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Sample records for accurate rotational constants

  1. Accurate rotational constants for linear interstellar carbon chains: achieving experimental accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etim, Emmanuel E.; Arunan, Elangannan

    2017-01-01

    Linear carbon chain molecular species remain the dominant theme in interstellar chemistry. Their continuous astronomical observation depends on the availability of accurate spectroscopic parameters. Accurate rotational constants are reported for hundreds of molecular species of astrophysical, spectroscopy and chemical interests from the different linear carbon chains; C_{{n}}H, C_{{n}}H-, C_{{n}}N, C_{{n}}N-, C_{{n}}O, C_{{n}}S, HC_{{n}}S, C_{{n}}Si, CH3(CC)_{{n}}H, HC_{{n}}N, DC_{2{n}+1}N, HC_{2{n}}NC, and CH3(C≡C)_{{n}}CN using three to four moments of inertia calculated from the experimental rotational constants coupled with those obtained from the optimized geometries at the Hartree Fock level. The calculated rotational constants are obtained from the corrected moments of inertia at the Hartfree Fock geometries. The calculated rotational constants show accuracy of few kHz below irrespective of the chain length and terminating groups. The obtained accuracy of few kHz places these rotational constants as excellent tools for both astronomical and laboratory detection of these molecular species of astrophysical interest. From the numerous unidentified lines from different astronomical surveys, transitions corresponding to known and new linear carbon chains could be found using these rotational constants. The astrophysical, spectroscopic and chemical implications of these results are discussed.

  2. Accurate rotational constant and bond lengths of hexafluorobenzene by femtosecond rotational Raman coherence spectroscopy and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Den, Takuya S; Frey, Hans-Martin; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2014-11-21

    The gas-phase rotational motion of hexafluorobenzene has been measured in real time using femtosecond (fs) time-resolved rotational Raman coherence spectroscopy (RR-RCS) at T = 100 and 295 K. This four-wave mixing method allows to probe the rotation of non-polar gas-phase molecules with fs time resolution over times up to ∼5 ns. The ground state rotational constant of hexafluorobenzene is determined as B0 = 1029.740(28) MHz (2σ uncertainty) from RR-RCS transients measured in a pulsed seeded supersonic jet, where essentially only the v = 0 state is populated. Using this B0 value, RR-RCS measurements in a room temperature gas cell give the rotational constants Bv of the five lowest-lying thermally populated vibrationally excited states ν7/8, ν9, ν11/12, ν13, and ν14/15. Their Bv constants differ from B0 by between -1.02 MHz and +2.23 MHz. Combining the B0 with the results of all-electron coupled-cluster CCSD(T) calculations of Demaison et al. [Mol. Phys. 111, 1539 (2013)] and of our own allow to determine the C-C and C-F semi-experimental equilibrium bond lengths re(C-C) = 1.3866(3) Å and re(C-F) = 1.3244(4) Å. These agree with the CCSD(T)/wCVQZ re bond lengths calculated by Demaison et al. within ±0.0005 Å. We also calculate the semi-experimental thermally averaged bond lengths rg(C-C)=1.3907(3) Å and rg(C-F)=1.3250(4) Å. These are at least ten times more accurate than two sets of experimental gas-phase electron diffraction rg bond lengths measured in the 1960s.

  3. Accurate rotational constant and bond lengths of hexafluorobenzene by femtosecond rotational Raman coherence spectroscopy and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Den, Takuya S.; Frey, Hans-Martin; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2014-11-21

    The gas-phase rotational motion of hexafluorobenzene has been measured in real time using femtosecond (fs) time-resolved rotational Raman coherence spectroscopy (RR-RCS) at T = 100 and 295 K. This four-wave mixing method allows to probe the rotation of non-polar gas-phase molecules with fs time resolution over times up to ∼5 ns. The ground state rotational constant of hexafluorobenzene is determined as B{sub 0} = 1029.740(28) MHz (2σ uncertainty) from RR-RCS transients measured in a pulsed seeded supersonic jet, where essentially only the v = 0 state is populated. Using this B{sub 0} value, RR-RCS measurements in a room temperature gas cell give the rotational constants B{sub v} of the five lowest-lying thermally populated vibrationally excited states ν{sub 7/8}, ν{sub 9}, ν{sub 11/12}, ν{sub 13}, and ν{sub 14/15}. Their B{sub v} constants differ from B{sub 0} by between −1.02 MHz and +2.23 MHz. Combining the B{sub 0} with the results of all-electron coupled-cluster CCSD(T) calculations of Demaison et al. [Mol. Phys. 111, 1539 (2013)] and of our own allow to determine the C-C and C-F semi-experimental equilibrium bond lengths r{sub e}(C-C) = 1.3866(3) Å and r{sub e}(C-F) = 1.3244(4) Å. These agree with the CCSD(T)/wCVQZ r{sub e} bond lengths calculated by Demaison et al. within ±0.0005 Å. We also calculate the semi-experimental thermally averaged bond lengths r{sub g}(C-C)=1.3907(3) Å and r{sub g}(C-F)=1.3250(4) Å. These are at least ten times more accurate than two sets of experimental gas-phase electron diffraction r{sub g} bond lengths measured in the 1960s.

  4. Benchmarking density-functional theory calculations of NMR shielding constants and spin-rotation constants using accurate coupled-cluster calculations.

    PubMed

    Teale, Andrew M; Lutnæs, Ola B; Helgaker, Trygve; Tozer, David J; Gauss, Jürgen

    2013-01-14

    Accurate sets of benchmark nuclear-magnetic-resonance shielding constants and spin-rotation constants are calculated using coupled-cluster singles-doubles (CCSD) theory and coupled-cluster singles-doubles-perturbative-triples [CCSD(T)] theory, in a variety of basis sets consisting of (rotational) London atomic orbitals. The accuracy of the calculated coupled-cluster constants is established by a careful comparison with experimental data, taking into account zero-point vibrational corrections. Coupled-cluster basis-set convergence is analyzed and extrapolation techniques are employed to estimate basis-set-limit quantities, thereby establishing an accurate benchmark data set. Together with the set provided for rotational g-tensors and magnetizabilities in our previous work [O. B. Lutnæs, A. M. Teale, T. Helgaker, D. J. Tozer, K. Ruud, and J. Gauss, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 144104 (2009)], it provides a substantial source of consistently calculated high-accuracy data on second-order magnetic response properties. The utility of this benchmark data set is demonstrated by examining a wide variety of Kohn-Sham exchange-correlation functionals for the calculation of these properties. None of the existing approximate functionals provide an accuracy competitive with that provided by CCSD or CCSD(T) theory. The need for a careful consideration of vibrational effects is clearly illustrated. Finally, the pure coupled-cluster results are compared with the results of Kohn-Sham calculations constrained to give the same electronic density. Routes to future improvements are discussed in light of this comparison.

  5. An Empirical Approach to Obtaining Accurate Molecular Rotational Constants for Isotopically-Substituted Species from AB Initio Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Brett A.; Carroll, P. Brandon; Blake, Geoffrey A.

    2013-06-01

    Recent advances in microwave spectroscopy, namely the development of broadband, chirped-pulse Fourier-transform microwave spectrometers, allow the acquisition of rotational spectra of isotopically-substituted species in natural abundance. The characterization and assignment of these spectra is of particular interest as it applies to astrochemical observations of such species in the interstellar medium. Here, we demonstrate an empirical method for determining rotational constants to aid in the initial assignment of such spectra using a combination of laboratory data and ab initio calculations. The result is an increase in the accuracy of these constants by as much as two orders of magnitude versus those resulting from simple structure optimizations. We have applied this method to a variety of species including diatomic molecules (e.g. HCl), large molecules with internal motion (e.g. CH_3COOH), ions (e.g. HCO^+), clusters (e.g. H_2O\\cdotH_2O), and long carbon chain molecules (e.g. HC_7N). We present the results of these analyses and comment on the applicability of this method to other systems.

  6. Microfabricated microengine with constant rotation rate

    DOEpatents

    Romero, Louis A.; Dickey, Fred M.

    1999-01-01

    A microengine uses two synchronized linear actuators as a power source and converts oscillatory motion from the actuators into constant rotational motion via direct linkage connection to an output gear or wheel. The microengine provides output in the form of a continuously rotating output gear that is capable of delivering drive torque at a constant rotation to a micromechanism. The output gear can have gear teeth on its outer perimeter for directly contacting a micromechanism requiring mechanical power. The gear is retained by a retaining means which allows said gear to rotate freely. The microengine is microfabricated of polysilicon on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication.

  7. Microfabricated microengine with constant rotation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, L.A.; Dickey, F.M.

    1999-09-21

    A microengine uses two synchronized linear actuators as a power source and converts oscillatory motion from the actuators into constant rotational motion via direct linkage connection to an output gear or wheel. The microengine provides output in the form of a continuously rotating output gear that is capable of delivering drive torque at a constant rotation to a micromechanism. The output gear can have gear teeth on its outer perimeter for directly contacting a micromechanism requiring mechanical power. The gear is retained by a retaining means which allows said gear to rotate freely. The microengine is microfabricated of polysilicon on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication.

  8. Accurate lineshape spectroscopy and the Boltzmann constant

    PubMed Central

    Truong, G.-W.; Anstie, J. D.; May, E. F.; Stace, T. M.; Luiten, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy has an illustrious history delivering serendipitous discoveries and providing a stringent testbed for new physical predictions, including applications from trace materials detection, to understanding the atmospheres of stars and planets, and even constraining cosmological models. Reaching fundamental-noise limits permits optimal extraction of spectroscopic information from an absorption measurement. Here, we demonstrate a quantum-limited spectrometer that delivers high-precision measurements of the absorption lineshape. These measurements yield a very accurate measurement of the excited-state (6P1/2) hyperfine splitting in Cs, and reveals a breakdown in the well-known Voigt spectral profile. We develop a theoretical model that accounts for this breakdown, explaining the observations to within the shot-noise limit. Our model enables us to infer the thermal velocity dispersion of the Cs vapour with an uncertainty of 35 p.p.m. within an hour. This allows us to determine a value for Boltzmann's constant with a precision of 6 p.p.m., and an uncertainty of 71 p.p.m. PMID:26465085

  9. Accurate measurements of the acoustical physical constants of synthetic alpha-quartz for SAW devices.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Juin-ichi; Takanaga, Izumi; Nishiyama, Shouichi

    2002-01-01

    Accurate measurements of the acoustical physical constants (elastic constants, piezoelectric constants, dielectric constants, and density) of commercially available and widely used surface acoustic wave (SAW)-grade synthetic a-quartz are reported. The propagation directions and modes of bulk waves optimal for accurately determining the constants were selected through numerical calculations, and three principal X-, Y-, and Z-cut specimens and several rotated Y-cut specimens were prepared from a single crystal ingot to determine the constants and to confirm their accuracy. All of the constants were determined through highly accurate measurements of the longitudinal velocities, shear velocities, dielectric constants, and density. The velocity values measured for the specimens that were not used to determine the constants agreed well with those calculated from the determined constants, within a difference of +/- 0.20 m/s (+/- 0.004%).

  10. Spin-rotation and NMR shielding constants in HCl

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszuński, Michał; Repisky, Michal; Demissie, Taye B.; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Malkin, Elena; Ruud, Kenneth; Garbacz, Piotr; Jackowski, Karol; Makulski, Włodzimierz

    2013-12-21

    The spin-rotation and nuclear magnetic shielding constants are analysed for both nuclei in the HCl molecule. Nonrelativistic ab initio calculations at the CCSD(T) level of approximation show that it is essential to include relativistic effects to obtain spin-rotation constants consistent with accurate experimental data. Our best estimates for the spin-rotation constants of {sup 1}H{sup 35}Cl are C{sub Cl}  = −53.914 kHz and C{sub H}  = 42.672 kHz (for the lowest rovibrational level). For the chlorine shielding constant, the ab initio value computed including the relativistic corrections, σ(Cl) = 976.202 ppm, provides a new absolute shielding scale; for hydrogen we find σ(H) = 31.403 ppm (both at 300 K). Combining the theoretical results with our new gas-phase NMR experimental data allows us to improve the accuracy of the magnetic dipole moments of both chlorine isotopes. For the hydrogen shielding constant, including relativistic effects yields better agreement between experimental and computed values.

  11. Spin-rotation and NMR shielding constants in HCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaszuński, Michał; Repisky, Michal; Demissie, Taye B.; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Malkin, Elena; Ruud, Kenneth; Garbacz, Piotr; Jackowski, Karol; Makulski, Włodzimierz

    2013-12-01

    The spin-rotation and nuclear magnetic shielding constants are analysed for both nuclei in the HCl molecule. Nonrelativistic ab initio calculations at the CCSD(T) level of approximation show that it is essential to include relativistic effects to obtain spin-rotation constants consistent with accurate experimental data. Our best estimates for the spin-rotation constants of 1H35Cl are CCl = -53.914 kHz and CH = 42.672 kHz (for the lowest rovibrational level). For the chlorine shielding constant, the ab initio value computed including the relativistic corrections, σ(Cl) = 976.202 ppm, provides a new absolute shielding scale; for hydrogen we find σ(H) = 31.403 ppm (both at 300 K). Combining the theoretical results with our new gas-phase NMR experimental data allows us to improve the accuracy of the magnetic dipole moments of both chlorine isotopes. For the hydrogen shielding constant, including relativistic effects yields better agreement between experimental and computed values.

  12. Accurate quartic and sextic centrifugal distortion constants of CH3CP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzocchi, L.; Cludi, L.; Degli Esposti, C.

    2003-03-01

    1-Phosphapropyne has been produced in the gas phase by pyrolysis of a mixture of ethane and phosphorus trichloride. The ground state rotational spectra of the most abundant isotopomer and of the isotopic variants 13CH3CP and CH313CP have been investigated in the millimeter and submillimeter wave regions obtaining very accurate values of the quartic centrifugal distortion constants DJ and DJK and of the sextic distortion constants HJK and HKJ.

  13. History and progress on accurate measurements of the Planck constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of the Planck constant, h, is entering a new phase. The CODATA 2010 recommended value is 6.626 069 57 × 10-34 J s, but it has been a long road, and the trip is not over yet. Since its discovery as a fundamental physical constant to explain various effects in quantum theory, h has become especially important in defining standards for electrical measurements and soon, for mass determination. Measuring h in the International System of Units (SI) started as experimental attempts merely to prove its existence. Many decades passed while newer experiments measured physical effects that were the influence of h combined with other physical constants: elementary charge, e, and the Avogadro constant, NA. As experimental techniques improved, the precision of the value of h expanded. When the Josephson and quantum Hall theories led to new electronic devices, and a hundred year old experiment, the absolute ampere, was altered into a watt balance, h not only became vital in definitions for the volt and ohm units, but suddenly it could be measured directly and even more accurately. Finally, as measurement uncertainties now approach a few parts in 108 from the watt balance experiments and Avogadro determinations, its importance has been linked to a proposed redefinition of a kilogram unit of mass. The path to higher accuracy in measuring the value of h was not always an example of continuous progress. Since new measurements periodically led to changes in its accepted value and the corresponding SI units, it is helpful to see why there were bumps in the road and where the different branch lines of research joined in the effort. Recalling the bumps along this road will hopefully avoid their repetition in the upcoming SI redefinition debates. This paper begins with a brief history of the methods to measure a combination of fundamental constants, thus indirectly obtaining the Planck constant. The historical path is followed in the section describing how the improved

  14. History and progress on accurate measurements of the Planck constant.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of the Planck constant, h, is entering a new phase. The CODATA 2010 recommended value is 6.626 069 57 × 10(-34) J s, but it has been a long road, and the trip is not over yet. Since its discovery as a fundamental physical constant to explain various effects in quantum theory, h has become especially important in defining standards for electrical measurements and soon, for mass determination. Measuring h in the International System of Units (SI) started as experimental attempts merely to prove its existence. Many decades passed while newer experiments measured physical effects that were the influence of h combined with other physical constants: elementary charge, e, and the Avogadro constant, N(A). As experimental techniques improved, the precision of the value of h expanded. When the Josephson and quantum Hall theories led to new electronic devices, and a hundred year old experiment, the absolute ampere, was altered into a watt balance, h not only became vital in definitions for the volt and ohm units, but suddenly it could be measured directly and even more accurately. Finally, as measurement uncertainties now approach a few parts in 10(8) from the watt balance experiments and Avogadro determinations, its importance has been linked to a proposed redefinition of a kilogram unit of mass. The path to higher accuracy in measuring the value of h was not always an example of continuous progress. Since new measurements periodically led to changes in its accepted value and the corresponding SI units, it is helpful to see why there were bumps in the road and where the different branch lines of research joined in the effort. Recalling the bumps along this road will hopefully avoid their repetition in the upcoming SI redefinition debates. This paper begins with a brief history of the methods to measure a combination of fundamental constants, thus indirectly obtaining the Planck constant. The historical path is followed in the section describing how the

  15. NMR shielding and spin-rotation constants in XCO (X = Ni, Pd, Pt) molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, Taye B.; Jaszuński, Michał; Malkin, Elena; Komorovský, Stanislav; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    Ab initio nonrelativistic and four-component relativistic DFT (density functional theory) methods are combined to study the spin-rotation and absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants of group 10 transition metal monocarbonyls. Good agreement is obtained between the calculated and available experimental data for the spin-rotation constants and shielding spans for PdCO and PtCO. These data allow us to determine accurate absolute chemical shielding constants for all the nuclei, as well as for the unknown spin-rotation constants. We compare the four-component shielding constants with those obtained from the spin-orbit zeroth-order regular approximation, together with an assessment of the performance of different basis sets. For the first time, relativistically optimised basis sets for the heavy atoms used in the four-component calculations are shown to give converged results for both magnetic properties studied. We dedicate this article to the memory of Professor Nicholas C. Handy.

  16. Note: Fast, small, accurate 90° rotator for a polarizer.

    PubMed

    Shelton, David P; O'Donnell, William M; Norton, James L

    2011-03-01

    A permanent magnet stepper motor is modified to hold a dichroic polarizer inside the motor. Rotation of the polarizer by 90° ± 0.04° is accomplished within 80 ms. This device is used for measurements of the intensity ratio for two orthogonal linear polarized components of a light beam. The two selected polarizations can be rapidly alternated to allow for signal drift compensation, and the two selected polarizations are accurately orthogonal.

  17. A more accurate value for the Avogadro constant

    SciTech Connect

    De Bievre, P.; Valkiers, S.; Becker, P.

    1994-12-31

    Significant improvements in the method to determine the absolute molar mass of Silicon have been achieved and are reported. They enable to reduce the uncertainty contribution of the molar mass to the uncertainty of a previously published Avogadro Constant NA. The new value for NA and its reduced uncertainty is reported.

  18. An accurate metric for the spacetime around rotating neutron stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, George

    2017-01-01

    The problem of having an accurate description of the spacetime around rotating neutron stars is of great astrophysical interest. For astrophysical applications, one needs to have a metric that captures all the properties of the spacetime around a rotating neutron star. Furthermore, an accurate appropriately parameterised metric, i.e., a metric that is given in terms of parameters that are directly related to the physical structure of the neutron star, could be used to solve the inverse problem, which is to infer the properties of the structure of a neutron star from astrophysical observations. In this work we present such an approximate stationary and axisymmetric metric for the exterior of rotating neutron stars, which is constructed using the Ernst formalism and is parameterised by the relativistic multipole moments of the central object. This metric is given in terms of an expansion on the Weyl-Papapetrou coordinates with the multipole moments as free parameters and is shown to be extremely accurate in capturing the physical properties of a neutron star spacetime as they are calculated numerically in general relativity. Because the metric is given in terms of an expansion, the expressions are much simpler and easier to implement, in contrast to previous approaches. For the parameterisation of the metric in general relativity, the recently discovered universal 3-hair relations are used to produce a 3-parameter metric. Finally, a straightforward extension of this metric is given for scalar-tensor theories with a massless scalar field, which also admit a formulation in terms of an Ernst potential.

  19. Synergic effects of 10°/s constant rotation and rotating background on visual cognitive processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Siyang; Cao, Yi; Zhao, Qi; Tan, Cheng; Niu, Dongbin

    In previous studies we have found that constant low-speed rotation facilitated the auditory cognitive process and constant velocity rotation background sped up the perception, recognition and assessment process of visual stimuli. In the condition of constant low-speed rotation body is exposed into a new physical state. In this study the variations of human brain's cognitive process under the complex condition of constant low-speed rotation and visual rotation backgrounds with different speed were explored. 14 university students participated in the ex-periment. EEG signals were recorded when they were performing three different cognitive tasks with increasing mental load, that is no response task, selective switch responses task and selec-tive mental arithmetic task. Rotary chair was used to create constant low-speed10/srotation. Four kinds of background were used in this experiment, they were normal black background and constant 30o /s, 45o /s or 60o /s rotating simulated star background. The P1 and N1 compo-nents of brain event-related potentials (ERP) were analyzed to detect the early visual cognitive processing changes. It was found that compared with task performed under other backgrounds, the posterior P1 and N1 latencies were shortened under 45o /s rotating background in all kinds of cognitive tasks. In the no response task, compared with task performed under black back-ground, the posterior N1 latencies were delayed under 30o /s rotating background. In the selec-tive switch responses task and selective mental arithmetic task, compared with task performed under other background, the P1 latencies were lengthened under 60o /s rotating background, but the average amplitudes of the posterior P1 and N1 were increased. It was suggested that under constant 10/s rotation, the facilitated effect of rotating visual background were changed to an inhibited one in 30o /s rotating background. Under vestibular new environment, not all of the rotating backgrounds

  20. Running Newton constant, improved gravitational actions, and galaxy rotation curves

    SciTech Connect

    Reuter, M.; Weyer, H.

    2004-12-15

    A renormalization group (RG) improvement of the Einstein-Hilbert action is performed which promotes Newton's constant and the cosmological constant to scalar functions on spacetime. They arise from solutions of an exact RG equation by means of a 'cutoff identification' which associates RG scales to the points of spacetime. The resulting modified Einstein equations for spherically symmetric, static spacetimes are derived and analyzed in detail. The modifications of the Newtonian limit due to the RG evolution are obtained for the general case. As an application, the viability of a scenario is investigated where strong quantum effects in the infrared cause Newton's constant to grow at large (astrophysical) distances. For two specific RG trajectories exact vacuum spacetimes modifying the Schwarzschild metric are obtained by means of a solution-generating Weyl transformation. Their possible relevance to the problem of the observed approximately flat galaxy rotation curves is discussed. It is found that a power law running of Newton's constant with a small exponent of the order 10{sup -6} would account for their non-Keplerian behavior without having to postulate the presence of any dark matter in the galactic halo.

  1. Steady-State Computation of Constant Rotational Rate Dynamic Stability Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Green, Lawrence L.

    2000-01-01

    Dynamic stability derivatives are essential to predicting the open and closed loop performance, stability, and controllability of aircraft. Computational determination of constant-rate dynamic stability derivatives (derivatives of aircraft forces and moments with respect to constant rotational rates) is currently performed indirectly with finite differencing of multiple time-accurate computational fluid dynamics solutions. Typical time-accurate solutions require excessive amounts of computational time to complete. Formulating Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations in a rotating noninertial reference frame and applying an automatic differentiation tool to the modified code has the potential for directly computing these derivatives with a single, much faster steady-state calculation. The ability to rapidly determine static and dynamic stability derivatives by computational methods can benefit multidisciplinary design methodologies and reduce dependency on wind tunnel measurements. The CFL3D thin-layer N-S computational fluid dynamics code was modified for this study to allow calculations on complex three-dimensional configurations with constant rotation rate components in all three axes. These CFL3D modifications also have direct application to rotorcraft and turbomachinery analyses. The modified CFL3D steady-state calculation is a new capability that showed excellent agreement with results calculated by a similar formulation. The application of automatic differentiation to CFL3D allows the static stability and body-axis rate derivatives to be calculated quickly and exactly.

  2. Accurate free and forced rotational motions of rigid Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottereau, L.; Souchay, J.; Aljbaae, S.

    2010-06-01

    Context. The precise and accurate modelling of a terrestrial planet like Venus is an exciting and challenging topic, all the more interesting because it can be compared with that of Earth for which such a modelling has already been achieved at the milli-arcsecond level. Aims: We aim to complete a previous study, by determining the polhody at the milli-arcsecond level, i.e. the torque-free motion of the angular momentum axis of a rigid Venus in a body-fixed frame, as well as the nutation of its third axis of figure in space, which is fundamental from an observational point of view. Methods: We use the same theoretical framework as Kinoshita (1977, Celest. Mech., 15, 277) did to determine the precession-nutation motion of a rigid Earth. It is based on a representation of the rotation of a rigid Venus, with the help of Andoyer variables and a set of canonical equations in Hamiltonian formalism. Results: In a first part we computed the polhody, we showed that this motion is highly elliptical, with a very long period of 525 cy compared with 430 d for the Earth. This is due to the very small dynamical flattening of Venus in comparison with our planet. In a second part we precisely computed the Oppolzer terms, which allow us to represent the motion in space of the third Venus figure axis with respect to the Venus angular momentum axis under the influence of the solar gravitational torque. We determined the corresponding tables of the nutation coefficients of the third figure axis both in longitude and in obliquity due to the Sun, which are of the same order of amplitude as for the Earth. We showed that the nutation coefficients for the third figure axis are significantly different from those of the angular momentum axis on the contrary of the Earth. Our analytical results have been validated by a numerical integration, which revealed the indirect planetary effects.

  3. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-10-29

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson's ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers.

  4. Accurate and precise calibration of AFM cantilever spring constants using laser Doppler vibrometry.

    PubMed

    Gates, Richard S; Pratt, Jon R

    2012-09-21

    Accurate cantilever spring constants are important in atomic force microscopy both in control of sensitive imaging and to provide correct nanomechanical property measurements. Conventional atomic force microscope (AFM) spring constant calibration techniques are usually performed in an AFM. They rely on significant handling and often require touching the cantilever probe tip to a surface to calibrate the optical lever sensitivity of the configuration. This can damage the tip. The thermal calibration technique developed for laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) can be used to calibrate cantilevers without handling or touching the tip to a surface. Both flexural and torsional spring constants can be measured. Using both Euler-Bernoulli modeling and an SI traceable electrostatic force balance technique as a comparison we demonstrate that the LDV thermal technique is capable of providing rapid calibrations with a combination of ease, accuracy and precision beyond anything previously available.

  5. An experimental and theoretical study on rotational constants of vibrationally excited CH2OO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Masakazu; Yue, Qiang; Li, Jun; Guo, Hua; Endo, Yasuki

    2015-02-01

    Pure rotational transitions of the simplest Criegee intermediate, CH2OO, were observed for several excited vibrational levels by Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy combined with a double-resonance technique, and precise rotational constants of vibrationally excited CH2OO were determined. Comparing the experimentally determined vibration-rotation constants with those derived from a high-level ab initio potential energy surface, vibrational assignments were made for the observed levels. The observed intensities of the 101-000 rotational lines suggested that the COO bending mode is significantly excited.

  6. Slowly rotating charged fluid balls in the presence of a cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    We examine charged slowly rotating perfect fluids in the presence of a cosmological constant. The asymptotic form of the vacuum solutions to the linearised Einstein-Maxwell field equations is found and the possibility of matching this vacuum to the slow rotating García metric is considered. We show that, contrary to the case of zero cosmological constant, this García metric can be matched to an asymptotically de Sitter vacuum in the slow rotation limit. We conclude the García metric may potentially be suitable for describing a charged isolated rotating body in a cosmological background.

  7. Accurate Measurements of the Dielectric Constant of Seawater at L Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Roger; Zhou, Yiwen; Utku, Cuneyt; Le Vine, David

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes measurements of the dielectric constant of seawater at a frequency of 1.413 GHz, the center of the protected band (i.e., passive use only) used in the measurement of sea surface salinity from space. The objective of the measurements is to accurately determine the complex dielectric constant of seawater as a function of salinity and temperature. A resonant cylindrical microwave cavity in transmission mode has been employed to make the measurements. The measurements are made using standard seawater at salinities of 30, 33, 35, and 38 practical salinity units over a range of temperatures from 0 degree C to 35 degree C in 5 degree C intervals. Repeated measurements have been made at each temperature and salinity. Mean values and standard deviations are then computed. The total error budget indicates that the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant have a combined standard uncertainty of about 0.3 over the range of salinities and temperatures considered. The measurements are compared with the dielectric constants obtained from the model functions of Klein and Swift and those of Meissner and Wentz. The biggest differences occur at low and high temperatures.

  8. Experimental determination of rotational constants of low-lying vibrational levels in the 0g- pure long-range state of ultracold Cs2 molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jizhou; Liu, Wenliang; Li, Yuqing; Ma, Jie; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2017-04-01

    We report an accurate experimental determination of rotational constants of the lowest vibrational levels in the purely long-range state of ultracold cesium molecules (Cs2). We engineer a precise reference of the frequency difference through double photoassociation spectroscopy (PAS). The PAS for the lowest vibrational levels, v=0-3, has been obtained with an enhanced sensitivity and accuracy, according to which the binding energies have been corrected. As deduced from the reference, the frequency intervals between neighboring rotational levels are fitted to a non-rigid rotor model, thus the rotational constants are precisely obtained. The experimental results show good agreement with theoretical expectations.

  9. Effective Torsion and Spring Constants in a Hybrid Translational-Rotational Oscillator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakhoda, Zein; Taylor, Ken

    2011-01-01

    A torsion oscillator is a vibrating system that experiences a restoring torque given by [tau] = -[kappa][theta] when it experiences a rotational displacement [theta] from its equilibrium position. The torsion constant [kappa] (kappa) is analogous to the spring constant "k" for the traditional translational oscillator (for which the restoring force…

  10. Contribution of irregular semicircular canal afferents to the horizontal vestibuloocular response during constant velocity rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelaki, D. E.; Perachio, A. A.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of constant anodal currents (100 microA) delivered bilaterally to both labyrinths on the horizontal vestibuloocular response (VOR) were studied in squirrel monkeys during steps of angular velocity in the dark. We report that bilateral anodal currents decreased eye velocity approximately 30-50% during the period of galvanic stimulation without a change in the time constant of VOR. The decrease in eye velocity, present during steps of angular velocity, was not observed during sinusoidal head rotation at 0.2, 0.5, and 1 Hz. The results suggest that responses from irregular vestibular afferents influence VOR amplitude during constant velocity rotation.

  11. Accurate Measurements of the Dielectric Constant of Seawater at L Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Roger H.; Utku, Cuneyt; Tarkocin, Yalcin; LeVine, David M.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes measurements of the dielectric constant of seawater at a frequency of 1.413 GHz that is at the center of the L-Sand radiometric protected frequency spectrum. Aquarius will be sensing the sea surface salinity from space in this band. The objective of the project is to refine the model function for the dielectric constant as a function of salinity and temperature so that remote sensing measurements can be made with the accuracy needed to meet the measurement goals (0.2 psu) of the Aquarius mission. The measurements were made, using a microwave cavity operated in the transmission configuration. The cavity's temperature was accurately regulated to 0.02 C by immersing it in a temperature controlled bath of distilled water and ethanol glycol. Seawater had been purchased from Ocean Scientific International Limited (OS1L) at salinities of 30, 35 and 38 psu. Measurements of these seawater samples were then made over a range of temperatures, from l0 C to 35 C in 5 C intervals. Repeated measurements were made at each temperature and salinity, Mean values and standard deviations were then computed. Total error budgets indicated that the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant had a relative accuracy of about l%.

  12. A priori predictions of the rotational constants for HC13N, HC15N, C5O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeFrees, D. J.; McLean, A. D.

    1989-01-01

    Ab initio molecular orbital theory is used to estimate the rotational constant for several carbon-chain molecules that are candidates for discovery in interstellar space. These estimated rotational constants can be used in laboratory or astronomical searches for the molecules. The rotational constant for HC13N is estimated to be 0.1073 +/- 0.0002 GHz and its dipole moment 5.4 D. The rotational constant for HC15N is estimated to be 0.0724 GHz, with a somewhat larger uncertainty. The rotational constant of C5O is estimated to be 1.360 +/- 2% GHz and its dipole moment 4.4. D.

  13. Rotational constants and structure of para-difluorobenzene determined by femtosecond Raman coherence spectroscopy: A new transient type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den, Takuya; Frey, Hans-Martin; Felker, Peter M.; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2015-10-01

    Femtosecond Raman rotational coherence spectroscopy (RCS) detected by degenerate four-wave mixing is a background-free method that allows to determine accurate gas-phase rotational constants of non-polar molecules. Raman RCS has so far mostly been applied to the regular coherence patterns of symmetric-top molecules, while its application to nonpolar asymmetric tops has been hampered by the large number of RCS transient types, the resulting variability of the RCS patterns, and the 103-104 times larger computational effort to simulate and fit rotational Raman RCS transients. We present the rotational Raman RCS spectra of the nonpolar asymmetric top 1,4-difluorobenzene (para-difluorobenzene, p-DFB) measured in a pulsed Ar supersonic jet and in a gas cell over delay times up to ˜2.5 ns. p-DFB exhibits rotational Raman transitions with ΔJ = 0, 1, 2 and ΔK = 0, 2, leading to the observation of J -, K -, A -, and C-type transients, as well as a novel transient (S-type) that has not been characterized so far. The jet and gas cell RCS measurements were fully analyzed and yield the ground-state (v = 0) rotational constants A0 = 5637.68(20) MHz, B0 = 1428.23(37) MHz, and C0 = 1138.90(48) MHz (1σ uncertainties). Combining the A0, B0, and C0 constants with coupled-cluster with single-, double- and perturbatively corrected triple-excitation calculations using large basis sets allows to determine the semi-experimental equilibrium bond lengths re(C1-C2) = 1.3849(4) Å, re(C2-C3) = 1.3917(4) Å, re(C-F) = 1.3422(3) Å, and re(C2-H2) = 1.0791(5) Å.

  14. Rotational constants and structure of para-difluorobenzene determined by femtosecond Raman coherence spectroscopy: A new transient type.

    PubMed

    Den, Takuya; Frey, Hans-Martin; Felker, Peter M; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2015-10-14

    Femtosecond Raman rotational coherence spectroscopy (RCS) detected by degenerate four-wave mixing is a background-free method that allows to determine accurate gas-phase rotational constants of non-polar molecules. Raman RCS has so far mostly been applied to the regular coherence patterns of symmetric-top molecules, while its application to nonpolar asymmetric tops has been hampered by the large number of RCS transient types, the resulting variability of the RCS patterns, and the 10(3)-10(4) times larger computational effort to simulate and fit rotational Raman RCS transients. We present the rotational Raman RCS spectra of the nonpolar asymmetric top 1,4-difluorobenzene (para-difluorobenzene, p-DFB) measured in a pulsed Ar supersonic jet and in a gas cell over delay times up to ∼2.5 ns. p-DFB exhibits rotational Raman transitions with ΔJ = 0, 1, 2 and ΔK = 0, 2, leading to the observation of J -, K -, A -, and C-type transients, as well as a novel transient (S-type) that has not been characterized so far. The jet and gas cell RCS measurements were fully analyzed and yield the ground-state (v = 0) rotational constants A0 = 5637.68(20) MHz, B0 = 1428.23(37) MHz, and C0 = 1138.90(48) MHz (1σ uncertainties). Combining the A0, B0, and C0 constants with coupled-cluster with single-, double- and perturbatively corrected triple-excitation calculations using large basis sets allows to determine the semi-experimental equilibrium bond lengths re(C1-C2) = 1.3849(4) Å, re(C2-C3) = 1.3917(4) Å, re(C-F) = 1.3422(3) Å, and re(C2-H2) = 1.0791(5) Å.

  15. Accurate mass replacement method for the sediment concentration measurement with a constant volume container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Yunyun; Chen, Tianqin; Yan, Jun; Lei, Tingwu

    2017-04-01

    The measurement of sediment concentration in water is of great importance in soil erosion research and soil and water loss monitoring systems. The traditional weighing method has long been the foundation of all the other measuring methods and instrument calibration. The development of a new method to replace the traditional oven-drying method is of interest in research and practice for the quick and efficient measurement of sediment concentration, especially field measurements. A new method is advanced in this study for accurately measuring the sediment concentration based on the accurate measurement of the mass of the sediment-water mixture in the confined constant volume container (CVC). A sediment-laden water sample is put into the CVC to determine its mass before the CVC is filled with water and weighed again for the total mass of the water and sediments in the container. The known volume of the CVC, the mass of sediment-laden water, and sediment particle density are used to calculate the mass of water, which is replaced by sediments, therefore sediment concentration of the sample is calculated. The influence of water temperature was corrected by measuring water density to determine the temperature of water before measurements were conducted. The CVC was used to eliminate the surface tension effect so as to obtain the accurate volume of water and sediment mixture. Experimental results showed that the method was capable of measuring the sediment concentration from 0.5 up to 1200 kg m‑3. A good liner relationship existed between the designed and measured sediment concentrations with all the coefficients of determination greater than 0.999 and the averaged relative error less than 0.2%. All of these seem to indicate that the new method is capable of measuring a full range of sediment concentration above 0.5 kg m‑3 to replace the traditional oven-drying method as a standard method for evaluating and calibrating other methods.

  16. Solvent effects on zero-point vibrational corrections to optical rotations and nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kongsted, Jacob; Ruud, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    We present a study of solvent effects on the zero-point vibrational corrections (ZPVC) to optical rotations and nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants of solvated molecules. The model used to calculate vibrational corrections rely on an expansion of the potential and property surfaces around an effective molecular geometry and includes both harmonic and anharmonic corrections. Numerical examples are presented for ( S)-propylene oxide in various solvents as well as for acetone and the three diazene molecules. We find that solvent effects on the ZPVCs may be significant and in some cases crucial to accurately predict solvent shifts on molecular properties.

  17. Accurate Estimation of the Entropy of Rotation-Translation Probability Distributions.

    PubMed

    Fogolari, Federico; Dongmo Foumthuim, Cedrix Jurgal; Fortuna, Sara; Soler, Miguel Angel; Corazza, Alessandra; Esposito, Gennaro

    2016-01-12

    The estimation of rotational and translational entropies in the context of ligand binding has been the subject of long-time investigations. The high dimensionality (six) of the problem and the limited amount of sampling often prevent the required resolution to provide accurate estimates by the histogram method. Recently, the nearest-neighbor distance method has been applied to the problem, but the solutions provided either address rotation and translation separately, therefore lacking correlations, or use a heuristic approach. Here we address rotational-translational entropy estimation in the context of nearest-neighbor-based entropy estimation, solve the problem numerically, and provide an exact and an approximate method to estimate the full rotational-translational entropy.

  18. Ab initio and relativistic DFT study of spin-rotation and NMR shielding constants in XF6 molecules, X = S, Se, Te, Mo, and W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruud, Kenneth; Demissie, Taye B.; Jaszuński, Michał

    2014-05-01

    We present an analysis of the spin-rotation and absolute shielding constants of XF6 molecules (X = S, Se, Te, Mo, W) based on ab initio coupled cluster and four-component relativistic density-functional theory (DFT) calculations. The results show that the relativistic contributions to the spin-rotation and shielding constants are large both for the heavy elements as well as for the fluorine nuclei. In most cases, incorporating the computed relativistic corrections significantly improves the agreement between our results and the well-established experimental values for the isotropic spin-rotation constants and their anisotropic components. This suggests that also for the other molecules, for which accurate and reliable experimental data are not available, reliable values of spin-rotation and absolute shielding constants were determined combining ab initio and relativistic DFT calculations. For the heavy nuclei, the breakdown of the relationship between the spin-rotation constant and the paramagnetic contribution to the shielding constant, due to relativistic effects, causes a significant error in the total absolute shielding constants.

  19. Accurate Determination of the Boltzmann Constant by Doppler Spectroscopy Towards a New Definition of the Kelvin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sow, P. L. T.; Merji, S.; Tokunaga, S. K.; Lemarchand, C.; Triki, M.; Borde, C.; Chardonnet, C.; Darquie, B.; Daussy, C.

    2013-06-01

    Accurate molecular spectroscopy in the mid-infrared region allows precision measurements of fundamental constants. For instance, measuring the linewidth of an isolated Doppler-broadened absorption line of ammonia around 10 μm enables a determination of the Boltzmann constant k_{{B}}. We report on our latest measurements. The main systematic effects, including the temperature control, will be discussed and an error budget will be presented in which the global uncertainty on systematic effects is at the level of a few ppm. This is valid provided that data is recorded under the optimized experimental conditions determined by the studies of systematic effects and provided that spectra are fitted to the speed-dependent Voigt profile, identified as the most suitable lineshape for our measurements. A determination of k_{{B}} by Doppler spectroscopy with a combined uncertainty of a few ppm is within reach. This is comparable to the best current uncertainty obtained using acoustic methods and would make a significant contribution to any new value of k_{{B}} determined by the CODATA. Furthermore, having multiple independent measurements at these accuracies opens the possibility of defining the Kelvin by fixing k_{{B}}, an exciting prospect considering the upcoming redefinition of the International System of Units (SI). C. Lemarchand, M. Triki, B. Darquié, C. J. Bordé, C. Chardonnet and C. Daussy, New J. Phys. 13, 073028 (2011). M. Triki, C. Lemarchand, B. Darquié, P. L. T. Sow, V. Roncin, C. Chardonnet, and C. Daussy, Phys. Rev. A 85, 062510 (2012).

  20. Numerical inversion of the Perrin equations for rotational and translational diffusion constants by iterative techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, A K; Baxter, J E

    1976-01-01

    An iterative numerical technique is presented which allows the semiaxes for prolate and oblate ellipsoids to be determined from the Perrin equations for rotational and translational diffusion constants. The use of this inversion technique is illustrated by application to the proteins: lysozyme, bovine serum albumin, human transferrin, and bovine rhodopsin solubilized in digitonin. PMID:938731

  1. Sub-Doppler millimetre-wave spectroscopy of DBS and HBS: accurate values of nuclear electric and magnetic hyperfine structure constants.

    PubMed

    Bizzocchi, Luca; Esposti, Claudio Degli; Dore, Luca

    2008-02-07

    The unstable thioborine molecule and its deuterated variant have been produced by a high-temperature reaction between hydrogen sulfide and crystalline boron at 1100 degrees C in a flow system. Five rotational transitions from J = 2 <-- 1, to J = 6 <-- 5 have been recorded with sub-Doppler resolution for the vibrational ground state of H10/11BS and D10/11BS using the Lamb-dip technique. The hyperfine structure due to the electric quadrupole interaction of deuterium nucleus has been resolved yielding the first experimental determination of the deuterium quadrupole coupling constant in thioborine, which is 0.1403(75) MHz in D11 BS and 0.1360(38) MHz in D10BS. Fairly accurate values of 10/11B spin-rotation coupling constants and of the hydrogen-boron spin-spin coupling constants have also been determined. Additionally, the hyperfine structure of the rotational lines for the nu2 = 1 excited state has been investigated, thus obtaining information on the asymmetry of the electric field gradient at the B nucleus in the bending state.

  2. A Method for Achieving Constant Rotation Rates in a Micro-Orthogonal Linkage System

    SciTech Connect

    Dickey, F.M.; Holswade, S.C.; Romero, L.A.

    1999-05-12

    Silicon micromachine designs include engines that consist of orthog- onally oriented linear comb drive actuators mechanically connected to a rotating gear. These gears are as small as 50 {micro}m in diameter and can be driven at rotation rates exceeding 300,000 rpm. Generally, these en- gines will run with non-uniform rotation rates if the drive signals are not properly designed and maintained over a range of system parameters. We present a method for producing constant rotation rates in a micro-engine driven by an orthogonal linkage system. We show that provided the val- ues of certain masses, springs, damping factors, and lever arms are in the right proportions, the system behaves as though it were symmetrical. We will refer to systems built in this way as being quasi-symmetrical. We show that if a system is built quasi-symmetrically , then it is possible to achieve constant rotation rates even if one does not know the form of the friction function, or the value of the friction. We analyze this case in some detail.

  3. The infrared rotation-vibration spectrum of dicyanoacetylene: The ground and v9 = 1 state rotational constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winther, F.; Schönhoff, M.; LePrince, R.; Guarnieri, A.; Bruget, D. N.; McNaughton, D.

    1992-03-01

    The bands ν5, ν6 + ν8, ν7 + ν8, ν6 + ν9, and ν8 of NCCCCN have been investigated in the gas phase with a resolution of 0.003 cm -1. The ground state rotational constants B0 = 0.04458699(10) cm -1 and D0 = 1.049(4) × 10 -9 cm -1 have been determined, together with the constants and the vibrational frequencies for the above bands. Several hot bands from the v9 = 1 state were analyzed to give B9 = 0.04468316(18) cm -1, D9 = 1.117(5) × 10 -9 cm -1, q9 = 3.85(2) × 10 -5 cm -1, and q9 J = 2.4(7) × 10 -11 cm -1. The bond lengths of NCCCCN correspond very closely to those of HCCCCCN.

  4. Accurate Calculations of Rotationally Inelastic Scattering Cross Sections Using Mixed Quantum/Classical Theory.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2014-01-16

    For computational treatment of rotationally inelastic scattering of molecules, we propose to use the mixed quantum/classical theory, MQCT. The old idea of treating translational motion classically, while quantum mechanics is used for rotational degrees of freedom, is developed to the new level and is applied to Na + N2 collisions in a broad range of energies. Comparison with full-quantum calculations shows that MQCT accurately reproduces all, even minor, features of energy dependence of cross sections, except scattering resonances at very low energies. The remarkable success of MQCT opens up wide opportunities for computational predictions of inelastic scattering cross sections at higher temperatures and/or for polyatomic molecules and heavier quenchers, which is computationally close to impossible within the full-quantum framework.

  5. The rotational spectrum, geometry, and intermolecular force constant of the heterodimer of hydrogen cyanide and fluoroform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Elizabeth J.; Legon, A. C.

    1986-02-01

    The ground-state rotational spectra of six isotopic species of an intermolecular complex formed by hydrogen cyanide and fluoroform have been measured using the pulsed-nozzle, Fourier-transform microwave technique. The rotational constant B0, the centrifugal distortion constants DJ,DJK,HJ, HJK, and HKJ, and, where appropriate, the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants χ(14N) and χ(D) have been determined for each of the species HC14NṡṡṡHCF3, DC14NṡṡṡHCF3, HC14ṡṡṡDCF3, HC15NṡṡṡHCF3, HC15NṡṡṡDCF3, and DC15NṡṡṡHCF3. For HC14NṡṡṡHCF3 the values are as follows: B0=1151.2991(4) MHz, DJ=1.91(1) kHz, DJK=282.75(6) kHz, HJ=-0.1(1) Hz, HJK=44.3(5) Hz, HKJ=53(5) Hz, and χ(14N)=3.948(8) MHz. The form of the spectra and magnitudes of the rotational constants allow the conclusion that the geometry of the complex is of C3V symmetry with the nuclei in the order HCNṡṡṡHCF3 and lead to r(NṡṡṡC)=3.489(2) Å for HCF3 species but 3.483(1) Å for DCF3 species. The intermolecular stretching force constant determined from DJ is kσ=3.52 N m-1.

  6. Coordinate transformation between rotating and inertial systems under the constant two-way speed of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yang-Ho

    2016-09-01

    An observation system consists of the world lines of rest observers in the system. Recently a coordinate transformation between an isotropic and a rotating observation system has been presented which was derived through a relativistic circular approach based on the Lorentz transformation. It was formulated such that the relative speeds between the two systems are the same, but the two-way speed of light is not constant in the rotating observation system. The constancy of the two-way speed of light in inertial frames has been known to be experimentally verified. This paper presents the transformation that holds the constancy in the rotating system as well. Though the rotating system is in motion with acceleration, it can be regarded as locally inertial. Thus, in the limit, a transformation into a rotating system should be reduced to a transformation into an inertial systems. The transformation presented is consistent with the one between inertial systems so that the latter can be derived from the former in the limit. Moreover it allows us to theoretically analyze the generalized Sagnac effect, which involves rectilinear motion as well as circular motion. The theoretical analysis corresponds to the experimental results.

  7. S3 HMBC hetero: Spin-State-Selective HMBC for accurate measurement of long-range heteronuclear coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeck, Casper; Gotfredsen, Charlotte H.; Sørensen, Ole W.

    2017-02-01

    A novel method, Spin-State-Selective (S3) HMBC hetero, for accurate measurement of heteronuclear coupling constants is introduced. The method extends the S3 HMBC technique for measurement of homonuclear coupling constants by appending a pulse sequence element that interchanges the polarization in 13C-1H methine pairs. This amounts to converting the spin-state selectivity from 1H spin states to 13C spin states in the spectra of long-range coupled 1H spins, allowing convenient measurement of heteronuclear coupling constants similar to other S3 or E.COSY-type methods. As usual in this type of techniques, the accuracy of coupling constant measurement is independent of the size of the coupling constant of interest. The merits of the new method are demonstrated by application to vinyl acetate, the alkaloid strychnine, and the carbohydrate methyl β-maltoside.

  8. Efficient calculation of nuclear spin-rotation constants from auxiliary density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuniga-Gutierrez, Bernardo; Camacho-Gonzalez, Monica; Bendana-Castillo, Alfonso; Simon-Bastida, Patricia; Calaminici, Patrizia; Köster, Andreas M.

    2015-09-01

    The computation of the spin-rotation tensor within the framework of auxiliary density functional theory (ADFT) in combination with the gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) scheme, to treat the gauge origin problem, is presented. For the spin-rotation tensor, the calculation of the magnetic shielding tensor represents the most demanding computational task. Employing the ADFT-GIAO methodology, the central processing unit time for the magnetic shielding tensor calculation can be dramatically reduced. In this work, the quality of spin-rotation constants obtained with the ADFT-GIAO methodology is compared with available experimental data as well as with other theoretical results at the Hartree-Fock and coupled-cluster level of theory. It is found that the agreement between the ADFT-GIAO results and the experiment is good and very similar to the ones obtained by the coupled-cluster single-doubles-perturbative triples-GIAO methodology. With the improved computational performance achieved, the computation of the spin-rotation tensors of large systems or along Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics trajectories becomes feasible in reasonable times. Three models of carbon fullerenes containing hundreds of atoms and thousands of basis functions are used for benchmarking the performance. Furthermore, a theoretical study of temperature effects on the structure and spin-rotation tensor of the H12C-12CH-DF complex is presented. Here, the temperature dependency of the spin-rotation tensor of the fluorine nucleus can be used to identify experimentally the so far unknown bent isomer of this complex. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that temperature effects on the spin-rotation tensor are investigated.

  9. Efficient calculation of nuclear spin-rotation constants from auxiliary density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Zuniga-Gutierrez, Bernardo; Camacho-Gonzalez, Monica; Bendana-Castillo, Alfonso; Simon-Bastida, Patricia; Calaminici, Patrizia; Köster, Andreas M

    2015-09-14

    The computation of the spin-rotation tensor within the framework of auxiliary density functional theory (ADFT) in combination with the gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) scheme, to treat the gauge origin problem, is presented. For the spin-rotation tensor, the calculation of the magnetic shielding tensor represents the most demanding computational task. Employing the ADFT-GIAO methodology, the central processing unit time for the magnetic shielding tensor calculation can be dramatically reduced. In this work, the quality of spin-rotation constants obtained with the ADFT-GIAO methodology is compared with available experimental data as well as with other theoretical results at the Hartree-Fock and coupled-cluster level of theory. It is found that the agreement between the ADFT-GIAO results and the experiment is good and very similar to the ones obtained by the coupled-cluster single-doubles-perturbative triples-GIAO methodology. With the improved computational performance achieved, the computation of the spin-rotation tensors of large systems or along Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics trajectories becomes feasible in reasonable times. Three models of carbon fullerenes containing hundreds of atoms and thousands of basis functions are used for benchmarking the performance. Furthermore, a theoretical study of temperature effects on the structure and spin-rotation tensor of the H(12)C-(12)CH-DF complex is presented. Here, the temperature dependency of the spin-rotation tensor of the fluorine nucleus can be used to identify experimentally the so far unknown bent isomer of this complex. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that temperature effects on the spin-rotation tensor are investigated.

  10. Efficient calculation of nuclear spin-rotation constants from auxiliary density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zuniga-Gutierrez, Bernardo; Camacho-Gonzalez, Monica; Bendana-Castillo, Alfonso; Simon-Bastida, Patricia; Calaminici, Patrizia; Köster, Andreas M.

    2015-09-14

    The computation of the spin-rotation tensor within the framework of auxiliary density functional theory (ADFT) in combination with the gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) scheme, to treat the gauge origin problem, is presented. For the spin-rotation tensor, the calculation of the magnetic shielding tensor represents the most demanding computational task. Employing the ADFT-GIAO methodology, the central processing unit time for the magnetic shielding tensor calculation can be dramatically reduced. In this work, the quality of spin-rotation constants obtained with the ADFT-GIAO methodology is compared with available experimental data as well as with other theoretical results at the Hartree-Fock and coupled-cluster level of theory. It is found that the agreement between the ADFT-GIAO results and the experiment is good and very similar to the ones obtained by the coupled-cluster single-doubles-perturbative triples-GIAO methodology. With the improved computational performance achieved, the computation of the spin-rotation tensors of large systems or along Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics trajectories becomes feasible in reasonable times. Three models of carbon fullerenes containing hundreds of atoms and thousands of basis functions are used for benchmarking the performance. Furthermore, a theoretical study of temperature effects on the structure and spin-rotation tensor of the H{sup 12}C–{sup 12}CH–DF complex is presented. Here, the temperature dependency of the spin-rotation tensor of the fluorine nucleus can be used to identify experimentally the so far unknown bent isomer of this complex. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that temperature effects on the spin-rotation tensor are investigated.

  11. Accurate Compensation of Attitude Angle Error in a Dual-Axis Rotation Inertial Navigation System

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Rui; Yang, Gongliu; Zou, Rui; Wang, Jing; Li, Jing

    2017-01-01

    In the dual-axis rotation inertial navigation system (INS), besides the gyro error, accelerometer error, rolling misalignment angle error, and the gimbal angle error, the shaft swing angle and the axis non-orthogonal angle also affect the attitude accuracy. Through the analysis of the structure, we can see that the shaft swing angle and axis non-orthogonal angle will produce coning errors which cause the fluctuation of the attitude. According to the analysis of the rotation vector, it can be seen that the coning error will generate additional drift velocity along the rotating shaft, which can reduce the navigation precision of the system. In this paper, based on the establishment of the modulation average frame, the vector projection is carried out, and then the attitude conversion matrix and the attitude error matrix mainly including the shaft swing angle and axis non-orthogonal are obtained. Because the attitude angles are given under the static condition, the shaft swing angle and the axis non-orthogonal angle are estimated by the static Kalman filter (KF). This kind of KF method has been widely recognized as the standard optimal estimation tool for estimating the parameters such as coning angles (α1 , α2), initial phase angles (ϕ1,ϕ2), and the non-perpendicular angle (η). In order to carry out the system level verification, a dual axis rotation INS is designed. Through simulation and experiments, the results show that the amplitudes of the attitude angles’ variation are reduced by about 20%–30% when the shaft rotates. The attitude error equation is reasonably simplified and the calibration method is accurate enough. The attitude accuracy is further improved. PMID:28304354

  12. Accurate Compensation of Attitude Angle Error in a Dual-Axis Rotation Inertial Navigation System.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Rui; Yang, Gongliu; Zou, Rui; Wang, Jing; Li, Jing

    2017-03-17

    In the dual-axis rotation inertial navigation system (INS), besides the gyro error, accelerometer error, rolling misalignment angle error, and the gimbal angle error, the shaft swing angle and the axis non-orthogonal angle also affect the attitude accuracy. Through the analysis of the structure, we can see that the shaft swing angle and axis non-orthogonal angle will produce coning errors which cause the fluctuation of the attitude. According to the analysis of the rotation vector, it can be seen that the coning error will generate additional drift velocity along the rotating shaft, which can reduce the navigation precision of the system. In this paper, based on the establishment of the modulation average frame, the vector projection is carried out, and then the attitude conversion matrix and the attitude error matrix mainly including the shaft swing angle and axis non-orthogonal are obtained. Because the attitude angles are given under the static condition, the shaft swing angle and the axis non-orthogonal angle are estimated by the static Kalman filter (KF). This kind of KF method has been widely recognized as the standard optimal estimation tool for estimating the parameters such as coning angles (α₁ , α₂), initial phase angles (ϕ₁,ϕ₂), and the non-perpendicular angle (η). In order to carry out the system level verification, a dual axis rotation INS is designed. Through simulation and experiments, the results show that the amplitudes of the attitude angles' variation are reduced by about 20%-30% when the shaft rotates. The attitude error equation is reasonably simplified and the calibration method is accurate enough. The attitude accuracy is further improved.

  13. High-resolution FTIR analysis and rotational constants for the ν12 band of ethylene-1-13C (13C12CH4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabona, M. G.; Tan, T. L.; Woo, J. Q.

    2014-11-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectrum of the ν12 fundamental band of ethylene-1-13C (or 13C12CH4) was recorded in the frequency range of 1350-1510 cm-1 with an unapodized resolution of 0.0063 cm-1. The upper state (ν12 = 1) and ground state rotational constants derived in the present analysis cover a wide wavenumber range and high J and Ka (J = 41 and Ka = 14). By assigning and fitting 1602 infrared transitions using Watson's A-reduced Hamiltonian in the Ir representation, upper state (ν12 = 1) constants consisting of three rotational, five quartic and two sextic constants were more accurately determined. The root-mean-square deviation of the fit was 0.00030 cm-1. Ground state rotational constants were also improved from the fit of 808 ground state combination differences (GSCDs) with a root-mean-square deviation of 0.00032 cm-1. The unperturbed A-type ν12 band is centered at 1439.34612(2) cm-1. The inertial defect Δ of 0.05381(8) μÅ2 for the ground state has been derived using the ground state rotational constants obtained from this work.

  14. Cooling achieved by rotating an anisotropic superconductor in a constant magnetic field: A new perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Manh-Huong; Mandrus, David

    2016-12-01

    A new type of rotary coolers based on the temperature change (Δ Trot ) of an anisotropic superconductor when rotated in a constant magnetic field is proposed. We show that at low temperature the Sommerfeld coefficient γ (B ,Θ ) of a single crystalline superconductor, such as MgB2 and NbS2, sensitively depends on the applied magnetic field (B) and the orientation of the crystal axis (Θ ) , which is related to the electronic entropy (SE) and temperature (T) via the expression: SE=γ T . A simple rotation of the crystal from one axis to one another in a constant magnetic field results in a change in γ and hence SE: Δ SE =Δ γ T . A temperature change -Δ Trot ˜ 0.94 K from a bath temperature of 2.5 K is achieved by simply rotating the single crystal MgB2 by 90° with respect to the c-axis direction in a fixed field of 2 T. Δ Trot can be tuned by adjusting the strength of B within a wide magnetic field range. Our study paves the way for development of new materials and cryogenic refrigerators that are potentially more energy-efficient, simplified, and compact.

  15. Translational and Rotational Diffusion Constants of Tobacco Mosaic Virus from Rayleigh Linewidths

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Herman Z.; Carlson, Francis D.; Herbert, Thomas J.; Woods, Gary

    1969-01-01

    The translational and rotational diffusion constants of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) have been determined from homodyne and heterodyne measurements of the spectrum of laser light scattered from dilute aqueous solutions of TMV. Our results for the translational and rotational constants respectively, reduced to 20°C, are: DT = 0.280 ± 0.006 × 10-7 cm2/sec, and DR = 320 ± 18 sec-1. We include a theoretical derivation of the spectrum of light scattered from rod-shaped molecules which reproduces results obtained previously by Pecora, but which is specialized at the outset to the problem of dilute solutions so that simple single-particle correlation functions may be utilized. An analysis of the photocurrent spectrum for both the homodyne and heterodyne detection schemes is given. Various data reduction schemes utilized in the analysis of our spectra are described in some detail, and our results are compared with values of the diffusion constants obtained from other experiments. PMID:5778184

  16. Rotational Constants for M-Methylbenzaldehyde a Study in Low Barrier Torsional Splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirar, Amanda J.; Hotopp, Kelly M.; Wilcox, David S.; Dian, Brian C.

    2010-06-01

    We present the ground state spectrum for m-methylbenzaldehyde taken with a chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectrometer. The presence of a methyl rotor on the molecule introduces a threefold internal rotation barrier. Tunneling through this barrier leads to splitting of the torsional energy level degeneracy into A and E states. Theory predicts a low torsional barrier for both the cis and trans conformers, which leads to large splitting in the frequency spectrum. The A states are simulated using the rigid rotor approximation and subsequent distortion terms. In order to predict the E states, a V3 parameter must be determined that correlates to the torsional barrier. All four possible species have been fit and parameters will be presented, including rotational constants, distortion terms and V3 values.

  17. Recent Results on the Accurate Measurements of the Dielectric Constant of Seawater at 1.413GHZ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, R.H.; Tarkocin, Y.; Utku, C.; Le Vine, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    Measurements of the complex. dielectric constant of seawater at 30.00 psu, 35.00 psu and 38.27 psu over the temperature range from 5 C to 3 5 at 1.413 GHz are given and compared with the Klein-Swift results. A resonant cavity technique is used. The calibration constant used in the cavity perturbation formulas is determined experimentally using methanol and ethanediol (ethylene glycol) as reference liquids. Analysis of the data shows that the measurements are accurate to better than 1.0% in almost all cases studied.

  18. Effects of Constant Time Delay Procedure on the Halliwick's Method of Swimming Rotation Skills for Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, Ilker; Konukman, Ferman; Birkan, Binyamin; Ozen, Arzu; Yanardag, Mehmet; Camursoy, Ilhan

    2010-01-01

    Effects of a constant time delay procedure on the Halliwick's method of swimming rotation skills (i.e., vertical and lateral rotation) for children with autism were investigated. A single subject multiple baseline model across behaviors with probe conditions was used. Participants were three boys, 8-9 years old. Data were collected over a 10-week…

  19. Reliable Spectroscopic Constants for CCH-, NH2- and Their Isotopomers from an Accurate Potential Energy Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Schwenke, David W.; Chaban, Galina M.

    2005-01-01

    Accurate quartic force fields have been determined for the CCH- and NH2- molecular anions using the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T). Very large one-particle basis sets have been used including diffuse functions and up through g-type functions. Correlation of the nitrogen and carbon core electrons has been included, as well as other "small" effects, such as the diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction, and basis set extrapolation, and corrections for higher-order correlation effects and scalar relativistic effects. Fundamental vibrational frequencies have been computed using standard second-order perturbation theory as well as variational methods. Comparison with the available experimental data is presented and discussed. The implications of our research for the astronomical observation of molecular anions will be discussed.

  20. Charged rotating black holes in Einstein-Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory with a negative cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blázquez-Salcedo, Jose Luis; Kunz, Jutta; Navarro-Lérida, Francisco; Radu, Eugen

    2017-03-01

    We consider rotating black hole solutions in five-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory with a negative cosmological constant and a generic value of the Chern-Simons coupling constant λ . Using both analytical and numerical techniques, we focus on cohomogeneity-1 configurations, with two equal-magnitude angular momenta, which approach at infinity a globally anti-de Sitter background. We find that the generic solutions share a number of basic properties with the known Cvetič, Lü, and Pope black holes which have λ =1 . New features occur as well; for example, when the Chern-Simons coupling constant exceeds a critical value, the solutions are no longer uniquely determined by their global charges. Moreover, the black holes possess radial excitations which can be labelled by the node number of the magnetic gauge potential function. Solutions with small values of λ possess other distinct features. For instance, the extremal black holes there form two disconnected branches, while not all near-horizon solutions are associated with global solutions.

  1. Detection of the N = 3-2 transition of CCH in Orion and determination of the molecular rotational constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziurys, L. M.; Saykally, R. J.; Plambeck, R. L.; Erickson, N. R.

    1982-03-01

    We report the detection of five hyperfine components of the N = 3-2 transition of CCH in Orion A. From an analysis of this data combined with N = 1-0 data from previous observations, the rotational constants (B0 and D0) were determined, and the values of the fine structure (γ) and hyperfine constants (b, c) were improved. We predict the frequencies of additional rotational transitions of CCH up to N = 5-4. A rotational temperature and column density are estimated on the basis of the 3-2 data.

  2. SPARC: Mass Models for 175 Disk Galaxies with Spitzer Photometry and Accurate Rotation Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelli, Federico; McGaugh, Stacy S.; Schombert, James M.

    2016-12-01

    We introduce SPARC (Spitzer Photometry and Accurate Rotation Curves): a sample of 175 nearby galaxies with new surface photometry at 3.6 μm and high-quality rotation curves from previous H i/Hα studies. SPARC spans a broad range of morphologies (S0 to Irr), luminosities (∼5 dex), and surface brightnesses (∼4 dex). We derive [3.6] surface photometry and study structural relations of stellar and gas disks. We find that both the stellar mass–H i mass relation and the stellar radius–H i radius relation have significant intrinsic scatter, while the H i mass–radius relation is extremely tight. We build detailed mass models and quantify the ratio of baryonic to observed velocity (V bar/V obs) for different characteristic radii and values of the stellar mass-to-light ratio (ϒ⋆) at [3.6]. Assuming ϒ⋆ ≃ 0.5 M ⊙/L ⊙ (as suggested by stellar population models), we find that (i) the gas fraction linearly correlates with total luminosity (ii) the transition from star-dominated to gas-dominated galaxies roughly corresponds to the transition from spiral galaxies to dwarf irregulars, in line with density wave theory; and (iii) V bar/V obs varies with luminosity and surface brightness: high-mass, high-surface-brightness galaxies are nearly maximal, while low-mass, low-surface-brightness galaxies are submaximal. These basic properties are lost for low values of ϒ⋆ ≃ 0.2 M ⊙/L ⊙ as suggested by the DiskMass survey. The mean maximum-disk limit in bright galaxies is ϒ⋆ ≃ 0.7 M ⊙/L ⊙ at [3.6]. The SPARC data are publicly available and represent an ideal test bed for models of galaxy formation.

  3. Control circuitry using electronic emulation of a synchro signal for accurate control of position and rate of rotation for shafts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, David E. (Inventor); Smith, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The invention disclosed is a digital circuit which emulates a synchro signal in a synchro-resolver follower system for precise control of shaft position and rotation at very low rotational rates. The invention replaces the synchro and drive motor in a synchro-resolver follower system with a digital and analog synchro emulation circuit for generating the resolver control signal. The synchro emulation circuit includes amplitude modulation means to provide relatively high frequency resolver excitation signals for accurate resolver response even with very low shaft rotation rates.

  4. Control Circuitry Using Electronic Emulation of a Synchro Signal for Accurate Control of Position and Rate of Rotation for Shafts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, David E. (Inventor); Smith, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    The invention herein disclosed is a digital circuit which emulates a synchro signal in a synchro-resolver follower system for precise control of shaft position and rotation at very low rotational rates. The subject invention replaces the synchro and drive motor in a synchroresolver follower system with a digital and analog synchro emulation circuit for generating the resolver control signal. The synchro emulation circuit includes amplitude modulation means to provide relatively high frequency resolver excitation signals for accurate resolver response even with very low shaft rotation rates.

  5. Accurate spectroscopy of polycyclic aromatic compounds: from the rotational spectrum of fluoren-9-one in the millimeter wave region to its infrared spectrum.

    PubMed

    Maris, Assimo; Calabrese, Camilla; Melandri, Sonia; Blanco, Susana

    2015-01-14

    The rotational spectrum of fluoren-9-one, a small oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, has been recorded and assigned in the 52-74.4 GHz region. The determined small negative value of the inertia defect (-0.3 u Å(2)) has been explained in terms of vibrational-rotational coupling constants calculated at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Vibrational anharmonic analysis together with second-order vibrational perturbation theory approximation was applied both to fluorenone and its reduced form, fluorene, to predict the mid- and near-infrared spectra. The data presented here give precise indication on the fluorenone ground state structure, allow for an accurate spectral characterization in the millimeter wave and infrared regions, and hopefully will facilitate extensive radio astronomical searches with large radio telescopes.

  6. Accurate Measurements of Multiple-Bond 13C- 1H Coupling Constants from Phase-Sensitive 2D INEPT Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Keyang

    1999-10-01

    Measurements of multiple-bond 13C-1H coupling constants are of great interest for the assignment of nonprotonated 13C resonances and the elucidation of molecular conformation in solution. Usually, the heteronuclear multiple-bond coupling constants were measured either by the JCH splittings mostly in selective 2D spectra or in 3D spectra, which are time consuming, or by the cross peak intensity analysis in 2D quantitative heteronuclear J correlation spectra (1994, G. Zhu, A. Renwick, and A. Bax, J. Magn. Reson. A 110, 257; 1994, A. Bax, G. W. Vuister, S. Grzesiek, F. Delaglio, A. C. Wang, R. Tschudin, and G. Zhu, Methods Enzymol. 239, 79.), which suffer from the accuracy problem caused by the signal-to-noise ratio and the nonpure absorptive peak patterns. Concerted incrementation of the duration for developing proton antiphase magnetization with respect to carbon-13 and the evolution time for proton chemical shift in different steps in a modified INEPT pulse sequence provides a new method for accurate measurements of heteronuclear multiple-bond coupling constants in a single 2D experiment.

  7. A Numerical Inversion of the Perrin Equations for Rotational Diffusion Constants for Ellipsoids of Revolution by Iterative Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Wright, A. Kent; Duncan, Robert C.; Beekman, Karen A.

    1973-01-01

    The rotational diffusion coefficients R1 and R3 for ellipsoids of revolution are shown to represent another pair of hydrodynamic data to obtain size and shape with theories by Sadron and Scheraga-Mandelkern. An iterative numerical technique is presented which allows the semiaxes to be determined from the Perrin equations for rotational diffusion constants. The use of this inversion technique is illustrated by application to literature data from dielectric dispersion studies. PMID:4726879

  8. A Simple yet Accurate Method for Students to Determine Asteroid Rotation Periods from Fragmented Light Curve Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beare, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    Professional astronomers use specialized software not normally available to students to determine the rotation periods of asteroids from fragmented light curve data. This paper describes a simple yet accurate method based on Microsoft Excel[R] that enables students to find periods in asteroid light curve and other discontinuous time series data of…

  9. Bound state potential energy surface construction: ab initio zero-point energies and vibrationally averaged rotational constants.

    PubMed

    Bettens, Ryan P A

    2003-01-15

    Collins' method of interpolating a potential energy surface (PES) from quantum chemical calculations for reactive systems (Jordan, M. J. T.; Thompson, K. C.; Collins, M. A. J. Chem. Phys. 1995, 102, 5647. Thompson, K. C.; Jordan, M. J. T.; Collins, M. A. J. Chem. Phys. 1998, 108, 8302. Bettens, R. P. A.; Collins, M. A. J. Chem. Phys. 1999, 111, 816) has been applied to a bound state problem. The interpolation method has been combined for the first time with quantum diffusion Monte Carlo calculations to obtain an accurate ground state zero-point energy, the vibrationally average rotational constants, and the vibrationally averaged internal coordinates. In particular, the system studied was fluoromethane using a composite method approximating the QCISD(T)/6-311++G(2df,2p) level of theory. The approach adopted in this work (a) is fully automated, (b) is fully ab initio, (c) includes all nine nuclear degrees of freedom, (d) requires no assumption of the functional form of the PES, (e) possesses the full symmetry of the system, (f) does not involve fitting any parameters of any kind, and (g) is generally applicable to any system amenable to quantum chemical calculations and Collins' interpolation method. The calculated zero-point energy agrees to within 0.2% of its current best estimate. A0 and B0 are within 0.9 and 0.3%, respectively, of experiment.

  10. Highly Accurate Quartic Force Fields, Vibrational Frequencies, and Spectroscopic Constants for Cyclic and Linear C3H3(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xinchuan; Taylor, Peter R.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    High levels of theory have been used to compute quartic force fields (QFFs) for the cyclic and linear forms of the C H + molecular cation, referred to as c-C H + and I-C H +. Specifically the 33 3333 singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T), has been used in conjunction with extrapolation to the one-particle basis set limit and corrections for scalar relativity and core correlation have been included. The QFFs have been used to compute highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and other spectroscopic constants using both vibrational 2nd-order perturbation theory and variational methods to solve the nuclear Schroedinger equation. Agreement between our best computed fundamental vibrational frequencies and recent infrared photodissociation experiments is reasonable for most bands, but there are a few exceptions. Possible sources for the discrepancies are discussed. We determine the energy difference between the cyclic and linear forms of C H +, 33 obtaining 27.9 kcal/mol at 0 K, which should be the most reliable available. It is expected that the fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants presented here for c-C H + 33 and I-C H + are the most reliable available for the free gas-phase species and it is hoped that 33 these will be useful in the assignment of future high-resolution laboratory experiments or astronomical observations.

  11. An Accurate Calibration Method Based on Velocity in a Rotational Inertial Navigation System.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Lei; Liu, Zengjun; Feng, Peide

    2015-07-28

    Rotation modulation is an effective method to enhance the accuracy of an inertial navigation system (INS) by modulating the gyroscope drifts and accelerometer bias errors into periodically varying components. The typical RINS drives the inertial measurement unit (IMU) rotation along the vertical axis and the horizontal sensors' errors are modulated, however, the azimuth angle error is closely related to vertical gyro drift, and the vertical gyro drift also should be modulated effectively. In this paper, a new rotation strategy in a dual-axis rotational INS (RINS) is proposed and the drifts of three gyros could be modulated, respectively. Experimental results from a real dual-axis RINS demonstrate that the maximum azimuth angle error is decreased from 0.04° to less than 0.01° during 1 h. Most importantly, the changing of rotation strategy leads to some additional errors in the velocity which is unacceptable in a high-precision INS. Then the paper studies the basic reason underlying horizontal velocity errors in detail and a relevant new calibration method is designed. Experimental results show that after calibration and compensation, the fluctuation and stages in the velocity curve disappear and velocity precision is improved.

  12. An Accurate Calibration Method Based on Velocity in a Rotational Inertial Navigation System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Lei; Liu, Zengjun; Feng, Peide

    2015-01-01

    Rotation modulation is an effective method to enhance the accuracy of an inertial navigation system (INS) by modulating the gyroscope drifts and accelerometer bias errors into periodically varying components. The typical RINS drives the inertial measurement unit (IMU) rotation along the vertical axis and the horizontal sensors’ errors are modulated, however, the azimuth angle error is closely related to vertical gyro drift, and the vertical gyro drift also should be modulated effectively. In this paper, a new rotation strategy in a dual-axis rotational INS (RINS) is proposed and the drifts of three gyros could be modulated, respectively. Experimental results from a real dual-axis RINS demonstrate that the maximum azimuth angle error is decreased from 0.04° to less than 0.01° during 1 h. Most importantly, the changing of rotation strategy leads to some additional errors in the velocity which is unacceptable in a high-precision INS. Then the paper studies the basic reason underlying horizontal velocity errors in detail and a relevant new calibration method is designed. Experimental results show that after calibration and compensation, the fluctuation and stages in the velocity curve disappear and velocity precision is improved. PMID:26225983

  13. THE HYPERFINE STRUCTURE OF THE ROTATIONAL SPECTRUM OF HDO AND ITS EXTENSION TO THE THz REGION: ACCURATE REST FREQUENCIES AND SPECTROSCOPIC PARAMETERS FOR ASTROPHYSICAL OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzoli, Gabriele; Lattanzi, Valerio; Puzzarini, Cristina; Alonso, José Luis; Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-06-10

    The rotational spectrum of the mono-deuterated isotopologue of water, HD{sup 16}O, has been investigated in the millimeter- and submillimeter-wave frequency regions, up to 1.6 THz. The Lamb-dip technique has been exploited to obtain sub-Doppler resolution and to resolve the hyperfine (hf) structure due to the deuterium and hydrogen nuclei, thus enabling the accurate determination of the corresponding hf parameters. Their experimental determination has been supported by high-level quantum-chemical calculations. The Lamb-dip measurements have been supplemented by Doppler-limited measurements (weak high-J and high-frequency transitions) in order to extend the predictive capability of the available spectroscopic constants. The possibility of resolving hf splittings in astronomical spectra has been discussed.

  14. State-to-state rotational phase coherence effect on the vibration-rotation band shape - An accurate quantum calculation for CO-He

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boissoles, J.; Boulet, C.; Robert, D.; Green, S.

    1989-01-01

    Accurate coupled state calculations of line coupling are performed for infrared lines of carbon monoxide perturbed by helium. Such calculations lead to both real and imaginary line couplings. For the first time, the effect of this imaginary line couplings, connected with state-to-state rotational phase coherences, on infrared band shape, is analyzed. An extension of detailed balance principle to the complex plane is suggested from the present computed off-diagonal cross sections. This allows us to understand the physical mechanism underlying the weak effect of phase coherences on CO-He infrared band shape.

  15. Benchmarking density-functional-theory calculations of rotational g tensors and magnetizabilities using accurate coupled-cluster calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutnæs, Ola B.; Teale, Andrew M.; Helgaker, Trygve; Tozer, David J.; Ruud, Kenneth; Gauss, Jürgen

    2009-10-01

    An accurate set of benchmark rotational g tensors and magnetizabilities are calculated using coupled-cluster singles-doubles (CCSD) theory and coupled-cluster single-doubles-perturbative-triples [CCSD(T)] theory, in a variety of basis sets consisting of (rotational) London atomic orbitals. The accuracy of the results obtained is established for the rotational g tensors by careful comparison with experimental data, taking into account zero-point vibrational corrections. After an analysis of the basis sets employed, extrapolation techniques are used to provide estimates of the basis-set-limit quantities, thereby establishing an accurate benchmark data set. The utility of the data set is demonstrated by examining a wide variety of density functionals for the calculation of these properties. None of the density-functional methods are competitive with the CCSD or CCSD(T) methods. The need for a careful consideration of vibrational effects is clearly illustrated. Finally, the pure coupled-cluster results are compared with the results of density-functional calculations constrained to give the same electronic density. The importance of current dependence in exchange-correlation functionals is discussed in light of this comparison.

  16. Accurate prediction of the optical rotation and NMR properties for highly flexible chiral natural products.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Muhammad Ali; Andreassend, Sarah K; Keyzers, Robert A; Lein, Matthias

    2016-09-21

    Despite advances in electronic structure theory the theoretical prediction of spectroscopic properties remains a computational challenge. This is especially true for natural products that exhibit very large conformational freedom and hence need to be sampled over many different accessible conformations. We report a strategy, which is able to predict NMR chemical shifts and more elusive properties like the optical rotation with great precision, through step-wise incremental increases of the conformational degrees of freedom. The application of this method is demonstrated for 3-epi-xestoaminol C, a chiral natural compound with a long, linear alkyl chain of 14 carbon atoms. Experimental NMR and [α]D values are reported to validate the results of the density functional theory calculations.

  17. Excited vibrational level rotational constants for SiC2: A sensitive molecular diagnostic for astrophysical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Lee, Timothy J.; Müller, Holger S. P.

    2015-11-01

    Silacyclopropynylidene, SiC2, is a known and highly abundant circumstellar molecule. Its spectrum has been established as a major component of lines observed toward the carbon-rich star IRC +10216 (CW Leonis). It has been detected in its low-lying v3 = 1 and 2 vibrational states as well as in various isotopic compositions. Increasing sensitivity and spatial resolution will enable many more emission or absorption lines to be detected. In order to detect new molecular species, unassigned lines of known species must be identified. This work uses established ab initio quartic force fields to produce data necessary for this classification of lines related to SiC2. Agreement between the theoretical vibrational frequencies and known rotational and spectroscopic constants is quite good, as good as 5 cm-1 and 3 MHz, respectively in some cases. In addition, experimentally unknown vibrational frequencies and rotational constants are provided for the first overtones and combination bands in addition to 3ν3, the second overtone of the low-lying antisymmetric stretch/carbide rotation mode. Frequencies of v3 = 3 low-J rotational transitions of the main isotopic species are also estimated from published data for v3 ≤ 2. Further, we determine rotational and centrifugal distortion parameters for which in most cases vibrational effects due to the ν3 mode were reduced to first, and in several cases also to second order. These values may approximate equilibrium values better than the ground state values. The data produced herein will aid in the experimental and observational characterization of this known astromolecule in order to identify some of the unassigned lines for a known entity.

  18. Accurate Feeding of Nanoantenna by Singular Optics for Nanoscale Translational and Rotational Displacement Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Zheng; Wei, Lei; Adam, A. J. L.; Urbach, H. P.; Du, Luping

    2016-09-01

    Identifying subwavelength objects and displacements is of crucial importance in optical nanometrology. We show in this Letter that nanoantennas with subwavelength structures can be excited precisely by incident beams with singularity. This accurate feeding beyond the diffraction limit can lead to dynamic control of the unidirectional scattering in the far field. The combination of the field discontinuity of the incoming singular beam with the rapid phase variation near the antenna leads to remarkable sensitivity of the far-field scattering to the displacement at a scale much smaller than the wavelength. This Letter introduces a far-field deep subwavelength position detection method based on the interaction of singular optics with nanoantennas.

  19. Observation of b2 symmetry vibrational levels of the SO2C 1B2 state: Vibrational level staggering, Coriolis interactions, and rotation-vibration constants

    DOE PAGES

    Park, G. Barratt; Jiang, Jun; Saladrigas, Catherine A.; ...

    2016-04-14

    Here, the C 1B2 state of SO2 has a double-minimum potential in the antisymmetric stretch coordinate, such that the minimum energy geometry has nonequivalent SO bond lengths. However, low-lying levels with odd quanta of antisymmetric stretch (b2 vibrational symmetry) have not previously been observed because transitions into these levels from the zero-point level of the X~ state are vibronically forbidden. We use IR-UV double resonance to observe the b2 vibrational levels of the C state below 1600 cm–1 of vibrational excitation. This enables a direct characterization of the vibrational level staggering that results from the double-minimum potential. In addition, itmore » allows us to deperturb the strong c-axis Coriolis interactions between levels of a1 and b2 vibrational symmetry, and to determine accurately the vibrational dependence of the rotational constants in the distorted C electronic state.« less

  20. Observation of b2 symmetry vibrational levels of the SO2 C̃ (1)B2 state: Vibrational level staggering, Coriolis interactions, and rotation-vibration constants.

    PubMed

    Park, G Barratt; Jiang, Jun; Saladrigas, Catherine A; Field, Robert W

    2016-04-14

    The C̃ (1)B2 state of SO2 has a double-minimum potential in the antisymmetric stretch coordinate, such that the minimum energy geometry has nonequivalent SO bond lengths. However, low-lying levels with odd quanta of antisymmetric stretch (b2 vibrational symmetry) have not previously been observed because transitions into these levels from the zero-point level of the X̃ state are vibronically forbidden. We use IR-UV double resonance to observe the b2 vibrational levels of the C̃ state below 1600 cm(-1) of vibrational excitation. This enables a direct characterization of the vibrational level staggering that results from the double-minimum potential. In addition, it allows us to deperturb the strong c-axis Coriolis interactions between levels of a1 and b2 vibrational symmetry and to determine accurately the vibrational dependence of the rotational constants in the distorted C̃ electronic state.

  1. Torsion-vibration coupling in S1 toluene: Implications for IVR, the torsional barrier height, and rotational constants.

    PubMed

    Gascooke, Jason R; Virgo, Edwina A; Lawrance, Warren D

    2015-07-28

    We have examined the S1←S0 transition of toluene in the region from the 0(0)(0) band to ∼210 cm(-1) above it. The spectrum reveals methyl rotor levels of 0(0) toluene up to m = 6 and of the lowest frequency vibration, 20(1), up to m = 4. The rotor levels of both 20(1) and 0(0) are perturbed by torsion-vibration coupling. The inclusion of torsion-vibration coupling leads to the S1 torsional barrier, V6, being revised from -26.376 cm(-1) to -5.59 cm(-1). The torsion-vibration coupling constant is determined to be 21.1 cm(-1). This situation is the S1 analogue of that recently reported for S0 toluene [Gascooke et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 024315 (2015)]. Torsion-vibration coupling alters both the rotor band positions and the rotational contours, which particularly affects the rotational constants associated with motion around the a-axis, about which the methyl group rotates. Every vibrational state (indicated generically by X) will be involved in the corresponding X - X20(1) torsion-vibration coupling; so, this interaction permeates the vib-rotor manifold, providing a mechanism to enhance intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution.

  2. Constants of motion for constrained Hamiltonian systems: A particle around a charged rotating black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Igata, Takahisa; Ishihara, Hideki; Koike, Tatsuhiko

    2011-03-15

    We discuss constants of motion of a particle under an external field in a curved spacetime, taking into account the Hamiltonian constraint, which arises from the reparametrization invariance of the particle orbit. As the necessary and sufficient condition for the existence of a constant of motion, we obtain a set of equations with a hierarchical structure, which is understood as a generalization of the Killing tensor equation. It is also a generalization of the conventional argument in that it includes the case when the conservation condition holds only on the constraint surface in the phase space. In that case, it is shown that the constant of motion is associated with a conformal Killing tensor. We apply the hierarchical equations and find constants of motion in the case of a charged particle in an electromagnetic field in black hole spacetimes. We also demonstrate that gravitational and electromagnetic fields exist in which a charged particle has a constant of motion associated with a conformal Killing tensor.

  3. A mathematical model for constant and intermittent batch drying of grains in a novel rotating jet spouted bed

    SciTech Connect

    Jumah, R.Y.; Mujumdar, A.S.; Raghavan, G.S.V.

    1996-05-01

    A diffusion-based mathematical model is presented for batch drying of corn in a novel rotating jet spouted bed device under constant as well as intermittent drying conditions. Such a device is suited for drying of large particles (e.g. grains, beans, seeds, etc.) for which internal heat and mass transfer rates control the drying kinetics. Based on literature data for moisture diffusivities the model predictions are compared with experimental data for both continuous and time-dependent air supply and/or heat input. Effects of relevant parameters are evaluated and discussed in the light of potential practical applications. 44 refs.

  4. (SO2)-S-34-O-16: High-resolution analysis of the (030),(101), (111), (002) and (201) vibrational states; determination of equilibrium rotational constants for sulfur dioxide and anharmonic vibrational constants

    SciTech Connect

    Lafferty, Walter; Flaud, Jean-marie; Ngom, El Hadji A.; Sams, Robert L.

    2009-01-02

    High resolution Fourier transform spectra of a sample of sulfur dioxide, enriched in 34S (95.3%). were completely analyzed leading to a large set of assigned lines. The experimental levels derived from this set of transitions were fit to within their experimental uncertainties using Watson-type Hamiltonians. Precise band centers, rotational and centrifugal distortion constants were determined. The following band centers in cm-1 were obtained: ν0(3ν2)=1538.720198(11), ν0(ν1+ν3)=2475.828004(29), ν0(ν1+ν2+ν3)=2982.118600(20), ν0(2ν3)=2679.800919(35), and ν0(2ν1+ν3)=3598.773915(38). The rotational constants obtained in this work have been fit together with the rotational constants of lower lying vibrational states [ W.J. Lafferty, J.-M. Flaud, R.L. Sams and EL Hadjiabib, in press] to obtain equilibrium constants as well as vibration-rotation constants. These equilibrium constants have been fit together with those of 32S16O2 [J.-M. Flaud and W.J. Lafferty, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 16 (1993) 396-402] leading to an improved equilibrium structure. Finally the observed band centers have been fit to obtain anharmonic rotational constants.

  5. Exact vibrational energies of non-rotating H 2O and D 2O using an accurate ab initio potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Joel M.; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; Zúñiga, Jose

    1988-09-01

    Variationally exact vibrational energies are reported for non-rotating H 2O and D 2O using the recent CCSDT-1 ab initio potential of Bartlett, Cole, Purvis, Ermler, Hsieh and Shavitt as fit to an SPF quartic force field by Ermler. Twenty vibrational states are calculated for H 2O and D 2O and compared with experimental data. The agreement with experiment is fairly good; however, when the second-order bending force constant is reduced slightly, the agreement with experiment improves significantly. For eighteen states of H 2O the largest error is 15 cm -1 and the average absolute error is 6 cm -1. For eight states of D 2O the largest error is 7 cm -1 and the average absolute error is 4 cm -1.

  6. NMR shielding and spin–rotation constants of {sup 175}LuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I) molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Demissie, Taye B.

    2015-12-31

    This presentation demonstrates the relativistic effects on the spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants and shielding spans of {sup 175}LuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I) molecules. The results are obtained from calculations performed using density functional theory (non-relativistic and four-component relativistic) and coupled-cluster calculations. The spin-rotation constants are compared with available experimental values. In most of the molecules studied, relativistic effects make an order of magnitude difference on the NMR absolute shielding constants.

  7. An Accurate Simulation Of Thermoforming And Blow-Molding Processes Using The Space Fiber Rotation (SFR) Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghomari, T.; Ayad, R.; Talbi, N.

    2007-05-01

    This work deals with a non-linear formulation of an axisymmetric hyperelastic solid model for thermoforming and blow-molding processes. It's based on a new kinematic concept labeled SFR (Space Fiber Rotation). The SFR-Axi element model uses a kinematic motion of a space linear fiber in order to obtain more accurate displacement field, without increasing the number of nodes. It improves in a significant way the precision of the linear element Q4 indeed. The corresponding numerical results are comparable and even better, in term of time CPU, with those of the 8-nodes higher order element Q8. A hyperelastic behavior law based on Mooney-Rivlin model has been implemented to allow the model better simulations of forming processes hollow plastic bodies. The numerical results, very promising, are given with considering or not the contact between the polymer.

  8. Millimeter-wave rotational spectrum and molecular constants of diatomic gallium iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, K. P. R.; Schütze-Pahlmann, H.-U.; Hoeft, J.

    1980-03-01

    The gas-phase molecular spectrum of Gal has been detected in the millimeter wavelength region. The molecules are produced by vapourising a mixture of gallium and lead iodide into an evaculated cell. Analysis of the observed rotational transitions yields the following molecular parameters for 69Ga 127I: Y01 = 1706.89645(83) MHz, Y11 = -5.68714(53) MHz, Y21 = 6.329(43) kHz, Y02 = -0.472713(60) kHz, Y12 = 0.472(38) Hz, ω e = 216.38 cm -1, ω exe= 0.471 cm -1, and for 71Ga 127I: y 01 = 1675.72004(71) MHz, Y11 = -5.53277(57) MHz, Y21 = 5.995(34) kHz, Y02 = -0.455700(51) kHz, y12 = 0.522(40) Hz, ω e = 214.37 cm -1, and ω exe = 0.458 cm -1. The equilibrium internuclear distance obtained for Gal is re = 2.574667(12) Å.

  9. SPECTROSCOPIC CONSTANTS AND VIBRATIONAL FREQUENCIES FOR l-C{sub 3}H{sup +} AND ISOTOPOLOGUES FROM HIGHLY ACCURATE QUARTIC FORCE FIELDS: THE DETECTION OF l-C{sub 3}H{sup +} IN THE HORSEHEAD NEBULA PDR QUESTIONED

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Xinchuan; Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2013-05-10

    Very recently, molecular rotational transitions observed in the photon-dominated region of the Horsehead nebula have been attributed to l-C{sub 3}H{sup +}. In an effort to corroborate this finding, we employed state-of-the-art and proven high-accuracy quantum chemical techniques to compute spectroscopic constants for this cation and its isotopologues. Even though the B rotational constant from the fit of the observed spectrum and our computations agree to within 20 MHz, a typical level of accuracy, the D rotational constant differs by more than 40%, while the H rotational constant differs by three orders of magnitude. With the likely errors in the rotational transition energies resulting from this difference in D on the order of 1 MHz for the lowest observed transition (J = 4 {yields} 3) and growing as J increases, the assignment of the observed rotational lines from the Horsehead nebula to l-C{sub 3}H{sup +} is questionable.

  10. Spectroscopic Constants and Vibrational Frequencies for l-C3H+ and Isotopologues from Highly-Accurate Quartic Force Fields: The Detection of l-C3H+ in the Horsehead Nebula PDR Questioned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xinchuan; Fortenberry, Ryan Clifton; Lee, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Very recently, molecular rotational transitions observed in the photon-dominated region of the Horsehead nebula have been attributed to l-C3H+. In an effort to corroborate this finding, we employed state-of-the art and proven high-accuracy quantum chemical techniques to compute spectroscopic constants for this cation and its isotopologues. Even though the B rotational constant from the fit of the observed spectrum and our computations agree to within 20 MHz, a typical level of accuracy, the D rotational constant differs by more than 40%, while the H rotational constant differs by three orders of magnitude. With the likely errors in the rotational transition energies resulting from this difference in D on the order of 1 MHz for the lowest observed transition (J = 4 yields 3) and growing as J increases, the assignment of the observed rotational lines from the Horsehead nebula to l-C3H+ is questionable.

  11. Accurate analytical measurements in the atomic force microscope: a microfabricated spring constant standard potentially traceable to the SI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumpson, Peter J.; Hedley, John

    2003-12-01

    Calibration of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is necessary for the measurement of nanonewton and piconewton forces, which are critical to analytical applications of AFM in the analysis of polymer surfaces, biological structures and organic molecules at nanoscale lateral resolution. We have developed a compact and easy-to-use reference artefact for this calibration, using a method that allows traceability to the SI (Système International). Traceability is crucial to ensure that force measurements by AFM are comparable to those made by optical tweezers and other methods. The new non-contact calibration method measures the spring constant of these artefacts, by a combination of electrical measurements and Doppler velocimetry. The device was fabricated by silicon surface micromachining. The device allows AFM cantilevers to be calibrated quite easily by the 'cantilever-on-reference' method, with our reference device having a spring constant uncertainty of around ± 5% at one standard deviation. A simple substitution of the analogue velocimeter used in this work with a digital model should reduce this uncertainty to around ± 2%. Both are significant improvements on current practice, and allow traceability to the SI for the first time at these nanonewton levels.

  12. S(3) HMBC: Spin-State-Selective HMBC for accurate measurement of homonuclear coupling constants. Application to strychnine yielding thirteen hitherto unreported J(HH).

    PubMed

    Kjaerulff, Louise; Benie, Andrew J; Hoeck, Casper; Gotfredsen, Charlotte H; Sørensen, Ole W

    2016-02-01

    A novel method, Spin-State-Selective (S(3)) HMBC, for accurate measurement of homonuclear coupling constants is introduced. As characteristic for S(3) techniques, S(3) HMBC yields independent subspectra corresponding to particular passive spin states and thus allows determination of coupling constants between detected spins and homonuclear coupling partners along with relative signs. In the presented S(3) HMBC experiment, spin-state selection occurs via large one-bond coupling constants ensuring high editing accuracy and unequivocal sign determination of the homonuclear long-range relative to the associated one-bond coupling constant. The sensitivity of the new experiment is comparable to that of regular edited HMBC and the accuracy of the J/RDC measurement is as usual for E.COSY and S(3)-type experiments independent of the size of the homonuclear coupling constant of interest. The merits of the method are demonstrated by an application to strychnine where thirteen J(HH) coupling constants not previously reported could be measured.

  13. Microwave spectrum, structure, dipole moment, quadrupole coupling constants, and barrier to internal rotation of methoxyborane, CH 3OBH 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Takeo, Harutoshi; Matsumura, Chi

    1986-03-01

    A short-lived boron compound, CH 3OBH 2, has been identified by microwave spectroscopy as an intermediate in the reaction of diborane with methanol or diborane with formaldehyde. The spectrum shows large splittings due to the internal rotation of the methyl top. An analysis of the spectrum by use of the principal axis method leads to the following parameters for the normal species: A = 50684.2(13) MHz, B = 10284.41(11) MHz, C = 9024.80(11) MHz, θ = 26.06(18)°, s = 15.983(5), I α = 3.226(11) u Å2, and V3 = 740(5) cal/mol. The hyperfine structure due to the 11B nuclear quadrupole moment has also been analyzed, and χaa = -1.90(24) MHz, χbb = -1.91(24) MHz, and χcc = 3.81(22) MHz have been obtained. The total electric dipole moment determined for the normal species is μ = 1.61(10) D. The molecular structure has been determined from the rotational constants of 10B, 13C, CH 3OBD 2, CD 3OBH 2, and CHD 2OBH 2 species with the aid of an ab initio MO calculation.

  14. Benchmark studies of the Bending Corrected Rotating Linear Model (BCRLM) reactive scattering code: Implications for accurate quantum calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, E.F.; Darakjian, Z. . Dept. of Chemistry); Walker, R.B. )

    1990-01-01

    The Bending Corrected Rotating Linear Model (BCRLM), developed by Hayes and Walker, is a simple approximation to the true multidimensional scattering problem for reaction of the type: A + BC {yields} AB + C. While the BCRLM method is simpler than methods designed to obtain accurate three dimensional quantum scattering results, this turns out to be a major advantage in terms of our benchmarking studies. The computer code used to obtain BCRLM scattering results is written for the most part in standard FORTRAN and has been reported to several scalar, vector, and parallel architecture computers including the IBM 3090-600J, the Cray XMP and YMP, the Ardent Titan, IBM RISC System/6000, Convex C-1 and the MIPS 2000. Benchmark results will be reported for each of these machines with an emphasis on comparing the scalar, vector, and parallel performance for the standard code with minimum modifications. Detailed analysis of the mapping of the BCRLM approach onto both shared and distributed memory parallel architecture machines indicates the importance of introducing several key changes in the basic strategy and algorithums used to calculate scattering results. This analysis of the BCRLM approach provides some insights into optimal strategies for mapping three dimensional quantum scattering methods, such as the Parker-Pack method, onto shared or distributed memory parallel computers.

  15. Four-Component Relativistic Density-Functional Theory Calculations of Nuclear Spin-Rotation Constants: Relativistic Effects in p-Block Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Malkin, Elena; Demissie, Taye B; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-08-11

    We present an implementation of the nuclear spin-rotation (SR) constants based on the relativistic four-component Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian. This formalism has been implemented in the framework of the Hartree-Fock and Kohn-Sham theory, allowing assessment of both pure and hybrid exchange-correlation functionals. In the density-functional theory (DFT) implementation of the response equations, a noncollinear generalized gradient approximation (GGA) has been used. The present approach enforces a restricted kinetic balance condition for the small-component basis at the integral level, leading to very efficient calculations of the property. We apply the methodology to study relativistic effects on the spin-rotation constants by performing calculations on XHn (n = 1-4) for all elements X in the p-block of the periodic table and comparing the effects of relativity on the nuclear SR tensors to that observed for the nuclear magnetic shielding tensors. Correlation effects as described by the density-functional theory are shown to be significant for the spin-rotation constants, whereas the differences between the use of GGA and hybrid density functionals are much smaller. Our calculated relativistic spin-rotation constants at the DFT level of theory are only in fair agreement with available experimental data. It is shown that the scaling of the relativistic effects for the spin-rotation constants (varying between Z(3.8) and Z(4.5)) is as strong as for the chemical shieldings but with a much smaller prefactor.

  16. Far-Infrared Rotational and Fine-Structure Transition Frequencies and Molecular Constants of 14NO and 15NO in the X2Pi (v = 0) State.

    PubMed

    Varberg; Stroh; Evenson

    1999-07-01

    We have made highly accurate measurements of the absorption spectrum of the 14NO and 15NO isotopomers of nitric oxide in the far-infrared. Pure rotational transitions up to J" = 3712 within the 2Pi1/2 and 2Pi3/2 spin components and several 2Pi3/2 <-- 2Pi1/2 fine-structure transitions were recorded within the ground vibrational state. A least-squares fit to these data combined with some lambda-doubling and rotational transitions measured by previous workers has resulted in accurate values for the rotational, fine, and hyperfine parameters of these two isotopomers. Most of the far-infrared transitions reported here have an experimental uncertainty of about 20 kHz and will be useful for astronomers and atmospheric scientists studying this important molecule. The more accurate calculated frequencies will also be useful as spectroscopic calibration standards. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  17. Blade synchronous vibration measurement based on tip-timing at constant rotating speed without once-per-revolution sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Haotian; Duan, Fajie; Wang, Meng

    2016-01-01

    In this article, a blade synchronous vibration measurement method based on tip-timing at constant rotating speed is presented. This method requires no once-per revolution sensor, which makes it more generally applicable, especially for high pressure compressors of the dual rotor engines. The vibration amplitude and engine order are identified with this method. The theoretical analysis is presented, and the least square method is utilized for vibration parameter identification. The method requires at least four tip-timing sensors if the Campbell diagram is previously known and five sensors if the Campbell diagram is unknown. The method has no strict requirement on the angles among sensors which facilitate the installation of the sensors in the measurement. In some special conditions the method will fail and these conditions are analyzed. Experiments are conducted on a high speed rotor with a fiber based tip-timing system, and the experimental results indicate that the theoretical analysis is correct and the method is feasible.

  18. Accurate Three States Model for Amino Acids with Two Chemically Coupled Titrating Sites in Explicit Solvent Atomistic Constant pH Simulations and pKa Calculations.

    PubMed

    Dobrev, Plamen; Donnini, Serena; Groenhof, Gerrit; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2017-01-10

    Correct protonation of titratable groups in biomolecules is crucial for their accurate description by molecular dynamics simulations. In the context of constant pH simulations, an additional protonation degree of freedom is introduced for each titratable site, allowing the protonation state to change dynamically with changing structure or electrostatics. Here, we extend previous approaches for an accurate description of chemically coupled titrating sites. A second reaction coordinate is used to switch between two tautomeric states of an amino acid with chemically coupled titratable sites, such as aspartate (Asp), glutamate (Glu), and histidine (His). To this aim, we test a scheme involving three protonation states. To facilitate charge neutrality as required for periodic boundary conditions and Particle Mesh Ewald (PME) electrostatics, titration of each respective amino acid is coupled to a "water" molecule that is charged in the opposite direction. Additionally, a force field modification for Amber99sb is introduced and tested for the description of carboxyl group protonation. Our three states model is tested by titration simulations of Asp, Glu, and His, yielding a good agreement, reproducing the correct geometry of the groups in their different protonation forms. We further show that the ion concentration change due to the neutralizing "water" molecules does not significantly affect the protonation free energies of the titratable groups, suggesting that the three states model provides a good description of biomolecular dynamics at constant pH.

  19. Rotational state dependence of rate constants for the reaction of ions with asymmetric top molecules at very low temperatures: application to the N+/H2O system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubernet, M. L.; McCarroll, R.

    1990-12-01

    The adiabatic rotational state method is applied to the study of reactions between ions and polar asymmetric top molecules at very low temperatures. Detailed results of the calculated rate coefficients for the reaction of N+ with H2O are presented. A strong dependence of the rate coefficients on the initial rotational state is observed at low temperatures. In the case of a thermal distribution of rotational states, where the rate constants are summed over a Boltzman distribution, the replacement of the asymmetric top by an average symmetric top, which leads to a considerable simplification of the calculations, appears to be satisfactory. On the other hand, for a non thermal distribution, no such simplifying assumption can be made. In particular, the rate coefficient for a specific initial rotational state is quite sensitive to the orientation of the dipole moment.

  20. Accurate Characterization of the Peptide Linkage in the Gas Phase: a Joint Quantum-Chemical and Rotational Spectroscopy Study of the Glycine Dipeptide Analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Barone, Vincenzo; Largo, Laura; Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L.

    2014-06-01

    Accurate structures of aminoacids in the gas phase have been obtained by joint microwave and quantum-chemical investigations. However, the structure and conformational behavior of α-aminoacids once incorporated into peptide chains are completely different and have not yet been characterized with the same accuracy. To fill this gap, we present here an accurate characterization of the simplest dipeptide analogue (N-acetylglycinamide) involving peptidic bonds. State-of-the-art quantum-chemical computations are complemented by a comprehensive study of the rotational spectrum using a combination of Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy with laser ablation. The coexistence of the C_7 and C_5 conformers has been proved and energetically as well as spectroscopically characterized. This joint theoretical-experimental investigation demonstrated the feasibility of obtaining accurate structures for flexible small biomolecules, thus paving the route to the elucidation of the inherent behavior of peptides.

  1. Rapid and accurate measurement of left ventricular function with a new second-harmonic fast-rotating transducer and semi-automated border detection.

    PubMed

    Krenning, Boudewijn J; Voormolen, Marco M; van Geuns, Robert-Jan; Vletter, W B; Lancée, Charles T; de Jong, Nico; Ten Cate, Folkert J; van der Steen, Anton F W; Roelandt, Jos R T C

    2006-07-01

    Measurement of left ventricular (LV) volume and function are the most common clinical referral questions to the echocardiography laboratory. A fast, practical, and accurate method would offer important advantages to obtain this important information. To validate a new practical method for rapid measurement of LV volume and function. We developed a continuous fast-rotating transducer, with second-harmonic capabilities, for three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE). Fifteen cardiac patients underwent both 3DE and magnetic resonance imaging (reference method) on the same day. 3DE image acquisition was performed during a 10-second breath-hold with a frame rate of 100 frames/sec and a rotational speed of 6 rotations/sec. The individual images were postprocessed with Matlab software using multibeat data fusion. Subsequently, with these images, 12 datasets per cardiac cycle were reconstructed, each comprising seven equidistant cross-sectional images for analysis in the new TomTec 4DLV analysis software, which uses a semi-automated border detection (ABD) algorithm. The ABD requires an average analysis time of 15 minutes per patient. A strong correlation was found between LV end-diastolic volume (r = 0.99; y = 0.95x - 1.14 ml; SEE = 6.5 ml), LV end-systolic volume (r = 0.96; y = 0.89x + 7.91 ml; SEE = 7.0 ml), and LV ejection fraction (r = 0.93; y = 0.69x + 13.36; SEE = 2.4%). Inter- and intraobserver agreement for all measurements was good. The fast-rotating transducer with new ABD software is a dedicated tool for rapid and accurate analysis of LV volume and function.

  2. Performance of phased rotation, conformation and translation function: accurate protein model building with tripeptidic and tetrapeptidic fragments.

    PubMed

    Pavelcík, Frantisek; Václavík, Jirí

    2010-09-01

    The automatic building of protein structures with tripeptidic and tetrapeptidic fragments was investigated. The oligopeptidic conformers were positioned in the electron-density map by a phased rotation, conformation and translation function and refined by a real-space refinement. The number of successfully located fragments lay within the interval 75-95% depending on the resolution and phase quality. The overlaps of partially located fragments were analyzed. The correctly positioned fragments were connected into chains. Chains formed in this way were extended directly into the electron density and a sequence was assigned. In the initial stage of the model building the number of located fragments was between 60% and 95%, but this number could be increased by several cycles of reciprocal-space refinement and automatic model rebuilding. A nearly complete structure can be obtained on the condition that the resolution is reasonable. Computer graphics will only be needed for a final check and small corrections.

  3. Absolute NMR shielding scales and nuclear spin–rotation constants in {sup 175}LuX and {sup 197}AuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br and {sup 127}I)

    SciTech Connect

    Demissie, Taye B. Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth; Jaszuński, Michał

    2015-10-28

    We present nuclear spin–rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, and shielding spans of all the nuclei in {sup 175}LuX and {sup 197}AuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I), calculated using coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles with a perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) correction theory, four-component relativistic density functional theory (relativistic DFT), and non-relativistic DFT. The total nuclear spin–rotation constants determined by adding the relativistic corrections obtained from DFT calculations to the CCSD(T) values are in general in agreement with available experimental data, indicating that the computational approach followed in this study allows us to predict reliable results for the unknown spin–rotation constants in these molecules. The total NMR absolute shielding constants are determined for all the nuclei following the same approach as that applied for the nuclear spin–rotation constants. In most of the molecules, relativistic effects significantly change the computed shielding constants, demonstrating that straightforward application of the non-relativistic formula relating the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin–rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the shielding constants does not yield correct results. We also analyze the origin of the unusually large absolute shielding constant and its relativistic correction of gold in AuF compared to the other gold monohalides.

  4. Absolute NMR shielding scales and nuclear spin-rotation constants in (175)LuX and (197)AuX (X = (19)F, (35)Cl, (79)Br and (127)I).

    PubMed

    Demissie, Taye B; Jaszuński, Michał; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-10-28

    We present nuclear spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, and shielding spans of all the nuclei in (175)LuX and (197)AuX (X = (19)F, (35)Cl, (79)Br, (127)I), calculated using coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles with a perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) correction theory, four-component relativistic density functional theory (relativistic DFT), and non-relativistic DFT. The total nuclear spin-rotation constants determined by adding the relativistic corrections obtained from DFT calculations to the CCSD(T) values are in general in agreement with available experimental data, indicating that the computational approach followed in this study allows us to predict reliable results for the unknown spin-rotation constants in these molecules. The total NMR absolute shielding constants are determined for all the nuclei following the same approach as that applied for the nuclear spin-rotation constants. In most of the molecules, relativistic effects significantly change the computed shielding constants, demonstrating that straightforward application of the non-relativistic formula relating the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin-rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the shielding constants does not yield correct results. We also analyze the origin of the unusually large absolute shielding constant and its relativistic correction of gold in AuF compared to the other gold monohalides.

  5. Absolute NMR shielding scales and nuclear spin-rotation constants in 175LuX and 197AuX (X = 19F, 35Cl, 79Br and 127I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, Taye B.; Jaszuński, Michał; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-10-01

    We present nuclear spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, and shielding spans of all the nuclei in 175LuX and 197AuX (X = 19F, 35Cl, 79Br, 127I), calculated using coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles with a perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) correction theory, four-component relativistic density functional theory (relativistic DFT), and non-relativistic DFT. The total nuclear spin-rotation constants determined by adding the relativistic corrections obtained from DFT calculations to the CCSD(T) values are in general in agreement with available experimental data, indicating that the computational approach followed in this study allows us to predict reliable results for the unknown spin-rotation constants in these molecules. The total NMR absolute shielding constants are determined for all the nuclei following the same approach as that applied for the nuclear spin-rotation constants. In most of the molecules, relativistic effects significantly change the computed shielding constants, demonstrating that straightforward application of the non-relativistic formula relating the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin-rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the shielding constants does not yield correct results. We also analyze the origin of the unusually large absolute shielding constant and its relativistic correction of gold in AuF compared to the other gold monohalides.

  6. The (3000), (4000) and (5000) stretching overtone bands of silane—I. The effect of local-mode vibration on rotational constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qingshi; Zhang, Baoshu; Ma, Yueren; Qian, Haibo

    The (4000) stretching overtone band of SiH 4 has been observed near 8347 cm -1. A symmetric top rotational structure, similar to that observed in the (3000) band of GeH 4: Q.-S. Zhu, B. A. Thrush and A. G. Robiette, Chem. Phys. Lett. 150, 181 (1988); Q.-S. Zhu and B. A. Thrush, J. Chem. Phys. 92, 2691 (1990) [1], and the (3000) and (5000) bands of SiH 4: Q.-S. Zhu, B.-S. Zhang, Y.-R. Ma and H.-B. Qian, Chem. Phys. Lett. 164, 596 (1989) [2], are clearly demonstrated. Three local-mode bands of SiH 4, (3000), (4000) and (5000) are analysed in the symmetric top model. A striking effect of local-mode vibration on rotational constants is observed and accounted for in a classical picture of vibrational localization.

  7. EVALUATION OF ANATOMICAL INTEGRITY USING ULTRASOUND EXAMINATION, AND FUNCTIONAL INTEGRITY USING THE CONSTANT & MURLEY SCORE, OF THE ROTATOR CUFF FOLLOWING ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Glaydson Gomes; França, Flavio de Oliveira; Alves, Freitas José Marcio; Watanabe, Fábio Nagato; Nobre, Leonardo Oliveira; De Almeida Neto, Manoel Augusto; Mendes Da Silva, Marcos André

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the functional and anatomical results from surgical treatment via arthroscopy in cases of complete rupture of the rotator cuff, using ultrasound images and the Constant and Murley functional index to investigate the correlation between them. Methods: 100 patients (110 shoulders) were evaluated. The mean follow-up was 48.8 ± 33.28 months (12 to 141 months). The mean age was 60.25 ± 10.09 (36 to 81 years). Rupture of the supraspinal tendon alone occurred in 85 cases (77%), and in association with the infraspinatus in 20 cases (18%) and subscapularis in four shoulders (4%). An association of supraspinatus, infraspinatus and subscapularis lesions was found in one shoulder (1%). The lesions were classified according to DeOrio and Cofield scores as small/medium in 85 shoulders (77%) and large/extensive in 25 (23%). The clinical results were assessed in accordance with the Constant and Murley criteria. The ultrasound results relate to reports issued by different radiologists. Statistical analysis was carried out using the chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, Student's t test, Pearson's correlation, Kruskal-Wallis correlation and logistic regression (significance: p < 0.05). Results: The mean Constant evaluation was 85.3 ± 10.06 in the normal shoulders and 83.96 ± 8.67 in the operated shoulders (p = 0.224). Excellent and good results were found in 74 shoulders (67%), satisfactory and moderate results in 32 (29%) and poor results in four (4%). The ultrasound evaluation showed 38 shoulders with re-rupture (35%) and absence of rupture in 71 (65%). Among the 74 shoulders (67%) with excellent/good results, 22 (30%) presented re-rupture in the ultrasound report (p = 0.294). Among the four shoulders (4%) with poor results, two (50%) presented reports of intact tendons (p = 0.294). Conclusion: There was no statistically valid correlation between the ultrasound diagnosis and the clinical evaluation of results among the patients who underwent arthroscopic

  8. Accurate determination of pyridine-poly(amidoamine) dendrimer absolute binding constants with the OPLS-AA force field and direct integration of radial distribution functions.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yong; Kaminski, George A

    2005-08-11

    OPLS-AA force field and direct integration of intermolecular radial distribution functions (RDF) were employed to calculate absolute binding constants of pyridine molecules to amino group (NH2) and amide group hydrogen atoms in and first generation poly(amidoamine) dendrimers in chloroform. The average errors in the absolute and relative association constants, as predicted with the calculations, are 14.1% and 10.8%, respectively, which translate into ca. 0.08 and 0.06 kcal/mol errors in the absolute and relative binding free energies. We believe that this level of accuracy proves the applicability of the OPLS-AA, force field, in combination with the direct RDF integration, to reproducing and predicting absolute intermolecular association constants of low magnitudes (ca. 0.2-2.0 range).

  9. Accurate Determination of Pyridine -- Poly (Amidoamine) Dendrimer Absolute Binding Constants with the OPLS-AA Force Field and Direct Integration of Radial Distribution Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yong; Kaminski, George

    2006-03-01

    OPLS-AA force field and direct integration of intermolecular radial distribution functions (RDF) were employed to calculate absolute binding constants of pyridine molecules to NH2 and amide group hydrogen atoms in 0th and 1st generation poly (amidoamine) dendrimers in chloroform. The average errors in the absolute and relative association constants, as predicted with the calculations, are 14.1% and 10.8%, respectively, which translate into ca. 0.08 kcal/mol and 0.06 kcal/mol errors in the absolute and relative binding free energies. We believe that this level of accuracy proves the applicability of the OPLS-AA, force field, in combination with the direct RDF integration, to reproducing and predicting absolute intermolecular association constants of low magnitudes (ca. 0.2 -- 2.0 range).

  10. Fully Coriolis-coupled quantum studies of the H + O2 (upsilon i = 0-2, j i = 0,1) --> OH + O reaction on an accurate potential energy surface: integral cross sections and rate constants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi Ying; Sun, Zhigang; Guo, Hua; Zhang, Dong Hui; Honvault, Pascal; Xie, Daiqian; Lee, Soo-Y

    2008-01-31

    We present accurate quantum calculations of the integral cross section and rate constant for the H + O2 --> OH + O combustion reaction on a recently developed ab initio potential energy surface using parallelized time-dependent and Chebyshev wavepacket methods. Partial wave contributions up to J = 70 were computed with full Coriolis coupling, which enabled us to obtain the initial state-specified integral cross sections up to 2.0 eV of the collision energy and thermal rate constants up to 3000 K. The integral cross sections show a large reaction threshold due to the quantum endothermicity of the reaction, and they monotonically increase with the collision energy. As a result, the temperature dependence of the rate constant is of the Arrhenius type. In addition, it was found that reactivity is enhanced by reactant vibrational excitation. The calculated thermal rate constant shows a significant improvement over that obtained on the DMBE IV potential, but it still underestimates the experimental consensus.

  11. An Example of Wang and Yau's Quasilocal Energy for Constant Radial Spacelike 2-Surfaces in a Maximally Rotating Black Hole Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Shannon; Miller, Warner

    2017-01-01

    We present the first non-trivial illustration of Wang and Yau's quasilocal energy (WYQLE) for a maximally rotating Kerr spacetime. The surfaces for which we compute quasilocal energy (QLE) are axisymmetric closed space like 2-surfaces S with constant radii in Boyer-Lindquist coordinates. There exists a critical radius r* for which these 2-surfaces are isometrically embeddable in R3 . For surfaces with r >=r* , the WYQLE trivially becomes the Brown and York QLE (BYQLE). To fully illustrate Wang and Yau's formulation, we compute the WYQLE for surfaces with r

  12. Accurate equilibrium structures for piperidine and cyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Demaison, Jean; Craig, Norman C; Groner, Peter; Écija, Patricia; Cocinero, Emilio J; Lesarri, Alberto; Rudolph, Heinz Dieter

    2015-03-05

    Extended and improved microwave (MW) measurements are reported for the isotopologues of piperidine. New ground state (GS) rotational constants are fitted to MW transitions with quartic centrifugal distortion constants taken from ab initio calculations. Predicate values for the geometric parameters of piperidine and cyclohexane are found from a high level of ab initio theory including adjustments for basis set dependence and for correlation of the core electrons. Equilibrium rotational constants are obtained from GS rotational constants corrected for vibration-rotation interactions and electronic contributions. Equilibrium structures for piperidine and cyclohexane are fitted by the mixed estimation method. In this method, structural parameters are fitted concurrently to predicate parameters (with appropriate uncertainties) and moments of inertia (with uncertainties). The new structures are regarded as being accurate to 0.001 Å and 0.2°. Comparisons are made between bond parameters in equatorial piperidine and cyclohexane. Another interesting result of this study is that a structure determination is an effective way to check the accuracy of the ground state experimental rotational constants.

  13. Energy disposal and thermal rate constants for the OH + HBr and OH + DBr reactions: quasiclassical trajectory calculations on an accurate potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira-Filho, Antonio G S; Ornellas, Fernando R; Bowman, Joel M

    2014-12-26

    We report reaction cross sections, energy disposal, and rate constants for the OH + HBr → Br + H2O and OH + DBr → Br + HDO reactions from quasiclassical trajectory calculations using an ab initio potential energy surface [ de Oliveira-Filho , A. G. S. ; Ornellas , F. R. ; Bowman , J. M. J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2014 , 5 , 706 - 712 ]. Comparison with available experiments are made and generally show good agreement.

  14. Full-Dimensional Potential Energy and Dipole Moment Surfaces of GeH4 Molecule and Accurate First-Principle Rotationally Resolved Intensity Predictions in the Infrared.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, A V; Rey, M; Rodina, A; Krishna, B M; Tyuterev, Vl G

    2016-11-17

    Nine-dimensional potential energy surface (PES) and dipole moment surface (DMS) of the germane molecule are constructed using extended ab initio CCSD(T) calculations at 19 882 points. PES analytical representation is determined as an expansion in nonlinear symmetry adapted products of orthogonal and internal coordinates involving 340 parameters up to eighth order. Minor empirical refinement of the equilibrium geometry and of four quadratic parameters of the PES computed at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVQZ-DK level of the theory yielded the accuracy below 1 cm(-1) for all experimentally known vibrational band centers of five stable isotopologues of (70)GeH4, (72)GeH4, (73)GeH4, (74)GeH4, and (76)GeH4 up to 8300 cm(-1). The optimized equilibrium bond re = 1.517 594 Å is very close to best ab initio values. Rotational energies up to J = 15 are calculated using potential expansion in normal coordinate tensors with maximum errors of 0.004 and 0.0006 cm(-1) for (74)GeH4 and (76)GeH4. The DMS analytical representation is determined through an expansion in symmetry-adapted products of internal nonlinear coordinates involving 967 parameters up to the sixth order. Vibration-rotation line intensities of five stable germane isotopologues were calculated from purely ab initio DMS using nuclear motion variational calculations with a full account of the tetrahedral symmetry of the molecules. For the first time a good overall agreement of main absorption features with experimental rotationally resolved Pacific Northwest National Laboratory spectra was achieved in the entire range of 700-5300 cm(-1). It was found that very accurate description of state-dependent isotopic shifts is mandatory to correctly describe complex patterns of observed spectra at natural isotopic abundance resulting from the superposition of five stable isotopologues. The data obtained in this work will be made available through the TheoReTS information system.

  15. Beyond transition state theory: accurate description of nuclear quantum effects on the rate and equilibrium constants of chemical reactions using Feynman path integrals.

    PubMed

    Vanícek, Jirí

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear tunneling and other nuclear quantum effects have been shown to play a significant role in molecules as large as enzymes even at physiological temperatures. I discuss how these quantum phenomena can be accounted for rigorously using Feynman path integrals in calculations of the equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects as well as of the temperature dependence of the rate constant. Because these calculations are extremely computationally demanding, special attention is devoted to increasing the computational efficiency by orders of magnitude by employing efficient path integral estimators.

  16. A simple, efficient, and high-order accurate curved sliding-mesh interface approach to spectral difference method on coupled rotating and stationary domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Liang, Chunlei

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a simple, efficient, and high-order accurate sliding-mesh interface approach to the spectral difference (SD) method. We demonstrate the approach by solving the two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations on quadrilateral grids. This approach is an extension of the straight mortar method originally designed for stationary domains [7,8]. Our sliding method creates curved dynamic mortars on sliding-mesh interfaces to couple rotating and stationary domains. On the nonconforming sliding-mesh interfaces, the related variables are first projected from cell faces to mortars to compute common fluxes, and then the common fluxes are projected back from the mortars to the cell faces to ensure conservation. To verify the spatial order of accuracy of the sliding-mesh spectral difference (SSD) method, both inviscid and viscous flow cases are tested. It is shown that the SSD method preserves the high-order accuracy of the SD method. Meanwhile, the SSD method is found to be very efficient in terms of computational cost. This novel sliding-mesh interface method is very suitable for parallel processing with domain decomposition. It can be applied to a wide range of problems, such as the hydrodynamics of marine propellers, the aerodynamics of rotorcraft, wind turbines, and oscillating wing power generators, etc.

  17. Rotational Spectrum of 1,1-Difluoroethane: Internal Rotation Analysis and Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villamanan, R. M.; Chen, W. D.; Wlodarczak, G.; Demaison, J.; Lesarri, A. G.; Lopez, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    1995-05-01

    The rotational spectrum of CH3CHF2 in its ground state was measured up to 653 GHz. Accurate rotational and centrifugal distortion constants were determined. The internal rotation splittings were analyzed using the internal axis method. An ab initio structure has been calculated and a near-equilibrium structure has been estimated using offsets derived empirically. This structure was compared to an experimental r0 structure. The four lowest excited states (including the methyl torsion) have also been assigned.

  18. Observation of b2 symmetry vibrational levels of the SO2C 1B2 state: Vibrational level staggering, Coriolis interactions, and rotation-vibration constants

    SciTech Connect

    Park, G. Barratt; Jiang, Jun; Saladrigas, Catherine A.; Field, Robert W.

    2016-04-14

    Here, the C 1B2 state of SO2 has a double-minimum potential in the antisymmetric stretch coordinate, such that the minimum energy geometry has nonequivalent SO bond lengths. However, low-lying levels with odd quanta of antisymmetric stretch (b2 vibrational symmetry) have not previously been observed because transitions into these levels from the zero-point level of the X~ state are vibronically forbidden. We use IR-UV double resonance to observe the b2 vibrational levels of the C state below 1600 cm–1 of vibrational excitation. This enables a direct characterization of the vibrational level staggering that results from the double-minimum potential. In addition, it allows us to deperturb the strong c-axis Coriolis interactions between levels of a1 and b2 vibrational symmetry, and to determine accurately the vibrational dependence of the rotational constants in the distorted C electronic state.

  19. Direct determination of state-to-state rotational energy transfer rate constants via a Raman-Raman double resonance technique: ortho-acetylene in v(2)=1 at 155 K.

    PubMed

    Doménech, José L; Martínez, Raúl Z; Ramos, Angel; Bermejo, Dionisio

    2010-04-21

    A new technique for the direct determination of state-to-state rotational energy transfer rate constants in the gas phase is presented. It is based on two sequential stimulated Raman processes: the first one prepares the sample in a single rotational state of an excited vibrational level, and the second one, using the high resolution quasi-continuous stimulated Raman-loss technique, monitors the transfer of population to other rotational states of the same vibrational level as a function of the delay between the pump and the probe stages. The technique is applied to the odd-J rotational states of v(2)=1 acetylene at 155 K. The experimental layout, data acquisition, retrieval procedures, and numerical treatment are described. The quantity and quality of the data are high enough to allow a direct determination of the state-to-state rate constant matrix from a fit of the experimental data, with the only conditions of detailed balance and of a closed number of states. The matrix obtained from this direct fit is also compared with those obtained using some common fitting and scaling laws.

  20. Test of variational transition state theory and multidimensional semiclassical transmission coefficient methods against accurate quantal rate constants for H + H/sub 2//HD, D + H/sub 2/, and O + H/sub 2//D/sub 2//HD, including intra- and intermolecular kinetic isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, B.C.; Truhlar, D.G.; Schatz, G.C.

    1986-05-28

    Rate constants and kinetic isotope effects for the title reactions have been calculated by using accurate quantum dynamical methods and used to test the accuracy of corresponding rate constants from conventional and variational transition state theory. The quantum dynamical rate constants are estimated to be within 35% of the exact rate constants for the potential surfaces chosen for this comparison. For all the reactions considered, the conventional and variational transition state theory rate constants with unit transmission coefficient are found to be very close to each other (better than 7%) but in poor agreement with the accurate quantum results (off by factors of 6-22 at 300 K). This indicates that although variational effects are small, tunnelling makes a very important contribution to the rate constants, and it is found that this tunnelling contribution is described quantitatively for all the reactions considered with use of the least action ground state (LAG) transmission coefficient. The combination of improved canonical variational theory (ICVT) and LAG yields rate constants which have an average error (considering all the reactions and temperatures studied) of 15% compared to the accurate quantum rate constants, and in only one case (D + H/sub 2/ at 200 K) does the ICVT/LAG rate constant differ by more than 35% from the accurate value. The comparison of ICVT/LAG kinetic isotope effects is found to be similarly good, with the worst comparisons occurring for intramolecular (X + HD) isotope ratios.

  1. Test of variational transition-state theory and multidimensional semiclassical transmission coefficient methods against accurate quantal rate constants for H + H/sub 2//HD, D + H/sub 2/, and O + H/sub 2//D/sub 2//HD, including intra- and intermolecular kinetic isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, B.C.; Truhlar, D.G.; Schatz, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    Rate constants and kinetic isotope effects for the title reactions were calculated using accurate quantum-dynamical methods, and used to test the accuracy of corresponding rate constants from conventional and variational transition-state theory. The quantum-dynamical rate constants are estimated to be within 35% of the exact rate constants for the potential energy surfaces chosen for this comparison. For all the reactions considered, the conventional and variational transition-state theory rate constants with unit transmission coefficient are found to be very close to each other (better than 7%), but in poor agreement with the accurate quantum results (off by factors of 6-22 at 300K). This indicates that although variational effects are small, tunneling makes a very important contribution to the rate constants, and it is found that the tunneling contribution is described quantitatively for all the reactions considered using the least-action ground state (LAG) transmission coefficient. The combination of improved canonical variational theory (ICVT) and LAG yields rate constants that have an average error (considering all the reactions and temperatures studied) of only 15% compared to the accurate quantal rate constants, and in only one case (D + H/sub 2/ at 200K) does the ICVT/LAG rate constant differ by more than 35% from the accurate value. The comparison of ICVT/LAG kinetic isotope effects is found to be similarly good, with worst comparisons occurring for intramolecular (X+HD) isotope ratios.

  2. Accurate ab initio dipole moment surfaces of ozone: First principle intensity predictions for rotationally resolved spectra in a large range of overtone and combination bands.

    PubMed

    Tyuterev, Vladimir G; Kochanov, Roman V; Tashkun, Sergey A

    2017-02-14

    Ab initio dipole moment surfaces (DMSs) of the ozone molecule are computed using the MRCI-SD method with AVQZ, AV5Z, and VQZ-F12 basis sets on a dense grid of about 1950 geometrical configurations. The analytical DMS representation used for the fit of ab initio points provides better behavior for large nuclear displacements than that of previous studies. Various DMS models were derived and tested. Vibration-rotation line intensities of (16)O3 were calculated from these ab initio surfaces by the variational method using two different potential functions determined in our previous works. For the first time, a very good agreement of first principle calculations with the experiment was obtained for the line-by-line intensities in rotationally resolved ozone spectra in a large far- and mid-infrared range. This includes high overtone and combination bands up to ΔV = 6. A particular challenge was a correct description of the B-type bands (even ΔV3 values) that represented major difficulties for the previous ab initio investigations and for the empirical spectroscopic models. The major patterns of various B-type bands were correctly described without empirically adjusted dipole moment parameters. For the 10 μm range, which is of key importance for the atmospheric ozone retrievals, our ab initio intensity results are within the experimental error margins. The theoretical values for the strongest lines of the ν3 band lie in general between two successive versions of HITRAN (HIgh-resolution molecular TRANsmission) empirical database that corresponded to most extended available sets of observations. The overall qualitative agreement in a large wavenumber range for rotationally resolved cold and hot ozone bands up to about 6000 cm(-1) is achieved here for the first time. These calculations reveal that several weak bands are yet missing from available spectroscopic databases.

  3. Accurate ab initio dipole moment surfaces of ozone: First principle intensity predictions for rotationally resolved spectra in a large range of overtone and combination bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyuterev, Vladimir G.; Kochanov, Roman V.; Tashkun, Sergey A.

    2017-02-01

    Ab initio dipole moment surfaces (DMSs) of the ozone molecule are computed using the MRCI-SD method with AVQZ, AV5Z, and VQZ-F12 basis sets on a dense grid of about 1950 geometrical configurations. The analytical DMS representation used for the fit of ab initio points provides better behavior for large nuclear displacements than that of previous studies. Various DMS models were derived and tested. Vibration-rotation line intensities of 16O3 were calculated from these ab initio surfaces by the variational method using two different potential functions determined in our previous works. For the first time, a very good agreement of first principle calculations with the experiment was obtained for the line-by-line intensities in rotationally resolved ozone spectra in a large far- and mid-infrared range. This includes high overtone and combination bands up to Δ V = 6. A particular challenge was a correct description of the B-type bands (even Δ V3 values) that represented major difficulties for the previous ab initio investigations and for the empirical spectroscopic models. The major patterns of various B-type bands were correctly described without empirically adjusted dipole moment parameters. For the 10 μ m range, which is of key importance for the atmospheric ozone retrievals, our ab initio intensity results are within the experimental error margins. The theoretical values for the strongest lines of the ν3 band lie in general between two successive versions of HITRAN (HIgh-resolution molecular TRANsmission) empirical database that corresponded to most extended available sets of observations. The overall qualitative agreement in a large wavenumber range for rotationally resolved cold and hot ozone bands up to about 6000 cm-1 is achieved here for the first time. These calculations reveal that several weak bands are yet missing from available spectroscopic databases.

  4. The cosmological constant problem

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A.D.

    1989-05-01

    A review of the cosmological term problem is presented. Baby universe model and the compensating field model are discussed. The importance of more accurate data on the Hubble constant and the Universe age is stressed. 18 refs.

  5. Accurate Assessment of the Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalytic Activity of Mn/Polypyrrole Nanocomposites Based on Rotating Disk Electrode Measurements, Complemented with Multitechnique Structural Characterizations.

    PubMed

    Bocchetta, Patrizia; Sánchez, Carolina Ramírez; Taurino, Antonietta; Bozzini, Benedetto

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the quantitative assessment of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalytic activity of electrodeposited Mn/polypyrrole (PPy) nanocomposites for alkaline aqueous solutions, based on the Rotating Disk Electrode (RDE) method and accompanied by structural characterizations relevant to the establishment of structure-function relationships. The characterization of Mn/PPy films is addressed to the following: (i) morphology, as assessed by Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM); (ii) local electrical conductivity, as measured by Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM); and (iii) molecular structure, accessed by Raman Spectroscopy; these data provide the background against which the electrocatalytic activity can be rationalised. For comparison, the properties of Mn/PPy are gauged against those of graphite, PPy, and polycrystalline-Pt (poly-Pt). Due to the literature lack of accepted protocols for precise catalytic activity measurement at poly-Pt electrode in alkaline solution using the RDE methodology, we have also worked on the obtainment of an intralaboratory benchmark by evidencing some of the time-consuming parameters which drastically affect the reliability and repeatability of the measurement.

  6. Accurate Assessment of the Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalytic Activity of Mn/Polypyrrole Nanocomposites Based on Rotating Disk Electrode Measurements, Complemented with Multitechnique Structural Characterizations

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Carolina Ramírez; Taurino, Antonietta; Bozzini, Benedetto

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the quantitative assessment of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalytic activity of electrodeposited Mn/polypyrrole (PPy) nanocomposites for alkaline aqueous solutions, based on the Rotating Disk Electrode (RDE) method and accompanied by structural characterizations relevant to the establishment of structure-function relationships. The characterization of Mn/PPy films is addressed to the following: (i) morphology, as assessed by Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM); (ii) local electrical conductivity, as measured by Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM); and (iii) molecular structure, accessed by Raman Spectroscopy; these data provide the background against which the electrocatalytic activity can be rationalised. For comparison, the properties of Mn/PPy are gauged against those of graphite, PPy, and polycrystalline-Pt (poly-Pt). Due to the literature lack of accepted protocols for precise catalytic activity measurement at poly-Pt electrode in alkaline solution using the RDE methodology, we have also worked on the obtainment of an intralaboratory benchmark by evidencing some of the time-consuming parameters which drastically affect the reliability and repeatability of the measurement. PMID:28042491

  7. On the formation of dynamic structures in the form of rotating rings and vortices in a thin layer of a magnetodielectric colloid subjected to a constant electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, M. I.; Yastrebov, S. S.

    2012-04-01

    Experimental data on the electrical and optical properties of a thin layer of a magnetodielectric colloid obtained by Kozhevnikov et al. (Tech. Phys. 51 (7), 946 (2006)), are analyzed. Using a three-layer hierarchical model, the possible structure and properties of near-electrode layers are determined, the formation mechanisms of dynamic structures are described, and the variation of the electrical properties of the magnetodielectric colloid layer with time and constant electric field strength are discussed.

  8. Evolution of the rotation of an artificial earth satellite under the influence of a perturbing moment which is constant in fixed axes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neyshtadt, A. I.; Pivovarov, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    The change in the modulus of the vector of the kinetic moment of a satellite which is noted during the determination of the actual orientation of an artificial earth is discussed. The change is due to the presence of a small perturbing moment, which is constant in fixed axes relative to the satellite. It is also shown that the averaged equations in this problem can be integrated.

  9. Bending and shear stresses developed by the instantaneous arrest of the root of a cantilever beam rotating with constant angular velocity about a transverse axis through the root

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowell, Elbridge Z; Schwartz, Edward B; Houbolt, John C

    1945-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was made of the behavior of a cantilever beam in rotational motion about a transverse axis through the root determining the stresses, the deflections, and the accelerations that occur in the beam as a result of the arrest of motion. The equations for bending and shear stress reveal that, at a given percentage of the distance from root to tip and at a given trip velocity, the bending stresses for a particular mode are independent of the length of the beam and the shear stresses vary inversely with the length. When examined with respect to a given angular velocity instead of a given tip velocity, the equations reveal that the bending stress is proportional to the length of the beam whereas the shear stress is independent of the length. Sufficient experimental verification of the theory has previously been given in connection with another problem of the same type.

  10. Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  11. Are Fundamental Constants Really Constant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swetman, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    Dirac's classical conclusions, that the values of e2, M and m are constants and the quantity of G decreases with time. Evoked considerable interest among researchers and traces historical development by which further experimental evidence points out that both e and G are constant values. (PS)

  12. Molecular structure and conformational composition of 1,3-dihydroxyacetone studied by combined analysis of gas-phase electron diffraction data, rotational constants, and results of theoretical calculations. Ideal gas thermodynamic properties of 1,3-dihydroxyacetone.

    PubMed

    Dorofeeva, Olga V; Vogt, Natalja; Vogt, Jürgen; Popik, Mikhail V; Rykov, Anatolii N; Vilkov, Lev V

    2007-07-19

    The molecular structure of 1,3-dihydroxyacetone (DHA) has been studied by gas-phase electron diffraction (GED), combined analysis of GED and microwave (MW) data, ab initio, and density functional theory calculations. The equilibrium re structure of DHA was determined by a joint analysis of the GED data and rotational constants taken from the literature. The anharmonic vibrational corrections to the internuclear distances (re-ra) and to the rotational constants (B(i)e-B(i)0) needed for the estimation of the re structure were calculated from the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ cubic force field. It was found that the experimental data are well reproduced by assuming that DHA consists of a mixture of three conformers. The most stable conformer of C2v symmetry has two hydrogen bonds, whereas the next two lowest energy conformers (Cs and C1 symmetry) have one hydrogen bond and their abundance is about 30% in total. A combined analysis of GED and MW data led to the following equilibrium structural parameters (re) of the most abundant conformer of DHA (the uncertainties in parentheses are 3 times the standard deviations): r(C=O)=1.215(2) A, r(C-C)=1.516(2) A, r(C-O)=1.393(2) A, r(C-H)=1.096(4) A, r(O-H)=0.967(4) A, angleC-C=O=119.9(2) degrees, angleC-C-O=111.0(2) degrees, angleC-C-H=108.2(7) degrees, angleC-O-H=106.5(7) degrees. These structural parameters reproduce the experimental B(i)0 values within 0.05 MHz. The experimental structural parameters are in good agreement with those obtained from theoretical calculations. Ideal gas thermodynamic functions (S degrees (T), C degrees p(T), and H degrees (T)-H degrees (0)) of DHA were calculated on the basis of experimental and theoretical molecular parameters obtained in this work. The enthalpy of formation of DHA, -523+/-4 kJ/mol, was calculated by the atomization procedure using the G3X method.

  13. Rotational Spectrum and Internal Rotation Barrier of 1-Chloro-1,1-difluoroethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, José L.; López, Juan C.; Blanco, Susana; Guarnieri, Antonio

    1997-03-01

    The rotational spectra of 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane (HCFC-142b) has been investigated in the frequency region 8-115 GHz with Stark, waveguide Fourier transform (FTMW), and millimeter-wave spectrometers. Assignments in large frequency regions with the corresponding frequency measurements have been made for the ground andv18= 1 (CH3torsion) vibrational states of the35Cl isotopomer and for the ground state of the37Cl species. Accurate rotational, quartic centrifugal distortion, and quadrupole coupling constants have been determined from global fits considering all these states. SmallA-Einternal rotation splittings have been observed for thev18= 1 vibrational state using FTMW spectroscopy. The barrier height for the internal rotation of the methyl group has been determined to be 3751 (4) cal mol-1, in disagreement with the previous microwave value of 4400 (100) cal mol-1reported by G. Graner and C. Thomas [J. Chem. Phys.49,4160-4167 (1968)].

  14. Rotation, differential rotation, and gyrochronology of active Kepler stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhold, Timo; Gizon, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    most reliable. Explaining the bimodality in the age distribution is challenging, and limits accurate stellar age predictions. The relation between activity and age is interesting, and requires further investigation. The existence of cool stars with almost constant rotation period over more than three years of observation might be explained by synchronization with stellar companions, or a dynamo mechanism keeping the spot configurations extremely stable. Full Tables 2 and 4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/583/A65

  15. STRUCTURE OF UNIFORMLY ROTATING STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Deupree, Robert G.

    2011-07-10

    Zero-age main-sequence models of uniformly rotating stars have been computed for 10 masses between 1.625 and 8 M{sub sun} and for 21 rotation rates from zero to nearly critical rotation. The surface shape is used to distinguish rotation rather than the surface equatorial velocity or the rotation rate. Using the surface shape is close, but not quite equivalent, to using the ratio of the rotation rate to the critical rotation rate. Using constant shape as the rotation variable means that it and the mass are separable, something that is not true for either the rotation rate or surface equatorial velocity. Thus, a number of properties, including the ratio of the effective temperature anywhere on the surface to the equatorial temperature, are nearly independent of the mass of the model, as long as the rotation rate changes in such a way as to keep the surface shape constant.

  16. Adaptation to rotating artificial gravity environments.

    PubMed

    Lackner, James R; DiZio, Paul A

    2003-01-01

    A series of pioneering experiments on adaptation to rotating artificial gravity environments was conducted in the 1960s. The results of these experiments led to the general belief that humans with normal vestibular function would not be able to adapt to rotating environments with angular velocities above 3 or 4 rpm. By contrast, our recent work has shown that sensory-motor adaptation to 10 rpm can be achieved relatively easily and quickly if subjects make the same movement repeatedly. This repetition allows the nervous system to gauge how the Coriolis forces generated by movements in a rotating reference frame are deflecting movement paths and endpoints and to institute corrective adaptations. Independent mechanisms appear to underlie restoration of straight movement paths and of accurate movement endpoints. Control of head movements involves adaptation of vestibulo-collic and vestibulo-spinal mechanisms as well as adaptation to motor control of the head as an inertial mass. The vestibular adaptation has a long time constant and the motor adaptation a short one. Surprisingly, Coriolis forces generated by natural turning and reaching movements in our normal environment are typically larger than those elicited in rotating artificial gravity environments. They are not recognized as such because self-generated Coriolis forces during voluntary trunk rotation are perceptually transparent. After adaptation to a rotating environment is complete, the Coriolis forces generated by movements within it also become transparent and are not felt although they are still present.

  17. Rotational and rotationless states of weakly bound molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Lemeshko, Mikhail; Friedrich, Bretislav

    2009-05-15

    By making use of the quantization rule of Raab and Friedrich [Phys. Rev. A 78, 022707 (2008)], we derive simple and accurate formulae for the number of rotational states supported by a weakly bound vibrational level of a diatomic molecule and the rotational constants of any such levels up to the threshold, and provide a criterion for determining whether a given weakly bound vibrational level is rotationless. The results depend solely on the long-range part of the molecular potential and are applicable to halo molecules.

  18. Accurate analytical approximation of asteroid deflection with constant tangential thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombardelli, Claudio; Baù, Giulio

    2012-11-01

    We present analytical formulas to estimate the variation of achieved deflection for an Earth-impacting asteroid following a continuous tangential low-thrust deflection strategy. Relatively simple analytical expressions are obtained with the aid of asymptotic theory and the use of Peláez orbital elements set, an approach that is particularly suitable to the asteroid deflection problem and is not limited to small eccentricities. The accuracy of the proposed formulas is evaluated numerically showing negligible error for both early and late deflection campaigns. The results will be of aid in planning future low-thrust asteroid deflection missions.

  19. Rotationally resolved infrared spectroscopy of adamantane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirali, O.; Boudon, V.; Oomens, J.; Vervloet, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first rotationally resolved spectra of adamantane (C10H16) applying gas-phase Fourier transform infrared (IR) absorption spectroscopy. High-resolution IR spectra are recorded in the 33-4500 cm-1range using as source of IR radiation both synchrotron radiation (at the AILES beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron) as well as a classical globar. Adamantane is a spherical top molecule with tetrahedral symmetry (Td point group) and has no permanent dipole moment in its vibronic ground state. Of the 72 fundamental vibrational modes in adamantane, only 11 are IR active. Here we present rotationally resolved spectra for seven of them: ν30, ν28, ν27, ν26, ν25, ν24, and ν23. The typical rotational structure of spherical tops is observed and analyzed using the STDS software developed in the Dijon group, which provides the first accurate energy levels and rotational constants for seven fundamental modes. Rotational levels with quantum numbers as high as J = 107 have been identified and included in the fit leading to a typical standard deviation of about 10-3 cm-1.

  20. Rotational frequencies of transition metal hydrides for astrophysical searches in the far-infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John M.; Beaton, Stuart P.; Evenson, Kenneth M.

    1993-01-01

    Accurate frequencies for the lowest rotational transitions of five transition metal hydrides (CrH, FeH, CoH, NiH, and CuH) in their ground electronic states are reported to help the identification of these species in astrophysical sources from their far-infrared spectra. Accurate frequencies are determined in two ways: for CuH, by calculation from rotational constants determined from higher J transitions with an accuracy of 190 kHz; for the other species, by extrapolation to zero magnetic field from laser magnetic resonance spectra with an accuracy of 0.7 MHz.

  1. Rotational spectrum of phenylglycinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simão, Alcides; Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L.

    2014-11-01

    Solid samples of phenylglycinol were vaporized by laser ablation and investigated through rotational spectroscopy in a supersonic expansion using two different techniques: chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy and narrow band molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. One conformer, bearing an O-H···N and an N-H···π intramolecular hydrogen bonds, could be successfully identified by comparison of the experimental rotational and 14N nuclear quadruple coupling constants with those predicted theoretically.

  2. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-manometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment.

  3. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, T.J.

    1994-06-07

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment is disclosed. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-nanometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment. 10 figs.

  4. The Hubble Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Wendy; Madore, Barry; Mager, Violet; Persson, Eric; Rigby, Jane; Sturch, Laura

    2008-12-01

    We present a plan to measure a value of the Hubble constant having a final systematic uncertainty of only 3% by taking advantage of Spitzer's unique mid-infrared capabilities. This involves using IRAC to undertake a fundamental recalibration of the Cepheid distance scale and progressively moving it out to pure Hubble flow by an application of a revised mid-IR Tully-Fisher relation. The calibration and application, in one coherent and self-consistent program, will go continuously from distances of parsecs to several hundred megaparsecs. It will provide a first-ever mid-IR calibration of Cepheids in the Milky Way, LMC and Key Project spiral galaxies and a first-ever measurement and calibration of the TF relation at mid-infrared wavelengths, and finally a calibration of Type Ia SNe. Most importantly this program will be undertaken with a single instrument, on a single telescope, working exclusively at mid-infrared wavelengths that are far removed from the obscuring effects of dust extinction. Using Spitzer in this focused way will effectively eliminate all of the major systematics in the Cepheid and TF distance scales that have been the limiting factors in all previous applications, including the HST Key Project. By executing this program, based exclusively on Spitzer data, we will deliver a value of the Hubble constant, having a statistical precision better than 11%, with all currently known systematics quantified and constrained to a level of less than 3%. A value of Ho determined to this level of systematic accuracy is required for up-coming cosmology experiments, including Planck. A more accurate value of the Hubble constant will directly result in other contingently measured cosmological parameters (e.g., Omega_m, Omega_L, & w) having their covariant uncertainties reduced significantly now. Any further improvements using this route will have to await JWST, for which this study is designed to provide a lasting and solid foundation, and ultimately a value of Ho

  5. Probing the Structure, Pseudorotation, and Radial Vibrations of Cyclopentane by Femtosecond Rotational Raman Coherence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kowalewski, Philipp; Frey, Hans-Martin; Infanger, Daniel; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2015-11-12

    Femtosecond time-resolved Raman rotational coherence spectroscopy (RCS) is employed to determine accurate rotational, vibration–rotation coupling constants, and centrifugal distortion constants of cyclopentane (C5H10). Its lowest-frequency vibration is a pseudorotating ring deformation that interconverts 10 permutationally distinct but energetically degenerate "twist" minima interspersed by 10 "bent" conformers. While the individual twist and bent structures are polar asymmetric tops, the pseudorotation is fast on the time scale of external rotation, rendering cyclopentane a fluxionally nonpolar symmetric top molecule. The pseudorotational level pattern corresponds to a one-dimensional internal rotor with a pseudorotation constant Bps ≈ 2.8 cm(-1). The pseudorotational levels are significantly populated up to l = ± 13 at 298 K; <10% of the molecules are in the l = 0 level. The next-higher vibration is the “radial” ν23 ring deformation mode at 273 cm–1, which is far above the pseudorotational fundamental. Femtosecond Raman RCS measurements were performed in a gas cell at T = 293 K and in a pulsed supersonic jet at T ≈ 90 K. The jet cooling reduces the pseudorotational distribution to l < ±8 and eliminates the population of ν23, allowing one to determine the rotational constant as A0 = B0 = 6484.930(11) MHz. This value is ∼300 times more precise than the previous value. The fit of the RCS transients reveals that the rotation–pseudorotation coupling constant αe,psB = −0.00070(1) MHz is diminutive, implying that excitation of the pseudorotation has virtually no effect on the B0 rotational constant of cyclopentane. The smallness of αe,psB can be realized when comparing to the vibration–rotation coupling constant of the ν23 vibration, αe,23B = -9.547(1) MHz, which is about 104 times larger.

  6. Cosmological constant from quantum spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, Shahn; Tao, Wen-Qing

    2015-06-01

    We show that a hypothesis that spacetime is quantum with coordinate algebra [xi,t ]=λPxi , and spherical symmetry under rotations of the xi, essentially requires in the classical limit that the spacetime metric is the Bertotti-Robinson metric, i.e., a solution of Einstein's equations with a cosmological constant and a non-null electromagnetic field. Our arguments do not give the value of the cosmological constant or the Maxwell field strength, but they cannot both be zero. We also describe the quantum geometry and the full moduli space of metrics that can emerge as classical limits from this algebra.

  7. On flows having constant vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Paul H.; Wu, Cheng-Chin

    2011-10-01

    Constant vorticity flows of a uniform fluid in a rigid ellipsoidal container rotating at a variable rate are considered. These include librationally driven and precessionally driven flows. The well-known Poincaré solution for precessionally driven flow in a spheroid is generalized to an ellipsoid with unequal principal axes. The dynamic stability of these flows is investigated, and of other flows in which the angular velocity of the container is constant in time. Solutions for the Chandler wobble are discussed. The role of an invariant, called here the Helmholtzian, is examined.

  8. Vibrational force constants for acetaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolova, B.

    1990-05-01

    The vibrational force field of ethanal (acetaldehyde), CH 3CHO, is refined by using procedures with differential increments for the force constants (Commun. Dep. Chem., Bulg. Acad. Sci., 21/3 (1988) 433). The characteristics general valence force constants of the high-dimensional symmetry classes of ethanal, A' of tenth and A″ of fifth order, are determined for the experimental assignment of bands. The low barrier to hindered internal rotation about the single carbon—carbon bond is quantitatively estimated on the grounds of normal vibrational analysis.

  9. Nonaxisymmetric oscillations of differentially rotating relativistic stars

    SciTech Connect

    Passamonti, Andrea; Stavridis, Adamantios; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2008-01-15

    Nonaxisymmetric oscillations of differentially rotating stars are studied using both slow rotation and Cowling approximation. The equilibrium stellar models are relativistic polytropes where differential rotation is described by the relativistic j-constant rotation law. The oscillation spectrum is studied versus three main parameters: the stellar compactness M/R, the degree of differential rotation A, and the number of maximum couplings l{sub max}. It is shown that the rotational splitting of the nonaxisymmetric modes are strongly enhanced by increasing the compactness of the star and the degree of differential rotation. Finally, we investigate the relation between the fundamental quadrupole mode and the corotation band of differentially rotating stars.

  10. The Hubble constant.

    PubMed Central

    Tully, R B

    1993-01-01

    Five methods of estimating distances have demonstrated internal reproducibility at the level of 5-20% rms accuracy. The best of these are the cepheid (and RR Lyrae), planetary nebulae, and surface-brightness fluctuation techniques. Luminosity-line width and Dn-sigma methods are less accurate for an individual case but can be applied to large numbers of galaxies. The agreement is excellent between these five procedures. It is determined that Hubble constant H0 = 90 +/- 10 km.s-1.Mpc-1 [1 parsec (pc) = 3.09 x 10(16) m]. It is difficult to reconcile this value with the preferred world model even in the low-density case. The standard model with Omega = 1 may be excluded unless there is something totally misunderstood about the foundation of the distance scale or the ages of stars. PMID:11607391

  11. Optimized dynamic rotation with wedges.

    PubMed

    Rosen, I I; Morrill, S M; Lane, R G

    1992-01-01

    Dynamic rotation is a computer-controlled therapy technique utilizing an automated multileaf collimator in which the radiation beam shape changes dynamically as the treatment machine rotates about the patient so that at each instant the beam shape matches the projected shape of the target volume. In simple dynamic rotation, the dose rate remains constant during rotation. For optimized dynamic rotation, the dose rate is varied as a function of gantry angle. Optimum dose rate at each gantry angle is computed by linear programming. Wedges can be included in the optimized dynamic rotation therapy by using additional rotations. Simple and optimized dynamic rotation treatment plans, with and without wedges, for a pancreatic tumor have been compared using optimization cost function values, normal tissue complication probabilities, and positive difference statistic values. For planning purposes, a continuous rotation is approximated by static beams at a number of gantry angles equally spaced about the patient. In theory, the quality of optimized treatment planning solutions should improve as the number of static beams increases. The addition of wedges should further improve dose distributions. For the case studied, no significant improvements were seen for more than 36 beam angles. Open and wedged optimized dynamic rotations were better than simple dynamic rotation, but wedged optimized dynamic rotation showed no definitive improvement over open beam optimized dynamic rotation.

  12. Rotating Vesta

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronomers combined 146 exposures taken by NASA's Hubble SpaceTelescope to make this 73-frame movie of the asteroid Vesta's rotation.Vesta completes a rotation every 5.34 hours.› Asteroid and...

  13. Correlation of Experimental and Theoretical Steady-State Spinning Motion for a Current Fighter Airplane Using Rotation-Balance Aerodynamic Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-07-01

    required for accurate simulation of spinning motions. Attempts to analytically model departure and spin entry characteristics using measured static...rate of the airplane. Simulated flight motions using measured large angle static aerodynamics did produce more representative motions in the stall...NASA Langley began a program to measure aerodynamic data on airplane models under constant rotating conditions. This program resulted in the

  14. Rotating flexible drag mill

    DOEpatents

    Pepper, W.B.

    1984-05-09

    A rotating parachute for decelerating objects travelling through atmosphere at subsonic or supersonic deployment speeds includes a circular canopy having a plurality of circumferentially arranged flexible panels projecting radially from a solid central disk. A slot extends radially between adjacent panels to the outer periphery of the canopy. Upon deployment, the solid disk diverts air radially to rapidly inflate the panels into a position of maximum diameter. Air impinging on the panels adjacent the panel slots rotates the parachute during its descent. Centrifugal force flattens the canopy into a constant maximum diameter during terminal descent for maximum drag and deceleration.

  15. Rotational testing.

    PubMed

    Furman, J M

    2016-01-01

    The natural stimulus for the semicircular canals is rotation of the head, which also might stimulate the otolith organs. Vestibular stimulation usually induces eye movements via the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). The orientation of the subject with respect to the axis of rotation and the orientation of the axis of rotation with respect to gravity together determine which labyrinthine receptors are stimulated for particular motion trajectories. Rotational testing usually includes the measurement of eye movements via a video system but might use a subject's perception of motion. The most common types of rotational testing are whole-body computer-controlled sinusoidal or trapezoidal stimuli during earth-vertical axis rotation (EVAR), which stimulates primarily the horizontal semicircular canals bilaterally. Recently, manual impulsive rotations, known as head impulse testing (HIT), have been developed to assess individual horizontal semicircular canals. Most types of rotational stimuli are not used routinely in the clinical setting but may be used in selected research environments. This chapter will discuss clinically relevant rotational stimuli and several types of rotational testing that are used primarily in research settings.

  16. Laboratory Measurement of the Pure Rotational Transitions of HCNH+ and Its Isotopic Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, M.; Ozeki, H.; Saito, S.

    1998-03-01

    The pure rotational transitions of the protonated hydrogen cyanide ion, HCNH+, and its isotopic species, HCND+ and DCND+, were measured in the 107-482 GHz region with a source-modulated microwave spectrometer. The ions were generated in a cell with a magnetically confined DC-glow discharge of HCN and/or DCN. The rotational constant B0 and the centrifugal distortion constant D0 for each ion were precisely determined by a least-squares fitting to the observed spectral lines. The observed rotational transition frequencies by laboratory spectroscopy and the predicted ones are accurate to about 30-40 kHz and are useful as rest frequencies for astronomical searches of HCNH+ and HCND+.

  17. A High-resolution Isotopic Study of the Rotational Spectrum of c-C3H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spezzano, S.; Tamassia, F.; Thorwirth, S.; Thaddeus, P.; Gottlieb, C. A.; McCarthy, M. C.

    2012-05-01

    The rotational spectra of the normal and seven isotopic species of cyclopropenylidene c-C3H2 have been measured at high spectral resolution by Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy of a supersonic molecular beam between 10 and 43 GHz. Deuterium quadrupole coupling and carbon-13 spin-rotation hyperfine constants were determined in addition to the rotational constants. Quartic and sextic centrifugal distortion constants derived from 28 lines between 150 and 316 GHz of the doubly deuterated species c-C3D2 allow the rotational spectrum to be calculated to 0.5 km s-1 or better in equivalent radial velocity up to 500 GHz. Spectroscopic constants determined from four centimeter-wave and 19 millimeter-wave lines of the normal species c-C3H2, including 15 with sharp Lamb-dips, allow prediction of the most important astronomical transitions (i.e., those with ΔJ = 1 and Ka <= 3) to 0.05 km s-1 or better at 500 GHz. The doubly deuterated species is a good candidate for detection in cold dark clouds, because deuterium fractionation is high in c-C3H2 and lines of C3HD are fairly intense in these sources. An accurate empirical equilibrium structure of c-C3H2, derived from the experimental rotational constants of normal and isotopic c-C3H2, corrected for zero-point vibrational effects, is compared with previously reported structures.

  18. Effects of spin-lock field direction on the quantitative measurement of spin-lattice relaxation time constant in the rotating frame (T1ρ) in a clinical MRI system

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Seonghwan; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether the direction of spin-lock field, either parallel or antiparallel to the rotating magnetization, has any effect on the spin-lock MRI signal and further on the quantitative measurement of T1ρ, in a clinical 3 T MRI system. Methods: The effects of inverted spin-lock field direction were investigated by acquiring a series of spin-lock MRI signals for an American College of Radiology MRI phantom, while the spin-lock field direction was switched between the parallel and antiparallel directions. The acquisition was performed for different spin-locking methods (i.e., for the single- and dual-field spin-locking methods) and for different levels of clinically feasible spin-lock field strength, ranging from 100 to 500 Hz, while the spin-lock duration was varied in the range from 0 to 100 ms. Results: When the spin-lock field was inverted into the antiparallel direction, the rate of MRI signal decay was altered and the T1ρ value, when compared to the value for the parallel field, was clearly different. Different degrees of such direction-dependency were observed for different spin-lock field strengths. In addition, the dependency was much smaller when the parallel and the antiparallel fields are mixed together in the dual-field method. Conclusions: The spin-lock field direction could impact the MRI signal and further the T1ρ measurement in a clinical MRI system.

  19. Rotational Spectrum of Sarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, A. R. Hight; Suenram, R. D.; Samuels, Alan; Jensen, James; Ellzy, Michael W.; Lochner, J. Michael; Zeroka, Daniel

    2001-05-01

    As part of an effort to examine the possibility of using molecular-beam Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy to unambiguously detect and monitor chemical warfare agents, we report the first observation and assignment of the rotational spectrum of the nerve agent Sarin (GB) (Methylphosphonofluoridic acid 1-methyl-ethyl ester, CAS #107-44-8) at frequencies between 10 and 22 GHz. Only one of the two low-energy conformers of this organophosphorus compound (C4H10FO2P) was observed in the rotationally cold (Trot<2 K) molecular beam. The experimental asymmetric-rotor ground-state rotational constants of this conformer are A=2874.0710(9) MHz, B=1168.5776(4) MHz, C=1056.3363(4) MHz (Type A standard uncertainties are given, i.e., 1σ), as obtained from a least-squares analysis of 74 a-, b-, and c-type rotational transitions. Several of the transitions are split into doublets due to the internal rotation of the methyl group attached to the phosphorus. The three-fold-symmetry barrier to internal rotation estimated from these splittings is 677.0(4) cm-1. Ab initio electronic structure calculations using Hartree-Fock, density functional, and Moller-Plesset perturbation theories have also been made. The structure of the lowest-energy conformer determined from a structural optimization at the MP2/6-311G** level of theory is consistent with our experimental findings.

  20. Translation and Rotation Trade Off in Human Visual Heading Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Leland S.; Perrone, John A.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We have previously shown that, during simulated curvilinear motion, humans can make reasonably accurate and precise heading judgments from optic flow without either oculomotor or static-depth cues about rotation. We now systematically investigate the effect of varying the parameters of self-motion. We visually simulated 400 ms of self-motion along curved paths (constant rotation and translation rates, fixed retinocentric heading) towards two planes of random dots at 10.3 m and 22.3 m at mid-trial. Retinocentric heading judgments of 4 observers (2 naive) were measured for 12 different combinations of translation (T between 4 and 16 m/s) and rotation (R either 8 or 16 deg/s). In the range tested, heading bias and uncertainty decrease quasilinearly with T/R, but the bias also appears to depend on R. If depth is held constant, the ratio T/R can account for much of the variation in the accuracy and precision of human visual heading estimation, although further experiments are needed to resolve whether absolute rotation rate, total flow rate, or some other factor can account for the observed -2 deg shift between the bias curves.

  1. Highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Jokiel, Jr., Bernhard; Ensz, Mark T.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-12-30

    Disclosed is a highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine, comprising a revolute joint, comprising a circular encoder wheel, having an axis of rotation; a plurality of marks disposed around at least a portion of the circumference of the encoder wheel; bearing means for supporting the encoder wheel, while permitting free rotation of the encoder wheel about the wheel's axis of rotation; and a sensor, rigidly attached to the bearing means, for detecting the motion of at least some of the marks as the encoder wheel rotates; a probe arm, having a proximal end rigidly attached to the encoder wheel, and having a distal end with a probe tip attached thereto; and coordinate processing means, operatively connected to the sensor, for converting the output of the sensor into a set of cylindrical coordinates representing the position of the probe tip relative to a reference cylindrical coordinate system.

  2. Rotational spectra of rare isotopic species of fluoroiodomethane: Determination of the equilibrium structure from rotational spectroscopy and quantum-chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Cazzoli, Gabriele; López, Juan Carlos; Alonso, José Luis; Baldacci, Agostino; Baldan, Alessandro; Stopkowicz, Stella; Cheng, Lan; Gauss, Jürgen

    2012-07-01

    Supported by accurate quantum-chemical calculations, the rotational spectra of the mono- and bi-deuterated species of fluoroiodomethane, CHDFI and CD2FI, as well as of the 13C-containing species, 13CH2FI, were recorded for the first time. Three different spectrometers were employed, a Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer, a millimeter/submillimter-wave spectrometer, and a THz spectrometer, thus allowing to record a huge portion of the rotational spectrum, from 5 GHz up to 1.05 THz, and to accurately determine the ground-state rotational and centrifugal-distortion constants. Sub-Doppler measurements allowed to resolve the hyperfine structure of the rotational spectrum and to determine the complete iodine quadrupole-coupling tensor as well as the diagonal elements of the iodine spin-rotation tensor. The present investigation of rare isotopic species of CH2FI together with the results previously obtained for the main isotopologue [C. Puzzarini, G. Cazzoli, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, A. Baldacci, A. Baldan, S. Stopkowicz, L. Cheng, and J. Gauss, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 174312 (2011);, 10.1063/1.3583498 G. Cazzoli, A. Baldacci, A. Baldan, and C. Puzzarini, Mol. Phys. 109, 2245 (2011)], 10.1080/00268976.2011.609142 enabled us to derive a semi-experimental equilibrium structure for fluoroiodomethane by means of a least-squares fit procedure using the available experimental ground-state rotational constants together with computed vibrational corrections. Problems related to the missing isotopic substitution of fluorine and iodine were overcome thanks to the availability of an accurate theoretical equilibrium geometry (computed at the coupled-cluster singles and doubles level augmented by a perturbative treatment of triple excitations).

  3. Rotational spectra of rare isotopic species of fluoroiodomethane: determination of the equilibrium structure from rotational spectroscopy and quantum-chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Cazzoli, Gabriele; López, Juan Carlos; Alonso, José Luis; Baldacci, Agostino; Baldan, Alessandro; Stopkowicz, Stella; Cheng, Lan; Gauss, Jürgen

    2012-07-14

    Supported by accurate quantum-chemical calculations, the rotational spectra of the mono- and bi-deuterated species of fluoroiodomethane, CHDFI and CD(2)FI, as well as of the (13)C-containing species, (13)CH(2)FI, were recorded for the first time. Three different spectrometers were employed, a Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer, a millimeter/submillimter-wave spectrometer, and a THz spectrometer, thus allowing to record a huge portion of the rotational spectrum, from 5 GHz up to 1.05 THz, and to accurately determine the ground-state rotational and centrifugal-distortion constants. Sub-Doppler measurements allowed to resolve the hyperfine structure of the rotational spectrum and to determine the complete iodine quadrupole-coupling tensor as well as the diagonal elements of the iodine spin-rotation tensor. The present investigation of rare isotopic species of CH(2)FI together with the results previously obtained for the main isotopologue [C. Puzzarini, G. Cazzoli, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, A. Baldacci, A. Baldan, S. Stopkowicz, L. Cheng, and J. Gauss, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 174312 (2011); G. Cazzoli, A. Baldacci, A. Baldan, and C. Puzzarini, Mol. Phys. 109, 2245 (2011)] enabled us to derive a semi-experimental equilibrium structure for fluoroiodomethane by means of a least-squares fit procedure using the available experimental ground-state rotational constants together with computed vibrational corrections. Problems related to the missing isotopic substitution of fluorine and iodine were overcome thanks to the availability of an accurate theoretical equilibrium geometry (computed at the coupled-cluster singles and doubles level augmented by a perturbative treatment of triple excitations).

  4. Rotating Wavepackets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekner, John

    2008-01-01

    Any free-particle wavepacket solution of Schrodinger's equation can be converted by differentiations to wavepackets rotating about the original direction of motion. The angular momentum component along the motion associated with this rotation is an integral multiple of [h-bar]. It is an "intrinsic" angular momentum: independent of origin and…

  5. Fourier Transform Microwave Spectrum of Propene-3-d1 (CH2=CHCH2D), Quadrupole Coupling Constants of Deuterium and a Semiexperimental Equilibrium Structure of Propene.

    PubMed

    Demaison, Jean; Craig, Norman C; Gurusinghe, Ranil Malaka; Tubergen, Michael John; Rudolph, Heinz Dieter; Coudert, Laurent H; Szalay, Peter G; Császár, Attila G

    2017-04-03

    The ground state rotational spectrum of propene-3-d1, CH2=CHCH2D, was measured by Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Transitions were assigned for the two conformers, one with the D atom in the symmetry plane (S) and the other with the D atom out of plane (A). The energy difference between the two conformers was calculated to be 6.5 cm-1, the S conformer having lower energy. The quadrupole hyperfine structure due to deuterium was resolved and analyzed for the two conformers. The experimental quadrupole coupling and the centrifugal distortion constants compared favorably to their ab initio counterparts. Ground state rotational constants for the S conformer are 40582.157(9), 9067.024(1), and 7766.0165(12) MHz. Ground state rotational constants for the A conformer are 43403.75(3), 8658.961(2), and 7718.247(2) MHz. For the A conformer, a small tunneling splitting (19 MHz) due to internal rotation was observed and analyzed. Using the new rotational constants of this work as well as those previously determined for the 13C species and for some deuterium-substituted species from the literature, a new semiexperimental equilibrium structure was determined and its high accuracy was confirmed. The difficulty in obtaining accurate coordinates for the out-of-plane hydrogen atom is discussed.

  6. The rotational spectra of HD17O and D217O: Experiment and quantum-chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Cazzoli, Gabriele; Gauss, Jürgen

    2012-10-01

    Guided by theoretical predictions, the rotational spectrum of HD17O was recorded and assigned for the first time, while the measurements for D217O were extended up to the THz region. For both isotopic species, a large portion of the rotational spectrum, from 65 GHz (from 200 GHz for the bideuterated isotopologue) up to 1.6 THz, was investigated, thus allowing the accurate determination of the ground-state rotational and centrifugal-distortion constants. Considering that the rotational spectra of water isotopologues are characterized by a very low density of lines and strong centrifugal-distortion effects, the accurate quantum-chemical prediction of the relevant spectroscopic parameters played a crucial role in the line search and assignment as well as in supporting the fitting procedure. In addition to rotational and centrifugal-distortion constants, the knowledge of the oxygen quadrupole-coupling constants was essential, as the corresponding interaction leads to characteristic features (hyperfine structure) that enabled proper line assignments.

  7. Black holes surrounded by uniformly rotating rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansorg, Marcus; Petroff, David

    2005-07-01

    Highly accurate numerical solutions to the problem of black holes surrounded by uniformly rotating rings in axially symmetric, stationary spacetimes are presented. The numerical methods developed to handle the problem are discussed in some detail. Related Newtonian problems are described and numerical results provided, which show that configurations can reach an inner mass-shedding limit as the mass of the central object increases. Exemplary results for the full relativistic problem for rings of constant density are given and the deformation of the event horizon due to the presence of the ring is demonstrated. Finally, we provide an example of a system for which the angular momentum of the central black hole divided by the square of its mass exceeds one (Jc/M2c>1).

  8. Supergranulation rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schou, Jesper; Beck, John G.

    2001-01-01

    Simple convection models estimate the depth of supergranulation at approximately 15,000 km which suggests that supergranules should rotate at the rate of the plasma in the outer 2% of the Sun by radius. Previous measurements (Snodgrass & Ulrich, 1990; Beck & Schou, 2000) found that supergranules rotate significantly faster than this, with a size-dependent rotation rate. We expand on previous work and show that the torsional oscillation signal seen in the supergranules tracks that obtained for normal modes. We also find that the amplitudes and lifetimes of the supergranulation are size dependent.

  9. The measurement system of birefringence and Verdet constant of optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi; Chen, Li; Guo, Qiang; Pang, Fufei; Wen, Jianxiang; Shang, Yana; Wang, Tingyun

    2013-12-01

    The Faraday magneto-optical effect of optical fiber has many applications in monitoring magnetic field and electric current. When a linearly polarized light propagates in the direction of a magnetic field, the plane of polarization will rotate linearly proportional to the strength of the applied magnetic field, which following the relationship of θF =VBl. θF is the Faraday rotation angle, which is proportional to the magnetic flux density B and the Verdet constant V . However, when the optical fiber contains the effect of linear birefringence, the detection of Faraday rotation angle will depend on the line birefringence. In order to determine the Verdet constant of an optical fiber under a linear birefringence, the fiber birefringence needs to be accurately measured. In this work, a model is applied to analyze the polarization properties of an optical fiber by using the Jones matrix method. A measurement system based on the lock-in amplifier technology is designed to test the Verdet constant and the birefringence of optical fiber. The magnetic field is produced by a solenoid with a DC current. A tunable laser is intensity modulated with a motorized rotating chopper. The actuator supplies a signal as the phase-locked synchronization reference to the signal of the lock-in amplifier. The measurement accuracy is analyzed and the sensitivity of the system is optimized. In this measurement system, the Verdet constant of the SMF-28 fiber was measured to be 0.56±0.02 rad/T·m at 1550nm. This setup is well suitable for measuring the high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) sensitivity for lock-in amplifier at a low magnetic field strength.

  10. Cosmological constant, fine structure constant and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hao; Zou, Xiao-Bo; Li, Hong-Yu; Xue, Dong-Ze

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, we consider the cosmological constant model Λ ∝ α ^{-6}, which is well motivated from three independent approaches. As is well known, the hint of varying fine structure constant α was found in 1998. If Λ ∝ α ^{-6} is right, it means that the cosmological constant Λ should also be varying. Here, we try to develop a suitable framework to model this varying cosmological constant Λ ∝ α ^{-6}, in which we view it from an interacting vacuum energy perspective. Then we consider the observational constraints on these models by using the 293 Δ α /α data from the absorption systems in the spectra of distant quasars. We find that the model parameters can be tightly constrained to the very narrow ranges of O(10^{-5}) typically. On the other hand, we can also view the varying cosmological constant model Λ ∝ α ^{-6} from another perspective, namely it can be equivalent to a model containing "dark energy" and "warm dark matter", but there is no interaction between them. We find that this is also fully consistent with the observational constraints on warm dark matter.

  11. Determination of the Vibrational Constants of Some Diatomic Molecules: A Combined Infrared Spectroscopic and Quantum Chemical Third Year Chemistry Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, T. A.

    1979-01-01

    In one option for this project, the rotation-vibration infrared spectra of a number of gaseous diatomic molecules were recorded, from which the fundamental vibrational wavenumber, the force constant, the rotation-vibration interaction constant, the equilibrium rotational constant, and the equilibrium internuclear distance were determined.…

  12. Rotational Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockett, Keith

    1988-01-01

    Demonstrates several objects rolling down a slope to explain the energy transition among potential energy, translational kinetic energy, and rotational kinetic energy. Contains a problem from Galileo's rolling ball experiment. (YP)

  13. Solar rotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziembowski, W.

    Sunspot observations made by Johannes Hevelius in 1642 - 1644 are the first ones providing significant information about the solar differential rotation. In modern astronomy the determination of the rotation rate is done in a routine way by measuring positions of various structures on the solar surface as well as by studying the Doppler shifts of spectral lines. In recent years a progress in helioseismology enabled determination of the rotation rate in the layers inaccessible for direct observations. There are still uncertainties concerning, especially, the temporal variations of the rotation rate and its behaviour in the radiative interior. We are far from understanding the observations. Theoretical works have not yet resulted in a satisfactory model for the angular momentum transport in the convective zone.

  14. Analysis of the Rotational Structure in the High-Resolution Infrared Spectra of cis,cis- and trans,trans-1,4-DIFLUOROBUTADIENE-1-d_{1} and trans,trans-1,4-DIFLUOROBUTADIENE-1,4-d_{2}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Norman C.; Chen, Yihui; Lu, Yuhua; Neese, Christopher F.; Nemchick, Deacon J.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2013-06-01

    Samples of cis,cis- and trans,trans-1,4-difluorobutadiene-1-d_{1} (DFBD) and trans,trans-DFBD-1,4-d_{2} have been synthesized and investigated with high-resolution (0.0015 cm^{-1}) infrared spectroscopy. For the first two species the rotational structure in more than one band has been analyzed. For the 1,4-d_{2} species the spectrum of only one C-type band was available in an isotopic mixture. Ground state rotational constants are reported for all three molecules. It is proposed that quartic centrifugal distortion constants computed with a B3LYP/cc-pVTZ model can be used to assess the quality of observed rotational constants. The favorable comparison of predicted and observed ground state rotational constants for all four ^{13}C species of cis,trans-DFBD, which is MW active, demonstrates that the ground state rotational constants for the ^{13}C species of the cis,cis and trans,trans isomers can be successfully predicted with high accuracy. Rotational constants for a full set of isotopologues will be used to determine accurate semiexperimental equilibrium structures of the cis,cis and trans,trans species of DFBD. N. C. Craig, C. M. Oertel, D. C. Oertel, M. J. Tubergen, R. J. Lavrich, A. M Chaka J. Phys. Chem. A 106, 4230-4235 (2002).

  15. ACCURATE SPECTROSCOPIC CHARACTERIZATION OF OXIRANE: A VALUABLE ROUTE TO ITS IDENTIFICATION IN TITAN’S ATMOSPHERE AND THE ASSIGNMENT OF UNIDENTIFIED INFRARED BANDS

    PubMed Central

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to provide an accurate spectroscopic characterization of oxirane, state-of-the-art computational methods and approaches have been employed to determine highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and rotational parameters. Available experimental data were used to assess the reliability of our computations, and an accuracy on average of 10 cm−1 for fundamental transitions as well as overtones and combination bands has been pointed out. Moving to rotational spectroscopy, relative discrepancies of 0.1%, 2%–3%, and 3%–4% were observed for rotational, quartic, and sextic centrifugal-distortion constants, respectively. We are therefore confident that the highly accurate spectroscopic data provided herein can be useful for identification of oxirane in Titan’s atmosphere and the assignment of unidentified infrared bands. Since oxirane was already observed in the interstellar medium and some astronomical objects are characterized by very high D/H ratios, we also considered the accurate determination of the spectroscopic parameters for the mono-deuterated species, oxirane-d1. For the latter, an empirical scaling procedure allowed us to improve our computed data and to provide predictions for rotational transitions with a relative accuracy of about 0.02% (i.e., an uncertainty of about 40 MHz for a transition lying at 200 GHz). PMID:26543240

  16. On the Khinchin Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.; Crandall, Richard E.; Craw, James M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We prove known identities for the Khinchin constant and develop new identities for the more general Hoelder mean limits of continued fractions. Any of these constants can be developed as a rapidly converging series involving values of the Riemann zeta function and rational coefficients. Such identities allow for efficient numerical evaluation of the relevant constants. We present free-parameter, optimizable versions of the identities, and report numerical results.

  17. Spatial and temporal variations of fundamental constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levshakov, S. A.; Agafonova, I. I.; Molaro, P.; Reimers, D.

    2010-11-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in the electron-to-proton mass ratio, μ, and in the fine-structure constant, α, are not present in the Standard Model of particle physics but they arise quite naturally in grant unification theories, multidimensional theories and in general when a coupling of light scalar fields to baryonic matter is considered. The light scalar fields are usually attributed to a negative pressure substance permeating the entire visible Universe and known as dark energy. This substance is thought to be responsible for a cosmic acceleration at low redshifts, z < 1. A strong dependence of μ and α on the ambient matter density is predicted by chameleon-like scalar field models. Calculations of atomic and molecular spectra show that different transitions have different sensitivities to changes in fundamental constants. Thus, measuring the relative line positions, Δ V, between such transitions one can probe the hypothetical variability of physical constants. In particular, interstellar molecular clouds can be used to test the matter density dependence of μ, since gas density in these clouds is ~15 orders of magnitude lower than that in terrestrial environment. We use the best quality radio spectra of the inversion transition of NH3 (J,K)=(1,1) and rotational transitions of other molecules to estimate the radial velocity offsets, Δ V ≡ Vrot - Vinv. The obtained value of Δ V shows a statistically significant positive shift of 23±4stat±3sys m s-1 (1σ). Being interpreted in terms of the electron-to-proton mass ratio variation, this gives Δμ/μ = (22±4stat±3sys)×10-9. A strong constraint on variation of the quantity F = α2/μ in the Milky Way is found from comparison of the fine-structure transition J=1-0 in atomic carbon C i with the low-J rotational lines in carbon monoxide 13CO arising in the interstellar molecular clouds: |Δ F/F| < 3×10-7. This yields |Δ α/α| < 1.5×10-7 at z = 0. Since extragalactic absorbers have gas densities

  18. Rotational spectrum of tryptophan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, M. Eugenia; Cabezas, Carlos; Mata, Santiago; Alonso, Josè L.

    2014-05-01

    The rotational spectrum of the natural amino acid tryptophan has been observed for the first time using a combination of laser ablation, molecular beams, and Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Independent analysis of the rotational spectra of individual conformers has conducted to a definitive identification of two different conformers of tryptophan, with one of the observed conformers never reported before. The analysis of the 14N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants is of particular significance since it allows discrimination between structures, thus providing structural information on the orientation of the amino group. Both observed conformers are stabilized by an O-H...N hydrogen bond in the side chain and a N-H...π interaction forming a chain that reinforce the strength of hydrogen bonds through cooperative effects.

  19. Rotational spectrum of tryptophan

    SciTech Connect

    Sanz, M. Eugenia Cabezas, Carlos Mata, Santiago Alonso, Josè L.

    2014-05-28

    The rotational spectrum of the natural amino acid tryptophan has been observed for the first time using a combination of laser ablation, molecular beams, and Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Independent analysis of the rotational spectra of individual conformers has conducted to a definitive identification of two different conformers of tryptophan, with one of the observed conformers never reported before. The analysis of the {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants is of particular significance since it allows discrimination between structures, thus providing structural information on the orientation of the amino group. Both observed conformers are stabilized by an O–H···N hydrogen bond in the side chain and a N–H···π interaction forming a chain that reinforce the strength of hydrogen bonds through cooperative effects.

  20. Modeling rigid magnetically rotated microswimmers: Rotation axes, bistability, and controllability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkati, Farshad; Fu, Henry Chien

    2014-12-01

    Magnetically actuated microswimmers have recently attracted attention due to many possible biomedical applications. In this study we investigate the dynamics of rigid magnetically rotated microswimmers with permanent magnetic dipoles. Our approach uses a boundary element method to calculate a mobility matrix, accurate for arbitrary geometries, which is then used to identify the steady periodically rotating orbits in a co-rotating body-fixed frame. We evaluate the stability of each of these orbits. We map the magnetoviscous behavior as a function of dimensionless Mason number and as a function of the angle that the magnetic field makes with its rotation axis. We describe the wobbling motion of these swimmers by investigating how the rotation axis changes as a function of experimental parameters. We show that for a given magnetic field strength and rotation frequency, swimmers can have more than one stable periodic orbit with different rotation axes. Finally, we demonstrate that one can improve the controllability of these types of microswimmers by adjusting the relative angle between the magnetic field and its axis of rotation.

  1. The Possible Interstellar Anion CH2CN-: Spectroscopic Constants, Vibrational Frequencies, and Other Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Crawford, T. Daniel; Lee, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    The A 1B1 <-1A0 excitation into the dipole-bound state of the cyanomethyl anion (CH2CN??) has been hypothesized as the carrier for one di use interstellar band. However, this particular molecular system has not been detected in the interstellar medium even though the related cyanomethyl radical and the isoelectronic ketenimine molecule have been found. In this study we are employing the use of proven quartic force elds and second-order vibrational perturbation theory to compute accurate spectroscopic constants and fundamental vibrational frequencies for X 1A0 CH2CN?? in order to assist in laboratory studies and astronomical observations. Keywords: Astrochemistry, ISM: molecular anions, Quartic force elds, Rotational constants, Vibrational frequencies

  2. Compensation of Verdet Constant Temperature Dependence by Crystal Core Temperature Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Petricevic, Slobodan J.; Mihailovic, Pedja M.

    2016-01-01

    Compensation of the temperature dependence of the Verdet constant in a polarimetric extrinsic Faraday sensor is of major importance for applying the magneto-optical effect to AC current measurements and magnetic field sensing. This paper presents a method for compensating the temperature effect on the Faraday rotation in a Bi12GeO20 crystal by sensing its optical activity effect on the polarization of a light beam. The method measures the temperature of the same volume of crystal that effects the beam polarization in a magnetic field or current sensing process. This eliminates the effect of temperature difference found in other indirect temperature compensation methods, thus allowing more accurate temperature compensation for the temperature dependence of the Verdet constant. The method does not require additional changes to an existing Δ/Σ configuration and is thus applicable for improving the performance of existing sensing devices. PMID:27706043

  3. The rotational spectrum of 17O2 up to the THz region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzoli, Gabriele; Kirsch, Till; Gauss, Jürgen; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the pure rotational spectrum of the 17O2 isotopic species of molecular oxygen has been extended with respect to previous investigations to the submillimeter-wave region, from 230 GHz up to 1.06 THz. The resulting spectroscopic parameters, which have an accuracy comparable to that of the constants obtained from an updated isotopic invariant fit involving data for three electronic states and six isotopologues [Yu et al. High resolution spectral analysis of oxygen. IV. Energy levels, partition sums, bandconstants, RKR potentials, Franck-Condon factors involving the X3 Σg-, a1Δg, and b1 Σg+ states. J Chem Phys 2014;141:174302/1-12], permit the prediction of the pure rotational transitions up to 2 THz with an estimated uncertainty not greater than 100 kHz. In the present study, high-level quantum-chemical calculations guided, supported, and complemented the determination of the hyperfine parameters of 17O, with particular effort made in determining an accurate and reliable experimental value for the nuclear spin-rotation constant. A detailed discussion about the magnitude of the nuclear spin-rotation constant in the 17O-containing O2 species for both the ground and the first excited electronic state is presented.

  4. Fundamental Physical Constants

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 121 CODATA Fundamental Physical Constants (Web, free access)   This site, developed in the Physics Laboratory at NIST, addresses three topics: fundamental physical constants, the International System of Units (SI), which is the modern metric system, and expressing the uncertainty of measurement results.

  5. WHY IS THE SOLAR CONSTANT NOT A CONSTANT?

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K. J.; Xu, J. C.; Gao, P. X.; Yang, L. H.; Liang, H. F.; Zhan, L. S.

    2012-03-10

    In order to probe the mechanism of variations of the solar constant on the inter-solar-cycle scale, the total solar irradiance (TSI; the so-called solar constant) in the time interval of 1978 November 7 to 2010 September 20 is decomposed into three components through empirical mode decomposition and time-frequency analyses. The first component is the rotation signal, counting up to 42.31% of the total variation of TSI, which is understood to be mainly caused by large magnetic structures, including sunspot groups. The second is an annual-variation signal, counting up to 15.17% of the total variation, the origin of which is not known at this point in time. Finally, the third is the inter-solar-cycle signal, counting up to 42.52%, which is inferred to be caused by the network magnetic elements in quiet regions, whose magnetic flux ranges from (4.27-38.01) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} Mx.

  6. The time constant of the somatogravic illusion.

    PubMed

    Correia Grácio, B J; de Winkel, K N; Groen, E L; Wentink, M; Bos, J E

    2013-02-01

    Without visual feedback, humans perceive tilt when experiencing a sustained linear acceleration. This tilt illusion is commonly referred to as the somatogravic illusion. Although the physiological basis of the illusion seems to be well understood, the dynamic behavior is still subject to discussion. In this study, the dynamic behavior of the illusion was measured experimentally for three motion profiles with different frequency content. Subjects were exposed to pure centripetal accelerations in the lateral direction and were asked to indicate their tilt percept by means of a joystick. Variable-radius centrifugation during constant angular rotation was used to generate these motion profiles. Two self-motion perception models were fitted to the experimental data and were used to obtain the time constant of the somatogravic illusion. Results showed that the time constant of the somatogravic illusion was on the order of two seconds, in contrast to the higher time constant found in fixed-radius centrifugation studies. Furthermore, the time constant was significantly affected by the frequency content of the motion profiles. Motion profiles with higher frequency content revealed shorter time constants which cannot be explained by self-motion perception models that assume a fixed time constant. Therefore, these models need to be improved with a mechanism that deals with this variable time constant. Apart from the fundamental importance, these results also have practical consequences for the simulation of sustained accelerations in motion simulators.

  7. Laboratory detection of the rotational-tunnelling spectrum of the hydroxymethyl radical, CH2OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermudez, C.; Bailleux, S.; Cernicharo, J.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Of the two structural isomers of CH3O, methoxy is the only radical whose astronomical detection has been reported through the observation of several rotational lines at 2 and 3 mm wavelengths. Although the hydroxymethyl radical, CH2OH, is known to be thermodynamically the most stable (by 3300 cm-1), it has so far eluded rotational spectroscopy presumably because of its high chemical reactivity. Aims: Recent high-resolution ( 10 MHz) sub-Doppler rovibrationally resolved infrared spectra of CH2OH (symmetric CH stretching a-type band) provided accurate ground vibrational state rotational constants, thus reviving the quest for its millimeter-wave spectrum in laboratory and subsequently in space. Methods: The search and assignment of the rotational spectrum of this fundamental species were guided by our quantum chemical calculations and by using rotational constants derived from high-resolution IR data. The hydroxymethyl radical was produced by hydrogen abstraction from methanol by atomic chlorine. Results: Ninety-six b-type rotational transitions between the v = 0 and v = 1 tunnelling sublevels involving 25 fine-structure components of Q branches (with Ka = 1 ← 0) and 4 fine-structure components of R branches (assigned to Ka = 0 ← 1) were measured below 402 GHz. Hyperfine structure alternations due to the two identical methylenic hydrogens were observed and analysed based on the symmetry and parity of the rotational levels. A global fit including infrared and millimeter-wave lines has been conducted using Pickett's reduced axis system Hamiltonian. The recorded transitions (odd ΔKa) did not allow us to evaluate the Coriolis tunnelling interaction term. The comparison of the experimentally determined constants for both tunnelling levels with their computed values secures the long-awaited first detection of the rotational-tunnelling spectrum of this radical. In particular, a tunnelling rate of 139.73 ± 0.10 MHz (4.6609(32) × 10-3 cm-1) was obtained along

  8. Rotational spectra of the X 2Sigma(+) states of CaH and CaD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frum, C. I.; Oh, J. J.; Cohen, E. A.; Pickett, H. M.

    1993-01-01

    The rotational spectra of the 2Sigma(2+) ground states of calcium monohydride and monodeuteride have been recorded in absorption between 250 and 700 GHz. The gas phase free radicals have been produced in a ceramic furnace by the reaction of elemental calcium with molecular hydrogen or deuterium in the presence of an electrical discharge. The molecular constants including the rotational constant, centrifugal distortion constants, spin-rotation constants, and magnetic hyperfine interaction constants have been extracted from the spectra.

  9. Reaching during virtual rotation: context specific compensations for expected coriolis forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohn, J. V.; DiZio, P.; Lackner, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    Subjects who are in an enclosed chamber rotating at constant velocity feel physically stationary but make errors when pointing to targets. Reaching paths and endpoints are deviated in the direction of the transient inertial Coriolis forces generated by their arm movements. By contrast, reaching movements made during natural, voluntary torso rotation seem to be accurate, and subjects are unaware of the Coriolis forces generated by their movements. This pattern suggests that the motor plan for reaching movements uses a representation of body motion to prepare compensations for impending self-generated accelerative loads on the arm. If so, stationary subjects who are experiencing illusory self-rotation should make reaching errors when pointing to a target. These errors should be in the direction opposite the Coriolis accelerations their arm movements would generate if they were actually rotating. To determine whether such compensations exist, we had subjects in four experiments make visually open-loop reaches to targets while they were experiencing compelling illusory self-rotation and displacement induced by rotation of a complex, natural visual scene. The paths and endpoints of their initial reaching movements were significantly displaced leftward during counterclockwise illusory rotary displacement and rightward during clockwise illusory self-displacement. Subjects reached in a curvilinear path to the wrong place. These reaching errors were opposite in direction to the Coriolis forces that would have been generated by their arm movements during actual torso rotation. The magnitude of path curvature and endpoint errors increased as the speed of illusory self-rotation increased. In successive reaches, movement paths became straighter and endpoints more accurate despite the absence of visual error feedback or tactile feedback about target location. When subjects were again presented a stationary scene, their initial reaches were indistinguishable from pre

  10. Reaching during virtual rotation: context specific compensations for expected coriolis forces.

    PubMed

    Cohn, J V; DiZio, P; Lackner, J R

    2000-06-01

    Subjects who are in an enclosed chamber rotating at constant velocity feel physically stationary but make errors when pointing to targets. Reaching paths and endpoints are deviated in the direction of the transient inertial Coriolis forces generated by their arm movements. By contrast, reaching movements made during natural, voluntary torso rotation seem to be accurate, and subjects are unaware of the Coriolis forces generated by their movements. This pattern suggests that the motor plan for reaching movements uses a representation of body motion to prepare compensations for impending self-generated accelerative loads on the arm. If so, stationary subjects who are experiencing illusory self-rotation should make reaching errors when pointing to a target. These errors should be in the direction opposite the Coriolis accelerations their arm movements would generate if they were actually rotating. To determine whether such compensations exist, we had subjects in four experiments make visually open-loop reaches to targets while they were experiencing compelling illusory self-rotation and displacement induced by rotation of a complex, natural visual scene. The paths and endpoints of their initial reaching movements were significantly displaced leftward during counterclockwise illusory rotary displacement and rightward during clockwise illusory self-displacement. Subjects reached in a curvilinear path to the wrong place. These reaching errors were opposite in direction to the Coriolis forces that would have been generated by their arm movements during actual torso rotation. The magnitude of path curvature and endpoint errors increased as the speed of illusory self-rotation increased. In successive reaches, movement paths became straighter and endpoints more accurate despite the absence of visual error feedback or tactile feedback about target location. When subjects were again presented a stationary scene, their initial reaches were indistinguishable from pre

  11. Rotating mandrel speeds assembly of plastic inflatables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Fadden, J. A.; Stenlund, S. J.; Wendt, A. J.

    1966-01-01

    Rotating mandrel permits the accurate cutting, forming, and sealing of plastic gores for assembly of an inflatable surface of revolution. The gores remain on the mandrel until the final seam is reached. Tolerances are tightly controlled by the mandrel configuration.

  12. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  13. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  14. "Recognizing Numerical Constants"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Craw, James M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The advent of inexpensive, high performance computer and new efficient algorithms have made possible the automatic recognition of numerically computed constants. In other words, techniques now exist for determining, within certain limits, whether a computed real or complex number can be written as a simple expression involving the classical constants of mathematics. In this presentation, some of the recently discovered techniques for constant recognition, notably integer relation detection algorithms, will be presented. As an application of these methods, the author's recent work in recognizing "Euler sums" will be described in some detail.

  15. A phenomenological treatment of rotating turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, YE

    1995-01-01

    The strong similarity between the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and initially isotropic turbulence subject to rotation is noted. We then apply the MHD phenomenologies of Kraichnan and Matthaeus & Zhou to rotating turbulence. When the turbulence is subject to a strong rotation, the energy spectrum is found to scale as E(k) = C(sub Omega)(Omega(sub epsilon))(sup 1/2)k(sup -2), where Omega is the rotation rate, k is the wavenumber, and epsilon is the dissipation rate. This spectral form is consistent with a recent letter by Zeman. However, here the constant C(sub Omega) is found to be related to the Kolmogorov constant and is estimated in the range 1.22 - 1.87 for the typical values of the latter constant. A 'rule' that relates spectral transfer times to the eddy turnover time and the time scale for decay of the triple correlations is deduced. A hypothesis for the triple correlation decay rate leads to the spectral law which varies between the '-5/3' (without rotation) and '-2' laws (with strong rotation). For intermediate rotation rates, the spectrum varies according to the value of a dimensionless parameter that measures the strength of the rotation wavenumber k(sub Omega) = (Omega(sup 3)/epsiolon)(sup 1/2) relative to the wavenumber k. An eddy viscosity is derived with an explicit dependence on the rotation rate.

  16. Science Is Constantly Cool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichinger, John

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students attempt to keep water at a constant temperature. Helps students in grades three to six hone their skills in prediction, observation, measurement, data collection, graphing, data analysis, and communication. (JRH)

  17. Rotational Energy Transfer in N2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.

    1994-01-01

    Using the N2-N2 intermolecular potential of van der Avoird et al. rotational energy transfer cross sections have been calculated using both the coupled state (CS) and infinite order sudden (IOS) approximations. The rotational energy transfer rate constants at 300 K, calculated in the CS approximation, are in reasonable agreement with the measurements of Sitz and Farrow. The IOS approximation qualitatively reproduces the dependence of the rate constants on the rotational quantum numbers, but consistently overestimates their magnitudes. The treatment of exchange symmetry will be discussed.

  18. Vibration-rotation-tunneling dynamics in small water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Pugliano, N.

    1992-11-01

    The goal of this work is to characterize the intermolecular vibrations of small water clusters. Using tunable far infrared laser absorption spectroscopy, large amplitude vibration-rotation-tunneling (VRT) dynamics in vibrationally excited states of the water dimer and the water trimer are investigated. This study begins with the measurement of 12 VRT subbands, consisting of approximately 230 transitions, which are assigned to an 82.6 cm[sup [minus]1] intermolecular vibration of the water dimer-d[sub 4]. Each of the VRT subbands originate from K[sub a][double prime]=0 and terminate in either K[sub a][prime]=0 or 1. These data provide a complete characterization of the tunneling dynamics in the vibrationally excited state as well as definitive symmetry labels for all VRT energy levels. Furthermore, an accurate value for the A[prime] rotational constant is found to agree well with its corresponding ground state value. All other excited state rotational constants are fitted, and discussed in terms of the corresponding ground state constants. In this vibration, the quantum tunneling motions are determined to exhibit large dependencies with both the K[sub a][prime] quantum number and the vibrational coordinate, as is evidenced by the measured tunneling splittings. The generalized internal-axis-method treatment which has been developed to model the tunneling dynamics, is considered for the qualitative description of each tunneling pathway, however, the variation of tunneling splittings with vibrational excitation indicate that the high barrier approximation does not appear to be applicable for this vibrational coordinate. The data are consistent with a motion possessing a[prime] symmetry, and the vibration is assigned as the [nu][sub 12] acceptor bending coordinate. This assignment is in agreement with the vibrational symmetry, the resultsof high level ab initio calculations, and preliminary data assigned to the analogous vibration in the D[sub 2]O-DOH isotopomer.

  19. Vibration-rotation-tunneling dynamics in small water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Pugliano, N.

    1992-11-01

    The goal of this work is to characterize the intermolecular vibrations of small water clusters. Using tunable far infrared laser absorption spectroscopy, large amplitude vibration-rotation-tunneling (VRT) dynamics in vibrationally excited states of the water dimer and the water trimer are investigated. This study begins with the measurement of 12 VRT subbands, consisting of approximately 230 transitions, which are assigned to an 82.6 cm{sup {minus}1} intermolecular vibration of the water dimer-d{sub 4}. Each of the VRT subbands originate from K{sub a}{double_prime}=0 and terminate in either K{sub a}{prime}=0 or 1. These data provide a complete characterization of the tunneling dynamics in the vibrationally excited state as well as definitive symmetry labels for all VRT energy levels. Furthermore, an accurate value for the A{prime} rotational constant is found to agree well with its corresponding ground state value. All other excited state rotational constants are fitted, and discussed in terms of the corresponding ground state constants. In this vibration, the quantum tunneling motions are determined to exhibit large dependencies with both the K{sub a}{prime} quantum number and the vibrational coordinate, as is evidenced by the measured tunneling splittings. The generalized internal-axis-method treatment which has been developed to model the tunneling dynamics, is considered for the qualitative description of each tunneling pathway, however, the variation of tunneling splittings with vibrational excitation indicate that the high barrier approximation does not appear to be applicable for this vibrational coordinate. The data are consistent with a motion possessing a{prime} symmetry, and the vibration is assigned as the {nu}{sub 12} acceptor bending coordinate. This assignment is in agreement with the vibrational symmetry, the resultsof high level ab initio calculations, and preliminary data assigned to the analogous vibration in the D{sub 2}O-DOH isotopomer.

  20. Formation of the prebiotic molecule NH2CHO on astronomical amorphous solid water surfaces: accurate tunneling rate calculations† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Geometric details, lists of calculated rate constants. See DOI: 10.1039/c6cp05727f Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Investigating how formamide forms in the interstellar medium is a hot topic in astrochemistry, which can contribute to our understanding of the origin of life on Earth. We have constructed a QM/MM model to simulate the hydrogenation of isocyanic acid on amorphous solid water surfaces to form formamide. The binding energy of HNCO on the ASW surface varies significantly between different binding sites, we found values between ∼0 and 100 kJ mol–1. The barrier for the hydrogenation reaction is almost independent of the binding energy, though. We calculated tunneling rate constants of H + HNCO → NH2CO at temperatures down to 103 K combining QM/MM with instanton theory. Tunneling dominates the reaction at such low temperatures. The tunneling reaction is hardly accelerated by the amorphous solid water surface compared to the gas phase for this system, even though the activation energy of the surface reaction is lower than the one of the gas-phase reaction. Both the height and width of the barrier affect the tunneling rate in practice. Strong kinetic isotope effects were observed by comparing to rate constants of D + HNCO → NHDCO. At 103 K we found a KIE of 231 on the surface and 146 in the gas phase. Furthermore, we investigated the gas-phase reaction NH2 + H2CO → NH2CHO + H and found it unlikely to occur at cryogenic temperatures. The data of our tunneling rate constants are expected to significantly influence astrochemical models. PMID:27731439

  1. Quantum electrodynamics and fundamental constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wundt, Benedikt Johannes Wilhelm

    The unprecedented precision achieved both in the experimental measurements as well as in the theoretical description of atomic bound states make them an ideal study object for fundamental physics and the determination of fundamental constants. This requires a careful study of the effects from quantum electrodynamics (QED) on the interaction between the electron and the nucleus. The two theoretical approaches for the evaluation of QED corrections are presented and discussed. Due to the presence of two energy scales from the binding potential and the radiation field, an overlapping parameter has to be used in both approaches in order to separate the energy scales. The different choices for the overlapping parameter in the two methods are further illustrated in a model example. With the nonrelativistic theory, relativistic corrections in order ( Zalpha)2 to the two-photon decay rate of ionic states are calculated, as well as the leading radiative corrections of alpha( Zalpha)2ln[(Zalpha)-2 ]. It is shown that the corrections is gauge-invariant under a "hybrid" gauge transformation between Coulomb and Yennie gauge. Furthermore, QED corrections for Rydberg states in one-electron ions are investigated. The smallness of the corrections and the absence of nuclear size corrections enable very accurate theoretical predictions. Measuring transition frequencies and comparing them to the theoretical predictions, QED theory can be tested more precisely. In turn, this could yield a more accurate value for the Rydberg constant. Using a transition in a nucleus with a well determined mass, acting as a reference, a comparison to transition in other nuclei can even allow to determined nuclear masses. Finally, in order to avoid an additional uncertainty in nuclei with non zero nuclear spin, QED self-energy corrections to the hyperfine structure up to order alpha(Zalpha)2Delta EHFS are determined for highly excited Rydberg states.

  2. Dielectric Constant of Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelson, Kenneth S.; Ackmann, James J.

    1997-03-01

    We have used a finite element method to calculate the dielectric constant of a cubic array of spheres. Extensive calculations support preliminary conclusions reported previously (K. Mendelson and J. Ackmann, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 41), 657 (1996).. At frequencies below 100 kHz the real part of the dielectric constant (ɛ') shows oscillations as a function of the volume fraction of suspension. These oscillations disappear at low conductivities of the suspending fluid. Measurements of the dielectric constant (J. Ackmann, et al., Ann. Biomed. Eng. 24), 58 (1996). (H. Fricke and H. Curtis, J. Phys. Chem. 41), 729 (1937). are not sufficiently sensitive to show oscillations but appear to be consistent with the theoretical results.

  3. Elastic constants of calcite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peselnick, L.; Robie, R.A.

    1962-01-01

    The recent measurements of the elastic constants of calcite by Reddy and Subrahmanyam (1960) disagree with the values obtained independently by Voigt (1910) and Bhimasenachar (1945). The present authors, using an ultrasonic pulse technique at 3 Mc and 25??C, determined the elastic constants of calcite using the exact equations governing the wave velocities in the single crystal. The results are C11=13.7, C33=8.11, C44=3.50, C12=4.82, C13=5.68, and C14=-2.00, in units of 1011 dyncm2. Independent checks of several of the elastic constants were made employing other directions and polarizations of the wave velocities. With the exception of C13, these values substantially agree with the data of Voigt and Bhimasenachar. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  4. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  5. The rotational spectrum of tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Cristóbal; Mata, Santiago; Cabezas, Carlos; López, Juan C; Alonso, José L

    2015-04-23

    In this work neutral tyrosine has been generated in the gas phase by laser ablation of solid samples, and its most abundant conformers characterized through their rotational spectra. Their identification has been made by comparison between the experimental and ab initio values of the rotational and quadrupole coupling constants. Both conformers are stabilized by an O-H•••N hydrogen bond established within the amino acid skeleton chain and an additional weak N-H•••π hydrogen bond. The observed conformers differ in the orientation of the phenolic -OH group.

  6. Systematic angle random walk estimation of the constant rate biased ring laser gyro.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huapeng; Wu, Wenqi; Wu, Meiping; Feng, Guohu; Hao, Ming

    2013-02-27

    An actual account of the angle random walk (ARW) coefficients of gyros in the constant rate biased rate ring laser gyro (RLG) inertial navigation system (INS) is very important in practical engineering applications. However, no reported experimental work has dealt with the issue of characterizing the ARW of the constant rate biased RLG in the INS. To avoid the need for high cost precise calibration tables and complex measuring set-ups, the objective of this study is to present a cost-effective experimental approach to characterize the ARW of the gyros in the constant rate biased RLG INS. In the system, turntable dynamics and other external noises would inevitably contaminate the measured RLG data, leading to the question of isolation of such disturbances. A practical observation model of the gyros in the constant rate biased RLG INS was discussed, and an experimental method based on the fast orthogonal search (FOS) for the practical observation model to separate ARW error from the RLG measured data was proposed. Validity of the FOS-based method was checked by estimating the ARW coefficients of the mechanically dithered RLG under stationary and turntable rotation conditions. By utilizing the FOS-based method, the average ARW coefficient of the constant rate biased RLG in the postulate system is estimated. The experimental results show that the FOS-based method can achieve high denoising ability. This method estimate the ARW coefficients of the constant rate biased RLG in the postulate system accurately. The FOS-based method does not need precise calibration table with high cost and complex measuring set-up, and Statistical results of the tests will provide us references in engineering application of the constant rate biased RLG INS.

  7. Systematic Angle Random Walk Estimation of the Constant Rate Biased Ring Laser Gyro

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Huapeng; Wu, Wenqi; Wu, Meiping; Feng, Guohu; Hao, Ming

    2013-01-01

    An actual account of the angle random walk (ARW) coefficients of gyros in the constant rate biased rate ring laser gyro (RLG) inertial navigation system (INS) is very important in practical engineering applications. However, no reported experimental work has dealt with the issue of characterizing the ARW of the constant rate biased RLG in the INS. To avoid the need for high cost precise calibration tables and complex measuring set-ups, the objective of this study is to present a cost-effective experimental approach to characterize the ARW of the gyros in the constant rate biased RLG INS. In the system, turntable dynamics and other external noises would inevitably contaminate the measured RLG data, leading to the question of isolation of such disturbances. A practical observation model of the gyros in the constant rate biased RLG INS was discussed, and an experimental method based on the fast orthogonal search (FOS) for the practical observation model to separate ARW error from the RLG measured data was proposed. Validity of the FOS-based method was checked by estimating the ARW coefficients of the mechanically dithered RLG under stationary and turntable rotation conditions. By utilizing the FOS-based method, the average ARW coefficient of the constant rate biased RLG in the postulate system is estimated. The experimental results show that the FOS-based method can achieve high denoising ability. This method estimate the ARW coefficients of the constant rate biased RLG in the postulate system accurately. The FOS-based method does not need precise calibration table with high cost and complex measuring set-up, and Statistical results of the tests will provide us references in engineering application of the constant rate biased RLG INS. PMID:23447008

  8. Rotating Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues currently being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  9. The effect of rotations on Michelson interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Maraner, Paolo

    2014-11-15

    In the contest of the special theory of relativity, it is shown that uniform rotations induce a phase shift in Michelson interferometers. The effect is second order in the ratio of the interferometer’s speed to the speed of light, further suppressed by the ratio of the interferometer’s arms length to the radius of rotation and depends on the interferometer’s position in the co-rotating frame. The magnitude of the phase shift is just beyond the sensitivity of turntable rotated optical resonators used in present tests of Lorentz invariance. It grows significantly large in Earth’s rotated kilometer-scale Fabry–Perot enhanced interferometric gravitational-wave detectors where it appears as a constant bias. The effect can provide the means of sensing center and radius of rotations. - Highlights: • Rotations induce a phase shift in Michelson interferometers. • Earth’s rotation induces a constant bias in Michelson interferometers. • Michelson interferometers can be used to sense center and radius of rotations.

  10. BIOACCESSIBILITY TESTS ACCURATELY ESTIMATE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hazards of soil-borne Pb to wild birds may be more accurately quantified if the bioavailability of that Pb is known. To better understand the bioavailability of Pb to birds, we measured blood Pb concentrations in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) fed diets containing Pb-contaminated soils. Relative bioavailabilities were expressed by comparison with blood Pb concentrations in quail fed a Pb acetate reference diet. Diets containing soil from five Pb-contaminated Superfund sites had relative bioavailabilities from 33%-63%, with a mean of about 50%. Treatment of two of the soils with P significantly reduced the bioavailability of Pb. The bioaccessibility of the Pb in the test soils was then measured in six in vitro tests and regressed on bioavailability. They were: the “Relative Bioavailability Leaching Procedure” (RBALP) at pH 1.5, the same test conducted at pH 2.5, the “Ohio State University In vitro Gastrointestinal” method (OSU IVG), the “Urban Soil Bioaccessible Lead Test”, the modified “Physiologically Based Extraction Test” and the “Waterfowl Physiologically Based Extraction Test.” All regressions had positive slopes. Based on criteria of slope and coefficient of determination, the RBALP pH 2.5 and OSU IVG tests performed very well. Speciation by X-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrated that, on average, most of the Pb in the sampled soils was sorbed to minerals (30%), bound to organic matter 24%, or present as Pb sulfate 18%. Ad

  11. Current status of quantitative rotational spectroscopy for atmospheric research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drouin, Brian J.; Wlodarczak, Georges; Colmont, Jean-Marcel; Rohart, Francois

    2004-01-01

    Remote sensing of rotational transitions in the Earth's atmosphere has become an important method for the retrieval of geophysical temperatures, pressures and chemical composition profiles that requires accurate spectral information. This paper highlights the current status of rotational data that are useful for atmospheric measurements, with a discussion of the types the rotational lineshape measurements that are not generally available in either online repository.

  12. Comparing Vibrationally Averaged Nuclear Shielding Constants by Quantum Diffusion Monte Carlo and Second-Order Perturbation Theory.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yee-Hong; Bettens, Ryan P A

    2016-03-03

    Using the method of modified Shepard's interpolation to construct potential energy surfaces of the H2O, O3, and HCOOH molecules, we compute vibrationally averaged isotropic nuclear shielding constants ⟨σ⟩ of the three molecules via quantum diffusion Monte Carlo (QDMC). The QDMC results are compared to that of second-order perturbation theory (PT), to see if second-order PT is adequate for obtaining accurate values of nuclear shielding constants of molecules with large amplitude motions. ⟨σ⟩ computed by the two approaches differ for the hydrogens and carbonyl oxygen of HCOOH, suggesting that for certain molecules such as HCOOH where big displacements away from equilibrium happen (internal OH rotation), ⟨σ⟩ of experimental quality may only be obtainable with the use of more sophisticated and accurate methods, such as quantum diffusion Monte Carlo. The approach of modified Shepard's interpolation is also extended to construct shielding constants σ surfaces of the three molecules. By using a σ surface with the equilibrium geometry as a single data point to compute isotropic nuclear shielding constants for each descendant in the QDMC ensemble representing the ground state wave function, we reproduce the results obtained through ab initio computed σ to within statistical noise. Development of such an approach could thereby alleviate the need for any future costly ab initio σ calculations.

  13. Accurate spectral color measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltunen, Jouni; Jaeaeskelaeinen, Timo; Parkkinen, Jussi P. S.

    1999-08-01

    Surface color measurement is of importance in a very wide range of industrial applications including paint, paper, printing, photography, textiles, plastics and so on. For a demanding color measurements spectral approach is often needed. One can measure a color spectrum with a spectrophotometer using calibrated standard samples as a reference. Because it is impossible to define absolute color values of a sample, we always work with approximations. The human eye can perceive color difference as small as 0.5 CIELAB units and thus distinguish millions of colors. This 0.5 unit difference should be a goal for the precise color measurements. This limit is not a problem if we only want to measure the color difference of two samples, but if we want to know in a same time exact color coordinate values accuracy problems arise. The values of two instruments can be astonishingly different. The accuracy of the instrument used in color measurement may depend on various errors such as photometric non-linearity, wavelength error, integrating sphere dark level error, integrating sphere error in both specular included and specular excluded modes. Thus the correction formulas should be used to get more accurate results. Another question is how many channels i.e. wavelengths we are using to measure a spectrum. It is obvious that the sampling interval should be short to get more precise results. Furthermore, the result we get is always compromise of measuring time, conditions and cost. Sometimes we have to use portable syste or the shape and the size of samples makes it impossible to use sensitive equipment. In this study a small set of calibrated color tiles measured with the Perkin Elmer Lamda 18 and the Minolta CM-2002 spectrophotometers are compared. In the paper we explain the typical error sources of spectral color measurements, and show which are the accuracy demands a good colorimeter should have.

  14. The spectroscopic constants and anharmonic force field of AgSH: An ab initio study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanliang; Wang, Meishan; Yang, Chuanlu; Ma, Xiaoguang; Zhu, Ziliang

    2016-07-05

    The equilibrium structure, spectroscopy constants, and anharmonic force field of silver hydrosulfide (AgSH) have been calculated at B3P86, B3PW91 and MP2 methods employing two basis sets, TZP and QZP, respectively. The calculated geometries, ground state rotational constants, harmonic vibrational wave numbers, and quartic and sextic centrifugal distortion constants are compared with the available experimental and theoretical data. The equilibrium rotational constants, fundamental frequencies, anharmonic constants, and vibration-rotation interaction constants, Coriolis coupling constants, cubic and quartic force constants are predicted. The calculated results show that the MP2/TZP results are in good agreement with experiment observation and are also an advisable choice to study the anharmonic force field of AgSH.

  15. Redshift in Hubble's constant.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temple-Raston, M.

    1997-01-01

    A topological field theory with Bogomol'nyi solitons is examined. The Bogomol'nyi solitons have much in common with the instanton in Yang-Mills theory; consequently the author called them 'topological instantons'. When periodic boundary conditions are imposed, the field theory comments indirectly on the speed of light within the theory. In this particular model the speed of light is not a universal constant. This may or may not be relevant to the current debate in astronomy and cosmology over the large values of the Hubble constant obtained by the latest generation of ground- and space-based telescopes. An experiment is proposed to detect spatial variation in the speed of light.

  16. Wall of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Peloso, Marco; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-02-15

    We consider the signatures of a domain wall produced in the spontaneous symmetry breaking involving a dilatonlike scalar field coupled to electromagnetism. Domains on either side of the wall exhibit slight differences in their respective values of the fine-structure constant, {alpha}. If such a wall is present within our Hubble volume, absorption spectra at large redshifts may or may not provide a variation in {alpha} relative to the terrestrial value, depending on our relative position with respect to the wall. This wall could resolve the contradiction between claims of a variation of {alpha} based on Keck/Hires data and of the constancy of {alpha} based on Very Large Telescope data. We derive the properties of the wall and the parameters of the underlying microscopic model required to reproduce the possible spatial variation of {alpha}. We discuss the constraints on the existence of the low-energy domain wall and describe its observational implications concerning the variation of the fundamental constants.

  17. Percolation with Constant Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottram, Edward

    2014-06-01

    We introduce and study a model of percolation with constant freezing ( PCF) where edges open at constant rate , and clusters freeze at rate independently of their size. Our main result is that the infinite volume process can be constructed on any amenable vertex transitive graph. This is in sharp contrast to models of percolation with freezing previously introduced, where the limit is known not to exist. Our interest is in the study of the percolative properties of the final configuration as a function of . We also obtain more precise results in the case of trees. Surprisingly the algebraic exponent for the cluster size depends on the degree, suggesting that there is no lower critical dimension for the model. Moreover, even for , it is shown that finite clusters have algebraic tail decay, which is a signature of self organised criticality. Partial results are obtained on , and many open questions are discussed.

  18. Constant-pressure Blowers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, E

    1940-01-01

    The conventional axial blowers operate on the high-pressure principle. One drawback of this type of blower is the relatively low pressure head, which one attempts to overcome with axial blowers producing very high pressure at a given circumferential speed. The Schicht constant-pressure blower affords pressure ratios considerably higher than those of axial blowers of conventional design with approximately the same efficiency.

  19. The effect of rotations on Michelson interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraner, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    In the contest of the special theory of relativity, it is shown that uniform rotations induce a phase shift in Michelson interferometers. The effect is second order in the ratio of the interferometer's speed to the speed of light, further suppressed by the ratio of the interferometer's arms length to the radius of rotation and depends on the interferometer's position in the co-rotating frame. The magnitude of the phase shift is just beyond the sensitivity of turntable rotated optical resonators used in present tests of Lorentz invariance. It grows significantly large in Earth's rotated kilometer-scale Fabry-Perot enhanced interferometric gravitational-wave detectors where it appears as a constant bias. The effect can provide the means of sensing center and radius of rotations.

  20. Universe of constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongquan, Han

    2016-10-01

    The ideal gas state equation is not applicable to ordinary gas, it should be applied to the Electromagnetic ``gas'' that is applied to the radiation, the radiation should be the ultimate state of matter changes or initial state, the universe is filled with radiation. That is, the ideal gas equation of state is suitable for the Singular point and the universe. Maybe someone consider that, there is no vessel can accommodate radiation, it is because the Ordinary container is too small to accommodate, if the radius of your container is the distance that Light through an hour, would you still think it can't accommodates radiation? Modern scientific determinate that the radius of the universe now is about 1027 m, assuming that the universe is a sphere whose volume is approximately: V = 4.19 × 1081 cubic meters, the temperature radiation of the universe (cosmic microwave background radiation temperature of the universe, should be the closest the average temperature of the universe) T = 3.15k, radiation pressure P = 5 × 10-6 N / m 2, according to the law of ideal gas state equation, PV / T = constant = 6 × 1075, the value of this constant is the universe, The singular point should also equal to the constant Author: hanyongquan

  1. The Hubble Constant.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Neal

    2015-01-01

    I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. There are two broad categories of measurements. The first uses individual astrophysical objects which have some property that allows their intrinsic luminosity or size to be determined, or allows the determination of their distance by geometric means. The second category comprises the use of all-sky cosmic microwave background, or correlations between large samples of galaxies, to determine information about the geometry of the Universe and hence the Hubble constant, typically in a combination with other cosmological parameters. Many, but not all, object-based measurements give H0 values of around 72-74 km s(-1) Mpc(-1), with typical errors of 2-3 km s(-1) Mpc(-1). This is in mild discrepancy with CMB-based measurements, in particular those from the Planck satellite, which give values of 67-68 km s(-1) Mpc(-1) and typical errors of 1-2 km s(-1) Mpc(-1). The size of the remaining systematics indicate that accuracy rather than precision is the remaining problem in a good determination of the Hubble constant. Whether a discrepancy exists, and whether new physics is needed to resolve it, depends on details of the systematics of the object-based methods, and also on the assumptions about other cosmological parameters and which datasets are combined in the case of the all-sky methods.

  2. Balance in a rotating artificial gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeda, Kazuhiro; DiZio, Paul; Lackner, James R.

    2003-01-01

    When subjects stand at the center of a fully enclosed room that is rotating at constant velocity, their natural postural sway generates Coriolis forces that destabilize their center of mass and head. We quantitatively assessed how exposure to constant velocity rotation at 10 rpm affected postural control. Twelve subjects stood in a heel-to-toe stance in the rotating room. Each test session involved three phases: (1) pre-rotation, (2) per-rotation, and (3) post-rotation. In each phase, subjects were tested in both eyes open and eyes closed conditions. Four measures were used to characterize center of mass movement and head movement: mean sway amplitude, total power, mean power frequency, and frequency of maximum power. Each measure was computed for anterior-posterior and medial-lateral sway. Both anterior-posterior and medial-lateral head and center of mass sway during rotation had significantly greater mean sway amplitude and total power compared with pre- and post-rotation values. Mean power frequency and frequency of maximum power were little affected. Eyes open conditions were significantly more stable in all test phases than eyes-closed, but vision did not completely suppress the effects of rotation. The greatest effect of rotation was in the eyes-closed condition with mean sway amplitude and total power increasing more than twofold. Inverted pendulum sway was maintained in all phases of both test conditions. No aftereffects of rotation were present after the four 25-s exposures each subject received. We expect that with longer exposure periods and with active generation of body sway subjects would both adapt to rotation and exhibit post-rotary aftereffects.

  3. Quantum electrodynamics, high-resolution spectroscopy and fundamental constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karshenboim, Savely G.; Ivanov, Vladimir G.

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress in high-resolution spectroscopy has delivered us a variety of accurate optical results, which can be used for the determination of the atomic fundamental constants and for constraining their possible time variation. We present a brief overview of the results discussing in particular, the determination of the Rydberg constant, the relative atomic weight of the electron and proton, their mass ratio and the fine structure constant. Many individual results on those constants are obtained with use of quantum electrodynamics, and we discuss which sectors of QED are involved. We derive constraints on a possible time variation of the fine structure constants and me/mp.

  4. The Maximum Mass of Rotating Strange Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkudlarek, M.; Gondek-Rosiń; ska, D.; Villain, L.; Ansorg, M.

    2012-12-01

    Strange quark stars are considered as a possible alternative to neutron stars as compact objects (e.g. Weber 2003). A hot compact star (a proto-neutron star or a strange star) born in a supernova explosion or a remnant of neutron stars binary merger are expected to rotate differentially and be important sources of gravitational waves. We present results of the first relativistic calculations of differentially rotating strange quark stars for broad ranges of degree of differential rotation and maximum densities. Using a highly accurate, relativistic code we show that rotation may cause a significant increase of maximum allowed mass of strange stars, much larger than in the case of neutron stars with the same degree of differential rotation. Depending on the maximum allowed mass a massive neutron star (strange star) can be temporarily stabilized by differential rotation or collapse to a black hole.

  5. RNA structure and scalar coupling constants

    SciTech Connect

    Tinoco, I. Jr.; Cai, Z.; Hines, J.V.; Landry, S.M.; SantaLucia, J. Jr.; Shen, L.X.; Varani, G.

    1994-12-01

    Signs and magnitudes of scalar coupling constants-spin-spin splittings-comprise a very large amount of data that can be used to establish the conformations of RNA molecules. Proton-proton and proton-phosphorus splittings have been used the most, but the availability of {sup 13}C-and {sup 15}N-labeled molecules allow many more coupling constants to be used for determining conformation. We will systematically consider the torsion angles that characterize a nucleotide unit and the coupling constants that depend on the values of these torsion angles. Karplus-type equations have been established relating many three-bond coupling constants to torsion angles. However, one- and two-bond coupling constants can also depend on conformation. Serianni and coworkers measured carbon-proton coupling constants in ribonucleosides and have calculated their values as a function of conformation. The signs of two-bond coupling can be very useful because it is easier to measure a sign than an accurate magnitude.

  6. Alternating-current relaxation of a rotating metallic particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo-Xi, Nie; Wen-Jia, Tian; Ji-Ping, Huang; Guo-Qing, Gu

    2016-06-01

    Based on a first-principles approach, we establish an alternating-current (AC) relaxation theory for a rotating metallic particle with complex dielectric constant . Here is the real part, the conductivity, ω 0 the angular frequency of an AC electric field, and . Our theory yields an accurate interparticle force, which is in good agreement with the existing experiment. The agreement helps to show that the relaxations of two kinds of charges, namely, surface polarized charges (described by ) and free charges (corresponding to ), contribute to the unusually large reduction in the attracting interparticle force. This theory can be adopted to determine the relaxation time of dynamic particles in various fields. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11222544), the Fok Ying Tung Education Foundation (Grant No. 131008), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University, China (Grant No. NCET-12-0121), and the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB922004).

  7. No Pseudosynchronous Rotation for Terrestrial Planets and Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, Valeri V.; Efroimsky, Michael

    2013-02-01

    We re-examine the popular belief that a telluric planet or a satellite on an eccentric orbit can, outside a spin-orbit resonance, be captured in a quasi-static tidal equilibrium called pseudosynchronous rotation. The existence of such configurations was deduced from oversimplified tidal models assuming either a constant tidal torque or a torque linear in the tidal frequency. A more accurate treatment requires that the torque be decomposed into the Darwin-Kaula series over the tidal modes, and that this decomposition be combined with a realistic choice of rheological properties of the mantle, which we choose to be a combination of the Andrade model at ordinary frequencies and the Maxwell model at low frequencies. This development demonstrates that there exist no stable equilibrium states for solid planets and moons, other than spin-orbit resonances.

  8. NO PSEUDOSYNCHRONOUS ROTATION FOR TERRESTRIAL PLANETS AND MOONS

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, Valeri V.; Efroimsky, Michael E-mail: michael.efroimsky@usno.navy.mil

    2013-02-10

    We re-examine the popular belief that a telluric planet or a satellite on an eccentric orbit can, outside a spin-orbit resonance, be captured in a quasi-static tidal equilibrium called pseudosynchronous rotation. The existence of such configurations was deduced from oversimplified tidal models assuming either a constant tidal torque or a torque linear in the tidal frequency. A more accurate treatment requires that the torque be decomposed into the Darwin-Kaula series over the tidal modes, and that this decomposition be combined with a realistic choice of rheological properties of the mantle, which we choose to be a combination of the Andrade model at ordinary frequencies and the Maxwell model at low frequencies. This development demonstrates that there exist no stable equilibrium states for solid planets and moons, other than spin-orbit resonances.

  9. Change is a Constant.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H; Provencher, Matthew T; Brand, Jefferson C; Rossi, Michael J; Poehling, Gary G

    2015-06-01

    In 2015, Henry P. Hackett, Managing Editor, Arthroscopy, retires, and Edward A. Goss, Executive Director, Arthroscopy Association of North America (AANA), retires. Association is a positive constant, in a time of change. With change comes a need for continuing education, research, and sharing of ideas. While the quality of education at AANA and ISAKOS is superior and most relevant, the unique reason to travel and meet is the opportunity to interact with innovative colleagues. Personal interaction best stimulates new ideas to improve patient care, research, and teaching. Through our network, we best create innovation.

  10. Cosmology with varying constants.

    PubMed

    Martins, Carlos J A P

    2002-12-15

    The idea of possible time or space variations of the 'fundamental' constants of nature, although not new, is only now beginning to be actively considered by large numbers of researchers in the particle physics, cosmology and astrophysics communities. This revival is mostly due to the claims of possible detection of such variations, in various different contexts and by several groups. I present the current theoretical motivations and expectations for such variations, review the current observational status and discuss the impact of a possible confirmation of these results in our views of cosmology and physics as a whole.

  11. Optical rotation sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotge, J. R.; Simmons, B. J.; Kroncke, G. T.; Stech, D. J.

    1986-05-01

    Research efforts were concentrated on passive ring laser rotation sensor technology. Initial efforts were performed on supportive projects, e.g., laser stabilization, followed by a 0.62 sq m passive resonant ring laser gyro (PRRLG), leading to the development of a 60 sq m system mounted on the pneumatically supported isolation test platform (Iso-Pad) at FJSRL. Numerous sub-system tasks and a feasibility 0.62 sq m PRRLG were completed, supporting projections of very high resolution performance by a large 60 sq m PRRLG. The expected performance of the large PRRLG, on the order of 10 to the minus 10th power ERU (earth rate units), would provide an accurate error model applicable to Air Force operational ring laser gyros, a new source of geophysical data, e.g., earth wobble and variations in earth rotation, a proven design concept applicable to Air Force sensor needs as reference to MX instruments tests, and relativity experiments. This report documents the many accomplishments leading to, and the status of the large PRRLG at the date of the PRRLG stop order, November 1985.

  12. Deconvolving Current from Faraday Rotation Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen E. Mitchell

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, a unique software program is reported which automatically decodes the Faraday rotation signal into a time-dependent current representation. System parameters, such as the Faraday fiber’s Verdet constant and number of loops in the sensor, are the only user-interface inputs. The central aspect of the algorithm utilizes a short-time Fourier transform, which reveals much of the Faraday rotation measurement’s implicit information necessary for unfolding the dynamic current measurement.

  13. Exotic Rotational Correlations in Quantum Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Craig

    2015-09-26

    It is argued by extrapolation of general relativity and quantum mechanics that a classical inertial frame corresponds to a statistically defined observable that rotationally fluctuates due to Planck scale indeterminacy. Physical effects of exotic nonlocal rotational correlations on large scale field states are estimated. Their entanglement with the strong interaction vacuum is estimated to produce a universal, statistical centrifugal acceleration that resembles the observed cosmological constant.

  14. New model accurately predicts reformate composition

    SciTech Connect

    Ancheyta-Juarez, J.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E. )

    1994-01-31

    Although naphtha reforming is a well-known process, the evolution of catalyst formulation, as well as new trends in gasoline specifications, have led to rapid evolution of the process, including: reactor design, regeneration mode, and operating conditions. Mathematical modeling of the reforming process is an increasingly important tool. It is fundamental to the proper design of new reactors and revamp of existing ones. Modeling can be used to optimize operating conditions, analyze the effects of process variables, and enhance unit performance. Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo has developed a model of the catalytic reforming process that accurately predicts reformate composition at the higher-severity conditions at which new reformers are being designed. The new AA model is more accurate than previous proposals because it takes into account the effects of temperature and pressure on the rate constants of each chemical reaction.

  15. Accurate colorimetric feedback for RGB LED clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Kwong; Ashdown, Ian

    2006-08-01

    We present an empirical model of LED emission spectra that is applicable to both InGaN and AlInGaP high-flux LEDs, and which accurately predicts their relative spectral power distributions over a wide range of LED junction temperatures. We further demonstrate with laboratory measurements that changes in LED spectral power distribution with temperature can be accurately predicted with first- or second-order equations. This provides the basis for a real-time colorimetric feedback system for RGB LED clusters that can maintain the chromaticity of white light at constant intensity to within +/-0.003 Δuv over a range of 45 degrees Celsius, and to within 0.01 Δuv when dimmed over an intensity range of 10:1.

  16. The Hubble Constant.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Neal

    2007-01-01

    I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. In the last 20 years, much progress has been made and estimates now range between 60 and 75 km s(-1) Mpc(-1), with most now between 70 and 75 km s(-1) Mpc(-1), a huge improvement over the factor-of-2 uncertainty which used to prevail. Further improvements which gave a generally agreed margin of error of a few percent rather than the current 10% would be vital input to much other interesting cosmology. There are several programmes which are likely to lead us to this point in the next 10 years.

  17. A Constant Pressure Bomb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, F W

    1924-01-01

    This report describes a new optical method of unusual simplicity and of good accuracy suitable to study the kinetics of gaseous reactions. The device is the complement of the spherical bomb of constant volume, and extends the applicability of the relationship, pv=rt for gaseous equilibrium conditions, to the use of both factors p and v. The method substitutes for the mechanical complications of a manometer placed at some distance from the seat of reaction the possibility of allowing the radiant effects of reaction to record themselves directly upon a sensitive film. It is possible the device may be of use in the study of the photoelectric effects of radiation. The method makes possible a greater precision in the measurement of normal flame velocities than was previously possible. An approximate analysis shows that the increase of pressure and density ahead of the flame is negligible until the velocity of the flame approaches that of sound.

  18. When constants are important

    SciTech Connect

    Beiu, V.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper the authors discuss several complexity aspects pertaining to neural networks, commonly known as the curse of dimensionality. The focus will be on: (1) size complexity and depth-size tradeoffs; (2) complexity of learning; and (3) precision and limited interconnectivity. Results have been obtained for each of these problems when dealt with separately, but few things are known as to the links among them. They start by presenting known results and try to establish connections between them. These show that they are facing very difficult problems--exponential growth in either space (i.e. precision and size) and/or time (i.e., learning and depth)--when resorting to neural networks for solving general problems. The paper will present a solution for lowering some constants, by playing on the depth-size tradeoff.

  19. Study of Axes Rotation during Simple Shear Tests on Aluminum Sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Duchene, L.; Diouf, B.; Lelotte, T.; Flores, P.; Habraken, A. M.; Bouvier, S.

    2007-05-17

    In order to model accurately the anisotropic material behavior during finite element simulations, a precise description of the material yield locus is required. Beside the shape (linked to the material model used), the size (related to the isotropic hardening) and the position (kinematic hardening) of the yield locus, its orientation is of particular interest when large rotations of the material are encountered during the simulations. This paper proposes three distinct methods for the determination of the material yield locus rotation: a method based on the Constant Symmetric Local Velocity Gradient (CSLVG), a corotational method and a method based on the Mandel spin. These methods are compared during simple shear tests of an aluminum sheet.

  20. High-Accuracy Quartic Force Field Calculations for the Spectroscopic Constants and Vibrational Frequencies of 1(exp 1)A' l-C3H(-): A Possible Link to Lines Observed in the Horsehead Nebula PDR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Huang, Xinchuan; Crawford, T. Daniel; Lee, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown that rotational lines observed in the Horsehead nebula photon-dominated-region (PDR) are probably not caused by l-C3H+, as was originally suggested. In the search for viable alternative candidate carriers, quartic force fields are employed here to provide highly accurate rotational constants, as well as fundamental vibrational frequencies, for another candidate carrier: 1 (sup 1)A' C3H(-). The ab initio computed spectroscopic constants provided in this work are, compared to those necessary to define the observed lines, as accurate as the computed spectroscopic constants for many of the known interstellar anions. Additionally, the computed D-eff for C3H(-) is three times closer to the D deduced from the observed Horsehead nebula lines relative to l-C3H(+). As a result, 1 (sup 1)A' C3H(-). is a more viable candidate for these observed rotational transitions and would be the seventh confirmed interstellar anion detected within the past decade and the first C(sub n)H(-) molecular anion with an odd n.

  1. Universal constants and equations of turbulent motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumert, Helmut

    2011-11-01

    For turbulence at high Reynolds number we present an analogy with the kinetic theory of gases, with dipoles made of vortex tubes as frictionless, incompressible but deformable quasi-particles. Their movements are governed by Helmholtz' elementary vortex rules applied locally. A contact interaction or ``collision'' leads either to random scatter of a trajectory or to the formation of two likewise rotating, fundamentally unstable whirls forming a dissipative patch slowly rotating around its center of mass, the latter almost at rest. This approach predicts von Karman's constant as 1/sqrt(2 pi) = 0.399 and the spatio-temporal dynamics of energy-containing time and length scales controlling turbulent mixing [Baumert 2005, 2009]. A link to turbulence spectra was missing so far. In the present contribution it is shown that the above image of dipole movements is compatible with Kolmogorov's spectra if dissipative patches, beginning as two likewise rotating eddies, evolve locally into a space-filling bearing in the sense of Herrmann [1990], i.e. into an ``Apollonian gear.'' Its parts and pieces are are frictionless, excepting the dissipative scale of size zero. Our approach predicts the dimensionless pre-factor in the 3D Eulerian wavenumber spectrum (in terms of pi) as 1.8, and in the Lagrangian frequency spectrum as the integer number 2. Our derivations are free of empirical relations and rest on geometry, methods from many-particle physics, and on elementary conservation laws only. Department of the Navy Grant, ONR Global

  2. Atmospheric icing intensity on slowly rotating hexagonal prism and cylinder with fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mughal, Umair Najeeb; Virk, Muhammad Shakeel

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric ice accretion intensities on constantly slowly rotating hexagonal prism with six fins and constantly slowly rotating cylinder with four fins were studied using experimental and mathematical analysis. The experimental intensities were compared with the existing ice accretion intensity models of Makkonen. Based upon this study a forced rotation constant and generalized windward area ratio is proposed to be added in the existing intensity models, in order to validate the experimental observations.

  3. Adiabatic rotation of effective spin. II. Spin-rotational relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrennikov, Yu. A.; Steiner, U. E.

    1994-05-01

    The theory of electron spin-rotational (SR) relaxation in systems with an effective spin Seff=1/2 is formulated in terms of the adiabatic rotation of effective spin (ARES) approach. It is shown that SR relaxation results from the orientational random walk of the axes of the intramolecular electric field potential (ligand field) to which a spin-bearing atomic center is exposed. The validity of the stochastic treatment presented here is not limited by the Redfield conditions. The general expression obtained for the time constant of electron spin relaxation in liquid phase reproduces the well-known result of Hubbard-Atkins-Kivelson theory if it is specialized to the case of systems with weak spin-orbit coupling.

  4. Methanol as A Tracer of Fundamental Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levshakov, S. A.; Kozlov, M. G.; Reimers, D.

    2011-09-01

    The methanol molecule CH3OH has a complex microwave spectrum with a large number of very strong lines. This spectrum includes purely rotational transitions as well as transitions with contributions of the internal degree of freedom associated with the hindered rotation of the OH group. The latter takes place due to the tunneling of hydrogen through the potential barriers between three equivalent potential minima. Such transitions are highly sensitive to changes in the electron-to-proton mass ratio, μ = m e/m p, and have different responses to μ-variations. The highest sensitivity is found for the mixed rotation-tunneling transitions at low frequencies. Observing methanol lines provides more stringent limits on the hypothetical variation of μ than ammonia observation with the same velocity resolution. We show that the best-quality radio astronomical data on methanol maser lines constrain the variability of μ in the Milky Way at the level of |Δμ/μ| < 28 × 10-9 (1σ) which is in line with the previously obtained ammonia result, |Δμ/μ| < 29 × 10-9 (1σ). This estimate can be further improved if the rest frequencies of the CH3OH microwave lines will be measured more accurately.

  5. Model verification studies using accurate measurements of spin up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyun, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The reliability and accuracy of the numerical code for spin up flows in a cylinder by comparing the numerical results against high resolution laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) measurements of the azimuthal flows were checked. A computer code to generate numerical solution for axisymmetric rotating fluid in a cylinder was obtained and amended for routine use at MSFC. The numerical simulations used the Navier-Stokes equations in axisymmetric form and employed finite difference techniques on both constant and variable grids. The numerical solutions are analyzed to gain further insight into the fundamental questions analyzed in rotating fluid dynamics.

  6. Rotational spectroscopy of pyridazine and its isotopologs from 235–360 GHz: Equilibrium structure and vibrational satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Esselman, Brian J.; Amberger, Brent K.; Shutter, Joshua D.; Daane, Mitchell A.; Woods, R. Claude; McMahon, Robert J.; Stanton, John F.

    2013-12-14

    The rotational spectrum of pyridazine (o-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}), the ortho disubstituted nitrogen analog of benzene, has been measured and analyzed in the gas phase. For the ground vibrational state of the normal isotopolog, over 2000 individual rotational transitions have been identified between 238 and 360 GHz and have been fit to 13 parameters of a 6th-order centrifugal distortion Hamiltonian. All transitions in this frequency region can now be predicted from this model to near experimental accuracy, i.e., well enough for the purpose of any future radio-astronomical search for this species. Three isotopologs, [3-{sup 13}C]-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}, [4-{sup 13}C]-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}, and [1-{sup 15}N]-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}, have been detected in natural abundance, and several hundred lines have been measured for each of these species and fit to 6th-order Hamiltonians. Ten additional isotopologs were synthesized with enhanced deuterium substitution and analyzed to allow for a complete structure determination. The equilibrium structure (R{sub e}) of pyridazine was obtained by correcting the experimental rotational constants for the effects of vibration-rotation coupling using interaction constants predicted from CCSD(T) calculations with an ANO0 basis set and further correcting for the effect of electron mass. The final R{sub e} structural parameters are determined with excellent accuracy, as evidenced by their ability to predict 28 independent moments of inertia (I{sub a} and I{sub b} for 14 isotopologs) very well from 9 structural parameters. The rotational spectra of the six lowest-energy fundamental vibrational satellites of the main isotopolog have been detected. The rotational spectra of the five lowest-energy vibrational satellites have been assigned and fit to yield accurate rotational and distortion constants, while the fit and assignment for the sixth is less complete. The resultant vibration-rotation interaction (α) constants are found to

  7. Rotational spectroscopy of pyridazine and its isotopologs from 235-360 GHz: Equilibrium structure and vibrational satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esselman, Brian J.; Amberger, Brent K.; Shutter, Joshua D.; Daane, Mitchell A.; Stanton, John F.; Woods, R. Claude; McMahon, Robert J.

    2013-12-01

    The rotational spectrum of pyridazine (o-C4H4N2), the ortho disubstituted nitrogen analog of benzene, has been measured and analyzed in the gas phase. For the ground vibrational state of the normal isotopolog, over 2000 individual rotational transitions have been identified between 238 and 360 GHz and have been fit to 13 parameters of a 6th-order centrifugal distortion Hamiltonian. All transitions in this frequency region can now be predicted from this model to near experimental accuracy, i.e., well enough for the purpose of any future radio-astronomical search for this species. Three isotopologs, [3-13C]-C4H4N2, [4-13C]-C4H4N2, and [1-15N]-C4H4N2, have been detected in natural abundance, and several hundred lines have been measured for each of these species and fit to 6th-order Hamiltonians. Ten additional isotopologs were synthesized with enhanced deuterium substitution and analyzed to allow for a complete structure determination. The equilibrium structure (Re) of pyridazine was obtained by correcting the experimental rotational constants for the effects of vibration-rotation coupling using interaction constants predicted from CCSD(T) calculations with an ANO0 basis set and further correcting for the effect of electron mass. The final Re structural parameters are determined with excellent accuracy, as evidenced by their ability to predict 28 independent moments of inertia (Ia and Ib for 14 isotopologs) very well from 9 structural parameters. The rotational spectra of the six lowest-energy fundamental vibrational satellites of the main isotopolog have been detected. The rotational spectra of the five lowest-energy vibrational satellites have been assigned and fit to yield accurate rotational and distortion constants, while the fit and assignment for the sixth is less complete. The resultant vibration-rotation interaction (α) constants are found to be in excellent agreement with ones predicted from coupled-cluster calculations, which proved to be the key to

  8. Slowly rotating homogeneous masses revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reina, Borja

    2016-02-01

    Hartle's model for slowly rotating stars has been extensively used to compute equilibrium configurations of slowly rotating stars to second order in perturbation theory in general relativity, given a barotropic equation of state. A recent study based on the modern theory of perturbed matchings concludes that the functions in the (first and second order) perturbation tensors can always be taken as continuous at the surface of the star, except for the second-order function m0. This function presents a jump at the surface of the star proportional to the discontinuity of the energy density there. This concerns only a particular outcome of the model: the change in mass δM. In this paper, the amended change in mass is calculated for the case of constant density stars.

  9. Position, rotation, and intensity invariant recognizing method

    DOEpatents

    Ochoa, E.; Schils, G.F.; Sweeney, D.W.

    1987-09-15

    A method for recognizing the presence of a particular target in a field of view which is target position, rotation, and intensity invariant includes the preparing of a target-specific invariant filter from a combination of all eigen-modes of a pattern of the particular target. Coherent radiation from the field of view is then imaged into an optical correlator in which the invariant filter is located. The invariant filter is rotated in the frequency plane of the optical correlator in order to produce a constant-amplitude rotational response in a correlation output plane when the particular target is present in the field of view. Any constant response is thus detected in the output plane to determine whether a particular target is present in the field of view. Preferably, a temporal pattern is imaged in the output plane with a optical detector having a plurality of pixels and a correlation coefficient for each pixel is determined by accumulating the intensity and intensity-square of each pixel. The orbiting of the constant response caused by the filter rotation is also preferably eliminated either by the use of two orthogonal mirrors pivoted correspondingly to the rotation of the filter or the attaching of a refracting wedge to the filter to remove the offset angle. Detection is preferably performed of the temporal pattern in the output plane at a plurality of different angles with angular separation sufficient to decorrelate successive frames. 1 fig.

  10. Laminar flow past a rotating circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sangmo; Choi, Haecheon; Lee, Sangsan

    1999-11-01

    The present study numerically investigates two-dimensional laminar flow past a circular cylinder rotating with a constant angular velocity, for the purpose of controlling vortex shedding and understanding the underlying flow mechanism. Numerical simulations are performed for flows with Re=60, 100, and 160 in the range of 0⩽α⩽2.5, where α is the circumferential speed at the cylinder surface normalized by the free-stream velocity. Results show that the rotation of a cylinder can suppress vortex shedding effectively. Vortex shedding exists at low rotational speeds and completely disappears at α>αL, where αL is the critical rotational speed which shows a logarithmic dependence on Re. The Strouhal number remains nearly constant regardless of α while vortex shedding exists. With increasing α, the mean lift increases linearly and the mean drag decreases, which differ significantly from those predicted by the potential flow theory. On the other hand, the amplitude of lift fluctuation stays nearly constant with increasing α (<αL), while that of drag fluctuation increases. Further studies from the instantaneous flow fields demonstrate again that the rotation of a cylinder makes a substantial effect on the flow pattern.

  11. Rotational Spectra of the Molecular Ions H_2NCO^+ and NCO^-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzi, Valerio; Gottlieb, Carl A.; Thaddeus, Patrick; McCarthy, Michael C.; Thorwirth, Sven

    2010-06-01

    We report the first high resolution spectroscopic detection of H_2NCO^+, the protonated cation of isocyanic acid, in a discharge through HNCO heavily diluted in hydrogen in the throat of a supersonic nozzle. Spectroscopic constants derived from the two lowest rotational transitions agree very well with theoretical structure calculations of the ground state isomer, in which protonation occurs at the nitrogen atom, yielding an isomer of C2v symmetry. In the same molecular beam, the fundamental rotational transition of NCO^- was observed with well-resolved nitrogen quadrupole hyperfine structure. Detection of NCO^- in our beam was subsequently confirmed by observation of several millimeter-wave transitions in a low pressure discharge through cyanogen and water. The spectroscopic constants of NCO^- obtained earlier by infrared laser spectroscopy are in good agreement with the highly accurate constants derived here. Owing to the high abundance of HNCO in many galactic molecular sources, both ions are excellent candidates for astronomical detection in the radio band. Structure calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pwCV5Z level of theory and zero-point vibrational effects at CCSD(T)/cc-pVQZ. M. Gruebele, M. Polak, and R. J. Saykally, J. Chem. Phys., 86, 6631, (1987).

  12. Laboratory study of isocyanic acid ions: Rotational spectroscopy of NCO-, H2NCO+, and HNCOH+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzi, Valerio; Gottlieb, Carl A.; Thaddeus, Patrick; Thorwirth, Sven; McCarthy, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    We report detection of protonated isocyanic acid in two isomeric forms, H2NCO+ and HNCOH+, by high-resolution spectroscopy. The two ions were first observed at centimeter wavelengths by Fourier Transform (FT) microwave spectroscopy, in a discharge through HNCO heavily diluted in hydrogen in the throat of a supersonic nozzle. Spectroscopic constants derived from the two lowest rotational transitions of both isomers agree very well with those derived from theoretical structures computed at the coupled cluster level of theory. In the same molecular beam, the fundamental rotational transition of NCO- was observed with well-resolved nitrogen quadrupole hyperfine structure. Detection of NCO- and H2NCO+ in our beam was subsequently confirmed by observation of several millimeter-wave transitions in a low pressure discharge through cyanogen and water. The spectroscopic constants of NCO- obtained earlier by infrared laser spectroscopy are in good agreement with the highly accurate constants derived here. Owing to the high abundance of HNCO in many galactic molecular sources, both ions are excellent candidates for astronomical detection in the radio band.

  13. The Rotational Spectrum and Anharmonic Force Field of Chlorine Dioxide, OClO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Holger S. P.; Sorensen, G.; Birk, Manfred; Friedl, Randy R.

    1997-01-01

    The ground state rotational and quartic centrifugal distortion constants, their vibrational changes, and the sextic centrifugal distortion constants were used in a calculation of the quartic force field together with data from infrared studies.

  14. Rotational diffusion of TEMPONE in the cytoplasm of Chinese hamster lung cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lepock, J R; Cheng, K H; Campbell, S D; Kruuv, J

    1983-01-01

    The correlation time for rotational diffusion (tau R) of 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone-N-oxide (TEMPONE) in Chinese hamster lung (V79) cells has been measured. For these cells in an isosmotic solution at 20 degrees C, tau R = 4.18 X 10(-11) s, approximately 3.6 times greater than tau R = 1.17 X 10(-11) s in water. The relationship between tau R and viscosity was investigated in a number of glycerol-water (0-50%) and sucrose-water (20-40%) solutions and a constant Stokes-Einstein volume of 44 A3 was found for TEMPONE in solutions of less than 20% glycerol and sucrose. This gives an average shear viscosity (for rotation of a small molecule) of 0.038 poise for the cytoplasm. When nonsecular terms were used in the calculation of tau R, the activation energies for rotation of TEMPONE in the above solutions correlated well with the activation energies for shear viscosity. The viscosity increases as the cell is shrunk in hypertonic solutions. It also increases with decreasing temperature with an activation energy of 3.7 kcal/mol, about the same as the activation energy for the viscosity of pure water. The rotational correlation times were carefully calculated considering inhomogeneous line broadening, non-Lorentzian line shapes, the need for accurate tensor values and nonsecular terms. PMID:6318842

  15. The pure rotational spectrum of the ScO (X2Σ+) radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfen, D. T.; Min, J.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2017-01-01

    The rotational spectrum of ScO (X2Σ+) has been measured in the gas phase in the frequency range 30-493 GHz using a combination of Fourier transform microwave/millimeter-wave (FTM/mmW) and submillimeter direct absorption methods. This work is the first pure rotational study of this radical. Both the ground vibrational and v = 1 states were observed. ScO was created from the reaction of metal vapor, produced either by a laser ablation source or a Broida-type oven, and N2O, in the former case heavily diluted in argon. Extensive hyperfine structure was observed in the FTM/mmW data, although the spin-rotation splitting was found to be small (∼3 MHz). In the mm-wave spectra, however, the fine and hyperfine structure was blended together, resulting in broad, single lines for a given transition N + 1 ← N. The data were analyzed in a combined fit using the very accurate hyperfine measurements of Childs and Steimle (1988), employing a Hund's case b Hamiltonian, and an improved set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants were determined. These measurements improve the accuracy of predicted frequencies for astronomical searches by 14-18 MHz, or 16-20 km/s, in the 1 mm region - a difference of half to a full linewidth for certain interstellar sources. This work also demonstrates the capabilities of the FTM/mmW spectrometer at 61 GHz.

  16. Rotation and differential rotation of active Kepler stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhold, Timo; Reiners, Ansgar; Basri, Gibor

    2013-12-01

    Context. The Kepler space telescope monitors more than 160 000 stars with an unprecedented precision providing the opportunity to study the rotation of thousands of stars. Aims: We present rotation periods for thousands of active stars in the Kepler field derived from Q3 data. In most cases a second period close to the rotation period was detected that we interpreted as surface differential rotation (DR). We show how the absolute and relative shear (ΔΩ and α = ΔΩ/Ω, respectively) correlate with rotation period and effective temperature. Methods: Active stars were selected from the whole sample using the range of the variability amplitude. To detect different periods in the light curves we used the Lomb-Scargle periodogram in a pre-whitening approach to achieve parameters for a global sine fit. The most dominant periods from the fit were associated to different surface rotation periods. Our purely mathematical approach is capable of detecting different periods but cannot distinguish between the physical origins of periodicity. We ascribe the existence of different periods to DR, but spot evolution could also play a role. Because of the large number of stars the period errors are estimated statistically. We thus cannot exclude the existence of false positives among our periods. Results: In our sample of 40 661 active stars we found 24 124 rotation periods P1 between 0.5 and 45 days, with a mean of ⟨P1⟩ = 16.3 days. The distribution of stars with 0.5 < B - V < 1.0 and ages derived from angular momentum evolution that are younger than 300 Myr is consistent with a constant star-formation rate; the detection among older stars is incomplete probably because of our active sample selection. A second period P2 within ±30% of the rotation period P1 was found in 18 616 stars (77.2%). Attributing these two periods to DR we found that for active stars other than the Sun the relative shear α increases with rotation period, and slightly decreases with effective

  17. Damping constant estimation in magnetoresistive readers

    SciTech Connect

    Stankiewicz, Andrzej Hernandez, Stephanie

    2015-05-07

    The damping constant is a key design parameter in magnetic reader design. Its value can be derived from bulk or sheet film ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) line width. However, dynamics of nanodevices is usually defined by presence of non-uniform modes. It triggers new damping mechanisms and produces stronger damping than expected from traditional FMR. This work proposes a device-level technique for damping evaluation, based on time-domain analysis of thermally excited stochastic oscillations. The signal is collected using a high bandwidth oscilloscope, by direct probing of a biased reader. Recorded waveforms may contain different noise signals, but free layer FMR is usually a dominating one. The autocorrelation function is a reflection of the damped oscillation curve, averaging out stochastic contributions. The damped oscillator formula is fitted to autocorrelation data, producing resonance frequency and damping constant values. Restricting lag range allows for mitigation of the impact of other phenomena (e.g., reader instability) on the damping constant. For a micromagnetically modeled reader, the technique proves to be much more accurate than the stochastic FMR line width approach. Application to actual reader waveforms yields a damping constant of ∼0.03.

  18. Rotating bio-reactor cell culture apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, Ray P. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A bioreactor system is described in which a tubular housing contains an internal circularly disposed set of blade members and a central tubular filter all mounted for rotation about a common horizontal axis and each having independent rotational support and rotational drive mechanisms. The housing, blade members and filter preferably are driven at a constant slow speed for placing a fluid culture medium with discrete microbeads and cell cultures in a discrete spatial suspension in the housing. Replacement fluid medium is symmetrically input and fluid medium is symmetrically output from the housing where the input and the output are part of a loop providing a constant or intermittent flow of fluid medium in a closed loop.

  19. Position, rotation, and intensity invariant recognizing method

    DOEpatents

    Ochoa, Ellen; Schils, George F.; Sweeney, Donald W.

    1989-01-01

    A method for recognizing the presence of a particular target in a field of view which is target position, rotation, and intensity invariant includes the preparing of a target-specific invariant filter from a combination of all eigen-modes of a pattern of the particular target. Coherent radiation from the field of view is then imaged into an optical correlator in which the invariant filter is located. The invariant filter is rotated in the frequency plane of the optical correlator in order to produce a constant-amplitude rotational response in a correlation output plane when the particular target is present in the field of view. Any constant response is thus detected in the output The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC04-76DP00789 between the U.S. Department of Energy and AT&T Technologies, Inc.

  20. An Accurate Direction Finding Scheme Using Virtual Antenna Array via Smartphones

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaopu; Xiong, Yan; Huang, Wenchao

    2016-01-01

    With the development of localization technologies, researchers solve the indoor localization problems using diverse methods and equipment. Most localization techniques require either specialized devices or fingerprints, which are inconvenient for daily use. Therefore, we propose and implement an accurate, efficient and lightweight system for indoor direction finding using common smartphones and loudspeakers. Our method is derived from a key insight: By moving a smartphone in regular patterns, we can effectively emulate the sensitivity and functionality of a Uniform Antenna Array to estimate the angle of arrival of the target signal. Specifically, a user only needs to hold his smartphone still in front of him, and then rotate his body around 360∘ duration with the smartphone at an approximate constant velocity. Then, our system can provide accurate directional guidance and lead the user to their destinations (normal loudspeakers we preset in the indoor environment transmitting high frequency acoustic signals) after a few measurements. Major challenges in implementing our system are not only imitating a virtual antenna array by ordinary smartphones but also overcoming the detection difficulties caused by the complex indoor environment. In addition, we leverage the gyroscope of the smartphone to reduce the impact of a user’s motion pattern change to the accuracy of our system. In order to get rid of the multipath effect, we leverage multiple signal classification to calculate the direction of the target signal, and then design and deploy our system in various indoor scenes. Extensive comparative experiments show that our system is reliable under various circumstances. PMID:27801866

  1. CENTRAL ROTATIONS OF MILKY WAY GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Fabricius, Maximilian H.; Rukdee, Surangkhana; Saglia, Roberto P.; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Thomas, Jens; Williams, Michael J.; Noyola, Eva; Opitsch, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Most Milky Way globular clusters (GCs) exhibit measurable flattening, even if on a very low level. Both cluster rotation and tidal fields are thought to cause this flattening. Nevertheless, rotation has only been confirmed in a handful of GCs, based mostly on individual radial velocities at large radii. We are conducting a survey of the central kinematics of Galactic GCs using the new Integral Field Unit instrument VIRUS-W. We detect rotation in all 11 GCs that we have observed so far, rendering it likely that a large majority of the Milky Way GCs rotate. We use published catalogs of GCs to derive central ellipticities and position angles. We show that in all cases where the central ellipticity permits an accurate measurement of the position angle, those angles are in excellent agreement with the kinematic position angles that we derive from the VIRUS-W velocity fields. We find an unexpected tight correlation between central rotation and outer ellipticity, indicating that rotation drives flattening for the objects in our sample. We also find a tight correlation between central rotation and published values for the central velocity dispersion, most likely due to rotation impacting the old dispersion measurements.

  2. Central Rotations of Milky Way Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabricius, Maximilian H.; Noyola, Eva; Rukdee, Surangkhana; Saglia, Roberto P.; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Thomas, Jens; Opitsch, Michael; Williams, Michael J.

    2014-06-01

    Most Milky Way globular clusters (GCs) exhibit measurable flattening, even if on a very low level. Both cluster rotation and tidal fields are thought to cause this flattening. Nevertheless, rotation has only been confirmed in a handful of GCs, based mostly on individual radial velocities at large radii. We are conducting a survey of the central kinematics of Galactic GCs using the new Integral Field Unit instrument VIRUS-W. We detect rotation in all 11 GCs that we have observed so far, rendering it likely that a large majority of the Milky Way GCs rotate. We use published catalogs of GCs to derive central ellipticities and position angles. We show that in all cases where the central ellipticity permits an accurate measurement of the position angle, those angles are in excellent agreement with the kinematic position angles that we derive from the VIRUS-W velocity fields. We find an unexpected tight correlation between central rotation and outer ellipticity, indicating that rotation drives flattening for the objects in our sample. We also find a tight correlation between central rotation and published values for the central velocity dispersion, most likely due to rotation impacting the old dispersion measurements. This Letter includes data taken at The McDonald Observatory of The University of Texas at Austin.

  3. What is the energy dissipation rate in rotating turbulence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisy, Frederic; Campagne, Antoine; Cortet, Pierre-Philippe; Gallet, Basile

    2014-11-01

    The scaling of the energy dissipation rate ɛ is one of the most fundamental open issues for rapidly rotating turbulence. For non-rotating 3D turbulence at large Reynolds number, it takes the classical form ɛ3 D ~=U3 / L , with U and L the characteristic velocity and length scales. Here, we propose a simple experiment aiming to probe directly the influence of the background rotation on ɛ: we measure the torque Γ acting on a propeller rotating at constant rate ω in a large volume of fluid rotating at Ω (the torque measurement being performed in the rotating frame). The normalized torque Kp = Γ / (ρR4 Hω2) (where R and H are the propeller radius and height) provides a direct measure of the normalized dissipation ɛ /ɛ3 D as a function of the Rossby number Ro = ω / Ω . For cyclonic propeller rotation (Ro > 0) we find a transition between Kp = constant at large Ro (no rotation) and Kp ~= Ro at small Ro (large rotation), in agreement with weakly nonlinear rotating turbulence prediction. The situation is more intricate for anticyclonic rotation (Ro < 0), showing a peak dissipation at intermediate Ro , and a decrease at small Ro but with a different scaling.

  4. Accurate Evaluation of Quantum Integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, D. C.; Goorvitch, D.; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Combining an appropriate finite difference method with Richardson's extrapolation results in a simple, highly accurate numerical method for solving a Schrodinger's equation. Important results are that error estimates are provided, and that one can extrapolate expectation values rather than the wavefunctions to obtain highly accurate expectation values. We discuss the eigenvalues, the error growth in repeated Richardson's extrapolation, and show that the expectation values calculated on a crude mesh can be extrapolated to obtain expectation values of high accuracy.

  5. Accurate and efficient integration for molecular dynamics simulations at constant temperature and pressure.

    PubMed

    Lippert, Ross A; Predescu, Cristian; Ierardi, Douglas J; Mackenzie, Kenneth M; Eastwood, Michael P; Dror, Ron O; Shaw, David E

    2013-10-28

    In molecular dynamics simulations, control over temperature and pressure is typically achieved by augmenting the original system with additional dynamical variables to create a thermostat and a barostat, respectively. These variables generally evolve on timescales much longer than those of particle motion, but typical integrator implementations update the additional variables along with the particle positions and momenta at each time step. We present a framework that replaces the traditional integration procedure with separate barostat, thermostat, and Newtonian particle motion updates, allowing thermostat and barostat updates to be applied infrequently. Such infrequent updates provide a particularly substantial performance advantage for simulations parallelized across many computer processors, because thermostat and barostat updates typically require communication among all processors. Infrequent updates can also improve accuracy by alleviating certain sources of error associated with limited-precision arithmetic. In addition, separating the barostat, thermostat, and particle motion update steps reduces certain truncation errors, bringing the time-average pressure closer to its target value. Finally, this framework, which we have implemented on both general-purpose and special-purpose hardware, reduces software complexity and improves software modularity.

  6. Extracting Time-Accurate Acceleration Vectors From Nontrivial Accelerometer Arrangements.

    PubMed

    Franck, Jennifer A; Blume, Janet; Crisco, Joseph J; Franck, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Sports-related concussions are of significant concern in many impact sports, and their detection relies on accurate measurements of the head kinematics during impact. Among the most prevalent recording technologies are videography, and more recently, the use of single-axis accelerometers mounted in a helmet, such as the HIT system. Successful extraction of the linear and angular impact accelerations depends on an accurate analysis methodology governed by the equations of motion. Current algorithms are able to estimate the magnitude of acceleration and hit location, but make assumptions about the hit orientation and are often limited in the position and/or orientation of the accelerometers. The newly formulated algorithm presented in this manuscript accurately extracts the full linear and rotational acceleration vectors from a broad arrangement of six single-axis accelerometers directly from the governing set of kinematic equations. The new formulation linearizes the nonlinear centripetal acceleration term with a finite-difference approximation and provides a fast and accurate solution for all six components of acceleration over long time periods (>250 ms). The approximation of the nonlinear centripetal acceleration term provides an accurate computation of the rotational velocity as a function of time and allows for reconstruction of a multiple-impact signal. Furthermore, the algorithm determines the impact location and orientation and can distinguish between glancing, high rotational velocity impacts, or direct impacts through the center of mass. Results are shown for ten simulated impact locations on a headform geometry computed with three different accelerometer configurations in varying degrees of signal noise. Since the algorithm does not require simplifications of the actual impacted geometry, the impact vector, or a specific arrangement of accelerometer orientations, it can be easily applied to many impact investigations in which accurate kinematics need to

  7. Is Planck's quantization constant unique?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, George

    2016-07-01

    A cornerstone of Quantum Mechanics is the existence of a non-zero least action, the Planck constant. However, the basic concepts and theoretical developments of Quantum Mechanics are independent of its specific numerical value. A different constant h _{*}, similar to the Planck constant h, but ˜12 orders of magnitude larger, characterizes plasmas. The study of >50 different geophysical, space, and laboratory plasmas, provided the first evidence for the universality and the quantum nature of h _{*}, revealing that it is a new quantization constant. The recent results show the diagnostics for determining whether plasmas are characterized by the Planck or the new quantization constant, compounding the challenge to reconcile both quantization constants in quantum mechanics.

  8. Shear rotation numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doeff, E.; Misiurewicz, M.

    1997-11-01

    This paper presents results on rotation numbers for orientation-preserving torus homeomorphisms homotopic to a Dehn twist. Rotation numbers and the rotation set for such homeomorphisms have been defined and initially investigated by the first author in a previous paper. Here we prove that each rotation number 0951-7715/10/6/017/img5 in the interior of the rotation set is realized by some compact invariant set, and that there is an ergodic measure on that set with mean rotation number 0951-7715/10/6/017/img5. It is also proved that the function which assigns its rotation set to such a homeomorphism is continuous. Finally, a counterexample is presented that shows that rational extremal points of the shear rotation set do not necessarily correspond to any periodic orbits.

  9. Power Harvesting from Rotation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicone, Carmen; Feng, Z. C.

    2008-01-01

    We show the impossibility of harvesting power from rotational motions by devices attached to the rotating object. The presentation is suitable for students who have studied Lagrangian mechanics. (Contains 2 figures.)

  10. Rotator cuff exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... to these tendons may result in: Rotator cuff tendinitis, which is irritation and swelling of these tendons ... Brien MJ, Leggin BG, Williams GR. Rotator cuff tendinopathies and tears: surgery and therapy. In: Skirven TM, ...

  11. Optical angular momentum in a rotating frame.

    PubMed

    Speirits, Fiona C; Lavery, Martin P J; Padgett, Miles J; Barnett, Stephen M

    2014-05-15

    It is well established that light carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) can be used to induce a mechanical torque causing an object to spin. We consider the complementary scenario: will an observer spinning relative to the beam axis measure a change in OAM as a result of their rotational velocity? Remarkably, although a linear Doppler shift changes the linear momentum of a photon, the angular Doppler shift induces no change in the angular momentum. Further, we examine the rotational Doppler shift in frequency imparted to the incident light due to the relative motion of the beam with respect to the observer and consider what must happen to the measured wavelength if the speed of light c is to remain constant. We show specifically that the OAM of the incident beam is not affected by the rotating observer and that the measured wavelength is shifted by a factor equal and opposite to that of the frequency shift induced by the rotational Doppler effect.

  12. Tear rotation in reinforced natural rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotta, Paul; Gabrielle, Brice; Vieyres, Arnaud; Vanel, Loic; Long, Didier; Sanseau, Olivier; Albouy, Pierre-Antoine

    2012-02-01

    We analyze the impact of tear rotation, that is, an abrupt instability in the direction of propagation of a notch, on the tensile strength of natural rubber elastomers reinforced with carbon black or precipitated silica, in single edge notched samples stretched at constant velocity. As a consequence of tear rotation, the energy at break increases by a factor of 6 to 8 in some cases. We show how the tensile strength of a test sample is related to the presence of tear rotations and analyze semi-quantitatively this increase in tensile strength, based on energetic arguments, without entering into a detailed description of the elastic strain field in the vicinity of the tear tip. The proposed interpretation is based on the idea that tear rotations creates a macroscopic tip radius, which relaxes the local strain (or stress) at the tear tip. Materials reinforced with carbon black or precipitated silica aggregates show similar behavior. The relation to strain-induced crystallization is discussed.

  13. Proton-driven spin diffusion in rotating solids via reversible and irreversible quantum dynamics.

    PubMed

    Veshtort, Mikhail; Griffin, Robert G

    2011-10-07

    Proton-driven spin diffusion (PDSD) experiments in rotating solids have received a great deal of attention as a potential source of distance constraints in large biomolecules. However, the quantitative relationship between the molecular structure and observed spin diffusion has remained obscure due to the lack of an accurate theoretical description of the spin dynamics in these experiments. We start with presenting a detailed relaxation theory of PDSD in rotating solids that provides such a description. The theory applies to both conventional and radio-frequency-assisted PDSD experiments and extends to the non-Markovian regime to include such phenomena as rotational resonance (R(2)). The basic kinetic equation of the theory in the non-Markovian regime has the form of a memory function equation, with the role of the memory function played by the correlation function. The key assumption used in the derivation of this equation expresses the intuitive notion of the irreversible dissipation of coherences in macroscopic systems. Accurate expressions for the correlation functions and for the spin diffusion constants are given. The theory predicts that the spin diffusion constants governing the multi-site PDSD can be approximated by the constants observed in the two-site diffusion. Direct numerical simulations of PDSD dynamics via reversible Liouville-von Neumann equation are presented to support and compliment the theory. Remarkably, an exponential decay of the difference magnetization can be observed in such simulations in systems consisting of only 12 spins. This is a unique example of a real physical system whose typically macroscopic and apparently irreversible behavior can be traced via reversible microscopic dynamics. An accurate value for the spin diffusion constant can be usually obtained through direct simulations of PDSD in systems consisting of two (13)C nuclei and about ten (1)H nuclei from their nearest environment. Spin diffusion constants computed by this

  14. Proton-driven spin diffusion in rotating solids via reversible and irreversible quantum dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Veshtort, Mikhail; Griffin, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    Proton-driven spin diffusion (PDSD) experiments in rotating solids have received a great deal of attention as a potential source of distance constraints in large biomolecules. However, the quantitative relationship between the molecular structure and observed spin diffusion has remained obscure due to the lack of an accurate theoretical description of the spin dynamics in these experiments. We start with presenting a detailed relaxation theory of PDSD in rotating solids that provides such a description. The theory applies to both conventional and radio-frequency-assisted PDSD experiments and extends to the non-Markovian regime to include such phenomena as rotational resonance (R2). The basic kinetic equation of the theory in the non-Markovian regime has the form of a memory function equation, with the role of the memory function played by the correlation function. The key assumption used in the derivation of this equation expresses the intuitive notion of the irreversible dissipation of coherences in macroscopic systems. Accurate expressions for the correlation functions and for the spin diffusion constants are given. The theory predicts that the spin diffusion constants governing the multi-site PDSD can be approximated by the constants observed in the two-site diffusion. Direct numerical simulations of PDSD dynamics via reversible Liouville-von Neumann equation are presented to support and compliment the theory. Remarkably, an exponential decay of the difference magnetization can be observed in such simulations in systems consisting of only 12 spins. This is a unique example of a real physical system whose typically macroscopic and apparently irreversible behavior can be traced via reversible microscopic dynamics. An accurate value for the spin diffusion constant can be usually obtained through direct simulations of PDSD in systems consisting of two 13C nuclei and about ten 1H nuclei from their nearest environment. Spin diffusion constants computed by this method

  15. Shaft-Rotation Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, Richard L.

    1990-01-01

    Signal-processing subsystem generates signal indicative of rotation of shaft from output of accelerometer mounted on housing of bearing supporting shaft. Output of subsystem binary signal at frequency of rotation of shaft. Part of assembly of electronic equipment measuring vibrations in rotating machinery. Accelerometer mounted in such way sensitive to vibrations of shaft perpendicular to axis. Output of accelerometer includes noise and components of vibration at frequencies higher than rotational frequency of shaft.

  16. Rotations with Rodrigues' Vector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, E.

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears…

  17. Galaxy cluster's rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manolopoulou, M.; Plionis, M.

    2017-03-01

    We study the possible rotation of cluster galaxies, developing, testing, and applying a novel algorithm which identifies rotation, if such does exist, as well as its rotational centre, its axis orientation, rotational velocity amplitude, and, finally, the clockwise or counterclockwise direction of rotation on the plane of the sky. To validate our algorithms we construct realistic Monte Carlo mock rotating clusters and confirm that our method provides robust indications of rotation. We then apply our methodology on a sample of Abell clusters with z ≲ 0.1 with member galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR10 spectroscopic data base. After excluding a number of substructured clusters, which could provide erroneous indications of rotation, and taking into account the expected fraction of misidentified coherent substructure velocities for rotation, provided by our Monte Carlo simulation analysis, we find that ∼23 per cent of our clusters are rotating under a set of strict criteria. Loosening the strictness of the criteria, on the expense of introducing spurious rotation indications, we find this fraction increasing to ∼28 per cent. We correlate our rotation indicators with the cluster dynamical state, provided either by their Bautz-Morgan type or by their X-ray isophotal shape and find for those clusters showing rotation within 1.5 h^{-1}_{70} Mpc that the significance of their rotation is related to the dynamically younger phases of cluster formation but after the initial anisotropic accretion and merging has been completed. Finally, finding rotational modes in galaxy clusters could lead to the necessity of correcting the dynamical cluster mass calculations.

  18. Circular test structure for the determination of piezoelectric constants of ScxAl1−xN thin films applying Laser Doppler Vibrometry and FEM simulations☆

    PubMed Central

    Mayrhofer, P.M.; Euchner, H.; Bittner, A.; Schmid, U.

    2015-01-01

    Piezoelectric scandium aluminium nitride (ScxAl1−xN) thin films offer a large potential for the application in micro electromechanical systems, as advantageous properties of pure AlN thin films are maintained, but combined with an increased piezoelectric actuation and sensing potential. ScxAl1−xN thin films with x = 27% have been prepared by DC reactive magnetron sputtering to find optimized deposition parameters to maximize the piezoelectric constants d33 and d31. For the accurate and simultaneous measurement of these constants Laser Doppler Vibrometry has been applied and compared to finite element (FEM) simulations. The electrode design has been optimized to rotational symmetric structures enabling a 180° phase shifted excitation, so that a straight-forward comparison of experimental displacement curves with those obtained from FEM is feasible. PMID:26109748

  19. Quantum mechanical calculations of state-to-state cross sections and rate constants for the F + DCl → Cl + DF reaction.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Niyazi; Kłos, Jacek; Roncero, Octavio

    2015-06-07

    We present accurate state-to-state quantum wave packet calculations of integral cross sections and rate constants for the title reaction. Calculations are carried out on the best available ground 1(2)A' global adiabatic potential energy surface of Deskevich et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 224303 (2006)]. Converged state-to-state reaction cross sections have been calculated for collision energies up to 0.5 eV and different initial rotational and vibrational excitations, DCl(v = 0, j = 0 - 1; v = 1, j = 0). Also, initial-state resolved rate constants of the title reaction have been calculated in a temperature range of 100-400 K. It is found that the initial rotational excitation of the DCl molecule does not enhance reactivity, in contract to the reaction with the isotopologue HCl in which initial rotational excitation produces an important enhancement. These differences between the isotopologue reactions are analyzed in detail and attributed to the presence of resonances for HCl(v = 0, j), absent in the case of DCl(v = 0, j). For vibrational excited DCl(v = 1, j), however, the reaction cross section increases noticeably, what is also explained by another resonance.

  20. Quantum mechanical calculations of state-to-state cross sections and rate constants for the F + DCl → Cl + DF reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bulut, Niyazi; Kłos, Jacek; Roncero, Octavio

    2015-06-07

    We present accurate state-to-state quantum wave packet calculations of integral cross sections and rate constants for the title reaction. Calculations are carried out on the best available ground 1{sup 2}A′ global adiabatic potential energy surface of Deskevich et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 224303 (2006)]. Converged state-to-state reaction cross sections have been calculated for collision energies up to 0.5 eV and different initial rotational and vibrational excitations, DCl(v = 0, j = 0 − 1; v = 1, j = 0). Also, initial-state resolved rate constants of the title reaction have been calculated in a temperature range of 100-400 K. It is found that the initial rotational excitation of the DCl molecule does not enhance reactivity, in contract to the reaction with the isotopologue HCl in which initial rotational excitation produces an important enhancement. These differences between the isotopologue reactions are analyzed in detail and attributed to the presence of resonances for HCl(v = 0, j), absent in the case of DCl(v = 0, j). For vibrational excited DCl(v = 1, j), however, the reaction cross section increases noticeably, what is also explained by another resonance.

  1. Universal equations and constants of turbulent motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumert, H. Z.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a parameter-free theory of shear-generated turbulence at asymptotically high Reynolds numbers in incompressible fluids. It is based on a two-fluids concept. Both components are materially identical and inviscid. The first component is an ensemble of quasi-rigid dipole-vortex tubes (vortex filaments, excitations) as quasi-particles in chaotic motion. The second is a superfluid performing evasive motions between the tubes. The local dipole motions follow Helmholtz' law. The vortex radii scale with the energy-containing length scale. Collisions between quasi-particles lead either to annihilation (likewise rotation, turbulent dissipation) or to scattering (counterrotation, turbulent diffusion). There are analogies with birth and death processes of population dynamics and their master equations and with Landau's two-fluid theory of liquid helium. For free homogeneous decay the theory predicts the turbulent kinetic energy to follow t-1. With an adiabatic wall condition it predicts the logarithmic law with von Kármán's constant as 1/\\sqrt {2\\,\\pi }= 0.399 . Likewise rotating couples form localized dissipative patches almost at rest (→ intermittency) wherein under local quasi-steady conditions the spectrum evolves into an ‘Apollonian gear’ as discussed first by Herrmann (1990 Correlation and Connectivity (Dordrecht: Kluwer) pp 108-20). Dissipation happens exclusively at scale zero and at finite scales this system is frictionless and reminds of Prigogine's (1947 Etude Thermodynamique des Phenomenes Irreversibles (Liege: Desoer) p 143) law of minimum (here: zero) entropy production. The theory predicts further the prefactor of the 3D-wavenumber spectrum (a Kolmogorov constant) as \\frac {1}{3}(4\\,\\pi )^{2/3}=1.802 , well within the scatter range of observational, experimental and direct numerical simulation results.

  2. Nonradial oscillations of slowly and differentially rotating compact stars

    SciTech Connect

    Stavridis, Adamantios; Kokkotas, Kostas; Passamonti, Andrea

    2007-03-15

    The equations describing nonradial adiabatic oscillations of differentially rotating relativistic stars are derived in relativistic slow rotation approximation. The differentially rotating configuration is described by a perturbative version of the relativistic j-constant rotation law. Focusing on the oscillation properties of the stellar fluid, the adiabatic nonradial perturbations are studied in the Cowling approximation with a system of five partial differential equations. In these equations, differential rotation introduces new coupling terms between the perturbative quantities with respect to the uniformly rotating stars. In particular, we investigate the axisymmetric and barotropic oscillations and compare their spectral properties with those obtained in nonlinear hydrodynamical studies. The perturbative description of the differentially rotating background and the oscillation spectrum agree within a few percent with those of the nonlinear studies.

  3. QCD coupling constants and VDM

    SciTech Connect

    Erkol, G.; Ozpineci, A.; Zamiralov, V. S.

    2012-10-23

    QCD sum rules for coupling constants of vector mesons with baryons are constructed. The corresponding QCD sum rules for electric charges and magnetic moments are also derived and with the use of vector-meson-dominance model related to the coupling constants. The VDM role as the criterium of reciprocal validity of the sum rules is considered.

  4. Constant-Pressure Hydraulic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galloway, C. W.

    1982-01-01

    Constant output pressure in gas-driven hydraulic pump would be assured in new design for gas-to-hydraulic power converter. With a force-multiplying ring attached to gas piston, expanding gas would apply constant force on hydraulic piston even though gas pressure drops. As a result, pressure of hydraulic fluid remains steady, and power output of the pump does not vary.

  5. SEAL FOR ROTATING SHAFT

    DOEpatents

    Coffman, R.T.

    1957-12-10

    A seal is described for a rotatable shaft that must highly effective when the shaft is not rotating but may be less effective while the shaft is rotating. Weights distributed about a sealing disk secured to the shaft press the sealing disk against a tubular section into which the shiilt extends, and whem the shaft rotates, the centrifugal forces on the weights relieve the pressurc of the sealing disk against the tubular section. This action has the very desirible result of minimizing the wear of the rotating disk due to contact with the tubular section, while affording maximum sealing action when it is needed.

  6. Visualizing molecular unidirectional rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kang; Song, Qiying; Gong, Xiaochun; Ji, Qinying; Pan, Haifeng; Ding, Jingxin; Zeng, Heping; Wu, Jian

    2015-07-01

    We directly visualize the spatiotemporal evolution of a unidirectional rotating molecular rotational wave packet. Excited by two time-delayed polarization-skewed ultrashort laser pulses, the cigar- or disk-shaped rotational wave packet is impulsively kicked to unidirectionally rotate as a quantum rotor which afterwards disperses and exhibits field-free revivals. The rich dynamics can be coherently controlled by varying the timing or polarization of the excitation laser pulses. The numerical simulations very well reproduce the experimental observations and intuitively revivify the thoroughgoing evolution of the molecular rotational wave packet of unidirectional spin.

  7. An Alcohol Test for Drifting Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, P.; Bagdonaite, J.; Ubachs, W.; Bethlem, H. L.; Kleiner, I.; Xu, L.-H.

    2013-06-01

    The Standard Model of physics is built on the fundamental constants of nature, however without providing an explanation for their values, nor requiring their constancy over space and time. Molecular spectroscopy can address this issue. Recently, we found that microwave transitions in methanol are extremely sensitive to a variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio μ, due to a fortuitous interplay between classically forbidden internal rotation and rotation of the molecule as a whole. In this talk, we will explain the origin of this effect and how the sensitivity coefficients in methanol are calculated. In addition, we set a limit on a possible cosmological variation of μ by comparing transitions in methanol observed in the early Universe with those measured in the laboratory. Based on radio-astronomical observations of PKS1830-211, we deduce a constraint of Δμ/μ=(0.0± 1.0)× 10^{-7} at redshift z = 0.89, corresponding to a look-back time of 7 billion years. While this limit is more constraining and systematically more robust than previous ones, the methanol method opens a new search territory for probing μ-variation on cosmological timescales. P. Jansen, L.-H. Xu, I. Kleiner, W. Ubachs, and H.L. Bethlem Phys. Rev. Lett. {106}(100801) 2011. J. Bagdonaite, P. Jansen, C. Henkel, H.L. Bethlem, K.M. Menten, and W. Ubachs Science {339}(46) 2013.

  8. Predictors of human rotation.

    PubMed

    Stochl, Jan; Croudace, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Why some humans prefer to rotate clockwise rather than anticlockwise is not well understood. This study aims to identify the predictors of the preferred rotation direction in humans. The variables hypothesised to influence rotation preference include handedness, footedness, sex, brain hemisphere lateralisation, and the Coriolis effect (which results from geospatial location on the Earth). An online questionnaire allowed us to analyse data from 1526 respondents in 97 countries. Factor analysis showed that the direction of rotation should be studied separately for local and global movements. Handedness, footedness, and the item hypothesised to measure brain hemisphere lateralisation are predictors of rotation direction for both global and local movements. Sex is a predictor of the direction of global rotation movements but not local ones, and both sexes tend to rotate clockwise. Geospatial location does not predict the preferred direction of rotation. Our study confirms previous findings concerning the influence of handedness, footedness, and sex on human rotation; our study also provides new insight into the underlying structure of human rotation movements and excludes the Coriolis effect as a predictor of rotation.

  9. Rotational and Fine Structure of Pseudo-Jahn Molecules with C_1 Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinjun

    2016-06-01

    It has been found in our previous works that rotational and fine-structure analysis of spectra involving nearly degenerate electronic states may aid in interpretation and analysis of the vibronic structure, specifically in the case of pseudo-Jahn-Teller (pJT) molecules with C_s symmetry. The spectral analysis of pJT derivatives (isopropoxy and cyclohexoxy of a prototypical JT molecule (the methoxy radical) allowed for quantitative determination of various contributions to the energy separation between the nearly degenerate electronic states, including the relativistic spin-orbit (SO) effect, the electrostatic interaction, and their zero-point energy difference. These states are coupled by SO and Coriolis interactions, which can also be determined accurately in rotational and fine structure analysis. Most recently, the spectroscopic model for rotational analysis of pJT molecules has been extended for analysis of molecules with C_1 symmetry, i.e., no symmetry. This model includes the six independently determinable components of the spin-rotation (SR) tensor and the three components of the SO and Coriolis interactions. It has been employed to simulate and fit high-resolution laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of jet-cooled alkoxy radicals with C_1 symmetry, including the 2-hexoxy and the 2-pentoxy radicals, as well as previously recorded LIF spectrum of the trans-conformer (defined by its OCCC dihedral angle) of the 2-butoxy radical. Although the LIF spectra can be reproduced by using either the SR constants or SO and Coriolis constants, the latter simulation offers results that are physically more meaningful whereas the SR constants have to be regarded as effective constants. Furthermore, we will review the SO and Coriolis constants of alkoxy radicals that have been investigated, starting from the well-studied methoxy radical (CH_3O). J. Liu, D. Melnik, and T. A. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 094308 (2013) J. Liu and T. A. Miller, J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 11871

  10. The rotation-inversion spectrum of cyanamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, W. G.; Cohen, E. A.; Pickett, H. M.

    1986-02-01

    The microwave, millimeter, and submillimeter spectra of cyanamide were studied to better determine the inversion-rotation parameters of the ground and first excited states. A total of 146 transitions including 64 rotation-inversion frequencies between 7 and 500 GHz have been measured at this laboratory. An additional 118 a-type R-branch transitions between 139 and 262 GHz measured by Möller and Winnewisser at Justus Liebig University, Giessen, have also been included in the analysis. The data were fitted to a Hamiltonian which contains a rotation-inversion interaction as an off-diagonal inertial term. The interpretation of the interaction term in terms of the molecular structure and inversion motion is in good agreement with experiment. Higher order rotational effects were handled with a Watson " S" centrifugal distortion Hamiltonian. The inversion splitting, rotational constants, centrifugal distortion constants, nitrogen nuclear quadrupole coupling tensors including χac for the amino nitrogen, and the a and c components of the electric dipole moment are reported.

  11. The effect of external boundary conditions on condensation heat transfer in rotating heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, T. C.; Williams, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental evidence shows the importance of external boundary conditions on the overall performance of a rotating heat pipe condenser. Data are presented for the boundary conditions of constant heat flux and constant wall temperature for rotating heat pipes containing either pure vapor or a mixture of vapor and noncondensable gas as working fluid.

  12. Constant-mesh, multiple-shaft transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Rea, J.E.; Mills, D.D.; Sewell, J.S.

    1992-04-21

    This patent describes a multiple-shaft, constant-mesh transmission adapted to establish selectively a reverse torque delivery path and a forward drive torque delivery path and having a torque input means including a torque input shaft, a mainshaft aligned with the input shaft, a countershaft geared to the input shaft in spaced, parallel relationship with respect to the mainshaft, a torque output shaft joined to the mainshaft; multiple mainshaft gear elements journalled on the main airshaft, multiple cluster gear elements carried by the countershaft in meshing engagement with the mainshaft gear elements, one of the cluster gear elements being rotatably journalled on the countershaft; a reverse idle gear, a reverse gear journalled on the countershaft, the reverse idler gear being in constant mesh with the reverse gear and one of the mainshaft gear elements; first clutch means for connecting selectively the reverse gear and the countershaft; second synchronizer clutch means for connecting selectively the one of the mainshaft gear elements to the mainshaft; and third synchronizer clutch means for selectively connecting another of the mainshaft gear elements to the mainshaft; the first clutch means being a double-acting clutch with a first common axially movable clutch element adapted upon movement in one axial direction to drivably connected the reverse gear to the countershaft and adapted upon movement in the opposite axial direction to connect the one cluster gear element to the countershaft.

  13. Measurement of turbulent wind velocities using a rotating boom apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Sandborn, V.A.; Connell, J.R.

    1984-04-01

    The present report covers both the development of a rotating-boom facility and the evaluation of the spectral energy of the turbulence measured relative to the rotating boom. The rotating boom is composed of a helicopter blade driven through a pulley speed reducer by a variable speed motor. The boom is mounted on a semiportable tower that can be raised to provide various ratios of hub height to rotor diameter. The boom can be mounted to rotate in either the vertical or horizontal plane. Probes that measure the three components of turbulence can be mounted at any location along the radius of the boom. Special hot-film sensors measured two components of the turbulence at a point directly in front of the rotating blade. By using the probe rotated 90/sup 0/ about its axis, the third turbulent velocity component was measured. Evaluation of the spectral energy distributions for the three components of velocity indicates a large concentration of energy at the rotational frequency. At frequencies slightly below the rotational frequency, the spectral energy is greatly reduced over that measured for the nonrotating case measurements. Peaks in the energy at frequencies that are multiples of the rotation frequency were also observed. We conclude that the rotating boom apparatus is suitable and ready to be used in experiments for developing and testing sensors for rotational measurement of wind velocity from wind turbine rotors. It also can be used to accurately measure turbulent wind for testing theories of rotationally sampled wind velocity.

  14. Time constants in thermal laser medicine: II. Distributions of time constants and thermal relaxation of tissue.

    PubMed

    van Gemert, M J; Lucassen, G W; Welch, A J

    1996-08-01

    The thermal response of a semi-infinite medium in air, irradiated by laser light in a cylindrical geometry, cannot accurately be approximately by single radial and axial time constants for heat conduction. This report presents an analytical analysis of hear conduction where the thermal response is expressed in terms of distributions over radial and axial time constants. The source term for heat production is written as the product of a Gaussian shaped radial term and an exponentially shaped axial term. The two terms are expanded in integrals over eigenfunctions of the radial and axial parts of the Laplace heat conduction operator. The result is a double integral over the coupled distributions of the two time constants to compute the temperature rise as a function of time and of axial and radial positions. The distribution of axial time constants is a homogeneous slowly decreasing function of spatial frequency (v) indicating that one single axial time constant cannot reasonably characterize axial heat conduction. The distribution of radial time constants is a function centred around a distinguished maximum in the spatial frequency (lambda) close to the single radial time constant value used previously. This suggests that one radial time constant to characterize radial heat conduction may be a useful concept. Special cases have been evaluated analytically, such as short and long irradiation times, axial or radial heat conduction (shallow or deep penetrating laser beams) and, especially, thermal relaxation (cooling) of the tissue. For shallow penetrating laser beams the asymptotic cooling rate is confirmed to be proportional to [(t)0.5-(t-tL)0.5] which approaches 1/t0.5 for t > tL, where t is the time and tL is the laser pulse duration. For deep penetrating beams this is proportional to 1/(t-tL). For intermediate penetration, i.e. penetration depths about equal to spot size diameters, this is proportional to 1/(t-tL)1.5. The double integral has been evaluated

  15. Cylindrical rotating triboelectric nanogenerator.

    PubMed

    Bai, Peng; Zhu, Guang; Liu, Ying; Chen, Jun; Jing, Qingshen; Yang, Weiqing; Ma, Jusheng; Zhang, Gong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-07-23

    We demonstrate a cylindrical rotating triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) based on sliding electrification for harvesting mechanical energy from rotational motion. The rotating TENG is based on a core-shell structure that is made of distinctly different triboelectric materials with alternative strip structures on the surface. The charge transfer is strengthened with the formation of polymer nanoparticles on surfaces. During coaxial rotation, a contact-induced electrification and the relative sliding between the contact surfaces of the core and the shell result in an "in-plane" lateral polarization, which drives the flow of electrons in the external load. A power density of 36.9 W/m(2) (short-circuit current of 90 μA and open-circuit voltage of 410 V) has been achieved by a rotating TENG with 8 strip units at a linear rotational velocity of 1.33 m/s (a rotation rate of 1000 r/min). The output can be further enhanced by integrating more strip units and/or applying larger linear rotational velocity. This rotating TENG can be used as a direct power source to drive small electronics, such as LED bulbs. This study proves the possibility to harvest mechanical energy by TENGs from rotational motion, demonstrating its potential for harvesting the flow energy of air or water for applications such as self-powered environmental sensors and wildlife tracking devices.

  16. On geodesics of the rotation group SO(3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novelia, Alyssa; O'Reilly, Oliver M.

    2015-11-01

    Geodesics on SO(3) are characterized by constant angular velocity motions and as great circles on a three-sphere. The former interpretation is widely used in optometry and the latter features in the interpolation of rotations in computer graphics. The simplicity of these two disparate interpretations belies the complexity of the corresponding rotations. Using a quaternion representation for a rotation, we present a simple proof of the equivalence of the aforementioned characterizations and a straightforward method to establish features of the corresponding rotations.

  17. Rotational effects on turbine blade cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Govatzidakis, G.J.; Guenette, G.R.; Kerrebrock, J.L.

    1995-10-01

    An experimental investigation of the influence of rotation on the heat transfer in a smooth, rectangular passage rotating in the orthogonal mode is presented. The passage simulates one of the cooling channels found in gas turbine blades. A constant heat flux is imposed on the model with either inward or outward flow. The effects of rotation and buoyancy on the Nusselt number were quantified by systematically varying the Rotation number, Density Ratio, Reynolds number, and Buoyancy parameter. The experiment utilizes a high resolution infrared temperature measurement technique in order to measure the wall temperature distribution. The experimental results show that the rotational effects on the Nusselt number are significant and proper turbine blade design must take into account the effects of rotation, buoyancy, and flow direction. The behavior of the Nusselt number distribution depends strongly on the particular side, axial position, flow direction, and the specific range of the scaling parameters. The results show a strong coupling between buoyancy and Corollas effects throughout the passage. For outward flow, the trailing side Nusselt numbers increase with Rotation number relative to stationary values. On the leading side, the Nusselt numbers tended to decrease with rotation near the inlet and subsequently increased farther downstream in the passage. The Nusselt numbers on the side walls generally increased with rotation. For inward flow, the Nusselt numbers generally improved relative to stationary results, but increases in the Nusselt number were relatively smaller than in the case of outward flow. For outward and inward flows, increasing the density ratio generally tended to decrease Nusselt numbers on the leading and trailing sides, but the exact behavior and magnitude depended on the local axial position and specific range of Buoyancy parameters.

  18. Effect of gravity level fluctuations for rotating fluids in high and low rotating speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Tsao, Y. D.; Hong, B. B.; Leslie, F. W.

    1989-01-01

    Time-dependent evolutions of the profile of the free surface (bubble shapes) for a cylindrical container partially filled with a Newtonian fluid of constant density, rotating about its axis of symmetry, have been studied. Numerical computations of the dynamics of bubble shapes have been carried out with sinusoidal-function vibration of the gravity environment at high and low cylinder speeds.

  19. A Study of 2-Iodobutane by Rotational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenault, Eric A.; Obenchain, Daniel A.; Choi, Yoon Jeong; Blake, Thomas A.; Cooke, S. A.; Novick, Stewart E.

    2016-09-15

    The rotational transitions belonging to 2-iodobutane (sec-butyl-iodide, CH3CHICH2CH3) have been measured over the frequency range 5.5-16.5 GHz via jet-pulsed Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectroscopy. The complete nuclear quadrupole coupling tensor of iodine, ¬, has been obtained for the gauche (g)-, anti (a)-, and gauche0 (g0)-conformers, as well as the four 13C isotopologues of the gauche species. Rotational constants, centrifugal distortion constants, quadrupole coupling constants, and nuclear spin-rotation constants were determined for each species. Changes in the ¬ of the iodine nucleus, resulting from conformational and isotopic dierences, will be discussed. Isotopic substitution of g-2-iodobutane allowed for a rs structure to be determined for the carbon backbone. Additionally, isotopic substitution, in conjunction with an ab initio structure, allowed for a t of various r0 structural parameters belonging to g-2-iodobutane.

  20. Oxygen Michaelis constants for tyrosinase.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-López, J N; Ros, J R; Varón, R; García-Cánovas, F

    1993-01-01

    The Michaelis constant of tyrosinase for oxygen in the presence of monophenols and o-diphenols, which generate a cyclizable o-quinone, has been studied. This constant depends on the nature of the monophenol and o-diphenol and is always lower in the presence of the former than of the latter. From the mechanism proposed for tyrosinase and from its kinetic analysis [Rodríguez-López, J. N., Tudela, J., Varón, R., García-Carmona, F. and García-Cánovas, F. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 3801-3810] a quantitative ratio has been established between the Michaelis constants for oxygen in the presence of monophenols and their o-diphenols. This ratio is used for the determination of the Michaelis constant for oxygen with monophenols when its value cannot be calculated experimentally. PMID:8352753

  1. Avogadro's Number and Avogadro's Constant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, R. O.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses three possible methods of thinking about the implications of the definitions of the Avogadro constant and number. Indicates that there is only one way to arrive at a simple and standard conclusion. (CC)

  2. Varying Constants, Gravitation and Cosmology.

    PubMed

    Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. Thus, it is of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, solar system observations, meteorite dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describe the main theoretical frameworks in which the low-energy constants may actually be varying and we focus on the unification mechanisms and the relations between the variation of different constants. To finish, we discuss the more speculative possibility of understanding their numerical values and the apparent fine-tuning that they confront us with.

  3. Structural tailoring of counter rotation propfans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Kenneth W.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    The STAT program was designed for the optimization of single rotation, tractor propfan designs. New propfan designs, however, generally consist of two counter rotating propfan rotors. STAT is constructed to contain two levels of analysis. An interior loop, consisting of accurate, efficient approximate analyses, is used to perform the primary propfan optimization. Once an optimum design has been obtained, a series of refined analyses are conducted. These analyses, while too computer time expensive for the optimization loop, are of sufficient accuracy to validate the optimized design. Should the design prove to be unacceptable, provisions are made for recalibration of the approximate analyses, for subsequent reoptimization.

  4. Rovibrational Spectroscopic Constants and Fundamental Vibrational Frequencies for Isotopologues of Cyclic and Bent Singlet HC2N isomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inostroza, Natalia; Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Huang, Xinchuan; Lee, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Through established, highly-accurate ab initio quartic force fields (QFFs), a complete set of fundamental vibrational frequencies, rotational constants, and rovibrational coupling and centrifugal distortion constants have been determined for both the cyclic 1(sup 1) 1A' and bent 2(sup 1)A' DCCN, H(C13)CCN, HC(C-13)N, and HCC(N-15) isotopologues of HCCN. Spectroscopic constants are computed for all isotopologues using second-order vibrational perturbation theory (VPT2), and the fundamental vibrational frequencies are computed with VPT2 and vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) theory. Agreement between VPT2 and VCI results is quite good with the fundamental vibrational frequencies of the bent isomer isotopologues in accord to within a 0.1 to 3.2 / cm range. Similar accuracies are present for the cyclic isomer isotopologues. The data generated here serve as a reference for astronomical observations of these closed-shell, highly-dipolar molecules using new, high-resolution telescopes and as reference for laboratory studies where isotopic labeling may lead to elucidation of the formation mechanism for the known interstellar molecule: X 3A0 HCCN.

  5. Rovibrational spectroscopic constants and fundamental vibrational frequencies for isotopologues of cyclic and bent singlet HC{sub 2}N isomers

    SciTech Connect

    Inostroza, Natalia; Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Lee, Timothy J.; Huang, Xinchuan

    2013-12-01

    Through established, highly accurate ab initio quartic force fields, a complete set of fundamental vibrational frequencies, rotational constants, and rovibrational coupling and centrifugal distortion constants have been determined for both the cyclic 1 {sup 1} A' and bent 2 {sup 1} A' DCCN, H{sup 13}CCN, HC{sup 13}CN, and HCC{sup 15}N isotopologues of HCCN. Spectroscopic constants are computed for all isotopologues using second-order vibrational perturbation theory (VPT2), and the fundamental vibrational frequencies are computed with VPT2 and vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) theory. Agreement between VPT2 and VCI results is quite good, with the fundamental vibrational frequencies of the bent isomer isotopologues in accord to within a 0.1-3.2 cm{sup –1} range. Similar accuracies are present for the cyclic isomer isotopologues. The data generated here serve as a reference for astronomical observations of these closed-shell, highly dipolar molecules using new, high-resolution telescopes and as reference for laboratory studies where isotopic labeling may lead to elucidation of the formation mechanism for the known interstellar molecule: X {sup 3} A' HCCN.

  6. Rotating cooloing flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kley, Wilhelm; Mathews, William G.

    1995-01-01

    We describe the evolution of the hot interstellar medium in a large, slowly rotating elliptical galaxy. Although the rotation assumed is a small fraction of the circular velocity, in accordance with recent observations, it is sufficient to have a profound influence on the X-ray emission and cooling geometry of the interstellar gas. The hot gas cools into a disk that extends out to approximately 10 kpc. The cool, dusty disks observed in the majority of elliptical galaxies may arise naturally from internal cooling rather than from mergers with gas-rich companions. As a result of angular momentum conservation in the cooling flow, the soft X-ray isophotes are quite noticeably flatter than those of the stellar image. The gas temperature is higer along the rotation axis. The rotational velocity of the gas several kiloparcsecs above the central disk far exceeds the local stellar rotation and approaches the local circular velocity as it flows toward the galactic core. The detailed appearance of the X-ray image and velocity field of the X-ray gas provide information about the global rotational properties of giant ellipticals at radii too distant for optical observations. The overall pattern of rotation in these galaxies retains information about the origin of ellipticals, particularly of their merging history. In ellipticals having radio jets, if the jets are aligned with the rotation axis of the inner cooling flow, rotation within the jet could be sustained by the rotating environment. Since most large ellipticals have modest rotation, the X-ray observations at low spatial resolution, when interpreted with spherical theoretical models, give the impression that hot gas undergoes localized cooling to very low temperatures many kiloparcsecs from the galactic core. We suggest that such apparent cooling can result in a natural way as gas cools onto a rotating disk.

  7. Determining accurate distances to nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanos, Alceste Zoe

    2005-11-01

    Determining accurate distances to nearby or distant galaxies is a very simple conceptually, yet complicated in practice, task. Presently, distances to nearby galaxies are only known to an accuracy of 10-15%. The current anchor galaxy of the extragalactic distance scale is the Large Magellanic Cloud, which has large (10-15%) systematic uncertainties associated with it, because of its morphology, its non-uniform reddening and the unknown metallicity dependence of the Cepheid period-luminosity relation. This work aims to determine accurate distances to some nearby galaxies, and subsequently help reduce the error in the extragalactic distance scale and the Hubble constant H 0 . In particular, this work presents the first distance determination of the DIRECT Project to M33 with detached eclipsing binaries. DIRECT aims to obtain a new anchor galaxy for the extragalactic distance scale by measuring direct, accurate (to 5%) distances to two Local Group galaxies, M31 and M33, with detached eclipsing binaries. It involves a massive variability survey of these galaxies and subsequent photometric and spectroscopic follow-up of the detached binaries discovered. In this work, I also present a catalog of variable stars discovered in one of the DIRECT fields, M31Y, which includes 41 eclipsing binaries. Additionally, we derive the distance to the Draco Dwarf Spheroidal galaxy, with ~100 RR Lyrae found in our first CCD variability study of this galaxy. A "hybrid" method of discovering Cepheids with ground-based telescopes is described next. It involves applying the image subtraction technique on the images obtained from ground-based telescopes and then following them up with the Hubble Space Telescope to derive Cepheid period-luminosity distances. By re-analyzing ESO Very Large Telescope data on M83 (NGC 5236), we demonstrate that this method is much more powerful for detecting variability, especially in crowded fields. I finally present photometry for the Wolf-Rayet binary WR 20a

  8. Rotatable crucible for rapid solidification process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaspar, Thomas (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus for producing filament, fiber, ribbon or film from a molten material, comprising a preferably heat extracting crucible which contains a pool of molten material at a selected horizontal level in the pool. The crucible has an opening extending from above the free surface level to a bottom edge of the opening, the bottom edge being sufficiently below the free surface level so that the molten material cannot form and hold a meniscus by surface tension between the edge and the level of the free surface and further comprises a heat extracting substrate laterally disposed with respect to the crucible and which rotates about an axis of rotation. The substrate is positioned adjacent the edge of the opening which confines the molten material and prevents it from overflowing downwardly out of the crucible. The invention features rotating means which includes a first drive means for tiltably rotating the crucible about an axis of rotation which is coaxial with the axis of rotation of the substrate, so the crucible edge can be maintained a predetermined constant distance from the substrate. The distance chosen is suitable for depositing molten material on the substrate and the apparatus also has a second drive means which is drivingly connected to the substrate for continuously moving the surface of the substrate upwardly past the edge and a melt front formed at the interface of the molten material and the substrate surface.

  9. Mental Rotation of Dynamic, Three-Dimensional Stimuli by 3-Month-Old Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, David S.; Johnson, Scott P.

    2011-01-01

    Mental rotation involves transforming a mental image of an object so as to accurately predict how the object would look if it were rotated in space. This study examined mental rotation in male and female 3-month-olds, using the stimuli and paradigm developed by Moore and Johnson (2008). Infants were habituated to a video of a three-dimensional…

  10. On the Structure Orientation in Rotating and Sheared Homogeneous Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Joylene C.; Moreau, Adam F.; Jacobitz, Frank G.

    2016-11-01

    The results of direct numerical simulations are used to study the effect of rotation on the orientation of structures and the evolution of the turbulent kinetic energy in homogeneous sheared turbulence. Shear flows without rotation, with moderate rotation, and with strong rotation are considered and the rotation axis is either parallel or anti-parallel to the mean flow vorticity. In the case of moderate rotation, an anti-parallel configuration increases the growth rate of the turbulent kinetic energy, while a parallel configuration decreases the growth rate as compared to the flow without rotation. The orientation of turbulent structures present in the flows are characterized using the three-dimensional, two-point autocorrelation coefficient of velocity magnitude and vorticity magnitude. An ellipsoid is fitted to the surface defined by a constant autocorrelation coefficient value and the major and minor axes are used to determine the inclination angle of flow structures in the plane of shear. It was found that the inclination angle assumes a maximum value for the anti-parallel configuration with moderate rotation. Again, the inclination angle for the parallel configuration with moderate rotation is reduced as compared to the case without rotation. The smallest inclination angles are found for the strongly rotating cases. Hence, the inclination angle is directly related to the growth rate of the turbulent kinetic energy. University of San Diego Shiley-Marcos School of Engineering and McNair Scholars.

  11. Variable speed constant frequency constant voltage alternator. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Grannemann, W.W.; Yang, C.E.; Seo, P.H.

    1980-07-01

    A test alternator is operated with digital control of its output frequency for variable shaft speed. The machine is a two-pole alternator with power removed through slip rings. The output frequency of the alternator is controlled by rotating the field by stepping through sixteen coils around the rotor. Usually four coils are active at one time. The rotating field in the stationary coils of the stator is controlled by microcircuits. The control circuits are constructed with available low-cost, low-power integrated circuits (ICs). The test results from the first test alternator indicate the feasibility of using this type of alternator to convert available wind power directly to usable 60 hertz power.

  12. The effects of methyl internal rotation and {sup 14}N quadrupole coupling in the microwave spectra of two conformers of N,N-diethylacetamide

    SciTech Connect

    Kannengießer, Raphaela; Klahm, Sebastian; Vinh Lam Nguyen, Ha Lüchow, Arne; Stahl, Wolfgang

    2014-11-28

    The gas phase structures and internal dynamics of N,N-diethylacetamide were determined with very high accuracy using a combination of molecular beam Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations at high levels. Conformational studies yielded five stable conformers with C{sub 1} symmetry. The two most energetically favorable conformers, conformer I and II, could be found in the experimental spectrum. For both conformers, quadrupole hyperfine splittings of the {sup 14}N nucleus and torsional fine splittings due to the internal rotation of the acetyl methyl group occurred in the same order of magnitude and were fully assigned. The rotational constants, centrifugal distortion constants as well as the quadrupole coupling constants of the {sup 14}N nucleus were determined and fitted to experimental accuracy. The V{sub 3} potentials were found to be 517.04(13) cm{sup −1} and 619.48(91) cm{sup −1} for conformer I and II, respectively, and compared to the V{sub 3} potentials found in other acetamides. Highly accurate CCSD(T) and DMC calculations were carried out for calculating the barriers to internal rotation in comparison with the experimentally deduced V{sub 3} values.

  13. Accurate upwind-monotone (nonoscillatory) methods for conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1992-01-01

    The well known MUSCL scheme of Van Leer is constructed using a piecewise linear approximation. The MUSCL scheme is second order accurate at the smooth part of the solution except at extrema where the accuracy degenerates to first order due to the monotonicity constraint. To construct accurate schemes which are free from oscillations, the author introduces the concept of upwind monotonicity. Several classes of schemes, which are upwind monotone and of uniform second or third order accuracy are then presented. Results for advection with constant speed are shown. It is also shown that the new scheme compares favorably with state of the art methods.

  14. Constant fields and constant gradients in open ionic channels.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, D P; Barcilon, V; Eisenberg, R S

    1992-01-01

    Ions enter cells through pores in proteins that are holes in dielectrics. The energy of interaction between ion and charge induced on the dielectric is many kT, and so the dielectric properties of channel and pore are important. We describe ionic movement by (three-dimensional) Nemst-Planck equations (including flux and net charge). Potential is described by Poisson's equation in the pore and Laplace's equation in the channel wall, allowing induced but not permanent charge. Asymptotic expansions are constructed exploiting the long narrow shape of the pore and the relatively high dielectric constant of the pore's contents. The resulting one-dimensional equations can be integrated numerically; they can be analyzed when channels are short or long (compared with the Debye length). Traditional constant field equations are derived if the induced charge is small, e.g., if the channel is short or if the total concentration gradient is zero. A constant gradient of concentration is derived if the channel is long. Plots directly comparable to experiments are given of current vs voltage, reversal potential vs. concentration, and slope conductance vs. concentration. This dielectric theory can easily be tested: its parameters can be determined by traditional constant field measurements. The dielectric theory then predicts current-voltage relations quite different from constant field, usually more linear, when gradients of total concentration are imposed. Numerical analysis shows that the interaction of ion and channel can be described by a mean potential if, but only if, the induced charge is negligible, that is to say, the electric field is spatially constant. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:1376159

  15. Effective cosmological constant induced by stochastic fluctuations of Newton's constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cesare, Marco; Lizzi, Fedele; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2016-09-01

    We consider implications of the microscopic dynamics of spacetime for the evolution of cosmological models. We argue that quantum geometry effects may lead to stochastic fluctuations of the gravitational constant, which is thus considered as a macroscopic effective dynamical quantity. Consistency with Riemannian geometry entails the presence of a time-dependent dark energy term in the modified field equations, which can be expressed in terms of the dynamical gravitational constant. We suggest that the late-time accelerated expansion of the Universe may be ascribed to quantum fluctuations in the geometry of spacetime rather than the vacuum energy from the matter sector.

  16. Hydrogen isotope separation in carbon nanotubes: calculation of coupled rotational and translational States at high densities.

    PubMed

    Garberoglio, Giovanni; Johnson, J Karl

    2010-03-23

    The effect of the quantized rotational degrees of freedom of hydrogen on the adsorption and sieving properties in carbon nanotubes is studied using computer simulations. We have developed a highly efficient multiple timestep algorithm for hybrid Monte Carlo sampling of quantized rotor configurations and extended the grand canonical Boltzmann bias method to rigid linear molecules. These new computational tools allow us to calculate accurately the quantum sieving selectivities for cases of extreme two-dimensional confinement as a function of pressure. The para-T2/para-H2 selectivity at 20 K is analyzed as a function of the tube diameter and the density of adsorbed hydrogen. Extraordinarily high selectivities, up to 2.6 x 10(8), are observed in the narrowest nanotube. The quantized nature of the rotational degrees of freedom is found to dramatically affect adsorption and selectivity for hydrogen isotopes adsorbed in very narrow nanotubes. The T2/H2 zero-pressure selectivity increases from 2.4 x 10(4) to 1.7 x 10(8) in the (3,6) nanotube at 20 K when quantum rotations are accounted for. The isotopic selectivity is found to increase with pressure, tending to a constant value at saturation. A simplified mean-field model is used to discuss the origin of this behavior.

  17. Computational calculation of equilibrium constants: addition to carbonyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; González-Pérez, Marina; Pérez-Prior, María Teresa; Calle, Emilio; Casado, Julio

    2009-10-22

    Hydration reactions are relevant for understanding many organic mechanisms. Since the experimental determination of hydration and hemiacetalization equilibrium constants is fairly complex, computational calculations now offer a useful alternative to experimental measurements. In this work, carbonyl hydration and hemiacetalization constants were calculated from the free energy differences between compounds in solution, using absolute and relative approaches. The following conclusions can be drawn: (i) The use of a relative approach in the calculation of hydration and hemiacetalization constants allows compensation of systematic errors in the solvation energies. (ii) On average, the methodology proposed here can predict hydration constants within +/- 0.5 log K(hyd) units for aldehydes. (iii) Hydration constants can be calculated for ketones and carboxylic acid derivatives within less than +/- 1.0 log K(hyd), on average, at the CBS-Q level of theory. (iv) The proposed methodology can predict hemiacetal formation constants accurately at the MP2 6-31++G(d,p) level using a common reference. If group references are used, the results obtained using the much cheaper DFT-B3LYP 6-31++G(d,p) level are almost as accurate. (v) In general, the best results are obtained if a common reference for all compounds is used. The use of group references improves the results at the lower levels of theory, but at higher levels, this becomes unnecessary.

  18. Optical constants of solid methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N.; Thompson, W. R.; Sagan, C.; Arakawa, E. T.; Bruel, C.; Judish, J. P.; Khanna, R. K.; Pollack, J. B.

    1989-01-01

    Methane is the most abundant simple organic molecule in the outer solar system bodies. In addition to being a gaseous constituent of the atmospheres of the Jovian planets and Titan, it is present in the solid form as a constituent of icy surfaces such as those of Triton and Pluto, and as cloud condensate in the atmospheres of Titan, Uranus, and Neptune. It is expected in the liquid form as a constituent of the ocean of Titan. Cometary ices also contain solid methane. The optical constants for both solid and liquid phases of CH4 for a wide temperature range are needed for radiative transfer calculations, for studies of reflection from surfaces, and for modeling of emission in the far infrared and microwave regions. The astronomically important visual to near infrared measurements of solid methane optical constants are conspicuously absent from the literature. Preliminary results are presented of the optical constants of solid methane for the 0.4 to 2.6 micron region. K is reported for both the amorphous and the crystalline (annealed) states. Using the previously measured values of the real part of the refractive index, n, of liquid methane at 110 K n is computed for solid methane using the Lorentz-Lorentz relationship. Work is in progress to extend the measurements of optical constants n and k for liquid and solid to both shorter and longer wavelengths, eventually providing a complete optical constants database for condensed CH4.

  19. Oscillatory patterns in a rotating aqueous suspension.

    PubMed

    Breu, A P J; Kruelle, C A; Rehberg, I

    2004-02-01

    Suspensions of granular material in glycerin-water mixtures agitated in horizontally aligned rotating tubes show a whole variety of patterns. The stationary pattern of a homogeneous distribution and a chain of rings have been investigated before. Here we report on two types of oscillatory states in the same system. For a certain range of the rotation frequency and sufficiently high viscosity traveling waves propagate with constant velocity back and forth along the tube in an almost homogeneous distribution of sedimenting particles. The transition from a stationary to the traveling-wave state is found to be an imperfect supercritical bifurcation. The dependence of the wave length and speed on the tube's rotation frequency and the dynamic viscosity of the fluid are determined. Experiments with low viscosities show no traveling waves but low-frequency oscillations, when the previously known chain of rings undergoes a secondary instability.

  20. Earth Rotation Dynamics: Review and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.

    2004-01-01

    Modem space geodetic measurement of Earth rotation variations, particularly by means of the VLBI technique, has over the years allowed studies of Earth rotation dynamics to advance in ever-increasing precision, accuracy, and temporal resolution. A review will be presented on our understanding of the geophysical and climatic causes, or "excitations", for length-of-day change, polar motion, and nutations. These excitations sources come from mass transports that constantly take place in the Earth system comprised of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, lithosphere, mantle, and the cores. In this sense, together with other space geodetic measurements of time-variable gravity and geocenter motion, Earth rotation variations become a remote-sensing tool for the integral of all mass transports, providing valuable information about the latter on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Future prospects with respect to geophysical studies with even higher accuracy and resolution will be discussed.

  1. Earth Rotational Variations Excited by Geophysical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.

    2004-01-01

    Modern space geodetic measurement of Earth rotation variations, particularly by means of the VLBI technique, has over the years allowed studies of Earth rotation dynamics to advance in ever-increasing precision, accuracy, and temporal resolution. A review will be presented on our understanding of the geophysical and climatic causes, or "excitations". for length-of-day change, polar motion, and nutations. These excitations sources come from mass transports that constantly take place in the Earth system comprised of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, lithosphere, mantle, and the cores. In this sense, together with other space geodetic measurements of time-variable gravity and geocenter motion, Earth rotation variations become a remote-sensing tool for the integral of all mass transports, providing valuable information about the latter on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Future prospects with respect to geophysical studies with even higher accuracy and resolution will be discussed.

  2. Reducing parametric backscattering by polarization rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, Ido; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-10-01

    When a laser passes through underdense plasmas, Raman and Brillouin Backscattering can reflect a substantial portion of the incident laser energy. This is a major loss mechanism, for example, in employing lasers in inertial confinement fusion. But, by slow rotation of the incident linear polarization, the overall reflectivity can be reduced significantly. Particle in cell simulations show that, for parameters similar to those of indirect drive fusion experiments, polarization rotation reduces the reflectivity by a factor of 5. A general, fluid-model based analytical estimation for the reflectivity reduction agrees with simulations. However, in identifying the source of the backscatter reduction, it is difficult to disentangle the rotating polarization from the frequency separation based approach used to engineer the beam's polarization. Though the backscatter reduction arises similarly to other approaches that employ frequency separation, in the case here, the intensity remains constant in time.

  3. Reducing parametric backscattering by polarization rotation

    DOE PAGES

    Barth, Ido; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-10-01

    When a laser passes through underdense plasmas, Raman and Brillouin Backscattering can reflect a substantial portion of the incident laser energy. This is a major loss mechanism, for example, in employing lasers in inertial confinement fusion. But, by slow rotation of the incident linear polarization, the overall reflectivity can be reduced significantly. Particle in cell simulations show that, for parameters similar to those of indirect drive fusion experiments, polarization rotation reduces the reflectivity by a factor of 5. A general, fluid-model based analytical estimation for the reflectivity reduction agrees with simulations. However, in identifying the source of the backscatter reduction,more » it is difficult to disentangle the rotating polarization from the frequency separation based approach used to engineer the beam's polarization. Though the backscatter reduction arises similarly to other approaches that employ frequency separation, in the case here, the intensity remains constant in time.« less

  4. Reducing parametric backscattering by polarization rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Ido; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-10-01

    When a laser passes through underdense plasmas, Raman and Brillouin Backscattering can reflect a substantial portion of the incident laser energy. This is a major loss mechanism, for example, in employing lasers in inertial confinement fusion. However, by slow rotation of the incident linear polarization, the overall reflectivity can be reduced significantly. Particle in cell simulations show that, for parameters similar to those of indirect drive fusion experiments, polarization rotation reduces the reflectivity by a factor of 5. A general, fluid-model based analytical estimation for the reflectivity reduction agrees with simulations. However, in identifying the source of the backscatter reduction, it is difficult to disentangle the rotating polarization from the frequency separation based approach used to engineer the beam's polarization. Although the backscatter reduction arises similarly to other approaches that employ frequency separation, in the case here, the intensity remains constant in time.

  5. Rotational spectrum of 13C chloromethanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kania, Patrik; Stříteská, Lucie Nová; Šimečková, Marie; Musil, Peter; Kolesniková, Lucie; Koubek, Jindřich; Urban, Štěpán

    2008-11-01

    Rotational spectra of 13 carbon chloromethane isotopologues 13CH 335Cl and 13CH 337Cl with resolved hyperfine structures were measured in the spectral region from 50 GHz to 275 GHz. An estimated uncertainty of individual well developed lines was better than 5 kHz. Ground state molecular parameters B, DJ, DJK, HJ, HJK, HKJ, eQq, and CN were derived. Determination mainly of the hyperfine constants is significantly better than in previous studies.

  6. Diamagnetism of rotating plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Young, W. C.; Hassam, A. B.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Ellis, R. F.; Teodorescu, C.

    2011-11-15

    Diamagnetism and magnetic measurements of a supersonically rotating plasma in a shaped magnetic field demonstrate confinement of plasma pressure along the magnetic field resulting from centrifugal force. The Grad-Shafranov equation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic force balance, including supersonic rotation, is solved to confirm that the predicted angular velocity is in agreement with spectroscopic measurements of the Doppler shifts.

  7. Wideband rotating junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochernyaev, V. N.

    1993-06-01

    Rotating junctions of coaxial-waveguide and waveguide type with a traveling wave coefficient exceeding 0.8 in a wide frequency range are considered. The design of these junctions is based on a method of the theory of electrodynamic circuits. Numerical results are obtained for rotating junctions of partially filled rectangular waveguide type and their particular cases.

  8. The Weighted Oblimin Rotation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano

    2000-01-01

    Demonstrates that the weighting procedure proposed by E. Cureton and S. Mulaik (1975) can be applied to the Direct Oblimin approach of D. Clarkson and R. Jennrich (1988) to provide good results. The rotation method obtained is called Weighted Oblimin. Compared this method to other rotation methods with favorable results. (SLD)

  9. SMAP Faraday Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, David

    2016-01-01

    Faraday rotation is a change in the polarization as signal propagates through the ionosphere. At L-band it is necessary to correct for this change and measurements are made on the spacecraft of the rotation angle. These figures show that there is good agreement between the SMAP measurements (blue) and predictions based on models (red).

  10. Rotatable shear plate interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Duffus, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotatable shear plate interferometer comprises a transparent shear plate mounted obliquely in a tubular supporting member at 45.degree. with respect to its horizontal center axis. This tubular supporting member is supported rotatably around its center axis and a collimated laser beam is made incident on the shear plate along this center axis such that defocus in different directions can be easily measured.

  11. Inconstant Planck’s constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangano, Gianpiero; Lizzi, Fedele; Porzio, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Motivated by the Dirac idea that fundamental constants are dynamical variables and by conjectures on quantum structure of space-time at small distances, we consider the possibility that Planck constant ℏ is a time depending quantity, undergoing random Gaussian fluctuations around its measured constant mean value, with variance σ2 and a typical correlation timescale Δt. We consider the case of propagation of a free particle and a one-dimensional harmonic oscillator coherent state, and show that the time evolution in both cases is different from the standard behavior. Finally, we discuss how interferometric experiments or exploiting coherent electromagnetic fields in a cavity may put effective bounds on the value of τ = σ2Δt.

  12. Rotation sensor switch

    DOEpatents

    Sevec, John B.

    1978-01-01

    A protective device to provide a warning if a piece of rotating machinery slows or stops comprises a pair of hinged weights disposed to rotate on a rotating shaft of the equipment. When the equipment is rotating, the weights remain in a plane essentially perpendicular to the shaft and constitute part of an electrical circuit that is open. When the shaft slows or stops, the weights are attracted to a pair of concentric electrically conducting disks disposed in a plane perpendicular to the shaft and parallel to the plane of the weights when rotating. A disk magnet attracts the weights to the electrically conducting plates and maintains the electrical contact at the plates to complete an electrical circuit that can then provide an alarm signal.

  13. Optical constants of solid methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N.; Thompson, W. R.; Sagan, C.; Arakawa, E. T.; Bruel, C.; Judish, J. P.; Khanna, R. K.; Pollack, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    Methane is the most abundant simple organic molecule in the outer solar system bodies. In addition to being a gaseous constituent of the atmospheres of the Jovian planets and Titan, it is present in the solid form as a constituent of icy surfaces such as those of Triton and Pluto, and as cloud condensate in the atmospheres of Titan, Uranus, and Neptune. It is expected in the liquid form as a constituent of the ocean of Titan. Cometary ices also contain solid methane. The optical constants for both solid and liquid phases of CH4 for a wide temperature range are needed for radiative transfer calculations, for studies of reflection from surfaces, and for modeling of emission in the far infrared and microwave regions. The astronomically important visual to near infrared measurements of solid methane optical constants are conspicuously absent from the literature. Preliminary results are presented on the optical constants of solid methane for the 0.4 to 2.6 micrometer region. Deposition onto a substrate at 10 K produces glassy (semi-amorphous) material. Annealing this material at approximately 33 K for approximately 1 hour results in a crystalline material as seen by sharper, more structured bands and negligible background extinction due to scattering. The constant k is reported for both the amorphous and the crystalline (annealed) states. Typical values (at absorption maxima) are in the .001 to .0001 range. Below lambda = 1.1 micrometers the bands are too weak to be detected by transmission through the films less than or equal to 215 micrometers in thickness, employed in the studies to date. Using previously measured values of the real part of the refractive index, n, of liquid methane at 110 K, n is computed for solid methane using the Lorentz-Lorenz relationship. Work is in progress to extend the measurements of optical constants n and k for liquid and solid to both shorter and longer wavelengths, eventually providing a complete optical constants database for

  14. On the fast magnetic rotator regime of stellar winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, C. P.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We study the acceleration of the stellar winds of rapidly rotating low mass stars and the transition between the slow magnetic rotator and fast magnetic rotator regimes. We aim to understand the properties of stellar winds in the fast magnetic rotator regime and the effects of magneto-centrifugal forces on wind speeds and mass loss rates. Methods: We extend a solar wind model to 1D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the winds of rotating stars. We test two assumptions for how to scale the wind temperature to other stars and assume the mass loss rate scales as dot{M_star ∝ R_star2 Ω_star1.33 M_star-3.36}, in the unsaturated regime, as estimated from observed rotational evolution. Results: For 1.0 M⊙ stars, the winds can be accelerated to several thousand km s-1, and the effects of magneto-centrifugal forces are much weaker for lower mass stars. We find that the different assumptions for how to scale the wind temperature to other stars lead to significantly different mass loss rates for the rapid rotators. If we assume a constant temperature, the mass loss rates of solar mass stars do not saturate at rapid rotation, which we show to be inconsistent with observed rotational evolution. If we assume the wind temperatures scale positively with rotation, the mass loss rates are only influenced significantly at rotation rates above 75 Ω⊙. We suggest that models with increasing wind speed for more rapid rotators are preferable to those that assume a constant wind speed. If this conclusion is confirmed by more sophisticated wind modelling. it might provide an interesting observational constraint on the properties of stellar winds. All of the codes and output data used in this paper can be downloaded from http://https://zenodo.org/record/160052#.V_y6drWkVC1 or obtained by contacting the author.

  15. Rotational Spectrum of Propargyl Alcohol Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Devendra; Arunan, E.

    2013-06-01

    Propargyl alcohol is a molecule of interest to astrophysics as well as combustion studies. Rotational-tunneling spectra of propargyl alcohol monomer is well known and shows that the molecule exists in gauche form. Recently we reported microwave spectra of Ar...propargyl alcohol complex. Propargyl alcochol exists in gauche form in the complex as well. In this study we have recorded pure rotational spectra of propargyl alcohol dimer between 4-13 GHz range.A total of 47 transitions, 24 a-type, 16 b-type and 7 c-type, have been observed and fitted with semi rigid rotor asymmetric top hamiltonian. The fitted rotational constants are: A = 2321.83323(47) MHz, B = 1150.47726(24) MHz and C = 1124.89000(20) MHz. The standard deviation for the fit is 2.5 kHz. The experimental rotational constants are very close to the structure predicted by ab-initio calculations in which two gauche-propargyl alcohol moieties are in three point contact stabilized by O-H...O, O-H...pi and C-H...pi interactions. Few transitions for duterated isotopologues of the dimer have also been observed and search for the remaining transitions is in progress. Details will be presented in the talk. E. Hirota,J. Mol. Spectrosc. 26 (1968) 335-350. J.C. Pearson, B.J. Drouin, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 234 (2005) 149-156. D. Mani, E. Arunan, ChemPhysChem 14 (2013) 754-763.

  16. THE ROTATIONAL SPECTRUM OF HCl{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, H.; Drouin, B. J.; Pearson, J. C.

    2012-06-01

    The rotational spectrum of the radical ion HCl{sup +} has been detected at high resolution in the laboratory, confirming the identification reported in the accompanying Letter by De Luca et al., in diffuse clouds toward W31C and W49N. Three rotational transitions, one in the ground-state {sup 2}{Pi}{sub 3/2} ladder and two in the {sup 2}{Pi}{sub 1/2} ladder (643 cm{sup -1} above ground), were observed in a microwave discharge of He and HCl. Well-resolved chlorine hyperfine structure and {Lambda}-doubling, and the detection of lines of H{sup 37}Cl{sup +} at precisely the expected isotopic shift, provide conclusive evidence for the laboratory identification. Detection of rotational transitions in the {sup 2}{Pi}{sub 1/2} ladder of HCl{sup +} for the first time allows an experimental determination of the individual hyperfine coupling constants of chlorine and yields a precise value of eQq{sub 2}. The spectroscopic constants obtained by fitting a Hamiltonian simultaneously to our data and more than 8000 optical transitions are so precise that they allow us to calculate the frequencies of the {sup 2}{Pi}{sub 3/2} J = 5/2 - 3/2 transition observed in space to within 0.2 km s{sup -1}, and indeed, those of the strongest rotational transitions below 7.5 THz, to better than 1 km s{sup -1}.

  17. The rotation of the Sun's core.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterno, L.; Sofia, S.; di Mauro, M. P.

    1996-10-01

    The rotation of the Sun's core, below 0.3Rsun_, is inferred from two independent new results. The first is based on the recent oblateness measurements carried out by the Solar Disk Sextant (SDS) instrument outside the Earth's atmosphere, and the second on the very accurate measurements of rotational splittings of the lowest degree acoustic modes, carried out in the framework of the helioseismic network IRIS. By using the theory of slowly rotating stars applied to a solar standard model, we deduce a set of rotational laws for the innermost layers, which are consistent with both the measured oblateness value and the results of the inversion of helioseismic data. The SDS and IRIS results indicate that the Sun's central regions rotate at a rate in between 1.5 and 2 times the surface equatorial angular velocity. As a result of our analysis, we deduce a quadrupole moment J_2_=2.22x10^-7^, which implies an advance of Mercury's perihelion of 42.98arcsec/c, in agreement with the theory of General Relativity and the measurements of Mercury's orbit by means of planetary radar ranging. However, very recent results obtained by the helioseismic network BISON indicate that core rotation is even slower than the polar surface rotation and therefore imply a completely different scenario than that proposed here. If we assume the intermediate solution of rigid body rotation, an alternate source of the oblateness may be attributed to a magnetic field of the order of 10^5^Gauss in the interior of the Sun.

  18. Cosmologies with variable gravitational constant

    SciTech Connect

    Narkikar, J.V.

    1983-03-01

    In 1937 Dirac presented an argument, based on the socalled large dimensionless numbers, which led him to the conclusion that the Newtonian gravitational constant G changes with epoch. Towards the end of the last century Ernst Mach had given plausible arguments to link the property of inertia of matter to the large scale structure of the universe. Mach's principle also leads to cosmological models with a variable gravitational constant. Three cosmologies which predict a variable G are discussed in this paper both from theoretical and observational points of view.

  19. Cryogenic temperature characteristics of Verdet constant of terbium sesquioxide ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snetkov, I. L.; Palashov, O. V.

    2016-12-01

    The dependence of the Verdet constant on temperature in the (80-300 K) range for a promising magneto-active material terbium sesquioxide Tb2O3 at the wavelengths of 405-1064 nm is considered. For each of the studied wavelengths, the Verdet constant of the material cooled down to the liquid nitrogen temperature increased by more than a factor of 3.2 as compared to the room temperature value. Similarly to the other paramagnetics, the increase follows the law ∼1/T. Approximations for the temperature dependence of the Verdet constant have been obtained and the value of 1/V·(dV/dT) has been estimated. This information is needed to determine the angle of rotation as well as the variation of the extinction ratio of a Faraday isolator with temperature and extremely important at creation a cryogenic Faraday devices.

  20. Accurate spectroscopic characterization of ethyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide isotopologues: a route toward their astrophysical detection

    SciTech Connect

    Puzzarini, C.; Senent, M. L.; Domínguez-Gómez, R.; Carvajal, M.; Hochlaf, M.; Al-Mogren, M. Mogren E-mail: senent@iem.cfmac.csic.es E-mail: miguel.carvajal@dfa.uhu.es E-mail: mmogren@ksu.edu.sa

    2014-11-20

    Using state-of-the-art computational methodologies, we predict a set of reliable rotational and torsional parameters for ethyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide monosubstituted isotopologues. This includes rotational, quartic, and sextic centrifugal-distortion constants, torsional levels, and torsional splittings. The accuracy of the present data was assessed from a comparison to the available experimental data. Generally, our computed parameters should help in the characterization and the identification of these organo-sulfur molecules in laboratory settings and in the interstellar medium.

  1. Rovibrational constants of the ground and ν12 = 1 states of C2D4 by high-resolution synchrotron FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, T. L.; Gabona, M. G.; Appadoo, Dominique R. T.; Godfrey, Peter D.; McNaughton, Don

    2014-09-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectrum of the ν12 fundamental band of ethylene-d4 (C2D4) was recorded in the 1000-1150 cm-1 region with a resolution of 0.00096 cm-1 using the THz/far-infrared beamline of the Australian Synchrotron. Upper state (ν12 = 1) rovibrational constants consisting of three rotational constants and up to five quartic constants were improved by assigning and fitting 3950 rovibrational transitions using Watson’s A-reduced and S-reduced Hamiltonians in the Ir representation. The band centres of the unperturbed A-type ν12 band are found to be 1076.984958(14) cm-1 and 1076.984813(14) cm-1 for A-reduced and S-reduced Hamiltonians respectively. The present analysis, covering a wider wavenumber range and higher J and Kc values (up to 58) than previous studies, yielded upper state constants including the band centre which are more accurate than previously reported. The rms deviation of the upper state (ν12 = 1) fit is 0.00040 cm-1 in the A-reduction and 0.00041 cm-1 in the S-reduction. Improved ground state rovibrational constants were also determined from the fit of 3151 ground state combination differences (GSCD) from the presently-assigned transitions of the ν12 band of C2D4 using Watson’s A-reduced and S-reduced Hamiltonians in the Ir representation. The rms deviation of the GSCD fit is 0.00036 cm-1 in the A-reduction and 0.00035 cm-1 in the S-reduction. The ground state constants of C2D4 derived from the experimental GSCD fit are in good agreement with those from theoretical calculations using the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ, MP2/cc-pVTZ, and CSSD/cc-pVTZ levels, up to five quartic constants.

  2. On numerically accurate finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagtegaal, J. C.; Parks, D. M.; Rice, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A general criterion for testing a mesh with topologically similar repeat units is given, and the analysis shows that only a few conventional element types and arrangements are, or can be made suitable for computations in the fully plastic range. Further, a new variational principle, which can easily and simply be incorporated into an existing finite element program, is presented. This allows accurate computations to be made even for element designs that would not normally be suitable. Numerical results are given for three plane strain problems, namely pure bending of a beam, a thick-walled tube under pressure, and a deep double edge cracked tensile specimen. The effects of various element designs and of the new variational procedure are illustrated. Elastic-plastic computation at finite strain are discussed.

  3. Theoretical study on the dimerization of Si(OH) 4 in aqueous solution and its dependence on temperature and dielectric constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tossell, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    Energetics for the condensation dimerization reaction of monosilicic acid: 2Si(⇒SiOH+HO have been calculated quantum mechanically, in gas-phase and aqueous solution, over a range of temperatures and dielectric constants. The calculated gas phase energy, E g, for this reaction is -6.6 kcal/mol at the very accurate composite G2 level, but the vibrational, rotational and translational contributions to the free energy in the gas-phase, ΔG VRT, sum to + 2.5 kcal/mol and the hydration free energy contribution calculated with a polarizable continuum model, ΔΔG COSMO, for a dielectric constant of 78.5, is about + 6.2 kcal/mol. Thus, the free energy change for the reaction in aqueous solution at ambient conditions is about + 2.1 kcal/mol and the equilibrium constant is ˜10 -1.5, in reasonable agreement with experiment. As T increases, ΔG VRT increases slowly. As the dielectric constant decreases (for example, under high T and P conditions in the supercritical region), ΔΔG COSMO decreases substantially. Thus, at elevated T and P, if the effective dielectric constant of the aqueous fluid is 10 or less, the reaction becomes much more favorable, consistent with recent experimental observations. The PΔV contribution to the enthalpy is also considered, but cannot be accurately determined. We have also calculated 29Si-NMR shieldings and Raman frequencies for Si(OH) 4, Si 2O 7H 6 and some other oligomeric silicates. We correctly reproduce the separation of monomer and dimer peaks observed in the 29Si-NMR spectrra at ambient T and P. The Raman spectral data are somewhat ambiguous, and the new peaks seen at high T and P could arise either from the dimer or from a 3-ring trimer, which is calculated to be highly stabilized entropically at high T.

  4. Energy conservation and constants variation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraiselburd, L.; Miller Bertolami, M. M.; Sisterna, P.; Vucetich, H.

    If fundamental constants vary, the internal energy of macroscopic bodies should change. This should produce observable effects. It is shown that those effects can produce upper bounds on the variation of much lower than those coming from Eötvös experiments.

  5. Variations of the solar constant

    SciTech Connect

    Sofia, S.

    1981-12-01

    The variations in data received from rocket-borne and balloon-borne instruments are discussed. Indirect techniques to measure and monitor the solar constant are presented. Emphasis is placed on the correlation of data from the Solar Maximum Mission and the Nimbus 7 satellites. Abstracts of individual items from the workshop were prepared separately for the data base.

  6. A Rotational Pressure-Correction Scheme for Incompressible Two-Phase Flows with Open Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Dong, S.; Wang, X.

    2016-01-01

    Two-phase outflows refer to situations where the interface formed between two immiscible incompressible fluids passes through open portions of the domain boundary. We present several new forms of open boundary conditions for two-phase outflow simulations within the phase field framework, as well as a rotational pressure correction based algorithm for numerically treating these open boundary conditions. Our algorithm gives rise to linear algebraic systems for the velocity and the pressure that involve only constant and time-independent coefficient matrices after discretization, despite the variable density and variable viscosity of the two-phase mixture. By comparing simulation results with theory and the experimental data, we show that the method produces physically accurate results. We also present numerical experiments to demonstrate the long-term stability of the method in situations where large density contrast, large viscosity contrast, and backflows occur at the two-phase open boundaries. PMID:27163909

  7. A Rotational Pressure-Correction Scheme for Incompressible Two-Phase Flows with Open Boundaries.

    PubMed

    Dong, S; Wang, X

    2016-01-01

    Two-phase outflows refer to situations where the interface formed between two immiscible incompressible fluids passes through open portions of the domain boundary. We present several new forms of open boundary conditions for two-phase outflow simulations within the phase field framework, as well as a rotational pressure correction based algorithm for numerically treating these open boundary conditions. Our algorithm gives rise to linear algebraic systems for the velocity and the pressure that involve only constant and time-independent coefficient matrices after discretization, despite the variable density and variable viscosity of the two-phase mixture. By comparing simulation results with theory and the experimental data, we show that the method produces physically accurate results. We also present numerical experiments to demonstrate the long-term stability of the method in situations where large density contrast, large viscosity contrast, and backflows occur at the two-phase open boundaries.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Rotational spectrum of vinyl formate (CH2=CHOCHO) (Alonso+,

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, E. R.; Kolesnikova, L.; Tercero, B.; Cabezas, C.; Alonso, J. L.; Cernicharo, J.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2017-02-01

    Previous detections of methyl and ethyl formate make other small substituted formates potential candidates for observation in the interstellar medium. Among them, vinyl formate is one of the simplest unsaturated carboxylic ester. The aim of this work is to provide direct experimental frequencies of the ground vibrational state of vinyl formate in a large spectral range for astrophysical use. The room-temperature rotational spectrum of vinyl formate has been measured from 80 to 360GHz and analyzed in terms of Watson's semirigid rotor Hamiltonian. Two thousand six hundred transitions within J=3-88 and Ka=0-28 were assigned to the most stable conformer of vinyl formate and a new set of spectroscopic constants was accurately determined. Spectral features of vinyl formate were then searched for in Orion KL, Sgr B2(N), B1-b, and TMC-1 molecular clouds. Upper limits to the column density of vinyl formate are provided. (1 data file).

  9. Accurately measuring dynamic coefficient of friction in ultraform finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Dennis; Echaves, Samantha; Pidgeon, Brendan; Travis, Nathan; Ellis, Jonathan D.

    2013-09-01

    UltraForm Finishing (UFF) is a deterministic sub-aperture computer numerically controlled grinding and polishing platform designed by OptiPro Systems. UFF is used to grind and polish a variety of optics from simple spherical to fully freeform, and numerous materials from glasses to optical ceramics. The UFF system consists of an abrasive belt around a compliant wheel that rotates and contacts the part to remove material. This work aims to accurately measure the dynamic coefficient of friction (μ), how it changes as a function of belt wear, and how this ultimately affects material removal rates. The coefficient of friction has been examined in terms of contact mechanics and Preston's equation to determine accurate material removal rates. By accurately predicting changes in μ, polishing iterations can be more accurately predicted, reducing the total number of iterations required to meet specifications. We have established an experimental apparatus that can accurately measure μ by measuring triaxial forces during translating loading conditions or while manufacturing the removal spots used to calculate material removal rates. Using this system, we will demonstrate μ measurements for UFF belts during different states of their lifecycle and assess the material removal function from spot diagrams as a function of wear. Ultimately, we will use this system for qualifying belt-wheel-material combinations to develop a spot-morphing model to better predict instantaneous material removal functions.

  10. Accurate calculation of the transverse anisotropy of a magnetic domain wall in perpendicularly magnetized multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büttner, Felix; Krüger, Benjamin; Eisebitt, Stefan; Kläui, Mathias

    2015-08-01

    Bloch domain walls are the most common type of transition between two out-of-plane magnetized domains (one magnetized upwards, one downwards) in films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The rotation of the spins of such domain walls in the plane of the film requires energy, which is described by an effective anisotropy, the so-called transverse or hard axis anisotropy K⊥. This anisotropy and the related Döring mass density of the domain wall are key parameters of the one-dimensional model to describe the motion of magnetic domain walls. In particular, the critical field strength or current density where oscillatory domain wall motion sets in (Walker breakdown) is directly proportional to K⊥. So far, no general framework is available to determine K⊥ from static characterizations such as magnetometry measurements. Here, we derive a universal analytical expression to calculate the transverse anisotropy constant for the important class of perpendicular magnetic multilayers. All the required input parameters of the model, such as the number of repeats, the thickness of a single magnetic layer, and the layer periodicity, as well as the effective perpendicular anisotropy, the saturation magnetization, and the static domain wall width are accessible by static sample characterizations. We apply our model to a widely used multilayer system and find that the effective transverse anisotropy constant is a factor of seven different from that when using the conventional approximations, showing the importance of using our analysis scheme. Our model is also applicable to domain walls in materials with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI). The accurate knowledge of K⊥ is needed to determine other unknown parameters from measurements, such as the DMI strength or the spin polarization of the spin current in current-induced domain wall motion experiments.

  11. Rotatable seal assembly. [Patent application; rotating targets

    DOEpatents

    Logan, C.M.; Garibaldi, J.L.

    1980-11-12

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

  12. Rotating reactor studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Glyn O.

    1991-01-01

    Undesired gravitational effects such as convection or sedimentation in a fluid can sometimes be avoided or decreased by the use of a closed chamber uniformly rotated about a horizontal axis. In a previous study, the spiral orbits of a heavy or buoyant particle in a uniformly rotating fluid were determined. The particles move in circles, and spiral in or out under the combined effects of the centrifugal force and centrifugal buoyancy. A optimization problem for the rotation rate of a cylindrical reactor rotated about its axis and containing distributed particles was formulated and solved. Related studies in several areas are addressed. A computer program based on the analysis was upgraded by correcting some minor errors, adding a sophisticated screen-and-printer graphics capability and other output options, and by improving the automation. The design, performance, and analysis of a series of experiments with monodisperse polystyrene latex microspheres in water were supported to test the theory and its limitations. The theory was amply confirmed at high rotation rates. However, at low rotation rates (1 rpm or less) the assumption of uniform solid-body rotation of the fluid became invalid, and there were increasingly strong secondary motions driven by variations in the mean fluid density due to variations in the particle concentration. In these tests the increase in the mean fluid density due to the particles was of order 0.015 percent. To a first approximation, these flows are driven by the buoyancy in a thin crescent-shaped depleted layer on the descending side of the rotating reactor. This buoyancy distribution is balanced by viscosity near the walls, and by the Coriolis force in the interior. A full analysis is beyond the scope of this study. Secondary flows are likely to be stronger for buoyant particles, which spiral in towards the neutral point near the rotation axis under the influence of their centrifugal buoyancy. This is because the depleted layer is

  13. New Quasar Studies Keep Fundamental Physical Constant Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    Very Large Telescope sets stringent limit on possible variation of the fine-structure constant over cosmological time Summary Detecting or constraining the possible time variations of fundamental physical constants is an important step toward a complete understanding of basic physics and hence the world in which we live. A step in which astrophysics proves most useful. Previous astronomical measurements of the fine structure constant - the dimensionless number that determines the strength of interactions between charged particles and electromagnetic fields - suggested that this particular constant is increasing very slightly with time. If confirmed, this would have very profound implications for our understanding of fundamental physics. New studies, conducted using the UVES spectrograph on Kueyen, one of the 8.2-m telescopes of ESO's Very Large Telescope array at Paranal (Chile), secured new data with unprecedented quality. These data, combined with a very careful analysis, have provided the strongest astronomical constraints to date on the possible variation of the fine structure constant. They show that, contrary to previous claims, no evidence exist for assuming a time variation of this fundamental constant. PR Photo 07/04: Relative Changes with Redshift of the Fine Structure Constant (VLT/UVES) A fine constant To explain the Universe and to represent it mathematically, scientists rely on so-called fundamental constants or fixed numbers. The fundamental laws of physics, as we presently understand them, depend on about 25 such constants. Well-known examples are the gravitational constant, which defines the strength of the force acting between two bodies, such as the Earth and the Moon, and the speed of light. One of these constants is the so-called "fine structure constant", alpha = 1/137.03599958, a combination of electrical charge of the electron, the Planck constant and the speed of light. The fine structure constant describes how electromagnetic forces hold

  14. Constant-bandwidth constant-temperature hot-wire anemometer.

    PubMed

    Ligeza, P

    2007-07-01

    A constant-temperature anemometer (CTA) enables the measurement of fast-changing velocity fluctuations. In the classical solution of CTA, the transmission band is a function of flow velocity. This is a minor drawback when the mean flow velocity does not significantly change, though it might lead to dynamic errors when flow velocity varies over a considerable range. A modification is outlined, whereby an adaptive controller is incorporated in the CTA system such that the anemometer's transmission band remains constant in the function of flow velocity. For that purpose, a second feedback loop is provided, and the output signal from the anemometer will regulate the controller's parameters such that the transmission bandwidth remains constant. The mathematical model of a CTA that has been developed and model testing data allow a through evaluation of the proposed solution. A modified anemometer can be used in measurements of high-frequency variable flows in a wide range of velocities. The proposed modification allows the minimization of dynamic measurement errors.

  15. Non-contact method for characterization of a rotational table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Moure Shattuck, Judson, III; Parisi, Vincent M.; Smerdon, Arryn J.

    2007-04-01

    The United States Air Force (USAF) uses and evaluates a variety of helmet-mounted trackers for incorporation into their high performance aircraft. The primary head tracker technologies commercially available are magnetic trackers, inertial trackers, and optical trackers. Each head tracker has a unique method of determining the pilot's head position within the cockpit of the aircraft. Magnetic trackers generally have a small head mounted size and minimal head weight. Because they sense a generated magnetic field, their accuracy can be affected by other magnetic fields or ferrous components within the cockpit. Inertial trackers cover the entire head motion box but require constant motion in order to accommodate drifting of the inertial sensors or a secondary system that updates the inertial system, often referred to as a hybrid system. Although optical head trackers (OHT) are immune to magnetic fields some of their limitations may be daylight/night vision goggle (NVG) compatibility issues and, depending on system configuration, may require numerous emitters and/or receivers to cover a large head motion box and provide a wide field of regard. The Dynamic Tracker Test Fixture (DTTF) was designed by the Helmet Mounted Sensory Technology (HMST) laboratory to accurately measure azimuth rotation in both static and dynamic conditions for the purpose of determining the accuracy of a variety of head trackers. Before the DTTF could be used as an evaluation tool, it required characterization to determine the amount and location of any induced elevation or roll as the table rotated in azimuth. Optimally, the characterization method would not affect the DTTF's movement so a non-contact method was devised. This paper describes the characterization process and its results.

  16. Chaotic rotation of Hyperion?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binzel, R. P.; Green, J. R.; Opal, C. B.

    1986-01-01

    Thomas et al. (1984) analyzed 14 Voyager 2 images of Saturn's satellite Hyperion and interpreted them to be consistent with a coherent (nonchaotic) rotation period of 13.1 days. This interpretation was criticized by Peale and Wisdom (1984), who argued that the low sampling frequency of Voyager data does not allow chaotic or nonchaotic rotation to be distinguished. New observations obtained with a higher sampling frequency are reported here which conclusively show that the 13.1 day period found by Thomas et al. was not due to coherent rotation.

  17. Method for Design Rotation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    desirability of a rotation as a function of the set of planar angles. Criteria for the symmetry of the design (such as the same set of factor levels for...P is -1. Hence there is no theoretical problem in obtaining rotations of a design; there are only the practical questions Why rotate a design? And...star points, which can be represented in a shorthand notation by the permutations of (±1,0, "’" , 0), and (c) factorial points, which are a two- level

  18. Accurate, meshless methods for magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Raives, Matthias J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we explored new meshless finite-volume Lagrangian methods for hydrodynamics: the `meshless finite mass' (MFM) and `meshless finite volume' (MFV) methods; these capture advantages of both smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) schemes. We extend these to include ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The MHD equations are second-order consistent and conservative. We augment these with a divergence-cleaning scheme, which maintains nabla \\cdot B≈ 0. We implement these in the code GIZMO, together with state-of-the-art SPH MHD. We consider a large test suite, and show that on all problems the new methods are competitive with AMR using constrained transport (CT) to ensure nabla \\cdot B=0. They correctly capture the growth/structure of the magnetorotational instability, MHD turbulence, and launching of magnetic jets, in some cases converging more rapidly than state-of-the-art AMR. Compared to SPH, the MFM/MFV methods exhibit convergence at fixed neighbour number, sharp shock-capturing, and dramatically reduced noise, divergence errors, and diffusion. Still, `modern' SPH can handle most test problems, at the cost of larger kernels and `by hand' adjustment of artificial diffusion. Compared to non-moving meshes, the new methods exhibit enhanced `grid noise' but reduced advection errors and diffusion, easily include self-gravity, and feature velocity-independent errors and superior angular momentum conservation. They converge more slowly on some problems (smooth, slow-moving flows), but more rapidly on others (involving advection/rotation). In all cases, we show divergence control beyond the Powell 8-wave approach is necessary, or all methods can converge to unphysical answers even at high resolution.

  19. A Singular Limit Problem for Rotating Capillary Fluids with Variable Rotation Axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanelli, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    In the present paper we study a singular perturbation problem for a Navier-Stokes-Korteweg model with Coriolis force. Namely, we perform the incompressible and fast rotation asymptotics simultaneously, while we keep the capillarity coefficient constant in order to capture surface tension effects in the limit. We consider here the case of variable rotation axis: we prove the convergence to a linear parabolic-type equation with variable coefficients. The proof of the result relies on compensated compactness arguments. Besides, we look for minimal regularity assumptions on the variations of the axis.

  20. The rotation of Titan and Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hoolst, Tim; Coyette, Alexis; Baland, Rose-Marie; Trinh, Antony

    2016-10-01

    The rotation rates of Titan and Ganymede, the largest satellites of Saturn and Jupiter, are on average equal to their orbital mean motion. Here we discuss small deviations from the average rotation for both satellites and evaluate the polar motion of Titan induced by its surface fluid layers. We examine different causes at various time scales and assess possible consequences and the potential of using librations and polar motion as probes of the interior structure of the satellites.The rotation rate of Titan and Ganymede cannot be constant on the orbital time scale as a result of the gravitational torque of the central planet acting on the satellites. Titan is moreover expected to show significant polar motion and additional variations in the rotation rate due to angular momentum exchange with the atmosphere, mainly at seasonal periods. Observational evidence for deviations from the synchronous state has been reported several times for Titan but is unfortunately inconclusive. The measurements of the rotation variations are based on determinations of the shift in position of Cassini radar images taken during different flybys. The ESA JUICE (JUpiter ICy moons Explorer) mission will measure the rotation variations of Ganymede during its orbital phase around the satellite starting in 2032.We report on different theoretical aspects of the librations and polar motion. We consider the influence of the rheology of the ice shell and take into account Cassini measurements of the external gravitational field and of the topography of Titan and similar Galileo data about Ganymede. We also evaluate the librations and polar motion induced by Titan's hydrocarbon seas and use the most recent results of Titan's atmosphere dynamics. We finally evaluate the potential of rotation variations to constrain the satellite's interior structure, in particular its ice shell and ocean.

  1. Beam Profile Monitor With Accurate Horizontal And Vertical Beam Profiles

    DOEpatents

    Havener, Charles C [Knoxville, TN; Al-Rejoub, Riad [Oak Ridge, TN

    2005-12-26

    A widely used scanner device that rotates a single helically shaped wire probe in and out of a particle beam at different beamline positions to give a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is modified by the addition of a second wire probe. As a result, a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a first beamline position, and a second pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a second beamline position. The simple modification not only provides more accurate beam profiles, but also provides a measurement of the beam divergence and quality in a single compact device.

  2. Remote Sensing of Salinity: The Dielectric Constant of Sea Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David M.; Lang, R.; Utku, C.; Tarkocin, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Global monitoring of sea surface salinity from space requires an accurate model for the dielectric constant of sea water as a function of salinity and temperature to characterize the emissivity of the surface. Measurements are being made at 1.413 GHz, the center frequency of the Aquarius radiometers, using a resonant cavity and the perturbation method. The cavity is operated in a transmission mode and immersed in a liquid bath to control temperature. Multiple measurements are made at each temperature and salinity. Error budgets indicate a relative accuracy for both real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant of about 1%.

  3. A constant daylength during the Precambrian era?

    PubMed

    Zahnle, K; Walker, J C

    1987-01-01

    The semidiurnal atmospheric thermal tide would have been resonant with free oscillations of the atmosphere when the day was approximately 21 h long, c. 600 Ma ago. Very large atmospheric tides would have resulted, with associated surface pressure oscillations in excess of 10 mbar in the tropics. Near resonance the Sun's gravitational torque on the atmospheric tide--accelerating Earth's rotation--would have been comparable in magnitude to the decelerating lunar torque upon the oceanic tides. The balance of the opposing torques may have long maintained a resonant approximately 21 h day, perhaps for much of the Precambrian. Because the timescale of lunar orbital evolution is not directly affected, a constant daylength would result in fewer days/month. The hypothesis is shown not to conflict with the available (stromatolitic) evidence. Escape from the resonance could have followed a relatively abrupt global warming, such as that occurring at the end of the Precambrian. Alternatively, escape may simply have followed a major increase in the rate of oceanic tidal dissipation, brought about by the changing topography of the world's oceans. We integrate the history of the lunar orbit with and without a sustained resonance, finding that the impact of a sustained resonance on the other orbital parameters of the Earth-Moon system would have not been large.

  4. Rotating mobile launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    Apparatus holds remotely piloted arm that accelerates until launching speed is reached. Then vehicle and counterweight at other end of arm are released simultaneously to avoid structural damage from unbalanced rotating forces.

  5. The Rotating Mirror.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses theory of the rotating mirror, its use in measuring the velocity of the electrical signal in wires, and the velocity of light. Concludes with a description of the manometric flame apparatus developed for analyzing sound waves. (SK)

  6. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... cuff are common. They include tendinitis, bursitis, and injuries such as tears. Rotator cuff tendons can become ... cuff depends on age, health, how severe the injury is, and how long you've had the ...

  7. Rotator cuff problems

    MedlinePlus

    Miller RH III, Azar FM, Throckmorton TW. Shoulder and elbow injuries. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. ... Krishnan SG. Rotator cuff and impingement lesions. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic ...

  8. Rotator cuff repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... presentations/100229.htm Rotator cuff repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  9. Search for a Variation of Fundamental Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubachs, W.

    2013-06-01

    Since the days of Dirac scientists have speculated about the possibility that the laws of nature, and the fundamental constants appearing in those laws, are not rock-solid and eternal but may be subject to change in time or space. Such a scenario of evolving constants might provide an answer to the deepest puzzle of contemporary science, namely why the conditions in our local Universe allow for extreme complexity: the fine-tuning problem. In the past decade it has been established that spectral lines of atoms and molecules, which can currently be measured at ever-higher accuracies, form an ideal test ground for probing drifting constants. This has brought this subject from the realm of metaphysics to that of experimental science. In particular the spectra of molecules are sensitive for probing a variation of the proton-electron mass ratio μ, either on a cosmological time scale, or on a laboratory time scale. A comparison can be made between spectra of molecular hydrogen observed in the laboratory and at a high redshift (z=2-3), using the Very Large Telescope (Paranal, Chile) and the Keck telescope (Hawaii). This puts a constraint on a varying mass ratio Δμ/μ at the 10^{-5} level. The optical work can also be extended to include CO molecules. Further a novel direction will be discussed: it was discovered that molecules exhibiting hindered internal rotation have spectral lines in the radio-spectrum that are extremely sensitive to a varying proton-electron mass ratio. Such lines in the spectrum of methanol were recently observed with the radio-telescope in Effelsberg (Germany). F. van Weerdenburg, M.T. Murphy, A.L. Malec, L. Kaper, W. Ubachs, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 180802 (2011). A. Malec, R. Buning, M.T. Murphy, N. Milutinovic, S.L. Ellison, J.X. Prochaska, L. Kaper, J. Tumlinson, R.F. Carswell, W. Ubachs, Mon. Not. Roy. Astron. Soc. 403, 1541 (2010). E.J. Salumbides, M.L. Niu, J. Bagdonaite, N. de Oliveira, D. Joyeux, L. Nahon, W. Ubachs, Phys. Rev. A 86, 022510

  10. Accurate ab Initio Spin Densities.

    PubMed

    Boguslawski, Katharina; Marti, Konrad H; Legeza, Ors; Reiher, Markus

    2012-06-12

    We present an approach for the calculation of spin density distributions for molecules that require very large active spaces for a qualitatively correct description of their electronic structure. Our approach is based on the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm to calculate the spin density matrix elements as a basic quantity for the spatially resolved spin density distribution. The spin density matrix elements are directly determined from the second-quantized elementary operators optimized by the DMRG algorithm. As an analytic convergence criterion for the spin density distribution, we employ our recently developed sampling-reconstruction scheme [J. Chem. Phys.2011, 134, 224101] to build an accurate complete-active-space configuration-interaction (CASCI) wave function from the optimized matrix product states. The spin density matrix elements can then also be determined as an expectation value employing the reconstructed wave function expansion. Furthermore, the explicit reconstruction of a CASCI-type wave function provides insight into chemically interesting features of the molecule under study such as the distribution of α and β electrons in terms of Slater determinants, CI coefficients, and natural orbitals. The methodology is applied to an iron nitrosyl complex which we have identified as a challenging system for standard approaches [J. Chem. Theory Comput.2011, 7, 2740].

  11. Continuum estimates of rotational dielectric friction and polar solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Maroncelli, M.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamical solvation data recently obtained with the probe solute coumarin 153 are used to test the reliability of dielectric continuum models for estimating dielectric friction effects. In particular, the predictions of the Nee{endash}Zwanzig theory of rotational dielectric friction are examined in some detail. The analysis undertaken here uncovers an error made in virtually all previous applications of the Nee{endash}Zwanzig formalism. The error involves neglect of the solvent{close_quote}s electronic polarizability when calculating dielectric friction constants. In highly polar solvents the effect of this neglect is shown to be minor, so that the results of past studies should not be appreciably altered. However, in weakly polar and especially in nondipolar solvents, the proper inclusion of electronic polarizability terms is essential. The equivalence between the Nee{endash}Zwanzig theory of dielectric friction and more general continuum treatments of polar solvation dynamics is also demonstrated. This equivalence enables the use of solvation data to test the reliability of the Nee{endash}Zwanzig description of electrical interactions between a solute and solvent that form the core of this and related continuum theories of dielectric friction. Comparisons to experimental data show that, with the important exception of nondipolar solvents, such continuum treatments provide reasonably accurate ({plus_minus}40{percent}) predictors of time-dependent solvation and/or dielectric friction. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Dielectric-constant gas thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaiser, Christof; Zandt, Thorsten; Fellmuth, Bernd

    2015-10-01

    The principles, techniques and results from dielectric-constant gas thermometry (DCGT) are reviewed. Primary DCGT with helium has been used for measuring T-T90 below the triple point of water (TPW), where T is the thermodynamic temperature and T90 is the temperature on the international temperature scale of 1990 (ITS-90), and, in an inverse regime with T as input quantity, for determining the Boltzmann constant at the TPW. Furthermore, DCGT allows the determination of several important material properties including the polarizability of neon and argon as well as the virial coefficients of helium, neon, and argon. With interpolating DCGT (IDCGT), the ITS-90 has been approximated in the temperature range from 4 K to 25 K. An overview and uncertainty budget for each of these applications of DCGT is provided, accompanied by corroborating evidence from the literature or, for IDCGT, a CIPM key comparison.

  13. Three pion nucleon coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Arriola, E.; Amaro, J. E.; Navarro Pérez, R.

    2016-08-01

    There exist four pion nucleon coupling constants, fπ0pp, - fπ0nn, fπ+pn/2 and fπ-np/2 which coincide when up and down quark masses are identical and the electron charge is zero. While there is no reason why the pion-nucleon-nucleon coupling constants should be identical in the real world, one expects that the small differences might be pinned down from a sufficiently large number of independent and mutually consistent data. Our discussion provides a rationale for our recent determination fp2 = 0.0759(4),f 02 = 0.079(1),f c2 = 0.0763(6), based on a partial wave analysis of the 3σ self-consistent nucleon-nucleon Granada-2013 database comprising 6713 published data in the period 1950-2013.

  14. Rotator cuff injuries.

    PubMed

    Crusher, R H

    2000-07-01

    Different types of rotator cuff injuries frequently present to Accident and Emergency departments and minor injury units but can be difficult to differentiate clinically. This brief case study describes the examination and diagnosis of related shoulder injuries, specifically rotator cuff tears/disruption and calcifying supraspinatus tendinitis. The relevant anatomy and current therapies for these injuries is also discussed to enable the emergency nurse practitioner to have a greater understanding of the theory surrounding their diagnosis and treatments.

  15. Rotational rate sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Steven L.

    2002-01-01

    A rate sensor for angular/rotational acceleration includes a housing defining a fluid cavity essentially completely filled with an electrolyte fluid. Within the housing, such as a toroid, ions in the fluid are swept during movement from an excitation electrode toward one of two output electrodes to provide a signal for directional rotation. One or more ground electrodes within the housing serve to neutralize ions, thus preventing any effect at the other output electrode.

  16. Rotating arc spark plug

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Tsai, Chin-Chi

    2003-05-27

    A spark plug device includes a structure for modification of an arc, the modification including arc rotation. The spark plug can be used in a combustion engine to reduce emissions and/or improve fuel economy. A method for operating a spark plug and a combustion engine having the spark plug device includes the step of modifying an arc, the modifying including rotating the arc.

  17. Instability in Rotating Machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings contain 45 papers on a wide range of subjects including flow generated instabilities in fluid flow machines, cracked shaft detection, case histories of instability phenomena in compressors, turbines, and pumps, vibration control in turbomachinery (including antiswirl techniques), and the simulation and estimation of destabilizing forces in rotating machines. The symposium was held to serve as an update on the understanding and control of rotating machinery instability problems.

  18. Electromagnetic rotational actuation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Alexander Lee

    2010-08-01

    There are many applications that need a meso-scale rotational actuator. These applications have been left by the wayside because of the lack of actuation at this scale. Sandia National Laboratories has many unique fabrication technologies that could be used to create an electromagnetic actuator at this scale. There are also many designs to be explored. In this internship exploration of the designs and fabrications technologies to find an inexpensive design that can be used for prototyping the electromagnetic rotational actuator.

  19. Renormalization constants from string theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Vecchia, P.; Magnea, L.; Lerda, A.; Russo, R.; Marotta, R.

    The authors review some recent results on the calculation of renormalization constants in Yang-Mills theory using open bosonic strings. The technology of string amplitudes, supplemented with an appropriate continuation off the mass shell, can be used to compute the ultraviolet divergences of dimensionally regularized gauge theories. The results show that the infinite tension limit of string amplitudes corresponds to the background field method in field theory.

  20. Accurate and Robust Attitude Estimation Using MEMS Gyroscopes and a Monocular Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobori, Norimasa; Deguchi, Daisuke; Takahashi, Tomokazu; Ide, Ichiro; Murase, Hiroshi

    In order to estimate accurate rotations of mobile robots and vehicle, we propose a hybrid system which combines a low-cost monocular camera with gyro sensors. Gyro sensors have drift errors that accumulate over time. On the other hand, a camera cannot obtain the rotation continuously in the case where feature points cannot be extracted from images, although the accuracy is better than gyro sensors. To solve these problems we propose a method for combining these sensors based on Extended Kalman Filter. The errors of the gyro sensors are corrected by referring to the rotations obtained from the camera. In addition, by using the reliability judgment of camera rotations and devising the state value of the Extended Kalman Filter, even when the rotation is not continuously observable from the camera, the proposed method shows a good performance. Experimental results showed the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. Stellar Rotation Effects in Polarimetric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajadian, Sedighe

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that the polarization signal in microlensing events of hot stars is larger than that of main-sequence stars. Most hot stars rotate rapidly around their stellar axes. The stellar rotation creates ellipticity and gravity-darkening effects that break the spherical symmetry of the source's shape and the circular symmetry of the source's surface brightness respectively. Hence, it causes a net polarization signal for the source star. This polarization signal should be considered in polarimetric microlensing of fast rotating stars. For moderately rotating stars, lensing can magnify or even characterize small polarization signals due to the stellar rotation through polarimetric observations. The gravity-darkening effect due to a rotating source star creates asymmetric perturbations in polarimetric and photometric microlensing curves whose maximum occurs when the lens trajectory crosses the projected position of the rotation pole on the sky plane. The stellar ellipticity creates a time shift (i) in the position of the second peak of the polarimetric curves in transit microlensing events and (ii) in the peak position of the polarimetric curves with respect to the photometric peak position in bypass microlensing events. By measuring this time shift via polarimetric observations of microlensing events, we can evaluate the ellipticity of the projected source surface on the sky plane. Given the characterizations of the FOcal Reducer and low dispersion Spectrograph (FORS2) polarimeter at the Very Large Telescope, the probability of observing this time shift is very small. The more accurate polarimeters of the next generation may well measure these time shifts and evaluate the ellipticity of microlensing source stars.

  2. Bubble mass center and fluid feedback force fluctuations activated by constant lateral impulse with variable thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Long, Y. T.

    1995-01-01

    Sloshing dynamics within a partially filled rotating dewar of superfluid helium 2 are investigated in response to constant lateral impulse with variable thrust. The study, including how the rotating bubble of superfluid helium 2 reacts to the constant impulse with variable time period of thrust action in microgravity, how amplitudes of bubble mass center fluctuates with growth and decay of disturbances, and how fluid feedback forces fluctuates in activating on the rotating dewar through the dynamics of sloshing waves are investigated. The numerical computation of sloshing dynamics is based on the non-inertial frame spacecraft bound coordinate with lateral impulses actuating on the rotating dewar in both inertial and non-inertial frames of thrust. Results of the simulations are illustrated.

  3. Spring constant modulation in a zone plate tweezer using linear polarization.

    PubMed

    Schonbrun, E; Crozier, K B

    2008-09-01

    At large NAs a micro-Fresnel zone plate produces a focal spot that is more elliptical than that produced by an objective lens with the same NA. Using this anisotropy we demonstrate a method for modulating the spring constant of an optical trap by rotating the linear input polarization. The focal spot ellipticity is enhanced by the apodization factor of the zone plate and its extremely high NA. By measuring the positions of trapped particles we obtain two-dimensional histograms of particle position. These indicate that the trap spring constant is 2.75 times larger perpendicular to the incident polarization than along it. The elliptical focal spot distribution can be rotated by rotating the incident polarization, allowing the spring constant along a given direction to be modulated.

  4. Accurate quantum wave packet calculations for the F + HCl → Cl + HF reaction on the ground 1(2)A' potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Niyazi; Kłos, Jacek; Alexander, Millard H

    2012-03-14

    We present converged exact quantum wave packet calculations of reaction probabilities, integral cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients for the title reaction. Calculations have been carried out on the ground 1(2)A' global adiabatic potential energy surface of Deskevich et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 224303 (2006)]. Converged wave packet reaction probabilities at selected values of the total angular momentum up to a partial wave of J = 140 with the HCl reagent initially selected in the v = 0, j = 0-16 rovibrational states have been obtained for the collision energy range from threshold up to 0.8 eV. The present calculations confirm an important enhancement of reactivity with rotational excitation of the HCl molecule. First, accurate integral cross sections and rate constants have been calculated and compared with the available experimental data.

  5. The rotational spectrum up to 1 THz and the molecular structure of thiomethylium, HCS+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulès, L.; Lewen, F.; Winnewisser, G.; Botschwina, P.; Müller, H. S. P.

    2003-06-01

    The rotational spectra of HCS+, DCS+, and HC34S+ have been investigated using a newly constructed ion cell in selected regions between 0.46 and 0.94 THz. 23 transitions covering the quantum numbers 10 <= J" <= 25 have been used in a combined fit together with previous data to improve the rotational and quartic centrifigal distortion constants B0 and D0, respectively. High J transitions have been measured specifically to obtain an estimate of the sextic distortion constant H0. Vibration rotation coupling constants alphai were obtained from coupled cluster calculations. They were used to determine a mixed experimental/ab initio equilibrium structure re.

  6. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    DOEpatents

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  7. Enhanced effect of temporal variation of the fine-structure constant in diatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Flambaum, V. V.

    2006-03-15

    We show that the relative effect of variation of the fine-structure constant in microwave transitions between very close and narrow rotational-hyperfine levels may be enhanced 2-3 orders of magnitude in diatomic molecules with unpaired electrons like LaS, LaO, LuS, LuO, YbF, and similar molecular ions. The enhancement is result of cancellation between the hyperfine and rotational intervals.

  8. Differential rotation of the unstable nonlinear r -modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, John L.; Lindblom, Lee; Lockitch, Keith H.

    2016-01-01

    At second order in perturbation theory, the r -modes of uniformly rotating stars include an axisymmetric part that can be identified with differential rotation of the background star. If one does not include radiation reaction, the differential rotation is constant in time and has been computed by Sá. It has a gauge dependence associated with the family of time-independent perturbations that add differential rotation to the unperturbed equilibrium star: For stars with a barotropic equation of state, one can add to the time-independent second-order solution arbitrary differential rotation that is stratified on cylinders (that is a function of distance ϖ to the axis of rotation). We show here that the gravitational radiation-reaction force that drives the r -mode instability removes this gauge freedom; the exponentially growing differential rotation of the unstable second-order r -mode is unique. We derive a general expression for this rotation law for Newtonian models and evaluate it explicitly for slowly rotating models with polytropic equations of state.

  9. Oscillations and instabilities of fast and differentially rotating relativistic stars

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, Christian; Gaertig, Erich; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2010-04-15

    We study nonaxisymmetric oscillations of rapidly and differentially rotating relativistic stars in the Cowling approximation. Our equilibrium models are sequences of relativistic polytropes, where the differential rotation is described by the relativistic j-constant law. We show that a small degree of differential rotation raises the critical rotation value for which the quadrupolar f-mode becomes prone to the Chandrasekhar-Friedman-Schutz (CFS) instability, while the critical value of T/|W| at the mass-shedding limit is raised even more. For stiffer equations of state these effects are even more pronounced. When increasing differential rotation further to a high degree, the neutral point of the CFS instability first reaches a local maximum and is lowered afterwards. For stars with a rather high compactness we find that for a large degree of differential rotation the absolute value of the critical T/|W| is below the corresponding value for rigid rotation. We conclude that the onset of the CFS instability is eased for a small degree of differential rotation and for a large degree at least in stars with a higher compactness. Moreover, we were able to extract the eigenfrequencies and the eigenfunctions of r-modes for differentially rotating stars and our simulations show a good qualitative agreement with previous Newtonian results.

  10. Nuclear quadrupole coupling constants for N2O: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alex; Wasylishen, Roderick E

    2012-10-04

    The nuclear quadrupole coupling constants (NQCCs) for the nitrogen and oxygen nuclei in N(2)O have been determined using a variety of computational methods (MP2, QCISD, DFT with B3LYP, PBE0, and B3PW91 functionals, CCSD, CCSD(T), CASSCF, and MRCI) combined with correlation-consistent basis sets. When compared to the available experimental determinations, the results demonstrate that only CCSD(T) and MRCI methods are capable of accurately predicting the NQCCs of the central and terminal nitrogen atoms. The spin-rotation and magnetic shielding tensors have also been determined and compared to experimental measurements where available. (14)N and (17)O NMR relaxation data for N(2)O in the gas phase and a variety of solvents is reported. The increase in the ratio of (14)N spin-lattice relaxation times in solvent for the central and terminal nitrogens supports previous reports of the modification of the electric field gradients at these nuclei in van der Waals complexes. Ab initio computations for the linear FH···N(2)O complex confirm the large change in EFGs imposed by a single perturber.

  11. Constant-Frequency Pulsed Phase-Locked-Loop Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.; Kushnick, Peter W.

    1992-01-01

    Constant-frequency pulsed phase-locked-loop measuring device is sensitive to small changes in phase velocity and easily automated. Based on use of fixed-frequency oscillator in measuring small changes in ultrasonic phase velocity when sample exposed to such changes in environment as changes in pressure and temperature. Automatically balances electrical phase shifts against acoustical phase shifts to obtain accurate measurements of acoustical phase shifts.

  12. Millikan's measurement of Planck's constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Allan

    2013-12-01

    Robert Millikan is famous for measuring the charge of the electron. His result was better than any previous measurement and his method established that there was a fundamental unit of charge, or charge quantization. He is less well-known for his measurement of Planck's constant, although, as discussed below, he is often mistakenly given credit for providing significant evidence in support of Einstein's photon theory of light.1 His Nobel Prize citation was "for his work on the elementary electric charge of electricity and the photoelectric effect," an indication of the significance of his work on the photoelectric effect.

  13. Chandra Independently Determines Hubble Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-08-01

    A critically important number that specifies the expansion rate of the Universe, the so-called Hubble constant, has been independently determined using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This new value matches recent measurements using other methods and extends their validity to greater distances, thus allowing astronomers to probe earlier epochs in the evolution of the Universe. "The reason this result is so significant is that we need the Hubble constant to tell us the size of the Universe, its age, and how much matter it contains," said Max Bonamente from the University of Alabama in Huntsville and NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Ala., lead author on the paper describing the results. "Astronomers absolutely need to trust this number because we use it for countless calculations." Illustration of Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect Illustration of Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect The Hubble constant is calculated by measuring the speed at which objects are moving away from us and dividing by their distance. Most of the previous attempts to determine the Hubble constant have involved using a multi-step, or distance ladder, approach in which the distance to nearby galaxies is used as the basis for determining greater distances. The most common approach has been to use a well-studied type of pulsating star known as a Cepheid variable, in conjunction with more distant supernovae to trace distances across the Universe. Scientists using this method and observations from the Hubble Space Telescope were able to measure the Hubble constant to within 10%. However, only independent checks would give them the confidence they desired, considering that much of our understanding of the Universe hangs in the balance. Chandra X-ray Image of MACS J1149.5+223 Chandra X-ray Image of MACS J1149.5+223 By combining X-ray data from Chandra with radio observations of galaxy clusters, the team determined the distances to 38 galaxy clusters ranging from 1.4 billion to 9.3 billion

  14. Assessing uncertainty in physical constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrion, Max; Fischhoff, Baruch

    1986-09-01

    Assessing the uncertainty due to possible systematic errors in a physical measurement unavoidably involves an element of subjective judgment. Examination of historical measurements and recommended values for the fundamental physical constants shows that the reported uncertainties have a consistent bias towards underestimating the actual errors. These findings are comparable to findings of persistent overconfidence in psychological research on the assessment of subjective probability distributions. Awareness of these biases could help in interpreting the precision of measurements, as well as provide a basis for improving the assessment of uncertainty in measurements.

  15. Inverse Magnus effect on a rotating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jooha; Park, Hyungmin; Choi, Haecheon; Yoo, Jung Yul

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we investigate the flow characteristics of rotating spheres in the subcritical Reynolds number (Re) regime by measuring the drag and lift forces on the sphere and the two-dimensional velocity in the wake. The experiment is conducted in a wind tunnel at Re = 0 . 6 ×105 - 2 . 6 ×105 and the spin ratio (ratio of surface velocity to the free-stream velocity) of 0 (no spin) - 0.5. The drag coefficient on a stationary sphere remains nearly constant at around 0.52. However, the magnitude of lift coefficient is nearly zero at Re < 2 . 0 ×105 , but rapidly increases to 0.3 and then remains constant with further increasing Reynolds number. On the other hand, with rotation, the lift coefficient shows negative values, called inverse Magnus effect, depending on the magnitudes of the Reynolds number and spin ratio. The velocity field measured from a particle image velocimetry (PIV) indicates that non-zero lift coefficient on a stationary sphere at Re > 2 . 0 ×105 results from the asymmetry of separation line, whereas the inverse Magnus effect for the rotating sphere results from the differences in the boundary-layer growth and separation along the upper and lower sphere surfaces. Supported by the WCU, Converging Research Center and Priority Research Centers Program, NRF, MEST, Korea.

  16. Unusual Slowly Rotating Brown Dwarfs Discovered through Precision Spitzer Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, Aren; Metchev, S.

    2014-01-01

    Many brown dwarfs exhibit low-amplitude rotationally modulated variability due to photospheric inhomogeneities caused by condensate clouds in their atmospheres. The Spitzer Space Telescope 'Weather on Other Worlds' (WoW) project has monitored 44 brown dwarfs at unprecedented photometric precision from space. We present one of several important new results from WoW: the discovery of brown dwarfs with unexpectedly slow rotation periods. While most brown dwarfs have periods of 2-12 hours, we have identified two with well-constrained periods of 13±1 and >20 hours, respectively, and 2 others that show more tentative evidence of longer than 20-hour periods. By serving as almost non-rotating standards, these objects will allow more accurate calibration of spectroscopic measurements of brown dwarfs' projected rotational velocities. The existence of such slowly-rotating objects also constrains models of brown dwarf formation and angular momentum evolution.

  17. Accurate calculations of bound rovibrational states for argon trimer

    SciTech Connect

    Brandon, Drew; Poirier, Bill

    2014-07-21

    This work presents a comprehensive quantum dynamics calculation of the bound rovibrational eigenstates of argon trimer (Ar{sub 3}), using the ScalIT suite of parallel codes. The Ar{sub 3} rovibrational energy levels are computed to a very high level of accuracy (10{sup −3} cm{sup −1} or better), and up to the highest rotational and vibrational excitations for which bound states exist. For many of these rovibrational states, wavefunctions are also computed. Rare gas clusters such as Ar{sub 3} are interesting because the interatomic interactions manifest through long-range van der Waals forces, rather than through covalent chemical bonding. As a consequence, they exhibit strong Coriolis coupling between the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom, as well as highly delocalized states, all of which renders accurate quantum dynamical calculation difficult. Moreover, with its (comparatively) deep potential well and heavy masses, Ar{sub 3} is an especially challenging rare gas trimer case. There are a great many rovibrational eigenstates to compute, and a very high density of states. Consequently, very few previous rovibrational state calculations for Ar{sub 3} may be found in the current literature—and only for the lowest-lying rotational excitations.

  18. Accurate calculations of bound rovibrational states for argon trimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandon, Drew; Poirier, Bill

    2014-07-01

    This work presents a comprehensive quantum dynamics calculation of the bound rovibrational eigenstates of argon trimer (Ar3), using the ScalIT suite of parallel codes. The Ar3 rovibrational energy levels are computed to a very high level of accuracy (10-3 cm-1 or better), and up to the highest rotational and vibrational excitations for which bound states exist. For many of these rovibrational states, wavefunctions are also computed. Rare gas clusters such as Ar3 are interesting because the interatomic interactions manifest through long-range van der Waals forces, rather than through covalent chemical bonding. As a consequence, they exhibit strong Coriolis coupling between the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom, as well as highly delocalized states, all of which renders accurate quantum dynamical calculation difficult. Moreover, with its (comparatively) deep potential well and heavy masses, Ar3 is an especially challenging rare gas trimer case. There are a great many rovibrational eigenstates to compute, and a very high density of states. Consequently, very few previous rovibrational state calculations for Ar3 may be found in the current literature—and only for the lowest-lying rotational excitations.

  19. Cosmological constant and local gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bernabeu, Jose; Espinoza, Catalina; Mavromatos, Nick E.

    2010-04-15

    We discuss the linearization of Einstein equations in the presence of a cosmological constant, by expanding the solution for the metric around a flat Minkowski space-time. We demonstrate that one can find consistent solutions to the linearized set of equations for the metric perturbations, in the Lorentz gauge, which are not spherically symmetric, but they rather exhibit a cylindrical symmetry. We find that the components of the gravitational field satisfying the appropriate Poisson equations have the property of ensuring that a scalar potential can be constructed, in which both contributions, from ordinary matter and {Lambda}>0, are attractive. In addition, there is a novel tensor potential, induced by the pressure density, in which the effect of the cosmological constant is repulsive. We also linearize the Schwarzschild-de Sitter exact solution of Einstein's equations (due to a generalization of Birkhoff's theorem) in the domain between the two horizons. We manage to transform it first to a gauge in which the 3-space metric is conformally flat and, then, make an additional coordinate transformation leading to the Lorentz gauge conditions. We compare our non-spherically symmetric solution with the linearized Schwarzschild-de Sitter metric, when the latter is transformed to the Lorentz gauge, and we find agreement. The resulting metric, however, does not acquire a proper Newtonian form in terms of the unique scalar potential that solves the corresponding Poisson equation. Nevertheless, our solution is stable, in the sense that the physical energy density is positive.

  20. Rotational spectra of methyl ethyl and methyl propyl nitrosamines. Conformational assignment, internal rotation and quadrupole coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, A. R. Hight; Lou, Qi; Bohn, Robert K.; Novick, Stewart E.

    1995-02-01

    A structural determination of two carcinogenic nitrosamines, methyl ethyl and methyl propyl nitrosamine, was performed. Microwave spectra were gathered from both a Stark cell spectrometer and a pulsed jet Fabry-Perot Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Each rotational transition is split into quadrupole hyperfine components by two nitrogen nuclei. This quadrupole pattern is doubled by a low barrier methyl rotor which produces resolvable A and E states. Rotational spectra were assigned for one conformer of methyl ethyl nitrosamine and two conformers of methyl propyl nitrosamine. The lowest energy conformers of each compound, according to empirical force field calculations, were assigned. The structure found for methyl ethyl nitrosamine has the nitrosyl oxygen on the methyl side with the terminal methyl group of the ethyl chain in the gauche position (OMG). Both conformers of methyl propyl nitrosamine have the same skeletal structure as the methyl ethyl compound; one conformer has the terminal methyl of the propyl group in the anti position (OMGA) while the other conformer has this methyl in the gauche position (OMGG -). Rotational constants and quadrupole coupling constants are reported for each assigned species. A barrier to internal rotation of the N-methyl group in each compound is also reported.

  1. Angle estimation of simultaneous orthogonal rotations from 3D gyroscope measurements.

    PubMed

    Stančin, Sara; Tomažič, Sašo

    2011-01-01

    A 3D gyroscope provides measurements of angular velocities around its three intrinsic orthogonal axes, enabling angular orientation estimation. Because the measured angular velocities represent simultaneous rotations, it is not appropriate to consider them sequentially. Rotations in general are not commutative, and each possible rotation sequence has a different resulting angular orientation. None of these angular orientations is the correct simultaneous rotation result. However, every angular orientation can be represented by a single rotation. This paper presents an analytic derivation of the axis and angle of the single rotation equivalent to three simultaneous rotations around orthogonal axes when the measured angular velocities or their proportions are approximately constant. Based on the resulting expressions, a vector called the simultaneous orthogonal rotations angle (SORA) is defined, with components equal to the angles of three simultaneous rotations around coordinate system axes. The orientation and magnitude of this vector are equal to the equivalent single rotation axis and angle, respectively. As long as the orientation of the actual rotation axis is constant, given the SORA, the angular orientation of a rigid body can be calculated in a single step, thus making it possible to avoid computing the iterative infinitesimal rotation approximation. The performed test measurements confirm the validity of the SORA concept. SORA is simple and well-suited for use in the real-time calculation of angular orientation based on angular velocity measurements derived using a gyroscope. Moreover, because of its demonstrated simplicity, SORA can also be used in general angular orientation notation.

  2. IO Rotation Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    During its 1979 flyby, Voyager 2 observed Io only from a distance. However, the volcanic activity discovered by Voyager 1 months earlier was readily visible. This sequence of nine color images was collected using the Blue, Green and Orange filters from about 1.2 million kilometers. A 2.5 hour period is covered during which Io rotates 7 degrees.

    Rotating into view over the limb of Io are the plumes of the volcanoes Amirani (top) and Maui (lower). These plumes are very distinct against the black sky because they are being illuminated from behind. Notice that as Io rotates, the proportion of Io which is sunlit decreases greatly. This changing phase angle is because Io is moving between the spacecraft and the Sun.

    This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1985.

  3. Rotating Aperture System

    DOEpatents

    Rusnak, Brian; Hall, James M.; Shen, Stewart; Wood, Richard L.

    2005-01-18

    A rotating aperture system includes a low-pressure vacuum pumping stage with apertures for passage of a deuterium beam. A stator assembly includes holes for passage of the beam. The rotor assembly includes a shaft connected to a deuterium gas cell or a crossflow venturi that has a single aperture on each side that together align with holes every rotation. The rotating apertures are synchronized with the firing of the deuterium beam such that the beam fires through a clear aperture and passes into the Xe gas beam stop. Portions of the rotor are lapped into the stator to improve the sealing surfaces, to prevent rapid escape of the deuterium gas from the gas cell.

  4. Chiral rotational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Robert P.; Götte, Jörg B.; Barnett, Stephen M.

    2016-09-01

    We introduce chiral rotational spectroscopy, a technique that enables the determination of the orientated optical activity pseudotensor components BX X, BY Y, and BZ Z of chiral molecules, in a manner that reveals the enantiomeric constitution of a sample and provides an incisive signal even for a racemate. Chiral rotational spectroscopy could find particular use in the analysis of molecules that are chiral solely by virtue of their isotopic constitution and molecules with multiple chiral centers. A basic design for a chiral rotational spectrometer together with a model of its functionality is given. Our proposed technique offers the more familiar polarizability components αX X, αY Y, and αZ Z as by-products, which could see it find use even for achiral molecules.

  5. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  6. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  7. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  8. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  9. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  10. Stability constant estimator user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, B.P.; Castleton, K.J.; Rustad, J.R.

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of the Stability Constant Estimator (SCE) program is to estimate aqueous stability constants for 1:1 complexes of metal ions with ligands by using trends in existing stability constant data. Such estimates are useful to fill gaps in existing thermodynamic databases and to corroborate the accuracy of reported stability constant values.

  11. Lattice QCD in rotating frames.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Arata; Hirono, Yuji

    2013-08-23

    We formulate lattice QCD in rotating frames to study the physics of QCD matter under rotation. We construct the lattice QCD action with the rotational metric and apply it to the Monte Carlo simulation. As the first application, we calculate the angular momenta of gluons and quarks in the rotating QCD vacuum. This new framework is useful to analyze various rotation-related phenomena in QCD.

  12. Rotating bubble membrane radiator

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Brent J.; Coomes, Edmund P.

    1988-12-06

    A heat radiator useful for expelling waste heat from a power generating system aboard a space vehicle is disclosed. Liquid to be cooled is passed to the interior of a rotating bubble membrane radiator, where it is sprayed into the interior of the bubble. Liquid impacting upon the interior surface of the bubble is cooled and the heat radiated from the outer surface of the membrane. Cooled liquid is collected by the action of centrifical force about the equator of the rotating membrane and returned to the power system. Details regarding a complete space power system employing the radiator are given.

  13. Mental rotation within linguistic and non-linguistic domains in users of American sign language.

    PubMed

    Emmorey, K; Klima, E; Hickok, G

    1998-09-01

    American sign language (ASL) uses space itself to encode spatial information. Spatial scenes are most often described from the perspective of the person signing (the 'narrator'), such that the viewer must perform what amounts to a 180 degrees mental rotation to correctly comprehend the description. But scenes can also be described, non-canonically, from the viewer's perspective, in which case no rotation is required. Is mental rotation during sign language processing difficult for ASL signers? Are there differences between linguistic and non-linguistic mental rotation? Experiment 1 required subjects to decide whether a signed description matched a room presented on videotape. Deaf ASL signers were more accurate when viewing scenes described from the narrator's perspective (even though rotation is required) than from the viewer's perspective (no rotation required). In Experiment 2, deaf signers and hearing non-signers viewed videotapes of objects appearing briefly and sequentially on a board marked with an entrance. This board either matched an identical board in front of the subject or was rotated 180 degrees. Subjects were asked to place objects on their board in the orientation and location shown on the video, making the appropriate rotation when required. All subjects were significantly less accurate when rotation was required, but ASL signers performed significantly better than hearing non-signers under rotation. ASL signers were also more accurate in remembering object orientation. Signers then viewed a video in which the same scenes were signed from the two perspectives (i.e. rotation required or no rotation required). In contrast to their performance with real objects, signers did not show the typical mental rotation effect. Males outperformed females on the rotation task with objects, but the superiority disappeared in the linguistic condition. We discuss the nature of the ASL mental rotation transformation, and we conclude that habitual use of ASL can

  14. When Rate Constants Are Not Enough.

    PubMed

    Barker, John R; Frenklach, Michael; Golden, David M

    2015-07-16

    Real-world chemical systems consisting of multiple isomers and multiple reaction channels often react significantly prior to attaining a steady state energy distribution (SED). Detailed elementary reaction models, which implicitly require SED conditions, may be invalid when non-steady-state energy distributions (NSED) exist. NSED conditions may result in reaction rates and product yields that are different from those expected for SED conditions, although this problem is to some extent reduced by using phenomenological models and rate constants. The present study defines pragmatic diagnostics useful for identifying NSED conditions in stochastic master equation simulations. A representative example is presented for each of four classes of common combustion species: RO2 radicals, aliphatic hydrocarbons, alkyl radicals, and polyaromatic radicals. An example selected from the seminal work of Tsang et al. demonstrates that stochastic simulations and eigenvalue methods for solving the master equation predict the same NSED effects. NSED effects are common under relatively moderate combustion conditions, and accurate simulations may require a master equation analysis.

  15. Constant magnification optical tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazer, R. E. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A constant magnification optical tracking system for continuously tracking of a moving object is described. In the tracking system, a traveling objective lens maintains a fixed relationship with an object to be optically tracked. The objective lens was chosen to provide a collimated light beam oriented in the direction of travel of the moving object. A reflective surface is attached to the traveling objective lens for reflecting an image of the moving object. The object to be tracked is a free-falling object which is located at the focal point of the objective lens for at least a portion of its free-fall path. A motor and control means is provided for mantaining the traveling objective lens in a fixed relationship relative to the free-falling object, thereby keeping the free-falling object at the focal point and centered on the axis of the traveling objective lens throughout its entire free-fall path.

  16. Philicities, Fugalities, and Equilibrium Constants.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Herbert; Ofial, Armin R

    2016-05-17

    The mechanistic model of Organic Chemistry is based on relationships between rate and equilibrium constants. Thus, strong bases are generally considered to be good nucleophiles and poor nucleofuges. Exceptions to this rule have long been known, and the ability of iodide ions to catalyze nucleophilic substitutions, because they are good nucleophiles as well as good nucleofuges, is just a prominent example for exceptions from the general rule. In a reaction series, the Leffler-Hammond parameter α = δΔG(⧧)/δΔG° describes the fraction of the change in the Gibbs energy of reaction, which is reflected in the change of the Gibbs energy of activation. It has long been considered as a measure for the position of the transition state; thus, an α value close to 0 was associated with an early transition state, while an α value close to 1 was considered to be indicative of a late transition state. Bordwell's observation in 1969 that substituent variation in phenylnitromethanes has a larger effect on the rates of deprotonation than on the corresponding equilibrium constants (nitroalkane anomaly) triggered the breakdown of this interpretation. In the past, most systematic investigations of the relationships between rates and equilibria of organic reactions have dealt with proton transfer reactions, because only for few other reaction series complementary kinetic and thermodynamic data have been available. In this Account we report on a more general investigation of the relationships between Lewis basicities, nucleophilicities, and nucleofugalities as well as between Lewis acidities, electrophilicities, and electrofugalities. Definitions of these terms are summarized, and it is suggested to replace the hybrid terms "kinetic basicity" and "kinetic acidity" by "protophilicity" and "protofugality", respectively; in this way, the terms "acidity" and "basicity" are exclusively assigned to thermodynamic properties, while "philicity" and "fugality" refer to kinetics

  17. Omnidirectional antenna having constant phase

    DOEpatents

    Sena, Matthew

    2017-04-04

    Various technologies presented herein relate to constructing and/or operating an antenna having an omnidirectional electrical field of constant phase. The antenna comprises an upper plate made up of multiple conductive rings, a lower ground-plane plate, a plurality of grounding posts, a conical feed, and a radio frequency (RF) feed connector. The upper plate has a multi-ring configuration comprising a large outer ring and several smaller rings of equal size located within the outer ring. The large outer ring and the four smaller rings have the same cross-section. The grounding posts ground the upper plate to the lower plate while maintaining a required spacing/parallelism therebetween.

  18. Wireless Measurement of Rotation and Displacement Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor, Bryant D.

    2007-01-01

    A magnetic field response sensor is designed to measure displacement or rotation rate without a physical connection to a power source, microprocessor, data acquisition equipment, or electrical circuitry. The sensor works with the magnetic field response recorder, which was described in Magnetic-Field-Response Measurement-Acquisition System, NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 6 (June 2006), page 28. These sensors are wirelessly powered and interrogated, and the measurement acquisition system and sensors are extremely lightweight.The response recorder uses oscillating magnetic fields to power the sensors. Once powered, the sensors respond with their own magnetic field. For displacement/ rotation measurements, the response recorder uses the sensor s response amplitude, which is dependent on the distance from the antenna. The recorder s antenna orientation and position are kept fixed, and the sampling period is constant.

  19. Rotationally resolved electronic spectroscopy of 5-methoxyindole.

    PubMed

    Brand, Christian; Oeltermann, Olivia; Pratt, David; Weinkauf, Rainer; Meerts, W Leo; van der Zande, Wim; Kleinermanns, Karl; Schmitt, Michael

    2010-07-14

    Rotationally resolved electronic spectra of the vibrationless origin and of eight vibronic bands of 5-methoxyindole (5MOI) have been measured and analyzed using an evolutionary strategy approach. The experimental results are compared to the results of ab initio calculations. All vibronic bands can be explained by absorption of a single conformer, which unambiguously has been shown to be the anti-conformer from its rotational constants and excitation energy. For both anti- and syn-conformers, a (1)L(a)/(1)L(b) gap larger than 4000 cm(-1) is calculated, making the vibronic coupling between both states very small, thereby explaining why the spectrum of 5MOI is very different from that of the parent molecule, indole.

  20. Apparatus producing constant cable tension for intermittent demand

    DOEpatents

    Lauritzen, Ted

    1985-01-01

    The disclosed apparatus produces constant tension in superconducting electrical cable, or some other strand, under conditions of intermittent demand, as the cable is unreeled from a reel or reeled thereon. The apparatus comprises a pivotally supported swing frame on which the reel is rotatably supported, a rotary motor, a drive train connected between the motor and the reel and including an electrically controllable variable torque slip clutch, a servo transducer connected to the swing frame for producing servo input signals corresponding to the position thereof, a servo control system connected between the transducer and the clutch for regulating the torque transmitted by the clutch to maintain the swing frame in a predetermined position, at least one air cylinder connected to the swing frame for counteracting the tension in the cable, and pressure regulating means for supplying a constant air pressure to the cylinder to establish the constant tension in the cable, the servo system and the clutch being effective to produce torque on the reel in an amount sufficient to provide tension in the cable corresponding to the constant force exerted by the air cylinder. The drive train also preferably includes a fail-safe brake operable to its released position by electrical power in common with the servo system, for preventing rotation of the reel if there is a power failure. A shock absorber and biasing springs may also be connected to the swing frame, such springs biasing the frame toward its predetermined position. The tension in the cable may be measured by force measuring devices engageable with the bearings for the reel shaft, such bearings being supported for slight lateral movement. The reel shaft is driven by a Shmidt coupler which accommodates such movement.

  1. Modeling dynamic stall on wind turbine blades under rotationally augmented flow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Guntur, S.; Schreck, S.; Sorensen, N. N.; Bergami, L.

    2015-04-22

    It is well known that airfoils under unsteady flow conditions with a periodically varying angle of attack exhibit aerodynamic characteristics different from those under steady flow conditions, a phenomenon commonly known as dynamic stall. It is also well known that the steady aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils in the inboard region of a rotating blade differ from those under steady two-dimensional (2D) flow conditions, a phenomenon commonly known as rotational augmentation. This paper presents an investigation of these two phenomena together in the inboard parts of wind turbine blades. This analysis is carried out using data from three sources: (1) the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment Phase VI experimental data, including constant as well as continuously pitching blade conditions during axial operation, (2) data from unsteady Delayed Detached Eddy Simulations (DDES) carried out using the Technical University of Denmark’s in-house flow solver Ellipsys3D, and (3) data from a simplified model based on the blade element momentum method with a dynamic stall subroutine that uses rotationally augmented steady-state polars obtained from steady Phase VI experimental sequences, instead of the traditional 2D nonrotating data. The aim of this work is twofold. First, the blade loads estimated by the DDES simulations are compared to three select cases of the N sequence experimental data, which serves as a validation of the DDES method. Results show reasonable agreement between the two data in two out of three cases studied. Second, the dynamic time series of the lift and the moment polars obtained from the experiments are compared to those from the dynamic stall subroutine that uses the rotationally augmented steady polars. This allowed the differences between the stall phenomenon on the inboard parts of harmonically pitching blades on a rotating wind turbine and the classic dynamic stall representation in 2D flow to be

  2. Effect of rotation on a rotating hot-wire sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, C.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to discern the effects of centrifugal and Coriolis forces on a rotating hot-wire. The probe was calibrated in a wind tunnel as well as in a rotating mode. The effect of rotation was found to be negligibly small. A small change in cold resistance (1.5%) was observed in the rotating wire. The rotation seems to have a negligible effect on the fluid mechanics, heat transfer and material characteristics of the wire. This is a significant conclusion in view of the potential application of the hot-wire probe in a rotating passage (such as turbomachinery).

  3. Determination of the Hubble constant.

    PubMed

    Freedman, W L; Feng, L L

    1999-09-28

    Establishing accurate extragalactic distances has provided an immense challenge to astronomers since the 1920s. The situation has improved dramatically as better detectors have become available, and as several new, promising techniques have been developed. For the first time in the history of this difficult field, relative distances to galaxies are being compared on a case-by-case basis, and their quantitative agreement is being established. New instrumentation, the development of new techniques for measuring distances, and recent measurements with the Hubble Space telescope all have resulted in new distances to galaxies with precision at the +/-5-20% level. The current statistical uncertainty in some methods for measuring H(0) is now only a few percent; with systematic errors, the total uncertainty is approaching +/-10%. Hence, the historical factor-of-two uncertainty in the value of the H(0) is now behind us.

  4. The Complete Molecular Geometry of Salicyl Aldehyde from Rotational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorosh, O.; Bialkowska-Jaworska, E.; Kisiel, Z.; Pszczolkowski, L.; Kanska, M.; Krygowski, T. M.; Maeder, H.

    2013-06-01

    Salicyl aldehyde is a well known planar molecule containing an internal hydrogen bond. In preparing the publication of our previous report of the study of its rotational spectrum we have taken the opportunity to update the structure determination of this molecule to the complete r_e^{SE} geometry. The molecule contains 15 atoms and we have used supersonic expansion FTMW spectroscopy to obtain rotational constants for a total 26 different isotopic species, including all singly substitued species relative to the parent molecule. The ^{13}C and ^{18}O substitutions were measured in natural abundance, while deuterium substitutions were carried out synthetically. The r_e^{SE} determination requires the calculation of vibration-rotation changes in rotational constants from an ab initio anharmonic force field, which necessitates some compromises in the level of calculation for a molecule of the size of salicyl aldehyde. For this reason we studied the five lowest vibrationally excited states, by using the combination of room-temperature mm-wave spectroscopy and waveguide Fourier transform cm-wave spectroscopy. The experimental excited state rotational constants were then used to calibrate the anharmonic force field calculation. The resulting r_e^{SE} geometry is compared with other types of geometry determination possible from this data, with emphasis on the effect of the near zero principal coordinate of the important C_2 atom. Z.Kisiel et al., 61^{st} OSU Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, The Ohio State University, Ohio 2006, RI-12.

  5. Specfitter: a Learning Environment for the Rotational Spectroscopist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yoon Jeong; Wu, Weixin; Minei, A. J.; Cooke, S. A.

    2015-06-01

    A windows based, mouse-event driven software program that acts a graphical user interface to Pickett's fitting programs has been created and improved. The program, SpecFitter, is aimed at walking users through the process of assigning pure rotational spectra. Rotational spectra, in XY format, may be viewed and inspected and the user is provided with tools for observing and recording repeating, similar patterns of transitions. The structure of these patterns is interpreted into ``guesses" at rotational constants which the user may then use to predict a spectrum. Observed transition frequencies may then be assigned quantum number transitions and appended to the .lin file through mouse clicks. Although the thrust of this project is to develop a users ability to assign spectra without knowing the molecule producing the spectra the program can also read in and display calculated structures of target molecules produced by the Gaussian03/09 software, or alternatively the user can draw their own structures. Structures can be edited allowing users to observe the relationship between molecular structure and (i) the direction of dipole moment components and (ii) the relationships between structure and rotational constants. Users may also easily predict spectra from the molecules structure and further relate rotational constants to observed spectra. Students in CHEM 3510 at Purchase College have been vital in developing the software.

  6. Study on spectroscopic parameters and molecular constants of HC1(X1Σ+) molecule by using multireference configuration interaction approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Niu; Shi, De-Heng; Zhang, Jin-Ping; Zhu, Zun-Lüe; Sun, Jin-Feng

    2010-05-01

    Equilibrium internuclear separations, harmonic frequencies and potential energy curves (PECs) of HC1(X1Σ+) molecule are investigated by using the highly accurate valence internally contracted multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) approach in combination with a series of correlation-consistent basis sets in the valence range. The PECs are all fitted to the Murrell-Sorbie function, and they are used to accurately derive the spectroscopic parameters (De, D0, ωeχe, αe and Be). Compared with the available measurements, the PEC obtained at the basis set, aug-cc-pV5Z, is selected to investigate the vibrational manifolds. The constants D0, De, Re, ωe, ωeχe, αe and Be at this basis set are 4.4006 eV, 4.5845 eV, 0.12757 nm, 2993.33 cm-1, 52.6273 cm-1, 0.2981 cm-1 and 10.5841 cm-1, respectively, which almost perfectly conform to the available experimental results. With the potential determined at the MRCI/aug-cc-pV5Z level of theory, by numerically solving the radial Schrödinger equation of nuclear motion in the adiabatic approximation, a total of 21 vibrational levels are predicted. Complete vibrational levels, classical turning points, inertial rotation and centrifugal distortion constants are reproduced, which are in excellent agreement with the available Rydberg-Klein-Rees data. Most of these theoretical vibrational manifolds are reported for the first time to the best of our knowledge.

  7. Compact rotating cup anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellman, J. B.

    1968-01-01

    Compact, collapsible rotating cup anemometer is used in remote locations where portability and durability are factors in the choice of equipment. This lightweight instrument has a low wind-velocity threshold, is capable of withstanding large mechanical shocks while in its stowed configuration, and has fast response to wind fluctuations.

  8. Rotationally Actuated Prosthetic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell G., Jr.; Carden, James R.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand attached to end of remaining part of forearm and to upper arm just above elbow. Pincerlike fingers pushed apart to degree depending on rotation of forearm. Simpler in design, simpler to operate, weighs less, and takes up less space.

  9. Rotating Science Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogg, Loretta A.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a science classroom program with centralized materials, and assistance and workshops for teachers. Classroom materials on one of five topics rotate every six weeks among five schools. Teachers plan specific units to match the arrival of the materials in their schools. (Author/DS)

  10. Rotational Dynamics with Tracker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eadkhong, T.; Rajsadorn, R.; Jannual, P.; Danworaphong, S.

    2012-01-01

    We propose the use of Tracker, freeware for video analysis, to analyse the moment of inertia ("I") of a cylindrical plate. Three experiments are performed to validate the proposed method. The first experiment is dedicated to find the linear coefficient of rotational friction ("b") for our system. By omitting the effect of such friction, we derive…

  11. Concepts in crop rotations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop rotations have been a part of civilization since the Middle Ages. With colonization of what would become the United States came new crops of tobacco, cotton, and corn, the first two of which would play significant roles in both the economic beginnings and social fabric of the new country, how ...

  12. Anisotropy in rotating drums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povall, Timothy; McBride, Andrew; Govender, Indresan

    2015-11-01

    An anisotropic relationship between the stress and the strain rate has been observed in two-dimensional simulations of rotating drums. The objective of this work is to investigate the structure of the constitutive relation using three-dimensional discrete-element-method simulations of a rotating drum containing identical rigid spheres for a range of rotational speeds. Anisotropy is quantified from the alignment of the stress and strain rate tensors, with the strain rate computed using a least-squares fit. It is shown that in certain regions there is a strong anisotropic relationship, regardless of the speed of rotation. The effective friction coefficient is examined in order to determine the phase space in which the μ (I) rheology is valid. Lastly, a depth-averaged approach through the flowing layer is employed to determine the relationship between the velocity tangential to the equilibrium surface and the height of the flowing layer. A power-law relationship that approaches linear at high speeds is observed. Supported by NRF/DST Scarce Skills (South Africa).

  13. Rotating Saddle Paul Trap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueckner, Wolfgang; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a demonstration in which a ball is placed in an unstable position on a saddle shape. The ball becomes stable when it is rotated above some threshold angular velocity. The demonstration is a mechanical analog of confining a particle in a "Paul Trap". (DDR)

  14. Rotatable stem and lock

    DOEpatents

    Deveney, Joseph E.; Sanderson, Stephen N.

    1984-01-01

    A valve stem and lock include a housing surrounding a valve stem, a solenoid affixed to an interior wall of the housing, an armature affixed to the valve stem and a locking device for coupling the armature to the housing body. When the solenoid is energized, the solenoid moves away from the housing body, permitting rotation of the valve stem.

  15. Rotatable stem and lock

    DOEpatents

    Deveney, J.E.; Sanderson, S.N.

    1981-10-27

    A valve stem and lock is disclosed which includes a housing surrounding a valve stem, a solenoid affixed to an interior wall of the housing, an armature affixed to the valve stem and a locking device for coupling the armature to the housing body. When the solenoid is energized, the solenoid moves away from the housing body, permitting rotation of the valve stem.

  16. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  17. NEA rotations and binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravec, Petr; Harris, A. W.; Warner, B. D.

    2007-05-01

    Of nearly 3900 near-Earth asteroids known in June 2006, 325 have got estimated rotation periods. NEAs with sizes down to 10 meters have been sampled. Observed spin distribution shows a major changing point around D=200 m. Larger NEAs show a barrier against spin rates >11 d-1 (period P~2.2 h) that shifts to slower rates with increasing equatorial elongation. The spin barrier is interpreted as a critical spin rate for bodies held together by self-gravitation only, suggesting that NEAs larger than 200 m are mostly strenghtless bodies (i.e., with zero tensile strength), so called `rubble piles'. The barrier disappears at D<200 m where most objects rotate too fast to be held together by self-gravitation only, so a non-zero cohesion is implied in the smaller NEAs. The distribution of NEA spin rates in the `rubble pile' range (D>0.2 km) is non-Maxwellian, suggesting that other mechanisms than just collisions worked there. There is a pile up in front of the barrier (P of 2-3 h). It may be related to a spin up mechanism crowding asteroids to the barrier. An excess of slow rotators is seen at P>30 h. The spin-down mechanism has no clear lower limit on spin rate; periods as long as tens of days occur. Most NEAs appear to be in basic spin states with rotation around the principal axis. Excited rotations are present among and actually dominate in slow rotators with damping timescales >4.5 byr. A few tumblers observed among fast rotating coherent objects consistently appear to be more rigid or younger than the larger, rubble-pile tumblers. An abundant population of binary systems among NEAs has been found. The fraction of binaries among NEAs larger than 0.3 km has been estimated to be 15 +/-4%. Primaries of the binary systems concentrate at fast spin rates (periods 2-3 h) and low amplitudes, i.e., they lie just below the spin barrier. The total angular momentum content in the binary systems suggests that they formed at the critical spin rate, and that little or no angular

  18. Accurate pressure gradient calculations in hydrostatic atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, John J.; Mendez-Nunez, Luis R.; Tanrikulu, Saffet

    1987-01-01

    A method for the accurate calculation of the horizontal pressure gradient acceleration in hydrostatic atmospheric models is presented which is especially useful in situations where the isothermal surfaces are not parallel to the vertical coordinate surfaces. The present method is shown to be exact if the potential temperature lapse rate is constant between the vertical pressure integration limits. The technique is applied to both the integration of the hydrostatic equation and the computation of the slope correction term in the horizontal pressure gradient. A fixed vertical grid and a dynamic grid defined by the significant levels in the vertical temperature distribution are employed.

  19. Fluid forces on rotating centrifugal impeller with whirling motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoji, H.; Ohashi, H.

    1980-01-01

    Fluid forces on a centrifugal impeller, whose rotating axis whirls with a constant speed, were calculated by using unsteady potential theory. Calculations were performed for various values of whirl speed, number of impeller blades and angle of blades. Specific examples as well as significant results are given.

  20. Internal rotation effects in the pulsed jet rotational spectrum of the trifluoromethane carbon dioxide dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafin, Michal M.; Peebles, Rebecca A.; Peebles, Sean A.

    2008-07-01

    The rotational spectrum of the normal isotopic species of the HCF 3-CO 2 weakly bound complex has been measured by Fourier-transform microwave (FTMW) spectroscopy. All transitions are split into A and E states by internal rotation of the trifluoromethane subunit. A global fit of these states gives rotational constants that are consistent with a structure predicted by an MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) ab initio calculation in which the axes of the monomers are coplanar, with the hydrogen atom of the trifluoromethane angled toward one of the oxygen atoms of the CO 2. Measured dipole moment components ( μa = 0.431(6) D, μb = 0, μc = 1.436(6) D, μtotal = 1.499(6) D) confirm the ab initio prediction of an ac plane of symmetry; however, the very near-prolate nature of the complex ( κ = -0.997), combined with the relatively high barrier to internal rotation (˜30 cm -1) leads to asymmetry splittings and internal rotation splittings of similar magnitude, resulting in the observation of dipole forbidden b-type E-state transitions in addition to the expected a- and c-type lines. Although this effect has been observed previously in several monomer spectra, this appears to be one of few examples for a weakly bound complex.

  1. Two Equivalent Methyl Internal Rotations in 2,5-DIMETHYLTHIOPHENE Investigated by Microwave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van, Vinh; Stahl, Wolfgang; Nguyen, Ha Vinh Lam

    2016-06-01

    The microwave spectrum of 2,5-dimethylthiophene, a sulfur-containing five-membered heterocyclic molecule with two conjugated double bonds, was recorded using two molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometers operating in the frequency range from 2 to 40 GHz. Highly accurate molecular parameters were determined. The rotational constants obtained by geometry optimizations at different levels of theory are in good agreement with the experimental values. A C2v equilibrium structure was calculated, where one hydrogen atom of each methyl group is antiperiplanar to the sulfur atom, and the two methyl groups are thus equivalent. Transition states were optimized at different levels of theory using the Berny algorithm to calculate the barrier height of the two equivalent methyl rotors. The fitted experimental torsional barrier of 247.95594(30) wn is in reasonable agreement with the calculated barriers. Similar barriers to internal rotation were found for the monomethyl derivatives 2-methylthiophene (194.1 wn) and 3-methylthiophene (258.8 wn). A labeling scheme for the group G36 written as the semi-direct product (C3I x C3I) (x C2v was introduced.

  2. Theoretical gravity darkening as a function of optical depth. A first approach to fast rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claret, A.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: Recent observations of very fast rotating stars show systematic deviations from the von Zeipel theorem and pose a challenge to the theory of gravity-darkening exponents (β1). In this paper, we present a new insight into the problem of temperature distribution over distorted stellar surfaces to try to reduce these discrepancies. Methods: We use a variant of the numerical method based on the triangles strategy, which we previously introduced, to evaluate the gravity-darkening exponents. The novelty of the present method is that the theoretical β1 is now computed as a function of the optical depth, that is, β1 ≡ β1(τ). The stellar evolutionary models, which are necessary to obtain the physical conditions of the stellar envelopes/atmospheres inherent to the numerical method, are computed via the code GRANADA. Results: When the resulting theoretical β1(τ) are compared with the best accurate data of very fast rotators, a good agreement for the six systems is simultaneously achieved. In addition, we derive an equation that relates the locus of constant convective efficiency in the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram with gravity-darkening exponents.

  3. Fourier-Bessel rotational invariant eigenimages.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhizhen; Singer, Amit

    2013-05-01

    We present an efficient and accurate algorithm for principal component analysis (PCA) of a large set of two-dimensional images and, for each image, the set of its uniform rotations in the plane and its reflection. The algorithm starts by expanding each image, originally given on a Cartesian grid, in the Fourier-Bessel basis for the disk. Because the images are essentially band limited in the Fourier domain, we use a sampling criterion to truncate the Fourier-Bessel expansion such that the maximum amount of information is preserved without the effect of aliasing. The constructed covariance matrix is invariant to rotation and reflection and has a special block diagonal structure. PCA is efficiently done for each block separately. This Fourier-Bessel-based PCA detects more meaningful eigenimages and has improved denoising capability compared to traditional PCA for a finite number of noisy images.

  4. Geometric calibration of rotational kaleidoscopic instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havran, Vlastimil; Němcová, Šárka; Čáp, Jiří; Hošek, Jan; Bittner, Jiří; Macúchová, Karolina

    2016-11-01

    The measurement of spatially varying surface reflectance is required for faithful reproduction of real world to allow for predictive look of computer generated images. One such proposed method uses a rotational kaleidoscopic imaging, where illumination and imaging paths are realized by subimages on kaleidoscopic mirrors and illumination is carried out by a DLP projector. We describe a novel geometric calibration method for a rotational kaleidoscope that is necessary to get aligned and accurate data from measurement. The calibration has two stages. The first stage mechanically adjusts the camera, the projector, and the autocollimator against the kaleidoscope mirrors. The second stage is based on the software. By random perturbation of camera and projector in corresponding mathematical model of the kaleidoscope we estimate better real positions of camera and projector in a physical setup, comparing the computed images from the software simulator and the acquired images from the physical setup.

  5. Research on motor rotational speed measurement in regenerative braking system of electric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Chaofeng; Chen, Liao; Chen, Long; Jiang, Haobin; Li, Zhongxing; Wang, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    Rotational speed signals acquisition and processing techniques are widely used in rotational machinery. In order to realized precise and real-time control of motor drive and regenerative braking process, rotational speed measurement techniques are needed in electric vehicles. Obtaining accurate motor rotational speed signal will contribute to the regenerative braking force control steadily and realized higher energy recovery rate. This paper aims to develop a method that provides instantaneous speed information in the form of motor rotation. It addresses principles of motor rotational speed measurement in the regenerative braking systems of electric vehicle firstly. The paper then presents ideal and actual Hall position sensor signals characteristics, the relation between the motor rotational speed and the Hall position sensor signals is revealed. Finally, Hall position sensor signals conditioning and processing circuit and program for motor rotational speed measurement have been carried out based on measurement error analysis.

  6. HIGH-PRECISION MACLAURIN-BASED MODELS OF ROTATING LIQUID PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, W. B.

    2012-09-01

    We present an efficient numerical self-consistent field method for calculating a gravitational model of a rotating liquid planet to spherical harmonic degree {approx}30 and a precision {approx}10{sup -12} in the external gravity field. The method's accuracy is validated by comparing results, for Jupiter rotation parameters, with the exact Maclaurin constant-density solution. The method can be generalized to non-constant density.

  7. The rotational spectrum of Roesky’s ketone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blockhuys, Frank; Tersago, Karla; Shlykov, Sergey A.; Konrad, Alexander; Christen, Dines

    2010-08-01

    The experimental rotational spectrum of 5-oxo-1,3,2,4-dithiadiazole (Roesky's ketone) has been recorded and the experimental rotational constants have been determined. The latter have been used to evaluate the performance of a large number of quantum chemical methods combined with different basis sets, by comparing the calculated with the experimental values. The results of this comparison indicate that, in general, the wave-function-based methods perform better than those from Density Functional Theory. Four of the 42 investigated method/basis set combinations prove to be the most valuable, i.e., MP4(SDQ)/(aug-)cc-pVTZ, B3PW91/cc-pV(T+d)Z and MPW1PW91/aug-cc-pVTZ, as they produce rotational constants with a root-mean-square deviation from the experimental values of only about 5 MHz.

  8. Rotating Shaft Tilt Angle Measurement Using an Inclinometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jun; Wang, Zhiqian; Shen, Chengwu; Wen, Zhuoman; Liu, Shaojin; Cai, Sheng; Li, Jianrong

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes a novel measurement method to accurately measure the rotating shaft tilt angle of rotating machine for alignment or compensation using a dual-axis inclinometer. A model of the rotating shaft tilt angle measurement is established using a dual-axis inclinometer based on the designed mechanical structure, and the calculation equation between the rotating shaft tilt angle and the inclinometer axes outputs is derived under the condition that the inclinometer axes are perpendicular to the rotating shaft. The reversal measurement method is applied to decrease the effect of inclinometer drifts caused by temperature, to eliminate inclinometer and rotating shaft mechanical error and inclinometer systematic error to attain high measurement accuracy. The uncertainty estimation shows that the accuracy of rotating shaft tilt angle measurement depends mainly on the inclinometer uncertainty and its uncertainty is almost the same as the inclinometer uncertainty in the simulation. The experimental results indicate that measurement time is 4 seconds; the range of rotating shaft tilt angle is 0.002° and its standard deviation is 0.0006° using NS-5/P2 inclinometer, whose precision and resolution are ±0.01° and 0.0005°, respectively.

  9. Dynamical analysis of sea-breeze hodograph rotation in Sardinia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisseeva, N.; Steyn, D. G.

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the diurnal evolution of sea-breeze rotation over an island in the mid-latitudes. Earlier research on sea-breezes in Sardinia shows that the onshore winds around various coasts of the island exhibit both the theoretically predicted clockwise rotation as well as seemingly anomalous anti-clockwise rotation. A non-hydrostatic fully compressible numerical model (WRF) is used to simulate wind fields on and around the island on previously-studied sea-breeze days and is shown to accurately capture the circulation on all coasts. Diurnal rotation of wind is examined and patterns of clockwise and anti-clockwise rotation are identified. A dynamical analysis is performed by extracting individual forcing terms from the horizontal momentum equations. Analysis of several regions around the island shows that the direction of rotation is a result of a complex interaction between near-surface and synoptic pressure gradient, Coriolis and advection forcings. An idealized simulation is performed over an artificial island with dramatically simplified topography, yet similar dimensions and latitude to Sardinia. Dynamical analysis of the idealized case reveals a rather different pattern of hodograph rotation to the real Sardinia, yet similar underlying dynamics. The research provides new insights into the dynamics underlying sea-breeze hodograph rotation, especially in coastal zones with complex topography and/or coastline.

  10. A Dynamical Analysis of Sea Breeze Hodograph Rotation on Sardinia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisseeva, Nadya; Steyn, Douw

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the dynamics of diurnal sea-breeze rotation over coastal Sardinia using realistic and idealized model runs and historical observations. Earlier research on sea-breezes in Sardinia shows that the onshore winds around various coasts of the island exhibit both the theoretically predicted clockwise rotation as well as seemingly anomalous anticlockwise rotation. A non-hydrostatic fully compressible numerical model (WRF) is used to simulate wind fields on and around the island on previously-studied sea-breeze days. WRF accurately captures the sea breeze circulation on all coasts, as depicted in station data. Diurnal rotation of wind is examined and patterns of clockwise and anti-clockwise rotation are identified. A dynamical analysis is performed by extracting individual forcing terms from the horizontal momentum equations. Analysis of several regions around the island shows that the direction of rotation is a result of a complex interaction between near-surface and synoptic pressure gradient, Coriolis and advection forcings. An idealized simulation is performed over an artificial island of similar dimensions and latitude to Sardinia, but with dramatically simplified topography. Dynamical analysis of the idealized runs reveals a rather different pattern of hodograph rotation to the real Sardinia, yet similar underlying dynamics. The research provides new insights into the dynamics underlying sea-breeze hodograph rotation, especially in coastal zones with complex topography and/or coastline.

  11. Dynamical analysis of sea-breeze hodograph rotation in Sardinia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisseeva, N.; Steyn, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates the diurnal evolution of sea-breeze (SB) rotation over an island at the middle latitudes. Earlier research on sea breezes in Sardinia shows that the onshore winds around various coasts of the island exhibit both the theoretically predicted clockwise rotation as well as seemingly anomalous anticlockwise rotation. A non-hydrostatic fully compressible numerical model (WRF) is used to simulate wind fields on and around the island on previously studied sea-breeze days, and is shown to capture the circulation on all coasts accurately. Diurnal rotation of wind is examined, and patterns of clockwise and anticlockwise rotation are identified. A dynamical analysis is performed by extracting individual forcing terms from the horizontal momentum equations. Analysis of several regions around the island shows that the direction of rotation is a result of a complex interaction between near-surface and synoptic pressure gradient, Coriolis and advection forcings. An idealized simulation is performed over an artificial island with dramatically simplified topography yet similar dimensions and latitude to Sardinia. Dynamical analysis of the idealized case reveals a rather different pattern of hodograph rotation to the real Sardinia, yet similar underlying dynamics. The research provides new insights into the dynamics underlying sea-breeze hodograph rotation, especially in coastal zones with a complex topography and/or coastline.

  12. Is There a Cosmological Constant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanek, Christopher

    2002-07-01

    The grant contributed to the publication of 18 refereed papers and 5 conference proceedings. The primary uses of the funding have been for page charges, travel for invited talks related to the grant research, and the support of a graduate student, Charles Keeton. The refereed papers address four of the primary goals of the proposal: (1) the statistics of radio lenses as a probe of the cosmological model (#1), (2) the role of spiral galaxies as lenses (#3), (3) the effects of dust on statistics of lenses (#7, #8), and (4) the role of groups and clusters as lenses (#2, #6, #10, #13, #15, #16). Four papers (#4, #5, #11, #12) address general issues of lens models, calibrations, and the relationship between lens galaxies and nearby galaxies. One considered cosmological effects in lensing X-ray sources (#9), and two addressed issues related to the overall power spectrum and theories of gravity (#17, #18). Our theoretical studies combined with the explosion in the number of lenses and the quality of the data obtained for them is greatly increasing our ability to characterize and understand the lens population. We can now firmly conclude both from our study of the statistics of radio lenses and our survey of extinctions in individual lenses that the statistics of optically selected quasars were significantly affected by extinction. However, the limits on the cosmological constant remain at lambda < 0.65 at a 2-sigma confidence level, which is in mild conflict with the results of the Type la supernova surveys. We continue to find that neither spiral galaxies nor groups and clusters contribute significantly to the production of gravitational lenses. The lack of group and cluster lenses is strong evidence for the role of baryonic cooling in increasing the efficiency of galaxies as lenses compared to groups and clusters of higher mass but lower central density. Unfortunately for the ultimate objective of the proposal, improved constraints on the cosmological constant, the next

  13. Is There a Cosmological Constant?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kochanek, Christopher; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The grant contributed to the publication of 18 refereed papers and 5 conference proceedings. The primary uses of the funding have been for page charges, travel for invited talks related to the grant research, and the support of a graduate student, Charles Keeton. The refereed papers address four of the primary goals of the proposal: (1) the statistics of radio lenses as a probe of the cosmological model (#1), (2) the role of spiral galaxies as lenses (#3), (3) the effects of dust on statistics of lenses (#7, #8), and (4) the role of groups and clusters as lenses (#2, #6, #10, #13, #15, #16). Four papers (#4, #5, #11, #12) address general issues of lens models, calibrations, and the relationship between lens galaxies and nearby galaxies. One considered cosmological effects in lensing X-ray sources (#9), and two addressed issues related to the overall power spectrum and theories of gravity (#17, #18). Our theoretical studies combined with the explosion in the number of lenses and the quality of the data obtained for them is greatly increasing our ability to characterize and understand the lens population. We can now firmly conclude both from our study of the statistics of radio lenses and our survey of extinctions in individual lenses that the statistics of optically selected quasars were significantly affected by extinction. However, the limits on the cosmological constant remain at lambda < 0.65 at a 2-sigma confidence level, which is in mild conflict with the results of the Type la supernova surveys. We continue to find that neither spiral galaxies nor groups and clusters contribute significantly to the production of gravitational lenses. The lack of group and cluster lenses is strong evidence for the role of baryonic cooling in increasing the efficiency of galaxies as lenses compared to groups and clusters of higher mass but lower central density. Unfortunately for the ultimate objective of the proposal, improved constraints on the cosmological constant, the next

  14. Determination of the Avogadro Constant by Counting the Atoms in a Si28 Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreas, B.; Azuma, Y.; Bartl, G.; Becker, P.; Bettin, H.; Borys, M.; Busch, I.; Gray, M.; Fuchs, P.; Fujii, K.; Fujimoto, H.; Kessler, E.; Krumrey, M.; Kuetgens, U.; Kuramoto, N.; Mana, G.; Manson, P.; Massa, E.; Mizushima, S.; Nicolaus, A.; Picard, A.; Pramann, A.; Rienitz, O.; Schiel, D.; Valkiers, S.; Waseda, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Avogadro constant links the atomic and the macroscopic properties of matter. Since the molar Planck constant is well known via the measurement of the Rydberg constant, it is also closely related to the Planck constant. In addition, its accurate determination is of paramount importance for a definition of the kilogram in terms of a fundamental constant. We describe a new approach for its determination by counting the atoms in 1 kg single-crystal spheres, which are highly enriched with the Si28 isotope. It enabled isotope dilution mass spectroscopy to determine the molar mass of the silicon crystal with unprecedented accuracy. The value obtained, NA=6.02214078(18)×1023mol-1, is the most accurate input datum for a new definition of the kilogram.

  15. Determination of the Avogadro constant by counting the atoms in a 28Si crystal.

    PubMed

    Andreas, B; Azuma, Y; Bartl, G; Becker, P; Bettin, H; Borys, M; Busch, I; Gray, M; Fuchs, P; Fujii, K; Fujimoto, H; Kessler, E; Krumrey, M; Kuetgens, U; Kuramoto, N; Mana, G; Manson, P; Massa, E; Mizushima, S; Nicolaus, A; Picard, A; Pramann, A; Rienitz, O; Schiel, D; Valkiers, S; Waseda, A

    2011-01-21

    The Avogadro constant links the atomic and the macroscopic properties of matter. Since the molar Planck constant is well known via the measurement of the Rydberg constant, it is also closely related to the Planck constant. In addition, its accurate determination is of paramount importance for a definition of the kilogram in terms of a fundamental constant. We describe a new approach for its determination by counting the atoms in 1 kg single-crystal spheres, which are highly enriched with the 28Si isotope. It enabled isotope dilution mass spectroscopy to determine the molar mass of the silicon crystal with unprecedented accuracy. The value obtained, NA = 6.022,140,78(18) × 10(23) mol(-1), is the most accurate input datum for a new definition of the kilogram.

  16. A Rotating Space Interferometer with Variable Baselines and Low Power Consumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.

    1999-01-01

    A new concept is presented here for a large, rotating space interferometer which would achieve full u, v plane coverage with reasonably uniform integration times, yet once set in motion no additional energy would be required to change collector separations, maintain constant baseline rotation rates, or to counteract centrifugal forces on the collectors.

  17. Wave-driven Rotation in Supersonically Rotating Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    A. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2010-02-15

    Supersonic rotation in mirrors may be produced by radio frequency waves. The waves produce coupled diffusion in ion kinetic and potential energy. A population inversion along the diffusion path then produces rotation. Waves may be designed to exploit a natural kinetic energy source or may provide the rotation energy on their own. Centrifugal traps for fusion and isotope separation may benefit from this wave-driven rotation.

  18. Electro-hydrodynamic propulsion of counter-rotating Pickering drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dommersnes, P.; Mikkelsen, A.; Fossum, J. O.

    2016-07-01

    Insulating particles or drops suspended in carrier liquids may start to rotate with a constant frequency when subjected to a uniform DC electric field. This is known as the Quincke rotation electro-hydrodynamic instability. A single isolated rotating particle exhibit no translational motion at low Reynolds number, however interacting rotating particles may move relative to one another. Here we present a simple system consisting of two interacting and deformable Quincke rotating particle covered drops, i.e. deformable Pickering drops. The drops attract one another and spontaneously form a counter-rotating pair that exhibits electro-hydrodynamic driven propulsion at low Reynolds number flow.

  19. Left/right neck rotation judgments are affected by age, gender, handedness and image rotation.

    PubMed

    Wallwork, Sarah B; Butler, David S; Fulton, Ian; Stewart, Halton; Darmawan, Igusti; Moseley, G Lorimer

    2013-06-01

    Understanding motor imagery of the hands and feet has led to promising new treatments for neurological and chronic pain disorders. We aimed to extend this line of research to the neck with a view to developing the definitive platform study upon which clinical and experimental studies can be based. In a cross-sectional experiment with a convenience sample, volunteers were shown 40 photographs of a model with their head turned to the left or right. Images were presented in random order and orientation. Participants judged the direction of neck rotation. They also completed a left/right hand judgment task. 1361 pain-free participants volunteered. Mean ± standard deviation response time (RT) for making left/right judgments of neck rotation was 1.621 ± 0.501 s. Median accuracy was 92.5%. RT was related to age, gender, and handedness (p < 0.001). That is, RT increased with age, was greater in females than in males and was greater in left-handers than in right-handers. Accuracy reduced with age (p < 0.001), but was unaffected by gender or handedness. Judgments were more accurate when images showed a neck rotated to the right than when they showed a neck rotated to the left (p < 0.001). The magnitude of image rotation affected both response time and accuracy (p < 0.001). In general, the performance parameters established for left/right limb judgments also apply for left/right neck rotation judgments. The current work establishes the definitive normative values against which clinical and experimental groups can be compared and reveals unpredicted effects of the direction neck rotation and the orientation of the image.

  20. Equatorial symmetry of Boussinesq convective solutions in a rotating spherical shell allowing rotation of the inner and outer spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Keiji; Takehiro, Shin-ichi; Yamada, Michio

    2014-08-15

    We investigate properties of convective solutions of the Boussinesq thermal convection in a moderately rotating spherical shell allowing the respective rotation of the inner and outer spheres due to the viscous torque of the fluid. The ratio of the inner and outer radii of the spheres, the Prandtl number, and the Taylor number are fixed to 0.4, 1, and 500{sup 2}, respectively. The Rayleigh number is varied from 2.6 × 10{sup 4} to 3.4 × 10{sup 4}. In this parameter range, the behaviours of obtained asymptotic convective solutions are almost similar to those in the system whose inner and outer spheres are restricted to rotate with the same constant angular velocity, although the difference is found in the transition process to chaotic solutions. The convective solution changes from an equatorially symmetric quasi-periodic one to an equatorially symmetric chaotic one, and further to an equatorially asymmetric chaotic one, as the Rayleigh number is increased. This is in contrast to the transition in the system whose inner and outer spheres are assumed to rotate with the same constant angular velocity, where the convective solution changes from an equatorially symmetric quasi-periodic one, to an equatorially asymmetric quasi-periodic one, and to equatorially asymmetric chaotic one. The inner sphere rotates in the retrograde direction on average in the parameter range; however, it sometimes undergoes the prograde rotation when the convective solution becomes chaotic.

  1. Acquiring New Spatial Intuitions: Learning to Reason about Rotations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pani, John R.; Chariker, Julia H.; Dawson, Thomas E.; Johnson, Nathan

    2005-01-01

    There are certain simple rotations of objects that most people cannot reason about accurately. Reliable gaps in the understanding of a fundamental physical domain raise the question of how learning to reason in that domain might proceed. Using virtual reality techniques, this project investigated the nature of learning to reason across the domain…

  2. Rotational Spectroscopy of 4-HYDROXY-2-BUTYNENITRILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2015-06-01

    Recently we studied the rotational spectrum of hydroxyacetonitrile (HOCH_2CN, HAN) in order to provide a firm basis for its possible detection in the interstellar medium Different plausible pathways of the formation of HAN in the interstellar conditions were proposed; however, up to now, the searches for this molecule were unsuccessful. To continue the study of nitriles that represent an astrophysical interest we present in this talk the analysis of the rotational spectrum of 4-hydroxy-2-butynenitrile (HOCH_2CC-CN, HBN), the next molecule in the series of hydroxymethyl nitriles. Using the Lille spectrometer the spectrum of HBN was measured in the frequency range 50 -- 500 GHz. From the spectroscopic point of view HBN molecule is rather similar to HAN, because of -OH group tunnelling in gauche conformation. As it was previously observed for HAN, due to this large amplitude motion, the splittings in the rotational spectra of HBN are easily resolved making the spectral analysis more difficult. Additional difficulties arise from the near symmetric top character of HBN (κ = -0.996), and very dense spectrum because of relatively small values of rotational constants and a number of low-lying excited vibrational states. The analysis carried out in the frame of reduced axis system approach of Pickett allows to fit within experimental accuracy all the rotational transitions in the ground vibrational state. Thus, the results of the present study provide a reliable catalog of frequency predictions for HBN. The support of the Action sur Projets de l'INSU PCMI, and ANR-13-BS05-0008-02 IMOLABS is gratefully acknowledged Margulès L., Motiyenko R.A., Guillemin J.-C. 68th ISMS, 2013, TI12. Danger G. et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2014, 16, 3360. Pickett H.M. J. Chem. Phys. 1972, 56, 1715.

  3. Foliage discrimination using a rotating ladar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castano, A.; Matthies, L.

    2003-01-01

    We present a real time algorithm that detects foliage using range from a rotating laser. Objects not classified as foliage are conservatively labeled as non-driving obstacles. In contrast to related work that uses range statistics to classify objects, we exploit the expected localities and continuities of an obstacle, in both space and time. Also, instead of attempting to find a single accurate discriminating factor for every ladar return, we hypothesize the class of some few returns and then spread the confidence (and classification) to other returns using the locality constraints. The Urbie robot is presently using this algorithm to descriminate drivable grass from obstacles during outdoor autonomous navigation tasks.

  4. Manipulator for rotating and examining small spheres

    DOEpatents

    Weinstein, B.W.; Willenborg, D.L.

    1980-02-12

    A manipulator is disclosed which provides fast, accurate rotational positioning of a small sphere, such as an inertial confinement fusion target, which allows inspecting of the entire surface of the sphere. The sphere is held between two flat, flexible tips which move equal amounts in opposite directions. This provides rolling of the ball about two orthogonal axes without any overall translation. The manipulator may be controlled, for example, by an x- and y-axis driven controlled by a mini-computer which can be programmed to generate any desired scan pattern. 8 figs.

  5. Manipulator for rotating and examining small spheres

    DOEpatents

    Weinstein, Berthold W. [Livermore, CA; Willenborg, David L. [Livermore, CA

    1980-02-12

    A manipulator which provides fast, accurate rotational positioning of a small sphere, such as an inertial confinement fusion target, which allows inspecting of the entire surface of the sphere. The sphere is held between two flat, flexible tips which move equal amounts in opposite directions. This provides rolling of the ball about two orthogonal axes without any overall translation. The manipulator may be controlled, for example, by an x- and y-axis driven controlled by a mini-computer which can be programmed to generate any desired scan pattern.

  6. Rotation-induced nonlinear wavepackets in internal waves

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, A. J. Johnson, E. R.

    2014-05-15

    The long time effect of weak rotation on an internal solitary wave is the decay into inertia-gravity waves and the eventual formation of a localised wavepacket. Here this initial value problem is considered within the context of the Ostrovsky, or the rotation-modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV), equation and a numerical method for obtaining accurate wavepacket solutions is presented. The flow evolutions are described in the regimes of relatively-strong and relatively-weak rotational effects. When rotational effects are relatively strong a second-order soliton solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation accurately predicts the shape, and phase and group velocities of the numerically determined wavepackets. It is suggested that these solitons may form from a local Benjamin-Feir instability in the inertia-gravity wave-train radiated when a KdV solitary wave rapidly adjusts to the presence of strong rotation. When rotational effects are relatively weak the initial KdV solitary wave remains coherent longer, decaying only slowly due to weak radiation and modulational instability is no longer relevant. Wavepacket solutions in this regime appear to consist of a modulated KdV soliton wavetrain propagating on a slowly varying background of finite extent.

  7. Rotation-induced nonlinear wavepackets in internal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield, A. J.; Johnson, E. R.

    2014-05-01

    The long time effect of weak rotation on an internal solitary wave is the decay into inertia-gravity waves and the eventual formation of a localised wavepacket. Here this initial value problem is considered within the context of the Ostrovsky, or the rotation-modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV), equation and a numerical method for obtaining accurate wavepacket solutions is presented. The flow evolutions are described in the regimes of relatively-strong and relatively-weak rotational effects. When rotational effects are relatively strong a second-order soliton solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation accurately predicts the shape, and phase and group velocities of the numerically determined wavepackets. It is suggested that these solitons may form from a local Benjamin-Feir instability in the inertia-gravity wave-train radiated when a KdV solitary wave rapidly adjusts to the presence of strong rotation. When rotational effects are relatively weak the initial KdV solitary wave remains coherent longer, decaying only slowly due to weak radiation and modulational instability is no longer relevant. Wavepacket solutions in this regime appear to consist of a modulated KdV soliton wavetrain propagating on a slowly varying background of finite extent.

  8. FOREWORD: International determination of the Avogadro constant International determination of the Avogadro constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, Enrico; Nicolaus, Arnold

    2011-04-01

    This issue of Metrologia collects papers about the results of an international research project aimed at the determination of the Avogadro constant, NA, by counting the atoms in a silicon crystal highly enriched with the isotope 28Si. Fifty years ago, Egidi [1] thought about realizing an atomic mass standard. In 1965, Bonse and Hart [2] operated the first x-ray interferometer, thus paving the way to the achievement of Egidi's dream, and soon Deslattes et al [3] completed the first counting of the atoms in a natural silicon crystal. The present project, outlined by Zosi [4] in 1983, began in 2004 by combining the experiences and capabilities of the BIPM, INRIM, IRMM, NIST, NPL, NMIA, NMIJ and PTB. The start signal, ratified by a memorandum of understanding, was a contract for the production of a silicon crystal highly enriched with 28Si. The enrichment process was undertaken by the Central Design Bureau of Machine Building in St Petersburg. Subsequently, a polycrystal was grown in the Institute of Chemistry of High-Purity Substances of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Nizhny Novgorod and a 28Si boule was grown and purified by the Leibniz-Institut für Kristallzüchtung in Berlin. Isotope enrichment made it possible to apply isotope dilution mass spectroscopy, to determine the Avogadro constant with unprecedented accuracy, and to fulfil Egidi's dream. To convey Egidi's 'fantasy' into practice, two 28Si kilogram prototypes shaped as quasi-perfect spheres were manufactured by the Australian Centre for Precision Optics; their isotopic composition, molar mass, mass, volume, density and lattice parameter were accurately determined and their surfaces were chemically and physically characterized at the atomic scale. The paper by Andreas et al reviews the work carried out; it collates all the findings and illustrates how Avogadro's constant was obtained. Impurity concentration and gradients in the enriched crystal were measured by infrared spectroscopy and taken into

  9. Far-infrared rotational emission by carbon monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckee, C. F.; Storey, J. W. V.; Watson, D. M.; Green, S.

    1981-01-01

    Accurate theoretical collisional excitation rates are used to determine the emissivities of CO rotational lines 10 to the 4th power/cu cm n(H2), 100 K T 2000 K, and J 50. An approximate analytic expression for the emissitivities which is valid over most of this region is obtained. Population inversions in the lower rotational levels occur for densities n(H2) approximately 10 (to the 3rd to 5th power)/cu cm and temperatures T approximately 50 K. Interstellar shocks observed edge on are a potential source of millimeter wave CO maser emission. The CO rotational cooling function suggested by Hollenbach and McKee (1979) is verified, and accurate numerical values given. Application of these results to other linear molecules should be straightforward.

  10. Electronic excitation of H{sub 2} by {ital e}{sup +} impact using adiabatic nuclear rotation model

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, T.; Ghosh, A.S.

    1996-06-01

    The adiabatic nuclear rotation (ANR) model has been employed to obtain rotational excitation cross sections for electronically elastic and electronic excitation processes in {ital e}{sup +}-H{sub 2} scattering. The present results are compared with the more accurate laboratory-frame rotational close-coupling approximation (LFCCA) predictions. The electronically inelastic rotational excitation results using the ANR model differ from the corresponding LFCCA results near the electronic excitation threshold energies. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  11. A Translational Polarization Rotator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T.; Wollack, Edward J.; Pisano, Giampaolo; Ackiss, Sheridan; U-Yen, Kongpop; Ng, Ming wah

    2012-01-01

    We explore a free-space polarization modulator in which a variable phase introduction between right- and left-handed circular polarization components is used to rotate the linear polarization of the outgoing beam relative to that of the incoming beam. In this device, the polarization states are separated by a circular polarizer that consists of a quarter-wave plate in combination with a wire grid. A movable mirror is positioned behind and parallel to the circular polarizer. As the polarizer-mirror distance is separated, an incident liear polarization will be rotated through an angle that is proportional to the introduced phase delay. We demonstrate a prototype device that modulates Stokes Q and U over a 20% bandwidth.

  12. A call for rotators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountain, Gregory

    “Needed: highly motivated geoscientists willing to slow the pace of their research for 1-2 years while managing federal government support of their discipline. Assured: change of perspective; no change in pay. Contact your National Science Foundation Program Director for details.—No, this isn't an NSF job announcement; this is an open letter to members of the Earth science community from a recently “retired” NSF rotator concerned by the small number of researchers interested in a Washington tour. I learned firsthand the extent to which an individual in this position is entrusted with decision-making powers, and as a result, I believe that each of us in the research community should feel responsible for ensuring that highly qualified people serve as rotators.

  13. Rotatable seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Logan, Clinton M.; Garibaldi, Jack L.

    1982-01-01

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

  14. Capacitive Cells for Dielectric Constant Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilar, Horacio Munguía; Maldonado, Rigoberto Franco

    2015-01-01

    A simple capacitive cell for dielectric constant measurement in liquids is presented. As an illustrative application, the cell is used for measuring the degradation of overheated edible oil through the evaluation of their dielectric constant.

  15. Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pate, Brooks

    2014-06-01

    The past decade has seen several major technology advances in electronics operating at microwave frequencies making it possible to develop a new generation of spectrometers for molecular rotational spectroscopy. High-speed digital electronics, both arbitrary waveform generators and digitizers, continue on a Moore's Law-like development cycle that started around 1993 with device bandwidth doubling about every 36 months. These enabling technologies were the key to designing chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectrometers which offer significant sensitivity enhancements for broadband spectrum acquisition in molecular rotational spectroscopy. A special feature of the chirped-pulse spectrometer design is that it is easily implemented at low frequency (below 8 GHz) where Balle-Flygare type spectrometers with Fabry-Perot cavity designs become technologically challenging due to the mirror size requirements. The capabilities of CP-FTMW spectrometers for studies of molecular structure will be illustrated by the collaborative research effort we have been a part of to determine the structures of water clusters - a project which has identified clusters up to the pentadecamer. A second technology trend that impacts molecular rotational spectroscopy is the development of high power, solid state sources in the mm-wave/THz regions. Results from the field of mm-wave chirped-pulse Fourier transform spectroscopy will be described with an emphasis on new problems in chemical dynamics and analytical chemistry that these methods can tackle. The third (and potentially most important) technological trend is the reduction of microwave components to chip level using monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC) - a technology driven by an enormous mass market in communications. Some recent advances in rotational spectrometer designs that incorporate low-cost components will be highlighted. The challenge to the high-resolution spectroscopy community - as posed by Frank De

  16. On rotational conical flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrari, Carlo

    1952-01-01

    Some general properties of isoenergetic rotational conical fields are determined. For such fields, provided the physical parameters of the fluid flow are known on a conical reference surface, it being understood that they satisfy certain imposed conditions, it is shown how to construct the hodographs in the various meridional semiplanes, as the envelope of either the tangents to the hodographs or of the osculatory circles.

  17. Rotating housing turbine

    DOEpatents

    Allouche, Erez; Jaganathan, Arun P.

    2016-10-11

    The invention is a new turbine structure having a housing that rotates. The housing has a sidewall, and turbine blades are attached to a sidewall portion. The turbine may be completely open in the center, allowing space for solids and debris to be directed out of the turbine without jamming the spinning blades/sidewall. The turbine may be placed in a generator for generation of electrical current.

  18. A Micro-Machined Gyroscope for Rotating Aircraft

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qingwen; Zhang, Fuxue; Zhang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present recent work on the design, fabrication by silicon micromachining, and packaging of a new gyroscope for stabilizing the autopilot of rotating aircraft. It operates based on oscillation of the silicon pendulum between two torsion girders for detecting the Coriolis force. The oscillation of the pendulum is initiated by the rolling and deflecting motion of the rotating carrier. Therefore, the frequency and amplitude of the oscillation are proportional to the rolling frequency and deflecting angular rate of the rotating carrier, and are measured by the sensing electrodes. A modulated pulse with constant amplitude and unequal width is obtained by a linearizing process of the gyroscope output signal and used to control the deflection of the rotating aircraft. Experimental results show that the gyroscope has a resolution of 0.008 °/s and a bias of 56.18 °/h. PMID:23012572

  19. A micro-machined gyroscope for rotating aircraft.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qingwen; Zhang, Fuxue; Zhang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present recent work on the design, fabrication by silicon micromachining, and packaging of a new gyroscope for stabilizing the autopilot of rotating aircraft. It operates based on oscillation of the silicon pendulum between two torsion girders for detecting the Coriolis force. The oscillation of the pendulum is initiated by the rolling and deflecting motion of the rotating carrier. Therefore, the frequency and amplitude of the oscillation are proportional to the rolling frequency and deflecting angular rate of the rotating carrier, and are measured by the sensing electrodes. A modulated pulse with constant amplitude and unequal width is obtained by a linearizing process of the gyroscope output signal and used to control the deflection of the rotating aircraft. Experimental results show that the gyroscope has a resolution of 0.008 °/s and a bias of 56.18 °/h.

  20. The Rotational Excitation Temperature of the 6614 DIB Carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cami, J.; Salama, F.; Jimenez-Vicente, J.; Galazutdinov, G.; Krelowski, J.

    2004-01-01

    Analysis of high spectral resolution observations of the lambda6614 DIB line profile show systematic variations in the positions of the peaks in the substructure of the profile. These variations can only be understood in the framework of rotational contours of large molecules, where the variations are caused by changes in the rotational excitation temperature. We show that the rotational excitation temperature for the DIB carrier is of the order 10-40 K - much lower than the gas kinetic temperature - indicating that for this particular DIB carrier angular momentum buildup is not very efficient. The rotational constant indicates that the carrier of this DIB is smaller than previously assumed:7-22 C atoms, depending on the geometry.

  1. Rotating Connection for Electrical Cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manges, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    Cable reel provides electrical connections between fixed structure and rotating one. Reel carries power and signal lines while allowing rotating structure to turn up to 360 degrees with respect to fixed structure. Reel replaces sliprings. Can be used to electrically connect arm of robot with body. Reel releases cable to rotating part as it turns and takes up cable as rotating part comes back to its starting position, without tangling, twisting, or kinking.

  2. Rotating black hole hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Ruth; Kubizňák, David; Wills, Danielle

    2013-06-01

    A Kerr black hole sporting cosmic string hair is studied in the context of the abelian Higgs model vortex. It is shown that such a system displays much richer phenomenology than its static Schwarzschild or Reissner-Nordstrom cousins, for example, the rotation generates a near horizon `electric' field. In the case of an extremal rotating black hole, two phases of the Higgs hair are possible: large black holes exhibit standard hair, with the vortex piercing the event horizon. Small black holes on the other hand, exhibit a flux-expelled solution, with the gauge and scalar field remaining identically in their false vacuum state on the event horizon. This solution however is extremely sensitive to confirm numerically, and we conjecture that it is unstable due to a supperradiant mechanism similar to the Kerr-adS instability. Finally, we compute the gravitational back reaction of the vortex, which turns out to be far more nuanced than a simple conical deficit. While the string produces a conical effect, it is conical with respect to a local co-rotating frame, not with respect to the static frame at infinity.

  3. Bioreactor rotating wall vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Cell constructs grown in a rotating bioreactor on Earth (left) eventually become too large to stay suspended in the nutrient media. In the microgravity of orbit, the cells stay suspended. Rotation then is needed for gentle stirring to replenish the media around the cells.

  4. Snakes and spin rotators

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    1990-06-18

    The generalized snake configuration offers advantages of either shorter total snake length and smaller orbit displacement in the compact configuration or the multi-functions in the split configuration. We found that the compact configuration can save about 10% of the total length of a snake. On other hand, the spilt snake configuration can be used both as a snake and as a spin rotator for the helicity state. Using the orbit compensation dipoles, the spilt snake configuration can be located at any distance on both sides of the interaction point of a collider provided that there is no net dipole rotation between two halves of the snake. The generalized configuration is then applied to the partial snake excitation. Simple formula have been obtained to understand the behavior of the partial snake. Similar principle can also be applied to the spin rotators. We also estimate the possible snake imperfections are due to various construction errors of the dipole magnets. Accuracy of field error of better than 10{sup {minus}4} will be significant. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  5. OH "Rotational" Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slanger, T. G.; Matsiev, D.

    2015-12-01

    It is customary to determine temperatures in the mesosphere and MLT by using Boltzmann plots based on the distributions of the lowest rotational levels in the bands of the OH Meinel system, assuming that populations in these levels are in LTE with the kinetic temperature. The higher rotational levels are clearly not in LTE, and using sky spectra from the large telescopes (Keck, VLT) has now shown that this assumption is invalid even for low rotational levels [Cosby and Slanger, 2007; Noll et al. 2014]. The apparent temperatures derived from such Boltzmann plots show an upward trend with increasing OH vibrational level, from v = 2 to v = 9, with reproducible structure such that there is always a peak at v = 8. Over this range of vibrational levels, the "temperature" increase with increasing altitude is on the order of 15-20 K. At the same time, the modeled kinetic temperature is decreasing, as the OH layer lies below the mesopause, and rocket/satellite measurements indicate that the highest levels have the highest altitude. Since this technique of kinetic temperature assessment has been in use for many years, it is important to realize that the procedure is flawed, most likely due to the details of the relaxation processes of OH(v).

  6. Nearshore Modeling using Rotational Boussinesq Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, A. B.; Zhang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    There is a strong tradeoff between accuracy and efficiency in phase-resolving modeling of nearshore waves and currents: Boussinesq-type equations are relatively efficient but lack details of interior velocities and are limited in their range of wavenumbers, while full Navier-Stokes solvers are quite accurate but are slow enough to limit their application to small regions. Here, we present details of a new higher order Boussinesq model which includes rotational motions as part of its derivation, and allows for better representations of surf zone properties while retaining reasonable computational cost. Asymptotic rearrangement techniques allow improvement of wave properties up to very large water depths. A novel absorbing-generating sponge layer allows the simple and accurate generation of both linear and nonlinear regular or irregular waves while simultaneously absorbing outgoing waves. We present breaking and nonbreaking examples of nearshore wave transformation, setup and current generation for a variety of tests.

  7. More-Accurate Model of Flows in Rocket Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, Ashvin; Chenoweth, James; Brinckman, Kevin; Dash, Sanford

    2011-01-01

    An improved computational model for simulating flows in liquid-propellant injectors in rocket engines has been developed. Models like this one are needed for predicting fluxes of heat in, and performances of, the engines. An important part of predicting performance is predicting fluctuations of temperature, fluctuations of concentrations of chemical species, and effects of turbulence on diffusion of heat and chemical species. Customarily, diffusion effects are represented by parameters known in the art as the Prandtl and Schmidt numbers. Prior formulations include ad hoc assumptions of constant values of these parameters, but these assumptions and, hence, the formulations, are inaccurate for complex flows. In the improved model, these parameters are neither constant nor specified in advance: instead, they are variables obtained as part of the solution. Consequently, this model represents the effects of turbulence on diffusion of heat and chemical species more accurately than prior formulations do, and may enable more-accurate prediction of mixing and flows of heat in rocket-engine combustion chambers. The model has been implemented within CRUNCH CFD, a proprietary computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer program, and has been tested within that program. The model could also be implemented within other CFD programs.

  8. An Accurate and Dynamic Computer Graphics Muscle Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, David Asher

    1997-01-01

    A computer based musculo-skeletal model was developed at the University in the departments of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering. This model accurately represents human shoulder kinematics. The result of this model is the graphical display of bones moving through an appropriate range of motion based on inputs of EMGs and external forces. The need existed to incorporate a geometric muscle model in the larger musculo-skeletal model. Previous muscle models did not accurately represent muscle geometries, nor did they account for the kinematics of tendons. This thesis covers the creation of a new muscle model for use in the above musculo-skeletal model. This muscle model was based on anatomical data from the Visible Human Project (VHP) cadaver study. Two-dimensional digital images from the VHP were analyzed and reconstructed to recreate the three-dimensional muscle geometries. The recreated geometries were smoothed, reduced, and sliced to form data files defining the surfaces of each muscle. The muscle modeling function opened these files during run-time and recreated the muscle surface. The modeling function applied constant volume limitations to the muscle and constant geometry limitations to the tendons.

  9. Rotating plug bearing and seal

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1977-01-01

    A bearing and seal structure for nuclear reactors utilizing rotating plugs above the nuclear reactor vessel. The structure permits lubrication of bearings and seals of the rotating plugs without risk of the lubricant draining into the reactor vessel below. The structure permits lubrication by utilizing a rotating outer race bearing.

  10. The rotation of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Thomas A.

    1991-01-01

    Earth rotation studies are reviewed for the 1987-1990 time period. It is noted that the emphasis in these studies has shifted from improvements in the observational techniques to interpreting and gaining greater understanding of the variations of the earth rotations. There have been progressive improvements in the accuracy and the temporal resolution of earth rotation measurements.

  11. Doppler observations of solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    Daily observations of the photospheric equatorial rotation rate using the Doppler effect mode at the Sanford Solar Observatory are presented. These observations show no variations in the rotation rate that exceed the observational error of about one percent. The average rotation rate is indistinguishable from that of sunspots and large scale magnetic field structures.

  12. Doppler observations of solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, P. H.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Daily observations of the photospheric equatorial rotation rate using the Doppler effect are made at the Stanford Solar Observatory. These observations show no variations in the rotation rate that exceed the observational error of about 1%. The average rotation rate is indistinguishable from that of sunspots and large-scale magnetic field structures.

  13. On the Product of Rotations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trenkler, G.; Trenkler, D.

    2008-01-01

    Using the elementary tools of matrix theory, we show that the product of two rotations in the three-dimensional Euclidean space is a rotation again. For this purpose, three types of rotation matrices are identified which are of simple structure. One of them is the identity matrix, and each of the other two types can be uniquely characterized by…

  14. Differentially Rotating White Dwarfs I: Regimes of Internal Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pranab; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2017-01-01

    Most viable models of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) require the thermonuclear explosion of a carbon/oxygen white dwarf that has evolved in a binary system. Rotation could be an important aspect of any model for SNe Ia, whether single or double degenerate, with the white dwarf mass at, below, or above the Chandrasekhar limit. Differential rotation is specifically invoked in attempts to account for the apparent excess mass in the super-Chandrasekhar events. Some earlier work has suggested that only uniform rotation is consistent with the expected mechanisms of angular momentum transport in white dwarfs, while others have found pronounced differential rotation. We show that if the baroclinic instability is active in degenerate matter and the effects of magnetic fields are neglected, both nearly uniform rotation and strongly differential rotation are possible. We classify rotation regimes in terms of the Richardson number, Ri. At small values of Ri ≤slant 0.1, we find both the low-viscosity Zahn regime with a nonmonotonic angular velocity profile and a new differential rotation regime for which the viscosity is high and scales linearly with the shear, σ. Employment of Kelvin–Helmholtz viscosity alone yields differential rotation. Large values of Ri ≫ 1 produce a regime of nearly uniform rotation for which the baroclinic viscosity is of intermediate value and scales as {σ }3. We discuss the gap in understanding of the behavior at intermediate values of Ri and how observations may constrain the rotation regimes attained by nature.

  15. Rare Isotopic Species of Sulfur Monoxide: The Rotational Spectrum in the THz Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzi, Valerio; Cazzoli, Gabriele; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2015-11-01

    Many sulfur-bearing species have been detected in different astronomical environments and have allowed us to derive important information about the chemical and physical composition of interstellar regions. In particular, these species have also been shown to trace and probe hot-core environment time evolution. Among the most prominent sulfur-bearing molecules is SO, the sulfur monoxide radical, one of the more ubiquitous and abundant, which is also observed in its isotopic substituted species such as 34SO and S18O. Due to the importance of this simple diatomic system, and in order to face the challenge of modern radioastronomical facilities, an extension to the THz range of the rare isotopologues of sulfur monoxide has been performed. High-resolution rotational molecular spectroscopy has been employed to extend the available data set of four isotopic species, SO, 34SO, S17O, and S18O, up to the 1.5 THz region. The frequency coverage and spectral resolution of our measurements allowed a better constraint of the molecular constants of the four species considered, specifically focusing on the two oxygen-substituted isotopologues. Our measurements were also employed in an isotopically invariant fit including all of the available pure rotational and ro-vibrational transitions for all of the SO isotopologues, thus enabling accurate predictions of the rotational transitions at higher frequencies. We also provide comparisons with recent works performed on the same system, demonstrating the quality of our experiment and the improvement of the data sets for all of the species considered. Transition frequencies for this system can now be used with confidence by the astronomical community well into the THz spectral region.

  16. RARE ISOTOPIC SPECIES OF SULFUR MONOXIDE: THE ROTATIONAL SPECTRUM IN THE THz REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Lattanzi, Valerio; Cazzoli, Gabriele; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2015-11-01

    Many sulfur-bearing species have been detected in different astronomical environments and have allowed us to derive important information about the chemical and physical composition of interstellar regions. In particular, these species have also been shown to trace and probe hot-core environment time evolution. Among the most prominent sulfur-bearing molecules is SO, the sulfur monoxide radical, one of the more ubiquitous and abundant, which is also observed in its isotopic substituted species such as {sup 34}SO and S{sup 18}O. Due to the importance of this simple diatomic system, and in order to face the challenge of modern radioastronomical facilities, an extension to the THz range of the rare isotopologues of sulfur monoxide has been performed. High-resolution rotational molecular spectroscopy has been employed to extend the available data set of four isotopic species, SO, {sup 34}SO, S{sup 17}O, and S{sup 18}O, up to the 1.5 THz region. The frequency coverage and spectral resolution of our measurements allowed a better constraint of the molecular constants of the four species considered, specifically focusing on the two oxygen-substituted isotopologues. Our measurements were also employed in an isotopically invariant fit including all of the available pure rotational and ro-vibrational transitions for all of the SO isotopologues, thus enabling accurate predictions of the rotational transitions at higher frequencies. We also provide comparisons with recent works performed on the same system, demonstrating the quality of our experiment and the improvement of the data sets for all of the species considered. Transition frequencies for this system can now be used with confidence by the astronomical community well into the THz spectral region.

  17. Local Anesthetics in the Gas-Phase the Rotational Spectrum of Butamben and Isobutamben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallejo-López, Montserrat; Ecija, Patricia; Caminati, Walther; Grabow, Jens-Uwe; Lesarri, Alberto; Cocinero, Emilio J.

    2016-06-01

    Benzocaine (BZ), butamben (BTN) and isobutamben (BTI) are local anesthetics characterized by a hydrophilic head and a lipophilic aliphatic tail linked by an aminobenzoate group. Previous rotational work on BZ (H2N-C6H4-COO-Et) showed that its ethyl aliphatic tail may adopt either in-plane (trans) or out of plane (gauche) conformations, with a low interconversion barrier below 50 cm-1. Here we extend the rotational study to BTN and BTI, isolated in a supersonic jet expansion and vaporized either by heating or UV ps-laser ablation methods. Both molecules share a 14 heavy-atoms skeleton, differing in their butyl (-(CH2)3-CH3) or isobutyl (-CH2-CH(CH3)2) four-carbon tail. We detected a single conformer for BTN and two conformers for BTI. The two molecules do not adopt an all-trans carbon skeleton. Conversely, the β-ethyl carbon in BTN is gauche. For BTI the β-carbon may be either trans or gauche. The microwave spectrum covered the cm- (BTN, BTI, 6-18 GHz) and mm-wave (BTW, 50-75 GHz) frequency ranges.In all the cases, rotational and centrifugal distortion constants as well as the diagonal elements of the 14N nuclear quadrupole coupling tensor were accurate determined and compared to the theoretical results (ab initio and DFT). No transitions belonging to configurations predicted as higher minima of the PES were found, pointing out that conformational interconversions may take place in the jet. A. Lesarri, S. T. Shipman, G. G. Brown, L. Alvarez-Valtierra, R. D. Suenram, B. H. Pate, Int. Symp. Mol. Spectrosc., 2008, Comm. RH07. E. Aguado, A. Longarte, E. Alejandro, J. A. Fernández, F. Castaño, J. Phys. Chem. A, 2006, 110, 6010.

  18. High order accurate finite difference schemes based on symmetry preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbenli, Ersin; Vedula, Prakash

    2016-11-01

    A new algorithm for development of high order accurate finite difference schemes for numerical solution of partial differential equations using Lie symmetries is presented. Considering applicable symmetry groups (such as those relevant to space/time translations, Galilean transformation, scaling, rotation and projection) of a partial differential equation, invariant numerical schemes are constructed based on the notions of moving frames and modified equations. Several strategies for construction of invariant numerical schemes with a desired order of accuracy are analyzed. Performance of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated using analysis of one-dimensional partial differential equations, such as linear advection diffusion equations inviscid Burgers equation and viscous Burgers equation, as our test cases. Through numerical simulations based on these examples, the expected improvement in accuracy of invariant numerical schemes (up to fourth order) is demonstrated. Advantages due to implementation and enhanced computational efficiency inherent in our proposed algorithm are presented. Extension of the basic framework to multidimensional partial differential equations is also discussed.

  19. Nonlinear dynamics and anisotropic structure of rotating sheared turbulence.

    PubMed

    Salhi, A; Jacobitz, F G; Schneider, K; Cambon, C

    2014-01-01

    Homogeneous turbulence in rotating shear flows is studied by means of pseudospectral direct numerical simulation and analytical spectral linear theory (SLT). The ratio of the Coriolis parameter to shear rate is varied over a wide range by changing the rotation strength, while a constant moderate shear rate is used to enable significant contributions to the nonlinear interscale energy transfer and to the nonlinear intercomponental redistribution terms. In the destabilized and neutral cases, in the sense of kinetic energy evolution, nonlinearity cannot saturate the growth of the largest scales. It permits the smallest scale to stabilize by a scale-by-scale quasibalance between the nonlinear energy transfer and the dissipation spectrum. In the stabilized cases, the role of rotation is mainly nonlinear, and interacting inertial waves can affect almost all scales as in purely rotating flows. In order to isolate the nonlinear effect of rotation, the two-dimensional manifold with vanishing spanwise wave number is revisited and both two-component spectra and single-point two-dimensional energy components exhibit an important effect of rotation, whereas the SLT as well as the purely two-dimensional nonlinear analysis are unaffected by rotation as stated by the Proudman theorem. The other two-dimensional manifold with vanishing streamwise wave number is analyzed with similar tools because it is essential for any shear flow. Finally, the spectral approach is used to disentangle, in an analytical way, the linear and nonlinear terms in the dynamical equations.

  20. Nonlinear dynamics and anisotropic structure of rotating sheared turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salhi, A.; Jacobitz, F. G.; Schneider, K.; Cambon, C.

    2014-01-01

    Homogeneous turbulence in rotating shear flows is studied by means of pseudospectral direct numerical simulation and analytical spectral linear theory (SLT). The ratio of the Coriolis parameter to shear rate is varied over a wide range by changing the rotation strength, while a constant moderate shear rate is used to enable significant contributions to the nonlinear interscale energy transfer and to the nonlinear intercomponental redistribution terms. In the destabilized and neutral cases, in the sense of kinetic energy evolution, nonlinearity cannot saturate the growth of the largest scales. It permits the smallest scale to stabilize by a scale-by-scale quasibalance between the nonlinear energy transfer and the dissipation spectrum. In the stabilized cases, the role of rotation is mainly nonlinear, and interacting inertial waves can affect almost all scales as in purely rotating flows. In order to isolate the nonlinear effect of rotation, the two-dimensional manifold with vanishing spanwise wave number is revisited and both two-component spectra and single-point two-dimensional energy components exhibit an important effect of rotation, whereas the SLT as well as the purely two-dimensional nonlinear analysis are unaffected by rotation as stated by the Proudman theorem. The other two-dimensional manifold with vanishing streamwise wave number is analyzed with similar tools because it is essential for any shear flow. Finally, the spectral approach is used to disentangle, in an analytical way, the linear and nonlinear terms in the dynamical equations.