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Sample records for accurate resonance parameters

  1. A tailored multi-frequency EPR approach to accurately determine the magnetic resonance parameters of dynamic nuclear polarization agents: application to AMUPol.

    PubMed

    Gast, P; Mance, D; Zurlo, E; Ivanov, K L; Baldus, M; Huber, M

    2017-02-01

    To understand the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhancements of biradical polarizing agents, the magnetic resonance parameters need to be known. We describe a tailored EPR approach to accurately determine electron spin-spin coupling parameters using a combination of standard (9 GHz), high (95 GHz) and ultra-high (275 GHz) frequency EPR. Comparing liquid- and frozen-solution continuous-wave EPR spectra provides accurate anisotropic dipolar interaction D and isotropic exchange interaction J parameters of the DNP biradical AMUPol. We found that D was larger by as much as 30% compared to earlier estimates, and that J is 43 MHz, whereas before it was considered to be negligible. With the refined data, quantum mechanical calculations confirm that an increase in dipolar electron-electron couplings leads to higher cross-effect DNP efficiencies. Moreover, the DNP calculations qualitatively reproduce the difference of TOTAPOL and AMUPol DNP efficiencies found experimentally and suggest that AMUPol is particularly effective in improving the DNP efficiency at magnetic fields higher than 500 MHz. The multi-frequency EPR approach will aid in predicting the optimal structures for future DNP agents.

  2. Parasitic analysis and π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke model for complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor Lamb wave resonator with accurate two-port Y-parameter characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Goh, Wang Ling; Chai, Kevin T.-C.; Mu, Xiaojing; Hong, Yan; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Je, Minkyu

    2016-04-01

    The parasitic effects from electromechanical resonance, coupling, and substrate losses were collected to derive a new two-port equivalent-circuit model for Lamb wave resonators, especially for those fabricated on silicon technology. The proposed model is a hybrid π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke (PiBVD) model that accounts for the above mentioned parasitic effects which are commonly observed in Lamb-wave resonators. It is a combination of interdigital capacitor of both plate capacitance and fringe capacitance, interdigital resistance, Ohmic losses in substrate, and the acoustic motional behavior of typical Modified Butterworth-Van Dyke (MBVD) model. In the case studies presented in this paper using two-port Y-parameters, the PiBVD model fitted significantly better than the typical MBVD model, strengthening the capability on characterizing both magnitude and phase of either Y11 or Y21. The accurate modelling on two-port Y-parameters makes the PiBVD model beneficial in the characterization of Lamb-wave resonators, providing accurate simulation to Lamb-wave resonators and oscillators.

  3. Evaluation of the Chromium Resonance Parameters Including Resonance Parameter Covariance

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, Luiz C; Derrien, Herve; Guber, Klaus H; Arbanas, Goran; Wiarda, Dorothea

    2011-01-01

    The intent of this work is to report the results and describe the procedures utilized to evaluate the chromium isotopes' cross sections, i.e., (50)Cr, (52)Cr, (53)Cr, and (54)Cr, for criticality safety applications. The evaluations were done in the resolved resonance region using the reduced Reich-Moore R-matrix formalism. The novel aspect of this evaluation is the inclusion of new transmission and capture cross-section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) for energies below 100 keV and the extension of the (53)Cr energy region. The resonance analysis was performed with the multilevel R-matrix code, SAMMY, which utilizes the generalized least-squares technique based on the Bayes' theory. Complete sets of resonance parameters and resonance parameter covariance matrices (RPCMs) were obtained for each of the chromium isotopes from the SAMMY analysis of the experimental database.

  4. Resonance parameter analysis with SAMMY

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, N.M.; Perey, F.G.

    1988-01-01

    The multilevel R-matrix computer code SAMMY has evolved over the past decade to become an important analysis tool for neutron data. SAMMY uses the Reich-Moore approximation to the multilevel R-matrix and includes an optional logarithmic parameterization of the external R-function. Doppler broadening is simulated either by numerical integration using the Gaussian approximation to the free gas model or by a more rigorous solution of the partial differential equation equivalent to the exact free gas model. Resolution broadening of cross sections and derivatives also has new options that more accurately represent the experimental situation. SAMMY treats constant normalization and some types of backgrounds directly and treats other normalizations and/or backgrounds with the introduction of user-generated partial derivatives. The code uses Bayes' method as an efficient alternative to least squares for fitting experimental data. SAMMY allows virtually any parameter to be varied and outputs values, uncertainties, and covariance matrix for all varied parameters. Versions of SAMMY exist for VAX, FPS, and IBM computers.

  5. Resonance parameter measurements and analysis of gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Leinweber, G.; Barry, D. P.; Trbovich, M. J.; Burke, J. A.; Drindak, N. J.; Knox, H. D.; Ballad, R. V.; Block, R. C.; Danon, Y.; Severnyak, L. I.

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of the present work is to measure the neutron cross sections of gadolinium accurately. Gd has the highest thermal absorption cross section of any natural element. Therefore it is an important element for thermal reactor applications Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. (RPI) LINAC facility using metallic and liquid Gd samples. The liquid samples were isotopically-enriched in either {sup 155}Gd or {sup 157}Gd. The capture measurements were made at the 25-m flight station with a sodium iodide detector, and the transmission measurements were performed at 15- and 25-m flight stations with {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors. The multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY was used to extract resonance parameters. The results of the thermal region analysis are significant. Resonance parameters for the low energy doublet, at 0.025 and 0.032 eV, are presented. The thermal (2200 m/s) capture cross section of {sup 157}Gd has been measured to be 11% smaller than that calculated from ENDF/B-VI updated through release 8. Thermal capture cross sections and capture resonance integrals for each isotope as well as elemental gadolinium are presented. In the epithermal region, natural metal samples were measured in capture and transmission. Neutron interaction data up to 300 eV have been analyzed. Substantial improvement to the understanding of gadolinium cross sections is presented, particularly above 180 eV where the ENDF resolved region for {sup 155}Gd ends. (authors)

  6. Neutron Resonance Parameters for Cm-242 (Curium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Volume 24 `Neutron Resonance Parameters' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides the neutron resonance parameters for the isotope Cm-242 (Curium).

  7. Neutron Resonance Parameters for Np-237 (Neptunium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Volume 24 `Neutron Resonance Parameters' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides the neutron resonance parameters for the isotope Np-237 (Neptunium).

  8. Integral data analysis for resonance parameters determination

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.; Derrien, H.

    1997-09-01

    Neutron time-of-flight experiments have long been used to determine resonance parameters. Those resonance parameters have then been used in calculations of integral quantities such as Maxwellian averages or resonance integrals, and results of those calculations in turn have been used as a criterion for acceptability of the resonance analysis. However, the calculations were inadequate because covariances on the parameter values were not included in the calculations. In this report an effort to correct for that deficiency is documented: (1) the R-matrix analysis code SAMMY has been modified to include integral quantities of importance, (2) directly within the resonance parameter analysis, and (3) to determine the best fit to both differential (microscopic) and integral (macroscopic) data simultaneously. This modification was implemented because it is expected to have an impact on the intermediate-energy range that is important for criticality safety applications.

  9. New Resonance Parameter Evaluation of Cl Neutron Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Sayer, R.O.; Guber, K.H.; Leal, L.C.; Larson, N.M.

    2005-05-24

    Better measurements and evaluations are needed for many elements where the existing evaluations or the underlying nuclear cross-section data are not sufficiently accurate for reliable calculation of criticality safety margins. Deficiencies in the existing ENDF/B-VI data evaluation for Cl led to our resonance parameter evaluation of Cl neutron cross sections in the resolved resonance region with the multilevel Reich-Moore R-matrix formalism. Our evaluation takes advantage of recent high-resolution capture and transmission measurements at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) as well as older total cross-section measurements at Karlsruhe (KFK) to extend the resolved resonance energy range to 1.2 MeV with much more accurate representation of the data than previous evaluations.

  10. Machine Learning of Parameters for Accurate Semiempirical Quantum Chemical Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of semiempirical quantum chemistry (SQC) methods through the use of machine learning (ML) models for the parameters. For a given class of compounds, ML techniques require sufficiently large training sets to develop ML models that can be used for adapting SQC parameters to reflect changes in molecular composition and geometry. The ML-SQC approach allows the automatic tuning of SQC parameters for individual molecules, thereby improving the accuracy without deteriorating transferability to molecules with molecular descriptors very different from those in the training set. The performance of this approach is demonstrated for the semiempirical OM2 method using a set of 6095 constitutional isomers C7H10O2, for which accurate ab initio atomization enthalpies are available. The ML-OM2 results show improved average accuracy and a much reduced error range compared with those of standard OM2 results, with mean absolute errors in atomization enthalpies dropping from 6.3 to 1.7 kcal/mol. They are also found to be superior to the results from specific OM2 reparameterizations (rOM2) for the same set of isomers. The ML-SQC approach thus holds promise for fast and reasonably accurate high-throughput screening of materials and molecules. PMID:26146493

  11. Machine learning of parameters for accurate semiempirical quantum chemical calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Dral, Pavlo O.; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Thiel, Walter

    2015-04-14

    We investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of semiempirical quantum chemistry (SQC) methods through the use of machine learning (ML) models for the parameters. For a given class of compounds, ML techniques require sufficiently large training sets to develop ML models that can be used for adapting SQC parameters to reflect changes in molecular composition and geometry. The ML-SQC approach allows the automatic tuning of SQC parameters for individual molecules, thereby improving the accuracy without deteriorating transferability to molecules with molecular descriptors very different from those in the training set. The performance of this approach is demonstrated for the semiempiricalmore » OM2 method using a set of 6095 constitutional isomers C7H10O2, for which accurate ab initio atomization enthalpies are available. The ML-OM2 results show improved average accuracy and a much reduced error range compared with those of standard OM2 results, with mean absolute errors in atomization enthalpies dropping from 6.3 to 1.7 kcal/mol. They are also found to be superior to the results from specific OM2 reparameterizations (rOM2) for the same set of isomers. The ML-SQC approach thus holds promise for fast and reasonably accurate high-throughput screening of materials and molecules.« less

  12. Machine learning of parameters for accurate semiempirical quantum chemical calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Dral, Pavlo O.; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Thiel, Walter

    2015-04-14

    We investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of semiempirical quantum chemistry (SQC) methods through the use of machine learning (ML) models for the parameters. For a given class of compounds, ML techniques require sufficiently large training sets to develop ML models that can be used for adapting SQC parameters to reflect changes in molecular composition and geometry. The ML-SQC approach allows the automatic tuning of SQC parameters for individual molecules, thereby improving the accuracy without deteriorating transferability to molecules with molecular descriptors very different from those in the training set. The performance of this approach is demonstrated for the semiempirical OM2 method using a set of 6095 constitutional isomers C7H10O2, for which accurate ab initio atomization enthalpies are available. The ML-OM2 results show improved average accuracy and a much reduced error range compared with those of standard OM2 results, with mean absolute errors in atomization enthalpies dropping from 6.3 to 1.7 kcal/mol. They are also found to be superior to the results from specific OM2 reparameterizations (rOM2) for the same set of isomers. The ML-SQC approach thus holds promise for fast and reasonably accurate high-throughput screening of materials and molecules.

  13. Machine Learning of Parameters for Accurate Semiempirical Quantum Chemical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Dral, Pavlo O; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole; Thiel, Walter

    2015-05-12

    We investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of semiempirical quantum chemistry (SQC) methods through the use of machine learning (ML) models for the parameters. For a given class of compounds, ML techniques require sufficiently large training sets to develop ML models that can be used for adapting SQC parameters to reflect changes in molecular composition and geometry. The ML-SQC approach allows the automatic tuning of SQC parameters for individual molecules, thereby improving the accuracy without deteriorating transferability to molecules with molecular descriptors very different from those in the training set. The performance of this approach is demonstrated for the semiempirical OM2 method using a set of 6095 constitutional isomers C7H10O2, for which accurate ab initio atomization enthalpies are available. The ML-OM2 results show improved average accuracy and a much reduced error range compared with those of standard OM2 results, with mean absolute errors in atomization enthalpies dropping from 6.3 to 1.7 kcal/mol. They are also found to be superior to the results from specific OM2 reparameterizations (rOM2) for the same set of isomers. The ML-SQC approach thus holds promise for fast and reasonably accurate high-throughput screening of materials and molecules.

  14. Direct computation of parameters for accurate polarizable force fields

    SciTech Connect

    Verstraelen, Toon Vandenbrande, Steven; Ayers, Paul W.

    2014-11-21

    We present an improved electronic linear response model to incorporate polarization and charge-transfer effects in polarizable force fields. This model is a generalization of the Atom-Condensed Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory (DFT), approximated to second order (ACKS2): it can now be defined with any underlying variational theory (next to KS-DFT) and it can include atomic multipoles and off-center basis functions. Parameters in this model are computed efficiently as expectation values of an electronic wavefunction, obviating the need for their calibration, regularization, and manual tuning. In the limit of a complete density and potential basis set in the ACKS2 model, the linear response properties of the underlying theory for a given molecular geometry are reproduced exactly. A numerical validation with a test set of 110 molecules shows that very accurate models can already be obtained with fluctuating charges and dipoles. These features greatly facilitate the development of polarizable force fields.

  15. Accurate 3D quantification of the bronchial parameters in MDCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saragaglia, A.; Fetita, C.; Preteux, F.; Brillet, P. Y.; Grenier, P. A.

    2005-08-01

    The assessment of bronchial reactivity and wall remodeling in asthma plays a crucial role in better understanding such a disease and evaluating therapeutic responses. Today, multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) makes it possible to perform an accurate estimation of bronchial parameters (lumen and wall areas) by allowing a quantitative analysis in a cross-section plane orthogonal to the bronchus axis. This paper provides the tools for such an analysis by developing a 3D investigation method which relies on 3D reconstruction of bronchial lumen and central axis computation. Cross-section images at bronchial locations interactively selected along the central axis are generated at appropriate spatial resolution. An automated approach is then developed for accurately segmenting the inner and outer bronchi contours on the cross-section images. It combines mathematical morphology operators, such as "connection cost", and energy-controlled propagation in order to overcome the difficulties raised by vessel adjacencies and wall irregularities. The segmentation accuracy was validated with respect to a 3D mathematically-modeled phantom of a pair bronchus-vessel which mimics the characteristics of real data in terms of gray-level distribution, caliber and orientation. When applying the developed quantification approach to such a model with calibers ranging from 3 to 10 mm diameter, the lumen area relative errors varied from 3.7% to 0.15%, while the bronchus area was estimated with a relative error less than 5.1%.

  16. Accurate fundamental parameters for 23 bright solar-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruntt, H.; Bedding, T. R.; Quirion, P.-O.; Lo Curto, G.; Carrier, F.; Smalley, B.; Dall, T. H.; Arentoft, T.; Bazot, M.; Butler, R. P.

    2010-07-01

    We combine results from interferometry, asteroseismology and spectroscopy to determine accurate fundamental parameters of 23 bright solar-type stars, from spectral type F5 to K2 and luminosity classes III-V. For some stars we can use direct techniques to determine the mass, radius, luminosity and effective temperature, and we compare with indirect methods that rely on photometric calibrations or spectroscopic analyses. We use the asteroseismic information available in the literature to infer an indirect mass with an accuracy of 4-15 per cent. From indirect methods we determine luminosity and radius to 3 per cent. We find evidence that the luminosity from the indirect method is slightly overestimated (~ 5 per cent) for the coolest stars, indicating that their bolometric corrections (BCs) are too negative. For Teff we find a slight offset of -40 +/- 20K between the spectroscopic method and the direct method, meaning the spectroscopic temperatures are too high. From the spectroscopic analysis we determine the detailed chemical composition for 13 elements, including Li, C and O. The metallicity ranges from [Fe/H] = -1.7 to +0.4, and there is clear evidence for α-element enhancement in the metal-poor stars. We find no significant offset between the spectroscopic surface gravity and the value from combining asteroseismology with radius estimates. From the spectroscopy we also determine v sin i and we present a new calibration of macroturbulence and microturbulence. From the comparison between the results from the direct and spectroscopic methods we claim that we can determine Teff, log g and [Fe/H] with absolute accuracies of 80K, 0.08 and 0.07dex. Photometric calibrations of Strömgren indices provide accurate results for Teff and [Fe/H] but will be more uncertain for distant stars when interstellar reddening becomes important. The indirect methods are important to obtain reliable estimates of the fundamental parameters of relatively faint stars when interferometry

  17. Resonance Parameter Adjustment Based on Integral Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Sobes, Vladimir; Leal, Luiz; Arbanas, Goran; Forget, Benoit

    2016-06-02

    Our project seeks to allow coupling of differential and integral data evaluation in a continuous-energy framework and to use the generalized linear least-squares (GLLS) methodology in the TSURFER module of the SCALE code package to update the parameters of a resolved resonance region evaluation. We recognize that the GLLS methodology in TSURFER is identical to the mathematical description of a Bayesian update in SAMMY, the SAMINT code was created to use the mathematical machinery of SAMMY to update resolved resonance parameters based on integral data. Traditionally, SAMMY used differential experimental data to adjust nuclear data parameters. Integral experimental data, such as in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments Project, remain a tool for validation of completed nuclear data evaluations. SAMINT extracts information from integral benchmarks to aid the nuclear data evaluation process. Later, integral data can be used to resolve any remaining ambiguity between differential data sets, highlight troublesome energy regions, determine key nuclear data parameters for integral benchmark calculations, and improve the nuclear data covariance matrix evaluation. Moreover, SAMINT is not intended to bias nuclear data toward specific integral experiments but should be used to supplement the evaluation of differential experimental data. Using GLLS ensures proper weight is given to the differential data.

  18. Resonance Parameter Adjustment Based on Integral Experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Sobes, Vladimir; Leal, Luiz; Arbanas, Goran; ...

    2016-06-02

    Our project seeks to allow coupling of differential and integral data evaluation in a continuous-energy framework and to use the generalized linear least-squares (GLLS) methodology in the TSURFER module of the SCALE code package to update the parameters of a resolved resonance region evaluation. We recognize that the GLLS methodology in TSURFER is identical to the mathematical description of a Bayesian update in SAMMY, the SAMINT code was created to use the mathematical machinery of SAMMY to update resolved resonance parameters based on integral data. Traditionally, SAMMY used differential experimental data to adjust nuclear data parameters. Integral experimental data, suchmore » as in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments Project, remain a tool for validation of completed nuclear data evaluations. SAMINT extracts information from integral benchmarks to aid the nuclear data evaluation process. Later, integral data can be used to resolve any remaining ambiguity between differential data sets, highlight troublesome energy regions, determine key nuclear data parameters for integral benchmark calculations, and improve the nuclear data covariance matrix evaluation. Moreover, SAMINT is not intended to bias nuclear data toward specific integral experiments but should be used to supplement the evaluation of differential experimental data. Using GLLS ensures proper weight is given to the differential data.« less

  19. Rho resonance parameters from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Dehua; Alexandru, Andrei; Molina, Raquel; Döring, Michael

    2016-08-01

    We perform a high-precision calculation of the phase shifts for $\\pi$-$\\pi$ scattering in the I = 1, J = 1 channel in the elastic region using elongated lattices with two mass-degenerate quark favors ($N_f = 2$). We extract the $\\rho$ resonance parameters using a Breit-Wigner fit at two different quark masses, corresponding to $m_{\\pi} = 226$MeV and $m_{\\pi} = 315$MeV, and perform an extrapolation to the physical point. The extrapolation is based on a unitarized chiral perturbation theory model that describes well the phase-shifts around the resonance for both quark masses. We find that the extrapolated value, $m_{\\rho} = 720(1)(15)$MeV, is significantly lower that the physical rho mass and we argue that this shift could be due to the absence of the strange quark in our calculation.

  20. Accurate Critical Parameters for the Modified Lennard-Jones Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Kazuma; Fuchizaki, Kazuhiro

    2017-03-01

    The critical parameters of the modified Lennard-Jones system were examined. The isothermal-isochoric ensemble was generated by conducting a molecular dynamics simulation for the system consisting of 6912, 8788, 10976, and 13500 particles. The equilibrium between the liquid and vapor phases was judged from the chemical potential of both phases upon establishing the coexistence envelope, from which the critical temperature and density were obtained invoking the renormalization group theory. The finite-size scaling enabled us to finally determine the critical temperature, pressure, and density as Tc = 1.0762(2), pc = 0.09394(17), and ρc = 0.331(3), respectively.

  1. Combining MFD and PIE for accurate single-pair Förster resonance energy transfer measurements.

    PubMed

    Kudryavtsev, Volodymyr; Sikor, Martin; Kalinin, Stanislav; Mokranjac, Dejana; Seidel, Claus A M; Lamb, Don C

    2012-03-01

    Single-pair Förster resonance energy transfer (spFRET) experiments using single-molecule burst analysis on a confocal microscope are an ideal tool to measure inter- and intramolecular distances and dynamics on the nanoscale. Different techniques have been developed to maximize the amount of information available in spFRET burst analysis experiments. Multiparameter fluorescence detection (MFD) is used to monitor a variety of fluorescence parameters simultaneously and pulsed interleaved excitation (PIE) employs direct excitation of the acceptor to probe its presence and photoactivity. To calculate accurate FRET efficiencies from spFRET experiments with MFD or PIE, several calibration measurements are usually required. Herein, we demonstrate that by combining MFD with PIE information regarding all calibration factors as well as an accurate determination of spFRET histograms can be performed in a single measurement. In addition, the quality of overlap of the different detection volumes as well as the detection of acceptor photophysics can be investigated with MFD-PIE. Bursts containing acceptor photobleaching can be identified and excluded from further investigation while bursts that contain FRET dynamics are unaffected by this analysis. We have employed MFD-PIE to accurately analyze the effects of nucleotides and substrate on the interdomain separation in DnaK, the major bacterial heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70). The interdomain distance increases from 47 Å in the ATP-bound state to 84 Å in the ADP-bound state and slightly contracts to 77 Å when a substrate is bound. This is in contrast to what was observed for the mitochondrial member of the Hsp70s, Ssc1, supporting the notion of evolutionary specialization of Hsp70s for different cellular functions in different organisms and cell organelles.

  2. Accurate measurement method of Fabry-Perot cavity parameters via optical transfer function

    SciTech Connect

    Bondu, Francois; Debieu, Olivier

    2007-05-10

    It is shown how the transfer function from frequency noise to a Pound-Drever-Hall signal for a Fabry-Perot cavity can be used to accurately measure cavity length, cavity linewidth, mirror curvature, misalignments, laser beam shape mismatching with resonant beam shape, and cavity impedance mismatching with respect to vacuum.

  3. Influence of resonance parameters' correlations on the resonance integral uncertainty; 55Mn case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žerovnik, Gašper; Trkov, Andrej; Capote, Roberto; Rochman, Dimitri

    2011-03-01

    For nuclides with a large number of resonances the covariance matrix of resonance parameters can become very large and expensive to process in terms of the computation time. By converting covariance matrix of resonance parameters into covariance matrices of background cross-section in a more or less coarse group structure a considerable amount of computer time and memory can be saved. The question is how important is the information that is discarded in the process. First, the uncertainty of the 55Mn resonance integral was estimated in narrow resonance approximation for different levels of self-shielding using Bondarenko method by random sampling of resonance parameters according to their covariance matrices from two different 55Mn evaluations: one from Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group NRG (with large uncertainties but no correlations between resonances), the other from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (with smaller uncertainties but full covariance matrix). We have found out that if all (or at least significant part of the) resonance parameters are correlated, the resonance integral uncertainty greatly depends on the level of self-shielding. Second, it was shown that the commonly used 640-group SAND-II representation cannot describe the increase of the resonance integral uncertainty. A much finer energy mesh for the background covariance matrix would have to be used to take the resonance structure into account explicitly, but then the objective of a more compact data representation is lost.

  4. Single-level resonance parameters fit nuclear cross-sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drawbaugh, D. W.; Gibson, G.; Miller, M.; Page, S. L.

    1970-01-01

    Least squares analyses of experimental differential cross-section data for the U-235 nucleus have yielded single level Breit-Wigner resonance parameters that fit, simultaneously, three nuclear cross sections of capture, fission, and total.

  5. 95Mo nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of molybdenum hexacarbonyl from density functional theory: appraisal of computational and geometrical parameters.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Jérôme; Sykina, Kateryna; Fontaine, Bruno; Le Pollès, Laurent; Pickard, Chris J; Gautier, Régis

    2011-11-21

    Solid-state (95)Mo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) properties of molybdenum hexacarbonyl have been computed using density functional theory (DFT) based methods. Both quadrupolar coupling and chemical shift parameters were evaluated and compared with parameters of high precision determined using single-crystal (95)Mo NMR experiments. Within a molecular approach, the effects of major computational parameters, i.e. basis set, exchange-correlation functional, treatment of relativity, have been evaluated. Except for the isotropic parameter of both chemical shift and chemical shielding, computed NMR parameters are more sensitive to geometrical variations than computational details. Relativistic effects do not play a crucial part in the calculations of such parameters for the 4d transition metal, in particular isotropic chemical shift. Periodic DFT calculations were tackled to measure the influence of neighbouring molecules on the crystal structure. These effects have to be taken into account to compute accurate solid-state (95)Mo NMR parameters even for such an inorganic molecular compound.

  6. A simple and accurate resist parameter extraction method for sub-80-nm DRAM patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sook; Hwang, Chan; Park, Dong-Woon; Kim, In-Sung; Kim, Ho-Chul; Woo, Sang-Gyun; Cho, Han-Ku; Moon, Joo-Tae

    2004-05-01

    Due to the polarization effect of high NA lithography, the consideration of resist effect in lithography simulation becomes increasingly important. In spite of the importance of resist simulation, many process engineers are reluctant to consider resist effect in lithography simulation due to time-consuming procedure to extract required resist parameters and the uncertainty of measurement of some parameters. Weiss suggested simplified development model, and this model does not require the complex kinetic parameters. For the device fabrication engineers, there is a simple and accurate parameter extraction and optimizing method using Weiss model. This method needs refractive index, Dill"s parameters and development rate monitoring (DRM) data in parameter extraction. The parameters extracted using referred sequence is not accurate, so that we have to optimize the parameters to fit the critical dimension scanning electron microscopy (CD SEM) data of line and space patterns. Hence, the FiRM of Sigma-C is utilized as a resist parameter-optimizing program. According to our study, the illumination shape, the aberration and the pupil mesh point have a large effect on the accuracy of resist parameter in optimization. To obtain the optimum parameters, we need to find the saturated mesh points in terms of normalized intensity log slope (NILS) prior to an optimization. The simulation results using the optimized parameters by this method shows good agreement with experiments for iso-dense bias, Focus-Exposure Matrix data and sub 80nm device pattern simulation.

  7. Novel method for accurate g measurements in electron-spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stesmans, A.; Van Gorp, G.

    1989-09-01

    In high-accuracy work, electron-spin-resonance (ESR) g values are generally determined by calibrating against the accurately known proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). For that method—based on leakage of microwave energy out of the ESR cavity—a convenient technique is presented to obtain accurate g values without needing conscientious precalibration procedures or cumbersome constructions. As main advantages, the method allows the easy monitoring of the positioning of the ESR and NMR samples while they are mounted as close as physically realizable at all time during their simultaneous resonances. Relative accuracies on g of ≊2×10-6 are easily achieved for ESR signals of peak-to-peak width ΔBpp≲0.3 G. The method has been applied to calibrate the g value of conduction electrons of small Li particles embedded in LiF—a frequently used g marker—resulting in gLiF: Li=2.002 293±0.000 002.

  8. On random sampling of correlated resonance parameters with large uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žerovnik, Gašper; Capote, Roberto; Trkov, Andrej

    2013-09-01

    Three different methods for multivariate random sampling of correlated resonance parameters are proposed: the diagonalization method, the Metropolis method, and the correlated sampling method. For small relative uncertainties (typical for s-wave resonances) and weak correlations all methods are equivalent. Differences arise under difficult conditions: large relative uncertainties of inherently positive parameters (typical for widths of higher-l-wave resonances) and/or strong correlations between a large number of parameters. The methods are tested on realistic examples; advantages and disadvantages of each method are pointed out. The correlated sampling method is the only method which produces consistent samples under any conditions. In the field of reactor physics, these methods are mostly used for the sampling of nuclear data, however, they may be used for any data with given uncertainties and correlations.

  9. Evaluation of the Covariance Matrix of Estimated Resonance Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, B.; Capote, R.; Kopecky, S.; Massimi, C.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Sirakov, I.; Volev, K.

    2014-04-01

    In the resonance region nuclear resonance parameters are mostly obtained by a least square adjustment of a model to experimental data. Derived parameters can be mutually correlated through the adjustment procedure as well as through common experimental or model uncertainties. In this contribution we investigate four different methods to propagate the additional covariance caused by experimental or model uncertainties into the evaluation of the covariance matrix of the estimated parameters: (1) including the additional covariance into the experimental covariance matrix based on calculated or theoretical estimates of the data; (2) including the uncertainty affected parameter in the adjustment procedure; (3) evaluation of the full covariance matrix by Monte Carlo sampling of the common parameter; and (4) retroactively including the additional covariance by using the marginalization procedure of Habert et al.

  10. Neutron Resonance Parameters and Covariance Matrix of 239Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, Herve; Leal, Luiz C; Larson, Nancy M

    2008-08-01

    In order to obtain the resonance parameters in a single energy range and the corresponding covariance matrix, a reevaluation of 239Pu was performed with the code SAMMY. The most recent experimental data were analyzed or reanalyzed in the energy range thermal to 2.5 keV. The normalization of the fission cross section data was reconsidered by taking into account the most recent measurements of Weston et al. and Wagemans et al. A full resonance parameter covariance matrix was generated. The method used to obtain realistic uncertainties on the average cross section calculated by SAMMY or other processing codes was examined.

  11. Bayesian parameter estimation of a k-ε model for accurate jet-in-crossflow simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Jaideep; Lefantzi, Sophia; Arunajatesan, Srinivasan; Dechant, Lawrence

    2016-05-31

    Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes models are not very accurate for high-Reynolds-number compressible jet-in-crossflow interactions. The inaccuracy arises from the use of inappropriate model parameters and model-form errors in the Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes model. In this study, the hypothesis is pursued that Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes predictions can be significantly improved by using parameters inferred from experimental measurements of a supersonic jet interacting with a transonic crossflow.

  12. Parameter measurement of synchronous reluctance motor using LC resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Joonseon; Kim, Ki-Chan; Lee, Ju

    2006-04-01

    The motor characterizing parameters are most important factors to drive precisely, effectively, and robustly. Especially, the exact knowledge of synchronous inductance is necessary to control the torque precisely in synchronous reluctance motor (SynRM). Therefore many works have been done for the exact measurement of motor parameters. In this paper, we propose the simple method of measuring the motor parameters, especially measuring the synchronous inductance of SynRM, which can overcome the demerits of conventional methods and measure the exact values. The proposed method uses the resonance phenomenon between the phase inductance and capacitors externally connected.

  13. Parameters optimization for magnetic resonance coupling wireless power transmission.

    PubMed

    Li, Changsheng; Zhang, He; Jiang, Xiaohua

    2014-01-01

    Taking maximum power transmission and power stable transmission as research objectives, optimal design for the wireless power transmission system based on magnetic resonance coupling is carried out in this paper. Firstly, based on the mutual coupling model, mathematical expressions of optimal coupling coefficients for the maximum power transmission target are deduced. Whereafter, methods of enhancing power transmission stability based on parameters optimal design are investigated. It is found that the sensitivity of the load power to the transmission parameters can be reduced and the power transmission stability can be enhanced by improving the system resonance frequency or coupling coefficient between the driving/pick-up coil and the transmission/receiving coil. Experiment results are well conformed to the theoretical analysis conclusions.

  14. Giant dipole resonance parameters with uncertainties from photonuclear cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plujko, V. A.; Capote, R.; Gorbachenko, O. M.

    2011-09-01

    Updated values and corresponding uncertainties of isovector giant dipole resonance (IVGDR or GDR) model parameters are presented that are obtained by the least-squares fitting of theoretical photoabsorption cross sections to experimental data. The theoretical photoabsorption cross section is taken as a sum of the components corresponding to excitation of the GDR and quasideuteron contribution to the experimental photoabsorption cross section. The present compilation covers experimental data as of January 2010.

  15. Some principles in choosing parameters of magnetic resonance tomographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volobuev, A. N.

    2017-01-01

    The problem of amplifying the signal that ensures the visualization of internal organs in the magnetic resonance tomograph due to the optimal selection of some of its parameters has been considered. The operating principle of the tomograph has been analyzed. The relation between the angle of the magnetic moment precession in hydrogen nuclei in an organism, the frequency of the ac magnetic field exciting this precession, and the constant magnetic field used has been determined using quantum-mechanical concepts. This relation makes it possible to determine the optimal parameters for tomograph operation.

  16. Acoustic-resonance spectrometry as a process analytical technology for rapid and accurate tablet identification.

    PubMed

    Medendorp, Joseph; Lodder, Robert A

    2006-03-01

    This research was performed to test the hypothesis that acoustic-resonance spectrometry (ARS) is able to rapidly and accurately differentiate tablets of similar size and shape. The US Food and Drug Administration frequently orders recalls of tablets because of labeling problems (eg, the wrong tablet appears in a bottle). A high-throughput, nondestructive method of online analysis and label comparison before shipping could obviate the need for recall or disposal of a batch of mislabeled drugs, thus saving a company considerable expense and preventing a major safety risk. ARS is accurate and precise as well as inexpensive and nondestructive, and the sensor, is constructed from readily available parts, suggesting utility as a process analytical technology (PAT). To test the classification ability of ARS, 5 common household tablets of similar size and shape were chosen for analysis (aspirin, ibuprofen, acetaminophen, vitamin C, and vitamin B12). The measures of successful tablet identification were intertablet distances in nonparametric multidimensional standard deviations (MSDs) greater than, 3 and intratablet MSDs less than 3, as calculated from an extended bootstrap erroradjusted single sample technique. The average intertablet MSD was 65.64, while the average intratablet MSD from cross-validation was 1.91. Tablet mass (r(2)=0.977), thickness (r(2)=0.977), and density (r(2)=0.900) were measured very accurately from the AR spectra, each with less than 10% error. Tablets were identified correctly with only 250 ms data collection time. These results demonstrate that ARS effectively identified and characterized the 5 types of tablets and could potentially serve as a rapid high-throughput online pharmaceutical sensor.

  17. On the Methodology to Calculate the Covariance of Estimated Resonance Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, B.; Kopecky, S.; Schillebeeckx, P.

    2015-01-15

    Principles to determine resonance parameters and their covariance from experimental data are discussed. Different methods to propagate the covariance of experimental parameters are compared. A full Bayesian statistical analysis reveals that the level to which the initial uncertainty of the experimental parameters propagates, strongly depends on the experimental conditions. For high precision data the initial uncertainties of experimental parameters, like a normalization factor, has almost no impact on the covariance of the parameters in case of thick sample measurements and conventional uncertainty propagation or full Bayesian analysis. The covariances derived from a full Bayesian analysis and least-squares fit are derived under the condition that the model describing the experimental observables is perfect. When the quality of the model can not be verified a more conservative method based on a renormalization of the covariance matrix is recommended to propagate fully the uncertainty of experimental systematic effects. Finally, neutron resonance transmission analysis is proposed as an accurate method to validate evaluated data libraries in the resolved resonance region.

  18. Evaluation of silicon neutron resonance parameters in the thermal to 1800 keV energy range.

    PubMed

    Derrien, H; Leal, L C; Guber, K H; Larson, N M

    2005-01-01

    Because silicon is a major constituent of concrete and soil, neutron and gamma ray information on silicon is important for reactor shielding and criticality safety calculations. Therefore, much effort was put into the ENDF/B-VI evaluation for the three stable isotopes of silicon. The neutron capture cross section of natural silicon was recently measured at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in the energy range 1-700 keV. Using the ENDF/B-VI evaluation for initial values, a new evaluation of the resonance parameters was performed by adding the results of the ORELA capture measurements to the experimental database. The computer code SAMMY was used for the analysis of the experimental data; the new version of SAMMY allows accurate calculations of the self-shielding and multiple scattering effects in the capture measurements. The accuracy of the radiative capture widths of the resonances was improved by this analysis. Accurate values of the s-, p- and d-wave neutron strength functions were also obtained. Although the resonance capture component of the present evaluation is 2-3 times smaller than that in ENDF/B-VI, the total capture cross section is much larger, at least for energies >250 keV, because the direct capture component contributes values of the same order of magnitude as the resonance component. The direct component was not taken into account in the ENDF/B-VI evaluation and was calculated for the first time in the present evaluation.

  19. Polynomial fitting of DT-MRI fiber tracts allows accurate estimation of muscle architectural parameters.

    PubMed

    Damon, Bruce M; Heemskerk, Anneriet M; Ding, Zhaohua

    2012-06-01

    Fiber curvature is a functionally significant muscle structural property, but its estimation from diffusion-tensor magnetic resonance imaging fiber tracking data may be confounded by noise. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of polynomial fitting of fiber tracts for improving the accuracy and precision of fiber curvature (κ) measurements. Simulated image data sets were created in order to provide data with known values for κ and pennation angle (θ). Simulations were designed to test the effects of increasing inherent fiber curvature (3.8, 7.9, 11.8 and 15.3 m(-1)), signal-to-noise ratio (50, 75, 100 and 150) and voxel geometry (13.8- and 27.0-mm(3) voxel volume with isotropic resolution; 13.5-mm(3) volume with an aspect ratio of 4.0) on κ and θ measurements. In the originally reconstructed tracts, θ was estimated accurately under most curvature and all imaging conditions studied; however, the estimates of κ were imprecise and inaccurate. Fitting the tracts to second-order polynomial functions provided accurate and precise estimates of κ for all conditions except very high curvature (κ=15.3 m(-1)), while preserving the accuracy of the θ estimates. Similarly, polynomial fitting of in vivo fiber tracking data reduced the κ values of fitted tracts from those of unfitted tracts and did not change the θ values. Polynomial fitting of fiber tracts allows accurate estimation of physiologically reasonable values of κ, while preserving the accuracy of θ estimation.

  20. Time resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy with geometrically accurate models for bulk parameter recovery

    PubMed Central

    Guggenheim, James A.; Bargigia, Ilaria; Farina, Andrea; Pifferi, Antonio; Dehghani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    A novel straightforward, accessible and efficient approach is presented for performing hyperspectral time-domain diffuse optical spectroscopy to determine the optical properties of samples accurately using geometry specific models. To allow bulk parameter recovery from measured spectra, a set of libraries based on a numerical model of the domain being investigated is developed as opposed to the conventional approach of using an analytical semi-infinite slab approximation, which is known and shown to introduce boundary effects. Results demonstrate that the method improves the accuracy of derived spectrally varying optical properties over the use of the semi-infinite approximation. PMID:27699137

  1. A time domain based method for the accurate measurement of Q-factor and resonance frequency of microwave resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Gyüre, B.; Márkus, B. G.; Bernáth, B.; Simon, F.; Murányi, F.

    2015-09-15

    We present a novel method to determine the resonant frequency and quality factor of microwave resonators which is faster, more stable, and conceptually simpler than the yet existing techniques. The microwave resonator is pumped with the microwave radiation at a frequency away from its resonance. It then emits an exponentially decaying radiation at its eigen-frequency when the excitation is rapidly switched off. The emitted microwave signal is down-converted with a microwave mixer, digitized, and its Fourier transformation (FT) directly yields the resonance curve in a single shot. Being a FT based method, this technique possesses the Fellgett (multiplex) and Connes (accuracy) advantages and it conceptually mimics that of pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance. We also establish a novel benchmark to compare accuracy of the different approaches of microwave resonator measurements. This shows that the present method has similar accuracy to the existing ones, which are based on sweeping or modulating the frequency of the microwave radiation.

  2. A time domain based method for the accurate measurement of Q-factor and resonance frequency of microwave resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyüre, B.; Márkus, B. G.; Bernáth, B.; Murányi, F.; Simon, F.

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel method to determine the resonant frequency and quality factor of microwave resonators which is faster, more stable, and conceptually simpler than the yet existing techniques. The microwave resonator is pumped with the microwave radiation at a frequency away from its resonance. It then emits an exponentially decaying radiation at its eigen-frequency when the excitation is rapidly switched off. The emitted microwave signal is down-converted with a microwave mixer, digitized, and its Fourier transformation (FT) directly yields the resonance curve in a single shot. Being a FT based method, this technique possesses the Fellgett (multiplex) and Connes (accuracy) advantages and it conceptually mimics that of pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance. We also establish a novel benchmark to compare accuracy of the different approaches of microwave resonator measurements. This shows that the present method has similar accuracy to the existing ones, which are based on sweeping or modulating the frequency of the microwave radiation.

  3. Accurate Structure Parameters for Tunneling Ionization Rates of Gas-Phase Linear Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Song-Feng; Li, Jian-Ke; Wang, Guo-Li; Li, Peng-Cheng; Zhou, Xiao-Xin

    2017-03-01

    In the molecular Ammosov–Delone–Krainov (MO-ADK) model of Tong et al. [Phys. Rev. A 66 (2002) 033402], the ionization rate depends on the structure parameters of the molecular orbital from which the electron is removed. We determine systematically and tabulate accurate structure parameters of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) for 123 gas-phase linear molecules by solving time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials which are constructed numerically using the modified Leeuwen–Baerends (LBα) model. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11664035, 11674268, 11465016, 11364038, 11364039, the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China under Grant No. 20116203120001 and the Basic Scientific Research Foundation for Institution of Higher Learning of Gansu Province

  4. A Method for Accurate Reconstructions of the Upper Airway Using Magnetic Resonance Images

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Huahui; Huang, Xiaoqing; Li, Yong; Li, Jianhong; Xian, Junfang; Huang, Yaqi

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to provide an optimized method to reconstruct the structure of the upper airway (UA) based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that can faithfully show the anatomical structure with a smooth surface without artificial modifications. Methods MRI was performed on the head and neck of a healthy young male participant in the axial, coronal and sagittal planes to acquire images of the UA. The level set method was used to segment the boundary of the UA. The boundaries in the three scanning planes were registered according to the positions of crossing points and anatomical characteristics using a Matlab program. Finally, the three-dimensional (3D) NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines) surface of the UA was constructed using the registered boundaries in all three different planes. Results A smooth 3D structure of the UA was constructed, which captured the anatomical features from the three anatomical planes, particularly the location of the anterior wall of the nasopharynx. The volume and area of every cross section of the UA can be calculated from the constructed 3D model of UA. Conclusions A complete scheme of reconstruction of the UA was proposed, which can be used to measure and evaluate the 3D upper airway accurately. PMID:26066461

  5. Accurate estimation of motion blur parameters in noisy remote sensing image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xueyan; Wang, Lin; Shao, Xiaopeng; Wang, Huilin; Tao, Zhong

    2015-05-01

    The relative motion between remote sensing satellite sensor and objects is one of the most common reasons for remote sensing image degradation. It seriously weakens image data interpretation and information extraction. In practice, point spread function (PSF) should be estimated firstly for image restoration. Identifying motion blur direction and length accurately is very crucial for PSF and restoring image with precision. In general, the regular light-and-dark stripes in the spectrum can be employed to obtain the parameters by using Radon transform. However, serious noise existing in actual remote sensing images often causes the stripes unobvious. The parameters would be difficult to calculate and the error of the result relatively big. In this paper, an improved motion blur parameter identification method to noisy remote sensing image is proposed to solve this problem. The spectrum characteristic of noisy remote sensing image is analyzed firstly. An interactive image segmentation method based on graph theory called GrabCut is adopted to effectively extract the edge of the light center in the spectrum. Motion blur direction is estimated by applying Radon transform on the segmentation result. In order to reduce random error, a method based on whole column statistics is used during calculating blur length. Finally, Lucy-Richardson algorithm is applied to restore the remote sensing images of the moon after estimating blur parameters. The experimental results verify the effectiveness and robustness of our algorithm.

  6. Accurate parameters for HD 209458 and its planet from HST spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Burgo, C.; Allende Prieto, C.

    2016-12-01

    We present updated parameters for the star HD 209458 and its transiting giant planet. The stellar angular diameter θ = 0.2254 ± 0.0017 mas is obtained from the average ratio between the absolute flux observed with the Hubble Space Telescope and that of the best-fitting Kurucz model atmosphere. This angular diameter represents an improvement in precision of more than four times compared to available interferometric determinations. The stellar radius R⋆ = 1.20 ± 0.05 R⊙ is ascertained by combining the angular diameter with the Hipparcos trigonometric parallax, which is the main contributor to its uncertainty, and therefore the radius accuracy should be significantly improved with Gaia's measurements. The radius of the exoplanet Rp = 1.41 ± 0.06 RJ is derived from the corresponding transit depth in the light curve and our stellar radius. From the model fitting, we accurately determine the effective temperature, Teff = 6071 ± 20 K, which is in perfect agreement with the value of 6070 ± 24 K calculated from the angular diameter and the integrated spectral energy distribution. We also find precise values from recent Padova isochrones, such as R⋆ = 1.20 ± 0.06 R⊙ and Teff = 6099 ± 41 K. We arrive at a consistent picture from these methods and compare the results with those from the literature.

  7. Significance of accurate diffraction corrections for the second harmonic wave in determining the acoustic nonlinearity parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Zhang, Shuzeng; Li, Xiongbing; Barnard, Dan

    2015-09-15

    The accurate measurement of acoustic nonlinearity parameter β for fluids or solids generally requires making corrections for diffraction effects due to finite size geometry of transmitter and receiver. These effects are well known in linear acoustics, while those for second harmonic waves have not been well addressed and therefore not properly considered in previous studies. In this work, we explicitly define the attenuation and diffraction corrections using the multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) equations which were developed from the quasilinear solutions of the KZK equation. The effects of making these corrections are examined through the simulation of β determination in water. Diffraction corrections are found to have more significant effects than attenuation corrections, and the β values of water can be estimated experimentally with less than 5% errors when the exact second harmonic diffraction corrections are used together with the negligible attenuation correction effects on the basis of linear frequency dependence between attenuation coefficients, α{sub 2} ≃ 2α{sub 1}.

  8. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Herman

    2016-02-28

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3/2,5/2,7/2, and 9/2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Furthermore, applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  9. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Herman

    2016-09-01

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3 / 2 , 5 / 2 , 7 / 2, and 9 / 2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  10. Consistency of VDJ Rearrangement and Substitution Parameters Enables Accurate B Cell Receptor Sequence Annotation.

    PubMed

    Ralph, Duncan K; Matsen, Frederick A

    2016-01-01

    VDJ rearrangement and somatic hypermutation work together to produce antibody-coding B cell receptor (BCR) sequences for a remarkable diversity of antigens. It is now possible to sequence these BCRs in high throughput; analysis of these sequences is bringing new insight into how antibodies develop, in particular for broadly-neutralizing antibodies against HIV and influenza. A fundamental step in such sequence analysis is to annotate each base as coming from a specific one of the V, D, or J genes, or from an N-addition (a.k.a. non-templated insertion). Previous work has used simple parametric distributions to model transitions from state to state in a hidden Markov model (HMM) of VDJ recombination, and assumed that mutations occur via the same process across sites. However, codon frame and other effects have been observed to violate these parametric assumptions for such coding sequences, suggesting that a non-parametric approach to modeling the recombination process could be useful. In our paper, we find that indeed large modern data sets suggest a model using parameter-rich per-allele categorical distributions for HMM transition probabilities and per-allele-per-position mutation probabilities, and that using such a model for inference leads to significantly improved results. We present an accurate and efficient BCR sequence annotation software package using a novel HMM "factorization" strategy. This package, called partis (https://github.com/psathyrella/partis/), is built on a new general-purpose HMM compiler that can perform efficient inference given a simple text description of an HMM.

  11. Evaluation of 238U Resonance Parameters from 0 to 20 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.; Leal, L.C.; Larson, N.; Courcelle, A.; Santamarina, A.

    2005-05-24

    The neutron resonance parameters of 238U were obtained in the energy range 0 to 20 keV from a sequential SAMMY analysis of the most recent high-resolution neutron transmission and neutron capture cross-section measurements. Special care was taken in the analysis of the lowest s-wave resonances leading to resonance parameters slightly different from those of ENDF/B-VI (Moxon-Sowerby resonance parameters). The resolved-resonance range was extended to 20 keV, taking advantage of the high-resolution neutron transmission data of Harvey and neutron capture data of Macklin et al. Preliminary integral tests were performed with the new resonance parameters; thermal low-enriched benchmark calculations show an improvement of the keff prediction, mainly due to a 1.5% decrease of the capture cross section at 0.0253 eV and about a 0.4% decrease of the effective shielded resonance capture integral.

  12. Resonance in a weakly nonlinear system with slowly varying parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevorkian, J.

    1980-02-01

    Multiple-variable expansion procedures appropriate for nonlinear systems in resonance are surveyed by the use of the model of two coupled weakly nonlinear oscillators with either constant or slowly varying frequencies. In the autonomous problem it is shown that an n-variable expansion (where n depends on the order of accuracy desired) yields uniformly valid results. The problem of passage through resonance for the nonautonomous problem is also considered and the solution is described by constructing a sequence of three expansions. The solution before resonance is developed as a generalized multiple-variable expansion and is matched with an inner expansion valid during resonance. This latter is then matched with a postresonance solution and determines it completely. Numerical integrations are used to substantiate the theoretical results. The dominant effect of passage through resonance is shown to be the excitation of a higher-order oscillation beyond resonance. Contrary to the claim in a recent work, the total action of the system does not remain constant if one accounts for the leading perturbation terms in the postresonance solution. Instead, the total action goes from one constant value to another.

  13. Accurate quantum calculation of the bound and resonant rovibrational states of Li-(H2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yingsheng; Poirier, Bill

    2005-03-01

    In a recent paper [B. Poirier, Chem. Phys. 308, 305 (2005)] a full-dimensional quantum method for computing the rovibrational dynamics of triatomic systems was presented, incorporating three key features: (1) exact analytical treatment of Coriolis coupling, (2) three-body "effective potential," and (3) a single bend angle basis for all rotational states. In this paper, these ideas are applied to the Li-(H2) electrostatic complex, to compute all of the rovibrational bound state energies, and a number of resonance energies and widths, to very high accuracy (thousandths of a wave number). This application is very challenging, owing to the long-range nature of the interaction and to narrow level spacings near dissociation. Nevertheless, by combining the present method with a G4 symmetry-adapted phase-space-optimized representation, only modest basis sizes are required for which the matrices are amenable to direct diagonalization. Several new bound levels are reported, as compared with a previous calculation [D. T. Chang, G. Surratt, G. Ristroff, and G. I. Gellene, J. Chem. Phys. 116, 9188 (2002)]. The resonances exhibit a clear-cut separation into shape and Feshbach varieties, with the latter characterized by extremely long lifetimes (microseconds or longer).

  14. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis for the Rapid and Accurate Characterization of Hexacosanoylceramide.

    PubMed

    Ross, Charles W; Simonsick, William J; Bogusky, Michael J; Celikay, Recep W; Guare, James P; Newton, Randall C

    2016-06-28

    Ceramides are a central unit of all sphingolipids which have been identified as sites of biological recognition on cellular membranes mediating cell growth and differentiation. Several glycosphingolipids have been isolated, displaying immunomodulatory and anti-tumor activities. These molecules have generated considerable interest as potential vaccine adjuvants in humans. Accurate analyses of these and related sphingosine analogues are important for the characterization of structure, biological function, and metabolism. We report the complementary use of direct laser desorption ionization (DLDI), sheath flow electrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) and high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis for the rapid, accurate identification of hexacosanoylceramide and starting materials. DLDI does not require stringent sample preparation and yields representative ions. Sheath-flow ESI yields ions of the product and byproducts and was significantly better than monospray ESI due to improved compound solubility. Negative ion sheath flow ESI provided data of starting materials and products all in one acquisition as hexacosanoic acid does not ionize efficiently when ceramides are present. NMR provided characterization of these lipid molecules complementing the results obtained from MS analyses. NMR data was able to differentiate straight chain versus branched chain alkyl groups not easily obtained from mass spectrometry.

  15. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis for the Rapid and Accurate Characterization of Hexacosanoylceramide

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Charles W.; Simonsick, William J.; Bogusky, Michael J.; Celikay, Recep W.; Guare, James P.; Newton, Randall C.

    2016-01-01

    Ceramides are a central unit of all sphingolipids which have been identified as sites of biological recognition on cellular membranes mediating cell growth and differentiation. Several glycosphingolipids have been isolated, displaying immunomodulatory and anti-tumor activities. These molecules have generated considerable interest as potential vaccine adjuvants in humans. Accurate analyses of these and related sphingosine analogues are important for the characterization of structure, biological function, and metabolism. We report the complementary use of direct laser desorption ionization (DLDI), sheath flow electrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) and high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis for the rapid, accurate identification of hexacosanoylceramide and starting materials. DLDI does not require stringent sample preparation and yields representative ions. Sheath-flow ESI yields ions of the product and byproducts and was significantly better than monospray ESI due to improved compound solubility. Negative ion sheath flow ESI provided data of starting materials and products all in one acquisition as hexacosanoic acid does not ionize efficiently when ceramides are present. NMR provided characterization of these lipid molecules complementing the results obtained from MS analyses. NMR data was able to differentiate straight chain versus branched chain alkyl groups not easily obtained from mass spectrometry. PMID:27367671

  16. Magnetic resonance elastography is accurate in detecting advanced fibrosis in autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin; Malik, Neera; Yin, Meng; Smyrk, Thomas C; Czaja, Albert J; Ehman, Richard L; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K

    2017-01-01

    AIM To assess the value of magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) in detecting advanced fibrosis/cirrhosis in autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). METHODS In this retrospective study, 36 patients (19 treated and 17 untreated) with histologically confirmed AIH and liver biopsy performed within 3 mo of MRE were identified at a tertiary care referral center. Liver stiffness (LS) with MRE was calculated by a radiologist, and inflammation grade and fibrosis stage in liver biopsy was assessed by a pathologist in a blinded fashion. Two radiologists evaluated morphological features of cirrhosis on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Accuracy of MRE was compared to laboratory markers and MRI for detection of advanced fibrosis/cirrhosis. RESULTS Liver fibrosis stages of 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4 were present in 4, 6, 7, 6 and 13 patients respectively. There were no significant differences in distribution of fibrosis stage and inflammation grade between treated and untreated patient groups. LS with MRE demonstrated stronger correlation with liver fibrosis stage in comparison to laboratory markers for chronic liver disease (r = 0.88 vs -0.48-0.70). A trend of decreased mean LS in treated patients compared to untreated patients was observed (3.7 kPa vs 3.84 kPa) but was not statistically significant. MRE had an accuracy/sensitivity/specificity/positive predictive value/negative predictive value of 0.97/90%/100%/100%/90% and 0.98/92.3%/96%/92.3%/96% for detection of advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis, respectively. The performance of MRE was significantly better than laboratory tests for detection of advanced fibrosis (0.97 vs 0.53-0.80, P < 0.01), and cirrhosis (0.98 vs 0.58-0.80, P < 0.01) and better than conventional MRI for diagnosis of cirrhosis (0.98 vs 0.78, P = 0.002). CONCLUSION MRE is a promising modality for detection of advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis in patients with AIH with superior diagnostic accuracy compared to laboratory assessment and MRI. PMID:28223730

  17. Accurate Simulation of Resonance-Raman Spectra of Flexible Molecules: An Internal Coordinates Approach.

    PubMed

    Baiardi, Alberto; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-07-14

    The interpretation and analysis of experimental resonance-Raman (RR) spectra can be significantly facilitated by vibronic computations based on reliable quantum-mechanical (QM) methods. With the aim of improving the description of large and flexible molecules, our recent time-dependent formulation to compute vibrationally resolved electronic spectra, based on Cartesian coordinates, has been extended to support internal coordinates. A set of nonredundant delocalized coordinates is automatically generated from the molecular connectivity thanks to a new general and robust procedure. In order to validate our implementation, a series of molecules has been used as test cases. Among them, rigid systems show that normal modes based on Cartesian and delocalized internal coordinates provide equivalent results, but the latter set is much more convenient and reliable for systems characterized by strong geometric deformations associated with the electronic transition. The so-called Z-matrix internal coordinates, which perform well for chain molecules, are also shown to be poorly suited in the presence of cycles or nonstandard structures.

  18. Polynomial Fitting of DT-MRI Fiber Tracts Allows Accurate Estimation of Muscle Architectural Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Damon, Bruce M.; Heemskerk, Anneriet M.; Ding, Zhaohua

    2012-01-01

    Fiber curvature is a functionally significant muscle structural property, but its estimation from diffusion-tensor MRI fiber tracking data may be confounded by noise. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of polynomial fitting of fiber tracts for improving the accuracy and precision of fiber curvature (κ) measurements. Simulated image datasets were created in order to provide data with known values for κ and pennation angle (θ). Simulations were designed to test the effects of increasing inherent fiber curvature (3.8, 7.9, 11.8, and 15.3 m−1), signal-to-noise ratio (50, 75, 100, and 150), and voxel geometry (13.8 and 27.0 mm3 voxel volume with isotropic resolution; 13.5 mm3 volume with an aspect ratio of 4.0) on κ and θ measurements. In the originally reconstructed tracts, θ was estimated accurately under most curvature and all imaging conditions studied; however, the estimates of κ were imprecise and inaccurate. Fitting the tracts to 2nd order polynomial functions provided accurate and precise estimates of κ for all conditions except very high curvature (κ=15.3 m−1), while preserving the accuracy of the θ estimates. Similarly, polynomial fitting of in vivo fiber tracking data reduced the κ values of fitted tracts from those of unfitted tracts and did not change the θ values. Polynomial fitting of fiber tracts allows accurate estimation of physiologically reasonable values of κ, while preserving the accuracy of θ estimation. PMID:22503094

  19. Accurate kinetic parameter estimation during progress curve analysis of systems with endogenous substrate production.

    PubMed

    Goudar, Chetan T

    2011-10-01

    We have identified an error in the published integral form of the modified Michaelis-Menten equation that accounts for endogenous substrate production. The correct solution is presented and the error in both the substrate concentration, S, and the kinetic parameters Vm , Km , and R resulting from the incorrect solution was characterized. The incorrect integral form resulted in substrate concentration errors as high as 50% resulting in 7-50% error in kinetic parameter estimates. To better reflect experimental scenarios, noise containing substrate depletion data were analyzed by both the incorrect and correct integral equations. While both equations resulted in identical fits to substrate depletion data, the final estimates of Vm , Km , and R were different and Km and R estimates from the incorrect integral equation deviated substantially from the actual values. Another observation was that at R = 0, the incorrect integral equation reduced to the correct form of the Michaelis-Menten equation. We believe this combination of excellent fits to experimental data, albeit with incorrect kinetic parameter estimates, and the reduction to the Michaelis-Menten equation at R = 0 is primarily responsible for the incorrectness to go unnoticed. However, the resulting error in kinetic parameter estimates will lead to incorrect biological interpretation and we urge the use of the correct integral form presented in this study.

  20. Accurate parameters of the oldest known rocky-exoplanet hosting system: Kepler-10 revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Fogtmann-Schulz, Alexandra; Hinrup, Brian; Van Eylen, Vincent; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Kjeldsen, Hans; Silva Aguirre, Víctor; Tingley, Brandon

    2014-02-01

    Since the discovery of Kepler-10, the system has received considerable interest because it contains a small, rocky planet which orbits the star in less than a day. The system's parameters, announced by the Kepler team and subsequently used in further research, were based on only five months of data. We have reanalyzed this system using the full span of 29 months of Kepler photometric data, and obtained improved information about its star and the planets. A detailed asteroseismic analysis of the extended time series provides a significant improvement on the stellar parameters: not only can we state that Kepler-10 is the oldest known rocky-planet-harboring system at 10.41 ± 1.36 Gyr, but these parameters combined with improved planetary parameters from new transit fits gives us the radius of Kepler-10b to within just 125 km. A new analysis of the full planetary phase curve leads to new estimates on the planetary temperature and albedo, which remain degenerate in the Kepler band. Our modeling suggests that the flux level during the occultation is slightly lower than at the transit wings, which would imply that the nightside of this planet has a non-negligible temperature.

  1. Accurate Parameters for the Most Massive Stars in the Local Universe: the Brightest Eclipsing Binaries in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, José L.; Bonanos, Alceste; Stanek, Krzysztof

    2007-08-01

    Eclipsing binaries are the only systems that provide accurate fundamental parameters of distant stars. Currently, only a handful of accurate measurements of stars with masses between 40-80 Msun have been made. We propose to make accurate measurements of the masses, radii and luminosities of the most massive eclipsing binaries in M33. The results of this study will provide much needed constraints on theories that model the formation and evolution of massive stars and binary systems. Furthermore, it will provide vital statistics on the occurrence of massive binary twins, like the 80+80 solar masses WR 20a system and the 30+30 solar masses detached eclipsing binary in M33.

  2. Effects of relevant parameters on the bandgaps of acoustic metamaterials with multi-resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoqin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Rongqi; Lin, Jieqiong

    2016-04-01

    Locally resonant acoustic metamaterials with multi-resonators are generally regarded as a fine trend for managing the bandgaps, the different effects of relevant structural parameters on the bandgaps, which will be numerically investigated in this paper. A two-step homogenization method is extended to achieve the effective mass of multi-resonators metamaterial in the lattice system. As comparison, the dispersive wave propagation in lattice system and continuum model is studied. Then, the different effects of relevant parameters on the center frequencies and bandwidth of bandgaps are perfectly revealed, and the steady-state responses in the continuum models with purposed relevant parameters are additionally clarified. The related results can well confirm that the bandgaps exist around the undamped natural frequencies of internal resonators, and also their bandwidth can be efficiently controlled with the ensured center frequencies. Moreover, the design of purposed multi-resonators acoustic metamaterial in vibration control is presented and discussed by an example.

  3. Lower bound on reliability for Weibull distribution when shape parameter is not estimated accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Zhaofeng; Porter, Albert A.

    1990-01-01

    The mathematical relationships between the shape parameter Beta and estimates of reliability and a life limit lower bound for the two parameter Weibull distribution are investigated. It is shown that under rather general conditions, both the reliability lower bound and the allowable life limit lower bound (often called a tolerance limit) have unique global minimums over a range of Beta. Hence lower bound solutions can be obtained without assuming or estimating Beta. The existence and uniqueness of these lower bounds are proven. Some real data examples are given to show how these lower bounds can be easily established and to demonstrate their practicality. The method developed here has proven to be extremely useful when using the Weibull distribution in analysis of no-failure or few-failures data. The results are applicable not only in the aerospace industry but anywhere that system reliabilities are high.

  4. Lower bound on reliability for Weibull distribution when shape parameter is not estimated accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Zhaofeng; Porter, Albert A.

    1991-01-01

    The mathematical relationships between the shape parameter Beta and estimates of reliability and a life limit lower bound for the two parameter Weibull distribution are investigated. It is shown that under rather general conditions, both the reliability lower bound and the allowable life limit lower bound (often called a tolerance limit) have unique global minimums over a range of Beta. Hence lower bound solutions can be obtained without assuming or estimating Beta. The existence and uniqueness of these lower bounds are proven. Some real data examples are given to show how these lower bounds can be easily established and to demonstrate their practicality. The method developed here has proven to be extremely useful when using the Weibull distribution in analysis of no-failure or few-failures data. The results are applicable not only in the aerospace industry but anywhere that system reliabilities are high.

  5. Revised Charge Equilibration Parameters for More Accurate Hydration Free Energies of Alkanes.

    PubMed

    Davis, Joseph E; Patel, Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    We present a refined alkane charge equilibration (CHEQ) force field, improving our previously reported CHEQ alkane force field[1] to better reproduce experimental hydration free energies. Experimental hydration free energies of ethane, propane, butane, pentane, hexane, and heptane are reproduced to within 3.6% on average. We demonstrate that explicit polarization results in a shift in molecular dipole moment for water molecules associated with the alkane molecule. We also show that our new parameters do not have a significant effect on the alkane-water interactions as measured by the radial distribution function (RDF).

  6. Accurate prediction of severe allergic reactions by a small set of environmental parameters (NDVI, temperature).

    PubMed

    Notas, George; Bariotakis, Michail; Kalogrias, Vaios; Andrianaki, Maria; Azariadis, Kalliopi; Kampouri, Errika; Theodoropoulou, Katerina; Lavrentaki, Katerina; Kastrinakis, Stelios; Kampa, Marilena; Agouridakis, Panagiotis; Pirintsos, Stergios; Castanas, Elias

    2015-01-01

    Severe allergic reactions of unknown etiology,necessitating a hospital visit, have an important impact in the life of affected individuals and impose a major economic burden to societies. The prediction of clinically severe allergic reactions would be of great importance, but current attempts have been limited by the lack of a well-founded applicable methodology and the wide spatiotemporal distribution of allergic reactions. The valid prediction of severe allergies (and especially those needing hospital treatment) in a region, could alert health authorities and implicated individuals to take appropriate preemptive measures. In the present report we have collecterd visits for serious allergic reactions of unknown etiology from two major hospitals in the island of Crete, for two distinct time periods (validation and test sets). We have used the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), a satellite-based, freely available measurement, which is an indicator of live green vegetation at a given geographic area, and a set of meteorological data to develop a model capable of describing and predicting severe allergic reaction frequency. Our analysis has retained NDVI and temperature as accurate identifiers and predictors of increased hospital severe allergic reactions visits. Our approach may contribute towards the development of satellite-based modules, for the prediction of severe allergic reactions in specific, well-defined geographical areas. It could also probably be used for the prediction of other environment related diseases and conditions.

  7. Accurate Prediction of Severe Allergic Reactions by a Small Set of Environmental Parameters (NDVI, Temperature)

    PubMed Central

    Andrianaki, Maria; Azariadis, Kalliopi; Kampouri, Errika; Theodoropoulou, Katerina; Lavrentaki, Katerina; Kastrinakis, Stelios; Kampa, Marilena; Agouridakis, Panagiotis; Pirintsos, Stergios; Castanas, Elias

    2015-01-01

    Severe allergic reactions of unknown etiology,necessitating a hospital visit, have an important impact in the life of affected individuals and impose a major economic burden to societies. The prediction of clinically severe allergic reactions would be of great importance, but current attempts have been limited by the lack of a well-founded applicable methodology and the wide spatiotemporal distribution of allergic reactions. The valid prediction of severe allergies (and especially those needing hospital treatment) in a region, could alert health authorities and implicated individuals to take appropriate preemptive measures. In the present report we have collecterd visits for serious allergic reactions of unknown etiology from two major hospitals in the island of Crete, for two distinct time periods (validation and test sets). We have used the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), a satellite-based, freely available measurement, which is an indicator of live green vegetation at a given geographic area, and a set of meteorological data to develop a model capable of describing and predicting severe allergic reaction frequency. Our analysis has retained NDVI and temperature as accurate identifiers and predictors of increased hospital severe allergic reactions visits. Our approach may contribute towards the development of satellite-based modules, for the prediction of severe allergic reactions in specific, well-defined geographical areas. It could also probably be used for the prediction of other environment related diseases and conditions. PMID:25794106

  8. An Accurate and Generic Testing Approach to Vehicle Stability Parameters Based on GPS and INS

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Zhibin; Zhang, Hongtian; Zhang, Jinzhu

    2015-01-01

    With the development of the vehicle industry, controlling stability has become more and more important. Techniques of evaluating vehicle stability are in high demand. As a common method, usually GPS sensors and INS sensors are applied to measure vehicle stability parameters by fusing data from the two system sensors. Although prior model parameters should be recognized in a Kalman filter, it is usually used to fuse data from multi-sensors. In this paper, a robust, intelligent and precise method to the measurement of vehicle stability is proposed. First, a fuzzy interpolation method is proposed, along with a four-wheel vehicle dynamic model. Second, a two-stage Kalman filter, which fuses the data from GPS and INS, is established. Next, this approach is applied to a case study vehicle to measure yaw rate and sideslip angle. The results show the advantages of the approach. Finally, a simulation and real experiment is made to verify the advantages of this approach. The experimental results showed the merits of this method for measuring vehicle stability, and the approach can meet the design requirements of a vehicle stability controller. PMID:26690154

  9. An Accurate and Generic Testing Approach to Vehicle Stability Parameters Based on GPS and INS.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhibin; Zhang, Hongtian; Zhang, Jinzhu

    2015-12-04

    With the development of the vehicle industry, controlling stability has become more and more important. Techniques of evaluating vehicle stability are in high demand. As a common method, usually GPS sensors and INS sensors are applied to measure vehicle stability parameters by fusing data from the two system sensors. Although prior model parameters should be recognized in a Kalman filter, it is usually used to fuse data from multi-sensors. In this paper, a robust, intelligent and precise method to the measurement of vehicle stability is proposed. First, a fuzzy interpolation method is proposed, along with a four-wheel vehicle dynamic model. Second, a two-stage Kalman filter, which fuses the data from GPS and INS, is established. Next, this approach is applied to a case study vehicle to measure yaw rate and sideslip angle. The results show the advantages of the approach. Finally, a simulation and real experiment is made to verify the advantages of this approach. The experimental results showed the merits of this method for measuring vehicle stability, and the approach can meet the design requirements of a vehicle stability controller.

  10. SAMDIST: A Computer Code for Calculating Statistical Distributions for R-Matrix Resonance Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.

    1995-01-01

    The: SAMDIST computer code has been developed to calculate distribution of resonance parameters of the Reich-Moore R-matrix type. The program assumes the parameters are in the format compatible with that of the multilevel R-matrix code SAMMY. SAMDIST calculates the energy-level spacing distribution, the resonance width distribution, and the long-range correlation of the energy levels. Results of these calculations are presented in both graphic and tabular forms.

  11. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Herman

    2016-09-01

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3/2, 5/2, 7/2, and 9/2. These results may be used to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Heavy Element Chemistry program.

  12. Resonance Parameters of the Rho-Meson from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Feng, Karl Jansen, Dru Renner

    2011-05-01

    We perform a non-perturbative lattice calculation of the P-wave pion-pion scattering phase in the rho-meson decay channel using two flavors of maximally twisted mass fermions at pion masses ranging from 480 MeV to 290 MeV. Making use of finite-size methods, we evaluate the pion-pion scattering phase in the center-of-mass frame and two moving frames. Applying an effective range formula, we find a good description of our results for the scattering phase as a function of the energy covering the resonance region. This allows us to extract the rho-meson mass and decay width and to study their quark mass dependence.

  13. Accurate structure and dynamics of the metal-site of paramagnetic metalloproteins from NMR parameters using natural bond orbitals.

    PubMed

    Hansen, D Flemming; Westler, William M; Kunze, Micha B A; Markley, John L; Weinhold, Frank; Led, Jens J

    2012-03-14

    A natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis of unpaired electron spin density in metalloproteins is presented, which allows a fast and robust calculation of paramagnetic NMR parameters. Approximately 90% of the unpaired electron spin density occupies metal-ligand NBOs, allowing the majority of the density to be modeled by only a few NBOs that reflect the chemical bonding environment. We show that the paramagnetic relaxation rate of protons can be calculated accurately using only the metal-ligand NBOs and that these rates are in good agreement with corresponding rates measured experimentally. This holds, in particular, for protons of ligand residues where the point-dipole approximation breaks down. To describe the paramagnetic relaxation of heavy nuclei, also the electron spin density in the local orbitals must be taken into account. Geometric distance restraints for (15)N can be derived from the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and the Fermi contact shift when local NBOs are included in the analysis. Thus, the NBO approach allows us to include experimental paramagnetic NMR parameters of (15)N nuclei as restraints in a structure optimization protocol. We performed a molecular dynamics simulation and structure determination of oxidized rubredoxin using the experimentally obtained paramagnetic NMR parameters of (15)N. The corresponding structures obtained are in good agreement with the crystal structure of rubredoxin. Thus, the NBO approach allows an accurate description of the geometric structure and the dynamics of metalloproteins, when NMR parameters are available of nuclei in the immediate vicinity of the metal-site.

  14. Assessment of Gate Width Size on Lifetime-Based Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Parameter Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sez-Jade; Sinsuebphon, Nattawut; Intes, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) enables the observation of interactions at the nanoscale level through the use of fluorescence optical imaging techniques. In FRET, fluorescence lifetime imaging can be used to quantify the fluorescence lifetime changes of the donor molecule, which are associated with proximity between acceptor and donor molecules. Among the FRET parameters derived from fluorescence lifetime imaging, the percentage of donor that interacts with the acceptor (in proximity) can be estimated via model-based fitting. However, estimation of the lifetime parameters can be affected by the acquisition parameters such as the temporal characteristics of the imaging system. Herein, we investigate the effect of various gate widths on the accuracy of estimation of FRET parameters with focus on the near-infrared spectral window. Experiments were performed in silico, in vitro, and in vivo with gate width sizes ranging from 300 ps to 1000 ps in intervals of 100 ps. For all cases, the FRET parameters were retrieved accurately and the imaging acquisition time was decreased three-fold. These results indicate that increasing the gate width up to 1000 ps still allows for accurate quantification of FRET interactions even in the case of short lifetimes such as those encountered with near-infrared FRET pairs. PMID:26557647

  15. A Mathematical Assessment of the Precision of Parameters in Measuring Resonance Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golding, Elke M.; Golding, Raymund M.

    1998-12-01

    The accurate interpretation ofin vivomagnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) spectra requires a complete understanding of the associated noise-induced errors. In this paper, we address the effect of complex correlated noise patterns on the measurement of a set ofpeakparameters. This is examined initially at the level of a single spectral analysis followed by addressing the noise-induced errors associated with determining thesignalparameters from thepeakparameters. We describe a relatively simple method for calculating these errors for any correlated noise pattern in terms of the noise standard deviation and correlation length. The results are presented in such a way that an estimate of the errors may be made from a single MRS spectrum. We also explore how, under certain circumstances, the lineshape of the signal may be determined. We then apply these results to reexamine a set ofin vivo31P MRS spectra obtained from rat brain prior to and following moderate fluid percussion injury. The approach outlined in this paper will demonstrate how meaningful results may be obtained from spectra where the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is quite small and where knowledge of the precise shape of the signal and the detail of the noise pattern is unknown. In essence, we show how to determine the expected errors in the spectral parameters from an estimate of the SNR from a single spectrum, thereby allowing a more discriminative interpretation of the data.

  16. A Weibull statistics-based lignocellulose saccharification model and a built-in parameter accurately predict lignocellulose hydrolysis performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingyu; Han, Lijuan; Liu, Shasha; Zhao, Xuebing; Yang, Jinghua; Loh, Soh Kheang; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Chenxi; Fang, Xu

    2015-09-01

    Renewable energy from lignocellulosic biomass has been deemed an alternative to depleting fossil fuels. In order to improve this technology, we aim to develop robust mathematical models for the enzymatic lignocellulose degradation process. By analyzing 96 groups of previously published and newly obtained lignocellulose saccharification results and fitting them to Weibull distribution, we discovered Weibull statistics can accurately predict lignocellulose saccharification data, regardless of the type of substrates, enzymes and saccharification conditions. A mathematical model for enzymatic lignocellulose degradation was subsequently constructed based on Weibull statistics. Further analysis of the mathematical structure of the model and experimental saccharification data showed the significance of the two parameters in this model. In particular, the λ value, defined the characteristic time, represents the overall performance of the saccharification system. This suggestion was further supported by statistical analysis of experimental saccharification data and analysis of the glucose production levels when λ and n values change. In conclusion, the constructed Weibull statistics-based model can accurately predict lignocellulose hydrolysis behavior and we can use the λ parameter to assess the overall performance of enzymatic lignocellulose degradation. Advantages and potential applications of the model and the λ value in saccharification performance assessment were discussed.

  17. Radio frequency spectral characterization and model parameters extraction of high Q optical resonators

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Zeina; Boucher, Yann G.; Fernandez, Arnaud; Balac, Stéphane; Llopis, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    A microwave domain characterization approach is proposed to determine the properties of high quality factor optical resonators. This approach features a very high precision in frequency and aims to acquire a full knowledge of the complex transfer function (amplitude and phase) characterizing an optical resonator using a microwave vector network analyzer. It is able to discriminate between the different coupling regimes, from the under-coupling to the selective amplification, and it is used together with a model from which the main resonator parameters are extracted, i.e. coupling factor, intrinsic losses, phase slope, intrinsic and external quality factor. PMID:27251460

  18. New evaluation of the{sup 232}Th resonance parameters in the energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.; Leal, L. C.; Larson, N. M.

    2006-07-01

    Neutron resonance parameters of {sup 232}Th were obtained from a Reich-Moore SAMMY analysis of high-resolution neutron transmission measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Linear Accelerator (ORELA) by Olsen et al. in 1981 and of high-resolution neutron capture measurements performed recently at the Geel Linear Accelerator (GELINA (Belgium)) by Schillebeeckx et al. and at n-TOF (CERN (Switzerland)) by Aerts et al. The ORELA data were analyzed previously by Olsen using the Breit-Wigner multilevel code SIOB, and their results were used for the ENDF/B-VI evaluation. In our new analysis of the Olsen neutron transmissions using the modern computer code SAMMY, better accuracy is obtained for the resonance parameters by including recent experimental neutron capture data in the experimental data base. The experimental data base and the method of analysis are described in the report. Neutron transmissions and capture cross sections calculated with the resonance parameters are compared to the experimental values. A description is given of the statistical properties of the resonance parameters. The new evaluation produces a decrease in the capture resonance integral, and improves the prediction of integral thermal benchmarks. (authors)

  19. Some highlights in the evaluations of the thermal cross sections and resonance parameters of the actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Mughabghab, S.F.; Divadeenam, M.

    1981-01-01

    The resonance parameters and thermal cross sections of /sup 235/ /sup 238/U and /sup 239/ /sup 240/ /sup 241/ /sup 242/Pu are reevaluated by considering the measurements carried out since 1973. Capture, scattering, fission cross sections as well as resonance integrals are calculated from the parameters and are compared with experimental values with the objective of achieving consistency between calculations and measurements. The Dyson-Metha ..delta../sub 3/ statistical analysis was applied in order to calculate average level spacings. Calculations of average radiative widths based on systematics are carried out and are compared with experimental values as well as with Moore's and Lynn's estimates.

  20. The determination of electrical parameters of quartz crystal resonators with the consideration of dissipation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji; Zhao, Wenhua; Du, Jianke

    2006-12-22

    Recently, as the dissipation of quartz crystal through material viscosity is being considered in vibrations of piezoelectric plates, we have the opportunity to obtain electrical parameters from vibration solutions of a crystal plate representing an ideal resonator. Since the solutions are readily available with complex elastic constants from Mindlin plate equations for thickness-shear vibrations, the calculation of resistance and other parameters related to both mechanical deformation and electrical potential is straightforward. We start with the first-order Mindlin plate equations of a piezoelectric plate for the thickness-shear vibration analysis of a simple resonator model. The electrical parameters are derived with emphasis on the resistance that is related to the imaginary part of complex elastic constants, or the viscosity. All the electrical parameters are frequency dependent, enabling the study of the frequency behavior of crystal resonators with a direct formulation. Through the full consideration of complications like partial electrodes and supporting structures, we should be able obtain electrical parameters for practical applications in resonator design.

  1. Comparison of Resonance Parameter Covariance Generation using CONRAD and SAMMY Computer Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, Luiz C; De Saint Jean, C; Noguere, G

    2010-01-01

    Cross section evaluations in the resolved resonance region are based on formalisms derived from the R-matrix theory. As a result, the evaluations provide a set of resonance parameters that can be used to reproduce the experimental data reasonably well. The evaluated nuclear data are used in neutron transport calculations for the analysis and design of nuclear reactor systems, nuclear criticality safety analyses, etc. To achieve the desired accuracy on the nuclear system calculations, the questions frequently asked are how well the nuclear data are known and how the uncertainty in the nuclear data can be propagated into the final nuclear system results. There have been ongoing efforts at several research centers for generating data uncertainties in the resonance and high-energy regions. The biggest issue in relation to the covariance data is how good the calculated uncertainties are or whether the calculated uncertainties are in agreement with realistic uncertainties derived from an experimental nuclear system or nuclear benchmark. In this work an attempt is made to use two distinct and independently developed computer codes, CONRAD and SAMMY, to evaluate and generate covariance data in the resonance region. The verification study has been performed in support of the U.S. Nuclear Criticality Safety program (NCSP) as the NCSP is working to provide improved nuclear data files to support criticality safety analyses. The objective is to check the procedures and the methodologies used in the resonance region for covariance generation. The studies have been carried out using the 48Ti resolved resonance parameters.

  2. Very Broad X(4260) and the Resonance Parameters of the ψ(3D) Vector Charmonium State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beveren, Eef; Rupp, George; Segovia, J.

    2010-09-01

    We argue that the X(4260) enhancement contains a wealth of information on 1-- cc¯ spectroscopy. We discuss the shape of the X(4260) observed in the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-forbidden process e+e-→π+π-J/ψ, in particular, at and near vector charmonium resonances as well as open-charm threshold enhancements. The resulting very broad X(4260) structure does not seem to classify itself as a 1-- cc¯ resonance, but its detailed shape allows us to identify new vector charmonium states with higher statistics than in open-charm decay. Here, we estimate the resonance parameters of the ψ(3D). Our approach also provides an explanation for the odd dip in the π+π-J/ψ data precisely at the ψ(4415) resonance.

  3. Very Broad X(4260) and the Resonance Parameters of the {psi}(3D) Vector Charmonium State

    SciTech Connect

    Beveren, Eef van; Rupp, George; Segovia, J.

    2010-09-03

    We argue that the X(4260) enhancement contains a wealth of information on 1{sup --} cc spectroscopy. We discuss the shape of the X(4260) observed in the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-forbidden process e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}J/{psi}, in particular, at and near vector charmonium resonances as well as open-charm threshold enhancements. The resulting very broad X(4260) structure does not seem to classify itself as a 1{sup --} cc resonance, but its detailed shape allows us to identify new vector charmonium states with higher statistics than in open-charm decay. Here, we estimate the resonance parameters of the {psi}(3D). Our approach also provides an explanation for the odd dip in the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}J/{psi} data precisely at the {psi}(4415) resonance.

  4. Linear-In-The-Parameters Oblique Least Squares (LOLS) Provides More Accurate Estimates of Density-Dependent Survival

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Vasco M. N. C. S.; Engelen, Aschwin H.; Huanel, Oscar R.; Guillemin, Marie-Laure

    2016-01-01

    Survival is a fundamental demographic component and the importance of its accurate estimation goes beyond the traditional estimation of life expectancy. The evolutionary stability of isomorphic biphasic life-cycles and the occurrence of its different ploidy phases at uneven abundances are hypothesized to be driven by differences in survival rates between haploids and diploids. We monitored Gracilaria chilensis, a commercially exploited red alga with an isomorphic biphasic life-cycle, having found density-dependent survival with competition and Allee effects. While estimating the linear-in-the-parameters survival function, all model I regression methods (i.e, vertical least squares) provided biased line-fits rendering them inappropriate for studies about ecology, evolution or population management. Hence, we developed an iterative two-step non-linear model II regression (i.e, oblique least squares), which provided improved line-fits and estimates of survival function parameters, while robust to the data aspects that usually turn the regression methods numerically unstable. PMID:27936048

  5. Accurate reconstruction of the optical parameter distribution in participating medium based on the frequency-domain radiative transfer equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yao-Bin; Qi, Hong; Zhao, Fang-Zhou; Ruan, Li-Ming

    2016-12-01

    Reconstructing the distribution of optical parameters in the participating medium based on the frequency-domain radiative transfer equation (FD-RTE) to probe the internal structure of the medium is investigated in the present work. The forward model of FD-RTE is solved via the finite volume method (FVM). The regularization term formatted by the generalized Gaussian Markov random field model is used in the objective function to overcome the ill-posed nature of the inverse problem. The multi-start conjugate gradient (MCG) method is employed to search the minimum of the objective function and increase the efficiency of convergence. A modified adjoint differentiation technique using the collimated radiative intensity is developed to calculate the gradient of the objective function with respect to the optical parameters. All simulation results show that the proposed reconstruction algorithm based on FD-RTE can obtain the accurate distributions of absorption and scattering coefficients. The reconstructed images of the scattering coefficient have less errors than those of the absorption coefficient, which indicates the former are more suitable to probing the inner structure. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51476043), the Major National Scientific Instruments and Equipment Development Special Foundation of China (Grant No. 51327803), and the Foundation for Innovative Research Groups of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51121004).

  6. Accurate characterization of the stellar and orbital parameters of the exoplanetary system WASP-33 b from orbital dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, L.

    2016-01-01

    By using the most recently published Doppler tomography measurements and accurate theoretical modelling of the oblateness-driven orbital precessions, we tightly constrain some of the physical and orbital parameters of the planetary system hosted by the fast rotating star WASP-33. In particular, the measurements of the orbital inclination ip to the plane of the sky and of the sky-projected spin-orbit misalignment λ at two epochs about six years apart allowed for the determination of the longitude of the ascending node Ω and of the orbital inclination I to the apparent equatorial plane at the same epochs. As a consequence, average rates of change dot{Ω }_exp, dot{I}_exp of this two orbital elements, accurate to a ≈10-2 deg yr-1 level, were calculated as well. By comparing them to general theoretical expressions dot{Ω }_{J_2}, dot{I}_{J_2} for their precessions induced by an oblate star whose symmetry axis is arbitrarily oriented, we were able to determine the angle i⋆ between the line of sight the star's spin {S}^{star } and its first even zonal harmonic J_2^{star } obtaining i^{star } = {142}^{+10}_{-11} deg, J_2^{star } = 2.1^{+0.8}_{-0.5}times; 10^{-4}. As a by-product, the angle between {S}^{star } and the orbital angular momentum L is as large as about ψ ≈ 100 ° psi; ^{2008} = 99^{+5}_{-4} deg, ψ ^{{2014}} = 103^{+5}_{-4} deg and changes at a rate dot{ψ }= 0.{7}^{+1.5}_{-1.6} deg {yr}^{-1}. The predicted general relativistic Lense-Thirring precessions, of the order of ≈10-3deg yr-1, are, at present, about one order of magnitude below the measurability threshold.

  7. Evaluation of Silicon Neutron Resonance Parameters in the Energy Range Thermal to 1800 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.

    2002-09-30

    The evaluation of the neutron cross sections of the three stable isotopes of silicon in the energy range thermal to 20 MeV was performed by Hetrick et al. for ENDF/B-VI (Evaluated Nuclear Data File). Resonance parameters were obtained in the energy range thermal to 1500 keV from a SAMMY analysis of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory experimental neutron transmission data. A new measurement of the capture cross section of natural silicon in the energy range 1 to 700 keV has recently been performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. Results of this measurement were used in a SAMMY reevaluation of the resonance parameters, allowing determination of the capture width of a large number of resonances. The experimental data base is described; properties of the resonance parameters are given. For the first time the direct neutron capture component has been taken into account from the calculation by Rauscher et al. in the energy range from thermal to 1 MeV. Results of benchmark calculations are also given. The new evaluation is available in the ENDF/B-VI format.

  8. Stochastic Parameter Resonance of Road-Vehicle Systems and Related Bifurcation Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedig, Walter V.

    The paper investigates stochastic dynamics of road-vehicle systems and related bifurcation problems. The ride on rough roads generates vertical car vibrations whose root-mean-squares are resonant for critical car speeds and vanish when the car velocity is increasing, infinitely. These investigations are extended to wheel suspensions with progressive spring characteristics. For weak but still positive damping, the car vibrations become unstable when the velocity reaches the parameter resonance near twice the critical speed bifurcating into stochastic chaos of larger non-stationary car vibrations.

  9. Dependence of radial thermal diffusivity on parameters of toroidal plasma affected by resonant magnetic perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, Ryutaro; Nunami, Masanori; Satake, Shinsuke; Takamaru, Hisanori; Okamoto, Masao

    2013-06-01

    We investigate how the neoclassical thermal diffusivity of an axisymmetric toroidal plasma is modified by the effect of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs), using a drift-kinetic simulation code for calculating the radial thermal diffusivity of ion in the perturbed region under an assumption of zero electric field. Here, the perturbed region is assumed to be generated on and near the resonance surfaces, and is wedged in between the regular closed magnetic surfaces. We find that the dependence of the radial thermal diffusivity on parameters of the toroidal plasma is represented as \\chi_r=\\chi_r^{(0)} \\{1+ c_0\\,(\\omega_b/\

  10. Accurate determination of the fine-structure intervals in the 3P ground states of C-13 and C-12 by far-infrared laser magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooksy, A. L.; Saykally, R. J.; Brown, J. M.; Evenson, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    Accurate values are presented for the fine-structure intervals in the 3P ground state of neutral atomic C-12 and C-13 as obtained from laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The rigorous analysis of C-13 hyperfine structure, the measurement of resonant fields for C-12 transitions at several additional far-infrared laser frequencies, and the increased precision of the C-12 measurements, permit significant improvement in the evaluation of these energies relative to earlier work. These results will expedite the direct and precise measurement of these transitions in interstellar sources and should assist in the determination of the interstellar C-12/C-13 abundance ratio.

  11. Note: Modified π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke model for dual-mode Lamb-wave resonator with precise two-port Y-parameter characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Hong, Yan; Goh, Wang Ling; Mu, Xiaojing

    2016-10-01

    Dual-mode Lamb-wave resonator has become a powerful component for clock reference and sensing applications, enabling efficient compensations of temperature effects, concurrent measurements of multiple environmental parameters, etc. An equivalent circuit model for the dual-mode Lamb-wave resonator is indispensable as it provides a means as well as being an effective tool for evaluating device characteristics and to aid the designing of circuitry for the resonators. This could be the first time ever that an efficient equivalent-circuit model, i.e., modified π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke model for dual-mode Lamb-wave resonators is reported. Evaluated by experiments, this model attains noteworthy agreements on both the magnitudes and phases of Y11 and Y21 of the measurement results. Compared to literature, the proposed model is capable of modeling the dual resonances efficiently. Moreover, this work also proves more accurate when viewing the Y-parameters across a wide frequency range. The gained features of this model are most beneficial for the analysis of the dual-mode Lamb-wave resonator and also for the designing of circuits.

  12. Note: Modified π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke model for dual-mode Lamb-wave resonator with precise two-port Y-parameter characterizations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Hong, Yan; Goh, Wang Ling; Mu, Xiaojing

    2016-10-01

    Dual-mode Lamb-wave resonator has become a powerful component for clock reference and sensing applications, enabling efficient compensations of temperature effects, concurrent measurements of multiple environmental parameters, etc. An equivalent circuit model for the dual-mode Lamb-wave resonator is indispensable as it provides a means as well as being an effective tool for evaluating device characteristics and to aid the designing of circuitry for the resonators. This could be the first time ever that an efficient equivalent-circuit model, i.e., modified π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke model for dual-mode Lamb-wave resonators is reported. Evaluated by experiments, this model attains noteworthy agreements on both the magnitudes and phases of Y11 and Y21 of the measurement results. Compared to literature, the proposed model is capable of modeling the dual resonances efficiently. Moreover, this work also proves more accurate when viewing the Y-parameters across a wide frequency range. The gained features of this model are most beneficial for the analysis of the dual-mode Lamb-wave resonator and also for the designing of circuits.

  13. Compound piezoelectric cylindrical resonators as sensors of the rheological parameters of viscoelastic media.

    PubMed

    Kiełczyński, Piotr; Szalewski, Marek

    2007-06-01

    The electro-elastic behavior of a viscoelastically loaded layered cylindrical resonator (sensor) comprising two coupled hollow cylinders is presented. The inner cylinder is a piezoelectric ceramic tube. The outer cylinder is a non-piezoelectric (passive) metallic cylinder. An analytical formula for the electrical admittance of a compound layered cylindrical resonator loaded with a viscoelastic liquid is established. Admittance (conductance) diagrams were obtained using a continuum electromechanical model. The established analytical formulas enable the determination of the influence of the liquid viscosity, material, and geometrical parameters of a compound cylindrical resonator on the response characteristics of the compound sensor. In the paper, the sensor implications resulting from the performed analysis are described. Moreover, the algorithm of the method developed by the authors to evaluate the rheological parameters of a viscoelastic liquid is presented. Good agreement between the theoretical results and experimental data is shown. The analysis presented in this paper can be utilized for the design and construction of cylindrical piezoelectric viscosity sensors, annular accelerometers, filters, transducers, and multilayer resonators.

  14. Parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy and its application to weak signal detection

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinjing; Zhang, Tao

    2015-02-15

    The parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy (PSRSE) method is introduced for the detection of a very weak signal in the presence of strong noise. The effect of stochastic resonance on the detection is optimized using parameters obtained in spectral entropy analysis. Upon processing employing the PSRSE method, the amplitude of the weak signal is enhanced and the noise power is reduced, so that the frequency of the signal can be estimated with greater precision through spectral analysis. While the improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio is similar to that obtained using the Duffing oscillator algorithm, the computational cost reduces from O(N{sup 2}) to O(N). The PSRSE approach is applied to the frequency measurement of a weak signal made by a vortex flow meter. The results are compared with those obtained applying the Duffing oscillator algorithm.

  15. Assignment of resonances in dissociative recombination of HD{sup +} ions: High-resolution measurements compared with accurate computations

    SciTech Connect

    Waffeu Tamo, F. O.; Buhr, H.; Schwalm, D.; Motapon, O.; Altevogt, S.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.; Grieser, M.; Lammich, L.; Lestinsky, M.; Motsch, M.; Novotny, S.; Orlov, D. A.; Pedersen, H. B.; Sprenger, F.; Weigel, U.; Wolf, A.; Nevo, I.; Urbain, X.; Schneider, I. F.

    2011-08-15

    The collision-energy resolved rate coefficient for dissociative recombination of HD{sup +} ions in the vibrational ground state is measured using the photocathode electron target at the heavy-ion storage ring TSR. Rydberg resonances associated with rovibrational excitation of the HD{sup +} core are scanned as a function of the electron collision energy with an instrumental broadening below 1 meV in the low-energy limit. The measurement is compared to calculations using multichannel quantum defect theory, accounting for rotational structure and interactions and considering the six lowest rotational energy levels as initial ionic states. Using thermal-equilibrium-level populations at 300 K to approximate the experimental conditions, close correspondence between calculated and measured structures is found up to the first vibrational excitation threshold of the cations near 0.24 eV. Detailed assignments, including naturally broadened and overlapping Rydberg resonances, are performed for all structures up to 0.024 eV. Resonances from purely rotational excitation of the ion core are found to have similar strengths as those involving vibrational excitation. A dominant low-energy resonance is assigned to contributions from excited rotational states only. The results indicate strong modifications in the energy dependence of the dissociative recombination rate coefficient through the rotational excitation of the parent ions, and underline the need for studies with rotationally cold species to obtain results reflecting low-temperature ionized media.

  16. A laboratory study to estimate pore geometric parameters of sandstones using complex conductivity and nuclear magnetic resonance for permeability prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, Gordon; Keating, Kristina; Binley, Andrew; Slater, Lee

    2016-06-01

    We estimate parameters from the Katz and Thompson permeability model using laboratory complex electrical conductivity (CC) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data to build permeability models parameterized with geophysical measurements. We use the Katz and Thompson model based on the characteristic hydraulic length scale, determined from mercury injection capillary pressure estimates of pore throat size, and the intrinsic formation factor, determined from multisalinity conductivity measurements, for this purpose. Two new permeability models are tested, one based on CC data and another that incorporates CC and NMR data. From measurements made on forty-five sandstone cores collected from fifteen different formations, we evaluate how well the CC relaxation time and the NMR transverse relaxation times compare to the characteristic hydraulic length scale and how well the formation factor estimated from CC parameters compares to the intrinsic formation factor. We find: (1) the NMR transverse relaxation time models the characteristic hydraulic length scale more accurately than the CC relaxation time (R2 of 0.69 and 0.33 and normalized root mean square errors (NRMSE) of 0.16 and 0.21, respectively); (2) the CC estimated formation factor is well correlated with the intrinsic formation factor (NRMSE=0.23). We demonstrate that that permeability estimates from the joint-NMR-CC model (NRMSE=0.13) compare favorably to estimates from the Katz and Thompson model (NRMSE=0.074). This model advances the capability of the Katz and Thompson model by employing parameters measureable in the field giving it the potential to more accurately estimate permeability using geophysical measurements than are currently possible.

  17. A parameter study of mode conversion at ion-ion hybrid resonances for ICRF-heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alava, M. J.; Heikkinen, J. A.

    1992-04-01

    By solving the wave equation for the radial electric field with constant poloidal electric field around the resonance layer of the fast Alfvén wave, various complex characteristics of mode conversion physics can be elucidated and analyzed for ion cyclotron heating of tokamaks. The validity of the Budden and tunnelling model [Ngan, Y. C. and Swanson, D. G., Phys. Fluids 20, 1920 (1977)] for the conversion studies is explored, and the conversion coefficient for the ion-ion hybrid resonance in the presence of cyclotron damping is found in closed form. The analytical results are compared with the numerical solution of the full wave equations expanded to second order in ion Larmor radius. It is found that the standard tunnelling solutions can be erroneous, not only in the case of strong damping, but also when the linearization of the plasma parameters around the resonance, peculiar to the tunnelling model, becomes inaccurate. The effects of the damping and cavity resonances on the conversion are separated in the derived analytical estimates, and the limits of the local theory of conversion are determined.

  18. Study of dual wavelength composite output of solid state laser based on adjustment of resonator parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Nie, Jinsong; Wang, Xi; Hu, Yuze

    2016-10-01

    The 1064nm fundamental wave (FW) and the 532nm second harmonic wave (SHW) of Nd:YAG laser have been widely applied in many fields. In some military applications requiring interference in both visible and near-infrared spectrum range, the de-identification interference technology based on the dual wavelength composite output of FW and SHW offers an effective way of making the device or equipment miniaturized and low cost. In this paper, the application of 1064nm and 532nm dual-wavelength composite output technology in military electro-optical countermeasure is studied. A certain resonator configuration that can achieve composite laser output with high power, high beam quality and high repetition rate is proposed. Considering the thermal lens effect, the stability of this certain resonator is analyzed based on the theory of cavity transfer matrix. It shows that with the increase of thermal effect, the intracavity fundamental mode volume decreased, resulting the peak fluctuation of cavity stability parameter. To explore the impact the resonator parameters does to characteristics and output ratio of composite laser, the solid-state laser's dual-wavelength composite output models in both continuous and pulsed condition are established by theory of steady state equation and rate equation. Throughout theoretical simulation and analysis, the optimal KTP length and best FW transmissivity are obtained. The experiment is then carried out to verify the correctness of theoretical calculation result.

  19. Parameter optimization analysis to minimize the polarization error in a localized thermal tunable fiber ring resonator gyro.

    PubMed

    Bobbili, Prasada Rao; Nayak, Jagannath; Pinnoji, Prerana Dabral; Rama Koti Reddy, D V

    2016-03-10

    The accuracy of the resonant frequency servo loop is a major concern for the high-performance operation of a resonant fiber optic gyro. For instance, a bias error as large as tens or even hundreds of degrees/hour has been observed at the demodulated output of the resonant frequency servo loop. The traditional frequency servo mechanism is not an efficient tool to address this problem. In our previous work, we proposed a novel method to minimize the laser frequency noise to the level of the shot noise by refractive index modulation by a thermally tunable resonator. In this paper, we performed the parameter optimization for the resonator coil, multifunction integrated-optics chip, and couplers by the transition matrix using the Jones matrix methodology to minimize the polarization error. With the optimized parameter values, we achieved the bias value of the resonator fiber optic gyro to 1.924°/h.

  20. Parameter allocation of parallel array bistable stochastic resonance and its application in communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Wang, You-Guo; Zhai, Qi-Qing; Liu, Jin

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a parameter allocation scheme in a parallel array bistable stochastic resonance-based communication system (P-BSR-CS) to improve the performance of weak binary pulse amplitude modulated (BPAM) signal transmissions. The optimal parameter allocation policy of the P-BSR-CS is provided to minimize the bit error rate (BER) and maximize the channel capacity (CC) under the adiabatic approximation condition. On this basis, we further derive the best parameter selection theorem in realistic communication scenarios via variable transformation. Specifically, the P-BSR structure design not only brings the robustness of parameter selection optimization, where the optimal parameter pair is not fixed but variable in quite a wide range, but also produces outstanding system performance. Theoretical analysis and simulation results indicate that in the P-BSR-CS the proposed parameter allocation scheme yields considerable performance improvement, particularly in very low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) environments. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61179027), the Qinglan Project of Jiangsu Province of China (Grant No. QL06212006), and the University Postgraduate Research and Innovation Project of Jiangsu Province (Grant Nos. KYLX15_0829, KYLX15_0831).

  1. Insights on the role of accurate state estimation in coupled model parameter estimation by a conceptual climate model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaolin; Zhang, Shaoqing; Lin, Xiaopei; Li, Mingkui

    2017-03-01

    The uncertainties in values of coupled model parameters are an important source of model bias that causes model climate drift. The values can be calibrated by a parameter estimation procedure that projects observational information onto model parameters. The signal-to-noise ratio of error covariance between the model state and the parameter being estimated directly determines whether the parameter estimation succeeds or not. With a conceptual climate model that couples the stochastic atmosphere and slow-varying ocean, this study examines the sensitivity of state-parameter covariance on the accuracy of estimated model states in different model components of a coupled system. Due to the interaction of multiple timescales, the fast-varying atmosphere with a chaotic nature is the major source of the inaccuracy of estimated state-parameter covariance. Thus, enhancing the estimation accuracy of atmospheric states is very important for the success of coupled model parameter estimation, especially for the parameters in the air-sea interaction processes. The impact of chaotic-to-periodic ratio in state variability on parameter estimation is also discussed. This simple model study provides a guideline when real observations are used to optimize model parameters in a coupled general circulation model for improving climate analysis and predictions.

  2. Determination of acoustic nonlinearity parameter (β) using nonlinear resonance ultrasound spectroscopy: Theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Chakrapani, Sunil Kishore; Barnard, Daniel J

    2017-02-01

    The present article investigates the possibility of using nonlinear resonance ultrasound spectroscopy to determine the acoustic nonlinearity parameter (β) and third order elastic constant by developing an inverse problem. A theoretical framework was developed for nonlinear forced vibration of a cantilever beam using material nonlinearity (stress-strain nonlinearity). The resulting nonlinear equation was solved using method of multiple time scales to obtain the nonlinear frequency shifts. The present works focuses only on classical nonlinearity and, therefore, a diverse group of intact, classic nonlinear materials were chosen. The samples were tested using nonlinear resonance ultrasound spectroscopy, and the developed theory was used to invert the experimental frequency shifts to obtain the nonlinearity parameters. The third order elastic constants and β were calculated using their analytical relationship with the nonlinearity parameter. The experimentally determined C111 and β values for all various materials agree well with literature values. In addition to determining β, determination of the sign, or phase of β was also explored theoretically and experimentally.

  3. Exact two-component relativistic theory for nuclear magnetic resonance parameters.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiming; Liu, Wenjian; Xiao, Yunlong; Cheng, Lan

    2009-08-28

    An exact two-component (X2C) relativistic theory for nuclear magnetic resonance parameters is obtained by first a single block-diagonalization of the matrix representation of the Dirac operator in a magnetic-field-dependent basis and then a magnetic perturbation expansion of the resultant two-component Hamiltonian and transformation matrices. Such a matrix formulation is not only simple but also general in the sense that the various ways of incorporating the field dependence can be treated in a unified manner. The X2C dia- and paramagnetic terms agree individually with the corresponding four-component ones up to machine accuracy for any basis.

  4. Symmetric Resonance Charge Exchange Cross Section Based on Impact Parameter Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, Kazem; Murphy, Kendrah; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Using a two-state impact parameter approximation, a calculation has been carried out to obtain symmetric resonance charge transfer cross sections between nine ions and their parent atoms or molecules. Calculation is based on a two-dimensional numerical integration. The method is mostly suited for hydrogenic and some closed shell atoms. Good agreement has been obtained with the results of laboratory measurements for the ion-atom pairs H+-H, He+-He, and Ar+-Ar. Several approximations in a similar published calculation have been eliminated.

  5. A magnetic resonance imaging study on the articulatory and acoustic speech parameters of Malay vowels.

    PubMed

    Zourmand, Alireza; Mirhassani, Seyed Mostafa; Ting, Hua-Nong; Bux, Shaik Ismail; Ng, Kwan Hoong; Bilgen, Mehmet; Jalaludin, Mohd Amin

    2014-07-25

    The phonetic properties of six Malay vowels are investigated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize the vocal tract in order to obtain dynamic articulatory parameters during speech production. To resolve image blurring due to the tongue movement during the scanning process, a method based on active contour extraction is used to track tongue contours. The proposed method efficiently tracks tongue contours despite the partial blurring of MRI images. Consequently, the articulatory parameters that are effectively measured as tongue movement is observed, and the specific shape of the tongue and its position for all six uttered Malay vowels are determined.Speech rehabilitation procedure demands some kind of visual perceivable prototype of speech articulation. To investigate the validity of the measured articulatory parameters based on acoustic theory of speech production, an acoustic analysis based on the uttered vowels by subjects has been performed. As the acoustic speech and articulatory parameters of uttered speech were examined, a correlation between formant frequencies and articulatory parameters was observed. The experiments reported a positive correlation between the constriction location of the tongue body and the first formant frequency, as well as a negative correlation between the constriction location of the tongue tip and the second formant frequency. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is an effective tool for the dynamic study of speech production.

  6. Theoretical calculations of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance parameters of liquid phase Orotic acid radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarikaya, Ebru Karakaş; Dereli, Ömer

    2017-02-01

    To obtain liquid phase molecular structure, conformational analysis of Orotic acid was performed and six conformers were determined. For these conformations, eight possible radicals were modelled by using Density Functional Theory computations with respect to molecular structure. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance parameters of these model radicals were calculated and then they were compared with the experimental ones. Geometry optimizations of the molecule and modeled radicals were performed using Becke's three-parameter hybrid-exchange functional combined with the Lee-Yang-Parr correlation functional of Density Functional Theory and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets in p-dioxane solution. Because Orotic acid can be mutagenic in mammalian somatic cells and it is also mutagenic for bacteria and yeast, it has been studied.

  7. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Enhancement of the efficiency and control of emission parameters of an unstable-resonator chemical oxygen—iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreisho, A. S.; Lobachev, V. V.; Savin, A. V.; Strakhov, S. Yu; Trilis, A. V.

    2007-07-01

    The outlook is considered for the development of a high-power supersonic flowing chemical oxygen—iodine laser operating as an amplifier and controlled by radiation from a master oscillator by using an unstable resonator with a hole-coupled mirror. The influence of the seed radiation intensity, the coupling-hole diameter, the active-medium length, and the magnification factor on the parameters of laser radiation is analysed. It is shown that the use of such resonators is most advisable in medium-power oxygen—iodine lasers for which classical unstable resonators are inefficient because of their low magnification factors. The use of unstable resonators with a hole-coupled mirror and injection provides the control of radiation parameters and a considerable increase in the output power and brightness of laser radiation.

  8. Reevaluation and Validation of the {sup 241}Pu Resonance Parameters in the Energy Range Thermal to 20 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.; Leal, L.C.; Courcelle, A.; Santamarina, A.

    2005-05-15

    A new SAMMY analysis of the {sup 241}Pu resonance parameters from thermal to 20 eV is presented. This evaluation takes into account the trends given by integral experiments [post-irradiation experiments performed in French pressurized water reactors (PWRs)]. Compared to the previous evaluations performed by Derrien and de Saussure, the capture cross section increases especially in the 0.26-eV resonance. It is shown that the new resonance parameters proposed in this work improve the prediction of the {sup 242}Pu buildup in a PWR, which was significantly underestimated with the previous evaluations.

  9. Numerical parameter constraints for accurate PIC-DSMC simulation of breakdown from arc initiation to stable arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Christopher; Hopkins, Matthew; Moore, Stan; Boerner, Jeremiah; Cartwright, Keith

    2015-09-01

    Simulation of breakdown is important for understanding and designing a variety of applications such as mitigating undesirable discharge events. Such simulations need to be accurate through early time arc initiation to late time stable arc behavior. Here we examine constraints on the timestep and mesh size required for arc simulations using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method with direct simulation Monte Carlo (DMSC) collisions. Accurate simulation of electron avalanche across a fixed voltage drop and constant neutral density (reduced field of 1000 Td) was found to require a timestep ~ 1/100 of the mean time between collisions and a mesh size ~ 1/25 the mean free path. These constraints are much smaller than the typical PIC-DSMC requirements for timestep and mesh size. Both constraints are related to the fact that charged particles are accelerated by the external field. Thus gradients in the electron energy distribution function can exist at scales smaller than the mean free path and these must be resolved by the mesh size for accurate collision rates. Additionally, the timestep must be small enough that the particle energy change due to the fields be small in order to capture gradients in the cross sections versus energy. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Study and Optimization of CPT Resonance Parameters in 87 Rb/Ar/Ne Microcells Aimed for Application in Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masian, Y.; Sivak, A.; Sevostianov, D.; Vassiliev, V.; Velichansky, V.

    The paper shows the presents results of studies of small-size rubidium cells with argon and neon buffer gases, produced by a patent pended technique of laser welding [Fishman et al. (2014)]. Cells were designed for miniature frequency standard. Temperature dependence of the frequency of the coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance was measured and used to optimize the ratio of partial pressures of buffer gases. The influence of duration and regime of annealing on the CPT-resonance frequency drift was investigated. The parameters of the FM modulation of laser current for two cases which correspond to the highest amplitude of CPT resonance and to the smallest light shifts of the resonance frequency were determined. The temperature dependences of the CPT resonance frequency were found to be surprisingly different in the two cases. A non-linear dependence of CPT resonance frequency on the temperature of the cell with the two extremes was revealed for one of these cases.

  11. Prediction of hydraulic parameters from block joint inversion of magnetic resonance and vertical electric soundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, T.; Müller-Petke, M.

    2012-04-01

    For assessing the impact of climate changes on salinity of coastal aquifers, numerical modelling needs to be done. As input, the spatial distribution of the parameters porosity, hydraulic conductivity and salt concentrations is needed. Airborne resistivity data are available that gives hints to fluid conductivity. Magnetic resonance soundings (MRS) can provide free water content directly yielding porosity, which in turn is needed for fluid conductivities and thus TDS concentrations. Furthermore, hydraulic conductivities can be retrieved by empirical relations using porosity and decay times. For having a unique model with all three primary parameters, vertical electrical and magnetic resonance soundings are inverted jointly using a block discretization. The MRS data were preprocessed using noise cancellation, despiking and a new gate integration scheme. Data errors were derived from fitting and include the effect of gating. Since the resistivity model affects the MRS inversion but demands an extensive kernel calculation, resistivity is updated only once. After inversion, a systematic model variation is done in order to retrieve confidence intervals of the primary and secondary parameters. We apply the methodology to several soundings at the North Sea Island Borkum, where the dynamics of the fresh/salt water interface is currently investigated. All soundings exhibit a very good data quality. One sounding close to a research borehole verifies the approach qualitatively. Another sounding was done to calibrate the petrophysical parameters using a pumping test. Finally, it is applied to a sounding in the flooding area. Whereas single MRS and VES data can be explained by a 3-layer and 4-layer model, respectively, a 5-layer model is needed to find a comprehensive model. Even though porosities are fairly constant, we can distinguish lithology and salinity due to the combination of resistivity and decay time. This case shows two fresh/salt water interfaces separated by a

  12. Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions

    PubMed Central

    Costabel, Stephan; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2013-01-01

    [1] For characterizing water flow in the vadose zone, the water retention curve (WRC) of the soil must be known. Because conventional WRC measurements demand much time and effort in the laboratory, alternative methods with shortened measurement duration are desired. The WRC can be estimated, for instance, from the cumulative pore size distribution (PSD) of the investigated material. Geophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry have successfully been applied to recover PSDs of sandstones and limestones. It is therefore expected that the multiexponential analysis of the NMR signal from water-saturated loose sediments leads to a reliable estimation of the WRC. We propose an approach to estimate the WRC using the cumulative NMR relaxation time distribution and approximate it with the well-known van-Genuchten (VG) model. Thereby, the VG parameter n, which controls the curvature of the WRC, is of particular interest, because it is the essential parameter to predict the relative hydraulic conductivity. The NMR curves are calibrated with only two conventional WRC measurements, first, to determine the residual water content and, second, to define a fixed point that relates the relaxation time to a corresponding capillary pressure. We test our approach with natural and artificial soil samples and compare the NMR-based results to WRC measurements using a pressure plate apparatus and to WRC predictions from the software ROSETTA. We found that for sandy soils n can reliably be estimated with NMR, whereas for samples with clay and silt contents higher than 10% the estimation fails. This is the case when the hydraulic properties of the soil are mainly controlled by the pore constrictions. For such samples, the sensitivity of the NMR method for the pore bodies hampers a plausible WRC estimation. Citation: Costabel, S., and U. Yaramanci (2013), Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions, Water

  13. Liver steatosis in pre-transplant liver biopsies can be quantified rapidly and accurately by nuclear magnetic resonance analysis.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Stefanie; Myland, Cathrin; Swoboda, Sandra; Gallinat, Anja; Minor, Thomas; Lehmann, Nils; Thie, Michael; Kälsch, Julia; Pott, Leona; Canbay, Ali; Bajanowski, Thomas; Reis, Henning; Paul, Andreas; Baba, Hideo A

    2017-02-01

    Donor livers marginally acceptable or acceptable according to extended criteria are more frequently transplanted due to the growing discrepancy between demand and availability of donor organs. One type of marginally acceptable graft is a steatotic donor liver, because it is more sensitive to ischemia-reperfusion injury. Thus, quantitative assessment of steatosis is crucial prior to liver transplantation. Extent of steatosis of 49 pre-reperfusion liver biopsies from patients who received orthotopic liver transplantation was assessed by three techniques: semi-quantitative histological evaluation, computerized histomorphometry, and NMR-based estimation of fat content. The findings were correlated to clinical data and to histological examination of corresponding post-reperfusion biopsies for quantification of ischemia-reperfusion injury. We found that values obtained through all three assessment methods were positively correlated. None of the values obtained by the three applied methods correlated with clinical outcome or extent of ischemia-reperfusion injury. Quantitative evaluation of steatosis by NMR yields results comparable to histological and morphometrical assessment. This technique is rapid (<5 min), accurately quantifies fat in donor livers, and provides results that can be used when evaluation by a pathologist is not available.

  14. Using prior knowledge in SVD-based parameter estimation for magnetic resonance spectroscopy--the ATP example.

    PubMed

    Stoica, Petre; Selén, Yngve; Sandgren, Niclas; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2004-09-01

    We introduce the knowledge-based singular value decomposition (KNOB-SVD) method for exploiting prior knowledge in magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy based on the SVD of the data matrix. More specifically, we assume that the MR data are well modeled by the superposition of a given number of exponentially damped sinusoidal components and that the dampings alphakappa, frequencies omegakappa, and complex amplitudes rhokappa of some components satisfy the following relations: alphakappa = alpha (alpha = unknown), omegakappa = omega + (kappa- 1)delta (omega = unknown, delta = known), and rhokappa = Ckapparho (rho = unknown, ckappa = known real constants). The adenosine triphosphate (ATP) complex, which has one triple peak and two double peaks whose dampings, frequencies, and amplitudes may in some cases be known to satisfy the above type of relations, is used as a vehicle for describing our SVD-based method throughout the paper. By means of numerical examples, we show that our method provides more accurate parameter estimates than a commonly used general-purpose SVD-based method and a previously suggested prior knowledge-based SVD method.

  15. Characterization of condenser microphones under different environmental conditions for accurate speed of sound measurements with acoustic resonators.

    PubMed

    Guianvarc'h, Cécile; Gavioso, Roberto M; Benedetto, Giuliana; Pitre, Laurent; Bruneau, Michel

    2009-07-01

    Condenser microphones are more commonly used and have been extensively modeled and characterized in air at ambient temperature and static pressure. However, several applications of interest for metrology and physical acoustics require to use these transducers in significantly different environmental conditions. Particularly, the extremely accurate determination of the speed of sound in monoatomic gases, which is pursued for a determination of the Boltzmann constant k by an acoustic method, entails the use of condenser microphones mounted within a spherical cavity, over a wide range of static pressures, at the temperature of the triple point of water (273.16 K). To further increase the accuracy achievable in this application, the microphone frequency response and its acoustic input impedance need to be precisely determined over the same static pressure and temperature range. Few previous works examined the influence of static pressure, temperature, and gas composition on the microphone's sensitivity. In this work, the results of relative calibrations of 1/4 in. condenser microphones obtained using an electrostatic actuator technique are presented. The calibrations are performed in pure helium and argon gas at temperatures near 273 K and in the pressure range between 10 and 600 kPa. These experimental results are compared with the predictions of a realistic model available in the literature, finding a remarkable good agreement. The model provides an estimate of the acoustic impedance of 1/4 in. condenser microphones as a function of frequency and static pressure and is used to calculate the corresponding frequency perturbations induced on the normal modes of a spherical cavity when this is filled with helium or argon gas.

  16. Characterization of condenser microphones under different environmental conditions for accurate speed of sound measurements with acoustic resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Guianvarc'h, Cecile; Pitre, Laurent; Bruneau, Michel

    2009-07-15

    Condenser microphones are more commonly used and have been extensively modeled and characterized in air at ambient temperature and static pressure. However, several applications of interest for metrology and physical acoustics require to use these transducers in significantly different environmental conditions. Particularly, the extremely accurate determination of the speed of sound in monoatomic gases, which is pursued for a determination of the Boltzmann constant k by an acoustic method, entails the use of condenser microphones mounted within a spherical cavity, over a wide range of static pressures, at the temperature of the triple point of water (273.16 K). To further increase the accuracy achievable in this application, the microphone frequency response and its acoustic input impedance need to be precisely determined over the same static pressure and temperature range. Few previous works examined the influence of static pressure, temperature, and gas composition on the microphone's sensitivity. In this work, the results of relative calibrations of 1/4 in. condenser microphones obtained using an electrostatic actuator technique are presented. The calibrations are performed in pure helium and argon gas at temperatures near 273 K and in the pressure range between 10 and 600 kPa. These experimental results are compared with the predictions of a realistic model available in the literature, finding a remarkable good agreement. The model provides an estimate of the acoustic impedance of 1/4 in. condenser microphones as a function of frequency and static pressure and is used to calculate the corresponding frequency perturbations induced on the normal modes of a spherical cavity when this is filled with helium or argon gas.

  17. R-MATRIX RESONANCE ANALYSIS AND STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF THE RESONANCE PARAMETERS OF 233U IN THE NEUTRON ENERGY RANGE FROM THERMAL TO 600 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.

    2001-02-27

    The R-matrix resonance analysis of experimental neutron transmission and cross sections of {sup 233}U, with the Reich-Moore Bayesian code SAMMY, was extended up to the neutron energy of 600 eV by taking advantage of new high resolution neutron transmission and fission cross section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). The experimental data base is described. In addition to the microscopic data (time-of-flight measurements of transmission and cross sections), some experimental and evaluated integral quantities were included in the data base. Tabulated and graphical comparisons between the experimental data and the SAMMY calculated cross sections are given. The ability of the calculated cross sections to reproduce the effective multiplication factors k{sub eff} for various thermal, intermediate, and fast systems was tested. The statistical properties of the resonance parameters were examined and recommended values of the average s-wave resonance parameters are given.

  18. Parameter analysis for a nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope based on 133Cs–129Xe/131Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Da-Wei; Xu, Zheng-Yi; Zhou, Min; Xu, Xin-Ye

    2017-02-01

    We theoretically investigate several parameters for the nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope based on 133Cs–129Xe/131Xe. For a cell containing a mixture of 133Cs at saturated pressure, we investigate the optimal quenching gas (N2) pressure and the corresponding pump laser intensity to achieve 30% 133Cs polarization at the center of the cell when the static magnetic field B 0 is 5 {{μ }}{{T}} with different 129Xe/131Xe pressure. The effective field produced by spin-exchange polarized 129Xe or 131Xe sensed by 133Cs can also be discussed in different 129Xe/131Xe pressure conditions. Furthermore, the relationship between the detected signal and the probe laser frequency is researched. We obtain the optimum probe laser detuning from the D2 (6{}2{{S}}1/2\\to 6{}2{{P}}3/2) resonance with different 129Xe/131Xe pressure owing to the pressure broadening. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2014AA123401), the National Key Basic Research and Development Program of China (Grant Nos. 2016YFA0302103 and 2012CB821302), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant 11134003), and Shanghai Excellent Academic Leaders Program of China (Grant No. 12XD1402400).

  19. Determination of molecular spectroscopic parameters and energy-transfer rates by double-resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinfeld, J. I.; Foy, B.; Hetzler, J.; Flannery, C.; Klaassen, J.; Mizugai, Y.; Coy, S.

    1990-05-01

    The spectroscopy of small to medium-size polyatomic molecules can be extremely complex, especially in higher-lying overtone and combination vibrational levels. The high density of levels also complicates the understanding of inelastic collision processes, which is required to model energy transfer and collision broadening of spectral lines. Both of these problems can be addressed by double-resonance spectroscopy, i.e., time-resolved pump-probe measurements using microwave, infrared, near-infrared, and visible-wavelength sources. Information on excited-state spectroscopy, transition moments, inelastic energy transfer rates and propensity rules, and pressure-broadening parameters may be obtained from such experiments. Examples are given for several species of importance in planetary atmospheres, including ozone, silane, ethane, and ammonia.

  20. Neutron capture on Zr94: Resonance parameters and Maxwellian-averaged cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliente, G.; Milazzo, P. M.; Fujii, K.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Bisterzo, S.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapiço, C.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Furman, W.; Gallino, R.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Gramegna, F.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Kossionides, E.; Krtička, M.; Lamboudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marrone, S.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M. T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2011-07-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of the Zr isotopes play an important role in nucleosynthesis studies. The s-process reaction flow between the Fe seed and the heavier isotopes passes through the neutron magic nucleus Zr90 and through Zr91,92,93,94, but only part of the flow extends to Zr96 because of the branching point at Zr95. Apart from their effect on the s-process flow, the comparably small isotopic (n,γ) cross sections make Zr also an interesting structural material for nuclear reactors. The Zr94 (n,γ) cross section has been measured with high resolution at the spallation neutron source n_TOF at CERN and resonance parameters are reported up to 60 keV neutron energy.

  1. Interpretation and application of reaction class transition state theory for accurate calculation of thermokinetic parameters using isodesmic reaction method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bi-Yao; Li, Ze-Rong; Tan, Ning-Xin; Yao, Qian; Li, Xiang-Yuan

    2013-04-25

    We present a further interpretation of reaction class transition state theory (RC-TST) proposed by Truong et al. for the accurate calculation of rate coefficients for reactions in a class. It is found that the RC-TST can be interpreted through the isodesmic reaction method, which is usually used to calculate reaction enthalpy or enthalpy of formation for a species, and the theory can also be used for the calculation of the reaction barriers and reaction enthalpies for reactions in a class. A correction scheme based on this theory is proposed for the calculation of the reaction barriers and reaction enthalpies for reactions in a class. To validate the scheme, 16 combinations of various ab initio levels with various basis sets are used as the approximate methods and CCSD(T)/CBS method is used as the benchmarking method in this study to calculate the reaction energies and energy barriers for a representative set of five reactions from the reaction class: R(c)CH(R(b))CR(a)CH2 + OH(•) → R(c)C(•)(R(b))CR(a)CH2 + H2O (R(a), R(b), and R(c) in the reaction formula represent the alkyl or hydrogen). Then the results of the approximate methods are corrected by the theory. The maximum values of the average deviations of the energy barrier and the reaction enthalpy are 99.97 kJ/mol and 70.35 kJ/mol, respectively, before correction and are reduced to 4.02 kJ/mol and 8.19 kJ/mol, respectively, after correction, indicating that after correction the results are not sensitive to the level of the ab initio method and the size of the basis set, as they are in the case before correction. Therefore, reaction energies and energy barriers for reactions in a class can be calculated accurately at a relatively low level of ab initio method using our scheme. It is also shown that the rate coefficients for the five representative reactions calculated at the BHandHLYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory via our scheme are very close to the values calculated at CCSD(T)/CBS level. Finally, reaction

  2. Diagnostics of recombining laser plasma parameters based on He-like ion resonance lines intensity ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryazantsev, S. N.; Skobelev, I. Yu; Faenov, A. Ya; Pikuz, T. A.; Grum-Grzhimailo, A. N.; Pikuz, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    While the plasma created by powerful laser expands from the target surface it becomes overcooled, i.e. recombining one. Improving of diagnostic methods applicable for such plasma is rather important problem in laboratory astrophysics nowadays because laser produced jets are fully scalable to young stellar objects. Such scaling is possible because of the plasma hydrodynamic equations invariance under some transformations. In this paper it is shown that relative intensities of the resonance transitions in He-like ions can be used to measure the parameters of recombining plasma. Intensity of the spectral lines corresponding to these transitions is sensitive to the density in the range of 1016-1020 cm-3 while the temperature ranges from 10 to 100 eV for ions with nuclear charge Zn ∼ 10. Calculations were carried out for F VIII ion and allowed to determine parameters of plasma jets created by nanosecond laser system ELFIE (Ecole Polytechnique, France) for astrophysical phenomenon modelling. Obtained dependencies are quite universal and can be used for any recombining plasma containing He-like fluorine ions.

  3. Accurate extraction of WSe2 FETs parameters by using pulsed I-V method at various temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung Tae; Cho, In Tak; Kang, Won Mook; Park, Byung Gook; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2016-11-01

    This work investigates the intrinsic characteristics of multilayer WSe2 field effect transistors (FETs) by analysing Pulsed I- V (PIV) and DC characteristics measured at various temperatures. In DC measurement, unwanted charge trapping due to the gate bias stress results in I- V curves different from the intrinsic characteristic. However, PIV reduces the effect of gate bias stress so that intrinsic characteristic of WSe2 FETs is obtained. The parameters such as hysteresis, field effect mobility (μeff), subthreshold slope ( SS), and threshold voltage ( V th) measured by PIV are significantly different from those obtained by DC measurement. In PIV results, the hysteresis is considerably reduced compared with DC measurement, because the charge trapping effect is significantly reduced. With increasing temperature, the field effect mobility (μeff) and subthreshold swing ( SS) are deteriorated, and threshold voltage ( V th) decreases.

  4. Petermann I and II spot size: Accurate semi analytical description involving Nelder-Mead method of nonlinear unconstrained optimization and three parameter fundamental modal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Choudhury, Raja; Roy Choudhury, Arundhati; Kanti Ghose, Mrinal

    2013-01-01

    A semi-analytical model with three optimizing parameters and a novel non-Gaussian function as the fundamental modal field solution has been proposed to arrive at an accurate solution to predict various propagation parameters of graded-index fibers with less computational burden than numerical methods. In our semi analytical formulation the optimization of core parameter U which is usually uncertain, noisy or even discontinuous, is being calculated by Nelder-Mead method of nonlinear unconstrained minimizations as it is an efficient and compact direct search method and does not need any derivative information. Three optimizing parameters are included in the formulation of fundamental modal field of an optical fiber to make it more flexible and accurate than other available approximations. Employing variational technique, Petermann I and II spot sizes have been evaluated for triangular and trapezoidal-index fibers with the proposed fundamental modal field. It has been demonstrated that, the results of the proposed solution identically match with the numerical results over a wide range of normalized frequencies. This approximation can also be used in the study of doped and nonlinear fiber amplifier.

  5. Coupling 1D Navier Stokes equation with autoregulation lumped parameter networks for accurate cerebral blood flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jaiyoung; Hu, Xiao; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2014-11-01

    The cerebral circulation is unique in its ability to maintain blood flow to the brain under widely varying physiologic conditions. Incorporating this autoregulatory response is critical to cerebral blood flow modeling, as well as investigations into pathological conditions. We discuss a one-dimensional nonlinear model of blood flow in the cerebral arteries that includes coupling of autoregulatory lumped parameter networks. The model is tested to reproduce a common clinical test to assess autoregulatory function - the carotid artery compression test. The change in the flow velocity at the middle cerebral artery (MCA) during carotid compression and release demonstrated strong agreement with published measurements. The model is then used to investigate vasospasm of the MCA, a common clinical concern following subarachnoid hemorrhage. Vasospasm was modeled by prescribing vessel area reduction in the middle portion of the MCA. Our model showed similar increases in velocity for moderate vasospasms, however, for serious vasospasm (~ 90% area reduction), the blood flow velocity demonstrated decrease due to blood flow rerouting. This demonstrates a potentially important phenomenon, which otherwise would lead to false-negative decisions on clinical vasospasm if not properly anticipated.

  6. Density functional theory computation of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance parameters in light and heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, Kiplangat

    This thesis illustrates the utilization of Density functional theory (DFT) in calculations of gas and solution phase Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) properties of light and heavy nuclei. Computing NMR properties is still a challenge and there are many unknown factors that are still being explored. For instance, influence of hydrogen-bonding; thermal motion; vibration; rotation and solvent effects. In one of the theoretical studies of 195Pt NMR chemical shift in cisplatin and its derivatives illustrated in Chapter 2 and 3 of this thesis. The importance of representing explicit solvent molecules explicitly around the Pt center in cisplatin complexes was outlined. In the same complexes, solvent effect contributed about half of the J(Pt-N) coupling constant. Indicating the significance of considering the surrounding solvent molecules in elucidating the NMR measurements of cisplatin binding to DNA. In chapter 4, we explore the Spin-Orbit (SO) effects on the 29Si and 13C chemical shifts induced by surrounding metal and ligands. The unusual Ni, Pd, Pt trends in SO effects to the 29Si in metallasilatrane complexes X-Si-(mu-mt)4-M-Y was interpreted based on electronic and relativistic effects rather than by structural differences between the complexes. In addition, we develop a non-linear model for predicting NMR SO effects in a series of organics bonded to heavy nuclei halides. In chapter 5, we extend the idea of "Chemist's orbitals" LMO analysis to the quantum chemical proton NMR computation of systems with internal resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds. Consequently, we explicitly link the relationship between the NMR parameters related to H-bonded systems and intuitive picture of a chemical bond from quantum calculations. The analysis shows how NMR signatures characteristic of H-bond can be explained by local bonding and electron delocalization concepts. One shortcoming of some of the anti-cancer agents like cisplatin is that they are toxic and researchers are looking for

  7. Treatment time reduction through parameter optimization in magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coon, Joshua

    Magnetic Resonance guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MRgHIFU) treatments are a promising modality for cancer treatments in which a focused beam of ultrasound energy is used to kill tumor tissue. However, obstacles still exist to its widespread clinical implementation, including long treatment times. This research demonstrates reductions in treatment times through intelligent selection of the user-controllable parameters, including: the focal zone treatment path, focal zone size, focal zone spacing, and whether to treat one or several focal zone locations at any given time. Several treatments using various combinations of these parameters were simulated using a finite difference method to solve the Pennes bio-heat transfer equation for an ultrasonically heated tissue region with a wide range of acoustic, thermal, geometric, and tumor properties. The total treatment time was iteratively optimized using either a heuristic method or routines included in the Matlab software package, with constraints imposed for patient safety and treatment efficacy. The results demonstrate that large reductions in treatment time are possible through the intelligent selection of user-controllable treatment parameters. For the treatment path, treatment times are reduced by as much as an order of magnitude if the focal zones are arranged into stacks along the axial direction and a middle-front-back ordering is followed. For situations where normal tissue heating constraints are less stringent, these focal zones should have high levels of adjacency to further decrease treatment times; however, adjacency should be reduced in some cases where normal tissue constraints are more stringent. Also, the use of smaller, more concentrated focal zones produces shorter treatment times than larger, more diluted focal zones, a result verified in an agar phantom model. Further, focal zones should be packed using only a small amount of overlap in the axial direction and with a small gap in the

  8. Crossing resonance of wave fields in a medium with an inhomogeneous coupling parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatchenko, V. A. Polukhin, D. S.

    2013-11-15

    The dynamic susceptibilities (Green functions) of the system of two coupled wave fields of different physical natures in a medium with an arbitrary relation between the mean value ε and rms fluctuation Δε of the coupling parameter have been examined. The self-consistent approximation involving all diagrams with noncrossing correlation lines has been developed for the case where the initial Green’s function of the homogeneous medium describes the system of coupled wave fields. The analysis has been performed for spin and elastic waves. Expressions have been obtained for the diagonal elements G{sub mm} and G{sub uu} of the matrix Green’s function, which describe spin and elastic waves in the case of magnetic and elastic excitations, and for the off-diagonal elements G{sub mu} and G{sub um}, which describe these waves in the case of cross excitation. Change in the forms of these elements has been numerically studied for the case of one-dimensional inhomogeneities with an increase in Δε and with a decrease in ε under the condition that the sum of the squares of these quantities is conserved: two peaks in the frequency dependences of imaginary parts of G{sub mm} and G{sub uu} are broadened and then joined into one broad peak; a fine structure appears in the form of narrow resonance at the vertex of the Green’s function of one wave field and narrow antiresonance at the vertex of the Green function of the other field; peaks of the fine structure are broadened and then disappear with an increase in the correlation wavenumber of the inhomogeneities of the coupling parameter; and the amplitudes of the off-diagonal elements vanish in the limit ε → 0.

  9. Variability of Schumann resonance parameters observed at low latitude stations in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, X.-Y.; Xiao, Z.; Hao, Y.-Q.; Zhang, D.-H.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the Schumann resonance (SR) parameters observed at low latitude stations in China for the first time. Variations of SR peak frequency and intensity on different timescales (from minutes to years) are analyzed in detail. Diurnal and seasonal variations are shown and the source-observer distance is calculated to confirm the contributions of lightning activity. Differences in the profiles of SR intensity between the NS and EW components are due to the effects of the source-observer distance and the relative position of the observer to the sources. Diurnal frequency variations are more complicated and cannot be directly linked with the three thunderstorm centers. Seasonal variations are clear for intensity but not for frequency. The differences in the diurnal and seasonal variations between the SR intensity and frequency show that the greatest contributor to SR intensity is global lightning activity, while the SR frequency is not affected solely by lightning, as certain other factors involving ionosphere properties may play non-negligible roles. We also emphasize that our observations do not show a distinct day-night change in the SR parameters, and that the SR intensity does not show abrupt changes across terminators. This observation is consistent with previous simulations. Finally, the response of the SR to a solar flare is discussed. The flare leads to a sudden increase of about 0.2 Hz relative to the 2σ level of the SR frequencies in the first three modes, which is in agreement with other works in the literature. This frequency enhancement is explained using theoretical calculations.

  10. Measurement of resonance parameters of orbitally excited narrow B0 mesons.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; González, B Alvarez; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Griso, S Pagan; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-03-13

    We report a measurement of resonance parameters of the orbitally excited (L=1) narrow B0 mesons in decays to B;{(*)+}pi;{-} using 1.7 fb;{-1} of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The mass and width of the B_{2};{*0} state are measured to be m(B_{2};{*0})=5740.2_{-1.8};{+1.7}(stat)-0.8+0.9(syst) MeV/c;{2} and Gamma(B_{2};{*0})=22.7_{-3.2};{+3.8}(stat)-10.2+3.2(syst) MeV/c;{2}. The mass difference between the B_{2};{*0} and B10 states is measured to be 14.9_{-2.5};{+2.2}(stat)-1.4+1.2(syst) MeV/c;{2}, resulting in a B10 mass of 5725.3_{-2.2};{+1.6}(stat)-1.5+1.4(syst) MeV/c;{2}. This is currently the most precise measurement of the masses of these states and the first measurement of the B_{2};{*0} width.

  11. Methodological aspects in the calculation of parity-violating effects in nuclear magnetic resonance parameters.

    PubMed

    Weijo, Ville; Bast, Radovan; Manninen, Pekka; Saue, Trond; Vaara, Juha

    2007-02-21

    We examine the quantum chemical calculation of parity-violating (PV) electroweak contributions to the spectral parameters of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from a methodological point of view. Nuclear magnetic shielding and indirect spin-spin coupling constants are considered and evaluated for three chiral molecules, H2O2, H2S2, and H2Se2. The effects of the choice of a one-particle basis set and the treatment of electron correlation, as well as the effects of special relativity, are studied. All of them are found to be relevant. The basis-set dependence is very pronounced, especially at the electron correlated ab initio levels of theory. Coupled-cluster and density-functional theory (DFT) results for PV contributions differ significantly from the Hartree-Fock data. DFT overestimates the PV effects, particularly with nonhybrid exchange-correlation functionals. Beginning from third-row elements, special relativity is of importance for the PV NMR properties, shown here by comparing perturbational one-component and various four-component calculations. In contrast to what is found for nuclear magnetic shielding, the choice of the model for nuclear charge distribution--point charge or extended (Gaussian)--has a significant impact on the PV contribution to the spin-spin coupling constants.

  12. Measurement of Resonance Parameters of Orbitally Excited Narrow B0 Mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M. G.; González, B. Álvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzurri, P.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burke, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Almenar, C. Cuenca; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; da Costa, J. Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kusakabe, Y.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Luci, C.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlok, J.; Fernandez, P. Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Griso, S. Pagan; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Rekovic, V.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Veszpremi, V.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Wynne, S. M.; Xie, S.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2009-03-01

    We report a measurement of resonance parameters of the orbitally excited (L=1) narrow B0 mesons in decays to B(*)+π- using 1.7fb-1 of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The mass and width of the B2*0 state are measured to be m(B2*0)=5740.2-1.8+1.7(stat)-0.8+0.9(syst)MeV/c2 and Γ(B2*0)=22.7-3.2+3.8(stat)-10.2+3.2(syst)MeV/c2. The mass difference between the B2*0 and B10 states is measured to be 14.9-2.5+2.2(stat)-1.4+1.2(syst)MeV/c2, resulting in a B10 mass of 5725.3-2.2+1.6(stat)-1.5+1.4(syst)MeV/c2. This is currently the most precise measurement of the masses of these states and the first measurement of the B2*0 width.

  13. Blade resonance parameter identification based on tip-timing method without the once-per revolution sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Haotian; Duan, Fajie; Zhang, Jilong

    2016-01-01

    Blade tip-timing is the most effective method for blade vibration online measurement of turbomachinery. In this article a synchronous resonance vibration measurement method of blade based on tip-timing is presented. This method requires no once-per revolution sensor which makes it more generally applicable in the condition where this sensor is difficult to install, especially for the high-pressure rotors of dual-rotor engines. Only three casing mounted probes are required to identify the engine order, amplitude, natural frequency and the damping coefficient of the blade. A method is developed to identify the blade which a tip-timing data belongs to without once-per revolution sensor. Theoretical analyses of resonance parameter measurement are presented. Theoretic error of the method is investigated and corrected. Experiments are conducted and the results indicate that blade resonance parameter identification is achieved without once-per revolution sensor.

  14. Extension of the AMBER force field for nitroxide radicals and combined QM/MM/PCM approach to the accurate determination of EPR parameters of DMPOH in solution

    PubMed Central

    Hermosilla, Laura; Prampolini, Giacomo; Calle, Paloma; García de la Vega, José Manuel; Brancato, Giuseppe; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    A computational strategy that combines both time-dependent and time-independent approaches is exploited to accurately model molecular dynamics and solvent effects on the isotropic hyperfine coupling constants of the DMPO-H nitroxide. Our recent general force field for nitroxides derived from AMBER ff99SB is further extended to systems involving hydrogen atoms in β-positions with respect to NO. The resulting force-field has been employed in a series of classical molecular dynamics simulations, comparing the computed EPR parameters from selected molecular configurations to the corresponding experimental data in different solvents. The effect of vibrational averaging on the spectroscopic parameters is also taken into account, by second order vibrational perturbation theory involving semi-diagonal third energy derivatives together first and second property derivatives. PMID:26584116

  15. A rapid and accurate method, ventilated chamber C-history method, of measuring the emission characteristic parameters of formaldehyde/VOCs in building materials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shaodan; Xiong, Jianyin; Zhang, Yinping

    2013-10-15

    The indoor pollution caused by formaldehyde and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from building materials poses an adverse effect on people's health. It is necessary to understand and control the behaviors of the emission sources. Based on detailed mass transfer analysis on the emission process in a ventilated chamber, this paper proposes a novel method of measuring the three emission characteristic parameters, i.e., the initial emittable concentration, the diffusion coefficient and the partition coefficient. A linear correlation between the logarithm of dimensionless concentration and time is derived. The three parameters can then be calculated from the intercept and slope of the correlation. Compared with the closed chamber C-history method, the test is performed under ventilated condition thus some commonly-used measurement instruments (e.g., GC/MS, HPLC) can be applied. While compared with other methods, the present method can rapidly and accurately measure the three parameters, with experimental time less than 12h and R(2) ranging from 0.96 to 0.99 for the cases studied. Independent experiment was carried out to validate the developed method, and good agreement was observed between the simulations based on the determined parameters and experiments. The present method should prove useful for quick characterization of formaldehyde/VOC emissions from indoor materials.

  16. Feasibility, Safety, and Efficacy of Accurate Uterine Fibroid Ablation Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound With Shot Sonication.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yonghua; Fu, Zhongxiang; Yang, Lixia; Huang, Zili; Chen, Wen-Zhi; Wang, Zhibiao

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of uterine fibroid treatment using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (US) with shot sonication for accurate ablation. Forty-three patients with 51 symptomatic uterine fibroids were treated with MRI-guided high-intensity focused US with shot sonication, which was a small acoustic focus of higher intensity with a shorter time (2 seconds) of US exposure and a shorter cooling time (2-3 seconds). The treatment efficacy and adverse events were analyzed, and the changes in the severity of symptoms and the reduction in fibroid volume were assessed 3 and 6 months after the procedure. All patients were successfully treated in a single session, without major complications, and the mean nonperfused volume ratio ± SD was 84.3% ± 15.7% (range, 33.8%-100%).Complete ablation was achieved in 13 T2-hypointense fibroids from 10 patients, and partial ablation was achieved in 38 fibroids from 33 patients. The overall mean treatment time was 135.0 ± 50.9 minutes (2.2 ± 0.8 hours). The transformed symptom severity scores and mean fibroid volumes decreased significantly after treatment (P < .05). In conclusion, MRI-guided high-intensity focused US with shot sonication is a feasible, safe, and effective technique for ablation of uterine fibroids and complete ablation of T2-hypointense fibroids.

  17. Neutron Resonance Parameters of 55Mn from Reich-Moore Analysis of Recent Experimental Neutron Transmission and Capture Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, Herve; Leal, Luiz C; Larson, Nancy M; Guber, Klaus H; Wiarda, Dorothea; Arbanas, Goran

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution neutron capture cross section measurements of 55Mn were recently performed at GELINA by Schillebeeckx et al. (2005) and at ORELA by Guber et al. (2007). The analysis of the experimental data was performed with the computer code SAMMY using the Bayesian approach in the resonance parameters representation of the cross sections. The neutron transmission data taken in 1988 by Harvey et al. (2007) and not analyzed before were added to the SAMMY experimental data base. More than 95% of the s-wave resonances and more than 85% of the p-wave resonances were identified in the energy range up to 125 keV, leading to the neutron strength functions S0 = (3.90 0.78) x 10-4 and S1 = (0.45 0.08) x 10-4. About 25% of the d-wave resonances were identified with a possible strength function of S2 = 1.0 x 10-4. The capture cross section calculated at 0.0253 eV is 13.27 b, and the capture resonance integral is 13.52 0.30 b. In the energy range 15 to 120 keV, the average capture cross section is 12% lower than Lerigoleur value and 25% smaller than Macklin value. GELINA and ORELA experimental capture cross sections show a background cross section not described by the Reich-Moore resonance parameters. Part of this background could be due to a direct capture component and/or to the missing d-wave resonances. The uncertainty of 10% on the average capture cross section above 20 keV is mainly due to the inaccuracy in the calculation of the background components.

  18. Triangular Ring Resonator: Direct Measurement of the Parity-Odd Parameters of the Photon Sector of SME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exirifard, Qasem

    2014-03-01

    We introduce the Triangular Ring (TR) resonator. We show that the difference between the clockwise and anti-clockwise resonant frequencies of a vacuum TR resonator is sensitive to the birefringence parity-odd parameters of the photon's sector of the minimal Standard Model Extension (mSME): the Standard Model plus all the perturbative parameters encoding the break of the Lorentz symmetry. We report that utilizing the current technology allows for direct measurement of these parameters with a sensitivity of the parity-even ones and improves the best current resonator bounds by couple of orders of magnitudes. We note that, designing an optical table that rotates perpendicular to the gravitational equipotential surface (geoid) allows for direct measurement of the constancy of the light speed at the vicinity of the earth in all directions, in particular, perpendicular to the geoid. If this table could achieve the precision of the ordinary tables, then it would improve the GPS bounds on the constancy of the light speed perpendicular to geoid by about eight orders of magnitude.

  19. Analytical modeling of Schumann resonance and ELF propagation parameters on Mars with a multi-layered ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozakiewicz, Joanna; Kulak, Andrzej; Mlynarczyk, Janusz

    2015-11-01

    Two electrically conductive planetary spheres, the ionosphere and the ground, form a spherical waveguide. Within such a planetary cavity a phenomenon called Schumann resonance (SR) can occur. It is a resonance of extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic waves. The resonance parameters are strongly related to the electromagnetic properties of the cavity. On Mars, as there is no liquid water at the planetary surface, the ground has a low conductivity. In such a situation, ELF waves penetrate into the planetary subsurface up to many kilometers depth. To examine the influence of low-conductivity grounds on ELF propagation, we have introduced a recently developed analytical method, which enables to estimate the propagation parameters and explicate their dependence of the ground properties. Since the presented model is fully analytical, it is computationally efficient and can be very useful in finding inverse solutions. To demonstrate the potential of the method, we present the relationship between individual ground properties and the parameters of Schumann resonance. The obtained results indicate that Martian exploration performed by one ELF station located at the planetary surface can reveal, along with the properties of the ionosphere, the existence of liquid water under the Martian surface.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of atomic xenon dissolved in Gay-Berne model liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Lintuvuori, Juho; Straka, Michal; Vaara, Juha

    2007-03-01

    We present constant-pressure Monte Carlo simulations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral parameters, nuclear magnetic shielding relative to the free atom as well as nuclear quadrupole coupling, for atomic xenon dissolved in a model thermotropic liquid crystal. The solvent is described by Gay-Berne (GB) molecules with parametrization kappa=4.4, kappa{'}=20.0 , and mu=nu=1 . The reduced pressure of P{*}=2.0 is used. Previous simulations of a pure GB system with this parametrization have shown that upon lowering the temperature, the model exhibits isotropic, nematic, smectic- A , and smectic- B /molecular crystal phases. We introduce spherical xenon solutes and adjust the energy and length scales of the GB-Xe interaction to those of the GB-GB interaction. This is done through first principles quantum chemical calculations carried out for a dimer of model mesogens as well as the mesogen-xenon complex. We preparametrize quantum chemically the Xe nuclear shielding and quadrupole coupling tensors when interacting with the model mesogen, and use the parametrization in a pairwise additive fashion in the analysis of the simulation. We present the temperature evolution of {129/131}Xe shielding and 131Xe quadrupole coupling in the different phases of the GB model. From the simulations, separate isotropic and anisotropic contributions to the experimentally available total shielding can be obtained. At the experimentally relevant concentration, the presence of the xenon atoms does not significantly affect the phase behavior as compared to the pure GB model. The simulations reproduce many of the characteristic experimental features of Xe NMR in real thermotropic LCs: Discontinuity in the value or trends of the shielding and quadrupole coupling at the nematic-isotropic and smectic-A-nematic phase transitions, nonlinear shift evolution in the nematic phase reflecting the behavior of the orientational order parameter, and decreasing shift in the smectic-A phase. The last

  1. THE HYPERFINE STRUCTURE OF THE ROTATIONAL SPECTRUM OF HDO AND ITS EXTENSION TO THE THz REGION: ACCURATE REST FREQUENCIES AND SPECTROSCOPIC PARAMETERS FOR ASTROPHYSICAL OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzoli, Gabriele; Lattanzi, Valerio; Puzzarini, Cristina; Alonso, José Luis; Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-06-10

    The rotational spectrum of the mono-deuterated isotopologue of water, HD{sup 16}O, has been investigated in the millimeter- and submillimeter-wave frequency regions, up to 1.6 THz. The Lamb-dip technique has been exploited to obtain sub-Doppler resolution and to resolve the hyperfine (hf) structure due to the deuterium and hydrogen nuclei, thus enabling the accurate determination of the corresponding hf parameters. Their experimental determination has been supported by high-level quantum-chemical calculations. The Lamb-dip measurements have been supplemented by Doppler-limited measurements (weak high-J and high-frequency transitions) in order to extend the predictive capability of the available spectroscopic constants. The possibility of resolving hf splittings in astronomical spectra has been discussed.

  2. Accurate grading of brain gliomas by soft independent modeling of class analogy based on non-negative matrix factorization of proton magnetic resonance spectra.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, K; Khanmohammadi, M; Saligheh Rad, H

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1) H-MRS) is a non-invasive technique which provides a 'frequency-signal intensity' spectrum of biochemical compounds of tissues in the body. Although this method is currently used in human brain studies, accurate classification of in-vivo (1) H-MRS is a challenging task in the diagnosis of brain tumors. Problems such as overlapping metabolite peaks, incomplete information on background component and low signal-to-noise ratio disturb classification results of this spectroscopic method. This study presents an alternative approach to the soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) technique, using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) for dimensionality reduction. In the adopted strategy, the performance of SIMCA was improved by application of a robust algorithm for classification in the presence of noisy measurements. Total of 219 spectra from two databases were taken by water-suppressed short echo-time (1) H-MRS, acquired from different subjects with different stages of glial brain tumors (Grade II (26 cases), grade III (24 cases), grade IV (41 cases), as well as 25 healthy cases). The SIMCA was performed using two approaches: (i) principal component analysis (PCA) and (ii) non-negative matrix factorization (NMF), as a modified approach. Square prediction error was considered to assess the class membership of the external validation set. Finally, several figures of merit such as the correct classification rate (CCR), sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Results of SIMCA based on NMF showed significant improvement in percentage of correctly classified samples, 91.4% versus 83.5% for PCA-based model in an independent test set.

  3. A rapid and accurate quantification method for real-time dynamic analysis of cellular lipids during microalgal fermentation processes in Chlorella protothecoides with low field nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Liu, Tingting; Wang, Zejian; Tian, Xiwei; Yang, Yi; Guo, Meijin; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping

    2016-05-01

    The rapid and real-time lipid determination can provide valuable information on process regulation and optimization in the algal lipid mass production. In this study, a rapid, accurate and precise quantification method of in vivo cellular lipids of Chlorella protothecoides using low field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) was newly developed. LF-NMR was extremely sensitive to the algal lipids with the limits of the detection (LOD) of 0.0026g and 0.32g/L in dry lipid samples and algal broth, respectively, as well as limits of quantification (LOQ) of 0.0093g and 1.18g/L. Moreover, the LF-NMR signal was specifically proportional to the cellular lipids of C. protothecoides, thus the superior regression curves existing in a wide detection range from 0.02 to 0.42g for dry lipids and from 1.12 to 8.97gL(-1) of lipid concentration for in vivo lipid quantification were obtained with all R(2) higher than 0.99, irrespective of the lipid content and fatty acids profile variations. The accuracy of this novel method was further verified to be reliable by comparing lipid quantification results to those obtained by GC-MS. And the relative standard deviation (RSD) of LF-NMR results were smaller than 2%, suggesting the precision of this method. Finally, this method was successfully used in the on-line lipid monitoring during the algal lipid fermentation processes, making it possible for better understanding of the lipid accumulation mechanism and dynamic bioprocess control.

  4. Accurate estimation of global and regional cardiac function by retrospectively gated multidetector row computed tomography: comparison with cine magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Belge, Bénédicte; Coche, Emmanuel; Pasquet, Agnès; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis J; Gerber, Bernhard L

    2006-07-01

    Retrospective reconstruction of ECG-gated images at different parts of the cardiac cycle allows the assessment of cardiac function by multi-detector row CT (MDCT) at the time of non-invasive coronary imaging. We compared the accuracy of such measurements by MDCT to cine magnetic resonance (MR). Forty patients underwent the assessment of global and regional cardiac function by 16-slice MDCT and cine MR. Left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes estimated by MDCT (134+/-51 and 67+/-56 ml) were similar to those by MR (137+/-57 and 70+/-60 ml, respectively; both P=NS) and strongly correlated (r=0.92 and r=0.95, respectively; both P<0.001). Consequently, LV ejection fractions by MDCT and MR were also similar (55+/-21 vs. 56+/-21%; P=NS) and highly correlated (r=0.95; P<0.001). Regional end-diastolic and end-systolic wall thicknesses by MDCT were highly correlated (r=0.84 and r=0.92, respectively; both P<0.001), but significantly lower than by MR (8.3+/-1.8 vs. 8.8+/-1.9 mm and 12.7+/-3.4 vs. 13.3+/-3.5 mm, respectively; both P<0.001). Values of regional wall thickening by MDCT and MR were similar (54+/-30 vs. 51+/-31%; P=NS) and also correlated well (r=0.91; P<0.001). Retrospectively gated MDCT can accurately estimate LV volumes, EF and regional LV wall thickening compared to cine MR.

  5. Calculation of supercritical Dirac resonance parameters for heavy-ion systems from a coupled-differential-equation approach

    SciTech Connect

    Marsman, A.; Horbatsch, M.

    2011-09-15

    Previous work [E. Ackad and M. Horbatsch, Phys. Rev. A 78, 062711 (2008)] on supercritical Dirac resonance parameters from extrapolated analytic continuation, obtained with a Fourier grid method, is generalized by numerically solving the coupled Dirac radial equations to a high precision. The equations, which contain the multipole decomposition of the two-center potential, are augmented by a complex absorbing potential and truncated at various orders in the partial wave expansion to demonstrate convergence of the resonance parameters in the limit of vanishing absorber. The convergence of the partial-wave spinor and of the multipole potential expansions is demonstrated in the supercritical regime. The comparison of critical distances with literature values shows that the work provides benchmark results for future two-center calculations without multipole expansion.

  6. Accurate calculations of spectroscopic parameters, transition properties of 17 Λ-S states and 32 Ω states of SiB+ cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Wei; Shi, Deheng; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2017-02-01

    This work computed the potential energy curves of 17 Λ-S states, which came from the first three dissociation limits, Si+(2Pu) + B(2Pu), Si(3Pg) + B+(1Sg), and Si(1Dg) + B+(1Sg), of the SiB+ cation. The potential energy curves were also calculated for the 32 Ω states generated from these Λ-S states. The calculations were done using the CASSCF method, which was followed by internally contracted MRCI approach with Davidson correction. To obtain the reliable and accurate spectroscopic parameters and vibrational properties, core-valence correlation and scalar relativistic corrections were included. Of these 17 Λ-S states, the C3Σ+, E3Π, 33Π, 23Σ+, 21Π, and 31Σ+ states had double wells. The 31Π state had three wells. The D3Σ-, E3Π, 33Π, and B3Δ states were inverted with the spin-orbit coupling effect accounted for. The 21Δ state, the first well of 31Σ+ state, the second wells of 33Π, 23Σ+, and 21Π states and the second and third wells of 31Π state were weakly bound, which well depths were within several hundreds cm-1. The second well of 31Π state had no vibrational states. The first wells of E3Π and 31Σ+ states had only one vibrational state. The spectroscopic parameters were evaluated. The vibrational properties of some weaklybound states were predicted. Franck-Condon factors of some transitions between different two Λ-S states were determined. The spin-orbit coupling effect on the spectroscopic parameters and vibrational properties was discussed. These results reported here can be expected to be reliably predicted ones.

  7. Markov Chain Monte Carlo Used in Parameter Inference of Magnetic Resonance Spectra

    DOE PAGES

    Hock, Kiel; Earle, Keith

    2016-02-06

    In this paper, we use Boltzmann statistics and the maximum likelihood distribution derived from Bayes’ Theorem to infer parameter values for a Pake Doublet Spectrum, a lineshape of historical significance and contemporary relevance for determining distances between interacting magnetic dipoles. A Metropolis Hastings Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm is implemented and designed to find the optimum parameter set and to estimate parameter uncertainties. In conclusion, the posterior distribution allows us to define a metric on parameter space that induces a geometry with negative curvature that affects the parameter uncertainty estimates, particularly for spectra with low signal to noise.

  8. Generalized Parameter-Adjusted Stochastic Resonance of Duffing Oscillator and Its Application to Weak-Signal Detection.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zhi-Hui; Leng, Yong-Gang

    2015-08-28

    A two-dimensional Duffing oscillator which can produce stochastic resonance (SR) is studied in this paper. We introduce its SR mechanism and present a generalized parameter-adjusted SR (GPASR) model of this oscillator for the necessity of parameter adjustments. The Kramers rate is chosen as the theoretical basis to establish a judgmental function for judging the occurrence of SR in this model; and to analyze and summarize the parameter-adjusted rules under unmatched signal amplitude, frequency, and/or noise-intensity. Furthermore, we propose the weak-signal detection approach based on this GPASR model. Finally, we employ two practical examples to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach in practical engineering application.

  9. Generalized Parameter-Adjusted Stochastic Resonance of Duffing Oscillator and Its Application to Weak-Signal Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Zhi-Hui; Leng, Yong-Gang

    2015-01-01

    A two-dimensional Duffing oscillator which can produce stochastic resonance (SR) is studied in this paper. We introduce its SR mechanism and present a generalized parameter-adjusted SR (GPASR) model of this oscillator for the necessity of parameter adjustments. The Kramers rate is chosen as the theoretical basis to establish a judgmental function for judging the occurrence of SR in this model; and to analyze and summarize the parameter-adjusted rules under unmatched signal amplitude, frequency, and/or noise-intensity. Furthermore, we propose the weak-signal detection approach based on this GPASR model. Finally, we employ two practical examples to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach in practical engineering application. PMID:26343671

  10. Design parameters of a resonant infrared photoconductor with unity quantum efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhoomand, Jam; Mcmurray, Robert E., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This paper proposes a concept of a resonant infrared photoconductor that has characteristics of 100 percent quantum efficiency, high photoconductive gain, and very low noise equivalent power. Central to this concept is an establishment of a high-finesse absorption cavity internal to the detector element. A theoretical analysis is carried out, demonstrating this concept and providing some design guidelines. A Ge:Ga FIR detector is presently being fabricated using this approach.

  11. Approximate Schumann resonance parameters for a two-scale-height ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sentman, D. D.

    1990-01-01

    An isotropic, spherically symmetric two-scale-height ionosphere's transverse magnetic mode eigenfrequencies, as well as the height and angular profiles of its electric and magnetic fields, are presently addressed by an approximate solution. The electromagnetic energy in the eigenmodes is equally partitioned between the electric and magnetic fields, allowing a simple expression of the relative degrees of dissipation within the radial and tangential dissipation layers. The results obtained may be relevant to interpretations of the temporal variations in the Schumann resonances.

  12. Referencing strategy for the direct comparison of nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics motional parameters in RNA.

    PubMed

    Musselman, Catherine; Zhang, Qi; Al-Hashimi, Hashim; Andricioaei, Ioan

    2010-01-21

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are both techniques that can be used to characterize the structural dynamics of biomolecules and their underlying time scales. Comparison of relaxation parameters obtained through each methodology allows for cross validation of techniques and for complementarity in the analysis of dynamics. Here we present a combined NMR/MD study of the dynamics of HIV-1 transactivation response (TAR) RNA. We compute relaxation constants (R(1), R(2), and NOE) and model-free parameters (S(2) and tau) from a 65 ns molecular dynamics (MD) trajectory and compare them with the respective parameters measured in a domain-elongation NMR experiment. Using the elongated domain as the frame of reference for all computed parameters allows for a direct comparison between experiment and simulation. We see good agreement for many parameters and gain further insight into the nature of the local and global dynamics of TAR, which are found to be quite complex, spanning multiple time scales. For the few cases where agreement is poor, comparison of the dynamical parameters provides insight into the limits of each technique. We suggest a frequency-matching procedure that yields an upper bound for the time scale of dynamics to which the NMR relaxation experiment is sensitive.

  13. An Analysis Method for Superconducting Resonator Parameter Extraction with Complex Baseline Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    A new semi-empirical model is proposed for extracting the quality (Q) factors of arrays of superconducting microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). The determination of the total internal and coupling Q factors enables the computation of the loss in the superconducting transmission lines. The method used allows the simultaneous analysis of multiple interacting discrete resonators with the presence of a complex spectral baseline arising from reflections in the system. The baseline removal allows an unbiased estimate of the device response as measured in a cryogenic instrumentation setting.

  14. Rapid Scan Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Opens New Avenues for Imaging Physiologically Important Parameters In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Biller, Joshua R; Mitchell, Deborah G; Tseytlin, Mark; Elajaili, Hanan; Rinard, George A; Quine, Richard W; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2016-09-26

    We demonstrate a superior method of 2D spectral-spatial imaging of stable radical reporter molecules at 250 MHz using rapid-scan electron-paramagnetic-resonance (RS-EPR), which can provide quantitative information under in vivo conditions on oxygen concentration, pH, redox status and concentration of signaling molecules (i.e., OH(•), NO(•)). The RS-EPR technique has a higher sensitivity, improved spatial resolution (1 mm), and shorter acquisition time in comparison to the standard continuous wave (CW) technique. A variety of phantom configurations have been tested, with spatial resolution varying from 1 to 6 mm, and spectral width of the reporter molecules ranging from 16 µT (160 mG) to 5 mT (50 G). A cross-loop bimodal resonator decouples excitation and detection, reducing the noise, while the rapid scan effect allows more power to be input to the spin system before saturation, increasing the EPR signal. This leads to a substantially higher signal-to-noise ratio than in conventional CW EPR experiments.

  15. Electrical and ionic conductivity effects on magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of CuI.

    PubMed

    Yesinowski, James P; Ladouceur, Harold D; Purdy, Andrew P; Miller, Joel B

    2010-12-21

    We investigate experimentally and theoretically the effects of two different types of conductivity, electrical and ionic, upon magic-angle spinning NMR spectra. The experimental demonstration of these effects involves (63)Cu, (65)Cu, and (127)I variable temperature MAS-NMR experiments on samples of γ-CuI, a Cu(+)-ion conductor at elevated temperatures as well as a wide bandgap semiconductor. We extend previous observations that the chemical shifts depend very strongly upon the square of the spinning-speed as well as the particular sample studied and the magnetic field strength. By using the (207)Pb resonance of lead nitrate mixed with the γ-CuI as an internal chemical shift thermometer we show that frictional heating effects of the rotor do not account for the observations. Instead, we find that spinning bulk CuI, a p-type semiconductor due to Cu(+) vacancies in nonstoichiometric samples, in a magnetic field generates induced AC electric currents from the Lorentz force that can resistively heat the sample by over 200 °C. These induced currents oscillate along the rotor spinning axis at the spinning speed. Their associated heating effects are disrupted in samples containing inert filler material, indicating the existence of macroscopic current pathways between micron-sized crystallites. Accurate measurements of the temperature-dependence of the (63)Cu and (127)I chemical shifts in such diluted samples reveal that they are of similar magnitude (ca. 0.27 ppm/K) but opposite sign (being negative for (63)Cu), and appear to depend slightly upon the particular sample. This relationship is identical to the corresponding slopes of the chemical shifts versus square of the spinning speed, again consistent with sample heating as the source of the observed large shift changes. Higher drive-gas pressures are required to spin samples that have higher effective electrical conductivities, indicating the presence of a braking effect arising from the induced currents produced by

  16. Fully self-consistent study of charge-exchange resonances and the impact on the symmetry energy parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Maza, X.; Cao, Li-Gang; Colò, G.; Sagawa, H.

    2016-10-01

    We have examined within a fully self-consistent theoretical framework the energy difference between the anti-analog giant dipole resonance (AGDR) and the isobaric analog state (IAS), EAGDR-EIAS , as an indicator of the neutron skin and of the density behavior of the symmetry energy. We have improved two specific points in our HF+RPA calculations: (1) the exchange term of the two-body Coulomb interaction is treated exactly without Slater approximation; and (2) the two-parameters spin-orbit interaction is treated in a consistent way within the energy density functional theory. The estimated values for the neutron skin in 208Pb and the slope parameter of symmetry energy are compared with previous analysis available in the literature.

  17. Reevaluation of 58Ni and 60Ni Resonance Parameters in the Energy Range Thermal to 800 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, Herve; Leal, Luiz C; Guber, Klaus H; Wiarda, Dorothea; Arbanas, Goran

    2009-01-01

    The previous 58Ni and 60Ni set of resonance parameters (ENDF/B-VII-0, JEFF-3, etc.) was based on the SAMMY analysis of Oak Ridge National Laboratory neutron transmission, scattering cross section and capture cross section measurements by C. M. Perey et al. The present results were obtained by adding to the SAMMY experimental data base the capture cross sections measured recently at the Oak Ridge Linear Electron Accelerator by Guber et al. and the Geel Electron Linear Accelerator very high-resolution neutron transmission measurements performed by Brusegan et al. A complete resonance parameter covariance matrix (RPCM) was obtained from the SAMMY analysis of the experimental database. The data sets were made consistent, when needed, by adjusting the neutron energy scales, the normalization coefficients, and the background corrections. The RPCM allows the calculation of the cross section uncertainties due mainly to statistical errors in the experimental data. The systematic uncertainties of the experimental data, estimated from the preliminary analyses of the experimental database, were taken into account in the cross section covariance matrix (CSCM) for total, scattering, and capture cross sections. The diagonal elements of the CSCM were obtained by quadratic combination of the different components of the uncertainties. Because of a lack of experimental information, the energy correlations were not obtained, and a value of 0.5 was arbitrarily taken for all the CSCM nondiagonal elements.

  18. Longitudinal NMR parameter measurements of Japanese pear fruit during the growing process using a mobile magnetic resonance imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geya, Yuto; Kimura, Takeshi; Fujisaki, Hirotaka; Terada, Yasuhiko; Kose, Katsumi; Haishi, Tomoyuki; Gemma, Hiroshi; Sekozawa, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Longitudinal nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameter measurements of Japanese pear fruit (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai, Kosui) were performed using an electrically mobile magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system with a 0.2 T and 16 cm gap permanent magnet. To measure the relaxation times and apparent diffusion coefficients of the pear fruit in relation to their weight, seven pear fruits were harvested almost every week during the cell enlargement period and measured in a research orchard. To evaluate the in situ relaxation times, six pear fruits were longitudinally measured for about two months during the same period. The measurements for the harvested samples showed good agreement with the in situ measurements. From the measurements of the harvested samples, it is clear that the relaxation rates of the pear fruits linearly change with the inverse of the linear dimension of the fruits, demonstrating that the relaxation mechanism is a surface relaxation. We therefore conclude that the mobile MRI system is a useful device for measuring the NMR parameters of outdoor living plants.

  19. Anomalous Solute Transport in Saturated Porous Media: Linking Transport Model Parameters to Electrical and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, R. D.; Binley, A. M.; Keating, K.; France, S.; Osterman, G. K.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Singha, K.

    2013-12-01

    The advection-dispersion equation fails to describe non-Fickian solute transport in saturated porous media, necessitating the use of other models. The dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) model partitions the total porosity into mobile and less-mobile domains with solute exchange between the domains; consequently, the DDMT model can produce a better fit to breakthrough curves (BTCs) in systems defined by more- and less-mobile components. However, direct experimental estimation of DDMT model parameters such as rate of exchange and the mobile and less-mobile porosities remains elusive. Consequently, model parameters are often calculated purely as a model fitting exercise. There is a clear need for material characterization techniques that can offer some insight into the pore space geometrical arrangement, particularly if such techniques can be extended to the field scale. Here, we interpret static direct-current (DC) resistivity, complex resistivity (CR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) geophysical measurements in the characterization of mass transfer parameters. We use two different samples of the zeolite clinoptilolite, a material shown to demonstrate solute mass transfer due to a significant intragranular porosity, along with glass beads as a control. We explore the relation between geophysical and DDMT parameters in conjunction with supporting material characterization methods. Our results reveal how these geophysical measurements can offer some insight into the pore structures controlling the observed anomalous transport behavior.

  20. Decimative Subspace-Based Parameter Estimation Techniques Applied to Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Signals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    DESE : another decimative subspace-based parameter estimation algorithm, recently proposed as Decimative Spectral Estimation [3]. In what follows...Sponsoring/Monitoring Agency Name(s) and Address(es) US Army Research , Development & Standardization Group (UK) PSC 802 Box 15 FPO AE 09499-1500 Sponsor...1DXstackX∗stack. (12) C. DESE This algorithm was presented very recently [3]. Like HTLS, DESE also makes use of the SVD of a Hankel ma- trix and the

  1. Determination of GLUT1 Oligomerization Parameters using Bioluminescent Förster Resonance Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Looyenga, Brendan; VanOpstall, Calvin; Lee, Zion; Bell, Jed; Lodge, Evans; Wrobel, Katherine; Arnoys, Eric; Louters, Larry

    2016-01-01

    The facilitated glucose transporter GLUT1 (SLC2A1) is an important mediator of glucose homeostasis in humans. Though it is found in most cell types to some extent, the level of GLUT1 expression across different cell types can vary dramatically. Prior studies in erythrocytes—which express particularly high levels of GLUT1—have suggested that GLUT1 is able to form tetrameric complexes with enhanced transport activity. Whether dynamic aggregation of GLUT1 also occurs in cell types with more modest expression of GLUT1, however, is unclear. To address this question, we developed a genetically encoded bioluminescent Förster resonance energy transfer (BRET) assay using the luminescent donor Nanoluciferase and fluorescent acceptor mCherry. By tethering these proteins to the N-terminus of GLUT1 and performing saturation BRET analysis, we were able to demonstrate the formation of multimeric complexes in live cells. Parallel use of flow cytometry and immunoblotting further enabled us to estimate the density of GLUT1 proteins required for spontaneous oligomerization. These data provide new insights into the physiological relevance of GLUT1 multimerization as well as a new variant of BRET assay that is useful for measuring the interactions among other cell membrane proteins in live cells. PMID:27357903

  2. Interrogating the origin and behavior of magnetic resonance diffusion tensor scalar parameters in the myocardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Osama Mahmoud

    Myocardial microstructure plays an important role in sustaining the orchestrated beating motion of the heart. Several microstructural components, including myocytes and auxiliary cells, extracellular space, and blood vessels provide the infrastructure for normal heart function, including excitation propagation, myocyte contraction, delivery of oxygen and nutrients, and removing byproduct wastes. Cardiac diseases cause deleterious changes to some or all of these microstructural components in the detrimental process of cardiac remodeling. Since heart failure is among the leading causes of death in the world, new and novel tools to noninvasively characterize heart microstructure are needed for monitoring and staging of cardiac disease. In this regards, diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a promising framework to probe and quantify tissue microstructure without the need for exogenous contrast agent. As diffusion in 3-dimensional space is characterized by the diffusion tensor, MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is being used to noninvasively measure anisotropic diffusion, and thus the magnitude and spatial orientation of microstructural organization of tissues, including the heart. However, even though in vivo cardiac DTI has become more clinically available, to date the origin and behavior of different microstructural components on the measured DTI signal remain to be explicitly specified. The presented studies in this work demonstrate that DTI can be used as a noninvasive and contrast-free imaging modality to characterize myocyte size and density, extracellular collagen content, and the directional magnitude of blood flow. The identified applications are expected to provide metrics to enable physicians to detect, quantify, and stage different microstructural components during progression of cardiac disease.

  3. Electron-paramagnetic-resonance parameters of molybdenum(V) in sulphite oxidase from chicken liver.

    PubMed Central

    Lamy, M T; Gutteridge, S; Bary, R C

    1980-01-01

    A study has been made of e.p.r. signals due to Mo(V) in reduced sulphite oxidase (EC 1.8.3.1) from chicken liver. Reduction by SO3(2-), or photochemically in the presence of a deazaflavin derivative, produces spectra indistinguishable from one another. Three types of spectra from the enzyme were distingusihed and shown to correspond to single chemical species, since they could be simulated at both 9 and 35 GHz by using the same parameters. These were the low-pH form of the enzyme, with gav. 1.9805, the high-pH form, with gav. 1.9681 and a phosphate complex, with gav. 1.9741. The low-H form shows interaction with a single exchangeable proton, with A(1H)av. (hyperfine coupling constant) = 0.98 mT, probably in the form of an MoOH group. Parameters of the signals are compared with those for signals from xanthine oxidase and nitrate reductase. The signal from the phosphate complex of sulphite oxidase in unique among anion complexes of Mo-containing enzymes in showing no hyperfine coupling to protons. There is no evidence for additional weakly coupled protons or nitrogen nuclei in the sulphite oxidase signals. The possibility is considered that the enzymic mechanism involves abstraction of a proton and two electrons from HSO3- by a Mo = O group in the enzyme. PMID:6249254

  4. Anomalous solute transport in saturated porous media: Relating transport model parameters to electrical and nuclear magnetic resonance properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Ryan D.; Binley, Andrew; Keating, Kristina; France, Samantha; Osterman, Gordon; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Singha, Kamini

    2015-02-01

    The advection-dispersion equation (ADE) fails to describe commonly observed non-Fickian solute transport in saturated porous media, necessitating the use of other models such as the dual-domain mass-transfer (DDMT) model. DDMT model parameters are commonly calibrated via curve fitting, providing little insight into the relation between effective parameters and physical properties of the medium. There is a clear need for material characterization techniques that can provide insight into the geometry and connectedness of pore spaces related to transport model parameters. Here, we consider proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), direct-current (DC) resistivity, and complex conductivity (CC) measurements for this purpose, and assess these methods using glass beads as a control and two different samples of the zeolite clinoptilolite, a material that demonstrates non-Fickian transport due to intragranular porosity. We estimate DDMT parameters via calibration of a transport model to column-scale solute tracer tests, and compare NMR, DC resistivity, CC results, which reveal that grain size alone does not control transport properties and measured geophysical parameters; rather, volume and arrangement of the pore space play important roles. NMR cannot provide estimates of more-mobile and less-mobile pore volumes in the absence of tracer tests because these estimates depend critically on the selection of a material-dependent and flow-dependent cutoff time. Increased electrical connectedness from DC resistivity measurements are associated with greater mobile pore space determined from transport model calibration. CC was hypothesized to be related to length scales of mass transfer, but the CC response is unrelated to DDMT.

  5. Fascicular Ratio: A New Parameter to Evaluate Peripheral Nerve Pathology on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tagliafico, Alberto S.; Tagliafico, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The objective of the study was to define and quantitatively evaluate the fascicular ratio (FR) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with peripheral neuropathies compared with healthy controls. Forty control subjects (20 women, 20 men; age, 44.6 ± 13.4 years) and 40 patients with peripheral neuropathy (22 women, 18 men; age, 50.3 ± 10.2 years) were examined with a standard 3T MRI protocol. With customized software (with semiautomatic and automatic interface), the hypointense and hyperintense areas of the peripheral nerves corresponding to fascicular and nonfascicular tissue were examined on T1-weighted sequences. The ratio of fascicular pixels to total pixels was called FR. Correlation with FR calculated on high-resolution ultrasound was performed. The statistical analysis included the Mann–Whitney U test of controls versus patients, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, and the subgroup analysis of patients according to etiologies of neuropathy. Intraobserver and interobserver agreement was calculated based on the evaluation made by 3 readers. Finally, a complete automatic evaluation was performed. On MRI, FRs were significantly increased in patients compared with controls (FR, 76.7 ± 15.1 vs 56 ± 12.3; P < 0.0001 for the semiautomatic interface; and FR 66.3 ± 17.5 vs 47.8 ± 18.4; P < 0.0001 for the automatic interface). The increase in FR was caused mainly by an increase in the hypointense part of the nerve. This observation was valid for all causes of neuropathies. ROC analysis found an area under the curve of 0.75 (95% confidence interval, 0.44–0.81) for FR to discriminate neuropathy from control. The correlation coefficient between MRI and ultrasound was significant (r = 0.49; 95% confidence interval for r, 0.21–0.70; P = 0.012). With the semiautomated evaluation, the mean intraobserver agreement was good (K = 0.86). The interobserver agreements were also good (reader 1

  6. Experimental investigations of tuned liquid damper-structure interactions in resonance considering multiple parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashasi-Sorkhabi, Ali; Malekghasemi, Hadi; Ghaemmaghami, Amirreza; Mercan, Oya

    2017-02-01

    As structures are constructed more slender and taller, their vibrational response and its mitigation become challenging design considerations. Tuned liquid dampers (TLDs) are cost effective and low maintenance vibration absorbers that can be used to suppress structural vibrations. A TLD dissipates energy through liquid boundary layer friction, free surface contamination, and wave breaking. The dynamic characteristics of the TLD and its interaction with the structure is quite complex. In this paper, using a state-of-the-art experimental testing method, namely real-time hybrid simulation (RTHS), a comprehensive parametric study is conducted to investigate the effectiveness of TLDs. During RTHS the TLD response is obtained experimentally while the structure is modeled in a computer, thus capturing the TLD-structure interaction in real-time. By keeping the structure as the analytical model, RTHS offers a unique flexibility in which a wide range of influential parameters can be investigated without modifying the experimental setup. The parameters considered in this study with a wide range of variation include TLD/structure mass ratio, TLD/structure frequency ratio, and structural damping ratio. Additionally, the accuracy of FVM/FEM method that couples the finite volume and finite element approaches to model the liquid and solid domains to capture TLD- structure interaction is assessed experimentally. Results obtained in this study, will not only lead to a better understanding of TLDs and their interaction with the structures but also, contribute to the enhanced design of these devices which will in turn result in their wide-spread application.

  7. The far-infrared laser magnetic resonance spectrum of the SiH radical and determination of ground state parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. M.; Curl, R. F.; Evenson, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    The far-infrared laser magnetic resonance spectrum of the SiH radical in the v = O level of its X2Pi state has been recorded. The signals are rather weak. The molecules were generated in the reaction between fluorine atoms and SiH4. Rotational transitions have been detected in both 2Pi1/2 and 2Pi3/2 spin components but no fine structure transitions between the spin components were observed. Proton hyperfine splittings were resolved on some lines. The measurements have been analyzed, subjected to a least-squares fit using an effective Hamiltonian, and the appropriate molecular parameters determined. The weakness of the spectrum and the failure of attempts to power saturate favorable lines are both consistent with a small value for the electric dipole moment for SiH.

  8. Approximating large resonance parameter covariance matrices with group-wise covariance matrices for advanced nuclear fuel cycle applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Michael E; Leal, Luiz C; Wiarda, Dorothea; Arbanas, Goran

    2008-01-01

    The large size of resonance parameter covariance matrices (RPCM) in the actinide region often renders them impractical for dissemination via ENDF. Therefore, a method of approximating the RPCM by a much smaller group-wise covariance matrix (GWCM) is described, implemented, and examined. In this work, 233U RPCM is used to generate GWCM's for the 44 group AMPX, 100 group GE, 171 group VITAMIN-C, and 240 group CSWEG. Each of these GWCM's is then used to compute group-wise uncertainties for the groups of the remaining group structures. The group-wise uncertainties thus obtained are compared with those obtained from a full RPCM, i.e. without the approximation. A systematic comparison of group-wise uncertainties based on GWCM's vs. RPCM, for a variety of group structures, will shed light on the validity of this approximation and may suggest which group structure(s) yield a GWCM that could be used in lieu of the RPCM.

  9. Effect of constructional parameters on the performance of a surface plasmon resonance sensor based on a multimode polymer optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Gasior, Katarzyna; Martynkien, Tadeusz; Urbanczyk, Waclaw

    2014-12-10

    We experimentally studied the influence of different constructional parameters on the performance of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors based on a commercially available polymer step-index multimode fiber. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, we experimentally investigated the influence of polishing depth on the characteristics of SPR sensors based on a straight multimode fiber. We also examined the impact of sensing length on the spectral position and strength of the SPR in side-polished straight fibers. To clarify literature contradictions concerning the effect of fiber bending on SPR, we experimentally investigated the performance of U-bent SPR sensing probes based on multimode fibers. We have shown that the SPR can be significantly amplified by bending the polymer fiber with stripped cladding. We also demonstrated that the side-polishing of U-bent sensing probes has little impact on their performance.

  10. Tabletop magnetic resonance elastography for the measurement of viscoelastic parameters of small tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipek-Ugay, Selcan; Drießle, Toni; Ledwig, Michael; Guo, Jing; Hirsch, Sebastian; Sack, Ingolf; Braun, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of low-cost tabletop MR elastography (MRE) for quantifying the complex shear modulus G∗ of small soft biological tissue samples as provided by pathologists. The MRE system was developed based on a tabletop MRI scanner equipped with a 0.5 T permanent magnet and a tissue sample holder mounted to a loudspeaker. A spin echo sequence was enhanced with motion-encoding gradients of 250 mT/m amplitude synchronized to acoustic vibration frequencies. Shear wave images suitable for elastography were acquired between vibration frequencies of 0.5 and 1 kHz in agarose, ultrasound gel, porcine liver, porcine skeletal muscle, and bovine heart with a spatial resolution of 234 μm pixel edge length. The measured frequency dependence of G∗ agreed well with previous work based on high-field MR systems. The ratio between loss and storage moduli was highest in liver and ultrasound gel, followed by muscle tissue and agarose gel while ultrasound gel and liver showed similarly low storage moduli compared to the other samples. The shear wave to noise ratio is an important imaging criteria for MRE and was about 4.2 times lower for the preliminary setup of the 0.5 T tabletop system compared to a 7 T animal scanner. In the future, the new tabletop MRE system may serve as a low cost device for preclinical research on the correlation of viscoelastic parameters with histopathology of biological samples.

  11. Effects of subcortical cerebrovascular lesions on cortical hemodynamic parameters assessed by perfusion magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Nighoghossian, N; Berthezene, Y; Adeleine, P; Wiart, M; Damien, J; Derex, L; Itti, R; Froment, J C; Trouillas, P

    1999-01-01

    A simultaneous decrease of cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) has been described after subcortical stroke with positron emission tomography. However, this imaging modality cannot be applied routinely to stroke patients. Dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced MRI techniques (DSC-MRI) might be interesting in the assessment of these effects. Dynamic T2-weighted echo planar imaging was used to produce DSC-MR images during an intravenous bolus injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine in 9 patients who experienced a subcortical stroke involving thalamus or basal ganglia and in 8 control subjects. A series of 50 consecutive images at 1-second intervals was acquired at the anatomic level of the centrum semiovale quite distant from the subcortical lesion, rCBF and rCBV were determined over frontal and parietal regions of interest and through the entire cortical mantle. DSC-MRI enabled the detection of hemodynamic changes induced by subcortical stroke. Analysis of rCBV and rCBF values showed that the hemodynamic parameters were significantly decreased on the affected side. In controls mean rCBF and rCBV values recorded over the whole cortical mantle of each hemisphere showed no significant interhemispheric asymmetry.

  12. Accurate automated non-resonant NRA depth profiling: Application to the low 3He concentration detection in UO 2 and SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G.; Sauvage, T.; Desgardin, P.; Garcia, P.; Carlot, G.; Barthe, M. F.

    2007-05-01

    An automated method was developed to extract elemental depth profiles from non-resonant nuclear reaction analyses (NRA), which involves a two-stage procedure. The first stage enables the determination of the number of layers to be used in the final depth profile determination along with the thicknesses of each of the layers. To this end, the RESNRA program, which relies on the SIMNRA 5.0 simulation software to calculate a multilayer target, was designed at CERI. A definition of the depth resolution based on statistical considerations is proposed. In the second stage of the fitting process, a depth profile and corresponding error bars are extracted from the experimental spectrum by running a generalized reduced gradient (GRG2) algorithm using the previously calculated multilayer target. The one-to-one correspondence between the experimental spectrum and the depth profile demonstrates the objectivity of the method. The method is then applied to determining low concentration 3He depth profiles in implanted UO 2 and SiC samples using the 3He( 2H, 4He) 1H non-resonant nuclear reaction. The results clearly demonstrate the relevance and potential of the method.

  13. Narrowing of lumbar spinal canal predicts chronic low back pain more accurately than intervertebral disc degeneration: a magnetic resonance imaging study in young Finnish male conscripts.

    PubMed

    Visuri, Tuomo; Ulaska, Jaana; Eskelin, Marja; Pulkkinen, Pekka

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this magnetic resonance imaging study was to evaluate the role of degenerative changes, developmental spinal stenosis, and compression of spinal nerve roots in chronic low back (CLBP) and radicular pain in Finnish conscripts. The degree of degeneration, protrusion, and herniation of the intervertebral discs and stenosis of the nerve root canals was evaluated, and the midsagittal diameter and cross-sectional area of the lumbar vertebrae canal were measured in 108 conscripts with CLBP and 90 asymptomatic controls. The midsagittal diameters at L1-L4 levels were significantly smaller in the patients with CLBP than in the controls. Moreover, degeneration of the L4/5 disc and protrusion or herniation of the L5/S1 disc and stenosis of the nerve root canals at level L5/S1 were more frequent among the CLBP patients. Multifactorial analysis of the magnetic resonance imaging findings provided a total explanatory rate of only 33%. Narrowing of the vertebral canal in the anteroposterior direction was more likely to produce CLBP and radiating pain than intervertebral disc degeneration or narrowing of the intervertebral nerve root canals.

  14. Relativistic theory of nuclear magnetic resonance parameters in a Gaussian basis representation

    SciTech Connect

    Kutzelnigg, Werner; Liu Wenjian

    2009-07-28

    The calculation of NMR parameters from relativistic quantum theory in a Gaussian basis expansion requires some care. While in the absence of a magnetic field the expansion in a kinetically balanced basis converges for the wave function in the mean and for the energy with any desired accuracy, this is not necessarily the case for magnetic properties. The results for the magnetizability or the nuclear magnetic shielding are not even correct in the nonrelativistic limit (nrl) if one expands the original Dirac equation in a kinetically balanced Gaussian basis. This defect disappears if one starts from the unitary transformed Dirac equation as suggested by Kutzelnigg [Phys. Rev. A 67, 032109 (2003)]. However, a new difficulty can arise instead if one applies the transformation in the presence of the magnetic field of a point nucleus. If one decomposes certain contributions, the individual terms may diverge, although their sum is regular. A controlled cancellation may become difficult and numerical instabilities can arise. Various ways exist to avoid these singularities and at the same time get the correct nrl. There are essentially three approaches intermediate between the transformed and the untransformed formulation, namely, the bispinor decomposition, the decomposition of the lower component, and the hybrid unitary transformation partially at operator and partially at matrix level. All three possibilities were first considered by Xiao et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 214101 (2007)] in a different context and in a different nomenclature. Their analysis and classification in a more general context are given here for the first time. Use of an extended balanced basis has no advantages and has other drawbacks and is not competitive, while the use of a restricted magnetic balance basis can be justified.

  15. Relationships between nuclear magnetic resonance parameters used to characterize weathering spilled oil and soil toxicity in central Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Ríos, Stella Maris; Barquin, Mercedes; Katusich, Ofelia; Nudelman, Norma

    2014-01-01

    Oil spill in the Central Patagonian zone was studied to evaluate if any relationship exists between the parameters used to characterize weathering spilled oil and soil toxicity for two plant species and to evaluate if the phytotoxicity to local species would be a good index for the soil contamination. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structural indexes and column chromatography compositional indexes were determined to characterize the oil spill in the soil samples. Bioassays were also carried out using Lactuca sativa L (reference) and Atriplex lampa (native species) as test organisms. Measurements of the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) and the electrical conductivity (EC) of the soil were carried out to evaluate the effect on the bioassays. The principal components analysis of the parameters determined by NMR, compositional indexes, EC, TPH, and toxicology data shows that the first three principal components accounted for the 78% of the total variance (40%, 25%, and 13% for the first, second, and third PC, respectively). A good agreement was found between information obtained by compositional indexes and NMR structural indexes. Soil toxicity increases with the increase of EC and TPH. Other factors, such as, the presence of branched and aromatic hydrocarbons is also significant. The statistical evaluation showed that the Euclidean distances (3D) between the background and each one of the samples might be a better indicator of the soil contamination, compared with chemical criterion of TPH.

  16. Quantifying Uranium Isotope Ratios Using Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry: The Influence of Laser Parameters on Relative Ionization Probability

    SciTech Connect

    Isselhardt, Brett H.

    2011-09-01

    Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) has been developed as a method to measure relative uranium isotope abundances. In this approach, RIMS is used as an element-selective ionization process to provide a distinction between uranium atoms and potential isobars without the aid of chemical purification and separation. We explore the laser parameters critical to the ionization process and their effects on the measured isotope ratio. Specifically, the use of broad bandwidth lasers with automated feedback control of wavelength was applied to the measurement of 235U/238U ratios to decrease laser-induced isotopic fractionation. By broadening the bandwidth of the first laser in a 3-color, 3-photon ionization process from a bandwidth of 1.8 GHz to about 10 GHz, the variation in sequential relative isotope abundance measurements decreased from >10% to less than 0.5%. This procedure was demonstrated for the direct interrogation of uranium oxide targets with essentially no sample preparation. A rate equation model for predicting the relative ionization probability has been developed to study the effect of variation in laser parameters on the measured isotope ratio. This work demonstrates that RIMS can be used for the robust measurement of uranium isotope ratios.

  17. Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters and Local Tumor Control in Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Johannes Lang, Stefan; Kirisits, Christian; Fidarova, Elena F.; Berger, Daniel; Georg, Petra; Doerr, Wolfgang; Poetter, Richard

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the value of dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters for predicting local control in magnetic resonance (MR) image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) for patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Our study population consists of 141 patients with cervical cancer (Stages IB-IVA) treated with 45-50 Gy external beam radiotherapy plus four times 7 Gy IGBT with or without cisplatin. Gross tumor volume (GTV), high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and intermediate-risk clinical target volume (IRCTV) were contoured, and DVH parameters (minimum dose delivered to 90% of the volume of interest [D90] and D100) were assessed. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy (EQD2) by applying the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy). Groups were defined for patients with or without local recurrence (LR) in the true pelvis for tumor size at diagnosis (GTV at diagnosis [GTVD] of 2-5 cm (Group 1) or greater than 5 cm (Group 2) and for tumor size response at IGBT (HRCTV) of 2-5 cm (Group 2a) or greater than 5 cm (Group 2b). Results: Eighteen LRs were observed. The most important DVH parameters correlated with LR were the D90 and D100 for HRCTV. Mean D90 and D100 values for HRCTV were 86 {+-} 16 and 65 {+-} 10 Gy, respectively. The D90 for HRCTV greater than 87 Gy resulted in an LR incidence of 4% (3 of 68) compared with 20% (15 of 73) for D90 less than 87 Gy. The effect was most pronounced in the tumor group (Group 2b). Conclusions: We showed an increase in local control in IGBT in patients with cervical cancer with the dose delivered, which can be expressed by the D90 and D100 for HRCTV. Local control rates greater than 95% can be achieved if the D90 (EQD2) for HRCTV is 87 Gy or greater.

  18. (239)Pu neutron resonance parameters revisited and covariance matrix in the neutron energy range from thermal to 2.5 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, Herve; Leal, Luiz C; Larson, Nancy M

    2008-01-01

    To obtain the resonance parameters in a single energy range up to 2.5 keV neutron energy and the corresponding covariance matrix, a reevaluation of 239Pu was performed with the analysis code SAMMY. The most recent experimental data were analyzed in the energy range thermal to 2.5 keV. The experimental data were renormalized, aligned on a common energy scale, and corrected for residual background. Average neutron transmission and cross sections calculated with the new resonance parameters were compared to the corresponding experimental data and to ENDF/B-VI.

  19. Efficient method for calculating kinetic parameters using T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Murase, Kenya

    2004-04-01

    It has become increasingly important to quantitatively estimate tissue physiological parameters such as perfusion, capillary permeability, and the volume of extravascular-extracellular space (EES) using T(1)-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). A linear equation was derived by integrating the differential equation describing the kinetic behavior of contrast agent (CA) in tissue, from which K(1) (rate constant for the transfer of CA from plasma to EES), k(2) (rate constant for the transfer from EES to plasma), and V(p) (plasma volume) can be easily obtained by the linear least-squares (LLSQ) method. The usefulness of this method was investigated by means of computer simulations, in comparison with the nonlinear least-squares (NLSQ) method. The new method calculated the above parameters faster than the NLSQ method by a factor of approximately 6, and estimated them more accurately than the NLSQ method at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of < approximately 10. This method will be useful for generating functional images of K(1), k(2), and V(p) from DCE-MRI data.

  20. Rapid and accurate detection of the CFTR gene mutation 1811+1.6 kbA>G by real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer PCR.

    PubMed

    Reboul, Marie-Pierre; Higueret, Laurent; Biteau, Nicolas; Iron, Albert

    2005-10-01

    The CFTR gene mutation 1811+1.6 kbA>G has been reported as associated with a severe phenotype of cystic fibrosis with pancreatic insufficiency. This mutation has been identified as a rather common one in the South West of France and in the Iberian Peninsula. Because of the precise geographical origin of the subjects and its frequency, the mutation has to be investigated with accuracy. We have developed an original real-time Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) PCR assay for genotyping the mutation 1811+1.6 kbA>G. It is based on the amplification of a region spanning the mutation with simultaneous detection of the amplicon by hybridization with a bi-probe followed by a melting curve analysis. The results obtained are identical with those resulting from either restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis or sequencing. The distinction between the wild type and the mutation 1811+1.6 kbA>G is easy because the corresponding melting points shows a difference of 6 or 9.5 degrees C depending on the associated SNP A/T located 16 bp downstream. We demonstrated that a FRET assay showed enough sensitivity to discriminate between two nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the sequence of the sensor. In conclusion, this method is specific, fast, easy to perform, reproducible, inexpensive as it uses only one bi-probe and well adapted to daily practice.

  1. Infrared and far-infrared laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the GeH radical - Determination of ground state parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. M.; Evenson, K. M.; Sears, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    The GeH radical has been detected in its ground 2 Pi state in the gas phase reaction of fluorine atoms with GeH4 by laser magnetic resonance techniques. Rotational transitions within both 2 Pi 1/2 and 2 Pi 3/2 manifolds have been observed at far-infrared wavelengths and rotational transitions between the two fine structure components have been detected at infrared wavelengths (10 microns). Signals have been observed for all five naturally occurring isotopes of germanium. Nuclear hyperfine structure for H-1 and Ge-73 has also been observed. The data for the dominant isotope (/Ge-74/H) have been fitted to within experimental error by an effective Hamiltonian to give a set of molecular parameters for the X 2 Pi state which is very nearly complete. In addition, the dipole moment of GeH in its ground state has been estimated from the relative intensities of electric and magnetic dipole transitions in the 10 micron spectrum to be 1.24(+ or - 0.10) D.

  2. TI-205 nuclear magnetic resonance determination of the thermodynamic parameters for the binding of monovalent cations to gramicidins A and C.

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, J F; Fernandez, J Q; Shungu, D C; Whaley, W L; Koeppe, R E; Millett, F S

    1988-01-01

    Thermodynamic parameters for the binding of the monovalent cations, Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+, NH4+, TI+, and Ag+, to gramicidin A and for the binding of TI+ to gramicidin C, incorporated into lysophosphatidylcholine, have been determined using a combination of TI-205 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and competition binding. The thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy and entropy, are discussed in terms of a process involving the transfer of cations from an aqueous to amide environment. PMID:2462930

  3. 3D simulation of silicon micro-ring resonator with Comsol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyarev, S. A.; Podlipnov, V. V.; Verma, Payal; Khonina, S. N.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we provide 3d full-vector static electromagnetic simulation of silicon micro-ring resonator operating. We show that geometrical and scalar approaches are not sufficiently accurate for calculating resonator parameters. Quite strong dependence of ring resonator radius on waveguide width is revealed.

  4. Contributions of structural connectivity and cerebrovascular parameters to functional magnetic resonance imaging signals in mice at rest and during sensory paw stimulation.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, Aileen; Grandjean, Joanes; Schlegel, Felix; Saab, Bechara J; Rudin, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we reported widespread bilateral increases in stimulus-evoked functional magnetic resonance imaging signals in mouse brain to unilateral sensory paw stimulation. We attributed the pattern to arousal-related cardiovascular changes overruling cerebral autoregulation thereby masking specific signal changes elicited by local neuronal activity. To rule out the possibility that interhemispheric neuronal communication might contribute to bilateral functional magnetic resonance imaging responses, we compared stimulus-evoked functional magnetic resonance imaging responses to unilateral hindpaw stimulation in acallosal I/LnJ, C57BL/6, and BALB/c mice. We found bilateral blood-oxygenation-level dependent signal changes in all three strains, ruling out a dominant contribution of transcallosal communication as reason for bilaterality. Analysis of functional connectivity derived from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, revealed that bilateral cortical functional connectivity is largely abolished in I/LnJ animals. Cortical functional connectivity in all strains correlated with structural connectivity in corpus callosum as revealed by diffusion tensor imaging. Given the profound influence of systemic hemodynamics on stimulus-evoked functional magnetic resonance imaging outcomes, we evaluated whether functional connectivity data might be affected by cerebrovascular parameters, i.e. baseline cerebral blood volume, vascular reactivity, and reserve. We found that effects of cerebral hemodynamics on functional connectivity are largely outweighed by dominating contributions of structural connectivity. In contrast, contributions of transcallosal interhemispheric communication to the occurrence of ipsilateral functional magnetic resonance imaging response of equal amplitude to unilateral stimuli seem negligible.

  5. Accurate calculations on 9 Λ-S and 28 Ω states of NSe radical in the gas phase: Potential energy curves, spectroscopic parameters and spin-orbit couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Deheng; Li, Peiling; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2014-01-01

    The potential energy curves (PECs) of 28 Ω states generated from 9 Λ-S states (X2Π, 14Π, 16Π, 12Σ+, 14Σ+, 16Σ+, 14Σ-, 24Π and 14Δ) are studied for the first time using an ab initio quantum chemical method. All the 9 Λ-S states correlate to the first two dissociation limits, N(4Su) + Se(3Pg) and N(4Su) + Se(3Dg), of NSe radical. Of these Λ-S states, the 16Σ+, 14Σ+, 16Π, 24Π and 14Δ are found to be rather weakly bound states. The 12Σ+ is found to be unstable and has double wells. And the 16Σ+, 14Σ+, 14Π and 16Π are found to be the inverted ones with the SO coupling included. The PEC calculations are made by the complete active space self-consistent field method, which is followed by the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction approach with the Davidson modification. The spin-orbit coupling is accounted for by the state interaction approach with the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. The convergence of the present calculations is discussed with respect to the basis set and the level of theory. Core-valence correlation corrections are included with a cc-pCVTZ basis set. Scalar relativistic corrections are calculated by the third-order Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian approximation at the level of a cc-pV5Z basis set. All the PECs are extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The variation with internuclear separation of spin-orbit coupling constants is discussed in brief for some Λ-S states with one shallow well on each PEC. The spectroscopic parameters of 9 Λ-S and 28 Ω states are determined by fitting the first ten vibrational levels whenever available, which are calculated by solving the rovibrational Schrödinger equation with Numerov's method. The splitting energy in the X2Π Λ-S state is determined to be about 864.92 cm-1, which agrees favorably with the measurements of 891.80 cm-1. Moreover, other spectroscopic parameters of Λ-S and Ω states involved here are also in fair agreement with available measurements. It

  6. Is scoring system of computed tomography based metric parameters can accurately predicts shock wave lithotripsy stone-free rates and aid in the development of treatment strategies?

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Yasser Ali; Abdelaziz, Alsayed Saad; Shehab, Mohamed Ahmed; Mohamed, Hazem Abdelsabour Dief; Emara, Absel-Aziz Ali; Elnabtity, Ali Mohamed Ali; Ghanem, Maged Mohammed; ELHelaly, Hesham Abdel Azim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to determine the predicting success of shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) using a combination of computed tomography based metric parameters to improve the treatment plan. Patients and Methods: Consecutive 180 patients with symptomatic upper urinary tract calculi 20 mm or less were enrolled in our study underwent extracorporeal SWL were divided into two main groups, according to the stone size, Group A (92 patients with stone ≤10 mm) and Group B (88 patients with stone >10 mm). Both groups were evaluated, according to the skin to stone distance (SSD) and Hounsfield units (≤500, 500–1000 and >1000 HU). Results: Both groups were comparable in baseline data and stone characteristics. About 92.3% of Group A rendered stone-free, whereas 77.2% were stone-free in Group B (P = 0.001). Furthermore, in both group SWL success rates was a significantly higher for stones with lower attenuation <830 HU than with stones >830 HU (P < 0.034). SSD were statistically differences in SWL outcome (P < 0.02). Simultaneous consideration of three parameters stone size, stone attenuation value, and SSD; we found that stone-free rate (SFR) was 100% for stone attenuation value <830 HU for stone <10 mm or >10 mm but total number SWL sessions and shock waves required for the larger stone group were higher than in the smaller group (P < 0.01). Furthermore, SFR was 83.3% and 37.5% for stone <10 mm, mean HU >830, SSD 90 mm and SSD >120 mm, respectively. On the other hand, SFR was 52.6% and 28.57% for stone >10 mm, mean HU >830, SSD <90 mm and SSD >120 mm, respectively. Conclusion: Stone size, stone density (HU), and SSD is simple to calculate and can be reported by radiologists to applying combined score help to augment predictive power of SWL, reduce cost, and improving of treatment strategies. PMID:27141192

  7. The Araucaria Project: accurate stellar parameters and distance to evolved eclipsing binary ASAS J180057-2333.8 in Sagittarius Arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchomska, K.; Graczyk, D.; Smolec, R.; Pietrzyński, G.; Gieren, W.; Stȩpień, K.; Konorski, P.; Pilecki, B.; Villanova, S.; Thompson, I. B.; Górski, M.; Karczmarek, P.; Wielgórski, P.; Anderson, R. I.

    2015-07-01

    We have analyzed the double-lined eclipsing binary system ASAS J180057-2333.8 from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) catalogue. We measure absolute physical and orbital parameters for this system based on archival V-band and I-band ASAS photometry, as well as on high-resolution spectroscopic data obtained with ESO 3.6 m/HARPS and CORALIE spectrographs. The physical and orbital parameters of the system were derived with an accuracy of about 0.5-3 per cent. The system is a very rare configuration of two bright well-detached giants of spectral types K1 and K4 and luminosity class II. The radii of the stars are R1 = 52.12 ± 1.38 and R2 = 67.63 ± 1.40 R⊙ and their masses are M1 = 4.914 ± 0.021 and M2 = 4.875 ± 0.021 M⊙. The exquisite accuracy of 0.5 per cent obtained for the masses of the components is one of the best mass determinations for giants. We derived a precise distance to the system of 2.14 ± 0.06 kpc (stat.) ± 0.05 (syst.) which places the star in the Sagittarius-Carina arm. The Galactic rotational velocity of the star is Θs = 258 ± 26 km s-1 assuming Θ0 = 238 km s-1. A comparison with PARSEC isochrones places the system at the early phase of core helium burning with an age of slightly larger than 100 million years. The effect of overshooting on stellar evolutionary tracks was explored using the MESA star code.

  8. Profiles of ion beams and plasma parameters on a multi-frequencies microwaves large bore electron cyclotron resonance ion source with permanent magnets.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yushi; Sakamoto, Naoki; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2012-02-01

    In order to contribute to various applications of plasma and beams based on an electron cyclotron resonance, a new concept on magnetic field with all magnets on plasma production and confinement has been proposed with enhanced efficiency for broad and dense ion beam. The magnetic field configuration consists of a pair of comb-shaped magnet surrounding plasma chamber cylindrically. Resonance zones corresponding for 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz frequencies are positioned at spatially different positions. We launch simultaneously multiplex frequencies microwaves operated individually, try to control profiles of the plasma parameters and the extracted ion beams, and to measure them in detail.

  9. Profiles of ion beams and plasma parameters on a multi-frequencies microwaves large bore electron cyclotron resonance ion source with permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Yushi; Sakamoto, Naoki; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2012-02-15

    In order to contribute to various applications of plasma and beams based on an electron cyclotron resonance, a new concept on magnetic field with all magnets on plasma production and confinement has been proposed with enhanced efficiency for broad and dense ion beam. The magnetic field configuration consists of a pair of comb-shaped magnet surrounding plasma chamber cylindrically. Resonance zones corresponding for 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz frequencies are positioned at spatially different positions. We launch simultaneously multiplex frequencies microwaves operated individually, try to control profiles of the plasma parameters and the extracted ion beams, and to measure them in detail.

  10. Possibilities of improving the parameters of hyperthermia in regional isolated limb perfusion using epidural bupivacaine and accurate temperature measurement of the three layers of limb tissue.

    PubMed

    Jastrzebski, Tomasz; Sommer, Anna; Swierblewski, Maciej; Lass, Piotr; Rogowski, Jan; Drucis, Kamil; Kopacz, Andrzej

    2006-06-01

    The present study presents the author's modification of the method, which aims to create proper parameters of the treatment. The selected group consisted of 15 women and eight men, with a mean age of 57.2 years (range from 26 to 72 years). The patients were divided into two groups, depending on whether they were given epidural bupivacaine (group I - 13 patients treated between the years 2001 and 2004) or not [group II (control) - 10 patients treated earlier, between the years 1997 and 2000]. We observed a significant change in the temperature of thigh muscles (P=0.009) and shank muscles (P=0.006). In the control group II, there was a statistically significant difference (P=0.048) in the temperatures between the muscles and subcutaneous tissue on the one hand and the shank skin on the other. That difference was mean 0.67 degrees Celsius (from 0.4 to 0.9) during the perfusion after applying the cytostatic. The temperature of the skin was lower than the temperature of the deeper tissues of the shank and did not exceed 39.9 degrees Celsius. Such a difference in the temperatures was not observed in case of the group I patients who were given bupivacaine into the extrameningeal space before applying the cytostatic. The difference in the temperatures was on average 0.26 degrees Celsius and was not statistically significant (P=0.99), whereas the shank skin temperature was 40.0-40.6 degrees Celsius. The attained results imply that despite the noticeable improvement in the heating of the limb muscles after application of bupivacaine, the improvement in the heating of the skin and subcutaneous tissue is still not satisfactory, although the growing tendency implies such a possibility.

  11. Recent results of the parameters A and R measurements in the resonance region of the {pi}N-elastic scattering and subsequent investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Sumachev, V. V.; Beloglazov, Yu. A.; Filimonov, E. A.; Kovalev, A. I.; Kozlenko, N. G.; Kruglov, S. P.; Kulbardis, A. A.; Lopatin, I. V.; Novinsky, D. V.; Shchedrov, V. A.; Trautman, V. Yu.; Alekseev, I. G.; Budkovsky, P. E.; Kanavets, V. P.; Koroleva, L. I.; Morozov, B. V.; Nesterov, V. M.; Ryltsov, V. V.; Sulimov, A. D.; Svirida, D. N.

    2008-10-13

    The existing models of baryons usually predict considerably more resonance (three or more in number) than it was found by investigation of elastic pion-nucleon scattering. This disagreement invites further investigation of the pion-nucleon interaction and among other things the measurement of spin rotation parameters A and R in the elastic pion-nucleon scattering.Recent experiments of the PNPI and PNPI-ITEP collaborations resolved a part of twofold ambiguities of the existing partial wave analyses (PWA). These results were used in the last PWA of the George Washington University group SP06. The proposal for the additional spin rotation parameters A and R measurement in the resonance region is motivated. Such additional measurements are necessary to resolve remaining twofold ambiguities of the existing PWAs.

  12. Nonlinear resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevorkian, J.; Pernarowski, Mark; Bosley, David L.

    1990-04-01

    The subjects discussed are: transient and sustained resonance for systems with very slowly varying parameters; free electron lasers with very slow wiggler taper; and bursting oscillations in biological systems. Plans are discussed for: FEL applications; transient and sustained resonance; and bursting oscillations.

  13. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Method for calculating a negative-dispersion resonator-type multilayer mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholokhonova, Polina A.; Erg, G. V.

    2005-11-01

    A method is proposed for the calculation of negative-dispersion mirrors with resonator cavities. The mirror optimisation algorithm combines the capabilities of the gradient method and the random search method. A multilayer mirror structure with a reflectivity R>99.9% and a group delay dispersion of -60±10 fs2 in the 930-1070 nm wavelength range was calculated. The sensitivity of the obtained structure to random variations of layer thicknesses was analysed.

  14. Detection and Classification of Buried UXO and Determination of Seafloor Parameters in Littoral Environments using Resonance Scattering Sonar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-02

    Environmental Technology Technical Symposium and Workshop, Washington, D.C. Cobb, W. (2006), Acoustic identification of filler materials in unexploded...Underwater UXO Using Resonance Scattered Sonar, Partners in Environmental Technology Technical Symposium and Workshop, Washington, D.C., Dec. 1-3...Nelson, H., Yoder, T, Kraus, L. and Carin L., 2009, Broadband, Multi-Aspect Scattering from UXO, Partners in Environmental Technology Technical

  15. Classification of the micro and nanoparticles and biological agents by neural network analysis of the parameters of optical resonance of whispering gallery mode in dielectric microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saetchnikov, Vladimir A.; Tcherniavskaia, Elina A.; Schweiger, Gustav; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2011-07-01

    A novel technique for the label-free analysis of micro and nanoparticles including biomolecules using optical micro cavity resonance of whispering-gallery-type modes is being developed. Various schemes of the method using both standard and specially produced microspheres have been investigated to make further development for microbial application. It was demonstrated that optical resonance under optimal geometry could be detected under the laser power of less 1 microwatt. The sensitivity of developed schemes has been tested by monitoring the spectral shift of the whispering gallery modes. Water solutions of ethanol, ascorbic acid, blood phantoms including albumin and HCl, glucose, biotin, biomarker like C reactive protein so as bacteria and virus phantoms (gels of silica micro and nanoparticles) have been used. Structure of resonance spectra of the solutions was a specific subject of investigation. Probabilistic neural network classifier for biological agents and micro/nano particles classification has been developed. Several parameters of resonance spectra as spectral shift, broadening, diffuseness and others have been used as input parameters to develop a network classifier for micro and nanoparticles and biological agents in solution. Classification probability of approximately 98% for probes under investigation have been achieved. Developed approach have been demonstrated to be a promising technology platform for sensitive, lab-on-chip type sensor which can be used for development of diagnostic tools for different biological molecules, e.g. proteins, oligonucleotides, oligosaccharides, lipids, small molecules, viral particles, cells as well as in different experimental contexts e.g. proteomics, genomics, drug discovery, and membrane studies.

  16. Multi-frequency weak signal detection based on wavelet transform and parameter compensation band-pass multi-stable stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dongying; li, Pei; An, Shujun; Shi, Peiming

    2016-03-01

    In actual fault diagnosis, useful information is often submerged in heavy noise, and the feature information is difficult to extract. A novel weak signal detection method aimed at the problem of detecting multi-frequency signals buried under heavy background noise is proposed based on wavelet transform and parameter compensation band-pass multi-stable stochastic resonance (SR). First, the noisy signal is processed by parameter compensation, with the noise and system parameters expanded 10 times to counteract the effect of the damping term. The processed signal is decomposed into multiple signals of different scale frequencies by wavelet transform. Following this, we adjust the size of the scaled signals' amplitudes and reconstruct the signals; the weak signal frequency components are then enhanced by multi-stable stochastic resonance. The enhanced components of the signal are processed through a band-pass filter, leaving the enhanced sections of the signal. The processed signal is analyzed by FFT to achieve detection of the multi-frequency weak signals. The simulation and experimental results show that the proposed method can enhance the signal amplitude, can effectively detect multi-frequency weak signals buried under heavy noise and is valuable and usable for bearing fault signal analysis.

  17. [Study of the effect of the microenvironment on magnetic resonance parameters of spin-labeled human serum albumin in a 2-mm ESR range].

    PubMed

    Krinichnyĭ, V I; Grinberg, O Ia; Likhtenshteĭn, G I; Lebedev, Ia S

    1985-01-01

    Basic values of g-tensor and Azz component of HF tensor of two spin labels and spin probe on HSA and nitroxyl radicals HO-15, HO-34 in the solvents of different polarity were measured by 2 mm band ESR of 2 mm range. Magnetic-resonance parameters of liophylized and water-solved spin-labeled HSA were shown to correspond to the parameters of the solvents of the label HO-15 and HO-34 in ethyl alcohol and water. A conclusion was drawn concerning the identity of microenvironment of the nitroxyl fragment of liophylized HSA and frozen solution of the label HO-15 and HO-34 in ethyl alcohol and solvatation of the nitroxyl fragment of spin-labeled HSA and label HO-15 (HO-34) by water molecules.

  18. Comparison of three lines of broiler breeders differing in ascites susceptibility or growth rate. 1. Relationship between acoustic resonance data and embryonic or hatching parameters.

    PubMed

    Tona, K; Kemps, B; Bruggeman, V; Bamelis, F; De Smit, L; Onagbesan, O; De Baerdemaeker, J; Decuypere, E

    2005-09-01

    Ascites is a prevalent cardiovascular disease among modern broilers with negative impacts on production and animal welfare. The peak of mortality due to ascites occurs at the end of the growing period, but the etiology of this problem may start during embryonic development. A few recent reports have demonstrated that the signs of ascites susceptibility are manifested during the late stages of incubation. In the current study, we used a nondestructive method based on egg acoustic resonance parameters [resonant frequency (RF) and damping] to establish a relationship between embryo physiological events during early development in broiler eggs and susceptibility to ascites. The hatching eggs of 3 broiler lines differing in ascites susceptibility were used for this study: ascites-resistant dam line (DAR), ascites-sensitive dam line (DAS), and ascites-sensitive sire line (SASL). These lines were selected on the basis of fast growth, high breast meat yield, and ascites induction at low temperatures such that the order of ascites susceptibility in terms of mortality was SASL > DAS > DAR. Eggs were incubated under standard conditions in forced-draft incubators. We measured egg weights at setting, albumen pH, Haugh units (HU) at setting, and embryo weights at d 11 and 18, at internal pipping (IP), and at hatch. The durations of IP, external pipping (EP), and hatching were also determined. At 2 hourly periods during incubation, egg RF and damping were also measured. There were differences in egg weights between DAR and SASL vs. DAS, but albumen HU, albumen pH, and the ratio of yolk weight to egg weight were similar. There were differences in RF, damping, embryonic growth rates, and hatching events. Changes in resonant frequency and damping, which certainly suggest eggshell differences among lines, were not totally related to variations in physiological events during early and late embryonic development. A comparison between DAR and DAS, between DAS and SASL, or DAR and SASL

  19. Parameter-adjusted stochastic resonance system for the aperiodic echo chirp signal in optimal FrFT domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li-feng; Yu, Lei; Wang, Huiqi; Zhong, Suchuan

    2017-02-01

    In order to improve the system performance for moving target detection and localization, this paper presents a new aperiodic chirp signal and additive noise driving stochastic dynamical system, in which the internal frequency has the linear variation matching with the driving frequency. By using the fractional Fourier transform (FrFT) operator with the optimal order, the proposed time-domain dynamical system is transformed into the equivalent FrFT-domain system driven by the periodic signal and noise. Therefore, system performance is conveniently analyzed from the view of output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in optimal FrFT domain. Simulation results demonstrate that the output SNR, as a function of system parameter, shows the different generalized SR behaviors in the case of various internal parameters of driving chirp signal and external parameters of the moving target.

  20. Measurement and calculation of the Stark-broadening parameters for the resonance lines of singly ionized calcium and magnesium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. W.; Sanchez, A.; Greig, J. R.; Griem, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    The electron-impact-broadened profiles of the resonance lines of singly ionized calcium and magnesium have been measured using an electromagnetically driven shock tube and a rapid-scanning Fabry-Perot spectrometer. For an electron density of 10 to the 17th power per cu cm and a temperature of 19,000 K, we found the Lorentzian half-width of the Ca+ line to be 0.086 A plus or minus 10% and of the Mg+ line to be 0.044 A plus or minus 10%. Using the quantum-mechanical theory of Barnes and Peach and our semiclassical calculation for the calcium lines, we found that the temperature dependence of the theoretical curves is close to that measured, although both theories predict actual values which are somewhat large.

  1. Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters and Late Side Effects in Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Georg, Petra; Lang, Stefan; Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Doerr, Wolfgang; Sturdza, Alina E.; Berger, Daniel; Georg, Dietmar; Kirisits, Christian; Poetter, Richard

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the predictive value of dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters for late side effects of the rectum, sigmoid colon, and bladder in image-guided brachytherapy for cervix cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 141 patients received external-beam radiotherapy and image-guided brachytherapy with or without chemotherapy. The DVH parameters for the most exposed 2, 1, and 0.1 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 2cc}, D{sub 1cc}, and D{sub 0.1cc}) of the rectum, sigmoid, and bladder, as well as International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements point doses (D{sub ICRU}) were computed. Total doses were converted to equivalent doses in 2 Gy by applying the linear-quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy). Late side effects were prospectively assessed using the Late Effects in Normal Tissues-Subjective, Objective, Management and Analytic score. The following patient groups were defined: Group 1: no side effects (Grade 0); Group 2: side effects (Grade 1-4); Group 3: minor side effects (Grade 0-1); and Group 4: major side effects (Grade 2-4). Results: The median follow-up was 51 months. The overall 5-year actuarial side effect rates were 12% for rectum, 3% for sigmoid, and 23% for bladder. The mean total D{sub 2cc} were 65 {+-} 12 Gy for rectum, 62 {+-} 12 Gy for sigmoid, and 95 {+-} 22 Gy for bladder. For rectum, statistically significant differences were observed between Groups 1 and 2 in all DVH parameters and D{sub ICRU}. Between Groups 3 and 4, no difference was observed for D{sub 0.1cc.} For sigmoid, significant differences were observed for D{sub 2cc} and D{sub 1cc}, but not for D{sub 0.1cc} in all groups. For bladder, significant differences were observed for all DVH parameters only comparing Groups 3 and 4. No differences were observed for D{sub ICRU}. Conclusions: The parameters D{sub 2cc} and D{sub 1cc} have a good predictive value for rectal toxicity. For sigmoid, no prediction could be postulated because of limited data. In bladder, DVH

  2. Resonant alteration of propagation in guiding structures with complex Robin parameter and its magnetic-field-induced restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Olendski, O.

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Solutions of the wave equation are analyzed for the confined circular geometry with complex Robin boundary conditions. > Sharp extremum is found in the energy dependence on the imaginary part of the extrapolation length. > Nonzero real part of the Robin length or/and magnetic field wipe out the resonance. - Abstract: Solutions of the scalar Helmholtz wave equation are derived for the analysis of the transport and thermodynamic properties of the two-dimensional disk and three-dimensional infinitely long straight wire in the external uniform longitudinal magnetic field B under the assumption that the Robin boundary condition contains extrapolation length {Lambda} with nonzero imaginary part {Lambda}{sub i}. As a result of this complexity, the self-adjointness of the Hamiltonian is lost, its eigenvalues E become complex too and the discrete bound states of the disk characteristic for the real {Lambda} turn into the corresponding quasibound states with their lifetime defined by the eigenenergies imaginary parts E{sub i}. Accordingly, the longitudinal flux undergoes an alteration as it flows along the wire with its attenuation/amplification being E{sub i}-dependent too. It is shown that, for zero magnetic field, the component E{sub i} as a function of the Robin imaginary part exhibits a pronounced sharp extremum with its magnitude being the largest for the zero real part {Lambda}{sub r} of the extrapolation length. Increasing magnitude of {Lambda}{sub r} quenches the E{sub i} - {Lambda}{sub i} resonance and at very large {Lambda}{sub r} the eigenenergies E approach the asymptotic real values independent of {Lambda}{sub i}. The extremum is also wiped out by the magnetic field when, for the large B, the energies tend to the Landau levels. Mathematical and physical interpretations of the obtained results are provided; in particular, it is shown that the finite lifetime of the disk quasibound states stems from the {Lambda}{sub i}-induced currents flowing

  3. Multi-Group Formulation of the Temperature-Dependent Resonance Scattering Model and its Impact on Reactor Core Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Ghrayeb, Shadi Z.; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.; Ouisloumen, Mohamed; Ivanov, Kostadin N.

    2014-01-01

    A multi-group formulation for the exact neutron elastic scattering kernel is developed. It incorporates the neutron up-scattering effects, stemming from lattice atoms thermal motion and accounts for it within the resulting effective nuclear cross-section data. The effects pertain essentially to resonant scattering off of heavy nuclei. The formulation, implemented into a standalone code, produces effective nuclear scattering data that are then supplied directly into the DRAGON lattice physics code where the effects on Doppler Reactivity and neutron flux are demonstrated. The correct accounting for the crystal lattice effects influences the estimated values for the probability of neutron absorption and scattering, which in turn affect the estimation of core reactivity and burnup characteristics. The results show an increase in values of Doppler temperature feedback coefficients up to -10% for UOX and MOX LWR fuels compared to the corresponding values derived using the traditional asymptotic elastic scattering kernel. This paper also summarizes the results done on this topic to date.

  4. Modeling noisy resonant system response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Patrick Thomas; Walrath, David Edwin

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a theory-based model replicating empirical acoustic resonant signals is presented and studied to understand sources of noise present in acoustic signals. Statistical properties of empirical signals are quantified and a noise amplitude parameter, which models frequency and amplitude-based noise, is created, defined, and presented. This theory-driven model isolates each phenomenon and allows for parameters to be independently studied. Using seven independent degrees of freedom, this model will accurately reproduce qualitative and quantitative properties measured from laboratory data. Results are presented and demonstrate success in replicating qualitative and quantitative properties of experimental data.

  5. Appearance of monoclonal plasma cell diseases in whole-body magnetic resonance imaging and correlation with parameters of disease activity.

    PubMed

    Kloth, Jost K; Hillengass, Jens; Listl, Karin; Kilk, Kerstin; Hielscher, Thomas; Landgren, Ola; Delorme, Stefan; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weber, Marc-André

    2014-11-15

    The aim of our study was to assess in which way different infiltration patterns of monoclonal plasma cell diseases in whole-body (wb) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are associated with clinical stages, plasma cell content in bone marrow samples and established serum markers of disease activity. Institutional review board approval was obtained. We performed wb-MRI in 547 consecutive, unselected and untreated patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS, n=138), smoldering myeloma (SMM, n=157) and multiple myeloma (MM, n=252) on two 1.5 T MRI-scanners with body array coils. The studies were evaluated in consensus by two experienced radiologists blinded to the diagnosis. We observed focal lesions in 23.9% (MGUS), 34.4% (SMM) and 81.3% (MM), respectively. A diffuse infiltration pattern was detected in 38.4%, 45.9% and 71%, respectively. The differences between all infiltration patterns were significant (p<0.0001). The presence of focal lesions and the presence of a diffuse bone marrow infiltration was associated with an increased plasma cell percentage in bone marrow samples (median 22% vs. 14%, 26% vs. 10%, both p<0.0001) and monoclonal protein concentration (median 18 g/dl vs. 13 g/dl, p=0.003, 20 g/dl vs. 11 g/dl, p<0.0001). Further categorization of the diffuse infiltration patterns in wb-MRI into "salt-and-pepper," moderate and severe identified significant associations with M-protein (median g/dl for S+P/moderate/severe 23/18/25, p=0.04), plasma cell percentage in the bone marrow (median 25%/24%/40%, p=0.02), and age (median years 67/60/57, p<0.0001). Bone marrow infiltration in wb-MRI is significantly different between the various stages of plasma cell disease and correlates well with established markers of disease activity.

  6. Top-down, decoupled control of constitutive parameters in electromagnetic metamaterials with dielectric resonators of internal anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Sukmo; Mason, Daniel R.; Kim, Yunjung; Park, Namkyoo

    2017-02-01

    A meta-atom platform providing decoupled tuning for the constitutive wave parameters remains as a challenging problem, since the proposition of Pendry. Here we propose an electromagnetic meta-atom design of internal anisotropy (εr ≠ εθ), as a pathway for decoupling of the effective- permittivity εeff and permeability μeff. Deriving effective parameters for anisotropic meta-atom from the first principles, and then subsequent inverse-solving the obtained decoupled solution for a target set of εeff and μeff, we also achieve an analytic, top-down determination for the internal structure of a meta-atom. To realize the anisotropy from isotropic materials, a particle of spatial permittivity modulation in r or θ direction is proposed. As an application example, a matched zero index dielectric meta-atom is demonstrated, to enable the super-funneling of a 50λ-wide flux through a sub-λ slit; unharnessing the flux collection limit dictated by the λ-zone.

  7. Top-down, decoupled control of constitutive parameters in electromagnetic metamaterials with dielectric resonators of internal anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Koo, Sukmo; Mason, Daniel R; Kim, Yunjung; Park, Namkyoo

    2017-02-10

    A meta-atom platform providing decoupled tuning for the constitutive wave parameters remains as a challenging problem, since the proposition of Pendry. Here we propose an electromagnetic meta-atom design of internal anisotropy (εr ≠ εθ), as a pathway for decoupling of the effective- permittivity εeff and permeability μeff. Deriving effective parameters for anisotropic meta-atom from the first principles, and then subsequent inverse-solving the obtained decoupled solution for a target set of εeff and μeff, we also achieve an analytic, top-down determination for the internal structure of a meta-atom. To realize the anisotropy from isotropic materials, a particle of spatial permittivity modulation in r or θ direction is proposed. As an application example, a matched zero index dielectric meta-atom is demonstrated, to enable the super-funneling of a 50λ-wide flux through a sub-λ slit; unharnessing the flux collection limit dictated by the λ-zone.

  8. Top-down, decoupled control of constitutive parameters in electromagnetic metamaterials with dielectric resonators of internal anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Sukmo; Mason, Daniel R.; Kim, Yunjung; Park, Namkyoo

    2017-01-01

    A meta-atom platform providing decoupled tuning for the constitutive wave parameters remains as a challenging problem, since the proposition of Pendry. Here we propose an electromagnetic meta-atom design of internal anisotropy (εr ≠ εθ), as a pathway for decoupling of the effective- permittivity εeff and permeability μeff. Deriving effective parameters for anisotropic meta-atom from the first principles, and then subsequent inverse-solving the obtained decoupled solution for a target set of εeff and μeff, we also achieve an analytic, top-down determination for the internal structure of a meta-atom. To realize the anisotropy from isotropic materials, a particle of spatial permittivity modulation in r or θ direction is proposed. As an application example, a matched zero index dielectric meta-atom is demonstrated, to enable the super-funneling of a 50λ-wide flux through a sub-λ slit; unharnessing the flux collection limit dictated by the λ-zone. PMID:28186157

  9. [Comparison of various parameters for determining an index of myocardial perfusion reserve in detecting coronary stenosis with cardiovascular magnetic resonance tomography].

    PubMed

    al-Saadi, N; Gross, M; Bornstedt, A; Schnackenburg, B; Klein, C; Fleck, E; Nagel, E

    2001-11-01

    For the assessment of myocardial perfusion with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, different semiquantitative parameters of the first pass signal intensity time curves can be calculated and myocardial perfusion reserve indices can be determined. In this study we evaluated the feasibility of different perfusion parameters and their perfusion reserve indices for the detection of significant coronary artery stenosis. The signal intensity time curves of the first pass of a gadolinium-DTPA bolus injected via a central vein catheter before and after dipyridamole infusion were investigated in 15 patients with single vessel (stenosis > or = 75% area reduction) and five patients without significant coronary artery disease. For the distinction of ischemic and nonischemic myocardial segments, semiquantitative parameters, such as maximal signal intensity, contrast appearance time, time to maximal signal intensity and the steepness of the signal intensity curve's upslope determined by a linear fit, were assessed after correction for the input function. For each parameter a myocardial perfusion reserve index was calculated and cut off values for the detection of significant coronary stenosis were defined. The diagnostic accuracy of each parameter was then examined prospectively in 36 patients with coronary artery disease and compared with coronary angiography. Where as a distinction of ischemic and normal myocardium was possible with myocardial perfusion reserve indices, semiquantitative parameters at rest or after vasodilation alone did not allow such a distinction. The perfusion reserve index calculated from the upslope showed the most significant difference between ischemic and nonischemic myocardial segments (1.19 +/- 0.4 and 2.38 +/- 0.45, p < 0.001) followed by maximum signal intensity, time to maximum signal intensity and contrast apperance time. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy was 87, 82 and 85% for the detection of hypoperfusion induced by significant

  10. Controlling precise magnetic field configuration around electron cyclotron resonance zone for enhancing plasma parameters and beam current.

    PubMed

    Yano, Keisuke; Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Kimura, Daiju; Imai, Youta; Kumakura, Sho; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-01

    Multi-charged ion source which has wide operating conditions is required in various application fields. We have constructed tandem type ECR ion source (ECRIS); one of the features of its main stage is an additional coil for controlling magnetic field distribution around the mirror bottom precisely. Here the effect of magnetic field variation caused by the additional coil is experimentally considered in terms of plasma parameters and beam current as the first investigation of the main stage plasma. Furthermore, behavior of magnetic lines of force flowing from the ECR zone is calculated, and is compared with measurement results aiming for better understanding of interrelationship between plasma production and ion beam generation on the ECRIS.

  11. Incorporating doubly resonant W ± data in a global fit of SMEFT parameters to lift flat directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthier, Laure; Bjørn, Mikkel; Trott, Michael

    2016-09-01

    We calculate the double pole contribution to two to four fermion scattering through W ± currents at tree level in the Standard Model Effective Field Theory (SMEFT). We assume all fermions to be massless, U(3)5 flavour and CP symmetry. Using this result, we update the global constraint picture on SMEFT parameters including LEPII data on these charged current processes, and also modifications to our fit procedure motivated by a companion paper focused on W ± mass extractions. The fit reported is now to 177 observables and emphasises the need for a consistent inclusion of theoretical errors, and a consistent treatment of observables. Including charged current data lifts the two-fold degeneracy previously encountered in LEP (and lower energy) data, and allows us to set simultaneous constraints on 20 of 53 Wilson coefficients in the SMEFT, consistent with our assumptions. This allows the model independent inclusion of LEP data in SMEFT studies at LHC, which are projected into the SMEFT in a consistent fashion. We show how stronger constraints can be obtained by using some combinations of Wilson coefficients, when making assumptions on the UV completion of the Standard Model, or in an inconsistent analysis. We explain why strong bounds at the per-mille or sub-per-mille level on some combinations of Wilson coefficients in the Effective Lagrangian can be artificially enhanced in fits of this form in detail. This explains some of the different claims present in the literature.

  12. Modifications in Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Parameters After α-Particle-Emitting {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab Therapy of HER2-Expressing Ovarian Cancer Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Heyerdahl, Helen; Røe, Kathrine; Brevik, Ellen Mengshoel; Dahle, Jostein

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of α-particle-emitting {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab radioimmunotherapy on tumor vasculature to increase the knowledge about the mechanisms of action of {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab. Methods and Materials: Human HER2-expressing SKOV-3 ovarian cancer xenografts were grown bilaterally in athymic nude mice. Mice with tumor volumes 253 ± 36 mm{sup 3} (mean ± SEM) were treated with a single injection of either {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab at a dose of 1000 kBq/kg body weight (treated group, n=14 tumors) or 0.9% NaCl (control group, n=10 tumors). Dynamic T1-weighted contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) was used to study the effect of {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab on tumor vasculature. DCEMRI was performed before treatment and 1, 2, and 3 weeks after therapy. Tumor contrast-enhancement curves were extracted voxel by voxel and fitted to the Brix pharmacokinetic model. Pharmacokinetic parameters for the tumors that underwent radioimmunotherapy were compared with the corresponding parameters of control tumors. Results: Significant increases of k{sub ep}, the rate constant of diffusion from the extravascular extracellular space to the plasma (P<.05), and k{sub el,} the rate of clearance of contrast agent from the plasma (P<.01), were seen in the radioimmunotherapy group 2 and 3 weeks after injection, compared with the control group. The product of k{sub ep} and the amplitude parameter A, associated with increased vessel permeability and perfusion, was also significantly increased in the radioimmunotherapy group 2 and 3 weeks after injection (P<.01). Conclusions: Pharmacokinetic modeling of MRI contrast-enhancement curves evidenced significant alterations in parameters associated with increased tumor vessel permeability and tumor perfusion after {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab treatment of HER2-expressing ovarian cancer xenografts.

  13. Complex-coordinate calculation of (1,3)P resonances in Ps(-) using Hylleraas functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Ho, Y. K.

    1990-01-01

    An accurate calculation for (1,3)P autodetaching resonances in Ps(-) has been carried out using the complex-rotation method, which has the advantage of giving resonance position and width at the same time. The wave function is of the Hylleraas type with an available number of terms up to 1140. One 1P and two 3P resonances below the n = 2 threshold and two 1P and two 3P resonances below the n = 3 threshold of the positronium atom. Resonance parameters are compared with those obtained from scattering and adiabatic calculations where available.

  14. Fiber-optic sensors for monitoring patient physiological parameters: a review of applicable technologies and relevance to use during magnetic resonance imaging procedures.

    PubMed

    Dziuda, Łukasz

    2015-01-01

    The issues involved with recording vital functions in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment using fiber-optic sensors are considered in this paper. Basic physiological parameters, such as respiration and heart rate, are fundamental for predicting the risk of anxiety, panic, and claustrophobic episodes in patients undergoing MRI examinations. Electronic transducers are generally hazardous to the patient and are prone to erroneous operation in heavily electromagnetically penetrated MRI environments; however, nonmetallic fiber-optic sensors are inherently immune to electromagnetic effects and will be crucial for acquiring the above-mentioned physiological parameters. Forty-seven MRI-tested or potentially MRI-compatible sensors have appeared in the literature over the last 20 years. The author classifies these sensors into several categories and subcategories, depending on the sensing element placement, method of application, and measure and type. The author includes five in-house-designed fiber Bragg grating based sensors and shares experience in acquiring physiological measurements during MRI scans. This paper aims to systematize the knowledge of fiber-optic techniques for recording life functions and to indicate the current directions of development in this area.

  15. An analytical method for estimating the {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole resonance parameters of organic compounds with complex free induction decays for radiation effects studies

    SciTech Connect

    Iselin, L.H.

    1992-12-31

    The use of {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) as a radiation dosimetry tool has only recently been explored. An analytical method for analyzing {sup 14}N NQR complex free induction decays is presented with the background necessary to conduct pulsed NQR experiments. The {sup 14}N NQR energy levels and possible transitions are derived in step-by-step detail. The components of a pulsed NQR spectrometer are discussed along with the experimental techniques for conducting radiation effects experiments using the spectrometer. Three data analysis techniques -- the power spectral density Fourier transform, state space singular value decomposition (HSVD), and nonlinear curve fitting (using the downhill simplex method of global optimization and the Levenberg-Marquart method) -- are explained. These three techniques are integrated into an analytical method which uses these numerical techniques in this order to determine the physical NQR parameters. Sample data sets of urea and guanidine sulfate data are used to demonstrate how these methods can be employed to analyze both simple and complex free induction decays. By determining baseline values for biologically significant organics, radiation effects on the NQR parameters can be studied to provide a link between current radiation dosimetry techniques and the biological effects of radiation.

  16. Fiber-optic sensors for monitoring patient physiological parameters: a review of applicable technologies and relevance to use during magnetic resonance imaging procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziuda, Łukasz

    2015-01-01

    The issues involved with recording vital functions in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment using fiber-optic sensors are considered in this paper. Basic physiological parameters, such as respiration and heart rate, are fundamental for predicting the risk of anxiety, panic, and claustrophobic episodes in patients undergoing MRI examinations. Electronic transducers are generally hazardous to the patient and are prone to erroneous operation in heavily electromagnetically penetrated MRI environments; however, nonmetallic fiber-optic sensors are inherently immune to electromagnetic effects and will be crucial for acquiring the above-mentioned physiological parameters. Forty-seven MRI-tested or potentially MRI-compatible sensors have appeared in the literature over the last 20 years. The author classifies these sensors into several categories and subcategories, depending on the sensing element placement, method of application, and measurand type. The author includes five in-house-designed fiber Bragg grating based sensors and shares experience in acquiring physiological measurements during MRI scans. This paper aims to systematize the knowledge of fiber-optic techniques for recording life functions and to indicate the current directions of development in this area.

  17. Neutron Resonance Parameters of 238U and the Calculated Cross Sections from the Reich-Moore Analysis of Experimental Data in the Neutron Energy Range from 0 keV to 20 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H

    2005-12-05

    The neutron resonance parameters of {sup 238}U were obtained from a SAMMY analysis of high-resolution neutron transmission measurements and high-resolution capture cross section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in the years 1970-1990, and from more recent transmission and capture cross section measurements performed at the Geel Linear Accelerator (GELINA). Compared with previous evaluations, the energy range for this resonance analysis was extended from 10 to 20 keV, taking advantage of the high resolution of the most recent ORELA transmission measurements. The experimental database and the method of analysis are described in this report. The neutron transmissions and the capture cross sections calculated with the resonance parameters are compared with the experimental data. A description is given of the statistical properties of the resonance parameters and of the recommended values of the average parameters. The new evaluation results in a slight decrease of the effective capture resonance integral and improves the prediction of integral thermal benchmarks by 70 pcm to 200 pcm.

  18. Interference effect in the dipole and nondipole anisotropy parameters of the Kr 4p photoelectrons in the vicinity of the Kr (3d){sup -1{yields}}np resonant excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Ricz, S.; Ricsoka, T.; Holste, K.; Borovik, A. Jr.; Bernhardt, D.; Schippers, S.; Mueller, A.; Koever, A.; Varga, D.

    2010-04-15

    The angular distribution of the Kr 4p photoelectrons was investigated in the photon energy range of the (3d){sup -1{yields}}np resonant excitations. The experimental dipole ({beta}) and nondipole ({gamma} and {delta}) anisotropy parameters were determined for the spin-orbit components of the Kr 4p shell. A simple theoretical model was developed for the description of the photoionization and excitation processes. An interference effect was observed between the direct photoionization and the resonant excitation participator Auger decay processes in the photon energy dependence of the experimental anisotropy parameters.

  19. On the Use of Lambert W Function for Modeling of Quantum Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Horacek, Jiri; Ledvinka, Tomas

    2011-09-14

    The Lambert W function is used to represent data (bound state energies) for the process of analytical continuation in the coupling constant. It is shown how the presence of the singularity of the W function restricts the accuracy of determination of the branch point. The accuracy of the determination of resonance parameters is also discussed. It is shown that even for moderately accurate input data the process of analytical continuation yields resonance parameters of accuracy surpassing modern experimental data.

  20. On the Use of Lambert W Function for Modeling of Quantum Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horáček, Jiří; Ledvinka, Tomáš

    2011-09-01

    The Lambert W function is used to represent data (bound state energies) for the process of analytical continuation in the coupling constant. It is shown how the presence of the singularity of the W function restricts the accuracy of determination of the branch point. The accuracy of the determination of resonance parameters is also discussed. It is shown that even for moderately accurate input data the process of analytical continuation yields resonance parameters of accuracy surpassing modern experimental data.

  1. On the calculation of resonances by means of analytic continuation in coupling constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horáček, J.; Paidarová, I.

    2010-11-01

    The method of analytic continuation in the coupling constant in combination with the use of statistical Padé approximation designed to determine resonance parameters is introduced. It is shown that standard quantum chemistry codes provide accurate data which can be used for the process of analytic continuation in coupling constant. Resonance parameters, both the energy and the width, can be inferred for real molecules with accuracy comparable to other more elaborated methods.

  2. Site-specific experiments on folding/unfolding of Jun coiled coils: thermodynamic and kinetic parameters from spin inversion transfer nuclear magnetic resonance at leucine-18.

    PubMed

    d'Avignon, D André; Bretthorst, G Larry; Holtzer, Marilyn Emerson; Schwarz, Kathleen A; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue; Mints, Lisa; Holtzer, Alfred

    2006-10-15

    The 32-residue leucine zipper subsequence, called here Jun-lz, associates in benign media to form a parallel two-stranded coiled coil. Studies are reported of its thermal unfolding/folding transition by circular dichroism (CD) on samples of natural isotopic abundance and by both equilibrium and spin inversion transfer (SIT) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) on samples labeled at the leucine-18 alpha-carbon with 99% 13C. The data cover a wide range of temperature and concentration, and show that Jun-lz unfolds below room temperature, being far less stable than some other leucine zippers such as GCN4. 13C-NMR shows two well-separated resonances. We ascribe the upfield one to 13C spins on unfolded single chains and the downfield one to 13C spins on coiled-coil dimers. Their relative intensities provide a measure of the unfolding equilibrium constant. In SIT NMR, the recovery of the equilibrium magnetization after one resonance is inverted is modulated in part by the unfolding and folding rate constants, which are accessible from the data. Global Bayesian analysis of the equilibrium and SIT NMR data provide values for the standard enthalpy, entropy, and heat capacity of unfolding, and show the latter to be unusually large. The CD results are compatible with the NMR findings. Global Bayesian analysis of the SIT NMR data yields the corresponding activation parameters for unfolding and folding. The results show that both reaction directions are activated processes. Activation for unfolding is entropy driven, enthalpy opposed. Activation for folding is strongly enthalpy opposed and somewhat entropy opposed, falsifying the idea that the barrier for folding is solely due to a purely entropic search for properly registered partners. The activation heat capacity is much larger for folding, so almost the entire overall change is due to the folding direction. This latter finding, if it applies to GCN4 leucine zippers, clears up an extant apparent disagreement between folding rate

  3. Threshold-crossing counting technique for damping factor determination of resonator sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Kefeng; Grimes, Craig A.

    2004-12-01

    The behavior of resonator-type sensors at resonance is characterized by two fundamental parameters: resonance frequency and damping factor (or Q-factor). Practical applications require accurate and efficient measurements of these two parameters. Using magnetoelastic resonant sensors as a test case earlier work [K. Zeng, K. G. Ong, C. Mungle, and C. A. Grimes, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 4375 (2002)] demonstrated the ability to determine resonance frequency by counting the number of cycles in the transient response of a pulsewise excited sensor. Presented in this paper is a novel technique for measuring the damping factor of a resonant magnetoelastic sensor, or any resonator type sensor, using threshold-crossing counting of the transient response. The damping factor determination technique eliminates the need for a lock-in amplifier or FFT analysis as in the conventional method of quality factor estimation from spectrum analysis, significantly simplifying the electronic implementation as well as improving measurement speed and accuracy.

  4. Method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    DOEpatents

    Chalmers, S.A.; Killeen, K.P.; Lear, K.L.

    1995-03-14

    The authors report a method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). The method uses a single reflectivity spectrum measurement to determine the structure of the partially completed VCSEL at a critical point of growth. This information, along with the extracted growth rates, allows imprecisions in growth parameters to be compensated for during growth of the remaining structure, which can then be completed with very accurate critical dimensions. Using this method, they can now routinely grow lasing VCSELs with Fabry-Perot cavity resonance wavelengths controlled to within 0.5%. 4 figs.

  5. Method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    DOEpatents

    Chalmers, Scott A.; Killeen, Kevin P.; Lear, Kevin L.

    1995-01-01

    We report a method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). The method uses a single reflectivity spectrum measurement to determine the structure of the partially completed VCSEL at a critical point of growth. This information, along with the extracted growth rates, allows imprecisions in growth parameters to be compensated for during growth of the remaining structure, which can then be completed with very accurate critical dimensions. Using this method, we can now routinely grow lasing VCSELs with Fabry-Perot cavity resonance wavelengths controlled to within 0.5%.

  6. Measurement of the CP-Violation Parameter sin2Φ₁ with a New Tagging Method at the Υ(5S) Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Y.; Yamamoto, H.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bischofberger, M.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, P.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, I.-S.; Cho, K.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Fast, J. E.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hyun, H. J.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwabuchi, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Julius, T.; Kapusta, P.; Kawasaki, T.; Kichimi, H.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B. R.; Kobayashi, N.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kumar, R.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Liu, C.; Liu, Z. Q.; Louvot, R.; McOnie, S.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Muramatsu, N.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nishida, S.; Nishimura, K.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Poluektov, A.; Röhrken, M.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sanuki, T.; Schneider, O.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Seidl, R.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Stypula, J.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tanaka, S.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Wicht, J.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamashita, Y.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2012-04-23

    We report a measurement of the CP-violation parameter sin2Φ₁ at the Υ(5S) resonance using a new tagging method, called “B-π tagging.” In Υ(5S) decays containing a neutral B meson, a charged B, and a charged pion, the neutral B is reconstructed in the J/ψK0SCP-eigenstate decay channel. The initial flavor of the neutral B meson at the moment of the Υ(5S) decay is opposite to that of the charged B and may thus be inferred from the charge of the pion without reconstructing the charged B. From the asymmetry between B-π⁺ and Bπ⁻ tagged J/ψK0S yields, we determine sin2Φ₁=0.57±0.58(stat)±0.06(syst). The results are based on 121 fb⁻¹ of data recorded by the Belle detector at the KEKB e⁺e⁻ collider.

  7. Measurement of the CP-Violation Parameter sin2Φ₁ with a New Tagging Method at the Υ(5S) Resonance

    DOE PAGES

    Sato, Y.; Yamamoto, H.; Aihara, H.; ...

    2012-04-23

    We report a measurement of the CP-violation parameter sin2Φ₁ at the Υ(5S) resonance using a new tagging method, called “B-π tagging.” In Υ(5S) decays containing a neutral B meson, a charged B, and a charged pion, the neutral B is reconstructed in the J/ψK0SCP-eigenstate decay channel. The initial flavor of the neutral B meson at the moment of the Υ(5S) decay is opposite to that of the charged B and may thus be inferred from the charge of the pion without reconstructing the charged B. From the asymmetry between B-π⁺ and Bπ⁻ tagged J/ψK0S yields, we determine sin2Φ₁=0.57±0.58(stat)±0.06(syst). The resultsmore » are based on 121 fb⁻¹ of data recorded by the Belle detector at the KEKB e⁺e⁻ collider.« less

  8. A laser gyro with a four-mirror square resonator: formulas for simulating the dynamics of the synchronisation zone parameters of the frequencies of counterpropagating waves during the device operation in the self-heating regime

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, E A

    2014-04-28

    For a laser gyro with a four-mirror square resonator we have developed a mathematical model, which allows one to simulate the temporal behaviour of the synchronisation zone parameters of the frequencies of counterpropagating waves in a situation when the device operates in the self-heating regime and is switched-on at different initial temperatures. (laser gyroscopes)

  9. Treatment of Locally Advanced Vaginal Cancer With Radiochemotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: Dose-Volume Parameters and First Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Schmid, Maximilian P.; Fidarova, Elena; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Poetter, Richard

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical feasibility of magnetic resonance image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for patients with locally advanced vaginal cancer and to report treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with vaginal cancer were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45-50.4 Gy) plus IGABT with or without chemotherapy. Distribution of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages among patients were as follows: 4 patients had Stage II cancer, 5 patients had Stage III cancer, and 4 patients had Stage IV cancer. The concept of IGABT as developed for cervix cancer was transferred and adapted for vaginal cancer, with corresponding treatment planning and reporting. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy, applying the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy for tumor; {alpha}/{beta} = 3 for organs at risk). Endpoints studied were gross tumor volume (GTV), dose-volume parameters for high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and organs at risk, local control (LC), adverse side effects, and survival. Results: The mean GTV ({+-} 1 standard deviation) at diagnosis was 45.3 ({+-}30) cm{sup 3}, and the mean GTV at brachytherapy was 10 ({+-}14) cm{sup 3}. The mean D90 for the HRCTV was 86 ({+-}13) Gy. The mean D2cc for bladder, urethra, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 80 ({+-}20) Gy, 76 ({+-}16) Gy, 70 ({+-}9) Gy, and 60 ({+-}9) Gy, respectively. After a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 19-87 months), one local recurrence and two distant metastases cases were observed. Actuarial LC and overall survival rates at 3 years were 92% and 85%. One patient with Stage IVA and 1 patient with Stage III disease experienced fistulas (one vesicovaginal, one rectovaginal), and 1 patient developed periurethral necrosis. Conclusions: The concept of IGABT, originally developed for treating cervix cancer, appears to be applicable to vaginal cancer treatment with only minor adaptations. Dose-volume parameters for HRCTV and

  10. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  11. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  12. Resonances and resonance widths

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, T.

    1986-05-01

    Two-dimensional betatron resonances are much more important than their simple one-dimensional counterparts and exhibit a strong dependence on the betatron phase advance per cell. A practical definition of ''width'' is expanded upon in order to display these relations in tables. A primarily pedagogical introduction is given to explain the tables, and also to encourage a wider capability for deriving resonance behavior and wider use of ''designer'' resonances.

  13. Change in resonance parameters of a linear molecule as it bends: Evidence in electron-impact vibrational transitions of hot COS and CO2 molecules*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Masamitsu; Ishijima, Yohei; Kato, Hidetoshi; Mogi, Daisuke; Takahashi, Yoshinao; Fukae, Katsuya; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Shimamura, Isao

    2016-04-01

    Inelastic and superelastic electron-impact vibrational excitation functions of hot carbonyl sulphide COS (and hot CO2) are measured for electron energies from 0.5 to 3.0 eV (1.5 to 6.0 eV) and at a scattering angle of 90°. Based on the vibrational populations and the principle of detailed balance, these excitation functions are decomposed into contributions from state-to-state vibrational transitions involving up to the second bending overtone (030) in the electronically ground state. Both the 2Π resonance for COS around 1.2 eV and the 2Πu resonance for CO2 around 3.8 eV are shifted to lower energies as the initial vibrational state is excited in the bending mode. The width of the resonance hump for COS changes only little as the molecule bends, whereas that of the overall boomerang resonance for CO2 becomes narrower. The angular distribution of the electrons resonantly scattered by hot COS and hot CO2 is also measured. The different shapes depending on the vibrational transitions and gas temperatures are discussed in terms of the symmetry of the vibrational wave functions. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  14. Calculation of s-Wave Resonances by Means of Analytical Continuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horáček, Jiří; Ledvinka, Tomáš; Brožek, Pavel

    2010-09-01

    Calculation of s-wave resonances by means of the analytical continuation in the coupling constant is a difficult problem because the position of the critical bifurcation point is unknown. Here we propose a new variant of the method of analytical continuation which avoids this problem completely. The method is applied to a model case which allows for accurate determination of the input data. It is shown that very precise resonance parameters can be obtained in this way.

  15. Predicting hydration Gibbs energies of alkyl-aromatics using molecular simulation: a comparison of current force fields and the development of a new parameter set for accurate solvation data.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Nuno M; Jorge, Miguel; Queimada, António J; Gomes, José R B; Economou, Ioannis G; Macedo, Eugénia A

    2011-10-14

    The Gibbs energy of hydration is an important quantity to understand the molecular behavior in aqueous systems at constant temperature and pressure. In this work we review the performance of some popular force fields, namely TraPPE, OPLS-AA and Gromos, in reproducing the experimental Gibbs energies of hydration of several alkyl-aromatic compounds--benzene, mono-, di- and tri-substituted alkylbenzenes--using molecular simulation techniques. In the second part of the paper, we report a new model that is able to improve such hydration energy predictions, based on Lennard Jones parameters from the recent TraPPE-EH force field and atomic partial charges obtained from natural population analysis of density functional theory calculations. We apply a scaling factor determined by fitting the experimental hydration energy of only two solutes, and then present a simple rule to generate atomic partial charges for different substituted alkyl-aromatics. This rule has the added advantages of eliminating the unnecessary assumption of fixed charge on every substituted carbon atom and providing a simple guideline for extrapolating the charge assignment to any multi-substituted alkyl-aromatic molecule. The point charges derived here yield excellent predictions of experimental Gibbs energies of hydration, with an overall absolute average deviation of less than 0.6 kJ mol(-1). This new parameter set can also give good predictive performance for other thermodynamic properties and liquid structural information.

  16. Accurate determination of optical bandgap and lattice parameters of Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O epitaxial films (0{<=}x{<=}0.3) grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on a-plane sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Laumer, Bernhard; Schuster, Fabian; Stutzmann, Martin; Bergmaier, Andreas; Dollinger, Guenther; Eickhoff, Martin

    2013-06-21

    Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O epitaxial films with Mg concentrations 0{<=}x{<=}0.3 were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on a-plane sapphire substrates. Precise determination of the Mg concentration x was performed by elastic recoil detection analysis. The bandgap energy was extracted from absorption measurements with high accuracy taking electron-hole interaction and exciton-phonon complexes into account. From these results a linear relationship between bandgap energy and Mg concentration is established for x{<=}0.3. Due to alloy disorder, the increase of the photoluminescence emission energy with Mg concentration is less pronounced. An analysis of the lattice parameters reveals that the epitaxial films grow biaxially strained on a-plane sapphire.

  17. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  18. R-matrix parameters in reactor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, R.N.

    1992-01-01

    The key role of the resonance phenomena in reactor applications manifests through the self-shielding effect. The basic issue involves the application of the microscopic cross sections in the macroscopic reactor lattices consisting of many nuclides that exhibit resonance behavior. To preserve the fidelity of such a effect requires the accurate calculations of the cross sections and the neutron flux in great detail. This clearly not possible without viable resonance data. Recently released ENDF/B VI resonance data in the resolved range especially reflect the dramatic improvement in two important areas; namely, the significant extension of the resolved resonance ranges accompanied by the availability of the R-matrix parameters of the Reich-Moore type. Aside from the obvious increase in computing time required for the significantly greater number of resonances, the main concern is the compatibility of the Riech-Moore representation to the existing reactor processing codes which, until now, are based on the traditional cross section formalisms. This purpose of this paper is to summarize our recent efforts to facilitate implementation of the proposed methods into the production codes at ANL.

  19. Clinical application of a novel automatic algorithm for actigraphy-based activity and rest period identification to accurately determine awake and asleep ambulatory blood pressure parameters and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Cristina; Fernández, José R; Aboy, Mateo; Mojón, Artemio

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports the results of a study designed to determine whether there are statistically significant differences between the values of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) parameters obtained using different methods-fixed schedule, diary, and automatic algorithm based on actigraphy-of defining the main activity and rest periods, and to determine the clinical relevance of such differences. We studied 233 patients (98 men/135 women), 61.29 ± .83 yrs of age (mean ± SD). Statistical methods were used to measure agreement in the diagnosis and classification of subjects within the context of ABPM and cardiovascular disease risk assessment. The results show that there are statistically significant differences both at the group and individual levels. Those at the individual level have clinically significant implications, as they can result in a different classification, and, therefore, different diagnosis and treatment for individual subjects. The use of an automatic algorithm based on actigraphy can lead to better individual treatment by correcting the accuracy problems associated with the fixed schedule on patients whose actual activity/rest routine differs from the fixed schedule assumed, and it also overcomes the limitations and reliability issues associated with the use of diaries.

  20. Resonant spatial tracking using nanostructured resonant waveguide grating for multispectral sensing by imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougot-Robin, Kristelle; Cao, Wenbin; Li, Shunbo; Benisty, Henri; Wen, Weijia

    2016-04-01

    Resonant profile shift resulting from a change of resonant conditions is classically used for sensing, either liquid refractive index or immobilized biological layer effective thickness. Resonant waveguide gratings (RWG) allow sensing over a large spectral domain, depending on the materials and geometrical parameters of the grating. Profiles measurements usually involve scanning instrumentation. We recently demonstrated that direct imaging multi-assay RWGs sensing may be rendered more robust using spatial Fano profiles from "chirped" RWG chips. The scheme circumvents the classical but demanding scans: instead of varying angle or wavelength through fragile moving parts or special optics, a RWG structure parameter is varied. Our findings are illustrated with resonance profiles from nanostructured silicon nitride waveguide on glass. A sensitivity down to Δn=2x10-5 or biomolecules mass density of 10 pg/mm2 is demonstrated through theory and experiments. To assess different sensing wavelength, the period might also vary within the same chip support. We discuss guiding properties and sensing sensitivities of RWG sensing over the whole visible spectral range. Resonant profiles are analyzed using a correlation approach, correlating the sensed signal to a zero-shifted reference signal. This analysis was demonstrated to be more accurate than usual fitting, for analyzing signals including noise contribution. The current success of surface plasmon imaging suggests that our work could leverage an untapped potential to extend such techniques in a convenient and sturdy optical configuration. Moreover, extended spectral range sensing can be addressed by dielectric waveguide structures. This allows sensitive sensing of small volumes of analyte, which can be circulated close from the resonant waveguide. Together with the demonstration of highly accurate fits through correlation analysis, our scheme based on a "Peak-tracking chip" demonstrates a new technique for multispectral

  1. BIOACCESSIBILITY TESTS ACCURATELY ESTIMATE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hazards of soil-borne Pb to wild birds may be more accurately quantified if the bioavailability of that Pb is known. To better understand the bioavailability of Pb to birds, we measured blood Pb concentrations in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) fed diets containing Pb-contaminated soils. Relative bioavailabilities were expressed by comparison with blood Pb concentrations in quail fed a Pb acetate reference diet. Diets containing soil from five Pb-contaminated Superfund sites had relative bioavailabilities from 33%-63%, with a mean of about 50%. Treatment of two of the soils with P significantly reduced the bioavailability of Pb. The bioaccessibility of the Pb in the test soils was then measured in six in vitro tests and regressed on bioavailability. They were: the “Relative Bioavailability Leaching Procedure” (RBALP) at pH 1.5, the same test conducted at pH 2.5, the “Ohio State University In vitro Gastrointestinal” method (OSU IVG), the “Urban Soil Bioaccessible Lead Test”, the modified “Physiologically Based Extraction Test” and the “Waterfowl Physiologically Based Extraction Test.” All regressions had positive slopes. Based on criteria of slope and coefficient of determination, the RBALP pH 2.5 and OSU IVG tests performed very well. Speciation by X-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrated that, on average, most of the Pb in the sampled soils was sorbed to minerals (30%), bound to organic matter 24%, or present as Pb sulfate 18%. Ad

  2. Accurate spectral color measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltunen, Jouni; Jaeaeskelaeinen, Timo; Parkkinen, Jussi P. S.

    1999-08-01

    Surface color measurement is of importance in a very wide range of industrial applications including paint, paper, printing, photography, textiles, plastics and so on. For a demanding color measurements spectral approach is often needed. One can measure a color spectrum with a spectrophotometer using calibrated standard samples as a reference. Because it is impossible to define absolute color values of a sample, we always work with approximations. The human eye can perceive color difference as small as 0.5 CIELAB units and thus distinguish millions of colors. This 0.5 unit difference should be a goal for the precise color measurements. This limit is not a problem if we only want to measure the color difference of two samples, but if we want to know in a same time exact color coordinate values accuracy problems arise. The values of two instruments can be astonishingly different. The accuracy of the instrument used in color measurement may depend on various errors such as photometric non-linearity, wavelength error, integrating sphere dark level error, integrating sphere error in both specular included and specular excluded modes. Thus the correction formulas should be used to get more accurate results. Another question is how many channels i.e. wavelengths we are using to measure a spectrum. It is obvious that the sampling interval should be short to get more precise results. Furthermore, the result we get is always compromise of measuring time, conditions and cost. Sometimes we have to use portable syste or the shape and the size of samples makes it impossible to use sensitive equipment. In this study a small set of calibrated color tiles measured with the Perkin Elmer Lamda 18 and the Minolta CM-2002 spectrophotometers are compared. In the paper we explain the typical error sources of spectral color measurements, and show which are the accuracy demands a good colorimeter should have.

  3. Resonance frequency in ferromagnetic superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Rong-ke; Huang, An-dong; Li, Da; Zhang, Zhi-dong

    2011-10-01

    The resonance frequency in two-layer and three-layer ferromagnetic superlattices is studied, using the Callen's Green function method, the Tyablikov decoupling approximation and the Anderson-Callen decoupling approximation. The effects of interlayer exchange coupling, anisotropy, external magnetic field and temperature on the resonance frequency are investigated. It is found that the resonance frequencies increase with increasing external magnetic field. In a parameter region of the asymmetric system, each sublayer corresponds to its own resonance frequency. The anisotropy of a sublayer affects only the resonance frequency corresponding to this sublayer. The stronger the anisotropy, the higher is the resonance frequency. The interlayer exchange coupling affects only the resonance frequencies belonging to the sublayers connected by it. The stronger the interlayer exchange coupling, the higher are the resonance frequencies. All the resonance frequencies decrease as the reduced temperature increases. The results direct the method to enhance and adjust the resonance frequency of magnetic multilayered materials with a wide band.

  4. Developing Accurate Spatial Maps of Cotton Fiber Quality Parameters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Awareness of the importance of cotton fiber quality (Gossypium, L. sps.) has increased as advances in spinning technology require better quality cotton fiber. Recent advances in geospatial information sciences allow an improved ability to study the extent and causes of spatial variability in fiber p...

  5. Fast and accurate registration techniques for affine and nonrigid alignment of MR brain images.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Xiu; Chen, Yong-Sheng; Chen, Li-Fen

    2010-01-01

    Registration of magnetic resonance brain images is a geometric operation that determines point-wise correspondences between two brains. It remains a difficult task due to the highly convoluted structure of the brain. This paper presents novel methods, Brain Image Registration Tools (BIRT), that can rapidly and accurately register brain images by utilizing the brain structure information estimated from image derivatives. Source and target image spaces are related by affine transformation and non-rigid deformation. The deformation field is modeled by a set of Wendland's radial basis functions hierarchically deployed near the salient brain structures. In general, nonlinear optimization is heavily engaged in the parameter estimation for affine/non-rigid transformation and good initial estimates are thus essential to registration performance. In this work, the affine registration is initialized by a rigid transformation, which can robustly estimate the orientation and position differences of brain images. The parameters of the affine/non-rigid transformation are then hierarchically estimated in a coarse-to-fine manner by maximizing an image similarity measure, the correlation ratio, between the involved images. T1-weighted brain magnetic resonance images were utilized for performance evaluation. Our experimental results using four 3-D image sets demonstrated that BIRT can efficiently align images with high accuracy compared to several other algorithms, and thus is adequate to the applications which apply registration process intensively. Moreover, a voxel-based morphometric study quantitatively indicated that accurate registration can improve both the sensitivity and specificity of the statistical inference results.

  6. Parameter Estimation of Spacecraft Fuel Slosh Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangadharan, Sathya; Sudermann, James; Marlowe, Andrea; Njengam Charles

    2004-01-01

    Fuel slosh in the upper stages of a spinning spacecraft during launch has been a long standing concern for the success of a space mission. Energy loss through the movement of the liquid fuel in the fuel tank affects the gyroscopic stability of the spacecraft and leads to nutation (wobble) which can cause devastating control issues. The rate at which nutation develops (defined by Nutation Time Constant (NTC can be tedious to calculate and largely inaccurate if done during the early stages of spacecraft design. Pure analytical means of predicting the influence of onboard liquids have generally failed. A strong need exists to identify and model the conditions of resonance between nutation motion and liquid modes and to understand the general characteristics of the liquid motion that causes the problem in spinning spacecraft. A 3-D computerized model of the fuel slosh that accounts for any resonant modes found in the experimental testing will allow for increased accuracy in the overall modeling process. Development of a more accurate model of the fuel slosh currently lies in a more generalized 3-D computerized model incorporating masses, springs and dampers. Parameters describing the model include the inertia tensor of the fuel, spring constants, and damper coefficients. Refinement and understanding the effects of these parameters allow for a more accurate simulation of fuel slosh. The current research will focus on developing models of different complexity and estimating the model parameters that will ultimately provide a more realistic prediction of Nutation Time Constant obtained through simulation.

  7. Kinetic isotope effect of the {sup 16}O + {sup 36}O{sub 2} and {sup 18}O + {sup 32}O{sub 2} isotope exchange reactions: Dominant role of reactive resonances revealed by an accurate time-dependent quantum wavepacket study

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zhigang Yu, Dequan; Xie, Wenbo; Hou, Jiayi; Dawes, Richard; Guo, Hua

    2015-05-07

    The O + O{sub 2} isotope exchange reactions play an important role in determining the oxygen isotopic composition of a number of trace gases in the atmosphere, and their temperature dependence and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) provide important constraints on our understanding of the origin and mechanism of these and other unusual oxygen KIEs important in the atmosphere. This work reports a quantum dynamics study of the title reactions on the newly constructed Dawes-Lolur-Li-Jiang-Guo (DLLJG) potential energy surface (PES). The thermal reaction rate coefficients of both the {sup 18}O + {sup 32}O{sub 2} and {sup 16}O + {sup 36}O{sub 2} reactions obtained using the DLLJG PES exhibit a clear negative temperature dependence, in sharp contrast with the positive temperature dependence obtained using the earlier modified Siebert-Schinke-Bittererova (mSSB) PES. In addition, the calculated KIE shows an improved agreement with the experiment. These results strongly support the absence of the “reef” structure in the entrance/exit channels of the DLLJG PES, which is present in the mSSB PES. The quantum dynamics results on both PESs attribute the marked KIE to strong near-threshold reactive resonances, presumably stemming from the mass differences and/or zero point energy difference between the diatomic reactant and product. The accurate characterization of the reactivity for these near-thermoneutral reactions immediately above the reaction threshold is important for correct characterization of the thermal reaction rate coefficients.

  8. A Model Parameter Extraction Method for Dielectric Barrier Discharge Ozone Chamber using Differential Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amjad, M.; Salam, Z.; Ishaque, K.

    2014-04-01

    In order to design an efficient resonant power supply for ozone gas generator, it is necessary to accurately determine the parameters of the ozone chamber. In the conventional method, the information from Lissajous plot is used to estimate the values of these parameters. However, the experimental setup for this purpose can only predict the parameters at one operating frequency and there is no guarantee that it results in the highest ozone gas yield. This paper proposes a new approach to determine the parameters using a search and optimization technique known as Differential Evolution (DE). The desired objective function of DE is set at the resonance condition and the chamber parameter values can be searched regardless of experimental constraints. The chamber parameters obtained from the DE technique are validated by experiment.

  9. Spectroscopic Parameters of H2S Polyads Between 3400 and 8000 cm x 10 to -1 exponent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bykov, A. D.; Naumenko, O. V.; Smirnov, M. A.; Sinitsa, L. N.; Perrin, A.; Crisp, J.; Crisp, D.; Brown, L. R.

    1995-01-01

    The absorption spectra of hydrogen sulfide from 0.8 to 5 micro- meters were recorded with three spectral resolutions using the Fourier transform spectrometer at Kitt Peak National Observatory. Twenty bands were previously assigned so that accurate band origins and vi- brational parameters could be determined. Described are the analyses of the rotational structure of resonating hydrogen sulfide states.

  10. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  11. A systematic investigation of hydrogen-bonding effects on the 17O, 14N, and 2H nuclear quadrupole resonance parameters of anhydrous and monohydrated cytosine crystalline structures: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Mahmoud; Elmi, Fatemeh; Hadipour, Nasser L

    2006-06-08

    A systematic computational study was carried out to characterize the 17O, 14N, and 2H nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) parameters in the anhydrous and monohydrated cytosine crystalline structures. To include the hydrogen-bonding effects in the calculations, the most probable interacting molecules with the central molecule in the crystalline phase were considered in the pentameric clusters of both structures. To calculate the parameters, couples of the methods B3LYP and B3PW91 and the basis sets 6-311++G** and CC-pVTZ were employed. The mentioned methods calculated reliable values of 17O, 14N, and 2H NQR tensors in the pentameric clusters, which are in good agreements with the experiment. The different influences of various hydrogen-bonding interactions types, N-H...N, N-H...O, and O-H...O, were observed on the 17O, 14N, and 2H NQR tensors. Lower values of quadrupole coupling constants and higher values of asymmetry parameters in the crystalline monohydrated cytosine indicate the presence of stronger hydrogen-bonding interactions in the monohydrated form rather than that of crystalline anhydrous cytosine.

  12. Parametric resonance voltage response of electrostatically actuated Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems cantilever resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruntu, Dumitru I.; Martinez, Israel; W. Knecht, Martin

    2016-02-01

    This paper investigates the parametric resonance voltage response of nonlinear parametrically actuated Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) cantilever resonators. A soft AC voltage of frequency near natural frequency is applied between the resonator and a parallel ground plate. This produces an electrostatic force that leads the structure into parametric resonance. The model consists of an Euler-Bernoulli thin cantilever under the actuation of electrostatic force to include fringe effect, and damping force. Two methods of investigation are used, namely the Method of Multiple Scales (MMS) and Reduced Order Model (ROM) method. ROM convergence of the voltage response and the limitation of MMS to small to moderate amplitudes with respect to the gap (gap-amplitudes) are reported. MMS predicts accurately both Hopf supercritical and supercritical bifurcation voltages. However, MMS overestimates the large gap-amplitudes of the resonator, and. misses completely or overestimates the saddle-node bifurcation occurring at large gap-amplitudes. ROM produces valid results for small and/or large gap-amplitudes for a sufficient number of terms (vibration modes). As the voltage is swept up at constant frequency, the resonator maintains zero amplitude until reaches the subcritical Hopf bifurcation voltage where it loses stability and jumps up to large gap-amplitudes, next the gap-amplitude decreases until it reaches the supercritical Hopf bifurcation point, and after that the gap-amplitude remains zero, for the voltage range considered in this work. As the voltage is swept down at constant frequency, the zero gap-amplitude of the resonator starts increasing continuously after reaching the supercritical Hopf bifurcation voltage until it reaches the saddle-node bifurcation voltage when a sudden jump to zero gap-amplitude occurs. Effects of frequency, damping and fringe parameters on the voltage response show that (1) the supercritical Hopf bifurcation is shifted to lower voltage

  13. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy for elastic constant measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, R.D.; Migliori, A.; Roe, L.H.

    1993-12-31

    All objects exhibit vibrational resonances when mechanically excited. These resonant frequencies are determined by density, geometry, and elastic moduli. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) takes advantage of the known relationship between the parameters. In particular, for a freely suspended object, with three of the four parameters (vibrational spectra, density, geometry, or elastic moduli) known the remaining one can be calculated. From a materials characterization standpoint it is straight-forward to measure density and geometry but less so to measure all the elastic moduli. It has recently become possible to quickly and accurately measure vibrational spectra, and using code written at Los Alamos, calculate all the elastic moduli simultaneously. This is done to an accuracy of better than one percent for compression and 0.1 percent for shear. RUS provides rapid acquisition of materials information here-to-fore obtainable only with difficulty. It will greatly facilitate the use of real materials properties in models and thus make possible more realistic modeling results. The technique is sensitive to phase changes and microstructure. This offers a change to input real data into microstructure and phase change models. It will also enable measurement of moduli at locations in and about a weld thus providing information for a validating coupled thermomechanical calculations.

  14. Effect of source tuning parameters on the plasma potential of heavy ions in the 18 GHz high temperature superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, G.; Mathur, Y.; Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.; Baskaran, R.; Kukrety, S.

    2012-03-15

    Plasma potentials for various heavy ions have been measured using the retarding field technique in the 18 GHz high temperature superconducting ECR ion source, PKDELIS [C. Bieth, S. Kantas, P. Sortais, D. Kanjilal, G. Rodrigues, S. Milward, S. Harrison, and R. McMahon, Nucl. Instrum. Methods B 235, 498 (2005); D. Kanjilal, G. Rodrigues, P. Kumar, A. Mandal, A. Roy, C. Bieth, S. Kantas, and P. Sortais, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 03A317 (2006)]. The ion beam extracted from the source is decelerated close to the location of a mesh which is polarized to the source potential and beams having different plasma potentials are measured on a Faraday cup located downstream of the mesh. The influence of various source parameters, viz., RF power, gas pressure, magnetic field, negative dc bias, and gas mixing on the plasma potential is studied. The study helped to find an upper limit of the energy spread of the heavy ions, which can influence the design of the longitudinal optics of the high current injector being developed at the Inter University Accelerator Centre. It is observed that the plasma potentials are decreasing for increasing charge states and a mass effect is clearly observed for the ions with similar operating gas pressures. In the case of gas mixing, it is observed that the plasma potential minimizes at an optimum value of the gas pressure of the mixing gas and the mean charge state maximizes at this value. Details of the measurements carried out as a function of various source parameters and its impact on the longitudinal optics are presented.

  15. Effect of source tuning parameters on the plasma potential of heavy ions in the 18 GHz high temperature superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, G; Baskaran, R; Kukrety, S; Mathur, Y; Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A; Kanjilal, D; Roy, A

    2012-03-01

    Plasma potentials for various heavy ions have been measured using the retarding field technique in the 18 GHz high temperature superconducting ECR ion source, PKDELIS [C. Bieth, S. Kantas, P. Sortais, D. Kanjilal, G. Rodrigues, S. Milward, S. Harrison, and R. McMahon, Nucl. Instrum. Methods B 235, 498 (2005); D. Kanjilal, G. Rodrigues, P. Kumar, A. Mandal, A. Roy, C. Bieth, S. Kantas, and P. Sortais, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 03A317 (2006)]. The ion beam extracted from the source is decelerated close to the location of a mesh which is polarized to the source potential and beams having different plasma potentials are measured on a Faraday cup located downstream of the mesh. The influence of various source parameters, viz., RF power, gas pressure, magnetic field, negative dc bias, and gas mixing on the plasma potential is studied. The study helped to find an upper limit of the energy spread of the heavy ions, which can influence the design of the longitudinal optics of the high current injector being developed at the Inter University Accelerator Centre. It is observed that the plasma potentials are decreasing for increasing charge states and a mass effect is clearly observed for the ions with similar operating gas pressures. In the case of gas mixing, it is observed that the plasma potential minimizes at an optimum value of the gas pressure of the mixing gas and the mean charge state maximizes at this value. Details of the measurements carried out as a function of various source parameters and its impact on the longitudinal optics are presented.

  16. Effect of source tuning parameters on the plasma potential of heavy ions in the 18 GHz high temperature superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, G.; Baskaran, R.; Kukrety, S.; Mathur, Y.; Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.

    2012-03-01

    Plasma potentials for various heavy ions have been measured using the retarding field technique in the 18 GHz high temperature superconducting ECR ion source, PKDELIS [C. Bieth, S. Kantas, P. Sortais, D. Kanjilal, G. Rodrigues, S. Milward, S. Harrison, and R. McMahon, Nucl. Instrum. Methods B 235, 498 (2005), 10.1016/j.nimb.2005.03.232; D. Kanjilal, G. Rodrigues, P. Kumar, A. Mandal, A. Roy, C. Bieth, S. Kantas, and P. Sortais, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 03A317 (2006), 10.1063/1.2164887]. The ion beam extracted from the source is decelerated close to the location of a mesh which is polarized to the source potential and beams having different plasma potentials are measured on a Faraday cup located downstream of the mesh. The influence of various source parameters, viz., RF power, gas pressure, magnetic field, negative dc bias, and gas mixing on the plasma potential is studied. The study helped to find an upper limit of the energy spread of the heavy ions, which can influence the design of the longitudinal optics of the high current injector being developed at the Inter University Accelerator Centre. It is observed that the plasma potentials are decreasing for increasing charge states and a mass effect is clearly observed for the ions with similar operating gas pressures. In the case of gas mixing, it is observed that the plasma potential minimizes at an optimum value of the gas pressure of the mixing gas and the mean charge state maximizes at this value. Details of the measurements carried out as a function of various source parameters and its impact on the longitudinal optics are presented.

  17. Intersample fluctuations in phosphocreatine concentration determined by 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy and parameter estimation of metabolic responses to exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Rossiter, H B; Howe, F A; Ward, S A; Kowalchuk, J M; Griffiths, J R; Whipp, B J

    2000-10-15

    The ATP turnover rate during constant-load exercise is often estimated from the initial rate of change of phosphocreatine concentration ([PCr]) using 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). However, the phase and amplitude characteristics of the sample-to-sample fluctuations can markedly influence this estimation (as well as that for the time constant (tau) of the [PCr] change) and confound its physiological interpretation especially for small amplitude responses. This influence was investigated in six healthy males who performed repeated constant-load quadriceps exercise of a moderate intensity in a whole-body MRS system. A transmit- receive surface coil was placed under the right quadriceps, allowing determination of intramuscular [PCr]; pulmonary oxygen uptake (VO2) was simultaneously determined, breath-by-breath, using a mass spectrometer and a turbine volume measuring module. The probability density functions (PDF) of [PCr] and VO2 fluctuations were determined for each test during the steady states of rest and exercise and the PDF was then fitted to a Gaussian function. The standard deviation of the [PCr] and VO2 fluctuations at rest and during exercise (sr and sw, respectively) and the peak centres of the distributions (xc(r) and xc(w)) were determined, as were the skewness (gamma1) and kurtosis (gamma2) coefficients. There was no difference between sr and sw for [PCr] relative to the resting control baseline (s(r) = 1.554 %delta (s.d. = 0.44), s(w) = 1.514 %delta (s.d. = 0.35)) or the PDF peak centres (xc(r) = -0.013 %delta (s.d. = 0.09), xc(w) -0.197 %delta (s.d. = 0.18)). The standard deviation and peak centre of the 'noise' in VO2 also did not vary between rest and exercise (sr = 0.0427 l min(-1) (s.d. = 0.0104), s(w) = 0.0640 l min(-1) (s.d. = 0.0292); xc(r) = -0.0051 l min(-1) (s.d. = 0.0069), xc(w) 0.0022 l min(-1) (s.d. = 0.0034)). Our results demonstrate that the intersample 'noise' associated with [PCr] determination by 31P-MRS may be

  18. Fundamental properties of resonances.

    PubMed

    Ceci, S; Hadžimehmedović, M; Osmanović, H; Percan, A; Zauner, B

    2017-03-27

    All resonances, from hydrogen nuclei excited by the high-energy gamma rays in deep space to newly discovered particles produced in Large Hadron Collider, should be described by the same fundamental physical quantities. However, two distinct sets of properties are used to describe resonances: the pole parameters (complex pole position and residue) and the Breit-Wigner parameters (mass, width, and branching fractions). There is an ongoing decades-old debate on which one of them should be abandoned. In this study of nucleon resonances appearing in the elastic pion-nucleon scattering we discover an intricate interplay of the parameters from both sets, and realize that neither set is completely independent or fundamental on its own.

  19. Fundamental properties of resonances

    PubMed Central

    Ceci, S.; Hadžimehmedović, M.; Osmanović, H.; Percan, A.; Zauner, B.

    2017-01-01

    All resonances, from hydrogen nuclei excited by the high-energy gamma rays in deep space to newly discovered particles produced in Large Hadron Collider, should be described by the same fundamental physical quantities. However, two distinct sets of properties are used to describe resonances: the pole parameters (complex pole position and residue) and the Breit-Wigner parameters (mass, width, and branching fractions). There is an ongoing decades-old debate on which one of them should be abandoned. In this study of nucleon resonances appearing in the elastic pion-nucleon scattering we discover an intricate interplay of the parameters from both sets, and realize that neither set is completely independent or fundamental on its own. PMID:28345595

  20. Raman Spectroscopy as an Accurate Probe of Defects in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Nieva, Joaquin; Barros, Eduardo; Saito, Riichiro; Dresselhaus, Mildred

    2014-03-01

    Raman Spectroscopy has proved to be an invaluable non-destructive technique that allows us to obtain intrinsic information about graphene. Furthermore, defect-induced Raman features, namely the D and D' bands, have previously been used to assess the purity of graphitic samples. However, quantitative studies of the signatures of the different types of defects on the Raman spectra is still an open problem. Experimental results already suggest that the Raman intensity ratio ID /ID' may allow us to identify the nature of the defects. We study from a theoretical point of view the power and limitations of Raman spectroscopy in the study of defects in graphene. We derive an analytic model that describes the Double Resonance Raman process of disordered graphene samples, and which explicitly shows the role played by both the defect-dependent parameters as well as the experimentally-controlled variables. We compare our model with previous Raman experiments, and use it to guide new ways in which defects in graphene can be accurately probed with Raman spectroscopy. We acknowledge support from NSF grant DMR1004147.

  1. Transmission resonances in above-barrier reflection of ultra-cold atoms by the Rosen-Morse potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishkhanyan, H. A.; Krainov, V. P.; Ishkhanyan, A. M.

    2010-04-01

    Quantum above-barrier reflection of ultra-cold atoms by the Rosen-Morse potential is analytically considered within the mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii approximation. Reformulating the problem of reflectionless transmission as a quasi-linear eigenvalue problem for the potential depth, an approximation for the specific height of the potential that supports reflectionless transmission of the incoming matter wave is derived via modification of the Rayleigh-Schrödinger time-independent perturbation theory. The approximation provides a highly accurate description of the resonance position for all the resonance orders if the nonlinearity parameter is small compared with the incoming particle's chemical potential. Notably, the result for the first transmission resonance turns out to be exact, i.e. the derived formula for the resonant potential height gives the exact value of the first nonlinear resonance's position for all the allowed variation range of the involved parameters, the nonlinearity parameter and chemical potential. This has been demonstrated by constructing the exact solution of the problem for the first resonance. Furthermore, the presented approximation reveals that, in contrast to the linear case, in the nonlinear case reflectionless transmission may occur not only for potential wells but also for potential barriers with positive potential height. It also shows that the nonlinear shift of the resonance position from the position of the corresponding linear resonance is approximately described as a linear function of the resonance order. Finally, a compact (yet, highly accurate) analytic formula for the nth-order resonance position is constructed via combination of analytical and numerical methods.

  2. Effects of Dielectric Substrates and Ground Planes on Resonance Frequency of Archimedean Spirals.

    PubMed

    Hooker, Jerris W; Ramaswamy, Vijaykumar; Arora, Rajendra K; Edison, Arthur S; Brey, William W

    2016-04-01

    Superconducting self-resonant spiral structures are of current interest for applications both in metamaterials and as probe coils for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for high-sensitivity chemical analysis. Accurate spiral models are available in the literature for behavior of a spiral below and up to self-resonance. However, knowledge of the higher modes is also important. We present the relationships between the spiral parameters and the multiple mode frequencies of single sided spirals on dielectric substrates as modeled by method of moments simulation. In the absence of a ground plane, we find that the mode frequency has a linear though not necessarily harmonic dependence on the mode number. The effect of a thick substrate can be approximated by an effective dielectric constant. But when the thickness is less than 20% of the spiral trace width (router - rinner) this approximation is no longer accurate. We have developed a simple empirical formula to predict the higher modes.

  3. The Nucleon Resonance Program at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Ralf W. Gothe

    2006-02-01

    The status of the program to study baryon resonances at Jefferson Lab will be exemplified by the latest results on resonance parameters and transition form factors in single and double-pion production as well as kaon-hyperon decays.

  4. Accurate Evaluation of Quantum Integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, D. C.; Goorvitch, D.; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Combining an appropriate finite difference method with Richardson's extrapolation results in a simple, highly accurate numerical method for solving a Schrodinger's equation. Important results are that error estimates are provided, and that one can extrapolate expectation values rather than the wavefunctions to obtain highly accurate expectation values. We discuss the eigenvalues, the error growth in repeated Richardson's extrapolation, and show that the expectation values calculated on a crude mesh can be extrapolated to obtain expectation values of high accuracy.

  5. Fast and accurate MAS-DNP simulations of large spin ensembles.

    PubMed

    Mentink-Vigier, Frédéric; Vega, Shimon; De Paëpe, Gaël

    2017-02-01

    A deeper understanding of parameters affecting Magic Angle Spinning Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (MAS-DNP), an emerging nuclear magnetic resonance hyperpolarization method, is crucial for the development of new polarizing agents and the successful implementation of the technique at higher magnetic fields (>10 T). Such progress is currently impeded by computational limitation which prevents the simulation of large spin ensembles (electron as well as nuclear spins) and to accurately describe the interplay between all the multiple key parameters at play. In this work, we present an alternative approach to existing cross-effect and solid-effect MAS-DNP codes that yields fast and accurate simulations. More specifically we describe the model, the associated Liouville-based formalism (Bloch-type derivation and/or Landau-Zener approximations) and the linear time algorithm that allows computing MAS-DNP mechanisms with unprecedented time savings. As a result, one can easily scan through multiple parameters and disentangle their mutual influences. In addition, the simulation code is able to handle multiple electrons and protons, which allows probing the effect of (hyper)polarizing agents concentration, as well as fully revealing the interplay between the polarizing agent structure and the hyperfine couplings, nuclear dipolar couplings, nuclear relaxation times, both in terms of depolarization effect, but also of polarization gain and buildup times.

  6. Intrinsic Energy Dissipation Limits in Nano and Micromechanical Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Srikanth Subramanian

    Resonant microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) have enabled miniaturization of high-performance inertial sensors, radio-frequency filters, timing references and mass-based chemical sensors. Despite the increasing prevalence of MEMS resonators for these applications, the energy dissipation in these structures is not well-understood. Accurate prediction of the energy loss and the resulting quality factor (Q) has significant design implications because it is directly related to device performance metrics including sensitivity for resonant sensors, bandwidth for radio-frequency filters and phase-noise for timing references. In order to assess the future potential for MEMS resonators it is critically important to evaluate the energy dissipation limits, which will dictate the ultimate performance resonant MEMS devices can achieve. This work focuses on the derivation and evaluation of the intrinsic mechanical energy dissipation limit for single-crystal nano and micromechanical resonators due to anharmonic phonon-phonon scattering in the Akhiezer regime. The energy loss is derived using perturbation theory and the linearized Boltzmann transport equation for phonons, and includes the direction and polarization dependent mode-Gruneisen parameters in order to capture the strain-induced anharmonicity among phonon branches. Evaluation of the quality factor limit reveals that Akhiezer damping, previously thought to depend only on material properties, has a strong dependence on crystal orientation and resonant mode shape. The robust model provides a dissipation limit for all resonant modes including shear-mode vibrations, which have significantly reduced energy loss because dissipative phonon-phonon scattering is restricted to volume-preserving phonon branches, indicating that Lame or wine-glass mode resonators will have the highest upper limit on mechanical efficiency. Finally, the analytical dissipation model is integrated with commercial finite element software in order to

  7. Nonlinear Oscillations of Microscale Piezoelectric Resonators and Resonator Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-30

    static buckling deflection of the resonator d3E, kI(x) d 3 , k(x) can be expressed as Elt -t = Elk ----- T- at X = Xk-_ Here, it is important to note that...a number of the parameters can resonators clearly reveal nonlinear characteristics. Although b icted by usng the ro rg met ersal the dimensions of

  8. System and method for regulating resonant inverters

    DOEpatents

    Stevanovic, Ljubisa Dragoljub; Zane, Regan Andrew

    2007-08-28

    A technique is provided for direct digital phase control of resonant inverters based on sensing of one or more parameters of the resonant inverter. The resonant inverter control system includes a switching circuit for applying power signals to the resonant inverter and a sensor for sensing one or more parameters of the resonant inverter. The one or more parameters are representative of a phase angle. The resonant inverter control system also includes a comparator for comparing the one or more parameters to a reference value and a digital controller for determining timing of the one or more parameters and for regulating operation of the switching circuit based upon the timing of the one or more parameters.

  9. Laser magnetic resonance in supersonic plasmas - The rotational spectrum of SH(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovde, David C.; Saykally, Richard J.

    1987-01-01

    The rotational spectrum of v = 0 and v = 1X3Sigma(-)SH(+) was measured by laser magnetic resonance. Rotationally cold (Tr = 30 K), vibrationally excited (Tv = 3000 K) ions were generated in a corona excited supersonic expansion. The use of this source to identify ion signals is described. Improved molecular parameters were obtained; term values are presented from which astrophysically important transitions may be calculated. Accurate hyperfine parameters for both vibrational levels were determined and the vibrational dependence of the Fermi contact interaction was resolved. The hyperfine parameters agree well with recent many-body perturbation theory calculations.

  10. Optical resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention discloses a semi-ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP) optical resonator structure comprising a medium including an edge forming a reflective facet and a waveguide within the medium, the waveguide having opposing ends formed by the reflective facet. The performance of the SRFP resonator can be further enhanced by including a Mach-Zehnder interferometer in the waveguide on one side of the gain medium. The optical resonator can be employed in a variety of optical devices. Laser structures using at least one SRFP resonator are disclosed where the resonators are disposed on opposite sides of a gain medium. Other laser structures employing one or more resonators on one side of a gain region are also disclosed.

  11. Simulation of quartz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinmann, M.; Radius, R.; Mohr, R.

    Quartz resonators are suitable as novel sensor elements in the field of profilometry and three dimensional measurement techniques. This application requires a tailoring of the oscillator circuit which is performed by a network analysis program. The equivalent network parameters are computed by a finite element analysis. The mechanical loading of the quartz is modeled by a viscous damping approach.

  12. On the extraction of P11 resonances from πN data

    DOE PAGES

    Hiroyuki Kamano; Nakamura, Satoshi X.; Lee, Tsung -Shung; ...

    2010-06-22

    With the accuracy of the available P11 amplitudes of πΔ scattering, we show that two resonance poles near the pi Delta threshold, obtained in several analyses, are stable against large variations of parameters within a dynamical coupled-channels analysis. The number of poles in the 1.5 GeV < W < 2 GeV region could be more than one, depending on how the structure of the single-energy solution of SAID is fitted. Lastly, our results indicate the need of more accurate πN scattering data in the W > 1.6 GeV region for high precision resonance extractions.

  13. Angular dependent study on ferromagnetic resonance and spin excitations by spin rectification

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yichao; Fan, Xiaolong Zhao, Xiaobing; Rao, Jinwei; Zhou, Hengan; Guo, Dangwei; Xue, Desheng; Gui, Y. S.; Hu, C.-M.

    2015-01-14

    We report angular dependent spin rectification spectra which are applied to studying spin excitations in single permalloy stripe. Based on planar Hall effect, those spin excitations generate special resonant dc Hall voltages, which have been characterized as functions of the amplitude and direction of applied magnetic field. Through high angular resolution 2D mappings, the evolutions of different spin excitation can be directly presented, and the dynamic magnetic parameters such as the gyromagnetic ratio, effective exchange field, as well as the quantized numbers of standing spin waves can be accurately determined through fitting the angular evolution of each resonance.

  14. Measurement of the Z boson resonance parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, G.J.

    1989-11-01

    Using the Mark II detector at the SLC, we measure the Z mass and width to be 91.17 {plus minus} 0.18 GeV/c{sup 2} and 1.95{sup +0. 40}{sub {minus}0.30} GeV, respectively. From a fit in which the visible Z width is constrained to its Standard Model value, the number of neutrino species is determined to be 3.0 {plus minus} or <4.4 at the 95% confidence level. 13 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Nonlinear resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevorkian, J.

    This report discusses research in the area of slowly varying nonlinear oscillatory systems. Some of the topics discussed are as follows: adiabatic invariants and transient resonance in very slowly varying Hamiltonian systems; sustained resonance in very slowly varying Hamiltonian systems; free-electron lasers with very slow wiggler taper; and bursting oscillators.

  16. Orbital resonances around black holes.

    PubMed

    Brink, Jeandrew; Geyer, Marisa; Hinderer, Tanja

    2015-02-27

    We compute the length and time scales associated with resonant orbits around Kerr black holes for all orbital and spin parameters. Resonance-induced effects are potentially observable when the Event Horizon Telescope resolves the inner structure of Sgr A*, when space-based gravitational wave detectors record phase shifts in the waveform during the resonant passage of a compact object spiraling into the black hole, or in the frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations for accreting black holes. The onset of geodesic chaos for non-Kerr spacetimes should occur at the resonance locations quantified here.

  17. Orbital Resonances Around Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, Jeandrew; Geyer, Marisa; Hinderer, Tanja

    2015-02-01

    We compute the length and time scales associated with resonant orbits around Kerr black holes for all orbital and spin parameters. Resonance-induced effects are potentially observable when the Event Horizon Telescope resolves the inner structure of Sgr A*, when space-based gravitational wave detectors record phase shifts in the waveform during the resonant passage of a compact object spiraling into the black hole, or in the frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations for accreting black holes. The onset of geodesic chaos for non-Kerr spacetimes should occur at the resonance locations quantified here.

  18. Accurate equilibrium structures for piperidine and cyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Demaison, Jean; Craig, Norman C; Groner, Peter; Écija, Patricia; Cocinero, Emilio J; Lesarri, Alberto; Rudolph, Heinz Dieter

    2015-03-05

    Extended and improved microwave (MW) measurements are reported for the isotopologues of piperidine. New ground state (GS) rotational constants are fitted to MW transitions with quartic centrifugal distortion constants taken from ab initio calculations. Predicate values for the geometric parameters of piperidine and cyclohexane are found from a high level of ab initio theory including adjustments for basis set dependence and for correlation of the core electrons. Equilibrium rotational constants are obtained from GS rotational constants corrected for vibration-rotation interactions and electronic contributions. Equilibrium structures for piperidine and cyclohexane are fitted by the mixed estimation method. In this method, structural parameters are fitted concurrently to predicate parameters (with appropriate uncertainties) and moments of inertia (with uncertainties). The new structures are regarded as being accurate to 0.001 Å and 0.2°. Comparisons are made between bond parameters in equatorial piperidine and cyclohexane. Another interesting result of this study is that a structure determination is an effective way to check the accuracy of the ground state experimental rotational constants.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cryptorchid testis.

    PubMed

    Landa, H M; Gylys-Morin, V; Mattrey, R F; Krous, H F; Kaplan, G W; Packer, M G

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was used to evaluate seven patients with undescended testes. In six patients the presence or absence of testicular tissue was predicted correctly prior to surgery. Spermatic cord structures, if present, were accurately visualized in all patients.

  20. Introduction to nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Mlynárik, Vladimír

    2016-05-19

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a useful tool for studying normal and pathological biochemical processes in tissues. In this review, the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance and methods of obtaining nuclear magnetic resonance spectra are briefly outlined. The origin of the most important spectroscopic parameters-chemical shifts, coupling constants, longitudinal and transverse relaxation times, and spectroscopic line intensities-is explained, and the role of these parameters in interpretation of spectra is addressed. Basic methodological concepts of localized spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging for the study of tissue metabolism in vivo are also described.

  1. Stochastic resonance in tristable system induced by dichotomous noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Peiming; Su, Xiao; Han, Dongying

    2016-11-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) of a tristable system driven by dichotomous noise (DN) is investigated firstly by the mean signal-to-noise ratio gain (SNR-GM). Utilizing an efficiently numerical algorithm, we acquire the asymmetric DN accurately. Then the system responses and the SNR-GM as the signatures of the stochastic resonance are calculated by the fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm. It is founded that the change of system parameters a and c in a certain range can induce SR phenomenon. Moreover, with the increase of parameter c, the amplitude of SNR-GM increases and shows the trend of moving to the left. For the different state values of the symmetric DN, the SNR-GM will increase with the increase of state value a1 and b1 but only a highest peak and the interval of SR shift to the left. However, with the increase of forcing frequency, the SNR-GM decreases and the interval of SR moves to right. In addition to, the highest peak of SNR-GM will decrease with the increase of periodic signal amplitude. These results provide a reliable basis for how to realize the parameter selection of stochastic resonance in tristable system driven by DN.

  2. Acoustic Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2012-11-01

    Recently my collection of historical physics teaching apparatus was given a group of 19th-century tuning forks on resonant boxes. Figure 1 shows the smallest fork sitting on the largest one. The large tuning fork oscillates at 128 Hz and has a resonator that is 57.9 cm long. The small fork has a frequency 10 times higher, but its resonator has a length of 11.0 cm instead of the 5.8 cm that simple scaling would suggest. How is this possible?

  3. SVD compression for magnetic resonance fingerprinting in the time domain.

    PubMed

    McGivney, Debra F; Pierre, Eric; Ma, Dan; Jiang, Yun; Saybasili, Haris; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark A

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) fingerprinting is a technique for acquiring and processing MR data that simultaneously provides quantitative maps of different tissue parameters through a pattern recognition algorithm. A predefined dictionary models the possible signal evolutions simulated using the Bloch equations with different combinations of various MR parameters and pattern recognition is completed by computing the inner product between the observed signal and each of the predicted signals within the dictionary. Though this matching algorithm has been shown to accurately predict the MR parameters of interest, one desires a more efficient method to obtain the quantitative images. We propose to compress the dictionary using the singular value decomposition, which will provide a low-rank approximation. By compressing the size of the dictionary in the time domain, we are able to speed up the pattern recognition algorithm, by a factor of between 3.4-4.8, without sacrificing the high signal-to-noise ratio of the original scheme presented previously.

  4. Resonances for Symmetric Two-Barrier Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a method for the accurate calculation of bound-state and resonance energies for one-dimensional potentials. We calculate the shape resonances for symmetric two-barrier potentials and compare them with those coming from the Siegert approximation, the complex scaling method and the box-stabilization method. A comparison of the…

  5. Preliminary Assessment of Tricuspid Valve Annular Velocity Parameters by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Adults with a Volume-Overloaded Right Ventricle: Comparison of Unrepaired Atrial Septal Defect and Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Ito, Seiji; McElhinney, Doff B; Adams, Robert; Bhatla, Puneet; Chung, Sohae; Axel, Leon

    2015-08-01

    The aim is to compare tricuspid valve (TV) atrioventricular junction (AVJ) annular motion parameters in unrepaired atrial septal defect (ASD) and repaired Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. We retrospectively reviewed CMR studies performed between November 2007 and November 2013 in patients 16-45 years of age with unrepaired ASD (with or without partial anomalous pulmonary venous return) and with repaired TOF, who had previous infundibulotomy, but have not undergone pulmonary valve replacement. Longitudinal motion of lateral TV in four-chamber view cine image was tracked through the cardiac cycle with custom software. Twenty TOF patients and 12 ASD patients were included, and values were compared with 80 controls. Right ventricular end-diastolic volume index and right ventricular end-systolic volume index were similar in the ASD and TOF groups and were significantly higher in both groups than in controls. Maximum displacement of the TV in systole, velocity at half-maximal displacement during systole, and velocity at half-maximal displacement during early diastole were all significantly lower in the TOF group than the ASD group [1.39 ± 0.47 vs. 2.21 ± 0.46 (cm, p < 0.01), 5.9 ± 2.1 vs. 10.1 ± 2.3 (cm/s, p < 0.01), and 7.7 ± 2.6 vs. 10.9 ± 3.1 (cm/s, p < 0.05)]. TOF patients have diminished early diastolic TV AVJ velocity compared to patients with an unrepaired ASD, despite similar RV volumes. This observation could suggest diastolic dysfunction or cardiac mechanics unique to the postoperative, volume-overloaded right ventricle in patients with repaired TOF.

  6. Use of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging to distinguish between lung cancer and focal inflammatory lesions: a comparison of intravoxel incoherent motion derived parameters and apparent diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yu; Li, Xinchun; Lei, Yongxia; Liang, Changhong; Liu, Zaiyi

    2016-11-01

    Background Using imaging techniques to diagnose malignant and inflammatory lesions in the lung can be challenging. Purpose To compare intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis in their ability to discriminate lung cancer from focal inflammatory lung lesions. Material and Methods Thirty-eight patients with lung masses were included: 30 lung cancers and eight inflammatory lesions. Patients were imaged with 3.0T MRI diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) using 10 b values (range, 0-1000 s/mm(2)). Tissue diffusivity ( D), pseudo-diffusion coefficient ( D*), and perfusion fraction ( f) were calculated using segmented biexponential analysis. ADC (total) was calculated with monoexponential fitting of the DWI data. D, D*, f, and ADC were compared between lung cancer and inflammatory lung lesions. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed for all DWI parameters. Results The ADC was significantly higher for inflammatory lesions than for lung cancer ([1.21 ± 0.20] × 10(-3) mm(2)/s vs. [0.97 ± 0.15] × 10(-3) mm(2)/s; P = 0.004). By IVIM, f was found to be significantly higher in inflammatory lesions than lung cancer ([46.10 ± 12.92] % vs. [29.29 ± 10.89] %; P = 0.005). There was no difference in D and D* between lung cancer and inflammatory lesions ( P = 0.747 and 0.124, respectively). f showed comparable diagnostic performance with ADC in differentiating lung cancer from inflammatory lung lesions, with areas under the curve of 0.833 and 0.826, sensitivity 80.0% and 73.3%, and specificity 75.0% and 87.5%, respectively. Conclusion The IVIM parameter f value provides comparable diagnostic performance with ADC and could be used as a surrogate marker for differentiating lung cancer from inflammatory lesions.

  7. Gaussian-Beam Laser-Resonator Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Patricia L.; Bair, Clayton H.; Barnes, Norman

    1989-01-01

    Gaussian Beam Laser Resonator Program models laser resonators by use of Gaussian-beam-propagation techniques. Used to determine radii of beams as functions of position in laser resonators. Algorithm used in program has three major components. First, ray-transfer matrix for laser resonator must be calculated. Next, initial parameters of beam calculated. Finally, propagation of beam through optical elements computed. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN (Version 4.01).

  8. Analysis of Alternative Ring Resonator Designs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    the ring strip of the antenna as in the case of the original design. Both the alternative dielectric laminate and the increased thickness laminate...adjustments to the geometry parameters. 2. Ring Resonator Antenna Design The ring resonator is a two port antenna consisting of a ring strip and two...differing thicknesses for resonator antennas of the same design suggests that the RF fields penetrate slightly more or that the resonator can “see” a

  9. Accurate thermoplasmonic simulation of metallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Da-Miao; Liu, Yan-Nan; Tian, Fa-Lin; Pan, Xiao-Min; Sheng, Xin-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Thermoplasmonics leads to enhanced heat generation due to the localized surface plasmon resonances. The measurement of heat generation is fundamentally a complicated task, which necessitates the development of theoretical simulation techniques. In this paper, an efficient and accurate numerical scheme is proposed for applications with complex metallic nanostructures. Light absorption and temperature increase are, respectively, obtained by solving the volume integral equation (VIE) and the steady-state heat diffusion equation through the method of moments (MoM). Previously, methods based on surface integral equations (SIEs) were utilized to obtain light absorption. However, computing light absorption from the equivalent current is as expensive as O(NsNv), where Ns and Nv, respectively, denote the number of surface and volumetric unknowns. Our approach reduces the cost to O(Nv) by using VIE. The accuracy, efficiency and capability of the proposed scheme are validated by multiple simulations. The simulations show that our proposed method is more efficient than the approach based on SIEs under comparable accuracy, especially for the case where many incidents are of interest. The simulations also indicate that the temperature profile can be tuned by several factors, such as the geometry configuration of array, beam direction, and light wavelength.

  10. Modeling and analysis of mechanical Quality factor of the resonator for cylinder vibratory gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Xiang; Wu, Xuezhong; Wu, Yulie; Zhang, Yongmeng

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical Quality factor( Q factor) of the resonator is an important parameter for the cylinder vibratory gyroscope(CVG). Traditional analytical methods mainly focus on a partial energy loss during the vibration process of the CVG resonator, thus are not accurate for the mechanical Q factor prediction. Therefore an integrated model including air damping loss, surface defect loss, support loss, thermoelastic damping loss and internal friction loss is proposed to obtain the mechanical Q factor of the CVG resonator. Based on structural dynamics and energy dissipation analysis, the contribution of each energy loss to the total mechanical Q factor is quantificationally analyzed. For the resonator with radius ranging from 10 mm to 20 mm, its mechanical Q factor is mainly related to the support loss, thermoelastic damping loss and internal friction loss, which are fundamentally determined by the geometric sizes and material properties of the resonator. In addition, resonators made of alloy 3J53 (Ni42CrTiAl), with different sizes, were experimentally fabricated to test the mechanical Q factor. The theoretical model is well verified by the experimental data, thus provides an effective theoretical method to design and predict the mechanical Q factor of the CVG resonator.

  11. Texaco looks at magnetic resonance logs vs. coring in GOM

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.; Pickens, T.

    1997-11-01

    The latest generation of magnetic resonance wireline tools allows explorationists to obtain accurate values for formation permeability, moveable and bound-fluid volumes, irreducible water saturation and formation fluid types in one continuous pass under a wide range of borehole conditions. These petrophysical formation parameters were previously attainable only by going through the expensive process of taking a conventional core, or extensive sidewall cores on wireline. This article details how Texaco Exploration and Production Inc. examined this concept in one of its recent exploration wells in the Gulf of Mexico. The company combined data from Schlumberger Well Service`s Combinable Magnetic Resonance (CMR) and Formation MicroImager (FMI) tools to obtain accurate reserve figures for a submarine canyon-fill play, and reduced the need for extensive sidewall cores in future wells in the field. Texaco now uses magnetic resonance technology as an integral part of its formation package. They have found it highly reliable for predicting the production potential of an exploration well--a critical step when allocating resources for a new platform or subsea development project.

  12. Toward Accurate and Quantitative Comparative Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Nayfach, Stephen; Pollard, Katherine S.

    2016-01-01

    Shotgun metagenomics and computational analysis are used to compare the taxonomic and functional profiles of microbial communities. Leveraging this approach to understand roles of microbes in human biology and other environments requires quantitative data summaries whose values are comparable across samples and studies. Comparability is currently hampered by the use of abundance statistics that do not estimate a meaningful parameter of the microbial community and biases introduced by experimental protocols and data-cleaning approaches. Addressing these challenges, along with improving study design, data access, metadata standardization, and analysis tools, will enable accurate comparative metagenomics. We envision a future in which microbiome studies are replicable and new metagenomes are easily and rapidly integrated with existing data. Only then can the potential of metagenomics for predictive ecological modeling, well-powered association studies, and effective microbiome medicine be fully realized. PMID:27565341

  13. Sparse and accurate high resolution SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Duc; Zhao, Kexin; Rowe, William; Li, Jian

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the usage of an adaptive method, the Iterative Adaptive Approach (IAA), in combination with a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate to reconstruct high resolution SAR images that are both sparse and accurate. IAA is a nonparametric weighted least squares algorithm that is robust and user parameter-free. IAA has been shown to reconstruct SAR images with excellent side lobes suppression and high resolution enhancement. We first reconstruct the SAR images using IAA, and then we enforce sparsity by using MAP with a sparsity inducing prior. By coupling these two methods, we can produce a sparse and accurate high resolution image that are conducive for feature extractions and target classification applications. In addition, we show how IAA can be made computationally efficient without sacrificing accuracies, a desirable property for SAR applications where the size of the problems is quite large. We demonstrate the success of our approach using the Air Force Research Lab's "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set Version 1.0" challenge dataset. Via the widely used FFT, individual vehicles contained in the scene are barely recognizable due to the poor resolution and high side lobe nature of FFT. However with our approach clear edges, boundaries, and textures of the vehicles are obtained.

  14. Applications of the Hybrid Theory to the Scattering of Electrons from HE+ and Li++ and Resonances in these Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Anand K.

    2008-01-01

    Applications of the hybrid theory to the scattering of electrons from Ile+ and Li++ and resonances in these systems, A. K. Bhatia, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center- The Hybrid theory of electron-hydrogen elastic scattering [I] is applied to the S-wave scattering of electrons from He+ and Li++. In this method, both short-range and long-range correlations are included in the Schrodinger equation at the same time. Phase shifts obtained in this calculation have rigorous lower bounds to the exact phase shifts and they are compared with those obtained using the Feshbach projection operator formalism [2], the close-coupling approach [3], and Harris-Nesbet method [4]. The agreement among all the calculations is very good. These systems have doubly-excited or Feshbach resonances embedded in the continuum. The resonance parameters for the lowest ' S resonances in He and Li+ are calculated and they are compared with the results obtained using the Feshbach projection operator formalism [5,6]. It is concluded that accurate resonance parameters can be obtained by the present method, which has the advantage of including corrections due to neighboring resonances and the continuum in which these resonances are embedded.

  15. On numerically accurate finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagtegaal, J. C.; Parks, D. M.; Rice, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A general criterion for testing a mesh with topologically similar repeat units is given, and the analysis shows that only a few conventional element types and arrangements are, or can be made suitable for computations in the fully plastic range. Further, a new variational principle, which can easily and simply be incorporated into an existing finite element program, is presented. This allows accurate computations to be made even for element designs that would not normally be suitable. Numerical results are given for three plane strain problems, namely pure bending of a beam, a thick-walled tube under pressure, and a deep double edge cracked tensile specimen. The effects of various element designs and of the new variational procedure are illustrated. Elastic-plastic computation at finite strain are discussed.

  16. Universal formalism of Fano resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Liang; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Luo, Hong-Gang; Grebogi, Celso

    2015-01-15

    The phenomenon of Fano resonance is ubiquitous in a large variety of wave scattering systems, where the resonance profile is typically asymmetric. Whether the parameter characterizing the asymmetry should be complex or real is an issue of great experimental interest. Using coherent quantum transport as a paradigm and taking into account of the collective contribution from all available scattering channels, we derive a universal formula for the Fano-resonance profile. We show that our formula bridges naturally the traditional Fano formulas with complex and real asymmetry parameters, indicating that the two types of formulas are fundamentally equivalent (except for an offset). The connection also reveals a clear footprint for the conductance resonance during a dephasing process. Therefore, the emergence of complex asymmetric parameter when fitting with experimental data needs to be properly interpreted. Furthermore, we have provided a theory for the width of the resonance, which relates explicitly the width to the degree of localization of the close-by eigenstates and the corresponding coupling matrices or the self-energies caused by the leads. Our work not only resolves the issue about the nature of the asymmetry parameter, but also provides deeper physical insights into the origin of Fano resonance. Since the only assumption in our treatment is that the transport can be described by the Green’s function formalism, our results are also valid for broad disciplines including scattering problems of electromagnetic waves, acoustics, and seismology.

  17. Fast and accurate simulations of diffusion-weighted MRI signals for the evaluation of acquisition sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rensonnet, Gaëtan; Jacobs, Damien; Macq, Benoît.; Taquet, Maxime

    2016-03-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) is a powerful tool to probe the diffusion of water through tissues. Through the application of magnetic gradients of appropriate direction, intensity and duration constituting the acquisition parameters, information can be retrieved about the underlying microstructural organization of the brain. In this context, an important and open question is to determine an optimal sequence of such acquisition parameters for a specific purpose. The use of simulated DW-MRI data for a given microstructural configuration provides a convenient and efficient way to address this problem. We first present a novel hybrid method for the synthetic simulation of DW-MRI signals that combines analytic expressions in simple geometries such as spheres and cylinders and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations elsewhere. Our hybrid method remains valid for any acquisition parameters and provides identical levels of accuracy with a computational time that is 90% shorter than that required by MC simulations for commonly-encountered microstructural configurations. We apply our novel simulation technique to estimate the radius of axons under various noise levels with different acquisition protocols commonly used in the literature. The results of our comparison suggest that protocols favoring a large number of gradient intensities such as a Cube and Sphere (CUSP) imaging provide more accurate radius estimation than conventional single-shell HARDI acquisitions for an identical acquisition time.

  18. Density functional calculations of (55)Mn, (14)N and (13)C electron paramagnetic resonance parameters support an energetically feasible model system for the S(2) state of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Schinzel, Sandra; Schraut, Johannes; Arbuznikov, Alexei V; Siegbahn, Per E M; Kaupp, Martin

    2010-09-10

    Metal and ligand hyperfine couplings of a previously suggested, energetically feasible Mn(4)Ca model cluster (SG2009(-1)) for the S(2) state of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) have been studied by broken-symmetry density functional methods and compared with other suggested structural and spectroscopic models. This was carried out explicitly for different spin-coupling patterns of the S=1/2 ground state of the Mn(III)(Mn(IV))(3) cluster. By applying spin-projection techniques and a scaling of the manganese hyperfine couplings, computation of the hyperfine and nuclear quadrupole coupling parameters allows a direct evaluation of the proposed models in comparison with data obtained from the simulation of EPR, ENDOR, and ESEEM spectra. The computation of (55)Mn hyperfine couplings (HFCs) for SG2009(-1) gives excellent agreement with experiment. However, at the current level of spin projection, the (55)Mn HFCs do not appear sufficiently accurate to distinguish between different structural models. Yet, of all the models studied, SG2009(-1) is the only one with the Mn(III) site at the Mn(C) center, which is coordinated by histidine (D1-His332). The computed histidine (14)N HFC anisotropy for SG2009(-1) gives much better agreement with ESEEM data than the other models, in which Mn(C) is an Mn(IV) site, thus supporting the validity of the model. The (13)C HFCs of various carboxylates have been compared with (13)C ENDOR data for PSII preparations with (13)C-labelled alanine.

  19. Effects of Nonsphericity on the Behavior of Lorenz-Mie Resonances in Scattering Characteristics of Liquid-Cloud Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dlugach, Janna M.; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    By using the results of highly accurate T-matrix computations for randomly oriented oblate and prolate spheroids and Chebyshev particles with varying degrees of asphericity, we analyze the effects of a deviation of water-droplet shapes from that of a perfect sphere on the behavior of Lorenz-Mie morphology-dependent resonances of various widths. We demonstrate that the positions and profiles of the resonances can change significantly with increasing asphericity. The absolute degree of asphericity required to suppress a Lorenz-Mie resonance is approximately proportional to the resonance width. Our results imply that numerical averaging of scattering characteristics of real cloud droplets over sizes may rely on a significantly coarser size-parameter resolution than that required for ideal, perfectly spherical particles.

  20. Multiquark resonances

    DOE PAGES

    Esposito, A.; Pilloni, A.; Polosa, Antonio D.

    2016-12-02

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties have been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building.more » Lastly, data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.« less

  1. Multiquark resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, A.; Pilloni, A.; Polosa, Antonio D.

    2016-12-02

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties have been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building. Lastly, data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.

  2. Multiquark resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, A.; Pilloni, A.; Polosa, A. D.

    2017-01-01

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties have been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building. Data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.

  3. GAUSSIAN BEAM LASER RESONATOR PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    In designing a laser cavity, the laser engineer is frequently concerned with more than the stability of the resonator. Other considerations include the size of the beam at various optical surfaces within the resonator or the performance of intracavity line-narrowing or other optical elements. Laser resonators obey the laws of Gaussian beam propagation, not geometric optics. The Gaussian Beam Laser Resonator Program models laser resonators using Gaussian ray trace techniques. It can be used to determine the propagation of radiation through laser resonators. The algorithm used in the Gaussian Beam Resonator program has three major components. First, the ray transfer matrix for the laser resonator must be calculated. Next calculations of the initial beam parameters, specifically, the beam stability, the beam waist size and location for the resonator input element, and the wavefront curvature and beam radius at the input surface to the first resonator element are performed. Finally the propagation of the beam through the optical elements is computed. The optical elements can be modeled as parallel plates, lenses, mirrors, dummy surfaces, or Gradient Index (GRIN) lenses. A Gradient Index lens is a good approximation of a laser rod operating under a thermal load. The optical system may contain up to 50 elements. In addition to the internal beam elements the optical system may contain elements external to the resonator. The Gaussian Beam Resonator program was written in Microsoft FORTRAN (Version 4.01). It was developed for the IBM PS/2 80-071 microcomputer and has been implemented on an IBM PC compatible under MS DOS 3.21. The program was developed in 1988 and requires approximately 95K bytes to operate.

  4. Laser Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, L. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An optical resonator cavity configuration has a unitary mirror with oppositely directed convex and concave reflective surfaces disposed into one fold and concertedly reversing both ends of a beam propagating from a laser rod disposed between two total internal reflection prisms. The optical components are rigidly positioned with perpendicularly crossed virtual rooflines by a compact optical bed. The rooflines of the internal reflection prisms, are arranged perpendicularly to the axis of the laser beam and to the optical axes of the optical resonator components.

  5. A Scalable Framework For Segmenting Magnetic Resonance Images

    PubMed Central

    Hore, Prodip; Goldgof, Dmitry B.; Gu, Yuhua; Maudsley, Andrew A.; Darkazanli, Ammar

    2009-01-01

    A fast, accurate and fully automatic method of segmenting magnetic resonance images of the human brain is introduced. The approach scales well allowing fast segmentations of fine resolution images. The approach is based on modifications of the soft clustering algorithm, fuzzy c-means, that enable it to scale to large data sets. Two types of modifications to create incremental versions of fuzzy c-means are discussed. They are much faster when compared to fuzzy c-means for medium to extremely large data sets because they work on successive subsets of the data. They are comparable in quality to application of fuzzy c-means to all of the data. The clustering algorithms coupled with inhomogeneity correction and smoothing are used to create a framework for automatically segmenting magnetic resonance images of the human brain. The framework is applied to a set of normal human brain volumes acquired from different magnetic resonance scanners using different head coils, acquisition parameters and field strengths. Results are compared to those from two widely used magnetic resonance image segmentation programs, Statistical Parametric Mapping and the FMRIB Software Library (FSL). The results are comparable to FSL while providing significant speed-up and better scalability to larger volumes of data. PMID:20046893

  6. Stochastic resonance across bifurcation cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolis, C.; Nicolis, G.

    2017-03-01

    The classical setting of stochastic resonance is extended to account for parameter variations leading to transitions between a unique stable state, bistability, and multistability regimes, across singularities of various kinds. Analytic expressions for the amplitude and the phase of the response in terms of key parameters are obtained. The conditions for optimal responses are derived in terms of the bifurcation parameter, the driving frequency, and the noise strength.

  7. Accurate ab Initio Spin Densities.

    PubMed

    Boguslawski, Katharina; Marti, Konrad H; Legeza, Ors; Reiher, Markus

    2012-06-12

    We present an approach for the calculation of spin density distributions for molecules that require very large active spaces for a qualitatively correct description of their electronic structure. Our approach is based on the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm to calculate the spin density matrix elements as a basic quantity for the spatially resolved spin density distribution. The spin density matrix elements are directly determined from the second-quantized elementary operators optimized by the DMRG algorithm. As an analytic convergence criterion for the spin density distribution, we employ our recently developed sampling-reconstruction scheme [J. Chem. Phys.2011, 134, 224101] to build an accurate complete-active-space configuration-interaction (CASCI) wave function from the optimized matrix product states. The spin density matrix elements can then also be determined as an expectation value employing the reconstructed wave function expansion. Furthermore, the explicit reconstruction of a CASCI-type wave function provides insight into chemically interesting features of the molecule under study such as the distribution of α and β electrons in terms of Slater determinants, CI coefficients, and natural orbitals. The methodology is applied to an iron nitrosyl complex which we have identified as a challenging system for standard approaches [J. Chem. Theory Comput.2011, 7, 2740].

  8. Optimization of sample preparation for accurate results in quantitative NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Taichi; Nakamura, Satoe; Saito, Takeshi

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) spectroscopy has received high marks as an excellent measurement tool that does not require the same reference standard as the analyte. Measurement parameters have been discussed in detail and high-resolution balances have been used for sample preparation. However, the high-resolution balances, such as an ultra-microbalance, are not general-purpose analytical tools and many analysts may find those balances difficult to use, thereby hindering accurate sample preparation for qNMR measurement. In this study, we examined the relationship between the resolution of the balance and the amount of sample weighed during sample preparation. We were able to confirm the accuracy of the assay results for samples weighed on a high-resolution balance, such as the ultra-microbalance. Furthermore, when an appropriate tare and amount of sample was weighed on a given balance, accurate assay results were obtained with another high-resolution balance. Although this is a fundamental result, it offers important evidence that would enhance the versatility of the qNMR method.

  9. Nanoscale temperature sensor based on Fano resonance in metal-insulator-metal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Yan; Wei, Qi; Liu, Cheng; Wang, Shouyu

    2017-02-01

    In order to realize temperature measurements with high sensitivity using compact structure, a nanoscale metal-insulator-metal waveguide based sensor combining with Fano resonance is proposed in this paper. Sealed ethanol in resonant cavity is adopted to further improve sensing performance. Additionally, dual resonant cavity based configuration is designed to generate a Fano-based sharp and asymmetric spectrum, providing high figure of merit in measurements. Moreover, structural parameters are optimized considering both transmission rate and spectral peak width. Certified by numerical calculation, sensitivity of 0.36 nm/°C is acquired with the optimized structure, indicating the designed sensor can play an important role in the nano-integrated plasmonic devices for high-accurate temperature detection.

  10. Ring Laser Gyro Resonator Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-20

    vibration environment could cause errors in measured RLG rotation rates due to vibration (tilt) of the resonator mirrors . Vibration-induced mirror tilt...the RLG resonator design theoretically and calculated pertinent parameters such as the beam diameter at the aperture, cavity mirror alignment...sensitivities, and power loss due to aperture occlusion. The mirror vibration levels required to significantly affect the laser power were then calculated for

  11. Accurate state estimation from uncertain data and models: an application of data assimilation to mathematical models of human brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Data assimilation refers to methods for updating the state vector (initial condition) of a complex spatiotemporal model (such as a numerical weather model) by combining new observations with one or more prior forecasts. We consider the potential feasibility of this approach for making short-term (60-day) forecasts of the growth and spread of a malignant brain cancer (glioblastoma multiforme) in individual patient cases, where the observations are synthetic magnetic resonance images of a hypothetical tumor. Results We apply a modern state estimation algorithm (the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter), previously developed for numerical weather prediction, to two different mathematical models of glioblastoma, taking into account likely errors in model parameters and measurement uncertainties in magnetic resonance imaging. The filter can accurately shadow the growth of a representative synthetic tumor for 360 days (six 60-day forecast/update cycles) in the presence of a moderate degree of systematic model error and measurement noise. Conclusions The mathematical methodology described here may prove useful for other modeling efforts in biology and oncology. An accurate forecast system for glioblastoma may prove useful in clinical settings for treatment planning and patient counseling. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Anthony Almudevar, Tomas Radivoyevitch, and Kristin Swanson (nominated by Georg Luebeck). PMID:22185645

  12. Microrheological Coagulation Assay Exploiting Micromechanical Resonators.

    PubMed

    Padovani, Francesco; Duffy, James; Hegner, Martin

    2017-01-03

    Rheological measurements in biological liquids yield insights into homeostasis and provide information on important molecular processes that affect fluidity. We present a fully automated cantilever-based method for highly precise and sensitive measurements of microliter sample volumes of human blood plasma coagulation (0.009 cP for viscosity range 0.5-3 cP and 0.0012 g/cm(3) for density range 0.9-1.1 g/cm(3)). Microcantilever arrays are driven by a piezoelectric element, and resonance frequencies and quality factors of sensors that change over time are evaluated. A highly accurate approximation of the hydrodynamic function is introduced that correlates resonance frequency and quality factor of cantilever beams immersed in a fluid to the viscosity and density of that fluid. The theoretical model was validated using glycerol reference solutions. We present a surface functionalization protocol that allows minimization of unspecific protein adsorption onto cantilevers. Adsorption leads to measurement distortions and incorrect estimation of the fluid parameters (viscosity and density). Two hydrophilic terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) sensor surfaces are compared to a hydrophobic terminated SAM coating. As expected, the hydrophobic modified surfaces induced the highest mass adsorption and could promote conformational changes of the proteins and subsequent abnormal biological activity. Finally, the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) coagulation assay was performed, and the viscosity, density, and coagulation rate of human blood plasma were measured along with the standard coagulation time. The method could extend and improve current coagulation testing.

  13. Resonant Acoustic Determination of Complex Elastic Moduli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, David A.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1991-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive, yet accurate method for measuring the dynamic complex modulus of elasticity is described. Using a 'free-free' bar selectively excited in three independent vibrational modes, the shear modulus is obtained by measuring the frequency of the torsional resonant mode and the Young's modulus is determined from measurement of either the longitudinal or flexural mode. The damping properties are obtained by measuring the quality factor (Q) for each mode. The Q is inversely proportional to the loss tangent. The viscoelastic behavior of the sample can be obtained by tracking a particular resonant mode (and thus a particular modulus) using a phase locked loop (PLL) and by changing the temperature of the sample. The change in the damping properties is obtained by measuring the in-phase amplitude of the PLL which is proportional to the Q of the material. The real and imaginary parts or the complex modulus can be obtained continuously as a function of parameters such as temperature, pressure, or humidity. For homogeneous and isotropic samples only two independent moduli are needed in order to characterize the complete set of elastic constants, thus, values can be obtained for the dynamic Poisson's ratio, bulk modulus, Lame constants, etc.

  14. Nonlinear behavior of Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersh, A. S.

    1990-10-01

    A semi-empirical fluid mechanical model has been derived to predict the nonlinear acoustic behavior of thin-walled, single-orifice Helmholtz resonators. The model assumed that the sound particle velocity field approaches the resonator in a spherically symmetric manner. The incident and cavity sound pressure fields are connected in terms of an orifice discharge coefficient and an end correction parameter whose values are determined empirically. The accuracy of the model was verified by comparing predicted with measured impedance over a wide range of sound amplitudes and frequencies for two different resonator geometries and with measurements conducted by Ingard and Ising.

  15. Autostereogram resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavey, Sean; Rae, Katherine; Murray, Adam; Courtial, Johannes

    2012-09-01

    Autostereograms, or "Magic Eye" pictures, are repeating patterns designed to give the illusion of depth. Here we discuss optical resonators that create light patterns which, when viewed from a suitable position by a monocular observer, are autostereograms of the three-dimensional shape of one of the mirror surfaces.

  16. Earth's core and inner-core resonances from analysis of VLBI nutation and superconducting gravimeter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosat, S.; Lambert, S. B.; Gattano, C.; Calvo, M.

    2017-01-01

    Geophysical parameters of the deep Earth's interior can be evaluated through the resonance effects associated with the core and inner-core wobbles on the forced nutations of the Earth's figure axis, as observed by very long baseline interferometry (VLBI), or on the diurnal tidal waves, retrieved from the time-varying surface gravity recorded by superconducting gravimeters (SGs). In this paper, we inverse for the rotational mode parameters from both techniques to retrieve geophysical parameters of the deep Earth. We analyse surface gravity data from 15 SG stations and VLBI delays accumulated over the last 35 yr. We show existing correlations between several basic Earth parameters and then decide to inverse for the rotational modes parameters. We employ a Bayesian inversion based on the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm with a Markov-chain Monte Carlo method. We obtain estimates of the free core nutation resonant period and quality factor that are consistent for both techniques. We also attempt an inversion for the free inner-core nutation (FICN) resonant period from gravity data. The most probable solution gives a period close to the annual prograde term (or S1 tide). However the 95 per cent confidence interval extends the possible values between roughly 28 and 725 d for gravity, and from 362 to 414 d from nutation data, depending on the prior bounds. The precisions of the estimated long-period nutation and respective small diurnal tidal constituents are hence not accurate enough for a correct determination of the FICN complex frequency.

  17. Earth's core and inner core resonances from analysis of VLBI nutation and superconducting gravimeter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosat, S.; Lambert, S. B.; Gattano, C.; Calvo, M.

    2016-10-01

    Geophysical parameters of the deep Earth's interior can be evaluated through the resonance effects associated with the core and inner-core wobbles on the forced nutations of the Earth's figure axis, as observed by very long baseline interferometry (VLBI), or on the diurnal tidal waves, retrieved from the time-varying surface gravity recorded by superconducting gravimeters (SGs). In this paper, we inverse for the rotational mode parameters from both techniques to retrieve geophysical parameters of the deep Earth. We analyze surface gravity data from 15 SG stations and VLBI delays accumulated over the last 35 years. We show existing correlations between several basic Earth parameters and then decide to inverse for the rotational modes parameters. We employ a Bayesian inversion based on the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method. We obtain estimates of the free core nutation (FCN) resonant period and quality factor that are consistent for both techniques. We also attempt an inversion for the free inner core nutation (FICN) resonant period from gravity data. The most probable solution gives a period close to the annual prograde term (or S1 tide). However the 95% confidence interval extend the possible values between roughly 28 days and 725 days for gravity, and from 362 to 414 days from nutation data, depending on the prior bounds. The precisions of the estimated long-period nutation and respective small diurnal tidal constituents are hence not accurate enough for a correct determination of the FICN complex frequency.

  18. A new Skyrme energy density functional for a better description of spin-isospin resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Roca-Maza, X.; Colò, G.; Cao, Li-Gang; Sagawa, H.

    2015-10-15

    A correct determination of the isospin and spin-isospin properties of the nuclear effective interaction should lead to an accurate description of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GT), the Spin Dipole Resonance (SDR), the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) or the Antianalog Giant Dipole Resonance (AGDR), among others. A new Skyrme energy density functional named SAMi is introduced with the aim of going a step forward in setting the bases for a more precise description of spin-isospin resonances [1, 2]. In addition, we will discuss some new features of our analysis on the AGDR in {sup 208}Pb [3] as compared with available experimental data on this resonance [4, 5, 6], and on the GDR [7]. Such study, guided by a simple yet physical pocket formula, has been developed by employing the so called SAMi-J family of systematically varied interactions. This set of interactions is compatible with experimental data for values of the symmetry energy at saturation J and slope parameter L falling in the ranges 31−33 MeV and 75−95 MeV, respectively.

  19. A new Skyrme energy density functional for a better description of spin-isospin resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Maza, X.; Colò, G.; Cao, Li-Gang; Sagawa, H.

    2015-10-01

    A correct determination of the isospin and spin-isospin properties of the nuclear effective interaction should lead to an accurate description of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GT), the Spin Dipole Resonance (SDR), the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) or the Antianalog Giant Dipole Resonance (AGDR), among others. A new Skyrme energy density functional named SAMi is introduced with the aim of going a step forward in setting the bases for a more precise description of spin-isospin resonances [1, 2]. In addition, we will discuss some new features of our analysis on the AGDR in 208Pb [3] as compared with available experimental data on this resonance [4, 5, 6], and on the GDR [7]. Such study, guided by a simple yet physical pocket formula, has been developed by employing the so called SAMi-J family of systematically varied interactions. This set of interactions is compatible with experimental data for values of the symmetry energy at saturation J and slope parameter L falling in the ranges 31-33 MeV and 75-95 MeV, respectively.

  20. Accurate Sizing of Nanoparticles Using Confocal Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kuyper, Christopher L.; Fujimoto, Bryant S.; Zhao, Yiqiong; Schiro, Perry G.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to size accurately low concentrations of nanoscale particles in small volumes is useful for a broad range of disciplines. Here, we characterize confocal correlation spectroscopy (CCS), which is capable of measuring sizes of both fluorescent and non-fluorescent particles, such as quantum dots, gold colloids, latex spheres, and fluorescent beads. We measured accurately particles ranging in diameter from 11 nm to 300 nm, a size range that had been difficult to probe, owing to a phenomenon coined biased diffusion that causes diffusion times, or particle size, to deviate as a function of laser power. At low powers, artifacts mimicking biased diffusion are caused by saturation of the detector, which is especially problematic when probing highly fluorescent or highly scattering nanoparticles. At higher powers (>1 mW), however, autocorrelation curves in both resonant and non-resonant conditions show a structure indicative of an increased contribution from longer correlation times coupled with a decrease in shorter correlation times. We propose this change in the autocorrelation curve is due to partial trapping of the particles as they transit the probe volume. Furthermore, we found only a slight difference in the effect of biased diffusion when comparing resonant and non-resonant conditions. Simulations suggest the depth of trapping potential necessary for biased diffusion is >1 kBT. Overcoming artifacts from detector saturation and biased diffusion, confocal correlation spectroscopy is particularly advantageous due to its ability to size particles in small volumes characteristic of microfluidic channels and aqueous microdroplets. We believe the method will find increasing use in a wide range of applications in measuring nanoparticles and macromolecular systems. PMID:17134198

  1. Coupling-of-modes analysis of STW resonators including loss mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yantchev, Ventsislav M; Strashilov, Vesseline L

    2002-03-01

    Surface transverse wave (STW) resonators exhibit substantial advantages over conventional surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators. However, their analysis is more involved because of the complicated nature of STW. Many parameters have been studied, but the one that has been difficult to analyze accurately is the quality factor Q, which is of great importance for characterizing the devices. At present, none of the available analytical models is concerned with quantitative loss consideration, and the establishment of reliable design rules is difficult. We present a theoretical study that allows one to conduct coupling-of-modes (COM) STW loss analysis and estimate the resonator Q from material and layout parameters. The COM transmission coefficient chi11 is derived by Floquet analysis. Its imaginary part is obtained by numerically fitting available experimental data for the Q-factor of particular resonators. It is a measure of STW propagation loss that adds to the electrode reflection loss. As the overall loss is extremely sensitive to the choice of parameter values, the full numerical search for optimum design presently discussed can save considerable experimental effort.

  2. Low-profile wireless passive resonators for sensing

    DOEpatents

    Gong, Xun; An, Linan

    2017-04-04

    A resonator for sensing a physical or an environmental parameter includes a support having a top surface that provides a ground plane, and a polymer-derived ceramic (PDC) element positioned on the top surface including a PDC layer, and a metal patch on the PDC layer. The metal patch is electrically isolated from all surrounding structure, and the resonator has a resonant frequency that changes as a function of the physical or environmental parameter. A system for wirelessly sensing a physical or environmental parameter includes at least one resonator and a wireless RF reader located remotely from the resonator for transmitting a wide-band RF interrogation signal that excites the resonator. The wireless RF reader detects a sensing signal retransmitted by the resonator and includes a processor for determining the physical or environmental parameter at the location of the resonator from the sensing signal.

  3. Accurate ab initio Quartic Force Fields of Cyclic and Bent HC2N Isomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inostroza, Natalia; Huang, Xinchuan; Lee, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    Highly correlated ab initio quartic force field (QFFs) are used to calculate the equilibrium structures and predict the spectroscopic parameters of three HC2N isomers. Specifically, the ground state quasilinear triplet and the lowest cyclic and bent singlet isomers are included in the present study. Extensive treatment of correlation effects were included using the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations, denoted CCSD(T). Dunning s correlation-consistent basis sets cc-pVXZ, X=3,4,5, were used, and a three-point formula for extrapolation to the one-particle basis set limit was used. Core-correlation and scalar relativistic corrections were also included to yield highly accurate QFFs. The QFFs were used together with second-order perturbation theory (with proper treatment of Fermi resonances) and variational methods to solve the nuclear Schr dinger equation. The quasilinear nature of the triplet isomer is problematic, and it is concluded that a QFF is not adequate to describe properly all of the fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants (though some constants not dependent on the bending motion are well reproduced by perturbation theory). On the other hand, this procedure (a QFF together with either perturbation theory or variational methods) leads to highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants for the cyclic and bent singlet isomers of HC2N. All three isomers possess significant dipole moments, 3.05D, 3.06D, and 1.71D, for the quasilinear triplet, the cyclic singlet, and the bent singlet isomers, respectively. It is concluded that the spectroscopic constants determined for the cyclic and bent singlet isomers are the most accurate available, and it is hoped that these will be useful in the interpretation of high-resolution astronomical observations or laboratory experiments.

  4. Accurate ab initio quartic force fields of cyclic and bent HC2N isomers.

    PubMed

    Inostroza, Natalia; Huang, Xinchuan; Lee, Timothy J

    2011-12-28

    Highly correlated ab initio quartic force fields (QFFs) are used to calculate the equilibrium structures and predict the spectroscopic parameters of three HC(2)N isomers. Specifically, the ground state quasilinear triplet and the lowest cyclic and bent singlet isomers are included in the present study. Extensive treatment of correlation effects were included using the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations, denoted as CCSD(T). Dunning's correlation-consistent basis sets cc-pVXZ, X = 3,4,5, were used, and a three-point formula for extrapolation to the one-particle basis set limit was used. Core-correlation and scalar relativistic corrections were also included to yield highly accurate QFFs. The QFFs were used together with second-order perturbation theory (PT) (with proper treatment of Fermi resonances) and variational methods to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. The quasilinear nature of the triplet isomer is problematic, and it is concluded that a QFF is not adequate to describe properly all of the fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants (though some constants not dependent on the bending motion are well reproduced by PT). On the other hand, this procedure (a QFF together with either PT or variational methods) leads to highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants for the cyclic and bent singlet isomers of HC(2)N. All three isomers possess significant dipole moments, 3.05 D, 3.06 D, and 1.71 D, for the quasilinear triplet, the cyclic singlet, and the bent singlet isomers, respectively. It is concluded that the spectroscopic constants determined for the cyclic and bent singlet isomers are the most accurate available, and it is hoped that these will be useful in the interpretation of high-resolution astronomical observations or laboratory experiments.

  5. Gynecologic masses: value of magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hricak, H; Lacey, C; Schriock, E; Fisher, M R; Amparo, E; Dooms, G; Jaffe, R

    1985-09-01

    Forty-two women with gynecologic abnormalities were studied with the use of magnetic resonance imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging correctly assessed the origin of the pelvic mass in all patients. In the evaluation of leiomyoma, magnetic resonance imaging accurately depicted the number, size, and location of the lesion. In the evaluation of endometrial carcinoma, magnetic resonance imaging depicted the location of the lesion, the presence of cervical extension, and the depth of myometrial penetration in the majority of the cases. In the analysis of adnexal cysts, magnetic resonance imaging was sensitive in localizing the lesion and was able to distinguish serous from hemorrhagic fluid. This preliminary report indicates that magnetic resonance imaging may become a valuable imaging modality in the diagnosis of gynecologic abnormalities.

  6. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  7. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  8. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  9. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  10. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  11. Sphericity determination using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Dixon, Raymond D.; Migliori, Albert; Visscher, William M.

    1994-01-01

    A method is provided for grading production quantities of spherical objects, such as roller balls for bearings. A resonant ultrasound spectrum (RUS) is generated for each spherical object and a set of degenerate sphere-resonance frequencies is identified. From the degenerate sphere-resonance frequencies and known relationships between degenerate sphere-resonance frequencies and Poisson's ratio, a Poisson's ratio can be determined, along with a "best" spherical diameter, to form spherical parameters for the sphere. From the RUS, fine-structure resonant frequency spectra are identified for each degenerate sphere-resonance frequency previously selected. From each fine-structure spectrum and associated sphere parameter values an asphericity value is determined. The asphericity value can then be compared with predetermined values to provide a measure for accepting or rejecting the sphere.

  12. Sphericity determination using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Dixon, R.D.; Migliori, A.; Visscher, W.M.

    1994-10-18

    A method is provided for grading production quantities of spherical objects, such as roller balls for bearings. A resonant ultrasound spectrum (RUS) is generated for each spherical object and a set of degenerate sphere-resonance frequencies is identified. From the degenerate sphere-resonance frequencies and known relationships between degenerate sphere-resonance frequencies and Poisson's ratio, a Poisson's ratio can be determined, along with a 'best' spherical diameter, to form spherical parameters for the sphere. From the RUS, fine-structure resonant frequency spectra are identified for each degenerate sphere-resonance frequency previously selected. From each fine-structure spectrum and associated sphere parameter values an asphericity value is determined. The asphericity value can then be compared with predetermined values to provide a measure for accepting or rejecting the sphere. 14 figs.

  13. Nested trampoline resonators for optomechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, M. J. Pepper, B.; Luna, F.; Perock, B.; Buters, F. M.; Eerkens, H. J.; Welker, G.; Heeck, K.; Man, S. de; Bouwmeester, D.

    2016-01-18

    Two major challenges in the development of optomechanical devices are achieving a low mechanical and optical loss rate and vibration isolation from the environment. We address both issues by fabricating trampoline resonators made from low pressure chemical vapor deposition Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with a distributed Bragg reflector mirror. We design a nested double resonator structure with 80 dB of mechanical isolation from the mounting surface at the inner resonator frequency, and we demonstrate up to 45 dB of isolation at lower frequencies in agreement with the design. We reliably fabricate devices with mechanical quality factors of around 400 000 at room temperature. In addition, these devices were used to form optical cavities with finesse up to 181 000 ± 1000. These promising parameters will enable experiments in the quantum regime with macroscopic mechanical resonators.

  14. If It's Resonance, What is Resonating?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.

    2006-01-01

    The phenomenon under the name "resonance," which, is based on the mathematical analogy between mechanical resonance and the behavior of wave functions in quantum mechanical exchange phenomena was described. The resonating system does not have a structure intermediate between those involved in the resonance, but instead a structure which is further…

  15. Modern Design of Resonant Edge-Slot Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, R. B.

    2006-01-01

    Resonant edge-slot (slotted-waveguide) array antennas can now be designed very accurately following a modern computational approach like that followed for some other microwave components. This modern approach makes it possible to design superior antennas at lower cost than was previously possible. Heretofore, the physical and engineering knowledge of resonant edge-slot array antennas had remained immature since they were introduced during World War II. This is because despite their mechanical simplicity, high reliability, and potential for operation with high efficiency, the electromagnetic behavior of resonant edge-slot antennas is very complex. Because engineering design formulas and curves for such antennas are not available in the open literature, designers have been forced to implement iterative processes of fabricating and testing multiple prototypes to derive design databases, each unique for a specific combination of operating frequency and set of waveguide tube dimensions. The expensive, time-consuming nature of these processes has inhibited the use of resonant edge-slot antennas. The present modern approach reduces costs by making it unnecessary to build and test multiple prototypes. As an additional benefit, this approach affords a capability to design an array of slots having different dimensions to taper the antenna illumination to reduce the amplitudes of unwanted side lobes. The heart of the modern approach is the use of the latest commercially available microwave-design software, which implements finite-element models of electromagnetic fields in and around waveguides, antenna elements, and similar components. Instead of building and testing prototypes, one builds a database and constructs design curves from the results of computational simulations for sets of design parameters. The figure shows a resonant edge-slot antenna designed following this approach. Intended for use as part of a radiometer operating at a frequency of 10.7 GHz, this antenna

  16. Under-Coupling Whispering Gallery Mode Resonator Applied to Resonant Micro-Optic Gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Qian, Kun; Tang, Jun; Guo, Hao; Liu, Wenyao; Liu, Jun; Xue, Chenyang; Zheng, Yongqiu; Zhang, Chengfei

    2017-01-06

    As an important sensing element, the whispering gallery mode resonator (WGMR) parameters seriously affect the resonant micro-optic gyroscope (RMOG) performance. This work proposes an under-coupling resonator to improve the resonator's Q value and to optimize the coupling coefficient to maximize the RMOG's sensitivity. GeO₂-doped silica waveguide-type resonators with different coupling coefficients were simulated, designed, fabricated and tested. An under-coupling ring resonator with a quality factor of 10 million is reported. The RMOG system was built based on this resonator and the scale factor was tested on a uniaxial high-precision rotating platform. Experimental results show that this resonator could improve the RMOG sensitivity by five times.

  17. Resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Robert, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy may yield precise information on the conformation of, and on the interactions assumed by, the chromophores involved in the first steps of the photosynthetic process, whether isolated in solvents, embedded in soluble or membrane proteins, or, as shown recently, in vivo. By making use of this technique, it is possible, for instance, to relate the electronic properties of these molecules to their structure and/or the physical properties of their environment, or to determine subtle changes of their conformation associated with regulatory processes. After a short introduction to the physical principles that govern resonance Raman spectroscopy, the information content of resonance Raman spectra of chlorophyll and carotenoid molecules is described in this review, together with the experiments which helped in determining which structural parameter each Raman band is sensitive to. A selection of applications of this technique is then presented, in order to give a fair and precise idea of which type of information can be obtained from its use in the field of photosynthesis.

  18. Electroexcitation of nucleon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Inna Aznauryan, Volker D. Burkert

    2012-01-01

    We review recent progress in the investigation of the electroexcitation of nucleon resonances, both in experiment and in theory. The most accurate results have been obtained for the electroexcitation amplitudes of the four lowest excited states, which have been measured in a range of Q2 up to 8 and 4.5 GeV2 for the Delta(1232)P33, N(1535)S11 and N(1440)P11, N(1520)D13, respectively. These results have been confronted with calculations based on lattice QCD, large-Nc relations, perturbative QCD (pQCD), and QCD-inspired models. The amplitudes for the Delta(1232) indicate large pion-cloud contributions at low Q2 and don't show any sign of approaching the pQCD regime for Q2<7 GeV2. Measured for the first time, the electroexcitation amplitudes of the Roper resonance, N(1440)P11, provide strong evidence for this state as a predominantly radial excitation of a three-quark (3q) ground state, with additional non-3-quark contributions needed to describe the low Q2 behavior of the amplitudes. The longitudinal transition amplitude for the N(1535)S11 was determined and has become a challenge for quark models. Explanations may require large meson-cloud contributions or alternative representations of this state. The N(1520)D13 clearly shows the rapid changeover from helicity-3/2 dominance at the real photon point to helicity-1/2 dominance at Q2 > 0.5 GeV2, confirming a long-standing prediction of the constituent quark model. The interpretation of the moments of resonance transition form factors in terms of transition transverse charge distributions in infinite momentum frame is presented.

  19. Application of Quartz Resonators for Weighing Thin Films and for Microweighing,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    will change because of the increased mass now oscillating. Since the frequency changes of a quartz resonator can be measured very accurately, this offers a very accurate method for weighing thin films .

  20. Accurate Biomass Estimation via Bayesian Adaptive Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, K.; Knuth, K.; Castle, P.

    2005-12-01

    Typical estimates of standing wood derived from remote sensing sources take advantage of aggregate measurements of canopy heights (e.g. LIDAR) and canopy diameters (segmentation of IKONOS imagery) to obtain a wood volume estimate by assuming homogeneous species and a fixed function that returns volume. The validation of such techniques use manually measured diameter at breast height records (DBH). Our goal is to improve the accuracy and applicability of biomass estimation methods to heterogeneous forests and transitional areas. We are developing estimates with quantifiable uncertainty using a new form of estimation function, active sampling, and volumetric reconstruction image rendering for species specific mass truth. Initially we are developing a Bayesian adaptive sampling method for BRDF associated with the MISR Rahman model with respect to categorical biomes. This involves characterizing the probability distributions of the 3 free parameters of the Rahman model for the 6 categories of biomes used by MISR. Subsequently, these distributions can be used to determine the optimal sampling methodology to distinguish biomes during acquisition. We have a remotely controlled semi-autonomous helicopter that has stereo imaging, lidar, differential GPS, and spectrometers covering wavelengths from visible to NIR. We intend to automatically vary the way points of the flight path via the Bayesian adaptive sampling method. The second critical part of this work is in automating the validation of biomass estimates via using machine vision techniques. This involves taking 2-D pictures of trees of known species, and then via Bayesian techniques, reconstructing 3-D models of the trees to estimate the distribution moments associated with wood volume. Similar techniques have been developed by the medical imaging community. This then provides probability distributions conditional upon species. The final part of this work is in relating the BRDF actively sampled measurements to species

  1. Systematics of shape resonances in reactive collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakimoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-10-01

    Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) methodology is used to undertake a systematic analysis of shape resonances in exoergic reactive collisions at low energies E , and examples investigated are Li +H+ , He (2 3S )+H , and He (2 3S )+Mu (muonium). In so doing, the resonance positions should be measured by the tunneling parameter α and not by E . The resonance peak height Pres of the reaction probability and the resonance width times the vibrational period of the quasibound resonance state can be given by simple closed-form expressions with two variables, α and P0, the latter of which is a reaction probability given at collision energies much above a centrifugal barrier top and is determined by only short-range interactions. The resonance promotes the reaction maximally (i.e., Pres=1 ) when the resonance satisfies α =α0=(2π ) -1ln[(1 -P0) /P0] , in other words, when the transmission coefficient of tunneling through the centrifugal barrier happens to be equal to P0 at the resonance energy. If α0≳1 , the reaction system is rich in tunneling resonances. If α0≲0 , the prominent resonances are mostly an over-barrier type. The resonances occurring at α ≫α0 are of no significance in the reaction.

  2. Vibrational branching ratios and shape resonant photoionization dynamics in N2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunstein, M.; McKoy, V.

    1989-02-01

    Accurate photoelectron continuum orbitals are used to study vibrational branching ratios and photoelectron asymmetry parameters for alternative vibrational modes in the photoionization of N2O (7sigma exp -1). The strong non-Franck-Dondon vibrational ion distributions for the symmetric and antisymmetric stretching modes at low photoelectron energies observed in the dispersed ionic fluorescence measurements of Poliakoff et al. (1986) are confirmed. It is shown that these features arise from a sigma shape resonance which is associated with the molecular framework as a whole and not with either of its fragments, N-N or N-O.

  3. Micro-machined resonator oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, D.R.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Bivens, H.M.; Wessendorf, K.O.

    1994-08-16

    A micro-miniature resonator-oscillator is disclosed. Due to the miniaturization of the resonator-oscillator, oscillation frequencies of one MHz and higher are utilized. A thickness-mode quartz resonator housed in a micro-machined silicon package and operated as a telemetered sensor beacon'' that is, a digital, self-powered, remote, parameter measuring-transmitter in the FM-band. The resonator design uses trapped energy principles and temperature dependence methodology through crystal orientation control, with operation in the 20--100 MHz range. High volume batch-processing manufacturing is utilized, with package and resonator assembly at the wafer level. Unique design features include squeeze-film damping for robust vibration and shock performance, capacitive coupling through micro-machined diaphragms allowing resonator excitation at the package exterior, circuit integration and extremely small (0.1 in. square) dimensioning. A family of micro-miniature sensor beacons is also disclosed with widespread applications as bio-medical sensors, vehicle status monitors and high-volume animal identification and health sensors. The sensor family allows measurement of temperatures, chemicals, acceleration and pressure. A microphone and clock realization is also available. 21 figs.

  4. Micro-machined resonator oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, Dale R.; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.; Bivens, Hugh M.; Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    1994-01-01

    A micro-miniature resonator-oscillator is disclosed. Due to the miniaturization of the resonator-oscillator, oscillation frequencies of one MHz and higher are utilized. A thickness-mode quartz resonator housed in a micro-machined silicon package and operated as a "telemetered sensor beacon" that is, a digital, self-powered, remote, parameter measuring-transmitter in the FM-band. The resonator design uses trapped energy principles and temperature dependence methodology through crystal orientation control, with operation in the 20-100 MHz range. High volume batch-processing manufacturing is utilized, with package and resonator assembly at the wafer level. Unique design features include squeeze-film damping for robust vibration and shock performance, capacitive coupling through micro-machined diaphragms allowing resonator excitation at the package exterior, circuit integration and extremely small (0.1 in. square) dimensioning. A family of micro-miniature sensor beacons is also disclosed with widespread applications as bio-medical sensors, vehicle status monitors and high-volume animal identification and health sensors. The sensor family allows measurement of temperatures, chemicals, acceleration and pressure. A microphone and clock realization is also available.

  5. The principles of magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Longmore, D B

    1989-10-01

    Magnetic Resonance (MR), which has no known biological hazard, is capable of producing high resolution thin tomographic images in any plane and blocks of 3-dimensional information. It can be used to study blood flow and to gain information about the composition of important materials seen and quantified on dimensionally accurate images. The MR image is a thin tomographic slice or a true three dimensional block of data which can be reconstructed in any desired way rather than a shadowgram of all the structures in the beam. It is the only imaging technique which can acquire data in a 3-dimensional format. CT images can be reconstructed to form a pseudo 3-D image or a hologram but the flexibility conferred by acquiring the data as a true 3-D block gives many advantages. The spatial resolution of MR images are theoretically those of low powered microscopy, the practical limits with the present generation of equipment are voxel sizes of one third by one third by two millimetres. The term Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is used commonly, particularly in the USA, avoiding association with the term, nuclear, and emphasizing the imaging potential of the technique. The terms Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) or Magnetic Resonance (MR) more correctly describe the most powerful diagnostic instrument yet devised. The simplified description of the phenomena involved in MR which follows is intended to be comprehensive and does not require foreknowledge of classical physics, quantum mechanics, fluency with mathematical formulae or an understanding of image reconstruction. There are many explanations of MR, some omitting the more difficult concepts. An accurate, comprehensive description is found on the textbook on MR by Gadian, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and its Applications for Living Systems (Oxford University Press, 1982).

  6. Articulatory Parameters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladefoged, Peter

    1980-01-01

    Summarizes the 16 parameters hypothesized to be necessary and sufficient for linguistic phonetic specifications. Suggests seven parameters affecting tongue shapes, three determining the positions of the lips, one controlling the position of the velum, four varying laryngeal actions, and one controlling respiratory activity. (RL)

  7. Experiments with Helmholtz Resonators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Presents experiments that use Helmholtz resonators and have been designed for a sophomore-level course in oscillations and waves. Discusses the theory of the Helmholtz resonator and resonance curves. (JRH)

  8. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  9. Molecular resonances by removing complex absorbing potentials via Padé; Application to CO(-) and N2().

    PubMed

    Landau, Arie; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2016-10-28

    Atomic and molecular resonances play a role in many physical processes. Resonances are metastable states that have a finite lifetime. Nowadays, resonance complex eigenvalues can be calculated by quantum chemistry packages modified to include complex absorbing potentials (CAPs), where the imaginary energy part corresponds to the resonance lifetime. CAPs provide similar conditions to the ones obtained by imposing outgoing boundary conditions (OBCs), however, they also introduce artificial reflections. In this study, we present a scheme that eliminates the artificial effect of CAPs from bona fide electronic-structure calculations using the Padé approximant. This allows us to reach the physical limit and obtain the same eigenvalues as if we were able to solve the time-independent Schrödinger equation with OBCs (and without adding an unphysical CAP). We apply this scheme to the CO(-) and N2(-) shape-type (2)Π resonances with excellent agreement with experimental and other theoretical studies. The strength of the presented approach is demonstrated by providing accurate resonance complex energies independent of the CAP location, even when placed on the nuclei, which makes the optimization of the CAP-onset parameters redundant.

  10. Molecular resonances by removing complex absorbing potentials via Padé; Application to CO- and N 2-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landau, Arie; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2016-10-01

    Atomic and molecular resonances play a role in many physical processes. Resonances are metastable states that have a finite lifetime. Nowadays, resonance complex eigenvalues can be calculated by quantum chemistry packages modified to include complex absorbing potentials (CAPs), where the imaginary energy part corresponds to the resonance lifetime. CAPs provide similar conditions to the ones obtained by imposing outgoing boundary conditions (OBCs), however, they also introduce artificial reflections. In this study, we present a scheme that eliminates the artificial effect of CAPs from bona fide electronic-structure calculations using the Padé approximant. This allows us to reach the physical limit and obtain the same eigenvalues as if we were able to solve the time-independent Schrödinger equation with OBCs (and without adding an unphysical CAP). We apply this scheme to the CO- and N 2- shape-type 2Π resonances with excellent agreement with experimental and other theoretical studies. The strength of the presented approach is demonstrated by providing accurate resonance complex energies independent of the CAP location, even when placed on the nuclei, which makes the optimization of the CAP-onset parameters redundant.

  11. Orbital resonances and Poynting-Robertson drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.; Jackson, A. A.

    1993-01-01

    The phenomenon of resonance trapping with Poynting-Robertson drag in the simplest case - the circular restricted three-body problem - is elucidated. Attention is given to what determines whether a grain of a given size passes through a given resonance or is trapped there, to how and why a trapped particle's orbit evolves with time, and to why Poynting-Robertson drag resonances are only temporary, while gas-drag resonances appear to be stable. The possibility of trapping a grain into resonance with a planet depends on the combination of the following parameters: the ratio of radiation pressure force to solar gravity, the mass of the perturbing planet normalized to the solar mass, an integer, and eccentricity. In general, the peak eccentricity and sometimes the threshold value are large enough so that crossing orbits and close approaches to the planet can inhibit capture and aid escape from resonance.

  12. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    DOEpatents

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  13. CARS Spectral Fitting with Multiple Resonant Species using Sparse Libraries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Magnotti, Gaetano

    2010-01-01

    The dual pump CARS technique is often used in the study of turbulent flames. Fast and accurate algorithms are needed for fitting dual-pump CARS spectra for temperature and multiple chemical species. This paper describes the development of such an algorithm. The algorithm employs sparse libraries, whose size grows much more slowly with number of species than a conventional library. The method was demonstrated by fitting synthetic "experimental" spectra containing 4 resonant species (N2, O2, H2 and CO2), both with noise and without it, and by fitting experimental spectra from a H2-air flame produced by a Hencken burner. In both studies, weighted least squares fitting of signal, as opposed to least squares fitting signal or square-root signal, was shown to produce the least random error and minimize bias error in the fitted parameters.

  14. Elbow magnetic resonance imaging: imaging anatomy and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hauptfleisch, Jennifer; English, Collette; Murphy, Darra

    2015-04-01

    The elbow is a complex joint. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often the imaging modality of choice in the workup of elbow pain, especially in sports injuries and younger patients who often have either a history of a chronic repetitive strain such as the throwing athlete or a distinct traumatic injury. Traumatic injuries and alternative musculoskeletal pathologies can affect the ligaments, musculotendinous, cartilaginous, and osseous structures of the elbow as well as the 3 main nerves to the upper limb, and these structures are best assessed with MRI.Knowledge of the complex anatomy of the elbow joint as well as patterns of injury and disease is important for the radiologist to make an accurate diagnosis in the setting of elbow pain. This chapter will outline elbow anatomy, basic imaging parameters, compartmental pathology, and finally applications of some novel MRI techniques.

  15. Under-Coupling Whispering Gallery Mode Resonator Applied to Resonant Micro-Optic Gyroscope

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Kun; Tang, Jun; Guo, Hao; Liu, Wenyao; Liu, Jun; Xue, Chenyang; Zheng, Yongqiu; Zhang, Chengfei

    2017-01-01

    As an important sensing element, the whispering gallery mode resonator (WGMR) parameters seriously affect the resonant micro-optic gyroscope (RMOG) performance. This work proposes an under-coupling resonator to improve the resonator’s Q value and to optimize the coupling coefficient to maximize the RMOG’s sensitivity. GeO2-doped silica waveguide-type resonators with different coupling coefficients were simulated, designed, fabricated and tested. An under-coupling ring resonator with a quality factor of 10 million is reported. The RMOG system was built based on this resonator and the scale factor was tested on a uniaxial high-precision rotating platform. Experimental results show that this resonator could improve the RMOG sensitivity by five times. PMID:28067824

  16. High-frequency current oscillations in graphene-boron nitride resonant tunnel diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenaway, Mark; Gaskell, Jenn; Eaves, Laurence; Novoselov, Kostya; Mishchenko, Artem; Geim, Andre; Fromhold, Mark

    The successful realisation of multilayer graphene-hBN-graphene resonant tunnelling diodes (graphene- RTDs) with negative differential conductance (NDC) and MHz current oscillations offers the exciting possibility of exploiting them as high-frequency oscillators and mixers. In this paper, we examine their potential for generating higher frequencies by simulating the oscillations in the tunnel current and charge that arise when the device is biased in the NDC region and placed in a resonant circuit. Using the Bardeen transfer Hamiltonian method, we examine the effect on the device characteristics of the twist angle, θ, between the two graphene electrodes, the hBN barrier thickness and of the carrier density in the graphene electrodes, which can be adjusted by chemical doping or by an applied bias voltage. The simulations accurately reproduce our recently-reported measurements on these RTDs (Fig. 4,). The results of simulations show that frequencies of tens of GHz are achievable by optimising the device parameters. Leverhulme Trust, UK.

  17. Heat equation inversion framework for average SAR calculation from magnetic resonance thermal imaging.

    PubMed

    Alon, Leeor; Sodickson, Daniel K; Deniz, Cem M

    2016-10-01

    Deposition of radiofrequency (RF) energy can be quantified via electric field or temperature change measurements. Magnetic resonance imaging has been used as a tool to measure three dimensional small temperature changes associated with RF radiation exposure. When duration of RF exposure is long, conversion from temperature change to specific absorption rate (SAR) is nontrivial due to prominent heat-diffusion and conduction effects. In this work, we demonstrated a method for calculation of SAR via an inversion of the heat equation including heat-diffusion and conduction effects. This method utilizes high-resolution three dimensional magnetic resonance temperature images and measured thermal properties of the phantom to achieve accurate calculation of SAR. Accuracy of the proposed method was analyzed with respect to operating frequency of a dipole antenna and parameters used in heat equation inversion. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:493-503, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Characterization of nuclear material by Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradela, C.; Alaerts, G.; Becker, B.; Heyse, J.; Kopecky, S.; Moens, A.; Mondelaers, W.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Wynants, R.; Harada, H.; Kitatani, F.; Koizumi, M.; Tsuchiya, H.

    2016-11-01

    The use of Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis for the characterization of nuclear materials is discussed. The method, which relies on resonance structures in neutron-induced reaction cross sections, can be applied as a non-destructive method to characterise complex nuclear materials such as melted fuel resulting from a severe nuclear accident. Results of a demonstration experiment at the GELINA facility reveal that accurate data can be obtained at a compact facility even in the case of strong overlapping resonances.

  19. Mill profiler machines soft materials accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1966-01-01

    Mill profiler machines bevels, slots, and grooves in soft materials, such as styrofoam phenolic-filled cores, to any desired thickness. A single operator can accurately control cutting depths in contour or straight line work.

  20. Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Quiter, Brian; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Ambers, Scott

    2011-06-30

    In nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements, resonances are excited by an external photon beam leading to the emission of gamma rays with specific energies that are characteristic of the emitting isotope. NRF promises the unique capability of directly quantifying a specific isotope without the need for unfolding the combined responses of several fissile isotopes as is required in other measurement techniques. We have analyzed the potential of NRF as a non-destructive analysis technique for quantitative measurements of Pu isotopes in spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Given the low concentrations of 239Pu in SNF and its small integrated NRF cross sections, the main challenge in achieving precise and accurate measurements lies in accruing sufficient counting statistics in a reasonable measurement time. Using analytical modeling, and simulations with the radiation transport code MCNPX that has been experimentally tested recently, the backscatter and transmission methods were quantitatively studied for differing photon sources and radiation detector types. Resonant photon count rates and measurement times were estimated for a range of photon source and detection parameters, which were used to determine photon source and gamma-ray detector requirements. The results indicate that systems based on a bremsstrahlung source and present detector technology are not practical for high-precision measurements of 239Pu in SNF. Measurements that achieve the desired uncertainties within hour-long measurements will either require stronger resonances, which may be expressed by other Pu isotopes, or require quasi-monoenergetic photon sources with intensities that are approximately two orders of magnitude higher than those currently being designed or proposed.This work is part of a larger effort sponsored by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative to develop an integrated instrument, comprised of individual NDA techniques with complementary features, that is fully capable of

  1. Accurate and simple calibration of DLP projector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilm, Jakob; Olesen, Oline V.; Larsen, Rasmus

    2014-03-01

    Much work has been devoted to the calibration of optical cameras, and accurate and simple methods are now available which require only a small number of calibration targets. The problem of obtaining these parameters for light projectors has not been studied as extensively and most current methods require a camera and involve feature extraction from a known projected pattern. In this work we present a novel calibration technique for DLP Projector systems based on phase shifting profilometry projection onto a printed calibration target. In contrast to most current methods, the one presented here does not rely on an initial camera calibration, and so does not carry over the error into projector calibration. A radial interpolation scheme is used to convert features coordinates into projector space, thereby allowing for a very accurate procedure. This allows for highly accurate determination of parameters including lens distortion. Our implementation acquires printed planar calibration scenes in less than 1s. This makes our method both fast and convenient. We evaluate our method in terms of reprojection errors and structured light image reconstruction quality.

  2. Accurate modelling of unsteady flows in collapsible tubes.

    PubMed

    Marchandise, Emilie; Flaud, Patrice

    2010-01-01

    The context of this paper is the development of a general and efficient numerical haemodynamic tool to help clinicians and researchers in understanding of physiological flow phenomena. We propose an accurate one-dimensional Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin (RK-DG) method coupled with lumped parameter models for the boundary conditions. The suggested model has already been successfully applied to haemodynamics in arteries and is now extended for the flow in collapsible tubes such as veins. The main difference with cardiovascular simulations is that the flow may become supercritical and elastic jumps may appear with the numerical consequence that scheme may not remain monotone if no limiting procedure is introduced. We show that our second-order RK-DG method equipped with an approximate Roe's Riemann solver and a slope-limiting procedure allows us to capture elastic jumps accurately. Moreover, this paper demonstrates that the complex physics associated with such flows is more accurately modelled than with traditional methods such as finite difference methods or finite volumes. We present various benchmark problems that show the flexibility and applicability of the numerical method. Our solutions are compared with analytical solutions when they are available and with solutions obtained using other numerical methods. Finally, to illustrate the clinical interest, we study the emptying process in a calf vein squeezed by contracting skeletal muscle in a normal and pathological subject. We compare our results with experimental simulations and discuss the sensitivity to parameters of our model.

  3. Resonance beyond frequency-matching: multidimensional resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Li, Mingzhe; Wang, Ruifang

    2017-03-01

    Resonance, conventionally defined as the oscillation of a system when the temporal frequency of an external stimulus matches a natural frequency of the system, is important in both fundamental physics and applied disciplines. However, the spatial character of oscillation is not considered in this definition. We reveal the creation of spatial resonance when the stimulus matches the space pattern of a normal mode in an oscillating system. The complete resonance, which we call multidimensional resonance, should be a combination of both the temporal and the spatial resonance. We further elucidate that the spin wave produced by multidimensional resonance drives considerably faster reversal of the vortex core in a magnetic nanodisc. Multidimensional resonance provides insight into the nature of wave dynamics and opens the door to novel applications.

  4. EMR Gage Would Measure Coal Thickness Accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. D.; Rollwitz, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory tests indicate electron magnetic resonance (EMR) would be effective in measuring thickness of coal overlying rock substrate. In prototype dual-frequency EMR system, Sample is irradiated by two radio frequencies. Signals are mixed, producing sum and difference output frequencies that are detected by receiver. Magnetic field is varied to scan resonant spot through sample. In system designed for field use, electromagnet is U-shaped, so that sample can be adjacent to, rather than inside the probe. Same coil is used for transmitting and receiving.

  5. A MEMS diamond hemispherical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, J. J.; Bancu, M. G.; Cook, E. H.; Chaparala, M. V.; Teynor, W. A.; Weinberg, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we report the fabrication of hemispherical polycrystalline diamond resonators fabricated on a novel high-temperature glass substrate. The hemispherical resonator gyroscope is one of the most accurate and rugged of the mechanical gyroscopes, and can be operated in either rate or whole-angle mode due to its high degree of symmetry. A fabrication sequence for creating extremely symmetric 3D MEMS hemispheres is presented. Mode shapes and frequencies obtained with a laser vibrometer are shown, as well as curves of Q versus pressure, and the dependence of frequency on anchor size. Fundamental mode frequency matching to <0.1% in as-fabricated devices has been achieved, which is essential to gyroscope operation in whole-angle mode.

  6. Correlation of left ventricular wall thickness, heart mass, serological parameters and late gadolinium enhancement in cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging of myocardial inflammation in an experimental animal model of autoimmune myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Kromen, Wolfgang; Korkusuz, Huedayi; Korkusuz, Yuecel; Esters, Philip; Bauer, Ralf W; Huebner, Frank; Lindemayr, Sebastian; Vogl, Thomas J

    2012-12-01

    For a definitive diagnosis of myocarditis, different strategies like analysis of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) up to invasive endomyocardial biopsy have been applied. The objective of the study was to investigate inflammatory changes like left ventricular wall thickening and increase of ventricular mass and to quantitatively analyse their correlation with extent and localisation of myocardial damage in CMR and with subsequent changes of serological markers in an animal model of an experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM). In the current study, an EAM was induced in 10 male Lewis rats, 10 rats served as control. On day 21, animals were examined with four CMR protocols to assess the extent of LGE in a 12 segment model of the rat heart. Left myocardial wall thickness and mass and histological grade of inflammation were measured to determine localisation and severity of the induced myocarditis. Depending on the CMR sequence, LGE was mostly found in the left anterior (9.6%) and left lateral (8.7%) myocardial wall segments. Wall thickness correlated with the LGE area in CMR imaging and the histopathological severity of myocarditis for the left lateral myocardial wall segment. In a similar way, the heart mass correlated to the extent of LGE for the left lateral segment. We conclude that in our animal model left ventricular wall thickness and mass reflect the severity of myocardial changes in myocarditis and that the EAM rat model is well suited for further investigations of myocarditis.

  7. Tunable superconducting microstrip resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamyan, A. A.; Kubatkin, S. E.; Danilov, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    We report on a simple yet versatile design for a tunable superconducting microstrip resonator. Niobium nitride is employed as the superconducting material and aluminum oxide, produced by atomic layer deposition, as the dielectric layer. We show that the high quality of the dielectric material allows to reach the internal quality factors in the order of Qi˜104 in the single photon regime. Qi rapidly increases with the number of photons in the resonator N and exceeds 105 for N ˜10 -50 . A straightforward modification of the basic microstrip design allows to pass a current bias through the strip and to control its kinetic inductance. We achieve a frequency tuning δf =62 MHz around f0=2.4 GHz for a fundamental mode and δf =164 MHz for a third harmonic. This translates into a tuning parameter Qiδf /f0=150 . The presented design can be incorporated into essentially any superconducting circuitry operating at temperatures below 2.5 K.

  8. A mirrorless spinwave resonator

    PubMed Central

    Pinel, Olivier; Everett, Jesse L.; Hosseini, Mahdi; Campbell, Geoff T.; Buchler, Ben C.; Lam, Ping Koy

    2015-01-01

    Optical resonance is central to a wide range of optical devices and techniques. In an optical cavity, the round-trip length and mirror reflectivity can be chosen to optimize the circulating optical power, linewidth, and free-spectral range (FSR) for a given application. In this paper we show how an atomic spinwave system, with no physical mirrors, can behave in a manner that is analogous to an optical cavity. We demonstrate this similarity by characterising the build-up and decay of the resonance in the time domain, and measuring the effective optical linewidth and FSR in the frequency domain. Our spinwave is generated in a 20 cm long Rb gas cell, yet it facilitates an effective FSR of 83 kHz, which would require a round-trip path of 3.6 km in a free-space optical cavity. Furthermore, the spinwave coupling is controllable enabling dynamic tuning of the effective cavity parameters. PMID:26655839

  9. Sound propagation and absorption in foam - A distributed parameter model.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, L.; Lieberman, S.

    1971-01-01

    Liquid-base foams are highly effective sound absorbers. A better understanding of the mechanisms of sound absorption in foams was sought by exploration of a mathematical model of bubble pulsation and coupling and the development of a distributed-parameter mechanical analog. A solution by electric-circuit analogy was thus obtained and transmission-line theory was used to relate the physical properties of the foams to the characteristic impedance and propagation constants of the analog transmission line. Comparison of measured physical properties of the foam with values obtained from measured acoustic impedance and propagation constants and the transmission-line theory showed good agreement. We may therefore conclude that the sound propagation and absorption mechanisms in foam are accurately described by the resonant response of individual bubbles coupled to neighboring bubbles.

  10. Secondary resonances of electrically actuated resonant microsensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Rahman, Eihab M.; Nayfeh, Ali H.

    2003-05-01

    We investigate the response of a microbeam-based resonant sensor to superharmonic and subharmonic electric actuations using a model that incorporates the nonlinearities associated with moderately large displacements and electric forces. The method of multiple scales is used, in each case, to obtain two first-order nonlinear ordinary-differential equations that describe the modulation of the amplitude and phase of the response and its stability. We present typical frequency-response and force-response curves demonstrating, in both cases, the coexistence of multivalued solutions. The solution corresponding to a superharmonic excitation consists of three branches, which meet at two saddle-node bifurcation points. The solution corresponding to a subharmonic excitation consists of two branches meeting a branch of trivial solutions at two pitchfork bifurcation points. One of these bifurcation points is supercritical and the other is subcritical. The results provide an analytical tool to predict the microsensor response to superharmonic and subharmonic excitations, specifically the locations of sudden jumps and regions of hysteretic behavior, thereby enabling designers to safely use these frequencies as measurement signals. They also allow designers to examine the impact of various design parameters on the device behavior.

  11. Doubly-excited {sup 1,3}D{sup e} resonance states of two-electron positive ions Li{sup +} and Be{sup 2+} in Debye plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Sabyasachi; Wang, Yang; Jiang, Zishi; Li, Shuxia; Ratnavelu, K.

    2014-01-15

    We investigate the bound {sup 1,3}D states and the doubly-excited {sup 1,3}D{sup e} resonance states of two-electron positive ions Li{sup +} and Be{sup 2+} by employing correlated exponential wave functions. In the framework of the stabilization method, we are able to extract three series (2pnp, 2snd, 2pnf) of {sup 1}D{sup e} resonances and two series (2pnp, 2snd) of {sup 3}D{sup e} resonances below the N = 2 threshold. The {sup 1,3}D{sup e} resonance parameters (resonance energies and widths) for Li{sup +} and Be{sup 2+} along with the bound-excited 1s3d {sup 1,3}D state energies are reported for the first time as functions of the screening parameter. Accurate resonance energies and widths are also reported for Li{sup +} and Be{sup 2+} in vacuum. For free-atomic cases, comparisons are made with the reported results and few resonance states are reported for the first time.

  12. More-Accurate Model of Flows in Rocket Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, Ashvin; Chenoweth, James; Brinckman, Kevin; Dash, Sanford

    2011-01-01

    An improved computational model for simulating flows in liquid-propellant injectors in rocket engines has been developed. Models like this one are needed for predicting fluxes of heat in, and performances of, the engines. An important part of predicting performance is predicting fluctuations of temperature, fluctuations of concentrations of chemical species, and effects of turbulence on diffusion of heat and chemical species. Customarily, diffusion effects are represented by parameters known in the art as the Prandtl and Schmidt numbers. Prior formulations include ad hoc assumptions of constant values of these parameters, but these assumptions and, hence, the formulations, are inaccurate for complex flows. In the improved model, these parameters are neither constant nor specified in advance: instead, they are variables obtained as part of the solution. Consequently, this model represents the effects of turbulence on diffusion of heat and chemical species more accurately than prior formulations do, and may enable more-accurate prediction of mixing and flows of heat in rocket-engine combustion chambers. The model has been implemented within CRUNCH CFD, a proprietary computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer program, and has been tested within that program. The model could also be implemented within other CFD programs.

  13. Cavity- and waveguide-resonators in electron paramagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Webb, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Cavity resonators are widely used in electron paramagnetic resonance, very high field magnetic resonance microimaging and also in high field human imaging. The basic principles and designs of different forms of cavity resonators including rectangular, cylindrical, re-entrant, cavity magnetrons, toroidal cavities and dielectric resonators are reviewed. Applications in EPR and MRI are summarized, and finally the topic of traveling wave MRI using the magnet bore as a waveguide is discussed.

  14. Accurate Anharmonic IR Spectra from Integrated Cc/dft Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Vincenzo; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien; Carnimeo, Ivan; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2014-06-01

    The recent implementation of the computation of infrared (IR) intensities beyond the double harmonic approximation [1] paved the route to routine calculations of infrared spectra for a wide set of molecular systems. Contrary to common beliefs, second-order perturbation theory is able to deliver results of high accuracy provided that anharmonic resonances are properly managed [1,2]. It has been already shown for several small closed- and open shell molecular systems that the differences between coupled cluster (CC) and DFT anharmonic wavenumbers are mainly due to the harmonic terms, paving the route to introduce effective yet accurate hybrid CC/DFT schemes [2]. In this work we present that hybrid CC/DFT models can be applied also to the IR intensities leading to the simulation of highly accurate fully anharmonic IR spectra for medium-size molecules, including ones of atmospheric interest, showing in all cases good agreement with experiment even in the spectral ranges where non-fundamental transitions are predominant[3]. [1] J. Bloino and V. Barone, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 124108 (2012) [2] V. Barone, M. Biczysko, J. Bloino, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 16, 1759-1787 (2014) [3] I. Carnimeo, C. Puzzarini, N. Tasinato, P. Stoppa, A. P. Charmet, M. Biczysko, C. Cappelli and V. Barone, J. Chem. Phys., 139, 074310 (2013)

  15. Circular High-Q Resonating Isotropic Strain Sensors with Large Shift of Resonance Frequency under Stress

    PubMed Central

    Melik, Rohat; Unal, Emre; Perkgoz, Nihan Kosku; Puttlitz, Christian; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2009-01-01

    We present circular architecture bioimplant strain sensors that facilitate a strong resonance frequency shift with mechanical deformation. The clinical application area of these sensors is for in vivo assessment of bone fractures. Using a rectangular geometry, we obtain a resonance shift of 330 MHz for a single device and 170 MHz for its triplet configuration (with three side-by-side resonators on chip) under an applied load of 3,920 N. Using the same device parameters with a circular isotropic architecture, we achieve a resonance frequency shift of 500 MHz for the single device and 260 MHz for its triplet configuration, demonstrating substantially increased sensitivity. PMID:22303132

  16. Chirped nonlinear resonance dynamics in phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedland, Lazar; Armon, Tsafrir

    2016-10-01

    Passage through and capture into resonance in systems with slowly varying parameters is one of the outstanding problems of nonlinear dynamics. Examples include resonant capture in planetary dynamics , resonant excitation of nonlinear waves, adiabatic resonant transitions in atomic and molecular systems and more. In the most common setting the problem involves a nonlinear oscillator driven by an oscillating perturbation with a slowly varying frequency, which passes through the resonance with the unperturbed oscillator. The process of resonant capture in this case involves crossing of separatrix and, therefore, the adiabatic theorem cannot be used in studying this problem no matter how slow is the variation of the driving frequency. It will be shown that if instead of analyzing complicated single orbit dynamics in passage through resonance, one considers the evolution of a distribution of initial conditions in phase space, simple adiabaticity and phase space incompressibility arguments yield a solution to the resonant capture probability problem. The approach will be illustrated in the case of a beam of charged particles driven by a chirped frequency wave passing through the Cherenkov resonance with the velocity distribution of the particles. Supported by Israel Science Foundation Grant 30/14.

  17. An accurate metric for the spacetime around rotating neutron stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, George

    2017-01-01

    The problem of having an accurate description of the spacetime around rotating neutron stars is of great astrophysical interest. For astrophysical applications, one needs to have a metric that captures all the properties of the spacetime around a rotating neutron star. Furthermore, an accurate appropriately parameterised metric, i.e., a metric that is given in terms of parameters that are directly related to the physical structure of the neutron star, could be used to solve the inverse problem, which is to infer the properties of the structure of a neutron star from astrophysical observations. In this work we present such an approximate stationary and axisymmetric metric for the exterior of rotating neutron stars, which is constructed using the Ernst formalism and is parameterised by the relativistic multipole moments of the central object. This metric is given in terms of an expansion on the Weyl-Papapetrou coordinates with the multipole moments as free parameters and is shown to be extremely accurate in capturing the physical properties of a neutron star spacetime as they are calculated numerically in general relativity. Because the metric is given in terms of an expansion, the expressions are much simpler and easier to implement, in contrast to previous approaches. For the parameterisation of the metric in general relativity, the recently discovered universal 3-hair relations are used to produce a 3-parameter metric. Finally, a straightforward extension of this metric is given for scalar-tensor theories with a massless scalar field, which also admit a formulation in terms of an Ernst potential.

  18. Fast and accurate estimation for astrophysical problems in large databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Joseph W.

    2010-10-01

    A recent flood of astronomical data has created much demand for sophisticated statistical and machine learning tools that can rapidly draw accurate inferences from large databases of high-dimensional data. In this Ph.D. thesis, methods for statistical inference in such databases will be proposed, studied, and applied to real data. I use methods for low-dimensional parametrization of complex, high-dimensional data that are based on the notion of preserving the connectivity of data points in the context of a Markov random walk over the data set. I show how this simple parameterization of data can be exploited to: define appropriate prototypes for use in complex mixture models, determine data-driven eigenfunctions for accurate nonparametric regression, and find a set of suitable features to use in a statistical classifier. In this thesis, methods for each of these tasks are built up from simple principles, compared to existing methods in the literature, and applied to data from astronomical all-sky surveys. I examine several important problems in astrophysics, such as estimation of star formation history parameters for galaxies, prediction of redshifts of galaxies using photometric data, and classification of different types of supernovae based on their photometric light curves. Fast methods for high-dimensional data analysis are crucial in each of these problems because they all involve the analysis of complicated high-dimensional data in large, all-sky surveys. Specifically, I estimate the star formation history parameters for the nearly 800,000 galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 spectroscopic catalog, determine redshifts for over 300,000 galaxies in the SDSS photometric catalog, and estimate the types of 20,000 supernovae as part of the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge. Accurate predictions and classifications are imperative in each of these examples because these estimates are utilized in broader inference problems

  19. Measurement of the Q value of an acoustic resonator.

    PubMed

    Biwa, Tetsushi; Ueda, Yuki; Nomura, Hiroshi; Mizutani, Uichiro; Yazaki, Taichi

    2005-08-01

    A cylindrical acoustic resonator was externally driven at the first resonance frequency by a compression driver. The acoustic energy stored in the resonator and the power dissipated per unit time were evaluated through the simultaneous measurements of acoustic pressure and velocity, in order to determine the Q value of the resonator. The resulting Q value, being employed as a measure of the damping in a resonator, was obtained as 36. However, the Q value determined from a frequency response curve known as a conventional technique turned out to be 25, which is 30% less than that obtained in the present method. By further applying these two methods in the case of a resonator having an acoustic load inside, we present an accurate measurement of the Q value of the resonator by making full use of its definition.

  20. Tunable triple Fano resonances based on multimode interference in coupled plasmonic resonator system.

    PubMed

    Li, Shilei; Zhang, Yunyun; Song, Xiaokang; Wang, Yilin; Yu, Li

    2016-07-11

    In this paper, an asymmetric plasmonic structure composed of two MIM (metal-insulator-metal) waveguides and two rectangular cavities is reported, which can support triple Fano resonances originating from three different mechanisms. And the multimode interference coupled mode theory (MICMT) including coupling phases is proposed based on single mode coupled mode theory (CMT), which is used for describing and explaining the multiple Fano resonance phenomenon in coupled plasmonic resonator systems. Just because the triple Fano resonances originate from three different mechanisms, each Fano resonance can be tuned independently or semi-independently by changing the parameters of the two rectangular cavities. Such, a narrow 'M' type of double Lorentzian-like line-shape transmission windows with the position and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) can be tuned freely is constructed by changing the parameters of the two cavities appropriately, which can find widely applications in sensors, nonlinear and slow-light devices.

  1. Two-photon finite-pulse model for resonant transitions in attosecond experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Galán, Álvaro; Martín, Fernando; Argenti, Luca

    2016-02-01

    We present an analytical model capable of describing two-photon ionization of atoms with attosecond pulses in the presence of intermediate and final isolated autoionizing states. The model is based on the finite-pulse formulation of second-order time-dependent perturbation theory. It approximates the intermediate and final states with Fano's theory for resonant continua, and it depends on a small set of atomic parameters that can either be obtained from separate ab initio calculations or be extracted from a few selected experiments. We use the model to compute the two-photon resonant photoelectron spectrum of helium below the N =2 threshold for the RABITT (reconstruction of attosecond beating by interference of two-photon transitions) pump-probe scheme, in which an XUV attosecond pulse train is used in association with a weak IR probe, obtaining results in quantitative agreement with those from accurate ab initio simulations. In particular, we show that (i) the use of finite pulses results in a homogeneous redshift of the RABITT beating frequency, as well as a resonant modulation of the beating frequency in proximity to intermediate autoionizing states; (ii) the phase of resonant two-photon amplitudes generally experiences a continuous excursion as a function of the intermediate detuning, with either zero or 2 π overall variation.

  2. Resonant seismic emission of subsurface objects

    SciTech Connect

    Korneev, Valeri A.

    2009-04-15

    Numerical modeling results and field data indicate that some contrasting subsurface objects (such as tunnels, caves, pipes, filled pits, and fluid-filled fractures) are capable of generating durable resonant oscillations after trapping seismic energy. These oscillations consist of surface types of circumferential waves that repeatedly propagate around the object. The resonant emission of such trapped energy occurs primarily in the form of shear body waves that can be detected by remotely placed receivers. Resonant emission reveals itself in the form of sharp resonant peaks for the late parts of the records, when all strong direct and primary reflected waves are gone. These peaks were observed in field data for a buried barrel filled with water, in 2D finite-difference modeling results, and in the exact canonical solution for a fluid-filled sphere. A computed animation for the diffraction of a plane wave upon a low-velocity elastic sphere confirms the generation of resonances by durable surface waves. Resonant emission has characteristic quasi-hyperbolic traveltime patterns on shot gathers. The inversion of these patterns can be performed in the frequency domain after muting the strong direct and primary scattered waves. Subsurface objects can be detected and imaged at a single resonance frequency without an accurate knowledge of source trigger time. The imaging of subsurface objects requires information about the shear velocity distribution in an embedding medium, which can be done interactively during inversion.

  3. Experimental study of resonance fiber optic gyroscope employing a dual-ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yue; Wang, Wei

    2016-09-01

    A dual-ring resonator which is available to alter the full width at half maximum (FWHM) without altering the free spectrum range (FSR) for practice applications is analyzed theoretically and set up in practice. The parameters of the dual-ring resonator have been optimized in simulation, the resonance depth and the dynamic range are enhanced. The prototype is set up with single mode fiber of 8 meter and two 95 : 5 couplers for open loop experiment. The FWHM of the dual-ring resonator is demonstrated less than 1.5MHz and the fineness is calculated to be 37 during the frequency sweeping experiment. The frequency locking experiment with demodulation curve method has been accomplished, and the locking time achieves less than 40ms. All these provide a basic reference for optimizing the resonance fiber optic gyro based on dual-ring resonator.

  4. Accurate pointing of tungsten welding electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegelmeier, P.

    1971-01-01

    Thoriated-tungsten is pointed accurately and quickly by using sodium nitrite. Point produced is smooth and no effort is necessary to hold the tungsten rod concentric. The chemically produced point can be used several times longer than ground points. This method reduces time and cost of preparing tungsten electrodes.

  5. Resonant frequency calculations using a hybrid perturbation-Galerkin technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geer, James F.; Andersen, Carl M.

    1991-01-01

    A two-step hybrid perturbation Galerkin technique is applied to the problem of determining the resonant frequencies of one or several degree of freedom nonlinear systems involving a parameter. In one step, the Lindstedt-Poincare method is used to determine perturbation solutions which are formally valid about one or more special values of the parameter (e.g., for large or small values of the parameter). In step two, a subset of the perturbation coordinate functions determined in step one is used in Galerkin type approximation. The technique is illustrated for several one degree of freedom systems, including the Duffing and van der Pol oscillators, as well as for the compound pendulum. For all of the examples considered, it is shown that the frequencies obtained by the hybrid technique using only a few terms from the perturbation solutions are significantly more accurate than the perturbation results on which they are based, and they compare very well with frequencies obtained by purely numerical methods.

  6. Accurate measurement of the pulse wave delay with imaging photoplethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Kamshilin, Alexei A.; Sidorov, Igor S.; Babayan, Laura; Volynsky, Maxim A.; Giniatullin, Rashid; Mamontov, Oleg V.

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of the cardiovascular parameters using noncontact video-based or imaging photoplethysmography (IPPG) is usually considered as inaccurate because of strong influence of motion artefacts. To optimize this technique we performed a simultaneous recording of electrocardiogram and video frames of the face for 36 healthy volunteers. We found that signal disturbances originate mainly from the stochastically enhanced dichroic notch caused by endogenous cardiovascular mechanisms, with smaller contribution of the motion artefacts. Our properly designed algorithm allowed us to increase accuracy of the pulse-transit-time measurement and visualize propagation of the pulse wave in the facial region. Thus, the accurate measurement of the pulse wave parameters with this technique suggests a sensitive approach to assess local regulation of microcirculation in various physiological and pathological states. PMID:28018731

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging segmentation techniques using batch-type learning vector quantization algorithms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Miin-Shen; Lin, Karen Chia-Ren; Liu, Hsiu-Chih; Lirng, Jiing-Feng

    2007-02-01

    In this article, we propose batch-type learning vector quantization (LVQ) segmentation techniques for the magnetic resonance (MR) images. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) segmentation is an important technique to differentiate abnormal and normal tissues in MR image data. The proposed LVQ segmentation techniques are compared with the generalized Kohonen's competitive learning (GKCL) methods, which were proposed by Lin et al. [Magn Reson Imaging 21 (2003) 863-870]. Three MRI data sets of real cases are used in this article. The first case is from a 2-year-old girl who was diagnosed with retinoblastoma in her left eye. The second case is from a 55-year-old woman who developed complete left side oculomotor palsy immediately after a motor vehicle accident. The third case is from an 84-year-old man who was diagnosed with Alzheimer disease (AD). Our comparisons are based on sensitivity of algorithm parameters, the quality of MRI segmentation with the contrast-to-noise ratio and the accuracy of the region of interest tissue. Overall, the segmentation results from batch-type LVQ algorithms present good accuracy and quality of the segmentation images, and also flexibility of algorithm parameters in all the comparison consequences. The results support that the proposed batch-type LVQ algorithms are better than the previous GKCL algorithms. Specifically, the proposed fuzzy-soft LVQ algorithm works well in segmenting AD MRI data set to accurately measure the hippocampus volume in AD MR images.

  8. Accurate Determination of the Frequency Response Function of Submerged and Confined Structures by Using PZT-Patches†.

    PubMed

    Presas, Alexandre; Valentin, David; Egusquiza, Eduard; Valero, Carme; Egusquiza, Mònica; Bossio, Matias

    2017-03-22

    To accurately determine the dynamic response of a structure is of relevant interest in many engineering applications. Particularly, it is of paramount importance to determine the Frequency Response Function (FRF) for structures subjected to dynamic loads in order to avoid resonance and fatigue problems that can drastically reduce their useful life. One challenging case is the experimental determination of the FRF of submerged and confined structures, such as hydraulic turbines, which are greatly affected by dynamic problems as reported in many cases in the past. The utilization of classical and calibrated exciters such as instrumented hammers or shakers to determine the FRF in such structures can be very complex due to the confinement of the structure and because their use can disturb the boundary conditions affecting the experimental results. For such cases, Piezoelectric Patches (PZTs), which are very light, thin and small, could be a very good option. Nevertheless, the main drawback of these exciters is that the calibration as dynamic force transducers (relationship voltage/force) has not been successfully obtained in the past. Therefore, in this paper, a method to accurately determine the FRF of submerged and confined structures by using PZTs is developed and validated. The method consists of experimentally determining some characteristic parameters that define the FRF, with an uncalibrated PZT exciting the structure. These parameters, which have been experimentally determined, are then introduced in a validated numerical model of the tested structure. In this way, the FRF of the structure can be estimated with good accuracy. With respect to previous studies, where only the natural frequencies and mode shapes were considered, this paper discuss and experimentally proves the best excitation characteristic to obtain also the damping ratios and proposes a procedure to fully determine the FRF. The method proposed here has been validated for the structure vibrating

  9. Accurate Determination of the Frequency Response Function of Submerged and Confined Structures by Using PZT-Patches †

    PubMed Central

    Presas, Alexandre; Valentin, David; Egusquiza, Eduard; Valero, Carme; Egusquiza, Mònica; Bossio, Matias

    2017-01-01

    To accurately determine the dynamic response of a structure is of relevant interest in many engineering applications. Particularly, it is of paramount importance to determine the Frequency Response Function (FRF) for structures subjected to dynamic loads in order to avoid resonance and fatigue problems that can drastically reduce their useful life. One challenging case is the experimental determination of the FRF of submerged and confined structures, such as hydraulic turbines, which are greatly affected by dynamic problems as reported in many cases in the past. The utilization of classical and calibrated exciters such as instrumented hammers or shakers to determine the FRF in such structures can be very complex due to the confinement of the structure and because their use can disturb the boundary conditions affecting the experimental results. For such cases, Piezoelectric Patches (PZTs), which are very light, thin and small, could be a very good option. Nevertheless, the main drawback of these exciters is that the calibration as dynamic force transducers (relationship voltage/force) has not been successfully obtained in the past. Therefore, in this paper, a method to accurately determine the FRF of submerged and confined structures by using PZTs is developed and validated. The method consists of experimentally determining some characteristic parameters that define the FRF, with an uncalibrated PZT exciting the structure. These parameters, which have been experimentally determined, are then introduced in a validated numerical model of the tested structure. In this way, the FRF of the structure can be estimated with good accuracy. With respect to previous studies, where only the natural frequencies and mode shapes were considered, this paper discuss and experimentally proves the best excitation characteristic to obtain also the damping ratios and proposes a procedure to fully determine the FRF. The method proposed here has been validated for the structure vibrating

  10. Integral resonator gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor); Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Hayworth, Ken J. (Inventor); Wiberg, Dean V. (Inventor); Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention discloses an inertial sensor having an integral resonator. A typical sensor comprises a planar mechanical resonator for sensing motion of the inertial sensor and a case for housing the resonator. The resonator and a wall of the case are defined through an etching process. A typical method of producing the resonator includes etching a baseplate, bonding a wafer to the etched baseplate, through etching the wafer to form a planar mechanical resonator and the wall of the case and bonding an end cap wafer to the wall to complete the case.

  11. Noise-hidden signal recovery via stochastic resonance in the SOI waveguide resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Heng; Liu, Hongjun; Sun, Qibing; Huang, Nan; Wang, Zhaolu; Han, Jing; Li, Shaopeng

    2016-02-01

    We propose a method to recover weak pulse signals buried in noise via stochastic resonance (SR) based on optical bistability induced by the free-carrier dispersion effect in the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguide resonator. The bistable system threshold is determined by the resonator parameters including the waveguide length, mirror reflectivity, and the free-carrier lifetime. A signal with different power levels can be detected by changing the free-carrier lifetime using a reverse-biased p-i-n junction embedded in the SOI waveguide. The influence of the system parameters on the SR is quantitatively analyzed by calculating the cross-correlation coefficient between the input and output signals. A cross-correlation gain of 5.6 is obtained by optimizing the system parameters of the SOI waveguide resonator. The results show the potential of using this structure to reconstruct and extract weak signals in all-optical integrated systems.

  12. Design and manufacture of angle modulated surface plasmon resonance spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinlei; Chen, Ke; Mao, Xuefeng; Yu, Qingxu; Peng, Wei

    2015-08-01

    As an emerging biosensing technology, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) technique, characterized by high sensitivity, label-free detection and real-time monitoring, has been extensively applied in biochemical analysis, environmental monitoring and refractive index measurement. In this paper, an angle modulated SPR spectrometer with high resolution is designed and manufactured. First, according to the modeling and simulation for the SPR spectrometer, several key parameters such as the light source, the thickness of golden film and Cr film are determined. Then, an angle modulated SPR spectrometer system based on 5-layers Kretchmann prism structure is developed for biochemical analysis. System performance is tested after the SPR spectrometer established. We test the power stability of the laser first, which is up to 1.504% (5min). Different concentrations of glycerol are measured to demarcate the system. Then, we measured the deionized water ten times continuously, and a resolution of 1.5×10-5 RIU is achieved. At last, different concentrations of glucose solution are measured, and the resonance angles are used to calculate the refractive index of the glucose solutions, which is more accurate than the result of Abbe refractometer. The relationship between concentration and refractive index is presented by liner fitting.

  13. Degenerate four-wave mixing in triply resonant Kerr cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, David M.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Hashemi, Hila; Joannopoulos, J. D.; Soljačić, Marin; Johnson, Steven G.

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate theoretical conditions for highly efficient degenerate four-wave mixing in triply resonant nonlinear (Kerr) cavities. We employ a general and accurate temporal coupled-mode analysis in which the interaction of light in arbitrary microcavities is expressed in terms of a set of coupling coefficients that we rigorously derive from the full Maxwell equations. Using the coupled-mode theory, we show that light consisting of an input signal of frequency ω0-Δω can, in the presence of pump light at ω0, be converted with quantum-limited efficiency into an output shifted signal of frequency ω0+Δω, and we derive expressions for the critical input powers at which this occurs. We find the critical powers in the order of 10 mW, assuming very conservative cavity parameters (modal volumes ~10 cubic wavelengths and quality factors ~1000). The standard Manley-Rowe efficiency limits are obtained from the solution of the classical coupled-mode equations, although we also derive them from simple photon-counting “quantum” arguments. Finally, using a linear stability analysis, we demonstrate that maximal conversion efficiency can be retained even in the presence of self- and cross-phase modulation effects that generally act to disrupt the resonance condition.

  14. Microstrip Ring Resonator for Soil Moisture Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarabandi, Kamal; Li, Eric S.

    1993-01-01

    Accurate determination of spatial soil moisture distribution and monitoring its temporal variation have a significant impact on the outcomes of hydrologic, ecologic, and climatic models. Development of a successful remote sensing instrument for soil moisture relies on the accurate knowledge of the soil dielectric constant (epsilon(sub soil)) to its moisture content. Two existing methods for measurement of dielectric constant of soil at low and high frequencies are, respectively, the time domain reflectometry and the reflection coefficient measurement using an open-ended coaxial probe. The major shortcoming of these methods is the lack of accurate determination of the imaginary part of epsilon(sub soil). In this paper a microstrip ring resonator is proposed for the accurate measurement of soil dielectric constant. In this technique the microstrip ring resonator is placed in contact with soil medium and the real and imaginary parts of epsilon(sub soil) are determined from the changes in the resonant frequency and the quality factor of the resonator respectively. The solution of the electromagnetic problem is obtained using a hybrid approach based on the method of moments solution of the quasi-static formulation in conjunction with experimental data obtained from reference dielectric samples. Also a simple inversion algorithm for epsilon(sub soil) = epsilon'(sub r) + j(epsilon"(sub r)) based on regression analysis is obtained. It is shown that the wide dynamic range of the measured quantities provides excellent accuracy in the dielectric constant measurement. A prototype microstrip ring resonator at L-band is designed and measurements of soil with different moisture contents are presented and compared with other approaches.

  15. How accurately can 21cm tomography constrain cosmology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yi; Tegmark, Max; McQuinn, Matthew; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Zahn, Oliver

    2008-07-01

    There is growing interest in using 3-dimensional neutral hydrogen mapping with the redshifted 21 cm line as a cosmological probe. However, its utility depends on many assumptions. To aid experimental planning and design, we quantify how the precision with which cosmological parameters can be measured depends on a broad range of assumptions, focusing on the 21 cm signal from 6accurate yet robust method for measuring cosmological parameters that exploits the fact that the ionization power spectra are rather smooth functions that can be accurately fit by 7 phenomenological parameters. We find that for future experiments, marginalizing over these nuisance parameters may provide constraints almost as tight on the cosmology as if 21 cm tomography measured the matter power spectrum directly. A future square kilometer array optimized for 21 cm tomography could improve the sensitivity to spatial curvature and neutrino masses by up to 2 orders of magnitude, to ΔΩk≈0.0002 and Δmν≈0.007eV, and give a 4σ detection of the spectral index running predicted by the simplest inflation models.

  16. Subwavelength resonant nanostructured films for sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Edwards, Daniel L.; Mendoza, Albert

    2013-05-29

    We present a novel subwavelength nanostructure architecture that may be utilized for optical standoff sensing applications. The subwavelength structures are fabricated via a combination of nanoimprint lithography and metal sputtering to create metallic nanostructured films encased within a transparent media. The structures are based on the open ring resonator (ORR) architecture and have their analog in resonant LC circuits, which display a resonance frequency that is inversely proportional to the square root of the product of the inductance and capacitance. Therefore, any perturbation of the nanostructured films due to chemical or environmental effects can alter the inductive or capacitive behavior of the subwavelength features, which can shift the resonant frequency and provide an indication of the external stimulus. This shift in resonance can be interrogated remotely either actively using either laser illumination or passively using hyperspectral or multispectral sensing. These structures may be designed to be either anisotropic or isotropic, which can also provide polarization-sensitive interrogation. Due to the nanometer-scale of the structures, they can be tailored to be optically responsive in the visible or near infrared spectrum with a highly reflective resonant peak that is dependent solely on structural dimensions and material characteristics. We present experimental measurements of the optical response of these structures as a function of wavelength, polarization, and incident angle demonstrating the resonant effect in the near infrared region. Numerical modeling data showing the effect of different fabrication parameters such as structure parameters are also discussed.

  17. Method and apparatus for accurately manipulating an object during microelectrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Parvin, Bahram A.; Maestre, Marcos F.; Fish, Richard H.; Johnston, William E.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus using electrophoresis provides accurate manipulation of an object on a microscope stage for further manipulations add reactions. The present invention also provides an inexpensive and easily accessible means to move an object without damage to the object. A plurality of electrodes are coupled to the stage in an array whereby the electrode array allows for distinct manipulations of the electric field for accurate manipulations of the object. There is an electrode array control coupled to the plurality of electrodes for manipulating the electric field. In an alternative embodiment, a chamber is provided on the stage to hold the object. The plurality of electrodes are positioned in the chamber, and the chamber is filled with fluid. The system can be automated using visual servoing, which manipulates the control parameters, i.e., x, y stage, applying the field, etc., after extracting the significant features directly from image data. Visual servoing includes an imaging device and computer system to determine the location of the object. A second stage having a plurality of tubes positioned on top of the second stage, can be accurately positioned by visual servoing so that one end of one of the plurality of tubes surrounds at least part of the object on the first stage.

  18. Method and apparatus for accurately manipulating an object during microelectrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Parvin, B.A.; Maestre, M.F.; Fish, R.H.; Johnston, W.E.

    1997-09-23

    An apparatus using electrophoresis provides accurate manipulation of an object on a microscope stage for further manipulations and reactions. The present invention also provides an inexpensive and easily accessible means to move an object without damage to the object. A plurality of electrodes are coupled to the stage in an array whereby the electrode array allows for distinct manipulations of the electric field for accurate manipulations of the object. There is an electrode array control coupled to the plurality of electrodes for manipulating the electric field. In an alternative embodiment, a chamber is provided on the stage to hold the object. The plurality of electrodes are positioned in the chamber, and the chamber is filled with fluid. The system can be automated using visual servoing, which manipulates the control parameters, i.e., x, y stage, applying the field, etc., after extracting the significant features directly from image data. Visual servoing includes an imaging device and computer system to determine the location of the object. A second stage having a plurality of tubes positioned on top of the second stage, can be accurately positioned by visual servoing so that one end of one of the plurality of tubes surrounds at least part of the object on the first stage. 11 figs.

  19. Fano resonances in a plasmonic waveguide system composed of stub coupled with a square cavity resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binfeng, Yun; Hu, Guohua; Zhang, Ruohu; Yiping, Cui

    2016-05-01

    A coupled plasmonic waveguide resonator system which can produce sharp and asymmetric Fano resonances was proposed and analyzed. Two Fano resonances are induced by the interactions between the narrow discrete whispering gallery modes in a plasmonic square cavity resonator and the broad spectrum of the metal-insulator-metal stub resonator. The relative peak amplitudes between the 1st and 2nd order Fano resonances can be adjusted by changing the structure parameters, such as the square cavity size, the stub size and the center-to-center distance between the square cavity and the stub resonators. And the 1st order Fano resonant peak, which is a standing-wave mode, will split into two resonant peaks (one standing-wave mode and one traveling-wave mode) when it couples with the 2nd Fano resonance. Also, the potential of the proposed Fano system as an integrated slow-light device and refractive index sensor was investigated. The results show that a maximum group index of about 100 can be realized, and a linear refractive index sensitivity of 938 nm/RIU with a figure of merit of about 1.35 × 104 can be obtained.

  20. Partially orthogonal resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Malzacher, Matthias; Schad, Lothar R.

    2017-01-01

    Resonators for signal reception in magnetic resonance are traditionally planar to restrict coil material and avoid coil losses. Here, we present a novel concept to model resonators partially in a plane with maximum sensitivity to the magnetic resonance signal and partially in an orthogonal plane with reduced signal sensitivity. Thus, properties of individual elements in coil arrays can be modified to optimize physical planar space and increase the sensitivity of the overall array. A particular case of the concept is implemented to decrease H-field destructive interferences in planar concentric in-phase arrays. An increase in signal to noise ratio of approximately 20% was achieved with two resonators placed over approximately the same planar area compared to common approaches at a target depth of 10 cm at 3 Tesla. Improved parallel imaging performance of this configuration is also demonstrated. The concept can be further used to increase coil density. PMID:28186135

  1. Partially orthogonal resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Malzacher, Matthias; Schad, Lothar R.

    2017-02-01

    Resonators for signal reception in magnetic resonance are traditionally planar to restrict coil material and avoid coil losses. Here, we present a novel concept to model resonators partially in a plane with maximum sensitivity to the magnetic resonance signal and partially in an orthogonal plane with reduced signal sensitivity. Thus, properties of individual elements in coil arrays can be modified to optimize physical planar space and increase the sensitivity of the overall array. A particular case of the concept is implemented to decrease H-field destructive interferences in planar concentric in-phase arrays. An increase in signal to noise ratio of approximately 20% was achieved with two resonators placed over approximately the same planar area compared to common approaches at a target depth of 10 cm at 3 Tesla. Improved parallel imaging performance of this configuration is also demonstrated. The concept can be further used to increase coil density.

  2. Feedback about More Accurate versus Less Accurate Trials: Differential Effects on Self-Confidence and Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected by feedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On Day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of…

  3. Fast and Accurate Circuit Design Automation through Hierarchical Model Switching.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Linh; Tagkopoulos, Ilias

    2015-08-21

    In computer-aided biological design, the trifecta of characterized part libraries, accurate models and optimal design parameters is crucial for producing reliable designs. As the number of parts and model complexity increase, however, it becomes exponentially more difficult for any optimization method to search the solution space, hence creating a trade-off that hampers efficient design. To address this issue, we present a hierarchical computer-aided design architecture that uses a two-step approach for biological design. First, a simple model of low computational complexity is used to predict circuit behavior and assess candidate circuit branches through branch-and-bound methods. Then, a complex, nonlinear circuit model is used for a fine-grained search of the reduced solution space, thus achieving more accurate results. Evaluation with a benchmark of 11 circuits and a library of 102 experimental designs with known characterization parameters demonstrates a speed-up of 3 orders of magnitude when compared to other design methods that provide optimality guarantees.

  4. A new and accurate continuum description of moving fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, S. T.; Baker, R. E.; Simpson, M. J.

    2017-03-01

    Processes that involve moving fronts of populations are prevalent in ecology and cell biology. A common approach to describe these processes is a lattice-based random walk model, which can include mechanisms such as crowding, birth, death, movement and agent–agent adhesion. However, these models are generally analytically intractable and it is computationally expensive to perform sufficiently many realisations of the model to obtain an estimate of average behaviour that is not dominated by random fluctuations. To avoid these issues, both mean-field (MF) and corrected mean-field (CMF) continuum descriptions of random walk models have been proposed. However, both continuum descriptions are inaccurate outside of limited parameter regimes, and CMF descriptions cannot be employed to describe moving fronts. Here we present an alternative description in terms of the dynamics of groups of contiguous occupied lattice sites and contiguous vacant lattice sites. Our description provides an accurate prediction of the average random walk behaviour in all parameter regimes. Critically, our description accurately predicts the persistence or extinction of the population in situations where previous continuum descriptions predict the opposite outcome. Furthermore, unlike traditional MF models, our approach provides information about the spatial clustering within the population and, subsequently, the moving front.

  5. Accurate measurement of streamwise vortices using dual-plane PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldman, Rye M.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2012-11-01

    Low Reynolds number aerodynamic experiments with flapping animals (such as bats and small birds) are of particular interest due to their application to micro air vehicles which operate in a similar parameter space. Previous PIV wake measurements described the structures left by bats and birds and provided insight into the time history of their aerodynamic force generation; however, these studies have faced difficulty drawing quantitative conclusions based on said measurements. The highly three-dimensional and unsteady nature of the flows associated with flapping flight are major challenges for accurate measurements. The challenge of animal flight measurements is finding small flow features in a large field of view at high speed with limited laser energy and camera resolution. Cross-stream measurement is further complicated by the predominately out-of-plane flow that requires thick laser sheets and short inter-frame times, which increase noise and measurement uncertainty. Choosing appropriate experimental parameters requires compromise between the spatial and temporal resolution and the dynamic range of the measurement. To explore these challenges, we do a case study on the wake of a fixed wing. The fixed model simplifies the experiment and allows direct measurements of the aerodynamic forces via load cell. We present a detailed analysis of the wake measurements, discuss the criteria for making accurate measurements, and present a solution for making quantitative aerodynamic load measurements behind free-flyers.

  6. An Accurate and Efficient Method of Computing Differential Seismograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S.; Zhu, L.

    2013-12-01

    Inversion of seismic waveforms for Earth structure usually requires computing partial derivatives of seismograms with respect to velocity model parameters. We developed an accurate and efficient method to calculate differential seismograms for multi-layered elastic media, based on the Thompson-Haskell propagator matrix technique. We first derived the partial derivatives of the Haskell matrix and its compound matrix respect to the layer parameters (P wave velocity, shear wave velocity and density). We then derived the partial derivatives of surface displacement kernels in the frequency-wavenumber domain. The differential seismograms are obtained by using the frequency-wavenumber double integration method. The implementation is computationally efficient and the total computing time is proportional to the time of computing the seismogram itself, i.e., independent of the number of layers in the model. We verified the correctness of results by comparing with differential seismograms computed using the finite differences method. Our results are more accurate because of the analytical nature of the derived partial derivatives.

  7. Measurements of the refractive indices and thermo-optic coefficients of Si3N4 and SiO(x) using microring resonances.

    PubMed

    Arbabi, Amir; Goddard, Lynford L

    2013-10-01

    We present a method for determining the core and cladding refractive indices of a microring resonator from its measured quasi-transverse electric and magnetic resonant modes. We use single wavelength reflective microrings to resolve the azimuthal order ambiguity of the measured resonances. We perform accurate electromagnetic simulations to model the dependence of the resonances on geometrical and material parameters. We linearize the model and use the singular value decomposition method to find the best fit parameters for the measured data. At 1550 nm, we determine n(Si(3)N(4))=1.977±0.003 for stoichiometric silicon nitride deposited using low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) technique and n(SiO(x))=1.428±0.011 for plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) oxide. By measuring the temperature sensitivities of microring resonant modes with different polarizations, we find the thermo-optic coefficient of the stoichiometric silicon nitride to be dn(Si(3)N(4))/dT=(2.45±0.09)×10(-5) (RIU/°C) and the PECVD oxide to be dn(SiO(x))/dT=(0.95±0.10)×10(-5) (RIU/°C).

  8. Neutron resonance averaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    The principles of resonance averaging as applied to neutron capture reactions are described. Several illustrations of resonance averaging to problems of nuclear structure and the distribution of radiative strength in nuclei are provided. 30 refs., 12 figs.

  9. Nanomechanical resonance detector

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Jeffrey C; Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-10-29

    An embodiment of a nanomechanical frequency detector includes a support structure and a plurality of elongated nanostructures coupled to the support structure. Each of the elongated nanostructures has a particular resonant frequency. The plurality of elongated nanostructures has a range of resonant frequencies. An embodiment of a method of identifying an object includes introducing the object to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the object. An embodiment of a method of identifying a molecular species of the present invention includes introducing the molecular species to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the molecular species.

  10. Predicting in vivo glioma growth with the reaction diffusion equation constrained by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hormuth, David A., II; Weis, Jared A.; Barnes, Stephanie L.; Miga, Michael I.; Rericha, Erin C.; Quaranta, Vito; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2015-07-01

    Reaction-diffusion models have been widely used to model glioma growth. However, it has not been shown how accurately this model can predict future tumor status using model parameters (i.e., tumor cell diffusion and proliferation) estimated from quantitative in vivo imaging data. To this end, we used in silico studies to develop the methods needed to accurately estimate tumor specific reaction-diffusion model parameters, and then tested the accuracy with which these parameters can predict future growth. The analogous study was then performed in a murine model of glioma growth. The parameter estimation approach was tested using an in silico tumor ‘grown’ for ten days as dictated by the reaction-diffusion equation. Parameters were estimated from early time points and used to predict subsequent growth. Prediction accuracy was assessed at global (total volume and Dice value) and local (concordance correlation coefficient, CCC) levels. Guided by the in silico study, rats (n = 9) with C6 gliomas, imaged with diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, were used to evaluate the model’s accuracy for predicting in vivo tumor growth. The in silico study resulted in low global (tumor volume error <8.8%, Dice >0.92) and local (CCC values >0.80) level errors for predictions up to six days into the future. The in vivo study showed higher global (tumor volume error >11.7%, Dice <0.81) and higher local (CCC <0.33) level errors over the same time period. The in silico study shows that model parameters can be accurately estimated and used to accurately predict future tumor growth at both the global and local scale. However, the poor predictive accuracy in the experimental study suggests the reaction-diffusion equation is an incomplete description of in vivo C6 glioma biology and may require further modeling of intra-tumor interactions including segmentation of (for example) proliferative and necrotic regions.

  11. Triad mode resonant interactions in suspended cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, TieDing; Kang, HouJun; Wang, LianHua; Zhao, YueYu

    2016-03-01

    A triad mode resonance, or three-wave resonance, is typical of dynamical systems with quadratic nonlinearities. Suspended cables are found to be rich in triad mode resonant dynamics. In this paper, modulation equations for cable's triad resonance are formulated by the multiple scale method. Dynamic conservative quantities, i.e., mode energy and Manley-Rowe relations, are then constructed. Equilibrium/dynamic solutions of the modulation equations are obtained, and full investigations into their stability and bifurcation characteristics are presented. Various bifurcation behaviors are detected in cable's triad resonant responses, such as saddle-node, Hopf, pitchfork and period-doubling bifurcations. Nonlinear behaviors, like jump and saturation phenomena, are also found in cable's responses. Based upon the bifurcation analysis, two interesting properties associated with activation of cable's triad resonance are also proposed, i.e., energy barrier and directional dependence. The first gives the critical amplitude of high-frequency mode to activate cable's triad resonance, and the second characterizes the degree of difficulty for activating cable's triad resonance in two opposite directions, i.e., with positive or negative internal detuning parameter.

  12. Controlling metamaterial resonances with light

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Sangeeta; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha; Wanare, Harshawardhan

    2010-08-15

    We investigate the use of coherent optical fields as a means of dynamically controlling the resonant behavior of a variety of composite metamaterials, wherein the metamaterial structures are embedded in a dispersive dielectric medium. Control and switching are implemented by coherently driving the resonant permittivity of the embedding medium with applied optical radiation. The effect of embedding split ring resonators in a frequency-dispersive medium with Lorentz-like dispersion or with dispersion engineered by electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is manifested in the splitting of the negative-permeability band, the modified (frequency-dependent) filling fractions, and the dissipation factors. The modified material parameters are strongly linked to the resonant frequencies of the medium, and for an embedding medium exhibiting EIT also to the strength and detuning of the control field. The robustness of control against the deleterious influence of dissipation associated with the metallic structures as well as the inhomogeneous broadening due to structural imperfections is demonstrated. Studies on plasmonic metamaterials that consist of metallic nanorods arranged in loops and exhibit a collective magnetic response at optical frequencies are presented. Control and switching in this class of plasmonic nanorod metamaterials is shown to be possible, for example, by embedding these arrays in a Raman-active liquid like CS{sub 2} and utilizing the inverse Raman effect.

  13. Accurate Intensity Velocity Phase Difference in the Potassium Resonance Line Obtained with VAMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrì, M.; Oliviero, M.; Severino, G.

    2008-01-01

    We present new results about the phase difference between the intensity and velocity fluctuations of the solar photosphere obtained with the Velocity And Magnetic Observations of the Sun (VAMOS) instrument, which uses the magneto-optical filter (MOF) technique. Before this observing run, we applied the calibration method described in Magrì, Oliviero, and Severino ( Solar Phys. 232, 159, 2005) to reduce the instrumental cross-talk which was present in previous VAMOS data. The quality of this calibration, which can be easily applied to any MOF-based instrument, has been confirmed by comparing with the MOF transmission-profile measurements obtained with a diode laser system. Finally, we discuss the new VAMOS phase-difference value in relation to data obtained by other authors in the same potassium spectral line and in other lines that can be used to study nonadiabatic effects of solar global oscillations.

  14. Electron spin resonance spectral study of PVC and XLPE insulation materials and their life time analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsy, M. A.; Shwehdi, M. H.

    2006-03-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) study is carried out to characterize thermal endurance of insulating materials used in power cable industry. The presented work provides ESR investigation and evaluation of widely used cable insulation materials, namely polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE). The results confirm the fact that PVC is rapidly degrades than XLPE. The study also indicates that colorants and cable's manufacturing processes enhance the thermal resistance of the PVC. It also verifies the powerfulness and the importance of the ESR-testing of insulation materials compared to other tests assumed by International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Standard 216-procedure, e.g. weight loss (WL), electric strength (ES) or tensile strength (TS). The estimated thermal endurance parameters by ESR-method show that the other standard methods overestimate these parameters and produce less accurate thermal life time curves of cable insulation materials.

  15. Electron spin resonance spectral study of PVC and XLPE insulation materials and their life time analysis.

    PubMed

    Morsy, M A; Shwehdi, M H

    2006-03-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) study is carried out to characterize thermal endurance of insulating materials used in power cable industry. The presented work provides ESR investigation and evaluation of widely used cable insulation materials, namely polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE). The results confirm the fact that PVC is rapidly degrades than XLPE. The study also indicates that colorants and cable's manufacturing processes enhance the thermal resistance of the PVC. It also verifies the powerfulness and the importance of the ESR-testing of insulation materials compared to other tests assumed by International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Standard 216-procedure, e.g. weight loss (WL), electric strength (ES) or tensile strength (TS). The estimated thermal endurance parameters by ESR-method show that the other standard methods overestimate these parameters and produce less accurate thermal life time curves of cable insulation materials.

  16. Accurate Guitar Tuning by Cochlear Implant Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  17. New model accurately predicts reformate composition

    SciTech Connect

    Ancheyta-Juarez, J.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E. )

    1994-01-31

    Although naphtha reforming is a well-known process, the evolution of catalyst formulation, as well as new trends in gasoline specifications, have led to rapid evolution of the process, including: reactor design, regeneration mode, and operating conditions. Mathematical modeling of the reforming process is an increasingly important tool. It is fundamental to the proper design of new reactors and revamp of existing ones. Modeling can be used to optimize operating conditions, analyze the effects of process variables, and enhance unit performance. Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo has developed a model of the catalytic reforming process that accurately predicts reformate composition at the higher-severity conditions at which new reformers are being designed. The new AA model is more accurate than previous proposals because it takes into account the effects of temperature and pressure on the rate constants of each chemical reaction.

  18. Accurate colorimetric feedback for RGB LED clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Kwong; Ashdown, Ian

    2006-08-01

    We present an empirical model of LED emission spectra that is applicable to both InGaN and AlInGaP high-flux LEDs, and which accurately predicts their relative spectral power distributions over a wide range of LED junction temperatures. We further demonstrate with laboratory measurements that changes in LED spectral power distribution with temperature can be accurately predicted with first- or second-order equations. This provides the basis for a real-time colorimetric feedback system for RGB LED clusters that can maintain the chromaticity of white light at constant intensity to within +/-0.003 Δuv over a range of 45 degrees Celsius, and to within 0.01 Δuv when dimmed over an intensity range of 10:1.

  19. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    PubMed

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task.

  20. Effects of specimen resonances on acoustic-ultrasonic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Kahn, E. B.; Lee, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of specimen resonances on acoustic ultrasonic (AU) nondestructive testing were investigated. Selected resonant frequencies and the corresponding normal mode nodal patterns of the aluminum block are measured up to 75.64 kHz. Prominent peaks in the pencil lead fracture and sphere impact spectra from the two transducer locations corresponded exactly to resonant frequencies of the block. It is established that the resonant frequencies of the block dominated the spectral content of the output signal. The spectral content of the output signals is further influenced by the transducer location relative to the resonant frequency nodal lines. Implications of the results are discussed in relation to AU parameters and measurements.

  1. An Accurate, Simplified Model Intrabeam Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, Karl LF

    2002-05-23

    Beginning with the general Bjorken-Mtingwa solution for intrabeam scattering (IBS) we derive an accurate, greatly simplified model of IBS, valid for high energy beams in normal storage ring lattices. In addition, we show that, under the same conditions, a modified version of Piwinski's IBS formulation (where {eta}{sub x,y}{sup 2}/{beta}{sub x,y} has been replaced by {Eta}{sub x,y}) asymptotically approaches the result of Bjorken-Mtingwa.

  2. An accurate registration technique for distorted images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delapena, Michele; Shaw, Richard A.; Linde, Peter; Dravins, Dainis

    1990-01-01

    Accurate registration of International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) images is crucial because the variability of the geometrical distortions that are introduced by the SEC-Vidicon cameras ensures that raw science images are never perfectly aligned with the Intensity Transfer Functions (ITFs) (i.e., graded floodlamp exposures that are used to linearize and normalize the camera response). A technique for precisely registering IUE images which uses a cross correlation of the fixed pattern that exists in all raw IUE images is described.

  3. On accurate determination of contact angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.

    1992-01-01

    Methods are proposed that exploit a microgravity environment to obtain highly accurate measurement of contact angle. These methods, which are based on our earlier mathematical results, do not require detailed measurement of a liquid free-surface, as they incorporate discontinuous or nearly-discontinuous behavior of the liquid bulk in certain container geometries. Physical testing is planned in the forthcoming IML-2 space flight and in related preparatory ground-based experiments.

  4. Accurate atom counting in mesoscopic ensembles.

    PubMed

    Hume, D B; Stroescu, I; Joos, M; Muessel, W; Strobel, H; Oberthaler, M K

    2013-12-20

    Many cold atom experiments rely on precise atom number detection, especially in the context of quantum-enhanced metrology where effects at the single particle level are important. Here, we investigate the limits of atom number counting via resonant fluorescence detection for mesoscopic samples of trapped atoms. We characterize the precision of these fluorescence measurements beginning from the single-atom level up to more than one thousand. By investigating the primary noise sources, we obtain single-atom resolution for atom numbers as high as 1200. This capability is an essential prerequisite for future experiments with highly entangled states of mesoscopic atomic ensembles.

  5. Accurate Atom Counting in Mesoscopic Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hume, D. B.; Stroescu, I.; Joos, M.; Muessel, W.; Strobel, H.; Oberthaler, M. K.

    2013-12-01

    Many cold atom experiments rely on precise atom number detection, especially in the context of quantum-enhanced metrology where effects at the single particle level are important. Here, we investigate the limits of atom number counting via resonant fluorescence detection for mesoscopic samples of trapped atoms. We characterize the precision of these fluorescence measurements beginning from the single-atom level up to more than one thousand. By investigating the primary noise sources, we obtain single-atom resolution for atom numbers as high as 1200. This capability is an essential prerequisite for future experiments with highly entangled states of mesoscopic atomic ensembles.

  6. The Electric Giant Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Woude, A.

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Experimental Methods to Study Giant Resonances * Introduction * The Tools * Introduction * Tools for Isoscalar Scattering * INELASTIC α-SCATTERING * INELASTIC PROTON SCATTERING * Tools for Isovector Excitations * γ-ABSORPTION AND PARTICLE CAPTURE REACTIONS * CHARGE EXCHANGE REACTIONS - THE (π+, π0) REACTION * Tools For Isoscalar And Isovector Excitations * INELASTIC ELECTRON SCATTERING * GIANT RESONANCE EXCITATION BY FAST HEAVY IONS * From Multipole Cross Section To Multipole Strength * The Electric Isoscalar Resonances * The Isoscalar Giant Monopole Resonance * Systematics on the GMR * Compressibility and the Giant Monopole Resonance * Introduction * The Compressibility of nuclear matter from the GMR energies * Discussion * The Isoscalar Giant Quadrupole Resonance * General Trends In Medium-Heavy and Heavy Nuclei * The GQR In Light Nuclei * The Isoscalar 3- Strength, LEOR and HEOR * Isoscalar 4+ Strength * Miscellaneous; Isoscalar 1- and L > 4-Strength * The Electric Isovector Giant Resonances * The Isovector Giant Dipole Resonance: GDR * The Isovector Giant Monopole Resonances: IVGMR * The Isovector Quadrupole Resonance: IVGQR * The Effect of Ground State Deformation on the Shape of Giant Resonance: Microscopic Picture * Giant Resonances Built on Excited States * Introduction * Capture Reactions on Light Nuclei * Statistical decay of GDR γ Emission in Heavy Compound Systems * Introduction * Theoretical Predictions * Some Experimental Results * Summary and Outlook * Acknowledgements * General References * References

  7. Supergranular Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayashankar, Paniveni

    2016-07-01

    I study the complexity of supergranular cells using intensity patterns from Kodaikanal solar observatory. The chaotic and turbulent aspect of the solar supergranulation can be studied by examining the interrelationships amongst the parameters characterizing supergranular cells namely size, horizontal flow field, lifetime and physical dimensions of the cells and the fractal dimension deduced from the size data. The findings are supportive of Kolmogorov's theory of turbulence. The Data consists of visually identified supergranular cells, from which a fractal dimension 'D' for supergranulation is obtained according to the relation P α AD/2 where 'A' is the area and 'P' is the perimeter of the supergranular cells. I find a fractal dimension close to about 1.3 which is consistent with that for isobars and suggests a possible turbulent origin. The cell circularity shows a dependence on the perimeter with a peak around (1.1-1.2) x 105 m. The findings are supportive of Kolmogorov's theory of turbulence.

  8. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Silk, Joseph

    2008-09-15

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, n{sub s}, and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z{sub *}=1078{+-}11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1{sigma} to R=1.734{+-}0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: {epsilon}{sub {alpha}}<0.39 and {epsilon}{sub i}<0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  9. The spherical birdcage resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpen, Michael D.

    A description of the operation of a spherical resonator capable of producing a uniform magnetic induction throughout a spherical volume is presented. Simple closed-form expressions for the spectrum of resonant frequencies are derived for both the low-pass and the high-pass configuration of the resonator and are shown to compare favorably with observation in an experimental coil system. It is shown that the spherical resonator produces a uniform spherical field of view when used as a magnetic resonance imaging radiofrequency coil.

  10. Ovenized microelectromechanical system (MEMS) resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, Roy H; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kim, Bongsang

    2014-03-11

    An ovenized micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) resonator including: a substantially thermally isolated mechanical resonator cavity; a mechanical oscillator coupled to the mechanical resonator cavity; and a heating element formed on the mechanical resonator cavity.

  11. Resonance microwave volume plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhetskaya, N. K.; Kop'ev, V. A.; Kossyi, I. A.; Malykh, N. I.; Misakyan, M. A.; Taktakishvili, M. I.; Temchin, S. M.; Lee, Young Dong

    2007-07-15

    A conceptual design of a microwave gas-discharge plasma source is described. The possibility is considered of creating conditions under which microwave energy in the plasma resonance region would be efficiently converted into the energy of thermal and accelerated (fast) electrons. Results are presented from interferometric and probe measurements of the plasma density in a coaxial microwave plasmatron, as well as the data from probe measurements of the plasma potential and electron temperature. The dynamics of plasma radiation was recorded using a streak camera and a collimated photomultiplier. The experimental results indicate that, at relatively low pressures of the working gas, the nonlinear interaction between the microwave field and the inhomogeneous plasma in the resonance region of the plasmatron substantially affects the parameters of the ionized gas in the reactor volume.

  12. Resonant relaxation in electroweak baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Christopher; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.

    2005-04-01

    We compute the leading, chiral charge-changing relaxation term in the quantum transport equations that govern electroweak baryogenesis using the closed time path formulation of nonequilibrium quantum field theory. We show that the relaxation transport coefficients may be resonantly enhanced under appropriate conditions on electroweak model parameters and that such enhancements can mitigate the impact of similar enhancements in the CP-violating source terms. We also develop a power counting in the time and energy scales entering electroweak baryogenesis and include effects through second order in ratios ɛ of the small and large scales. We illustrate the implications of the resonantly enhanced O(ɛ2) terms using the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, focusing on the interplay between the requirements of baryogenesis and constraints obtained from collider studies, precision electroweak data, and electric dipole moment searches.

  13. A silicon microelectromechanical resonant gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yingying; Fan, Shangchun; Ren, Jie; Guo, Zhanshe

    2006-11-01

    This paper presents recent work on the design of a silicon microelectromechanical resonant gyroscope, and also describes the detailed principle of operation and simulation results with Matlab. The structure consists of comb drive actuators, a plate proof mass, lever mechanisms and double-ended tuning forks (DETF). The plate proof mass is driven by the comb drive actuators, and if an external rotation is applied, the Coriolis force acting on it is transmitted to the lever mechanisms attached. The lever mechanisms amplify the periodic force prior to being communicated axially onto the two symmetrical DETFs to provide a differential output. By demodulating the oscillators' frequency output, the rotation rate can then be estimated. This new design has several advantages including high sensitivity, high resolution and a quasi-digital FM output. Simulations include tests of the scale factor of the sensor and the resonant frequency of the DETF oscillators as a function of beam geometric parameters and the applied force.

  14. Observation of the nu(6) + nu(9) Band of Ketene via Resonant Coriolis Interaction with nu(8).

    PubMed

    Gruebele; Johns; Nemes

    1999-12-01

    We observed and analyzed a b-axis Coriolis resonance between higher J states of the nu(6) + nu(9) combination band and the nu(8) fundamental of ketene in the spectral region 940-970 cm(-1). The interaction resonantly couples K(a) = 1 states of the combination band to K(a) = 0 states of the fundamental and also affects K(a) = 1, 2 states in the fundamental. Due to the involvement of strongly asymmetry-split low K levels, the rotational constants and band origin of nu(6) + nu(9) could be accurately determined and are discussed in the light of high-quality anharmonic force fields. The Coriolis coupling parameter, zeta(b)(8,6+9), is very precisely determined. A smaller perturbation, which could not be fully analyzed, is tentatively attributed to K(a) = 2 upper states in the nu(5) + nu(9) band. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  15. Optical Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, Paul; Bouchon, Patrick; Haïdar, Riad; Pardo, Fabrice

    2014-08-01

    Helmholtz resonators are widely used acoustic components able to select a single frequency. Here, based on an analogy between acoustics and electromagnetism wave equations, we present an electromagnetic 2D Helmholtz resonator made of a metallic slit-box structure. At the resonance, the light is funneled in the λ/800 apertures, and is subsequently absorbed in the cavity. As in acoustics, there is no higher order of resonance, which is an appealing feature for applications such as photodetection or thermal emission. Eventually, we demonstrate that the slit is of capacitive nature while the box behaves inductively. We derive an analytical formula for the resonance wavelength, which does not rely on wave propagation and therefore does not depend on the permittivity of the material filling the box. Besides, in contrast with half-wavelength resonators, the resonance wavelength can be engineered by both the slit aspect ratio and the box area.

  16. Resonance splitting in gyrotropic ring resonators.

    PubMed

    Jalas, Dirk; Petrov, Alexander; Krause, Michael; Hampe, Jan; Eich, Manfred

    2010-10-15

    We present the theoretical concept of an optical isolator based on resonance splitting in a silicon ring resonator covered with a magneto-optical polymer cladding. For this task, a perturbation method is derived for the modes in the cylindrical coordinate system. A polymer magneto-optical cladding causing a 0.01 amplitude of the off-diagonal element of the dielectric tensor is assumed. It is shown that the derived resonance splitting of the clockwise and counterclockwise modes increases for smaller ring radii. For the ring with a radius of approximately 1.5μm, a 29GHz splitting is demonstrated. An integrated optical isolator with a 10μm geometrical footprint is proposed based on a critically coupled ring resonator.

  17. Accurate upwind methods for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1993-01-01

    A new class of piecewise linear methods for the numerical solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations of gas dynamics is presented. These methods are uniformly second-order accurate, and can be considered as extensions of Godunov's scheme. With an appropriate definition of monotonicity preservation for the case of linear convection, it can be shown that they preserve monotonicity. Similar to Van Leer's MUSCL scheme, they consist of two key steps: a reconstruction step followed by an upwind step. For the reconstruction step, a monotonicity constraint that preserves uniform second-order accuracy is introduced. Computational efficiency is enhanced by devising a criterion that detects the 'smooth' part of the data where the constraint is redundant. The concept and coding of the constraint are simplified by the use of the median function. A slope steepening technique, which has no effect at smooth regions and can resolve a contact discontinuity in four cells, is described. As for the upwind step, existing and new methods are applied in a manner slightly different from those in the literature. These methods are derived by approximating the Euler equations via linearization and diagonalization. At a 'smooth' interface, Harten, Lax, and Van Leer's one intermediate state model is employed. A modification for this model that can resolve contact discontinuities is presented. Near a discontinuity, either this modified model or a more accurate one, namely, Roe's flux-difference splitting. is used. The current presentation of Roe's method, via the conceptually simple flux-vector splitting, not only establishes a connection between the two splittings, but also leads to an admissibility correction with no conditional statement, and an efficient approximation to Osher's approximate Riemann solver. These reconstruction and upwind steps result in schemes that are uniformly second-order accurate and economical at smooth regions, and yield high resolution at discontinuities.

  18. Accurate measurement of unsteady state fluid temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaremkiewicz, Magdalena

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, two accurate methods for determining the transient fluid temperature were presented. Measurements were conducted for boiling water since its temperature is known. At the beginning the thermometers are at the ambient temperature and next they are immediately immersed into saturated water. The measurements were carried out with two thermometers of different construction but with the same housing outer diameter equal to 15 mm. One of them is a K-type industrial thermometer widely available commercially. The temperature indicated by the thermometer was corrected considering the thermometers as the first or second order inertia devices. The new design of a thermometer was proposed and also used to measure the temperature of boiling water. Its characteristic feature is a cylinder-shaped housing with the sheath thermocouple located in its center. The temperature of the fluid was determined based on measurements taken in the axis of the solid cylindrical element (housing) using the inverse space marching method. Measurements of the transient temperature of the air flowing through the wind tunnel using the same thermometers were also carried out. The proposed measurement technique provides more accurate results compared with measurements using industrial thermometers in conjunction with simple temperature correction using the inertial thermometer model of the first or second order. By comparing the results, it was demonstrated that the new thermometer allows obtaining the fluid temperature much faster and with higher accuracy in comparison to the industrial thermometer. Accurate measurements of the fast changing fluid temperature are possible due to the low inertia thermometer and fast space marching method applied for solving the inverse heat conduction problem.

  19. A More Accurate Measurement of the {sup 28}Si Lattice Parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Massa, E. Sasso, C. P.; Mana, G.; Palmisano, C.

    2015-09-15

    In 2011, a discrepancy between the values of the Planck constant measured by counting Si atoms and by comparing mechanical and electrical powers prompted a review, among others, of the measurement of the spacing of {sup 28}Si (220) lattice planes, either to confirm the measured value and its uncertainty or to identify errors. This exercise confirmed the result of the previous measurement and yields the additional value d{sub 220} = 192 014 711.98(34) am having a reduced uncertainty.

  20. Accurate Zero Parameter Correlation Energy Functional Obtained from the Homogeneous Electron Gas with an Energy Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, J. B.; Chen, Jiqiang; Iafrate, G. J.; Savin, A.

    1998-03-01

    We have obtained an analytic approximation to E_c(r_g, ζ,G) where G is an energy gap separating the occupied and unoccupied states of a homogeneous electron gas for ζ=3D0 and ξ=3D1. When G=3D0, E_c(r_g, ζ) reduces to the usual LSD result. This functional is employed in calculating correlation energies for unpolarized atoms and ions for Z <= 18 by taking G[n]=3D1/8|nabla ln n|^2, which reduces to the ionization energy in the large r limit in an exact Kohn-Sham (KS) theory. The resulting functional is self-interaction-corrected employing a method which is invariant under a unitary transformation. We find that the application of this approach to the calculation of the Ec functional reduces the error in the LSD result by more than 95%. When the value of G is approximately corrected to include the effect of higher lying unoccupied localized states, the resulting values of Ec are within a few percent of the exact results.

  1. The first accurate description of an aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Wilfried

    2006-12-01

    As technology has advanced, the scientific study of auroral phenomena has increased by leaps and bounds. A look back at the earliest descriptions of aurorae offers an interesting look into how medieval scholars viewed the subjects that we study.Although there are earlier fragmentary references in the literature, the first accurate description of the aurora borealis appears to be that published by the German Catholic scholar Konrad von Megenberg (1309-1374) in his book Das Buch der Natur (The Book of Nature). The book was written between 1349 and 1350.

  2. Determining accurate distances to nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanos, Alceste Zoe

    2005-11-01

    Determining accurate distances to nearby or distant galaxies is a very simple conceptually, yet complicated in practice, task. Presently, distances to nearby galaxies are only known to an accuracy of 10-15%. The current anchor galaxy of the extragalactic distance scale is the Large Magellanic Cloud, which has large (10-15%) systematic uncertainties associated with it, because of its morphology, its non-uniform reddening and the unknown metallicity dependence of the Cepheid period-luminosity relation. This work aims to determine accurate distances to some nearby galaxies, and subsequently help reduce the error in the extragalactic distance scale and the Hubble constant H 0 . In particular, this work presents the first distance determination of the DIRECT Project to M33 with detached eclipsing binaries. DIRECT aims to obtain a new anchor galaxy for the extragalactic distance scale by measuring direct, accurate (to 5%) distances to two Local Group galaxies, M31 and M33, with detached eclipsing binaries. It involves a massive variability survey of these galaxies and subsequent photometric and spectroscopic follow-up of the detached binaries discovered. In this work, I also present a catalog of variable stars discovered in one of the DIRECT fields, M31Y, which includes 41 eclipsing binaries. Additionally, we derive the distance to the Draco Dwarf Spheroidal galaxy, with ~100 RR Lyrae found in our first CCD variability study of this galaxy. A "hybrid" method of discovering Cepheids with ground-based telescopes is described next. It involves applying the image subtraction technique on the images obtained from ground-based telescopes and then following them up with the Hubble Space Telescope to derive Cepheid period-luminosity distances. By re-analyzing ESO Very Large Telescope data on M83 (NGC 5236), we demonstrate that this method is much more powerful for detecting variability, especially in crowded fields. I finally present photometry for the Wolf-Rayet binary WR 20a

  3. New law requires 'medically accurate' lesson plans.

    PubMed

    1999-09-17

    The California Legislature has passed a bill requiring all textbooks and materials used to teach about AIDS be medically accurate and objective. Statements made within the curriculum must be supported by research conducted in compliance with scientific methods, and published in peer-reviewed journals. Some of the current lesson plans were found to contain scientifically unsupported and biased information. In addition, the bill requires material to be "free of racial, ethnic, or gender biases." The legislation is supported by a wide range of interests, but opposed by the California Right to Life Education Fund, because they believe it discredits abstinence-only material.

  4. Parametric-based brain Magnetic Resonance Elastography using a Rayleigh damping material model.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Andrii Y; Sellier, Mathieu; Docherty, Paul D; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2014-10-01

    The three-parameter Rayleigh damping (RD) model applied to time-harmonic Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) has potential to better characterise fluid-saturated tissue systems. However, it is not uniquely identifiable at a single frequency. One solution to this problem involves simultaneous inverse problem solution of multiple input frequencies over a broad range. As data is often limited, an alternative elegant solution is a parametric RD reconstruction, where one of the RD parameters (μI or ρI) is globally constrained allowing accurate identification of the remaining two RD parameters. This research examines this parametric inversion approach as applied to in vivo brain imaging. Overall, success was achieved in reconstruction of the real shear modulus (μR) that showed good correlation with brain anatomical structures. The mean and standard deviation shear stiffness values of the white and gray matter were found to be 3±0.11kPa and 2.2±0.11kPa, respectively, which are in good agreement with values established in the literature or measured by mechanical testing. Parametric results with globally constrained μI indicate that selecting a reasonable value for the μI distribution has a major effect on the reconstructed ρI image and concomitant damping ratio (ξd). More specifically, the reconstructed ρI image using a realistic μI=333Pa value representative of a greater portion of the brain tissue showed more accurate differentiation of the ventricles within the intracranial matter compared to μI=1000Pa, and ξd reconstruction with μI=333Pa accurately captured the higher damping levels expected within the vicinity of the ventricles. Parametric RD reconstruction shows potential for accurate recovery of the stiffness characteristics and overall damping profile of the in vivo living brain despite its underlying limitations. Hence, a parametric approach could be valuable with RD models for diagnostic MRE imaging with single frequency data.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of diabetic foot complications

    PubMed Central

    Low, Keynes TA; Peh, Wilfred CG

    2015-01-01

    This pictorial review aims to illustrate the various manifestations of the diabetic foot on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The utility of MR imaging and its imaging features in the diagnosis of pedal osteomyelitis are illustrated. There is often difficulty encountered in distinguishing osteomyelitis from neuroarthropathy, both clinically and on imaging. By providing an accurate diagnosis based on imaging, the radiologist plays a significant role in the management of patients with complications of diabetic foot. PMID:25640096

  6. Neurosurgical uses for intraprocedural magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Mutchnick, Ian S; Moriarty, Thomas M

    2005-10-01

    Neurosurgical procedures demand precision, and efforts to create accurate neurosurgical navigation have been central to the profession through its history. Magnetic resonance image (MRI)-guided navigation offers the possibility of real-time, image-based stereotactic information for the neurosurgeon, which makes possible a number of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. This article will review both current options for intraoperative MRI operative suite arrangements and the current therapeutic/diagnostic uses of intraoperative MRI.

  7. Miniature Sapphire Acoustic Resonator - MSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Rabi T.; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    mechanical energy and back. Such an electrostatic tweeter type excitation of a mechanical resonator will be tested at 5 MHz. Finite element calculation will be applied to resonator design for the desired resonator frequency and optimum configuration. The experiment consists of the sapphire resonator sandwiched between parallel electrodes. A DC+AC voltage can be applied to generate a force to act on a sapphire resonator. With the frequency of the AC voltage tuned to the sapphire resonator frequency, a resonant condition occurs and the sapphire Q can be measured with a high-frequency impedance analyzer. To achieve high Q values, many experimental factors such as vacuum seal, gas damping effects, charge buildup on the sapphire surface, heat dissipation, sapphire anchoring, and the sapphire mounting configuration will need attention. The effects of these parameters will be calculated and folded into the resonator design. It is envisioned that the initial test configuration would allow for movable electrodes to check gap spacing dependency and verify the input impedance prediction. Quartz oscillators are key components in nearly all ground- and space-based communication, tracking, and radio science applications. They play a key role as local oscillators for atomic frequency standards and serve as flywheel oscillators or to improve phase noise in high performance frequency and timing distribution systems. With ultra-stable performance from one to three seconds, an Earth-orbit or moon-based MSAR can enhance available performance options for spacecraft due to elimination of atmospheric path degradation.

  8. Accurate taxonomic assignment of short pyrosequencing reads.

    PubMed

    Clemente, José C; Jansson, Jesper; Valiente, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Ambiguities in the taxonomy dependent assignment of pyrosequencing reads are usually resolved by mapping each read to the lowest common ancestor in a reference taxonomy of all those sequences that match the read. This conservative approach has the drawback of mapping a read to a possibly large clade that may also contain many sequences not matching the read. A more accurate taxonomic assignment of short reads can be made by mapping each read to the node in the reference taxonomy that provides the best precision and recall. We show that given a suffix array for the sequences in the reference taxonomy, a short read can be mapped to the node of the reference taxonomy with the best combined value of precision and recall in time linear in the size of the taxonomy subtree rooted at the lowest common ancestor of the matching sequences. An accurate taxonomic assignment of short reads can thus be made with about the same efficiency as when mapping each read to the lowest common ancestor of all matching sequences in a reference taxonomy. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach on several metagenomic datasets of marine and gut microbiota.

  9. Accurate shear measurement with faint sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Foucaud, Sebastien; Luo, Wentao E-mail: walt@shao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    For cosmic shear to become an accurate cosmological probe, systematic errors in the shear measurement method must be unambiguously identified and corrected for. Previous work of this series has demonstrated that cosmic shears can be measured accurately in Fourier space in the presence of background noise and finite pixel size, without assumptions on the morphologies of galaxy and PSF. The remaining major source of error is source Poisson noise, due to the finiteness of source photon number. This problem is particularly important for faint galaxies in space-based weak lensing measurements, and for ground-based images of short exposure times. In this work, we propose a simple and rigorous way of removing the shear bias from the source Poisson noise. Our noise treatment can be generalized for images made of multiple exposures through MultiDrizzle. This is demonstrated with the SDSS and COSMOS/ACS data. With a large ensemble of mock galaxy images of unrestricted morphologies, we show that our shear measurement method can achieve sub-percent level accuracy even for images of signal-to-noise ratio less than 5 in general, making it the most promising technique for cosmic shear measurement in the ongoing and upcoming large scale galaxy surveys.

  10. Accurate pose estimation for forensic identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merckx, Gert; Hermans, Jeroen; Vandermeulen, Dirk

    2010-04-01

    In forensic authentication, one aims to identify the perpetrator among a series of suspects or distractors. A fundamental problem in any recognition system that aims for identification of subjects in a natural scene is the lack of constrains on viewing and imaging conditions. In forensic applications, identification proves even more challenging, since most surveillance footage is of abysmal quality. In this context, robust methods for pose estimation are paramount. In this paper we will therefore present a new pose estimation strategy for very low quality footage. Our approach uses 3D-2D registration of a textured 3D face model with the surveillance image to obtain accurate far field pose alignment. Starting from an inaccurate initial estimate, the technique uses novel similarity measures based on the monogenic signal to guide a pose optimization process. We will illustrate the descriptive strength of the introduced similarity measures by using them directly as a recognition metric. Through validation, using both real and synthetic surveillance footage, our pose estimation method is shown to be accurate, and robust to lighting changes and image degradation.

  11. Accurate basis set truncation for wavefunction embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Taylor A.; Goodpaster, Jason D.; Manby, Frederick R.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2013-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) provides a formally exact framework for performing embedded subsystem electronic structure calculations, including DFT-in-DFT and wavefunction theory-in-DFT descriptions. In the interest of efficiency, it is desirable to truncate the atomic orbital basis set in which the subsystem calculation is performed, thus avoiding high-order scaling with respect to the size of the MO virtual space. In this study, we extend a recently introduced projection-based embedding method [F. R. Manby, M. Stella, J. D. Goodpaster, and T. F. Miller III, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2564 (2012)], 10.1021/ct300544e to allow for the systematic and accurate truncation of the embedded subsystem basis set. The approach is applied to both covalently and non-covalently bound test cases, including water clusters and polypeptide chains, and it is demonstrated that errors associated with basis set truncation are controllable to well within chemical accuracy. Furthermore, we show that this approach allows for switching between accurate projection-based embedding and DFT embedding with approximate kinetic energy (KE) functionals; in this sense, the approach provides a means of systematically improving upon the use of approximate KE functionals in DFT embedding.

  12. A seismic metamaterial: The resonant metawedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombi, Andrea; Colquitt, Daniel; Roux, Philippe; Guenneau, Sebastien; Craster, Richard V.

    2016-06-01

    Critical concepts from three different fields, elasticity, plasmonics and metamaterials, are brought together to design a metasurface at the geophysical scale, the resonant metawedge, to control seismic Rayleigh waves. Made of spatially graded vertical subwavelength resonators on an elastic substrate, the metawedge can either mode convert incident surface Rayleigh waves into bulk elastic shear waves or reflect the Rayleigh waves creating a “seismic rainbow” effect analogous to the optical rainbow for electromagnetic metasurfaces. Time-domain spectral element simulations demonstrate the broadband efficacy of the metawedge in mode conversion while an analytical model is developed to accurately describe and predict the seismic rainbow effect; allowing the metawedge to be designed without the need for extensive parametric studies and simulations. The efficiency of the resonant metawedge shows that large-scale mechanical metamaterials are feasible, will have application, and that the time is ripe for considering many optical devices in the seismic and geophysical context.

  13. A seismic metamaterial: The resonant metawedge.

    PubMed

    Colombi, Andrea; Colquitt, Daniel; Roux, Philippe; Guenneau, Sebastien; Craster, Richard V

    2016-06-10

    Critical concepts from three different fields, elasticity, plasmonics and metamaterials, are brought together to design a metasurface at the geophysical scale, the resonant metawedge, to control seismic Rayleigh waves. Made of spatially graded vertical subwavelength resonators on an elastic substrate, the metawedge can either mode convert incident surface Rayleigh waves into bulk elastic shear waves or reflect the Rayleigh waves creating a "seismic rainbow" effect analogous to the optical rainbow for electromagnetic metasurfaces. Time-domain spectral element simulations demonstrate the broadband efficacy of the metawedge in mode conversion while an analytical model is developed to accurately describe and predict the seismic rainbow effect; allowing the metawedge to be designed without the need for extensive parametric studies and simulations. The efficiency of the resonant metawedge shows that large-scale mechanical metamaterials are feasible, will have application, and that the time is ripe for considering many optical devices in the seismic and geophysical context.

  14. A seismic metamaterial: The resonant metawedge

    PubMed Central

    Colombi, Andrea; Colquitt, Daniel; Roux, Philippe; Guenneau, Sebastien; Craster, Richard V.

    2016-01-01

    Critical concepts from three different fields, elasticity, plasmonics and metamaterials, are brought together to design a metasurface at the geophysical scale, the resonant metawedge, to control seismic Rayleigh waves. Made of spatially graded vertical subwavelength resonators on an elastic substrate, the metawedge can either mode convert incident surface Rayleigh waves into bulk elastic shear waves or reflect the Rayleigh waves creating a “seismic rainbow” effect analogous to the optical rainbow for electromagnetic metasurfaces. Time-domain spectral element simulations demonstrate the broadband efficacy of the metawedge in mode conversion while an analytical model is developed to accurately describe and predict the seismic rainbow effect; allowing the metawedge to be designed without the need for extensive parametric studies and simulations. The efficiency of the resonant metawedge shows that large-scale mechanical metamaterials are feasible, will have application, and that the time is ripe for considering many optical devices in the seismic and geophysical context. PMID:27283587

  15. Generating Facial Expressions Using an Anatomically Accurate Biomechanical Model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tim; Hung, Alice; Mithraratne, Kumar

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a computational framework for modelling the biomechanics of human facial expressions. A detailed high-order (Cubic-Hermite) finite element model of the human head was constructed using anatomical data segmented from magnetic resonance images. The model includes a superficial soft-tissue continuum consisting of skin, the subcutaneous layer and the superficial Musculo-Aponeurotic system. Embedded within this continuum mesh, are 20 pairs of facial muscles which drive facial expressions. These muscles were treated as transversely-isotropic and their anatomical geometries and fibre orientations were accurately depicted. In order to capture the relative composition of muscles and fat, material heterogeneity was also introduced into the model. Complex contact interactions between the lips, eyelids, and between superficial soft tissue continuum and deep rigid skeletal bones were also computed. In addition, this paper investigates the impact of incorporating material heterogeneity and contact interactions, which are often neglected in similar studies. Four facial expressions were simulated using the developed model and the results were compared with surface data obtained from a 3D structured-light scanner. Predicted expressions showed good agreement with the experimental data.

  16. Rheometry and numerical simulations of antennas onboard the Resonance spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampl, M.; Macher, W.; Gruber, Ch.; Oswald, Th.; Rucker, H. O.

    2009-04-01

    computations based on ASAP and CONCEPT-II wire and patch models confirm very accurately the results obtained by rheometry. The knowledge of the acquired parameters is of great benefit to the Resonance mission. In particular, goniopolarimetry techniques like polarization analysis and direction finding depend crucially on the effective axes.

  17. Gap-plasmon nanoantennas and bowtie resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramotnev, Dmitri K.; Pors, Anders; Willatzen, Morten; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2012-01-01

    Plasmonic bowtie resonators involving gap surface plasmons (GSPs) in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structures, in which only the top metal layer is structured, are investigated using numerical simulations. We demonstrate that the considered configuration features two efficiently excitable GSP resonances associated with distinct charge distributions with the domination of the dipole and quadrupole moments resulting in low- and high-Q resonances, respectively. The typical Q factors for the high-Q resonances are shown to achieve ˜25 in the near-infrared, thus potentially exceeding the quasistatic limit. Detailed physical interpretations of the obtained results and consistent dependencies of the resonance characteristics on the geometrical structural parameters are presented. Excellent resonant characteristics, the simplicity of fabrication, and tuning of the resonance wavelength by adjusting the size of the bowtie arms, separation between them, and/or thickness of the insulator (SiO2) layer in the MIM structure appear attractive for a wide variety of applications, ranging from surface sensing to photovoltaics.

  18. Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, C. M.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, J.-L.; Ng, J. S.T.; Grote, D. P.; Pivi, M. T. F.; Wang, L. F.

    2009-04-29

    A new set of resonances for electron cloud dynamics in the presence of a magnetic field has been found. For short beam bunch lengths and low magnetic fields where lb<< 2pi c/omega c (with lb = bunch length, omega c = non-relativistic cyclotron frequency) resonances between the bunch frequency and harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency cause an increase in the electron cloud density in narrow ranges of magnetic field near the resonances. For ILC parameters the increase in the density is up to a factor ~;;3, and the spatial distribution of the electrons is broader near resonances, lacking the well-defined vertical density"stripes" found for non-resonant cases. Simulations with the 2D computer code POSINST, as well as a single-particle tracking code, were used to elucidate the physics of the dynamics. The existence of the resonances has been confirmed in experiments at PEP-II. The resonances are expected to affect the electron cloud dynamics in the fringe fields of conventional lattice magnets and in wigglers, where the magnetic fields are low. Results of the simulations and experimental observations, the reason for the bunch-length dependence, and details of the dynamics are discussed here.

  19. Accurate Biomass Estimation via Bayesian Adaptive Sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Kevin R.; Knuth, Kevin H.; Castle, Joseph P.; Lvov, Nikolay

    2005-01-01

    The following concepts were introduced: a) Bayesian adaptive sampling for solving biomass estimation; b) Characterization of MISR Rahman model parameters conditioned upon MODIS landcover. c) Rigorous non-parametric Bayesian approach to analytic mixture model determination. d) Unique U.S. asset for science product validation and verification.

  20. EMPIRE ULTIMATE EXPANSION: RESONANCES AND COVARIANCES.

    SciTech Connect

    HERMAN,M.; MUGHABGHAB, S.F.; OBLOZINSKY, P.; ROCHMAN, D.; PIGNI, M.T.; KAWANO, T.; CAPOTE, R.; ZERKIN, V.; TRKOV, A.; SIN, M.; CARSON, B.V.; WIENKE, H. CHO, Y.-S.

    2007-04-22

    The EMPIRE code system is being extended to cover the resolved and unresolved resonance region employing proven methodology used for the production of new evaluations in the recent Atlas of Neutron Resonances. Another directions of Empire expansion are uncertainties and correlations among them. These include covariances for cross sections as well as for model parameters. In this presentation we concentrate on the KALMAN method that has been applied in EMPIRE to the fast neutron range as well as to the resonance region. We also summarize role of the EMPIRE code in the ENDF/B-VII.0 development. Finally, large scale calculations and their impact on nuclear model parameters are discussed along with the exciting perspectives offered by the parallel supercomputing.

  1. Efficient determination of accurate atomic polarizabilities for polarizeable embedding calculations

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Heiner

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate embedding potentials, obtained via various methods, used for polarizable embedding computations of excitation energies of para‐nitroaniline in water and organic solvents as well as of the green fluorescent protein. We found that isotropic polarizabilities derived from DFTD3 dispersion coefficients correlate well with those obtained via the LoProp method. We show that these polarizabilities in conjunction with appropriately derived point charges are in good agreement with calculations employing static multipole moments up to quadrupoles and anisotropic polarizabilities for both computed systems. The (partial) use of these easily‐accessible parameters drastically reduces the computational effort to obtain accurate embedding potentials especially for proteins. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27317509

  2. Fast and accurate automated cell boundary determination for fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, Stephen Hugo; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Tseng, Yiider

    2013-07-01

    Detailed measurement of cell phenotype information from digital fluorescence images has the potential to greatly advance biomedicine in various disciplines such as patient diagnostics or drug screening. Yet, the complexity of cell conformations presents a major barrier preventing effective determination of cell boundaries, and introduces measurement error that propagates throughout subsequent assessment of cellular parameters and statistical analysis. State-of-the-art image segmentation techniques that require user-interaction, prolonged computation time and specialized training cannot adequately provide the support for high content platforms, which often sacrifice resolution to foster the speedy collection of massive amounts of cellular data. This work introduces a strategy that allows us to rapidly obtain accurate cell boundaries from digital fluorescent images in an automated format. Hence, this new method has broad applicability to promote biotechnology.

  3. Resonance fluorescence of a cold atom in a high-finesse resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Bienert, Marc; Torres, J. Mauricio; Zippilli, Stefano; Morigi, Giovanna

    2007-07-15

    We study the spectra of emission of a system composed by an atom, tightly confined inside a high-finesse resonator, when the atom is driven by a laser and is at steady state of the cooling dynamics induced by laser and cavity fields. In general, the spectrum of resonance fluorescence and the spectrum at the cavity output contain complementary information about the dynamics undergone by the system. In certain parameter regimes, quantum interference effects between the scattering processes induced by cavity and laser fields lead to the selective suppression of features of the resonance fluorescence spectrum, which are otherwise visible in the spectrum of laser-cooled atoms in free space.

  4. Quality metric for accurate overlay control in <20nm nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Dana; Amit, Eran; Cohen, Guy; Amir, Nuriel; Har-Zvi, Michael; Huang, Chin-Chou Kevin; Karur-Shanmugam, Ramkumar; Pierson, Bill; Kato, Cindy; Kurita, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-01

    The semiconductor industry is moving toward 20nm nodes and below. As the Overlay (OVL) budget is getting tighter at these advanced nodes, the importance in the accuracy in each nanometer of OVL error is critical. When process owners select OVL targets and methods for their process, they must do it wisely; otherwise the reported OVL could be inaccurate, resulting in yield loss. The same problem can occur when the target sampling map is chosen incorrectly, consisting of asymmetric targets that will cause biased correctable terms and a corrupted wafer. Total measurement uncertainty (TMU) is the main parameter that process owners use when choosing an OVL target per layer. Going towards the 20nm nodes and below, TMU will not be enough for accurate OVL control. KLA-Tencor has introduced a quality score named `Qmerit' for its imaging based OVL (IBO) targets, which is obtained on the-fly for each OVL measurement point in X & Y. This Qmerit score will enable the process owners to select compatible targets which provide accurate OVL values for their process and thereby improve their yield. Together with K-T Analyzer's ability to detect the symmetric targets across the wafer and within the field, the Archer tools will continue to provide an independent, reliable measurement of OVL error into the next advanced nodes, enabling fabs to manufacture devices that meet their tight OVL error budgets.

  5. Accurate estimation of sigma(exp 0) using AIRSAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holecz, Francesco; Rignot, Eric

    1995-01-01

    During recent years signature analysis, classification, and modeling of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data as well as estimation of geophysical parameters from SAR data have received a great deal of interest. An important requirement for the quantitative use of SAR data is the accurate estimation of the backscattering coefficient sigma(exp 0). In terrain with relief variations radar signals are distorted due to the projection of the scene topography into the slant range-Doppler plane. The effect of these variations is to change the physical size of the scattering area, leading to errors in the radar backscatter values and incidence angle. For this reason the local incidence angle, derived from sensor position and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data must always be considered. Especially in the airborne case, the antenna gain pattern can be an additional source of radiometric error, because the radar look angle is not known precisely as a result of the the aircraft motions and the local surface topography. Consequently, radiometric distortions due to the antenna gain pattern must also be corrected for each resolution cell, by taking into account aircraft displacements (position and attitude) and position of the backscatter element, defined by the DEM data. In this paper, a method to derive an accurate estimation of the backscattering coefficient using NASA/JPL AIRSAR data is presented. The results are evaluated in terms of geometric accuracy, radiometric variations of sigma(exp 0), and precision of the estimated forest biomass.

  6. Accurate colon residue detection algorithm with partial volume segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Liang, Zhengrong; Zhang, PengPeng; Kutcher, Gerald J.

    2004-05-01

    Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Earlier detection and removal of polyps can dramatically reduce the chance of developing malignant tumor. Due to some limitations of optical colonoscopy used in clinic, many researchers have developed virtual colonoscopy as an alternative technique, in which accurate colon segmentation is crucial. However, partial volume effect and existence of residue make it very challenging. The electronic colon cleaning technique proposed by Chen et al is a very attractive method, which is also kind of hard segmentation method. As mentioned in their paper, some artifacts were produced, which might affect the accurate colon reconstruction. In our paper, instead of labeling each voxel with a unique label or tissue type, the percentage of different tissues within each voxel, which we call a mixture, was considered in establishing a maximum a posterior probability (MAP) image-segmentation framework. A Markov random field (MRF) model was developed to reflect the spatial information for the tissue mixtures. The spatial information based on hard segmentation was used to determine which tissue types are in the specific voxel. Parameters of each tissue class were estimated by the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm during the MAP tissue-mixture segmentation. Real CT experimental results demonstrated that the partial volume effects between four tissue types have been precisely detected. Meanwhile, the residue has been electronically removed and very smooth and clean interface along the colon wall has been obtained.

  7. Automated Method for Estimating Nutation Time Constant Model Parameters for Spacecraft Spinning on Axis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Calculating an accurate nutation time constant (NTC), or nutation rate of growth, for a spinning upper stage is important for ensuring mission success. Spacecraft nutation, or wobble, is caused by energy dissipation anywhere in the system. Propellant slosh in the spacecraft fuel tanks is the primary source for this dissipation and, if it is in a state of resonance, the NTC can become short enough to violate mission constraints. The Spinning Slosh Test Rig (SSTR) is a forced-motion spin table where fluid dynamic effects in full-scale fuel tanks can be tested in order to obtain key parameters used to calculate the NTC. We accomplish this by independently varying nutation frequency versus the spin rate and measuring force and torque responses on the tank. This method was used to predict parameters for the Genesis, Contour, and Stereo missions, whose tanks were mounted outboard from the spin axis. These parameters are incorporated into a mathematical model that uses mechanical analogs, such as pendulums and rotors, to simulate the force and torque resonances associated with fluid slosh.

  8. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, D.D.

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperatures in the range of about 1800/sup 0/ to 2700/sup 0/C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  9. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Douglas D.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperaes in the range of about 1800.degree. to 2700.degree. C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  10. LSM: perceptually accurate line segment merging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Naila; Khan, Nazar

    2016-11-01

    Existing line segment detectors tend to break up perceptually distinct line segments into multiple segments. We propose an algorithm for merging such broken segments to recover the original perceptually accurate line segments. The algorithm proceeds by grouping line segments on the basis of angular and spatial proximity. Then those line segment pairs within each group that satisfy unique, adaptive mergeability criteria are successively merged to form a single line segment. This process is repeated until no more line segments can be merged. We also propose a method for quantitative comparison of line segment detection algorithms. Results on the York Urban dataset show that our merged line segments are closer to human-marked ground-truth line segments compared to state-of-the-art line segment detection algorithms.

  11. Highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Jokiel, Jr., Bernhard; Ensz, Mark T.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-12-30

    Disclosed is a highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine, comprising a revolute joint, comprising a circular encoder wheel, having an axis of rotation; a plurality of marks disposed around at least a portion of the circumference of the encoder wheel; bearing means for supporting the encoder wheel, while permitting free rotation of the encoder wheel about the wheel's axis of rotation; and a sensor, rigidly attached to the bearing means, for detecting the motion of at least some of the marks as the encoder wheel rotates; a probe arm, having a proximal end rigidly attached to the encoder wheel, and having a distal end with a probe tip attached thereto; and coordinate processing means, operatively connected to the sensor, for converting the output of the sensor into a set of cylindrical coordinates representing the position of the probe tip relative to a reference cylindrical coordinate system.

  12. Practical aspects of spatially high accurate methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfrey, Andrew G.; Mitchell, Curtis R.; Walters, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    The computational qualities of high order spatially accurate methods for the finite volume solution of the Euler equations are presented. Two dimensional essentially non-oscillatory (ENO), k-exact, and 'dimension by dimension' ENO reconstruction operators are discussed and compared in terms of reconstruction and solution accuracy, computational cost and oscillatory behavior in supersonic flows with shocks. Inherent steady state convergence difficulties are demonstrated for adaptive stencil algorithms. An exact solution to the heat equation is used to determine reconstruction error, and the computational intensity is reflected in operation counts. Standard MUSCL differencing is included for comparison. Numerical experiments presented include the Ringleb flow for numerical accuracy and a shock reflection problem. A vortex-shock interaction demonstrates the ability of the ENO scheme to excel in simulating unsteady high-frequency flow physics.

  13. Obtaining accurate translations from expressed sequence tags.

    PubMed

    Wasmuth, James; Blaxter, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The genomes of an increasing number of species are being investigated through the generation of expressed sequence tags (ESTs). However, ESTs are prone to sequencing errors and typically define incomplete transcripts, making downstream annotation difficult. Annotation would be greatly improved with robust polypeptide translations. Many current solutions for EST translation require a large number of full-length gene sequences for training purposes, a resource that is not available for the majority of EST projects. As part of our ongoing EST programs investigating these "neglected" genomes, we have developed a polypeptide prediction pipeline, prot4EST. It incorporates freely available software to produce final translations that are more accurate than those derived from any single method. We describe how this integrated approach goes a long way to overcoming the deficit in training data.

  14. Micron Accurate Absolute Ranging System: Range Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Larry L.; Smith, Kely L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate Fresnel diffraction as a means of obtaining absolute distance measurements with micron or greater accuracy. It is believed that such a system would prove useful to the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) as a non-intrusive, non-contact measuring system for use with secondary concentrator station-keeping systems. The present research attempts to validate past experiments and develop ways to apply the phenomena of Fresnel diffraction to micron accurate measurement. This report discusses past research on the phenomena, and the basis of the use Fresnel diffraction distance metrology. The apparatus used in the recent investigations, experimental procedures used, preliminary results are discussed in detail. Continued research and equipment requirements on the extension of the effective range of the Fresnel diffraction systems is also described.

  15. Accurate radio positions with the Tidbinbilla interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batty, M. J.; Gulkis, S.; Jauncey, D. L.; Rayner, P. T.

    1979-01-01

    The Tidbinbilla interferometer (Batty et al., 1977) is designed specifically to provide accurate radio position measurements of compact radio sources in the Southern Hemisphere with high sensitivity. The interferometer uses the 26-m and 64-m antennas of the Deep Space Network at Tidbinbilla, near Canberra. The two antennas are separated by 200 m on a north-south baseline. By utilizing the existing antennas and the low-noise traveling-wave masers at 2.29 GHz, it has been possible to produce a high-sensitivity instrument with a minimum of capital expenditure. The north-south baseline ensures that a good range of UV coverage is obtained, so that sources lying in the declination range between about -80 and +30 deg may be observed with nearly orthogonal projected baselines of no less than about 1000 lambda. The instrument also provides high-accuracy flux density measurements for compact radio sources.

  16. Magnetic ranging tool accurately guides replacement well

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, J.B.; Wesson, J.P. )

    1992-12-21

    This paper reports on magnetic ranging surveys and directional drilling technology which accurately guided a replacement well bore to intersect a leaking gas storage well with casing damage. The second well bore was then used to pump cement into the original leaking casing shoe. The repair well bore kicked off from the surface hole, bypassed casing damage in the middle of the well, and intersected the damaged well near the casing shoe. The repair well was subsequently completed in the gas storage zone near the original well bore, salvaging the valuable bottom hole location in the reservoir. This method would prevent the loss of storage gas, and it would prevent a potential underground blowout that could permanently damage the integrity of the storage field.

  17. The high cost of accurate knowledge.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Kathleen M; Weber, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    Many business thinkers believe it's the role of senior managers to scan the external environment to monitor contingencies and constraints, and to use that precise knowledge to modify the company's strategy and design. As these thinkers see it, managers need accurate and abundant information to carry out that role. According to that logic, it makes sense to invest heavily in systems for collecting and organizing competitive information. Another school of pundits contends that, since today's complex information often isn't precise anyway, it's not worth going overboard with such investments. In other words, it's not the accuracy and abundance of information that should matter most to top executives--rather, it's how that information is interpreted. After all, the role of senior managers isn't just to make decisions; it's to set direction and motivate others in the face of ambiguities and conflicting demands. Top executives must interpret information and communicate those interpretations--they must manage meaning more than they must manage information. So which of these competing views is the right one? Research conducted by academics Sutcliffe and Weber found that how accurate senior executives are about their competitive environments is indeed less important for strategy and corresponding organizational changes than the way in which they interpret information about their environments. Investments in shaping those interpretations, therefore, may create a more durable competitive advantage than investments in obtaining and organizing more information. And what kinds of interpretations are most closely linked with high performance? Their research suggests that high performers respond positively to opportunities, yet they aren't overconfident in their abilities to take advantage of those opportunities.

  18. How many dark energy parameters?

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V.; Huterer, Dragan

    2005-05-16

    For exploring the physics behind the accelerating universe a crucial question is how much we can learn about the dynamics through next generation cosmological experiments. For example, in defining the dark energy behavior through an effective equation of state, how many parameters can we realistically expect to tightly constrain? Through both general and specific examples (including new parametrizations and principal component analysis) we argue that the answer is 42 - no, wait, two. Cosmological parameter analyses involving a measure of the equation of state value at some epoch (e.g., w_0) and a measure of the change in equation of state (e.g., w') are therefore realistic in projecting dark energy parameter constraints. More elaborate parametrizations could have some uses (e.g., testing for bias or comparison with model features), but do not lead to accurately measured dark energy parameters.

  19. A new approach to compute accurate velocity of meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egal, Auriane; Gural, Peter; Vaubaillon, Jeremie; Colas, Francois; Thuillot, William

    2016-10-01

    The CABERNET project was designed to push the limits of meteoroid orbit measurements by improving the determination of the meteors' velocities. Indeed, despite of the development of the cameras networks dedicated to the observation of meteors, there is still an important discrepancy between the measured orbits of meteoroids computed and the theoretical results. The gap between the observed and theoretic semi-major axis of the orbits is especially significant; an accurate determination of the orbits of meteoroids therefore largely depends on the computation of the pre-atmospheric velocities. It is then imperative to dig out how to increase the precision of the measurements of the velocity.In this work, we perform an analysis of different methods currently used to compute the velocities and trajectories of the meteors. They are based on the intersecting planes method developed by Ceplecha (1987), the least squares method of Borovicka (1990), and the multi-parameter fitting (MPF) method published by Gural (2012).In order to objectively compare the performances of these techniques, we have simulated realistic meteors ('fakeors') reproducing the different error measurements of many cameras networks. Some fakeors are built following the propagation models studied by Gural (2012), and others created by numerical integrations using the Borovicka et al. 2007 model. Different optimization techniques have also been investigated in order to pick the most suitable one to solve the MPF, and the influence of the geometry of the trajectory on the result is also presented.We will present here the results of an improved implementation of the multi-parameter fitting that allow an accurate orbit computation of meteors with CABERNET. The comparison of different velocities computation seems to show that if the MPF is by far the best method to solve the trajectory and the velocity of a meteor, the ill-conditioning of the costs functions used can lead to large estimate errors for noisy

  20. Radio-frequency dressing of multiple Feshbach resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, A. M.; Anderson, R. P.; Hanna, Thomas M.; Tiesinga, E.; Julienne, P. S.; Hall, D. S.

    2009-11-01

    We demonstrate and theoretically analyze the dressing of several proximate Feshbach resonances in R87b using radio-frequency (rf) radiation. We present accurate measurements and characterizations of the resonances, and the dramatic changes in scattering properties that can arise through the rf dressing. Our scattering theory analysis yields quantitative agreement with the experimental data. We also present a simple interpretation of our results in terms of rf-coupled bound states interacting with the collision threshold.

  1. A point about electron paramagnetic resonance detection of irradiated foodstuffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douifi, Leila; Raffi, Jacques; Stocker, Pierre; Dole, François

    1998-12-01

    This paper makes a point about the identification of irradiated foodstuffs by means of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) or electron spin resonance (ESR). EPR is the most accurate method for such routine applications since radicals are stabilised for a long time in all (or part of) foods that are in solid and dry states; consequently, EPR can be applied to meat and fish bones, fruit and relative products (from vegetal origin). More details are given for mollusc shells, such as oysters and mussels.

  2. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technology for Medical Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budinger, Thomas F.; Lauterbur, Paul C.

    1984-01-01

    Reports on the status of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from theoretical and clinical perspectives, reviewing NMR theory and relaxation parameters relevant to NMR imaging. Also reviews literature related to modern imaging strategies, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast agents, in vivo spectroscopy, spectroscopic imaging, clinical applications, and…

  3. Large mode radius resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Michael R.

    1987-01-01

    Resonator configurations permitting operation with large mode radius while maintaining good transverse mode discrimination are considered. Stable resonators incorporating an intracavity telescope and unstable resonator geometries utilizing an output coupler with a Gaussian reflectivity profile are shown to enable large radius single mode laser operation. Results of heterodyne studies of pulsed CO2 lasers with large (11mm e sup-2 radius) fundamental mode sizes are presented demonstrating minimal frequency sweeping in accordance with the theory of laser-induced medium perturbations.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Elastography of Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Sudhakar K.; Ehman, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases cause substantial changes in the mechanical properties of tissue and this provides motivation for developing methods to non-invasively assess the stiffness of tissue using imaging technology. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has emerged as a versatile MRI-based technique, based on direct visualization of propagating shear waves in the tissues. The most established clinical application of MRE in the abdomen is in chronic liver disease. MRE is currently regarded as the most accurate non-invasive technique for detection and staging of liver fibrosis. Increasing experience and ongoing research is leading to exploration of applications in other abdominal organs. In this review article, the current use of MRE in liver disease and the potential future applications of this technology in other parts of the abdomen are surveyed. PMID:25488346

  5. Flexible receiver accurately tracks multiple threats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, Jack

    1988-09-01

    The design and performance of a broadband (0.03-40-GHz) receiver system for electronic-surveillance applications are described. The complete superheterodyne receiver system comprises a control and display unit, a scan display, an equipment frame, and a choice of readily interchangeable RF tuner and demodulator modules with narrow or broad instantaneous bandwidths and BITE capability. Photographs, block diagrams, and tables listing the performance parameters of the modules are provided.

  6. Approaching system equilibrium with accurate or not accurate feedback information in a two-route system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-mei; Xie, Dong-fan; Li, Qi

    2015-02-01

    With the development of intelligent transport system, advanced information feedback strategies have been developed to reduce traffic congestion and enhance the capacity. However, previous strategies provide accurate information to travelers and our simulation results show that accurate information brings negative effects, especially in delay case. Because travelers prefer to the best condition route with accurate information, and delayed information cannot reflect current traffic condition but past. Then travelers make wrong routing decisions, causing the decrease of the capacity and the increase of oscillations and the system deviating from the equilibrium. To avoid the negative effect, bounded rationality is taken into account by introducing a boundedly rational threshold BR. When difference between two routes is less than the BR, routes have equal probability to be chosen. The bounded rationality is helpful to improve the efficiency in terms of capacity, oscillation and the gap deviating from the system equilibrium.

  7. Electrically detected magnetic resonance modeling and fitting: An equivalent circuit approach

    SciTech Connect

    Leite, D. M. G.; Batagin-Neto, A.; Nunes-Neto, O.; Gómez, J. A.; Graeff, C. F. O.

    2014-01-21

    The physics of electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) quadrature spectra is investigated. An equivalent circuit model is proposed in order to retrieve crucial information in a variety of different situations. This model allows the discrimination and determination of spectroscopic parameters associated to distinct resonant spin lines responsible for the total signal. The model considers not just the electrical response of the sample but also features of the measuring circuit and their influence on the resulting spectral lines. As a consequence, from our model, it is possible to separate different regimes, which depend basically on the modulation frequency and the RC constant of the circuit. In what is called the high frequency regime, it is shown that the sign of the signal can be determined. Recent EDMR spectra from Alq{sub 3} based organic light emitting diodes, as well as from a-Si:H reported in the literature, were successfully fitted by the model. Accurate values of g-factor and linewidth of the resonant lines were obtained.

  8. Higher order accurate partial implicitization: An unconditionally stable fourth-order-accurate explicit numerical technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, R. A., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The previously obtained second-order-accurate partial implicitization numerical technique used in the solution of fluid dynamic problems was modified with little complication to achieve fourth-order accuracy. The Von Neumann stability analysis demonstrated the unconditional linear stability of the technique. The order of the truncation error was deduced from the Taylor series expansions of the linearized difference equations and was verified by numerical solutions to Burger's equation. For comparison, results were also obtained for Burger's equation using a second-order-accurate partial-implicitization scheme, as well as the fourth-order scheme of Kreiss.

  9. On open electromagnetic resonators: relation between interferometers and resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Manenkov, Aleksandr A; Bykov, Vladimir P; Kuleshov, N V

    2010-05-26

    The physical difference between the concepts 'Fabry-Perot interferometer' and 'open resonator' is discussed. It is shown that the use of the term 'Fabry-Perot resonator' for open laser resonators is incorrect both from the historical viewpoint and from the viewpoint of the physical meaning of the processes occurring in these resonators. (laser beams and resonators)

  10. Novel synthetic index-based adaptive stochastic resonance method and its application in bearing fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Peng; Lu, Siliang; Liu, Fang; Liu, Yongbin; Li, Guihua; Zhao, Jiwen

    2017-03-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR), which is characterized by the fact that proper noise can be utilized to enhance weak periodic signals, has been widely applied in weak signal detection. SR is a nonlinear parameterized filter, and the output signal relies on the system parameters for the deterministic input signal. The most commonly used index for parameter tuning in the SR procedure is the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, using the SNR index to evaluate the denoising effect of SR quantitatively is insufficient when the target signal frequency cannot be estimated accurately. To address this issue, six different indexes, namely, power spectral kurtosis of the SR output signal, correlation coefficient between the SR output and the original signal, peak SNR, structural similarity, root mean square error, and smoothness, are constructed in this study to measure the SR output quantitatively. These six quantitative indexes are fused into a new synthetic quantitative index (SQI) via a back propagation neural network to guide the adaptive parameter selection of the SR procedure. The index fusion procedure reduces the instability of each index and thus improves the robustness of parameter tuning. In addition, genetic algorithm is utilized to quickly select the optimal SR parameters. The efficiency of bearing fault diagnosis is thus further improved. The effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed SQI-based adaptive SR method for bearing fault diagnosis are verified through numerical and experiment analyses.

  11. Using Scaling for accurate stochastic macroweather forecasts (including the "pause")

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovejoy, Shaun; del Rio Amador, Lenin

    2015-04-01

    already more accurate (have smaller RMS errors) than existing GCM's over the 1 - 10 year range. At annual scales they are almost as accurate as the (stochastic) Linear Inverse Modelling (LIM) approach (with hundreds of parameters) and are more accurate than LIM for scales beyond three years or so.

  12. Mechanical Resonances of Helically Coiled Carbon Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Saini, D.; Behlow, H.; Podila, R.; Dickel, D.; Pillai, B.; Skove, M. J.; Serkiz, S. M.; Rao, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite their wide spread applications, the mechanical behavior of helically coiled structures has evaded an accurate understanding at any length scale (nano to macro) mainly due to their geometrical complexity. The advent of helically coiled micro/nanoscale structures in nano-robotics, nano-inductors, and impact protection coatings has necessitated the development of new methodologies for determining their shear and tensile properties. Accordingly, we developed a synergistic protocol which (i) integrates analytical, numerical (i.e., finite element using COMSOL®) and experimental (harmonic detection of resonance; HDR) methods to obtain an empirically validated closed form expression for the shear modulus and resonance frequency of a singly clamped helically coiled carbon nanowire (HCNW), and (ii) circumvents the need for solving 12th order differential equations. From the experimental standpoint, a visual detection of resonances (using in situ scanning electron microscopy) combined with HDR revealed intriguing non-planar resonance modes at much lower driving forces relative to those needed for linear carbon nanotube cantilevers. Interestingly, despite the presence of mechanical and geometrical nonlinearities in the HCNW resonance behavior the ratio of the first two transverse modes f2/f1 was found to be similar to the ratio predicted by the Euler-Bernoulli theorem for linear cantilevers. PMID:24986377

  13. Mechanical resonances of helically coiled carbon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Saini, D; Behlow, H; Podila, R; Dickel, D; Pillai, B; Skove, M J; Serkiz, S M; Rao, A M

    2014-07-02

    Despite their wide spread applications, the mechanical behavior of helically coiled structures has evaded an accurate understanding at any length scale (nano to macro) mainly due to their geometrical complexity. The advent of helically coiled micro/nanoscale structures in nano-robotics, nano-inductors, and impact protection coatings has necessitated the development of new methodologies for determining their shear and tensile properties. Accordingly, we developed a synergistic protocol which (i) integrates analytical, numerical (i.e., finite element using COMSOL) and experimental (harmonic detection of resonance; HDR) methods to obtain an empirically validated closed form expression for the shear modulus and resonance frequency of a singly clamped helically coiled carbon nanowire (HCNW), and (ii) circumvents the need for solving 12th order differential equations. From the experimental standpoint, a visual detection of resonances (using in situ scanning electron microscopy) combined with HDR revealed intriguing non-planar resonance modes at much lower driving forces relative to those needed for linear carbon nanotube cantilevers. Interestingly, despite the presence of mechanical and geometrical nonlinearities in the HCNW resonance behavior the ratio of the first two transverse modes f₂/f₁ was found to be similar to the ratio predicted by the Euler-Bernoulli theorem for linear cantilevers.

  14. Mechanical Resonances of Helically Coiled Carbon Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, D.; Behlow, H.; Podila, R.; Dickel, D.; Pillai, B.; Skove, M. J.; Serkiz, S. M.; Rao, A. M.

    2014-07-01

    Despite their wide spread applications, the mechanical behavior of helically coiled structures has evaded an accurate understanding at any length scale (nano to macro) mainly due to their geometrical complexity. The advent of helically coiled micro/nanoscale structures in nano-robotics, nano-inductors, and impact protection coatings has necessitated the development of new methodologies for determining their shear and tensile properties. Accordingly, we developed a synergistic protocol which (i) integrates analytical, numerical (i.e., finite element using COMSOL®) and experimental (harmonic detection of resonance; HDR) methods to obtain an empirically validated closed form expression for the shear modulus and resonance frequency of a singly clamped helically coiled carbon nanowire (HCNW), and (ii) circumvents the need for solving 12th order differential equations. From the experimental standpoint, a visual detection of resonances (using in situ scanning electron microscopy) combined with HDR revealed intriguing non-planar resonance modes at much lower driving forces relative to those needed for linear carbon nanotube cantilevers. Interestingly, despite the presence of mechanical and geometrical nonlinearities in the HCNW resonance behavior the ratio of the first two transverse modes f2/f1 was found to be similar to the ratio predicted by the Euler-Bernoulli theorem for linear cantilevers.

  15. Pediatric obesity phenotyping by magnetic resonance methods

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wei; Liu, Haiying; Punyanitya, Mark; Chen, Jun; Heymsfield, Steven B.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose of review Accurate measurement of adiposity in obese children is required for characterizing the condition’s phenotype, severity, and treatment effects in vivo. Non-invasive and safe, magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy provide an important new approach for characterizing key aspects of pediatric obesity. This review focuses on recent advances in non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy for quantifying total body and regional adiposity, mapping adipose tissue distribution, and evaluating selected metabolic disturbances in children. The aim is to provide an investigator-focused overview of magnetic resonance methods for use in the study of pediatric body composition and metabolism. Recent findings Whole body axial images can be rapidly acquired on most clinical magnetic resonance imaging scanners. The images can then be semi-automatically segmented into subcutaneous, visceral, and intramuscular adipose tissue. Specific pediatric studies of errors related to slice gap and number are available. The acquisition of scans in healthy and premature infants is now feasible with recent technological advances. Spectroscopic, Dixon, and other approaches can be used to quantify the lipid content of liver, skeletal muscle, and other organs. Protocol selection is based on factors such as subject age and cost. Particular attention should be directed towards identification of landmarks in growth studies. Recent advances promise to reduce the requirement of subjects to remain motionless for relatively long periods. Summary Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy are safe, practical, and widely available methods for phenotyping adiposity in children that open new opportunities for metabolism and nutritional research. PMID:16205458

  16. Noise in nonlinear nanoelectromechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra Vidal, Diego N.

    adjusting the resonator's operating parameters. The device can access one of two stable steady states, according to a specific logic function; this operation is mediated by the noise floor, which can be directly adjusted, or dynamically "tuned" via an adjustment of the underlying nonlinearity of the resonator. The demonstration of this reprogrammable nanomechanical logic gate affords a path to the practical realization of a new generation of mechanical computer.

  17. Resonant and secular orbital interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke

    In stable solar systems, planets remain in nearly elliptical orbits around their stars. Over longer timescales, however, their orbital shapes and sizes change due to mutual gravitational perturbations. Orbits of satellites around a planet vary for the same reason. Because of their interactions, the orbits of planets and satellites today are different from what they were earlier. In order to determine their original orbits, which are critical constraints on formation theories, it is crucial to understand how orbits evolve over the age of the Solar System. Depending on their timescale, we classify orbital interactions as either short-term (orbital resonances) or long-term (secular evolution). My work involves examples of both interaction types. Resonant history of the small Neptunian satellites. In satellite systems, tidal migration brings satellite orbits in and out of resonances. During a resonance passage, satellite orbits change dramatically in a very short period of time. We investigate the resonant history of the six small Neptunian moons. In this unique system, the exotic orbit of the large captured Triton (with a circular, retrograde, and highly tilted orbit) influences the resonances among the small satellites very strongly. We derive an analytical framework which can be applied to Neptune's satellites and to similar systems. Our numerical simulations explain the current orbital tilts of the small satellites as well as constrain key physical parameters of both Neptune and its moons. Secular orbital interactions during eccentricity damping. Long-term periodic changes of orbital shape and orientation occur when two or more planets orbit the same star. The variations of orbital elements are superpositions of the same number of fundamental modes as the number of planets in the system. We investigate how this effect interacts with other perturbations imposed by external disturbances, such as the tides and relativistic effects. Through analytical studies of a

  18. Strong WW scattering chiral lagrangians, unitarity and resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Pelaez, J.R.

    1996-08-01

    Chiral lagrangians provide a model independent description of the strongly interacting symmetry breaking sector. In this work, first we review the LHC sensitivity to the chiral parameters (in the hardest case of non-resonant low-energy WW scattering). Later we show how to reproduce or predict the resonance spectrum by means of dispersion theory and the inverse amplitude method. We present a parameter space scan that covers many different strong WW scattering scenarios.

  19. Resonances in positron-hydrogen scattering in dense quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Zishi; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; Kar, Sabyasachi

    2015-05-15

    We have investigated the S-wave resonance states in positron-hydrogen system embedded in dense quantum plasmas using Hylleraas-type wave functions within the framework of the stabilization method. The effect of quantum plasmas has been incorporated using the exponential-cosine-screened Coulomb (modified Yukawa-type) potential. Resonance parameters (both position and width) below the Ps n = 2 threshold are reported as functions of plasma screening parameters.

  20. Precision cosmological parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendt, William Ashton, Jr.

    2009-09-01

    methods. These techniques will help in the understanding of new physics contained in current and future data sets as well as benefit the research efforts of the cosmology community. Our idea is to shift the computationally intensive pieces of the parameter estimation framework to a parallel training step. We then provide a machine learning code that uses this training set to learn the relationship between the underlying cosmological parameters and the function we wish to compute. This code is very accurate and simple to evaluate. It can provide incredible speed- ups of parameter estimation codes. For some applications this provides the convenience of obtaining results faster, while in other cases this allows the use of codes that would be impossible to apply in the brute force setting. In this thesis we provide several examples where our method allows more accurate computation of functions important for data analysis than is currently possible. As the techniques developed in this work are very general, there are no doubt a wide array of applications both inside and outside of cosmology. We have already seen this interest as other scientists have presented ideas for using our algorithm to improve their computational work, indicating its importance as modern experiments push forward. In fact, our algorithm will play an important role in the parameter analysis of Planck, the next generation CMB space mission.