinel, V.; Disney, M.; Fernandes, R.; Gastellu-Etchegorry, J.-P.; Gobron, N.; Kuusk, A.; Lavergne, T.; Leblanc, S.; Lewis, P. E.; Martin, E.; Mõttus, M.; North, P. R. J.; Qin, W.; Robustelli, M.; Rochdi, N.; Ruiloba, R.; Soler, C.; Thompson, R.; Verhoef, W.; Verstraete, M. M.; Xie, D.

    2007-05-01

    The Radiation Transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) initiative benchmarks canopy reflectance models under well-controlled experimental conditions. Launched for the first time in 1999, this triennial community exercise encourages the systematic evaluation of canopy reflectance models on a voluntary basis. The first phase of RAMI focused on documenting the spread among radiative transfer (RT) simulations over a small set of primarily 1-D canopies. The second phase expanded the scope to include structurally complex 3-D plant architectures with and without background topography. Here sometimes significant discrepancies were noted which effectively prevented the definition of a reliable "surrogate truth," over heterogeneous vegetation canopies, against which other RT models could then be compared. The present paper documents the outcome of the third phase of RAMI, highlighting both the significant progress that has been made in terms of model agreement since RAMI-2 and the capability of/need for RT models to accurately reproduce local estimates of radiative quantities under conditions that are reminiscent of in situ measurements. Our assessment of the self-consistency and the relative and absolute performance of 3-D Monte Carlo models in RAMI-3 supports their usage in the generation of a "surrogate truth" for all RAMI test cases. This development then leads (1) to the presentation of the "RAMI Online Model Checker" (ROMC), an open-access web-based interface to evaluate RT models automatically, and (2) to a reassessment of the role, scope, and opportunities of the RAMI project in the future.

  18. Radiative Transfer Modeling of the Enigmatic Scattering Polarization in the Solar Na I D1 Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belluzzi, Luca; Trujillo Bueno, Javier; Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2015-12-01

    The modeling of the peculiar scattering polarization signals observed in some diagnostically important solar resonance lines requires the consideration of the detailed spectral structure of the incident radiation field as well as the possibility of ground level polarization, along with the atom's hyperfine structure and quantum interference between hyperfine F-levels pertaining either to the same fine structure J-level, or to different J-levels of the same term. Here we present a theoretical and numerical approach suitable for solving this complex non-LTE radiative transfer problem. This approach is based on the density-matrix metalevel theory (where each level is viewed as a continuous distribution of sublevels) and on accurate formal solvers of the transfer equations and efficient iterative methods. We show an application to the D-lines of Na i, with emphasis on the enigmatic D1 line, pointing out the observable signatures of the various physical mechanisms considered. We demonstrate that the linear polarization observed in the core of the D1 line may be explained by the effect that one gets when the detailed spectral structure of the anisotropic radiation responsible for the optical pumping is taken into account. This physical ingredient is capable of introducing significant scattering polarization in the core of the Na i D1 line without the need for ground-level polarization.

  19. A computer simulation model to compute the radiation transfer of mountainous regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuguang; Zhao, Feng; Song, Rui

    2011-11-01

    In mountainous regions, the radiometric signal recorded at the sensor depends on a number of factors such as sun angle, atmospheric conditions, surface cover type, and topography. In this paper, a computer simulation model of radiation transfer is designed and evaluated. This model implements the Monte Carlo ray-tracing techniques and is specifically dedicated to the study of light propagation in mountainous regions. The radiative processes between sun light and the objects within the mountainous region are realized by using forward Monte Carlo ray-tracing methods. The performance of the model is evaluated through detailed comparisons with the well-established 3D computer simulation model: RGM (Radiosity-Graphics combined Model) based on the same scenes and identical spectral parameters, which shows good agreements between these two models' results. By using the newly developed computer model, series of typical mountainous scenes are generated to analyze the physical mechanism of mountainous radiation transfer. The results show that the effects of the adjacent slopes are important for deep valleys and they particularly affect shadowed pixels, and the topographic effect needs to be considered in mountainous terrain before accurate inferences from remotely sensed data can be made.

  20. A high-dynamic and accurate electromagnetic radiation and thermal energy detector for planetary studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, P.; Karatekin, O.; Noel, J.-P.; van Ruymbeke, M.; Dehant, V.

    2012-04-01

    The radio meter has been broadly applied for the study of the Total Solar Irradiance (TSI). As the electromagnetic radiation is the main external climate driving force of our planet: Earth, the Imbalance of the Earth's Radiation Budget (IERB) is a key to better understanding our climate system. The PICARD mission is to study the Sun-Earth's climate connections. With the opportunity of the PICARD mission, we have developed a Bolometric Oscillation Sensor (BOS), which are currently flying side by side with the radiometer SOlar Variability for Picard (SOVAP-an updated instrument of DIARAD/VIRGO on SOHO) to study the solar constant as well as the radiation of the Earth. The BOS sensor is composed with two detectors, the light mass detector (m1), which is rapidly response to the thermal-flux change, and the heavy mass detector (m2), which is slowly modulated by the electromagnetic energy. In addition, the m1 detector can stand alone to precisely monitor the ambient temperature. The original goal of the BOS-PICARD is to study the irradiance of the Sun's and the Earth's. After nearly two year's observations, the variations of Long-Wave radiation of the Earth can be well determined from the BOS measurements. It confirms that the BOS can be applied to measure the electromagnetic radiation near the infrared. Encouraged by these results, we are now working on a second generation of the BOS sensor for the nano-satellite project and future planetary missions. The new sensor will be able to determine the albedo (visible), infrared radiation as well as to detect the thermal initial of objective target either by the remote sensing on-board satellite or by the in-situ measurement setting up in the Lander.

  1. An efficient and accurate technique to compute the absorption, emission, and transmission of radiation by the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Pollack, James B.

    1990-01-01

    CO2 comprises 95 pct. of the composition of the Martian atmosphere. However, the Martian atmosphere also has a high aerosol content. Dust particles vary from less than 0.2 to greater than 3.0. CO2 is an active absorber and emitter in near IR and IR wavelengths; the near IR absorption bands of CO2 provide significant heating of the atmosphere, and the 15 micron band provides rapid cooling. Including both CO2 and aerosol radiative transfer simultaneously in a model is difficult. Aerosol radiative transfer requires a multiple scattering code, while CO2 radiative transfer must deal with complex wavelength structure. As an alternative to the pure atmosphere treatment in most models which causes inaccuracies, a treatment was developed called the exponential sum or k distribution approximation. The chief advantage of the exponential sum approach is that the integration over k space of f(k) can be computed more quickly than the integration of k sub upsilon over frequency. The exponential sum approach is superior to the photon path distribution and emissivity techniques for dusty conditions. This study was the first application of the exponential sum approach to Martian conditions.

  2. THE RADIATIVE TRANSFER OF SYNCHROTRON RADIATION THROUGH A COMPRESSED RANDOM MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Cawthorne, T. V.; Hughes, P. A.

    2013-07-01

    This paper examines the radiative transfer of synchrotron radiation in the presence of a magnetic field configuration resulting from the compression of a highly disordered magnetic field. It is shown that, provided Faraday rotation and circular polarization can be neglected, the radiative transfer equations for synchrotron radiation separate for this configuration, and the intensities and polarization values for sources that are uniform on large scales can be found straightforwardly in the case where opacity is significant. Although the emission and absorption coefficients must, in general, be obtained numerically, the process is much simpler than a full numerical solution to the transfer equations. Some illustrative results are given and an interesting effect, whereby the polarization increases while the magnetic field distribution becomes less strongly confined to the plane of compression, is discussed. The results are of importance for the interpretation of polarization near the edges of lobes in radio galaxies and of bright features in the parsec-scale jets of active galactic nuclei, where such magnetic field configurations are believed to exist.

  3. Radiative Transfer Modeling of a Large Pool Fire by Discrete Ordinates, Discrete Transfer, Ray Tracing, Monte Carlo and Moment Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, K. A.; Ripoll, J.-F.; Wray, A. A.; Joseph, D.; ElHafi, M.

    2004-01-01

    Five computational methods for solution of the radiative transfer equation in an absorbing-emitting and non-scattering gray medium were compared on a 2 m JP-8 pool fire. The temperature and absorption coefficient fields were taken from a synthetic fire due to the lack of a complete set of experimental data for fires of this size. These quantities were generated by a code that has been shown to agree well with the limited quantity of relevant data in the literature. Reference solutions to the governing equation were determined using the Monte Carlo method and a ray tracing scheme with high angular resolution. Solutions using the discrete transfer method, the discrete ordinate method (DOM) with both S(sub 4) and LC(sub 11) quadratures, and moment model using the M(sub 1) closure were compared to the reference solutions in both isotropic and anisotropic regions of the computational domain. DOM LC(sub 11) is shown to be the more accurate than the commonly used S(sub 4) quadrature technique, especially in anisotropic regions of the fire domain. This represents the first study where the M(sub 1) method was applied to a combustion problem occurring in a complex three-dimensional geometry. The M(sub 1) results agree well with other solution techniques, which is encouraging for future applications to similar problems since it is computationally the least expensive solution technique. Moreover, M(sub 1) results are comparable to DOM S(sub 4).

  4. Suomi NPP VIIRS Striping Analysis using Radiative Transfer Model Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Cao, C.

    2015-12-01

    Modern satellite radiometers such as VIIRS have many detectors with slightly different relative spectral response (RSR). These differences can introduce artifacts such as striping in the imagery. In recent studies we have analyzed the striping pattern related to the detector level RSR difference in VIIRS Thermal Emissive Bands (TEB) M15 and M16, which includes line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) detector level response study and onboard detector stability evaluation using the solar diffuser. Now we extend these analysis to the Reflective Solar Bands (RSB) using MODTRAN atmospheric radiative transfer model (RTM) for detector level radiance simulation. Previous studies analyzed the striping pattern in the images of VIIRS ocean color and reflectance in RSB, further studies about the root cause for striping are still needed. In this study, we will use the MODTRAN model at spectral resolution of 1 cm^-1 under different atmospheric conditions for VIIRS RSB, for example band M1 centered at 410nm which is used for Ocean Color product retrieval. The impact of detector level RSR difference, atmospheric dependency, and solar geometry on the striping in VIIRS SDR imagery will be investigated. The cumulative histogram method used successfully for the TEB striping analysis will be used to quantify the striping. These analysis help S-NPP and J1 to better understand the root cause for VIIRS image artifacts and reduce the uncertainties in geophysical retrievals to meet the user needs.

  5. Infrared radiative transfer through a regular array of cuboidal clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    HARSHVARDHAN; Weinman, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Infrared radiative transfer through a regular array of cuboidal clouds is studied and the interaction of the sides of the clouds with each other and the ground is considered. The theory is developed for black clouds and is extended to scattering clouds using a variable azimuth two-stream approximation. It is shown that geometrical considerations often dominate over the microphysical aspects of radiative transfer through the clouds. For example, the difference in simulated 10 micron brightness temperature between black isothermal cubic clouds and cubic clouds of optical depth 10, is less than 2 deg for zenith angles less than 50 deg for all cloud fractions when viewed parallel to the array. The results show that serious errors are made in flux and cooling rate computations if broken clouds are modeled as planiform. Radiances computed by the usual practice of area-weighting cloudy and clear sky radiances are in error by 2 to 8 K in brightness temperature for cubic clouds over a wide range of cloud fractions and zenith angles. It is also shown that the lapse rate does not markedly affect the exiting radiances for cuboidal clouds of unit aspect ratio and optical depth 10.

  6. Rabacus: A Python package for analytic cosmological radiative transfer calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altay, G.; Wise, J. H.

    2015-04-01

    We describe RABACUS, a Python package for calculating the transfer of hydrogen ionizing radiation in simplified geometries relevant to astronomy and cosmology. We present example solutions for three specific cases: (1) a semi-infinite slab gas distribution in a homogeneous isotropic background, (2) a spherically symmetric gas distribution with a point source at the center, and (3) a spherically symmetric gas distribution in a homogeneous isotropic background. All problems can accommodate arbitrary spectra and density profiles as input. The solutions include a treatment of both hydrogen and helium, a self-consistent calculation of equilibrium temperatures, and the transfer of recombination radiation. The core routines are written in Fortran 90 and then wrapped in Python leading to execution speeds thousands of times faster than equivalent routines written in pure Python. In addition, all variables have associated units for ease of analysis. The software is part of the Python Package Index and the source code is available on Bitbucket at https://bitbucket.org/galtay/rabacus. In addition, installation instructions and a detailed users guide are available at http://pythonhosted.org//rabacus.

  7. Radiative transfer in highly scattering materials - numerical solution and evaluation of approximate analytic solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weston, K. C.; Reynolds, A. C., Jr.; Alikhan, A.; Drago, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    Numerical solutions for radiative transport in a class of anisotropically scattering materials are presented. Conditions for convergence and divergence of the iterative method are given and supported by computed results. The relation of two flux theories to the equation of radiative transfer for isotropic scattering is discussed. The adequacy of the two flux approach for the reflectance, radiative flux and radiative flux divergence of highly scattering media is evaluated with respect to solutions of the radiative transfer equation.

  8. Accurate tumor localization and tracking in radiation therapy using wireless body sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Pourhomayoun, Mohammad; Jin, Zhanpeng; Fowler, Mark

    2014-07-01

    Radiation therapy is an effective method to combat cancerous tumors by killing the malignant cells or controlling their growth. Knowing the exact position of the tumor is a very critical prerequisite in radiation therapy. Since the position of the tumor changes during the process of radiation therapy due to the patient׳s movements and respiration, a real-time tumor tracking method is highly desirable in order to deliver a sufficient dose of radiation to the tumor region without damaging the surrounding healthy tissues. In this paper, we develop a novel tumor positioning method based on spatial sparsity. We estimate the position by processing the received signals from only one implantable RF transmitter. The proposed method uses less number of sensors compared to common magnetic transponder based approaches. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated in two different cases: (1) when the tissue configuration is perfectly determined (acquired beforehand by MRI or CT) and (2) when there are some uncertainties about the tissue boundaries. The results demonstrate the high accuracy and performance of the proposed method, even when the tissue boundaries are imperfectly known. PMID:24832352

  9. Preliminary design for Arctic atmospheric radiative transfer experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, B. D.; Church, H. W.; Stamnes, K.; Shaw, G.; Filyushkin, V.; Jin, Z.; Ellingson, R. G.; Tsay, S. C.

    1995-01-01

    If current plans are realized, within the next few years, an extraordinary set of coordinated research efforts focusing on energy flows in the Arctic will be implemented. All are motivated by the prospect of global climate change. SHEBA (Surface Energy Budget of the Arctic Ocean), led by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Office of Naval Research (ONR), involves instrumenting an ice camp in the perennial Arctic ice pack, and taking data for 12-18 months. The ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) focuses on atmospheric radiative transport, especially in the presence of clouds. The NSA/AAO CART involves instrumenting a sizeable area on the North Slope of Alaska and adjacent waters in the vicinity of Barrow, and acquiring data over a period of about 10 years. FIRE (First ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Program) Regional Experiment) Phase 3 is a program led by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) which focuses on Arctic clouds, and which is coordinated with SHEBA and ARM. FIRE has historically emphasized data from airborne and satellite platforms. All three program anticipate initiating Arctic data acquisition during spring, 1997. In light of his historic opportunity, the authors discuss a strawman atmospheric radiative transfer experimental plan that identifies which features of the radiative transport models they think should be tested, what experimental data are required for each type of test, the platforms and instrumentation necessary to acquire those data, and in general terms, how the experiments could be conducted. Aspects of the plan are applicable to all three programs.

  10. Preliminary design for Arctic atmospheric radiative transfer experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zak, B.D.; Church, H.W.; Stamnes, K.; Shaw, G.; Filyushkin, V.; Jin, Z.; Ellingson, R.G.; Tsay, S.C.

    1995-04-01

    If current plans are realized, within the next few years, an extraordinary set of coordinated research efforts focusing on energy flows in the Arctic will be implemented. All are motivated by the prospect of global climate change. SHEBA (Surface Energy Budget of the Arctic Ocean), led by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Office of Naval Research (ONR), involves instrumenting an ice camp in the perennial Arctic ice pack, and taking data for 12--18 months. The ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) focuses on atmospheric radiative transport, especially in the presence of clouds. The NSA/AAO CART involves instrumenting a sizeable area on the North Slope of Alaska and adjacent waters in the vicinity of Barrow, and acquiring data over a period of about 10 years. FIRE (First ISCCP [International Satellite Cloud Climatology Program] Regional Experiment) Phase 3 is a program led by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) which focuses on Arctic clouds, and which is coordinated with SHEBA and ARM. FIRE has historically emphasized data from airborne and satellite platforms. All three program anticipate initiating Arctic data acquisition during spring, 1997. In light of his historic opportunity, the authors discuss a strawman atmospheric radiative transfer experimental plan that identifies which features of the radiative transport models they think should be tested, what experimental data are required for each type of test, the platforms and instrumentation necessary to acquire those data, and in general terms, how the experiments could be conducted. Aspects of the plan are applicable to all three programs.

  11. Estimation of photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) from OCEANSAT-I OCM using a simple atmospheric radiative transfer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Madhumita; Raman, Mini; Chauhan, Prakash

    2015-10-01

    Photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) is an important variable for radiation budget, marine and terrestrial ecosystem models. OCEANSAT-1 Ocean Color Monitor (OCM) PAR was estimated using two different methods under both clear and cloudy sky conditions. In the first approach, aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud optical depth (COD) were estimated from OCEANSAT-1 OCM TOA (top-of-atmosphere) radiance data on a pixel by pixel basis and PAR was estimated from extraterrestrial solar flux for fifteen spectral bands using a radiative transfer model. The second approach used TOA radiances measured by OCM in the PAR spectral range to compute PAR. This approach also included surface albedo and cloud albedo as inputs. Comparison between OCEANSAT-1 OCM PAR at noon with in situ measured PAR shows that root mean square difference was 5.82% for the method I and 7.24% for the method II in daily time scales. Results indicate that methodology adopted to estimate PAR from OCEANSAT-1 OCM can produce reasonably accurate PAR estimates over the tropical Indian Ocean region. This approach can be extended to OCEANSAT-2 OCM and future OCEANSAT-3 OCM data for operational estimation of PAR for regional marine ecosystem applications.

  12. Atmospheric radiative transfer generalised for use on Earth and other planets: ARTS 2.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendrok, Jana; Eriksson, Patrick; Buehler, Stefan; Perrin, Agnes; Hartogh, Paul; Rezac, Ladislav; Lemke, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    Microwave and (sub)millimetre-wave frequencies have long been of interest for remote sensing of the Earth and space objects. They suffer less from interference by small particles (dust, clouds), hence penetrate deeper into atmospheres revealing their deeper structures hidden to shorter wavelengths, and possess characteristic line absorption features of many gaseous species, which are of interest for the understanding of atmospheric chemistry and dynamics. Models simulating radiative transfer and wave propagation (RT/WP) have been developed by many institutions. Most of them are designed for a particular, narrow region of the electromagnetic spectrum, certain instrument types or missions, and specific atmospheric conditions. In particular, they are usually set up for a specific planetary body. This high level of specialisation allows for accurate modelling results. However, it also limits the flexibility of those models and comparability between them. One of the major differences in radiative transfer modeling in the atmospheres of Earth and other planets arises from the different composition of the atmospheres. When interested in measuring total abundance or even vertical distribution of atmospheric constituents, knowledge of parameters describing spectrally dependent absorption in dependence of atmospheric state is required. When modeling radiative transfer for different planets, the line shapes are often accounted for by scaling the parameters valid for Earth's ``air'' or by building a spectroscopic catalogue specific to the planet in question and its main atmospheric composition. This strongly limits applicability of these models. Based on the ARTS model [1], a sophisticated, flexible RT model for Earth atmosphere (3D spherical geometry, diverse absorption models, scattering, polarization, Jacobians), we have developed a toolbox for microwave atmospheric radiative transfer in solar system planets. As part of this, we developed and implemented a more generalized

  13. Near-field radiative heat transfer between two parallel SiO{sub 2} plates with and without microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ijiro, T.; Yamada, N.

    2015-01-12

    Near-to-far-field radiative heat transfer between two macroscopic SiO{sub 2} plates—with and without microcavities—was observed using a highly precise and accurate optical gap-measurement method. The experiments, conducted near 300 K, measured heat transfer as a function of gap separation from 1.0 μm to 50 μm and also as a function of temperature differences between 4.1 and 19.5 K. The gap-dependent heat flux was in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. Furthermore, the effects of microcavities on the plate surfaces were clearly observed and significant enhancement of near-field radiative heat transfer was confirmed between gold-coated microcavities with narrow vacuum separation.

  14. AN ALGORITHM FOR RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS BASED ON SOLVING THE TIME-DEPENDENT TRANSFER EQUATION

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yan-Fei; Stone, James M.; Davis, Shane W.

    2014-07-01

    We describe a new algorithm for solving the coupled frequency-integrated transfer equation and the equations of magnetohydrodynamics in the regime that light-crossing time is only marginally shorter than dynamical timescales. The transfer equation is solved in the mixed frame, including velocity-dependent source terms accurate to O(v/c). An operator split approach is used to compute the specific intensity along discrete rays, with upwind monotonic interpolation used along each ray to update the transport terms, and implicit methods used to compute the scattering and absorption source terms. Conservative differencing is used for the transport terms, which ensures the specific intensity (as well as energy and momentum) are conserved along each ray to round-off error. The use of implicit methods for the source terms ensures the method is stable even if the source terms are very stiff. To couple the solution of the transfer equation to the MHD algorithms in the ATHENA code, we perform direct quadrature of the specific intensity over angles to compute the energy and momentum source terms. We present the results of a variety of tests of the method, such as calculating the structure of a non-LTE atmosphere, an advective diffusion test, linear wave convergence tests, and the well-known shadow test. We use new semi-analytic solutions for radiation modified shocks to demonstrate the ability of our algorithm to capture the effects of an anisotropic radiation field accurately. Since the method uses explicit differencing of the spatial operators, it shows excellent weak scaling on parallel computers.

  15. Detectivity of gas leakage based on electromagnetic radiation transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yunting; Wang, Lingxue; Li, Jiakun; Zhang, Changxing; Zhang, Bei

    2011-05-01

    Standoff detection of gas leakage is a fundamental need in petrochemical and power industries. The passive gas imaging system using thermal imager has been proven to be efficient to visualize leaking gas which is not visible to the naked eye. The detection probability of gas leakage is the basis for designing a gas imaging system. Supposing the performance parameters of the thermal imager are known, the detectivity based on electromagnetic radiation transfer model to image gas leakage is analyzed. This model takes into consideration a physical analysis of the gas plume spread in the atmosphere-the interaction processes between the gas and its surrounding environment, the temperature of the gas and the background, the background surface emissivity, and also gas concentration, etc. Under a certain environmental conditions, through calculating the radiation reaching to the detector from the camera's optical field of view, we obtain an entity "Gas Equivalent Blackbody Temperature Difference (GEBTD)" which is the radiation difference between the on-plume and off-plume regions. Comparing the GEBTD with the Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference (NETD) of the thermal imager, we can know whether the system can image the gas leakage. At last, an example of detecting CO2 gas by JADE MWIR thermal imager with a narrow band-pass filter is presented.

  16. Optimum satellite orbits for accurate measurement of the earth's radiation budget, summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, G. G.; Vonderhaar, T. H.

    1978-01-01

    The optimum set of orbit inclinations for the measurement of the earth radiation budget from spacially integrating sensor systems was estimated for two and three satellite systems. The best set of the two were satellites at orbit inclinations of 80 deg and 50 deg; of three the inclinations were 80 deg, 60 deg and 50 deg. These were chosen on the basis of a simulation of flat plate and spherical detectors flying over a daily varying earth radiation field as measured by the Nimbus 3 medium resolution scanners. A diurnal oscillation was also included in the emitted flux and albedo to give a source field as realistic as possible. Twenty three satellites with different inclinations and equator crossings were simulated, allowing the results of thousand of multisatellite sets to be intercompared. All were circular orbits of radius 7178 kilometers.

  17. Development and evaluation of polycrystalline cadmium telluride dosimeters for accurate quality assurance in radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, K.; Han, M.; Kim, K.; Heo, Y.; Moon, C.; Park, S.; Nam, S.

    2016-02-01

    For quality assurance in radiation therapy, several types of dosimeters are used such as ionization chambers, radiographic films, thermo-luminescent dosimeter (TLD), and semiconductor dosimeters. Among them, semiconductor dosimeters are particularly useful for in vivo dosimeters or high dose gradient area such as the penumbra region because they are more sensitive and smaller in size compared to typical dosimeters. In this study, we developed and evaluated Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) dosimeters, one of the most promising semiconductor dosimeters due to their high quantum efficiency and charge collection efficiency. Such CdTe dosimeters include single crystal form and polycrystalline form depending upon the fabrication process. Both types of CdTe dosimeters are commercially available, but only the polycrystalline form is suitable for radiation dosimeters, since it is less affected by volumetric effect and energy dependence. To develop and evaluate polycrystalline CdTe dosimeters, polycrystalline CdTe films were prepared by thermal evaporation. After that, CdTeO3 layer, thin oxide layer, was deposited on top of the CdTe film by RF sputtering to improve charge carrier transport properties and to reduce leakage current. Also, the CdTeO3 layer which acts as a passivation layer help the dosimeter to reduce their sensitivity changes with repeated use due to radiation damage. Finally, the top and bottom electrodes, In/Ti and Pt, were used to have Schottky contact. Subsequently, the electrical properties under high energy photon beams from linear accelerator (LINAC), such as response coincidence, dose linearity, dose rate dependence, reproducibility, and percentage depth dose, were measured to evaluate polycrystalline CdTe dosimeters. In addition, we compared the experimental data of the dosimeter fabricated in this study with those of the silicon diode dosimeter and Thimble ionization chamber which widely used in routine dosimetry system and dose measurements for radiation

  18. ACCURATE ACCUMULATION OF DOSE FOR IMPROVED UNDERSTANDING OF RADIATION EFFECTS IN NORMAL TISSUE

    PubMed Central

    Jaffray, David A.; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Brock, Kristy K.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Tomé, W. A.

    2013-01-01

    The actual distribution of radiation dose accumulated in normal tissues over the complete course of radiation therapy is, in general, poorly quantified. Differences in the patient anatomy between planning and treatment can occur gradually (e.g., tumor regression, resolution of edema) or relatively rapidly (e.g., bladder filling, breathing motion) and these undermine the accuracy of the planned dose distribution. Current efforts to maximize the therapeutic ratio require models that relate the true accumulated dose to clinical outcome. The needed accuracy can only be achieved through the development of robust methods that track the accumulation of dose within the various tissues in the body. Specific needs include the development of segmentation methods, tissue-mapping algorithms, uncertainty estimation, optimal schedules for image-based monitoring, and the development of informatics tools to support subsequent analysis. These developments will not only improve radiation outcomes modeling but will address the technical demands of the adaptive radiotherapy paradigm. The next 5 years need to see academia and industry bring these tools into the hands of the clinician and the clinical scientist. PMID:20171508

  19. Accurate Accumulation of Dose for Improved Understanding of Radiation Effects in Normal Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffray, David A.; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Brock, Kristy K.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Tome, W.A.

    2010-03-01

    The actual distribution of radiation dose accumulated in normal tissues over the complete course of radiation therapy is, in general, poorly quantified. Differences in the patient anatomy between planning and treatment can occur gradually (e.g., tumor regression, resolution of edema) or relatively rapidly (e.g., bladder filling, breathing motion) and these undermine the accuracy of the planned dose distribution. Current efforts to maximize the therapeutic ratio require models that relate the true accumulated dose to clinical outcome. The needed accuracy can only be achieved through the development of robust methods that track the accumulation of dose within the various tissues in the body. Specific needs include the development of segmentation methods, tissue-mapping algorithms, uncertainty estimation, optimal schedules for image-based monitoring, and the development of informatics tools to support subsequent analysis. These developments will not only improve radiation outcomes modeling but will address the technical demands of the adaptive radiotherapy paradigm. The next 5 years need to see academia and industry bring these tools into the hands of the clinician and the clinical scientist.

  20. 3D-radiative transfer in terrestrial atmosphere: An efficient parallel numerical procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, L. P.; Germogenova, T. A.; Nikolaeva, O. V.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Kuznetsov, V. S.

    2003-04-01

    Light propagation and scattering in terrestrial atmosphere is usually studied in the framework of the 1D radiative transfer theory [1]. However, in reality particles (e.g., ice crystals, solid and liquid aerosols, cloud droplets) are randomly distributed in 3D space. In particular, their concentrations vary both in vertical and horizontal directions. Therefore, 3D effects influence modern cloud and aerosol retrieval procedures, which are currently based on the 1D radiative transfer theory. It should be pointed out that the standard radiative transfer equation allows to study these more complex situations as well [2]. In recent year the parallel version of the 2D and 3D RADUGA code has been developed. This version is successfully used in gammas and neutrons transport problems [3]. Applications of this code to radiative transfer in atmosphere problems are contained in [4]. Possibilities of code RADUGA are presented in [5]. The RADUGA code system is an universal solver of radiative transfer problems for complicated models, including 2D and 3D aerosol and cloud fields with arbitrary scattering anisotropy, light absorption, inhomogeneous underlying surface and topography. Both delta type and distributed light sources can be accounted for in the framework of the algorithm developed. The accurate numerical procedure is based on the new discrete ordinate SWDD scheme [6]. The algorithm is specifically designed for parallel supercomputers. The version RADUGA 5.1(P) can run on MBC1000M [7] (768 processors with 10 Gb of hard disc memory for each processor). The peak productivity is equal 1 Tfl. Corresponding scalar version RADUGA 5.1 is working on PC. As a first example of application of the algorithm developed, we have studied the shadowing effects of clouds on neighboring cloudless atmosphere, depending on the cloud optical thickness, surface albedo, and illumination conditions. This is of importance for modern satellite aerosol retrieval algorithms development. [1] Sobolev

  1. A fast operator perturbation method for the solution of the special relativistic equation of radiative transfer in spherical symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauschildt, P. H.

    1992-01-01

    A fast method for the solution of the radiative transfer equation in rapidly moving spherical media, based on an approximate Lambda-operator iteration, is described. The method uses the short characteristic method and a tridiagonal approximate Lambda-operator to achieve fast convergence. The convergence properties and the CPU time requirements of the method are discussed for the test problem of a two-level atom with background continuum absorption and Thomson scattering. Details of the actual implementation for fast vector and parallel computers are given. The method is accurate and fast enough to be incorporated in radiation-hydrodynamic calculations.

  2. Radiative transfer modeling in the coupled atmosphere- ocean system and its application to the remote sensing of ocean color imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Banghua

    2001-12-01

    Ocean color is the radiance emanating from the ocean due to scattering by chlorophyll pigments and particles of organic and inorganic origin. Thus, it contains information about chlorophyll concentrations which can be used to estimate primary productivity. Observations of ocean color from space can be used to monitor the variability in marine primary productivity, thereby permitting a quantum leap in our understanding of oceanographic processes from regional to global scales. Satellite remote sensing of ocean color requires accurate removal of the contribution by atmospheric molecules and aerosols to the radiance measured at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). This removal process is called ``atmospheric correction''. Since about 90% of the radiance received by the satellite sensor comes from the atmosphere, accurate removal of this portion is very important. A prerequisite for accurate atmospheric correction is accurate and reliable simulation of the transport of radiation in the atmosphere-ocean system. This thesis focuses on this radiative transfer process, and investigates the impact of particles in the atmosphere (aerosols) and ocean (oceanic chlorophylls and air bubbles) on our ability to remove the atmospheric contribution from the received signal. To explore these issues, a comprehensive radiative transfer model for the coupled atmosphere-ocean system is used to simulate the radiative transfer process and provide a physically sound link between surface-based measurements of oceanic and atmospheric parameters and radiances observed by satellite-deployed ocean color sensors. This model has been upgraded to provide accurate radiances in arbitrary directions as required to analyze satellite data. The model is then applied to quantify the uncertainties associated with several commonly made assumptions invoked in atmospheric correction algorithms. Since atmospheric aerosols consist of a mixture of absorbing and non- absorbing components that may or may not be

  3. Radiation transfer in plant canopies - Transmission of direct solar radiation and the role of leaf orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verstraete, Michel M.

    1987-01-01

    Understanding the details of the interaction between the radiation field and plant structures is important climatically because of the influence of vegetation on the surface water and energy balance, but also biologically, since solar radiation provides the energy necessary for photosynthesis. The problem is complex because of the extreme variety of vegetation forms in space and time, as well as within and across plant species. This one-dimensional vertical multilayer model describes the transfer of direct solar radiation through a leaf canopy, accounting explicitly for the vertical inhomogeneities of a plant stand and leaf orientation, as well as heliotropic plant behavior. This model reproduces observational results on homogeneous canopies, but it is also well adapted to describe vertically inhomogeneous canopies. Some of the implications of leaf orientation and plant structure as far as light collection is concerned are briefly reviewed.

  4. Radiative heat transfer in strongly forward scattering media using the discrete ordinates method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granate, Pedro; Coelho, Pedro J.; Roger, Maxime

    2016-03-01

    The discrete ordinates method (DOM) is widely used to solve the radiative transfer equation, often yielding satisfactory results. However, in the presence of strongly forward scattering media, this method does not generally conserve the scattering energy and the phase function asymmetry factor. Because of this, the normalization of the phase function has been proposed to guarantee that the scattering energy and the asymmetry factor are conserved. Various authors have used different normalization techniques. Three of these are compared in the present work, along with two other methods, one based on the finite volume method (FVM) and another one based on the spherical harmonics discrete ordinates method (SHDOM). In addition, the approximation of the Henyey-Greenstein phase function by a different one is investigated as an alternative to the phase function normalization. The approximate phase function is given by the sum of a Dirac delta function, which accounts for the forward scattering peak, and a smoother scaled phase function. In this study, these techniques are applied to three scalar radiative transfer test cases, namely a three-dimensional cubic domain with a purely scattering medium, an axisymmetric cylindrical enclosure containing an emitting-absorbing-scattering medium, and a three-dimensional transient problem with collimated irradiation. The present results show that accurate predictions are achieved for strongly forward scattering media when the phase function is normalized in such a way that both the scattered energy and the phase function asymmetry factor are conserved. The normalization of the phase function may be avoided using the FVM or the SHDOM to evaluate the in-scattering term of the radiative transfer equation. Both methods yield results whose accuracy is similar to that obtained using the DOM along with normalization of the phase function. Very satisfactory predictions were also achieved using the delta-M phase function, while the delta

  5. Radiative transfer theory applied to ocean bottom modeling.

    PubMed

    Quijano, Jorge E; Zurk, Lisa M

    2009-10-01

    Research on the propagation of acoustic waves in the ocean bottom sediment is of interest for active sonar applications such as target detection and remote sensing. The interaction of acoustic energy with the sea floor sublayers is usually modeled with techniques based on the full solution of the wave equation, which sometimes leads to mathematically intractable problems. An alternative way to model wave propagation in layered media containing random scatterers is the radiative transfer (RT) formulation, which is a well established technique in the electromagnetics community and is based on the principle of conservation of energy. In this paper, the RT equation is used to model the backscattering of acoustic energy from a layered elastic bottom sediment containing distributions of independent scatterers due to a constant single frequency excitation in the water column. It is shown that the RT formulation provides insight into the physical phenomena of scattering and conversion of energy between waves of different polarizations. PMID:19813787

  6. Casimir effect and radiative heat transfer between Chern Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Lopez, Pablo; Grushin, Adolfo; Tse, Wang-Kong; Dalvit, Diego

    2015-03-01

    Chern Insulators are a class of two-dimensional topological materials. Their electronic properties are different from conventional materials, and lead to interesting new physics as quantum Hall effect in absence of an external magnetic field. Here we will review some of their special properties and, in particular, we will discuss the radiative heat transfer and the Casimir effect between two planar Chern Insulators sheets. Finally, we will see how to control the intensity and sign of this Casimir force and the requirements to observe a repulsive Casimir force in the lab with those materials. The research leading to these results has received funding from the People Programme (Marie Curie Actions) of the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under REA Grant Agreement No. 302005.

  7. Matrix operator theory of radiative transfer. I - Rayleigh scattering.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plass, G. N.; Kattawar, G. W.; Catchings, F. E.

    1973-01-01

    An entirely rigorous method for the solution of the equations for radiative transfer based on the matrix operator theory is reviewed. The advantages of the present method are: (1) all orders of the reflection and transmission matrices are calculated at once; (2) layers of any thickness may be combined, so that a realistic model of the atmosphere can be developed from any arbitrary number of layers, each with different properties and thicknesses; (3) calculations can readily be made for large optical depths and with highly anisotropic phase functions; (4) results are obtained for any desired value of the surface albedo including the value unity and for a large number of polar and azimuthal angles; (5) all fundamental equations can be interpreted immediately in terms of the physical interactions appropriate to the problem; and (6) both upward and downward radiance can be calculated at interior points from relatively simple expressions.

  8. Radiative Transfer Theory Applied to Ocean Bottom Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quijano, Jorge Eduardo

    Research on the propagation of acoustic waves in ocean bottom sediment is of interest for active sonar applications such as target detection and remote sensing. Currently, all seabed scattering models available in the literature are based on the full solution of the wave equation, which sometimes leads to mathematically intractable problems. In the electromagnetics community, an alternative formulation that overcomes some of this complexity is radiative transfer theory, which has established itself as an important technique for remote sensing. In this work, radiative transfer (RT) theory is proposed for the first time as a tool for the study of seabed acoustic scattering. The focus of this work is the development of a complete model for the interaction of acoustic energy with water-saturated sediments. The general geometry considered in this study consists of multiple elastic layers containing random distributions of inhomogeneities. The accuracy of the proposed model is assessed by rigorous experimental work, with data collected from random media in which acoustic properties such as the concentration and size of scatterers, background material, and the presence of elastic boundaries are controlled parameters. First, the ultrasound RT model is implemented for layers of finite thickness. The range of applicability of the proposed model is then illustrated using scaled experiments conducted at the Northwest Electromagnetics and Acoustics Research Laboratory (NEAR-Lab). Next, the model is applied to field data collected in a region with gassy sediments and compared to the formulation originally used to explain these data. Finally, insight into the emerging area of study of the time-dependent RT formulation is presented, and its role in the representation of finite broadband pulses is discussed.

  9. Microwave radiative transfer through horizontally inhomogeneous precipitating clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberti, Laura; Haferman, Jeff; Kummerow, Christian

    1994-01-01

    Recent advances in cloud microphysical models have led to realistic three-dimensional distributions of cloud constituents. Radiative transfer schemes can make use of this detailed knowledge in order to study the effects of horizontal as well as vertical inhomogeneities within clouds. This study looks specifically at the differences between three-dimensional radiative transfer results and those obtained by plane parallel, independent pixel approximations in the microwave spectrum. A three-dimensional discrete ordinates method as well as a backward Monte Carlo method are used to calculate realistic radiances emerging from the cloud. Analyses between these models and independent pixel approximations reveal that plane parallel approximations introduce two distinct types of errors. The first error is physical in nature and is related to the fact that plane parallel approximations do not allow energy to leak out of dense areas into surrouding areas. In general, it was found that these errors are quite small for emission-dominated frequencies (37 GHz and lower) and that physical errors are highly pronounced only at scattering frequencies (85 GHz) where large deviations and biases up to 8 K averaged over the entire cloud were found. The second error is more geometric in nature and is related to the fact that plane parallel approximations cannot accommodate physical boundaries in the horizontal dimension for off-nadir viewing angles. The geometric errors were comparable in magnitude for all frequencies. Their magnitude, however, depends on a number of factors including the scheme used to deal with the edge, the nature of the surface, and the viewing angle.

  10. 3D Atmospheric Radiative Transfer for Cloud System-Resolving Models: Forward Modelling and Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Howard Barker; Jason Cole

    2012-05-17

    Utilization of cloud-resolving models and multi-dimensional radiative transfer models to investigate the importance of 3D radiation effects on the numerical simulation of cloud fields and their properties.

  11. Radiative transfer and radiative driving of outflows in active galactic nuclei and starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, G. S.; Ostriker, J. P.; Ciotti, L.

    2012-12-01

    To facilitate the study of black hole fuelling, star formation and feedback in galaxies, we outline a method for treating the radial forces on interstellar gas due to absorption of photons by dust grains. The method gives the correct behaviour in all of the relevant limits [dominated by the central point source; dominated by the distributed isotropic source; optically thin; optically thick to ultraviolet (UV)/optical; optically thick to infrared (IR)] and reasonably interpolates between the limits when necessary. The method is explicitly energy conserving so that UV/optical photons that are absorbed are not lost, but are rather redistributed to the IR where they may scatter out of the galaxy. We implement the radiative transfer algorithm in a two-dimensional hydrodynamical code designed to study feedback processes in the context of early-type galaxies. We find that the dynamics and final state of simulations are measurably but only moderately affected by radiative forces on dust, even when assumptions about the dust-to-gas ratio are varied from zero to a value appropriate for the Milky Way. In simulations with high gas densities designed to mimic ultraluminous IR galaxies with a star formation rate of several hundred solar masses per year, dust makes a more substantial contribution to the dynamics and outcome of the simulation. We find that, despite the large opacity of dust to UV radiation, the momentum input to the flow from radiation very rarely exceeds L/c due to two factors: the low opacity of dust to the re-radiated IR and the tendency for dust to be destroyed by sputtering in hot gas environments. We also develop a simplification of our radiative transfer algorithm that respects the essential physics but is much easier to implement and requires a fraction of the computational cost.

  12. Radiative transfer and spectroscopic databases: A line-sampling Monte Carlo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galtier, Mathieu; Blanco, Stéphane; Dauchet, Jérémi; El Hafi, Mouna; Eymet, Vincent; Fournier, Richard; Roger, Maxime; Spiesser, Christophe; Terrée, Guillaume

    2016-03-01

    Dealing with molecular-state transitions for radiative transfer purposes involves two successive steps that both reach the complexity level at which physicists start thinking about statistical approaches: (1) constructing line-shaped absorption spectra as the result of very numerous state-transitions, (2) integrating over optical-path domains. For the first time, we show here how these steps can be addressed simultaneously using the null-collision concept. This opens the door to the design of Monte Carlo codes directly estimating radiative transfer observables from spectroscopic databases. The intermediate step of producing accurate high-resolution absorption spectra is no longer required. A Monte Carlo algorithm is proposed and applied to six one-dimensional test cases. It allows the computation of spectrally integrated intensities (over 25 cm-1 bands or the full IR range) in a few seconds, regardless of the retained database and line model. But free parameters need to be selected and they impact the convergence. A first possible selection is provided in full detail. We observe that this selection is highly satisfactory for quite distinct atmospheric and combustion configurations, but a more systematic exploration is still in progress.

  13. First and Higher Order Effects on Zero Order Radiative Transfer Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelam, M.; Mohanty, B.

    2014-12-01

    Microwave radiative transfer model are valuable tool in understanding the complex land surface interactions. Past literature has largely focused on local sensitivity analysis for factor priotization and ignoring the interactions between the variables and uncertainties around them. Since land surface interactions are largely nonlinear, there always exist uncertainties, heterogeneities and interactions thus it is important to quantify them to draw accurate conclusions. In this effort, we used global sensitivity analysis to address the issues of variable uncertainty, higher order interactions, factor priotization and factor fixing for zero-order radiative transfer (ZRT) model. With the to-be-launched Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission of NASA, it is very important to have a complete understanding of ZRT for soil moisture retrieval to direct future research and cal/val field campaigns. This is a first attempt to use GSA technique to quantify first order and higher order effects on brightness temperature from ZRT model. Our analyses reflect conditions observed during the growing agricultural season for corn and soybeans in two different regions in - Iowa, U.S.A and Winnipeg, Canada. We found that for corn fields in Iowa, there exist significant second order interactions between soil moisture, surface roughness parameters (RMS height and correlation length) and vegetation parameters (vegetation water content, structure and scattering albedo), whereas in Winnipeg, second order interactions are mainly due to soil moisture and vegetation parameters. But for soybean fields in both Iowa and Winnipeg, we found significant interactions only to exist between soil moisture and surface roughness parameters.

  14. Odyssey: A Public GPU-based Code for General Relativistic Radiative Transfer in Kerr Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Hung-Yi; Yun, Kiyun; Younsi, Ziri; Yoon, Suk-Jin

    2016-04-01

    General relativistic radiative transfer calculations coupled with the calculation of geodesics in the Kerr spacetime are an essential tool for determining the images, spectra, and light curves from matter in the vicinity of black holes. Such studies are especially important for ongoing and upcoming millimeter/submillimeter very long baseline interferometry observations of the supermassive black holes at the centers of Sgr A* and M87. To this end we introduce Odyssey, a graphics processing unit (GPU) based code for ray tracing and radiative transfer in the Kerr spacetime. On a single GPU, the performance of Odyssey can exceed 1 ns per photon, per Runge-Kutta integration step. Odyssey is publicly available, fast, accurate, and flexible enough to be modified to suit the specific needs of new users. Along with a Graphical User Interface powered by a video-accelerated display architecture, we also present an educational software tool, Odyssey_Edu, for showing in real time how null geodesics around a Kerr black hole vary as a function of black hole spin and angle of incidence onto the black hole.

  15. Radiative transfer equation modeling by streamline diffusion modified continuous Galerkin method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Feixiao; Li, Fengyan; Intes, Xavier; Kotha, Shiva P.

    2016-03-01

    Optical tomography has a wide range of biomedical applications. Accurate prediction of photon transport in media is critical, as it directly affects the accuracy of the reconstructions. The radiative transfer equation (RTE) is the most accurate deterministic forward model, yet it has not been widely employed in practice due to the challenges in robust and efficient numerical implementations in high dimensions. Herein, we propose a method that combines the discrete ordinate method (DOM) with a streamline diffusion modified continuous Galerkin method to numerically solve RTE. Additionally, a phase function normalization technique was employed to dramatically reduce the instability of the DOM with fewer discrete angular points. To illustrate the accuracy and robustness of our method, the computed solutions to RTE were compared with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations when two types of sources (ideal pencil beam and Gaussian beam) and multiple optical properties were tested. Results show that with standard optical properties of human tissue, photon densities obtained using RTE are, on average, around 5% of those predicted by MC simulations in the entire/deeper region. These results suggest that this implementation of the finite element method-RTE is an accurate forward model for optical tomography in human tissues.

  16. Radiative transfer equation modeling by streamline diffusion modified continuous Galerkin method.

    PubMed

    Long, Feixiao; Li, Fengyan; Intes, Xavier; Kotha, Shiva P

    2016-03-01

    Optical tomography has a wide range of biomedical applications. Accurate prediction of photon transport in media is critical, as it directly affects the accuracy of the reconstructions. The radiative transfer equation (RTE) is the most accurate deterministic forward model, yet it has not been widely employed in practice due to the challenges in robust and efficient numerical implementations in high dimensions. Herein, we propose a method that combines the discrete ordinate method (DOM) with a streamline diffusion modified continuous Galerkin method to numerically solve RTE. Additionally, a phase function normalization technique was employed to dramatically reduce the instability of the DOM with fewer discrete angular points. To illustrate the accuracy and robustness of our method, the computed solutions to RTE were compared with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations when two types of sources (ideal pencil beam and Gaussian beam) and multiple optical properties were tested. Results show that with standard optical properties of human tissue, photon densities obtained using RTE are, on average, around 5% of those predicted by MC simulations in the entire/deeper region. These results suggest that this implementation of the finite element method-RTE is an accurate forward model for optical tomography in human tissues. PMID:26953662

  17. Nanoscale Radiative Heat Transfer between Graphene Ribbon Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhuomin; Liu, Xianglei

    Near-field radiative heat transfer between two graphene sheets can exceed that between blackbodies due to surface plasmons excited by the graphene sheet. This study shows that, by patterning a single layer of graphene sheet into ribbons, a giant enhancement of the near-field radiative heat flux, by more than one order of magnitude higher than that between two graphene sheets, can be achieved. The mechanism lies in that when the graphene sheet is patterned into an array of ribbons, the closed circular dispersion of graphene plasmons is opened to become hyperbolic, leading to broadband singularities of density of states. Extremely high-k evanescent waves can now couple with hyperbolic graphene plasmons. Exact numerical simulations are used by combining the scattering theory and rigorous coupled-wave analysis. Furthermore, effective medium calculations are used to support the arguments and provide clear physical insights. The findings from this study may open promising pathways for highly efficient thermal management, energy harvesting, and subwavelength thermal imaging. This work was supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences (DE-FG02-06ER46343).

  18. Relativistic radiative transfer and relativistic spherical shell flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2016-06-01

    We examine a radiatively driven spherical flow from a central object, whose thickness is smaller than the radius of the central object, and a plane-parallel approximation can be used-a spherical shell flow. We first solve the relativistic radiative transfer equation iteratively, using a given velocity field, and obtain specific intensities as well as moment quantities. Using the obtained comoving flux, we then solve the relativistic hydrodynamical equation, and obtain a new velocity field. We repeat these double iteration processes until both the intensity and velocity profiles converge. We found that the flow speed v(τ) is roughly approximated as β ≡ v/c = βs(1 - τ/τb), where τ is the optical depth, τb the flow total optical depth, and c the speed of light. We further found that the flow terminal speed vs is roughly expressed as β _s ≡ v_s/c = (Γ hat{F}_0-1)τ_b/dot{m} , where Γ is the central luminosity normalized by the Eddington luminosity, hat{F}_0 the comoving flux normalized by the incident flux, and of the order of unity, and dot{m} the mass-loss rate normalized by the critical mass loss.

  19. A Radiative Transfer Simulation of Water Rotational Excitation in Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V.; Biver, N.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Crovisier, J.; Lecacheux, A.

    2005-08-01

    In order to interpret comet observations of the 557 GHz water line performed with the Odin satellite (e.g., Lecacheux et al. 2003, A&A, 402, 55), we have developed a numerical model for the simulation of optically thick water rotational emission in cometary coma. For the treatment of radiative transfer, we have elaborated a Monte Carlo code based on the accelerated lambda iteration algorithm presented in Hogerheijde and van der Tak (2000, A&A, 362, 697). The model assumes a spherically symmetric density distribution with constant expansion velocity. It includes the seven lowest rotational levels of ortho-water, which are the primarily populated levels in the rotationally cold gas of the coma. Collisions with water and electrons, and infrared pumping, are taken into account. The model is similar to that presented by Bensch and Bergin (2004, ApJ, 615, 531). We compared the results obtained with this new model with those obtained by the model of Bockelee-Morvan (1987, A&A, 181, 169). Bockelee-Morvan used the escape probability formalism to treat radiation trapping, which is in principle only valid for large velocity gradients. Surprisingly, the results of both models differ only by a few percent, showing that the escape probability formalism can be used with good confidence to treat rotational excitation in cometary atmospheres. This model will allow us to prepare future observations by the ESA Herschel Space Observatory. V.Zakharov acknowledges financial support from CNES.

  20. Radiation transfer in metallic-powder beds during laser forming

    SciTech Connect

    Gusarov, A V

    2010-08-03

    This paper presents numerical simulations of two-dimensional radiation transfer in a powder layer that resides on a substrate of the same material and is exposed to a normally incident laser beam with an axisymmetric bell-shaped or top-hat intensity profile. The powder layer is treated as an equivalent homogeneous absorbing/scattering medium with radiative properties defined by the reflectance of the solid phase, the porosity of the powder and its surface area. The model used is applicable when the laser beam diameter far exceeds the particle size of the powder. It is shown that the absorptance of an optically thick layer of opaque powder particles is a universal function of the absorptance of the solid phase and is independent of surface area and porosity, in agreement with experimental data in the literature. The fraction of laser energy absorbed in the powder-substrate system and that absorbed in the substrate decrease with an increase in the reflectance of the material, but the powder bed is then more uniformly heated. (laser technologies)

  1. Relativistic radiative transfer and relativistic spherical shell flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2016-04-01

    We examine a radiatively driven spherical flow from a central object, whose thickness is smaller than the radius of the central object, and a plane-parallel approximation can be used-a spherical shell flow. We first solve the relativistic radiative transfer equation iteratively, using a given velocity field, and obtain specific intensities as well as moment quantities. Using the obtained comoving flux, we then solve the relativistic hydrodynamical equation, and obtain a new velocity field. We repeat these double iteration processes until both the intensity and velocity profiles converge. We found that the flow speed v(τ) is roughly approximated as β ≡ v/c = βs(1 - τ/τb), where τ is the optical depth, τb the flow total optical depth, and c the speed of light. We further found that the flow terminal speed vs is roughly expressed as β _s ≡ v_s/c = (Γ hat{F}_0-1)τ_b/dot{m} , where Γ is the central luminosity normalized by the Eddington luminosity, hat{F}_0 the comoving flux normalized by the incident flux, and of the order of unity, and dot{m} the mass-loss rate normalized by the critical mass loss.

  2. Accounting for dust aerosol size distribution in radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiangnan; Min, Qilong; Peng, Yiran; Sun, Zhian; Zhao, Jian-Qi

    2015-07-01

    The impact of size distribution of mineral dust aerosol on radiative transfer was investigated using the Aerosol Robotic Network-retrieved aerosol size distributions. Three methods for determining the aerosol optical properties using size distributions were discussed. The first is referred to as a bin method in which the aerosol optical properties are determined for each bin of the size distribution. The second is named as an assembly mean method in which the aerosol optical properties are determined with an integration of the aerosol optical parameters over the observed size distribution. The third is a normal parameterization method based on an assumed size distribution. The bin method was used to generate the benchmark results in the radiation calculations against the methods of the assembly mean, and parameterizations based on two size distribution functions, namely, lognormal and gamma were examined. It is seen that the assembly mean method can produce aerosol radiative forcing with accuracy of better than 1%. The accuracies of the parameterizations based on lognormal and gamma size distributions are about 25% and 5%, respectively. Both the lognormal and gamma size distributions can be determined by two parameters, the effective radius and effective variance. The better results from the gamma size distribution can be explained by a third parameter of skewness which is found to be useful for judging how close the assumed distribution is to the observation result. The parameterizations based on the two assumed size distributions are also evaluated in a climate model. The results show that the reflected solar fluxes over the desert areas determined by the scheme based on the gamma size distribution are about 1 W m-2 less than those from the scheme based on the lognormal size distribution, bringing the model results closer to the observations.

  3. Intercomparison of Shortwave Radiative Transfer Codes and Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Halthore, Rangasayi N.; Crisp, David; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Anderson, Gail; Berk, A.; Bonnel, B.; Boucher, Olivier; Chang, Fu-Lung; Chou, Ming-Dah; Clothiaux, Eugene E.; Dubuisson, P.; Fomin, Boris; Fouquart, Y.; Freidenreich, S.; Gautier, Catherine; Kato, Seiji; Laszlo, Istvan; Li, Zhanqing; Mather, Jim H.; Plana-Fattori, Artemio; Ramaswamy, V.; Ricchiazzi, P.; Shiren, Y.; Trishchenko, A.; Wiscombe, Warren J.

    2005-06-03

    Computation of components of shortwave (SW) or solar irradiance in the surface-atmospheric system forms the basis of intercomparison between 16 radiative transfer models of varying spectral resolution ranging from line-by-line models to broadband and general circulation models. In order of increasing complexity the components are: direct solar irradiance at the surface, diffuse irradiance at the surface, diffuse upward flux at the surface, and diffuse upward flux at the top of the atmosphere. These components allow computation of the atmospheric absorptance. Four cases are considered from pure molecular atmospheres to atmospheres with aerosols and atmosphere with a simple uniform cloud. The molecular and aerosol cases allow comparison of aerosol forcing calculation among models. A cloud-free case with measured atmospheric and aerosol properties and measured shortwave radiation components provides an absolute basis for evaluating the models. For the aerosol-free and cloud-free dry atmospheres, models agree to within 1% (root mean square deviation as a percentage of mean) in broadband direct solar irradiance at surface; the agreement is relatively poor at 5% for a humid atmosphere. A comparison of atmospheric absorptance, computed from components of SW radiation, shows that agreement among models is understandably much worse at 3% and 10% for dry and humid atmospheres, respectively. Inclusion of aerosols generally makes the agreement among models worse than when no aerosols are present, with some exceptions. Modeled diffuse surface irradiance is higher than measurements for all models for the same model inputs. Inclusion of an optically thick low-cloud in a tropical atmosphere, a stringent test for multiple scattering calculations, produces, in general, better agreement among models for a low solar zenith angle (SZA = 30?) than for a high SZA (75?). All models show about a 30% increase in broadband absorptance for 30? SZA relative to the clear-sky case and almost no

  4. A hybrid transport-diffusion method for Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffery D. . E-mail: jdd@lanl.gov; Urbatsch, Todd J. . E-mail: tmonster@lanl.gov; Evans, Thomas M. . E-mail: tme@lanl.gov; Buksas, Michael W. . E-mail: mwbuksas@lanl.gov

    2007-03-20

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Monte Carlo particle-transport simulations in diffusive media. If standard Monte Carlo is used in such media, particle histories will consist of many small steps, resulting in a computationally expensive calculation. In DDMC, particles take discrete steps between spatial cells according to a discretized diffusion equation. Each discrete step replaces many small Monte Carlo steps, thus increasing the efficiency of the simulation. In addition, given that DDMC is based on a diffusion equation, it should produce accurate solutions if used judiciously. In practice, DDMC is combined with standard Monte Carlo to form a hybrid transport-diffusion method that can accurately simulate problems with both diffusive and non-diffusive regions. In this paper, we extend previously developed DDMC techniques in several ways that improve the accuracy and utility of DDMC for nonlinear, time-dependent, radiative-transfer calculations. The use of DDMC in these types of problems is advantageous since, due to the underlying linearizations, optically thick regions appear to be diffusive. First, we employ a diffusion equation that is discretized in space but is continuous in time. Not only is this methodology theoretically more accurate than temporally discretized DDMC techniques, but it also has the benefit that a particle's time is always known. Thus, there is no ambiguity regarding what time to assign a particle that leaves an optically thick region (where DDMC is used) and begins transporting by standard Monte Carlo in an optically thin region. Also, we treat the interface between optically thick and optically thin regions with an improved method, based on the asymptotic diffusion-limit boundary condition, that can produce accurate results regardless of the angular distribution of the incident Monte Carlo particles. Finally, we develop a technique for estimating radiation momentum deposition during the

  5. Analytical discrete ordinate method for radiative transfer in dense vegetation canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picca, Paolo; Furfaro, Roberto

    2013-03-01

    The radiative transfer (RT) in dense vegetation canopies can be approximated via linear Boltzmann equation. However, the directionality of the basic scattering element (i.e. the canopy leaf) makes the medium inherently anisotropic and introduces special features in the definition of both scattering kernel and total cross section. In this paper, a classical methodology for the solution of transport problem, namely the analytical discrete ordinate (ADO) method, is extended to account for the peculiarities of photon transport into dense vegetation canopies. It is demonstrated that the special symmetries arising from modeling the leaf as a bi-Lambertian scatterer, enable the derivation of the ADO equations for canopy transport. Several numerical tests have been performed to evaluate the accuracy of ADO against numerical benchmarks available in the literature. The results show that the proposed methodology is highly accurate, computationally efficient and may set future standards for numerical transport in dense vegetation canopies.

  6. Inversion of chlorophyll contents by use of hyperspectral CHRIS data based on radiative transfer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M. C.; Niu, X. F.; Chen, S. B.; Guo, P. J.; Yang, Q.; Wang, Z. J.

    2014-03-01

    Chlorophyll content, the most important pigment related to photosynthesis, is the key parameter for vegetation growth. The continuous spectrum characteristics of ground objects can be captured through hyperspectral remotely sensed data. In this study, based on the coniferous forest radiative transfer model, chlorophyll contents were inverted by use of hyperspectral CHRIS data in the coniferous forest coverage of Changbai Mountain Area. In addition, the sensitivity of LIBERTY model was analyzed. The experimental results validated that the reflectance simulation of different chlorophyll contents was coincided with that of the field measurement, and hyperspectral vegetation indices applied to the quantitative inversion of chlorophyll contents was feasible and accurate. This study presents a reasonable method of chlorophyll inversion for the coniferous forest, promotes the inversion precision, is of significance in coniferous forest monitoring.

  7. Radiative transfer in the surfaces of atmosphereless bodies. III - Interpretation of lunar photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumme, K.; Irvine, W. M.

    1982-01-01

    Narrowband and UBV photoelectric phase curves of the entire lunar disk and surface photometry of some craters have been interpreted using a newly developed generalized radiative transfer theory for planetary regoliths. The data are well fitted by the theory, yielding information on both macroscopic and microscopic lunar properties. Derived values for the integrated disk geometric albedo are considerably higher than quoted previously, because of the present inclusion of an accurately determined opposition effect. The mean surface roughness, defined as the ratio of the height to the radius of a typical irregularity, is found to be 0.9 + or - 0.1, or somewhat less than the mean value of 1.2 obtained for the asteroids. From the phase curves, wavelength-dependent values of the single scattering albedo and the Henyey-Greenstein asymmetry factor for the average surface particle are derived.

  8. Image Reconstruction for Diffuse Optical Tomography Based on Radiative Transfer Equation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bo; Tang, Jinping

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse optical tomography is a novel molecular imaging technology for small animal studies. Most known reconstruction methods use the diffusion equation (DA) as forward model, although the validation of DA breaks down in certain situations. In this work, we use the radiative transfer equation as forward model which provides an accurate description of the light propagation within biological media and investigate the potential of sparsity constraints in solving the diffuse optical tomography inverse problem. The feasibility of the sparsity reconstruction approach is evaluated by boundary angular-averaged measurement data and internal angular-averaged measurement data. Simulation results demonstrate that in most of the test cases the reconstructions with sparsity regularization are both qualitatively and quantitatively more reliable than those with standard L2 regularization. Results also show the competitive performance of the split Bregman algorithm for the DOT image reconstruction with sparsity regularization compared with other existing L1 algorithms. PMID:25648064

  9. A conjugate gradient method for solving the non-LTE line radiation transfer problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paletou, F.; Anterrieu, E.

    2009-12-01

    This study concerns the fast and accurate solution of the line radiation transfer problem, under non-LTE conditions. We propose and evaluate an alternative iterative scheme to the classical ALI-Jacobi method, and to the more recently proposed Gauss-Seidel and successive over-relaxation (GS/SOR) schemes. Our study is indeed based on applying a preconditioned bi-conjugate gradient method (BiCG-P). Standard tests, in 1D plane parallel geometry and in the frame of the two-level atom model with monochromatic scattering are discussed. Rates of convergence between the previously mentioned iterative schemes are compared, as are their respective timing properties. The smoothing capability of the BiCG-P method is also demonstrated.

  10. Some critical remarks about the radiative heat transfer in air frame cavities according to EN ISO 10077-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuccurullo, G.; Giordano, L.

    2015-11-01

    Thermal performances of windows frames are established, in Europe, by the international standard UNI EN ISO 10077-2:2012. The standard introduces an equivalent thermal conductivity for air frame cavities thus simplifying the original combined heat transfer problem to a merely two-dimensional conductive one. The equivalence is referred to a rectangular cavity and is not able to fully recover the same radiative heat flux involved in the original problem. In view of that, the paper is focused on the radiative heat transfer taking place in the air cavities and aims to check if different equivalence criteria could lead to improved results. Thus, numerical tests involving an accurate description of radiative heat transfer in air cavities are compared to the simplified fully-conductive one provided by the standard. Results show that different criteria lead to quite different results. The optimal criterion turns out to depend on both geometrical and surface radiative parameters. It is also shown that, in any case, a proper radiative resistance but not the one suggested by the ISO 10077 should be adopted.

  11. Radiative transfer modeling of the OI 135.6 nm emission in the nighttime ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jianqi; Makela, Jonathan J.; Kamalabadi, Farzad; Meier, R. R.

    2015-11-01

    Remote sensing of the nighttime OI 135.6 nm emissions has been a widely used method for measuring the F region ionospheric plasma densities. In this work, we first develop a comprehensive radiative transfer model from first principles to investigate the effects of different physical processes on the production and transport of the 135.6 nm photons in the ionosphere and then propose a new approach for estimating electron densities from the nightglow. The forward modeling investigation indicates that under certain conditions mutual neutralization can contribute up to ˜38% of the total production of the nighttime 135.6 nm emissions. Moreover, depending on the ionospheric conditions, resonant scattering by atomic oxygen and pure absorption by oxygen molecules can reduce the limb brightness observed by satellite-borne instruments by up to ˜40% while enhancing the brightness viewing in the nadir direction by typically ˜25%. Further analysis shows that without properly addressing these effects in the inversion process, the peak electron density in the F region (NmF2) obtained using limb observations can be overestimated by up to ˜24%. For accurate estimation of the ionospheric electron density, we develop a new type of inverse model that accounts for the effects of mutual neutralization, resonant scattering, and pure absorption. This inversion method requires the knowledge of O and O2 densities in order to solve the radiative transfer equations. Application of the inverse model to the nighttime ionosphere in the noiseless cases demonstrates that the electron density can be accurately quantified with only ˜1% error in NmF2 and hmF2.

  12. Inversion of a radiative transfer model for estimation of rice chlorophyll content using support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jie; Yan, Zhenguo; Wei, Jingyi

    2014-11-01

    Accurate retrieval of crop chlorophyll content is of great importance for crop growth monitoring, crop stress situations, and the crop yield estimation. This study focused on retrieval of rice chlorophyll content from data through radiative transfer model inversion. A field campaign was carried out in September 2009 in the farmland of ChangChun, Jinlin province, China. A different set of 10 sites of the same species were used in 2009 for validation of methodologies. Reflectance of rice was collected using ASD field spectrometer for the solar reflective wavelengths (350-2500 nm), chlorophyll content of rice was measured by SPAD-502 chlorophyll meter. Each sample sites was recorded with a Global Position System (GPS).Firstly, the PROSPECT radiative transfer model was inverted using support vector machine in order to link rice spectrum and the corresponding chlorophyll content. Secondly, genetic algorithms were adopted to select parameters of support vector machine, then support vector machine was trained the training data set, in order to establish leaf chlorophyll content estimation model. Thirdly, a validation data set was established based on hyperspectral data, and the leaf chlorophyll content estimation model was applied to the validation data set to estimate leaf chlorophyll content of rice in the research area. Finally, the outcome of the inversion was evaluated using the calculated R2 and RMSE values with the field measurements. The results of the study highlight the significance of support vector machine in estimating leaf chlorophyll content of rice. Future research will concentrated on the view of the definition of satellite images and the selection of the best measurement configuration for accurate estimation of rice characteristics.

  13. Multi-scale methods for the solution of the radiative transfer equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Pedro J.; Crouseilles, Nicolas; Pereira, Pedro; Roger, Maxime

    2016-03-01

    Various methods have been developed and tested over the years to solve the radiative transfer equation (RTE) with different results and trade-offs. Although the RTE is extensively used, the approximate diffusion equation is sometimes preferred, particularly in optically thick media, due to the lower computational requirements. Recently, multi-scale models, namely the domain decomposition methods, the micro-macro model and the hybrid transport-diffusion model, have been proposed as an alternative to the RTE. In domain decomposition methods, the domain is split into two subdomains, namely a mesoscopic subdomain where the RTE is solved and a macroscopic subdomain where the diffusion equation is solved. In the micro-macro and hybrid transport-diffusion models, the radiation intensity is decomposed into a macroscopic component and a mesoscopic one. In both cases, the aim is to reduce the computational requirements, while maintaining the accuracy, or to improve the accuracy for similar computational requirements. In this paper, these multi-scale methods are described, and the application of the micro-macro and hybrid transport-diffusion models to three-dimensional transient problems is reported. It is shown that when the diffusion approximation is accurate, but not over the entire domain, the multi-scale methods may improve the solution accuracy in comparison with the solution of the RTE. The order of accuracy of the numerical schemes and the radiative properties of the medium play a key role in the performance of the multi-scale methods.

  14. Correlated k-distribution method for radiative transfer in climate models: Application to effect of cirrus clouds on climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, A. A.; Wang, W. C.; Hansen, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    A radiative transfer method appropriate for use in simple climate models and three dimensional global climate models was developed. It is fully interactive with climate changes, such as in the temperature-pressure profile, cloud distribution, and atmospheric composition, and it is accurate throughout the troposphere and stratosphere. The vertical inhomogeneity of the atmosphere is accounted for by assuming a correlation of gaseous k-distributions of different pressures and temperatures. Line-by-line calculations are made to demonstrate that The method is remarkably accurate. The method is then used in a one-dimensional radiative-convective climate model to study the effect of cirrus clouds on surface temperature. It is shown that an increase in cirrus cloud cover can cause a significant warming of the troposphere and the Earth's surface, by the mechanism of an enhanced green-house effect. The dependence of this phenomenon on cloud optical thickness, altitude, and latitude is investigated.

  15. Application of the discrete ordinates method to combined conductive and radiative heat transfer in a two-dimensional complex geometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakami, M.; Charette, A.; Le Dez, V.

    1996-10-01

    This paper describes a new approach for determining the radiative intensity and temperature fields in a semi-transparent medium for coupled radiative - conductive heat transfer in two-dimensional enclosures. The boundary surfaces are uniformly gray with prescribed emissivities and temperatures. The medium is radiatively absorbing - emitting - scattering and gray. The method is a modification of the discrete ordinates method based on the incorporation of directional ray propagation relations within the cells. The algorithm is applicable to enclosures of arbitrary geometry and does not generate numerical oscillations and negative intensities which can appear in the traditional technique. This is made possible by solving the radiative transfer equation exactly along a set of discretized directions. The method can handle triangular grids of any type, structured or unstructured, and is thus compatible with the finite element technique - which is used for the conduction part of the present coupled problem. A summary of the basic equations is given, followed by a brief assessment of the method for pure radiation. Cases of combined conduction - radiation are then presented and the results are compared with those obtained by other researchers. It is shown that the method has no limitation with respect to geometry and is accurate over a wide range of optical thicknesses.

  16. A scalable plant-resolving radiative transfer model based on optimized GPU ray tracing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new model for radiative transfer in participating media and its application to complex plant canopies is presented. The goal was to be able to efficiently solve complex canopy-scale radiative transfer problems while also representing sub-plant heterogeneity. In the model, individual leaf surfaces ...

  17. Best estimate radiation heat transfer model developed for TRAC-BD1

    SciTech Connect

    Spore, J.W.; Giles, M.M.; Shumway, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    A best estimate radiation heat transfer model for analysis of BWR fuel bundles has been developed and compared with 8 x 8 fuel bundle data. The model includes surface-to-surface and surface-to-two-phase fluid radiation heat transfer. A simple method of correcting for anisotropic reflection effects has been included in the model.

  18. Classification and radiative-transfer modeling of meteorite spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentikäinen, H.; Penttilä, A.; Peltoniemi, J.; Muinonen, K.

    2014-07-01

    The interpretation of asteroid spectra is closely tied to surface structure and composition. Asteroid surfaces are usually assumed to be covered with a regolith, which is a mixture of mineral grains ranging from micrometers to centimeters in size. The inverse problem of deducing the characteristics of the grains from the scattering of light (e.g., using photometric and polarimetric observations) is difficult. Meteorite spectroscopy can be a valuable alternative source of information considering that unweathered meteoritic ''falls'' are almost pristine samples of their parent bodies. Reflectance spectra of 18 different meteorite samples were measured with the Finnish Geodetic Institute Field Goniospectrometer (FIGIFIGO) covering a wavelength range of 450--2250 nm [1,2]. The measurements expand the database of reflectance spectra obtained by Paton et al. [3] and Gaffey [4]. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) performed on the spectra indicates a separation of the undifferentiated ordinary chondrites and the differentiated achondrites. The principal components also suggest a discrimination between the spectra of ordinary chondrites with petrologic grades 5 and 6. The distinction is not present when the data are supplemented with the spectra from the two other data sets obtained with differing measuring techniques. To further investigate the different classifications, the PCA is implemented with selected spectral features contrary to the previous analyses, which encompassed the complete spectra. Single-scattering albedos for meteoritic fundamental scatterers were derived with a Monte Carlo radiative-transfer model [1]. In the derivation, realistic scattering phase functions were utilized. The functions were obtained by fitting triple Henyey-Greenstein functions to the measured scattering phase functions of olivine powder for two different size distributions [5,6]. The simulated reflectances for different scattering phase functions were matched to the measured meteorite

  19. Importance of Accurate Liquid Water Path for Estimation of Solar Radiation in Warm Boundary Layer Clouds: An Observational Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Manajit; Clothiaux, Eugene E.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Kato, Seiji; Min, Qilong

    2003-09-15

    A one-year observational study of overcast boundary layer stratus at the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Southern Great Plains site illustrates that surface radiation is primarily sensitive to cloud liquid water path, with cloud drop effective radius having a secondary influence. The mean, median and standard deviation of cloud liquid water path and cloud drop effective radius for the dataset are 0.120 mm, 0.101 mm, 0.108 mm, and 7.38 {micro}m, 7.13 {micro}m, 2.39 {micro}m, respectively. Radiative transfer calculations demonstrate that cloud optical depth and cloud normalized forcing are respectively three and six times as sensitive to liquid water path variations as they are to effective radius variations, when the observed ranges of each of those variables is considered. Overall, there is a 79% correlation between observed and computed surface fluxes when using a fixed effective radius of 7.5 {micro}m and observed liquid water paths in the calculations. One conclusion from this study is that measurement of the indirect aerosol effect will be problematic at the site, as variations in cloud liquid water path will most likely mask effects of variations in particle size.

  20. THREE-DIMENSIONAL RADIATION TRANSFER IN YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, B. A.; Honor, J.; Robitaille, T. P.; Bjorkman, J. E.; Dong, R.; Wolff, M. J.; Wood, K.

    2013-08-15

    We have updated our publicly available dust radiative transfer code (HOCHUNK3D) to include new emission processes and various three-dimensional (3D) geometries appropriate for forming stars. The 3D geometries include warps and spirals in disks, accretion hotspots on the central star, fractal clumping density enhancements, and misaligned inner disks. Additional axisymmetric (2D) features include gaps in disks and envelopes, ''puffed-up inner rims'' in disks, multiple bipolar cavity walls, and iteration of disk vertical structure assuming hydrostatic equilibrium (HSEQ). We include the option for simple power-law envelope geometry, which, combined with fractal clumping and bipolar cavities, can be used to model evolved stars as well as protostars. We include non-thermal emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and very small grains, and external illumination from the interstellar radiation field. The grid structure was modified to allow multiple dust species in each cell; based on this, a simple prescription is implemented to model dust stratification. We describe these features in detail, and show example calculations of each. Some of the more interesting results include the following: (1) outflow cavities may be more clumpy than infalling envelopes. (2) PAH emission in high-mass stars may be a better indicator of evolutionary stage than the broadband spectral energy distribution slope; and related to this, (3) externally illuminated clumps and high-mass stars in optically thin clouds can masquerade as young stellar objects. (4) Our HSEQ models suggest that dust settling is likely ubiquitous in T Tauri disks, in agreement with previous observations.

  1. Radiative transfer calculated from a Markov chain formalism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, L. W.; House, L. L.

    1978-01-01

    The theory of Markov chains is used to formulate the radiative transport problem in a general way by modeling the successive interactions of a photon as a stochastic process. Under the minimal requirement that the stochastic process is a Markov chain, the determination of the diffuse reflection or transmission from a scattering atmosphere is equivalent to the solution of a system of linear equations. This treatment is mathematically equivalent to, and thus has many of the advantages of, Monte Carlo methods, but can be considerably more rapid than Monte Carlo algorithms for numerical calculations in particular applications. We have verified the speed and accuracy of this formalism for the standard problem of finding the intensity of scattered light from a homogeneous plane-parallel atmosphere with an arbitrary phase function for scattering. Accurate results over a wide range of parameters were obtained with computation times comparable to those of a standard 'doubling' routine. The generality of this formalism thus allows fast, direct solutions to problems that were previously soluble only by Monte Carlo methods. Some comparisons are made with respect to integral equation methods.

  2. Radiative transfer in cylindrical threads with incident radiation. VII. Multi-thread models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrosse, N.; Rodger, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: Our aim is to improve on previous radiative transfer calculations in illuminated cylindrical threads to better understand the physical conditions in cool solar chromospheric and coronal structures commonly observed in hydrogen and helium lines. Methods: We solved the radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations in a two-dimensional cross-section of a cylindrical structure oriented horizontally and lying above the solar surface. The cylinder is filled with a mixture of hydrogen and helium and is illuminated at a given altitude from the solar disc. We constructed simple models made from a single thread or from an ensemble of several threads along the line of sight. This first use of two-dimensional, multi-thread fine structure modelling combining hydrogen and helium radiative transfer allowed us to compute synthetic emergent spectra from cylindrical structures and to study the effect of line-of-sight integration of an ensemble of threads under a range of physical conditions. We analysed the effects of variations in temperature distribution and in gas pressure. We considered the effect of multi-thread structures within a given field of view and the effect of peculiar velocities between the structures in a multi-thread model. We compared these new models to the single thread model and tested them with varying parameters. Results: The presence of a temperature gradient, with temperature increasing towards the edge of the cylindrical thread, reduces the relative importance of the incident radiation coming from the solar disc on the emergent intensities of most hydrogen and helium lines. We also find that when assuming randomly displaced threads in a given field of view, the integrated intensities of optically thick and thin transitions behave considerably differently. In optically thin lines, the emergent intensity increases proportionally with the number of threads, and the spatial variation of the intensity becomes increasingly homogeneous. Optically

  3. Effect of radiative heat transfer on the convective stability of a fluid in a slot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kural, O.

    1988-06-01

    A fluid, confined between two vertical flat plates, with a linear temperature gradient decreasing upwards, is investigated analytically for convective stability under the influence of radiative heat transfer. The effect of radiative transfer is accounted for by use of the Milne-Eddington differential approximation. It is shown that three dimensionless parameters influence the stability: the optical thickness, tau, a parameter A which compares radiative and conductive fluxes, and E, which combines the effects of boundary surface properties with the 'color' properties of the medium. It is shown that radiative heat transfer has a stabilizing effect on the system and that A and tau exert strong influences.

  4. Calculation of radiative properties of SF6-C2F4 thermal plasmas—application to radiative transfer in high-voltage circuit breakers modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, C.; Cressault, Y.; Gleizes, A.; Bousoltane, K.

    2014-01-01

    Radiative transfer is a key point for accurate simulations of arcs in high voltage circuit breakers where the plasma is mainly composed, at high current, of a mixture of SF6 and PTFE vapours (C2F4 and decomposition products). Assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium, we have built a database of absorption coefficients over almost 300 000 spectral points, for a pressure range between 1 and 100 bar, temperatures from 300 to 50 000 K, and proportions from pure SF6 to pure C2F4. From these data, we have calculated the mean absorption coefficients (MAC) by considering several definitions of the mean coefficient and several spectral ranges or intervals. The choice between the various definitions was operated using a one dimensional radiative transfer model with imposed temperature profiles. The results showed that a combination of a normal average over the molecular continuum at low temperature, with a mixed definition of Planck average at high temperature gives the most accurate results. The optimization of the number of intervals for the definition of the MAC database was performed and showed that the accuracy on the radiative flux and on the divergence of the flux depends on the temperature profile. A good compromise is obtained with five or seven intervals.

  5. Transient Radiative Transfer Equation Applied to Oceanographic Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Kunal; Churnside, James H.

    1999-02-01

    We estimate the optical signal for an oceanographic lidar from the one-dimensional transient (time-dependent) radiative transfer equation using the discrete ordinates method. An oceanographic lidar directs a pulsed blue or green laser into the ocean and measures the time-dependent backscattered light. A large number of parameters affect the performance of such a system. Here the optical signal that is available to the receiver is calculated, rather than the receiver output, to reduce the number of parameters. The effects of albedo of a uniform water column are investigated. The effects of a school of fish in the water are also investigated for various school depths, thicknesses, and densities. The attenuation of a lidar signal is found to be greater than the diffuse attenuation coefficient at low albedo and close to it at higher albedo. The presence of fish in the water is found to have a significant effect on the signal at low to moderate albedo, but not at high albedo.

  6. History of one family of atmospheric radiative transfer codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Gail P.; Wang, Jinxue; Hoke, Michael L.; Kneizys, F. X.; Chetwynd, James H., Jr.; Rothman, Laurence S.; Kimball, L. M.; McClatchey, Robert A.; Shettle, Eric P.; Clough, Shepard (.; Gallery, William O.; Abreu, Leonard W.; Selby, John E. A.

    1994-12-01

    Beginning in the early 1970's, the then Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory initiated a program to develop computer-based atmospheric radiative transfer algorithms. The first attempts were translations of graphical procedures described in a 1970 report on The Optical Properties of the Atmosphere, based on empirical transmission functions and effective absorption coefficients derived primarily from controlled laboratory transmittance measurements. The fact that spectrally-averaged atmospheric transmittance (T) does not obey the Beer-Lambert Law (T equals exp(-(sigma) (DOT)(eta) ), where (sigma) is a species absorption cross section, independent of (eta) , the species column amount along the path) at any but the finest spectral resolution was already well known. Band models to describe this gross behavior were developed in the 1950's and 60's. Thus began LOWTRAN, the Low Resolution Transmittance Code, first released in 1972. This limited initial effort has how progressed to a set of codes and related algorithms (including line-of-sight spectral geometry, direct and scattered radiance and irradiance, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium, etc.) that contain thousands of coding lines, hundreds of subroutines, and improved accuracy, efficiency, and, ultimately, accessibility. This review will include LOWTRAN, HITRAN (atlas of high-resolution molecular spectroscopic data), FASCODE (Fast Atmospheric Signature Code), and MODTRAN (Moderate Resolution Transmittance Code), their permutations, validations, and applications, particularly as related to passive remote sensing and energy deposition.

  7. Transient radiative transfer equation applied to oceanographic lidar.

    PubMed

    Mitra, K; Churnside, J H

    1999-02-20

    We estimate the optical signal for an oceanographic lidar from the one-dimensional transient (time-dependent) radiative transfer equation using the discrete ordinates method. An oceanographic lidar directs a pulsed blue or green laser into the ocean and measures the time-dependent backscattered light. A large number of parameters affect the performance of such a system. Here the optical signal that is available to the receiver is calculated, rather than the receiver output, to reduce the number of parameters. The effects of albedo of a uniform water column are investigated. The effects of a school of fish in the water are also investigated for various school depths, thicknesses, and densities. The attenuation of a lidar signal is found to be greater than the diffuse attenuation coefficient at low albedo and close to it at higher albedo. The presence of fish in the water is found to have a significant effect on the signal at low to moderate albedo, but not at high albedo. PMID:18305688

  8. Radiation Transfer Model for Aerosol Events in the Earth Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Sonoyo; Yokomae, Takuma; Nakata, Makiko; Sano, Itaru

    Recently large scale-forest fire, which damages the Earth environment as biomass burning and emission of carbonaceous particles, frequently occurs due to the unstable climate and/or global warming tendency. It is also known that the heavy soil dust is transported from the China continent to Japan on westerly winds, especially in spring. Furthermore the increasing emis-sions of anthropogenic particles associated with continuing economic growth scatter serious air pollutants. Thus atmospheric aerosols, especially in Asia, are very complex and heavy loading, which is called aerosol event. In the case of aerosol events, it is rather difficult to do the sun/sky photometry from the ground, however satellite observation is an effective for aerosol monitoring. Here the detection algorithms from space for such aerosol events as dust storm or biomass burn-ing are dealt with multispectral satellite data as ADEOS-2/GLI, Terra/Aqua/MODIS and/or GOSAT/CAI first. And then aerosol retrieval algorithms are examined based on new radiation transfer code for semi-infinite atmosphere model. The derived space-based results are validated with ground-based measurements and/or model simulations. Namely the space-or surface-based measurements, multiple scattering calculations and model simulations are synthesized together for aerosol retrieval in this work.

  9. Modeling Planet-Building Stellar Disks with Radiative Transfer Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swearingen, Jeremy R.; Sitko, Michael L.; Whitney, Barbara; Grady, Carol A.; Wagner, Kevin Robert; Champney, Elizabeth H.; Johnson, Alexa N.; Warren, Chelsea C.; Russell, Ray W.; Hammel, Heidi B.; Lisse, Casey M.; Cure, Michel; Kraus, Stefan; Fukagawa, Misato; Calvet, Nuria; Espaillat, Catherine; Monnier, John D.; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Wilner, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the nature of the many planetary systems found outside of our own solar system cannot be completed without knowledge of the beginnings these systems. By detecting planets in very young systems and modeling the disks of material around stars from which they form, we can gain a better understanding of planetary origin and evolution. The efforts presented here have been in modeling two pre-transitional disk systems using a radiative transfer code. With the first of these systems, V1247 Ori, a model that fits the spectral energy distribution (SED) well and whose parameters are consistent with existing interferometry data (Kraus et al 2013) has been achieved. The second of these two systems, SAO 206462, has presented a different set of challenges but encouraging SED agreement between the model and known data gives hope that the model can produce images that can be used in future interferometry work. This work was supported by NASA ADAP grant NNX09AC73G, and the IR&D program at The Aerospace Corporation.

  10. Methods for the solution of radiative transfer equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, M. F.; Fung, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    To obtain an exact solution of the radiative-transfer equation in media where both absorption and scattering are significant, the usual approach is to use a numerical method. Three methods are known in the literature: invariant imbedding, eigenvalue-eigenfunction, and matrix doubling. This paper examines the practical application of these methods to the problem of emission from an inhomogeneous (Rayleigh) layer, the effects of layer parameters on the stability. It is found that invariant imbedding is most suitable for computing emission from an inhomogeneous layer with a temperature profile but tends to be unstable as the optical thickness of the layer increases beyond 0.5. On the other hand, the matrix-doubling method is stable for arbitrary optical thickness but is not suitable for handling multilayers. The eigenvalue-eigenfunction method is more stable than the invariant imbedding as optical thickness increases up to 2.0. It also permits temperature profile in the layer, but the computation is much more complicated. It is less stable than the matrix-doubling method when optical thickness is larger than 2.0. In general, the choice of a method is dependent on the nature of the problem.

  11. Test plan for validation of the radiative transfer equation.

    SciTech Connect

    Ricks, Allen Joseph; Grasser, Thomas W.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Jernigan, Dann A.; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2010-09-01

    As the capabilities of numerical simulations increase, decision makers are increasingly relying upon simulations rather than experiments to assess risks across a wide variety of accident scenarios including fires. There are still, however, many aspects of fires that are either not well understood or are difficult to treat from first principles due to the computational expense. For a simulation to be truly predictive and to provide decision makers with information which can be reliably used for risk assessment the remaining physical processes must be studied and suitable models developed for the effects of the physics. A set of experiments are outlined in this report which will provide soot volume fraction/temperature data and heat flux (intensity) data for the validation of models for the radiative transfer equation. In addition, a complete set of boundary condition measurements will be taken to allow full fire predictions for validation of the entire fire model. The experiments will be performed with a lightly-sooting liquid hydrocarbon fuel fire in the fully turbulent scale range (2 m diameter).

  12. Numerical model for combined conductive and radiative heat transfer in annular packed beds

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiuto, K.; Saito, S.; Ito, K. . Dept. of Production Systems Engineering)

    1993-06-01

    A numerical model is developed for quantitatively analyzing combined conductive and radiative heat transfer in concentric annular packed beds. A packed bed is considered to be a continuous medium for heat transfer, but the porosity distribution within a packed bed is taken into account. To examine the validity of the proposed model, combined conductive and radiative heat transfer through annular packed beds of cordierite or porcelain beads is analyzed numerically using finite differences under conditions corresponding to heat transfer experiments of these packed beds. The resultant temperature profiles and heat transfer characteristics are compared with the experimental results.

  13. A fast all-sky radiative transfer model and its implications for solar energy research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Y.; Sengupta, M.

    2015-12-01

    Radiative transfer models simulating broadband solar radiation, e.g. Rapid Radiation Transfer Model (RRTM) and its GCM applications, have been widely used by atmospheric scientists to model solar resource for various energy applications such as operational forecasting. Due to the complexity of solving the radiative transfer equation, simulating solar radiation under cloudy conditions can be extremely time consuming though many approximations, e.g. two-stream approach and delta-M truncation scheme, have been utilized. To provide a new option to approximate solar radiation, we developed a Fast All-sky Radiation Model for Solar applications (FARMS) using simulated cloud transmittance and reflectance from 16-stream RRTM model runs. The solar irradiances at the land surface were simulated by combining parameterized cloud properties with a fast clear-sky radiative transfer model. Using solar radiation measurements from the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) central facility in Oklahoma as a benchmark against the model simulations, we were able to demonstrate that the accuracy of FARMS was comparable to the two-stream approach. However, FARMS is much more efficient since it does not explicitly solve the radiative transfer equation for each individual cloud condition. We further explored the use of FARMS to promote solar resource assessment and forecasting research through the increased ability to accommodate higher spatial and temporal resolution calculations for the next generation of satellite and numerical weather prediction (NWP) models.

  14. Reverse Monte Carlo ray-tracing for radiative heat transfer in combustion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaojing

    Radiative heat transfer is a dominant heat transfer phenomenon in high temperature systems. With the rapid development of massive supercomputers, the Monte-Carlo ray tracing (MCRT) method starts to see its applications in combustion systems. This research is to find out if Monte-Carlo ray tracing can offer more accurate and efficient calculations than the discrete ordinates method (DOM). Monte-Carlo ray tracing method is a statistical method that traces the history of a bundle of rays. It is known as solving radiative heat transfer with almost no approximation. It can handle nonisotropic scattering and nongray gas mixtures with relative ease compared to conventional methods, such as DOM and spherical harmonics method, etc. There are two schemes in Monte-Carlo ray tracing method: forward and backward/reverse. Case studies and the governing equations demonstrate the advantages of reverse Monte-Carlo ray tracing (RMCRT) method. The RMCRT can be easily implemented for domain decomposition parallelism. In this dissertation, different efficiency improvements techniques for RMCRT are introduced and implemented. They are the random number generator, stratified sampling, ray-surface intersection calculation, Russian roulette, and important sampling. There are two major modules in solving the radiative heat transfer problems: the RMCRT RTE solver and the optical property models. RMCRT is first fully verified in gray, scattering, absorbing and emitting media with black/nonblack, diffuse/nondiffuse bounded surface problems. Sensitivity analysis is carried out with regard to the ray numbers, the mesh resolutions of the computational domain, optical thickness of the media and effects of variance reduction techniques (stratified sampling, Russian roulette). Results are compared with either analytical solutions or benchmark results. The efficiency (the product of error and computation time) of RMCRT has been compared to DOM and suggest great potential for RMCRT's application

  15. Radiative heat transfer in anisotropic many-body systems: Tuning and enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Nikbakht, Moladad

    2014-09-07

    A general formalism for calculating the radiative heat transfer in many body systems with anisotropic component is presented. Our scheme extends the theory of radiative heat transfer in isotropic many body systems to anisotropic cases. In addition, the radiative heating of the particles by the thermal bath is taken into account in our formula. It is shown that the radiative heat exchange (HE) between anisotropic particles and their radiative cooling/heating (RCH) could be enhanced several order of magnitude than that of isotropic particles. Furthermore, we demonstrate that both the HE and RCH can be tuned dramatically by particles relative orientation in many body systems.

  16. Radiative transfer modeling of a coniferous canopy characterized by airborne remote sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solar radiation beneath a forest canopy can have large spatial variations, but his is frequently neglected in radiative transfer models for large-scale applications. To explicitly model spatial variations in sub-canopy radiation, maps of canopy structure are required. Aerial photography and airbor...

  17. A polynomial chaos approach to narrow band modeling of radiative heat transfer in non-uniform gaseous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    An accurate treatment of non-uniformities is required in many applications involving radiative heat transfer in gaseous media. Usual techniques to handle path non-uniformities rely on simplifying assumptions, such as scaling or correlation of gas spectra. Those approximations are usually accurate but may also fail to provide accurate results, especially when large temperature gradients are considered. The objective of the present work is to show that this problem can be treated rigorously. The proposed method can be applied to any arbitrary narrow band model. It is based on some results from Polynomial Chaos' framework and copulas theory. Although the mathematical derivation may appear sophisticated, applying the method is straightforward. It is shown that adding only one coefficient to any uniform narrow band model (for a simple case involving a non-uniform column discretized into two uniform sub-paths) allows to achieve almost LBL accuracy for radiative heat transfer calculations. The technique is described and applied to some "severe" test cases from the literature.

  18. Bio-Optics of the Chesapeake Bay from Measurements and Radiative Transfer Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzortziou, Maria; Herman, Jay R.; Gallegos, Charles L.; Neale, Patrick J.; Subramaniam, Ajit; Harding, Lawrence W., Jr.; Ahmad, Ziauddin

    2005-01-01

    We combined detailed bio-optical measurements and radiative transfer (RT) modeling to perform an optical closure experiment for optically complex and biologically productive Chesapeake Bay waters. We used this experiment to evaluate certain assumptions commonly used when modeling bio-optical processes, and to investigate the relative importance of several optical characteristics needed to accurately model and interpret remote sensing ocean-color observations in these Case 2 waters. Direct measurements were made of the magnitude, variability, and spectral characteristics of backscattering and absorption that are critical for accurate parameterizations in satellite bio-optical algorithms and underwater RT simulations. We found that the ratio of backscattering to total scattering in the mid-mesohaline Chesapeake Bay varied considerably depending on particulate loading, distance from land, and mixing processes, and had an average value of 0.0128 at 530 nm. Incorporating information on the magnitude, variability, and spectral characteristics of particulate backscattering into the RT model, rather than using a volume scattering function commonly assumed for turbid waters, was critical to obtaining agreement between RT calculations and measured radiometric quantities. In situ measurements of absorption coefficients need to be corrected for systematic overestimation due to scattering errors, and this correction commonly employs the assumption that absorption by particulate matter at near infrared wavelengths is zero.

  19. Parameterization and Analysis of 3-D Solar Radiative Transfer in Clouds: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Y. Harrington

    2012-09-21

    This document reports on the research that we have done over the course of our two-year project. The report also covers the research done on this project during a 1 year no-cost extension of the grant. Our work has had two main, inter-related thrusts: The first thrust was to characterize the response of stratocumulus cloud structure and dynamics to systematic changes in cloud infrared radiative cooling and solar heating using one-dimensional radiative transfer models. The second was to couple a three-dimensional (3-D) solar radiative transfer model to the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model that we use to simulate stratocumulus. The purpose of the studies with 3-D radiative transfer was to examine the possible influences of 3-D photon transport on the structure, evolution, and radiative properties of stratocumulus. While 3-D radiative transport has been examined in static cloud environments, few studies have attempted to examine whether the 3-D nature of radiative absorption and emission influence the structure and evolution of stratocumulus. We undertook this dual approach because only a small number of LES simulations with the 3-D radiative transfer model are possible due to the high computational costs. Consequently, LES simulations with a 1-D radiative transfer solver were used in order to examine the portions of stratocumulus parameter space that may be most sensitive to perturbations in the radiative fields. The goal was then to explore these sensitive regions with LES using full 3-D radiative transfer. Our overall goal was to discover whether 3-D radiative processes alter cloud structure and evolution, and whether this may have any indirect implications for cloud radiative properties. In addition, we collaborated with Dr. Tamas Varni, providing model output fields for his attempt at parameterizing 3-D radiative effects for cloud models.

  20. Toward Fast and Accurate Evaluation of Charge On-Site Energies and Transfer Integrals in Supramolecular Architectures Using Linear Constrained Density Functional Theory (CDFT)-Based Methods.

    PubMed

    Ratcliff, Laura E; Grisanti, Luca; Genovese, Luigi; Deutsch, Thierry; Neumann, Tobias; Danilov, Denis; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Beljonne, David; Cornil, Jérôme

    2015-05-12

    A fast and accurate scheme has been developed to evaluate two key molecular parameters (on-site energies and transfer integrals) that govern charge transport in organic supramolecular architecture devices. The scheme is based on a constrained density functional theory (CDFT) approach implemented in the linear-scaling BigDFT code that exploits a wavelet basis set. The method has been applied to model disordered structures generated by force-field simulations. The role of the environment on the transport parameters has been taken into account by building large clusters around the active molecules involved in the charge transfer. PMID:26574411

  1. Numerical modelling and analysing of conjugate radiation- convective heat transfer of fin-tube radiator of spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcov, A.; Hodenkov, A.; Zhuikov, D.

    2015-10-01

    This paper covered the problem of assessing the effectiveness of the section of the fin-tube radiator of space thermal control system. The task of calculating the conjugate radiation-convective heat transfer is presented. The results of numerical simulation are described.

  2. Accurate analysis of electron transfer from quantum dots to metal oxides in quantum dot sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javad Fahimi, Mohammad; Fathi, Davood; Ansari-Rad, Mehdi

    2015-09-01

    Electron transfer rate from quantum dot (QD) to metal oxide (MO) in quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) has an important role in the efficiency. In this work, we analyse the electron transfer rate from CdSe, CdS and CdTe QDs to TiO2, ZnO and SnO2 MOs by extending the related equations with considering various effects, based on the Marcus theory. In this regard, the effects of QD diameter, QD-MO spacing, the crystalline defects, temperature, and the reorganizational energy, on the electron transfer rate are investigated. The results show that, the maximum electron transfer rate is achieved for CdTe QD with the mentioned three MOs. Moreover, in order to direct the designer to reach the appropriate QDs-MOs combinations for obtaining the maximum electron transfer rate, the average electron transfer rate for various combinations is calculated. For the verification of simulation method, a part of work has been compared with the previous experimental and theoretical results, which indicates the correctness of our simulation algorithm.

  3. Radiative Transfer Simulations of Neutron Star Merger Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masaomi; Hotokezaka, Kenta

    2013-10-01

    Mergers of binary neutron stars (NSs) are among the most promising gravitational wave (GW) sources. Next generation GW detectors are expected to detect signals from NS mergers within about 200 Mpc. The detection of electromagnetic wave (EM) counterparts is crucial to understanding the nature of GW sources. Among the possible EM emission from the NS merger, emission powered by radioactive r-process nuclei is one of the best targets for follow-up observations. However, predictions so far have not taken into account detailed r-process element abundances in the ejecta. We perform for the first time radiative transfer simulations of the NS merger ejecta including all the r-process elements from Ga to U. We show that the opacity of the NS merger ejecta is about κ = 10 cm2 g-1, which is higher than that of Fe-rich Type Ia supernova ejecta by a factor of ~100. As a result, the emission is fainter and lasts longer than previously expected. The spectra are almost featureless due to the high expansion velocity and bound-bound transitions of many different r-process elements. We demonstrate that the emission is brighter for a higher mass ratio of the two NSs and a softer equation of state adopted in the merger simulations. Because of the red color of the emission, follow-up observations in red optical and near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths will be the most efficient. At 200 Mpc, the expected brightness of the emission is i = 22-25 AB mag, z = 21-23 AB mag, and 21-24 AB mag in the NIR JHK bands. Thus, observations with wide-field 4 m- and 8 m-class optical telescopes and wide-field NIR space telescopes are necessary. We also argue that the emission powered by radioactive energy can be detected in the afterglow of nearby short gamma-ray bursts.

  4. Magnetic field and radiative transfer modelling of a quiescent prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunár, S.; Schwartz, P.; Dudík, J.; Schmieder, B.; Heinzel, P.; Jurčák, J.

    2014-07-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to analyse the multi-instrument observations of the June 22, 2010 prominence to study its structure in detail, including the prominence-corona transition region and the dark bubble located below the prominence body. Methods: We combined results of the 3D magnetic field modelling with 2D prominence fine structure radiative transfer models to fully exploit the available observations. Results: The 3D linear force-free field model with the unsheared bipole reproduces the morphology of the analysed prominence reasonably well, thus providing useful information about its magnetic field configuration and the location of the magnetic dips. The 2D models of the prominence fine structures provide a good representation of the local plasma configuration in the region dominated by the quasi-vertical threads. However, the low observed Lyman-α central intensities and the morphology of the analysed prominence suggest that its upper central part is not directly illuminated from the solar surface. Conclusions: This multi-disciplinary prominence study allows us to argue that a large part of the prominence-corona transition region plasma can be located inside the magnetic dips in small-scale features that surround the cool prominence material located in the dip centre. We also argue that the dark prominence bubbles can be formed because of perturbations of the prominence magnetic field by parasitic bipoles, causing them to be devoid of the magnetic dips. Magnetic dips, however, form thin layers that surround these bubbles, which might explain the occurrence of the cool prominence material in the lines of sight intersecting the prominence bubbles. Movie and Appendix A are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Testing quasar unification: radiative transfer in clumpy winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, J. H.; Knigge, C.; Long, K. S.; Sim, S. A.; Higginbottom, N.; Mangham, S. W.

    2016-05-01

    Various unification schemes interpret the complex phenomenology of quasars and luminous active galactic nuclei (AGN) in terms of a simple picture involving a central black hole, an accretion disc and an associated outflow. Here, we continue our tests of this paradigm by comparing quasar spectra to synthetic spectra of biconical disc wind models, produced with our state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. Previously, we have shown that we could produce synthetic spectra resembling those of observed broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, but only if the X-ray luminosity was limited to 1043 erg s-1. Here, we introduce a simple treatment of clumping, and find that a filling factor of ˜0.01 moderates the ionization state sufficiently for BAL features to form in the rest-frame UV at more realistic X-ray luminosities. Our fiducial model shows good agreement with AGN X-ray properties and the wind produces strong line emission in, e.g., Lyα and C IV 1550 Å at low inclinations. At high inclinations, the spectra possess prominent LoBAL features. Despite these successes, we cannot reproduce all emission lines seen in quasar spectra with the correct equivalent-width ratios, and we find an angular dependence of emission line equivalent width despite the similarities in the observed emission line properties of BAL and non-BAL quasars. Overall, our work suggests that biconical winds can reproduce much of the qualitative behaviour expected from a unified model, but we cannot yet provide quantitative matches with quasar properties at all viewing angles. Whether disc winds can successfully unify quasars is therefore still an open question.

  6. Ultraviolet Radiative Transfer Modeling of Nearby Galaxies with Extraplanar Dusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinn, Jong-Ho; Seon, Kwang-Il

    2015-12-01

    In order to examine their relation to the host galaxy, the extraplanar dusts of six nearby galaxies are modeled, employing a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. The targets are from the highly inclined galaxies that show dust-scattered ultraviolet halos, and the archival Galaxy Evolution Explorer FUV band images were fitted with the model. The observed images are generally well-reproduced by two dust layers and one light source layer, whose vertical and radial distributions have exponential profiles. We obtained several important physical parameters, such as star formation rate (SFRUV), face-on optical depth, and scale-heights. Three galaxies (NGC 891, NGC 3628, and UGC 11794) show clear evidence for the existence of an extraplanar dust layer. However, it is found that the remaining three targets (IC 5249, NGC 24, and NGC 4173) do not necessarily need a thick dust disk to model the ultraviolet (UV) halo, because its contribution is too small and the UV halo may be caused by the wing part of the GALEX point spread function. This indicates that the galaxy samples reported to have UV halos may be contaminated by galaxies with negligible extraplanar (halo) dust. The galaxies showing evidence of an extraplanar dust layer fall within a narrow range on the scatter plots between physical parameters such as SFRUV and extraplanar dust mass. Several mechanisms that could possibly produce the extraplanar dust are discussed. We also found a hint that the extraplanar dust scale-height might not be much different from the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission characteristic height.

  7. A simplified implementation of the discrete-ordinates method for a class of problems in radiative transfer with polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, R. D. M.; Siewert, C. E.

    2011-12-01

    A simplified implementation of the analytical discrete ordinates (ADO) method in radiative transfer with polarization is presented in this work. The class of problems that can be solved with the simplified ADO approach consists of problems defined in plane-parallel geometry and driven by external illumination in the form of obliquely incident parallel rays. Numerical results of benchmark quality are tabulated for the albedo problem with polarization and Lambert reflection. The new results improve on a tabulation made available in a previous work by the authors that was based on the (less accurate) spherical harmonics method.

  8. Modeling photosynthesis of discontinuous plant canopies by linking Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer model with biochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Q.; Gong, P.; Li, W.

    2015-02-01

    Modeling vegetation photosynthesis is essential for understanding carbon exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The radiative transfer process within plant canopies is one of the key drivers that regulate canopy photosynthesis. Most vegetation cover consists of discrete plant crowns, of which the physical observation departs from the underlying assumption of a homogenous and uniform medium in classic radiative transfer theory. Here we advance the Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer (GORT) model to simulate photosynthesis activities for discontinuous plant canopies. We separate radiation absorption into two components that are absorbed by sunlit and shaded leaves, and derive analytical solutions by integrating over the canopy layer. To model leaf-level and canopy-level photosynthesis, leaf light absorption is then linked to the biochemical process of gas diffusion through leaf stomata. The canopy gap probability derived from GORT differs from classic radiative transfer theory, especially when the leaf area index is high, due to leaf clumping effects. Tree characteristics such as tree density, crown shape, and canopy length affect leaf clumping and regulate radiation interception. Modeled gross primary production (GPP) for two deciduous forest stands could explain more than 80% of the variance of flux tower measurements at both near hourly and daily time scales. We also demonstrate that the ambient CO2 concentration influences daytime vegetation photosynthesis, which needs to be considered in state-of-the-art biogeochemical models. The proposed model is complementary to classic radiative transfer theory and shows promise in modeling the radiative transfer process and photosynthetic activities over discontinuous forest canopies.

  9. A high-order photon Monte Carlo method for radiative transfer in direct numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Modest, M.F.; Haworth, D.C. . E-mail: dch12@psu.edu

    2007-05-01

    A high-order photon Monte Carlo method is developed to solve the radiative transfer equation. The statistical and discretization errors of the computed radiative heat flux and radiation source term are isolated and quantified. Up to sixth-order spatial accuracy is demonstrated for the radiative heat flux, and up to fourth-order accuracy for the radiation source term. This demonstrates the compatibility of the method with high-fidelity direct numerical simulation (DNS) for chemically reacting flows. The method is applied to address radiative heat transfer in a one-dimensional laminar premixed flame and a statistically one-dimensional turbulent premixed flame. Modifications of the flame structure with radiation are noted in both cases, and the effects of turbulence/radiation interactions on the local reaction zone structure are revealed for the turbulent flame. Computational issues in using a photon Monte Carlo method for DNS of turbulent reacting flows are discussed.

  10. Principles of the radiosity method versus radiative transfer for canopy reflectance modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstl, Siegfried A. W.; Borel, Christoph C.

    1992-01-01

    The radiosity method is introduced to plant canopy reflectance modeling. We review the physics principles of the radiosity method which originates in thermal radiative transfer analyses when hot and cold surfaces are considered within a given enclosure. The radiosity equation, which is an energy balance equation for discrete surfaces, is described and contrasted with the radiative transfer equation, which is a volumetric energy balance equation. Comparing the strengths and weaknesses of the radiosity method and the radiative transfer method, we conclude that both methods are complementary to each other. Results of sample calculations are given for canopy models with up to 20,000 discrete leaves.

  11. Discrete-ordinates solution of radiative transfer equation in nonaxisymmetric cylindrical enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Jamaluddin, A.S.; Smith, P.J. Utah, University, Salt Lake City )

    1992-06-01

    The S4 discrete-ordinates approximation is used to solve the radiative transfer equation in nonasymmetric (i.e., three-dimensional) cylindrical enclosures containing absorbing-emitting and scattering media, with and without the temperature profile known a priori. Because neither detailed experimental data nor predictions from a zone or Monte-Carlo model for three-dimensional cylindrical enclosures are available, cylindrical equivalents of three-dimensional rectangular enclosures, for which zone model predictions of radiative transfer are available, are used in model evaluation. Limited evaluation of the model shows that the discrete-ordinates method provides acceptable predictions of radiative transfer in nonaxisymmetric cylindrical enclosures. 12 refs.

  12. SASKTRANIF- a New Engine for the Radiative Transfer Modeling of Solar Occultation Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A.; Lloyd, N.; Rieger, L. A.; Jensen, L.; Walker, K. A.; Degenstein, D. A.; Bourassa, A. E.; Boone, C. D.

    2014-12-01

    Vertical distributions of atmospheric gases measured by satellite instruments can be retrieved by mathematical inversion algorithms involving a forward model of the radiative transfer equation. Hence, an accurate forward model to predict atmospheric spectra is necessary for estimating volume mixing ratio quantities of these gases. One particular forward model is the SASKTRAN Inter-Face (or SASKTRANIF), which is a line by line radiative transfer model typically used to model atmospheric spectra arising from limb scattered sunlight at ultraviolet to near infrared wavelengths, using linear ray tracing and a three dimensional spherical shell atmosphere of homogeneous layers. An additional engine has now been implemented, designed to model solar occultation based measurements. Solar rays are traced through each atmospheric layer using an algorithm that accounts for refraction of the atmosphere. The extinction is calculated along the line of sight for a penetrating ray intersecting multiple layers of the atmosphere given a known chemical composition. By default, the engine uses the HITRAN 2008 spectral database to obtain information about the absorption cross sections of each modeled species, and also utilizes user defined climatologies for a priori information (such as input trace gas concentrations, temperature, and pressure). The new engine is currently in a testing phase. Here, we firstly compare synthesized spectra from SASKTRANIF with spectra derived from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) forward model. Secondly, we retrieve vertical volume mixing ratio profiles of various atmospheric gases by performing a global fit to ACE-FTS measured spectra where model parameters are determined using a Marquardt-Levenberg nonlinear least squares algorithm. Resulting vertical profiles are compared to those derived using the ACE-FTS retrieval system.

  13. An investigation of Titan's aerosols using microwave analog measurements and radiative transfer modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas-Osip, J. E.; Gustafson, B. Å. S.; Kolokolova, L.; Xu, Y.-L.

    2005-12-01

    A combination of laboratory experiments, theoretical modeling, and spacecraft observations is employed to characterize the aerosols in the atmosphere of Titan. The scattering properties of model aerosols were measured using the Microwave Analog Light Scattering Facility at the University of Florida and complemented with theoretical modeling of single scattering characteristics and radiative transfer in Titan's atmosphere. This study compares these modeling results with photopolarimetric observations made over a range of phase angles by the Pioneer 11 and Voyagers 1 and 2 spacecraft. Important results of this work include a survey of the scattering properties of different particle morphologies and compositions necessary to accurately interpret these observations without introducing non-physical assumptions about the particles or requiring additional free parameters to the radiative transfer models. Previous studies use calculation methods which, due to computing memory and processing time requirements, a priori exclude much of the parameter space that the microwave analog laboratory is ideal for exploring. The goal of the present work, to directly constrain aerosol physical characteristics, is addressed by studying in a consistent manner how a variety of particle morphologies and refractive indices affect the polarization and intensity reflected by Titan's atmosphere. Based on comparisons of model results to spacecraft observations, many model morphologies are excluded from further consideration. The most plausible physical particle models suggest that a combination of Rayleigh-like single particles and aggregates that are larger than those previously suggested and investigated [West, R.A., Smith, P.H., 1991. Evidence for aggregate particles in the atmospheres of Titan and Jupiter. Icarus 90, 330-333; Rannou, P., Cabane, M., Botet, R., Chassefière, E., 1997. A new interpretation of scattered light measurements at Titan's limb. J. Geophys. Res. 102, 10997

  14. 3D Hydrodynamical and Radiative Transfer Modeling of Eta Carinae's Colliding Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas Ignatius; Clementel, Nicola; Gull, Theodore R.; Kruip, Chael J. H.; Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Icke, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of full 3D hydrodynamical and radiative transfer simulations of the colliding stellar winds in the massive binary system Eta Carinae (Clementel, Madura, et al. 2014, MNRAS, 443, 2475 and Clementel, Madura, et al. 2015, MNRAS, 447, 2445). We accomplish this by applying the SimpleX algorithm for 3D radiative transfer on an unstructured Voronoi-Delaunay grid to 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the binary colliding winds. We use SimpleX to obtain detailed ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium in 3D. We investigate several computational domain sizes and Luminous Blue Variable primary-star mass-loss rates. We show how the SimpleX simulations can be used to generate synthetic spectral data cubes for comparison to data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph as part of a multi-cycle program to map changes in Eta Carinae's spatially extended interacting wind structures across one binary cycle. Comparison of the HST observations to the SimpleX models can help lead to more accurate constraints on the orbital, stellar, and wind parameters of the Eta Carinae system, such as the LBV primary's mass-loss rate and the companion star's temperature and luminosity. We furthermore present new methods of visualizing and interacting with output from complex 3D numerical simulations, including 3D interactive graphics and 3D printing (Madura et al. 2015, arXiv:1503.00716). While we initially focus specifically on Eta Carinae, the methods employed can be applied to numerous other colliding wind (WR 140, WR 137, WR 19) and dusty ‘pinwheel’ (WR 112, WR 104, WR 98a) binary systems. Coupled with 3D hydrodynamical simulations, SimpleX simulations have the potential to help determine the regions where dust can form and survive in these unique objects.

  15. Development of Limb-Scattering Radiative Transfer Models for Mars Remote Sensing and Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Flittner, D. E.; Moncet, J.; Uymin, G.; Wolff, M. J.

    2009-09-01

    We have commenced the development of efficient and accurate radiative transfer models for scattering and gaseous absorption in a spherical atmosphere, through a combination of the Gauss-Seidel Spherical Radiative Transfer (GSSRTM) and the Optimal Spectral Sampling (OSS) models. The combined models will be made available to the research community for use in validation, retrievals, and data assimilation from limb-sounding instruments, particularly the Mars Climate Sounder and future instruments for Mars and other planets. This work is very timely, as new instrument concepts will emerge from the ongoing NRC Decadal Survey. The traditional way of training an OSS model (e.g., for a down-looking configuration in the thermal regime) is directly in radiances. Radiance training allows for taking into account variations across wide spectral bands (e.g., the Planck function, cloud/aerosol optical properties, surface properties) in the OSS node selection and weights calculation. However, the GSSRTM model is slow when run at line-by-line resolution. Consequently, we are investigating training a first-step OSS model (at 1 cm-1 resolution) to fit transmittances (rather than radiances) computed for a broad range of atmospheric paths (including horizontal paths through selected layers). In a second step, we will compute limb band radiances from the monochromatic radiances calculated using the GSSRTM model only at the nodes selected in the first step and train an OSS model for the final configuration to fit these band radiances. With the new intermediate transmittance training step, we anticipate a gain on the order of 100 in computational time compared to the brute-force radiance training, which will make the overall model development much more manageable. This work is supported by the NASA Mars Fundamental Research Program.

  16. Multiangle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC):. 1; Radiative Transfer Basis and Look-up Tables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyapustin, Alexei; Martonchik, John; Wang, Yujie; Laszlo, Istvan; Korkin, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a radiative transfer basis of the algorithm MAIAC which performs simultaneous retrievals of atmospheric aerosol and bidirectional surface reflectance from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The retrievals are based on an accurate semianalytical solution for the top-of-atmosphere reflectance expressed as an explicit function of three parameters of the Ross-Thick Li-Sparse model of surface bidirectional reflectance. This solution depends on certain functions of atmospheric properties and geometry which are precomputed in the look-up table (LUT). This paper further considers correction of the LUT functions for variations of surface pressure/height and of atmospheric water vapor, which is a common task in the operational remote sensing. It introduces a new analytical method for the water vapor correction of the multiple ]scattering path radiance. It also summarizes the few basic principles that provide a high efficiency and accuracy of the LUT ]based radiative transfer for the aerosol/surface retrievals and optimize the size of LUT. For example, the single-scattering path radiance is calculated analytically for a given surface pressure and atmospheric water vapor. The same is true for the direct surface-reflected radiance, which along with the single-scattering path radiance largely defines the angular dependence of measurements. For these calculations, the aerosol phase functions and kernels of the surface bidirectional reflectance model are precalculated at a high angular resolution. The other radiative transfer functions depend rather smoothly on angles because of multiple scattering and can be calculated at coarser angular resolution to reduce the LUT size. At the same time, this resolution should be high enough to use the nearest neighbor geometry angles to avoid costly three ]dimensional interpolation. The pressure correction is implemented via linear interpolation between two LUTs computed for the standard and reduced

  17. Direct method for solving transfer equation by expansion in spherical harmonics: Scattering in atmosphere with Lambertian lower boundary and thermal radiation transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ustinov, Y. A.

    1978-01-01

    The direct method for the solution of the spherical harmonics approximation to the equation of transfer of radiation is applied to the cases of (1) scattering of the solar radiation in the atmosphere with the Lambertian boundary and (2) thermal radiation transfer.

  18. Graphene-assisted near-field radiative heat transfer between corrugated polar materials

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. L.; Zhang, Z. M.

    2014-06-23

    Graphene has attracted great attention in nanoelectronics, optics, and energy harvesting. Here, the near-field radiative heat transfer between graphene-covered corrugated silica is investigated based on the exact scattering theory. It is found that graphene can improve the radiative heat flux between silica gratings by more than one order of magnitude and alleviate the performance sensitivity to lateral shift. The underlying mechanism is mainly attributed to the improved photon tunneling of modes away from phonon resonances. Besides, coating with graphene leads to nonlocal radiative transfer that breaks Derjaguin's proximity approximation and enables corrugated silica to outperform bulk silica in near-field radiation.

  19. An overview on the JCSDA Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, F.

    2009-12-01

    The Community radiative transfer (RT) Model (CRTM) is developed by the US Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA) for rapid satellite radiance simulations and radiance derivative calculations under various atmospheric and surface conditions. It has been used in the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) data assimilation system at the NOAA National Center for the Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) and systems at other Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) centers, as well as in many other satellite remote sensing applications. The model was first released to the public in 2004, and has been substantially improved and expanded since then. It supports a large number of sensors, including the historical and near future sensors from GOES-R and NPOESS, covering the microwave, infrared and visible frequency regions. The model comprises four major modules for calculations of the atmospheric transmittance, surface emissivity/reflectivity, cloud/aerosol optical property and RT solution, respectively. In the atmospheric transmittance module, on top is the multiple transmittance algorithm framework, which allows different transmittance algorithms to coexist. Within the framework, a new transmittance algorithm has been recently implemented, which combines the strengths of the OPTRAN algorithm (Optical Path TRANsmittance) and the ODPS algorithm (Optical Depth in Pressure Space), currently used in the RTTOV model. In addition, special algorithms are implemented to take into account the Non Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE) effects for the IR hyper-spectral sensors, Zeeman-splitting effect for the SSMIS sensors and CO2 cell pressure leaking effect for the SSU sensors. The surface emissivity/reflectivity module consists of four sub-modules corresponds respectively to ocean, land, snow and sea ice surfaces, which are further divided into small modules according to the frequency regions and surface sub-types. An array of physical

  20. Uncertainty of microwave radiative transfer computations in rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung Wook

    Currently, the effect of the vertical resolution on the brightness temperature (BT) has not been examined in depth. The uncertainty of the freezing level (FL) retrieved using two different satellites' data is large. Various radiative transfer (RT) codes yield different BTs in strong scattering conditions. The purposes of this research were: (1) to understand the uncertainty of the BT contributed by the vertical resolution numerically and analytically; (2) to reduce the uncertainty of the FL retrieval using new thermodynamic observations; and (3) to investigate the characteristics of four different RT codes. Firstly, a plane-parallel RT Model (RTM) of n layers in light rainfall was used for the analytical and computational derivation of the vertical resolution effect on the BT. Secondly, a new temperature profile based on observations was absorbed in the Texas A&M University (TAMU) algorithm. The Precipitation Radar (PR) and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) data were utilized for the improved FL retrieval. Thirdly, the TAMU, Eddington approximation (EDD), Discrete Ordinate, and backward Monte Carlo codes were compared under various view angles, rain rates, FLs, frequencies, and surface properties. The uncertainty of the BT decreased as the number of layers increased. The uncertainty was due to the optical thickness rather than due to relative humidity, pressure distribution, water vapor, and temperature profile. The mean TMI FL showed a good agreement with mean bright band height. A new temperature profile reduced the uncertainty of the TMI FL by about 10%. The differences of the BTs among the four different RT codes were within 1 K at the current sensor view angle over the entire dynamic rain rate range of 10-37 GHz. The differences between the TAMU and EDD solutions were less than 0.5 K for the specular surface. In conclusion, this research suggested the vertical resolution should be considered as a parameter in the forward model

  1. Monte Carlo method based radiative transfer simulation of stochastic open forest generated by circle packing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shengye; Tamura, Masayuki

    2013-10-01

    Monte Carlo Ray Tracing (MCRT) method is a versatile application for simulating radiative transfer regime of the Solar - Atmosphere - Landscape system. Moreover, it can be used to compute the radiation distribution over a complex landscape configuration, as an example like a forest area. Due to its robustness to the complexity of the 3-D scene altering, MCRT method is also employed for simulating canopy radiative transfer regime as the validation source of other radiative transfer models. In MCRT modeling within vegetation, one basic step is the canopy scene set up. 3-D scanning application was used for representing canopy structure as accurately as possible, but it is time consuming. Botanical growth function can be used to model the single tree growth, but cannot be used to express the impaction among trees. L-System is also a functional controlled tree growth simulation model, but it costs large computing memory. Additionally, it only models the current tree patterns rather than tree growth during we simulate the radiative transfer regime. Therefore, it is much more constructive to use regular solid pattern like ellipsoidal, cone, cylinder etc. to indicate single canopy. Considering the allelopathy phenomenon in some open forest optical images, each tree in its own `domain' repels other trees. According to this assumption a stochastic circle packing algorithm is developed to generate the 3-D canopy scene in this study. The canopy coverage (%) and the tree amount (N) of the 3-D scene are declared at first, similar to the random open forest image. Accordingly, we randomly generate each canopy radius (rc). Then we set the circle central coordinate on XY-plane as well as to keep circles separate from each other by the circle packing algorithm. To model the individual tree, we employ the Ishikawa's tree growth regressive model to set the tree parameters including DBH (dt), tree height (H). However, the relationship between canopy height (Hc) and trunk height (Ht) is

  2. Production of pure quasi-monochromatic 11C beams for accurate radiation therapy and dose delivery verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzeroni, Marta; Brahme, Anders

    2015-09-01

    In the present study we develop a new technique for the production of clean quasi-monochromatic 11C positron emitter beams for accurate radiation therapy and PET-CT dose delivery imaging and treatment verification. The 11C ion beam is produced by projectile fragmentation using a primary 12C ion beam. The practical elimination of the energy spread of the secondary 11C fragments and other beam contaminating fragments is described. Monte Carlo calculation with the SHIELD-HIT10+ code and analytical methods for the transport of the ions in matter are used in the analysis. Production yields, as well as energy, velocity and magnetic rigidity distributions of the fragments generated in a cylindrical target are scored as a function of the depth within 1 cm thick slices for an optimal target consisting of a fixed 20 cm section of liquid hydrogen followed by a variable thickness section of polyethylene. The wide energy and magnetic rigidity spread of the 11C ion beam can be reduced to values around 1% by using a variable monochromatizing wedge-shaped degrader in the beam line. Finally, magnetic rigidity and particle species selection, as well as discrimination of the particle velocity through a combined Time of Flight and Radio Frequency-driven Velocity filter purify the beam from similar magnetic rigidity contaminating fragments (mainly 7Be and 3He fragments). A beam purity of about 99% is expected by the combined method.

  3. Directional Radiometry and Radiative Transfer: the Convoluted Path From Centuries-old Phenomenology to Physical Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    This Essay traces the centuries-long history of the phenomenological disciplines of directional radiometry and radiative transfer in turbid media, discusses their fundamental weaknesses, and outlines the convoluted process of their conversion into legitimate branches of physical optics.

  4. Two Experiments for Estimating Free Convection and Radiation Heat Transfer Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Economides, Michael J.; Maloney, J. O.

    1978-01-01

    This article describes two simple undergraduate heat transfer experiments which may reinforce a student's understanding of free convection and radiation. Apparatus, experimental procedure, typical results, and discussion are included. (Author/BB)

  5. The lattice Boltzmann method for one-dimensional transient radiative transfer in graded index gray medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2014-04-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is extended to solve transient radiative transfer in one-dimensional slab containing absorbing and scattering media with graded index subjected to a short square laser irradiation. By using a fully implicit backward differencing scheme to discretize the transient term in the radiative transfer equation, a new type of lattice structure is devised. Firstly, for the case of the refractive index matched boundary, LBM solutions to transient radiative transfer in graded index medium are validated by comparison with results reported in the literature. Afterward, LBM is employed to investigate transient radiative transfer in graded index medium with a refractive index discontinuity at the boundaries. Effects of the graded index distributions, the optical thickness, and scattering phase function on transmittance and reflectance signals are investigated, and several interesting trends on the time-resolved signals are observed and analyzed.

  6. Predicting Accurate Electronic Excitation Transfer Rates via Marcus Theory with Boys or Edmiston-Ruedenberg Localized Diabatization

    SciTech Connect

    Subotnik, Joseph E.; Vura-Weis, Josh; Sodt, Alex J.; Ratner, Mark A.

    2010-05-06

    We model the triplet-triplet energy-transfer experiments from the Closs group [Closs, G. L.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1988, 110, 2652.] using a combination of Marcus theory and either Boys or Edmiston-Ruedenberg localized diabatization, and we show that relative and absolute rates of electronic excitation transfer may be computed successfully. For the case where both the donor and acceptor occupy equatorial positions on a rigid cyclohexane bridge, we find βcalc = 2.8 per C-C bond, compared with the experimental value βexp = 2.6. This work highlights the power of using localized diabatization methods as a tool for modeling nonequilibrium processes.

  7. Hybrid model of light propagation in random media based on the time-dependent radiative transfer and diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Hiroyuki; Okawa, Shinpei; Yamada, Yukio; Hoshi, Yoko

    2014-11-01

    Numerical modeling of light propagation in random media has been an important issue for biomedical imaging, including diffuse optical tomography (DOT). For high resolution DOT, accurate and fast computation of light propagation in biological tissue is desirable. This paper proposes a space-time hybrid model for numerical modeling based on the radiative transfer and diffusion equations (RTE and DE, respectively) in random media under refractive-index mismatching. In the proposed model, the RTE and DE regions are separated into space and time by using a crossover length and the time from the ballistic regime to the diffusive regime, ρDA~10/μt‧ and tDA~20/vμt‧ where μt‧ and v represent a reduced transport coefficient and light velocity, respectively. The present model succeeds in describing light propagation accurately and reduces computational load by a quarter compared with full computation of the RTE.

  8. An alternative Monte Carlo approach to the thermal radiative transfer problem

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Thomas E.

    2011-02-20

    The usual Monte Carlo approach to the thermal radiative transfer problem is to view Monte Carlo as a solution technique for the nonlinear thermal radiative transfer equations. The equations contain time derivatives which are approximated by introducing small time steps. An alternative approach avoids time steps by using Monte Carlo to directly sample the time at which the next event occurs. That is, the time is advanced on a natural event-by-event basis rather than by introducing an artificial time step.

  9. Approximate Solution Methods for Spectral Radiative Transfer in High Refractive Index Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Spuckler, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    Some ceramic materials for high temperature applications are partially transparent for radiative transfer. The refractive indices of these materials can be substantially greater than one which influences internal radiative emission and reflections. Heat transfer behavior of single and laminated layers has been obtained in the literature by numerical solutions of the radiative transfer equations coupled with heat conduction and heating at the boundaries by convection and radiation. Two-flux and diffusion methods are investigated here to obtain approximate solutions using a simpler formulation than required for exact numerical solutions. Isotropic scattering is included. The two-flux method for a single layer yields excellent results for gray and two band spectral calculations. The diffusion method yields a good approximation for spectral behavior in laminated multiple layers if the overall optical thickness is larger than about ten. A hybrid spectral model is developed using the two-flux method in the optically thin bands, and radiative diffusion in bands that are optically thick.

  10. Adipose veno-lymphatic transfer for management of post-radiation lymphedema

    SciTech Connect

    Pho, R.W.; Bayon, P.; Tan, L.

    1989-01-01

    In a patient who had post-radiation lymphedema after excision of liposarcoma, a method is described that is called adipose veno-lymphatic transfer. The technique involves transferring adipose tissue containing lymphatic vessels that surround the long saphenous vein, from the normal, healthy leg to the irradiated leg, with the creation of an arteriovenous fistula.

  11. Polarized bidirectional reflectance of optically thick sparse particulate layers: An efficient numerically exact radiative-transfer solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Janna M.; Chowdhary, Jacek; Zakharova, Nadezhda T.

    2015-05-01

    We describe a simple yet efficient numerical algorithm for computing polarized bidirectional reflectance of an optically thick (semi-infinite), macroscopically flat layer composed of statistically isotropic and mirror symmetric random particles. The spatial distribution of the particles is assumed to be sparse, random, and statistically uniform. The 4×4 Stokes reflection matrix is calculated by iterating the Ambartsumian's vector nonlinear integral equation. The result is a numerically exact solution of the vector radiative transfer equation and as such fully satisfies the energy conservation law and the fundamental reciprocity relation. Since this technique bypasses the computation of the internal radiation field, it is very fast and highly accurate. The FORTRAN implementation of the technique is publicly available on the World Wide Web at

  12. Line-Mixing Relaxation Matrix model for spectroscopic and radiative transfer studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendaza, Teresa; Martin-Torres, Javier

    2016-04-01

    We present a generic model to compute the Relaxation Matrix easily adaptable to any molecule and type of spectroscopic lines or bands in non-reactive molecule collisions regimes. It also provides the dipole moment of every transition and level population of the selected molecule. The model is based on the Energy-Corrected Sudden (ECS) approximation/theory introduced by DePristo (1980), and on previous Relaxation Matrix studies for the interaction between molecular ro-vibrational levels (Ben-Rueven, 1966), atoms (Rosenkranz, 1975), linear molecules (Strow and Reuter, 1994; Niro, Boulet and Hartmann, 2004), and symmetric but not linear molecules (Tran et al., 2006). The model is open source, and it is user-friendly. To the point that the user only has to select the wished molecule and vibrational band to perform the calculations. It reads the needed spectroscopic data from the HIgh-resolution TRANsmission molecular absorption (HITRAN) (Rothman et al., 2013) and ExoMol (Tennyson and Yurchenko, 2012). In this work we present an example of the calculations with our model for the case of the 2ν3 band of methane (CH4), and a comparison with a previous work (Tran et al., 2010). The data produced by our model can be used to characterise the line-mixing effects on ro-vibrational lines of the infrared emitters of any atmosphere, to calculate accurate absorption spectra, that are needed in the interpretation of atmospheric spectra, radiative transfer modelling and General Circulation Models (GCM). References [1] A.E. DePristo, Collisional influence on vibration-rotation spectral line shapes: A scaling theoretical analysis and simplification, J. Chem. Phys. 73(5), 1980. [2] A. Ben-Reuven, Impact broadening of microwave spectra, Phys. Rev. 145(1), 7-22, 1966. [3] P.W. Rosenkranz, Shape of the 5 mm Oxygen Band in the Atmosphere, IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation, vol. AP-23, no. 4, pp. 498-506, 1975. [4] Strow, L.L., D.D. Tobin, and S.E. Hannon, A compilation of

  13. Comparison of Methods for Calculating Radiative Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred; Abbate, M J

    2012-01-19

    Various approximations for calculating radioactive heat transfer between parallel surfaces are evaluated. This is done by applying the approximations based on total emissivities to a special case of known spectral emissivities, for which exact heat transfer calculations are possible. Comparison of results indicates that the best approximation is obtained by basing the emissivity of the receiving surface primarily on the temperature of the emitter. A specific model is shown to give excellent agreement over a very wide range of values.

  14. Radiative heat transfer from a black body to dielectric nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalopin, Yann; Dammak, Hichem; Laroche, Marine; Hayoun, Marc; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2011-12-01

    Heating of dielectric nanoparticles by black-body radiation is investigated by using molecular-dynamics simulation. The thermal interaction with the radiation is modeled by coupling the ions with a random electric field and including a radiation reaction force. This approach shows that the heat is absorbed by the polariton mode. Its subsequent redistribution among other vibration modes strongly depends on the particle size and on temperature. We observe energy trapping in a finite subset of vibrational modes and study the relaxation pathway of (MgO)4 by performing a selective excitation with a deterministic force.

  15. Realistic NLTE Radiative Transfer for Modeling Stellar Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Philip D.

    1999-01-01

    This NASA grant supported the development of codes to solve the non-LTE multi-level spherical radiative transfer problem in the presence of velocity fields. Much of this work was done in collaboration with Graham Harper (CASA, University of Colorado). These codes were developed for application to the cool, low-velocity winds of evolved late-type stars. Particular emphasis was placed on modeling the wind of lambda Velorum (K4 lb), the brightest K supergiant in the sky, based on extensive observations of the ultraviolet spectrum with the HST/GHRS from GO program 5307. Several solution techniques were examined, including the Eddington factor Approach described in detail by Bennett & Harper (1997). An Eddington factor variant of Harper's S-MULTI code (Harper 1994) for stationary atmospheres was developed and implemented, although full convergence was not realized. The ratio of wind terminal velocity to turbulent velocity is large (approx. 0.3-0.5) in these cool star winds so this assumption of stationarity provides reasonable starting models. Final models, incorporating specified wind laws, were converged using the comoving CRD S-MULTI code. Details of the solution procedure were published by Bennett & Harper (1997). Our analysis of the wind of lambda Vel, based on wind absorption superimposed on chromospheric emission lines in the ultraviolet, can be found in Carpenter et al. (1999). In this paper, we compare observed wind absorption features to an exact CRD calculation in the comoving frame, and also to a much quicker, but approximate, method using the SEI (Sobolev with Exact Integration) code of Lamers, Cerruti-Sola, & Perinotto (1987). Carpenter et al. (1999) provide detailed comparisons of the exact CRD and approximate SEI results and discuss when SEI is adequate to use for computing wind line profiles. Unfortunately, the observational material is insufficient to unambiguously determine the wind acceleration law for lambda Vel. Relatively few unblended Fe II lines

  16. Parameterization and analysis of 3-D radiative transfer in clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Varnai, Tamas

    2012-03-16

    This report provides a summary of major accomplishments from the project. The project examines the impact of radiative interactions between neighboring atmospheric columns, for example clouds scattering extra sunlight toward nearby clear areas. While most current cloud models don't consider these interactions and instead treat sunlight in each atmospheric column separately, the resulting uncertainties have remained unknown. This project has provided the first estimates on the way average solar heating is affected by interactions between nearby columns. These estimates have been obtained by combining several years of cloud observations at three DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility sites (in Alaska, Oklahoma, and Papua New Guinea) with simulations of solar radiation around the observed clouds. The importance of radiative interactions between atmospheric columns was evaluated by contrasting simulations that included the interactions with those that did not. This study provides lower-bound estimates for radiative interactions: It cannot consider interactions in cross-wind direction, because it uses two-dimensional vertical cross-sections through clouds that were observed by instruments looking straight up as clouds drifted aloft. Data from new DOE scanning radars will allow future radiative studies to consider the full three-dimensional nature of radiative processes. The results reveal that two-dimensional radiative interactions increase overall day-and-night average solar heating by about 0.3, 1.2, and 4.1 Watts per meter square at the three sites, respectively. This increase grows further if one considers that most large-domain cloud simulations have resolutions that cannot specify small-scale cloud variability. For example, the increases in solar heating mentioned above roughly double for a fairly typical model resolution of 1 km. The study also examined the factors that shape radiative interactions between atmospheric columns and

  17. Single-node orbit analsyis with radiation heat transfer only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peoples, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The steady-state temperature of a single node which dissipates energy by radiation only is discussed for a nontime varying thermal environment. Relationships are developed to illustrate how shields can be utilized to represent a louver system. A computer program is presented which can assess periodic temperature characteristics of a single node in a time varying thermal environment having energy dissipation by radiation only. The computer program performs thermal orbital analysis for five combinations of plate, shields, and louvers.

  18. Radiative Heat Transfer During Atmosphere Entry at Parabolic Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshikawa, Kenneth K.; Wick, Bradford H.

    1961-01-01

    Stagnation point radiative heating rates for manned vehicles entering the earth's atmosphere at parabolic velocity are presented and compared with corresponding laminar convective heating rates. The calculations were made for both nonlifting and lifting entry trajectories for vehicles of varying nose radius, weight-to-area ratio, and drag. It is concluded from the results presented that radiative heating will be important for the entry conditions considered.

  19. Introduction to the Theory of Atmospheric Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buglia, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    The fundamental physical and mathematical principles governing the transmission of radiation through the atmosphere are presented, with emphasis on the scattering of visible and near-IR radiation. The classical two-stream, thin-atmosphere, and Eddington approximations, along with some of their offspring, are developed in detail, along with the discrete ordinates method of Chandrasekhar. The adding and doubling methods are discussed from basic principles, and references for further reading are suggested.

  20. Circumstellar shells, the formation of grains, and radiation transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefevre, Jean

    1987-01-01

    Advances in infrared astronomy during the last decade have firmly established the presence of dust around a large number of cold giant and supergiant stars. To describe the properties of stars and to understand their evolution, it is necessary to know the nature of the giants and their influence on stellar radiation. Two questions are considered: the formation of grains around cold stars and the modification of stellar radiation by the stellar shell.

  1. Numerical radiative transfer with state-of-the-art iterative methods made easy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Julien; Paletou, Frédéric; Josselin, Eric; Glorian, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an on-line tool and its accompanying software resources for the numerical solution of basic radiation transfer out of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). State-of-the-art stationary iterative methods such as Accelerated Λ-iteration and Gauss-Seidel schemes, using a short characteristics-based formal solver are used. We also comment on typical numerical experiments associated to the basic non-LTE radiation problem. These resources are intended for the largest use and benefit, in support to more classical radiation transfer lectures usually given at the Master level.

  2. Parallel processing approach for radiative heat transfer prediction in participating media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltiel, C.; Naraghi, M. H. N.

    1993-10-01

    Numerical analysis of radiative transfer in participating media can be very complex. Computer simulations of practical situations often require both large computer memory and long calculation times. The use of massively parallel machines has proven very effective in simulating large complex systems. This technical note presents a unified matrix formulation for node-to-node-based radiative exchange in isotropically scattering homogeneous media using the discrete exchange factor (DEF) method. Computational implementation is compared between serial and parallel computing machines. The results demonstrate that parallel computing has the potential for changing the nature of radiative transfer calculations. Parallel computing allows for faster, more manageable calculations; it is especially effective for nonlinear problems.

  3. An assessment on convective and radiative heat transfer modelling in tubular solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, D.; Muñoz, A.; Sánchez, T.

    Four models of convective and radiative heat transfer inside tubular solid oxide fuel cells are presented in this paper, all of them applicable to multidimensional simulations. The work is aimed at assessing if it is necessary to use a very detailed and complicated model to simulate heat transfer inside this kind of device and, for those cases when simple models can be used, the errors are estimated and compared to those of the more complex models. For the convective heat transfer, two models are presented. One of them accounts for the variation of film coefficient as a function of local temperature and composition. This model gives a local value for the heat transfer coefficients and establishes the thermal entry length. The second model employs an average value of the transfer coefficient, which is applied to the whole length of the duct being studied. It is concluded that, unless there is a need to calculate local temperatures, a simple model can be used to evaluate the global performance of the cell with satisfactory accuracy. For the radiation heat transfer, two models are presented again. One of them considers radial radiation exclusively and, thus, radiative exchange between adjacent cells is neglected. On the other hand, the second model accounts for radiation in all directions but increases substantially the complexity of the problem. For this case, it is concluded that deviations between both models are higher than for convection. Actually, using a simple model can lead to a not negligible underestimation of the temperature of the cell.

  4. A High Spatial Resolution Three Dimensional Version of the SASKTRAN Radiative Transfer Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawada, D.; Dueck, S.; Lloyd, N. D.; Bourassa, A. E.; Degenstein, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    For the past decade the SASKTRAN radiative transfer model has been used, along with OSIRIS measurements of spectrally dispersed limb scattered sunlight, to retrieve vertical profiles of atmospheric constituents such as ozone, nitrogen dioxide and stratospheric aerosol. SASKTRAN is a spherical geometry, multiple scatter model that uses a successive orders approach. Until recently SASKTRAN has relied on horizontal homogeneity of the atmospheric constituents for its simulations. This paper details recent advances to the SASKTRAN model that now allow it to accurately and quickly calculate the diffuse radiance field in the presence of two and three dimensional structure within the atmospheric state. Included is a description of the modifications along with an analysis of the similarities and differences between the original model and the new version in the presence of structures that are found near realistic ozone hole conditions. These results demonstrate the utility of the SASKTRAN model for use in the retrievals associated with the Canadian Atmospheric Tomography System (CATS), an OSIRIS follow-on instrument, that is currently funded under the auspices of the Canadian Space Agency.

  5. Effect of radiator position and mass flux on the dryer room heat transfer rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirmanto, M.; Sulistyowati, E. D.; Okariawan, I. D. K.

    A room radiator as usually used in cold countries, is actually able to be used as a heat source to dry goods, especially in the rainy season where the sun seldom shines due to much rain and cloud. Experiments to investigate effects of radiator position and mass flux on heat transfer rate were performed. This study is to determine the best position of the radiator and the optimum mass flux. The radiator used was a finned radiator made of copper pipes and aluminum fins with an overall dimension of 220 mm × 50 mm × 310 mm. The prototype room was constructed using plywood and wood frame with an overall size of 1000 mm × 1000 mm × 1000 mm. The working fluid was heated water flowing inside the radiator and air circulating naturally inside the prototype room. The nominal mass fluxes employed were 800, 900 and 1000 kg/m2 s. The water was kept at 80 °C at the radiator entrance, while the initial air temperature inside the prototype room was 30 °C. Three positions of the radiator were examined. The results show that the effect of the mass flux on the forced and free convection heat transfer rate is insignificant but the radiator position strongly affects the heat transfer rate for both forced and free convection.

  6. Bidirectional plant canopy reflection models derived from the radiation transfer equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeth, D. R.

    1975-01-01

    A collection of bidirectional canopy reflection models was obtained from the solution of the radiation transfer equation for a horizontally homogeneous canopy. A phase function is derived for a collection of bidirectionally reflecting and transmitting planar elements characterized geometrically by slope and azimuth density functions. Two approaches to solving the radiation transfer equation for the canopy are presented. One approach factors the radiation transfer equation into a solvable set of three first-order linear differential equations by assuming that the radiation field within the canopy can be initially approximated by three components: uniformly diffuse downwelling, uniformly diffuse upwelling, and attenuated specular. The solution to these equations, which can be iterated to any degree of accuracy, was used to obtain overall canopy reflection from the formal solution to the radiation transfer equation. A programable solution to canopy overall bidirectional reflection is given for this approach. The special example of Lambertian leaves with constant leaf bidirectional reflection and scattering functions is considered, and a programmable solution for this example is given. The other approach to solving the radiation transfer equation, a generalized Chandrasekhar technique, is presented in the appendix.

  7. A detailed evaluation of the stratospheric heat budget: 1. Radiation transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Portmann, Robert W.

    1999-03-01

    We present part 1 of a two-part series on a detailed evaluation of the stratospheric heat budget. In part 2 [Mlynczak et al., this issue] we present radiative heating, radiative cooling, net radiative heating, global radiation balance, radiative relaxation times, and diabatic circulations in the stratosphere using temperature and minor constituent data provided by instruments on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) between 1991 and 1993 and by the limb infrared monitor of the stratosphere (LIMS) instrument, which operated on the Nimbus-7 spacecraft in 1978-1979. Here we describe the radiative transfer techniques used to compute the climatology of radiative heating and circulations given in part 2. Included in the radiation transfer calculations are heating due to absorption of solar radiation from the ultraviolet through near-infrared wavelengths and radiative cooling due to emission by carbon dioxide, water vapor, and ozone from 0 to 3000 cm-1 (∞-3.3 μm). Infrared radiative effects of stratospheric aerosols are also considered in detail.

  8. Effective-medium model of wire metamaterials in the problems of radiative heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Mirmoosa, M. S. Nefedov, I. S. Simovski, C. R.; Rüting, F.

    2014-06-21

    In the present work, we check the applicability of the effective medium model (EMM) to the problems of radiative heat transfer (RHT) through so-called wire metamaterials (WMMs)—composites comprising parallel arrays of metal nanowires. It is explained why this problem is so important for the development of prospective thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems. Previous studies of the applicability of EMM for WMMs were targeted by the imaging applications of WMMs. The analogous study referring to the transfer of radiative heat is a separate problem that deserves extended investigations. We show that WMMs with practically realizable design parameters transmit the radiative heat as effectively homogeneous media. Existing EMM is an adequate tool for qualitative prediction of the magnitude of transferred radiative heat and of its effective frequency band.

  9. A Consummate Radiative Transfer Package for Studying the Atmosphere and Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, P.; Hu, Y.; Trepte, C. R.; Winker, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    We will present a radiative transfer package based on the successive order of scattering method. This code is capable to calculate the radiation field in turbid media, which can be either the atmosphere-land or atmosphere-ocean coupled systems. The outputs include all four Stokes parameters at arbitrary detector locations and viewing angles in the turbid medium. Both the elastic and inelastic scattering are implemented in the package. This radiative transfer tool has been used in various applications, for instance, generating an aerosol look-up table for atmospheric correction in ocean color remote sensing; retrieving water cloud size distribution using the polarized multi-angle measurements; simulating the OCO2 O2 A band radiance measurement, etc. Our radiative transfer package is a great tool to interpret and predict the measurements from the future polarimeters and multipolarization-state lidars for Earth observing missions.

  10. Development of transfer standard devices for ensuring the accurate calibration of ultrasonic physical therapy machines in clinical use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hekkenberg, R. T.; Richards, A.; Beissner, K.; Zeqiri, B.; Prout, G.; Cantrall, Ch; Bezemer, R. A.; Koch, Ch; Hodnett, M.

    2004-01-01

    Physical therapy ultrasound is widely applied to patients. However, many devices do not comply with the relevant standard stating that the actual power output shall be within +/-20% of the device indication. Extreme cases have been reported: from delivering effectively no ultrasound or operating at maximum power at all powers indicated. This can potentially lead to patient injury as well as mistreatment. The present European (EC) project is an ongoing attempt to improve the quality of the treatment of patients being treated with ultrasonic physical-therapy. A Portable ultrasound Power Standard (PPS) is being developed and accurately calibrated. The PPS includes: Ultrasound transducers (including one exhibiting an unusual output) and a driver for the ultrasound transducers that has calibration and proficiency test functions. Also included with the PPS is a Cavitation Detector to determine the onset of cavitation occurring within the propagation medium. The PPS will be suitable for conducting in-the-field accreditation (proficiency testing and calibration). In order to be accredited it will be important to be able to show traceability of the calibration, the calibration process and qualification of testing staff. The clinical user will benefit from traceability because treatments will be performed more reliably.

  11. Bidirectional Reflectance of Flat, Optically Thick Particulate Layers: An Efficient Radiative Transfer Solution and Applications to Snow and Soil Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Janna M.; Yanovitsku, Edgard G.; Zakharova, Nadia T.

    1999-01-01

    We describe a simple and highly efficient and accurate radiative transfer technique for computing bidirectional reflectance of a macroscopically flat scattering layer composed of nonabsorbing or weakly absorbing, arbitrarily shaped, randomly oriented and randomly distributed particles. The layer is assumed to be homogeneous and optically semi-infinite, and the bidirectional reflection function (BRF) is found by a simple iterative solution of the Ambartsumian's nonlinear integral equation. As an exact Solution of the radiative transfer equation, the reflection function thus obtained fully obeys the fundamental physical laws of energy conservation and reciprocity. Since this technique bypasses the computation of the internal radiation field, it is by far the fastest numerical approach available and can be used as an ideal input for Monte Carlo procedures calculating BRFs of scattering layers with macroscopically rough surfaces. Although the effects of packing density and coherent backscattering are currently neglected, they can also be incorporated. The FORTRAN implementation of the technique is available on the World Wide Web at http://ww,,v.giss.nasa.gov/-crmim/brf.html and can be applied to a wide range of remote sensing, engineering, and biophysical problems. We also examine the potential effect of ice crystal shape on the bidirectional reflectance of flat snow surfaces and the applicability of the Henyey-Greenstein phase function and the 6-Eddington approximation in calculations for soil surfaces.

  12. Tools for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer: Streamer and FluxNet. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, Jeffrey R.; Schweiger, Axel J.

    1998-01-01

    Two tools for the solution of radiative transfer problems are presented. Streamer is a highly flexible medium spectral resolution radiative transfer model based on the plane-parallel theory of radiative transfer. Capable of computing either fluxes or radiances, it is suitable for studying radiative processes at the surface or within the atmosphere and for the development of remote-sensing algorithms. FluxNet is a fast neural network-based implementation of Streamer for computing surface fluxes. It allows for a sophisticated treatment of radiative processes in the analysis of large data sets and potential integration into geophysical models where computational efficiency is an issue. Documentation and tools for the development of alternative versions of Fluxnet are available. Collectively, Streamer and FluxNet solve a wide variety of problems related to radiative transfer: Streamer provides the detail and sophistication needed to perform basic research on most aspects of complex radiative processes while the efficiency and simplicity of FluxNet make it ideal for operational use.

  13. Radiation heat transfer in SOFC materials and components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damm, David L.; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    Radiative transport within the electrode and electrolyte layers, as well as surface-to-surface radiation within the fuel and oxygen flow channels, has the potential to dramatically influence temperature fields and overall operating conditions of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). On a larger scale, radiation from the stack to the environment, including heat losses through insulation, must be accounted for in the plant design, and is of critical importance for effective thermal management of the high temperature stack. In this report, we discuss the current state-of-the-art and the challenges that remain in understanding, predicting, and quantifying the effects of radiation in SOFC materials and systems. These phenomena are of great interest and importance not only from a fundamental perspective but also from a systems design point of view. Last, but not the least in importance, the determination of radiative properties of the materials involved - either through experimental methods or predictive models - must be an ongoing effort as new materials are continuously being developed.

  14. Transient radiative energy transfer in incompressible laminar flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Singh, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis and numerical procedures are presented to investigate the transient radiative interactions of nongray absorbing-emitting species in laminar fully-developed flows between two parallel plates. The particular species considered are OH, CO, CO2, and H2O and different mixtures of these. Transient and steady-state results are obtained for the temperaure distribution and bulk temperature for different plate spacings, wall temperatures, and pressures. Results, in general, indicate that the rate of radiative heating can be quite high during earlier times. This information is useful in designing thermal protection systems for transient operations.

  15. The coupling of radiative transfer to quasi 1-D flows with thermochemical nonequilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokcen, Tahir; Park, Chul

    1991-01-01

    Quasi-one-dimensional nonequilibrium nozzle flows with coupled radiative transfer are considered. The strongly coupled formulation of radiation and flowfield leads to a governing set of integro-differential equations. A fully implicit numerical method using the full matrix inversion or block iteration methods is presented to solve these equations. The nonequilibrium gas model consists of two chemical species, molecular and atomic nitrogen. The thermodynamic state of the gas is described by two temperatures, translational-rotational and vibrational, and the thermal radiation is assumed to be governed by the vibrational temperature. In radiative transfer, gases are assumed to be absorbing and emitting, and a detailed spectral dependency of the absorption coefficient is prescribed for a non-gray gas. The numerical solutions of strongly radiating nonequilibrium flows are presented for both gray and non-gray gases.

  16. The effects of radiative transfer on low-level cyclogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, M.J.; Raman, S.

    1995-04-01

    Many investigators have documented the role that thermodynamic forcing due to radiative flux divergence plays in the enhancement or generation of circulation. Most of these studies involve large-scale systems, small-scale systems such as thunderstorms, and squall lines. The generation of circulation on large scales results from the creation of divergence in the upper troposphere and the maintenance of low-level potentially unstable air, and the maintenance of baroclinicity throughout the atmosphere. On smaller scales, radiative flux divergence acts similarly. In the thunderstorms and squall lines, the radiative forcing acts as a pump, increasing the divergence at the top of the storm systems and increasing the updraft velocity and the intensity of inflow at mid-levels in the storm systems. Other researchers have examined the role of surface processes and low-level baroclinicity in east coast cyclogenesis. In this paper, we examine the interactive role that radiative flux divergence, clouds, and surface processes play in low-level cyclogenesis and the creation or maintenance of the boundary layer baroclinicity.

  17. Coaxial radiative and convective heat transfer in gray and nongray gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattick, A. T.

    1980-01-01

    Coupled radiative and convective heat transfer is investigated for an absorbing gas flowing in a finite length channel and heated by blackbody radiation directed along the flow axis. The problem is formulated in one dimension and numerical solutions are obtained for the temperature profile of the gas and for the radiation escaping the channel entrance, assuming both gray and nongray absorption spectra. Due to radiation trapping, the flowing gas is found to have substantially smaller radiation losses for a given peak gas temperature than a solid surface that is radiatively heated to this temperature. A greenhouse effect is also evident whereby radiation losses are minimized for a gas having stronger absorption at long wavelengths.

  18. A Numerical Scheme for Special Relativistic Radiation Magnetohydrodynamics Based on Solving the Time-dependent Radiative Transfer Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsuga, Ken; Takahashi, Hiroyuki R.

    2016-02-01

    We develop a numerical scheme for solving the equations of fully special relativistic, radiation magnetohydrodynamics (MHDs), in which the frequency-integrated, time-dependent radiation transfer equation is solved to calculate the specific intensity. The radiation energy density, the radiation flux, and the radiation stress tensor are obtained by the angular quadrature of the intensity. In the present method, conservation of total mass, momentum, and energy of the radiation magnetofluids is guaranteed. We treat not only the isotropic scattering but also the Thomson scattering. The numerical method of MHDs is the same as that of our previous work. The advection terms are explicitly solved, and the source terms, which describe the gas-radiation interaction, are implicitly integrated. Our code is suitable for massive parallel computing. We present that our code shows reasonable results in some numerical tests for propagating radiation and radiation hydrodynamics. Particularly, the correct solution is given even in the optically very thin or moderately thin regimes, and the special relativistic effects are nicely reproduced.

  19. Verification of radiative transfer results by inserting them into the RTE: A demonstration for Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollstein, André

    2012-10-01

    The verification of a new or updated radiative transfer model (RTM) is one of the important steps in its development; this is usually achieved by comparisons with real measurements or published tables of generally accepted radiative transfer results. If such tables do not exist, verification becomes more complicated and an external review of the implementation is often unpractical due to the sheer amount and complexity of the code. The presented verification approach is to “simply” insert results of radiative transfer (RT) calculations into the radiative transfer equation (RTE). The evaluation of the RTE consists of numerically calculating partial derivatives and integrals, which is much simpler to implement than a solution of the RTE. Presented is a demonstration of this approach for a case of Rayleigh scattering in a plane parallel atmosphere, which showed only very small deviation from the radiative transfer equation.This approach has two key benefits. First, its implementation into a high level computer language can be very short (≈60 lines in MATHEMATICA) and clear compared to a full RTM; and such code is much more easy to review. Second, this approach can be easily extended to cases where no other independent RT implementation is available for validation. The proposed implementation and data are provided with this paper.

  20. Mathematical simulation of convective-radiative heat transfer in a ventilated rectangular cavity with consideration of internal mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheremet, M. A.; Shishkin, N. I.

    2012-07-01

    Mathematical simulation of the nonstationary regimes of heat-and-mass transfer in a ventilated rectangular cavity with heat-conducting walls of finite thickness in the presence of a heat-generating element of constant temperature has been carried out with account for the radiative heat transfer in the Rosseland approximation. As mechanisms of energy transfer in this cavity, the combined convection and the thermal radiation in the gas space of the cavity and the heat conduction in the elements of its fencing solid shell were considered. The mathematical model formulated in the dimensionless stream function-vorticity vector-temperature-concentration variables was realized numerically with the use of the finite-difference method. The streamline, temperature-field, and concentration distributions reflecting the influence of the Rayleigh number (Ra = 104, 105, 106), the nonstationarity (0 < τ ≤ 1000), and the optical thickness of the medium (τλ = 50, 100, 200) on the regimes of the gas flow and the heat-and-mass transfer in the cavity have been obtained.

  1. Testing and Improving Theories of Radiative Transfer for Determining the Mineralogy of Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, E.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Mustard, J. F.; Hiroi, T.; Poulet, F.

    2012-12-01

    Two radiative transfer theories, the Hapke and Shkuratov models, have been used to estimate the mineralogic composition of laboratory mixtures of anhydrous mafic minerals from reflected near-infrared light, accurately modeling abundances to within 10%. For this project, we tested the efficacy of the Hapke model for determining the composition of mixtures (weight fraction, particle diameter) containing hydrous minerals, including phyllosilicates. Modal mineral abundances for some binary mixtures were modeled to +/-10% of actual values, but other mixtures showed higher inaccuracies (up to 25%). Consequently, a sensitivity analysis of selected input and model parameters was performed. We first examined the shape of the model's error function (RMS error between modeled and measured spectra) over a large range of endmember weight fractions and particle diameters and found that there was a single global minimum for each mixture (rather than local minima). The minimum was sensitive to modeled particle diameter but comparatively insensitive to modeled endmember weight fraction. Derivation of the endmembers' k optical constant spectra using the Hapke model showed differences with the Shkuratov-derived optical constants originally used. Model runs with different sets of optical constants suggest that slight differences in the optical constants used significantly affect the accuracy of model predictions. Even for mixtures where abundance was modeled correctly, particle diameter agreed inconsistently with sieved particle sizes and varied greatly for individual mix within suite. Particle diameter was highly sensitive to the optical constants, possibly indicating that changes in modeled path length (proportional to particle diameter) compensate for changes in the k optical constant. Alternatively, it may not be appropriate to model path length and particle diameter with the same proportionality for all materials. Across mixtures, RMS error increased in proportion to the fraction

  2. Resonance laser-induced ionisation of sodium vapour taking radiative transfer into account

    SciTech Connect

    Kosarev, N I; Shaparev, N Ya

    2006-04-30

    The problem of ionisation of atomic sodium in the field of resonance laser radiation is numerically solved taking radiative transfer into account. Seed electrons are produced due to the mechanism of associative ionisation, then they gain energy in superelastic processes (collisions of the second kind) and initiate the avalanche ionisation of the medium by electron impact. We studied the effect of secondary radiation on the laser pulse propagation upon competition between the ionising and quenching electron collisions with excited atoms, on the kinetics of ionisation-induced vapour bleaching, and the plasma channel expansion in the form of a halo. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  3. Monte Carlo prediction of radiative heat transfer in inhomogeneous, anisotropic, nongray media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Jeff T.; Howell, John R.

    1994-01-01

    A Monte Carlo solution technique has been formulated to predict the radiative heat transfer in three-dimensional, inhomogeneous participating media which exhibit spectrally dependent emission and absorption and anisotropic scattering. Details of the technique and selected numerical sensitivities are discussed. The technique was applied to a problem involving a medium composed of a gas mixture of carbon dioxide and nitrogen and suspended carbon particles. A homogeneous medium was modeled to examine the effect of total pressure and carbon-particle concentration on radiative heat transfer. Variation in total pressure, over the range studied, had minimal effect on the amount of heat radiated to the enclosure walls and on the radiative-flux distribution within the medium. Increases in the carbon particle concentration produced significantly higher heat fluxes at the boundaries and altered the radiative flux distribution. The technique was then applied to an inhomogeneous medium to examine effects of specific temperature and carbon particle concentration distributions on radiative heat transfer. For the inhomogeneous conditions examined, the largest radiative flux divergence occurs near the center of the medium and the regions near some enclosure walls act as energy sinks.

  4. Comparisons of bidirectional reflectance distribution function measurements on prepared particulate surfaces and radiative-transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Voss, Kenneth J.

    2005-02-01

    To understand the connection between single-particle optics and the optics of a closely packed surface, controlled laboratory measurements of bidirectional reflectance distribution functions on layers of polymer and glass spheres are carried out. The measurements are compared with predictions from five radiative-transfer models; the Hapke's models, the Lumme-Bowell model, the BRF algorithm of Mishchenko et al., and the discrete ordinate radiative transfer. It is found that models of strict numerical radiative-transfer equations (RTEs) predict measurements well in some regions but have errors in both forward-and backward-scattering directions. The improved Hapke's model, although it has an anisotropic multiple-scattering term, still produces considerable errors compared with the strict RTE. The difference can be attributed to the exclusion of a diffraction contribution in the Hapke model.

  5. Numerical calculation of the radiation heat transfer between rocket motor nozzle's wall and gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yipeng; Zhu, Dingqiang

    2014-11-01

    The heat flux density of radiation heat transfer between rocket motor nozzle's wall and gas is one of the most important factors to decide temperature of nozzle's wall. It also provides an invaluable references advice for choosing the material of wall and type of cooling. The numerical calculation based on finite volume method is introduced in the paper. After analysis of the formula of FVM without the influence of scattering, a formula that is used to let spectral radiant intensity that is the calculation of FVM be converted into heat flux density of radiation heat transfer is deduced. It is compiled that the program based on FVM is used to calculate the heat flux density. At the end, the heat flux density of radiation heat transfer of 3D model of double-arc nozzle's wall is calculated under different condition, then simply analysis cooling system is performed.

  6. Radiative transfer in the dynamic atmospheres of long period variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luttermoser, Donald G.; Bowen, George H.

    1990-01-01

    An iterative procedure is presented for determining the thermal structure and dynamics of Mira-type stellar atmospheres, where the non-LTE radiative transfer code PANDORA is used in conjunction with the Bowen hydrodynamics code of Iowa State University. Preliminary results are reported for an atmospheric model of a pulsating AGB star of 1 solar mass, 240 solar radii, Teff = 3000 K, and a period of 320 days. At the present time, H, H(-), Mg I, and Mg II radiative transfer calculations have been completed and synthetic spectra are shown for H-alpha. The radiative transfer calculations demonstrate that cooling in the innermost shock of the original Bowen model is underestimated due to the omission of various hydrogen transitions. These initial results suggest that the main shock of the Bowen models are too hot and/or too deep.

  7. Radiative transfer theory for active remote sensing of a layer of nonspherical particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, L.; Kong, J. A.; Shin, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    The radiative transfer theory is applied to calculate the scattering by a layer of randomly positioned and oriented nonspherical particles. The scattering amplitude functions of each individual particle are calculated with Waterman's T matrix method, which utilizes vector spherical wave functions for expansion of incident, scattered, and surface fields. The orientation of the particles is described by a probability density function of the Eulerian angles of rotation. A rotation matrix is used to relate the T matrix of the principal frame to that of the natural frame of the particle. The extinction matrix and phase matrix of the radiative transfer equations are expressed in terms of the T matrix elements. The extinction matrix for nonspherical particles is generally nondiagonal. There are only two attenuation rates in a specified direction of propagation. The radiative transfer equations are solved by an iterative method to first order in albedo. Numerical results are illustrated as functions of incidence angle and frequency with applications to active remote sensing.

  8. RADIATIVE TRANSFER MODELING OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS. I. STATISTICS OF SPECTRA AND LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Zheng; Cen Renyue; Trac, Hy; Miralda-Escude, Jordi

    2010-06-10

    We combine a cosmological reionization simulation with box size of 100 h {sup -1} Mpc on a side and a Monte Carlo Ly{alpha} radiative transfer code to model Ly{alpha} Emitters (LAEs) at z {approx} 5.7. The model introduces Ly{alpha} radiative transfer as the single factor for transforming the intrinsic Ly{alpha} emission properties into the observed ones. Spatial diffusion of Ly{alpha} photons from radiative transfer results in extended Ly{alpha} emission and only the central part with high surface brightness can be observed. Because of radiative transfer, the appearance of LAEs depends on density and velocity structures in circumgalactic and intergalactic media as well as the viewing angle, which leads to a broad distribution of apparent (observed) Ly{alpha} luminosity for a given intrinsic Ly{alpha} luminosity. Radiative transfer also causes frequency diffusion of Ly{alpha} photons. The resultant Ly{alpha} line is asymmetric with a red tail. The peak of the Ly{alpha} line shifts toward longer wavelength and the shift is anti-correlated with the apparent-to-intrinsic Ly{alpha} luminosity ratio. The simple radiative transfer model provides a new framework for studying LAEs. It is able to explain an array of observed properties of z {approx} 5.7 LAEs in Ouchi et al., producing Ly{alpha} spectra, morphology, and apparent Ly{alpha} luminosity function (LF) similar to those seen in observation. The broad distribution of apparent Ly{alpha} luminosity at fixed UV luminosity provides a natural explanation for the observed UV LF, especially the turnover toward the low luminosity end. The model also reproduces the observed distribution of Ly{alpha} equivalent width (EW) and explains the deficit of UV bright, high EW sources. Because of the broad distribution of the apparent-to-intrinsic Ly{alpha} luminosity ratio, the model predicts effective duty cycles and Ly{alpha} escape fractions for LAEs.

  9. Comparative accuracy of the Albedo, transmission and absorption for selected radiative transfer approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, M. D.; HARSHVARDHAN

    1986-01-01

    Illustrations of both the relative and absolute accuracy of eight different radiative transfer approximations as a function of optical thickness, solar zenith angle and single scattering albedo are given. Computational results for the plane albedo, total transmission and fractional absorption were obtained for plane-parallel atmospheres composed of cloud particles. These computations, which were obtained using the doubling method, are compared with comparable results obtained using selected radiative transfer approximations. Comparisons were made between asymptotic theory for thick layers and the following widely used two stream approximations: Coakley-Chylek's models 1 and 2, Meador-Weaver, Eddington, delta-Eddington, PIFM and delta-discrete ordinates.

  10. Plant architecture, growth and radiative transfer for terrestrial and space environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, John M.; Goel, Narendra S.

    1993-01-01

    The overall objective of this research was to develop a hardware implemented model that would incorporate realistic and dynamic descriptions of canopy architecture in physiologically based models of plant growth and functioning, with an emphasis on radiative transfer while accommodating other environmental constraints. The general approach has five parts: a realistic mathematical treatment of canopy architecture, a methodology for combining this general canopy architectural description with a general radiative transfer model, the inclusion of physiological and environmental aspects of plant growth, inclusion of plant phenology, and integration.

  11. Efficient application of the spectrally integrated Voigt function to radiative transfer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrarov, Sanjar

    We present a new application of the spectrally integrated Voigt function (SIVF) to the radiative transfer spectroscopy that enables computation of the spectral radiance and radiance at reduced spectral resolution. Applying a technique based on the Fourier expansion of the exponential multiplier we obtain the series approximations providing high-accuracy and rapid SIVF computation. In contrast to traditional line-by-line (LBL) radiative transfer models, the proposed SIVF algorithm prevents underestimation in the absorption coefficients and, therefore, preserves the radiant energy. LBL sample computations utilizing SIVF algorithm show the advantages of the proposed methodology in terms of the accuracy and computational speed.

  12. Derivation and application of the reciprocity relations for radiative transfer with internal illumination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogley, A. C.

    1975-01-01

    A Green's function formulation is used to derive basic reciprocity relations for planar radiative transfer in a general medium with internal illumination. Reciprocity (or functional symmetry) allows an explicit and generalized development of the equivalence between source and probability functions. Assuming similar symmetry in three-dimensional space, a general relationship is derived between planar-source intensity and point-source total directional energy. These quantities are expressed in terms of standard (universal) functions associated with the planar medium, while all results are derived from the differential equation of radiative transfer.

  13. Three-dimensional radiative transfer calculations on an SIMD machine applied to accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vath, H.

    We have developed a tool to solve the radiative transfer equation for a three-dimensional astrophysical object on the SIMD computer MasPar MP-1. With this tool we can rapidly calculate the image of such an object as seen from an arbitrary direction and at an arbitrary wavelength. Such images and spectra can then be used to directly compare observations with the model. This tool can be applied to many different areas in astrophysics, e.g., HI disks of galaxies and polarized radiative transfer of accretion columns onto white dwarfs. Here we use this tool to calculate the image and spectrum of a simple model of an accretion disk.

  14. Three-dimensional radiative transfer using a Fourier-transform matrix-operator method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martonchik, J. V.; Diner, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The three-dimensional equation of transfer for a scattering medium with planar geometry is solved by using a spatial Fourier transform and extending matrix-operator techniques developed previously for the one-dimensional equation. Doubling and adding algorithms were derived by means of an interaction principle for computing the Fourier-transformed radiation field. The resulting expressions fully describe the radiative transfer process in a scattering medium, inhomogeneous in the x-, y- and z-directions, illuminated from above by an arbitrarily general intensity field and bounded from below by a surface with completely general reflection properties.

  15. Radiative heat transfer inside a cylindrical enclosure with nonparticipating media using a deterministic statistical method

    SciTech Connect

    Sivathanu, Y.R.; Gore, J.P.

    1996-12-31

    The radiative heat transfer inside a cylindrical enclosure is modeled using a discrete probability function method. The discrete probability function method involves solution of the equation of radiative heat transfer using Lagrangian simulations of representative photon trajectories on a discrete spatial grid. The DPF method is applied to radiation exchange in a cylindrical tube which has a hot source at one end and a detector at the other end. The cylindrical wall absorbs and reflects (both diffusely and specularly) the radiation incident on it. The calculations are used to simulate the effect of collimating tubes used in intrusive multi-wavelength emission spectroscopy. Results highlight the effect of surface properties on the apparent source temperature determined by the detector. The calculation procedure has application to the measurements of spectral absorption and reflection coefficient of the cylindrical surface using an inverse method.

  16. A convective and radiative heat transfer analysis for the FIRE II forebody

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greendyke, Robert B.; Hartung, Lin C.

    1993-01-01

    A Navier-Stokes flowfield solution method (LAURA code) using finite-rate chemistry and two-temperature thermal nonequilibrium was used in combination with two nonequilibrium radiative heat transfer codes to calculate heating for the FIRE II vehicle. An axisymmetric model of the actual body shape was used. One radiative heating code (NEQAIR) was used in uncoupled fashion with the flowfield solver's energy equations, while the other code (LORAN) was used in both coupled and uncoupled variations. Several trajectory points ranging from highly nonequilibrium flow to near-equilibrium flow were used for a study of both convective and radiative heating over the vehicle. Considerable variation in radiative heating was seen at the extremes, while agreement was good in the intermediate trajectory points. Total heat transfer calculations gave good comparison until the peak heating trajectory points were encountered, and returned to good agreement for the last two equilibrium points.

  17. Two-dimensional HID light source radiative transfer using discrete ordinates method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghrib, Basma; Bouaoun, Mohamed; Elloumi, Hatem

    2016-08-01

    This paper shows the implementation of the Discrete Ordinates Method for handling radiation problems in High Intensity Discharge (HID) lamps. Therefore, we start with presenting this rigorous method for treatment of radiation transfer in a two-dimensional, axisymmetric HID lamp. Furthermore, the finite volume method is used for the spatial discretization of the Radiative Transfer Equation. The atom and electron densities were calculated using temperature profiles established by a 2D semi-implicit finite-element scheme for the solution of conservation equations relative to energy, momentum, and mass. Spectral intensities as a function of position and direction are first calculated, and then axial and radial radiative fluxes are evaluated as well as the net emission coefficient. The results are given for a HID mercury lamp on a line-by-line basis. A particular attention is paid on the 253.7 nm resonance and 546.1 nm green lines.

  18. Spectrometer and radiative transfer model comparison using high sun in-situ observations in Pretoria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysko, Meena D.; Feister, Uwe; Griffith, Derek; Gross, Steffen; Vhengani, Lufuno; Ramkilowan, Arshath; Mahlobo, Dawn

    2013-05-01

    There is need for reliable in-situ spectral solar irradiance measurements. For instance, the spectrally resolved irradiance may be used to infer its influence on radiative forcing of climate and in solar energy applications. In any case, reliable data with relatively short spectral scan times as well as apt spectral range, resolution and sensitivity is necessary. The in-situ data is commonly used to validate solar irradiance models and as metadata to atmospheric radiative transfer models. The scope of this work has therefore been twofold: 1. to explore the suitability of a diode array spectrometer for in-situ spectral global solar irradiance by comparing the system against a performance established Analytical Spectral Devices FieldSpec spectroradiometer and 2. to compare two radiative transfer models and provide clear-sky background data for the spectroradiometric measurements. The considered models are MODTRAN and LibRadtran. Metadata such as the spectral global solar irradiance from the above mentioned instruments, water vapour, aerosol optical depth, humidity and cloud information is used as input into the radiative transfer models. This paper reports on the in-situ spectrometer comparison and the results from the two radiative transfer models.

  19. Radiative transfer in nonuniformly refracting layered media: atmosphere-ocean system.

    PubMed

    Jin, Z; Stamnes, K

    1994-01-20

    We have applied the discrete-ordinate method to solve the radiative-transfer problem pertaining to a system consisting of two strata with different indices of refraction. The refraction and reflection at the interface are taken into account. The relevant changes (as compared with the standard problem with a constant index of refraction throughout the medium) in formulation and solution of the radiative-transfer equation, including the proper application of interface and boundary conditions, are described. Appropriate quadrature points (streams) and weights are chosen for the interface-continuity relations. Examples of radiative transfer in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system are provided. To take into account the region of total reflection in the ocean, additional angular quadrature points are required, compared with those used in the atmosphere and in the refractive region of the ocean that communicates directly with the atmosphere. To verify the model we have tested for energy conservation. We also discuss the effect of the number of streams assigned to the refractive region and the total reflecting region on the convergence. Our results show that the change in the index of refraction between the two strata significantly affects the radiation field. The radiative-transfer model we present is designed for application to the atmosphere-ocean system, but it can be applied to other systems that need to consider the change in the index of refraction between two strata. PMID:20862035

  20. Neural network radiative transfer solvers for the generation of high resolution solar irradiance spectra parameterized by cloud and aerosol parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M.; Kosmopoulos, P. G.; Kazadzis, S.; Keramitsoglou, I.; Kiranoudis, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a neural network (NN) model for instantaneous and accurate estimation of solar radiation spectra and budgets geared toward satellite cloud data using a ≈2.4 M record, high-spectral resolution look up table (LUT) generated with the radiative transfer model libRadtran. Two NN solvers, one for clear sky conditions dominated by aerosol and one for cloudy skies, were trained on a normally-distributed and multiparametric subset of the LUT that spans a very broad class of atmospheric and meteorological conditions as inputs with corresponding high resolution solar irradiance target spectra as outputs. The NN solvers were tested by feeding them with a large (10 K record) "off-grid" random subset of the LUT spanning the training data space, and then comparing simulated outputs with target values provided by the LUT. The NN solvers demonstrated a capability to interpolate accurately over the entire multiparametric space. Once trained, the NN solvers allow for high-speed estimation of solar radiation spectra with high spectral resolution (1 nm) and for a quantification of the effect of aerosol and cloud optical parameters on the solar radiation budget without the need for a massive database. The cloudy sky NN solver was applied to high spatial resolution (54 K pixel) cloud data extracted from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) onboard the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation 3 (MSG3) satellite and demonstrated that coherent maps of spectrally-integrated global horizontal irradiance at this resolution can be produced on the order of 1 min.

  1. Differences in Water Vapor Radiative Transfer among 1D Models Can Significantly Affect the Inner Edge of the Habitable Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Leconte, Jérémy; Wolf, Eric T.; Goldblatt, Colin; Feldl, Nicole; Merlis, Timothy; Wang, Yuwei; Koll, Daniel D. B.; Ding, Feng; Forget, François; Abbot, Dorian S.

    2016-08-01

    An accurate estimate of the inner edge of the habitable zone is critical for determining which exoplanets are potentially habitable and for designing future telescopes to observe them. Here, we explore differences in estimating the inner edge among seven one-dimensional radiative transfer models: two line-by-line codes (SMART and LBLRTM) as well as five band codes (CAM3, CAM4_Wolf, LMDG, SBDART, and AM2) that are currently being used in global climate models. We compare radiative fluxes and spectra in clear-sky conditions around G and M stars, with fixed moist adiabatic profiles for surface temperatures from 250 to 360 K. We find that divergences among the models arise mainly from large uncertainties in water vapor absorption in the window region (10 μm) and in the region between 0.2 and 1.5 μm. Differences in outgoing longwave radiation increase with surface temperature and reach 10–20 W m‑2 differences in shortwave reach up to 60 W m‑2, especially at the surface and in the troposphere, and are larger for an M-dwarf spectrum than a solar spectrum. Differences between the two line-by-line models are significant, although smaller than among the band models. Our results imply that the uncertainty in estimating the insolation threshold of the inner edge (the runaway greenhouse limit) due only to clear-sky radiative transfer is ≈10% of modern Earth’s solar constant (i.e., ≈34 W m‑2 in global mean) among band models and ≈3% between the two line-by-line models. These comparisons show that future work is needed that focuses on improving water vapor absorption coefficients in both shortwave and longwave, as well as on increasing the resolution of stellar spectra in broadband models.

  2. Modeling lidar waveforms with time-dependent stochastic radiative transfer theory for remote estimations of forest structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotchenova, Svetlana Y.; Shabanov, Nikolay V.; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Davis, Anthony B.; Dubayah, Ralph; Myneni, Ranga B.

    2003-08-01

    Large footprint waveform-recording laser altimeters (lidars) have demonstrated a potential for accurate remote sensing of forest biomass and structure, important for regional and global climate studies. Currently, radiative transfer analyses of lidar data are based on the simplifying assumption that only single scattering contributes to the return signal, which may lead to errors in the modeling of the lower portions of recorded waveforms in the near-infrared spectrum. In this study we apply time-dependent stochastic radiative transfer (RT) theory to model the propagation of lidar pulses through forest canopies. A time-dependent stochastic RT equation is formulated and solved numerically. Such an approach describes multiple scattering events, allows for realistic representation of forest structure including foliage clumping and gaps, simulates off-nadir and multiangular observations, and has the potential to provide better approximations of return waveforms. The model was tested with field data from two conifer forest stands (southern old jack pine and southern old black spruce) in central Canada and two closed canopy deciduous forest stands (with overstory dominated by tulip poplar) in eastern Maryland. Model-simulated signals were compared with waveforms recorded by the Scanning Lidar Imager of Canopies by Echo Recovery (SLICER) over these regions. Model simulations show good agreement with SLICER signals having a slow decay of the waveform. The analysis of the effects of multiple scattering shows that multiply scattered photons magnify the amplitude of the reflected signal, especially that originating from the lower portions of the canopy.

  3. Optimization by means of an analytical heat transfer model of a thermal insulation for CSP applications based on radiative shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaetano, A.; Roncolato, J.; Montorfano, D.; Barbato, M. C.; Ambrosetti, G.; Pedretti, A.

    2016-05-01

    The employment of new gaseous heat transfer fluids as air or CO2, which are cheaper and environmentally friendly, is drawing more and more attention within the field of Concentrated Solar Power applications. However, despite the advantages, their use requires receivers with a larger heat transfer area and flow cross section with a consequent greater volume of thermal insulation. Solid thermal insulations currently used present high thermal inertia which is energetically penalizing during the daily transient phases faced by the main plant components (e.g. receivers). With the aim of overcoming this drawback a thermal insulation based on radiative shields is presented in this study. Starting from an initial layout comprising a solid thermal insulation layer, the geometry was optimized avoiding the use of the solid insulation keeping performance and fulfilling the geometrical constraints. An analytical Matlab model was implemented to assess the system thermal behavior in terms of heat loss taking into account conductive, convective and radiative contributions. Accurate 2D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were run to validate the Matlab model which was then used to select the most promising among three new different designs.

  4. A full-spectrum k-distribution look-up table for radiative transfer in nonhomogeneous gaseous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chaojun; Ge, Wenjun; Modest, Michael F.; He, Boshu

    2016-01-01

    A full-spectrum k-distribution (FSK) look-up table has been constructed for gas mixtures within a certain range of thermodynamic states for three species, i.e., CO2, H2O and CO. The k-distribution of a mixture is assembled directly from the summation of the linear absorption coefficients of three species. The systematic approach to generate the table, including the generation of the pressure-based absorption coefficient and the generation of the k-distribution, is discussed. To efficiently obtain accurate k-values for arbitrary thermodynamic states from tabulated values, a 6-D linear interpolation method is employed. A large number of radiative heat transfer calculations have been carried out to test the accuracy of the FSK look-up table. Results show that, using the FSK look-up table can provide excellent accuracy compared to the exact results. Without the time-consuming process of assembling k-distribution from individual species plus mixing, using the FSK look-up table can save considerable computational cost. To evaluate the accuracy as well as the efficiency of the FSK look-up table, radiative heat transfer via a scaled Sandia D Flame is calculated to compare the CPU execution time using the FSK method based on the narrow-band database, correlations, and the look-up table. Results show that the FSK look-up table can provide a computationally cheap alternative without much sacrifice in accuracy.

  5. An isolated line-shape model to go beyond the Voigt profile in spectroscopic databases and radiative transfer codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, N. H.; Lisak, D.; Tran, H.; Hartmann, J.-M.

    2013-11-01

    We demonstrate that a previously proposed model opens the route for the inclusion of refined non-Voigt profiles in spectroscopic databases and atmospheric radiative transfer codes. Indeed, this model fulfills many essential requirements: (i) it takes both velocity changes and the speed dependences of the pressure-broadening and -shifting coefficients into account. (ii) It leads to accurate descriptions of the line shapes of very different molecular systems. Tests made for pure H2, CO2 and O2 and for H2O diluted in N2 show that residuals are down to ≃0.2% of the peak absorption, (except for the untypical system of H2 where a maximum residual of ±3% is reached), thus fulfilling the precision requirements of the most demanding remote sensing experiments. (iii) It is based on a limited set of parameters for each absorption line that have known dependences on pressure and can thus be stored in databases. (iv) Its calculation requires very reasonable computer costs, only a few times higher than that of a usual Voigt profile. Its inclusion in radiative transfer codes will thus induce bearable CPU time increases. (v) It can be extended in order to take line-mixing effects into account, at least within the so-called first-order approximation.

  6. Scattering in infrared radiative transfer: A comparison between the spectrally averaging model JURASSIC and the line-by-line model KOPRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griessbach, Sabine; Hoffmann, Lars; Höpfner, Michael; Riese, Martin; Spang, Reinhold

    2013-09-01

    The viability of a spectrally averaging model to perform radiative transfer calculations in the infrared including scattering by atmospheric particles is examined for the application of infrared limb remote sensing measurements. Here we focus on the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) aboard the European Space Agency's Envisat. Various spectra for clear air and cloudy conditions were simulated with a spectrally averaging radiative transfer model and a line-by-line radiative transfer model for three atmospheric window regions (825-830, 946-951, 1224-1228 cm-1) and compared to each other. The results are rated in terms of the MIPAS noise equivalent spectral radiance (NESR). The clear air simulations generally agree within one NESR. The cloud simulations neglecting the scattering source term agree within two NESR. The differences between the cloud simulations including the scattering source term are generally below three and always below four NESR. We conclude that the spectrally averaging approach is well suited for fast and accurate infrared radiative transfer simulations including scattering by clouds. We found that the main source for the differences between the cloud simulations of both models is the cloud edge sampling. Furthermore we reasoned that this model comparison for clouds is also valid for atmospheric aerosol in general.

  7. Radiative heat transfer in molten and glassy obsidian

    SciTech Connect

    Gable, C.W.; Shankland, T.J.

    1984-08-10

    We have measured optical transmittance spectra in rhyolitic obsidian samples in the wavelength range lambda = 380-5500 nm and at temperatures T from 19/sup 0/-1145/sup 0/C, above and below the softening point. From the transmittance, we calculated the absorption coefficient ..cap alpha..(lambda,T) and the radiative thermal conductivity K/sub R/(T). K/sub R/ ranges from 3 x 10/sup -3/ cal cm/sup -1/s/sup -1/K/sup -1/ (1.2Wm/sup -1/K/sup -1/) at 700/sup 0/C to 12 x 10/sup -3/ cal cm/sup -1/s/sup -1/K/sup -1/(5Wm/sup -1/K/sup -1/) at 1145/sup 0/C. The 700/sup 0/C value is comparable with lattice thermal conductivity K/sub L/ of about 4 x 10/sup -3/ cal cm/sup -1/ s/sup -1/K/sup -1/(1.7 Wm/sup -1/K/sup -1/). Removing scattering effects due to bubbles from the transmittance spectra by lowering the absorption baseline increased K/sub R/ to 20 x 10/sup -3/ cal cm/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ K/sup -1/(8.4Wm/sup -1/K/sup -1/) at 1145/sup 0/C. Because scattering bubbles is likely to be small in confined magmas, these numbers are probably minimum values for K/sub R/ and indicate that in active plutons radiative heat transport could be greater than lattice conductivity by more than a factor of 2 at 1000/sup 0/C. Thus melting markedly strengthens K/sub R/, and radiative heat transport is probably the dominant component of the total conductivity K = K/sub L/+K/sub R/ in silicic magmas. These relatively large values of K can be applied to models of the thermal evolution of magma bodies and to cooling of intrusives.

  8. Radiative and free convective heat transfer from a containerless sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K.

    1979-01-01

    A mathematical model is derived for heat loss due to radiation and free convection for a small copper sphere (approximately 0.3 to 0.4 cm diameter) cooled by a helium-argon gas mixture. A FORTRAN program written to simplify calculations and extend the range of applicability to experimentation is presented. Pressures used were less than 400 torr, and resulting temperatures ranged from 500 to 4600 K. Comparison of results for initial cooling by the gas mixture with experimental data showed a 5 percent error for temperature values and a 2.7 percent error for the temperature difference caused by the cooling. Results indicate that the accuracy could be increased significantly by using better estimates for thermal conductivities.

  9. Radiative transfer effects on reflected shock waves. II - Absorbing gas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, F. Y.; Olfe, D. B.

    1972-01-01

    Radiative cooling effects behind a reflected shock wave are calculated for an absorbing-emitting gas by means of an expansion procedure in the small density ratio across the shock front. For a gray gas shock layer with an optical thickness of order unity or less the absorption integral is simplified by use of the local temperature approximation, whereas for larger optical thicknesses a Rosseland diffusion type of solution is matched with the local temperature approximation solution. The calculations show that the shock wave will attenuate at first and then accelerate to a constant velocity. Under appropriate conditions the gas enthalpy near the wall may increase at intermediate times before ultimately decreasing to zero. A two-band absorption model yields end-wall radiant-heat fluxes which agree well with available shock-tube measurements.

  10. An improved radiative transfer model for estimating mineral abundance of immature and mature lunar soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dawei; Li, Lin; Sun, Ying

    2015-06-01

    An improved Hapke's radiative transfer model (RTM) is presented to estimate mineral abundance for both immature and mature lunar soils from the Lunar Soil Characterization Consortium (LSCC) dataset. Fundamental to this improved Hapke's model is the application of an alternative equation to describe the effects of larger size submicroscopic metallic iron (SMFe) (>50 nm) in the interior of agglutinitic glass that mainly darken the host material, contrasting to the darkening and reddening effects of smaller size SMFe (<50 nm) residing in the rims of mineral grains. Results from applying a nonlinear inversion procedure to the improved Hapke's RTM show that the average mass fraction of smaller and larger size SMFe in lunar soils was estimated to be 0.30% and 0.31% respectively, and the particle size distribution of soil samples is all within their measured range. Based on the derived mass fraction of SMFe and particle size of the soil samples, abundances of end-member components composing lunar soil samples were derived via minimizing the difference between measured and calculated spectra. The root mean square error (RMSE) between the fitted and measured spectra is lower than 0.01 for highland samples and 0.005 for mare samples. This improved Hapke's model accurately estimates abundances of agglutinitic glass (R-squared = 0.88), pyroxene (R-squared = 0.69) and plagioclase (R-squared = 0.95) for all 57 samples used in this study including both immature and mature lunar soils. However, the improved Hapke's RTM shows poor performance for quantifying abundances of olivine, ilmenite and volcanic glass. Improving the model performance for estimation of these three end-member components is the central focus for our future work.

  11. Radiative transfer modeling of direct and diffuse sunlight in a Siberian pine forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alton, P. B.; North, P.; Kaduk, J.; Los, S.

    2005-12-01

    We have expanded the Monte Carlo, ray-tracing model FLIGHT in order to simulate photosynthesis within three-dimensional, heterogeneous tree canopies. In contrast to the simple radiative transfer schemes adopted in many land-surface models (e.g., the Big Leaf approximation), our simulation calculates explicitly the leaf irradiance at different heights within the canopy and thus produces an accurate scale-up in photosynthesis from leaf to canopy level. We also account for both diffuse and direct sunlight. For a Siberian stand of Scots pine Pinus sylvestris, FLIGHT predicts observed carbon assimilation, across the full range of sky radiance, with an r.m.s. error of 12%. Our main findings for this sparse canopy, using both measurements and model, are as follows: (1) Observationally, we detect a light-use efficiency (LUE) increase of only ≤10% for the canopy when the proportion of diffuse sky radiance is 75% rather than 25%. The corresponding enhancement predicted by our simulations is 10-20%. With such small increases in LUE, our site will not assimilate more carbon on overcast days compared to seasonally equivalent sunny days; (2) the scale-up in photosynthesis from top-leaf to canopy is less than unity. The Big Leaf approximation, based on Beer's law and light-acclimated leaf nitrogen, overpredicts this scale-up by ≥60% for low sky radiance (≤500 μmolPAR m-2 s-1); (3) when leaf nitrogen is distributed so as to maximize canopy photosynthesis, the increase in the canopy carbon assimilation, compared with a uniform nitrogen distribution, is small (≃4%). Maximum assimilation occurs when the vertical gradient of leaf nitrogen is slightly shallower than that of the light profile.

  12. Impact of differences in the solar irradiance spectrum on surface reflectance retrieval with different radiative transfer codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staenz, K.; Williams, D. J.; Fedosejevs, G.; Teillet, P. M.

    1995-01-01

    Surface reflectance retrieval from imaging spectrometer data as acquired with the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) has become important for quantitative analysis. In order to calculate surface reflectance from remotely measured radiance, radiative transfer codes such as 5S and MODTRAN2 play an increasing role for removal of scattering and absorption effects of the atmosphere. Accurate knowledge of the exo-atmospheric solar irradiance (E(sub 0)) spectrum at the spectral resolution of the sensor is important for this purpose. The present study investigates the impact of differences in the solar irradiance function, as implemented in a modified version of 5S (M5S), 6S, and MODTRAN2, and as proposed by Green and Gao, on the surface reflectance retrieved from AVIRIS data. Reflectance measured in situ is used as a basis of comparison.

  13. Monte Carlo simulation methods in moment-based scale-bridging algorithms for thermal radiative-transfer problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Densmore, J. D.; Park, H.; Wollaber, A. B.; Rauenzahn, R. M.; Knoll, D. A.

    2015-03-01

    We present a moment-based acceleration algorithm applied to Monte Carlo simulation of thermal radiative-transfer problems. Our acceleration algorithm employs a continuum system of moments to accelerate convergence of stiff absorption-emission physics. The combination of energy-conserving tallies and the use of an asymptotic approximation in optically thick regions remedy the difficulties of local energy conservation and mitigation of statistical noise in such regions. We demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the developed method. We also compare directly to the standard linearization-based method of Fleck and Cummings [1]. A factor of 40 reduction in total computational time is achieved with the new algorithm for an equivalent (or more accurate) solution as compared with the Fleck-Cummings algorithm.

  14. Monte Carlo simulation methods in moment-based scale-bridging algorithms for thermal radiative-transfer problems

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, J.D.; Park, H.; Wollaber, A.B.; Rauenzahn, R.M.; Knoll, D.A.

    2015-03-01

    We present a moment-based acceleration algorithm applied to Monte Carlo simulation of thermal radiative-transfer problems. Our acceleration algorithm employs a continuum system of moments to accelerate convergence of stiff absorption–emission physics. The combination of energy-conserving tallies and the use of an asymptotic approximation in optically thick regions remedy the difficulties of local energy conservation and mitigation of statistical noise in such regions. We demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the developed method. We also compare directly to the standard linearization-based method of Fleck and Cummings [1]. A factor of 40 reduction in total computational time is achieved with the new algorithm for an equivalent (or more accurate) solution as compared with the Fleck–Cummings algorithm.

  15. Non-Radiative Energy Transfer Mediated by Hybrid Light-Matter States.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiaolan; Chervy, Thibault; Wang, Shaojun; George, Jino; Thomas, Anoop; Hutchison, James A; Devaux, Eloise; Genet, Cyriaque; Ebbesen, Thomas W

    2016-05-17

    We present direct evidence of enhanced non-radiative energy transfer between two J-aggregated cyanine dyes strongly coupled to the vacuum field of a cavity. Excitation spectroscopy and femtosecond pump-probe measurements show that the energy transfer is highly efficient when both the donor and acceptor form light-matter hybrid states with the vacuum field. The rate of energy transfer is increased by a factor of seven under those conditions as compared to the normal situation outside the cavity, with a corresponding effect on the energy transfer efficiency. The delocalized hybrid states connect the donor and acceptor molecules and clearly play the role of a bridge to enhance the rate of energy transfer. This finding has fundamental implications for coherent energy transport and light-energy harvesting. PMID:27072296

  16. Natural element method for radiative heat transfer in a semitransparent medium with irregular geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yong; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2013-05-15

    This paper develops a numerical solution to the radiative heat transfer problem coupled with conduction in an absorbing, emitting and isotropically scattering medium with the irregular geometries using the natural element method (NEM). The walls of the enclosures, having temperature and mixed boundary conditions, are considered to be opaque, diffuse as well as gray. The NEM as a meshless method is a new numerical scheme in the field of computational mechanics. Different from most of other meshless methods such as element-free Galerkin method or those based on radial basis functions, the shape functions used in NEM are constructed by the natural neighbor interpolations, which are strictly interpolant and the essential boundary conditions can be imposed directly. The natural element solutions in dealing with the coupled heat transfer problem for the mixed boundary conditions have been validated by comparison with those from Monte Carlo method (MCM) generated by the authors. For the validation of the NEM solution to radiative heat transfer in the semicircular medium with an inner circle, the results by NEM have been compared with those reported in the literatures. For pure radiative transfer, the upwind scheme is employed to overcome the oscillatory behavior of the solutions in some conditions. The steady state and transient heat transfer problem combined with radiation and conduction in the semicircular enclosure with an inner circle are studied. Effects of various parameters such as the extinction coefficient, the scattering albedo, the conduction–radiation parameter and the boundary emissivity are analyzed on the radiative and conductive heat fluxes and transient temperature distributions.

  17. Analytical Models of Exoplanetary Atmospheres. II. Radiative Transfer via the Two-stream Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, Kevin; Mendonça, João M.; Lee, Jae-Min

    2014-11-01

    We present a comprehensive analytical study of radiative transfer using the method of moments and include the effects of non-isotropic scattering in the coherent limit. Within this unified formalism, we derive the governing equations and solutions describing two-stream radiative transfer (which approximates the passage of radiation as a pair of outgoing and incoming fluxes), flux-limited diffusion (which describes radiative transfer in the deep interior), and solutions for the temperature-pressure profiles. Generally, the problem is mathematically underdetermined unless a set of closures (Eddington coefficients) is specified. We demonstrate that the hemispheric (or hemi-isotropic) closure naturally derives from the radiative transfer equation if energy conservation is obeyed, while the Eddington closure produces spurious enhancements of both reflected light and thermal emission. We concoct recipes for implementing two-stream radiative transfer in stand-alone numerical calculations and general circulation models. We use our two-stream solutions to construct toy models of the runaway greenhouse effect. We present a new solution for temperature-pressure profiles with a non-constant optical opacity and elucidate the effects of non-isotropic scattering in the optical and infrared. We derive generalized expressions for the spherical and Bond albedos and the photon deposition depth. We demonstrate that the value of the optical depth corresponding to the photosphere is not always 2/3 (Milne's solution) and depends on a combination of stellar irradiation, internal heat, and the properties of scattering in both the optical and infrared. Finally, we derive generalized expressions for the total, net, outgoing, and incoming fluxes in the convective regime.

  18. ANALYTICAL MODELS OF EXOPLANETARY ATMOSPHERES. II. RADIATIVE TRANSFER VIA THE TWO-STREAM APPROXIMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Heng, Kevin; Mendonça, João M.; Lee, Jae-Min E-mail: joao.mendonca@csh.unibe.ch

    2014-11-01

    We present a comprehensive analytical study of radiative transfer using the method of moments and include the effects of non-isotropic scattering in the coherent limit. Within this unified formalism, we derive the governing equations and solutions describing two-stream radiative transfer (which approximates the passage of radiation as a pair of outgoing and incoming fluxes), flux-limited diffusion (which describes radiative transfer in the deep interior), and solutions for the temperature-pressure profiles. Generally, the problem is mathematically underdetermined unless a set of closures (Eddington coefficients) is specified. We demonstrate that the hemispheric (or hemi-isotropic) closure naturally derives from the radiative transfer equation if energy conservation is obeyed, while the Eddington closure produces spurious enhancements of both reflected light and thermal emission. We concoct recipes for implementing two-stream radiative transfer in stand-alone numerical calculations and general circulation models. We use our two-stream solutions to construct toy models of the runaway greenhouse effect. We present a new solution for temperature-pressure profiles with a non-constant optical opacity and elucidate the effects of non-isotropic scattering in the optical and infrared. We derive generalized expressions for the spherical and Bond albedos and the photon deposition depth. We demonstrate that the value of the optical depth corresponding to the photosphere is not always 2/3 (Milne's solution) and depends on a combination of stellar irradiation, internal heat, and the properties of scattering in both the optical and infrared. Finally, we derive generalized expressions for the total, net, outgoing, and incoming fluxes in the convective regime.

  19. Natural element method for radiative heat transfer in a semitransparent medium with irregular geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2013-05-01

    This paper develops a numerical solution to the radiative heat transfer problem coupled with conduction in an absorbing, emitting and isotropically scattering medium with the irregular geometries using the natural element method (NEM). The walls of the enclosures, having temperature and mixed boundary conditions, are considered to be opaque, diffuse as well as gray. The NEM as a meshless method is a new numerical scheme in the field of computational mechanics. Different from most of other meshless methods such as element-free Galerkin method or those based on radial basis functions, the shape functions used in NEM are constructed by the natural neighbor interpolations, which are strictly interpolant and the essential boundary conditions can be imposed directly. The natural element solutions in dealing with the coupled heat transfer problem for the mixed boundary conditions have been validated by comparison with those from Monte Carlo method (MCM) generated by the authors. For the validation of the NEM solution to radiative heat transfer in the semicircular medium with an inner circle, the results by NEM have been compared with those reported in the literatures. For pure radiative transfer, the upwind scheme is employed to overcome the oscillatory behavior of the solutions in some conditions. The steady state and transient heat transfer problem combined with radiation and conduction in the semicircular enclosure with an inner circle are studied. Effects of various parameters such as the extinction coefficient, the scattering albedo, the conduction-radiation parameter and the boundary emissivity are analyzed on the radiative and conductive heat fluxes and transient temperature distributions.

  20. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer in polymer solutions exposed to intermittent infrared radiation heating

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.J.; Lin, J.D.

    1998-06-01

    Drying is one of the essential steps in a number of industrial applications, such as the preserving of food and the drying of paint, pulp, and paper. The quality of paper tubes is significantly affected by the heat and mass transfer process. The drying of polymer solution plays a crucial role in the manufacturer of photographic film, synthetic fibers, adhesives, and a variety of other polymeric products. During drying of wet materials, simultaneous heat and mass transfer occurs both inside the medium and in the boundary layer of the drying agent. Drying is one of the most energy-consuming processes in the industrial sector and can also be very time consuming as, for example, in conventional convective drying by hot air, while minimum cost and energy consumption and maximum product quality are among the main concerns in industry today. Here, a theoretical study is performed that describes heat transfer and moisture variation while a polymer solution is exposed to high-intensity infrared radiation flux and/or an airflow. While the intermittent heating is considered, the authors investigate the influences of various radiation and convection parameters on the transfer of heat and moisture variation of coated layers on an optically thick substrate. During the tempering stage in the intermittent heating process, the convective mass transfer is included to simulate the ambient air in reality. The effects of radiation and convection parameters on the transfer processes are presented in terms of the rate of water content removal, heat transfer, and moisture distributions. Numerical results show that the rate of water removal from the polymer solution is dominated by both the adsorbed radiative heat energy and the distributions of water mass fraction in the polymer solution.

  1. Heat transfer in vertical Bridgman growth of oxides - Effects of conduction, convection, and internal radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, S.; Derby, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    In the present investigation of crystalline phase internal radiation and heat conduction during the vertical Bridgman growth of a YAG-like oxide crystal, where transport through the melt is dominated by convection and conduction, heat is also noted to be conducted through ampoule walls via natural convection and enclosure radiation. The results of a quasi-steady-state axisymmetric Galerkin FEM indicate that heat transfer through the system is powerfully affected by the optical absorption coefficient of the crystal. The coupling of internal radiation through the crystal with conduction through the ampoule walls promotes melt/crystal interface shapes that are highly reflected near the ampoule wall.

  2. The Radiative Transfer Of CH{sub 4}-N{sub 2} Plasma Arc

    SciTech Connect

    Benallal, R.; Liani, B.

    2008-09-23

    Any physical modelling of a circuit-breaker arc therefore requires an understanding of the radiated energy which is taken into account in the form of a net coefficient. The evaluation of the net emission coefficient is performed by the knowledge of the chemical plasma composition and the resolution of the radiative transfer equation. In this paper, the total radiation which escapes from a CH{sub 4}-N{sub 2} plasma is calculated in the temperature range between 5000 and 30000K on the assumption of a local thermodynamic equilibrium and we have studied the nitrogen effect in the hydrocarbon plasmas.

  3. Flame radiation and liner heat transfer in a tubular-can combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, R. W.; Neely, G. M.; Humenik, F. M.

    1983-01-01

    Heat transfer within a combuster were examined. Total and spectral flame radiation in a tubular can combustor at a series of parametric operating conditions was measured. Radiation measurements were taken for a range of inlet air pressures from 0.34 to 2.0 MPa, inlet air temperatures from 533 to 700 K, with two different fuels, Jet-A and ERBS. Measurements of liner temperatures combined with the parametric radiation results allowed a calculation of the combustor liner heat loads. Flame emissivity was determined from the spectral measurements.

  4. Radiative transfer in arbitrarily-shaped axisymmetric bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Edmundo Miguel

    2001-08-01

    A mathematical model for evaluating thermal radiative transport in axisymmetric enclosures is presented. Based on the Discrete Exchange Factor (DEF) method, exchange factors between arbitrarily-oriented differential surface/volume ring elements are systematically calculated. The formulation is capable of treating geometrically complex systems including enclosures with shadowing effects ensuing from inner and/or outer obstructing bodies. The model is developed for isotropically scattering participating media. The solutions to several cylindrical media benchmark problems are found to be in excellent agreement with existing solutions in the literature. The solutions to several rocket-nozzle and plug-chamber geometries are presented for a host of geometric conditions and optical thicknesses. In addition, two variants of the DEF method are presented for anisotropically scattering media. The N-bounce method approximates total exchange factors by summing direct and user-designated higher order terms representative of multiple reflections/scattering. The source function approach is an intensity-based method relating the source function (gas leaving intensity) to the surface leaving intensity. The results obtained via these methods are found to be in good agreement with the existing solutions to several axisymmetric benchmark problems. A mathematical formulation is additionally proposed for addressing the effects of nonhomogeneous property distributions. Several nonhomogeneous benchmark problems are solved in an effort to validate the model.

  5. Time-resolved diffuse spectroscopy measurements using a hybrid Green's function for the radiative transfer equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Emanuel; Foschum, Florian; Kienle, Alwin

    2013-06-01

    Time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy measurements of phantoms at small source-detector separations yield good results for the retrieved coefficients of reduced scattering and absorption when a hybrid Green's function of the radiative transfer equation for semi-infinite media is used.

  6. Numerical prediction of radiation heat transfer in optoelectronics hermetic packaging process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Chinmoy P.; Zhang, Daming; Liu, Sheng

    2005-03-01

    Hermetic packaging of the high-speed optoelectronics devices is important not only for robustness but also to protect the device from adverse operational environments and ensure reliable communications. We have developed a complete hermetic packaging assembly process for a photonic Mini-DIL module of 10.0Gbps type. We have developed and simulated the step by step fluxless reflow soldering process (pick and place) of the whole mini-module package and finally, the hermetic sealing by Finite Element Analysis (FEA) simulation. A commercially available, general purpose, finite element program - ABAQUS has been used along with Altair HyperWorks as pre and post processor for this numerical simulation. The actual 3-D model has been simplified to the 2-D model for the hermetic sealing, radiation heat transfer prediction to reduce computational complicacy. During the sealing process at a high temperature, there is a possibility of considerable heat transfer from the module top sealing cap to the high temperature susceptible LD (Laser Diode). In the event of a critical temperature the LD may suffer malfunction and eventual destruction. Radiation along with the conduction heat transfer mechanism has been modeled for this sealing to predict the temperature variation as a result of heat transfer from wledspots to the LD. Various issues with cavity radiations such as, effect of radiation view factor, surface blocking and surface emissivity have been considered and results discussed. The convection mechanism has been neglected considering the hermeticity of the sealing.

  7. Use of Maple Seeding Canopy Reflectance Dataset for Validation of SART/LEAFMOD Radiative Transfer Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Barbara J.; Peterson, David L.

    1999-01-01

    This project was a collaborative effort by researchers at ARC, OSU and the University of Arizona. The goal was to use a dataset obtained from a previous study to "empirically validate a new canopy radiative-transfer model (SART) which incorporates a recently-developed leaf-level model (LEAFMOD)". The document includes a short research summary.

  8. A Comparison of Numerical and Analytical Radiative-Transfer Solutions for Plane Albedo of Natural Waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three numerical algorithms were compared to provide a solution of a radiative transfer equation (RTE) for plane albedo (hemispherical reflectance) in semi-infinite one-dimensional plane-parallel layer. Algorithms were based on the invariant imbedding method and two different var...

  9. A Comparison of Numerical and Analytical Radiative-Transfer Solutions for Plane Albedo in Natural Waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several numerical and analytical solutions of the radiative transfer equation (RTE) for plane albedo were compared for solar light reflection by sea water. The study incorporated the simplest case, that being a semi-infinite one-dimensional plane-parallel absorbing and scattering...

  10. Advances in studies of cloud overlap and its radiative transfer in climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua; Jing, Xianwen

    2016-04-01

    The latest advances in studies on the treatment of cloud overlap and its radiative transfer in global climate models are summarized. Developments with respect to this internationally challenging problem are described from aspects such as the design of cloud overlap assumptions, the realization of cloud overlap assumptions within climate models, and the data and methods used to obtain consistent observations of cloud overlap structure and radiative transfer in overlapping clouds. To date, there has been an appreciable level of achievement in studies on cloud overlap in climate models, demonstrated by the development of scientific assumptions (e.g., e-folding overlap) to describe cloud overlap, the invention and broad application of the fast radiative transfer method for overlapped clouds (Monte Carlo Independent Column Approximation), and the emergence of continuous 3D cloud satellite observation (e.g., CloudSat/CALIPSO) and cloud-resolving models, which provide numerous data valuable for the exact description of cloud overlap structure in climate models. However, present treatments of cloud overlap and its radiative transfer process are far from complete, and there remain many unsettled problems that need to be explored in the future.

  11. Radiation Transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) exercise: Results from the second phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinty, B.; Widlowski, J.-L.; Taberner, M.; Gobron, N.; Verstraete, M. M.; Disney, M.; Gascon, F.; Gastellu, J.-P.; Jiang, L.; Kuusk, A.; Lewis, P.; Li, X.; Ni-Meister, W.; Nilson, T.; North, P.; Qin, W.; Su, L.; Tang, S.; Thompson, R.; Verhoef, W.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Yan, G.; Zang, H.

    2004-03-01

    The Radiation Transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) initiative is a community-driven exercise to benchmark the models of radiation transfer (RT) used to represent the reflectance of terrestrial surfaces. Systematic model intercomparisons started in 1999 as a self-organized, open-access, voluntary activity of the RT modeling community. The results of the first phase were published by [2001]. The present paper describes the benchmarking protocol and the results achieved during the second phase, which took place during 2002. This second phase included two major components: The first one included a rerun of all direct-mode tests proposed during the first phase, to accommodate the evaluation of models that have been upgraded since, and the participation of new models into the entire exercise. The second component was designed to probe the performance of three-dimensional models in complex heterogeneous environments, which closely mimic the observations of actual space instruments operating at various spatial resolutions over forest canopy systems. Phases 1 and 2 of RAMI both confirm not only that a majority of the radiation transfer models participating in RAMI are in good agreement between themselves for relatively simple radiation transfer problems but also that these models exhibit significant discrepancies when considering more complex but nevertheless realistic geophysical scenarios. Specific recommendations are provided to guide the future of this benchmarking program (Phase 3 and beyond).

  12. The Fokker-Planck equation for the radiation transfer in a strongly magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonazzola, S.

    1982-04-01

    The Fokker-Planck equation for the radiation transfer in a strongly magnetized plasma is obtained by means of an approximation. It is noted that this equation requires less computer time than the Monte Carlo method and that it allows the effect of the induced processes to be taken into account without difficulty.

  13. Estimating crop biophysical properties from remote sensing data by inverting linked radiative transfer and ecophysiological models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing technology can rapidly provide spatial information on crop growth status, which ideally could be used to invert radiative transfer models or ecophysiological models for estimating a variety of crop biophysical properties. However, the outcome of the model inversion procedure will be ...

  14. Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) Code and Application to WASP-43b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Cubillos, Patricio; Bowman, Oliver; Rojo, Patricio; Stemm, Madison; Lust, Nathaniel B.; Challener, Ryan; Foster, Austin James; Foster, Andrew S.; Blumenthal, Sarah D.; Bruce, Dylan

    2016-01-01

    We present a new open-source Bayesian radiative-transfer framework, Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART, https://github.com/exosports/BART), and its application to WASP-43b. BART initializes a model for the atmospheric retrieval calculation, generates thousands of theoretical model spectra using parametrized pressure and temperature profiles and line-by-line radiative-transfer calculation, and employs a statistical package to compare the models with the observations. It consists of three self-sufficient modules available to the community under the reproducible-research license, the Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances module (TEA, https://github.com/dzesmin/TEA, Blecic et al. 2015}, the radiative-transfer module (Transit, https://github.com/exosports/transit), and the Multi-core Markov-chain Monte Carlo statistical module (MCcubed, https://github.com/pcubillos/MCcubed, Cubillos et al. 2015). We applied BART on all available WASP-43b secondary eclipse data from the space- and ground-based observations constraining the temperature-pressure profile and molecular abundances of the dayside atmosphere of WASP-43b. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G and NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program grant NNX13AF38G. JB holds a NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship.

  15. Evaluation of a radiative transfer equation and diffusion approximation hybrid forward solver for fluorescence molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    The solution of the forward problem in fluorescence molecular imaging strongly influences the successful convergence of the fluorophore reconstruction. The most common approach to meeting this problem has been to apply the diffusion approximation. However, this model is a first-order angular approximation of the radiative transfer equation, and thus is subject to some well-known limitations. This manuscript proposes a methodology that confronts these limitations by applying the radiative transfer equation in spatial regions in which the diffusion approximation gives decreased accuracy. The explicit integro differential equations that formulate this model were solved by applying the Galerkin finite element approximation. The required spatial discretization of the investigated domain was implemented through the Delaunay triangulation, while the azimuthal discretization scheme was used for the angular space. This model has been evaluated on two simulation geometries and the results were compared with results from an independent Monte Carlo method and the radiative transfer equation by calculating the absolute values of the relative errors between these models. The results show that the proposed forward solver can approximate the radiative transfer equation and the Monte Carlo method with better than 95% accuracy, while the accuracy of the diffusion approximation is approximately 10% lower. PMID:23208221

  16. Shape-Independent Limits to Near-Field Radiative Heat Transfer.

    PubMed

    Miller, Owen D; Johnson, Steven G; Rodriguez, Alejandro W

    2015-11-13

    We derive shape-independent limits to the spectral radiative heat transfer rate between two closely spaced bodies, generalizing the concept of a blackbody to the case of near-field energy transfer. Through conservation of energy and reciprocity, we show that each body of susceptibility χ can emit and absorb radiation at enhanced rates bounded by |χ|(2)/Im χ, optimally mediated by near-field photon transfer proportional to 1/d(2) across a separation distance d. Dipole-dipole and dipole-plate structures approach restricted versions of the limit, but common large-area structures do not exhibit the material enhancement factor and thus fall short of the general limit. By contrast, we find that particle arrays interacting in an idealized Born approximation (i.e., neglecting multiple scattering) exhibit both enhancement factors, suggesting the possibility of orders-of-magnitude improvement beyond previous designs and the potential for radiative heat transfer to be comparable to conductive heat transfer through air at room temperature, and significantly greater at higher temperatures. PMID:26613444

  17. Radiative heat transfer in periodic geometries using a finite volume scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, S.R.; Murthy, J.Y.

    1999-05-01

    Periodic flow and heat transfer occurs in a number of engineering applications. Heat exchangers employ repeating units of fins, dimples, or indentations to increase heat transfer area and improve heat exchanger performance. In many applications, rotational periodicity may be invoked. Burners and combustors, for example, employ swirler vanes and secondary air inlets which destroy axisymmetry. However, it is frequently possible to restrict computations to a single rotationally periodic module and thus to reduce computational time. It would be useful to devise general-purpose calculation procedures for radiative heat transfer in arbitrary geometries with arbitrary rotational and translational periodicity. Here, a procedure for computing radiative heat transfer in translationally and rotationally periodic geometries is presented. The finite volume scheme is applied to meshes composed of arbitrary polyhedral control volumes. The angular domain is discretized into a finite number of control angles over which radiant energy is conserved. At periodic boundaries, control angle overhand occurs because of the misalignment of the arbitrary periodic face with the global angular discretization and due to the arbitrary rotation of adjacent modules with respect to each other. A discretization scheme using control angle pixelation is developed to conservatively transfer radiant energy between adjacent modules. The method is tested for a variety of radiation problems and shown to perform satisfactorily.

  18. An accurate radiative heating and cooling algorithm for use in a dynamical model of the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehrbein, W. M.; Leovy, C. B.

    1982-01-01

    The circulation of the middle atmosphere of the earth (15-90 km) is driven by the unequal distribution of net radiative heating. Calculations have shown that local radiative heating is nearly balanced by radiative cooling throughout parts of the stratosphere and mesosphere. The 15 micrometer band of CO2 is the dominant component of the infrared cooling. The present investigation is concerned with an algorithm regarding the involved cooling process. The algorithm was designed for the semispectral primitive equation model of the stratosphere and mesosphere described by Holton and Wehrbein (1980). The model consists of 16 layers, each nominally 5 km thick, between the base of the stratosphere at 100 mb (approximately 16 km) and the base of the thermosphere (approximately 96 km). The considered algorithm provides a convenient means of incorporating cooling due to CO2 into dynamical models of the middle atmosphere.

  19. Radiative heat transfer in plasma of pulsed high pressure caesium discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapshin, V. F.

    2016-01-01

    Two-temperature many component gas dynamic model is used for the analysis of features of radiative heat transfer in pulsed high pressure caesium discharge plasma. It is shown that at a sufficiently high pressure the radial optical thickness of arc column is close to unit (τR (λ) ∼ 1) in most part of spectrum. In this case radiative heat transfer has not local character. In these conditions the photons which are emitted in any point of plasma volume are absorbed in other point remote from an emission point on considerable distance. As a result, the most part of the electric energy put in the discharge mainly near its axis is almost instantly redistributed on all volume of discharge column. In such discharge radial profiles of temperature are smooth. In case of low pressure, when discharge plasma is optically transparent for own radiation in the most part of a spectrum (τR(λ) << 1), the emission of radiation without reabsorption takes place. Radiative heat transfer in plasma has local character and profiles of temperature have considerable gradient.

  20. Hybrid finite volume/ finite element method for radiative heat transfer in graded index media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Zhao, J. M.; Liu, L. H.; Wang, S. Y.

    2012-09-01

    The rays propagate along curved path determined by the Fermat principle in the graded index medium. The radiative transfer equation in graded index medium (GRTE) contains two specific redistribution terms (with partial derivatives to the angular coordinates) accounting for the effect of the curved ray path. In this paper, the hybrid finite volume with finite element method (hybrid FVM/FEM) (P.J. Coelho, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf., vol. 93, pp. 89-101, 2005) is extended to solve the radiative heat transfer in two-dimensional absorbing-emitting-scattering graded index media, in which the spatial discretization is carried out using a FVM, while the angular discretization is by a FEM. The FEM angular discretization is demonstrated to be preferable in dealing with the redistribution terms in the GRTE. Two stiff matrix assembly schemes of the angular FEM discretization, namely, the traditional assembly approach and a new spherical assembly approach (assembly on the unit sphere of the solid angular space), are discussed. The spherical assembly scheme is demonstrated to give better results than the traditional assembly approach. The predicted heat flux distributions and temperature distributions in radiative equilibrium are determined by the proposed method and compared with the results available in other references. The proposed hybrid FVM/FEM method can predict the radiative heat transfer in absorbing-emitting-scattering graded index medium with good accuracy.

  1. Electrically tunable near-field radiative heat transfer via ferroelectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yi; Boriskina, Svetlana V.; Chen, Gang

    2014-12-15

    We explore ways to actively control near-field radiative heat transfer between two surfaces that relies on electrical tuning of phonon modes of ferroelectric materials. Ferroelectrics are widely used for tunable electrical devices, such as capacitors and memory devices; however, their tunable properties have not yet been examined for heat transfer applications. We show via simulations that radiative heat transfer between two ferroelectric materials can be enhanced by over two orders of magnitude over the blackbody limit in the near field, and can be tuned as much as 16.5% by modulating the coupling between surface phonon polariton modes at the two surfaces via varying external electric fields. We then discuss how to maximize the modulation contrast for tunable thermal devices using the studied mechanism.

  2. On the equivalence between the discrete ordinates and the spherical harmonics methods in radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Barichello, L.B.; Siewert, C.E.

    1998-09-01

    In this work concerning steady-state radiative-transfer calculations in plane-parallel media, the equivalence between the discrete ordinates method and the spherical harmonics method is proved. More specifically, it is shown that for standard radiative-transfer problems without the imposed restriction of azimuthal symmetry the two methods yield identical results for the radiation intensity when the quadrature scheme for the discrete ordinates method is defined by the zeros of the associated Legendre functions and when generalized Mark boundary conditions are used to define the spherical harmonics solution. It is also shown that, with these choices for a quadrature scheme and for the boundary conditions, the two methods can be formulated so as to require the same computational effort. Finally a justification for using the generalized Mark boundary conditions in the spherical harmonics solution is given.

  3. Regimes of microscale radiative transfer for exchange of thermal energy between metallic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Whale, M.D.; Cravalho, E.G.

    1997-07-01

    There is ample theoretical and experimental evidence to substantiate the enhanced transfer of energy by thermal radiation between two closely-spaced surfaces when the distance of separation is on the order of the characteristic wavelength of the radiation. There is no clear agreement, however, as to the magnitude of the effect. In the present work, they consolidate these various approaches for the first time, and they show the fundamental underlying reasons for the disparate experimental results and analytical models. They identify a set of microscale radiative transfer regimes that account for the different mechanisms of absorption that occur. For the various experimental configurations, they show that the disagreement among the experimental measurements performed thus far can be traced to the different microscale regimes that govern the absorption process. Furthermore, using these regimes they are able to explain the discrepancies between the analytical models and the experimental measurements.

  4. Nonlinear radiative heat transfer to stagnation-point flow of Sisko fluid past a stretching cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Masood; Malik, Rabia; Hussain, M.

    2016-05-01

    In the present paper, we endeavor to perform a numerical analysis in connection with the nonlinear radiative stagnation-point flow and heat transfer to Sisko fluid past a stretching cylinder in the presence of convective boundary conditions. The influence of thermal radiation using nonlinear Rosseland approximation is explored. The numerical solutions of transformed governing equations are calculated through forth order Runge-Kutta method using shooting technique. With the help of graphs and tables, the influence of non-dimensional parameters on velocity and temperature along with the local skin friction and Nusselt number is discussed. The results reveal that the temperature increases however, heat transfer from the surface of cylinder decreases with the increasing values of thermal radiation and temperature ratio parameters. Moreover, the authenticity of numerical solutions is validated by finding their good agreement with the HAM solutions.

  5. SKIRT: The design of a suite of input models for Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baes, M.; Camps, P.

    2015-09-01

    The Monte Carlo method is the most popular technique to perform radiative transfer simulations in a general 3D geometry. The algorithms behind and acceleration techniques for Monte Carlo radiative transfer are discussed extensively in the literature, and many different Monte Carlo codes are publicly available. On the contrary, the design of a suite of components that can be used for the distribution of sources and sinks in radiative transfer codes has received very little attention. The availability of such models, with different degrees of complexity, has many benefits. For example, they can serve as toy models to test new physical ingredients, or as parameterised models for inverse radiative transfer fitting. For 3D Monte Carlo codes, this requires algorithms to efficiently generate random positions from 3D density distributions. We describe the design of a flexible suite of components for the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code SKIRT. The design is based on a combination of basic building blocks (which can be either analytical toy models or numerical models defined on grids or a set of particles) and the extensive use of decorators that combine and alter these building blocks to more complex structures. For a number of decorators, e.g. those that add spiral structure or clumpiness, we provide a detailed description of the algorithms that can be used to generate random positions. Advantages of this decorator-based design include code transparency, the avoidance of code duplication, and an increase in code maintainability. Moreover, since decorators can be chained without problems, very complex models can easily be constructed out of simple building blocks. Finally, based on a number of test simulations, we demonstrate that our design using customised random position generators is superior to a simpler design based on a generic black-box random position generator.

  6. Radiative transfer simulations for the MADRAS imager of Megha-Tropiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanujam, K. Srinivasa; Balaji, C.

    2011-02-01

    This paper reports the radiative transfer simulations for the passive microwave radiometer onboard the proposed Indian climate research satellite Megha-Tropiques due to be launched in 2011. These simulations have been performed by employing an in-house polarized radiative transfer code for raining systems ranging from depression and tropical cyclones to the Indian monsoon. For the sake of validation and completeness, simulations have also been done for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)'s Microwave Imager (TMI) of the highly successful TRMM mission of NASA and JAXA. The paper is essentially divided into two parts: (a) Radiometer response with specific focus on high frequency channels in both the radiometers is discussed in detail with a parametric study of the effect of four hydrometeors (cloud liquid water, cloud ice, precipitating water and precipitating ice) on the brightness temperatures. The results are compared with TMI measurements wherever possible. (b) Development of a neural network-based fast radiative transfer model is elucidated here. The goal is to speed up the computational time involved in the simulation of brightness temperatures, necessitated by the need for quick and online retrieval strategies. The neural network model uses hydrometeor profiles as inputs and simulates spectral microwave brightness temperature at multiple frequencies as output. A huge database is generated by executing the in-house radiative transfer code for seven different cyclones occurred in North Indian Ocean region during the period 2001-2006. A part of the dataset is used to train the network while the remainder is used for testing purposes. For the purpose of testing, a typical scene from the southwest monsoon rain is also considered. The results obtained are very encouraging and show that the neural network is able to mimic the underlying physics of the radiative transfer simulations with a correlation coefficient of over 99%.

  7. Fundamentals of thermal radiation heat transfer; Proceedings of the Winter Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA, December 9-14, 1984

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, T. C.; Chen, J. L. S.

    1984-12-01

    Recent work in the field of radiation heat transfer is addressed in this symposium volume. Three broad topics are considered: analysis and modeling of radiation theory, radiation with a participating medium in a complex geometry, and radiation and/or other modes. Individual papers examine: Hookean and Stokesean implications of radiative stress; effective emissivity of a fluidized bed; mathematical modelling of heat transfer within the furnace of a pulverized coal-fired boiler equipped with platen superheaters; radiative transfer in axisymmetric, finite cylindrical enclosures; thermal behavior in furnaces of complex geometry; analysis of radiative equilibrium in a rectangular enclosure with gray medium; effects of isotropic scattering on melting and solidification of a semiinfinite, semitransparent medium; simultaneous radiation and forced convection in thermally developing turbulent flow through a parallel plate channel; and recent advances in the numerical analysis of dynamic coupled thermoelasticity.

  8. An Analytical Solution of Radiative Transfer in the Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean System with Rough Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Zhonghai; Charlock, Thomas P.; Rutledge, Ken; Knut Stamnes; Wang, Yingjian

    2006-01-01

    Using the efficient discrete-ordinate method, we present an analytical solution for radiative transfer in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system with rough air-water interface. The theoretical formulations of the radiative transfer equation and solution are described. The effects of surface roughness on radiation field in the atmosphere and ocean are studied and compared with measurements. The results show that ocean surface roughness has significant effects on the upwelling radiation in the atmosphere and the downwelling radiation in the ocean. As wind speed increases, the angular domain of sunglint broadens, the surface albedo decreases, and the transmission to ocean increases. The downward radiance field in the upper ocean is highly anisotropic, but this anisotropy decreases rapidly as surface wind increases and as depth in ocean increases. The effects of surface roughness on radiation also depend greatly on both wavelength and angle of incidence (i.e., solar elevation); these effects are significantly smaller throughout the spectrum at high sun. The model-observation discrepancies may indicate that the Cox-Munk surface roughness model is not sufficient for high wind conditions.

  9. Radiative Heat Transfer in Finite Cylindrical Enclosures with Nonhomogeneous Participating Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Pei-Feng; Ku, Jerry C.

    1994-01-01

    Results of a numerical solution for radiative heat transfer in homogeneous and nonhomogeneous participating media are presented. The geometry of interest is a finite axisymmetric cylindrical enclosure. The integral formulation for radiative transport is solved by the YIX method. A three-dimensional solution scheme is applied to two-dimensional axisymmetric geometry to simplify kernel calculations and to avoid difficulties associated with treating boundary conditions. As part of the effort to improve modeling capabilities for turbulent jet diffusion flames, predicted distributions for flame temperature and soot volume fraction are used to calculate radiative heat transfer from soot particles in such flames. It is shown that the nonhomogeneity of radiative property has very significant effects. The peak value of the divergence of radiative heat flux could be underestimated by 2 factor of 7 if a mean homogeneous radiative property is used. Since recent studies have shown that scattering by soot agglomerates is significant in flames, the effect of magnitude of scattering is also investigated and found to be nonnegligible.

  10. Analytical Solutions for Radiative Transfer: Implications for Giant Planet Formation by Disk Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    2009-03-01

    The disk instability mechanism for giant planet formation is based on the formation of clumps in a marginally gravitationally unstable protoplanetary disk, which must lose thermal energy through a combination of convection and radiative cooling if they are to survive and contract to become giant protoplanets. While there is good observational support for forming at least some giant planets by disk instability, the mechanism has become theoretically contentious, with different three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamics codes often yielding different results. Rigorous code testing is required to make further progress. Here we present two new analytical solutions for radiative transfer in spherical coordinates, suitable for testing the code employed in all of the Boss disk instability calculations. The testing shows that the Boss code radiative transfer routines do an excellent job of relaxing to and maintaining the analytical results for the radial temperature and radiative flux profiles for a spherical cloud with high or moderate optical depths, including the transition from optically thick to optically thin regions. These radial test results are independent of whether the Eddington approximation, diffusion approximation, or flux-limited diffusion approximation routines are employed. The Boss code does an equally excellent job of relaxing to and maintaining the analytical results for the vertical (θ) temperature and radiative flux profiles for a disk with a height proportional to the radial distance. These tests strongly support the disk instability mechanism for forming giant planets.

  11. Radiative and free-convective heat transfer from a finite horizontal plate inside an enclosure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrycak, Peter; Sandman, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation of heat transfer from a horizontal, thin, square plate inside of an enclosure was carried out. Experimental results were obtained from both the upward-facing and the downward-facing sides of the heated plate. Starting with the integrated momentum and energy equations, approximate solutions were obtained for heat transfer in the laminar and the turbulent regime that correlate well with experimental data. Radiative heat transfer correction was given special attention. Effects of the enclosure-related recirculation of the test fluid, as well as effects of simultaneous heat transfer on both sides of the plate, caused an early transition, and indicated a high level of internal turbulence.

  12. Indium tin oxide nanowires as hyperbolic metamaterials for near-field radiative heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jui-Yung; Basu, Soumyadipta Wang, Liping

    2015-02-07

    We investigate near-field radiative heat transfer between Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) nanowire arrays which behave as type 1 and 2 hyperbolic metamaterials. Using spatial dispersion dependent effective medium theory to model the dielectric function of the nanowires, the impact of filling fraction on the heat transfer is analyzed. Depending on the filling fraction, it is possible to achieve both types of hyperbolic modes. At 150 nm vacuum gap, the heat transfer between the nanowires with 0.5 filling fraction can be 11 times higher than that between two bulk ITOs. For vacuum gaps less than 150 nm the heat transfer increases as the filling fraction decreases. Results obtained from this study will facilitate applications of ITO nanowires as hyperbolic metamaterials for energy systems.

  13. Multiple automated headspace in-tube extraction for the accurate analysis of relevant wine aroma compounds and for the estimation of their relative liquid-gas transfer rates.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Julián; Lopez, Ricardo; Herrero, Paula; Ferreira, Vicente

    2012-11-30

    An automated headspace in-tube extraction (ITEX) method combined with multiple headspace extraction (MHE) has been developed to provide simultaneously information about the accurate wine content in 20 relevant aroma compounds and about their relative transfer rates to the headspace and hence about the relative strength of their interactions with the matrix. In the method, 5 μL (for alcohols, acetates and carbonyl alcohols) or 200 μL (for ethyl esters) of wine sample were introduced in a 2 mL vial, heated at 35°C and extracted with 32 (for alcohols, acetates and carbonyl alcohols) or 16 (for ethyl esters) 0.5 mL pumping strokes in four consecutive extraction and analysis cycles. The application of the classical theory of Multiple Extractions makes it possible to obtain a highly reliable estimate of the total amount of volatile compound present in the sample and a second parameter, β, which is simply the proportion of volatile not transferred to the trap in one extraction cycle, but that seems to be a reliable indicator of the actual volatility of the compound in that particular wine. A study with 20 wines of different types and 1 synthetic sample has revealed the existence of significant differences in the relative volatility of 15 out of 20 odorants. Differences are particularly intense for acetaldehyde and other carbonyls, but are also notable for alcohols and long chain fatty acid ethyl esters. It is expected that these differences, linked likely to sulphur dioxide and some unknown specific compositional aspects of the wine matrix, can be responsible for relevant sensory changes, and may even be the cause explaining why the same aroma composition can produce different aroma perceptions in two different wines. PMID:23102525

  14. Tabulation of Mie scattering calculation results for microwave radiative transfer modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Hwa-Young M.; Prasad, N.

    1988-01-01

    In microwave radiative transfer model simulations, the Mie calculations usually consume the majority of the computer time necessary for the calculations (70 to 86 percent for frequencies ranging from 6.6 to 183 GHz). For a large array of atmospheric profiles, the repeated calculations of the Mie codes make the radiative transfer computations not only expensive, but sometimes impossible. It is desirable, therefore, to develop a set of Mie tables to replace the Mie codes for the designated ranges of temperature and frequency in the microwave radiative transfer calculation. Results of using the Mie tables in the transfer calculations show that the total CPU time (IBM 3081) used for the modeling simulation is reduced by a factor of 7 to 16, depending on the frequency. The tables are tested by computing the upwelling radiance of 144 atmospheric profiles generated by a 3-D cloud model (Tao, 1986). Results are compared with those using Mie quantities computed from the Mie codes. The bias and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) of the model results using the Mie tables, in general, are less than 1 K except for 37 and 90 GHz. Overall, neither the bias nor RMSD is worse than 1.7 K for any frequency and any viewing angle.

  15. Efficient weakly-radiative wireless energy transfer: An EIT-like approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamam, Rafif E.; Karalis, Aristeidis; Joannopoulos, J. D.; Soljačić, Marin

    2009-08-01

    Inspired by a quantum interference phenomenon known in the atomic physics community as electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), we propose an efficient weakly radiative wireless energy transfer scheme between two identical classical resonant objects, strongly coupled to an intermediate classical resonant object of substantially different properties, but with the same resonance frequency. The transfer mechanism essentially makes use of the adiabatic evolution of an instantaneous (so called "dark") eigenstate of the coupled 3-object system. Our analysis is based on temporal coupled mode theory (CMT), and is general enough to be valid for various possible sorts of coupling, including the resonant inductive coupling on which witricity-type wireless energy transfer is based. We show that in certain parameter regimes of interest, this scheme can be more efficient, and/or less radiative than other, more conventional approaches. A concrete example of wireless energy transfer between capacitively-loaded metallic loops is illustrated at the beginning, as a motivation for the more general case. We also explore the performance of the currently proposed EIT-like scheme, in terms of improving efficiency and reducing radiation, as the relevant parameters of the system are varied.

  16. High resolution surface solar radiation patterns over Eastern Mediterranean: Satellite, ground-based, reanalysis data and radiative transfer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandri, G.; Georgoulias, A.; Meleti, C.; Balis, D.

    2013-12-01

    Surface solar radiation (SSR) and its long and short term variations play a critical role in the modification of climate and by extent of the social and financial life of humans. Thus, SSR measurements are of primary importance. SSR is measured for decades from ground-based stations for specific spots around the planet. During the last decades, satellite observations allowed for the assessment of the spatial variability of SSR at a global as well as regional scale. In this study, a detailed spatiotemporal view of the SSR over Eastern Mediterranean is presented at a high spatial resolution. Eastern Mediterranean is affected by various aerosol types (continental, sea, dust and biomass burning particles) and encloses countries with significant socioeconomical changes during the last decades. For the aims of this study, SSR data from satellites (Climate Monitoring Satellite Application Facility - CM SAF) and our ground station in Thessaloniki, a coastal city of ~1 million inhabitants in northern Greece, situated in the heart of Eastern Mediterranean (Eppley Precision pyranometer and Kipp & Zonen CM-11 pyranometer) are used in conjunction with radiative transfer simulations (Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer - SBDART). The CM SAF dataset used here includes monthly mean SSR observations at a high spatial resolution of 0.03x0.03 degrees for the period 1983-2005. Our ground-based SSR observations span from 1983 until today. SBDART radiative transfer simulations were implemented for a number of spots in the area of study in order to calculate the SSR. High resolution (level-2) aerosol and cloud data from MODIS TERRA and AQUA satellite sensors were used as input, as well as ground-based data from the AERONET. Data from other satellites (Earth Probe TOMS, OMI, etc) and reanalysis projects (ECMWF) were used where needed. The satellite observations, the ground-based measurements and the model estimates are validated against each other. The good agreement

  17. Polarized radiative transfer in two-dimensional scattering medium with complex geometries by natural element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Kim, Yong-Jun; Yi, Hong-Liang; Xie, Ming; Tan, He-Ping

    2016-08-01

    The natural element method (NEM) is extended to solve the polarized radiative transfer problem in a two-dimensional scattering medium with complex geometries, in which the angular space is discretized by the discrete-ordinates approach, and the spatial discretization is conducted by the Galerkin weighted residuals approach. The Laplace interpolation scheme is adopted to obtain the shape functions used in the Galerkin weighted residuals approach. The NEM solution to the vector radiative transfer in a square enclosure filled with a Mie scattering medium is first examined to validate our program. We then study the polarized radiative transfer in two kinds of geometries filled with scattering medium which is equivalent to a suspension of latex spheres in water. Three sizes of spheres are considered. The results for non-dimensional polarized radiative flux along the boundaries and the angular distributions of the Stokes vector at specific positions are presented and discussed. For the complex geometry bounded by the square and circular object, numerical solutions are presented for the cases both with Lambertian (diffuse) reflection and with Fresnel reflection. Some interesting phenomenon are found and analyzed.

  18. EMMA: an adaptive mesh refinement cosmological simulation code with radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, Dominique; Deparis, Nicolas; Ocvirk, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    EMMA is a cosmological simulation code aimed at investigating the reionization epoch. It handles simultaneously collisionless and gas dynamics, as well as radiative transfer physics using a moment-based description with the M1 approximation. Field quantities are stored and computed on an adaptive three-dimensional mesh and the spatial resolution can be dynamically modified based on physically motivated criteria. Physical processes can be coupled at all spatial and temporal scales. We also introduce a new and optional approximation to handle radiation: the light is transported at the resolution of the non-refined grid and only once the dynamics has been fully updated, whereas thermo-chemical processes are still tracked on the refined elements. Such an approximation reduces the overheads induced by the treatment of radiation physics. A suite of standard tests are presented and passed by EMMA, providing a validation for its future use in studies of the reionization epoch. The code is parallel and is able to use graphics processing units (GPUs) to accelerate hydrodynamics and radiative transfer calculations. Depending on the optimizations and the compilers used to generate the CPU reference, global GPU acceleration factors between ×3.9 and ×16.9 can be obtained. Vectorization and transfer operations currently prevent better GPU performance and we expect that future optimizations and hardware evolution will lead to greater accelerations.

  19. Nonradiative and radiative Förster energy transfer between quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddubny, A. N.; Rodina, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    We theoretically study nonradiative and radiative energy transfer between two localized quantum emitters, a donor (initially excited) and an acceptor (receiving the excitation). The rates of nonradiative and radiative processes are calculated depending on the spatial and spectral separation between the donor and acceptor states and for different donor and acceptor lifetimes for typical parameters of semiconductor quantum dots. We find that the donor lifetime can be significantly modified only due to the nonradiative Förster energy transfer process at donor-acceptor separations of approximately 10 nm (depending on the acceptor radiative lifetime) and for the energy detuning not larger than 1-2 meV. The efficiency of the nonradiative Förster energy transfer process under these conditions is close to unity and decreases rapidly with an increase in the donor-acceptor distance or energy detuning. At large donor-acceptor separations greater than 40 nm, the radiative corrections to the donor lifetime are comparable with nonradiative ones but are relatively weak.

  20. Solution of the self-adjoint radiative transfer equation on hybrid computer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasilov, V. A.; Kuchugov, P. A.; Olkhovskaya, O. G.; Chetverushkin, B. N.

    2016-06-01

    A new technique for simulating three-dimensional radiative energy transfer for the use in the software designed for the predictive simulation of plasma with high energy density on parallel computers is proposed. A highly scalable algorithm that takes into account the angular dependence of the radiation intensity and is free of the ray effect is developed based on the solution of a second-order equation with a self-adjoint operator. A distinctive feature of this algorithm is a preliminary transformation of rotation to eliminate mixed derivatives with respect to the spatial variables, simplify the structure of the difference operator, and accelerate the convergence of the iterative solution of the equation. It is shown that the proposed method correctly reproduces the limiting cases—isotropic radiation and the directed radiation with a δ-shaped angular distribution.