Science.gov

Sample records for accurate resonance parameters

  1. Parasitic analysis and π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke model for complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor Lamb wave resonator with accurate two-port Y-parameter characterizations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Goh, Wang Ling; Chai, Kevin T-C; Mu, Xiaojing; Hong, Yan; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Je, Minkyu

    2016-04-01

    The parasitic effects from electromechanical resonance, coupling, and substrate losses were collected to derive a new two-port equivalent-circuit model for Lamb wave resonators, especially for those fabricated on silicon technology. The proposed model is a hybrid π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke (PiBVD) model that accounts for the above mentioned parasitic effects which are commonly observed in Lamb-wave resonators. It is a combination of interdigital capacitor of both plate capacitance and fringe capacitance, interdigital resistance, Ohmic losses in substrate, and the acoustic motional behavior of typical Modified Butterworth-Van Dyke (MBVD) model. In the case studies presented in this paper using two-port Y-parameters, the PiBVD model fitted significantly better than the typical MBVD model, strengthening the capability on characterizing both magnitude and phase of either Y11 or Y21. The accurate modelling on two-port Y-parameters makes the PiBVD model beneficial in the characterization of Lamb-wave resonators, providing accurate simulation to Lamb-wave resonators and oscillators. PMID:27131699

  2. Parasitic analysis and π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke model for complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor Lamb wave resonator with accurate two-port Y-parameter characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Goh, Wang Ling; Chai, Kevin T.-C.; Mu, Xiaojing; Hong, Yan; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Je, Minkyu

    2016-04-01

    The parasitic effects from electromechanical resonance, coupling, and substrate losses were collected to derive a new two-port equivalent-circuit model for Lamb wave resonators, especially for those fabricated on silicon technology. The proposed model is a hybrid π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke (PiBVD) model that accounts for the above mentioned parasitic effects which are commonly observed in Lamb-wave resonators. It is a combination of interdigital capacitor of both plate capacitance and fringe capacitance, interdigital resistance, Ohmic losses in substrate, and the acoustic motional behavior of typical Modified Butterworth-Van Dyke (MBVD) model. In the case studies presented in this paper using two-port Y-parameters, the PiBVD model fitted significantly better than the typical MBVD model, strengthening the capability on characterizing both magnitude and phase of either Y11 or Y21. The accurate modelling on two-port Y-parameters makes the PiBVD model beneficial in the characterization of Lamb-wave resonators, providing accurate simulation to Lamb-wave resonators and oscillators.

  3. Resonance parameter measurements and analysis of gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Leinweber, G.; Barry, D. P.; Trbovich, M. J.; Burke, J. A.; Drindak, N. J.; Knox, H. D.; Ballad, R. V.; Block, R. C.; Danon, Y.; Severnyak, L. I.

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of the present work is to measure the neutron cross sections of gadolinium accurately. Gd has the highest thermal absorption cross section of any natural element. Therefore it is an important element for thermal reactor applications Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. (RPI) LINAC facility using metallic and liquid Gd samples. The liquid samples were isotopically-enriched in either {sup 155}Gd or {sup 157}Gd. The capture measurements were made at the 25-m flight station with a sodium iodide detector, and the transmission measurements were performed at 15- and 25-m flight stations with {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors. The multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY was used to extract resonance parameters. The results of the thermal region analysis are significant. Resonance parameters for the low energy doublet, at 0.025 and 0.032 eV, are presented. The thermal (2200 m/s) capture cross section of {sup 157}Gd has been measured to be 11% smaller than that calculated from ENDF/B-VI updated through release 8. Thermal capture cross sections and capture resonance integrals for each isotope as well as elemental gadolinium are presented. In the epithermal region, natural metal samples were measured in capture and transmission. Neutron interaction data up to 300 eV have been analyzed. Substantial improvement to the understanding of gadolinium cross sections is presented, particularly above 180 eV where the ENDF resolved region for {sup 155}Gd ends. (authors)

  4. Integral data analysis for resonance parameters determination

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.; Derrien, H.

    1997-09-01

    Neutron time-of-flight experiments have long been used to determine resonance parameters. Those resonance parameters have then been used in calculations of integral quantities such as Maxwellian averages or resonance integrals, and results of those calculations in turn have been used as a criterion for acceptability of the resonance analysis. However, the calculations were inadequate because covariances on the parameter values were not included in the calculations. In this report an effort to correct for that deficiency is documented: (1) the R-matrix analysis code SAMMY has been modified to include integral quantities of importance, (2) directly within the resonance parameter analysis, and (3) to determine the best fit to both differential (microscopic) and integral (macroscopic) data simultaneously. This modification was implemented because it is expected to have an impact on the intermediate-energy range that is important for criticality safety applications.

  5. Accurate parameter estimation for unbalanced three-phase system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan; So, Hing Cheung

    2014-01-01

    Smart grid is an intelligent power generation and control console in modern electricity networks, where the unbalanced three-phase power system is the commonly used model. Here, parameter estimation for this system is addressed. After converting the three-phase waveforms into a pair of orthogonal signals via the α β-transformation, the nonlinear least squares (NLS) estimator is developed for accurately finding the frequency, phase, and voltage parameters. The estimator is realized by the Newton-Raphson scheme, whose global convergence is studied in this paper. Computer simulations show that the mean square error performance of NLS method can attain the Cramér-Rao lower bound. Moreover, our proposal provides more accurate frequency estimation when compared with the complex least mean square (CLMS) and augmented CLMS. PMID:25162056

  6. Accurate and robust estimation of camera parameters using RANSAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fuqiang; Cui, Yi; Wang, Yexin; Liu, Liu; Gao, He

    2013-03-01

    Camera calibration plays an important role in the field of machine vision applications. The popularly used calibration approach based on 2D planar target sometimes fails to give reliable and accurate results due to the inaccurate or incorrect localization of feature points. To solve this problem, an accurate and robust estimation method for camera parameters based on RANSAC algorithm is proposed to detect the unreliability and provide the corresponding solutions. Through this method, most of the outliers are removed and the calibration errors that are the main factors influencing measurement accuracy are reduced. Both simulative and real experiments have been carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed method and the results show that the proposed method is robust under large noise condition and quite efficient to improve the calibration accuracy compared with the original state.

  7. Machine learning of parameters for accurate semiempirical quantum chemical calculations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dral, Pavlo O.; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Thiel, Walter

    2015-04-14

    We investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of semiempirical quantum chemistry (SQC) methods through the use of machine learning (ML) models for the parameters. For a given class of compounds, ML techniques require sufficiently large training sets to develop ML models that can be used for adapting SQC parameters to reflect changes in molecular composition and geometry. The ML-SQC approach allows the automatic tuning of SQC parameters for individual molecules, thereby improving the accuracy without deteriorating transferability to molecules with molecular descriptors very different from those in the training set. The performance of this approach is demonstrated for the semiempiricalmore » OM2 method using a set of 6095 constitutional isomers C7H10O2, for which accurate ab initio atomization enthalpies are available. The ML-OM2 results show improved average accuracy and a much reduced error range compared with those of standard OM2 results, with mean absolute errors in atomization enthalpies dropping from 6.3 to 1.7 kcal/mol. They are also found to be superior to the results from specific OM2 reparameterizations (rOM2) for the same set of isomers. The ML-SQC approach thus holds promise for fast and reasonably accurate high-throughput screening of materials and molecules.« less

  8. Machine learning of parameters for accurate semiempirical quantum chemical calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Dral, Pavlo O.; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Thiel, Walter

    2015-04-14

    We investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of semiempirical quantum chemistry (SQC) methods through the use of machine learning (ML) models for the parameters. For a given class of compounds, ML techniques require sufficiently large training sets to develop ML models that can be used for adapting SQC parameters to reflect changes in molecular composition and geometry. The ML-SQC approach allows the automatic tuning of SQC parameters for individual molecules, thereby improving the accuracy without deteriorating transferability to molecules with molecular descriptors very different from those in the training set. The performance of this approach is demonstrated for the semiempirical OM2 method using a set of 6095 constitutional isomers C7H10O2, for which accurate ab initio atomization enthalpies are available. The ML-OM2 results show improved average accuracy and a much reduced error range compared with those of standard OM2 results, with mean absolute errors in atomization enthalpies dropping from 6.3 to 1.7 kcal/mol. They are also found to be superior to the results from specific OM2 reparameterizations (rOM2) for the same set of isomers. The ML-SQC approach thus holds promise for fast and reasonably accurate high-throughput screening of materials and molecules.

  9. Direct computation of parameters for accurate polarizable force fields

    SciTech Connect

    Verstraelen, Toon Vandenbrande, Steven; Ayers, Paul W.

    2014-11-21

    We present an improved electronic linear response model to incorporate polarization and charge-transfer effects in polarizable force fields. This model is a generalization of the Atom-Condensed Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory (DFT), approximated to second order (ACKS2): it can now be defined with any underlying variational theory (next to KS-DFT) and it can include atomic multipoles and off-center basis functions. Parameters in this model are computed efficiently as expectation values of an electronic wavefunction, obviating the need for their calibration, regularization, and manual tuning. In the limit of a complete density and potential basis set in the ACKS2 model, the linear response properties of the underlying theory for a given molecular geometry are reproduced exactly. A numerical validation with a test set of 110 molecules shows that very accurate models can already be obtained with fluctuating charges and dipoles. These features greatly facilitate the development of polarizable force fields.

  10. Accurate 3D quantification of the bronchial parameters in MDCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saragaglia, A.; Fetita, C.; Preteux, F.; Brillet, P. Y.; Grenier, P. A.

    2005-08-01

    The assessment of bronchial reactivity and wall remodeling in asthma plays a crucial role in better understanding such a disease and evaluating therapeutic responses. Today, multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) makes it possible to perform an accurate estimation of bronchial parameters (lumen and wall areas) by allowing a quantitative analysis in a cross-section plane orthogonal to the bronchus axis. This paper provides the tools for such an analysis by developing a 3D investigation method which relies on 3D reconstruction of bronchial lumen and central axis computation. Cross-section images at bronchial locations interactively selected along the central axis are generated at appropriate spatial resolution. An automated approach is then developed for accurately segmenting the inner and outer bronchi contours on the cross-section images. It combines mathematical morphology operators, such as "connection cost", and energy-controlled propagation in order to overcome the difficulties raised by vessel adjacencies and wall irregularities. The segmentation accuracy was validated with respect to a 3D mathematically-modeled phantom of a pair bronchus-vessel which mimics the characteristics of real data in terms of gray-level distribution, caliber and orientation. When applying the developed quantification approach to such a model with calibers ranging from 3 to 10 mm diameter, the lumen area relative errors varied from 3.7% to 0.15%, while the bronchus area was estimated with a relative error less than 5.1%.

  11. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis Using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Trbovich, M J; Barry, D P; Slovacek, R E; Danon, Y; Block, R C; Francis, N C; Lubert, M; Burke, J A; Drindak, N J; Lienweber, G; Ballad, R

    2007-02-06

    The focus of this work is to determine the resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005 - 200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf resonances near 8 eV. Accurate hafnium cross sections and resonance parameters are needed in order to quantify the effects of hafnium found in zirconium, a metal commonly used in reactors. The accuracy of the cross sections and the corresponding resonance parameters used in current nuclear analysis tools are rapidly becoming the limiting factor in reducing the overall uncertainty on reactor physics calculations. Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission are routinely performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) LINAC using the time-of flight technique. {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m, respectively. Capture experiments were performed using a sixteen section NaI multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized several thicknesses of metallic and isotope-enriched liquid Hf samples. The liquid Hf samples were designed to provide information on the {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf contributions to the 8 eV doublet without saturation. Data analyses were performed using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY. A combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005 - 200 eV. Additionally, resonance integrals were calculated, along with errors for each hafnium isotope, using the NJOY and INTER codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previous values. The {sup 176}Hf resonance integral, based on this work, is approximately 73% higher than the ENDF/B-VI value. This is due primarily to the changes to resonance parameters in the 8 eV resonance, the neutron width presented in this work is more than twice that of the previous value. The calculated elemental

  12. Resonance Parameter Adjustment Based on Integral Experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sobes, Vladimir; Leal, Luiz; Arbanas, Goran; Forget, Benoit

    2016-06-02

    Our project seeks to allow coupling of differential and integral data evaluation in a continuous-energy framework and to use the generalized linear least-squares (GLLS) methodology in the TSURFER module of the SCALE code package to update the parameters of a resolved resonance region evaluation. We recognize that the GLLS methodology in TSURFER is identical to the mathematical description of a Bayesian update in SAMMY, the SAMINT code was created to use the mathematical machinery of SAMMY to update resolved resonance parameters based on integral data. Traditionally, SAMMY used differential experimental data to adjust nuclear data parameters. Integral experimental data, suchmore » as in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments Project, remain a tool for validation of completed nuclear data evaluations. SAMINT extracts information from integral benchmarks to aid the nuclear data evaluation process. Later, integral data can be used to resolve any remaining ambiguity between differential data sets, highlight troublesome energy regions, determine key nuclear data parameters for integral benchmark calculations, and improve the nuclear data covariance matrix evaluation. Moreover, SAMINT is not intended to bias nuclear data toward specific integral experiments but should be used to supplement the evaluation of differential experimental data. Using GLLS ensures proper weight is given to the differential data.« less

  13. Rho resonance parameters from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dehua; Alexandru, Andrei; Molina, Raquel; Döring, Michael

    2016-08-01

    We perform a high-precision calculation of the phase shifts for π -π scattering in the I =1 , J =1 channel in the elastic region using elongated lattices with two mass-degenerate quark flavors (Nf=2 ). We extract the ρ resonance parameters using a Breit-Wigner fit at two different quark masses, corresponding to mπ=226 MeV and mπ=315 MeV , and perform an extrapolation to the physical point. The extrapolation is based on a unitarized chiral perturbation theory model that describes well the phase shifts around the resonance for both quark masses. We find that the extrapolated value, mρ=720 (1 )(15 ) MeV , is significantly lower that the physical rho mass and we argue that this shift could be due to the absence of the strange quark in our calculation.

  14. Guided resonances on lithium niobate for extremely small electric field detection investigated by accurate sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wentao; Ndao, Abdoulaye; Lu, Huihui; Bernal, Maria-Pilar; Baida, Fadi Issam

    2016-09-01

    We present a theoretical study of guided resonances (GR) on a thin film lithium niobate rectangular lattice photonic crystal by band diagram calculations and 3D Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) transmission investigations which cover a broad range of parameters. A photonic crystal with an active zone as small as 13μm×13μm×0.7μm can be easily designed to obtain a resonance Q value in the order of 1000. These resonances are then employed in electric field (E-field) sensing applications exploiting the electro optic (EO) effect of lithium niobate. A local field factor that is calculated locally for each FDTD cell is proposed to accurately estimate the sensitivity of GR based E-field sensor. The local field factor allows well agreement between simulations and reported experimental data therefore providing a valuable method in optimizing the GR structure to obtain high sensitivities. When these resonances are associated with sub-picometer optical spectrum analyzer and high field enhancement antenna design, an E-field probe with a sensitivity of 50 μV/m could be achieved. The results of our simulations could be also exploited in other EO based applications such as EEG (Electroencephalography) or ECG (Electrocardiography) probe and E-field frequency detector with an 'invisible' probe to the field being detected etc. PMID:27607627

  15. Accurate lattice parameter measurements of stoichiometric uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinders, Gregory; Cardinaels, Thomas; Binnemans, Koen; Verwerft, Marc

    2015-04-01

    The paper presents and discusses lattice parameter analyses of pure, stoichiometric UO2. Attention was paid to prepare stoichiometric samples and to maintain stoichiometry throughout the analyses. The lattice parameter of UO2.000±0.001 was evaluated as being 547.127 ± 0.008 pm at 20 °C, which is substantially higher than many published values for the UO2 lattice constant and has an improved precision by about one order of magnitude. The higher value of the lattice constant is mainly attributed to the avoidance of hyperstoichiometry in the present study and to a minor extent to the use of the currently accepted Cu Kα1 X-ray wavelength value. Many of the early studies used Cu Kα1 wavelength values that differ from the currently accepted value, which also contributed to an underestimation of the true lattice parameter.

  16. Accurate circuit analysis of resonant-type left handed transmission lines with inter-resonator coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, I.; Bonache, J.; Gil, M.; García-García, J.; Martín, F.; Marqués, R.

    2006-10-01

    In this paper, a circuit model for the description of left handed transmission lines based on complementary split rings resonators (CSRRs) is proposed. As compared to previous models, coupling between adjacent resonators is included in the present work. The conditions that make this coupling significant are discussed. Specifically, it will be shown that it is barely present when circular CSRRs are used to implement the left handed transmission line. However, if the line is loaded with rectangular CSRRs separated by a small distance, inter-resonator coupling is important and it significantly influences the electromagnetic behavior of the structures. It will be also shown that under low or moderate coupling, it is possible to describe the structures by means of a simplified model with modified parameters. Several prototype devices with different CSRR topologies and coupling levels have been fabricated to illustrate the phenomenology associated with these structures and the accuracy of their model descriptions. The results of this work can be of interest for the design of planar microwave circuits based on CSRR left handed lines.

  17. Clinically accurate fetal ECG parameters acquired from maternal abdominal sensors

    PubMed Central

    CLIFFORD, Gari; SAMENI, Reza; WARD, Mr. Jay; ROBINSON, Julian; WOLFBERG, Adam J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the accuracy of a novel system for measuring fetal heart rate and ST-segment changes using non-invasive electrodes on the maternal abdomen. STUDY DESIGN Fetal ECGs were recorded using abdominal sensors from 32 term laboring women who had a fetal scalp electrode (FSE) placed for a clinical indication. RESULTS Good quality data for FHR estimation was available in 91.2% of the FSE segments, and 89.9% of the abdominal electrode segments. The root mean square (RMS) error between the FHR data calculated by both methods over all processed segments was 0.36 beats per minute. ST deviation from the isoelectric point ranged from 0 to 14.2% of R-wave amplitude. The RMS error between the ST change calculated by both methods averaged over all processed segments was 3.2%. CONCLUSION FHR and ST change acquired from the maternal abdomen is highly accurate and on average is clinically indistinguishable from FHR and ST change calculated using FSE data. PMID:21514560

  18. Predicting accurate line shape parameters for CO2 transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamache, Robert R.; Lamouroux, Julien

    2013-11-01

    The vibrational dependence of CO2 half-widths and line shifts are given by a modification of the model proposed by Gamache and Hartmann [Gamache R, Hartmann J-M. J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transfer 2004;83:119]. This model allows the half-widths and line shifts for a ro-vibrational transition to be expressed in terms of the number of vibrational quanta exchanged in the transition raised to a power and a reference ro-vibrational transition. Calculations were made for 24 bands for lower rotational quantum numbers from 0 to 160 for N2-, O2-, air-, and self-collisions with CO2. These data were extrapolated to J″=200 to accommodate several databases. Comparison of the CRB calculations with measurement gives very high confidence in the data. In the model a Quantum Coordinate is defined by (c1 |Δν1|+c2 |Δν2|+c3|Δν3|)p. The power p is adjusted and a linear least-squares fit to the data by the model expression is made. The procedure is iterated on the correlation coefficient, R, until [|R|-1] is less than a threshold. The results demonstrate the appropriateness of the model. The model allows the determination of the slope and intercept as a function of rotational transition, broadening gas, and temperature. From the data of the fits, the half-width, line shift, and the temperature dependence of the half-width can be estimated for any ro-vibrational transition, allowing spectroscopic CO2 databases to have complete information for the line shape parameters.

  19. Theory and computation of nuclear magnetic resonance parameters.

    PubMed

    Vaara, Juha

    2007-10-28

    The art of quantum chemical electronic structure calculation has over the last 15 years reached a point where systematic computational studies of magnetic response properties have become a routine procedure for molecular systems. One of their most prominent areas of application are the spectral parameters of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, due to the immense importance of this experimental method in many scientific disciplines. This article attempts to give an overview on the theory and state-of-the-art of the practical computations in the field, in terms of the size of systems that can be treated, the accuracy that can be expected, and the various factors that would influence the agreement of even the most accurate imaginable electronic structure calculation with experiment. These factors include relativistic effects, thermal effects, as well as solvation/environmental influences, where my group has been active. The dependence of the NMR spectra on external magnetic and optical fields is also briefly touched on. PMID:17925967

  20. Are Patient-Specific Joint and Inertial Parameters Necessary for Accurate Inverse Dynamics Analyses of Gait?

    PubMed Central

    Reinbolt, Jeffrey A.; Haftka, Raphael T.; Chmielewski, Terese L.; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Variations in joint parameter values (axis positions and orientations in body segments) and inertial parameter values (segment masses, mass centers, and moments of inertia) as well as kinematic noise alter the results of inverse dynamics analyses of gait. Three-dimensional linkage models with joint constraints have been proposed as one way to minimize the effects of noisy kinematic data. Such models can also be used to perform gait optimizations to predict post-treatment function given pre-treatment gait data. This study evaluates whether accurate patient-specific joint and inertial parameter values are needed in three-dimensional linkage models to produce accurate inverse dynamics results for gait. The study was performed in two stages. First, we used optimization analyses to evaluate whether patient-specific joint and inertial parameter values can be calibrated accurately from noisy kinematic data, and second, we used Monte Carlo analyses to evaluate how errors in joint and inertial parameter values affect inverse dynamics calculations. Both stages were performed using a dynamic, 27 degree-of-freedom, full-body linkage model and synthetic (i.e., computer generated) gait data corresponding to a nominal experimental gait motion. In general, joint but not inertial parameter values could be found accurately from noisy kinematic data. Root-mean-square (RMS) errors were 3° and 4 mm for joint parameter values and 1 kg, 22 mm, and 74,500 kg*mm2 for inertial parameter values. Furthermore, errors in joint but not inertial parameter values had a significant effect on calculated lower-extremity inverse dynamics joint torques. The worst RMS torque error averaged 4% bodyweight*height (BW*H) due to joint parameter variations but less than 0.25% BW*H due to inertial parameter variations. These results suggest that inverse dynamics analyses of gait utilizing linkage models with joint constraints should calibrate the model’s joint parameter values to obtain accurate joint

  1. Single-level resonance parameters fit nuclear cross-sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drawbaugh, D. W.; Gibson, G.; Miller, M.; Page, S. L.

    1970-01-01

    Least squares analyses of experimental differential cross-section data for the U-235 nucleus have yielded single level Breit-Wigner resonance parameters that fit, simultaneously, three nuclear cross sections of capture, fission, and total.

  2. A simple and accurate resist parameter extraction method for sub-80-nm DRAM patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sook; Hwang, Chan; Park, Dong-Woon; Kim, In-Sung; Kim, Ho-Chul; Woo, Sang-Gyun; Cho, Han-Ku; Moon, Joo-Tae

    2004-05-01

    Due to the polarization effect of high NA lithography, the consideration of resist effect in lithography simulation becomes increasingly important. In spite of the importance of resist simulation, many process engineers are reluctant to consider resist effect in lithography simulation due to time-consuming procedure to extract required resist parameters and the uncertainty of measurement of some parameters. Weiss suggested simplified development model, and this model does not require the complex kinetic parameters. For the device fabrication engineers, there is a simple and accurate parameter extraction and optimizing method using Weiss model. This method needs refractive index, Dill"s parameters and development rate monitoring (DRM) data in parameter extraction. The parameters extracted using referred sequence is not accurate, so that we have to optimize the parameters to fit the critical dimension scanning electron microscopy (CD SEM) data of line and space patterns. Hence, the FiRM of Sigma-C is utilized as a resist parameter-optimizing program. According to our study, the illumination shape, the aberration and the pupil mesh point have a large effect on the accuracy of resist parameter in optimization. To obtain the optimum parameters, we need to find the saturated mesh points in terms of normalized intensity log slope (NILS) prior to an optimization. The simulation results using the optimized parameters by this method shows good agreement with experiments for iso-dense bias, Focus-Exposure Matrix data and sub 80nm device pattern simulation.

  3. Influence of resonance parameters' correlations on the resonance integral uncertainty; 55Mn case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žerovnik, Gašper; Trkov, Andrej; Capote, Roberto; Rochman, Dimitri

    2011-03-01

    For nuclides with a large number of resonances the covariance matrix of resonance parameters can become very large and expensive to process in terms of the computation time. By converting covariance matrix of resonance parameters into covariance matrices of background cross-section in a more or less coarse group structure a considerable amount of computer time and memory can be saved. The question is how important is the information that is discarded in the process. First, the uncertainty of the 55Mn resonance integral was estimated in narrow resonance approximation for different levels of self-shielding using Bondarenko method by random sampling of resonance parameters according to their covariance matrices from two different 55Mn evaluations: one from Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group NRG (with large uncertainties but no correlations between resonances), the other from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (with smaller uncertainties but full covariance matrix). We have found out that if all (or at least significant part of the) resonance parameters are correlated, the resonance integral uncertainty greatly depends on the level of self-shielding. Second, it was shown that the commonly used 640-group SAND-II representation cannot describe the increase of the resonance integral uncertainty. A much finer energy mesh for the background covariance matrix would have to be used to take the resonance structure into account explicitly, but then the objective of a more compact data representation is lost.

  4. Measuring accurate body parameters of dressed humans with large-scale motion using a Kinect sensor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huanghao; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Yu; Li, Yang; Du, Sidan

    2013-01-01

    Non-contact human body measurement plays an important role in surveillance, physical healthcare, on-line business and virtual fitting. Current methods for measuring the human body without physical contact usually cannot handle humans wearing clothes, which limits their applicability in public environments. In this paper, we propose an effective solution that can measure accurate parameters of the human body with large-scale motion from a Kinect sensor, assuming that the people are wearing clothes. Because motion can drive clothes attached to the human body loosely or tightly, we adopt a space-time analysis to mine the information across the posture variations. Using this information, we recover the human body, regardless of the effect of clothes, and measure the human body parameters accurately. Experimental results show that our system can perform more accurate parameter estimation on the human body than state-of-the-art methods. PMID:24064597

  5. Accurate Analysis and Computer Aided Design of Microstrip Dual Mode Resonators and Filters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grounds, Preston Whitfield, III

    1995-01-01

    Microstrip structures are of interest due to their many applications in microwave circuit design. Their small size and ease of connection to both passive and active components make them well suited for use in systems where size and space is at a premium. These include satellite communication systems, radar systems, satellite navigation systems, cellular phones and many others. In general, space is always a premium for any mobile system. Microstrip resonators find particular application in oscillators and filters. In typical filters each microstrip patch corresponds to one resonator. However, when dual mode patches are employed, each patch acts as two resonators and therefore reduces the amount of space required to build the filter. This dissertation focuses on the accurate electromagnetic analysis of the components of planar dual mode filters. Highly accurate analyses are required so that the resonator to resonator coupling and the resonator to input/output can be predicted with precision. Hence, filters can be built with a minimum of design iterations and tuning. The analysis used herein is an integral equation formulation in the spectral domain. The analysis is done in the spectral domain since the Green's function can be derived in closed form, and the spatial domain convolution becomes a simple product. The resulting set of equations is solved using the Method of Moments with Galerkin's procedure. The electromagnetic analysis is applied to range of problems including unloaded dual mode patches, dual mode patches coupled to microstrip feedlines, and complete filter structures. At each step calculated results are compared to measured results and good agreement is found. The calculated results are also compared to results from the circuit analysis program HP EESOF^{ rm TM} and again good agreement is found. A dual mode elliptic filter is built and good performance is obtained.

  6. Accurate and transferable extended Hückel-type tight-binding parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdá, J.; Soria, F.

    2000-03-01

    We show how the simple extended Hückel theory can be easily parametrized in order to yield accurate band structures for bulk materials, while the resulting optimized atomic orbital basis sets present good transferability properties. The number of parameters involved is exceedingly small, typically ten or eleven per structural phase. We apply the method to almost fifty elemental and compound bulk phases.

  7. Neutron Resonance Parameters and Covariance Matrix of 239Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, Herve; Leal, Luiz C; Larson, Nancy M

    2008-08-01

    In order to obtain the resonance parameters in a single energy range and the corresponding covariance matrix, a reevaluation of 239Pu was performed with the code SAMMY. The most recent experimental data were analyzed or reanalyzed in the energy range thermal to 2.5 keV. The normalization of the fission cross section data was reconsidered by taking into account the most recent measurements of Weston et al. and Wagemans et al. A full resonance parameter covariance matrix was generated. The method used to obtain realistic uncertainties on the average cross section calculated by SAMMY or other processing codes was examined.

  8. Identification of accurate nonlinear rainfall-runoff models with unique parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoups, G.; Vrugt, J. A.; Fenicia, F.; van de Giesen, N.

    2009-04-01

    We propose a strategy to identify models with unique parameters that yield accurate streamflow predictions, given a time-series of rainfall inputs. The procedure consists of five general steps. First, an a priori range of model structures is specified based on prior general and site-specific hydrologic knowledge. To this end, we rely on a flexible model code that allows a specification of a wide range of model structures, from simple to complex. Second, using global optimization each model structure is calibrated to a record of rainfall-runoff data, yielding optimal parameter values for each model structure. Third, accuracy of each model structure is determined by estimating model prediction errors using independent validation and statistical theory. Fourth, parameter identifiability of each calibrated model structure is estimated by means of Monte Carlo Markov Chain simulation. Finally, an assessment is made about each model structure in terms of its accuracy of mimicking rainfall-runoff processes (step 3), and the uniqueness of its parameters (step 4). The procedure results in the identification of the most complex and accurate model supported by the data, without causing parameter equifinality. As such, it provides insight into the information content of the data for identifying nonlinear rainfall-runoff models. We illustrate the method using rainfall-runoff data records from several MOPEX basins in the US.

  9. Neutron Capture and Transmission Measurements and Resonance Parameter Analysis of Samarium

    SciTech Connect

    G. Leinweber; J.A. Burke; H.D. Knox; N.J. Drindak; D.W. Mesh; W.T. Haines; R.V. Ballad; R.C. Block; R.E. Slovacek; C.J. Werner; M.J. Trbovich; D.P. Barry; T. Sato

    2001-07-16

    The purpose of the present work is to accurately measure the neutron cross sections of samarium. The most significant isotope is {sup 149}Sm, which has a large neutron absorption cross section at thermal energies and is a {sup 235}U fission product with a 1% yield. Its cross sections are thus of concern to reactor neutronics. Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic institute (RPI) LINAC facility using metallic and liquid Sm samples. The capture measurements were made at the 25 meter flight station with a multiplicity-type capture detector, and the transmission total cross-section measurements were performed at 15- and 25-meter flight stations with {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors. Resonance parameters were determined by a combined analysis of six experiments (three capture and three transmission) using the multi-level R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M2. The significant features of this work are as follows. Dilute samples of samarium nitrate in deuterated water (D{sub 2}O) were prepared to measure the strong resonances at 0.1 and 8 eV without saturation. Disk-shaped spectroscopic quartz cells were obtained with parallel inner surfaces to provide a uniform thickness of solution. The diluent feature of the SAMMY program was used to analyze these data. The SAMMY program also includes multiple scattering corrections to capture yield data and resolution functions specific to the RPI facility. Resonance parameters for all stable isotopes of samarium were deduced for all resonances up to 30 eV. Thermal capture cross-section and capture resonance integral calculations were made using the resultant resonance parameters and were compared to results obtained using resonance parameters from ENDF/B-VI updated through release 3. Extending the definition of the capture resonance integral to include the strong 0.1 eV resonance in {sup 149}Sm, present measurements agree within estimated

  10. Parameter measurement of synchronous reluctance motor using LC resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Joonseon; Kim, Ki-Chan; Lee, Ju

    2006-04-01

    The motor characterizing parameters are most important factors to drive precisely, effectively, and robustly. Especially, the exact knowledge of synchronous inductance is necessary to control the torque precisely in synchronous reluctance motor (SynRM). Therefore many works have been done for the exact measurement of motor parameters. In this paper, we propose the simple method of measuring the motor parameters, especially measuring the synchronous inductance of SynRM, which can overcome the demerits of conventional methods and measure the exact values. The proposed method uses the resonance phenomenon between the phase inductance and capacitors externally connected.

  11. Parameter Estimation of Ion Current Formulations Requires Hybrid Optimization Approach to Be Both Accurate and Reliable

    PubMed Central

    Loewe, Axel; Wilhelms, Mathias; Schmid, Jochen; Krause, Mathias J.; Fischer, Fathima; Thomas, Dierk; Scholz, Eberhard P.; Dössel, Olaf; Seemann, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Computational models of cardiac electrophysiology provided insights into arrhythmogenesis and paved the way toward tailored therapies in the last years. To fully leverage in silico models in future research, these models need to be adapted to reflect pathologies, genetic alterations, or pharmacological effects, however. A common approach is to leave the structure of established models unaltered and estimate the values of a set of parameters. Today’s high-throughput patch clamp data acquisition methods require robust, unsupervised algorithms that estimate parameters both accurately and reliably. In this work, two classes of optimization approaches are evaluated: gradient-based trust-region-reflective and derivative-free particle swarm algorithms. Using synthetic input data and different ion current formulations from the Courtemanche et al. electrophysiological model of human atrial myocytes, we show that neither of the two schemes alone succeeds to meet all requirements. Sequential combination of the two algorithms did improve the performance to some extent but not satisfactorily. Thus, we propose a novel hybrid approach coupling the two algorithms in each iteration. This hybrid approach yielded very accurate estimates with minimal dependency on the initial guess using synthetic input data for which a ground truth parameter set exists. When applied to measured data, the hybrid approach yielded the best fit, again with minimal variation. Using the proposed algorithm, a single run is sufficient to estimate the parameters. The degree of superiority over the other investigated algorithms in terms of accuracy and robustness depended on the type of current. In contrast to the non-hybrid approaches, the proposed method proved to be optimal for data of arbitrary signal to noise ratio. The hybrid algorithm proposed in this work provides an important tool to integrate experimental data into computational models both accurately and robustly allowing to assess the often non

  12. An accurate Fortran code for computing hydrogenic continuum wave functions at a wide range of parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Liang-You; Gong, Qihuang

    2010-12-01

    The accurate computations of hydrogenic continuum wave functions are very important in many branches of physics such as electron-atom collisions, cold atom physics, and atomic ionization in strong laser fields, etc. Although there already exist various algorithms and codes, most of them are only reliable in a certain ranges of parameters. In some practical applications, accurate continuum wave functions need to be calculated at extremely low energies, large radial distances and/or large angular momentum number. Here we provide such a code, which can generate accurate hydrogenic continuum wave functions and corresponding Coulomb phase shifts at a wide range of parameters. Without any essential restrict to angular momentum number, the present code is able to give reliable results at the electron energy range [10,10] eV for radial distances of [10,10] a.u. We also find the present code is very efficient, which should find numerous applications in many fields such as strong field physics. Program summaryProgram title: HContinuumGautchi Catalogue identifier: AEHD_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHD_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1233 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 7405 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran90 in fixed format Computer: AMD Processors Operating system: Linux RAM: 20 MBytes Classification: 2.7, 4.5 Nature of problem: The accurate computation of atomic continuum wave functions is very important in many research fields such as strong field physics and cold atom physics. Although there have already existed various algorithms and codes, most of them can only be applicable and reliable in a certain range of parameters. We present here an accurate FORTRAN program for

  13. Neutron Capture and Transmission Measurements and Resonance Parameter Analysis of Samarium

    SciTech Connect

    Leinweber, G.; Burke, J.A.; Knox, H.D.; Drindak, N.J.; Mesh, D.W.; Haines, W.T.; Ballad, R.V.; Block, R.C.; Slovacek, R.E.; Werner, C.J.; Trbovich, M.J.; Barry, D.P.; Sato, T.

    2002-09-15

    The purpose of the present work is to measure the neutron cross sections of samarium accurately. The most significant isotope is {sup 149}Sm, which has a large neutron absorption cross section at thermal energies and is a {sup 235}U fission product with a 1% yield. Its cross sections are thus of concern to reactor neutronics.Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) LINAC facility using metallic and liquid Sm samples. The capture measurements were made at the 25-m flight station with a multiplicity-type capture detector, and the transmission total cross-section measurements were performed at 15- and 25-m flight stations with {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors. Resonance parameters were determined by a combined analysis of six experiments (three capture and three transmission) using the multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M2.The significant features of this work are as follows. Dilute samples of samarium nitrate in deuterated water (D{sub 2}O) were prepared to measure the strong resonances at 0.1 and 8 eV without saturation. Disk-shaped spectroscopic quartz cells were obtained with parallel inner surfaces to provide a uniform thickness of solution. The diluent feature of the SAMMY program was used to analyze these data. The SAMMY program also includes multiple-scattering corrections to capture yield data and resolution functions specific to the RPI facility.Resonance parameters for all stable isotopes of samarium were deduced for all resonances up to 30 eV. Thermal capture cross-section and capture resonance integral (RI) calculations were made using the resultant resonance parameters and were compared to results obtained using resonance parameters from ENDF/B-VI updated through release 3. Extending the definition of the capture RI to include the strong 0.1-eV resonance in {sup 149}Sm, present measurements agree within estimated uncertainties with ENDF

  14. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis Using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    MJ Trbovich; DP Barry; RE Slovacck; Y Danon; RC Block; JA Burke; NJ Drindak; G Leinweber; RV Ballad

    2004-10-13

    The focus of this work is to determine resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005-200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf resonances near 8 eV. The large neutron cross section of hafnium, combined with its corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties, make it a useful material for controlling nuclear reactions. Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission were performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) electron linear accelerator (LINAC) using the time of flight method. {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m. Capture experiments were done using a sixteen section NaI(Tl) multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized various thicknesses of metallic and isotopically-enriched liquid samples. The liquid samples were designed to provide information on the {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf contributions to the 8 eV doublet without saturation. Data analysis was done using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M6 beta. SAMMY is able to account for experimental resolution effects for each of the experimental setups at the RPI LINAC, and also can correct for multiple scattering effects in neutron capture yield data. The combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005-200 eV. Resonance integrals were calculated along with errors for each hafnium isotope using the NJOY [1] and INTER [2] codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previously published values; however the calculated elemental hafnium resonance integral changed very little.

  15. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Trbovich, Michael J.; Barry, Devin P.; Burke, John A.; Drindak, Noel J.; Leinweber, Greg; Ballad, Robert V.; Slovacek, Rudy E.; Danon, Yaron; Block, Robert C.

    2005-05-24

    The focus of this work is to determine resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005-200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping 176Hf and 178Hf resonances near 8 eV. The large neutron cross section of hafnium, combined with its corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties, make it a useful material for controlling nuclear reactions.Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission were performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) electron linear accelerator (LINAC) using the time of flight method. 6Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m. Capture experiments were done using a sixteen-section NaI(Tl) multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized various thicknesses of metallic and isotopically enriched liquid samples. The liquid samples were designed to provide information on the 176Hf and 178Hf contributions to the 8-eV doublet without saturation.Data analysis was done using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M6 beta. SAMMY is able to account for experimental resolution effects for each of the experimental setups at the RPI LINAC, and also can correct for multiple scattering effects in neutron capture yield data. The combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005-200 eV. Resonance integrals were calculated along with errors for each hafnium isotope using the NJOY and INTER codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previously published values; however the calculated elemental hafnium resonance integral changed very little.

  16. Accurate optical parameter extraction procedure for broadband near-infrared spectroscopy of brain matter

    PubMed Central

    Najafizadeh, Laleh; Gandjbakhche, Amir H.; Pourrezaei, Kambiz; Daryoush, Afshin

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Modeling behavior of broadband (30 to 1000 MHz) frequency modulated near-infrared (NIR) photons through a phantom is the basis for accurate extraction of optical absorption and scattering parameters of biological turbid media. Photon dynamics in a phantom are predicted using both analytical and numerical simulation and are related to the measured insertion loss (IL) and insertion phase (IP) for a given geometry based on phantom optical parameters. Accuracy of the extracted optical parameters using finite element method (FEM) simulation is compared to baseline analytical calculations from the diffusion equation (DE) for homogenous brain phantoms. NIR spectroscopy is performed using custom-designed, broadband, free-space optical transmitter (Tx) and receiver (Rx) modules that are developed for photon migration at wavelengths of 680, 780, and 820 nm. Differential detection between two optical Rx locations separated by 0.3 cm is employed to eliminate systemic artifacts associated with interfaces of the optical Tx and Rx with the phantoms. Optical parameter extraction is achieved for four solid phantom samples using the least-square-error method in MATLAB (for DE) and COMSOL (for FEM) simulation by fitting data to measured results over broadband and narrowband frequency modulation. Confidence in numerical modeling of the photonic behavior using FEM has been established here by comparing the transmission mode’s experimental results with the predictions made by DE and FEM for known commercial solid brain phantoms. PMID:23322361

  17. Accurate estimation of motion blur parameters in noisy remote sensing image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xueyan; Wang, Lin; Shao, Xiaopeng; Wang, Huilin; Tao, Zhong

    2015-05-01

    The relative motion between remote sensing satellite sensor and objects is one of the most common reasons for remote sensing image degradation. It seriously weakens image data interpretation and information extraction. In practice, point spread function (PSF) should be estimated firstly for image restoration. Identifying motion blur direction and length accurately is very crucial for PSF and restoring image with precision. In general, the regular light-and-dark stripes in the spectrum can be employed to obtain the parameters by using Radon transform. However, serious noise existing in actual remote sensing images often causes the stripes unobvious. The parameters would be difficult to calculate and the error of the result relatively big. In this paper, an improved motion blur parameter identification method to noisy remote sensing image is proposed to solve this problem. The spectrum characteristic of noisy remote sensing image is analyzed firstly. An interactive image segmentation method based on graph theory called GrabCut is adopted to effectively extract the edge of the light center in the spectrum. Motion blur direction is estimated by applying Radon transform on the segmentation result. In order to reduce random error, a method based on whole column statistics is used during calculating blur length. Finally, Lucy-Richardson algorithm is applied to restore the remote sensing images of the moon after estimating blur parameters. The experimental results verify the effectiveness and robustness of our algorithm.

  18. On the Methodology to Calculate the Covariance of Estimated Resonance Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, B.; Kopecky, S.; Schillebeeckx, P.

    2015-01-15

    Principles to determine resonance parameters and their covariance from experimental data are discussed. Different methods to propagate the covariance of experimental parameters are compared. A full Bayesian statistical analysis reveals that the level to which the initial uncertainty of the experimental parameters propagates, strongly depends on the experimental conditions. For high precision data the initial uncertainties of experimental parameters, like a normalization factor, has almost no impact on the covariance of the parameters in case of thick sample measurements and conventional uncertainty propagation or full Bayesian analysis. The covariances derived from a full Bayesian analysis and least-squares fit are derived under the condition that the model describing the experimental observables is perfect. When the quality of the model can not be verified a more conservative method based on a renormalization of the covariance matrix is recommended to propagate fully the uncertainty of experimental systematic effects. Finally, neutron resonance transmission analysis is proposed as an accurate method to validate evaluated data libraries in the resolved resonance region.

  19. Evaluation of silicon neutron resonance parameters in the thermal to 1800 keV energy range.

    PubMed

    Derrien, H; Leal, L C; Guber, K H; Larson, N M

    2005-01-01

    Because silicon is a major constituent of concrete and soil, neutron and gamma ray information on silicon is important for reactor shielding and criticality safety calculations. Therefore, much effort was put into the ENDF/B-VI evaluation for the three stable isotopes of silicon. The neutron capture cross section of natural silicon was recently measured at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in the energy range 1-700 keV. Using the ENDF/B-VI evaluation for initial values, a new evaluation of the resonance parameters was performed by adding the results of the ORELA capture measurements to the experimental database. The computer code SAMMY was used for the analysis of the experimental data; the new version of SAMMY allows accurate calculations of the self-shielding and multiple scattering effects in the capture measurements. The accuracy of the radiative capture widths of the resonances was improved by this analysis. Accurate values of the s-, p- and d-wave neutron strength functions were also obtained. Although the resonance capture component of the present evaluation is 2-3 times smaller than that in ENDF/B-VI, the total capture cross section is much larger, at least for energies >250 keV, because the direct capture component contributes values of the same order of magnitude as the resonance component. The direct component was not taken into account in the ENDF/B-VI evaluation and was calculated for the first time in the present evaluation. PMID:16381717

  20. Accurate prediction of electron-paramagnetic-resonance tensors for spin probes dissolved in liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Benzi, Caterina; Cossi, Maurizio; Barone, Vincenzo

    2005-11-15

    High-level ab initio g and A tensor components have been calculated for PD-tempone and tempo-palmitate (TP) radical spin probes dissolved in n-pentyl and n-hexyl cyanobiphenyl liquid crystals. Solvent effects have been included in the proposed approach by means of the polarizable continuum model, allowing for solvent anisotropy. An in-depth analysis of the electronic structure of probes was performed to choose a suitable model for TP and make the calculations more accessible. Computed magnetic tensor components have been compared with corresponding values measured in the rigid limit. The quality of the results suggests the use of quantum-mechanical data to determine the order parameter of the nematic from experimental electron-spin resonance measurements. PMID:16321115

  1. A Method for Accurate Reconstructions of the Upper Airway Using Magnetic Resonance Images

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Huahui; Huang, Xiaoqing; Li, Yong; Li, Jianhong; Xian, Junfang; Huang, Yaqi

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to provide an optimized method to reconstruct the structure of the upper airway (UA) based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that can faithfully show the anatomical structure with a smooth surface without artificial modifications. Methods MRI was performed on the head and neck of a healthy young male participant in the axial, coronal and sagittal planes to acquire images of the UA. The level set method was used to segment the boundary of the UA. The boundaries in the three scanning planes were registered according to the positions of crossing points and anatomical characteristics using a Matlab program. Finally, the three-dimensional (3D) NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines) surface of the UA was constructed using the registered boundaries in all three different planes. Results A smooth 3D structure of the UA was constructed, which captured the anatomical features from the three anatomical planes, particularly the location of the anterior wall of the nasopharynx. The volume and area of every cross section of the UA can be calculated from the constructed 3D model of UA. Conclusions A complete scheme of reconstruction of the UA was proposed, which can be used to measure and evaluate the 3D upper airway accurately. PMID:26066461

  2. A time domain based method for the accurate measurement of Q-factor and resonance frequency of microwave resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Gyüre, B.; Márkus, B. G.; Bernáth, B.; Simon, F.; Murányi, F.

    2015-09-15

    We present a novel method to determine the resonant frequency and quality factor of microwave resonators which is faster, more stable, and conceptually simpler than the yet existing techniques. The microwave resonator is pumped with the microwave radiation at a frequency away from its resonance. It then emits an exponentially decaying radiation at its eigen-frequency when the excitation is rapidly switched off. The emitted microwave signal is down-converted with a microwave mixer, digitized, and its Fourier transformation (FT) directly yields the resonance curve in a single shot. Being a FT based method, this technique possesses the Fellgett (multiplex) and Connes (accuracy) advantages and it conceptually mimics that of pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance. We also establish a novel benchmark to compare accuracy of the different approaches of microwave resonator measurements. This shows that the present method has similar accuracy to the existing ones, which are based on sweeping or modulating the frequency of the microwave radiation.

  3. Can a combination of ultrasonographic parameters accurately evaluate concussion and guide return-to-play decisions?

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Michael S; Dupuis, Janae E; Bargoil, Jessica M; Foster, Dana C

    2015-09-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury, often referred to as concussion, is a common, potentially debilitating, and costly condition. One of the main challenges in diagnosing and managing concussion is that there is not currently an objective test to determine the presence of a concussion and to guide return-to-play decisions for athletes. Traditional neuroimaging tests, such as brain magnetic resonance imaging, are normal in concussion, and therefore diagnosis and management are guided by reported symptoms. Some athletes will under-report symptoms to accelerate their return-to-play and others will over-report symptoms out of fear of further injury or misinterpretation of underlying conditions, such as migraine headache. Therefore, an objective measure is needed to assist in several facets of concussion management. Limited data in animal and human testing indicates that intracranial pressure increases slightly and cerebrovascular reactivity (the ability of the cerebral arteries to auto-regulate in response to changes in carbon dioxide) decreases slightly following mild traumatic brain injury. We hypothesize that a combination of ultrasonographic measurements (optic nerve sheath diameter and transcranial Doppler assessment of cerebrovascular reactivity) into a single index will allow for an accurate and non-invasive measurement of intracranial pressure and cerebrovascular reactivity, and this index will be clinically relevant and useful for guiding concussion diagnosis and management. Ultrasound is an ideal modality for the evaluation of concussion because it is portable (allowing for evaluation in many settings, such as on the playing field or in a combat zone), radiation-free (making repeat scans safe), and relatively inexpensive (resulting in nearly universal availability). This paper reviews the literature supporting our hypothesis that an ultrasonographic index can assist in the diagnosis and management of concussion, and it also presents limited data regarding the

  4. How accurate are polymer models in the analysis of Förster resonance energy transfer experiments on proteins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Edward P.; Morrison, Greg; Brooks, Bernard R.; Thirumalai, D.

    2009-03-01

    Single molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments are used to infer the properties of the denatured state ensemble (DSE) of proteins. From the measured average FRET efficiency, ⟨E⟩, the distance distribution P(R ) is inferred by assuming that the DSE can be described as a polymer. The single parameter in the appropriate polymer model (Gaussian chain, wormlike chain, or self-avoiding walk) for P(R ) is determined by equating the calculated and measured ⟨E⟩. In order to assess the accuracy of this "standard procedure," we consider the generalized Rouse model (GRM), whose properties [⟨E⟩ and P(R )] can be analytically computed, and the Molecular Transfer Model for protein L for which accurate simulations can be carried out as a function of guanadinium hydrochloride (GdmCl) concentration. Using the precisely computed ⟨E⟩ for the GRM and protein L, we infer P(R ) using the standard procedure. We find that the mean end-to-end distance can be accurately inferred (less than 10% relative error) using ⟨E⟩ and polymer models for P(R ). However, the value extracted for the radius of gyration (Rg) and the persistence length (lp) are less accurate. For protein L, the errors in the inferred properties increase as the GdmCl concentration increases for all polymer models. The relative error in the inferred Rg and lp, with respect to the exact values, can be as large as 25% at the highest GdmCl concentration. We propose a self-consistency test, requiring measurements of ⟨E⟩ by attaching dyes to different residues in the protein, to assess the validity of describing DSE using the Gaussian model. Application of the self-consistency test to the GRM shows that even for this simple model, which exhibits an order→disorder transition, the Gaussian P(R ) is inadequate. Analysis of experimental data of FRET efficiencies with dyes at several locations for the cold shock protein, and simulations results for protein L, for which accurate FRET

  5. Tissue resonance interaction accurately detects colon lesions: A double-blind pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Dore, Maria P; Tufano, Marcello O; Pes, Giovanni M; Cuccu, Marianna; Farina, Valentina; Manca, Alessandra; Graham, David Y

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigated the performance of the tissue resonance interaction method (TRIM) for the non-invasive detection of colon lesions. METHODS: We performed a prospective single-center blinded pilot study of consecutive adults undergoing colonoscopy at the University Hospital in Sassari, Italy. Before patients underwent colonoscopy, they were examined by the TRIMprobe which detects differences in electromagnetic properties between pathological and normal tissues. All patients had completed the polyethylene glycol-containing bowel prep for the colonoscopy procedure before being screened. During the procedure the subjects remained fully dressed. A hand-held probe was moved over the abdomen and variations in electromagnetic signals were recorded for 3 spectral lines (462-465 MHz, 930 MHz, and 1395 MHz). A single investigator, blind to any clinical information, performed the test using the TRIMprob system. Abnormal signals were identified and recorded as malignant or benign (adenoma or hyperplastic polyps). Findings were compared with those from colonoscopy with histologic confirmation. Statistical analysis was performed by χ2 test. RESULTS: A total of 305 consecutive patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were enrolled over a period of 12 months. The most frequent indication for colonoscopy was abdominal pain (33%). The TRIMprob was well accepted by all patients; none spontaneously complained about the procedure, and no adverse effects were observed. TRIM proved inaccurate for polyp detection in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and they were excluded leaving 281 subjects (mean age 59 ± 13 years; 107 males). The TRIM detected and accurately characterized all 12 adenocarcinomas and 135/137 polyps (98.5%) including 64 adenomatous (100%) found. The method identified cancers and polyps with 98.7% sensitivity, 96.2% specificity, and 97.5% diagnostic accuracy, compared to colonoscopy and histology analyses. The positive predictive value was 96.7% and the

  6. Precise and accurate assessment of uncertainties in model parameters from stellar interferometry. Application to stellar diameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachaume, Regis; Rabus, Markus; Jordan, Andres

    2015-08-01

    In stellar interferometry, the assumption that the observables can be seen as Gaussian, independent variables is the norm. In particular, neither the optical interferometry FITS (OIFITS) format nor the most popular fitting software in the field, LITpro, offer means to specify a covariance matrix or non-Gaussian uncertainties. Interferometric observables are correlated by construct, though. Also, the calibration by an instrumental transfer function ensures that the resulting observables are not Gaussian, even if uncalibrated ones happened to be so.While analytic frameworks have been published in the past, they are cumbersome and there is no generic implementation available. We propose here a relatively simple way of dealing with correlated errors without the need to extend the OIFITS specification or making some Gaussian assumptions. By repeatedly picking at random which interferograms, which calibrator stars, and which are the errors on their diameters, and performing the data processing on the bootstrapped data, we derive a sampling of p(O), the multivariate probability density function (PDF) of the observables O. The results can be stored in a normal OIFITS file. Then, given a model m with parameters P predicting observables O = m(P), we can estimate the PDF of the model parameters f(P) = p(m(P)) by using a density estimation of the observables' PDF p.With observations repeated over different baselines, on nights several days apart, and with a significant set of calibrators systematic errors are de facto taken into account. We apply the technique to a precise and accurate assessment of stellar diameters obtained at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer with PIONIER.

  7. Significance of accurate diffraction corrections for the second harmonic wave in determining the acoustic nonlinearity parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Zhang, Shuzeng; Li, Xiongbing; Barnard, Dan

    2015-09-15

    The accurate measurement of acoustic nonlinearity parameter β for fluids or solids generally requires making corrections for diffraction effects due to finite size geometry of transmitter and receiver. These effects are well known in linear acoustics, while those for second harmonic waves have not been well addressed and therefore not properly considered in previous studies. In this work, we explicitly define the attenuation and diffraction corrections using the multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) equations which were developed from the quasilinear solutions of the KZK equation. The effects of making these corrections are examined through the simulation of β determination in water. Diffraction corrections are found to have more significant effects than attenuation corrections, and the β values of water can be estimated experimentally with less than 5% errors when the exact second harmonic diffraction corrections are used together with the negligible attenuation correction effects on the basis of linear frequency dependence between attenuation coefficients, α{sub 2} ≃ 2α{sub 1}.

  8. Accurate parameters for HD 209458 and its planet from HST spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Burgo, C.; Allende Prieto, C.

    2016-08-01

    We present updated parameters for the star HD 209458 and its transiting giant planet. The stellar angular diameter θ=0.2254±0.0017 mas is obtained from the average ratio between the absolute flux observed with the Hubble Space Telescope and that of the best-fitting Kurucz model atmosphere. This angular diameter represents an improvement in precision of more than four times compared to available interferometric determinations. The stellar radius R⋆=1.20±0.05 R⊙ is ascertained by combining the angular diameter with the Hipparcos trigonometric parallax, which is the main contributor to its uncertainty, and therefore the radius accuracy should be significantly improved with Gaia's measurements. The radius of the exoplanet Rp=1.41±0.06 RJ is derived from the corresponding transit depth in the light curve and our stellar radius. From the model fitting, we accurately determine the effective temperature, Teff=6071±20 K, which is in perfect agreement with the value of 6070±24 K calculated from the angular diameter and the integrated spectral energy distribution. We also find precise values from recent Padova Isochrones, such as R⋆=1.20±0.06 R⊙ and Teff=6099±41 K. We arrive at a consistent picture from these methods and compare the results with those from the literature.

  9. Accurate three-dimensional registration of magnetic resonance images for detecting local changes in cartilage thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuanzhi; Jin, Quan; Zhao, Jie; Guo, Changyong; Bai, Jing

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a three-dimensional registration method for monitoring knee joint disease from magnetic resonance (MR) image data sets. A global optimization technique was used for identifying anatomically corresponding points of knee femur surfaces (bone cartilage interfaces). In a first pre-registration step, we used the principal axes transformation to correct for different knee joint positions and orientations in the MR scanner. In a second step, we presented a global search algorithm based on Lipschitz optimization theory. This technique can simultaneously determine the translation and rotation parameters through searching a six-dimensional space of Euclidean motion metrics (translation and rotation) after calculating the point correspondences. The point correspondences were calculated by using the Hungarian algorithm. The accuracy of registration was evaluated using 20 porcine knees. There were 300 corresponding landmark points over the 20 pig knees. We evaluated the registration accuracy by measuring the root-mean-square distance (RMSD) error of corresponding landmark points between two femur surfaces (two time-points). The results show that the average RMSD was 1.22 +/- 0.10 mm (SD) by the iterative closest point (ICP) method, 1.17 +/- 0.10 mm the by expectation-maximization-ICP method, 1.02 +/- 0.06 mm by the genetic method, and 0.93 +/- 0.04 mm by the proposed method. Compared with the other three registration approaches, the proposed method achieved the highest registration accuracy.

  10. Consistency of VDJ Rearrangement and Substitution Parameters Enables Accurate B Cell Receptor Sequence Annotation

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Duncan K.; Matsen, Frederick A.

    2016-01-01

    VDJ rearrangement and somatic hypermutation work together to produce antibody-coding B cell receptor (BCR) sequences for a remarkable diversity of antigens. It is now possible to sequence these BCRs in high throughput; analysis of these sequences is bringing new insight into how antibodies develop, in particular for broadly-neutralizing antibodies against HIV and influenza. A fundamental step in such sequence analysis is to annotate each base as coming from a specific one of the V, D, or J genes, or from an N-addition (a.k.a. non-templated insertion). Previous work has used simple parametric distributions to model transitions from state to state in a hidden Markov model (HMM) of VDJ recombination, and assumed that mutations occur via the same process across sites. However, codon frame and other effects have been observed to violate these parametric assumptions for such coding sequences, suggesting that a non-parametric approach to modeling the recombination process could be useful. In our paper, we find that indeed large modern data sets suggest a model using parameter-rich per-allele categorical distributions for HMM transition probabilities and per-allele-per-position mutation probabilities, and that using such a model for inference leads to significantly improved results. We present an accurate and efficient BCR sequence annotation software package using a novel HMM “factorization” strategy. This package, called partis (https://github.com/psathyrella/partis/), is built on a new general-purpose HMM compiler that can perform efficient inference given a simple text description of an HMM. PMID:26751373

  11. Consistency of VDJ Rearrangement and Substitution Parameters Enables Accurate B Cell Receptor Sequence Annotation.

    PubMed

    Ralph, Duncan K; Matsen, Frederick A

    2016-01-01

    VDJ rearrangement and somatic hypermutation work together to produce antibody-coding B cell receptor (BCR) sequences for a remarkable diversity of antigens. It is now possible to sequence these BCRs in high throughput; analysis of these sequences is bringing new insight into how antibodies develop, in particular for broadly-neutralizing antibodies against HIV and influenza. A fundamental step in such sequence analysis is to annotate each base as coming from a specific one of the V, D, or J genes, or from an N-addition (a.k.a. non-templated insertion). Previous work has used simple parametric distributions to model transitions from state to state in a hidden Markov model (HMM) of VDJ recombination, and assumed that mutations occur via the same process across sites. However, codon frame and other effects have been observed to violate these parametric assumptions for such coding sequences, suggesting that a non-parametric approach to modeling the recombination process could be useful. In our paper, we find that indeed large modern data sets suggest a model using parameter-rich per-allele categorical distributions for HMM transition probabilities and per-allele-per-position mutation probabilities, and that using such a model for inference leads to significantly improved results. We present an accurate and efficient BCR sequence annotation software package using a novel HMM "factorization" strategy. This package, called partis (https://github.com/psathyrella/partis/), is built on a new general-purpose HMM compiler that can perform efficient inference given a simple text description of an HMM. PMID:26751373

  12. Comments on extracting the resonance strength parameter from yield data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Stephen; Favalli, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    The F(α,n) reaction is the focus of on-going research in part because it is an important source of neutrons in the nuclear fuel cycle which can be exploited to assay nuclear materials, especially uranium in the form of UF6 [1,2]. At the present time there remains some considerable uncertainty (of the order of ±20%) in the thick target integrated over angle (α,n) yield from 19F (100% natural abundance) and its compounds as discussed in [3,4]. An important thin target cross-section measurement is that of Wrean and Kavanagh [5] who explore the region from below threshold (2.36 MeV) to approximately 3.1 MeV with fine energy resolution. Integration of their cross-section data over the slowing down history of a stopping α-particle allows the thick target yield to be calculated for incident energies up to 3.1 MeV. This trend can then be combined with data from other sources to obtain a thick target yield curve over the wider range of interest to the fuel cycle (roughly threshold to 10 MeV to include all relevant α-emitters). To estimate the thickness of the CaF2 target they used, Wrean and Kavanagh separately measured the integrated yield of the 6.129 MeV γ-rays from the resonance at 340.5 keV (laboratory α-particle kinetic energy) in the 19F(p,αγ) reaction. To interpret the data they adopted a resonance strength parameter of (22.3±0.8) eV based on a determination by Becker et al [6]. The value and its uncertainty directly affects the thickness estimate and the extracted (α,n) cross-section values. In their citation to Becker et al's work, Wrean and Kavanagh comment that they did not make use of an alternative value of (23.7±1.0) eV reported by Croft [7] because they were unable to reproduce the value from the data given in that paper. The value they calculated for the resonance strength from the thick target yield given by Croft was 21.4 eV. The purpose of this communication is to revisit the paper by Croft published in this journal and specifically to

  13. Accurate analytical method for the extraction of solar cell model parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phang, J. C. H.; Chan, D. S. H.; Phillips, J. R.

    1984-05-01

    Single diode solar cell model parameters are rapidly extracted from experimental data by means of the presently derived analytical expressions. The parameter values obtained have a less than 5 percent error for most solar cells, in light of the extraction of model parameters for two cells of differing quality which were compared with parameters extracted by means of the iterative method.

  14. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Herman

    2016-09-01

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3 / 2 , 5 / 2 , 7 / 2, and 9 / 2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  15. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cho, Herman

    2016-02-28

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3/2,5/2,7/2, and 9/2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Furthermore, applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  16. Evaluation of 238U Resonance Parameters from 0 to 20 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrien, H.; Courcelle, A.; Leal, L. C.; Larson, N.; Santamarina, A.

    2005-05-01

    The neutron resonance parameters of 238U were obtained in the energy range 0 to 20 keV from a sequential SAMMY analysis of the most recent high-resolution neutron transmission and neutron capture cross-section measurements. Special care was taken in the analysis of the lowest s-wave resonances leading to resonance parameters slightly different from those of ENDF/B-VI (Moxon-Sowerby resonance parameters). The resolved-resonance range was extended to 20 keV, taking advantage of the high-resolution neutron transmission data of Harvey and neutron capture data of Macklin et al. Preliminary integral tests were performed with the new resonance parameters; thermal low-enriched benchmark calculations show an improvement of the keff prediction, mainly due to a 1.5% decrease of the capture cross section at 0.0253 eV and about a 0.4% decrease of the effective shielded resonance capture integral.

  17. Evaluation of 238U Resonance Parameters from 0 to 20 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.; Leal, L.C.; Larson, N.; Courcelle, A.; Santamarina, A.

    2005-05-24

    The neutron resonance parameters of 238U were obtained in the energy range 0 to 20 keV from a sequential SAMMY analysis of the most recent high-resolution neutron transmission and neutron capture cross-section measurements. Special care was taken in the analysis of the lowest s-wave resonances leading to resonance parameters slightly different from those of ENDF/B-VI (Moxon-Sowerby resonance parameters). The resolved-resonance range was extended to 20 keV, taking advantage of the high-resolution neutron transmission data of Harvey and neutron capture data of Macklin et al. Preliminary integral tests were performed with the new resonance parameters; thermal low-enriched benchmark calculations show an improvement of the keff prediction, mainly due to a 1.5% decrease of the capture cross section at 0.0253 eV and about a 0.4% decrease of the effective shielded resonance capture integral.

  18. Modification of piezoelectric vibratory gyroscope resonator parameters by feedback control.

    PubMed

    Loveday, P W; Rogers, C A

    1998-01-01

    A method for analyzing the effect of feedback control on the dynamics of piezoelectric resonators used in vibratory gyroscopes has been developed. This method can be used to determine the feasibility of replacing the traditional mechanical balancing operations, used to adjust the resonant frequency, by displacement feedback and for determining the velocity feedback required to produce a particular bandwidth. Experiments were performed on a cylindrical resonator with discrete piezoelectric actuation and sensing elements to demonstrate the principles. Good agreement between analysis and experiment was obtained, and it was shown that this type of resonator could be balanced by displacement feedback. The analysis method presented also is applicable to micromachined piezoelectric gyroscopes. PMID:18244281

  19. Parameter-Induced Stochastic Resonance of Weak Periodic Signal Excitation with α Stable Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing; Kou, Jie; Jiao, Shang-Bin

    In view of the nonlinear bistable system, this paper studied the parameter-induced stochastic resonance phenomenon of low-frequency weak signal excitation under α stable noise environment, and explored the action laws of the α stable noise distribution parameters α, β, μ, σ and the bistable system parameters a, b on stochastic resonance effect. The results show that in different α stable noise, adjusting the bistable system parameters can induce stochastic resonance; Moreover, when a(or b) is fixed, the intervals of b(or a) which can induce stochastic resonance are multiple and don't change with any α stable distribution parameter. Further, by combining with the parameter compensation method for researching on high-frequency weak signal, the same action laws as the low-frequency signal are got. The conclusions are significant for using parameter-induced stochastic resonance principle in weak signal detection in the abnormal diffusion dynamical system.

  20. Polynomial Fitting of DT-MRI Fiber Tracts Allows Accurate Estimation of Muscle Architectural Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Damon, Bruce M.; Heemskerk, Anneriet M.; Ding, Zhaohua

    2012-01-01

    Fiber curvature is a functionally significant muscle structural property, but its estimation from diffusion-tensor MRI fiber tracking data may be confounded by noise. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of polynomial fitting of fiber tracts for improving the accuracy and precision of fiber curvature (κ) measurements. Simulated image datasets were created in order to provide data with known values for κ and pennation angle (θ). Simulations were designed to test the effects of increasing inherent fiber curvature (3.8, 7.9, 11.8, and 15.3 m−1), signal-to-noise ratio (50, 75, 100, and 150), and voxel geometry (13.8 and 27.0 mm3 voxel volume with isotropic resolution; 13.5 mm3 volume with an aspect ratio of 4.0) on κ and θ measurements. In the originally reconstructed tracts, θ was estimated accurately under most curvature and all imaging conditions studied; however, the estimates of κ were imprecise and inaccurate. Fitting the tracts to 2nd order polynomial functions provided accurate and precise estimates of κ for all conditions except very high curvature (κ=15.3 m−1), while preserving the accuracy of the θ estimates. Similarly, polynomial fitting of in vivo fiber tracking data reduced the κ values of fitted tracts from those of unfitted tracts and did not change the θ values. Polynomial fitting of fiber tracts allows accurate estimation of physiologically reasonable values of κ, while preserving the accuracy of θ estimation. PMID:22503094

  1. Accurate Atmospheric Parameters at Moderate Resolution Using Spectral Indices: Preliminary Application to the MARVELS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezzi, Luan; Dutra-Ferreira, Letícia; Lorenzo-Oliveira, Diego; Porto de Mello, Gustavo F.; Santiago, Basílio X.; De Lee, Nathan; Lee, Brian L.; da Costa, Luiz N.; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; Wisniewski, John P.; González Hernández, Jonay I.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Fleming, Scott W.; Schneider, Donald P.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Cargile, Phillip; Ge, Jian; Pepper, Joshua; Wang, Ji; Paegert, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Studies of Galactic chemical, and dynamical evolution in the solar neighborhood depend on the availability of precise atmospheric parameters (effective temperature T eff, metallicity [Fe/H], and surface gravity log g) for solar-type stars. Many large-scale spectroscopic surveys operate at low to moderate spectral resolution for efficiency in observing large samples, which makes the stellar characterization difficult due to the high degree of blending of spectral features. Therefore, most surveys employ spectral synthesis, which is a powerful technique, but relies heavily on the completeness and accuracy of atomic line databases and can yield possibly correlated atmospheric parameters. In this work, we use an alternative method based on spectral indices to determine the atmospheric parameters of a sample of nearby FGK dwarfs and subgiants observed by the MARVELS survey at moderate resolving power (R ~ 12,000). To avoid a time-consuming manual analysis, we have developed three codes to automatically normalize the observed spectra, measure the equivalent widths of the indices, and, through a comparison of those with values calculated with predetermined calibrations, estimate the atmospheric parameters of the stars. The calibrations were derived using a sample of 309 stars with precise stellar parameters obtained from the analysis of high-resolution FEROS spectra, permitting the low-resolution equivalent widths to be directly related to the stellar parameters. A validation test of the method was conducted with a sample of 30 MARVELS targets that also have reliable atmospheric parameters derived from the high-resolution spectra and spectroscopic analysis based on the excitation and ionization equilibria method. Our approach was able to recover the parameters within 80 K for T eff, 0.05 dex for [Fe/H], and 0.15 dex for log g, values that are lower than or equal to the typical external uncertainties found between different high-resolution analyses. An additional test was

  2. Accurate atmospheric parameters at moderate resolution using spectral indices: Preliminary application to the marvels survey

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezzi, Luan; Da Costa, Luiz N.; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; Dutra-Ferreira, Letícia; Lorenzo-Oliveira, Diego; Porto de Mello, Gustavo F.; Santiago, Basílio X.; De Lee, Nathan; Lee, Brian L.; Ge, Jian; Wisniewski, John P.; González Hernández, Jonay I.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Cargile, Phillip; Pepper, Joshua; Fleming, Scott W.; Schneider, Donald P.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Wang, Ji; and others

    2014-12-01

    Studies of Galactic chemical, and dynamical evolution in the solar neighborhood depend on the availability of precise atmospheric parameters (effective temperature T {sub eff}, metallicity [Fe/H], and surface gravity log g) for solar-type stars. Many large-scale spectroscopic surveys operate at low to moderate spectral resolution for efficiency in observing large samples, which makes the stellar characterization difficult due to the high degree of blending of spectral features. Therefore, most surveys employ spectral synthesis, which is a powerful technique, but relies heavily on the completeness and accuracy of atomic line databases and can yield possibly correlated atmospheric parameters. In this work, we use an alternative method based on spectral indices to determine the atmospheric parameters of a sample of nearby FGK dwarfs and subgiants observed by the MARVELS survey at moderate resolving power (R ∼ 12,000). To avoid a time-consuming manual analysis, we have developed three codes to automatically normalize the observed spectra, measure the equivalent widths of the indices, and, through a comparison of those with values calculated with predetermined calibrations, estimate the atmospheric parameters of the stars. The calibrations were derived using a sample of 309 stars with precise stellar parameters obtained from the analysis of high-resolution FEROS spectra, permitting the low-resolution equivalent widths to be directly related to the stellar parameters. A validation test of the method was conducted with a sample of 30 MARVELS targets that also have reliable atmospheric parameters derived from the high-resolution spectra and spectroscopic analysis based on the excitation and ionization equilibria method. Our approach was able to recover the parameters within 80 K for T {sub eff}, 0.05 dex for [Fe/H], and 0.15 dex for log g, values that are lower than or equal to the typical external uncertainties found between different high-resolution analyses. An

  3. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION Accurate estimate of α variation and isotope shift parameters in Na and Mg+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, B. K.

    2010-12-01

    We present accurate calculations of fine-structure constant variation coefficients and isotope shifts in Na and Mg+ using the relativistic coupled-cluster method. In our approach, we are able to discover the roles of various correlation effects explicitly to all orders in these calculations. Most of the results, especially for the excited states, are reported for the first time. It is possible to ascertain suitable anchor and probe lines for the studies of possible variation in the fine-structure constant by using the above results in the considered systems.

  4. Fast and accurate resonance assignment of small-to-large proteins by combining automated and manual approaches.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Markus; Ahlner, Alexandra; Andresen, Cecilia; Marsh, Joseph A; Lundström, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    The process of resonance assignment is fundamental to most NMR studies of protein structure and dynamics. Unfortunately, the manual assignment of residues is tedious and time-consuming, and can represent a significant bottleneck for further characterization. Furthermore, while automated approaches have been developed, they are often limited in their accuracy, particularly for larger proteins. Here, we address this by introducing the software COMPASS, which, by combining automated resonance assignment with manual intervention, is able to achieve accuracy approaching that from manual assignments at greatly accelerated speeds. Moreover, by including the option to compensate for isotope shift effects in deuterated proteins, COMPASS is far more accurate for larger proteins than existing automated methods. COMPASS is an open-source project licensed under GNU General Public License and is available for download from http://www.liu.se/forskning/foass/tidigare-foass/patrik-lundstrom/software?l=en. Source code and binaries for Linux, Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows are available. PMID:25569628

  5. Accurate nuclear masses from a three parameter Kohn-Sham DFT approach (BCPM)

    SciTech Connect

    Baldo, M.; Robledo, L. M.; Schuck, P.; Vinas, X.

    2012-10-20

    Given the promising features of the recently proposed Barcelona-Catania-Paris (BCP) functional [1], it is the purpose of this work to still improve on it. It is, for instance, shown that the number of open parameters can be reduced from 4-5 to 2-3, i.e. by practically a factor of two without deteriorating the results.

  6. Accurate parameters of the oldest known rocky-exoplanet hosting system: Kepler-10 revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Fogtmann-Schulz, Alexandra; Hinrup, Brian; Van Eylen, Vincent; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Kjeldsen, Hans; Silva Aguirre, Víctor; Tingley, Brandon

    2014-02-01

    Since the discovery of Kepler-10, the system has received considerable interest because it contains a small, rocky planet which orbits the star in less than a day. The system's parameters, announced by the Kepler team and subsequently used in further research, were based on only five months of data. We have reanalyzed this system using the full span of 29 months of Kepler photometric data, and obtained improved information about its star and the planets. A detailed asteroseismic analysis of the extended time series provides a significant improvement on the stellar parameters: not only can we state that Kepler-10 is the oldest known rocky-planet-harboring system at 10.41 ± 1.36 Gyr, but these parameters combined with improved planetary parameters from new transit fits gives us the radius of Kepler-10b to within just 125 km. A new analysis of the full planetary phase curve leads to new estimates on the planetary temperature and albedo, which remain degenerate in the Kepler band. Our modeling suggests that the flux level during the occultation is slightly lower than at the transit wings, which would imply that the nightside of this planet has a non-negligible temperature.

  7. Accurate protein-peptide titration experiments by nuclear magnetic resonance using low-volume samples.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Christian; Recht, Raphaël; Quinternet, Marc; de Lamotte, Frederic; Delsuc, Marc-André; Kieffer, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy allows measurements of very accurate values of equilibrium dissociation constants using chemical shift perturbation methods, provided that the concentrations of the binding partners are known with high precision and accuracy. The accuracy and precision of these experiments are improved if performed using individual capillary tubes, a method enabling full automation of the measurement. We provide here a protocol to set up and perform these experiments as well as a robust method to measure peptide concentrations using tryptophan as an internal standard. PMID:25749962

  8. Towards the computations of accurate spectroscopic parameters and vibrational spectra for organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochlaf, M.; Puzzarini, C.; Senent, M. L.

    2015-07-01

    We present multi-component computations for rotational constants, vibrational and torsional levels of medium-sized molecules. Through the treatment of two organic sulphur molecules, ethyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulphide, which are relevant for atmospheric and astrophysical media, we point out the outstanding capabilities of explicitly correlated coupled clusters (CCSD(T)-F12) method in conjunction with the cc-pVTZ-F12 basis set for the accurate predictions of such quantities. Indeed, we show that the CCSD(T)-F12/cc-pVTZ-F12 equilibrium rotational constants are in good agreement with those obtained by means of a composite scheme based on CCSD(T) calculations that accounts for the extrapolation to the complete basis set (CBS) limit and core-correlation effects [CCSD(T)/CBS+CV], thus leading to values of ground-state rotational constants rather close to the corresponding experimental data. For vibrational and torsional levels, our analysis reveals that the anharmonic frequencies derived from CCSD(T)-F12/cc-pVTZ-F12 harmonic frequencies and anharmonic corrections (Δν = ω - ν) at the CCSD/cc-pVTZ level closely agree with experimental results. The pattern of the torsional transitions and the shape of the potential energy surfaces along the torsional modes are also well reproduced using the CCSD(T)-F12/cc-pVTZ-F12 energies. Interestingly, this good accuracy is accompanied with a strong reduction of the computational costs. This makes the procedures proposed here as schemes of choice for effective and accurate prediction of spectroscopic properties of organic compounds. Finally, popular density functional approaches are compared with the coupled cluster (CC) methodologies in torsional studies. The long-range CAM-B3LYP functional of Handy and co-workers is recommended for large systems.

  9. Lower bound on reliability for Weibull distribution when shape parameter is not estimated accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Zhaofeng; Porter, Albert A.

    1991-01-01

    The mathematical relationships between the shape parameter Beta and estimates of reliability and a life limit lower bound for the two parameter Weibull distribution are investigated. It is shown that under rather general conditions, both the reliability lower bound and the allowable life limit lower bound (often called a tolerance limit) have unique global minimums over a range of Beta. Hence lower bound solutions can be obtained without assuming or estimating Beta. The existence and uniqueness of these lower bounds are proven. Some real data examples are given to show how these lower bounds can be easily established and to demonstrate their practicality. The method developed here has proven to be extremely useful when using the Weibull distribution in analysis of no-failure or few-failures data. The results are applicable not only in the aerospace industry but anywhere that system reliabilities are high.

  10. Lower bound on reliability for Weibull distribution when shape parameter is not estimated accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Zhaofeng; Porter, Albert A.

    1990-01-01

    The mathematical relationships between the shape parameter Beta and estimates of reliability and a life limit lower bound for the two parameter Weibull distribution are investigated. It is shown that under rather general conditions, both the reliability lower bound and the allowable life limit lower bound (often called a tolerance limit) have unique global minimums over a range of Beta. Hence lower bound solutions can be obtained without assuming or estimating Beta. The existence and uniqueness of these lower bounds are proven. Some real data examples are given to show how these lower bounds can be easily established and to demonstrate their practicality. The method developed here has proven to be extremely useful when using the Weibull distribution in analysis of no-failure or few-failures data. The results are applicable not only in the aerospace industry but anywhere that system reliabilities are high.

  11. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis for the Rapid and Accurate Characterization of Hexacosanoylceramide.

    PubMed

    Ross, Charles W; Simonsick, William J; Bogusky, Michael J; Celikay, Recep W; Guare, James P; Newton, Randall C

    2016-01-01

    Ceramides are a central unit of all sphingolipids which have been identified as sites of biological recognition on cellular membranes mediating cell growth and differentiation. Several glycosphingolipids have been isolated, displaying immunomodulatory and anti-tumor activities. These molecules have generated considerable interest as potential vaccine adjuvants in humans. Accurate analyses of these and related sphingosine analogues are important for the characterization of structure, biological function, and metabolism. We report the complementary use of direct laser desorption ionization (DLDI), sheath flow electrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) and high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis for the rapid, accurate identification of hexacosanoylceramide and starting materials. DLDI does not require stringent sample preparation and yields representative ions. Sheath-flow ESI yields ions of the product and byproducts and was significantly better than monospray ESI due to improved compound solubility. Negative ion sheath flow ESI provided data of starting materials and products all in one acquisition as hexacosanoic acid does not ionize efficiently when ceramides are present. NMR provided characterization of these lipid molecules complementing the results obtained from MS analyses. NMR data was able to differentiate straight chain versus branched chain alkyl groups not easily obtained from mass spectrometry. PMID:27367671

  12. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis for the Rapid and Accurate Characterization of Hexacosanoylceramide

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Charles W.; Simonsick, William J.; Bogusky, Michael J.; Celikay, Recep W.; Guare, James P.; Newton, Randall C.

    2016-01-01

    Ceramides are a central unit of all sphingolipids which have been identified as sites of biological recognition on cellular membranes mediating cell growth and differentiation. Several glycosphingolipids have been isolated, displaying immunomodulatory and anti-tumor activities. These molecules have generated considerable interest as potential vaccine adjuvants in humans. Accurate analyses of these and related sphingosine analogues are important for the characterization of structure, biological function, and metabolism. We report the complementary use of direct laser desorption ionization (DLDI), sheath flow electrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) and high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis for the rapid, accurate identification of hexacosanoylceramide and starting materials. DLDI does not require stringent sample preparation and yields representative ions. Sheath-flow ESI yields ions of the product and byproducts and was significantly better than monospray ESI due to improved compound solubility. Negative ion sheath flow ESI provided data of starting materials and products all in one acquisition as hexacosanoic acid does not ionize efficiently when ceramides are present. NMR provided characterization of these lipid molecules complementing the results obtained from MS analyses. NMR data was able to differentiate straight chain versus branched chain alkyl groups not easily obtained from mass spectrometry. PMID:27367671

  13. Accurate Prediction of Severe Allergic Reactions by a Small Set of Environmental Parameters (NDVI, Temperature)

    PubMed Central

    Andrianaki, Maria; Azariadis, Kalliopi; Kampouri, Errika; Theodoropoulou, Katerina; Lavrentaki, Katerina; Kastrinakis, Stelios; Kampa, Marilena; Agouridakis, Panagiotis; Pirintsos, Stergios; Castanas, Elias

    2015-01-01

    Severe allergic reactions of unknown etiology,necessitating a hospital visit, have an important impact in the life of affected individuals and impose a major economic burden to societies. The prediction of clinically severe allergic reactions would be of great importance, but current attempts have been limited by the lack of a well-founded applicable methodology and the wide spatiotemporal distribution of allergic reactions. The valid prediction of severe allergies (and especially those needing hospital treatment) in a region, could alert health authorities and implicated individuals to take appropriate preemptive measures. In the present report we have collecterd visits for serious allergic reactions of unknown etiology from two major hospitals in the island of Crete, for two distinct time periods (validation and test sets). We have used the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), a satellite-based, freely available measurement, which is an indicator of live green vegetation at a given geographic area, and a set of meteorological data to develop a model capable of describing and predicting severe allergic reaction frequency. Our analysis has retained NDVI and temperature as accurate identifiers and predictors of increased hospital severe allergic reactions visits. Our approach may contribute towards the development of satellite-based modules, for the prediction of severe allergic reactions in specific, well-defined geographical areas. It could also probably be used for the prediction of other environment related diseases and conditions. PMID:25794106

  14. An Accurate and Generic Testing Approach to Vehicle Stability Parameters Based on GPS and INS

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Zhibin; Zhang, Hongtian; Zhang, Jinzhu

    2015-01-01

    With the development of the vehicle industry, controlling stability has become more and more important. Techniques of evaluating vehicle stability are in high demand. As a common method, usually GPS sensors and INS sensors are applied to measure vehicle stability parameters by fusing data from the two system sensors. Although prior model parameters should be recognized in a Kalman filter, it is usually used to fuse data from multi-sensors. In this paper, a robust, intelligent and precise method to the measurement of vehicle stability is proposed. First, a fuzzy interpolation method is proposed, along with a four-wheel vehicle dynamic model. Second, a two-stage Kalman filter, which fuses the data from GPS and INS, is established. Next, this approach is applied to a case study vehicle to measure yaw rate and sideslip angle. The results show the advantages of the approach. Finally, a simulation and real experiment is made to verify the advantages of this approach. The experimental results showed the merits of this method for measuring vehicle stability, and the approach can meet the design requirements of a vehicle stability controller. PMID:26690154

  15. An Accurate and Generic Testing Approach to Vehicle Stability Parameters Based on GPS and INS.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhibin; Zhang, Hongtian; Zhang, Jinzhu

    2015-01-01

    With the development of the vehicle industry, controlling stability has become more and more important. Techniques of evaluating vehicle stability are in high demand. As a common method, usually GPS sensors and INS sensors are applied to measure vehicle stability parameters by fusing data from the two system sensors. Although prior model parameters should be recognized in a Kalman filter, it is usually used to fuse data from multi-sensors. In this paper, a robust, intelligent and precise method to the measurement of vehicle stability is proposed. First, a fuzzy interpolation method is proposed, along with a four-wheel vehicle dynamic model. Second, a two-stage Kalman filter, which fuses the data from GPS and INS, is established. Next, this approach is applied to a case study vehicle to measure yaw rate and sideslip angle. The results show the advantages of the approach. Finally, a simulation and real experiment is made to verify the advantages of this approach. The experimental results showed the merits of this method for measuring vehicle stability, and the approach can meet the design requirements of a vehicle stability controller. PMID:26690154

  16. Accurate motion parameter estimation for colonoscopy tracking using a regression method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianfei; Subramanian, Kalpathi R.; Yoo, Terry S.

    2010-03-01

    Co-located optical and virtual colonoscopy images have the potential to provide important clinical information during routine colonoscopy procedures. In our earlier work, we presented an optical flow based algorithm to compute egomotion from live colonoscopy video, permitting navigation and visualization of the corresponding patient anatomy. In the original algorithm, motion parameters were estimated using the traditional Least Sum of squares(LS) procedure which can be unstable in the context of optical flow vectors with large errors. In the improved algorithm, we use the Least Median of Squares (LMS) method, a robust regression method for motion parameter estimation. Using the LMS method, we iteratively analyze and converge toward the main distribution of the flow vectors, while disregarding outliers. We show through three experiments the improvement in tracking results obtained using the LMS method, in comparison to the LS estimator. The first experiment demonstrates better spatial accuracy in positioning the virtual camera in the sigmoid colon. The second and third experiments demonstrate the robustness of this estimator, resulting in longer tracked sequences: from 300 to 1310 in the ascending colon, and 410 to 1316 in the transverse colon.

  17. Accurate solutions, parameter studies and comparisons for the Euler and potential flow equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. Kyle; Batina, John T.

    1988-01-01

    Parameter studies are conducted using the Euler and potential flow equation models for steady and unsteady flows in both two and three dimensions. The Euler code is an implicit, upwind, finite volume code which uses the Van Leer method of flux vector splitting which has been recently extended for use on dynamic meshes and maintain all the properties of the original splitting. The potential flow code is an implicit, finite difference method for solving the transonic small disturbance equations and incorporates both entropy and vorticity corrections into the solution procedures thereby extending its applicability into regimes where shock strength normally precludes its use. Parameter studies resulting in benchmark type calculations include the effects of spatial and temporal refinement, spatial order of accuracy, far field boundary conditions for steady flow, frequency of oscillation, and the use of subiterations at each time step to reduce linearization and factorization errors. Comparisons between Euler and potential flow results are made, as well as with experimental data where available.

  18. Accurate solutions, parameter studies and comparisons for the Euler and potential flow equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. Kyle; Batina, John T.

    1988-01-01

    Parameter studies are conducted using the Euler and potential flow equation models for unsteady and steady flows in both two and three dimensions. The Euler code is an implicit, upwind, finite volume code which uses the Van Leer method of flux-vector-splitting which has been recently extended for use on dynamic meshes and maintain all the properties of the original splitting. The potential flow code is an implicit, finite difference method for solving the transonic small disturbance equations and incorporates both entropy and vorticity corrections into the solution procedures thereby extending its applicability into regimes where shock strength normally precludes its use. Parameter studies resulting in benchmark type calculations include the effects of spatial and temporal refinement, spatial order of accuracy, far field boundary conditions for steady flow, frequency of oscillation, and the use of subiterations at each time step to reduce linearization and factorization errors. Comparisons between Euler and potential flows results are made as well as with experimental data where available.

  19. First-principles calculation of parameters of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in solids.

    PubMed

    Kadantsev, Eugene S; Ziegler, Tom

    2010-12-01

    The hyperfine A-tensor and Zeeman g-tensor parameterize the interaction of an 'effective' electron spin with the magnetic field due to the nuclear spin and the homogeneous external magnetic field, respectively. The A- and g-tensors are the quantities of primary interest in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. In this paper, we review our work [E.S. Kadantsev, T. Ziegler, J. Phys. Chem. A 2008, 112, 4521; E. S. Kadantsev, T. Ziegler, J. Phys. Chem. A 2009, 113, 1327] on the calculation of these EPR parameters under periodic boundary conditions (PBC) from first-principles. Our methodology is based on the Kohn-Sham DFT (KS DFT), explicit usage of Bloch basis set made up of numerical and Slater-type atomic orbitals (NAOs/STOs), and is implemented in the 'full potential' program BAND. Our implementation does not rely on the frozen core approximation. The NAOs/STOs basis is well suited for the accurate representation of the electron density near the nuclei, a prerequisite for the calculation of highly accurate hyperfine parameters. In the case of g-tensor, our implementation is based on the method of Van Lenthe et al. [E. van Lenthe, P. E. S. Wormer, A. van der Avoird, J. Chem. Phys. 1997, 107, 2488] in which the spin-orbital coupling is taken into account variationally. We demonstrate the viability of our scheme by calculating EPR parameters of paramagnetic defects in solids. We consider the A-tensor of 'normal' and 'anomalous' muonium defect in IIIA-VA semiconductors as well as the S2 anion radical in KCl host crystal lattice. PMID:20821407

  20. Accurate Cross Sections for Excitation of Resonance Transitions in Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    2004-01-01

    Electron collision excitation cross sections for the resonance 2p(sup)4 (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3s (sup 3)S(sup 0), 2p(sup 4) (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3d (sup 3)D(sup 0), 2p4 (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3s (sup 3)D(sup 0), 2p(sup 4) (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3s (sup 3)P(sup 0) and 2p(sup 4) (sup 3)P-2s2p(sup 5) (sup 3)P(sup 0) transitions have been calculated by using the R matrix with a pseudostates approach for incident electron energies from near threshold to 100 eV. The excitation of these transition sgives rise to strong atomic oxygen emission features at 1304, 1027, 989, 878, and 792 Angstrom in the spectra of several planetary atmospheres. We included 22 spectroscopic bound and autoionizing states and 30 pseudostates in the close-coupling expansion. The target wave functions are chosen to properly account for the important correlation and relaxation effects. The effect of coupling to the continuum is included through the use of pseudostates. The contribution of the ionization continuum is significant for resonance transitions. Measured absolute direct excitation cross sections of 0 I are reported by experimental groups from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Johns Hopkins University. Good agreement is noted for the 2p(sup)4 (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3s (sup 3)S(sup 0) transition (lambda 1304 Ang) with measured cross sections from both groups that agree well with each other. There is disagreement between experiments for other transitions. Our results support the measured cross sections from the Johns Hopkins University for the 2p(sup 4) (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3d (sup 3)D(sup 0) and 2p4 (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3s (sup 3)D(sup 0) transitions, while for the 2p4 (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3s (sup 3)D(sup 0) transition the agreement is switched to the measured cross sections from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  1. Test of the Universality of the Three-Body Efimov Parameter at Narrow Feshbach Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sanjukta; Landini, Manuele; Trenkwalder, Andreas; Semeghini, Giulia; Spagnolli, Giacomo; Simoni, Andrea; Fattori, Marco; Inguscio, Massimo; Modugno, Giovanni

    2013-08-01

    We measure the critical scattering length for the appearance of the first three-body bound state, or Efimov three-body parameter, at seven different Feshbach resonances in ultracold K39 atoms. We study both intermediate and narrow resonances, where the three-body spectrum is expected to be determined by the nonuniversal coupling of two scattering channels. Instead, our observed ratio of the three-body parameter with the van der Waals radius is approximately the same universal ratio as for broader resonances. This unexpected observation suggests the presence of a new regime for three-body scattering at narrow resonances.

  2. Accurate Structure and Dynamics of the Metal-Site of Paramagnetic Metalloproteins from NMR Parameters Using Natural Bond Orbitals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis of unpaired electron spin density in metalloproteins is presented, which allows a fast and robust calculation of paramagnetic NMR parameters. Approximately 90% of the unpaired electron spin density occupies metal–ligand NBOs, allowing the majority of the density to be modeled by only a few NBOs that reflect the chemical bonding environment. We show that the paramagnetic relaxation rate of protons can be calculated accurately using only the metal–ligand NBOs and that these rates are in good agreement with corresponding rates measured experimentally. This holds, in particular, for protons of ligand residues where the point-dipole approximation breaks down. To describe the paramagnetic relaxation of heavy nuclei, also the electron spin density in the local orbitals must be taken into account. Geometric distance restraints for 15N can be derived from the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and the Fermi contact shift when local NBOs are included in the analysis. Thus, the NBO approach allows us to include experimental paramagnetic NMR parameters of 15N nuclei as restraints in a structure optimization protocol. We performed a molecular dynamics simulation and structure determination of oxidized rubredoxin using the experimentally obtained paramagnetic NMR parameters of 15N. The corresponding structures obtained are in good agreement with the crystal structure of rubredoxin. Thus, the NBO approach allows an accurate description of the geometric structure and the dynamics of metalloproteins, when NMR parameters are available of nuclei in the immediate vicinity of the metal-site. PMID:22329704

  3. On the utility of spectroscopic imaging as a tool for generating geometrically accurate MR images and parameter maps in the presence of field inhomogeneities and chemical shift effects.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Chris J G; de Leeuw, Hendrik; van de Maat, Gerrit H; van Gorp, Jetse S; Bouwman, Job G; Seevinck, Peter R

    2013-01-01

    Lack of spatial accuracy is a recognized problem in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which severely detracts from its value as a stand-alone modality for applications that put high demands on geometric fidelity, such as radiotherapy treatment planning and stereotactic neurosurgery. In this paper, we illustrate the potential and discuss the limitations of spectroscopic imaging as a tool for generating purely phase-encoded MR images and parameter maps that preserve the geometry of an object and allow localization of object features in world coordinates. Experiments were done on a clinical system with standard facilities for imaging and spectroscopy. Images were acquired with a regular spin echo sequence and a corresponding spectroscopic imaging sequence. In the latter, successive samples of the acquired echo were used for the reconstruction of a series of evenly spaced images in the time and frequency domain. Experiments were done with a spatial linearity phantom and a series of test objects representing a wide range of susceptibility- and chemical-shift-induced off-resonance conditions. In contrast to regular spin echo imaging, spectroscopic imaging was shown to be immune to off-resonance effects, such as those caused by field inhomogeneity, susceptibility, chemical shift, f(0) offset and field drift, and to yield geometrically accurate images and parameter maps that allowed object structures to be localized in world coordinates. From these illustrative examples and a discussion of the limitations of purely phase-encoded imaging techniques, it is concluded that spectroscopic imaging offers a fundamental solution to the geometric deficiencies of MRI which may evolve toward a practical solution when full advantage will be taken of current developments with regard to scan time reduction. This perspective is backed up by a demonstration of the significant scan time reduction that may be achieved by the use of compressed sensing for a simple phantom. PMID:22898694

  4. GUIDANCE2: accurate detection of unreliable alignment regions accounting for the uncertainty of multiple parameters

    PubMed Central

    Sela, Itamar; Ashkenazy, Haim; Katoh, Kazutaka; Pupko, Tal

    2015-01-01

    Inference of multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) is a critical part of phylogenetic and comparative genomics studies. However, from the same set of sequences different MSAs are often inferred, depending on the methodologies used and the assumed parameters. Much effort has recently been devoted to improving the ability to identify unreliable alignment regions. Detecting such unreliable regions was previously shown to be important for downstream analyses relying on MSAs, such as the detection of positive selection. Here we developed GUIDANCE2, a new integrative methodology that accounts for: (i) uncertainty in the process of indel formation, (ii) uncertainty in the assumed guide tree and (iii) co-optimal solutions in the pairwise alignments, used as building blocks in progressive alignment algorithms. We compared GUIDANCE2 with seven methodologies to detect unreliable MSA regions using extensive simulations and empirical benchmarks. We show that GUIDANCE2 outperforms all previously developed methodologies. Furthermore, GUIDANCE2 also provides a set of alternative MSAs which can be useful for downstream analyses. The novel algorithm is implemented as a web-server, available at: http://guidance.tau.ac.il. PMID:25883146

  5. Accurate Analytical and Statistical Approaches to Reduce O-C Discrepancies in the Precessional Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, M. J.; Marco, F. J.; López, J. A.

    2009-02-01

    The Hipparcos catalog provides a reference frame at optical wavelengths for the new International Celestial Reference System (ICRS). This new reference system was adopted following the resolution agreed at the 23rd IAU General Assembly held in Kyoto in 1997. Differences in the Hipparcos system of proper motions and the previous materialization of the reference frame, the FK5, are expected to be caused only by the combined effects of the motion of the equinox of the FK5 and the precession of the equator and the ecliptic. Several authors have pointed out an inconsistency between the differences in proper motion of the Hipparcos-FK5 and the correction of the precessional values derived from VLBI and lunar laser ranging (LLR) observations. Most of them have claimed that these discrepancies are due to slightly biased proper motions in the FK5 catalog. The different mathematical models that have been employed to explain these errors have not fully accounted for the discrepancies in the correction of the precessional parameters. Our goal here is to offer an explanation for this fact. We propose the use of independent parametric and nonparametric models. The introduction of a nonparametric model, combined with the inner product in the square integrable functions over the unitary sphere, would give us values which do not depend on the possible interdependencies existing in the data set. The evidence shows that zonal studies are needed. This would lead us to introduce a local nonparametric model. All these models will provide independent corrections to the precessional values, which could then be compared in order to study the reliability in each case. Finally, we obtain values for the precession corrections that are very consistent with those that are currently adopted.

  6. Effects of relevant parameters on the bandgaps of acoustic metamaterials with multi-resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoqin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Rongqi; Lin, Jieqiong

    2016-04-01

    Locally resonant acoustic metamaterials with multi-resonators are generally regarded as a fine trend for managing the bandgaps, the different effects of relevant structural parameters on the bandgaps, which will be numerically investigated in this paper. A two-step homogenization method is extended to achieve the effective mass of multi-resonators metamaterial in the lattice system. As comparison, the dispersive wave propagation in lattice system and continuum model is studied. Then, the different effects of relevant parameters on the center frequencies and bandwidth of bandgaps are perfectly revealed, and the steady-state responses in the continuum models with purposed relevant parameters are additionally clarified. The related results can well confirm that the bandgaps exist around the undamped natural frequencies of internal resonators, and also their bandwidth can be efficiently controlled with the ensured center frequencies. Moreover, the design of purposed multi-resonators acoustic metamaterial in vibration control is presented and discussed by an example.

  7. Aperiodic signals processing via parameter-tuning stochastic resonance in a photorefractive ring cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xuefeng; Cao, Guangzhan; Liu, Hongjun

    2014-04-15

    Based on solving numerically the generalized nonlinear Langevin equation describing the nonlinear dynamics of stochastic resonance by Fourth-order Runge-Kutta method, an aperiodic stochastic resonance based on an optical bistable system is numerically investigated. The numerical results show that a parameter-tuning stochastic resonance system can be realized by choosing the appropriate optical bistable parameters, which performs well in reconstructing aperiodic signals from a very high level of noise background. The influences of optical bistable parameters on the stochastic resonance effect are numerically analyzed via cross-correlation, and a maximum cross-correlation gain of 8 is obtained by optimizing optical bistable parameters. This provides a prospective method for reconstructing noise-hidden weak signals in all-optical signal processing systems.

  8. SAMDIST: A Computer Code for Calculating Statistical Distributions for R-Matrix Resonance Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.

    1995-01-01

    The: SAMDIST computer code has been developed to calculate distribution of resonance parameters of the Reich-Moore R-matrix type. The program assumes the parameters are in the format compatible with that of the multilevel R-matrix code SAMMY. SAMDIST calculates the energy-level spacing distribution, the resonance width distribution, and the long-range correlation of the energy levels. Results of these calculations are presented in both graphic and tabular forms.

  9. SAMDIST: A computer code for calculating statistical distributions for R-matrix resonance parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.; Larson, N.M.

    1995-09-01

    The SAMDIST computer code has been developed to calculate distribution of resonance parameters of the Reich-Moore R-matrix type. The program assumes the parameters are in the format compatible with that of the multilevel R-matrix code SAMMY. SAMDIST calculates the energy-level spacing distribution, the resonance width distribution, and the long-range correlation of the energy levels. Results of these calculations are presented in both graphic and tabular forms.

  10. A Weibull statistics-based lignocellulose saccharification model and a built-in parameter accurately predict lignocellulose hydrolysis performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingyu; Han, Lijuan; Liu, Shasha; Zhao, Xuebing; Yang, Jinghua; Loh, Soh Kheang; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Chenxi; Fang, Xu

    2015-09-01

    Renewable energy from lignocellulosic biomass has been deemed an alternative to depleting fossil fuels. In order to improve this technology, we aim to develop robust mathematical models for the enzymatic lignocellulose degradation process. By analyzing 96 groups of previously published and newly obtained lignocellulose saccharification results and fitting them to Weibull distribution, we discovered Weibull statistics can accurately predict lignocellulose saccharification data, regardless of the type of substrates, enzymes and saccharification conditions. A mathematical model for enzymatic lignocellulose degradation was subsequently constructed based on Weibull statistics. Further analysis of the mathematical structure of the model and experimental saccharification data showed the significance of the two parameters in this model. In particular, the λ value, defined the characteristic time, represents the overall performance of the saccharification system. This suggestion was further supported by statistical analysis of experimental saccharification data and analysis of the glucose production levels when λ and n values change. In conclusion, the constructed Weibull statistics-based model can accurately predict lignocellulose hydrolysis behavior and we can use the λ parameter to assess the overall performance of enzymatic lignocellulose degradation. Advantages and potential applications of the model and the λ value in saccharification performance assessment were discussed. PMID:26121186

  11. Resonance Parameters of the Rho-Meson from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Feng, Karl Jansen, Dru Renner

    2011-05-01

    We perform a non-perturbative lattice calculation of the P-wave pion-pion scattering phase in the rho-meson decay channel using two flavors of maximally twisted mass fermions at pion masses ranging from 480 MeV to 290 MeV. Making use of finite-size methods, we evaluate the pion-pion scattering phase in the center-of-mass frame and two moving frames. Applying an effective range formula, we find a good description of our results for the scattering phase as a function of the energy covering the resonance region. This allows us to extract the rho-meson mass and decay width and to study their quark mass dependence.

  12. Resonance parameters of the {rho} meson from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Xu; Jansen, Karl; Renner, Dru B.

    2011-05-01

    We perform a nonperturbative lattice calculation of the P-wave pion-pion scattering phase in the {rho}-meson decay channel using two flavors of maximally twisted mass fermions at pion masses ranging from 480 to 290 MeV. Making use of finite-size methods, we evaluate the pion-pion scattering phase in the center-of-mass frame and two moving frames. Applying an effective range formula, we find a good description of our results for the scattering phase as a function of the energy covering the resonance region. This allows us to extract the {rho}-meson mass and decay width and to study their quark mass dependence.

  13. Assessment of Gate Width Size on Lifetime-Based Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Parameter Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sez-Jade; Sinsuebphon, Nattawut; Intes, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) enables the observation of interactions at the nanoscale level through the use of fluorescence optical imaging techniques. In FRET, fluorescence lifetime imaging can be used to quantify the fluorescence lifetime changes of the donor molecule, which are associated with proximity between acceptor and donor molecules. Among the FRET parameters derived from fluorescence lifetime imaging, the percentage of donor that interacts with the acceptor (in proximity) can be estimated via model-based fitting. However, estimation of the lifetime parameters can be affected by the acquisition parameters such as the temporal characteristics of the imaging system. Herein, we investigate the effect of various gate widths on the accuracy of estimation of FRET parameters with focus on the near-infrared spectral window. Experiments were performed in silico, in vitro, and in vivo with gate width sizes ranging from 300 ps to 1000 ps in intervals of 100 ps. For all cases, the FRET parameters were retrieved accurately and the imaging acquisition time was decreased three-fold. These results indicate that increasing the gate width up to 1000 ps still allows for accurate quantification of FRET interactions even in the case of short lifetimes such as those encountered with near-infrared FRET pairs. PMID:26557647

  14. Measurement of physiological flow parameters with magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, Charles L.; Tarnawski, M.; Doorly, D. J.; Caro, C. G.; Darrow, R. D.

    1993-08-01

    Some phase-sensitive methods obtain a phase measurement for each voxel in an otherwise conventional image. In an alternative approach, data for a variety of flow-sensitive conditions are obtained and Fourier transformed to obtain a velocity 'spectrum'. Fourier velocity encoded data are highly accurate and are not degraded by velocity distributions within a voxel. One important application of Fourier velocity encoding is the non-invasive measurement of local vessel wall compliance. We have developed a new technique in which spin velocity information is acquired simultaneously for several stations along a vessel using a comb excitation rf pulse and Fourier velocity encoding. In the absence of pulse wave reflections, two stations separated by a sufficient distance are enough to calculate the velocity of the pressure wave, C. Once the wave velocity is known, it can be used to determine vessel wall distensibility, D, using the relationship D equals 1/((rho) C2), where (rho) is the density of blood. Preliminary data from a group of healthy volunteers suggest a strong correlation of local vessel compliance with physical fitness and age.

  15. Optimization of tissue physical parameters for accurate temperature estimation from finite-element simulation of radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Swetha; Mast, T Douglas

    2015-10-01

    Computational finite element models are commonly used for the simulation of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) treatments. However, the accuracy of these simulations is limited by the lack of precise knowledge of tissue parameters. In this technical note, an inverse solver based on the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is proposed to optimize values for specific heat, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity resulting in accurately simulated temperature elevations. A total of 15 RFA treatments were performed on ex vivo bovine liver tissue. For each RFA treatment, 15 finite-element simulations were performed using a set of deterministically chosen tissue parameters to estimate the mean and variance of the resulting tissue ablation. The UKF was implemented as an inverse solver to recover the specific heat, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity corresponding to the measured area of the ablated tissue region, as determined from gross tissue histology. These tissue parameters were then employed in the finite element model to simulate the position- and time-dependent tissue temperature. Results show good agreement between simulated and measured temperature. PMID:26352462

  16. Optimization of tissue physical parameters for accurate temperature estimation from finite-element simulation of radiofrequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Swetha; Mast, T. Douglas

    2015-09-01

    Computational finite element models are commonly used for the simulation of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) treatments. However, the accuracy of these simulations is limited by the lack of precise knowledge of tissue parameters. In this technical note, an inverse solver based on the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is proposed to optimize values for specific heat, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity resulting in accurately simulated temperature elevations. A total of 15 RFA treatments were performed on ex vivo bovine liver tissue. For each RFA treatment, 15 finite-element simulations were performed using a set of deterministically chosen tissue parameters to estimate the mean and variance of the resulting tissue ablation. The UKF was implemented as an inverse solver to recover the specific heat, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity corresponding to the measured area of the ablated tissue region, as determined from gross tissue histology. These tissue parameters were then employed in the finite element model to simulate the position- and time-dependent tissue temperature. Results show good agreement between simulated and measured temperature.

  17. Deep-tissue imaging of intramolecular fluorescence resonance energy-transfer parameters.

    PubMed

    Gaind, Vaibhav; Kularatne, Sumith; Low, Philip S; Webb, Kevin J

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate the in vivo reconstruction of all fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) parameters, including the nanometer donor-acceptor distance, in a mouse. The FRET chemical targets cancer cells, and on internalization, the acceptor is released, in lieu of a targeted anticancer drug in chemotherapy. Our method provides a new vehicle for studying disease by imaging FRET parameters in deep tissue. PMID:20436553

  18. Resonance parameters based analysis for metallic thickness optimization of a bimetallic plasmonic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Mahua; Banerjee, Jayeta; Ray, Mina

    2014-02-01

    Metallic film thickness optimization in mono- and bimetallic plasmonic structures has been carried out in order to determine the correct device parameters. Different resonance parameters, such as reflectivity, phase, field enhancement, and the complex amplitude reflectance Argand diagram (CARAD), have been investigated for the proposed optimization procedure. Comparison of mono- and bimetallic plasmonic structures has been carried out in the context of these resonance parameters with simultaneous angular and spectral interrogation. Differential phase analysis has also been performed and its application to sensing has been discussed along with a proposed interferometric set-up.

  19. A simple and accurate protocol for absolute polar metabolite quantification in cell cultures using quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Goldoni, Luca; Beringhelli, Tiziana; Rocchia, Walter; Realini, Natalia; Piomelli, Daniele

    2016-05-15

    Absolute analyte quantification by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is rarely pursued in metabolomics, even though this would allow researchers to compare results obtained using different techniques. Here we report on a new protocol that permits, after pH-controlled serum protein removal, the sensitive quantification (limit of detection [LOD] = 5-25 μM) of hydrophilic nutrients and metabolites in the extracellular medium of cells in cultures. The method does not require the use of databases and uses PULCON (pulse length-based concentration determination) quantitative NMR to obtain results that are significantly more accurate and reproducible than those obtained by CPMG (Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill) sequence or post-processing filtering approaches. Three practical applications of the method highlight its flexibility under different cell culture conditions. We identified and quantified (i) metabolic differences between genetically engineered human cell lines, (ii) alterations in cellular metabolism induced by differentiation of mouse myoblasts into myotubes, and (iii) metabolic changes caused by activation of neurotransmitter receptors in mouse myoblasts. Thus, the new protocol offers an easily implementable, efficient, and versatile tool for the investigation of cellular metabolism and signal transduction. PMID:26898303

  20. Efimov Resonance and Three-Body Parameter in a Lithium-Rubidium Mixture.

    PubMed

    Maier, R A W; Eisele, M; Tiemann, E; Zimmermann, C

    2015-07-24

    We study collisional heating in a cold ^{7}Li-^{87}Rb mixture near a broad Feshbach resonance at 661 G. At the high field slope of the resonance, we find an enhanced three-body recombination rate that we interpret as a heteronuclear Efimov resonance. With improved Feshbach spectroscopy of two further resonances, a model for the molecular potentials has been developed that now consistently explains all known Feshbach resonances of the various Li-Rb isotope mixtures. The model is used to determine the scattering length of the observed Efimov state. Its value of -1870a_{0} Bohr radii supports the currently discussed assumption of universality of the three-body parameter also in heteronuclear mixtures. PMID:26252682

  1. Radio frequency spectral characterization and model parameters extraction of high Q optical resonators.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Zeina; Boucher, Yann G; Fernandez, Arnaud; Balac, Stéphane; Llopis, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    A microwave domain characterization approach is proposed to determine the properties of high quality factor optical resonators. This approach features a very high precision in frequency and aims to acquire a full knowledge of the complex transfer function (amplitude and phase) characterizing an optical resonator using a microwave vector network analyzer. It is able to discriminate between the different coupling regimes, from the under-coupling to the selective amplification, and it is used together with a model from which the main resonator parameters are extracted, i.e. coupling factor, intrinsic losses, phase slope, intrinsic and external quality factor. PMID:27251460

  2. Radio frequency spectral characterization and model parameters extraction of high Q optical resonators

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Zeina; Boucher, Yann G.; Fernandez, Arnaud; Balac, Stéphane; Llopis, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    A microwave domain characterization approach is proposed to determine the properties of high quality factor optical resonators. This approach features a very high precision in frequency and aims to acquire a full knowledge of the complex transfer function (amplitude and phase) characterizing an optical resonator using a microwave vector network analyzer. It is able to discriminate between the different coupling regimes, from the under-coupling to the selective amplification, and it is used together with a model from which the main resonator parameters are extracted, i.e. coupling factor, intrinsic losses, phase slope, intrinsic and external quality factor. PMID:27251460

  3. Radio frequency spectral characterization and model parameters extraction of high Q optical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Zeina; Boucher, Yann G.; Fernandez, Arnaud; Balac, Stéphane; Llopis, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    A microwave domain characterization approach is proposed to determine the properties of high quality factor optical resonators. This approach features a very high precision in frequency and aims to acquire a full knowledge of the complex transfer function (amplitude and phase) characterizing an optical resonator using a microwave vector network analyzer. It is able to discriminate between the different coupling regimes, from the under-coupling to the selective amplification, and it is used together with a model from which the main resonator parameters are extracted, i.e. coupling factor, intrinsic losses, phase slope, intrinsic and external quality factor.

  4. [Effect of the evaluation parameter on sensitivity of resonance thrombography of thrombocytopenia in dogs].

    PubMed

    Adamik, A; Mischke, R

    1998-11-01

    Based on 109 blood samples taken from 36 dogs suffering from thrombocytopenia resonance thrombography with the resonance thrombograph RTG 801 (von Hoerner und Sulger Electronic GmbH, Schwetzingen; manufacturer: Fresenius AG, Bad Homburg) was distinctly more sensitive and more closely correlated to the platelet count using an optimized parameter of the resonance thrombogramm (RTG) in comparison to usual parameters. Nevertheless, clinical requirements regarding samples with platelet counts > 25,000/microliter were not fulfilled. Out of 13 samples with reduced platelet count and simultanous extended capillary bleeding time, depending on the used parameter a maximum of 9 samples could be detected as pathological by the RTG. The normal RTG in part of the cases with clearly altered primary haemostasis contrasts to the exclusive use of RTG in the screening of thrombocytopenia in dogs. PMID:9857562

  5. Determination of Resonance Parameters and their Covariances from Neutron Induced Reaction Cross Section Data

    SciTech Connect

    Schillebeeckx, P.; Becker, B.; Danon, Y.; Guber, K.; Harada, H.; Heyse, J.; Junghans, A.R.; Kopecky, S.; Massimi, C.; Moxon, M.C.; Otuka, N.; Sirakov, I.; Volev, K.

    2012-12-15

    Cross section data in the resolved and unresolved resonance region are represented by nuclear reaction formalisms using parameters which are determined by fitting them to experimental data. Therefore, the quality of evaluated cross sections in the resonance region strongly depends on the experimental data used in the adjustment process and an assessment of the experimental covariance data is of primary importance in determining the accuracy of evaluated cross section data. In this contribution, uncertainty components of experimental observables resulting from total and reaction cross section experiments are quantified by identifying the metrological parameters involved in the measurement, data reduction and analysis process. In addition, different methods that can be applied to propagate the covariance of the experimental observables (i.e. transmission and reaction yields) to the covariance of the resonance parameters are discussed and compared. The methods being discussed are: conventional uncertainty propagation, Monte Carlo sampling and marginalization. It is demonstrated that the final covariance matrix of the resonance parameters not only strongly depends on the type of experimental observables used in the adjustment process, the experimental conditions and the characteristics of the resonance structure, but also on the method that is used to propagate the covariances. Finally, a special data reduction concept and format is presented, which offers the possibility to store the full covariance information of experimental data in the EXFOR library and provides the information required to perform a full covariance evaluation.

  6. Accurate characterization of the stellar and orbital parameters of the exoplanetary system WASP-33 b from orbital dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, L.

    2016-01-01

    By using the most recently published Doppler tomography measurements and accurate theoretical modelling of the oblateness-driven orbital precessions, we tightly constrain some of the physical and orbital parameters of the planetary system hosted by the fast rotating star WASP-33. In particular, the measurements of the orbital inclination ip to the plane of the sky and of the sky-projected spin-orbit misalignment λ at two epochs about six years apart allowed for the determination of the longitude of the ascending node Ω and of the orbital inclination I to the apparent equatorial plane at the same epochs. As a consequence, average rates of change dot{Ω }_exp, dot{I}_exp of this two orbital elements, accurate to a ≈10-2 deg yr-1 level, were calculated as well. By comparing them to general theoretical expressions dot{Ω }_{J_2}, dot{I}_{J_2} for their precessions induced by an oblate star whose symmetry axis is arbitrarily oriented, we were able to determine the angle i⋆ between the line of sight the star's spin {S}^{star } and its first even zonal harmonic J_2^{star } obtaining i^{star } = {142}^{+10}_{-11} deg, J_2^{star } = 2.1^{+0.8}_{-0.5}times; 10^{-4}. As a by-product, the angle between {S}^{star } and the orbital angular momentum L is as large as about ψ ≈ 100 ° psi; ^{2008} = 99^{+5}_{-4} deg, ψ ^{{2014}} = 103^{+5}_{-4} deg and changes at a rate dot{ψ }= 0.{7}^{+1.5}_{-1.6} deg {yr}^{-1}. The predicted general relativistic Lense-Thirring precessions, of the order of ≈10-3deg yr-1, are, at present, about one order of magnitude below the measurability threshold.

  7. High-resolution accurate mass measurements of biomolecules using a new electrospray ionization ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Winger, B E; Hofstadler, S A; Bruce, J E; Udseth, H R; Smith, R D

    1993-07-01

    A novel electrospray ionization/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer based on a 7-T superconducting magnet was developed for high-resolution accurate mass measurements of large biomolecules. Ions formed at atmospheric pressure using electrospray ionization (ESI) were transmitted (through six differential pumping stages) to the trapped ion cell maintained below 10(-9) torr. The increased pumping speed attainable with cryopumping (> 10(5) L/s) allowed brief pressure excursions to above 10(-4) torr, with greatly enhanced trapping efficiencies and subsequent short pumpdown times, facilitating high-resolution mass measurements. A set of electromechanical shutters were also used to minimize the effect of the directed molecular beam produced by the ES1 source and were open only during ion injection. Coupled with the use of the pulsed-valve gas inlet, the trapped ion cell was generally filled to the space charge limit within 100 ms. The use of 10-25 ms ion injection times allowed mass spectra to be obtained from 4 fmol of bovine insulin (Mr 5734) and ubiquitin (Mr 8565, with resolution sufficient to easily resolve the isotopic envelopes and determine the charge states. The microheterogeneity of the glycoprotein ribonuclease B was examined, giving a measured mass of 14,898.74 Da for the most abundant peak in the isotopic envelope of the normally glycosylated protein (i.e., with five mannose and two N-acetylglucosamine residues (an error of approximately 2 ppm) and an average error of approximately 1 ppm for the higher glycosylated and various H3PO4 adducted forms of the protein. Time-domain signals lasting in excess of 80 s were obtained for smaller proteins, producing, for example, a mass resolution of more than 700,000 for the 4(+) charge state (m/z 1434) of insulin. PMID:24227643

  8. Controlling the Radiation Parameters of a Resonant Medium Excited by a Sequence of Ultrashort Superluminal Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, R. M.; Arkhipov, M. V.; Belov, P. A.; Babushkin, I.; Tolmachev, Yu. A.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of controlling the radiation parameters of a spatially periodic one-dimensional medium consisting of classical harmonic oscillators by means of a sequence of ultrashort pulses that propagate through the medium with a superluminal velocity. We show that, in the spectrum of the transient process, in addition to the radiation at a resonant frequency of oscillators, new frequencies arise that depend on the period of the spatial distribution of the oscillator density, the excitation velocity, and the angle of observation. We have examined in detail the case of excitation of the medium by a periodic sequence of ultrashort pulses that travel with a superluminal velocity. We show that it is possible to excite oscillations of complex shapes and to control the radiation parameters of the resonant medium by changing the relationship between the pulse repetition rate, the medium resonant frequency, and the new frequency.

  9. 'Coulomb' description of basic relaxation parameters of isobar analog and charge-exchange giant monopole resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, M. L.; Rykovanov, V. S.; Urin, M. G.

    2010-12-15

    Within a semimicroscopic approach, basic relaxation parameters of the isobaric analog resonance and of the charge-exchange giant monopole resonance, which is an overtone of the isobaric analog resonance, are interpreted in terms of the mean Coulomb field of a nucleus. The continuum version of the random-phase approximation, allowance for an approximate isospin conservation in nuclei in an explicit form, and a phenomenological description of the fragmentation effect are basic ingredients of the approach used. The aforementioned parameters were calculated for a number of magic and near-magic nuclei by using a partly self-consistent phenomenological nuclear mean field and the isovector part of the Landau-Migdal interaction in the particle-hole channel. The results of the calculations are compared with corresponding experimental data.

  10. Accurate determination of the fine-structure intervals in the 3P ground states of C-13 and C-12 by far-infrared laser magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooksy, A. L.; Saykally, R. J.; Brown, J. M.; Evenson, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    Accurate values are presented for the fine-structure intervals in the 3P ground state of neutral atomic C-12 and C-13 as obtained from laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The rigorous analysis of C-13 hyperfine structure, the measurement of resonant fields for C-12 transitions at several additional far-infrared laser frequencies, and the increased precision of the C-12 measurements, permit significant improvement in the evaluation of these energies relative to earlier work. These results will expedite the direct and precise measurement of these transitions in interstellar sources and should assist in the determination of the interstellar C-12/C-13 abundance ratio.

  11. Evaluation of Silicon Neutron Resonance Parameters in the Energy Range Thermal to 1800 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.

    2002-09-30

    The evaluation of the neutron cross sections of the three stable isotopes of silicon in the energy range thermal to 20 MeV was performed by Hetrick et al. for ENDF/B-VI (Evaluated Nuclear Data File). Resonance parameters were obtained in the energy range thermal to 1500 keV from a SAMMY analysis of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory experimental neutron transmission data. A new measurement of the capture cross section of natural silicon in the energy range 1 to 700 keV has recently been performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. Results of this measurement were used in a SAMMY reevaluation of the resonance parameters, allowing determination of the capture width of a large number of resonances. The experimental data base is described; properties of the resonance parameters are given. For the first time the direct neutron capture component has been taken into account from the calculation by Rauscher et al. in the energy range from thermal to 1 MeV. Results of benchmark calculations are also given. The new evaluation is available in the ENDF/B-VI format.

  12. Stochastic Parameter Resonance of Road-Vehicle Systems and Related Bifurcation Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedig, Walter V.

    The paper investigates stochastic dynamics of road-vehicle systems and related bifurcation problems. The ride on rough roads generates vertical car vibrations whose root-mean-squares are resonant for critical car speeds and vanish when the car velocity is increasing, infinitely. These investigations are extended to wheel suspensions with progressive spring characteristics. For weak but still positive damping, the car vibrations become unstable when the velocity reaches the parameter resonance near twice the critical speed bifurcating into stochastic chaos of larger non-stationary car vibrations.

  13. Trojan resonant dynamics, stability, and chaotic diffusion, for parameters relevant to exoplanetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Páez, Rocío Isabel; Efthymiopoulos, Christos

    2015-02-01

    The possibility that giant extrasolar planets could have small Trojan co-orbital companions has been examined in the literature from both viewpoints of the origin and dynamical stability of such a configuration. Here we aim to investigate the dynamics of hypothetical small Trojan exoplanets in domains of secondary resonances embedded within the tadpole domain of motion. To this end, we consider the limit of a massless Trojan companion of a giant planet. Without other planets, this is a case of the elliptic restricted three body problem (ERTBP). The presence of additional planets (hereafter referred to as the restricted multi-planet problem, RMPP) induces new direct and indirect secular effects on the dynamics of the Trojan body. The paper contains a theoretical and a numerical part. In the theoretical part, we develop a Hamiltonian formalism in action-angle variables, which allows us to treat in a unified way resonant dynamics and secular effects on the Trojan body in both the ERTBP or the RMPP. In both cases, our formalism leads to a decomposition of the Hamiltonian in two parts, . , called the basic model, describes resonant dynamics in the short-period (epicyclic) and synodic (libration) degrees of freedom, while contains only terms depending trigonometrically on slow (secular) angles. is formally identical in the ERTBP and the RMPP, apart from a re-definition of some angular variables. An important physical consequence of this analysis is that the slow chaotic diffusion along resonances proceeds in both the ERTBP and the RMPP by a qualitatively similar dynamical mechanism. We found that this is best approximated by the paradigm of `modulational diffusion'. In the paper's numerical part, we then focus on the ERTBP in order to make a detailed numerical demonstration of the chaotic diffusion process along resonances. Using color stability maps, we first provide a survey of the resonant web for characteristic mass parameter values of the primary, in which the

  14. Why is the neutrino oscillation formula expanded in Δ m {21/2}/Δ m {31/2} still accurate near the solar resonance in matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xun-Jie

    2015-10-01

    The conventional approximate formula for neutrino oscillation in matter which is obtained from the expansion in terms of the ratio of mass square differences α = Δ m 21 2 /Δ m 31 2 ≈ 0.03, first proposed by Cervera, et al. and Freund, turns out to be an accurate formula for accelerator neutrino experiments. Originally it required the neutrino energy to be well above the solar resonance to validate the expansion but it is found to be still very accurate when the formula is extrapolated to the resonance, which is practically important for the T2K experiment. This paper shows that the accuracy is guaranteed by cancellations of branch cut singularities and also, for the first time, analytically computes the actual error of the formula. The actual error implies that the original requirement can be safely removed in current experiments.

  15. Changes of Schumann resonance parameters during the solar proton event of 14 July 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldugin, V. C.; Maltsev, Y. P.; Vasiljev, A. N.; Shvets, A. V.; Nikolaenko, A. P.

    2003-03-01

    The ELF measurements in Russian observatories Lovozero (the Kola Peninsula) and Lekhta (Karelija) during the solar proton event of 14 July 2000 show the decrease of frequencies of the first and second Schumann resonance modes of ˜0.4 Hz and the increase of the first-mode bandwidth from 0.8 to 1.5 Hz. The solar X-ray burst, preceding the proton precipitation, is accompanied by the increase of the first-mode frequency. Approximate formulas for frequencies and qualities of the two first modes are found for a two-layer model of the Schumann resonator (SR). The changes of the SR parameters are a response of the Earth-ionosphere resonator to large-scale disturbances of the polar ionosphere.

  16. Improved centroid moment tensor analyses in the NIED AQUA (Accurate and QUick Analysis system for source parameters)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, H.; Asano, Y.; Matsumoto, T.

    2012-12-01

    The rapid determination of hypocentral parameters and their transmission to the public are valuable components of disaster mitigation. We have operated an automatic system for this purpose—termed the Accurate and QUick Analysis system for source parameters (AQUA)—since 2005 (Matsumura et al., 2006). In this system, the initial hypocenter, the moment tensor (MT), and the centroid moment tensor (CMT) solutions are automatically determined and posted on the NIED Hi-net Web site (www.hinet.bosai.go.jp). This paper describes improvements made to the AQUA to overcome limitations that became apparent after the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake (05:46:17, March 11, 2011 in UTC). The improvements included the processing of NIED F-net velocity-type strong motion records, because NIED F-net broadband seismographs are saturated for great earthquakes such as the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake. These velocity-type strong motion seismographs provide unsaturated records not only for the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake, but also for recording stations located close to the epicenters of M>7 earthquakes. We used 0.005-0.020 Hz records for M>7.5 earthquakes, in contrast to the 0.01-0.05 Hz records employed in the original system. The initial hypocenters determined based on arrival times picked by using seismograms recorded by NIED Hi-net stations can have large errors in terms of magnitude and hypocenter location, especially for great earthquakes or earthquakes located far from the onland Hi-net network. The size of the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake was initially underestimated in the AQUA to be around M5 at the initial stage of rupture. Numerous aftershocks occurred at the outer rise east of the Japan trench, where a great earthquake is anticipated to occur. Hence, we modified the system to repeat the MT analyses assuming a larger size, for all earthquakes for which the magnitude was initially underestimated. We also broadened the search range of centroid depth for earthquakes located far from the onland Hi

  17. Parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy and its application to weak signal detection

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinjing; Zhang, Tao

    2015-02-15

    The parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy (PSRSE) method is introduced for the detection of a very weak signal in the presence of strong noise. The effect of stochastic resonance on the detection is optimized using parameters obtained in spectral entropy analysis. Upon processing employing the PSRSE method, the amplitude of the weak signal is enhanced and the noise power is reduced, so that the frequency of the signal can be estimated with greater precision through spectral analysis. While the improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio is similar to that obtained using the Duffing oscillator algorithm, the computational cost reduces from O(N{sup 2}) to O(N). The PSRSE approach is applied to the frequency measurement of a weak signal made by a vortex flow meter. The results are compared with those obtained applying the Duffing oscillator algorithm.

  18. Additional correction for energy transfer efficiency calculation in filter-based Förster resonance energy transfer microscopy for more accurate results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuansheng; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2010-03-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy is commonly used to monitor protein interactions with filter-based imaging systems, which require spectral bleedthrough (or cross talk) correction to accurately measure energy transfer efficiency (E). The double-label (donor+acceptor) specimen is excited with the donor wavelength, the acceptor emission provided the uncorrected FRET signal and the donor emission (the donor channel) represents the quenched donor (qD), the basis for the E calculation. Our results indicate this is not the most accurate determination of the quenched donor signal as it fails to consider the donor spectral bleedthrough (DSBT) signals in the qD for the E calculation, which our new model addresses, leading to a more accurate E result. This refinement improves E comparisons made with lifetime and spectral FRET imaging microscopy as shown here using several genetic (FRET standard) constructs, where cerulean and venus fluorescent proteins are tethered by different amino acid linkers.

  19. A laboratory study to estimate pore geometric parameters of sandstones using complex conductivity and nuclear magnetic resonance for permeability prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, Gordon; Keating, Kristina; Binley, Andrew; Slater, Lee

    2016-06-01

    We estimate parameters from the Katz and Thompson permeability model using laboratory complex electrical conductivity (CC) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data to build permeability models parameterized with geophysical measurements. We use the Katz and Thompson model based on the characteristic hydraulic length scale, determined from mercury injection capillary pressure estimates of pore throat size, and the intrinsic formation factor, determined from multisalinity conductivity measurements, for this purpose. Two new permeability models are tested, one based on CC data and another that incorporates CC and NMR data. From measurements made on forty-five sandstone cores collected from fifteen different formations, we evaluate how well the CC relaxation time and the NMR transverse relaxation times compare to the characteristic hydraulic length scale and how well the formation factor estimated from CC parameters compares to the intrinsic formation factor. We find: (1) the NMR transverse relaxation time models the characteristic hydraulic length scale more accurately than the CC relaxation time (R2 of 0.69 and 0.33 and normalized root mean square errors (NRMSE) of 0.16 and 0.21, respectively); (2) the CC estimated formation factor is well correlated with the intrinsic formation factor (NRMSE=0.23). We demonstrate that that permeability estimates from the joint-NMR-CC model (NRMSE=0.13) compare favorably to estimates from the Katz and Thompson model (NRMSE=0.074). This model advances the capability of the Katz and Thompson model by employing parameters measureable in the field giving it the potential to more accurately estimate permeability using geophysical measurements than are currently possible.

  20. sup 56 Fe resonance parameters for neutron energies up to 850 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Perey, C.M.; Perey, F.G.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Larson, N.M.

    1990-12-01

    High-resolution neutron measurements for {sup 56}Fe-enriched iron targets were made at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in transmission below 20 MeV and in differential elastic scattering below 5 MeV. Transmission measurements were also performed with a natural iron target below 160 keV. The transmission data were analyzed from 5 to 850 keV with the multilevel R-matrix code SAMMY which uses Bayes' theorem for the fitting process. This code provides energies and neutron widths of the resonances inside the 5- to 850-keV energy region, as well as possible parameterization for resonances external to the analyzed region to describe the smooth cross section from a few eV to 850 keV. The resulting set of resonance parameters yields the accepted values for the thermal total and capture cross sections. The differential elastic-scattering data at several scattering angles were compared to theoretical calculations from 40 to 850 keV using the R-matrix code RFUNC based on the Blatt-Biedenharn formalism. Various combinations of spin and parity were tried to predict cross sections for the well defined {ell} > 0 resonances; comparison of these predictions with the data allowed us to determine the most likely spin and parity assignments for these resonances. The results of a capture data analysis by Corvi et al. (COR84), from 2 to 350 keV, were combined with our results to obtain the radiation widths of the resonances below 350 keV observed in transmission, capture, and differential elastic-scattering experiments.

  1. GGOS and the EOP - the key role of SLR for a stable estimation of highly accurate Earth orientation parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloßfeld, Mathis; Panzetta, Francesca; Müller, Horst; Gerstl, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The GGOS vision is to integrate geometric and gravimetric observation techniques to estimate consistent geodetic-geophysical parameters. In order to reach this goal, the common estimation of station coordinates, Stokes coefficients and Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP) is necessary. Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) provides the ability to study correlations between the different parameter groups since the observed satellite orbit dynamics are sensitive to the above mentioned geodetic parameters. To decrease the correlations, SLR observations to multiple satellites have to be combined. In this paper, we compare the estimated EOP of (i) single satellite SLR solutions and (ii) multi-satellite SLR solutions. Therefore, we jointly estimate station coordinates, EOP, Stokes coefficients and orbit parameters using different satellite constellations. A special focus in this investigation is put on the de-correlation of different geodetic parameter groups due to the combination of SLR observations. Besides SLR observations to spherical satellites (commonly used), we discuss the impact of SLR observations to non-spherical satellites such as, e.g., the JASON-2 satellite. The goal of this study is to discuss the existing parameter interactions and to present a strategy how to obtain reliable estimates of station coordinates, EOP, orbit parameter and Stokes coefficients in one common adjustment. Thereby, the benefits of a multi-satellite SLR solution are evaluated.

  2. Numerical parameter constraints for accurate PIC-DSMC simulation of breakdown from arc initiation to stable arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Christopher; Hopkins, Matthew; Moore, Stan; Boerner, Jeremiah; Cartwright, Keith

    2015-09-01

    Simulation of breakdown is important for understanding and designing a variety of applications such as mitigating undesirable discharge events. Such simulations need to be accurate through early time arc initiation to late time stable arc behavior. Here we examine constraints on the timestep and mesh size required for arc simulations using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method with direct simulation Monte Carlo (DMSC) collisions. Accurate simulation of electron avalanche across a fixed voltage drop and constant neutral density (reduced field of 1000 Td) was found to require a timestep ~ 1/100 of the mean time between collisions and a mesh size ~ 1/25 the mean free path. These constraints are much smaller than the typical PIC-DSMC requirements for timestep and mesh size. Both constraints are related to the fact that charged particles are accelerated by the external field. Thus gradients in the electron energy distribution function can exist at scales smaller than the mean free path and these must be resolved by the mesh size for accurate collision rates. Additionally, the timestep must be small enough that the particle energy change due to the fields be small in order to capture gradients in the cross sections versus energy. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. A novel parameter-induced stochastic resonance phenomena in fractional Fourier domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lifeng; Wang, Huiqi; Lv, Wangyong; Zhong, Suchuan

    2016-08-01

    The parameter-induced stochastic resonance (SR) phenomenon in a novel self-adaptive dynamical system driven by linear frequency modulated (LFM) signal and additive noise is considered from the view of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). It is found that the dynamical system can be perfectly analyzed by equivalently transforming it into a traditional first-order linear dynamical system driven by periodic signal and additive noise in fractional Fourier transform (FrFT) domain with an optimal rotated angle, and the theoretical analysis and simulation results show that output SNR exhibits the SR behavior when it is plotted as a function of the system parameter. Furthermore, the optimal value of adjusted parameter is obtained, and the possible area of SNR gain is theoretically determined only by center-frequency and modulated frequency of the driving LFM signal.

  4. Parameter optimization analysis to minimize the polarization error in a localized thermal tunable fiber ring resonator gyro.

    PubMed

    Bobbili, Prasada Rao; Nayak, Jagannath; Pinnoji, Prerana Dabral; Rama Koti Reddy, D V

    2016-03-10

    The accuracy of the resonant frequency servo loop is a major concern for the high-performance operation of a resonant fiber optic gyro. For instance, a bias error as large as tens or even hundreds of degrees/hour has been observed at the demodulated output of the resonant frequency servo loop. The traditional frequency servo mechanism is not an efficient tool to address this problem. In our previous work, we proposed a novel method to minimize the laser frequency noise to the level of the shot noise by refractive index modulation by a thermally tunable resonator. In this paper, we performed the parameter optimization for the resonator coil, multifunction integrated-optics chip, and couplers by the transition matrix using the Jones matrix methodology to minimize the polarization error. With the optimized parameter values, we achieved the bias value of the resonator fiber optic gyro to 1.924°/h. PMID:26974794

  5. A non-empirical, parameter-free, hybrid functional for accurate calculations of optoelectronic properties of finite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brawand, Nicholas; Vörös, Márton; Govoni, Marco; Galli, Giulia

    The accurate prediction of optoelectronic properties of molecules and solids is a persisting challenge for current density functional theory (DFT) based methods. We propose a hybrid functional where the mixing fraction of exact and local exchange is determined by a non-empirical, system dependent function. This functional yields ionization potentials, fundamental and optical gaps of many, diverse systems in excellent agreement with experiments, including organic and inorganic molecules and nanocrystals. We further demonstrate that the newly defined hybrid functional gives the correct alignment between the energy level of the exemplary TTF-TCNQ donor-acceptor system. DOE-BES: DE-FG02-06ER46262.

  6. Symmetric Resonance Charge Exchange Cross Section Based on Impact Parameter Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, Kazem; Murphy, Kendrah; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Using a two-state impact parameter approximation, a calculation has been carried out to obtain symmetric resonance charge transfer cross sections between nine ions and their parent atoms or molecules. Calculation is based on a two-dimensional numerical integration. The method is mostly suited for hydrogenic and some closed shell atoms. Good agreement has been obtained with the results of laboratory measurements for the ion-atom pairs H+-H, He+-He, and Ar+-Ar. Several approximations in a similar published calculation have been eliminated.

  7. Neutron total cross section and resonance parameters of /sup 231/Pa

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, A.R.Z.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Patterson, J.R.

    1981-08-01

    Time-of-flight measurements of the neutron total cross section of /sup 231/Pa were carried out, in the energy range 0.01 to 10,000 eV, on two sample thicknesses using the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator as the pulsed neutron source. The multilevel R matrix code MULTI, which includes instrumental resolution and the Doppler broadening, has been used to fit the data. The resonance parameters obtained from the present multilevel R matrix analysis of /sup 231/Pa transmission data from 0.03 to 120 eV are given. 14 refs.

  8. Towards an accurate specific reaction parameter density functional for water dissociation on Ni(111): RPBE versus PW91.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua

    2016-08-01

    In search for an accurate description of the dissociative chemisorption of water on the Ni(111) surface, we report a new nine-dimensional potential energy surface (PES) based on a large number of density functional theory points using the RPBE functional. Seven-dimensional quantum dynamical calculations have been carried out on the RPBE PES, followed by site averaging and lattice effect corrections, yielding sticking probabilities that are compared with both the previous theoretical results based on a PW91 PES and experiment. It is shown that the RPBE functional increases the reaction barrier, but has otherwise a minor impact on the PES topography. Better agreement with experimental results is obtained with the new PES, but the agreement is still not quantitative. Possible sources of the remaining discrepancies are discussed. PMID:27436348

  9. An accurate and simple technique of determination of the maximum power point and measurement of some solar cell parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, S.; Maitra, K.; Roychoudhuri, A.

    1985-06-01

    In the wake of the energy crisis, attempts are being made to develop a variety of energy conversion devices, such as solar cells. The single most important operational characteristic for a conversion element generating electricity is the V against I curve. Three points on this characteristic curve are of paramount importance, including the short-circuit, the open-circuit, and the maximum power point. The present paper has the objective to propose a new simple and accurate method of determining the maximum power point (Vm, Im) of the V against I characteristics, based on a geometrical interpretation. The method is general enough to be applicable to any energy conversion device having a nonlinear V against I characteristic. The paper provides also a method for determining the fill factor (FF), the series resistance (Rs), and the diode ideality factor (A) from a single set of connected observations.

  10. A magnetic resonance imaging study on the articulatory and acoustic speech parameters of Malay vowels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The phonetic properties of six Malay vowels are investigated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize the vocal tract in order to obtain dynamic articulatory parameters during speech production. To resolve image blurring due to the tongue movement during the scanning process, a method based on active contour extraction is used to track tongue contours. The proposed method efficiently tracks tongue contours despite the partial blurring of MRI images. Consequently, the articulatory parameters that are effectively measured as tongue movement is observed, and the specific shape of the tongue and its position for all six uttered Malay vowels are determined. Speech rehabilitation procedure demands some kind of visual perceivable prototype of speech articulation. To investigate the validity of the measured articulatory parameters based on acoustic theory of speech production, an acoustic analysis based on the uttered vowels by subjects has been performed. As the acoustic speech and articulatory parameters of uttered speech were examined, a correlation between formant frequencies and articulatory parameters was observed. The experiments reported a positive correlation between the constriction location of the tongue body and the first formant frequency, as well as a negative correlation between the constriction location of the tongue tip and the second formant frequency. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is an effective tool for the dynamic study of speech production. PMID:25060583

  11. Accurate determination of the scattering length of metastable helium atoms using dark resonances between atoms and exotic molecules.

    PubMed

    Moal, S; Portier, M; Kim, J; Dugué, J; Rapol, U D; Leduc, M; Cohen-Tannoudji, C

    2006-01-20

    We present a new measurement of the s-wave scattering length a of spin-polarized helium atoms in the 2(3)S1 metastable state. Using two-photon photoassociation spectroscopy and dark resonances, we measure the energy E(nu)=14= -91.35+/- 0.06 MHz of the least-bound state nu = 14 in the interaction potential of the two atoms. We deduce a value of a=7.512+/-0.005 nm, which is at least 100 times more precise than the best previous determinations and is in disagreement with some of them. This experiment also demonstrates the possibility to create exotic molecules binding two metastable atoms with a lifetime of the order of 1 micros. PMID:16486572

  12. Best parameters selection for wavelet packet-based compression of magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Abu-Rezq, A N; Tolba, A S; Khuwaja, G A; Foda, S G

    1999-10-01

    Transmission of compressed medical images is becoming a vital tool in telemedicine. Thus new methods are needed for efficient image compression. This study discovers the best design parameters for a data compression scheme applied to digital magnetic resonance (MR) images. The proposed technique aims at reducing the transmission cost while preserving the diagnostic information. By selecting the wavelet packet's filters, decomposition level, and subbands that are better adapted to the frequency characteristics of the image, one may achieve better image representation in the sense of lower entropy or minimal distortion. Experimental results show that the selection of the best parameters has a dramatic effect on the data compression rate of MR images. In all cases, decomposition at three or four levels with the Coiflet 5 wavelet (Coif 5) results in better compression performance than the other wavelets. Image resolution is found to have a remarkable effect on the compression rate. PMID:10529302

  13. FRETView: a computer program to simplify the process of obtaining fluorescence resonance energy transfer parameters.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Nathan; Dyer, Joanne; Martí, Angel A; Solomon, Marissa; Turro, Nicholas J

    2007-08-01

    The process of modeling the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process for a donor-acceptor pair can be rather challenging, yet few computer programs exist that allow such modeling to be done with relative ease. In order to address this, we have developed a Java-based program, FRETView, which allows numerous FRET parameters to be obtained with just a few mouse clicks. Being a Java-based program, it runs equally well on all the major operating systems such as Windows, Mac OS X, Linux, Solaris. The program allows the user to effortlessly input pertinent information about the donor-acceptor pair, including the absorption and/or emission spectra, and outputs the calculated FRET parameters in table format, as well as graphical plots. PMID:17668122

  14. Accurate determination of interface trap state parameters by admittance spectroscopy in the presence of a Schottky barrier contact: Application to ZnO-based solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Andrew T.; Musselman, Kevin P.; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.

    2013-04-01

    This work shows that when a Schottky barrier is present in a photovoltaic device, such as in a device with an ITO/ZnO contact, equivalent circuit analysis must be performed with admittance spectroscopy to accurately determine the pn junction interface recombination parameters (i.e., capture cross section and density of trap states). Without equivalent circuit analysis, a Schottky barrier can produce an error of ˜4-orders of magnitude in the capture cross section and ˜50% error in the measured density of trap states. Using a solution processed ZnO/Cu2O photovoltaic test system, we apply our analysis to clearly separate the contributions of interface states at the pn junction from the Schottky barrier at the ITO/ZnO contact so that the interface state recombination parameters can be accurately characterized. This work is widely applicable to the multitude of photovoltaic devices, which use ZnO adjacent to ITO.

  15. Rough parameter dependence in climate models and the role of Ruelle-Pollicott resonances

    PubMed Central

    Chekroun, Mickaël David; Neelin, J. David; Kondrashov, Dmitri; McWilliams, James C.; Ghil, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Despite the importance of uncertainties encountered in climate model simulations, the fundamental mechanisms at the origin of sensitive behavior of long-term model statistics remain unclear. Variability of turbulent flows in the atmosphere and oceans exhibits recurrent large-scale patterns. These patterns, while evolving irregularly in time, manifest characteristic frequencies across a large range of time scales, from intraseasonal through interdecadal. Based on modern spectral theory of chaotic and dissipative dynamical systems, the associated low-frequency variability may be formulated in terms of Ruelle-Pollicott (RP) resonances. RP resonances encode information on the nonlinear dynamics of the system, and an approach for estimating them—as filtered through an observable of the system—is proposed. This approach relies on an appropriate Markov representation of the dynamics associated with a given observable. It is shown that, within this representation, the spectral gap—defined as the distance between the subdominant RP resonance and the unit circle—plays a major role in the roughness of parameter dependences. The model statistics are the most sensitive for the smallest spectral gaps; such small gaps turn out to correspond to regimes where the low-frequency variability is more pronounced, whereas autocorrelations decay more slowly. The present approach is applied to analyze the rough parameter dependence encountered in key statistics of an El-Niño–Southern Oscillation model of intermediate complexity. Theoretical arguments, however, strongly suggest that such links between model sensitivity and the decay of correlation properties are not limited to this particular model and could hold much more generally. PMID:24443553

  16. A two-parameter kinetic model based on a time-dependent activity coefficient accurately describes enzymatic cellulose digestion

    PubMed Central

    Kostylev, Maxim; Wilson, David

    2014-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a potential source of renewable, low-carbon-footprint liquid fuels. Biomass recalcitrance and enzyme cost are key challenges associated with the large-scale production of cellulosic fuel. Kinetic modeling of enzymatic cellulose digestion has been complicated by the heterogeneous nature of the substrate and by the fact that a true steady state cannot be attained. We present a two-parameter kinetic model based on the Michaelis-Menten scheme (Michaelis L and Menten ML. (1913) Biochem Z 49:333–369), but with a time-dependent activity coefficient analogous to fractal-like kinetics formulated by Kopelman (Kopelman R. (1988) Science 241:1620–1626). We provide a mathematical derivation and experimental support to show that one of the parameters is a total activity coefficient and the other is an intrinsic constant that reflects the ability of the cellulases to overcome substrate recalcitrance. The model is applicable to individual cellulases and their mixtures at low-to-medium enzyme loads. Using biomass degrading enzymes from a cellulolytic bacterium Thermobifida fusca we show that the model can be used for mechanistic studies of enzymatic cellulose digestion. We also demonstrate that it applies to the crude supernatant of the widely studied cellulolytic fungus Trichoderma reesei and can thus be used to compare cellulases from different organisms. The two parameters may serve a similar role to Vmax, KM, and kcat in classical kinetics. A similar approach may be applicable to other enzymes with heterogeneous substrates and where a steady state is not achievable. PMID:23837567

  17. Fast determination of beef quality parameters with time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Fabíola Manhas Verbi; Bertelli Pflanzer, Sérgio; Gomig, Thaísa; Lugnani Gomes, Carolina; de Felício, Pedro Eduardo; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2013-04-15

    The noteworthy of this study is to predict seven quality parameters for beef samples using time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR) relaxometry data and multivariate models. Samples from 61 Bonsmara heifers were separated into five groups based on genetic (breeding composition) and feed system (grain and grass feed). Seven sample parameters were analyzed by reference methods; among them, three sensorial parameters, flavor, juiciness and tenderness and four physicochemical parameters, cooking loss, fat and moisture content and instrumental tenderness using Warner Bratzler shear force (WBSF). The raw beef samples of the same animals were analyzed by TD-NMR relaxometry using Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) and Continuous Wave-Free Precession (CWFP) sequences. Regression models computed by partial least squares (PLS) chemometric technique using CPMG and CWFP data and the results of the classical analysis were constructed. The results allowed for the prediction of aforementioned seven properties. The predictive ability of the method was evaluated using the root mean square error (RMSE) for the calibration (RMSEC) and validation (RMSEP) data sets. The reference and predicted values showed no significant differences at a 95% confidence level. PMID:23601874

  18. An accurate method for the determination of complex coefficients of single crystal piezoelectric resonators II: design of measurement and experiments.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiao-Hong; Wang, Qing-Ming; Uchino, Kenji

    2004-02-01

    In this paper, we present the design of measurements for single crystals by using the general results in Part I of this paper. The selection of impedance measurement or admittance measurement for both bar and plate type resonators is dependent on whether the cutting orientation l is parallel to or perpendicular to the electric field direction n. Two matrices A and B, which are defined in part I of this paper, are major tools used for the measurement design. For different cutting orientations, the elements in matrix A are associated with different elastic and piezoelectric constants. Matrix B reveals what vibration modes can be excited electrically and how to excite them. With the aid of matrices A and B, the design of measurement becomes straightforward. The measurement for a rhombohedral class (3m) LiNbO3 single crystal is used as an example to demonstrate the experiment and calculation procedures. It is found that by using either three thin bars and one plate or three plates and one thin bar we can completely characterize the complex materials constants of a LiNbO3 single crystal. PMID:15055814

  19. Multi-parameter sensing with a single magnetoelastic sensor by applying loads on the null locations of multiple resonant modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeRouin, Andrew; Ghee Ong, Keat

    2016-03-01

    Magnetoelastic sensors are mass sensitive sensors commonly used for stress and pressure measurement, as well as chemical and biological monitoring when combined with a functionalized coating. Magnetoelastic sensors are typically made of free-standing, rectangular strips of magnetoelastic materials that exhibit longitudinal, extensional vibrations due to the excitation of magnetic fields. A single magnetoelastic sensor is generally used to monitor one parameter since only the fundamental resonant frequency is measured. Multiple-parameter sensing in close proximity has previously been achieved by using multiple magnetoelastic sensors of different dimensions and tracking their resonant frequencies independently. However, this requires a large surface area and inconvenient layout of dissimilarly shaped sensors. This paper presents a technique for monitoring multiple parameters with a single magnetoelastic sensor by applying separate mass loads at the null points (points of zero vibration) of multiple resonant modes. Applying a load at a null location does not affect the corresponding resonant mode but alters the resonant frequencies of other modes. Therefore, by isolating the variables of interest to multiple null points and simultaneously measuring the resonant frequency shifts of related resonant modes, the masses at each null location can be calculated. Results showed that changing the coverage at a null location along the width of the sensor can be used to minimize the loading effect on the corresponding resonant mode. In contrast, changing the lengthwise coverage can maximize the loading effect on other resonant modes, thus increasing the mass sensitivity of the sensor. Furthermore, simultaneously applying loads to null points of multiple resonant modes had a nearly additive effect, allowing detection of multiple parameters with a single magnetoelastic sensor.

  20. Study and Optimization of CPT Resonance Parameters in 87 Rb/Ar/Ne Microcells Aimed for Application in Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masian, Y.; Sivak, A.; Sevostianov, D.; Vassiliev, V.; Velichansky, V.

    The paper shows the presents results of studies of small-size rubidium cells with argon and neon buffer gases, produced by a patent pended technique of laser welding [Fishman et al. (2014)]. Cells were designed for miniature frequency standard. Temperature dependence of the frequency of the coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance was measured and used to optimize the ratio of partial pressures of buffer gases. The influence of duration and regime of annealing on the CPT-resonance frequency drift was investigated. The parameters of the FM modulation of laser current for two cases which correspond to the highest amplitude of CPT resonance and to the smallest light shifts of the resonance frequency were determined. The temperature dependences of the CPT resonance frequency were found to be surprisingly different in the two cases. A non-linear dependence of CPT resonance frequency on the temperature of the cell with the two extremes was revealed for one of these cases.

  1. Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions.

    PubMed

    Costabel, Stephan; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2013-04-01

    [1] For characterizing water flow in the vadose zone, the water retention curve (WRC) of the soil must be known. Because conventional WRC measurements demand much time and effort in the laboratory, alternative methods with shortened measurement duration are desired. The WRC can be estimated, for instance, from the cumulative pore size distribution (PSD) of the investigated material. Geophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry have successfully been applied to recover PSDs of sandstones and limestones. It is therefore expected that the multiexponential analysis of the NMR signal from water-saturated loose sediments leads to a reliable estimation of the WRC. We propose an approach to estimate the WRC using the cumulative NMR relaxation time distribution and approximate it with the well-known van-Genuchten (VG) model. Thereby, the VG parameter n, which controls the curvature of the WRC, is of particular interest, because it is the essential parameter to predict the relative hydraulic conductivity. The NMR curves are calibrated with only two conventional WRC measurements, first, to determine the residual water content and, second, to define a fixed point that relates the relaxation time to a corresponding capillary pressure. We test our approach with natural and artificial soil samples and compare the NMR-based results to WRC measurements using a pressure plate apparatus and to WRC predictions from the software ROSETTA. We found that for sandy soils n can reliably be estimated with NMR, whereas for samples with clay and silt contents higher than 10% the estimation fails. This is the case when the hydraulic properties of the soil are mainly controlled by the pore constrictions. For such samples, the sensitivity of the NMR method for the pore bodies hampers a plausible WRC estimation. Citation: Costabel, S., and U. Yaramanci (2013), Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions, Water

  2. Petermann I and II spot size: Accurate semi analytical description involving Nelder-Mead method of nonlinear unconstrained optimization and three parameter fundamental modal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Choudhury, Raja; Roy Choudhury, Arundhati; Kanti Ghose, Mrinal

    2013-01-01

    A semi-analytical model with three optimizing parameters and a novel non-Gaussian function as the fundamental modal field solution has been proposed to arrive at an accurate solution to predict various propagation parameters of graded-index fibers with less computational burden than numerical methods. In our semi analytical formulation the optimization of core parameter U which is usually uncertain, noisy or even discontinuous, is being calculated by Nelder-Mead method of nonlinear unconstrained minimizations as it is an efficient and compact direct search method and does not need any derivative information. Three optimizing parameters are included in the formulation of fundamental modal field of an optical fiber to make it more flexible and accurate than other available approximations. Employing variational technique, Petermann I and II spot sizes have been evaluated for triangular and trapezoidal-index fibers with the proposed fundamental modal field. It has been demonstrated that, the results of the proposed solution identically match with the numerical results over a wide range of normalized frequencies. This approximation can also be used in the study of doped and nonlinear fiber amplifier.

  3. Establishing Magnetic Resonance Imaging as an Accurate and Reliable Tool to Diagnose and Monitor Esophageal Cancer in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Kosovec, Juliann E.; Zaidi, Ali H.; Komatsu, Yoshihiro; Kasi, Pashtoon M.; Cothron, Kyle; Thompson, Diane V.; Lynch, Edward; Jobe, Blair A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the reliability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection of esophageal cancer in the Levrat model of end-to-side esophagojejunostomy. Background The Levrat model has proven utility in terms of its ability to replicate Barrett’s carcinogenesis by inducing gastroduodenoesophageal reflux (GDER). Due to lack of data on the utility of non-invasive methods for detection of esophageal cancer, treatment efficacy studies have been limited, as adenocarcinoma histology has only been validated post-mortem. It would therefore be of great value if the validity and reliability of MRI could be established in this setting. Methods Chronic GDER reflux was induced in 19 male Sprague-Dawley rats using the modified Levrat model. At 40 weeks post-surgery, all animals underwent endoscopy, MRI scanning, and post-mortem histological analysis of the esophagus and anastomosis. With post-mortem histology serving as the gold standard, assessment of presence of esophageal cancer was made by five esophageal specialists and five radiologists on endoscopy and MRI, respectively. Results The accuracy of MRI and endoscopic analysis to correctly identify cancer vs. no cancer was 85.3% and 50.5%, respectively. ROC curves demonstrated that MRI rating had an AUC of 0.966 (p<0.001) and endoscopy rating had an AUC of 0.534 (p = 0.804). The sensitivity and specificity of MRI for identifying cancer vs. no-cancer was 89.1% and 80% respectively, as compared to 45.5% and 57.5% for endoscopy. False positive rates of MRI and endoscopy were 20% and 42.5%, respectively. Conclusions MRI is a more reliable diagnostic method than endoscopy in the Levrat model. The non-invasiveness of the tool and its potential to volumetrically quantify the size and number of tumors likely makes it even more useful in evaluating novel agents and their efficacy in treatment studies of esophageal cancer. PMID:24705451

  4. Coupling 1D Navier Stokes equation with autoregulation lumped parameter networks for accurate cerebral blood flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jaiyoung; Hu, Xiao; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2014-11-01

    The cerebral circulation is unique in its ability to maintain blood flow to the brain under widely varying physiologic conditions. Incorporating this autoregulatory response is critical to cerebral blood flow modeling, as well as investigations into pathological conditions. We discuss a one-dimensional nonlinear model of blood flow in the cerebral arteries that includes coupling of autoregulatory lumped parameter networks. The model is tested to reproduce a common clinical test to assess autoregulatory function - the carotid artery compression test. The change in the flow velocity at the middle cerebral artery (MCA) during carotid compression and release demonstrated strong agreement with published measurements. The model is then used to investigate vasospasm of the MCA, a common clinical concern following subarachnoid hemorrhage. Vasospasm was modeled by prescribing vessel area reduction in the middle portion of the MCA. Our model showed similar increases in velocity for moderate vasospasms, however, for serious vasospasm (~ 90% area reduction), the blood flow velocity demonstrated decrease due to blood flow rerouting. This demonstrates a potentially important phenomenon, which otherwise would lead to false-negative decisions on clinical vasospasm if not properly anticipated.

  5. Characterization of condenser microphones under different environmental conditions for accurate speed of sound measurements with acoustic resonators.

    PubMed

    Guianvarc'h, Cécile; Gavioso, Roberto M; Benedetto, Giuliana; Pitre, Laurent; Bruneau, Michel

    2009-07-01

    Condenser microphones are more commonly used and have been extensively modeled and characterized in air at ambient temperature and static pressure. However, several applications of interest for metrology and physical acoustics require to use these transducers in significantly different environmental conditions. Particularly, the extremely accurate determination of the speed of sound in monoatomic gases, which is pursued for a determination of the Boltzmann constant k by an acoustic method, entails the use of condenser microphones mounted within a spherical cavity, over a wide range of static pressures, at the temperature of the triple point of water (273.16 K). To further increase the accuracy achievable in this application, the microphone frequency response and its acoustic input impedance need to be precisely determined over the same static pressure and temperature range. Few previous works examined the influence of static pressure, temperature, and gas composition on the microphone's sensitivity. In this work, the results of relative calibrations of 1/4 in. condenser microphones obtained using an electrostatic actuator technique are presented. The calibrations are performed in pure helium and argon gas at temperatures near 273 K and in the pressure range between 10 and 600 kPa. These experimental results are compared with the predictions of a realistic model available in the literature, finding a remarkable good agreement. The model provides an estimate of the acoustic impedance of 1/4 in. condenser microphones as a function of frequency and static pressure and is used to calculate the corresponding frequency perturbations induced on the normal modes of a spherical cavity when this is filled with helium or argon gas. PMID:19655971

  6. The calculation of electrical parameters of AT-cut quartz crystal resonators with the consideration of material viscosity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji; Zhao, Wenhua; Du, Jianke; Hu, Yuantai

    2011-01-01

    Electrical parameters like resistance and quality factor of a quartz crystal resonator cannot be determined through vibration analysis without considering the presence of material dissipation. In this study, we use the first-order Mindlin plate equations of piezoelectric plates for thickness-shear vibrations of a simple resonator model with partial electrodes. We derive the expressions of electrical parameters with emphasis on the resistance that is related to the imaginary part of complex elastic constants, or the viscosity, of quartz crystal. Since all electrical parameters are frequency dependent, this procedure provides the chance to study the frequency behavior of crystal resonators with a direct formulation. We understand that the electrical parameters are strongly affected by the manufacturing process, with the plating techniques in particular, but the theoretical approach we presented here will be the first step for the precise estimation of such parameters and their further applications in the analysis of nonlinear behavior of resonators. We calculated the parameters from our simple resonator model of AT-cut quartz crystal with the first-order Mindlin plate theory to demonstrate the procedure and show that the numerical results are consistent with earlier measurements. PMID:20594568

  7. The Dependence Of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Image Contrast On Intrinsic And Operator-Selectable Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrli, F. W.; MacFall, J. R.; Glover, G. H.

    1983-12-01

    In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) the image pixel value is governed by four intrinsic parameters: the spin density ρ, the spin-lattice relaxation time T1, the spin-spin relaxation time T2 and, for non-stationary spins, the flow velocity v. The extent to which the signal is weighted toward one or several parameters is related to the history of the spin system preceding the detection pulse. In the present work T1 and T2 were determined in vivo for several regions in the CNS from inversion-recovery (T1) And multiple-echo (T2) images, using least-squares fitting procedures. From averaged values of T1 and T2 in grey matter, white matter and CSF, the signal intensity was calculated on the basis of the Bloch equations and plotted as a function of the intrinsic parameters for the three most common imaging pulse sequences. These data are in excellent agreement with images, recorded from normal volunteers on an experimental whole-body imaging system operating at 12.8 MHz (0.3T). The graphical presentation of contrast further will provide the radiologist with a straightforward tool for image interpretation.

  8. Resonance parameters of the first 1/2+ state in Be9 and astrophysical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burda, O.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Richter, A.; Forssén, C.; Brown, B. A.

    2010-07-01

    Spectra of the Be9(e,e') reaction have been measured at the Superconducting Darmstadt Electron Linear Accelerator at an electron energy of E0=73 MeV and scattering angles of 93° and 141° with high-energy resolution up to excitation energies of Ex=8 MeV. The astrophysically relevant resonance parameters of the first excited 1/2+ state of Be9 have been extracted in a one-level approximation of R-matrix theory, resulting in resonance energy ER=1.748(6) MeV and width ΓR=274(8) keV, which are in good agreement with the latest Be9(γ,n) experiment but with considerably improved uncertainties. However, the reduced B(E1) transition strength deduced from an extrapolation of the (e,e') data to the photon point is smaller by a factor of two. Implications of the new results for possible production of C12 in neutron-rich astrophysical scenarios are discussed.

  9. Measurement of neutron total cross-section and resonance parameters of xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoy, V. R.; Wang, T. F.; Kim, G. N.; Oh, Y. D.; Cho, M. H.; Ko, I. S.; Namkung, W.

    2009-07-01

    We measured the neutron total cross-sections of natural xenon in the neutron energy region from 0.1 to 40 eV by using the time-of-flight method at the Pohang neutron facility, which consists of an electron linear accelerator, a water-cooled tantalum target with a water moderator, and a 12-m long time-of-flight path. A 6Li-ZnS(Ag) scintillator with a diameter of 12.5 cm and a thickness of 1.6 cm was used as a neutron detector. Notch filters composed of Co, In, Cd were used to estimate the background level and to calculate the neutron flight path length. The present measurement was compared with the existing experimental and the evaluated data. The resonance parameters of Xe isotopes were obtained from the transmission ratio by using the SAMMY code and were compared with other previous results.

  10. Determination of molecular spectroscopic parameters and energy-transfer rates by double-resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinfeld, J. I.; Foy, B.; Hetzler, J.; Flannery, C.; Klaassen, J.; Mizugai, Y.; Coy, S.

    1990-01-01

    The spectroscopy of small to medium-size polyatomic molecules can be extremely complex, especially in higher-lying overtone and combination vibrational levels. The high density of levels also complicates the understanding of inelastic collision processes, which is required to model energy transfer and collision broadening of spectral lines. Both of these problems can be addressed by double-resonance spectroscopy, i.e., time-resolved pump-probe measurements using microwave, infrared, near-infrared, and visible-wavelength sources. Information on excited-state spectroscopy, transition moments, inelastic energy transfer rates and propensity rules, and pressure-broadening parameters may be obtained from such experiments. Examples are given for several species of importance in planetary atmospheres, including ozone, silane, ethane, and ammonia.

  11. Neutron total cross-sections and resonance parameters of Mo and Ta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moinul Haque Meaze, A. K. M.; Devan, K.; Lee, Y. S.; Oh, Y. D.; Kim, G. N.; Son, D.

    2007-02-01

    Experimental results of transmissions for the samples of natural molybdenum with thickness 0.0192 atoms/barn and for the four samples of natural tantalum with thickness 0.0222, 0.0111, 0.0055 and 0.0025 atoms/barn are presented in this work. Measurements were carried out at the Pohang Neutron Facility which consists of a 100 MeV Linac, water-cooled tantalum target, and 12 m flight path length. Effective total cross-sections were extracted from the transmission data, and resonance parameters were obtained by using the code SAMMY. The present measurements were compared with other measurements and with the evaluated nuclear data file ENDF/B-VI.8.

  12. R-MATRIX RESONANCE ANALYSIS AND STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF THE RESONANCE PARAMETERS OF 233U IN THE NEUTRON ENERGY RANGE FROM THERMAL TO 600 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.

    2001-02-27

    The R-matrix resonance analysis of experimental neutron transmission and cross sections of {sup 233}U, with the Reich-Moore Bayesian code SAMMY, was extended up to the neutron energy of 600 eV by taking advantage of new high resolution neutron transmission and fission cross section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). The experimental data base is described. In addition to the microscopic data (time-of-flight measurements of transmission and cross sections), some experimental and evaluated integral quantities were included in the data base. Tabulated and graphical comparisons between the experimental data and the SAMMY calculated cross sections are given. The ability of the calculated cross sections to reproduce the effective multiplication factors k{sub eff} for various thermal, intermediate, and fast systems was tested. The statistical properties of the resonance parameters were examined and recommended values of the average s-wave resonance parameters are given.

  13. Accurate Calculation of Hydration Free Energies using Pair-Specific Lennard-Jones Parameters in the CHARMM Drude Polarizable Force Field

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher M.; Lopes, Pedro E. M.; Zhu, Xiao; Roux, Benoît; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2010-01-01

    Lennard-Jones (LJ) parameters for a variety of model compounds have previously been optimized within the CHARMM Drude polarizable force field to reproduce accurately pure liquid phase thermodynamic properties as well as additional target data. While the polarizable force field resulting from this optimization procedure has been shown to satisfactorily reproduce a wide range of experimental reference data across numerous series of small molecules, a slight but systematic overestimate of the hydration free energies has also been noted. Here, the reproduction of experimental hydration free energies is greatly improved by the introduction of pair-specific LJ parameters between solute heavy atoms and water oxygen atoms that override the standard LJ parameters obtained from combining rules. The changes are small and a systematic protocol is developed for the optimization of pair-specific LJ parameters and applied to the development of pair-specific LJ parameters for alkanes, alcohols and ethers. The resulting parameters not only yield hydration free energies in good agreement with experimental values, but also provide a framework upon which other pair-specific LJ parameters can be added as new compounds are parametrized within the CHARMM Drude polarizable force field. Detailed analysis of the contributions to the hydration free energies reveals that the dispersion interaction is the main source of the systematic errors in the hydration free energies. This information suggests that the systematic error may result from problems with the LJ combining rules and is combined with analysis of the pair-specific LJ parameters obtained in this work to identify a preliminary improved combining rule. PMID:20401166

  14. Towards in vivo imaging of intramolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer parameters.

    PubMed

    Gaind, Vaibhav; Webb, Kevin J; Kularatne, Sumith; Bouman, Charles A

    2009-08-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a nonradiative energy transfer process based on dipole-dipole interaction between donor and acceptor fluorophores that are spatially separated by a distance of a few nanometers. FRET has proved to be of immense value in the study of cellular function and the underlying cause of disease due to, for example, protein misfolding (of consequence in Alzheimer's disease). The standard parameterization in intramolecular FRET is the lifetime and yield, which can be related to the donor-acceptor (DA) distance. FRET imaging has thus far been limited to in vitro or near-surface microscopy because of the deleterious effects of substantial scatter. We show that it is possible to extract the microscopic FRET parameters in a highly scattering environment by incorporating the FRET kinetics of an ensemble of DA molecules connected by a flexible or rigid linker into an optical diffusion tomography (ODT) framework. We demonstrate the efficacy of our approach for extracting the microscopic DA distance through simulations and an experiment using a phantom with scattering properties similar to tissue. Our method will allow the in vivo imaging of FRET parameters in deep tissue, and hence provide a new vehicle for the fundamental study of disease. PMID:19649115

  15. Diurnal and seasonal variations in the Schumann resonance parameters observed at Chinese observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongjuan; Yu, Haiyan; Cao, Bingxia; Qiao, Xiaolin

    2013-06-01

    The Schumann resonances (SRs) are of great significance for probing the global circuit. The diurnal and seasonal variations in mode amplitudes and frequencies of the first four modes of SR magnetic components based on 2 years measurements at the stations located in China are firstly presented here. The frequencies of all the four modes have their maxima during boreal winter and minima during summer, while the mode amplitudes change oppositely. The variations of both frequencies and amplitudes show their strong relationships with the lighting activity in south-east Asia (0800 UT) which is the nearest source to the observatories in China, while the other sources in Africa (1400 UT) and South America (2000 UT) have less effects on the mode amplitudes of both magnetic components. The effect of day-night asymmetry on SR parameters is estimated by a 3D-FDTD model of the Earth-ionosphere cavity with a single pulse traveling around the equator in a day. Two models of the Earth-ionosphere cavity, namely, a symmetric cavity and a cavity with day-night asymmetric conductivity profile are exploited. It is clear that the minima in the diurnal patterns of the mode frequencies near local sunrise/sunset times are mainly related to the migrations of the global lighting activity, not the day-night ionosphere asymmetry. Moreover, it is concluded that the ionosphere-induced variations of SR parameters including mode frequencies and amplitudes are much smaller than the variations resulting from lighting activity.

  16. Extracting the resonance parameters from experimental data on scattering of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaandrager, P.; Rakityansky, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    A new parametrization of the multi-channel S-matrix is used to fit scattering data and then to locate the resonances as its poles. The S-matrix is written in terms of the corresponding “in” and “out” Jost matrices which are expanded in the Taylor series of the collision energy E around an appropriately chosen energy E0. In order to do this, the Jost matrices are written in a semi-analytic form where all the factors (involving the channel momenta and Sommerfeld parameters) responsible for their “bad behavior” (i.e., responsible for the multi-valuedness of the Jost matrices and for branching of the Riemann surface of the energy) are given explicitly. The remaining unknown factors in the Jost matrices are analytic and single-valued functions of the variable E and are defined on a simple energy plane. The expansion is done for these analytic functions and the expansion coefficients are used as the fitting parameters. The method is tested on a two-channel model, using a set of artificially generated data points with typical error bars and a typical random noise in the positions of the points.

  17. Achieving high bit rate logical stochastic resonance in a bistable system by adjusting parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ding-Xin; Gu, Feng-Shou; Feng, Guo-Jin; Yang, Yong-Min; Ball, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    The phenomenon of logical stochastic resonance (LSR) in a nonlinear bistable system is demonstrated by numerical simulations and experiments. However, the bit rates of the logical signals are relatively low and not suitable for practical applications. First, we examine the responses of the bistable system with fixed parameters to different bit rate logic input signals, showing that an arbitrary high bit rate LSR in a bistable system cannot be achieved. Then, a normalized transform of the LSR bistable system is introduced through a kind of variable substitution. Based on the transform, it is found that LSR for arbitrary high bit rate logic signals in a bistable system can be achieved by adjusting the parameters of the system, setting bias value and amplifying the amplitudes of logic input signals and noise properly. Finally, the desired OR and AND logic outputs to high bit rate logic inputs in a bistable system are obtained by numerical simulations. The study might provide higher feasibility of LSR in practical engineering applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51379526).

  18. The Use of Accurate Mass Tags based upon High-Throughput Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry for Global Proteomic Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2004-07-30

    In this review, we describe the technological basis and progress towards a new global proteomics strategy that uses peptide accurate mass measurements augmented by information from separations (e.g. LC retention times) to provide large improvements in sensitivity, dynamic range, comprehensiveness and throughput. The use of ?accurate mass and time? (AMT) tags serves to eliminate the need for routine MS/MS measurements [#4109]. As the case study, we use our own research efforts to illustrate the role of AMTs within the broader context of a state-of-the-art proteomics effort. Our strategy exploits high-resolution capillary LC separations combined with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR). AMTs represent peptide biomarkers and can be used to confidently identify proteins based on the high mass measurement accuracy provided by FTICR combined with LC elution times. Once identified using MS/MS, these biomarkers provide the foundation for subsequent high throughput studies using only AMT tags to identify and quantify the proteins expressed within a cell system. Key attractions of this approach include the feasibility of completely automated high confidence protein identifications, extensive proteome coverage, and the capability for exploiting stable-isotope labeling methods for high precision abundance measurements [#4019]. Additional developments described in this review include methods for more effective coverage of membrane proteins [#4184], for dynamic range expansion of proteome measurements [#4012], and for multi-stage separations that promise to enable more focused analyses, further extend the quality of measurements, and also extend measurements to more complex proteomes.

  19. Accurate mass and nuclear magnetic resonance identification of bisphenolic can coating migrants and their interference with liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometric analysis of bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Luke K; Noonan, Gregory O; Begley, Timothy H; Mazzola, Eugene P

    2011-05-15

    Two unknown compounds were previously determined to be potential interferences in liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) analysis of bisphenol A (BPA) in canned infant formula. Both yielded two identical MS/MS transitions to BPA. The identities of the unknowns were investigated using accurate mass LC/MS, LC/MS/MS, and elemental formula and structures proposed. Exact identities were confirmed through purification or synthesis followed by (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments, as well as comparisons of one unknown with commercial standards. Comparisons of negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI) MS/MS and accurate mass spectra suggested both unknowns to be structurally identical (to BPA and each other). Positive ion ESI spectra confirmed both were larger molecules, suggesting that in the negative mode they likely fragmented to the deprotonated BPA ion in the source [corrected]. Elemental composition of positive ion accurate mass spectra and NMR analysis concluded the unknowns were oxidized forms of the known epoxy can coating monomer, bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE). One of the unknowns, 2,2-[bis-4-(2,3-dihydroxypropoxy)phenyl]propane, commonly known as BADGE*2H(2)O, is widely reported as an epoxy-phenolic can coating migrant, but has not been suggested to interfere with the MS/MS analysis of BPA. The other unknown, 2-[4-(2,3-dihydroxypropoxy)phenyl]-2-[4'-hydroxyphenyl]propane, or the oxidized form of bisphenol A monoglycidyl ether (BAMGE*H(2)O), has not been previously reported in food or packaging. PMID:21488128

  20. Theory and experimental verifications of the resonator Q and equivalent electrical parameters due to viscoelastic and mounting supports losses.

    PubMed

    Yong, Yook-Kong; Patel, Mihir S; Tanaka, Masako

    2010-08-01

    A novel analytical/numerical method for calculating the resonator Q and its equivalent electrical parameters due to viscoelastic, conductivity, and mounting supports losses is presented. The method presented will be quite useful for designing new resonators and reducing the time and costs of prototyping. There was also a necessity for better and more realistic modeling of the resonators because of miniaturization and the rapid advances in the frequency ranges of telecommunication. We present new 3-D finite elements models of quartz resonators with viscoelasticity, conductivity, and mounting support losses. The losses at the mounting supports were modeled by perfectly matched layers (PMLs). A previously published theory for dissipative anisotropic piezoelectric solids was formulated in a weak form for finite element (FE) applications. PMLs were placed at the base of the mounting supports to simulate the energy losses to a semi-infinite base substrate. FE simulations were carried out for free vibrations and forced vibrations of quartz tuning fork and AT-cut resonators. Results for quartz tuning fork and thickness shear AT-cut resonators were presented and compared with experimental data. Results for the resonator Q and the equivalent electrical parameters were compared with their measured values. Good equivalences were found. Results for both low- and high-Q AT-cut quartz resonators compared well with their experimental values. A method for estimating the Q directly from the frequency spectrum obtained for free vibrations was also presented. An important determinant of the quality factor Q of a quartz resonator is the loss of energy from the electrode area to the base via the mountings. The acoustical characteristics of the plate resonator are changed when the plate is mounted onto a base substrate. The base affects the frequency spectra of the plate resonator. A resonator with a high Q may not have a similarly high Q when mounted on a base. Hence, the base is an

  1. Density functional theory computation of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance parameters in light and heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, Kiplangat

    This thesis illustrates the utilization of Density functional theory (DFT) in calculations of gas and solution phase Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) properties of light and heavy nuclei. Computing NMR properties is still a challenge and there are many unknown factors that are still being explored. For instance, influence of hydrogen-bonding; thermal motion; vibration; rotation and solvent effects. In one of the theoretical studies of 195Pt NMR chemical shift in cisplatin and its derivatives illustrated in Chapter 2 and 3 of this thesis. The importance of representing explicit solvent molecules explicitly around the Pt center in cisplatin complexes was outlined. In the same complexes, solvent effect contributed about half of the J(Pt-N) coupling constant. Indicating the significance of considering the surrounding solvent molecules in elucidating the NMR measurements of cisplatin binding to DNA. In chapter 4, we explore the Spin-Orbit (SO) effects on the 29Si and 13C chemical shifts induced by surrounding metal and ligands. The unusual Ni, Pd, Pt trends in SO effects to the 29Si in metallasilatrane complexes X-Si-(mu-mt)4-M-Y was interpreted based on electronic and relativistic effects rather than by structural differences between the complexes. In addition, we develop a non-linear model for predicting NMR SO effects in a series of organics bonded to heavy nuclei halides. In chapter 5, we extend the idea of "Chemist's orbitals" LMO analysis to the quantum chemical proton NMR computation of systems with internal resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds. Consequently, we explicitly link the relationship between the NMR parameters related to H-bonded systems and intuitive picture of a chemical bond from quantum calculations. The analysis shows how NMR signatures characteristic of H-bond can be explained by local bonding and electron delocalization concepts. One shortcoming of some of the anti-cancer agents like cisplatin is that they are toxic and researchers are looking for

  2. Treatment time reduction through parameter optimization in magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coon, Joshua

    Magnetic Resonance guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MRgHIFU) treatments are a promising modality for cancer treatments in which a focused beam of ultrasound energy is used to kill tumor tissue. However, obstacles still exist to its widespread clinical implementation, including long treatment times. This research demonstrates reductions in treatment times through intelligent selection of the user-controllable parameters, including: the focal zone treatment path, focal zone size, focal zone spacing, and whether to treat one or several focal zone locations at any given time. Several treatments using various combinations of these parameters were simulated using a finite difference method to solve the Pennes bio-heat transfer equation for an ultrasonically heated tissue region with a wide range of acoustic, thermal, geometric, and tumor properties. The total treatment time was iteratively optimized using either a heuristic method or routines included in the Matlab software package, with constraints imposed for patient safety and treatment efficacy. The results demonstrate that large reductions in treatment time are possible through the intelligent selection of user-controllable treatment parameters. For the treatment path, treatment times are reduced by as much as an order of magnitude if the focal zones are arranged into stacks along the axial direction and a middle-front-back ordering is followed. For situations where normal tissue heating constraints are less stringent, these focal zones should have high levels of adjacency to further decrease treatment times; however, adjacency should be reduced in some cases where normal tissue constraints are more stringent. Also, the use of smaller, more concentrated focal zones produces shorter treatment times than larger, more diluted focal zones, a result verified in an agar phantom model. Further, focal zones should be packed using only a small amount of overlap in the axial direction and with a small gap in the

  3. Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costabel, Stephan; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2013-04-01

    For characterizing water flow in the vadose zone, the water retention curve (WRC) of the soil must be known. Because conventional WRC measurements demand much time and effort in the laboratory, alternative methods with shortened measurement duration are desired. The WRC can be estimated, for instance, from the cumulative pore size distribution (PSD) of the investigated material. Geophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry have successfully been applied to recover PSDs of sandstones and limestones. It is therefore expected that the multiexponential analysis of the NMR signal from water-saturated loose sediments leads to a reliable estimation of the WRC. We propose an approach to estimate the WRC using the cumulative NMR relaxation time distribution and approximate it with the well-known van-Genuchten (VG) model. Thereby, the VG parameter n, which controls the curvature of the WRC, is of particular interest, because it is the essential parameter to predict the relative hydraulic conductivity. The NMR curves are calibrated with only two conventional WRC measurements, first, to determine the residual water content and, second, to define a fixed point that relates the relaxation time to a corresponding capillary pressure. We test our approach with natural and artificial soil samples and compare the NMR-based results to WRC measurements using a pressure plate apparatus and to WRC predictions from the software ROSETTA. We found that for sandy soils n can reliably be estimated with NMR, whereas for samples with clay and silt contents higher than 10% the estimation fails. This is the case when the hydraulic properties of the soil are mainly controlled by the pore constrictions. For such samples, the sensitivity of the NMR method for the pore bodies hampers a plausible WRC estimation.

  4. Variability of Schumann resonance parameters observed at low latitude stations in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, X.-Y.; Xiao, Z.; Hao, Y.-Q.; Zhang, D.-H.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the Schumann resonance (SR) parameters observed at low latitude stations in China for the first time. Variations of SR peak frequency and intensity on different timescales (from minutes to years) are analyzed in detail. Diurnal and seasonal variations are shown and the source-observer distance is calculated to confirm the contributions of lightning activity. Differences in the profiles of SR intensity between the NS and EW components are due to the effects of the source-observer distance and the relative position of the observer to the sources. Diurnal frequency variations are more complicated and cannot be directly linked with the three thunderstorm centers. Seasonal variations are clear for intensity but not for frequency. The differences in the diurnal and seasonal variations between the SR intensity and frequency show that the greatest contributor to SR intensity is global lightning activity, while the SR frequency is not affected solely by lightning, as certain other factors involving ionosphere properties may play non-negligible roles. We also emphasize that our observations do not show a distinct day-night change in the SR parameters, and that the SR intensity does not show abrupt changes across terminators. This observation is consistent with previous simulations. Finally, the response of the SR to a solar flare is discussed. The flare leads to a sudden increase of about 0.2 Hz relative to the 2σ level of the SR frequencies in the first three modes, which is in agreement with other works in the literature. This frequency enhancement is explained using theoretical calculations.

  5. Measurement of Resonance Parameters of Orbitally Excited Narrow B^0 Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, : T.

    2008-09-01

    The authors report a measurement of resonance parameters of the orbitally excited (L = 1) narrow B{sup 0} mesons in decays to B{sup (*)+}{pi}{sup -} using 1.7 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The mass and width of the B*{sub 2}{sup 0} state are measured to be m(B*{sub 2}{sup 0}) = 5740.2{sub -1.8}{sup +1.7}(stat.){sub -0.8}{sup +0.9}(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2} and {Lambda}(B*{sub 2}{sup 0}) = 22.7{sub -3.2}{sup +3.8}(stat.){sub -10.2}{sup +3.2}(syst.) MeV/c{sub 2}. The mass difference between the B*{sub 2}{sup 0} and B{sub 1}{sup 0} states is measured to be 14.9{sub -2.5}{sup +2.2}(stat.){sub -1.4}{sup +1.2}(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}, resulting in a B{sub 1}{sup 0} mass of 5725.3{sub -2.2}{sup +1.6}(stat.){sub -1.5}{sup +1.4}(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}. This is currently the most precise measurement of the masses of these states and the first measurement of the B*{sub 2}{sup 0} width.

  6. Measurement of resonance parameters of orbitally excited narrow B0 mesons.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; González, B Alvarez; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Griso, S Pagan; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-03-13

    We report a measurement of resonance parameters of the orbitally excited (L=1) narrow B0 mesons in decays to B;{(*)+}pi;{-} using 1.7 fb;{-1} of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The mass and width of the B_{2};{*0} state are measured to be m(B_{2};{*0})=5740.2_{-1.8};{+1.7}(stat)-0.8+0.9(syst) MeV/c;{2} and Gamma(B_{2};{*0})=22.7_{-3.2};{+3.8}(stat)-10.2+3.2(syst) MeV/c;{2}. The mass difference between the B_{2};{*0} and B10 states is measured to be 14.9_{-2.5};{+2.2}(stat)-1.4+1.2(syst) MeV/c;{2}, resulting in a B10 mass of 5725.3_{-2.2};{+1.6}(stat)-1.5+1.4(syst) MeV/c;{2}. This is currently the most precise measurement of the masses of these states and the first measurement of the B_{2};{*0} width. PMID:19392106

  7. Methodological aspects in the calculation of parity-violating effects in nuclear magnetic resonance parameters.

    PubMed

    Weijo, Ville; Bast, Radovan; Manninen, Pekka; Saue, Trond; Vaara, Juha

    2007-02-21

    We examine the quantum chemical calculation of parity-violating (PV) electroweak contributions to the spectral parameters of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from a methodological point of view. Nuclear magnetic shielding and indirect spin-spin coupling constants are considered and evaluated for three chiral molecules, H2O2, H2S2, and H2Se2. The effects of the choice of a one-particle basis set and the treatment of electron correlation, as well as the effects of special relativity, are studied. All of them are found to be relevant. The basis-set dependence is very pronounced, especially at the electron correlated ab initio levels of theory. Coupled-cluster and density-functional theory (DFT) results for PV contributions differ significantly from the Hartree-Fock data. DFT overestimates the PV effects, particularly with nonhybrid exchange-correlation functionals. Beginning from third-row elements, special relativity is of importance for the PV NMR properties, shown here by comparing perturbational one-component and various four-component calculations. In contrast to what is found for nuclear magnetic shielding, the choice of the model for nuclear charge distribution--point charge or extended (Gaussian)--has a significant impact on the PV contribution to the spin-spin coupling constants. PMID:17328593

  8. Parameter dependence of stochastic resonance in the FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model driven by trichotomous noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huiqing; Yang, Tingting; Xu, Yong; Xu, Wei

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the stochastic resonance in a FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model driven by trichotomous noise and periodic signal, focusing on the dependence of properties of stochastic resonance (SR) on system parameters. The stochastic resonance is shown through several different measures: system response, power spectrum and signal-to-noise ratio. Firstly, it is found that whether the neuron can fire regularly depends on the cooperative effect of the signal frequency and the signal amplitude for the deterministic FHN neuron. When the forcing amplitude alone is insufficient to cause the neuron firing, the neuron can fire with the addition of trichotomous noise. Secondly, we show that power spectrum is maximized for an optimal value of the noise correlation time, which is the signature of SR. Finally, from studying SNR, the specific system parameters are found to optimize the SR phenomenon.

  9. Blade resonance parameter identification based on tip-timing method without the once-per revolution sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Haotian; Duan, Fajie; Zhang, Jilong

    2016-01-01

    Blade tip-timing is the most effective method for blade vibration online measurement of turbomachinery. In this article a synchronous resonance vibration measurement method of blade based on tip-timing is presented. This method requires no once-per revolution sensor which makes it more generally applicable in the condition where this sensor is difficult to install, especially for the high-pressure rotors of dual-rotor engines. Only three casing mounted probes are required to identify the engine order, amplitude, natural frequency and the damping coefficient of the blade. A method is developed to identify the blade which a tip-timing data belongs to without once-per revolution sensor. Theoretical analyses of resonance parameter measurement are presented. Theoretic error of the method is investigated and corrected. Experiments are conducted and the results indicate that blade resonance parameter identification is achieved without once-per revolution sensor.

  10. Adapting Data Processing To Compare Model and Experiment Accurately: A Discrete Element Model and Magnetic Resonance Measurements of a 3D Cylindrical Fluidized Bed.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Christopher M; Holland, Daniel J; Scott, Stuart A; Dennis, John S

    2013-12-18

    Discrete element modeling is being used increasingly to simulate flow in fluidized beds. These models require complex measurement techniques to provide validation for the approximations inherent in the model. This paper introduces the idea of modeling the experiment to ensure that the validation is accurate. Specifically, a 3D, cylindrical gas-fluidized bed was simulated using a discrete element model (DEM) for particle motion coupled with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to describe the flow of gas. The results for time-averaged, axial velocity during bubbling fluidization were compared with those from magnetic resonance (MR) experiments made on the bed. The DEM-CFD data were postprocessed with various methods to produce time-averaged velocity maps for comparison with the MR results, including a method which closely matched the pulse sequence and data processing procedure used in the MR experiments. The DEM-CFD results processed with the MR-type time-averaging closely matched experimental MR results, validating the DEM-CFD model. Analysis of different averaging procedures confirmed that MR time-averages of dynamic systems correspond to particle-weighted averaging, rather than frame-weighted averaging, and also demonstrated that the use of Gaussian slices in MR imaging of dynamic systems is valid. PMID:24478537

  11. Adapting Data Processing To Compare Model and Experiment Accurately: A Discrete Element Model and Magnetic Resonance Measurements of a 3D Cylindrical Fluidized Bed

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Discrete element modeling is being used increasingly to simulate flow in fluidized beds. These models require complex measurement techniques to provide validation for the approximations inherent in the model. This paper introduces the idea of modeling the experiment to ensure that the validation is accurate. Specifically, a 3D, cylindrical gas-fluidized bed was simulated using a discrete element model (DEM) for particle motion coupled with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to describe the flow of gas. The results for time-averaged, axial velocity during bubbling fluidization were compared with those from magnetic resonance (MR) experiments made on the bed. The DEM-CFD data were postprocessed with various methods to produce time-averaged velocity maps for comparison with the MR results, including a method which closely matched the pulse sequence and data processing procedure used in the MR experiments. The DEM-CFD results processed with the MR-type time-averaging closely matched experimental MR results, validating the DEM-CFD model. Analysis of different averaging procedures confirmed that MR time-averages of dynamic systems correspond to particle-weighted averaging, rather than frame-weighted averaging, and also demonstrated that the use of Gaussian slices in MR imaging of dynamic systems is valid. PMID:24478537

  12. Analytical modeling of Schumann resonance and ELF propagation parameters on Mars with a multi-layered ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozakiewicz, Joanna; Kulak, Andrzej; Mlynarczyk, Janusz

    2015-11-01

    Two electrically conductive planetary spheres, the ionosphere and the ground, form a spherical waveguide. Within such a planetary cavity a phenomenon called Schumann resonance (SR) can occur. It is a resonance of extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic waves. The resonance parameters are strongly related to the electromagnetic properties of the cavity. On Mars, as there is no liquid water at the planetary surface, the ground has a low conductivity. In such a situation, ELF waves penetrate into the planetary subsurface up to many kilometers depth. To examine the influence of low-conductivity grounds on ELF propagation, we have introduced a recently developed analytical method, which enables to estimate the propagation parameters and explicate their dependence of the ground properties. Since the presented model is fully analytical, it is computationally efficient and can be very useful in finding inverse solutions. To demonstrate the potential of the method, we present the relationship between individual ground properties and the parameters of Schumann resonance. The obtained results indicate that Martian exploration performed by one ELF station located at the planetary surface can reveal, along with the properties of the ionosphere, the existence of liquid water under the Martian surface.

  13. Triangular Ring Resonator: Direct Measurement of the Parity-Odd Parameters of the Photon Sector of SME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exirifard, Qasem

    2014-03-01

    We introduce the Triangular Ring (TR) resonator. We show that the difference between the clockwise and anti-clockwise resonant frequencies of a vacuum TR resonator is sensitive to the birefringence parity-odd parameters of the photon's sector of the minimal Standard Model Extension (mSME): the Standard Model plus all the perturbative parameters encoding the break of the Lorentz symmetry. We report that utilizing the current technology allows for direct measurement of these parameters with a sensitivity of the parity-even ones and improves the best current resonator bounds by couple of orders of magnitudes. We note that, designing an optical table that rotates perpendicular to the gravitational equipotential surface (geoid) allows for direct measurement of the constancy of the light speed at the vicinity of the earth in all directions, in particular, perpendicular to the geoid. If this table could achieve the precision of the ordinary tables, then it would improve the GPS bounds on the constancy of the light speed perpendicular to geoid by about eight orders of magnitude.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of atomic xenon dissolved in Gay-Berne model liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Lintuvuori, Juho; Straka, Michal; Vaara, Juha

    2007-03-01

    We present constant-pressure Monte Carlo simulations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral parameters, nuclear magnetic shielding relative to the free atom as well as nuclear quadrupole coupling, for atomic xenon dissolved in a model thermotropic liquid crystal. The solvent is described by Gay-Berne (GB) molecules with parametrization kappa=4.4, kappa{'}=20.0 , and mu=nu=1 . The reduced pressure of P{*}=2.0 is used. Previous simulations of a pure GB system with this parametrization have shown that upon lowering the temperature, the model exhibits isotropic, nematic, smectic- A , and smectic- B /molecular crystal phases. We introduce spherical xenon solutes and adjust the energy and length scales of the GB-Xe interaction to those of the GB-GB interaction. This is done through first principles quantum chemical calculations carried out for a dimer of model mesogens as well as the mesogen-xenon complex. We preparametrize quantum chemically the Xe nuclear shielding and quadrupole coupling tensors when interacting with the model mesogen, and use the parametrization in a pairwise additive fashion in the analysis of the simulation. We present the temperature evolution of {129/131}Xe shielding and 131Xe quadrupole coupling in the different phases of the GB model. From the simulations, separate isotropic and anisotropic contributions to the experimentally available total shielding can be obtained. At the experimentally relevant concentration, the presence of the xenon atoms does not significantly affect the phase behavior as compared to the pure GB model. The simulations reproduce many of the characteristic experimental features of Xe NMR in real thermotropic LCs: Discontinuity in the value or trends of the shielding and quadrupole coupling at the nematic-isotropic and smectic-A-nematic phase transitions, nonlinear shift evolution in the nematic phase reflecting the behavior of the orientational order parameter, and decreasing shift in the smectic-A phase. The last

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of atomic xenon dissolved in Gay-Berne model liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lintuvuori, Juho; Straka, Michal; Vaara, Juha

    2007-03-01

    We present constant-pressure Monte Carlo simulations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral parameters, nuclear magnetic shielding relative to the free atom as well as nuclear quadrupole coupling, for atomic xenon dissolved in a model thermotropic liquid crystal. The solvent is described by Gay-Berne (GB) molecules with parametrization κ=4.4 , κ'=20.0 , and μ=ν=1 . The reduced pressure of P⋆=2.0 is used. Previous simulations of a pure GB system with this parametrization have shown that upon lowering the temperature, the model exhibits isotropic, nematic, smectic- A , and smectic- B /molecular crystal phases. We introduce spherical xenon solutes and adjust the energy and length scales of the GB-Xe interaction to those of the GB-GB interaction. This is done through first principles quantum chemical calculations carried out for a dimer of model mesogens as well as the mesogen-xenon complex. We preparametrize quantum chemically the Xe nuclear shielding and quadrupole coupling tensors when interacting with the model mesogen, and use the parametrization in a pairwise additive fashion in the analysis of the simulation. We present the temperature evolution of Xe129/131 shielding and Xe131 quadrupole coupling in the different phases of the GB model. From the simulations, separate isotropic and anisotropic contributions to the experimentally available total shielding can be obtained. At the experimentally relevant concentration, the presence of the xenon atoms does not significantly affect the phase behavior as compared to the pure GB model. The simulations reproduce many of the characteristic experimental features of Xe NMR in real thermotropic LCs: Discontinuity in the value or trends of the shielding and quadrupole coupling at the nematic-isotropic and smectic- A -nematic phase transitions, nonlinear shift evolution in the nematic phase reflecting the behavior of the orientational order parameter, and decreasing shift in the smectic- A phase. The last

  16. A rapid and accurate quantification method for real-time dynamic analysis of cellular lipids during microalgal fermentation processes in Chlorella protothecoides with low field nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Liu, Tingting; Wang, Zejian; Tian, Xiwei; Yang, Yi; Guo, Meijin; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping

    2016-05-01

    The rapid and real-time lipid determination can provide valuable information on process regulation and optimization in the algal lipid mass production. In this study, a rapid, accurate and precise quantification method of in vivo cellular lipids of Chlorella protothecoides using low field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) was newly developed. LF-NMR was extremely sensitive to the algal lipids with the limits of the detection (LOD) of 0.0026g and 0.32g/L in dry lipid samples and algal broth, respectively, as well as limits of quantification (LOQ) of 0.0093g and 1.18g/L. Moreover, the LF-NMR signal was specifically proportional to the cellular lipids of C. protothecoides, thus the superior regression curves existing in a wide detection range from 0.02 to 0.42g for dry lipids and from 1.12 to 8.97gL(-1) of lipid concentration for in vivo lipid quantification were obtained with all R(2) higher than 0.99, irrespective of the lipid content and fatty acids profile variations. The accuracy of this novel method was further verified to be reliable by comparing lipid quantification results to those obtained by GC-MS. And the relative standard deviation (RSD) of LF-NMR results were smaller than 2%, suggesting the precision of this method. Finally, this method was successfully used in the on-line lipid monitoring during the algal lipid fermentation processes, making it possible for better understanding of the lipid accumulation mechanism and dynamic bioprocess control. PMID:26948045

  17. Distinguishing black-hole spin-orbit resonances by their gravitational wave signatures. II. Full parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifirò, Daniele; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Gerosa, Davide; Berti, Emanuele; Kesden, Michael; Littenberg, Tyson; Sperhake, Ulrich

    2016-02-01

    Gravitational waves from coalescing binary black holes encode the evolution of their spins prior to merger. In the post-Newtonian regime and on the precession time scale, this evolution has one of three morphologies, with the spins either librating around one of two fixed points ("resonances") or circulating freely. In this paper we perform full parameter estimation on resonant binaries with fixed masses and spin magnitudes, changing three parameters: a conserved "projected effective spin" ξ and resonant family Δ Φ =0 ,π (which uniquely label the source); the inclination θJ N of the binary's total angular momentum with respect to the line of sight (which determines the strength of precessional effects in the waveform); and the signal amplitude. We demonstrate that resonances can be distinguished for a wide range of binaries, except for highly symmetric configurations where precessional effects are suppressed. Motivated by new insight into double-spin evolution, we introduce new variables to characterize precessing black hole binaries which naturally reflects the time scale separation of the system and therefore better encode the dynamical information carried by gravitational waves.

  18. Nonlinear Parameters for a Diagnosis of Micro-Scale Cracks Using a Nonlinear Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (nrus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Yong-Moo; Alam, M. K.; Kim, CheolGi

    2010-02-01

    Micro-scale cracks in a material are one of the major factors for the determination of life of a structure as well as for the structural integrity. Micro-scale cracks caused by materials degradation and damage will affect the resonance spectrum of a sample only very slightly and be masked by the resolution of the frequency spectrum when we use a standard linear Resonance Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) analysis. Micro-scale damages, however, can produce a nonlinear elastic behavior. The nonlinearity can be measured by increasing the dynamic strain i.e. excitation amplitude in a Nonlinear Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (NRUS) device. In this paper a feasibility of NRUS for a diagnosis of micro-cracks are investigated for low carbon steel CT specimens. A shift of resonance frequency and normalized amplitude of resonance pattern are chosen to correlate the micro-scale cracks or damage. These two nonlinear parameters can be a potential tool for the detection of micro-cracks or damage of a material.

  19. Generalized Parameter-Adjusted Stochastic Resonance of Duffing Oscillator and Its Application to Weak-Signal Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Zhi-Hui; Leng, Yong-Gang

    2015-01-01

    A two-dimensional Duffing oscillator which can produce stochastic resonance (SR) is studied in this paper. We introduce its SR mechanism and present a generalized parameter-adjusted SR (GPASR) model of this oscillator for the necessity of parameter adjustments. The Kramers rate is chosen as the theoretical basis to establish a judgmental function for judging the occurrence of SR in this model; and to analyze and summarize the parameter-adjusted rules under unmatched signal amplitude, frequency, and/or noise-intensity. Furthermore, we propose the weak-signal detection approach based on this GPASR model. Finally, we employ two practical examples to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach in practical engineering application. PMID:26343671

  20. Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perozzi, E.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A resonance in CELESTIAL MECHANICS occurs when some of the quantities characterizing the motion of two or more celestial bodies can be considered as commensurable, i.e. their ratio is close to an integer fraction. In a simplified form, this can be expressed as ...

  1. Approximate Schumann resonance parameters for a two-scale-height ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sentman, D. D.

    1990-01-01

    An isotropic, spherically symmetric two-scale-height ionosphere's transverse magnetic mode eigenfrequencies, as well as the height and angular profiles of its electric and magnetic fields, are presently addressed by an approximate solution. The electromagnetic energy in the eigenmodes is equally partitioned between the electric and magnetic fields, allowing a simple expression of the relative degrees of dissipation within the radial and tangential dissipation layers. The results obtained may be relevant to interpretations of the temporal variations in the Schumann resonances.

  2. Design parameters of a resonant infrared photoconductor with unity quantum efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhoomand, Jam; Mcmurray, Robert E., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This paper proposes a concept of a resonant infrared photoconductor that has characteristics of 100 percent quantum efficiency, high photoconductive gain, and very low noise equivalent power. Central to this concept is an establishment of a high-finesse absorption cavity internal to the detector element. A theoretical analysis is carried out, demonstrating this concept and providing some design guidelines. A Ge:Ga FIR detector is presently being fabricated using this approach.

  3. Calibration of DFT Functionals for the Prediction of 57Fe Mössbauer Spectral Parameters in Iron-Nitrosyl and Iron-Sulfur Complexes: Accurate Geometries Prove Essential

    PubMed Central

    Sandala, Gregory M.; Hopmann, Kathrin H.; Ghosh, Abhik

    2011-01-01

    structure. Significant improvements to the isomer shift calibrations are obtained for B3LYP and B3LYP* when geometries obtained with the OLYP functional are used. In addition, greatly improved performance of these functionals is found if the complete test set is grouped separately into Fe–NO and Fe–S complexes. Calibration fits including only Fe–NO complexes are found to be excellent, while those containing the non-nitrosyl Fe–S complexes alone are found to demonstrate less accurate correlations. Similar trends are also found with OLYP, OPBE, PW91, and BP86. Correlations between experimental and calculated QSs were also investigated. Generally, universal and separate Fe–NO and Fe–S fit parameters obtained to determine QSs are found to be of good to excellent quality for every density functional examined, especially if [Fe4(NO)4(μ3-S)4]− is removed from the test set. PMID:22039359

  4. Electrostatic Generation of Bulk Acoustic Waves and Electrical Parameters of Si-MEMS Resonators.

    PubMed

    Dulmet, Bernard; Ivan, Mihaela Eugenia; Ballandras, Sylvain

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes an analytical approach to model the generation of bulk acoustic waves in an electrostatically excited silicon MEMS structure, as well as its electromechanical response in terms of static and dynamic displacements, electromechanical coupling, and motional current. The analysis pertains to the single-port electrostatic drive of trapped-energy thickness-extensional (TE) modes in thin plates. Both asymmetric single-side and symmetric double-side electrostatic gap configurations are modeled. Green's function is used to describe the characteristic of the static displacement of the driven surface of the structure versus the dc bias voltage, which allows us to determine the electrical response of the resonator. Optical and electrical characterizations have been performed on resonator samples operating at 10.3 MHz on the fundamental of TE mode under single-side electrostatic excitation. The various figures of merit depend on the dc bias voltage. Typical values of 9000 for the Q-factor, and of 10(-5) for the electromechanical coupling factor k(2) have been obtained with [Formula: see text] for [Formula: see text]-thick gaps. Here-considered modes have a typical temperature coefficients of frequency (TCF) close to -30 ppm/(°)C. We conclude that the practical usability of such electrostatically excited bulk acoustic waves (BAW) resonators essentially depends on the efficiency of the compensation of feed-through capacitance. PMID:26642450

  5. Mechanical design parameters for detection of nuclear signals by magnetic resonance force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, G.J.; Hanlon, J.A.; Lamartine, B.; Hawley, M.; Solem, J.C.; Signer, S.; Jarmer, J.J.; Penttila, S.; Sillerud, L.O.; Pryputniewicz, R.J.

    1993-10-01

    Recent theoretical work has shown that mechanical detection of magnetic resonance from a single nuclear spin is in principle possible. This theory has recently been experimentally validated by the mechanical detection of electron spin resonance signals using microscale cantilevers. Currently we are extending this technology in an attempt to detect nuclear signals which are extending this technology in an attempt to detect nuclear signals which are three orders of magnitude lower in intensity than electron signals. In order to achieve the needed thousand-fold improvement in sensitivity we have undertaken the development of optimized mechanical cantilevers and highly polarized samples. Finite element modeling is used as a tool to simulate cantilever beam dynamics and to optimize the mechanical properties including Q, resonant frequency, amplitude of vibration and spring constant. Simulations are compared to experiments using heterodyne hologram interferometry. Nanofabrication of optimized cantilevers via ion milling will be directed by the outcome of these simulations and experiments. Highly polarized samples are developed using a three-fold approach: (1) high magnetic field strength (2.5T), (2) low temperature (1K), and (3) use of samples polarized by dynamic nuclear polarization. Our recent experiments have demonstrated nuclear polarizations in excess of 50% in molecules of toulene.

  6. Referencing strategy for the direct comparison of nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics motional parameters in RNA.

    PubMed

    Musselman, Catherine; Zhang, Qi; Al-Hashimi, Hashim; Andricioaei, Ioan

    2010-01-21

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are both techniques that can be used to characterize the structural dynamics of biomolecules and their underlying time scales. Comparison of relaxation parameters obtained through each methodology allows for cross validation of techniques and for complementarity in the analysis of dynamics. Here we present a combined NMR/MD study of the dynamics of HIV-1 transactivation response (TAR) RNA. We compute relaxation constants (R(1), R(2), and NOE) and model-free parameters (S(2) and tau) from a 65 ns molecular dynamics (MD) trajectory and compare them with the respective parameters measured in a domain-elongation NMR experiment. Using the elongated domain as the frame of reference for all computed parameters allows for a direct comparison between experiment and simulation. We see good agreement for many parameters and gain further insight into the nature of the local and global dynamics of TAR, which are found to be quite complex, spanning multiple time scales. For the few cases where agreement is poor, comparison of the dynamical parameters provides insight into the limits of each technique. We suggest a frequency-matching procedure that yields an upper bound for the time scale of dynamics to which the NMR relaxation experiment is sensitive. PMID:20039757

  7. An Analysis Method for Superconducting Resonator Parameter Extraction with Complex Baseline Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    A new semi-empirical model is proposed for extracting the quality (Q) factors of arrays of superconducting microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). The determination of the total internal and coupling Q factors enables the computation of the loss in the superconducting transmission lines. The method used allows the simultaneous analysis of multiple interacting discrete resonators with the presence of a complex spectral baseline arising from reflections in the system. The baseline removal allows an unbiased estimate of the device response as measured in a cryogenic instrumentation setting.

  8. Electrical and ionic conductivity effects on magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of CuI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesinowski, James P.; Ladouceur, Harold D.; Purdy, Andrew P.; Miller, Joel B.

    2010-12-01

    We investigate experimentally and theoretically the effects of two different types of conductivity, electrical and ionic, upon magic-angle spinning NMR spectra. The experimental demonstration of these effects involves 63Cu, 65Cu, and 127I variable temperature MAS-NMR experiments on samples of γ-CuI, a Cu+-ion conductor at elevated temperatures as well as a wide bandgap semiconductor. We extend previous observations that the chemical shifts depend very strongly upon the square of the spinning-speed as well as the particular sample studied and the magnetic field strength. By using the 207Pb resonance of lead nitrate mixed with the γ-CuI as an internal chemical shift thermometer we show that frictional heating effects of the rotor do not account for the observations. Instead, we find that spinning bulk CuI, a p-type semiconductor due to Cu+ vacancies in nonstoichiometric samples, in a magnetic field generates induced AC electric currents from the Lorentz force that can resistively heat the sample by over 200 °C. These induced currents oscillate along the rotor spinning axis at the spinning speed. Their associated heating effects are disrupted in samples containing inert filler material, indicating the existence of macroscopic current pathways between micron-sized crystallites. Accurate measurements of the temperature-dependence of the 63Cu and 127I chemical shifts in such diluted samples reveal that they are of similar magnitude (ca. 0.27 ppm/K) but opposite sign (being negative for 63Cu), and appear to depend slightly upon the particular sample. This relationship is identical to the corresponding slopes of the chemical shifts versus square of the spinning speed, again consistent with sample heating as the source of the observed large shift changes. Higher drive-gas pressures are required to spin samples that have higher effective electrical conductivities, indicating the presence of a braking effect arising from the induced currents produced by rotating a

  9. Electrical and ionic conductivity effects on magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of CuI.

    PubMed

    Yesinowski, James P; Ladouceur, Harold D; Purdy, Andrew P; Miller, Joel B

    2010-12-21

    We investigate experimentally and theoretically the effects of two different types of conductivity, electrical and ionic, upon magic-angle spinning NMR spectra. The experimental demonstration of these effects involves (63)Cu, (65)Cu, and (127)I variable temperature MAS-NMR experiments on samples of γ-CuI, a Cu(+)-ion conductor at elevated temperatures as well as a wide bandgap semiconductor. We extend previous observations that the chemical shifts depend very strongly upon the square of the spinning-speed as well as the particular sample studied and the magnetic field strength. By using the (207)Pb resonance of lead nitrate mixed with the γ-CuI as an internal chemical shift thermometer we show that frictional heating effects of the rotor do not account for the observations. Instead, we find that spinning bulk CuI, a p-type semiconductor due to Cu(+) vacancies in nonstoichiometric samples, in a magnetic field generates induced AC electric currents from the Lorentz force that can resistively heat the sample by over 200 °C. These induced currents oscillate along the rotor spinning axis at the spinning speed. Their associated heating effects are disrupted in samples containing inert filler material, indicating the existence of macroscopic current pathways between micron-sized crystallites. Accurate measurements of the temperature-dependence of the (63)Cu and (127)I chemical shifts in such diluted samples reveal that they are of similar magnitude (ca. 0.27 ppm/K) but opposite sign (being negative for (63)Cu), and appear to depend slightly upon the particular sample. This relationship is identical to the corresponding slopes of the chemical shifts versus square of the spinning speed, again consistent with sample heating as the source of the observed large shift changes. Higher drive-gas pressures are required to spin samples that have higher effective electrical conductivities, indicating the presence of a braking effect arising from the induced currents produced by

  10. Neutron resonance parameters of /sup 79/Br and /sup 81/Br up to 15 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, M.; Kawarasaki, Y.; Mizumoto, M.

    1980-09-01

    Resonance parameters of separated isotopes of bromine were measured using TOF spectrometer of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute linear accelerator. Transmission and capture measurements were made with /sup 6/Li-glass and Moxon-Rae detectors, on separated isotopes (approx. 98%) of /sup 79/Br and /sup 81/Br. Resonance analyses were made on transmission data with an area analysis code, and on capture data with a Monte-Carlo program CAFIT. For /sup 79/Br gGAMMA/sup 0//sub n/ values for 156 levels below 10 keV are obtained, and for /sup 81/Br 100 levels below 15 keV. Strength functions are obtained: for /sup 79/Br S/sub O/ = (1.27 +- 0.14) x10/sup -4/ below 10 keV, and for /sup 81/Br S/sub O/ = (0.86 +- 0.14)10/sup -4/ below 15 keV. Intermediate structures are observed in the resonances of /sup 81/Br showing clusters of levels at 1.2, 10, 11.5, and 14 keV, where the sum of gGAMMA/sup 0//sub n/ vs. neutron energy shows steep rises.

  11. Neutron total and capture cross section measurements and resonance parameter analysis of tungsten from 0.01 eV to 200 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, C.J.; Block, R.C.; Slovacek, R.E.; Overberg, M.E.; Moretti, B.E.; Burke, J.A.; Leinweber, G.; Drindak, N.J.

    1998-06-15

    Natural tungsten metal was measured using neutron time-of-flight spectroscopy at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) Gaerttner Laboratory linear accelerator to determine the tungsten resonance parameters. Three separate measurements were performed: transmission, capture, and self-indication. Previous measurements did not employ all three experiment types and used less sophisticated methods. The current work improves on the published tungsten data base and reduces resonance parameter uncertainties.

  12. Longitudinal NMR parameter measurements of Japanese pear fruit during the growing process using a mobile magnetic resonance imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geya, Yuto; Kimura, Takeshi; Fujisaki, Hirotaka; Terada, Yasuhiko; Kose, Katsumi; Haishi, Tomoyuki; Gemma, Hiroshi; Sekozawa, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Longitudinal nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameter measurements of Japanese pear fruit (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai, Kosui) were performed using an electrically mobile magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system with a 0.2 T and 16 cm gap permanent magnet. To measure the relaxation times and apparent diffusion coefficients of the pear fruit in relation to their weight, seven pear fruits were harvested almost every week during the cell enlargement period and measured in a research orchard. To evaluate the in situ relaxation times, six pear fruits were longitudinally measured for about two months during the same period. The measurements for the harvested samples showed good agreement with the in situ measurements. From the measurements of the harvested samples, it is clear that the relaxation rates of the pear fruits linearly change with the inverse of the linear dimension of the fruits, demonstrating that the relaxation mechanism is a surface relaxation. We therefore conclude that the mobile MRI system is a useful device for measuring the NMR parameters of outdoor living plants.

  13. Construct a new method accurately extracting parameters associate with absorption and scattering coefficients of epithelium and stroma: using perpendicular and oblique fiber bundle probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, H. P.; Sung, K. B.; Hsu, F. W.

    2014-05-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy has been applied as a non-invasive method to measure tissue optical properties, which are associate with anatomical information. The algorithm widely used to extract, optical parameters from reflectance spectra is the regression method, which is time-consuming and frequently converge to local maxima. In this study, the effects of parameters changes on spectra are analyzed in different fiber geometries, source-detector separations and wavelengths. In the end of this paper, a new fitting algorithm is proposed base on parameters features found. The new algorithm is expected to enhance the accuracy of parameters extracted and save 75% of the process time.

  14. Anomalous Solute Transport in Saturated Porous Media: Linking Transport Model Parameters to Electrical and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, R. D.; Binley, A. M.; Keating, K.; France, S.; Osterman, G. K.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Singha, K.

    2013-12-01

    The advection-dispersion equation fails to describe non-Fickian solute transport in saturated porous media, necessitating the use of other models. The dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) model partitions the total porosity into mobile and less-mobile domains with solute exchange between the domains; consequently, the DDMT model can produce a better fit to breakthrough curves (BTCs) in systems defined by more- and less-mobile components. However, direct experimental estimation of DDMT model parameters such as rate of exchange and the mobile and less-mobile porosities remains elusive. Consequently, model parameters are often calculated purely as a model fitting exercise. There is a clear need for material characterization techniques that can offer some insight into the pore space geometrical arrangement, particularly if such techniques can be extended to the field scale. Here, we interpret static direct-current (DC) resistivity, complex resistivity (CR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) geophysical measurements in the characterization of mass transfer parameters. We use two different samples of the zeolite clinoptilolite, a material shown to demonstrate solute mass transfer due to a significant intragranular porosity, along with glass beads as a control. We explore the relation between geophysical and DDMT parameters in conjunction with supporting material characterization methods. Our results reveal how these geophysical measurements can offer some insight into the pore structures controlling the observed anomalous transport behavior.

  15. Determination of GLUT1 Oligomerization Parameters using Bioluminescent Förster Resonance Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Looyenga, Brendan; VanOpstall, Calvin; Lee, Zion; Bell, Jed; Lodge, Evans; Wrobel, Katherine; Arnoys, Eric; Louters, Larry

    2016-01-01

    The facilitated glucose transporter GLUT1 (SLC2A1) is an important mediator of glucose homeostasis in humans. Though it is found in most cell types to some extent, the level of GLUT1 expression across different cell types can vary dramatically. Prior studies in erythrocytes—which express particularly high levels of GLUT1—have suggested that GLUT1 is able to form tetrameric complexes with enhanced transport activity. Whether dynamic aggregation of GLUT1 also occurs in cell types with more modest expression of GLUT1, however, is unclear. To address this question, we developed a genetically encoded bioluminescent Förster resonance energy transfer (BRET) assay using the luminescent donor Nanoluciferase and fluorescent acceptor mCherry. By tethering these proteins to the N-terminus of GLUT1 and performing saturation BRET analysis, we were able to demonstrate the formation of multimeric complexes in live cells. Parallel use of flow cytometry and immunoblotting further enabled us to estimate the density of GLUT1 proteins required for spontaneous oligomerization. These data provide new insights into the physiological relevance of GLUT1 multimerization as well as a new variant of BRET assay that is useful for measuring the interactions among other cell membrane proteins in live cells. PMID:27357903

  16. Determination of GLUT1 Oligomerization Parameters using Bioluminescent Förster Resonance Energy Transfer.

    PubMed

    Looyenga, Brendan; VanOpstall, Calvin; Lee, Zion; Bell, Jed; Lodge, Evans; Wrobel, Katherine; Arnoys, Eric; Louters, Larry

    2016-01-01

    The facilitated glucose transporter GLUT1 (SLC2A1) is an important mediator of glucose homeostasis in humans. Though it is found in most cell types to some extent, the level of GLUT1 expression across different cell types can vary dramatically. Prior studies in erythrocytes-which express particularly high levels of GLUT1-have suggested that GLUT1 is able to form tetrameric complexes with enhanced transport activity. Whether dynamic aggregation of GLUT1 also occurs in cell types with more modest expression of GLUT1, however, is unclear. To address this question, we developed a genetically encoded bioluminescent Förster resonance energy transfer (BRET) assay using the luminescent donor Nanoluciferase and fluorescent acceptor mCherry. By tethering these proteins to the N-terminus of GLUT1 and performing saturation BRET analysis, we were able to demonstrate the formation of multimeric complexes in live cells. Parallel use of flow cytometry and immunoblotting further enabled us to estimate the density of GLUT1 proteins required for spontaneous oligomerization. These data provide new insights into the physiological relevance of GLUT1 multimerization as well as a new variant of BRET assay that is useful for measuring the interactions among other cell membrane proteins in live cells. PMID:27357903

  17. Anomalous solute transport in saturated porous media: Relating transport model parameters to electrical and nuclear magnetic resonance properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Ryan D.; Binley, Andrew; Keating, Kristina; France, Samantha; Osterman, Gordon; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Singha, Kamini

    2015-02-01

    The advection-dispersion equation (ADE) fails to describe commonly observed non-Fickian solute transport in saturated porous media, necessitating the use of other models such as the dual-domain mass-transfer (DDMT) model. DDMT model parameters are commonly calibrated via curve fitting, providing little insight into the relation between effective parameters and physical properties of the medium. There is a clear need for material characterization techniques that can provide insight into the geometry and connectedness of pore spaces related to transport model parameters. Here, we consider proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), direct-current (DC) resistivity, and complex conductivity (CC) measurements for this purpose, and assess these methods using glass beads as a control and two different samples of the zeolite clinoptilolite, a material that demonstrates non-Fickian transport due to intragranular porosity. We estimate DDMT parameters via calibration of a transport model to column-scale solute tracer tests, and compare NMR, DC resistivity, CC results, which reveal that grain size alone does not control transport properties and measured geophysical parameters; rather, volume and arrangement of the pore space play important roles. NMR cannot provide estimates of more-mobile and less-mobile pore volumes in the absence of tracer tests because these estimates depend critically on the selection of a material-dependent and flow-dependent cutoff time. Increased electrical connectedness from DC resistivity measurements are associated with greater mobile pore space determined from transport model calibration. CC was hypothesized to be related to length scales of mass transfer, but the CC response is unrelated to DDMT.

  18. Brain magnetic resonance imaging, aerobic power, and metabolic parameters among 30 asymptomatic scuba divers.

    PubMed

    Tripodi, D; Dupas, B; Potiron, M; Louvet, S; Geraut, C

    2004-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the presence of cerebral lesions in asymptomatic scuba divers and explain the causes of them: potential risk factors associating cardiovascular risk factors, low aerobic capacity, or characteristics of diving (maximum depth, ascent rate). Experienced scuba divers, over 40 years of age, without any decompression sickness (DCS) history were included. We studied 30 scuba divers (instructors) without any clinical symptoms. For all of them, we carried out a clinical examination with fatty body mass determination and we questioned them about their diving habits. A brain Magnetic Resonance imaging (MRI), an assessment of maximal oxygen uptake, glycemia, triglyceridemia, and cholesterolemia were systematically carried out. Cerebral spots of high intensity were found at 33 % in the scuba diving group and 30 % in the control group. In the diving group, abnormalities were related to unsafe scuba-diving or metabolic abnormalities. In our study, we did not find a significant relationship between the lesions of the central nervous system, and the age, depth of the dives, number of dives, and ergometric performances (maximal oxygen uptake, V.O (2max), serum level of blood lactate). Nevertheless, we found a significant relationship between the lesions of the central nervous system and ascent rate faster than 10 meters per minute (r = 0.57; p = 0.003) or presence of high level of cholesterolemia (r = 0.6; p = 0.001). We found concordant results using the Cochran's Test: meaningful link between the number of brain lesions and the speed of decompression (Uexp = 14 < Utable = 43; alpha = 0.05, p < 0.01). We concluded that hyperintensities can be explained by preformed nitrogen gas microbubbles and particularly in presence of cholesterol, when the ascent rate is up to 10 meters per minute. So, it was remarkable to note that asymptomatic patients practicing scuba diving either professionally or recreationally, presented lesions of the central nervous

  19. Fascicular Ratio: A New Parameter to Evaluate Peripheral Nerve Pathology on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tagliafico, Alberto S.; Tagliafico, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The objective of the study was to define and quantitatively evaluate the fascicular ratio (FR) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with peripheral neuropathies compared with healthy controls. Forty control subjects (20 women, 20 men; age, 44.6 ± 13.4 years) and 40 patients with peripheral neuropathy (22 women, 18 men; age, 50.3 ± 10.2 years) were examined with a standard 3T MRI protocol. With customized software (with semiautomatic and automatic interface), the hypointense and hyperintense areas of the peripheral nerves corresponding to fascicular and nonfascicular tissue were examined on T1-weighted sequences. The ratio of fascicular pixels to total pixels was called FR. Correlation with FR calculated on high-resolution ultrasound was performed. The statistical analysis included the Mann–Whitney U test of controls versus patients, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, and the subgroup analysis of patients according to etiologies of neuropathy. Intraobserver and interobserver agreement was calculated based on the evaluation made by 3 readers. Finally, a complete automatic evaluation was performed. On MRI, FRs were significantly increased in patients compared with controls (FR, 76.7 ± 15.1 vs 56 ± 12.3; P < 0.0001 for the semiautomatic interface; and FR 66.3 ± 17.5 vs 47.8 ± 18.4; P < 0.0001 for the automatic interface). The increase in FR was caused mainly by an increase in the hypointense part of the nerve. This observation was valid for all causes of neuropathies. ROC analysis found an area under the curve of 0.75 (95% confidence interval, 0.44–0.81) for FR to discriminate neuropathy from control. The correlation coefficient between MRI and ultrasound was significant (r = 0.49; 95% confidence interval for r, 0.21–0.70; P = 0.012). With the semiautomated evaluation, the mean intraobserver agreement was good (K = 0.86). The interobserver agreements were also good (reader 1

  20. Relativistic effects in the intermolecular interaction-induced nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of xenon dimer.

    PubMed

    Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Ilias, Miroslav; Jensen, Hans Jorgen Aagaard; Vaara, Juha

    2007-10-28

    Relativistic effects on the (129)Xe nuclear magnetic resonance shielding and (131)Xe nuclear quadrupole coupling (NQC) tensors are examined in the weakly bound Xe(2) system at different levels of theory including the relativistic four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) method. The intermolecular interaction-induced binary chemical shift delta, the anisotropy of the shielding tensor Deltasigma, and the NQC constant along the internuclear axis chi( parallel) are calculated as a function of the internuclear distance. DHF shielding calculations are carried out using gauge-including atomic orbitals. For comparison, the full leading-order one-electron Breit-Pauli perturbation theory (BPPT) is applied using a common gauge origin. Electron correlation effects are studied at the nonrelativistic (NR) coupled-cluster singles and doubles with perturbational triples [CCSD(T)] level of theory. The fully relativistic second-order Moller-Plesset many-body perturbation (DMP2) theory is used to examine the cross coupling between correlation and relativity on NQC. The same is investigated for delta and Deltasigma by BPPT with a density functional theory model. A semiquantitative agreement between the BPPT and DHF binary property curves is obtained for delta and Deltasigma in Xe(2). For these properties, the currently most complete theoretical description is obtained by a piecewise approximation where the uncorrelated relativistic DHF results obtained close to the basis-set limit are corrected, on the one hand, for NR correlation effects and, on the other hand, for the BPPT-based cross coupling of relativity and correlation. For chi( parallel), the fully relativistic DMP2 results obtain a correction for NR correlation effects beyond MP2. The computed temperature dependence of the second virial coefficient of the (129)Xe nuclear shielding is compared to experiment in Xe gas. Our best results, obtained with the piecewise approximation for the binary chemical shift combined with the

  1. /sup 187/Os + n resonance parameters in the interval 27-500 eV neutron energies

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, R.R.; Carlton, R.F.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.

    1982-01-01

    The neutron total cross section for /sup 187/Os, in the energy range, 27 eV to 500 eV, has been measured at the ORELA facility by the neutron time-of-flight technique, utilizing a 2.0 gm osmium sample (n = 0.008401 Os-nuclei/barn) enriched to 70.38% /sup 187/Os. Measurements were performed at a 80 m flight station with an energy resolution, ..delta..E/E, of 0.1% using a /sup 6/Li glass scintillator. Resolved resonances have been analyzed by a Reich-Moore multilevel code (SAMMY) to obtain parameters for 85 resonances up to 500 eV. Preliminary determinations of the level spacing (5 eV) and s-wave strength function (3.9 x 10/sup -4/) for /sup 187/Os are in agreement with recent analyses of the osmium isotopes, made in connection with the use of the Re/Os chronometer for estimating the duration of stellar nucleosynthesis.

  2. The far-infrared laser magnetic resonance spectrum of the SiH radical and determination of ground state parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. M.; Curl, R. F.; Evenson, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    The far-infrared laser magnetic resonance spectrum of the SiH radical in the v = O level of its X2Pi state has been recorded. The signals are rather weak. The molecules were generated in the reaction between fluorine atoms and SiH4. Rotational transitions have been detected in both 2Pi1/2 and 2Pi3/2 spin components but no fine structure transitions between the spin components were observed. Proton hyperfine splittings were resolved on some lines. The measurements have been analyzed, subjected to a least-squares fit using an effective Hamiltonian, and the appropriate molecular parameters determined. The weakness of the spectrum and the failure of attempts to power saturate favorable lines are both consistent with a small value for the electric dipole moment for SiH.

  3. Resolution of the multichannel anomaly in the extraction of S-matrix resonance-pole parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Ceci, Sasa; Stahov, Jugoslav; Svarc, Alfred; Zauner, Branimir; Watson, Shon

    2008-06-01

    Within the framework of a mathematically well-defined coupled-channel T-matrix model we have improved the existing multichannel pole-extraction procedure based on the numerical analytic continuation of the channel propagator, and for the first time we present the full set of pole parameters for already published amplitudes. Standard single-channel pole-extraction method (speed plot) was then applied to those amplitudes and resulting sets of T-matrix poles were inspected. The anomaly has been established that in some partial waves the pole values extracted using the standard single-channel methods differ not only from the values obtained using the analytic continuation method, but also change from one reaction to another. Inspired by this peculiarity, we have developed a new single-channel pole-extraction method based solely on the assumption of the partial wave analyticity. Since the speed plot turns out to be the lowest order term of the proposed method, the anomaly is understood and resolved.

  4. Tabletop magnetic resonance elastography for the measurement of viscoelastic parameters of small tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipek-Ugay, Selcan; Drießle, Toni; Ledwig, Michael; Guo, Jing; Hirsch, Sebastian; Sack, Ingolf; Braun, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of low-cost tabletop MR elastography (MRE) for quantifying the complex shear modulus G∗ of small soft biological tissue samples as provided by pathologists. The MRE system was developed based on a tabletop MRI scanner equipped with a 0.5 T permanent magnet and a tissue sample holder mounted to a loudspeaker. A spin echo sequence was enhanced with motion-encoding gradients of 250 mT/m amplitude synchronized to acoustic vibration frequencies. Shear wave images suitable for elastography were acquired between vibration frequencies of 0.5 and 1 kHz in agarose, ultrasound gel, porcine liver, porcine skeletal muscle, and bovine heart with a spatial resolution of 234 μm pixel edge length. The measured frequency dependence of G∗ agreed well with previous work based on high-field MR systems. The ratio between loss and storage moduli was highest in liver and ultrasound gel, followed by muscle tissue and agarose gel while ultrasound gel and liver showed similarly low storage moduli compared to the other samples. The shear wave to noise ratio is an important imaging criteria for MRE and was about 4.2 times lower for the preliminary setup of the 0.5 T tabletop system compared to a 7 T animal scanner. In the future, the new tabletop MRE system may serve as a low cost device for preclinical research on the correlation of viscoelastic parameters with histopathology of biological samples.

  5. Tabletop magnetic resonance elastography for the measurement of viscoelastic parameters of small tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Ipek-Ugay, Selcan; Drießle, Toni; Ledwig, Michael; Guo, Jing; Hirsch, Sebastian; Sack, Ingolf; Braun, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of low-cost tabletop MR elastography (MRE) for quantifying the complex shear modulus G(∗) of small soft biological tissue samples as provided by pathologists. The MRE system was developed based on a tabletop MRI scanner equipped with a 0.5 T permanent magnet and a tissue sample holder mounted to a loudspeaker. A spin echo sequence was enhanced with motion-encoding gradients of 250 mT/m amplitude synchronized to acoustic vibration frequencies. Shear wave images suitable for elastography were acquired between vibration frequencies of 0.5 and 1 kHz in agarose, ultrasound gel, porcine liver, porcine skeletal muscle, and bovine heart with a spatial resolution of 234 μm pixel edge length. The measured frequency dependence of G(∗) agreed well with previous work based on high-field MR systems. The ratio between loss and storage moduli was highest in liver and ultrasound gel, followed by muscle tissue and agarose gel while ultrasound gel and liver showed similarly low storage moduli compared to the other samples. The shear wave to noise ratio is an important imaging criteria for MRE and was about 4.2 times lower for the preliminary setup of the 0.5 T tabletop system compared to a 7 T animal scanner. In the future, the new tabletop MRE system may serve as a low cost device for preclinical research on the correlation of viscoelastic parameters with histopathology of biological samples. PMID:25554945

  6. Narrowing of lumbar spinal canal predicts chronic low back pain more accurately than intervertebral disc degeneration: a magnetic resonance imaging study in young Finnish male conscripts.

    PubMed

    Visuri, Tuomo; Ulaska, Jaana; Eskelin, Marja; Pulkkinen, Pekka

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this magnetic resonance imaging study was to evaluate the role of degenerative changes, developmental spinal stenosis, and compression of spinal nerve roots in chronic low back (CLBP) and radicular pain in Finnish conscripts. The degree of degeneration, protrusion, and herniation of the intervertebral discs and stenosis of the nerve root canals was evaluated, and the midsagittal diameter and cross-sectional area of the lumbar vertebrae canal were measured in 108 conscripts with CLBP and 90 asymptomatic controls. The midsagittal diameters at L1-L4 levels were significantly smaller in the patients with CLBP than in the controls. Moreover, degeneration of the L4/5 disc and protrusion or herniation of the L5/S1 disc and stenosis of the nerve root canals at level L5/S1 were more frequent among the CLBP patients. Multifactorial analysis of the magnetic resonance imaging findings provided a total explanatory rate of only 33%. Narrowing of the vertebral canal in the anteroposterior direction was more likely to produce CLBP and radiating pain than intervertebral disc degeneration or narrowing of the intervertebral nerve root canals. PMID:16450819

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging after Completion of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Can Accurately Discriminate between No Residual Carcinoma and Residual Ductal Carcinoma In Situ in Patients with Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seho; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Sohn, Joohyuk; Park, Hyung Seok; Moon, Hee Jung; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Seung Il; Park, Byeong-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background The accurate evaluation of favorable response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) is critical to determine the extent of surgery. We investigated independent clinicopathological and radiological predictors to discriminate no residual carcinoma (ypT0) from residual ductal carcinoma in situ (ypTis) in breast cancer patients who received NCT. Patients and Methods Parameters of 117 patients attaining pathological complete response (CR) in the breast after NCT between January 2010 and December 2013 were retrospectively evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. All patients underwent mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after NCT. Results There were 67 (57.3%) patients with ypT0. These patients were associated with hormone receptor-negative status, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)-negative tumors, and a higher likelihood of breast-conservation surgery. Baseline mammographic and MRI presentation of the main lesion, absence of associated microcalcifications, shape, posterior features, and absence of calcifications on ultrasound were significantly associated with ypT0. CR in mammography, ultrasound, or MRI after NCT was also related to ypT0. By multivariate analysis, independent predictors of ypT0 were the triple-negative subtype [Odds ratio (OR), 4.23; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.11–16.09] and CR in MRI after NCT (OR, 5.23; 95% CI, 1.53–17.85). Stratified analysis by breast cancer subtype demonstrated that MRI well predicted ypT0 in all subtypes except the HER2-positive subtype. In particular, of 40 triple-negative subtypes, 22 showed CR in MRI and 21 (95.5%) were ypT0 after NCT. Conclusion Among imaging modalities, breast MRI can potentially distinguish between ypT0 and ypTis after NCT, especially in patients with triple-negative breast cancer. This information can help clinicians evaluate tumor response to NCT and plan surgery for breast cancer patients of all subtypes except for those with HER2

  8. Quantifying Uranium Isotope Ratios Using Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry: The Influence of Laser Parameters on Relative Ionization Probability

    SciTech Connect

    Isselhardt, Brett H.

    2011-09-01

    Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) has been developed as a method to measure relative uranium isotope abundances. In this approach, RIMS is used as an element-selective ionization process to provide a distinction between uranium atoms and potential isobars without the aid of chemical purification and separation. We explore the laser parameters critical to the ionization process and their effects on the measured isotope ratio. Specifically, the use of broad bandwidth lasers with automated feedback control of wavelength was applied to the measurement of 235U/238U ratios to decrease laser-induced isotopic fractionation. By broadening the bandwidth of the first laser in a 3-color, 3-photon ionization process from a bandwidth of 1.8 GHz to about 10 GHz, the variation in sequential relative isotope abundance measurements decreased from >10% to less than 0.5%. This procedure was demonstrated for the direct interrogation of uranium oxide targets with essentially no sample preparation. A rate equation model for predicting the relative ionization probability has been developed to study the effect of variation in laser parameters on the measured isotope ratio. This work demonstrates that RIMS can be used for the robust measurement of uranium isotope ratios.

  9. Accurate fundamental parameters of CoRoT asteroseismic targets. The solar-like stars HD 49933, HD 175726, HD 181420, and HD 181906

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruntt, H.

    2009-10-01

    Context: The CoRoT satellite has provided high-quality light curves of several solar-like stars. Analysis of these light curves provides oscillation frequencies that make it possible to probe the interior of the stars. However, additional constraints on the fundamental parameters of the stars are important for the theoretical modelling to be successful. Aims: We estimate the fundamental parameters (mass, radius, and luminosity) of the first four solar-like targets to be observed in the asteroseismic field. In addition, we determine their effective temperature, metallicity, and detailed abundance patterns. Methods: To constrain the stellar mass, radius and age we used the shotgun software, which compares the location of the stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram with theoretical evolution models. This method takes the uncertainties of the observed parameters into account, including the large separation determined from the solar-like oscillations. We determined the effective temperatures and abundance patterns in the stars from the analysis of high-resolution spectra obtained with the HARPS, NARVAL, ELODIE and FEROS spectrographs. Results: We determined the mass, radius, and luminosity of the four CoRoT targets to within 5{-}10%, 2{-}4% and 5{-}13%, respectively. The quality of the stellar spectra determines how well we can constrain the effective temperature. For the two best spectra we get 1-σ uncertainties below 60 K and 100{-}150 K for the other two. The uncertainty on the surface gravity is less than 0.08 dex for three stars, while it is 0.15 dex for HD 181906. The reason for the larger uncertainty is that the spectrum has two components with a luminosity ratio of L_p/Ls = 0.50±0.15. While Hipparcos astrometric data strongly suggest it is a binary star, we find evidence that the fainter star may be a background star, since it is less luminous but hotter.

  10. Accurate age classification of 6 and 12 month-old infants based on resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging data

    PubMed Central

    Pruett, John R.; Kandala, Sridhar; Hoertel, Sarah; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Elison, Jed T.; Nishino, Tomoyuki; Feczko, Eric; Dosenbach, Nico U.F.; Nardos, Binyam; Power, Jonathan D.; Adeyemo, Babatunde; Botteron, Kelly N.; McKinstry, Robert C.; Evans, Alan C.; Hazlett, Heather C.; Dager, Stephen R.; Paterson, Sarah; Schultz, Robert T.; Collins, D. Louis; Fonov, Vladimir S.; Styner, Martin; Gerig, Guido; Das, Samir; Kostopoulos, Penelope; Constantino, John N.; Estes, Annette M.; Petersen, Steven E.; Schlaggar, Bradley L.; Piven, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Human large-scale functional brain networks are hypothesized to undergo significant changes over development. Little is known about these functional architectural changes, particularly during the second half of the first year of life. We used multivariate pattern classification of resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) data obtained in an on-going, multi-site, longitudinal study of brain and behavioral development to explore whether fcMRI data contained information sufficient to classify infant age. Analyses carefully account for the effects of fcMRI motion artifact. Support vector machines (SVMs) classified 6 versus 12 month-old infants (128 datasets) above chance based on fcMRI data alone. Results demonstrate significant changes in measures of brain functional organization that coincide with a special period of dramatic change in infant motor, cognitive, and social development. Explorations of the most different correlations used for SVM lead to two different interpretations about functional connections that support 6 versus 12-month age categorization. PMID:25704288

  11. Accurate calculations on 12 Λ-S and 28 Ω states of BN+ cation: potential energy curves, spectroscopic parameters and spin-orbit coupling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Deheng; Liu, Qionglan; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2014-03-25

    The potential energy curves (PECs) of 28 Ω states generated from the 12 states (X(4)Σ(-), 1(2)Π, 1(2)Σ(-), 1(2)Δ, 1(2)Σ(+), 2(2)Π, A(4)Π, B(4)Σ(-), 3(2)Π, 1(6)Σ(-), 2(2)Σ(-) and 1(6)Π) of the BN(+) cation are studied for the first time for internuclear separations from about 0.1 to 1.0 nm using an ab initio quantum chemical method. All the Λ-S states correlate to the first four dissociation channels. The 1(6)Σ(-), 3(2)Π and A(4)Π states are found to be the inverted ones. The 1(2)Σ(+), 2(2)Π, 3(2)Π and 2(2)Σ(-) states are found to possess the double well. The PECs are calculated by the complete active space self-consistent field method, which is followed by the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction approach with the Davidson correction. Core-valence correlation correction is included by a cc-pCV5Z basis set. Scalar relativistic correction is calculated by the third-order Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian approximation at the level of a cc-pV5Z basis set. The convergent behavior of present calculations is discussed with respect to the basis set and level of theory. The spin-orbit coupling is accounted for by the state interaction approach with the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian using the all-electron cc-pCV5Z basis set. All the PECs are extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The spectroscopic parameters are obtained, and the vibrational properties of 1(2)Σ(+), 2(2)Π, 3(2)Π and 2(2)Σ(-) states are evaluated. Analyses demonstrate that the spectroscopic parameters reported here can be expected to be reliably predicted ones. The conclusion is gained that the effect of spin-orbit coupling on the spectroscopic parameters are not obvious almost for all the Λ-S states involved in the present paper. PMID:24334021

  12. Accurate calculations on 9 Λ-S and 28 Ω states of NSe radical in the gas phase: potential energy curves, spectroscopic parameters and spin-orbit couplings.

    PubMed

    Shi, Deheng; Li, Peiling; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2014-01-01

    The potential energy curves (PECs) of 28 Ω states generated from 9 Λ-S states (X(2)Π, 1(4)Π, 1(6)Π, 1(2)Σ(+), 1(4)Σ(+), 1(6)Σ(+), 1(4)Σ(-), 2(4)Π and 1(4)Δ) are studied for the first time using an ab initio quantum chemical method. All the 9 Λ-S states correlate to the first two dissociation limits, N((4)Su)+Se((3)Pg) and N((4)Su)+Se((3)Dg), of NSe radical. Of these Λ-S states, the 1(6)Σ(+), 1(4)Σ(+), 1(6)Π, 2(4)Π and 1(4)Δ are found to be rather weakly bound states. The 1(2)Σ(+) is found to be unstable and has double wells. And the 1(6)Σ(+), 1(4)Σ(+), 1(4)Π and 1(6)Π are found to be the inverted ones with the SO coupling included. The PEC calculations are made by the complete active space self-consistent field method, which is followed by the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction approach with the Davidson modification. The spin-orbit coupling is accounted for by the state interaction approach with the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. The convergence of the present calculations is discussed with respect to the basis set and the level of theory. Core-valence correlation corrections are included with a cc-pCVTZ basis set. Scalar relativistic corrections are calculated by the third-order Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian approximation at the level of a cc-pV5Z basis set. All the PECs are extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The variation with internuclear separation of spin-orbit coupling constants is discussed in brief for some Λ-S states with one shallow well on each PEC. The spectroscopic parameters of 9 Λ-S and 28 Ω states are determined by fitting the first ten vibrational levels whenever available, which are calculated by solving the rovibrational Schrödinger equation with Numerov's method. The splitting energy in the X(2)Π Λ-S state is determined to be about 864.92 cm(-1), which agrees favorably with the measurements of 891.80 cm(-1). Moreover, other spectroscopic parameters of Λ-S and Ω states involved here are

  13. Is scoring system of computed tomography based metric parameters can accurately predicts shock wave lithotripsy stone-free rates and aid in the development of treatment strategies?

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Yasser Ali; Abdelaziz, Alsayed Saad; Shehab, Mohamed Ahmed; Mohamed, Hazem Abdelsabour Dief; Emara, Absel-Aziz Ali; Elnabtity, Ali Mohamed Ali; Ghanem, Maged Mohammed; ELHelaly, Hesham Abdel Azim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to determine the predicting success of shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) using a combination of computed tomography based metric parameters to improve the treatment plan. Patients and Methods: Consecutive 180 patients with symptomatic upper urinary tract calculi 20 mm or less were enrolled in our study underwent extracorporeal SWL were divided into two main groups, according to the stone size, Group A (92 patients with stone ≤10 mm) and Group B (88 patients with stone >10 mm). Both groups were evaluated, according to the skin to stone distance (SSD) and Hounsfield units (≤500, 500–1000 and >1000 HU). Results: Both groups were comparable in baseline data and stone characteristics. About 92.3% of Group A rendered stone-free, whereas 77.2% were stone-free in Group B (P = 0.001). Furthermore, in both group SWL success rates was a significantly higher for stones with lower attenuation <830 HU than with stones >830 HU (P < 0.034). SSD were statistically differences in SWL outcome (P < 0.02). Simultaneous consideration of three parameters stone size, stone attenuation value, and SSD; we found that stone-free rate (SFR) was 100% for stone attenuation value <830 HU for stone <10 mm or >10 mm but total number SWL sessions and shock waves required for the larger stone group were higher than in the smaller group (P < 0.01). Furthermore, SFR was 83.3% and 37.5% for stone <10 mm, mean HU >830, SSD 90 mm and SSD >120 mm, respectively. On the other hand, SFR was 52.6% and 28.57% for stone >10 mm, mean HU >830, SSD <90 mm and SSD >120 mm, respectively. Conclusion: Stone size, stone density (HU), and SSD is simple to calculate and can be reported by radiologists to applying combined score help to augment predictive power of SWL, reduce cost, and improving of treatment strategies. PMID:27141192

  14. The Araucaria Project: accurate stellar parameters and distance to evolved eclipsing binary ASAS J180057-2333.8 in Sagittarius Arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchomska, K.; Graczyk, D.; Smolec, R.; Pietrzyński, G.; Gieren, W.; Stȩpień, K.; Konorski, P.; Pilecki, B.; Villanova, S.; Thompson, I. B.; Górski, M.; Karczmarek, P.; Wielgórski, P.; Anderson, R. I.

    2015-07-01

    We have analyzed the double-lined eclipsing binary system ASAS J180057-2333.8 from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) catalogue. We measure absolute physical and orbital parameters for this system based on archival V-band and I-band ASAS photometry, as well as on high-resolution spectroscopic data obtained with ESO 3.6 m/HARPS and CORALIE spectrographs. The physical and orbital parameters of the system were derived with an accuracy of about 0.5-3 per cent. The system is a very rare configuration of two bright well-detached giants of spectral types K1 and K4 and luminosity class II. The radii of the stars are R1 = 52.12 ± 1.38 and R2 = 67.63 ± 1.40 R⊙ and their masses are M1 = 4.914 ± 0.021 and M2 = 4.875 ± 0.021 M⊙. The exquisite accuracy of 0.5 per cent obtained for the masses of the components is one of the best mass determinations for giants. We derived a precise distance to the system of 2.14 ± 0.06 kpc (stat.) ± 0.05 (syst.) which places the star in the Sagittarius-Carina arm. The Galactic rotational velocity of the star is Θs = 258 ± 26 km s-1 assuming Θ0 = 238 km s-1. A comparison with PARSEC isochrones places the system at the early phase of core helium burning with an age of slightly larger than 100 million years. The effect of overshooting on stellar evolutionary tracks was explored using the MESA star code.

  15. Photochemical parameters of atmospheric source gases: accurate determination of OH reaction rate constants over atmospheric temperatures, UV and IR absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orkin, V. L.; Khamaganov, V. G.; Martynova, L. E.; Kurylo, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    The emissions of halogenated (Cl, Br containing) organics of both natural and anthropogenic origin contribute to the balance of and changes in the stratospheric ozone concentration. The associated chemical cycles are initiated by the photochemical decomposition of the portion of source gases that reaches the stratosphere. Reactions with hydroxyl radicals and photolysis are the main processes dictating the compound lifetime in the troposphere and release of active halogen in the stratosphere for a majority of halogen source gases. Therefore, the accuracy of photochemical data is of primary importance for the purpose of comprehensive atmospheric modeling and for simplified kinetic estimations of global impacts on the atmosphere, such as in ozone depletion (i.e., the Ozone Depletion Potential, ODP) and climate change (i.e., the Global Warming Potential, GWP). The sources of critically evaluated photochemical data for atmospheric modeling, NASA/JPL Publications and IUPAC Publications, recommend uncertainties within 10%-60% for the majority of OH reaction rate constants with only a few cases where uncertainties lie at the low end of this range. These uncertainties can be somewhat conservative because evaluations are based on the data from various laboratories obtained during the last few decades. Nevertheless, even the authors of the original experimental works rarely estimate the total combined uncertainties of the published OH reaction rate constants to be less than ca. 10%. Thus, uncertainties in the photochemical properties of potential and current atmospheric trace gases obtained under controlled laboratory conditions still may constitute a major source of uncertainty in estimating the compound's environmental impact. One of the purposes of the presentation is to illustrate the potential for obtaining accurate laboratory measurements of the OH reaction rate constant over the temperature range of atmospheric interest. A detailed inventory of accountable sources of

  16. Accurate calculations on the 22 electronic states and 54 spin-orbit states of the O2 molecule: potential energy curves, spectroscopic parameters and spin-orbit coupling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Shi, Deheng; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue; Shulin, Zhang

    2014-04-24

    The potential energy curves (PECs) of 54 spin-orbit states generated from the 22 electronic states of O2 molecule are investigated for the first time for internuclear separations from about 0.1 to 1.0nm. Of the 22 electronic states, the X(3)Σg(-), A(')(3)Δu, A(3)Σu(+), B(3)Σu(-), C(3)Πg, a(1)Δg, b(1)Σg(+), c(1)Σu(-), d(1)Πg, f(1)Σu(+), 1(5)Πg, 1(3)Πu, 2(3)Σg(-), 1(5)Σu(-), 2(1)Σu(-) and 2(1)Δg are found to be bound, whereas the 1(5)Σg(+), 2(5)Σg(+), 1(1)Πu, 1(5)Δg, 1(5)Πu and 2(1)Πu are found to be repulsive ones. The B(3)Σu(-) and d(1)Πg states possess the double well. And the 1(3)Πu, C(3)Πg, A'(3)Δu, 1(5)Δg and 2(5)Σg(+) states are the inverted ones when the spin-orbit coupling is included. The PEC calculations are done by the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method, which is followed by the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction (icMRCI) approach with the Davidson correction. Core-valence correlation and scalar relativistic corrections are taken into account. The convergence of present calculations is evaluated with respect to the basis set and level of theory. The vibrational properties are discussed for the 1(5)Πg, 1(3)Πu, d(1)Πg and 1(5)Σu(-) states and for the second well of the B(3)Σu(-) state. The spin-orbit coupling effect is accounted for by the state interaction method with the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. The PECs of all the electronic states and spin-orbit states are extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The spectroscopic parameters are obtained, and compared with available experimental and other theoretical results. Analyses demonstrate that the spectroscopic parameters reported here can be expected to be reliably predicted ones. The conclusion is obtained that the effect of spin-orbit coupling on the spectroscopic parameters are small almost for all the electronic states involved in this paper except for the 1(5)Σu(-), 1(5)Πg and 1(3)Πu. PMID:24486866

  17. Accurate calculations on the 12 electronic states and 23 Ω states of the SiBr+ cation: potential energy curves, spectroscopic parameters and spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, De-Heng; Liu, Qionglan; Yu, Wei; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2014-05-01

    The potential energy curves (PECs) of 23 Ω states generated from the 12 electronic states (X1 Σ +, 21 Σ +, 11 Σ -, 11 Π, 21 Π, 11 Δ, 13 Σ +, 23 Σ +, 13 Σ -, a3 Π, 23 Π and 13 Δ) are studied for the first time. All the states correlate to the first dissociation channel of the SiBr+ cation. Of these electronic states, the 23 Σ + is the repulsive one without the spin-orbit coupling, whereas it becomes the bound one with the spin-orbit coupling added. On the one hand, without the spin-orbit coupling, the 11 Π, 21 Π and 23 Π are the rather weakly bound states, and only the 11 Π state possesses the double well; on the other hand, with the spin-orbit coupling included, the a3 Π and 11 Π states possess the double well, and the 13 Σ + and 13 Σ - are the inverted states. The PECs are calculated by the CASSCF method, which is followed by the internally contracted MRCI approach with the Davidson modification. Scalar relativistic correction is calculated by the third-order Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian approximation with a cc-pVTZ-DK basis set. Core-valence correlation correction is included with a cc-pCVTZ basis set. The spin-orbit coupling is accounted for by the state interaction method with the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian using the all-electron aug-cc-pCVTZ basis set. All the PECs are extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The variation with internuclear separation of the spin-orbit coupling constant is discussed in brief. The spectroscopic parameters are evaluated for the 11 bound electronic states and the 23 bound Ω states, and are compared with available measurements. Excellent agreement has been found between the present results and the experimental data. It demonstrates that the spectroscopic parameters reported here can be expected to be reliably predicted ones. The Franck-Condon factors and radiative lifetimes of the transitions from the a3 Π 0 + and a3 Π 1 states to the X1 Σ + 0+ state are calculated for several low vibrational levels, and

  18. Infrared and far-infrared laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the GeH radical - Determination of ground state parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. M.; Evenson, K. M.; Sears, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    The GeH radical has been detected in its ground 2 Pi state in the gas phase reaction of fluorine atoms with GeH4 by laser magnetic resonance techniques. Rotational transitions within both 2 Pi 1/2 and 2 Pi 3/2 manifolds have been observed at far-infrared wavelengths and rotational transitions between the two fine structure components have been detected at infrared wavelengths (10 microns). Signals have been observed for all five naturally occurring isotopes of germanium. Nuclear hyperfine structure for H-1 and Ge-73 has also been observed. The data for the dominant isotope (/Ge-74/H) have been fitted to within experimental error by an effective Hamiltonian to give a set of molecular parameters for the X 2 Pi state which is very nearly complete. In addition, the dipole moment of GeH in its ground state has been estimated from the relative intensities of electric and magnetic dipole transitions in the 10 micron spectrum to be 1.24(+ or - 0.10) D.

  19. TI-205 nuclear magnetic resonance determination of the thermodynamic parameters for the binding of monovalent cations to gramicidins A and C.

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, J F; Fernandez, J Q; Shungu, D C; Whaley, W L; Koeppe, R E; Millett, F S

    1988-01-01

    Thermodynamic parameters for the binding of the monovalent cations, Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+, NH4+, TI+, and Ag+, to gramicidin A and for the binding of TI+ to gramicidin C, incorporated into lysophosphatidylcholine, have been determined using a combination of TI-205 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and competition binding. The thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy and entropy, are discussed in terms of a process involving the transfer of cations from an aqueous to amide environment. PMID:2462930

  20. Improved Estimation of Cardiac Function Parameters Using a Combination of Independent Automated Segmentation Results in Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lebenberg, Jessica; Lalande, Alain; Clarysse, Patrick; Buvat, Irene; Casta, Christopher; Cochet, Alexandre; Constantinidès, Constantin; Cousty, Jean; de Cesare, Alain; Jehan-Besson, Stephanie; Lefort, Muriel; Najman, Laurent; Roullot, Elodie; Sarry, Laurent; Tilmant, Christophe; Frouin, Frederique; Garreau, Mireille

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed at combining different segmentation approaches to produce a robust and accurate segmentation result. Three to five segmentation results of the left ventricle were combined using the STAPLE algorithm and the reliability of the resulting segmentation was evaluated in comparison with the result of each individual segmentation method. This comparison was performed using a supervised approach based on a reference method. Then, we used an unsupervised statistical evaluation, the extended Regression Without Truth (eRWT) that ranks different methods according to their accuracy in estimating a specific biomarker in a population. The segmentation accuracy was evaluated by estimating six cardiac function parameters resulting from the left ventricle contour delineation using a public cardiac cine MRI database. Eight different segmentation methods, including three expert delineations and five automated methods, were considered, and sixteen combinations of the automated methods using STAPLE were investigated. The supervised and unsupervised evaluations demonstrated that in most cases, STAPLE results provided better estimates than individual automated segmentation methods. Overall, combining different automated segmentation methods improved the reliability of the segmentation result compared to that obtained using an individual method and could achieve the accuracy of an expert. PMID:26287691

  1. The Application of Multiobjective Genetic Algorithm to the Parameter Optimization of Single-Well Potential Stochastic Resonance Algorithm Aimed at Simultaneous Determination of Multiple Weak Chromatographic Peaks

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Bingren; Wu, Xiaohong; Liu, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous determination of multiple weak chromatographic peaks via stochastic resonance algorithm attracts much attention in recent years. However, the optimization of the parameters is complicated and time consuming, although the single-well potential stochastic resonance algorithm (SSRA) has already reduced the number of parameters to only one and simplified the process significantly. Even worse, it is often difficult to keep amplified peaks with beautiful peak shape. Therefore, multiobjective genetic algorithm was employed to optimize the parameter of SSRA for multiple optimization objectives (i.e., S/N and peak shape) and multiple chromatographic peaks. The applicability of the proposed method was evaluated with an experimental data set of Sudan dyes, and the results showed an excellent quantitative relationship between different concentrations and responses. PMID:24526920

  2. Dual-Channel Single-Molecule Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer to Establish Distance Parameters for RNA Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The increasing interest in RNA nanotechnology and the demonstrated feasibility of using RNA nanoparticles as therapeutics have prompted the need for imaging systems with nanometer-scale resolution for RNA studies. Phi29 dimeric pRNAs can serve as building blocks in assembly into the hexameric ring of the nanomotors, as modules of RNA nanoparciles, and as vehicles for specific delivery of therapeutics to cancers or viral infected cells. The understanding of the 3D structure of this novel RNA dimeric particle is fundamentally and practically important. Although a 3D model of pRNA dimer has been proposed based on biochemical analysis, no distance measurements or X-ray diffraction data have been reported. Here we evaluated the application of our customized single-molecule dual-viewing system for distance measurement within pRNA dimers using single-molecule Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (smFRET). Ten pRNA monomers labeled with single donor or acceptor fluorophores at various locations were constructed and eight dimers were assembled. smFRET signals were detected for six dimers. The tethered arm sizes of the fluorophores were estimated empirically from dual-labeled RNA/DNA standards. The distances between donor and acceptor were calculated and used as distance parameters to assess and refine the previously reported 3D model of the pRNA dimer. Distances between nucleotides in pRNA dimers were found to be different from those of the dimers bound to procapsid, suggesting a conformational change of the pRNA dimer upon binding to the procapsid. PMID:20954698

  3. Profiles of ion beams and plasma parameters on a multi-frequencies microwaves large bore electron cyclotron resonance ion source with permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Yushi; Sakamoto, Naoki; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2012-02-15

    In order to contribute to various applications of plasma and beams based on an electron cyclotron resonance, a new concept on magnetic field with all magnets on plasma production and confinement has been proposed with enhanced efficiency for broad and dense ion beam. The magnetic field configuration consists of a pair of comb-shaped magnet surrounding plasma chamber cylindrically. Resonance zones corresponding for 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz frequencies are positioned at spatially different positions. We launch simultaneously multiplex frequencies microwaves operated individually, try to control profiles of the plasma parameters and the extracted ion beams, and to measure them in detail.

  4. Study of resonance interactions in polyatomic molecules on the basis of highly accurate experimental data: Set of strongly interacting Bands ν10(B1), ν7(B2), ν4(A2), ν8(B2), ν3(A1) and ν6(B1) of CH2=CD2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulenikov, O. N.; Gromova, O. V.; Bekhtereva, E. S.; Berezkin, K. B.; Kashirina, N. V.; Tan, T. L.; Sydow, C.; Maul, C.; Bauerecker, S.

    2016-09-01

    The highly accurate (experimental accuracy in line positions ~(1 - 3) ×10-4cm-1) FTIR ro-vibrational spectra of CH2=CD2 in the region of 600-1300 cm-1, where the fundamental bands ν10, ν7, ν4, ν8, ν3, and ν6 are located, were recorded and analyzed with the Hamiltonian model which takes into account resonance interactions between all six studied bands. About 12 200 ro-vibrational transitions belonging to these bands (that is considerably more than it was made in the preceding studies for the bands ν10, ν7, ν8, ν3 and ν6; transitions belonging to the ν4 band were assigned for the first time) were assigned in the experimental spectra with the maximum values of quantum numbers Jmax. / Kamax . equal to 31/20, 46/18, 33/11, 50/26, 44/20 and 42/21 for the bands ν10, ν7, ν4, ν8, ν3, and ν6, respectively. On that basis, a set of 133 vibrational, rotational, centrifugal distortion and resonance interaction parameters was obtained from the weighted fit. They reproduce values of 3920 initial "experimental" ro-vibrational energy levels (positions of about 12 200 experimentally recorded and assigned transitions) with the rms error drms = 2.3 ×10-4cm-1.

  5. Recent results of the parameters A and R measurements in the resonance region of the πN-elastic scattering and subsequent investigations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumachev, V. V.; Beloglazov, Yu. A.; Filimonov, E. A.; Kovalev, A. I.; Kozlenko, N. G.; Kruglov, S. P.; Kulbardis, A. A.; Lopatin, I. V.; Novinsky, D. V.; Shchedrov, V. A.; Trautman, V. Yu.; Alekseev, I. G.; Budkovsky, P. E.; Kanavets, V. P.; Koroleva, L. I.; Morozov, B. V.; Nesterov, V. M.; Ryltsov, V. V.; Sulimov, A. D.; Svirida, D. N.; Bazhanov, N. A.; Bunyatova, E. I.

    2008-10-01

    The existing models of baryons usually predict considerably more resonance (three or more in number) than it was found by investigation of elastic pion-nucleon scattering. This disagreement invites further investigation of the pion-nucleon interaction and among other things the measurement of spin rotation parameters A and R in the elastic pion-nucleon scattering. Recent experiments of the PNPI and PNPI-ITEP collaborations resolved a part of twofold ambiguities of the existing partial wave analyses (PWA). These results were used in the last PWA of the George Washington University group SP06. The proposal for the additional spin rotation parameters A and R measurement in the resonance region is motivated. Such additional measurements are necessary to resolve remaining twofold ambiguities of the existing PWAs.

  6. Recent results of the parameters A and R measurements in the resonance region of the {pi}N-elastic scattering and subsequent investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Sumachev, V. V.; Beloglazov, Yu. A.; Filimonov, E. A.; Kovalev, A. I.; Kozlenko, N. G.; Kruglov, S. P.; Kulbardis, A. A.; Lopatin, I. V.; Novinsky, D. V.; Shchedrov, V. A.; Trautman, V. Yu.; Alekseev, I. G.; Budkovsky, P. E.; Kanavets, V. P.; Koroleva, L. I.; Morozov, B. V.; Nesterov, V. M.; Ryltsov, V. V.; Sulimov, A. D.; Svirida, D. N.

    2008-10-13

    The existing models of baryons usually predict considerably more resonance (three or more in number) than it was found by investigation of elastic pion-nucleon scattering. This disagreement invites further investigation of the pion-nucleon interaction and among other things the measurement of spin rotation parameters A and R in the elastic pion-nucleon scattering.Recent experiments of the PNPI and PNPI-ITEP collaborations resolved a part of twofold ambiguities of the existing partial wave analyses (PWA). These results were used in the last PWA of the George Washington University group SP06. The proposal for the additional spin rotation parameters A and R measurement in the resonance region is motivated. Such additional measurements are necessary to resolve remaining twofold ambiguities of the existing PWAs.

  7. Accurate complex scaling of three dimensional numerical potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Cerioni, Alessandro; Genovese, Luigi; Duchemin, Ivan; Deutsch, Thierry

    2013-05-28

    The complex scaling method, which consists in continuing spatial coordinates into the complex plane, is a well-established method that allows to compute resonant eigenfunctions of the time-independent Schroedinger operator. Whenever it is desirable to apply the complex scaling to investigate resonances in physical systems defined on numerical discrete grids, the most direct approach relies on the application of a similarity transformation to the original, unscaled Hamiltonian. We show that such an approach can be conveniently implemented in the Daubechies wavelet basis set, featuring a very promising level of generality, high accuracy, and no need for artificial convergence parameters. Complex scaling of three dimensional numerical potentials can be efficiently and accurately performed. By carrying out an illustrative resonant state computation in the case of a one-dimensional model potential, we then show that our wavelet-based approach may disclose new exciting opportunities in the field of computational non-Hermitian quantum mechanics.

  8. Kinetic isotope effect of the (16)O + (36)O2 and (18)O + (32)O2 isotope exchange reactions: Dominant role of reactive resonances revealed by an accurate time-dependent quantum wavepacket study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhigang; Yu, Dequan; Xie, Wenbo; Hou, Jiayi; Dawes, Richard; Guo, Hua

    2015-05-01

    The O + O2 isotope exchange reactions play an important role in determining the oxygen isotopic composition of a number of trace gases in the atmosphere, and their temperature dependence and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) provide important constraints on our understanding of the origin and mechanism of these and other unusual oxygen KIEs important in the atmosphere. This work reports a quantum dynamics study of the title reactions on the newly constructed Dawes-Lolur-Li-Jiang-Guo (DLLJG) potential energy surface (PES). The thermal reaction rate coefficients of both the (18)O + (32)O2 and (16)O + (36)O2 reactions obtained using the DLLJG PES exhibit a clear negative temperature dependence, in sharp contrast with the positive temperature dependence obtained using the earlier modified Siebert-Schinke-Bittererova (mSSB) PES. In addition, the calculated KIE shows an improved agreement with the experiment. These results strongly support the absence of the "reef" structure in the entrance/exit channels of the DLLJG PES, which is present in the mSSB PES. The quantum dynamics results on both PESs attribute the marked KIE to strong near-threshold reactive resonances, presumably stemming from the mass differences and/or zero point energy difference between the diatomic reactant and product. The accurate characterization of the reactivity for these near-thermoneutral reactions immediately above the reaction threshold is important for correct characterization of the thermal reaction rate coefficients. PMID:25956105

  9. Kinetic isotope effect of the 16O + 36O2 and 18O + 32O2 isotope exchange reactions: Dominant role of reactive resonances revealed by an accurate time-dependent quantum wavepacket study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhigang; Yu, Dequan; Xie, Wenbo; Hou, Jiayi; Dawes, Richard; Guo, Hua

    2015-05-01

    The O + O2 isotope exchange reactions play an important role in determining the oxygen isotopic composition of a number of trace gases in the atmosphere, and their temperature dependence and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) provide important constraints on our understanding of the origin and mechanism of these and other unusual oxygen KIEs important in the atmosphere. This work reports a quantum dynamics study of the title reactions on the newly constructed Dawes-Lolur-Li-Jiang-Guo (DLLJG) potential energy surface (PES). The thermal reaction rate coefficients of both the 18O + 32O2 and 16O + 36O2 reactions obtained using the DLLJG PES exhibit a clear negative temperature dependence, in sharp contrast with the positive temperature dependence obtained using the earlier modified Siebert-Schinke-Bittererova (mSSB) PES. In addition, the calculated KIE shows an improved agreement with the experiment. These results strongly support the absence of the "reef" structure in the entrance/exit channels of the DLLJG PES, which is present in the mSSB PES. The quantum dynamics results on both PESs attribute the marked KIE to strong near-threshold reactive resonances, presumably stemming from the mass differences and/or zero point energy difference between the diatomic reactant and product. The accurate characterization of the reactivity for these near-thermoneutral reactions immediately above the reaction threshold is important for correct characterization of the thermal reaction rate coefficients.

  10. Classification of the micro and nanoparticles and biological agents by neural network analysis of the parameters of optical resonance of whispering gallery mode in dielectric microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saetchnikov, Vladimir A.; Tcherniavskaia, Elina A.; Schweiger, Gustav; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2011-07-01

    A novel technique for the label-free analysis of micro and nanoparticles including biomolecules using optical micro cavity resonance of whispering-gallery-type modes is being developed. Various schemes of the method using both standard and specially produced microspheres have been investigated to make further development for microbial application. It was demonstrated that optical resonance under optimal geometry could be detected under the laser power of less 1 microwatt. The sensitivity of developed schemes has been tested by monitoring the spectral shift of the whispering gallery modes. Water solutions of ethanol, ascorbic acid, blood phantoms including albumin and HCl, glucose, biotin, biomarker like C reactive protein so as bacteria and virus phantoms (gels of silica micro and nanoparticles) have been used. Structure of resonance spectra of the solutions was a specific subject of investigation. Probabilistic neural network classifier for biological agents and micro/nano particles classification has been developed. Several parameters of resonance spectra as spectral shift, broadening, diffuseness and others have been used as input parameters to develop a network classifier for micro and nanoparticles and biological agents in solution. Classification probability of approximately 98% for probes under investigation have been achieved. Developed approach have been demonstrated to be a promising technology platform for sensitive, lab-on-chip type sensor which can be used for development of diagnostic tools for different biological molecules, e.g. proteins, oligonucleotides, oligosaccharides, lipids, small molecules, viral particles, cells as well as in different experimental contexts e.g. proteomics, genomics, drug discovery, and membrane studies.

  11. Multi-frequency weak signal detection based on wavelet transform and parameter compensation band-pass multi-stable stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dongying; li, Pei; An, Shujun; Shi, Peiming

    2016-03-01

    In actual fault diagnosis, useful information is often submerged in heavy noise, and the feature information is difficult to extract. A novel weak signal detection method aimed at the problem of detecting multi-frequency signals buried under heavy background noise is proposed based on wavelet transform and parameter compensation band-pass multi-stable stochastic resonance (SR). First, the noisy signal is processed by parameter compensation, with the noise and system parameters expanded 10 times to counteract the effect of the damping term. The processed signal is decomposed into multiple signals of different scale frequencies by wavelet transform. Following this, we adjust the size of the scaled signals' amplitudes and reconstruct the signals; the weak signal frequency components are then enhanced by multi-stable stochastic resonance. The enhanced components of the signal are processed through a band-pass filter, leaving the enhanced sections of the signal. The processed signal is analyzed by FFT to achieve detection of the multi-frequency weak signals. The simulation and experimental results show that the proposed method can enhance the signal amplitude, can effectively detect multi-frequency weak signals buried under heavy noise and is valuable and usable for bearing fault signal analysis.

  12. Correlation of magnetic resonance signal characteristics and perfusion parameters assessed by volume perfusion computed tomography in hepatocellular carcinoma: Impact on lesion characterization

    PubMed Central

    Grözinger, Gerd; Bitzer, Michael; Syha, Roland; Ketelsen, Dominik; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Lauer, Ulrich; Horger, Marius

    2016-01-01

    AIM To find out if magnetic resonance (MR)-signal characteristics of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) correlate with perfusion parameters assessed by volume perfusion computed tomography (VPCT). METHODS From October 2009 to January 2014, 26 (mean age, 69.3 years) patients with 36 HCC lesions who underwent both VPCT and MR liver imaging were analysed. We compared signal intensity in the T1w- and T2w-images and wash-in/wash-out kinetics on post-contrast MR images with mean values of blood flow (BF, mL/100 mL per minute), blood volume (BV, mL/100 mL), k-trans (mL/100 mL per minute), arterial liver perfusion (mL/100 mL per minute), portal venous perfusion and hepatic perfusion index (HPI, %) obtained by VPCT. Signal intensity on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was classified hyper/iso/hypointense compared with surrounding liver parenchyma. RESULTS Signal intensity on native T1w- and T2w-images was hyper/iso/hypo in 4/16/16 and 21/14/1 lesions, respectively. Wash-in and wash-out contrast kinetics were found on MRI in 33 of 36 lesions (91.7%) and 25 of 36 lesions (69.4%), respectively. The latter was observed significantly more often in higher graded lesions (P < 0.005). HPI was 94.7% ± 6.5%. There was no significant relationship between lesion’s MR-signal intensity, MR signal combinations, size and any of the VPCT-perfusion parameters. However HPI was constantly high in all HCC lesions. CONCLUSION VPCT parameters add limited value to MR-lesion characterization. However in HCC lesions with atypical MR signal characteristics HPI can add a parameter to ensure HCC diagnosis. PMID:27551338

  13. Comparison of three lines of broiler breeders differing in ascites susceptibility or growth rate. 1. Relationship between acoustic resonance data and embryonic or hatching parameters.

    PubMed

    Tona, K; Kemps, B; Bruggeman, V; Bamelis, F; De Smit, L; Onagbesan, O; De Baerdemaeker, J; Decuypere, E

    2005-09-01

    Ascites is a prevalent cardiovascular disease among modern broilers with negative impacts on production and animal welfare. The peak of mortality due to ascites occurs at the end of the growing period, but the etiology of this problem may start during embryonic development. A few recent reports have demonstrated that the signs of ascites susceptibility are manifested during the late stages of incubation. In the current study, we used a nondestructive method based on egg acoustic resonance parameters [resonant frequency (RF) and damping] to establish a relationship between embryo physiological events during early development in broiler eggs and susceptibility to ascites. The hatching eggs of 3 broiler lines differing in ascites susceptibility were used for this study: ascites-resistant dam line (DAR), ascites-sensitive dam line (DAS), and ascites-sensitive sire line (SASL). These lines were selected on the basis of fast growth, high breast meat yield, and ascites induction at low temperatures such that the order of ascites susceptibility in terms of mortality was SASL > DAS > DAR. Eggs were incubated under standard conditions in forced-draft incubators. We measured egg weights at setting, albumen pH, Haugh units (HU) at setting, and embryo weights at d 11 and 18, at internal pipping (IP), and at hatch. The durations of IP, external pipping (EP), and hatching were also determined. At 2 hourly periods during incubation, egg RF and damping were also measured. There were differences in egg weights between DAR and SASL vs. DAS, but albumen HU, albumen pH, and the ratio of yolk weight to egg weight were similar. There were differences in RF, damping, embryonic growth rates, and hatching events. Changes in resonant frequency and damping, which certainly suggest eggshell differences among lines, were not totally related to variations in physiological events during early and late embryonic development. A comparison between DAR and DAS, between DAS and SASL, or DAR and SASL

  14. Measurement and calculation of the Stark-broadening parameters for the resonance lines of singly ionized calcium and magnesium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. W.; Sanchez, A.; Greig, J. R.; Griem, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    The electron-impact-broadened profiles of the resonance lines of singly ionized calcium and magnesium have been measured using an electromagnetically driven shock tube and a rapid-scanning Fabry-Perot spectrometer. For an electron density of 10 to the 17th power per cu cm and a temperature of 19,000 K, we found the Lorentzian half-width of the Ca+ line to be 0.086 A plus or minus 10% and of the Mg+ line to be 0.044 A plus or minus 10%. Using the quantum-mechanical theory of Barnes and Peach and our semiclassical calculation for the calcium lines, we found that the temperature dependence of the theoretical curves is close to that measured, although both theories predict actual values which are somewhat large.

  15. Lineshape of {psi}(3770) and low-lying vector charmonium resonance parameters in e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}}DD

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yuanjiang; Zhao Qiang

    2010-02-01

    We investigate the DD production in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations near threshold in an effective Lagrangian approach. This shows that the lineshape of the cross section near threshold is sensitive to the contributions from {psi}{sup '}, though it is below the DD threshold. The recent experimental data from the BES and Belle collaborations allow us to determine the {psi}{sup '}DD coupling constant, which appears to be consistent with other theoretical studies. As a consequence, the {psi}{sup '}-{psi}(3770) mixing parameter can be extracted around the {psi}(3770) mass region. Resonance parameters for {psi}(3770), X(3900), {psi}(4040), and {psi}(4160) are also investigated. The X(3900) appears as an enhancement at around 3.9 GeV in the Belle data. In addition to treating it as a resonance, we also study the mechanism through which the enhancement is produced by the DD*+c.c. open channel effects. Our result shows that such a possibility cannot be eliminated.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of anterior cruciate ligament tears: reevaluation of quantitative parameters and imaging findings including a simplified method for measuring the anterior cruciate ligament angle.

    PubMed

    Mellado, J M; Calmet, J; Olona, M; Giné, J; Saurí, A

    2004-05-01

    We evaluated the diagnostic utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for predicting anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears using both quantitative parameters and nonquantitative imaging findings. MRI examinations were retrospectively evaluated in a group of patients with arthroscopically confirmed complete ACL tear and in a control group with arthroscopically confirmed intact ACL. We evaluated multiple MRI features to compare their sensitivity and specificity for detecting ACL tears. Particular emphasis is put on the evaluation of three different quantitative parameters, including a simplified method for measuring the ACL angle. With a threshold value of 45 degrees the ACL angle reached a sensitivity and specificity of 100% for detecting ACL tears. With a threshold value of 0 degrees the Blumensaat angle had a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 98%. Finally, a threshold value of 115 degrees gave the posterior cruciate ligament angle a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity of 82%. Discontinuity was found to be the most useful of the ACL abnormalities. Of the secondary findings anterior tibial displacement was the best predictor of ligamentous injury. However, ACL abnormalities and secondary findings, alone or combined, failed to surpass the diagnostic value of the ACL angle for predicting ACL tears. Quantitative parameters are thus good predictors of ACL tears and may increase the overall sensitivity and specificity of MRI. The ACL angle may be confidently measured in a single MRI section and can be considered to be the most reliable quantitative parameter for detecting ACL tears. PMID:14530852

  17. Resonant alteration of propagation in guiding structures with complex Robin parameter and its magnetic-field-induced restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Olendski, O.

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Solutions of the wave equation are analyzed for the confined circular geometry with complex Robin boundary conditions. > Sharp extremum is found in the energy dependence on the imaginary part of the extrapolation length. > Nonzero real part of the Robin length or/and magnetic field wipe out the resonance. - Abstract: Solutions of the scalar Helmholtz wave equation are derived for the analysis of the transport and thermodynamic properties of the two-dimensional disk and three-dimensional infinitely long straight wire in the external uniform longitudinal magnetic field B under the assumption that the Robin boundary condition contains extrapolation length {Lambda} with nonzero imaginary part {Lambda}{sub i}. As a result of this complexity, the self-adjointness of the Hamiltonian is lost, its eigenvalues E become complex too and the discrete bound states of the disk characteristic for the real {Lambda} turn into the corresponding quasibound states with their lifetime defined by the eigenenergies imaginary parts E{sub i}. Accordingly, the longitudinal flux undergoes an alteration as it flows along the wire with its attenuation/amplification being E{sub i}-dependent too. It is shown that, for zero magnetic field, the component E{sub i} as a function of the Robin imaginary part exhibits a pronounced sharp extremum with its magnitude being the largest for the zero real part {Lambda}{sub r} of the extrapolation length. Increasing magnitude of {Lambda}{sub r} quenches the E{sub i} - {Lambda}{sub i} resonance and at very large {Lambda}{sub r} the eigenenergies E approach the asymptotic real values independent of {Lambda}{sub i}. The extremum is also wiped out by the magnetic field when, for the large B, the energies tend to the Landau levels. Mathematical and physical interpretations of the obtained results are provided; in particular, it is shown that the finite lifetime of the disk quasibound states stems from the {Lambda}{sub i}-induced currents flowing

  18. Optimization of Regularization Parameters in Compressed Sensing of Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Can Statistical Image Metrics Mimic Radiologists' Perception?

    PubMed Central

    Akasaka, Thai; Fujimoto, Koji; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Okada, Tomohisa; Fushumi, Yasutaka; Yamamoto, Akira; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Togashi, Kaori

    2016-01-01

    In Compressed Sensing (CS) of MRI, optimization of the regularization parameters is not a trivial task. We aimed to establish a method that could determine the optimal weights for regularization parameters in CS of time-of-flight MR angiography (TOF-MRA) by comparing various image metrics with radiologists’ visual evaluation. TOF-MRA of a healthy volunteer was scanned using a 3T-MR system. Images were reconstructed by CS from retrospectively under-sampled data by varying the weights for the L1 norm of wavelet coefficients and that of total variation. The reconstructed images were evaluated both quantitatively by statistical image metrics including structural similarity (SSIM), scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and qualitatively by radiologists’ scoring. The results of quantitative metrics and qualitative scorings were compared. SSIM and SIFT in conjunction with brain masks and CNR of artery-to-parenchyma correlated very well with radiologists’ visual evaluation. By carefully selecting a region to measure, we have shown that statistical image metrics can reflect radiologists’ visual evaluation, thus enabling an appropriate optimization of regularization parameters for CS. PMID:26744843

  19. Multi-Group Formulation of the Temperature-Dependent Resonance Scattering Model and its Impact on Reactor Core Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Ghrayeb, Shadi Z.; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.; Ouisloumen, Mohamed; Ivanov, Kostadin N.

    2014-01-01

    A multi-group formulation for the exact neutron elastic scattering kernel is developed. It incorporates the neutron up-scattering effects, stemming from lattice atoms thermal motion and accounts for it within the resulting effective nuclear cross-section data. The effects pertain essentially to resonant scattering off of heavy nuclei. The formulation, implemented into a standalone code, produces effective nuclear scattering data that are then supplied directly into the DRAGON lattice physics code where the effects on Doppler Reactivity and neutron flux are demonstrated. The correct accounting for the crystal lattice effects influences the estimated values for the probability of neutron absorption and scattering, which in turn affect the estimation of core reactivity and burnup characteristics. The results show an increase in values of Doppler temperature feedback coefficients up to -10% for UOX and MOX LWR fuels compared to the corresponding values derived using the traditional asymptotic elastic scattering kernel. This paper also summarizes the results done on this topic to date.

  20. Controlling precise magnetic field configuration around electron cyclotron resonance zone for enhancing plasma parameters and beam current

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Keisuke Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Kimura, Daiju; Imai, Youta; Kumakura, Sho; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-15

    Multi-charged ion source which has wide operating conditions is required in various application fields. We have constructed tandem type ECR ion source (ECRIS); one of the features of its main stage is an additional coil for controlling magnetic field distribution around the mirror bottom precisely. Here the effect of magnetic field variation caused by the additional coil is experimentally considered in terms of plasma parameters and beam current as the first investigation of the main stage plasma. Furthermore, behavior of magnetic lines of force flowing from the ECR zone is calculated, and is compared with measurement results aiming for better understanding of interrelationship between plasma production and ion beam generation on the ECRIS.

  1. Modifications in Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Parameters After α-Particle-Emitting {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab Therapy of HER2-Expressing Ovarian Cancer Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Heyerdahl, Helen; Røe, Kathrine; Brevik, Ellen Mengshoel; Dahle, Jostein

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of α-particle-emitting {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab radioimmunotherapy on tumor vasculature to increase the knowledge about the mechanisms of action of {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab. Methods and Materials: Human HER2-expressing SKOV-3 ovarian cancer xenografts were grown bilaterally in athymic nude mice. Mice with tumor volumes 253 ± 36 mm{sup 3} (mean ± SEM) were treated with a single injection of either {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab at a dose of 1000 kBq/kg body weight (treated group, n=14 tumors) or 0.9% NaCl (control group, n=10 tumors). Dynamic T1-weighted contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) was used to study the effect of {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab on tumor vasculature. DCEMRI was performed before treatment and 1, 2, and 3 weeks after therapy. Tumor contrast-enhancement curves were extracted voxel by voxel and fitted to the Brix pharmacokinetic model. Pharmacokinetic parameters for the tumors that underwent radioimmunotherapy were compared with the corresponding parameters of control tumors. Results: Significant increases of k{sub ep}, the rate constant of diffusion from the extravascular extracellular space to the plasma (P<.05), and k{sub el,} the rate of clearance of contrast agent from the plasma (P<.01), were seen in the radioimmunotherapy group 2 and 3 weeks after injection, compared with the control group. The product of k{sub ep} and the amplitude parameter A, associated with increased vessel permeability and perfusion, was also significantly increased in the radioimmunotherapy group 2 and 3 weeks after injection (P<.01). Conclusions: Pharmacokinetic modeling of MRI contrast-enhancement curves evidenced significant alterations in parameters associated with increased tumor vessel permeability and tumor perfusion after {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab treatment of HER2-expressing ovarian cancer xenografts.

  2. Analysis of Three Body Resonances in the Complex Scaled Orthogonal Condition Model

    SciTech Connect

    Odsuren, M.; Katō, K.; Aikawa, M.

    2014-06-15

    Although the resonance structures of α+α+n have been studied experimentally and theoretically, it is still necessary to have more accurate and comprehensive understandings of the structure and decay of the low-lying excited states in {sup 9}Be. To perform calculations of an α+α+n system, we investigate five resonant states of α+α subsystem by utilizing different potential parameters and basis functions. In addition, two resonance states of α+n subsystem are computed.

  3. A laser gyro with a four-mirror square resonator: quantitative estimation of the dependence of the synchronisation zone parameters of the frequencies of counterpropagating waves on the active-medium gain

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, Evgenii A

    2012-05-31

    For a laser gyro with a four-mirror square resonator (with a perimeter of 20 cm) we have calculated, on the basis of the previously developed [see Bondarenko E.A. Quantum Electron., 41, 824 (2011)] model, the dependence of the parameters of the synchronisation zone of the frequencies of counterpropagating waves on the active-medium gain. The results obtained are in qualitative agreement with known experimental data for gyroscopes with three-mirror resonators.

  4. Fiber-optic sensors for monitoring patient physiological parameters: a review of applicable technologies and relevance to use during magnetic resonance imaging procedures.

    PubMed

    Dziuda, Łukasz

    2015-01-01

    The issues involved with recording vital functions in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment using fiber-optic sensors are considered in this paper. Basic physiological parameters, such as respiration and heart rate, are fundamental for predicting the risk of anxiety, panic, and claustrophobic episodes in patients undergoing MRI examinations. Electronic transducers are generally hazardous to the patient and are prone to erroneous operation in heavily electromagnetically penetrated MRI environments; however, nonmetallic fiber-optic sensors are inherently immune to electromagnetic effects and will be crucial for acquiring the above-mentioned physiological parameters. Forty-seven MRI-tested or potentially MRI-compatible sensors have appeared in the literature over the last 20 years. The author classifies these sensors into several categories and subcategories, depending on the sensing element placement, method of application, and measure and type. The author includes five in-house-designed fiber Bragg grating based sensors and shares experience in acquiring physiological measurements during MRI scans. This paper aims to systematize the knowledge of fiber-optic techniques for recording life functions and to indicate the current directions of development in this area. PMID:25594625

  5. Fiber-optic sensors for monitoring patient physiological parameters: a review of applicable technologies and relevance to use during magnetic resonance imaging procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziuda, Łukasz

    2015-01-01

    The issues involved with recording vital functions in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment using fiber-optic sensors are considered in this paper. Basic physiological parameters, such as respiration and heart rate, are fundamental for predicting the risk of anxiety, panic, and claustrophobic episodes in patients undergoing MRI examinations. Electronic transducers are generally hazardous to the patient and are prone to erroneous operation in heavily electromagnetically penetrated MRI environments; however, nonmetallic fiber-optic sensors are inherently immune to electromagnetic effects and will be crucial for acquiring the above-mentioned physiological parameters. Forty-seven MRI-tested or potentially MRI-compatible sensors have appeared in the literature over the last 20 years. The author classifies these sensors into several categories and subcategories, depending on the sensing element placement, method of application, and measurand type. The author includes five in-house-designed fiber Bragg grating based sensors and shares experience in acquiring physiological measurements during MRI scans. This paper aims to systematize the knowledge of fiber-optic techniques for recording life functions and to indicate the current directions of development in this area.

  6. An analytical method for estimating the {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole resonance parameters of organic compounds with complex free induction decays for radiation effects studies

    SciTech Connect

    Iselin, L.H.

    1992-12-31

    The use of {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) as a radiation dosimetry tool has only recently been explored. An analytical method for analyzing {sup 14}N NQR complex free induction decays is presented with the background necessary to conduct pulsed NQR experiments. The {sup 14}N NQR energy levels and possible transitions are derived in step-by-step detail. The components of a pulsed NQR spectrometer are discussed along with the experimental techniques for conducting radiation effects experiments using the spectrometer. Three data analysis techniques -- the power spectral density Fourier transform, state space singular value decomposition (HSVD), and nonlinear curve fitting (using the downhill simplex method of global optimization and the Levenberg-Marquart method) -- are explained. These three techniques are integrated into an analytical method which uses these numerical techniques in this order to determine the physical NQR parameters. Sample data sets of urea and guanidine sulfate data are used to demonstrate how these methods can be employed to analyze both simple and complex free induction decays. By determining baseline values for biologically significant organics, radiation effects on the NQR parameters can be studied to provide a link between current radiation dosimetry techniques and the biological effects of radiation.

  7. Method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    DOEpatents

    Chalmers, S.A.; Killeen, K.P.; Lear, K.L.

    1995-03-14

    The authors report a method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). The method uses a single reflectivity spectrum measurement to determine the structure of the partially completed VCSEL at a critical point of growth. This information, along with the extracted growth rates, allows imprecisions in growth parameters to be compensated for during growth of the remaining structure, which can then be completed with very accurate critical dimensions. Using this method, they can now routinely grow lasing VCSELs with Fabry-Perot cavity resonance wavelengths controlled to within 0.5%. 4 figs.

  8. Method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    DOEpatents

    Chalmers, Scott A.; Killeen, Kevin P.; Lear, Kevin L.

    1995-01-01

    We report a method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). The method uses a single reflectivity spectrum measurement to determine the structure of the partially completed VCSEL at a critical point of growth. This information, along with the extracted growth rates, allows imprecisions in growth parameters to be compensated for during growth of the remaining structure, which can then be completed with very accurate critical dimensions. Using this method, we can now routinely grow lasing VCSELs with Fabry-Perot cavity resonance wavelengths controlled to within 0.5%.

  9. Calculation of the geometrical three-point parameter constant appearing in the second order accurate effective medium theory expression for the B-term diffusion coefficient in fully porous and porous-shell random sphere packings.

    PubMed

    Deridder, Sander; Desmet, Gert

    2012-02-01

    Using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), the effective B-term diffusion constant γ(eff) has been calculated for four different random sphere packings with different particle size distributions and packing geometries. Both fully porous and porous-shell sphere packings are considered. The obtained γ(eff)-values have subsequently been used to determine the value of the three-point geometrical constant (ζ₂) appearing in the 2nd-order accurate effective medium theory expression for γ(eff). It was found that, whereas the 1st-order accurate effective medium theory expression is accurate to within 5% over most part of the retention factor range, the 2nd-order accurate expression is accurate to within 1% when calculated with the best-fit ζ₂-value. Depending on the exact microscopic geometry, the best-fit ζ₂-values typically lie in the range of 0.20-0.30, holding over the entire range of intra-particle diffusion coefficients typically encountered for small molecules (0.1 ≤ D(pz)/D(m) ≤ 0.5). These values are in agreement with the ζ₂-value proposed by Thovert et al. for the random packing they considered. PMID:22236565

  10. Neutron Resonance Parameters of 238U and the Calculated Cross Sections from the Reich-Moore Analysis of Experimental Data in the Neutron Energy Range from 0 keV to 20 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H

    2005-12-05

    The neutron resonance parameters of {sup 238}U were obtained from a SAMMY analysis of high-resolution neutron transmission measurements and high-resolution capture cross section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in the years 1970-1990, and from more recent transmission and capture cross section measurements performed at the Geel Linear Accelerator (GELINA). Compared with previous evaluations, the energy range for this resonance analysis was extended from 10 to 20 keV, taking advantage of the high resolution of the most recent ORELA transmission measurements. The experimental database and the method of analysis are described in this report. The neutron transmissions and the capture cross sections calculated with the resonance parameters are compared with the experimental data. A description is given of the statistical properties of the resonance parameters and of the recommended values of the average parameters. The new evaluation results in a slight decrease of the effective capture resonance integral and improves the prediction of integral thermal benchmarks by 70 pcm to 200 pcm.

  11. Evaluating the uncertainty in exchange parameters determined from off-resonance R1ρ relaxation dispersion for systems in fast exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothe, Jameson R.; Stein, Zachary W.; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2014-07-01

    Spin relaxation in the rotating frame (R1ρ) is a powerful NMR technique for characterizing fast microsecond timescale exchange processes directed toward short-lived excited states in biomolecules. At the limit of fast exchange, only kex = k1 + k-1 and Φex = pGpE(Δω)2 can be determined from R1ρ data limiting the ability to characterize the structure and energetics of the excited state conformation. Here, we use simulations to examine the uncertainty with which exchange parameters can be determined for two state systems in intermediate-to-fast exchange using off-resonance R1ρ relaxation dispersion. R1ρ data computed by solving the Bloch-McConnell equations reveals small but significant asymmetry with respect to offset (R1ρ (ΔΩ) ≠ R1ρ (-ΔΩ), which is a hallmark of slow-to-intermediate exchange, even under conditions of fast exchange for free precession chemical exchange line broadening (kex/Δω > 10). A grid search analysis combined with bootstrap and Monte-Carlo based statistical approaches for estimating uncertainty in exchange parameters reveals that both the sign and magnitude of Δω can be determined at a useful level of uncertainty for systems in fast exchange (kex/Δω < 10) but that this depends on the uncertainty in the R1ρ data and requires a thorough examination of the multidimensional variation of χ2 as a function of exchange parameters. Results from simulations are complemented by analysis of experimental R1ρ data measured in three nucleic acid systems with exchange processes occurring on the slow (kex/Δω = 0.2; pE = ∼0.7%), fast (kex/Δω = ∼10-16; pE = ∼13%) and very fast (kex = 39,000 s-1) chemical shift timescales.

  12. Interference effect in the dipole and nondipole anisotropy parameters of the Kr 4p photoelectrons in the vicinity of the Kr (3d){sup -1{yields}}np resonant excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Ricz, S.; Ricsoka, T.; Holste, K.; Borovik, A. Jr.; Bernhardt, D.; Schippers, S.; Mueller, A.; Koever, A.; Varga, D.

    2010-04-15

    The angular distribution of the Kr 4p photoelectrons was investigated in the photon energy range of the (3d){sup -1{yields}}np resonant excitations. The experimental dipole ({beta}) and nondipole ({gamma} and {delta}) anisotropy parameters were determined for the spin-orbit components of the Kr 4p shell. A simple theoretical model was developed for the description of the photoionization and excitation processes. An interference effect was observed between the direct photoionization and the resonant excitation participator Auger decay processes in the photon energy dependence of the experimental anisotropy parameters.

  13. On the Use of Lambert W Function for Modeling of Quantum Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Horacek, Jiri; Ledvinka, Tomas

    2011-09-14

    The Lambert W function is used to represent data (bound state energies) for the process of analytical continuation in the coupling constant. It is shown how the presence of the singularity of the W function restricts the accuracy of determination of the branch point. The accuracy of the determination of resonance parameters is also discussed. It is shown that even for moderately accurate input data the process of analytical continuation yields resonance parameters of accuracy surpassing modern experimental data.

  14. 2H nuclear magnetic resonance order parameter profiles suggest a change of molecular shape for phosphatidylcholines containing a polyunsaturated acyl chain.

    PubMed Central

    Holte, L. L.; Peter, S. A.; Sinnwell, T. M.; Gawrisch, K.

    1995-01-01

    Solid-state 2H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine the orientational order parameter profiles for a series of phosphatidylcholines with perdeuterated stearic acid, 18:0d35, in position sn-1 and 18:1 omega 9, 18:2 omega 6, 18:3 omega 3, 20:4 omega 6, 20:5 omega 3, or 22:6 omega 3 in position sn-2. The main phase transition temperatures were derived from a first moment analysis, and order parameter profiles of sn-1 chains were calculated from dePaked nuclear magnetic resonance powder patterns. Comparison of the profiles at 37 degrees C showed that unsaturation causes an inhomogenous disordering along the sn-1 chain. Increasing sn-2 chain unsaturation from one to six double bonds resulted in a 1.6-kHz decrease in quadrupolar splittings of the sn-1 chain in the upper half of the chain (or plateau region) and maximum splitting difference of 4.4 kHz at methylene carbon 14. The change in chain order corresponds to a decrease in the 18:0 chain length of 0.4 +/- 0.2 A with 18:2 omega 6 versus 18:1 omega 9 in position sn-2. Fatty acids containing three or more double bonds in sn-2 showed a decrease in sn-1 chain length of 0.7 +/- 0.2 A compared with 18:1 omega 9. The chain length of all lipids decreased with increasing temperature. Highly unsaturated phosphatidylcholines (three or more double bonds in sn-2) had shorter sn-1 chains, but the chain length was somewhat less sensitive to temperature. The profiles reveal that the sn-1 chain exhibits a selective increase in motional freedom in a region located toward the bottom half of the chain as sn-2 unsaturation is increased. This corresponds to an area increase around carbon atom number 14 that is three to four times greater than the increase for the top part of the chain. A similar asymmetric decrease in order, largest toward the methyl end of the chain, was observed when 1 -palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylethanolamine goes from a lamellar to an inverse hexagonal (H,,) phase. This is consistent with a

  15. Threshold-crossing counting technique for damping factor determination of resonator sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Kefeng; Grimes, Craig A.

    2004-12-01

    The behavior of resonator-type sensors at resonance is characterized by two fundamental parameters: resonance frequency and damping factor (or Q-factor). Practical applications require accurate and efficient measurements of these two parameters. Using magnetoelastic resonant sensors as a test case earlier work [K. Zeng, K. G. Ong, C. Mungle, and C. A. Grimes, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 4375 (2002)] demonstrated the ability to determine resonance frequency by counting the number of cycles in the transient response of a pulsewise excited sensor. Presented in this paper is a novel technique for measuring the damping factor of a resonant magnetoelastic sensor, or any resonator type sensor, using threshold-crossing counting of the transient response. The damping factor determination technique eliminates the need for a lock-in amplifier or FFT analysis as in the conventional method of quality factor estimation from spectrum analysis, significantly simplifying the electronic implementation as well as improving measurement speed and accuracy.

  16. [Optimal imaging parameters and the advantage of cerebrospinal fluid flow image using time-spatial labeling inversion pulse at 3 tesla magnetic resonance imaging: comparison of image quality for 1.5 tesla magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Ozasa, Masaya; Yahata, Seiji; Yoshida, Ayako; Takeyama, Mamoru; Eshima, Mitsuhiro; Shinohara, Maiko; Yamamoto, Takao; Abe, Kayoko

    2014-12-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) imaging by time-spatial labeling inversion pulse (Time-SLIP) technique is labeled by CSF with a selective inversion recovery (IR) pulse as internal tracer, thus making it possible to visualize CSF dynamics non-invasively. The purpose of this study was to clarify labeled CSF signals during various black blood time to inversion (BBTI) values at 3 tesla (T) and 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to determine appropriate CSF imaging parameters at 3 T MRI in 10 healthy volunteers. To calculate optimal BBTI values, ROIs were set in untagged cerebral parenchyma and CSF on the image of the CSF flow from the aqueduct to the fourth ventricle in 1.5 T and 3 T MRI. Visual evaluation of CSF flow also was assessed with changes of matrix and echo time (TE) at 3 T MRI. The mean BBTI value at null point of untagged CSF in 3 T MRI was longer than that of 1.5 T. The MR conditions of the highest visual evaluation were FOV, 14 cm×14 cm; Matrix, 192×192; and TE, 117 ms. CSF imaging using Time-SLIP at 3 T MRI is expected visualization of CSF flow and clarification of CSF dynamics in more detail by setting the optimal conditions because 3 T MRI has the advantage of high contrast and high signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:25672449

  17. A carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of inter-proton pair order parameters: a new approach to study order and dynamics in phospholipid membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Urbina, J A; Moreno, B; Arnold, W; Taron, C H; Orlean, P; Oldfield, E

    1998-09-01

    We report a simple new nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic method to investigate order and dynamics in phospholipids in which inter-proton pair order parameters are derived by using high resolution 13C cross-polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR combined with 1H dipolar echo preparation. The resulting two-dimensional NMR spectra permit determination of the motionally averaged interpair second moment for protons attached to each resolved 13C site, from which the corresponding interpair order parameters can be deducted. A spin-lock mixing pulse before cross-polarization enables the detection of spin diffusion amongst the different regions of the lipid molecules. The method was applied to a variety of model membrane systems, including 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC)/sterol and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC)/sterol model membranes. The results agree well with previous studies using specifically deuterium labeled or predeuterated phospholipid molecules. It was also found that efficient spin diffusion takes place within the phospholipid acyl chains, and between the glycerol backbone and choline headgroup of these molecules. The experiment was also applied to biosynthetically 13C-labeled ergosterol incorporated into phosphatidylcholine bilayers. These results indicate highly restricted motions of both the sterol nucleus and the aliphatic side chain, and efficient spin exchange between these structurally dissimilar regions of the sterol molecule. Finally, studies were carried out in the lamellar liquid crystalline (L alpha) and inverted hexagonal (HII) phases of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE). These results indicated that phosphatidylethanolamine lamellar phases are more ordered than the equivalent phases of phosphatidylcholines. In the HII (inverted hexagonal) phase, despite the increased translational freedom, there is highly constrained packing of the lipid molecules, particularly in

  18. Improved Quantification of Cerebral Hemodynamics Using Individualized Time Thresholds for Assessment of Peak Enhancement Parameters Derived from Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nasel, Christian; Kalcher, Klaudius; Boubela, Roland; Moser, Ewald

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Assessment of cerebral ischemia often employs dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with evaluation of various peak enhancement time parameters. All of these parameters use a single time threshold to judge the maximum tolerable peak enhancement delay that is supposed to reliably differentiate sufficient from critical perfusion. As the validity of this single threshold approach still remains unclear, in this study, (1) the definition of a threshold on an individual patient-basis, nevertheless (2) preserving the comparability of the data, was investigated. Methods The histogram of time-to-peak (TTP) values derived from DSC-MRI, the so-called TTP-distribution curve (TDC), was modeled using a double-Gaussian model in 61 patients without severe cerebrovascular disease. Particular model-based zf-scores were used to describe the arterial, parenchymal and venous bolus-transit phase as time intervals Ia,p,v. Their durations (delta Ia,p,v), were then considered as maximum TTP-delays of each phase. Results Mean-R2 for the model-fit was 0.967. Based on the generic zf-scores the proposed bolus transit phases could be differentiated. The Ip-interval reliably depicted the parenchymal bolus-transit phase with durations of 3.4 s–10.1 s (median = 4.3s), where an increase with age was noted (∼30 ms/year). Conclusion Individual threshold-adjustment seems rational since regular bolus-transit durations in brain parenchyma obtained from the TDC overlap considerably with recommended critical TTP-thresholds of 4 s–8 s. The parenchymal transit time derived from the proposed model may be utilized to individually correct TTP-thresholds, thereby potentially improving the detection of critical perfusion. PMID:25521121

  19. Estimate of interstellar helium parameters from Prognoz 6 and Voyager 1/2 - EUV resonance glow measurements taking into account a possible redshift in the solar line profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassefiere, E.; Dalaudier, F.; Bertaux, J. L.

    1988-07-01

    Voyager 1 and 2 observations at 58.4 nm are used to reanalyze the He I 58.4 nm interplanetary resonance glow measurements made by two EUV photometers aboard Prognoz 6. It is shown that model fitting using a low temperature (7000 + or - 2000 K) and velocity (21.5 + or - 2.5 km/s) resolves several contradictions concerning the physics of the coupling between neutrals and protons at the heliopause and the comparison with independent measurements of the solar line width. New solar parameter values of 36 + or - 6 km/s for the solar line half width at 1/e, 9 + or - 3 km/s for the redshift of the solar line, and 1.4 (+ 0.6 - 0.3) x 10 to the 7th for the lifetime are proposed. It is pointed out that if the redshift assumption is valid, a weak differentiation between helium and hydrogen at the heliospheric interface is implied.

  20. Measurement of the CP-Violation Parameter sin2Φ₁ with a New Tagging Method at the Υ(5S) Resonance

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sato, Y.; Yamamoto, H.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; et al

    2012-04-23

    We report a measurement of the CP-violation parameter sin2Φ₁ at the Υ(5S) resonance using a new tagging method, called “B-π tagging.” In Υ(5S) decays containing a neutral B meson, a charged B, and a charged pion, the neutral B is reconstructed in the J/ψK0SCP-eigenstate decay channel. The initial flavor of the neutral B meson at the moment of the Υ(5S) decay is opposite to that of the charged B and may thus be inferred from the charge of the pion without reconstructing the charged B. From the asymmetry between B-π⁺ and Bπ⁻ tagged J/ψK0S yields, we determine sin2Φ₁=0.57±0.58(stat)±0.06(syst). The resultsmore » are based on 121 fb⁻¹ of data recorded by the Belle detector at the KEKB e⁺e⁻ collider.« less

  1. Measurement of the CP-Violation Parameter sin2Φ₁ with a New Tagging Method at the Υ(5S) Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Y.; Yamamoto, H.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bischofberger, M.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, P.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, I.-S.; Cho, K.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Fast, J. E.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hyun, H. J.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwabuchi, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Julius, T.; Kapusta, P.; Kawasaki, T.; Kichimi, H.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B. R.; Kobayashi, N.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kumar, R.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Liu, C.; Liu, Z. Q.; Louvot, R.; McOnie, S.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Muramatsu, N.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nishida, S.; Nishimura, K.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Poluektov, A.; Röhrken, M.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sanuki, T.; Schneider, O.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Seidl, R.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Stypula, J.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tanaka, S.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Wicht, J.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamashita, Y.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2012-04-23

    We report a measurement of the CP-violation parameter sin2Φ₁ at the Υ(5S) resonance using a new tagging method, called “B-π tagging.” In Υ(5S) decays containing a neutral B meson, a charged B, and a charged pion, the neutral B is reconstructed in the J/ψK0SCP-eigenstate decay channel. The initial flavor of the neutral B meson at the moment of the Υ(5S) decay is opposite to that of the charged B and may thus be inferred from the charge of the pion without reconstructing the charged B. From the asymmetry between B-π⁺ and Bπ⁻ tagged J/ψK0S yields, we determine sin2Φ₁=0.57±0.58(stat)±0.06(syst). The results are based on 121 fb⁻¹ of data recorded by the Belle detector at the KEKB e⁺e⁻ collider.

  2. A laser gyro with a four-mirror square resonator: formulas for simulating the dynamics of the synchronisation zone parameters of the frequencies of counterpropagating waves during the device operation in the self-heating regime

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, E A

    2014-04-28

    For a laser gyro with a four-mirror square resonator we have developed a mathematical model, which allows one to simulate the temporal behaviour of the synchronisation zone parameters of the frequencies of counterpropagating waves in a situation when the device operates in the self-heating regime and is switched-on at different initial temperatures. (laser gyroscopes)

  3. Grading More Accurately

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rom, Mark Carl

    2011-01-01

    Grades matter. College grading systems, however, are often ad hoc and prone to mistakes. This essay focuses on one factor that contributes to high-quality grading systems: grading accuracy (or "efficiency"). I proceed in several steps. First, I discuss the elements of "efficient" (i.e., accurate) grading. Next, I present analytical results…

  4. Prediction of the efficacy of surgical intervention in patients with cervical myelopathy by using diffusion tensor 3T-magnetic resonance imaging parameters

    PubMed Central

    Arima, Hironori; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Naito, Kentaro; Yamagata, Toru; Uda, Takehiro; Ohata, Kenji; Takami, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Background: The clinical significance of diffusion tensor (DT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters was analyzed to predict postoperative functional recovery in patients with cervical myelopathy. Materials and Methods: Sixteen patients with cervical myelopathy caused by cervical spondylosis, disk herniation or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament who underwent surgical intervention in our institute were enrolled in this retrospective study. There were 7 men and 9 women, with a mean age of 62.8 years. Clinical assessment was done before surgery and at least 3 months after surgery. All patients underwent whole-body 3.0-Tesla MRI before surgery. DT images (DTIs) were obtained using a single-shot fast spin-echo-based sequence. Mean values of mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) at 6 disk levels of the cervical spine were measured using manual setting of regions of interest. The MD and FA values at the most compressed part were analyzed. Absolute MD and FA values at the most compressed spinal level in patients were transformed into the normalized values with a z-score analysis. Results: MD-z may decrease with the severity of cervical myelopathy. Receiver operating characteristic analysis of MD-z and FA-z suggested that both MD-z and FA-z have clinical validity for predicting the efficacy of surgical intervention, but MD-z was considered to be the most appropriate value to predict the efficacy of surgery. Conclusions: DTIs may be a promising modality to predict functional recovery after surgery. MD changes may reflect spinal cord condition and its reversibility. PMID:26288547

  5. Treatment of Locally Advanced Vaginal Cancer With Radiochemotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: Dose-Volume Parameters and First Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Schmid, Maximilian P.; Fidarova, Elena; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Poetter, Richard

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical feasibility of magnetic resonance image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for patients with locally advanced vaginal cancer and to report treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with vaginal cancer were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45-50.4 Gy) plus IGABT with or without chemotherapy. Distribution of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages among patients were as follows: 4 patients had Stage II cancer, 5 patients had Stage III cancer, and 4 patients had Stage IV cancer. The concept of IGABT as developed for cervix cancer was transferred and adapted for vaginal cancer, with corresponding treatment planning and reporting. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy, applying the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy for tumor; {alpha}/{beta} = 3 for organs at risk). Endpoints studied were gross tumor volume (GTV), dose-volume parameters for high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and organs at risk, local control (LC), adverse side effects, and survival. Results: The mean GTV ({+-} 1 standard deviation) at diagnosis was 45.3 ({+-}30) cm{sup 3}, and the mean GTV at brachytherapy was 10 ({+-}14) cm{sup 3}. The mean D90 for the HRCTV was 86 ({+-}13) Gy. The mean D2cc for bladder, urethra, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 80 ({+-}20) Gy, 76 ({+-}16) Gy, 70 ({+-}9) Gy, and 60 ({+-}9) Gy, respectively. After a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 19-87 months), one local recurrence and two distant metastases cases were observed. Actuarial LC and overall survival rates at 3 years were 92% and 85%. One patient with Stage IVA and 1 patient with Stage III disease experienced fistulas (one vesicovaginal, one rectovaginal), and 1 patient developed periurethral necrosis. Conclusions: The concept of IGABT, originally developed for treating cervix cancer, appears to be applicable to vaginal cancer treatment with only minor adaptations. Dose-volume parameters for HRCTV and

  6. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  7. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  8. Accurate stopping power measurements for (0.21-2.68) MeV/u 1H+ and 4He+ ions crossing thin Al foils; extraction of the (I, b) parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, D.; Damache, S.; Ouichaoui, S.

    2015-01-01

    The stopping powers of thin Al foils for H+ and 4He+ ions have been measured over the energy range E = (206.03- 2680.05) keV/amu with an overall relative uncertainty better than 1% using the transmission method. The derived S (E) experimental data are compared to previous ones from the literature, to values derived by the SRIM-2008 code or compiled in the ICRU-49 report, and to the predictions of Sigmund-Schinner binary collision stopping theory. Besides, the S (E) data for H+ ions together with those for He2+ ions reported by Andersen et al. (1977) have been analyzed over the energy interval E > 1.0 MeV using the modified Bethe-Bloch stopping theory. The following sets of values have been inferred for the mean excitation potential, I, and the Barkas-Andersen parameter, b, for H+ and He+ projectiles, respectively: { (I = 164 ± 3) eV, b = 1.40 } and { (I = 163 ± 2.5) eV, b = 1.38 } . As expected, the I parameter is found to be independent of the projectile electronic structure presumably indicating that the contribution of charge exchange effects becomes negligible as the projectile velocity increases. Therefore, the I parameter must be determined from precise stopping power measurements performed at high projectile energies where the Bethe stopping theory is fully valid.

  9. Accurate determination of optical bandgap and lattice parameters of Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O epitaxial films (0{<=}x{<=}0.3) grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on a-plane sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Laumer, Bernhard; Schuster, Fabian; Stutzmann, Martin; Bergmaier, Andreas; Dollinger, Guenther; Eickhoff, Martin

    2013-06-21

    Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O epitaxial films with Mg concentrations 0{<=}x{<=}0.3 were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on a-plane sapphire substrates. Precise determination of the Mg concentration x was performed by elastic recoil detection analysis. The bandgap energy was extracted from absorption measurements with high accuracy taking electron-hole interaction and exciton-phonon complexes into account. From these results a linear relationship between bandgap energy and Mg concentration is established for x{<=}0.3. Due to alloy disorder, the increase of the photoluminescence emission energy with Mg concentration is less pronounced. An analysis of the lattice parameters reveals that the epitaxial films grow biaxially strained on a-plane sapphire.

  10. Accurate measurement of time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itano, Wayne M.; Ramsey, Norman F.

    1993-07-01

    The paper discusses current methods for accurate measurements of time by conventional atomic clocks, with particular attention given to the principles of operation of atomic-beam frequency standards, atomic hydrogen masers, and atomic fountain and to the potential use of strings of trapped mercury ions as a time device more stable than conventional atomic clocks. The areas of application of the ultraprecise and ultrastable time-measuring devices that tax the capacity of modern atomic clocks include radio astronomy and tests of relativity. The paper also discusses practical applications of ultraprecise clocks, such as navigation of space vehicles and pinpointing the exact position of ships and other objects on earth using the GPS.

  11. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  12. Precision Measurements of the 278 keV {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}) and the 151 keV {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}) Resonance Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Borowski, M.; Lieb, K. P.; Uhrmacher, M.; Bolse, W.

    2009-01-28

    In thin film technology, analytical methods for monitoring the deposition of oxide and nitride coatings and the effects of corrosive, laser and ion-beam treatments have attracted considerable attention. For depth-profiling the concentrations of light isotopes, resonant nuclear reaction analysis is an excellent non-destructive ion-beam analytical tool. We report here on precision measurements of the 278 keV {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}) and the 151 keV {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}) resonances using the high-resolution proton beam of the Goettingen IONAS accelerator. The deduced resonance energies E{sub R} and total widths {gamma}(in the laboratory system) are E{sub R} = 277.60(27) keV and {gamma} = 1115(33) eV for the {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}) resonance, and E{sub R} = 150.97(26) keV and {gamma} = 178(35) eV for the {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}) resonance. These values are significantly more precise than the ones quoted in the literature.

  13. Change in resonance parameters of a linear molecule as it bends: Evidence in electron-impact vibrational transitions of hot COS and CO2 molecules*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Masamitsu; Ishijima, Yohei; Kato, Hidetoshi; Mogi, Daisuke; Takahashi, Yoshinao; Fukae, Katsuya; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Shimamura, Isao

    2016-05-01

    Inelastic and superelastic electron-impact vibrational excitation functions of hot carbonyl sulphide COS (and hot CO2) are measured for electron energies from 0.5 to 3.0 eV (1.5 to 6.0 eV) and at a scattering angle of 90°. Based on the vibrational populations and the principle of detailed balance, these excitation functions are decomposed into contributions from state-to-state vibrational transitions involving up to the second bending overtone (030) in the electronically ground state. Both the 2 Π resonance for COS around 1.2 eV and the 2 Π u resonance for CO2 around 3.8 eV are shifted to lower energies as the initial vibrational state is excited in the bending mode. The width of the resonance hump for COS changes only little as the molecule bends, whereas that of the overall boomerang resonance for CO2 becomes narrower. The angular distribution of the electrons resonantly scattered by hot COS and hot CO2 is also measured. The different shapes depending on the vibrational transitions and gas temperatures are discussed in terms of the symmetry of the vibrational wave functions.

  14. Clinical application of a novel automatic algorithm for actigraphy-based activity and rest period identification to accurately determine awake and asleep ambulatory blood pressure parameters and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Cristina; Fernández, José R; Aboy, Mateo; Mojón, Artemio

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports the results of a study designed to determine whether there are statistically significant differences between the values of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) parameters obtained using different methods-fixed schedule, diary, and automatic algorithm based on actigraphy-of defining the main activity and rest periods, and to determine the clinical relevance of such differences. We studied 233 patients (98 men/135 women), 61.29 ± .83 yrs of age (mean ± SD). Statistical methods were used to measure agreement in the diagnosis and classification of subjects within the context of ABPM and cardiovascular disease risk assessment. The results show that there are statistically significant differences both at the group and individual levels. Those at the individual level have clinically significant implications, as they can result in a different classification, and, therefore, different diagnosis and treatment for individual subjects. The use of an automatic algorithm based on actigraphy can lead to better individual treatment by correcting the accuracy problems associated with the fixed schedule on patients whose actual activity/rest routine differs from the fixed schedule assumed, and it also overcomes the limitations and reliability issues associated with the use of diaries. PMID:23130607

  15. Resonances and resonance widths

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, T.

    1986-05-01

    Two-dimensional betatron resonances are much more important than their simple one-dimensional counterparts and exhibit a strong dependence on the betatron phase advance per cell. A practical definition of ''width'' is expanded upon in order to display these relations in tables. A primarily pedagogical introduction is given to explain the tables, and also to encourage a wider capability for deriving resonance behavior and wider use of ''designer'' resonances.

  16. Magnetic resonance of slotted circular cylinder resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Junjie; Liu, Shiyang; Lin, Zhifang; Chui, S. T.

    2008-07-01

    By a rigorous full-wave approach, a systemic study is made on the magnetic resonance of slotted circular cylinder resonators (SCCRs) made of a perfect conductor for the lossless case. This is a two-dimensional analog of the split-ring resonator and may serve as an alternative type of essential constituent of electromagnetic metamaterials. It is found that the resonance frequency can be modulated by changing the geometrical parameters and the dielectrics filling in the cavity and the slot. An approximate empirical expression is presented for magnetic resonance frequency of SCCRs from the viewpoint of an L-C circuit system. Finally, it is demonstrated that the SCCR structure can be miniaturized to less than 1/150 resonant wavelength in size with the dielectrics available currently.

  17. Developing Accurate Spatial Maps of Cotton Fiber Quality Parameters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Awareness of the importance of cotton fiber quality (Gossypium, L. sps.) has increased as advances in spinning technology require better quality cotton fiber. Recent advances in geospatial information sciences allow an improved ability to study the extent and causes of spatial variability in fiber p...

  18. Parameter Estimation of Spacecraft Fuel Slosh Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangadharan, Sathya; Sudermann, James; Marlowe, Andrea; Njengam Charles

    2004-01-01

    Fuel slosh in the upper stages of a spinning spacecraft during launch has been a long standing concern for the success of a space mission. Energy loss through the movement of the liquid fuel in the fuel tank affects the gyroscopic stability of the spacecraft and leads to nutation (wobble) which can cause devastating control issues. The rate at which nutation develops (defined by Nutation Time Constant (NTC can be tedious to calculate and largely inaccurate if done during the early stages of spacecraft design. Pure analytical means of predicting the influence of onboard liquids have generally failed. A strong need exists to identify and model the conditions of resonance between nutation motion and liquid modes and to understand the general characteristics of the liquid motion that causes the problem in spinning spacecraft. A 3-D computerized model of the fuel slosh that accounts for any resonant modes found in the experimental testing will allow for increased accuracy in the overall modeling process. Development of a more accurate model of the fuel slosh currently lies in a more generalized 3-D computerized model incorporating masses, springs and dampers. Parameters describing the model include the inertia tensor of the fuel, spring constants, and damper coefficients. Refinement and understanding the effects of these parameters allow for a more accurate simulation of fuel slosh. The current research will focus on developing models of different complexity and estimating the model parameters that will ultimately provide a more realistic prediction of Nutation Time Constant obtained through simulation.

  19. An improved resonance self-shielding method for heterogeneous fast reactor assembly and core calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.; Yang, W. S.

    2013-07-01

    An improved resonance self-shielding method has been developed to accurately estimate the effective multigroup cross sections for heterogeneous fast reactor assembly and core calculations. In the method, the heterogeneity effect is considered by the use of isotopic escape cross sections while the resonance interference effect is accounted for through the narrow resonance approximation or slowing-down calculations for specific compositions. The isotopic escape cross sections are calculated by solving fixed-source transport equations with the method of characteristics for the whole problem domain. This method requires no pre-calculated resonance integral tables or parameters that are typically necessary in the subgroup method. Preliminary results for multi pin-cell fast reactor problems show that the escape cross sections estimated from the explicit-geometry fixed source calculations produce more accurate eigenvalue and self-shielded effective cross sections than those from conventional one-dimensional geometry models. (authors)

  20. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  1. A Model Parameter Extraction Method for Dielectric Barrier Discharge Ozone Chamber using Differential Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amjad, M.; Salam, Z.; Ishaque, K.

    2014-04-01

    In order to design an efficient resonant power supply for ozone gas generator, it is necessary to accurately determine the parameters of the ozone chamber. In the conventional method, the information from Lissajous plot is used to estimate the values of these parameters. However, the experimental setup for this purpose can only predict the parameters at one operating frequency and there is no guarantee that it results in the highest ozone gas yield. This paper proposes a new approach to determine the parameters using a search and optimization technique known as Differential Evolution (DE). The desired objective function of DE is set at the resonance condition and the chamber parameter values can be searched regardless of experimental constraints. The chamber parameters obtained from the DE technique are validated by experiment.

  2. Kinetic isotope effect of the {sup 16}O + {sup 36}O{sub 2} and {sup 18}O + {sup 32}O{sub 2} isotope exchange reactions: Dominant role of reactive resonances revealed by an accurate time-dependent quantum wavepacket study

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zhigang Yu, Dequan; Xie, Wenbo; Hou, Jiayi; Dawes, Richard; Guo, Hua

    2015-05-07

    The O + O{sub 2} isotope exchange reactions play an important role in determining the oxygen isotopic composition of a number of trace gases in the atmosphere, and their temperature dependence and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) provide important constraints on our understanding of the origin and mechanism of these and other unusual oxygen KIEs important in the atmosphere. This work reports a quantum dynamics study of the title reactions on the newly constructed Dawes-Lolur-Li-Jiang-Guo (DLLJG) potential energy surface (PES). The thermal reaction rate coefficients of both the {sup 18}O + {sup 32}O{sub 2} and {sup 16}O + {sup 36}O{sub 2} reactions obtained using the DLLJG PES exhibit a clear negative temperature dependence, in sharp contrast with the positive temperature dependence obtained using the earlier modified Siebert-Schinke-Bittererova (mSSB) PES. In addition, the calculated KIE shows an improved agreement with the experiment. These results strongly support the absence of the “reef” structure in the entrance/exit channels of the DLLJG PES, which is present in the mSSB PES. The quantum dynamics results on both PESs attribute the marked KIE to strong near-threshold reactive resonances, presumably stemming from the mass differences and/or zero point energy difference between the diatomic reactant and product. The accurate characterization of the reactivity for these near-thermoneutral reactions immediately above the reaction threshold is important for correct characterization of the thermal reaction rate coefficients.

  3. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of CCCC RNA Reveals a Right-Handed Helix, and Revised Parameters for AMBER Force Field Torsions Improve Structural Predictions from Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The sequence dependence of RNA energetics is important for predicting RNA structure. Hairpins with Cn loops are consistently less stable than hairpins with other loops, which suggests the structure of Cn regions could be unusual in the “unfolded” state. For example, previous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) evidence suggested that polycytidylic acid forms a left-handed helix. In this study, UV melting experiments show that the hairpin formed by r(5′GGACCCCCGUCC) is less stable than r(5′GGACUUUUGUCC). NMR spectra for single-stranded C4 oligonucleotide, mimicking the unfolded hairpin loop, are consistent with a right-handed A-form-like helix. Comparisons between NMR spectra and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest that recent reparametrizations, parm99χ_YIL and parm99TOR, of the AMBER parm99 force field improve the agreement between structural features for C4 determined by NMR and predicted by MD. Evidently, the force field revisions to parm99 improve the modeling of RNA energetics and therefore structure. PMID:23286901

  4. NNLOPS accurate associated HW production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astill, William; Bizon, Wojciech; Re, Emanuele; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2016-06-01

    We present a next-to-next-to-leading order accurate description of associated HW production consistently matched to a parton shower. The method is based on reweighting events obtained with the HW plus one jet NLO accurate calculation implemented in POWHEG, extended with the MiNLO procedure, to reproduce NNLO accurate Born distributions. Since the Born kinematics is more complex than the cases treated before, we use a parametrization of the Collins-Soper angles to reduce the number of variables required for the reweighting. We present phenomenological results at 13 TeV, with cuts suggested by the Higgs Cross section Working Group.

  5. Effect of dose and frequency of interferon beta-1a administration on clinical and magnetic resonance imaging parameters in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cocco, Eleonora; Marchi, Piernicola; Floris, Gianluca; Mascia, Maria Giuseppina; Deriu, Marcello; Sirca, Antonella; Mamusa, Elena; Lai, Marina; Mura, Marco; Mallarini, Giorgio; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna

    2006-01-01

    There is still debate over the optimal dosage, frequency and route of administration of interferon (IFN) beta in multiple sclerosis (MS). A prospective, non-randomized, comparative study was performed to evaluate differences in magnetic resonance imaging and clinical outcomes of two IFN beta-1a preparations (30mcg intramuscular [im] once-weekly [qw], AVO; and 22 mcg subcutaneous [sc] three-times-weekly [tiw]; R22). Relapsing-remitting MS patients on one of the two IFN preparations (AVO, n=47; R22, n=48) were assessed at baseline and after 6 months of further treatment. There were no significant differences between the two groups at baseline. Both groups showed significantly reduced relapse rates (F=19.5; p<0.001) from baseline (0.6) to 6-month assessment (0.2; p<0.001). Univariate analysis showed a significant difference in favour of R22 on T2 lesion volume (F=14.4; p<0.001) and T1 black hole lesion load (F=8.5; p=0.004), the latter showing a significant increase in the AVO group (p<0.001). The incidence of patients with new T1 black holes was also higher for AVO than R22 (23.5% vs 8.3%; p=0.025). These results from patients receiving AVO or R22 in normal clinical practice are in line with randomized clinical studies that show the benefits of high-dose, high-frequency administration of IFN beta-1a in MS therapy. PMID:17049133

  6. Electron-atom resonances: The complex-scaled multiconfigurational spin-tensor electron propagator method for the 2P Be- shape resonance problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsednee, Tsogbayar; Liang, Liyuan; Yeager, Danny L.

    2015-02-01

    We propose and develop the complex-scaled multiconfigurational spin-tensor electron propagator (CMCSTEP) technique for theoretical determination of resonance parameters with electron-atom and electron-molecule systems including open-shell and highly correlated atoms and molecules. The multiconfigurational spin-tensor electron propagator (MCSTEP) method developed and implemented by Yeager and co-workers in real space gives very accurate and reliable ionization potentials and attachment energies. The CMCSTEP method uses a complex-scaled multiconfigurational self-consistent field (CMCSCF) state as an initial state along with a dilated Hamiltonian where all of the electronic coordinates are scaled by a complex factor. The CMCSCF was developed and applied successfully to resonance problems earlier. We apply the CMCSTEP method to get 2P Be- shape resonance parameters using 14 s 11 p 5 d ,14 s 14 p 2 d , and 14 s 14 p 5 d basis sets with a 2 s 2 p 3 d complete active space. The obtained values of the resonance parameters are compared to previous results. Here CMCSTEP has been developed and used for a resonance problem. It appears to be among the most accurate and reliable techniques. Vertical ionization potentials and attachment energies in real space are typically within ±0.2 eV or better of excellent experimental results and full configuration-interaction calculations with a good basis set. We expect the same sort of agreement in complex space.

  7. How to accurately bypass damage

    PubMed Central

    Broyde, Suse; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation can cause cancer through DNA damage — specifically, by linking adjacent thymine bases. Crystal structures show how the enzyme DNA polymerase η accurately bypasses such lesions, offering protection. PMID:20577203

  8. Energy saver prototype accelerating resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, Q.; May, M.; Miller, H.W.; Reid, J.; Turkot, F.; Webber, R.; Wildman, D.

    1981-06-01

    A fixed frequency rf accelerating resonator has been built and tested for the Fermilab Energy Saver. The design parameters and prototype resonator test results are given. The resonator features a high permeability nickel alloy resistor which damps unwanted modes and corona rolls designed with the aid of the computer code SUPERFISH. In bench measurements, the prototype resonator has achieved peak accelerating voltages of 500 kV for a 1% duty cycle and cw operation at 360 kV. 4 refs.

  9. Accurate Evaluation of Quantum Integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, David C.; Goorvitch, D.

    1994-01-01

    Combining an appropriate finite difference method with Richardson's extrapolation results in a simple, highly accurate numerical method for solving a Schr\\"{o}dinger's equation. Important results are that error estimates are provided, and that one can extrapolate expectation values rather than the wavefunctions to obtain highly accurate expectation values. We discuss the eigenvalues, the error growth in repeated Richardson's extrapolation, and show that the expectation values calculated on a crude mesh can be extrapolated to obtain expectation values of high accuracy.

  10. Accurate wavelength calibration method for flat-field grating spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Du, Xuewei; Li, Chaoyang; Xu, Zhe; Wang, Qiuping

    2011-09-01

    A portable spectrometer prototype is built to study wavelength calibration for flat-field grating spectrometers. An accurate calibration method called parameter fitting is presented. Both optical and structural parameters of the spectrometer are included in the wavelength calibration model, which accurately describes the relationship between wavelength and pixel position. Along with higher calibration accuracy, the proposed calibration method can provide information about errors in the installation of the optical components, which will be helpful for spectrometer alignment. PMID:21929865

  11. Accurate Molecular Polarizabilities Based on Continuum Electrostatics

    PubMed Central

    Truchon, Jean-François; Nicholls, Anthony; Iftimie, Radu I.; Roux, Benoît; Bayly, Christopher I.

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach for representing the intramolecular polarizability as a continuum dielectric is introduced to account for molecular electronic polarization. It is shown, using a finite-difference solution to the Poisson equation, that the Electronic Polarization from Internal Continuum (EPIC) model yields accurate gas-phase molecular polarizability tensors for a test set of 98 challenging molecules composed of heteroaromatics, alkanes and diatomics. The electronic polarization originates from a high intramolecular dielectric that produces polarizabilities consistent with B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ and experimental values when surrounded by vacuum dielectric. In contrast to other approaches to model electronic polarization, this simple model avoids the polarizability catastrophe and accurately calculates molecular anisotropy with the use of very few fitted parameters and without resorting to auxiliary sites or anisotropic atomic centers. On average, the unsigned error in the average polarizability and anisotropy compared to B3LYP are 2% and 5%, respectively. The correlation between the polarizability components from B3LYP and this approach lead to a R2 of 0.990 and a slope of 0.999. Even the F2 anisotropy, shown to be a difficult case for existing polarizability models, can be reproduced within 2% error. In addition to providing new parameters for a rapid method directly applicable to the calculation of polarizabilities, this work extends the widely used Poisson equation to areas where accurate molecular polarizabilities matter. PMID:23646034

  12. Supplementation of Antipsychotic Treatment with the Amino Acid Sarcosine Influences Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Parameters in Left Frontal White Matter in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Strzelecki, Dominik; Podgórski, Michał; Kałużyńska, Olga; Gawlik-Kotelnicka, Oliwia; Stefańczyk, Ludomir; Kotlicka-Antczak, Magdalena; Gmitrowicz, Agnieszka; Grzelak, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunction of the glutamatergic system, the main stimulating system in the brain, has a major role in pathogenesis of schizophrenia. The frontal white matter (WM) is partially composed of axons from glutamatergic pyramidal neurons and glia with glutamatergic receptors. The natural amino acid sarcosine, a component of a normal diet, inhibits the glycine type 1 transporter, increasing the glycine level. Thus, it modulates glutamatergic transmission through the glutamatergic ionotropic NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) receptor, which requires glycine as a co-agonist. To evaluate the concentrations of brain metabolites (NAA, N-acetylaspartate; Glx, complex of glutamate, glutamine, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA); mI, myo-inositol; Cr, creatine; Cho, choline) in the left frontal WM, Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy was used. Twenty-five patients randomly chosen from a group of fifty with stable schizophrenia (DSM-IV-TR) and dominant negative symptoms, who were receiving antipsychotic therapy, were administered 2 g of sarcosine daily for six months. The remaining 25 patients received placebo. Assignment was double blinded. 1H-NMR spectroscopy (1.5 T) was performed twice: before and after the intervention. NAA, Glx and mI were evaluated as Cr and Cho ratios. All patients were also assessed twice with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Results were compared between groups and in two time points in each group. The sarcosine group demonstrated a significant decrease in WM Glx/Cr and Glx/Cho ratios compared to controls after six months of therapy. In the experimental group, the final NAA/Cr ratio significantly increased and Glx/Cr ratio significantly decreased compared to baseline values. Improvement in the PANSS scores was significant only in the sarcosine group. In patients with schizophrenia, sarcosine augmentation can reverse the negative effect of glutamatergic system overstimulation, with a simultaneous beneficial increase of NAA

  13. Supplementation of Antipsychotic Treatment with the Amino Acid Sarcosine Influences Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Parameters in Left Frontal White Matter in Patients with Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Strzelecki, Dominik; Podgórski, Michał; Kałużyńska, Olga; Gawlik-Kotelnicka, Oliwia; Stefańczyk, Ludomir; Kotlicka-Antczak, Magdalena; Gmitrowicz, Agnieszka; Grzelak, Piotr

    2015-10-01

    Dysfunction of the glutamatergic system, the main stimulating system in the brain, has a major role in pathogenesis of schizophrenia. The frontal white matter (WM) is partially composed of axons from glutamatergic pyramidal neurons and glia with glutamatergic receptors. The natural amino acid sarcosine, a component of a normal diet, inhibits the glycine type 1 transporter, increasing the glycine level. Thus, it modulates glutamatergic transmission through the glutamatergic ionotropic NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) receptor, which requires glycine as a co-agonist. To evaluate the concentrations of brain metabolites (NAA, N-acetylaspartate; Glx, complex of glutamate, glutamine, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA); mI, myo-inositol; Cr, creatine; Cho, choline) in the left frontal WM, Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (¹H-NMR) spectroscopy was used. Twenty-five patients randomly chosen from a group of fifty with stable schizophrenia (DSM-IV-TR) and dominant negative symptoms, who were receiving antipsychotic therapy, were administered 2 g of sarcosine daily for six months. The remaining 25 patients received placebo. Assignment was double blinded. ¹H-NMR spectroscopy (1.5 T) was performed twice: before and after the intervention. NAA, Glx and mI were evaluated as Cr and Cho ratios. All patients were also assessed twice with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Results were compared between groups and in two time points in each group. The sarcosine group demonstrated a significant decrease in WM Glx/Cr and Glx/Cho ratios compared to controls after six months of therapy. In the experimental group, the final NAA/Cr ratio significantly increased and Glx/Cr ratio significantly decreased compared to baseline values. Improvement in the PANSS scores was significant only in the sarcosine group. In patients with schizophrenia, sarcosine augmentation can reverse the negative effect of glutamatergic system overstimulation, with a simultaneous beneficial increase of NAA

  14. Two highly accurate methods for pitch calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniel, K.; Härtig, F.; Osawa, S.; Sato, O.

    2009-11-01

    Among profiles, helix and tooth thickness pitch is one of the most important parameters of an involute gear measurement evaluation. In principle, coordinate measuring machines (CMM) and CNC-controlled gear measuring machines as a variant of a CMM are suited for these kinds of gear measurements. Now the Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (NMIJ/AIST) and the German national metrology institute the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) have each developed independently highly accurate pitch calibration methods applicable to CMM or gear measuring machines. Both calibration methods are based on the so-called closure technique which allows the separation of the systematic errors of the measurement device and the errors of the gear. For the verification of both calibration methods, NMIJ/AIST and PTB performed measurements on a specially designed pitch artifact. The comparison of the results shows that both methods can be used for highly accurate calibrations of pitch standards.

  15. Intersample fluctuations in phosphocreatine concentration determined by 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy and parameter estimation of metabolic responses to exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Rossiter, H B; Howe, F A; Ward, S A; Kowalchuk, J M; Griffiths, J R; Whipp, B J

    2000-01-01

    The ATP turnover rate during constant-load exercise is often estimated from the initial rate of change of phosphocreatine concentration ([PCr]) using 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). However, the phase and amplitude characteristics of the sample-to-sample fluctuations can markedly influence this estimation (as well as that for the time constant (τ) of the [PCr] change) and confound its physiological interpretation especially for small amplitude responses. This influence was investigated in six healthy males who performed repeated constant-load quadriceps exercise of a moderate intensity in a whole-body MRS system. A transmit- receive surface coil was placed under the right quadriceps, allowing determination of intramuscular [PCr]; pulmonary oxygen uptake (V̇O2) was simultaneously determined, breath-by-breath, using a mass spectrometer and a turbine volume measuring module. The probability density functions (PDF) of [PCr] and V̇O2 fluctuations were determined for each test during the steady states of rest and exercise and the PDF was then fitted to a Gaussian function. The standard deviation of the [PCr] and V̇O2 fluctuations at rest and during exercise (sr and sw, respectively) and the peak centres of the distributions (xcr and xcw) were determined, as were the skewness (γ1) and kurtosis (γ2) coefficients. There was no difference between sr and sw for [PCr] relative to the resting control baseline (sr= 1.554%Δ (s.d.= 0.44), sw= 1.514%Δ (s.d.= 0.35)) or the PDF peak centres (xcr=−0.013 %Δ (s.d.= 0.09), xcw−0.197 %Δ (s.d.= 0.18)). The standard deviation and peak centre of the ‘noise’ in V̇O2 also did not vary between rest and exercise (sr= 0.0427 l min−1 (s.d.= 0.0104), sw= 0.0640 l min−1 (s.d.= 0.0292); xcr=−0.0051 l min−1 (s.d.= 0.0069), xcw 0.0022 l min−1 (s.d.= 0.0034)). Our results demonstrate that the intersample ‘noise’ associated with [PCr] determination by 31P-MRS may be characterised as a stochastic Gaussian

  16. Effect of spatial distribution of dissipated power on modeling of SMR BAW resonators at high power levels.

    PubMed

    Tag, Andreas; Bader, Bernhard; Huck, Christian; Karolewski, Dominik; Pitschi, Maximilian; Weigel, Robert; Hagelauer, Amelie

    2015-10-01

    The modeling of bulk acoustic wave resonators at elevated power levels has been improved by taking the spatial distribution of the dominating loss mechanisms into account. The spatial distribution of the dissipated power enables more accurate modeling of the temperature increase caused by the applied power. Thus, it is also possible to more accurately model the frequency shifts of the resonators' impedance curves resulting from the temperature increase caused by the applied power. Simulation and measurement results for the temperatures and impedances of the resonators with different layerstacks at high power loads are presented. The simulation and measurement results are in good agreement, confirming the presented modeling approach. Furthermore, the de-embedding procedure used to obtain vectorial scattering parameters of the resonators during high power loads, the according measurement setup, and the procedure for measuring absolute temperatures by infrared thermography are discussed. PMID:26470048

  17. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy for elastic constant measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, R.D.; Migliori, A.; Roe, L.H.

    1993-12-31

    All objects exhibit vibrational resonances when mechanically excited. These resonant frequencies are determined by density, geometry, and elastic moduli. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) takes advantage of the known relationship between the parameters. In particular, for a freely suspended object, with three of the four parameters (vibrational spectra, density, geometry, or elastic moduli) known the remaining one can be calculated. From a materials characterization standpoint it is straight-forward to measure density and geometry but less so to measure all the elastic moduli. It has recently become possible to quickly and accurately measure vibrational spectra, and using code written at Los Alamos, calculate all the elastic moduli simultaneously. This is done to an accuracy of better than one percent for compression and 0.1 percent for shear. RUS provides rapid acquisition of materials information here-to-fore obtainable only with difficulty. It will greatly facilitate the use of real materials properties in models and thus make possible more realistic modeling results. The technique is sensitive to phase changes and microstructure. This offers a change to input real data into microstructure and phase change models. It will also enable measurement of moduli at locations in and about a weld thus providing information for a validating coupled thermomechanical calculations.

  18. Parametric resonance voltage response of electrostatically actuated Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems cantilever resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruntu, Dumitru I.; Martinez, Israel; W. Knecht, Martin

    2016-02-01

    This paper investigates the parametric resonance voltage response of nonlinear parametrically actuated Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) cantilever resonators. A soft AC voltage of frequency near natural frequency is applied between the resonator and a parallel ground plate. This produces an electrostatic force that leads the structure into parametric resonance. The model consists of an Euler-Bernoulli thin cantilever under the actuation of electrostatic force to include fringe effect, and damping force. Two methods of investigation are used, namely the Method of Multiple Scales (MMS) and Reduced Order Model (ROM) method. ROM convergence of the voltage response and the limitation of MMS to small to moderate amplitudes with respect to the gap (gap-amplitudes) are reported. MMS predicts accurately both Hopf supercritical and supercritical bifurcation voltages. However, MMS overestimates the large gap-amplitudes of the resonator, and. misses completely or overestimates the saddle-node bifurcation occurring at large gap-amplitudes. ROM produces valid results for small and/or large gap-amplitudes for a sufficient number of terms (vibration modes). As the voltage is swept up at constant frequency, the resonator maintains zero amplitude until reaches the subcritical Hopf bifurcation voltage where it loses stability and jumps up to large gap-amplitudes, next the gap-amplitude decreases until it reaches the supercritical Hopf bifurcation point, and after that the gap-amplitude remains zero, for the voltage range considered in this work. As the voltage is swept down at constant frequency, the zero gap-amplitude of the resonator starts increasing continuously after reaching the supercritical Hopf bifurcation voltage until it reaches the saddle-node bifurcation voltage when a sudden jump to zero gap-amplitude occurs. Effects of frequency, damping and fringe parameters on the voltage response show that (1) the supercritical Hopf bifurcation is shifted to lower voltage

  19. Hand-held resonance sensor for tissue stiffness measurements—a theoretical and experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalkanen, Ville

    2010-05-01

    A piezoelectric transducer in a feedback circuit operating in a resonance state is the basis of a resonance sensor. Upon contact with a soft object a change in the resonance frequency reflects the acoustic impedance. Together with force measurement it is possible to obtain the elastic stiffness of the object. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concept of a hand-held resonance sensor for tissue stiffness measurement. A time derivative analysis of the force and the frequency change showed that a stiffness-sensitive parameter was independent of the impression speed. Soft tissue phantoms of gelatin were used in an experimental validation of the theory. A force indentation method was used as a reference method for assessing the gelatin's elastic stiffness. Results from the hand-held measurements showed that the stiffness parameter accurately measured the elastic stiffness of the gelatin (R2 = 0.94, p < 0.05). The stiffness parameter was weakly (on average R2 = 0.15) and non-significantly (p > 0.05, 14 out of 17) dependent on an impression speed parameter. On average, a small amount of the total variance was explained by the impression speed. In conclusion, soft tissue stiffness can be objectively measured with free-hand measurement with a resonance sensor. This study contributes a theoretical analysis and an experimental demonstration of the concept of a hand-held resonance sensor for stiffness measurements.

  20. The Nucleon Resonance Program at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Ralf W. Gothe

    2006-02-01

    The status of the program to study baryon resonances at Jefferson Lab will be exemplified by the latest results on resonance parameters and transition form factors in single and double-pion production as well as kaon-hyperon decays.

  1. Laser magnetic resonance in supersonic plasmas - The rotational spectrum of SH(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovde, David C.; Saykally, Richard J.

    1987-01-01

    The rotational spectrum of v = 0 and v = 1X3Sigma(-)SH(+) was measured by laser magnetic resonance. Rotationally cold (Tr = 30 K), vibrationally excited (Tv = 3000 K) ions were generated in a corona excited supersonic expansion. The use of this source to identify ion signals is described. Improved molecular parameters were obtained; term values are presented from which astrophysically important transitions may be calculated. Accurate hyperfine parameters for both vibrational levels were determined and the vibrational dependence of the Fermi contact interaction was resolved. The hyperfine parameters agree well with recent many-body perturbation theory calculations.

  2. Measurement of the Z boson resonance parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, G.J.

    1989-11-01

    Using the Mark II detector at the SLC, we measure the Z mass and width to be 91.17 {plus minus} 0.18 GeV/c{sup 2} and 1.95{sup +0. 40}{sub {minus}0.30} GeV, respectively. From a fit in which the visible Z width is constrained to its Standard Model value, the number of neutrino species is determined to be 3.0 {plus minus} or <4.4 at the 95% confidence level. 13 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. On the extraction of P11 resonances from πN data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hiroyuki Kamano; Nakamura, Satoshi X.; Lee, Tsung -Shung; Sato, Toru

    2010-06-22

    With the accuracy of the available P11 amplitudes of πΔ scattering, we show that two resonance poles near the pi Delta threshold, obtained in several analyses, are stable against large variations of parameters within a dynamical coupled-channels analysis. The number of poles in the 1.5 GeV < W < 2 GeV region could be more than one, depending on how the structure of the single-energy solution of SAID is fitted. Lastly, our results indicate the need of more accurate πN scattering data in the W > 1.6 GeV region for high precision resonance extractions.

  4. Accurate single-molecule FRET studies using multiparameter fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Sisamakis, Evangelos; Valeri, Alessandro; Kalinin, Stanislav; Rothwell, Paul J; Seidel, Claus A M

    2010-01-01

    In the recent decade, single-molecule (sm) spectroscopy has come of age and is providing important insight into how biological molecules function. So far our view of protein function is formed, to a significant extent, by traditional structure determination showing many beautiful static protein structures. Recent experiments by single-molecule and other techniques have questioned the idea that proteins and other biomolecules are static structures. In particular, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) studies of single molecules have shown that biomolecules may adopt many conformations as they perform their function. Despite the success of sm-studies, interpretation of smFRET data are challenging since they can be complicated due to many artifacts arising from the complex photophysical behavior of fluorophores, dynamics, and motion of fluorophores, as well as from small amounts of contaminants. We demonstrate that the simultaneous acquisition of a maximum of fluorescence parameters by multiparameter fluorescence detection (MFD) allows for a robust assessment of all possible artifacts arising from smFRET and offers unsurpassed capabilities regarding the identification and analysis of individual species present in a population of molecules. After a short introduction, the data analysis procedure is described in detail together with some experimental considerations. The merits of MFD are highlighted further with the presentation of some applications to proteins and nucleic acids, including accurate structure determination based on FRET. A toolbox is introduced in order to demonstrate how complications originating from orientation, mobility, and position of fluorophores have to be taken into account when determining FRET-related distances with high accuracy. Furthermore, the broad time resolution (picoseconds to hours) of MFD allows for kinetic studies that resolve interconversion events between various subpopulations as a biomolecule of interest explores its

  5. System and method for regulating resonant inverters

    DOEpatents

    Stevanovic, Ljubisa Dragoljub; Zane, Regan Andrew

    2007-08-28

    A technique is provided for direct digital phase control of resonant inverters based on sensing of one or more parameters of the resonant inverter. The resonant inverter control system includes a switching circuit for applying power signals to the resonant inverter and a sensor for sensing one or more parameters of the resonant inverter. The one or more parameters are representative of a phase angle. The resonant inverter control system also includes a comparator for comparing the one or more parameters to a reference value and a digital controller for determining timing of the one or more parameters and for regulating operation of the switching circuit based upon the timing of the one or more parameters.

  6. Modelling resonant planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emel'yanenko, V.

    2012-09-01

    Many discovered multi-planet systems are in meanmotion resonances. The aim of this work is to study dynamical processes leading to the formation of resonant configurations on the basis of a unified model described earlier [1]. The model includes gravitational interactions of planets and migration of planets due to the presence of a gas disc. For the observed systems 24 Sex, HD 37124, HD 73526, HD 82943, HD 128311, HD 160691, Kepler 9, NN Ser with planets moving in the 2:1 resonance, it is shown that the capture in this resonance occurs at very wide ranges of parameters of both type I and type II migration. Conditions of migration leading to the formation of the resonant systems HD 45364 и HD 200964 (3:2 and 4:3, respectively) are obtained. Formation scenarios are studied for the systems HD 102272, HD 108874, HD 181433, HD 202206 with planets in high order resonances. We discuss also how gravitational interactions of planets and planetesimal discs lead to the breakup of resonant configurations and the formation of systems similar to the 47 UMa system.

  7. Introducing gel dosimetry in a clinical environment: Customization of polymer gel composition and magnetic resonance imaging parameters used for 3D dose verifications in radiosurgery and intensity modulated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Crescenti, Remo A.; Scheib, Stefan G.; Schneider, Uwe; Gianolini, Stefano

    2007-04-15

    Radiation sensitive gels have been used as dosimeters for clinical dose verification of different radiation therapy modalities. However, the use of gels is not widespread, because careful techniques are required to achieve the dose precision and accuracy aimed for in clinical dose verification. Here, the introduction of gel dosimetry in a clinical environment is described, including the whole chain of customizations and preparations required to introduce magnetic resonance (MR) based gel dosimetry into clinical routine. In order to standardize gel dosimetry in dose verifications for radiosurgery and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), we focused on both the customization of the gel composition and of the MR imaging parameters to increase its precision. The relative amount of the components of the normoxic, methacrylic acid based gel (MAGIC) was changed to obtain linear and steep dose response relationships. MR imaging parameters were customized for the different dose ranges used in order to lower the relative standard deviation of the measured transversal relaxation rate (R{sub 2}). An optimization parameter was introduced to quantify the change in the relative standard deviation of R{sub 2} ({sigma}{sub R2,rel}) taking the increase in MR time into account. A 9% methacrylic acid gel customized for radiosurgery was found to give a linear dose response up to 40 Gy with a slope of 0.94 Gy{sup -1} s{sup -1}, while a 6% methacrylic acid gel customized for IMRT had a linear range up to 3 Gy with a slope of 1.86 Gy{sup -1} s{sup -1}. With the help of an introduced optimization parameter, the mean {sigma}{sub R2,rel} was improved by 13% for high doses and by 55% for low doses, without increasing MR time to unacceptable values. A mean dose resolution of less than 0.13 Gy has been achieved with the gel and imaging parameters customized for IMRT and a dose resolution from 0.97 Gy (at 5 Gy) to 2.15 Gy (at 40 Gy) for the radiosurgery dose range. The comparisons of

  8. Introducing gel dosimetry in a clinical environment: customization of polymer gel composition and magnetic resonance imaging parameters used for 3D dose verifications in radiosurgery and intensity modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Crescenti, Remo A; Scheib, Stefan G; Schneider, Uwe; Gianolini, Stefano

    2007-04-01

    Radiation sensitive gels have been used as dosimeters for clinical dose verification of different radiation therapy modalities. However, the use of gels is not widespread, because careful techniques are required to achieve the dose precision and accuracy aimed for in clinical dose verification. Here, the introduction of gel dosimetry in a clinical environment is described, including the whole chain of customizations and preparations required to introduce magnetic resonance (MR) based gel dosimetry into clinical routine. In order to standardize gel dosimetry in dose verifications for radiosurgery and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), we focused on both the customization of the gel composition and of the MR imaging parameters to increase its precision. The relative amount of the components of the normoxic, methacrylic acid based gel (MAGIC) was changed to obtain linear and steep dose response relationships. MR imaging parameters were customized for the different dose ranges used in order to lower the relative standard deviation of the measured transversal relaxation rate (R2). An optimization parameter was introduced to quantify the change in the relative standard deviation of R2 (sigma(R2,rel)) taking the increase in MR time into account. A 9% methacrylic acid gel customized for radiosurgery was found to give a linear dose response up to 40 Gy with a slope of 0.94 Gy(-1) s(-1), while a 6% methacrylic acid gel customized for IMRT had a linear range up to 3 Gy with a slope of 1.86 Gy(-1) s(-1). With the help of an introduced optimization parameter, the mean sigma(R2,rel) was improved by 13% for high doses and by 55% for low doses, without increasing MR time to unacceptable values. A mean dose resolution of less than 0.13 Gy has been achieved with the gel and imaging parameters customized for IMRT and a dose resolution from 0.97 Gy (at 5 Gy) to 2.15 Gy (at 40 Gy) for the radiosurgery dose range. The comparisons of calculated and measured relative 3D dose

  9. Three-pion resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcilazo, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    1994-03-01

    We investigate the continuum three-pion problem within a relativistic three-body model that takes into account the ππ S and P waves. The dynamical input of the two-body subsystem is given by separable potentials, which yield a good fit to the ππ scattering data and resonance parameters up to a two-body invariant mass of 900MeV. We introduce a parameter ν expressing the ambiguity in the reduction of a fully relativistic theory to a three-dimensional one. The masses and widths of the ω, a 1(1260), and π(1300) mesons, which decay predominantly into three pions, are reasonably well described by our model. The h 1(1170) meson, however, which also decays into three pions, cannot be explained as a three-pion resonance. Some πρ Argand diagrams are shown in those channels where resonances exist.

  10. Toward Accurate and Quantitative Comparative Metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Nayfach, Stephen; Pollard, Katherine S

    2016-08-25

    Shotgun metagenomics and computational analysis are used to compare the taxonomic and functional profiles of microbial communities. Leveraging this approach to understand roles of microbes in human biology and other environments requires quantitative data summaries whose values are comparable across samples and studies. Comparability is currently hampered by the use of abundance statistics that do not estimate a meaningful parameter of the microbial community and biases introduced by experimental protocols and data-cleaning approaches. Addressing these challenges, along with improving study design, data access, metadata standardization, and analysis tools, will enable accurate comparative metagenomics. We envision a future in which microbiome studies are replicable and new metagenomes are easily and rapidly integrated with existing data. Only then can the potential of metagenomics for predictive ecological modeling, well-powered association studies, and effective microbiome medicine be fully realized. PMID:27565341

  11. How Accurately can we Calculate Thermal Systems?

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D; Blomquist, R N; Dean, C; Heinrichs, D; Kalugin, M A; Lee, M; Lee, Y; MacFarlan, R; Nagaya, Y; Trkov, A

    2004-04-20

    I would like to determine how accurately a variety of neutron transport code packages (code and cross section libraries) can calculate simple integral parameters, such as K{sub eff}, for systems that are sensitive to thermal neutron scattering. Since we will only consider theoretical systems, we cannot really determine absolute accuracy compared to any real system. Therefore rather than accuracy, it would be more precise to say that I would like to determine the spread in answers that we obtain from a variety of code packages. This spread should serve as an excellent indicator of how accurately we can really model and calculate such systems today. Hopefully, eventually this will lead to improvements in both our codes and the thermal scattering models that they use in the future. In order to accomplish this I propose a number of extremely simple systems that involve thermal neutron scattering that can be easily modeled and calculated by a variety of neutron transport codes. These are theoretical systems designed to emphasize the effects of thermal scattering, since that is what we are interested in studying. I have attempted to keep these systems very simple, and yet at the same time they include most, if not all, of the important thermal scattering effects encountered in a large, water-moderated, uranium fueled thermal system, i.e., our typical thermal reactors.

  12. Predict amine solution properties accurately

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, S.; Meisen, A.; Chakma, A.

    1996-02-01

    Improved process design begins with using accurate physical property data. Especially in the preliminary design stage, physical property data such as density viscosity, thermal conductivity and specific heat can affect the overall performance of absorbers, heat exchangers, reboilers and pump. These properties can also influence temperature profiles in heat transfer equipment and thus control or affect the rate of amine breakdown. Aqueous-amine solution physical property data are available in graphical form. However, it is not convenient to use with computer-based calculations. Developed equations allow improved correlations of derived physical property estimates with published data. Expressions are given which can be used to estimate physical properties of methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), monoethanolamine (MEA) and diglycolamine (DGA) solutions.

  13. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, Cameron J.; Slattery, Ashley D.; Stapleton, Andrew J.; Shapter, Joseph G.; Gibson, Christopher T.

    2016-03-01

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  14. Optical resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention discloses a semi-ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP) optical resonator structure comprising a medium including an edge forming a reflective facet and a waveguide within the medium, the waveguide having opposing ends formed by the reflective facet. The performance of the SRFP resonator can be further enhanced by including a Mach-Zehnder interferometer in the waveguide on one side of the gain medium. The optical resonator can be employed in a variety of optical devices. Laser structures using at least one SRFP resonator are disclosed where the resonators are disposed on opposite sides of a gain medium. Other laser structures employing one or more resonators on one side of a gain region are also disclosed.

  15. Dielectric Resonator Transmission Line Models Employing the Generalized Telegraphist's Equation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbay, David

    1990-01-01

    A new comprehensive model that is applicable to both Dielectric Resonators (DR) and Dielectric Ring Resonators (DRR) has been developed. The dielectric resonator is typically a high dielectric constant material cylinder, where the ring resonator is modified by the addition of a concentric hole usually used for mounting. Both resonators are typically used in miniaturized high Q filtering at microwave and millimeter wave frequencies. The model is produced through a modal Fourier type expansion and results in a transmission line equivalent circuit. It is derived rigorously and its accuracy is not limited by a priori assumptions. However, a well selected set of basis functions achieves rapid convergence of the expansion series. It is therefore possible to truncate the modal expansion quite radically without greatly sacrificing its accuracy. Complete knowledge of the fields surrounding the resonator in association with the new model would provide an exact solution for the resonator network parameters. The concept of 'surface admittances' is introduced into the model formulation to represent the totality of the emanating and incident outside fields. As such, this technique allows the model to incorporate evanescent and radiating fields accurately. However, lacking an exact formulation for these fields, the derivation resorts to the use of approximations for the fields surrounding the resonator. The approximations are justifiable on physical grounds and allow a closed form treatment of the entire problem. The new model is used to predict the free-space resonance frequency and the results are compared to measured data and predictions which are based on other models. The predictions of the new model compare well with available data and illustrate some interesting phenomena associated with the dielectric resonator. This model is novel in that the equivalent circuit is derived with respect to the circular direction. The result is an equivalent circuit model possessing

  16. Resonance scraping

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, T.

    1986-06-01

    Protons lost in a ring leave at a few preferred locations, determined by some non-linear property of the dipoles. This paper suggests taking control of lost protons by beating the magnets at their own game - by means of a designed resonance used as a beam scraper. It is a study of suitable resonances, including estimates of the required multipole element strengths. The appropriate resonances are two-dimensional. A large number of figures is included.

  17. Electron-atom scattering resonances: Complex-scaled multiconfigurational spin-tensor electron propagator method for B-shape resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsednee, Tsogbayar; Yeager, Danny L.

    2015-06-01

    We develop the complex-scaled multiconfigurational spin-tensor electron propagator (CMCSTEP) technique for the theoretical determination of resonance parameters with electron-atom-molecule systems including open-shell and highly correlated (nondynamical correlation) atoms and molecules. The multiconfigurational spin-tensor electron propagator method developed and implemented by Yeager and his coworkers in real space gives very accurate and reliable ionization potentials and electron affinities. The CMCSTEP method uses a complex-scaled multiconfigurational self-consistent field state as an initial state along with a dilated Hamiltonian where all of the electronic coordinates are scaled by a complex factor. We apply the CMCSTEP and the related M1 methods to get the B-shape resonance parameters using 14 s 11 p and 14 s 11 p 5 d basis sets with 1 s 2 s 2 p 3 s , 1 s 2 s 2 p 3 s 3 p , 1 s 2 s 2 p 3 d , 2 s 2 p 3 s 3 p , 2 s 2 p 3 d , and 2 s 2 p 3 s 3 p 3 d complete active spaces. The CMCSTEP and M1 resonance positions and widths are obtained for the 1 s22 s22 p21D , 1 s22 s 2 p33D , and 1 s 2 s22 p33D , 3S , and 3P shape resonances.

  18. Fast and accurate simulations of diffusion-weighted MRI signals for the evaluation of acquisition sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rensonnet, Gaëtan; Jacobs, Damien; Macq, Benoît.; Taquet, Maxime

    2016-03-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) is a powerful tool to probe the diffusion of water through tissues. Through the application of magnetic gradients of appropriate direction, intensity and duration constituting the acquisition parameters, information can be retrieved about the underlying microstructural organization of the brain. In this context, an important and open question is to determine an optimal sequence of such acquisition parameters for a specific purpose. The use of simulated DW-MRI data for a given microstructural configuration provides a convenient and efficient way to address this problem. We first present a novel hybrid method for the synthetic simulation of DW-MRI signals that combines analytic expressions in simple geometries such as spheres and cylinders and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations elsewhere. Our hybrid method remains valid for any acquisition parameters and provides identical levels of accuracy with a computational time that is 90% shorter than that required by MC simulations for commonly-encountered microstructural configurations. We apply our novel simulation technique to estimate the radius of axons under various noise levels with different acquisition protocols commonly used in the literature. The results of our comparison suggest that protocols favoring a large number of gradient intensities such as a Cube and Sphere (CUSP) imaging provide more accurate radius estimation than conventional single-shell HARDI acquisitions for an identical acquisition time.

  19. Orbital resonances around black holes.

    PubMed

    Brink, Jeandrew; Geyer, Marisa; Hinderer, Tanja

    2015-02-27

    We compute the length and time scales associated with resonant orbits around Kerr black holes for all orbital and spin parameters. Resonance-induced effects are potentially observable when the Event Horizon Telescope resolves the inner structure of Sgr A*, when space-based gravitational wave detectors record phase shifts in the waveform during the resonant passage of a compact object spiraling into the black hole, or in the frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations for accreting black holes. The onset of geodesic chaos for non-Kerr spacetimes should occur at the resonance locations quantified here. PMID:25768747

  20. Accurate ab Initio Spin Densities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We present an approach for the calculation of spin density distributions for molecules that require very large active spaces for a qualitatively correct description of their electronic structure. Our approach is based on the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm to calculate the spin density matrix elements as a basic quantity for the spatially resolved spin density distribution. The spin density matrix elements are directly determined from the second-quantized elementary operators optimized by the DMRG algorithm. As an analytic convergence criterion for the spin density distribution, we employ our recently developed sampling-reconstruction scheme [J. Chem. Phys.2011, 134, 224101] to build an accurate complete-active-space configuration-interaction (CASCI) wave function from the optimized matrix product states. The spin density matrix elements can then also be determined as an expectation value employing the reconstructed wave function expansion. Furthermore, the explicit reconstruction of a CASCI-type wave function provides insight into chemically interesting features of the molecule under study such as the distribution of α and β electrons in terms of Slater determinants, CI coefficients, and natural orbitals. The methodology is applied to an iron nitrosyl complex which we have identified as a challenging system for standard approaches [J. Chem. Theory Comput.2011, 7, 2740]. PMID:22707921

  1. Resonances for Symmetric Two-Barrier Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a method for the accurate calculation of bound-state and resonance energies for one-dimensional potentials. We calculate the shape resonances for symmetric two-barrier potentials and compare them with those coming from the Siegert approximation, the complex scaling method and the box-stabilization method. A comparison of the…

  2. Accurate state estimation from uncertain data and models: an application of data assimilation to mathematical models of human brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Data assimilation refers to methods for updating the state vector (initial condition) of a complex spatiotemporal model (such as a numerical weather model) by combining new observations with one or more prior forecasts. We consider the potential feasibility of this approach for making short-term (60-day) forecasts of the growth and spread of a malignant brain cancer (glioblastoma multiforme) in individual patient cases, where the observations are synthetic magnetic resonance images of a hypothetical tumor. Results We apply a modern state estimation algorithm (the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter), previously developed for numerical weather prediction, to two different mathematical models of glioblastoma, taking into account likely errors in model parameters and measurement uncertainties in magnetic resonance imaging. The filter can accurately shadow the growth of a representative synthetic tumor for 360 days (six 60-day forecast/update cycles) in the presence of a moderate degree of systematic model error and measurement noise. Conclusions The mathematical methodology described here may prove useful for other modeling efforts in biology and oncology. An accurate forecast system for glioblastoma may prove useful in clinical settings for treatment planning and patient counseling. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Anthony Almudevar, Tomas Radivoyevitch, and Kristin Swanson (nominated by Georg Luebeck). PMID:22185645

  3. Can blind persons accurately assess body size from the voice?

    PubMed

    Pisanski, Katarzyna; Oleszkiewicz, Anna; Sorokowska, Agnieszka

    2016-04-01

    Vocal tract resonances provide reliable information about a speaker's body size that human listeners use for biosocial judgements as well as speech recognition. Although humans can accurately assess men's relative body size from the voice alone, how this ability is acquired remains unknown. In this study, we test the prediction that accurate voice-based size estimation is possible without prior audiovisual experience linking low frequencies to large bodies. Ninety-one healthy congenitally or early blind, late blind and sighted adults (aged 20-65) participated in the study. On the basis of vowel sounds alone, participants assessed the relative body sizes of male pairs of varying heights. Accuracy of voice-based body size assessments significantly exceeded chance and did not differ among participants who were sighted, or congenitally blind or who had lost their sight later in life. Accuracy increased significantly with relative differences in physical height between men, suggesting that both blind and sighted participants used reliable vocal cues to size (i.e. vocal tract resonances). Our findings demonstrate that prior visual experience is not necessary for accurate body size estimation. This capacity, integral to both nonverbal communication and speech perception, may be present at birth or may generalize from broader cross-modal correspondences. PMID:27095264

  4. Effects of Heavy Ions on ULF Wave Resonances Near the Equatorial Region

    SciTech Connect

    D.-H.Lee, J.R. Johnson, K. Kim and K.-S.Kim

    2008-11-20

    Pc1-2 ULF waves are strongly associated with the presence of various ions in the magnetosphere. We investigate the role of heavy ion resonances in nonuniform plasmas near the equatorial region. By adopting the invariant imbedding method, the coupled plasma wave equations are solved in an exact manner to calculate the resonant absorption at the ion-ion hybrid resonance. Our results show that irreversible mode conversion occurs at the resonance, which absorbs the fast wave energy. It is found that waves near the resonances appear with linear polarization, and their amplitude and frequency are sensitive to the properties of the heavy ion plasma composition. We examine how these resonances occur for various H+ - He+ populations in detail by performing an accurate calculation of the mode conversion effciency. Because the multi-ion hybrid resonance locations in cold plasmas are determined by simple parameters such as the fraction of the ion number density of each species and the magnetic field, we suggest that it is possible to monitor heavy ion composition by examining the peak frequencies of linearly polarized wave events in either electric field or magnetic field spectral data.

  5. Applications of the Hybrid Theory to the Scattering of Electrons from HE+ and Li++ and Resonances in these Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Anand K.

    2008-01-01

    Applications of the hybrid theory to the scattering of electrons from Ile+ and Li++ and resonances in these systems, A. K. Bhatia, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center- The Hybrid theory of electron-hydrogen elastic scattering [I] is applied to the S-wave scattering of electrons from He+ and Li++. In this method, both short-range and long-range correlations are included in the Schrodinger equation at the same time. Phase shifts obtained in this calculation have rigorous lower bounds to the exact phase shifts and they are compared with those obtained using the Feshbach projection operator formalism [2], the close-coupling approach [3], and Harris-Nesbet method [4]. The agreement among all the calculations is very good. These systems have doubly-excited or Feshbach resonances embedded in the continuum. The resonance parameters for the lowest ' S resonances in He and Li+ are calculated and they are compared with the results obtained using the Feshbach projection operator formalism [5,6]. It is concluded that accurate resonance parameters can be obtained by the present method, which has the advantage of including corrections due to neighboring resonances and the continuum in which these resonances are embedded.

  6. Electron paramagnetic resonance of Fe3+ in near-stoichiometric LiTaO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyo-Menoyo, M.; Keeble, D. J.; Furukawa, Y.; Kitamura, K.

    2004-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments on the dominant Fe3+ centre in near-stoichiometric LiTaO3 crystals grown by the double crucible Czochralski method are reported. A near complete roadmap of EPR positions was obtained, and transitions from two magnetically non-equivalent sites clearly resolved in the zx plane, perpendicular to the glide plane. This allowed accurate determination of C3 symmetry spin Hamiltonian parameters. Newman superposition model analyses of second and fourth order zero field splitting term parameters were performed to give further insight into the site of incorporation. The second order calculations provide evidence for Fe3+ substitution within the Li octahedron.

  7. Gaussian-Beam Laser-Resonator Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Patricia L.; Bair, Clayton H.; Barnes, Norman

    1989-01-01

    Gaussian Beam Laser Resonator Program models laser resonators by use of Gaussian-beam-propagation techniques. Used to determine radii of beams as functions of position in laser resonators. Algorithm used in program has three major components. First, ray-transfer matrix for laser resonator must be calculated. Next, initial parameters of beam calculated. Finally, propagation of beam through optical elements computed. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN (Version 4.01).

  8. Towards an accurate bioimpedance identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, B.; Louarroudi, E.; Bragos, R.; Pintelon, R.

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes the local polynomial method (LPM) for estimating the time-invariant bioimpedance frequency response function (FRF) considering both the output-error (OE) and the errors-in-variables (EIV) identification framework and compare it with the traditional cross— and autocorrelation spectral analysis techniques. The bioimpedance FRF is measured with the multisine electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. To show the overwhelming accuracy of the LPM approach, both the LPM and the classical cross— and autocorrelation spectral analysis technique are evaluated through the same experimental data coming from a nonsteady-state measurement of time-varying in vivo myocardial tissue. The estimated error sources at the measurement frequencies due to noise, σnZ, and the stochastic nonlinear distortions, σZNL, have been converted to Ω and plotted over the bioimpedance spectrum for each framework. Ultimately, the impedance spectra have been fitted to a Cole impedance model using both an unweighted and a weighted complex nonlinear least square (CNLS) algorithm. A table is provided with the relative standard errors on the estimated parameters to reveal the importance of which system identification frameworks should be used.

  9. Quantum mechanical resonance calculations using an energy selected basis in hyperspherical coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Jason

    2007-12-01

    Scattering resonances play a key role in many chemical processes, including unimolecular and bimolecular reactions and photodissociation. A significant theoretical emphasis over the past several decades has been placed on accurate resonance calculations for polyatomic systems. In spite of such efforts, a quantum treatment of molecular systems which exhibit a high density of states and strong coordinate coupling near dissociation remains a formidable task. The research described herein employs improved quantum mechanical methods to calculate a representation of nuclear motion, both bound and unbound, which is used subsequently to calculate accurate resonance energies and lifetimes for two triatomic systems: the neon trimer and ozone. Specifically, theory and results are given regarding the construction of an optimal, L2 eigenbasis using techniques such as the discrete variable representation, the energy selected basis (ESB) method, and iterative diagonalization methods. A new energy selection method is also developed and implemented for the neon trimer. Subsequent resonance calculations are described which make use of the artificial boundary inhomogeneity (ABI) method, adapted to work with the above mentioned ESB and hyperspherical coordinates. The ABI method is used to calculate a set of linearly independent wavefunctions (LIWs) at a given energy for the representation of the scattering wavefunction. Resonance parameters are obtained by imposing scattering boundary conditions on a linear combination of LIWs and solving for the S-matrix, S, its energy derivative, dS/dE, and the Smith lifetime matrix, Q. When available, comparisons are made with previously reported calculations.

  10. Effects of Nonsphericity on the Behavior of Lorenz-Mie Resonances in Scattering Characteristics of Liquid-Cloud Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dlugach, Janna M.; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    By using the results of highly accurate T-matrix computations for randomly oriented oblate and prolate spheroids and Chebyshev particles with varying degrees of asphericity, we analyze the effects of a deviation of water-droplet shapes from that of a perfect sphere on the behavior of Lorenz-Mie morphology-dependent resonances of various widths. We demonstrate that the positions and profiles of the resonances can change significantly with increasing asphericity. The absolute degree of asphericity required to suppress a Lorenz-Mie resonance is approximately proportional to the resonance width. Our results imply that numerical averaging of scattering characteristics of real cloud droplets over sizes may rely on a significantly coarser size-parameter resolution than that required for ideal, perfectly spherical particles.

  11. Validation study toward measuring the mechanical properties of blood clots using resonant acoustic spectroscopy with optical vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Gongting; Wolberg, Alisa S.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2012-03-01

    Clot elastic modulus (CEM) has recently been shown to correlate with various hemostatic and thrombotic disorders and may be an important diagnostic parameter in cardiovascular diseases. Current methods of CEM measurement lack repeatability and require large sample volume. We present a novel method named resonant acoustic spectroscopy with optical vibrometry (RASOV) that has the potential to assess CEM with higher accuracy and speed, and lower sample volume. To validate RASOV, we measured the acoustic spectrum of agarose gel with varied concentrations in openfaced rectangular wells. Results showed a linear relationship between the natural resonant frequency and agarose content within a concentration range of 4 to 12 mg/mL. Furthermore, we observed that the resonant frequencies decrease with increasing transducer mass. As a highly accurate, resonance-based method, RASOV has great potential for biomechanical properties measurement, especially for human blood.

  12. Effects of nonsphericity on the behavior of Lorenz-Mie resonances in scattering characteristics of liquid-cloud droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlugach, Janna M.; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2014-10-01

    By using the results of highly accurate T-matrix computations for randomly oriented oblate and prolate spheroids and Chebyshev particles with varying degrees of asphericity, we analyze the effects of a deviation of water-droplet shapes from that of a perfect sphere on the behavior of Lorenz-Mie morphology-dependent resonances of various widths. We demonstrate that the positions and profiles of the resonances can change significantly with increasing asphericity. The absolute degree of asphericity required to suppress a Lorenz-Mie resonance is approximately proportional to the resonance width. Our results imply that numerical averaging of scattering characteristics of real cloud droplets over sizes may rely on a significantly coarser size-parameter resolution than that required for ideal, perfectly spherical particles.

  13. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  14. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  15. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  16. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  17. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  18. Accurate ab initio Quartic Force Fields of Cyclic and Bent HC2N Isomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inostroza, Natalia; Huang, Xinchuan; Lee, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    Highly correlated ab initio quartic force field (QFFs) are used to calculate the equilibrium structures and predict the spectroscopic parameters of three HC2N isomers. Specifically, the ground state quasilinear triplet and the lowest cyclic and bent singlet isomers are included in the present study. Extensive treatment of correlation effects were included using the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations, denoted CCSD(T). Dunning s correlation-consistent basis sets cc-pVXZ, X=3,4,5, were used, and a three-point formula for extrapolation to the one-particle basis set limit was used. Core-correlation and scalar relativistic corrections were also included to yield highly accurate QFFs. The QFFs were used together with second-order perturbation theory (with proper treatment of Fermi resonances) and variational methods to solve the nuclear Schr dinger equation. The quasilinear nature of the triplet isomer is problematic, and it is concluded that a QFF is not adequate to describe properly all of the fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants (though some constants not dependent on the bending motion are well reproduced by perturbation theory). On the other hand, this procedure (a QFF together with either perturbation theory or variational methods) leads to highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants for the cyclic and bent singlet isomers of HC2N. All three isomers possess significant dipole moments, 3.05D, 3.06D, and 1.71D, for the quasilinear triplet, the cyclic singlet, and the bent singlet isomers, respectively. It is concluded that the spectroscopic constants determined for the cyclic and bent singlet isomers are the most accurate available, and it is hoped that these will be useful in the interpretation of high-resolution astronomical observations or laboratory experiments.

  19. Universal formalism of Fano resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Liang; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Luo, Hong-Gang; Grebogi, Celso

    2015-01-15

    The phenomenon of Fano resonance is ubiquitous in a large variety of wave scattering systems, where the resonance profile is typically asymmetric. Whether the parameter characterizing the asymmetry should be complex or real is an issue of great experimental interest. Using coherent quantum transport as a paradigm and taking into account of the collective contribution from all available scattering channels, we derive a universal formula for the Fano-resonance profile. We show that our formula bridges naturally the traditional Fano formulas with complex and real asymmetry parameters, indicating that the two types of formulas are fundamentally equivalent (except for an offset). The connection also reveals a clear footprint for the conductance resonance during a dephasing process. Therefore, the emergence of complex asymmetric parameter when fitting with experimental data needs to be properly interpreted. Furthermore, we have provided a theory for the width of the resonance, which relates explicitly the width to the degree of localization of the close-by eigenstates and the corresponding coupling matrices or the self-energies caused by the leads. Our work not only resolves the issue about the nature of the asymmetry parameter, but also provides deeper physical insights into the origin of Fano resonance. Since the only assumption in our treatment is that the transport can be described by the Green’s function formalism, our results are also valid for broad disciplines including scattering problems of electromagnetic waves, acoustics, and seismology.

  20. Dynamical coupled-channels model of K-p reactions. II. Extraction of Λ* and Σ* hyperon resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamano, H.; Nakamura, S. X.; Lee, T.-S. H.; Sato, T.

    2015-08-01

    Resonance parameters (pole masses and residues) associated with the excited states of hyperons, Λ* and Σ*, are extracted within a dynamical coupled-channels model developed recently by us [Phys. Rev. C 90, 065204 (2014)], 10.1103/PhysRevC.90.065204 through a comprehensive partial-wave analysis of the K-p →K ¯N ,π Σ ,π Λ ,η Λ ,K Ξ data up to invariant mass W =2.1 GeV. We confirm the existence of resonances corresponding to most, if not all, of the four-star resonances rated by the Particle Data Group. We also find several new resonances, and in particular propose a possible existence of a new narrow JP=3 /2+ Λ resonance that couples strongly to the η Λ channel. The JP=1 /2- Λ resonances located below the K ¯N threshold are also discussed. Comparing our extracted pole masses with the ones from a recent analysis by the Kent State University group, some significant differences in the extracted resonance parameters are found, suggesting the need of more extensive and accurate data of K-p reactions including polarization observables to eliminate such an analysis dependence of the resonance parameters. In addition, the determined large branching ratios of the decays of high-mass resonances to the π Σ* and K¯*N channels also suggest the importance of the data of 2 →3 reactions such as K-p →π π Λ and K-p →π K ¯N . Experiments on measuring cross sections and polarization observables of these fundamental reactions are highly desirable at hadron beam facilities such as J-PARC for establishing the Λ* and Σ* spectrum.

  1. Third-order intermodulation distortion in graphene resonant channel transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekas, Michael; Lee, Sunwoo; Cha, Wujoon; Hone, James; Shepard, Kenneth

    2015-02-01

    Third-order intermodulation distortion (IM3) is an important metric for electromechanical resonators used in radio frequency signal processing applications since it characterizes the nonlinearity of the device, and the amount of in-band interference it generates when subject to unwanted, out-of-band signals. In this letter, we measure and model IM3 in a strain-engineered graphene mechanical resonator operated as a graphene resonant channel transistor (G-RCT). The device analyzed in this work has a voltage third-order intercept point (VIIP3) of 69.5 dBm V at a gate-to-source DC bias (Vgs) of 2.5 V, which drops to 52.1 dBm V at Vgs = 4.5 V when driven with two out-of-band input tones spaced 5 and 10 MHz from the resonant frequency. The decrease in the VIIP3 with Vgs coincides with an increase in the transmission response (S21) of the device, illustrating a trade-off between transduction efficiency and linearity. In addition, we find that conventional micro-electro-mechanical systems theory for IM3 calculation does not accurately describe our measurement data. To resolve this discrepancy, we develop a model for IM3 in G-RCTs that takes into account all of the output current terms present in the embedded transistor structure, as well as an effective Duffing parameter (αeff).

  2. A study of the piezoelectric resonance in organic single crystal: glucuronic acid γ-lactone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saripalli, Ravi Kiran; Chakraborty, Tirthankar; Bhat, H. L.; Elizabeth, Suja

    2016-04-01

    An organic nonlinear optical material, namely glucuronic acid γ-lactone or glucuronolactone, was crystallized from aqueous solution. Crystals of large dimensions and full morphology were obtained by slow-cooling method in a custom-built solution growth setup. CHN analysis and X-ray diffraction confirmed the phase formation in the grown crystal. High-resolution XRD studies followed by Rietveld refinement yielded accurate lattice parameters which compared well with the reported values. UV-Vis spectrum recorded for a b-plate of 2 mm thickness revealed the low UV-cutoff at 250 nm. Dielectric constant and dielectric loss were monitored as a function of frequency. Piezoelectric resonance peaks were observed in the range 0.2-1.5 MHz which are dependent on the plate thickness. The temperature dependence of the resonance peak frequency was studied. Piezoelectric coefficients were estimated by resonance-antiresonance method.

  3. Damping of nanomechanical resonators.

    PubMed

    Unterreithmeier, Quirin P; Faust, Thomas; Kotthaus, Jörg P

    2010-07-01

    We study the transverse oscillatory modes of nanomechanical silicon nitride strings under high tensile stress as a function of geometry and mode index m≤9. Reproducing all observed resonance frequencies with classical elastic theory we extract the relevant elastic constants. Based on the oscillatory local strain we successfully predict the observed mode-dependent damping with a single frequency-independent fit parameter. Our model clarifies the role of tensile stress on damping and hints at the underlying microscopic mechanisms. PMID:20867737

  4. Accurate projector calibration method by using an optical coaxial camera.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shujun; Xie, Lili; Wang, Zhangying; Zhang, Zonghua; Gao, Feng; Jiang, Xiangqian

    2015-02-01

    Digital light processing (DLP) projectors have been widely utilized to project digital structured-light patterns in 3D imaging systems. In order to obtain accurate 3D shape data, it is important to calibrate DLP projectors to obtain the internal parameters. The existing projector calibration methods have complicated procedures or low accuracy of the obtained parameters. This paper presents a novel method to accurately calibrate a DLP projector by using an optical coaxial camera. The optical coaxial geometry is realized by a plate beam splitter, so the DLP projector can be treated as a true inverse camera. A plate having discrete markers on the surface is used to calibrate the projector. The corresponding projector pixel coordinate of each marker on the plate is determined by projecting vertical and horizontal sinusoidal fringe patterns on the plate surface and calculating the absolute phase. The internal parameters of the DLP projector are obtained by the corresponding point pair between the projector pixel coordinate and the world coordinate of discrete markers. Experimental results show that the proposed method can accurately calibrate the internal parameters of a DLP projector. PMID:25967789

  5. Resonant Acoustic Determination of Complex Elastic Moduli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, David A.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1991-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive, yet accurate method for measuring the dynamic complex modulus of elasticity is described. Using a 'free-free' bar selectively excited in three independent vibrational modes, the shear modulus is obtained by measuring the frequency of the torsional resonant mode and the Young's modulus is determined from measurement of either the longitudinal or flexural mode. The damping properties are obtained by measuring the quality factor (Q) for each mode. The Q is inversely proportional to the loss tangent. The viscoelastic behavior of the sample can be obtained by tracking a particular resonant mode (and thus a particular modulus) using a phase locked loop (PLL) and by changing the temperature of the sample. The change in the damping properties is obtained by measuring the in-phase amplitude of the PLL which is proportional to the Q of the material. The real and imaginary parts or the complex modulus can be obtained continuously as a function of parameters such as temperature, pressure, or humidity. For homogeneous and isotropic samples only two independent moduli are needed in order to characterize the complete set of elastic constants, thus, values can be obtained for the dynamic Poisson's ratio, bulk modulus, Lame constants, etc.

  6. GAUSSIAN BEAM LASER RESONATOR PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    In designing a laser cavity, the laser engineer is frequently concerned with more than the stability of the resonator. Other considerations include the size of the beam at various optical surfaces within the resonator or the performance of intracavity line-narrowing or other optical elements. Laser resonators obey the laws of Gaussian beam propagation, not geometric optics. The Gaussian Beam Laser Resonator Program models laser resonators using Gaussian ray trace techniques. It can be used to determine the propagation of radiation through laser resonators. The algorithm used in the Gaussian Beam Resonator program has three major components. First, the ray transfer matrix for the laser resonator must be calculated. Next calculations of the initial beam parameters, specifically, the beam stability, the beam waist size and location for the resonator input element, and the wavefront curvature and beam radius at the input surface to the first resonator element are performed. Finally the propagation of the beam through the optical elements is computed. The optical elements can be modeled as parallel plates, lenses, mirrors, dummy surfaces, or Gradient Index (GRIN) lenses. A Gradient Index lens is a good approximation of a laser rod operating under a thermal load. The optical system may contain up to 50 elements. In addition to the internal beam elements the optical system may contain elements external to the resonator. The Gaussian Beam Resonator program was written in Microsoft FORTRAN (Version 4.01). It was developed for the IBM PS/2 80-071 microcomputer and has been implemented on an IBM PC compatible under MS DOS 3.21. The program was developed in 1988 and requires approximately 95K bytes to operate.

  7. Resonance capture at arbitrary inclination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namouni, F.; Morais, M. H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Resonance capture is studied numerically in the three-body problem for arbitrary inclinations. Massless particles are set to drift from outside the 1:5 resonance with a Jupiter-mass planet thereby encountering the web of the planet's diverse mean motion resonances. Randomly constructed samples explore parameter space for inclinations from 0 to 180° with 5° increments totalling nearly 6 × 105 numerical simulations. 30 resonances internal and external to the planet's location are monitored. We find that retrograde resonances are unexpectedly more efficient at capture than prograde resonances and that resonance order is not necessarily a good indicator of capture efficiency at arbitrary inclination. Capture probability drops significantly at moderate sample eccentricity for initial inclinations in the range [10°,110°]. Orbit inversion is possible for initially circular orbits with inclinations in the range [60°,130°]. Capture in the 1:1 co-orbital resonance occurs with great likelihood at large retrograde inclinations. The planet's orbital eccentricity, if larger than 0.1, reduces the capture probabilities through the action of the eccentric Kozai-Lidov mechanism. A capture asymmetry appears between inner and outer resonances as prograde orbits are preferentially trapped in inner resonances. The relative capture efficiency of retrograde resonance suggests that the dynamical lifetimes of Damocloids and Centaurs on retrograde orbits must be significantly larger than those on prograde orbits implying that the recently identified asteroids in retrograde resonance, 2006 BZ8, 2008 SO218, 2009 QY6 and 1999 LE31 may be among the oldest small bodies that wander between the outer giant planets.

  8. The Use of Resonant Orbits in Satellite Geodesy: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klokočník, J.; Gooding, R. H.; Wagner, C. A.; Kostelecký, J.; Bezděk, A.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic resonance, arising from commensurate (orbital or rotational) periods of satellites or planets with each other, has been a strong force in the development of the solar system. The repetition of conditions over the commensurate periods can result in amplified long-term changes in the positions of the bodies involved. Such resonant phenomena driven by the commensurability between the mean motion of certain artificial Earth satellites and the Earth's rotation originally contributed to the evaluation and assessment of the Stokes parameters (harmonic geopotential coefficients) that specify the Earth's gravitational field. The technique constrains linear combinations of the harmonic coefficients that are of relevant resonant order (lumped coefficients). The attraction of the method eventually dwindled, but the very accurate orbits of CHAMP and GRACE have recently led to more general insights for commensurate orbits applied to satellite geodesy involving the best resolution for all coefficients, not just resonant ones. From the GRACE mission, we learnt how to explain and predict temporary decreases in the resolution and accuracy of derived geopotential parameters, due to passages through low-order commensurabilities, which lead to low-density ground-track patterns. For GOCE we suggest how to change a repeat orbit height slightly, to achieve the best feasible recovery of the field parameters derived from on-board gradiometric measurements by direct inversion from the measurements to the harmonic geopotential coefficients, not by the way of lumped coefficients. For orbiters of Mars, we have suggestions which orbits should be avoided. The slow rotation of Venus results in dense ground-tracks and excellent gravitational recovery for almost all orbiters.

  9. Discrete resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivaldi, Franco

    2015-12-01

    The concept of resonance has been instrumental to the study of Hamiltonian systems with divided phase space. One can also define such systems over discrete spaces, which have a finite or countable number of points, but in this new setting the notion of resonance must be re-considered from scratch. I review some recent developments in the area of arithmetic dynamics which outline some salient features of linear and nonlinear stable (elliptic) orbits over a discrete space, and also underline the difficulties that emerge in their analysis.

  10. Discrete resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivaldi, Franco

    The concept of resonance has been instrumental to the study of Hamiltonian systems with divided phase space. One can also define such systems over discrete spaces, which have a finite or countable number of points, but in this new setting the notion of resonance must be re-considered from scratch. I review some recent developments in the area of arithmetic dynamics which outline some salient features of linear and nonlinear stable (elliptic) orbits over a discrete space, and also underline the difficulties that emerge in their analysis.

  11. Laser Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, L. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An optical resonator cavity configuration has a unitary mirror with oppositely directed convex and concave reflective surfaces disposed into one fold and concertedly reversing both ends of a beam propagating from a laser rod disposed between two total internal reflection prisms. The optical components are rigidly positioned with perpendicularly crossed virtual rooflines by a compact optical bed. The rooflines of the internal reflection prisms, are arranged perpendicularly to the axis of the laser beam and to the optical axes of the optical resonator components.

  12. Geometric formulation of unstable-resonator design and application to self-collimating unstable-resonator diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Lang, R J

    1991-09-01

    A new set of design parameters for unstable resonators is presented that yields simpler expressions for the mirror and beam radii and magnification than those given by the usual g parameters. The new formalism is applied to determine the design of a solid unstable resonator of index n with a self-collimated output beam, applicable to unstable-resonator diode lasers. PMID:19776957

  13. A new Skyrme energy density functional for a better description of spin-isospin resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Maza, X.; Colò, G.; Cao, Li-Gang; Sagawa, H.

    2015-10-01

    A correct determination of the isospin and spin-isospin properties of the nuclear effective interaction should lead to an accurate description of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GT), the Spin Dipole Resonance (SDR), the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) or the Antianalog Giant Dipole Resonance (AGDR), among others. A new Skyrme energy density functional named SAMi is introduced with the aim of going a step forward in setting the bases for a more precise description of spin-isospin resonances [1, 2]. In addition, we will discuss some new features of our analysis on the AGDR in 208Pb [3] as compared with available experimental data on this resonance [4, 5, 6], and on the GDR [7]. Such study, guided by a simple yet physical pocket formula, has been developed by employing the so called SAMi-J family of systematically varied interactions. This set of interactions is compatible with experimental data for values of the symmetry energy at saturation J and slope parameter L falling in the ranges 31-33 MeV and 75-95 MeV, respectively.

  14. A new Skyrme energy density functional for a better description of spin-isospin resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Roca-Maza, X.; Colò, G.; Cao, Li-Gang; Sagawa, H.

    2015-10-15

    A correct determination of the isospin and spin-isospin properties of the nuclear effective interaction should lead to an accurate description of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GT), the Spin Dipole Resonance (SDR), the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) or the Antianalog Giant Dipole Resonance (AGDR), among others. A new Skyrme energy density functional named SAMi is introduced with the aim of going a step forward in setting the bases for a more precise description of spin-isospin resonances [1, 2]. In addition, we will discuss some new features of our analysis on the AGDR in {sup 208}Pb [3] as compared with available experimental data on this resonance [4, 5, 6], and on the GDR [7]. Such study, guided by a simple yet physical pocket formula, has been developed by employing the so called SAMi-J family of systematically varied interactions. This set of interactions is compatible with experimental data for values of the symmetry energy at saturation J and slope parameter L falling in the ranges 31−33 MeV and 75−95 MeV, respectively.

  15. Applications of the hybrid theory to the scattering of electrons from He+ and Li2+ and resonances in these systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, A. K.

    2008-05-01

    The hybrid theory of electron-hydrogen elastic scattering [Phys. Rev. A 75, 032713 (2007)] is applied to the S -wave scattering of electrons from He+ and Li2+ . In this method, both short-range and long-range correlations are included in the Schrödinger equation at the same time. Phase shifts obtained in this calculation have rigorous lower bounds to the exact phase shifts and they are compared with those obtained using the Feshbach projection operator formalism [Phys. Rev. A 66, 064702 (2002)], the close-coupling approach [J. Phys. B 2, 44 (1969)], and the Harris-Nesbet method [J. Phys. B 35, 4475 (2002); J. Phys. B 36, 2291 (2003)]. The agreement among all the calculations is very good. These systems have doubly excited or Feshbach resonances embedded in the continuum. The resonance parameters for the lowest S1 resonances in He and Li+ are calculated and they are compared with the results obtained using the Feshbach projection operator formalism [Phys. Rev. A 11, 2018 (1975); Phys. Rev. A 15, 131 (1977)]. It is concluded that accurate resonance parameters can be obtained by the present method, which has the advantage of including corrections due to neighboring resonances and the continuum in which these resonances are embedded.

  16. Review on Acoustic Transducers for Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, N.; Ogi, H.; Hirao, M.

    2015-08-01

    Determination of elastic constants using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy requires transducers that can measure resonance frequencies accurately and identify the vibrational mode of each resonance frequency. We developed three transducers, namely an electromagnetic acoustic transducer, a tripod piezoelectric transducer coupled with a laser Doppler interferometer, and an antenna transmission transducer, for use with various materials and in different measurement circumstances. Their capability in resonant ultrasound spectroscopy and their applications are described.

  17. Accurate method of modeling cluster scaling relations in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jian-hua; Li, Baojiu

    2016-06-01

    We propose a new method to model cluster scaling relations in modified gravity. Using a suite of nonradiative hydrodynamical simulations, we show that the scaling relations of accumulated gas quantities, such as the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (Compton-y parameter) and the x-ray Compton-y parameter, can be accurately predicted using the known results in the Λ CDM model with a precision of ˜3 % . This method provides a reliable way to analyze the gas physics in modified gravity using the less demanding and much more efficient pure cold dark matter simulations. Our results therefore have important theoretical and practical implications in constraining gravity using cluster surveys.

  18. Width of nonlinear resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnuma, S.

    1984-03-01

    Two approximations are made, one essential and the other not so essential but convenient to keep the analytical treatment manageable: (1) Only one nonlinear resonance is considered at a time so that the treatment is best suited when the tune is close to one resonance only. To improve this approximation, one must go to the next order which involves a canonical transformation of dynamical variables. Analytical treatment of more than one resonance is not possible for general cases. (2) In the formalism using the action-angle variables, the Hamiltonian can have terms which are independent of the angle variables. These terms are called phase-independent terms or shear terms. The tune is then a function of the oscillation amplitudes. In the lowest-order treatment, the (4N)-pole components but not the (4N + 2)-pole components contribute to this dependence. In deriving the resonance width analytically, one ignores these terms in the Hamiltonian for the sake of simplicity. If these are retained, one needs at least three extra parameters and the analytical treatment becomes rather unwieldy.

  19. Engineering a resonant nanocoating for an optical refractive index sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialiayeu, A.; Ianoul, A.; Albert, J.

    2014-03-01

    We proposing to boost the performance of refractive index sensors based on the tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) structure by resonant coupling of small spherical nanoparticles to the TFBG resonances. The optimal choice of nanoparticle parameters is discussed.

  20. Calculation of Resonance Reaction Rates in Reactor Lattices Using Resonance Profile Tabulations.

    1982-02-01

    Version 00 The OZMA code solves the neutron transport equation for a reactor lattice unit cell at energies which lie in the resolved resonance regions of the lattice nuclides. Spherical, slab, cylindrical, square and hexagonal geometries can be handled. OZMA is most readily applied as a sophisticated resonance module for the HAMMER lattice code. It is more flexible and more accurate than the resonance treatments provided in HAMMER itself in the resolved resonance region. Inmore » particular, mixtures of numerous resonance nuclides can be handled simultaneously rather than by individual resonance treatments. The results obtained by OZMA can also be used as reference values against which simpler resonance treatments can be checked.« less

  1. Resonant behavior of dielectric objects (electrostatic resonances).

    PubMed

    Fredkin, D R; Mayergoyz, I D

    2003-12-19

    Resonant behavior of dielectric objects occurs at certain frequencies for which the object permittivity is negative and the free-space wavelength is large in comparison with the object dimensions. Unique physical features of these resonances are studied and a novel technique for the calculation of resonance values of permittivity, and hence resonance frequencies, is proposed. Scale invariance of resonance frequencies, unusually strong orthogonality properties of resonance modes, and a two-dimensional phenomenon of "twin" spectra are reported. The paper concludes with brief discussions of optical controllability of these resonances in semiconductor nanoparticles and a plausible, electrostatic resonance based, mechanism for nucleation and formation of ball lightning. PMID:14754117

  2. Sphericity determination using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Dixon, R.D.; Migliori, A.; Visscher, W.M.

    1994-10-18

    A method is provided for grading production quantities of spherical objects, such as roller balls for bearings. A resonant ultrasound spectrum (RUS) is generated for each spherical object and a set of degenerate sphere-resonance frequencies is identified. From the degenerate sphere-resonance frequencies and known relationships between degenerate sphere-resonance frequencies and Poisson's ratio, a Poisson's ratio can be determined, along with a 'best' spherical diameter, to form spherical parameters for the sphere. From the RUS, fine-structure resonant frequency spectra are identified for each degenerate sphere-resonance frequency previously selected. From each fine-structure spectrum and associated sphere parameter values an asphericity value is determined. The asphericity value can then be compared with predetermined values to provide a measure for accepting or rejecting the sphere. 14 figs.

  3. Sphericity determination using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Dixon, Raymond D.; Migliori, Albert; Visscher, William M.

    1994-01-01

    A method is provided for grading production quantities of spherical objects, such as roller balls for bearings. A resonant ultrasound spectrum (RUS) is generated for each spherical object and a set of degenerate sphere-resonance frequencies is identified. From the degenerate sphere-resonance frequencies and known relationships between degenerate sphere-resonance frequencies and Poisson's ratio, a Poisson's ratio can be determined, along with a "best" spherical diameter, to form spherical parameters for the sphere. From the RUS, fine-structure resonant frequency spectra are identified for each degenerate sphere-resonance frequency previously selected. From each fine-structure spectrum and associated sphere parameter values an asphericity value is determined. The asphericity value can then be compared with predetermined values to provide a measure for accepting or rejecting the sphere.

  4. Modern Design of Resonant Edge-Slot Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, R. B.

    2006-01-01

    Resonant edge-slot (slotted-waveguide) array antennas can now be designed very accurately following a modern computational approach like that followed for some other microwave components. This modern approach makes it possible to design superior antennas at lower cost than was previously possible. Heretofore, the physical and engineering knowledge of resonant edge-slot array antennas had remained immature since they were introduced during World War II. This is because despite their mechanical simplicity, high reliability, and potential for operation with high efficiency, the electromagnetic behavior of resonant edge-slot antennas is very complex. Because engineering design formulas and curves for such antennas are not available in the open literature, designers have been forced to implement iterative processes of fabricating and testing multiple prototypes to derive design databases, each unique for a specific combination of operating frequency and set of waveguide tube dimensions. The expensive, time-consuming nature of these processes has inhibited the use of resonant edge-slot antennas. The present modern approach reduces costs by making it unnecessary to build and test multiple prototypes. As an additional benefit, this approach affords a capability to design an array of slots having different dimensions to taper the antenna illumination to reduce the amplitudes of unwanted side lobes. The heart of the modern approach is the use of the latest commercially available microwave-design software, which implements finite-element models of electromagnetic fields in and around waveguides, antenna elements, and similar components. Instead of building and testing prototypes, one builds a database and constructs design curves from the results of computational simulations for sets of design parameters. The figure shows a resonant edge-slot antenna designed following this approach. Intended for use as part of a radiometer operating at a frequency of 10.7 GHz, this antenna

  5. Calculations of resonances parameters for the ((2s2) 1Se, (2s2p) 1,3P0) and ((3s2) 1Se, (3s3p) 1,3P0) doubly excited states of helium-like ions with Z≤10 using a complex rotation method implemented in Scilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gning, Youssou; Sow, Malick; Traoré, Alassane; Dieng, Matabara; Diakhate, Babacar; Biaye, Mamadi; Wagué, Ahmadou

    2015-01-01

    In the present work a special computational program Scilab (Scientific Laboratory) in the complex rotation method has been used to calculate resonance parameters of ((2s2) 1Se, (2s2p) 1,3P0) and ((3s2) 1Se, (3s3p) 1,3P0) states of helium-like ions with Z≤10. The purpose of this study required a mathematical development of the Hamiltonian applied to Hylleraas wave function for intrashell states, leading to analytical expressions which are carried out under Scilab computational program. Results are in compliance with recent theoretical calculations.

  6. Neutron resonance averaging with filtered beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron resonance averaging using filtered beams from a reactor source has proven to be an effective nuclear structure tool within certain limitations. These limitations are imposed by the nature of the averaging process, which produces fluctuations in radiative intensities. The fluctuations have been studied quantitatively. Resonance averaging also gives us information about initial or capture state parameters, in particular the photon strength function. Suitable modifications of the filtered beams are suggested for the enhancement of non-resonant processes.

  7. Mill profiler machines soft materials accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1966-01-01

    Mill profiler machines bevels, slots, and grooves in soft materials, such as styrofoam phenolic-filled cores, to any desired thickness. A single operator can accurately control cutting depths in contour or straight line work.

  8. Remote balance weighs accurately amid high radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggenberger, D. N.; Shuck, A. B.

    1969-01-01

    Commercial beam-type balance, modified and outfitted with electronic controls and digital readout, can be remotely controlled for use in high radiation environments. This allows accurate weighing of breeder-reactor fuel pieces when they are radioactively hot.

  9. Dynamical generation of pseudoscalar resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Albaladejo, M.; Oller, J. A.; Roca, L.

    2010-11-01

    We study the interactions between the f{sub 0}(980) and a{sub 0}(980) scalar resonances and the lightest pseudoscalar mesons. We first obtain the elementary interaction amplitudes, or interacting kernels, without including any ad hoc free parameter. This is achieved by using previous results on the nature of the lightest scalar resonances as dynamically generated from the rescattering of S-wave two-meson pairs. Afterwards, the interaction kernels are unitarized and the final S-wave amplitudes result. We find that these interactions are very rich and generate a large amount of pseudoscalar resonances that could be associated with the K(1460), {pi}(1300), {pi}(1800), {eta}(1475), and X(1835). We also consider the exotic channels with isospin 3/2 and 1, the latter having positive G-parity. The former could also be resonant in agreement with a previous prediction.

  10. Nested trampoline resonators for optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, M. J.; Pepper, B.; Luna, F.; Buters, F. M.; Eerkens, H. J.; Welker, G.; Perock, B.; Heeck, K.; de Man, S.; Bouwmeester, D.

    2016-01-01

    Two major challenges in the development of optomechanical devices are achieving a low mechanical and optical loss rate and vibration isolation from the environment. We address both issues by fabricating trampoline resonators made from low pressure chemical vapor deposition Si3N4 with a distributed Bragg reflector mirror. We design a nested double resonator structure with 80 dB of mechanical isolation from the mounting surface at the inner resonator frequency, and we demonstrate up to 45 dB of isolation at lower frequencies in agreement with the design. We reliably fabricate devices with mechanical quality factors of around 400 000 at room temperature. In addition, these devices were used to form optical cavities with finesse up to 181 000 ± 1000. These promising parameters will enable experiments in the quantum regime with macroscopic mechanical resonators.

  11. Understanding the Code: keeping accurate records.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard

    2015-10-01

    In his continuing series looking at the legal and professional implications of the Nursing and Midwifery Council's revised Code of Conduct, Richard Griffith discusses the elements of accurate record keeping under Standard 10 of the Code. This article considers the importance of accurate record keeping for the safety of patients and protection of district nurses. The legal implications of records are explained along with how district nurses should write records to ensure these legal requirements are met. PMID:26418404

  12. Stripline split-ring resonator with integrated optogalvanic sample cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Anders; Berglund, Martin; Thornell, Greger; Possnert, Göran; Salehpour, Mehran

    2014-04-01

    Intracavity optogalvanic spectroscopy (ICOGS) has been proposed as a method for unambiguous detection of rare isotopes. Of particular interest is 14C, where detection of extremely low concentrations in the 1:1015 range (14C: 12C), is of interest in, e.g., radiocarbon dating and pharmaceutical sciences. However, recent reports show that ICOGS suffers from substantial problems with reproducibility. To qualify ICOGS as an analytical method, more stable and reliable plasma generation and signal detection are needed. In our proposed setup, critical parameters have been improved. We have utilized a stripline split-ring resonator microwave-induced microplasma source to excite and sustain the plasma. Such a microplasma source offers several advantages over conventional ICOGS plasma sources. For example, the stripline split-ring resonator concept employs separated plasma generation and signal detection, which enables sensitive detection at stable plasma conditions. The concept also permits in situ observation of the discharge conditions, which was found to improve reproducibility. Unique to the stripline split-ring resonator microplasma source in this study, is that the optogalvanic sample cell has been embedded in the device itself. This integration enables improved temperature control and more stable and accurate signal detection. Significant improvements are demonstrated, including reproducibility, signal-to-noise ratio, and precision.

  13. If It's Resonance, What is Resonating?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.

    2006-01-01

    The phenomenon under the name "resonance," which, is based on the mathematical analogy between mechanical resonance and the behavior of wave functions in quantum mechanical exchange phenomena was described. The resonating system does not have a structure intermediate between those involved in the resonance, but instead a structure which is further…

  14. INVESTIGATION OF RESONANT OPTOACOUSTIC CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A theory describing the optoacoustic signal is presented; dependence on both cell and gas parameters are given and the advantage of operating at a resonant frequency is discussed. Three elliptical cells with major axes 5.8, 12.7, and 15.2 cm (corresponding minor axes 5.5, 11.0; a...

  15. Accurate localization of needle entry point in interventional MRI.

    PubMed

    Daanen, V; Coste, E; Sergent, G; Godart, F; Vasseur, C; Rousseau, J

    2000-10-01

    In interventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the systems designed to help the surgeon during biopsy must provide accurate knowledge of the positions of the target and also the entry point of the needle on the skin of the patient. In some cases, this needle entry point can be outside the B(0) homogeneity area, where the distortions may be larger than a few millimeters. In that case, major correction for geometric deformation must be performed. Moreover, the use of markers to highlight the needle entry point is inaccurate. The aim of this study was to establish a three-dimensional coordinate correction according to the position of the entry point of the needle. We also describe a 2-degree of freedom electromechanical device that is used to determine the needle entry point on the patient's skin with a laser spot. PMID:11042649

  16. EMR Gage Would Measure Coal Thickness Accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. D.; Rollwitz, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory tests indicate electron magnetic resonance (EMR) would be effective in measuring thickness of coal overlying rock substrate. In prototype dual-frequency EMR system, Sample is irradiated by two radio frequencies. Signals are mixed, producing sum and difference output frequencies that are detected by receiver. Magnetic field is varied to scan resonant spot through sample. In system designed for field use, electromagnet is U-shaped, so that sample can be adjacent to, rather than inside the probe. Same coil is used for transmitting and receiving.

  17. Virtual magnetic resonance colonography

    PubMed Central

    Debatin, J; Lauenstein, T

    2003-01-01

    Colorectal cancer screening has vast potential. Beyond considerations for cost and diagnostic accuracy, the effectiveness of any colorectal screening strategy will be dependent on the degree of patient acceptance. Magnetic resonance (MR) colonography has been shown to be accurate regarding the detection of clinically relevant colonic polyps exceeding 10 mm in size, with reported sensitivity and specificity values exceeding 95%. To further increase patient acceptance, strategies for fecal tagging have recently been developed. By modulating the signal of fecal material to be identical to the signal characteristics of the enema applied to distend the colon, fecal tagging in conjunction with MR colonography obviates the need for bowel cleansing. The review will describe the techniques underlying MR colonography and describe early clinical experience with fecal tagging techniques. PMID:12746264

  18. Differential uncertainty analysis for evaluating the accuracy of S-parameter retrieval methods for electromagnetic properties of metamaterial slabs.

    PubMed

    Hasar, Ugur Cem; Barroso, Joaquim J; Sabah, Cumali; Kaya, Yunus; Ertugrul, Mehmet

    2012-12-17

    We apply a complete uncertainty analysis, not studied in the literature, to investigate the dependences of retrieved electromagnetic properties of two MM slabs (the first one with only split-ring resonators (SRRs) and the second with SRRs and a continuous wire) with single-band and dual-band resonating properties on the measured/simulated scattering parameters, the slab length, and the operating frequency. Such an analysis is necessary for the selection of a suitable retrieval method together with the correct examination of exotic properties of MM slabs especially in their resonance regions. For this analysis, a differential uncertainty model is developed to monitor minute changes in the dependent variables (electromagnetic properties of MM slabs) in functions of independent variables (scattering (S-) parameters, the slab length, and the operating frequency). Two complementary approaches (the analytical approach and the dispersion model approach) each with different strengths are utilized to retrieve the electromagnetic properties of various MM slabs, which are needed for the application of the uncertainty analysis. We note the following important results from our investigation. First, uncertainties in the retrieved electromagnetic properties of the analyzed MM slabs drastically increase when values of electromagnetic properties shrink to zero or near resonance regions where S-parameters exhibit rapid changes. Second, any low-loss or medium-loss inside the MM slabs due to an imperfect dielectric substrate or a finite conductivity of metals can decrease these uncertainties near resonance regions because these losses hinder abrupt changes in S-parameters. Finally, we note that precise information of especially the slab length and the operating frequency is a prerequisite for accurate analysis of exotic electromagnetic properties of MM slabs (especially multiband MM slabs) near resonance regions. PMID:23263141

  19. More-Accurate Model of Flows in Rocket Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, Ashvin; Chenoweth, James; Brinckman, Kevin; Dash, Sanford

    2011-01-01

    An improved computational model for simulating flows in liquid-propellant injectors in rocket engines has been developed. Models like this one are needed for predicting fluxes of heat in, and performances of, the engines. An important part of predicting performance is predicting fluctuations of temperature, fluctuations of concentrations of chemical species, and effects of turbulence on diffusion of heat and chemical species. Customarily, diffusion effects are represented by parameters known in the art as the Prandtl and Schmidt numbers. Prior formulations include ad hoc assumptions of constant values of these parameters, but these assumptions and, hence, the formulations, are inaccurate for complex flows. In the improved model, these parameters are neither constant nor specified in advance: instead, they are variables obtained as part of the solution. Consequently, this model represents the effects of turbulence on diffusion of heat and chemical species more accurately than prior formulations do, and may enable more-accurate prediction of mixing and flows of heat in rocket-engine combustion chambers. The model has been implemented within CRUNCH CFD, a proprietary computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer program, and has been tested within that program. The model could also be implemented within other CFD programs.

  20. Accurate camera calibration method specialized for virtual studios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Hidehiko; Yamanouchi, Yuko; Mitsumine, Hideki; Fukaya, Takashi; Inoue, Seiki

    2008-02-01

    Virtual studio is a popular technology for TV programs, that makes possible to synchronize computer graphics (CG) to realshot image in camera motion. Normally, the geometrical matching accuracy between CG and realshot image is not expected so much on real-time system, we sometimes compromise on directions, not to come out the problem. So we developed the hybrid camera calibration method and CG generating system to achieve the accurate geometrical matching of CG and realshot on virtual studio. Our calibration method is intended for the camera system on platform and tripod with rotary encoder, that can measure pan/tilt angles. To solve the camera model and initial pose, we enhanced the bundle adjustment algorithm to fit the camera model, using pan/tilt data as known parameters, and optimizing all other parameters invariant against pan/tilt value. This initialization yields high accurate camera position and orientation consistent with any pan/tilt values. Also we created CG generator implemented the lens distortion function with GPU programming. By applying the lens distortion parameters obtained by camera calibration process, we could get fair compositing results.

  1. Robust ODF smoothing for accurate estimation of fiber orientation.

    PubMed

    Beladi, Somaieh; Pathirana, Pubudu N; Brotchie, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Q-ball imaging was presented as a model free, linear and multimodal diffusion sensitive approach to reconstruct diffusion orientation distribution function (ODF) using diffusion weighted MRI data. The ODFs are widely used to estimate the fiber orientations. However, the smoothness constraint was proposed to achieve a balance between the angular resolution and noise stability for ODF constructs. Different regularization methods were proposed for this purpose. However, these methods are not robust and quite sensitive to the global regularization parameter. Although, numerical methods such as L-curve test are used to define a globally appropriate regularization parameter, it cannot serve as a universal value suitable for all regions of interest. This may result in over smoothing and potentially end up in neglecting an existing fiber population. In this paper, we propose to include an interpolation step prior to the spherical harmonic decomposition. This interpolation based approach is based on Delaunay triangulation provides a reliable, robust and accurate smoothing approach. This method is easy to implement and does not require other numerical methods to define the required parameters. Also, the fiber orientations estimated using this approach are more accurate compared to other common approaches. PMID:21096202

  2. Sound propagation and absorption in foam - A distributed parameter model.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, L.; Lieberman, S.

    1971-01-01

    Liquid-base foams are highly effective sound absorbers. A better understanding of the mechanisms of sound absorption in foams was sought by exploration of a mathematical model of bubble pulsation and coupling and the development of a distributed-parameter mechanical analog. A solution by electric-circuit analogy was thus obtained and transmission-line theory was used to relate the physical properties of the foams to the characteristic impedance and propagation constants of the analog transmission line. Comparison of measured physical properties of the foam with values obtained from measured acoustic impedance and propagation constants and the transmission-line theory showed good agreement. We may therefore conclude that the sound propagation and absorption mechanisms in foam are accurately described by the resonant response of individual bubbles coupled to neighboring bubbles.

  3. Microbalance accurately measures extremely small masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patashnick, H.

    1970-01-01

    Oscillating fiber microbalance has a vibrating quartz fiber as balance arm to hold the mass to be weighed. Increasing fiber weight decreases its resonant frequency. Scaler and timer measure magnitude of the shift. This instrument withstands considerable physical abuse and has calibration stability at normal room temperatures.

  4. Electroexcitation of nucleon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Inna Aznauryan, Volker D. Burkert

    2012-01-01

    We review recent progress in the investigation of the electroexcitation of nucleon resonances, both in experiment and in theory. The most accurate results have been obtained for the electroexcitation amplitudes of the four lowest excited states, which have been measured in a range of Q2 up to 8 and 4.5 GeV2 for the Delta(1232)P33, N(1535)S11 and N(1440)P11, N(1520)D13, respectively. These results have been confronted with calculations based on lattice QCD, large-Nc relations, perturbative QCD (pQCD), and QCD-inspired models. The amplitudes for the Delta(1232) indicate large pion-cloud contributions at low Q2 and don't show any sign of approaching the pQCD regime for Q2<7 GeV2. Measured for the first time, the electroexcitation amplitudes of the Roper resonance, N(1440)P11, provide strong evidence for this state as a predominantly radial excitation of a three-quark (3q) ground state, with additional non-3-quark contributions needed to describe the low Q2 behavior of the amplitudes. The longitudinal transition amplitude for the N(1535)S11 was determined and has become a challenge for quark models. Explanations may require large meson-cloud contributions or alternative representations of this state. The N(1520)D13 clearly shows the rapid changeover from helicity-3/2 dominance at the real photon point to helicity-1/2 dominance at Q2 > 0.5 GeV2, confirming a long-standing prediction of the constituent quark model. The interpretation of the moments of resonance transition form factors in terms of transition transverse charge distributions in infinite momentum frame is presented.

  5. Accurate Anharmonic IR Spectra from Integrated Cc/dft Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Vincenzo; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien; Carnimeo, Ivan; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2014-06-01

    The recent implementation of the computation of infrared (IR) intensities beyond the double harmonic approximation [1] paved the route to routine calculations of infrared spectra for a wide set of molecular systems. Contrary to common beliefs, second-order perturbation theory is able to deliver results of high accuracy provided that anharmonic resonances are properly managed [1,2]. It has been already shown for several small closed- and open shell molecular systems that the differences between coupled cluster (CC) and DFT anharmonic wavenumbers are mainly due to the harmonic terms, paving the route to introduce effective yet accurate hybrid CC/DFT schemes [2]. In this work we present that hybrid CC/DFT models can be applied also to the IR intensities leading to the simulation of highly accurate fully anharmonic IR spectra for medium-size molecules, including ones of atmospheric interest, showing in all cases good agreement with experiment even in the spectral ranges where non-fundamental transitions are predominant[3]. [1] J. Bloino and V. Barone, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 124108 (2012) [2] V. Barone, M. Biczysko, J. Bloino, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 16, 1759-1787 (2014) [3] I. Carnimeo, C. Puzzarini, N. Tasinato, P. Stoppa, A. P. Charmet, M. Biczysko, C. Cappelli and V. Barone, J. Chem. Phys., 139, 074310 (2013)

  6. Fast and accurate estimation for astrophysical problems in large databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Joseph W.

    2010-10-01

    A recent flood of astronomical data has created much demand for sophisticated statistical and machine learning tools that can rapidly draw accurate inferences from large databases of high-dimensional data. In this Ph.D. thesis, methods for statistical inference in such databases will be proposed, studied, and applied to real data. I use methods for low-dimensional parametrization of complex, high-dimensional data that are based on the notion of preserving the connectivity of data points in the context of a Markov random walk over the data set. I show how this simple parameterization of data can be exploited to: define appropriate prototypes for use in complex mixture models, determine data-driven eigenfunctions for accurate nonparametric regression, and find a set of suitable features to use in a statistical classifier. In this thesis, methods for each of these tasks are built up from simple principles, compared to existing methods in the literature, and applied to data from astronomical all-sky surveys. I examine several important problems in astrophysics, such as estimation of star formation history parameters for galaxies, prediction of redshifts of galaxies using photometric data, and classification of different types of supernovae based on their photometric light curves. Fast methods for high-dimensional data analysis are crucial in each of these problems because they all involve the analysis of complicated high-dimensional data in large, all-sky surveys. Specifically, I estimate the star formation history parameters for the nearly 800,000 galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 spectroscopic catalog, determine redshifts for over 300,000 galaxies in the SDSS photometric catalog, and estimate the types of 20,000 supernovae as part of the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge. Accurate predictions and classifications are imperative in each of these examples because these estimates are utilized in broader inference problems

  7. Leveraging Two Kinect Sensors for Accurate Full-Body Motion Capture

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhiquan; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Yu; Du, Sidan

    2015-01-01

    Accurate motion capture plays an important role in sports analysis, the medical field and virtual reality. Current methods for motion capture often suffer from occlusions, which limits the accuracy of their pose estimation. In this paper, we propose a complete system to measure the pose parameters of the human body accurately. Different from previous monocular depth camera systems, we leverage two Kinect sensors to acquire more information about human movements, which ensures that we can still get an accurate estimation even when significant occlusion occurs. Because human motion is temporally constant, we adopt a learning analysis to mine the temporal information across the posture variations. Using this information, we estimate human pose parameters accurately, regardless of rapid movement. Our experimental results show that our system can perform an accurate pose estimation of the human body with the constraint of information from the temporal domain. PMID:26402681

  8. Leveraging Two Kinect Sensors for Accurate Full-Body Motion Capture.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhiquan; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Yu; Du, Sidan

    2015-01-01

    Accurate motion capture plays an important role in sports analysis, the medical field and virtual reality. Current methods for motion capture often suffer from occlusions, which limits the accuracy of their pose estimation. In this paper, we propose a complete system to measure the pose parameters of the human body accurately. Different from previous monocular depth camera systems, we leverage two Kinect sensors to acquire more information about human movements, which ensures that we can still get an accurate estimation even when significant occlusion occurs. Because human motion is temporally constant, we adopt a learning analysis to mine the temporal information across the posture variations. Using this information, we estimate human pose parameters accurately, regardless of rapid movement. Our experimental results show that our system can perform an accurate pose estimation of the human body with the constraint of information from the temporal domain. PMID:26402681

  9. Tilted excitation implies odd periodic resonances.

    PubMed

    Depetri, G I; Sartorelli, J C; Marin, B; Baptista, M S

    2016-07-01

    Our aim is to unveil how resonances of parametric systems are affected when symmetry is broken. We showed numerically and experimentally that odd resonances indeed come about when the pendulum is excited along a tilted direction. Applying the Melnikov subharmonic function, we not only determined analytically the loci of saddle-node bifurcations delimiting resonance regions in parameter space but also explained these observations by demonstrating that, under the Melnikov method point of view, odd resonances arise due to an extra torque that appears in the asymmetric case. PMID:27575118

  10. Tilted excitation implies odd periodic resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depetri, G. I.; Sartorelli, J. C.; Marin, B.; Baptista, M. S.

    2016-07-01

    Our aim is to unveil how resonances of parametric systems are affected when symmetry is broken. We showed numerically and experimentally that odd resonances indeed come about when the pendulum is excited along a tilted direction. Applying the Melnikov subharmonic function, we not only determined analytically the loci of saddle-node bifurcations delimiting resonance regions in parameter space but also explained these observations by demonstrating that, under the Melnikov method point of view, odd resonances arise due to an extra torque that appears in the asymmetric case.

  11. Scalar-Pseudoscalar scattering and pseudoscalar resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Albaladejo, M.; Oller, J. A.; Roca, L.

    2011-05-23

    The interactions between the f{sub 0}(980) and a{sub 0}(980) scalar resonances and the lightest pseudoscalar mesons are studied. We first obtain the interacting kernels, without including any ad hoc free parameter, because the lightest scalar resonances are dynamically generated. These kernels are unitarized, giving the final amplitudes, which generate pseudoscalar resonances, associated with the K(1460), {pi}(1300), {pi}(1800), {eta}(1475) and X(1835). We also consider the exotic channels with I = 3/2 and I{sup G} = 1{sup +} quantum numbers. The former could be also resonant in agreement with a previous prediction.

  12. A highly accurate interatomic potential for argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Ronald A.

    1993-09-01

    A modified potential based on the individually damped model of Douketis, Scoles, Marchetti, Zen, and Thakkar [J. Chem. Phys. 76, 3057 (1982)] is presented which fits, within experimental error, the accurate ultraviolet (UV) vibration-rotation spectrum of argon determined by UV laser absorption spectroscopy by Herman, LaRocque, and Stoicheff [J. Chem. Phys. 89, 4535 (1988)]. Other literature potentials fail to do so. The potential also is shown to predict a large number of other properties and is probably the most accurate characterization of the argon interaction constructed to date.

  13. Accurate analysis of EBSD data for phase identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palizdar, Y.; Cochrane, R. C.; Brydson, R.; Leary, R.; Scott, A. J.

    2010-07-01

    This paper aims to investigate the reliability of software default settings in the analysis of EBSD results. To study the effect of software settings on the EBSD results, the presence of different phases in high Al steel has been investigated by EBSD. The results show the importance of appropriate automated analysis parameters for valid and reliable phase discrimination. Specifically, the importance of the minimum number of indexed bands and the maximum solution error have been investigated with values of 7-9 and 1.0-1.5° respectively, found to be needed for accurate analysis.

  14. Elbow magnetic resonance imaging: imaging anatomy and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hauptfleisch, Jennifer; English, Collette; Murphy, Darra

    2015-04-01

    The elbow is a complex joint. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often the imaging modality of choice in the workup of elbow pain, especially in sports injuries and younger patients who often have either a history of a chronic repetitive strain such as the throwing athlete or a distinct traumatic injury. Traumatic injuries and alternative musculoskeletal pathologies can affect the ligaments, musculotendinous, cartilaginous, and osseous structures of the elbow as well as the 3 main nerves to the upper limb, and these structures are best assessed with MRI.Knowledge of the complex anatomy of the elbow joint as well as patterns of injury and disease is important for the radiologist to make an accurate diagnosis in the setting of elbow pain. This chapter will outline elbow anatomy, basic imaging parameters, compartmental pathology, and finally applications of some novel MRI techniques. PMID:25835585

  15. CARS Spectral Fitting with Multiple Resonant Species using Sparse Libraries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Magnotti, Gaetano

    2010-01-01

    The dual pump CARS technique is often used in the study of turbulent flames. Fast and accurate algorithms are needed for fitting dual-pump CARS spectra for temperature and multiple chemical species. This paper describes the development of such an algorithm. The algorithm employs sparse libraries, whose size grows much more slowly with number of species than a conventional library. The method was demonstrated by fitting synthetic "experimental" spectra containing 4 resonant species (N2, O2, H2 and CO2), both with noise and without it, and by fitting experimental spectra from a H2-air flame produced by a Hencken burner. In both studies, weighted least squares fitting of signal, as opposed to least squares fitting signal or square-root signal, was shown to produce the least random error and minimize bias error in the fitted parameters.

  16. Micro-machined resonator oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, D.R.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Bivens, H.M.; Wessendorf, K.O.

    1994-08-16

    A micro-miniature resonator-oscillator is disclosed. Due to the miniaturization of the resonator-oscillator, oscillation frequencies of one MHz and higher are utilized. A thickness-mode quartz resonator housed in a micro-machined silicon package and operated as a telemetered sensor beacon'' that is, a digital, self-powered, remote, parameter measuring-transmitter in the FM-band. The resonator design uses trapped energy principles and temperature dependence methodology through crystal orientation control, with operation in the 20--100 MHz range. High volume batch-processing manufacturing is utilized, with package and resonator assembly at the wafer level. Unique design features include squeeze-film damping for robust vibration and shock performance, capacitive coupling through micro-machined diaphragms allowing resonator excitation at the package exterior, circuit integration and extremely small (0.1 in. square) dimensioning. A family of micro-miniature sensor beacons is also disclosed with widespread applications as bio-medical sensors, vehicle status monitors and high-volume animal identification and health sensors. The sensor family allows measurement of temperatures, chemicals, acceleration and pressure. A microphone and clock realization is also available. 21 figs.

  17. Micro-machined resonator oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, Dale R.; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.; Bivens, Hugh M.; Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    1994-01-01

    A micro-miniature resonator-oscillator is disclosed. Due to the miniaturization of the resonator-oscillator, oscillation frequencies of one MHz and higher are utilized. A thickness-mode quartz resonator housed in a micro-machined silicon package and operated as a "telemetered sensor beacon" that is, a digital, self-powered, remote, parameter measuring-transmitter in the FM-band. The resonator design uses trapped energy principles and temperature dependence methodology through crystal orientation control, with operation in the 20-100 MHz range. High volume batch-processing manufacturing is utilized, with package and resonator assembly at the wafer level. Unique design features include squeeze-film damping for robust vibration and shock performance, capacitive coupling through micro-machined diaphragms allowing resonator excitation at the package exterior, circuit integration and extremely small (0.1 in. square) dimensioning. A family of micro-miniature sensor beacons is also disclosed with widespread applications as bio-medical sensors, vehicle status monitors and high-volume animal identification and health sensors. The sensor family allows measurement of temperatures, chemicals, acceleration and pressure. A microphone and clock realization is also available.

  18. Accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging for measuring maturing cartilage: A phantom study

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, Jennifer R; Sussman, Marshall S; Moineddin, Rahim; Amirabadi, Afsaneh; Rayner, Tammy; Doria, Andrea S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging measurements of cartilage tissue-mimicking phantoms and to determine a combination of magnetic resonance imaging parameters to optimize accuracy while minimizing scan time. METHOD: Edge dimensions from 4 rectangular agar phantoms ranging from 10.5 to 14.5 mm in length and 1.25 to 5.5 mm in width were independently measured by two readers using a steel ruler. Coronal T1 spin echo (T1 SE), fast spoiled gradient-recalled echo (FSPGR) and multiplanar gradient-recalled echo (GRE MPGR) sequences were used to obtain phantom images on a 1.5-T scanner. RESULTS: Inter- and intra-reader reliability were high for both direct measurements and for magnetic resonance imaging measurements of phantoms. Statistically significant differences were noted between the mean direct measurements and the mean magnetic resonance imaging measurements for phantom 1 when using a GRE MPGR sequence (512x512 pixels, 1.5-mm slice thickness, 5:49 min scan time), while borderline differences were noted for T1 SE sequences with the following parameters: 320x320 pixels, 1.5-mm slice thickness, 6:11 min scan time; 320x320 pixels, 4-mm slice thickness, 6:11 min scan time; and 512x512 pixels, 1.5-mm slice thickness, 9:48 min scan time. Borderline differences were also noted when using a FSPGR sequence with 512x512 pixels, a 1.5-mm slice thickness and a 3:36 min scan time. CONCLUSIONS: FSPGR sequences, regardless of the magnetic resonance imaging parameter combination used, provided accurate measurements. The GRE MPGR sequence using 512x512 pixels, a 1.5-mm slice thickness and a 5:49 min scan time and, to a lesser degree, all tested T1 SE sequences produced suboptimal accuracy when measuring the widest phantom. PMID:27464298

  19. Numerical Investigations of High Pressure Acoustic Waves in Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athavale, Mahesh; Pindera, Maciej; Daniels, Christopher C.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation presents work on numerical investigations of nonlinear acoustic phenomena in resonators that can generate high-pressure waves using acoustic forcing of the flow. Time-accurate simulations of the flow in a closed cone resonator were performed at different oscillation frequencies and amplitudes, and the numerical results for the resonance frequency and fluid pressure increase match the GRC experimental data well. Work on cone resonator assembly simulations has started and will involve calculations of the flow through the resonator assembly with and without acoustic excitation. A new technique for direct calculation of resonance frequency of complex shaped resonators is also being investigated. Script-driven command procedures will also be developed for optimization of the resonator shape for maximum pressure increase.

  20. Accurate pointing of tungsten welding electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegelmeier, P.

    1971-01-01

    Thoriated-tungsten is pointed accurately and quickly by using sodium nitrite. Point produced is smooth and no effort is necessary to hold the tungsten rod concentric. The chemically produced point can be used several times longer than ground points. This method reduces time and cost of preparing tungsten electrodes.

  1. High-frequency current oscillations in graphene-boron nitride resonant tunnel diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenaway, Mark; Gaskell, Jenn; Eaves, Laurence; Novoselov, Kostya; Mishchenko, Artem; Geim, Andre; Fromhold, Mark

    The successful realisation of multilayer graphene-hBN-graphene resonant tunnelling diodes (graphene- RTDs) with negative differential conductance (NDC) and MHz current oscillations offers the exciting possibility of exploiting them as high-frequency oscillators and mixers. In this paper, we examine their potential for generating higher frequencies by simulating the oscillations in the tunnel current and charge that arise when the device is biased in the NDC region and placed in a resonant circuit. Using the Bardeen transfer Hamiltonian method, we examine the effect on the device characteristics of the twist angle, θ, between the two graphene electrodes, the hBN barrier thickness and of the carrier density in the graphene electrodes, which can be adjusted by chemical doping or by an applied bias voltage. The simulations accurately reproduce our recently-reported measurements on these RTDs (Fig. 4,). The results of simulations show that frequencies of tens of GHz are achievable by optimising the device parameters. Leverhulme Trust, UK.

  2. Heat equation inversion framework for average SAR calculation from magnetic resonance thermal imaging.

    PubMed

    Alon, Leeor; Sodickson, Daniel K; Deniz, Cem M

    2016-10-01

    Deposition of radiofrequency (RF) energy can be quantified via electric field or temperature change measurements. Magnetic resonance imaging has been used as a tool to measure three dimensional small temperature changes associated with RF radiation exposure. When duration of RF exposure is long, conversion from temperature change to specific absorption rate (SAR) is nontrivial due to prominent heat-diffusion and conduction effects. In this work, we demonstrated a method for calculation of SAR via an inversion of the heat equation including heat-diffusion and conduction effects. This method utilizes high-resolution three dimensional magnetic resonance temperature images and measured thermal properties of the phantom to achieve accurate calculation of SAR. Accuracy of the proposed method was analyzed with respect to operating frequency of a dipole antenna and parameters used in heat equation inversion. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:493-503, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27490064

  3. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactivity correlates with cortical perfusion parameters determined by bolus tracking arterial spin labelling (bt-ASL) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the Wistar Kyoto rat.

    PubMed

    Gormley, Shane; Rouine, Jennifer; McIntosh, Allison; Kerskens, Christian; Harkin, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Alterations in astrocyte number and function have been implicated in the pathophysiology of a number of psychiatric disorders. The development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool in the animal laboratory has enabled an investigation of the relationship between pathological and neuroimaging markers in animal models. However the physiological processes which underlie these markers and their role in mediating behavioural deficits is still poorly understood. Rodent models have provided us with important insights into physiological and cellular mechanisms which may mediate anxiety and depression-related behaviours. The Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat is a strain which endogenously expresses highly anxious and depressive-like behaviours and has previously been reported to exhibit alterations in immunoreactivity for the astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in brain sub-regions relative to more stress resilient out-bred strains. Here we report that the depressive and anxiety-like behaviours exhibited by the WKY rat strain are associated with alterations in brain morphology including a decrease in hippocampal volume, coupled with reduced resting state frontal cortical perfusion as assessed by MR bolus tracking arterial spin labelling (bt-ASL) relative to the out-bred Wistar strain. Pre-limbic cortical GFAP immunoreactivity and astrocyte cell number were positively correlated with cortical blood perfusion in the WKY strain. These experiments provide a link between pathological and neuroimaging markers of aberrant astrocytic function and add validity to the WKY rat as a model for co-morbid anxiety and depression. PMID:27068181

  4. A new generalized correlation for accurate vapor pressure prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Hui; Yang, Wenming

    2012-08-01

    An accurate knowledge of the vapor pressure of organic liquids is very important for the oil and gas processing operations. In combustion modeling, the accuracy of numerical predictions is also highly dependent on the fuel properties such as vapor pressure. In this Letter, a new generalized correlation is proposed based on the Lee-Kesler's method where a fuel dependent parameter 'A' is introduced. The proposed method only requires the input parameters of critical temperature, normal boiling temperature and the acentric factor of the fluid. With this method, vapor pressures have been calculated and compared with the data reported in data compilation for 42 organic liquids over 1366 data points, and the overall average absolute percentage deviation is only 1.95%.

  5. Scallops skeletons as tools for accurate proxy calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorrain, A.; Paulet, Y.-M.; Chauvaud, L.; Dunbar, R.; Mucciarone, D.; Pécheyran, C.; Amouroux, D.; Fontugne, M.

    2003-04-01

    Bivalves skeletons are able to produce great geochemical proxies. But general calibration of those proxies are based on approximate time basis because of misunderstanding of growth rhythm. In this context, the Great scallop, Pecten maximus, appears to be a powerful tool as a daily growth deposit has been clearly identified for this species (Chauvaud et al, 1998; Lorrain et al, 2000), allowing accurate environmental calibration. Indeed, using this species, a date can be affiliated to each growth increment, and as a consequence environmental parameters can be closely compared (at a daily scale) to observed chemical and structural shell variations. This daily record provides an unequivocal basis to calibrate proxies. Isotopic (Delta-13C and Delta-15N) and trace element analysis (LA-ICP-MS) have been performed on several individuals and different years depending on the analysed parameter. Seawater parameters measured one meter above the sea-bottom were compared to chemical variations in the calcitic shell. Their confrontation showed that even with a daily basis for data interpretation, calibration is still a challenge. Inter-individual variations are found and correlations are not always reproducible from one year to the others. The first explanation could be an inaccurate appreciation of the proximate environment of the animal, notably the water-sediment interface could best represent Pecten maximus environment. Secondly, physiological parameters could be inferred for those discrepancies. In particular, calcification takes places in the extrapallial fluid, which composition might be very different from external environment. Accurate calibration of chemical proxies should consider biological aspects to gain better insights into the processes controlling the incorporation of those chemical elements. The characterisation of isotopic and trace element composition of the extrapallial fluid and hemolymph could greatly help our understanding of chemical shell variations.

  6. Accurate and occlusion-robust multi-view stereo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhaokun; Stamatopoulos, Christos; Fraser, Clive S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes an accurate multi-view stereo method for image-based 3D reconstruction that features robustness in the presence of occlusions. The new method offers improvements in dealing with two fundamental image matching problems. The first concerns the selection of the support window model, while the second centers upon accurate visibility estimation for each pixel. The support window model is based on an approximate 3D support plane described by a depth and two per-pixel depth offsets. For the visibility estimation, the multi-view constraint is initially relaxed by generating separate support plane maps for each support image using a modified PatchMatch algorithm. Then the most likely visible support image, which represents the minimum visibility of each pixel, is extracted via a discrete Markov Random Field model and it is further augmented by parameter clustering. Once the visibility is estimated, multi-view optimization taking into account all redundant observations is conducted to achieve optimal accuracy in the 3D surface generation for both depth and surface normal estimates. Finally, multi-view consistency is utilized to eliminate any remaining observational outliers. The proposed method is experimentally evaluated using well-known Middlebury datasets, and results obtained demonstrate that it is amongst the most accurate of the methods thus far reported via the Middlebury MVS website. Moreover, the new method exhibits a high completeness rate.

  7. Method and apparatus for accurately manipulating an object during microelectrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Parvin, Bahram A.; Maestre, Marcos F.; Fish, Richard H.; Johnston, William E.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus using electrophoresis provides accurate manipulation of an object on a microscope stage for further manipulations add reactions. The present invention also provides an inexpensive and easily accessible means to move an object without damage to the object. A plurality of electrodes are coupled to the stage in an array whereby the electrode array allows for distinct manipulations of the electric field for accurate manipulations of the object. There is an electrode array control coupled to the plurality of electrodes for manipulating the electric field. In an alternative embodiment, a chamber is provided on the stage to hold the object. The plurality of electrodes are positioned in the chamber, and the chamber is filled with fluid. The system can be automated using visual servoing, which manipulates the control parameters, i.e., x, y stage, applying the field, etc., after extracting the significant features directly from image data. Visual servoing includes an imaging device and computer system to determine the location of the object. A second stage having a plurality of tubes positioned on top of the second stage, can be accurately positioned by visual servoing so that one end of one of the plurality of tubes surrounds at least part of the object on the first stage.

  8. Method and apparatus for accurately manipulating an object during microelectrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Parvin, B.A.; Maestre, M.F.; Fish, R.H.; Johnston, W.E.

    1997-09-23

    An apparatus using electrophoresis provides accurate manipulation of an object on a microscope stage for further manipulations and reactions. The present invention also provides an inexpensive and easily accessible means to move an object without damage to the object. A plurality of electrodes are coupled to the stage in an array whereby the electrode array allows for distinct manipulations of the electric field for accurate manipulations of the object. There is an electrode array control coupled to the plurality of electrodes for manipulating the electric field. In an alternative embodiment, a chamber is provided on the stage to hold the object. The plurality of electrodes are positioned in the chamber, and the chamber is filled with fluid. The system can be automated using visual servoing, which manipulates the control parameters, i.e., x, y stage, applying the field, etc., after extracting the significant features directly from image data. Visual servoing includes an imaging device and computer system to determine the location of the object. A second stage having a plurality of tubes positioned on top of the second stage, can be accurately positioned by visual servoing so that one end of one of the plurality of tubes surrounds at least part of the object on the first stage. 11 figs.

  9. Characterization of nuclear material by Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradela, C.; Alaerts, G.; Becker, B.; Heyse, J.; Kopecky, S.; Moens, A.; Mondelaers, W.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Wynants, R.; Harada, H.; Kitatani, F.; Koizumi, M.; Tsuchiya, H.

    2016-11-01

    The use of Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis for the characterization of nuclear materials is discussed. The method, which relies on resonance structures in neutron-induced reaction cross sections, can be applied as a non-destructive method to characterise complex nuclear materials such as melted fuel resulting from a severe nuclear accident. Results of a demonstration experiment at the GELINA facility reveal that accurate data can be obtained at a compact facility even in the case of strong overlapping resonances.

  10. Investigation of refractive index sensing based on Fano resonance in fiber Bragg grating ring resonators.

    PubMed

    Campanella, Carlo Edoardo; De Leonardis, Francesco; Mastronardi, Lorenzo; Malara, Pietro; Gagliardi, Gianluca; Passaro, Vittorio M N

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we theoretically investigate a ring resonant cavity obtained by closing on itself a π-shifted fiber Bragg grating, to be used for refractive index sensing applications. Differently from a conventional π-shifted fiber Bragg grating, the spectral structure of this cavity is characterized by an asymmetric splitting doublet composed by a right side resonance having an asymmetric Fano profile and a left side resonance having a symmetric Lorentzian profile. The right side resonance shows a narrower and sharper peak than all the other kinds of resonance achievable with both conventional ring resonators and π-shifted fiber Bragg gratings. A reduction of the resonant linewidth with respect to a conventional π-shifted Fiber Bragg grating and a fiber ring resonator, having the same physical parameters, is theoretically proved, achieving up to five orders of magnitude improvement with respect to the usual ring resonator. Due to these resonance features, the π-shifted Bragg grating ring resonator results suitable for RI sensing applications requiring extremely narrow resonances for high resolution measurements. In particular, by assuming a refractive index sensing to detect the presence of sugar in water, the sensor can show a theoretical resolution better than 10-9 RIU. PMID:26072795

  11. Probing Resonances of the Dirac Equation with Complex Momentum Representation.

    PubMed

    Li, Niu; Shi, Min; Guo, Jian-You; Niu, Zhong-Ming; Liang, Haozhao

    2016-08-01

    Resonance plays critical roles in the formation of many physical phenomena, and several methods have been developed for the exploration of resonance. In this work, we propose a new scheme for resonance by solving the Dirac equation in the complex momentum representation, in which the resonant states are exposed clearly in the complex momentum plane and the resonance parameters can be determined precisely without imposing unphysical parameters. Combined with the relativistic mean-field theory, this method is applied to probe the resonances in ^{120}Sn with the energies, widths, and wave functions being obtained. Compared to other methods, this method is not only very effective for narrow resonances, but also can be reliably applied to broad resonances. PMID:27541464

  12. Probing Resonances of the Dirac Equation with Complex Momentum Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Niu; Shi, Min; Guo, Jian-You; Niu, Zhong-Ming; Liang, Haozhao

    2016-08-01

    Resonance plays critical roles in the formation of many physical phenomena, and several methods have been developed for the exploration of resonance. In this work, we propose a new scheme for resonance by solving the Dirac equation in the complex momentum representation, in which the resonant states are exposed clearly in the complex momentum plane and the resonance parameters can be determined precisely without imposing unphysical parameters. Combined with the relativistic mean-field theory, this method is applied to probe the resonances in 120120 with the energies, widths, and wave functions being obtained. Compared to other methods, this method is not only very effective for narrow resonances, but also can be reliably applied to broad resonances.

  13. Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Quiter, Brian; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Ambers, Scott

    2011-06-30

    In nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements, resonances are excited by an external photon beam leading to the emission of gamma rays with specific energies that are characteristic of the emitting isotope. NRF promises the unique capability of directly quantifying a specific isotope without the need for unfolding the combined responses of several fissile isotopes as is required in other measurement techniques. We have analyzed the potential of NRF as a non-destructive analysis technique for quantitative measurements of Pu isotopes in spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Given the low concentrations of 239Pu in SNF and its small integrated NRF cross sections, the main challenge in achieving precise and accurate measurements lies in accruing sufficient counting statistics in a reasonable measurement time. Using analytical modeling, and simulations with the radiation transport code MCNPX that has been experimentally tested recently, the backscatter and transmission methods were quantitatively studied for differing photon sources and radiation detector types. Resonant photon count rates and measurement times were estimated for a range of photon source and detection parameters, which were used to determine photon source and gamma-ray detector requirements. The results indicate that systems based on a bremsstrahlung source and present detector technology are not practical for high-precision measurements of 239Pu in SNF. Measurements that achieve the desired uncertainties within hour-long measurements will either require stronger resonances, which may be expressed by other Pu isotopes, or require quasi-monoenergetic photon sources with intensities that are approximately two orders of magnitude higher than those currently being designed or proposed.This work is part of a larger effort sponsored by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative to develop an integrated instrument, comprised of individual NDA techniques with complementary features, that is fully capable of

  14. Supergranular Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayashankar, Paniveni

    2016-07-01

    I study the complexity of supergranular cells using intensity patterns from Kodaikanal solar observatory. The chaotic and turbulent aspect of the solar supergranulation can be studied by examining the interrelationships amongst the parameters characterizing supergranular cells namely size, horizontal flow field, lifetime and physical dimensions of the cells and the fractal dimension deduced from the size data. The findings are supportive of Kolmogorov's theory of turbulence. The Data consists of visually identified supergranular cells, from which a fractal dimension 'D' for supergranulation is obtained according to the relation P α AD/2 where 'A' is the area and 'P' is the perimeter of the supergranular cells. I find a fractal dimension close to about 1.3 which is consistent with that for isobars and suggests a possible turbulent origin. The cell circularity shows a dependence on the perimeter with a peak around (1.1-1.2) x 105 m. The findings are supportive of Kolmogorov's theory of turbulence.

  15. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    DOEpatents

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  16. Feedback about More Accurate versus Less Accurate Trials: Differential Effects on Self-Confidence and Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected by feedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On Day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of…

  17. Comparative Fluorescence Resonance Energy-Transfer Study in Pluronic Triblock Copolymer Micelle and Niosome Composed of Biological Component Cholesterol: An Investigation of Effect of Cholesterol and Sucrose on the FRET Parameters.

    PubMed

    Roy, Arpita; Kundu, Niloy; Banik, Debasis; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2016-01-14

    The formation of pluronic triblock copolymer (F127)-cholesterol-based niosome and its interaction with sugar (sucrose) molecules have been investigated. The morphology of F127-cholesterol -based niosome in the presence of sucrose has been successfully demonstrated using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) techniques. The DLS profiles and TEM images clearly suggest that the size of the niosome aggregates increases significantly in the presence of sucrose. In addition to structural characterization, a detailed comparative fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) study has been carried out in these F127-containing aggregates, involving coumarin 153 (C153) as donor (D) and rhodamine 6G (R6G) as an acceptor (A) to monitor the dynamic heterogeneity of the systems. Besides, time-resolved anisotropy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements have been carried out to monitor the rotational and lateral diffusion motion in these F127-cholesterol-based aggregates using C153 and R6G, respectively. During the course of FRET study, we have observed multiple time constants of FRET inside the F127-cholesterol-based niosomes in contrast with the F127 micelle. This corresponds to the presence of more than one preferential donor-acceptor (D-A) distance in niosomes than in F127 micelle. FRET has also been successfully used to probe the effect of sucrose on the morphology of F127-cholesterol-based niosome. In the presence of sucrose, the time constant of FRET further increases as the D-A distances increase in sucrose-decorated niosome. Finally, the excitation-wavelength-dependent FRET studies have indicated that as the excitation of donor molecules varies from 408 to 440 nm the contribution of the faster rise component of the acceptor enhances considerably, which clearly establishes the dynamics heterogeneity of both systems. Our findings also indicate that FRET is completely intravesicular in nature in these block copolymer

  18. Isomerism of Cyanomethanimine: Accurate Structural, Energetic, and Spectroscopic Characterization.

    PubMed

    Puzzarini, Cristina

    2015-11-25

    The structures, relative stabilities, and rotational and vibrational parameters of the Z-C-, E-C-, and N-cyanomethanimine isomers have been evaluated using state-of-the-art quantum-chemical approaches. Equilibrium geometries have been calculated by means of a composite scheme based on coupled-cluster calculations that accounts for the extrapolation to the complete basis set limit and core-correlation effects. The latter approach is proved to provide molecular structures with an accuracy of 0.001-0.002 Å and 0.05-0.1° for bond lengths and angles, respectively. Systematically extrapolated ab initio energies, accounting for electron correlation through coupled-cluster theory, including up to single, double, triple, and quadruple excitations, and corrected for core-electron correlation and anharmonic zero-point vibrational energy, have been used to accurately determine relative energies and the Z-E isomerization barrier with an accuracy of about 1 kJ/mol. Vibrational and rotational spectroscopic parameters have been investigated by means of hybrid schemes that allow us to obtain rotational constants accurate to about a few megahertz and vibrational frequencies with a mean absolute error of ∼1%. Where available, for all properties considered, a very good agreement with experimental data has been observed. PMID:26529434

  19. Feedback about more accurate versus less accurate trials: differential effects on self-confidence and activation.

    PubMed

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-06-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected byfeedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of two conditions: one group received feedback on the most accurate trials, whereas another group received feedback on the least accurate trials. On day 2, participants completed an anxiety questionnaire and performed a retention test. Shin conductance level, as a measure of arousal, was determined. The results indicated that feedback about more accurate trials resulted in more effective learning as well as increased self-confidence. Also, activation was a predictor of performance. PMID:22808705

  20. Doubly-excited {sup 1,3}D{sup e} resonance states of two-electron positive ions Li{sup +} and Be{sup 2+} in Debye plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Sabyasachi; Wang, Yang; Jiang, Zishi; Li, Shuxia; Ratnavelu, K.

    2014-01-15

    We investigate the bound {sup 1,3}D states and the doubly-excited {sup 1,3}D{sup e} resonance states of two-electron positive ions Li{sup +} and Be{sup 2+} by employing correlated exponential wave functions. In the framework of the stabilization method, we are able to extract three series (2pnp, 2snd, 2pnf) of {sup 1}D{sup e} resonances and two series (2pnp, 2snd) of {sup 3}D{sup e} resonances below the N = 2 threshold. The {sup 1,3}D{sup e} resonance parameters (resonance energies and widths) for Li{sup +} and Be{sup 2+} along with the bound-excited 1s3d {sup 1,3}D state energies are reported for the first time as functions of the screening parameter. Accurate resonance energies and widths are also reported for Li{sup +} and Be{sup 2+} in vacuum. For free-atomic cases, comparisons are made with the reported results and few resonance states are reported for the first time.

  1. New model accurately predicts reformate composition

    SciTech Connect

    Ancheyta-Juarez, J.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E. )

    1994-01-31

    Although naphtha reforming is a well-known process, the evolution of catalyst formulation, as well as new trends in gasoline specifications, have led to rapid evolution of the process, including: reactor design, regeneration mode, and operating conditions. Mathematical modeling of the reforming process is an increasingly important tool. It is fundamental to the proper design of new reactors and revamp of existing ones. Modeling can be used to optimize operating conditions, analyze the effects of process variables, and enhance unit performance. Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo has developed a model of the catalytic reforming process that accurately predicts reformate composition at the higher-severity conditions at which new reformers are being designed. The new AA model is more accurate than previous proposals because it takes into account the effects of temperature and pressure on the rate constants of each chemical reaction.

  2. Accurate colorimetric feedback for RGB LED clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Kwong; Ashdown, Ian

    2006-08-01

    We present an empirical model of LED emission spectra that is applicable to both InGaN and AlInGaP high-flux LEDs, and which accurately predicts their relative spectral power distributions over a wide range of LED junction temperatures. We further demonstrate with laboratory measurements that changes in LED spectral power distribution with temperature can be accurately predicted with first- or second-order equations. This provides the basis for a real-time colorimetric feedback system for RGB LED clusters that can maintain the chromaticity of white light at constant intensity to within +/-0.003 Δuv over a range of 45 degrees Celsius, and to within 0.01 Δuv when dimmed over an intensity range of 10:1.

  3. Accurate mask model for advanced nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zine El Abidine, Nacer; Sundermann, Frank; Yesilada, Emek; Ndiaye, El Hadji Omar; Mishra, Kushlendra; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Bork, Ingo; Buck, Peter; Toublan, Olivier; Schanen, Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    Standard OPC models consist of a physical optical model and an empirical resist model. The resist model compensates the optical model imprecision on top of modeling resist development. The optical model imprecision may result from mask topography effects and real mask information including mask ebeam writing and mask process contributions. For advanced technology nodes, significant progress has been made to model mask topography to improve optical model accuracy. However, mask information is difficult to decorrelate from standard OPC model. Our goal is to establish an accurate mask model through a dedicated calibration exercise. In this paper, we present a flow to calibrate an accurate mask enabling its implementation. The study covers the different effects that should be embedded in the mask model as well as the experiment required to model them.

  4. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    PubMed

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  5. Accurate modeling of parallel scientific computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Townsend, James C.

    1988-01-01

    Scientific codes are usually parallelized by partitioning a grid among processors. To achieve top performance it is necessary to partition the grid so as to balance workload and minimize communication/synchronization costs. This problem is particularly acute when the grid is irregular, changes over the course of the computation, and is not known until load time. Critical mapping and remapping decisions rest on the ability to accurately predict performance, given a description of a grid and its partition. This paper discusses one approach to this problem, and illustrates its use on a one-dimensional fluids code. The models constructed are shown to be accurate, and are used to find optimal remapping schedules.

  6. Accurate Guitar Tuning by Cochlear Implant Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  7. An accurate registration technique for distorted images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delapena, Michele; Shaw, Richard A.; Linde, Peter; Dravins, Dainis

    1990-01-01

    Accurate registration of International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) images is crucial because the variability of the geometrical distortions that are introduced by the SEC-Vidicon cameras ensures that raw science images are never perfectly aligned with the Intensity Transfer Functions (ITFs) (i.e., graded floodlamp exposures that are used to linearize and normalize the camera response). A technique for precisely registering IUE images which uses a cross correlation of the fixed pattern that exists in all raw IUE images is described.

  8. Accurate maser positions for MALT-45

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Christopher; Bains, Indra; Voronkov, Maxim; Lo, Nadia; Jones, Paul; Muller, Erik; Cunningham, Maria; Burton, Michael; Brooks, Kate; Green, James; Fuller, Gary; Barnes, Peter; Ellingsen, Simon; Urquhart, James; Morgan, Larry; Rowell, Gavin; Walsh, Andrew; Loenen, Edo; Baan, Willem; Hill, Tracey; Purcell, Cormac; Breen, Shari; Peretto, Nicolas; Jackson, James; Lowe, Vicki; Longmore, Steven

    2013-10-01

    MALT-45 is an untargeted survey, mapping the Galactic plane in CS (1-0), Class I methanol masers, SiO masers and thermal emission, and high frequency continuum emission. After obtaining images from the survey, a number of masers were detected, but without accurate positions. This project seeks to resolve each maser and its environment, with the ultimate goal of placing the Class I methanol maser into a timeline of high mass star formation.

  9. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R; Holmes, William M

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models. PMID:27111139

  10. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R.; Holmes, William M.

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models.

  11. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Silvia; Bean, Rachel; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Silk, Joseph

    2008-09-01

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, ns, and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z*=1078±11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1σ to R=1.734±0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: γα<0.39 and γi<0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  12. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Silk, Joseph

    2008-09-15

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, n{sub s}, and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z{sub *}=1078{+-}11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1{sigma} to R=1.734{+-}0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: {epsilon}{sub {alpha}}<0.39 and {epsilon}{sub i}<0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  13. A More Accurate Measurement of the {sup 28}Si Lattice Parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Massa, E. Sasso, C. P.; Mana, G.; Palmisano, C.

    2015-09-15

    In 2011, a discrepancy between the values of the Planck constant measured by counting Si atoms and by comparing mechanical and electrical powers prompted a review, among others, of the measurement of the spacing of {sup 28}Si (220) lattice planes, either to confirm the measured value and its uncertainty or to identify errors. This exercise confirmed the result of the previous measurement and yields the additional value d{sub 220} = 192 014 711.98(34) am having a reduced uncertainty.

  14. Compact and accurate linear and nonlinear autoregressive moving average model parameter estimation using laguerre functions.

    PubMed

    Chon, K H; Cohen, R J; Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    1997-01-01

    A linear and nonlinear autoregressive moving average (ARMA) identification algorithm is developed for modeling time series data. The algorithm uses Laguerre expansion of kernals (LEK) to estimate Volterra-Wiener kernals. However, instead of estimating linear and nonlinear system dynamics via moving average models, as is the case for the Volterra-Wiener analysis, we propose an ARMA model-based approach. The proposed algorithm is essentially the same as LEK, but this algorithm is extended to include past values of the output as well. Thus, all of the advantages associated with using the Laguerre function remain with our algorithm; but, by extending the algorithm to the linear and nonlinear ARMA model, a significant reduction in the number of Laguerre functions can be made, compared with the Volterra-Wiener approach. This translates into a more compact system representation and makes the physiological interpretation of higher order kernels easier. Furthermore, simulation results show better performance of the proposed approach in estimating the system dynamics than LEK in certain cases, and it remains effective in the presence of significant additive measurement noise. PMID:9236985

  15. Tunable superconducting microstrip resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamyan, A. A.; Kubatkin, S. E.; Danilov, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    We report on a simple yet versatile design for a tunable superconducting microstrip resonator. Niobium nitride is employed as the superconducting material and aluminum oxide, produced by atomic layer deposition, as the dielectric layer. We show that the high quality of the dielectric material allows to reach the internal quality factors in the order of Qi˜104 in the single photon regime. Qi rapidly increases with the number of photons in the resonator N and exceeds 105 for N ˜10 -50 . A straightforward modification of the basic microstrip design allows to pass a current bias through the strip and to control its kinetic inductance. We achieve a frequency tuning δf =62 MHz around f0=2.4 GHz for a fundamental mode and δf =164 MHz for a third harmonic. This translates into a tuning parameter Qiδf /f0=150 . The presented design can be incorporated into essentially any superconducting circuitry operating at temperatures below 2.5 K.

  16. A mirrorless spinwave resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinel, Olivier; Everett, Jesse L.; Hosseini, Mahdi; Campbell, Geoff T.; Buchler, Ben C.; Lam, Ping Koy

    2015-12-01

    Optical resonance is central to a wide range of optical devices and techniques. In an optical cavity, the round-trip length and mirror reflectivity can be chosen to optimize the circulating optical power, linewidth, and free-spectral range (FSR) for a given application. In this paper we show how an atomic spinwave system, with no physical mirrors, can behave in a manner that is analogous to an optical cavity. We demonstrate this similarity by characterising the build-up and decay of the resonance in the time domain, and measuring the effective optical linewidth and FSR in the frequency domain. Our spinwave is generated in a 20 cm long Rb gas cell, yet it facilitates an effective FSR of 83 kHz, which would require a round-trip path of 3.6 km in a free-space optical cavity. Furthermore, the spinwave coupling is controllable enabling dynamic tuning of the effective cavity parameters.

  17. A mirrorless spinwave resonator

    PubMed Central

    Pinel, Olivier; Everett, Jesse L.; Hosseini, Mahdi; Campbell, Geoff T.; Buchler, Ben C.; Lam, Ping Koy

    2015-01-01

    Optical resonance is central to a wide range of optical devices and techniques. In an optical cavity, the round-trip length and mirror reflectivity can be chosen to optimize the circulating optical power, linewidth, and free-spectral range (FSR) for a given application. In this paper we show how an atomic spinwave system, with no physical mirrors, can behave in a manner that is analogous to an optical cavity. We demonstrate this similarity by characterising the build-up and decay of the resonance in the time domain, and measuring the effective optical linewidth and FSR in the frequency domain. Our spinwave is generated in a 20 cm long Rb gas cell, yet it facilitates an effective FSR of 83 kHz, which would require a round-trip path of 3.6 km in a free-space optical cavity. Furthermore, the spinwave coupling is controllable enabling dynamic tuning of the effective cavity parameters. PMID:26655839

  18. Accurate, fully-automated NMR spectral profiling for metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Ravanbakhsh, Siamak; Liu, Philip; Bjorndahl, Trent C; Bjordahl, Trent C; Mandal, Rupasri; Grant, Jason R; Wilson, Michael; Eisner, Roman; Sinelnikov, Igor; Hu, Xiaoyu; Luchinat, Claudio; Greiner, Russell; Wishart, David S

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases cause significant changes to the concentrations of small molecules (a.k.a. metabolites) that appear in a person's biofluids, which means such diseases can often be readily detected from a person's "metabolic profile"-i.e., the list of concentrations of those metabolites. This information can be extracted from a biofluids Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrum. However, due to its complexity, NMR spectral profiling has remained manual, resulting in slow, expensive and error-prone procedures that have hindered clinical and industrial adoption of metabolomics via NMR. This paper presents a system, BAYESIL, which can quickly, accurately, and autonomously produce a person's metabolic profile. Given a 1D 1H NMR spectrum of a complex biofluid (specifically serum or cerebrospinal fluid), BAYESIL can automatically determine the metabolic profile. This requires first performing several spectral processing steps, then matching the resulting spectrum against a reference compound library, which contains the "signatures" of each relevant metabolite. BAYESIL views spectral matching as an inference problem within a probabilistic graphical model that rapidly approximates the most probable metabolic profile. Our extensive studies on a diverse set of complex mixtures including real biological samples (serum and CSF), defined mixtures and realistic computer generated spectra; involving > 50 compounds, show that BAYESIL can autonomously find the concentration of NMR-detectable metabolites accurately (~ 90% correct identification and ~ 10% quantification error), in less than 5 minutes on a single CPU. These results demonstrate that BAYESIL is the first fully-automatic publicly-accessible system that provides quantitative NMR spectral profiling effectively-with an accuracy on these biofluids that meets or exceeds the performance of trained experts. We anticipate this tool will usher in high-throughput metabolomics and enable a wealth of new applications of NMR in

  19. Accurately Mapping M31's Microlensing Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotts, Arlin

    2004-07-01

    We propose to augment an existing microlensing survey of M31 with source identifications provided by a modest amount of ACS {and WFPC2 parallel} observations to yield an accurate measurement of the masses responsible for microlensing in M31, and presumably much of its dark matter. The main benefit of these data is the determination of the physical {or "einstein"} timescale of each microlensing event, rather than an effective {"FWHM"} timescale, allowing masses to be determined more than twice as accurately as without HST data. The einstein timescale is the ratio of the lensing cross-sectional radius and relative velocities. Velocities are known from kinematics, and the cross-section is directly proportional to the {unknown} lensing mass. We cannot easily measure these quantities without knowing the amplification, hence the baseline magnitude, which requires the resolution of HST to find the source star. This makes a crucial difference because M31 lens m ass determinations can be more accurate than those towards the Magellanic Clouds through our Galaxy's halo {for the same number of microlensing events} due to the better constrained geometry in the M31 microlensing situation. Furthermore, our larger survey, just completed, should yield at least 100 M31 microlensing events, more than any Magellanic survey. A small amount of ACS+WFPC2 imaging will deliver the potential of this large database {about 350 nights}. For the whole survey {and a delta-function mass distribution} the mass error should approach only about 15%, or about 6% error in slope for a power-law distribution. These results will better allow us to pinpoint the lens halo fraction, and the shape of the halo lens spatial distribution, and allow generalization/comparison of the nature of halo dark matter in spiral galaxies. In addition, we will be able to establish the baseline magnitude for about 50, 000 variable stars, as well as measure an unprecedentedly deta iled color-magnitude diagram and luminosity

  20. Accurate measurement of unsteady state fluid temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaremkiewicz, Magdalena

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, two accurate methods for determining the transient fluid temperature were presented. Measurements were conducted for boiling water since its temperature is known. At the beginning the thermometers are at the ambient temperature and next they are immediately immersed into saturated water. The measurements were carried out with two thermometers of different construction but with the same housing outer diameter equal to 15 mm. One of them is a K-type industrial thermometer widely available commercially. The temperature indicated by the thermometer was corrected considering the thermometers as the first or second order inertia devices. The new design of a thermometer was proposed and also used to measure the temperature of boiling water. Its characteristic feature is a cylinder-shaped housing with the sheath thermocouple located in its center. The temperature of the fluid was determined based on measurements taken in the axis of the solid cylindrical element (housing) using the inverse space marching method. Measurements of the transient temperature of the air flowing through the wind tunnel using the same thermometers were also carried out. The proposed measurement technique provides more accurate results compared with measurements using industrial thermometers in conjunction with simple temperature correction using the inertial thermometer model of the first or second order. By comparing the results, it was demonstrated that the new thermometer allows obtaining the fluid temperature much faster and with higher accuracy in comparison to the industrial thermometer. Accurate measurements of the fast changing fluid temperature are possible due to the low inertia thermometer and fast space marching method applied for solving the inverse heat conduction problem.

  1. Accurate upwind methods for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1993-01-01

    A new class of piecewise linear methods for the numerical solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations of gas dynamics is presented. These methods are uniformly second-order accurate, and can be considered as extensions of Godunov's scheme. With an appropriate definition of monotonicity preservation for the case of linear convection, it can be shown that they preserve monotonicity. Similar to Van Leer's MUSCL scheme, they consist of two key steps: a reconstruction step followed by an upwind step. For the reconstruction step, a monotonicity constraint that preserves uniform second-order accuracy is introduced. Computational efficiency is enhanced by devising a criterion that detects the 'smooth' part of the data where the constraint is redundant. The concept and coding of the constraint are simplified by the use of the median function. A slope steepening technique, which has no effect at smooth regions and can resolve a contact discontinuity in four cells, is described. As for the upwind step, existing and new methods are applied in a manner slightly different from those in the literature. These methods are derived by approximating the Euler equations via linearization and diagonalization. At a 'smooth' interface, Harten, Lax, and Van Leer's one intermediate state model is employed. A modification for this model that can resolve contact discontinuities is presented. Near a discontinuity, either this modified model or a more accurate one, namely, Roe's flux-difference splitting. is used. The current presentation of Roe's method, via the conceptually simple flux-vector splitting, not only establishes a connection between the two splittings, but also leads to an admissibility correction with no conditional statement, and an efficient approximation to Osher's approximate Riemann solver. These reconstruction and upwind steps result in schemes that are uniformly second-order accurate and economical at smooth regions, and yield high resolution at discontinuities.

  2. Two-photon finite-pulse model for resonant transitions in attosecond experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Galán, Álvaro; Martín, Fernando; Argenti, Luca

    2016-02-01

    We present an analytical model capable of describing two-photon ionization of atoms with attosecond pulses in the presence of intermediate and final isolated autoionizing states. The model is based on the finite-pulse formulation of second-order time-dependent perturbation theory. It approximates the intermediate and final states with Fano's theory for resonant continua, and it depends on a small set of atomic parameters that can either be obtained from separate ab initio calculations or be extracted from a few selected experiments. We use the model to compute the two-photon resonant photoelectron spectrum of helium below the N =2 threshold for the RABITT (reconstruction of attosecond beating by interference of two-photon transitions) pump-probe scheme, in which an XUV attosecond pulse train is used in association with a weak IR probe, obtaining results in quantitative agreement with those from accurate ab initio simulations. In particular, we show that (i) the use of finite pulses results in a homogeneous redshift of the RABITT beating frequency, as well as a resonant modulation of the beating frequency in proximity to intermediate autoionizing states; (ii) the phase of resonant two-photon amplitudes generally experiences a continuous excursion as a function of the intermediate detuning, with either zero or 2 π overall variation.

  3. Phase-Shift Control of Resonant Frequencies of Magnetostatic Wave Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Takuro; Nakazawa, Hiroaki

    1994-05-01

    We discuss a possible technique to control the resonant frequencies of a straight-edge magnetostatic wave (MSW) resonator without changing the external applied magnetic field and the circuit parameters of a feedback load circuit. The method is to use two additional microstrip electrodes at the edges of the resonator and two varactor diodes connected in series. Upon varying the bias voltages to the varactor diodes, the input admittance at the center electrode can be changed. Theoretical investigation reveals that very large resonant frequency shifts can be obtained by changing only the bias voltage change to the varactor diodes, which may be useful in mobile telephone applications in the gigaherz frequency range.

  4. The first accurate description of an aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Wilfried

    2006-12-01

    As technology has advanced, the scientific study of auroral phenomena has increased by leaps and bounds. A look back at the earliest descriptions of aurorae offers an interesting look into how medieval scholars viewed the subjects that we study.Although there are earlier fragmentary references in the literature, the first accurate description of the aurora borealis appears to be that published by the German Catholic scholar Konrad von Megenberg (1309-1374) in his book Das Buch der Natur (The Book of Nature). The book was written between 1349 and 1350.

  5. Are Kohn-Sham conductances accurate?

    PubMed

    Mera, H; Niquet, Y M

    2010-11-19

    We use Fermi-liquid relations to address the accuracy of conductances calculated from the single-particle states of exact Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory. We demonstrate a systematic failure of this procedure for the calculation of the conductance, and show how it originates from the lack of renormalization in the KS spectral function. In certain limits this failure can lead to a large overestimation of the true conductance. We also show, however, that the KS conductances can be accurate for single-channel molecular junctions and systems where direct Coulomb interactions are strongly dominant. PMID:21231333

  6. Accurate density functional thermochemistry for larger molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavachari, K.; Stefanov, B. B.; Curtiss, L. A.; Lucent Tech.

    1997-06-20

    Density functional methods are combined with isodesmic bond separation reaction energies to yield accurate thermochemistry for larger molecules. Seven different density functionals are assessed for the evaluation of heats of formation, Delta H 0 (298 K), for a test set of 40 molecules composed of H, C, O and N. The use of bond separation energies results in a dramatic improvement in the accuracy of all the density functionals. The B3-LYP functional has the smallest mean absolute deviation from experiment (1.5 kcal mol/f).

  7. New law requires 'medically accurate' lesson plans.

    PubMed

    1999-09-17

    The California Legislature has passed a bill requiring all textbooks and materials used to teach about AIDS be medically accurate and objective. Statements made within the curriculum must be supported by research conducted in compliance with scientific methods, and published in peer-reviewed journals. Some of the current lesson plans were found to contain scientifically unsupported and biased information. In addition, the bill requires material to be "free of racial, ethnic, or gender biases." The legislation is supported by a wide range of interests, but opposed by the California Right to Life Education Fund, because they believe it discredits abstinence-only material. PMID:11366835

  8. Numerical and experimental studies of coupling-induced phase shift in resonator and interferometric integrated optics devices.

    PubMed

    Tobing, L Y M; Tjahjana, L; Darmawan, S; Zhang, D H

    2012-02-27

    Coupling induced effects are higher order effects inherent in waveguide evanescent coupling that are known to spectrally distort optical performances of integrated optics devices formed by coupled resonators. We present both numerical and experimental studies of coupling-induced phase shift in various basic integrated optics devices. Rigorous finite difference time domain simulations and systematic experimental characterizations of different basic structures were conducted for more accurate parameter extraction, where it can be observed that coupling induced wave vector may change sign at the increasing gap separation. The devices characterized in this work were fabricated by CMOS-process 193 nm Deep UV (DUV) lithography in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology. PMID:22418385

  9. Effective resonant stability of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhotka, Christoph; Sansottera, Marco; Lemaitre, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Mercury is the unique known planet that is situated in a 3:2 spin-orbit resonance nowadays. Observations and models converge to the same conclusion: the planet is presently deeply trapped in the resonance and situated at the Cassini state 1, or very close to it. We investigate the complete non-linear stability of this equilibrium, with respect to several physical parameters, in the framework of Birkhoff normal form and Nekhoroshev stability theory. We use the same approach adopted for the 1:1 spin-orbit case, published in Sansottera et al. (2014), with a peculiar attention to the role of Mercury's non negligible eccentricity. The selected parameters are the polar moment of inertia, the Mercury's inclination and eccentricity and the precession rates of the perihelion and node. Our study produces a bound to both the latitudinal and longitudinal librations (of 0.1 radians) for a long but finite time (greatly exceeding the age of the solar system). This is the so-called effective stability time. Our conclusion is that Mercury, placed inside the 3:2 spin-orbit resonance, occupies a very stable position in the space of these physical parameters, but not the most stable possible one.

  10. Cavity- and waveguide-resonators in electron paramagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Webb, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Cavity resonators are widely used in electron paramagnetic resonance, very high field magnetic resonance microimaging and also in high field human imaging. The basic principles and designs of different forms of cavity resonators including rectangular, cylindrical, re-entrant, cavity magnetrons, toroidal cavities and dielectric resonators are reviewed. Applications in EPR and MRI are summarized, and finally the topic of traveling wave MRI using the magnet bore as a waveguide is discussed. PMID:25456314

  11. Accurate basis set truncation for wavefunction embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Taylor A.; Goodpaster, Jason D.; Manby, Frederick R.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2013-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) provides a formally exact framework for performing embedded subsystem electronic structure calculations, including DFT-in-DFT and wavefunction theory-in-DFT descriptions. In the interest of efficiency, it is desirable to truncate the atomic orbital basis set in which the subsystem calculation is performed, thus avoiding high-order scaling with respect to the size of the MO virtual space. In this study, we extend a recently introduced projection-based embedding method [F. R. Manby, M. Stella, J. D. Goodpaster, and T. F. Miller III, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2564 (2012)], 10.1021/ct300544e to allow for the systematic and accurate truncation of the embedded subsystem basis set. The approach is applied to both covalently and non-covalently bound test cases, including water clusters and polypeptide chains, and it is demonstrated that errors associated with basis set truncation are controllable to well within chemical accuracy. Furthermore, we show that this approach allows for switching between accurate projection-based embedding and DFT embedding with approximate kinetic energy (KE) functionals; in this sense, the approach provides a means of systematically improving upon the use of approximate KE functionals in DFT embedding.

  12. Accurate radiative transfer calculations for layered media.

    PubMed

    Selden, Adrian C

    2016-07-01

    Simple yet accurate results for radiative transfer in layered media with discontinuous refractive index are obtained by the method of K-integrals. These are certain weighted integrals applied to the angular intensity distribution at the refracting boundaries. The radiative intensity is expressed as the sum of the asymptotic angular intensity distribution valid in the depth of the scattering medium and a transient term valid near the boundary. Integrated boundary equations are obtained, yielding simple linear equations for the intensity coefficients, enabling the angular emission intensity and the diffuse reflectance (albedo) and transmittance of the scattering layer to be calculated without solving the radiative transfer equation directly. Examples are given of half-space, slab, interface, and double-layer calculations, and extensions to multilayer systems are indicated. The K-integral method is orders of magnitude more accurate than diffusion theory and can be applied to layered scattering media with a wide range of scattering albedos, with potential applications to biomedical and ocean optics. PMID:27409700

  13. Fast and accurate propagation of coherent light

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, R. D.; Beylkin, G.; Monzón, L.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a fast algorithm to propagate, for any user-specified accuracy, a time-harmonic electromagnetic field between two parallel planes separated by a linear, isotropic and homogeneous medium. The analytical formulation of this problem (ca 1897) requires the evaluation of the so-called Rayleigh–Sommerfeld integral. If the distance between the planes is small, this integral can be accurately evaluated in the Fourier domain; if the distance is very large, it can be accurately approximated by asymptotic methods. In the large intermediate region of practical interest, where the oscillatory Rayleigh–Sommerfeld kernel must be applied directly, current numerical methods can be highly inaccurate without indicating this fact to the user. In our approach, for any user-specified accuracy ϵ>0, we approximate the kernel by a short sum of Gaussians with complex-valued exponents, and then efficiently apply the result to the input data using the unequally spaced fast Fourier transform. The resulting algorithm has computational complexity , where we evaluate the solution on an N×N grid of output points given an M×M grid of input samples. Our algorithm maintains its accuracy throughout the computational domain. PMID:24204184

  14. Accurate shear measurement with faint sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Foucaud, Sebastien; Luo, Wentao E-mail: walt@shao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    For cosmic shear to become an accurate cosmological probe, systematic errors in the shear measurement method must be unambiguously identified and corrected for. Previous work of this series has demonstrated that cosmic shears can be measured accurately in Fourier space in the presence of background noise and finite pixel size, without assumptions on the morphologies of galaxy and PSF. The remaining major source of error is source Poisson noise, due to the finiteness of source photon number. This problem is particularly important for faint galaxies in space-based weak lensing measurements, and for ground-based images of short exposure times. In this work, we propose a simple and rigorous way of removing the shear bias from the source Poisson noise. Our noise treatment can be generalized for images made of multiple exposures through MultiDrizzle. This is demonstrated with the SDSS and COSMOS/ACS data. With a large ensemble of mock galaxy images of unrestricted morphologies, we show that our shear measurement method can achieve sub-percent level accuracy even for images of signal-to-noise ratio less than 5 in general, making it the most promising technique for cosmic shear measurement in the ongoing and upcoming large scale galaxy surveys.

  15. Accurate pose estimation for forensic identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merckx, Gert; Hermans, Jeroen; Vandermeulen, Dirk

    2010-04-01

    In forensic authentication, one aims to identify the perpetrator among a series of suspects or distractors. A fundamental problem in any recognition system that aims for identification of subjects in a natural scene is the lack of constrains on viewing and imaging conditions. In forensic applications, identification proves even more challenging, since most surveillance footage is of abysmal quality. In this context, robust methods for pose estimation are paramount. In this paper we will therefore present a new pose estimation strategy for very low quality footage. Our approach uses 3D-2D registration of a textured 3D face model with the surveillance image to obtain accurate far field pose alignment. Starting from an inaccurate initial estimate, the technique uses novel similarity measures based on the monogenic signal to guide a pose optimization process. We will illustrate the descriptive strength of the introduced similarity measures by using them directly as a recognition metric. Through validation, using both real and synthetic surveillance footage, our pose estimation method is shown to be accurate, and robust to lighting changes and image degradation.

  16. Accurate determination of characteristic relative permeability curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Michael H.; Benson, Sally M.

    2015-09-01

    A recently developed technique to accurately characterize sub-core scale heterogeneity is applied to investigate the factors responsible for flowrate-dependent effective relative permeability curves measured on core samples in the laboratory. The dependency of laboratory measured relative permeability on flowrate has long been both supported and challenged by a number of investigators. Studies have shown that this apparent flowrate dependency is a result of both sub-core scale heterogeneity and outlet boundary effects. However this has only been demonstrated numerically for highly simplified models of porous media. In this paper, flowrate dependency of effective relative permeability is demonstrated using two rock cores, a Berea Sandstone and a heterogeneous sandstone from the Otway Basin Pilot Project in Australia. Numerical simulations of steady-state coreflooding experiments are conducted at a number of injection rates using a single set of input characteristic relative permeability curves. Effective relative permeability is then calculated from the simulation data using standard interpretation methods for calculating relative permeability from steady-state tests. Results show that simplified approaches may be used to determine flowrate-independent characteristic relative permeability provided flow rate is sufficiently high, and the core heterogeneity is relatively low. It is also shown that characteristic relative permeability can be determined at any typical flowrate, and even for geologically complex models, when using accurate three-dimensional models.

  17. Tunable triple Fano resonances based on multimode interference in coupled plasmonic resonator system.

    PubMed

    Li, Shilei; Zhang, Yunyun; Song, Xiaokang; Wang, Yilin; Yu, Li

    2016-07-11

    In this paper, an asymmetric plasmonic structure composed of two MIM (metal-insulator-metal) waveguides and two rectangular cavities is reported, which can support triple Fano resonances originating from three different mechanisms. And the multimode interference coupled mode theory (MICMT) including coupling phases is proposed based on single mode coupled mode theory (CMT), which is used for describing and explaining the multiple Fano resonance phenomenon in coupled plasmonic resonator systems. Just because the triple Fano resonances originate from three different mechanisms, each Fano resonance can be tuned independently or semi-independently by changing the parameters of the two rectangular cavities. Such, a narrow 'M' type of double Lorentzian-like line-shape transmission windows with the position and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) can be tuned freely is constructed by changing the parameters of the two cavities appropriately, which can find widely applications in sensors, nonlinear and slow-light devices. PMID:27410811

  18. Predicting in vivo glioma growth with the reaction diffusion equation constrained by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hormuth, David A., II; Weis, Jared A.; Barnes, Stephanie L.; Miga, Michael I.; Rericha, Erin C.; Quaranta, Vito; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2015-07-01

    Reaction-diffusion models have been widely used to model glioma growth. However, it has not been shown how accurately this model can predict future tumor status using model parameters (i.e., tumor cell diffusion and proliferation) estimated from quantitative in vivo imaging data. To this end, we used in silico studies to develop the methods needed to accurately estimate tumor specific reaction-diffusion model parameters, and then tested the accuracy with which these parameters can predict future growth. The analogous study was then performed in a murine model of glioma growth. The parameter estimation approach was tested using an in silico tumor ‘grown’ for ten days as dictated by the reaction-diffusion equation. Parameters were estimated from early time points and used to predict subsequent growth. Prediction accuracy was assessed at global (total volume and Dice value) and local (concordance correlation coefficient, CCC) levels. Guided by the in silico study, rats (n = 9) with C6 gliomas, imaged with diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, were used to evaluate the model’s accuracy for predicting in vivo tumor growth. The in silico study resulted in low global (tumor volume error <8.8%, Dice >0.92) and local (CCC values >0.80) level errors for predictions up to six days into the future. The in vivo study showed higher global (tumor volume error >11.7%, Dice <0.81) and higher local (CCC <0.33) level errors over the same time period. The in silico study shows that model parameters can be accurately estimated and used to accurately predict future tumor growth at both the global and local scale. However, the poor predictive accuracy in the experimental study suggests the reaction-diffusion equation is an incomplete description of in vivo C6 glioma biology and may require further modeling of intra-tumor interactions including segmentation of (for example) proliferative and necrotic regions.

  19. Design and manufacture of angle modulated surface plasmon resonance spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinlei; Chen, Ke; Mao, Xuefeng; Yu, Qingxu; Peng, Wei

    2015-08-01

    As an emerging biosensing technology, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) technique, characterized by high sensitivity, label-free detection and real-time monitoring, has been extensively applied in biochemical analysis, environmental monitoring and refractive index measurement. In this paper, an angle modulated SPR spectrometer with high resolution is designed and manufactured. First, according to the modeling and simulation for the SPR spectrometer, several key parameters such as the light source, the thickness of golden film and Cr film are determined. Then, an angle modulated SPR spectrometer system based on 5-layers Kretchmann prism structure is developed for biochemical analysis. System performance is tested after the SPR spectrometer established. We test the power stability of the laser first, which is up to 1.504% (5min). Different concentrations of glycerol are measured to demarcate the system. Then, we measured the deionized water ten times continuously, and a resolution of 1.5×10-5 RIU is achieved. At last, different concentrations of glucose solution are measured, and the resonance angles are used to calculate the refractive index of the glucose solutions, which is more accurate than the result of Abbe refractometer. The relationship between concentration and refractive index is presented by liner fitting.

  20. Properties of resonantly produced sterile neutrino dark matter subhaloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Bozek, Brandon; Abazajian, Kevork N.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Bullock, James S.; Garrison-Kimmel, Shea; Onorbe, Jose

    2016-03-01

    The anomalous 3.55 keV X-ray line recently detected towards a number of massive dark matter objects may be interpreted as the radiative decays of 7.1 keV mass sterile neutrino dark matter. Depending on its parameters, the sterile neutrino can range from cold to warm dark matter with small-scale suppression that differs in form from commonly adopted thermal warm dark matter. Here, we numerically investigate the subhalo properties for 7.1 keV sterile neutrino dark matter produced via the resonant Shi-Fuller mechanism. Using accurate matter power spectra, we run cosmological zoom-in simulations of a Milky Way-sized halo and explore the abundance of massive subhaloes, their radial distributions, and their internal structure. We also simulate the halo with thermal 2.0 keV warm dark matter for comparison and discuss quantitative differences. We find that the resonantly produced sterile neutrino model for the 3.55 keV line provides a good description of structures in the Local Group, including the number of satellite dwarf galaxies and their radial distribution, and largely mitigates the too-big-to-fail problem. Future searches for satellite galaxies by deep surveys, such as the Dark Energy Survey, Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, and Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope, will be a strong direct test of warm dark matter scenarios.

  1. Networks of nonlinear superconducting transmission line resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leib, M.; Deppe, F.; Marx, A.; Gross, R.; Hartmann, M. J.

    2012-07-01

    We investigate a network of coupled superconducting transmission line resonators, each of them made nonlinear with a capacitively shunted Josephson junction coupling to the odd flux modes of the resonator. The resulting eigenmode spectrum shows anticrossings between the plasma mode of the shunted junction and the odd resonator modes. Notably, we find that the combined device can inherit the complete nonlinearity of the junction, allowing for a description as a harmonic oscillator with a Kerr nonlinearity. Using a dc SQUID instead of a single junction, the nonlinearity can be tuned between 10 kHz and 4 MHz while maintaining resonance frequencies of a few gigahertz for realistic device parameters. An array of such nonlinear resonators can be considered a scalable superconducting quantum simulator for a Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian. The device would be capable of accessing the strongly correlated regime and be particularly well suited for investigating quantum many-body dynamics of interacting particles under the influence of drive and dissipation.

  2. Resonant seismic emission of subsurface objects

    SciTech Connect

    Korneev, Valeri A.

    2009-04-15

    Numerical modeling results and field data indicate that some contrasting subsurface objects (such as tunnels, caves, pipes, filled pits, and fluid-filled fractures) are capable of generating durable resonant oscillations after trapping seismic energy. These oscillations consist of surface types of circumferential waves that repeatedly propagate around the object. The resonant emission of such trapped energy occurs primarily in the form of shear body waves that can be detected by remotely placed receivers. Resonant emission reveals itself in the form of sharp resonant peaks for the late parts of the records, when all strong direct and primary reflected waves are gone. These peaks were observed in field data for a buried barrel filled with water, in 2D finite-difference modeling results, and in the exact canonical solution for a fluid-filled sphere. A computed animation for the diffraction of a plane wave upon a low-velocity elastic sphere confirms the generation of resonances by durable surface waves. Resonant emission has characteristic quasi-hyperbolic traveltime patterns on shot gathers. The inversion of these patterns can be performed in the frequency domain after muting the strong direct and primary scattered waves. Subsurface objects can be detected and imaged at a single resonance frequency without an accurate knowledge of source trigger time. The imaging of subsurface objects requires information about the shear velocity distribution in an embedding medium, which can be done interactively during inversion.

  3. Accurate Biomass Estimation via Bayesian Adaptive Sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Kevin R.; Knuth, Kevin H.; Castle, Joseph P.; Lvov, Nikolay

    2005-01-01

    The following concepts were introduced: a) Bayesian adaptive sampling for solving biomass estimation; b) Characterization of MISR Rahman model parameters conditioned upon MODIS landcover. c) Rigorous non-parametric Bayesian approach to analytic mixture model determination. d) Unique U.S. asset for science product validation and verification.

  4. Novel Cortical Thickness Pattern for Accurate Detection of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weihao; Yao, Zhijun; Hu, Bin; Gao, Xiang; Cai, Hanshu; Moore, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Brain network occupies an important position in representing abnormalities in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Currently, most studies only focused on morphological features of regions of interest without exploring the interregional alterations. In order to investigate the potential discriminative power of a morphological network in AD diagnosis and to provide supportive evidence on the feasibility of an individual structural network study, we propose a novel approach of extracting the correlative features from magnetic resonance imaging, which consists of a two-step approach for constructing an individual thickness network with low computational complexity. Firstly, multi-distance combination is utilized for accurate evaluation of between-region dissimilarity; and then the dissimilarity is transformed to connectivity via calculation of correlation function. An evaluation of the proposed approach has been conducted with 189 normal controls, 198 MCI subjects, and 163 AD patients using machine learning techniques. Results show that the observed correlative feature suggests significant promotion in classification performance compared with cortical thickness, with accuracy of 89.88% and area of 0.9588 under receiver operating characteristic curve. We further improved the performance by integrating both thickness and apolipoprotein E ɛ4 allele information with correlative features. New achieved accuracies are 92.11% and 79.37% in separating AD from normal controls and AD converters from non-converters, respectively. Differences between using diverse distance measurements and various correlation transformation functions are also discussed to explore an optimal way for network establishment. PMID:26444768

  5. Generating Facial Expressions Using an Anatomically Accurate Biomechanical Model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tim; Hung, Alice; Mithraratne, Kumar

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a computational framework for modelling the biomechanics of human facial expressions. A detailed high-order (Cubic-Hermite) finite element model of the human head was constructed using anatomical data segmented from magnetic resonance images. The model includes a superficial soft-tissue continuum consisting of skin, the subcutaneous layer and the superficial Musculo-Aponeurotic system. Embedded within this continuum mesh, are 20 pairs of facial muscles which drive facial expressions. These muscles were treated as transversely-isotropic and their anatomical geometries and fibre orientations were accurately depicted. In order to capture the relative composition of muscles and fat, material heterogeneity was also introduced into the model. Complex contact interactions between the lips, eyelids, and between superficial soft tissue continuum and deep rigid skeletal bones were also computed. In addition, this paper investigates the impact of incorporating material heterogeneity and contact interactions, which are often neglected in similar studies. Four facial expressions were simulated using the developed model and the results were compared with surface data obtained from a 3D structured-light scanner. Predicted expressions showed good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:26355331

  6. Fast and Accurate Construction of Confidence Intervals for Heritability.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Regev; Kaufman, Shachar; Laaksonen, Reijo; Kleber, Marcus E; März, Winfried; Eskin, Eleazar; Rosset, Saharon; Halperin, Eran

    2016-06-01

    Estimation of heritability is fundamental in genetic studies. Recently, heritability estimation using linear mixed models (LMMs) has gained popularity because these estimates can be obtained from unrelated individuals collected in genome-wide association studies. Typically, heritability estimation under LMMs uses the restricted maximum likelihood (REML) approach. Existing methods for the construction of confidence intervals and estimators of SEs for REML rely on asymptotic properties. However, these assumptions are often violated because of the bounded parameter space, statistical dependencies, and limited sample size, leading to biased estimates and inflated or deflated confidence intervals. Here, we show that the estimation of confidence intervals by state-of-the-art methods is inaccurate, especially when the true heritability is relatively low or relatively high. We further show that these inaccuracies occur in datasets including thousands of individuals. Such biases are present, for example, in estimates of heritability of gene expression in the Genotype-Tissue Expression project and of lipid profiles in the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health study. We also show that often the probability that the genetic component is estimated as 0 is high even when the true heritability is bounded away from 0, emphasizing the need for accurate confidence intervals. We propose a computationally efficient method, ALBI (accurate LMM-based heritability bootstrap confidence intervals), for estimating the distribution of the heritability estimator and for constructing accurate confidence intervals. Our method can be used as an add-on to existing methods for estimating heritability and variance components, such as GCTA, FaST-LMM, GEMMA, or EMMAX. PMID:27259052

  7. Electron paramagnetic resonance of Cr3+ in near-stoichiometric LiTaO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyo-Menoyo, M.; Keeble, D. J.; Furukawa, Y.; Kitamura, K.

    2005-06-01

    Electron-paramagnetic-resonance (EPR) experiments on the dominant Cr3+ center in near-stoichiometric LiTaO3 crystals, grown by the double crucible Czochralski method, are reported. A near complete roadmap of EPR positions was obtained allowing an accurate determination of the spin-Hamiltonian parameters. Newman superposition model calculations of zero-field splitting term were performed and support the model of Cr3+ incorporation within the Li octahedron. Calculations were also made for Cr3+ in LiNbO3, again good agreement with a Li site model was obtained for the main EPR center. The temperature dependence of the zero-field splitting parameter for Cr3+ in LiTaO3 was found to show anomalous behavior in the region of 40 K, suggesting the presence local structural instability at the ion site.

  8. Probing molecular geometry of solids by nuclear magnetic resonance spin exchange at the n=0 rotational-resonance condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekely, Piotr; Gardiennet, Carole; Potrzebowski, Marek J.; Sebald, Angelika; Reichert, Detlef; Luz, Zeev

    2002-05-01

    Exploration of the molecular geometry in rotating powder solids on the basis of magnetization exchange between spins with identical isotropic chemical shifts but differing chemical shielding tensor orientations is demonstrated experimentally. For this we take advantage of the potential of the ODESSA (one-dimensional exchange spectroscopy by sidebands alternation) experiment for the accurate measurement of spin exchange rate constants. We also report the observation of oscillatory behavior of the rotor-driven magnetization exchange at this so-called n=0 rotational-resonance condition which, in contrast to n=1,2,3,… rotational-resonance conditions, takes place at nearly arbitrary magic-angle spinning frequencies. The sensitivity of the longitudinal exchange decays to the relevant physical parameters of the spin system under conditions of rotor-driven and proton-driven magnetization exchange is discussed theoretically and demonstrated experimentally. Several 13C and 31P spin-exchange measurements have been performed on a series of model compounds covering a broad range of internuclear distances between carboxyl carbon atoms, and on a series of phosphorylated amino acids with different internuclear distances between phosphorus sites. The capacity of the ODESSA experiment for an unambiguous recognition of distinct internuclear distances is demonstrated. Potential applications of such measurements involve the exploration of intermolecular distances and the determination of the mutual orientation of neighboring molecular fragments in polycrystalline and noncrystalline solids.

  9. Efficient determination of accurate atomic polarizabilities for polarizeable embedding calculations.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Heiner; Schwabe, Tobias

    2016-08-15

    We evaluate embedding potentials, obtained via various methods, used for polarizable embedding computations of excitation energies of para-nitroaniline in water and organic solvents as well as of the green fluorescent protein. We found that isotropic polarizabilities derived from DFTD3 dispersion coefficients correlate well with those obtained via the LoProp method. We show that these polarizabilities in conjunction with appropriately derived point charges are in good agreement with calculations employing static multipole moments up to quadrupoles and anisotropic polarizabilities for both computed systems. The (partial) use of these easily-accessible parameters drastically reduces the computational effort to obtain accurate embedding potentials especially for proteins. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27317509

  10. Fast and accurate automated cell boundary determination for fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, Stephen Hugo; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Tseng, Yiider

    2013-07-01

    Detailed measurement of cell phenotype information from digital fluorescence images has the potential to greatly advance biomedicine in various disciplines such as patient diagnostics or drug screening. Yet, the complexity of cell conformations presents a major barrier preventing effective determination of cell boundaries, and introduces measurement error that propagates throughout subsequent assessment of cellular parameters and statistical analysis. State-of-the-art image segmentation techniques that require user-interaction, prolonged computation time and specialized training cannot adequately provide the support for high content platforms, which often sacrifice resolution to foster the speedy collection of massive amounts of cellular data. This work introduces a strategy that allows us to rapidly obtain accurate cell boundaries from digital fluorescent images in an automated format. Hence, this new method has broad applicability to promote biotechnology.

  11. On constructing accurate approximations of first integrals for difference equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafei, M.; Van Horssen, W. T.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, a perturbation method based on invariance factors and multiple scales will be presented for weakly nonlinear, regularly perturbed systems of ordinary difference equations. Asymptotic approximations of first integrals will be constructed on long iteration-scales, that is, on iteration-scales of order ɛ-1, where ɛ is a small parameter. It will be shown that all invariance factors have to satisfy a functional equation. To show how this perturbation method works, the method is applied to a Van der Pol equation, and a Rayleigh equation. It will be explicitly shown for the first time in the literature how these multiple scales should be introduced for systems of difference equations to obtain very accurate approximations of first integrals on long iteration-scales.

  12. Highly Accurate Inverse Consistent Registration: A Robust Approach

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Martin; Rosas, H. Diana; Fischl, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    The registration of images is a task that is at the core of many applications in computer vision. In computational neuroimaging where the automated segmentation of brain structures is frequently used to quantify change, a highly accurate registration is necessary for motion correction of images taken in the same session, or across time in longitudinal studies where changes in the images can be expected. This paper, inspired by Nestares and Heeger (2000), presents a method based on robust statistics to register images in the presence of differences, such as jaw movement, differential MR distortions and true anatomical change. The approach we present guarantees inverse consistency (symmetry), can deal with different intensity scales and automatically estimates a sensitivity parameter to detect outlier regions in the images. The resulting registrations are highly accurate due to their ability to ignore outlier regions and show superior robustness with respect to noise, to intensity scaling and outliers when compared to state-of-the-art registration tools such as FLIRT (in FSL) or the coregistration tool in SPM. PMID:20637289

  13. Accurate estimation of sigma(exp 0) using AIRSAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holecz, Francesco; Rignot, Eric

    1995-01-01

    During recent years signature analysis, classification, and modeling of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data as well as estimation of geophysical parameters from SAR data have received a great deal of interest. An important requirement for the quantitative use of SAR data is the accurate estimation of the backscattering coefficient sigma(exp 0). In terrain with relief variations radar signals are distorted due to the projection of the scene topography into the slant range-Doppler plane. The effect of these variations is to change the physical size of the scattering area, leading to errors in the radar backscatter values and incidence angle. For this reason the local incidence angle, derived from sensor position and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data must always be considered. Especially in the airborne case, the antenna gain pattern can be an additional source of radiometric error, because the radar look angle is not known precisely as a result of the the aircraft motions and the local surface topography. Consequently, radiometric distortions due to the antenna gain pattern must also be corrected for each resolution cell, by taking into account aircraft displacements (position and attitude) and position of the backscatter element, defined by the DEM data. In this paper, a method to derive an accurate estimation of the backscattering coefficient using NASA/JPL AIRSAR data is presented. The results are evaluated in terms of geometric accuracy, radiometric variations of sigma(exp 0), and precision of the estimated forest biomass.

  14. An accurate model potential for alkali neon systems.

    PubMed

    Zanuttini, D; Jacquet, E; Giglio, E; Douady, J; Gervais, B

    2009-12-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the ground and lowest excited states of M-Ne dimers, for M=Li, Na, and K. We show that the potential energy curves of these Van der Waals dimers can be obtained accurately by considering the alkali neon systems as one-electron systems. Following previous authors, the model describes the evolution of the alkali valence electron in the combined potentials of the alkali and neon cores by means of core polarization pseudopotentials. The key parameter for an accurate model is the M(+)-Ne potential energy curve, which was obtained by means of ab initio CCSD(T) calculation using a large basis set. For each MNe dimer, a systematic comparison with ab initio computation of the potential energy curve for the X, A, and B states shows the remarkable accuracy of the model. The vibrational analysis and the comparison with existing experimental data strengthens this conclusion and allows for a precise assignment of the vibrational levels. PMID:19968334

  15. Quality metric for accurate overlay control in <20nm nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Dana; Amit, Eran; Cohen, Guy; Amir, Nuriel; Har-Zvi, Michael; Huang, Chin-Chou Kevin; Karur-Shanmugam, Ramkumar; Pierson, Bill; Kato, Cindy; Kurita, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-01

    The semiconductor industry is moving toward 20nm nodes and below. As the Overlay (OVL) budget is getting tighter at these advanced nodes, the importance in the accuracy in each nanometer of OVL error is critical. When process owners select OVL targets and methods for their process, they must do it wisely; otherwise the reported OVL could be inaccurate, resulting in yield loss. The same problem can occur when the target sampling map is chosen incorrectly, consisting of asymmetric targets that will cause biased correctable terms and a corrupted wafer. Total measurement uncertainty (TMU) is the main parameter that process owners use when choosing an OVL target per layer. Going towards the 20nm nodes and below, TMU will not be enough for accurate OVL control. KLA-Tencor has introduced a quality score named `Qmerit' for its imaging based OVL (IBO) targets, which is obtained on the-fly for each OVL measurement point in X & Y. This Qmerit score will enable the process owners to select compatible targets which provide accurate OVL values for their process and thereby improve their yield. Together with K-T Analyzer's ability to detect the symmetric targets across the wafer and within the field, the Archer tools will continue to provide an independent, reliable measurement of OVL error into the next advanced nodes, enabling fabs to manufacture devices that meet their tight OVL error budgets.

  16. Accurate Thermal Stresses for Beams: Normal Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Pilkey, Walter D.

    2003-01-01

    Formulations for a general theory of thermoelasticity to generate accurate thermal stresses for structural members of aeronautical vehicles were developed in 1954 by Boley. The formulation also provides three normal stresses and a shear stress along the entire length of the beam. The Poisson effect of the lateral and transverse normal stresses on a thermally loaded beam is taken into account in this theory by employing an Airy stress function. The Airy stress function enables the reduction of the three-dimensional thermal stress problem to a two-dimensional one. Numerical results from the general theory of thermoelasticity are compared to those obtained from strength of materials. It is concluded that the theory of thermoelasticity for prismatic beams proposed in this paper can be used instead of strength of materials when precise stress results are desired.

  17. Accurate Thermal Stresses for Beams: Normal Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Pilkey, Walter D.

    2002-01-01

    Formulations for a general theory of thermoelasticity to generate accurate thermal stresses for structural members of aeronautical vehicles were developed in 1954 by Boley. The formulation also provides three normal stresses and a shear stress along the entire length of the beam. The Poisson effect of the lateral and transverse normal stresses on a thermally loaded beam is taken into account in this theory by employing an Airy stress function. The Airy stress function enables the reduction of the three-dimensional thermal stress problem to a two-dimensional one. Numerical results from the general theory of thermoelasticity are compared to those obtained from strength of materials. It is concluded that the theory of thermoelasticity for prismatic beams proposed in this paper can be used instead of strength of materials when precise stress results are desired.

  18. Highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Jokiel, Jr., Bernhard; Ensz, Mark T.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-12-30

    Disclosed is a highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine, comprising a revolute joint, comprising a circular encoder wheel, having an axis of rotation; a plurality of marks disposed around at least a portion of the circumference of the encoder wheel; bearing means for supporting the encoder wheel, while permitting free rotation of the encoder wheel about the wheel's axis of rotation; and a sensor, rigidly attached to the bearing means, for detecting the motion of at least some of the marks as the encoder wheel rotates; a probe arm, having a proximal end rigidly attached to the encoder wheel, and having a distal end with a probe tip attached thereto; and coordinate processing means, operatively connected to the sensor, for converting the output of the sensor into a set of cylindrical coordinates representing the position of the probe tip relative to a reference cylindrical coordinate system.

  19. Practical aspects of spatially high accurate methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfrey, Andrew G.; Mitchell, Curtis R.; Walters, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    The computational qualities of high order spatially accurate methods for the finite volume solution of the Euler equations are presented. Two dimensional essentially non-oscillatory (ENO), k-exact, and 'dimension by dimension' ENO reconstruction operators are discussed and compared in terms of reconstruction and solution accuracy, computational cost and oscillatory behavior in supersonic flows with shocks. Inherent steady state convergence difficulties are demonstrated for adaptive stencil algorithms. An exact solution to the heat equation is used to determine reconstruction error, and the computational intensity is reflected in operation counts. Standard MUSCL differencing is included for comparison. Numerical experiments presented include the Ringleb flow for numerical accuracy and a shock reflection problem. A vortex-shock interaction demonstrates the ability of the ENO scheme to excel in simulating unsteady high-frequency flow physics.

  20. The thermodynamic cost of accurate sensory adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Yuhai

    2015-03-01

    Living organisms need to obtain and process environment information accurately in order to make decisions critical for their survival. Much progress have been made in identifying key components responsible for various biological functions, however, major challenges remain to understand system-level behaviors from the molecular-level knowledge of biology and to unravel possible physical principles for the underlying biochemical circuits. In this talk, we will present some recent works in understanding the chemical sensory system of E. coli by combining theoretical approaches with quantitative experiments. We focus on addressing the questions on how cells process chemical information and adapt to varying environment, and what are the thermodynamic limits of key regulatory functions, such as adaptation.

  1. Accurate numerical solutions of conservative nonlinear oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Najeeb Alam; Nasir Uddin, Khan; Nadeem Alam, Khan

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to present an investigation to analyze the vibration of a conservative nonlinear oscillator in the form u" + lambda u + u^(2n-1) + (1 + epsilon^2 u^(4m))^(1/2) = 0 for any arbitrary power of n and m. This method converts the differential equation to sets of algebraic equations and solve numerically. We have presented for three different cases: a higher order Duffing equation, an equation with irrational restoring force and a plasma physics equation. It is also found that the method is valid for any arbitrary order of n and m. Comparisons have been made with the results found in the literature the method gives accurate results.

  2. Accurate Telescope Mount Positioning with MEMS Accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, L.; Jaskó, A.; Pál, A.; Csépány, G.

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes the advantages and challenges of applying microelectromechanical accelerometer systems (MEMS accelerometers) in order to attain precise, accurate, and stateless positioning of telescope mounts. This provides a completely independent method from other forms of electronic, optical, mechanical or magnetic feedback or real-time astrometry. Our goal is to reach the subarcminute range which is considerably smaller than the field-of-view of conventional imaging telescope systems. Here we present how this subarcminute accuracy can be achieved with very cheap MEMS sensors and we also detail how our procedures can be extended in order to attain even finer measurements. In addition, our paper discusses how can a complete system design be implemented in order to be a part of a telescope control system.

  3. Accurate metacognition for visual sensory memory representations.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Annelinde R E; Sligte, Ilja G; Barrett, Adam B; Seth, Anil K; Fahrenfort, Johannes J; Lamme, Victor A F

    2014-04-01

    The capacity to attend to multiple objects in the visual field is limited. However, introspectively, people feel that they see the whole visual world at once. Some scholars suggest that this introspective feeling is based on short-lived sensory memory representations, whereas others argue that the feeling of seeing more than can be attended to is illusory. Here, we investigated this phenomenon by combining objective memory performance with subjective confidence ratings during a change-detection task. This allowed us to compute a measure of metacognition--the degree of knowledge that subjects have about the correctness of their decisions--for different stages of memory. We show that subjects store more objects in sensory memory than they can attend to but, at the same time, have similar metacognition for sensory memory and working memory representations. This suggests that these subjective impressions are not an illusion but accurate reflections of the richness of visual perception. PMID:24549293

  4. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Douglas D.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperaes in the range of about 1800.degree. to 2700.degree. C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  5. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, D.D.

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperatures in the range of about 1800/sup 0/ to 2700/sup 0/C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  6. The importance of accurate atmospheric modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Dylan; Schroeder, John; Liang, Pang

    2014-11-01

    This paper will focus on the effect of atmospheric conditions on EO sensor performance using computer models. We have shown the importance of accurately modeling atmospheric effects for predicting the performance of an EO sensor. A simple example will demonstrated how real conditions for several sites in China will significantly impact on image correction, hyperspectral imaging, and remote sensing. The current state-of-the-art model for computing atmospheric transmission and radiance is, MODTRAN® 5, developed by the US Air Force Research Laboratory and Spectral Science, Inc. Research by the US Air Force, Navy and Army resulted in the public release of LOWTRAN 2 in the early 1970's. Subsequent releases of LOWTRAN and MODTRAN® have continued until the present. Please verify that (1) all pages are present, (2) all figures are correct, (3) all fonts and special characters are correct, and (4) all text and figures fit within the red margin lines shown on this review document. Complete formatting information is available at http://SPIE.org/manuscripts Return to the Manage Active Submissions page at http://spie.org/submissions/tasks.aspx and approve or disapprove this submission. Your manuscript will not be published without this approval. Please contact author_help@spie.org with any questions or concerns. The paper will demonstrate the importance of using validated models and local measured meteorological, atmospheric and aerosol conditions to accurately simulate the atmospheric transmission and radiance. Frequently default conditions are used which can produce errors of as much as 75% in these values. This can have significant impact on remote sensing applications.

  7. The high cost of accurate knowledge.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Kathleen M; Weber, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    Many business thinkers believe it's the role of senior managers to scan the external environment to monitor contingencies and constraints, and to use that precise knowledge to modify the company's strategy and design. As these thinkers see it, managers need accurate and abundant information to carry out that role. According to that logic, it makes sense to invest heavily in systems for collecting and organizing competitive information. Another school of pundits contends that, since today's complex information often isn't precise anyway, it's not worth going overboard with such investments. In other words, it's not the accuracy and abundance of information that should matter most to top executives--rather, it's how that information is interpreted. After all, the role of senior managers isn't just to make decisions; it's to set direction and motivate others in the face of ambiguities and conflicting demands. Top executives must interpret information and communicate those interpretations--they must manage meaning more than they must manage information. So which of these competing views is the right one? Research conducted by academics Sutcliffe and Weber found that how accurate senior executives are about their competitive environments is indeed less important for strategy and corresponding organizational changes than the way in which they interpret information about their environments. Investments in shaping those interpretations, therefore, may create a more durable competitive advantage than investments in obtaining and organizing more information. And what kinds of interpretations are most closely linked with high performance? Their research suggests that high performers respond positively to opportunities, yet they aren't overconfident in their abilities to take advantage of those opportunities. PMID:12747164

  8. Accurate Weather Forecasting for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddalena, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    The NRAO Green Bank Telescope routinely observes at wavelengths from 3 mm to 1 m. As with all mm-wave telescopes, observing conditions depend upon the variable atmospheric water content. The site provides over 100 days/yr when opacities are low enough for good observing at 3 mm, but winds on the open-air structure reduce the time suitable for 3-mm observing where pointing is critical. Thus, to maximum productivity the observing wavelength needs to match weather conditions. For 6 years the telescope has used a dynamic scheduling system (recently upgraded; www.gb.nrao.edu/DSS) that requires accurate multi-day forecasts for winds and opacities. Since opacity forecasts are not provided by the National Weather Services (NWS), I have developed an automated system that takes available forecasts, derives forecasted opacities, and deploys the results on the web in user-friendly graphical overviews (www.gb.nrao.edu/ rmaddale/Weather). The system relies on the "North American Mesoscale" models, which are updated by the NWS every 6 hrs, have a 12 km horizontal resolution, 1 hr temporal resolution, run to 84 hrs, and have 60 vertical layers that extend to 20 km. Each forecast consists of a time series of ground conditions, cloud coverage, etc, and, most importantly, temperature, pressure, humidity as a function of height. I use the Liebe's MWP model (Radio Science, 20, 1069, 1985) to determine the absorption in each layer for each hour for 30 observing wavelengths. Radiative transfer provides, for each hour and wavelength, the total opacity and the radio brightness of the atmosphere, which contributes substantially at some wavelengths to Tsys and the observational noise. Comparisons of measured and forecasted Tsys at 22.2 and 44 GHz imply that the forecasted opacities are good to about 0.01 Nepers, which is sufficient for forecasting and accurate calibration. Reliability is high out to 2 days and degrades slowly for longer-range forecasts.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Hash, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) affords high-resolution visualization of the soft tissue structures (menisci, ligaments, cartilage, etc) and bone marrow of the knee. Evidence Acquisition: Pertinent clinical and research articles in the orthopaedic and radiology literature over the past 30 years using PubMed. Results: Ligament tears can be accurately assessed with MRI, but distinguishing partial tears from ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) can be challenging. Determining the extent of a partial tear is often extremely difficult to accurately assess. The status of the posterolateral corner structures, menisci, and cartilage can be accurately evaluated, although limitations in the evaluation of certain structures exist. Patellofemoral joint, marrow, tibiofibular joint, and synovial pathology can supplement physical examination findings and provide definitive diagnosis. Conclusions: MRI provides an accurate noninvasive assessment of knee pathology. PMID:24381701

  10. Subwavelength resonant nanostructured films for sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Edwards, Daniel L.; Mendoza, Albert

    2013-05-29

    We present a novel subwavelength nanostructure architecture that may be utilized for optical standoff sensing applications. The subwavelength structures are fabricated via a combination of nanoimprint lithography and metal sputtering to create metallic nanostructured films encased within a transparent media. The structures are based on the open ring resonator (ORR) architecture and have their analog in resonant LC circuits, which display a resonance frequency that is inversely proportional to the square root of the product of the inductance and capacitance. Therefore, any perturbation of the nanostructured films due to chemical or environmental effects can alter the inductive or capacitive behavior of the subwavelength features, which can shift the resonant frequency and provide an indication of the external stimulus. This shift in resonance can be interrogated remotely either actively using either laser illumination or passively using hyperspectral or multispectral sensing. These structures may be designed to be either anisotropic or isotropic, which can also provide polarization-sensitive interrogation. Due to the nanometer-scale of the structures, they can be tailored to be optically responsive in the visible or near infrared spectrum with a highly reflective resonant peak that is dependent solely on structural dimensions and material characteristics. We present experimental measurements of the optical response of these structures as a function of wavelength, polarization, and incident angle demonstrating the resonant effect in the near infrared region. Numerical modeling data showing the effect of different fabrication parameters such as structure parameters are also discussed.

  11. Parameters for burst detection

    PubMed Central

    Bakkum, Douglas J.; Radivojevic, Milos; Frey, Urs; Franke, Felix; Hierlemann, Andreas; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    Bursts of action potentials within neurons and throughout networks are believed to serve roles in how neurons handle and store information, both in vivo and in vitro. Accurate detection of burst occurrences and durations are therefore crucial for many studies. A number of algorithms have been proposed to do so, but a standard method has not been adopted. This is due, in part, to many algorithms requiring the adjustment of multiple ad-hoc parameters and further post-hoc criteria in order to produce satisfactory results. Here, we broadly catalog existing approaches and present a new approach requiring the selection of only a single parameter: the number of spikes N comprising the smallest burst to consider. A burst was identified if N spikes occurred in less than T ms, where the threshold T was automatically determined from observing a probability distribution of inter-spike-intervals. Performance was compared vs. different classes of detectors on data gathered from in vitro neuronal networks grown over microelectrode arrays. Our approach offered a number of useful features including: a simple implementation, no need for ad-hoc or post-hoc criteria, and precise assignment of burst boundary time points. Unlike existing approaches, detection was not biased toward larger bursts, allowing identification and analysis of a greater range of neuronal and network dynamics. PMID:24567714

  12. Fano resonances in a plasmonic waveguide system composed of stub coupled with a square cavity resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binfeng, Yun; Hu, Guohua; Zhang, Ruohu; Yiping, Cui

    2016-05-01

    A coupled plasmonic waveguide resonator system which can produce sharp and asymmetric Fano resonances was proposed and analyzed. Two Fano resonances are induced by the interactions between the narrow discrete whispering gallery modes in a plasmonic square cavity resonator and the broad spectrum of the metal-insulator-metal stub resonator. The relative peak amplitudes between the 1st and 2nd order Fano resonances can be adjusted by changing the structure parameters, such as the square cavity size, the stub size and the center-to-center distance between the square cavity and the stub resonators. And the 1st order Fano resonant peak, which is a standing-wave mode, will split into two resonant peaks (one standing-wave mode and one traveling-wave mode) when it couples with the 2nd Fano resonance. Also, the potential of the proposed Fano system as an integrated slow-light device and refractive index sensor was investigated. The results show that a maximum group index of about 100 can be realized, and a linear refractive index sensitivity of 938 nm/RIU with a figure of merit of about 1.35 × 104 can be obtained.

  13. Electrochemical electron paramagnetic resonance utilizing loop gap resonators and micro-electrochemical cells.

    PubMed

    Tamski, Mika A; Macpherson, Julie V; Unwin, Patrick R; Newton, Mark E

    2015-09-28

    A miniaturised electrochemical cell design for Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) studies is reported. The cell incorporates a Loop Gap Resonator (LGR) for EPR investigation of electrochemically generated radicals in aqueous (and other large dielectric loss) samples and achieves accurate potential control for electrochemistry by using micro-wires as working electrodes. The electrochemical behaviour of the cell is analysed with COMSOL finite element models and the EPR sensitivity compared to a commercial TE011 cavity resonator using 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl (TEMPOL) as a reference. The electrochemical EPR performance is demonstrated using the reduction of methyl viologen as a redox probe in both water and acetonitrile. The data reported herein suggest that sub-micromolar concentrations of radical species can be detected in aqueous samples with accurate potential control, and that subtle solution processes coupled to electron transfer, such as comproportionation reactions, can be studied quantitatively using EPR. PMID:26291423

  14. Approaching system equilibrium with accurate or not accurate feedback information in a two-route system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-mei; Xie, Dong-fan; Li, Qi

    2015-02-01

    With the development of intelligent transport system, advanced information feedback strategies have been developed to reduce traffic congestion and enhance the capacity. However, previous strategies provide accurate information to travelers and our simulation results show that accurate information brings negative effects, especially in delay case. Because travelers prefer to the best condition route with accurate information, and delayed information cannot reflect current traffic condition but past. Then travelers make wrong routing decisions, causing the decrease of the capacity and the increase of oscillations and the system deviating from the equilibrium. To avoid the negative effect, bounded rationality is taken into account by introducing a boundedly rational threshold BR. When difference between two routes is less than the BR, routes have equal probability to be chosen. The bounded rationality is helpful to improve the efficiency in terms of capacity, oscillation and the gap deviating from the system equilibrium.

  15. Integral resonator gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor); Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Hayworth, Ken J. (Inventor); Wiberg, Dean V. (Inventor); Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention discloses an inertial sensor having an integral resonator. A typical sensor comprises a planar mechanical resonator for sensing motion of the inertial sensor and a case for housing the resonator. The resonator and a wall of the case are defined through an etching process. A typical method of producing the resonator includes etching a baseplate, bonding a wafer to the etched baseplate, through etching the wafer to form a planar mechanical resonator and the wall of the case and bonding an end cap wafer to the wall to complete the case.

  16. Automated Method for Estimating Nutation Time Constant Model Parameters for Spacecraft Spinning on Axis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Calculating an accurate nutation time constant (NTC), or nutation rate of growth, for a spinning upper stage is important for ensuring mission success. Spacecraft nutation, or wobble, is caused by energy dissipation anywhere in the system. Propellant slosh in the spacecraft fuel tanks is the primary source for this dissipation and, if it is in a state of resonance, the NTC can become short enough to violate mission constraints. The Spinning Slosh Test Rig (SSTR) is a forced-motion spin table where fluid dynamic effects in full-scale fuel tanks can be tested in order to obtain key parameters used to calculate the NTC. We accomplish this by independently varying nutation frequency versus the spin rate and measuring force and torque responses on the tank. This method was used to predict parameters for the Genesis, Contour, and Stereo missions, whose tanks were mounted outboard from the spin axis. These parameters are incorporated into a mathematical model that uses mechanical analogs, such as pendulums and rotors, to simulate the force and torque resonances associated with fluid slosh.

  17. Repeated passing principle for propagation in optical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keča, Tatjana P.; Headley, William R.; Mashanovich, Goran Z.; Matavulj, Petar S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we make comparison between a well-known theoretical model of light propagation through racetrack resonator and experimentally obtained results. Observed differences are studied and some original modifications are made in the existing model so as to achieve better alignment with experiment. The influence of several geometric parameters on racetrack's response is used for further adjustments to be performed. This procedure opens up the possibility to estimate the free spectral range and resonant wavelength for different geometric parameters and consequently to predict resonator functionality and working conditions, as well as functionality of complex photonic devices based on resonant structures.

  18. Higher order accurate partial implicitization: An unconditionally stable fourth-order-accurate explicit numerical technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, R. A., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The previously obtained second-order-accurate partial implicitization numerical technique used in the solution of fluid dynamic problems was modified with little complication to achieve fourth-order accuracy. The Von Neumann stability analysis demonstrated the unconditional linear stability of the technique. The order of the truncation error was deduced from the Taylor series expansions of the linearized difference equations and was verified by numerical solutions to Burger's equation. For comparison, results were also obtained for Burger's equation using a second-order-accurate partial-implicitization scheme, as well as the fourth-order scheme of Kreiss.

  19. Amplitude tests of direct channel resonances: The dibaryon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, G. R.; Moravosik, M. J.; Arash, F.

    1985-02-01

    A recently formulated polarization amplitude test for the existence of one-particle-exchange mechanisms is modified to deal with direct-channel resonances. The results are applied to proton-proton elastic scattering at and around 800 MeV to test the suggested existence of a dibaryon resonance. This test is sensitive to somewhat different circumstances and parameters than the methods used in the past to find dibaryon resonances. The evidence, on the basis of the SAID data set, is negative for a resonance in any singlet partial wave, but is tantalizingly subliminal for a 3F3 resonance.

  20. Amplitude tests of direct channel resonances: the dibaryon

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, G.R.; Moravcsik, M.J.; Arash, F.

    1984-02-01

    A recently formulated polarization amplitude test for the existence of one-particle-exchange mechanisms is modified to deal with direct-channel resonances. The results are applied to proton-proton elastic scattering at and around 800 MeV to test the suggested existence of a dibaryon resonance. This test is sensitive to somewhat different circumstances and parameters than the methods used in the past to find dibaryon resonances. The evidence, on the basis of the SAID data set, is negative for a resonance in any singlet partial wave, but is tantalizingly subliminal for a /sup 3/F/sub 3/ resonance. 7 refs., 4 figs.