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Sample records for accurate rotational line

  1. Limited rotational and rovibrational line lists computed with highly accurate quartic force fields and ab initio dipole surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fortenberry, Ryan C; Huang, Xinchuan; Schwenke, David W; Lee, Timothy J

    2014-02-01

    In this work, computational procedures are employed to compute the rotational and rovibrational spectra and line lists for H2O, CO2, and SO2. Building on the established use of quartic force fields, MP2 and CCSD(T) Dipole Moment Surfaces (DMSs) are computed for each system of study in order to produce line intensities as well as the transition energies. The computed results exhibit a clear correlation to reference data available in the HITRAN database. Additionally, even though CCSD(T) DMSs produce more accurate intensities as compared to experiment, the use of MP2 DMSs results in reliable line lists that are still comparable to experiment. The use of the less computationally costly MP2 method is beneficial in the study of larger systems where use of CCSD(T) would be more costly. PMID:23692860

  2. Combining Theory and Experiment to Compute Highly Accurate Line Lists for Stable Molecules, and Purely AB Initio Theory to Compute Accurate Rotational and Rovibrational Line Lists for Transient Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Huang, Xinchuan; Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Schwenke, David W.

    2013-06-01

    Theoretical chemists have been computing vibrational and rovibrational spectra of small molecules for more than 40 years, but over the last decade the interest in this application has grown significantly. The increased interest in computing accurate rotational and rovibrational spectra for small molecules could not come at a better time, as NASA and ESA have begun to acquire a mountain of high-resolution spectra from the Herschel mission, and soon will from the SOFIA and JWST missions. In addition, the ground-based telescope, ALMA, has begun to acquire high-resolution spectra in the same time frame. Hence the need for highly accurate line lists for many small molecules, including their minor isotopologues, will only continue to increase. I will present the latest developments from our group on using the "Best Theory + High-Resolution Experimental Data" strategy to compute highly accurate rotational and rovibrational spectra for small molecules, including NH3, CO2, and SO2. I will also present the latest work from our group in producing purely ab initio line lists and spectroscopic constants for small molecules thought to exist in various astrophysical environments, but for which there is either limited or no high-resolution experimental data available. These more limited line lists include purely rotational transitions as well as rovibrational transitions for bands up through a few combination/overtones.

  3. Accurate far-infrared rotational frequencies of carbon monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varberg, Thomas D.; Evenson, Kenneth M.

    1992-01-01

    This study presents high-resolution measurements of the pure rotational absorption spectrum of CO in its ground state for the range J arcsec - 5-37. A least-squares fit to this data set, augmented by previous microwave measurements of the J arcsec = 0-4 rotational transitions in the literature, determined accurate values for the molecular constants. A table of calculated CO rotational frequencies is provided for the range J arcsec = 0-45.

  4. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    DOEpatents

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  5. Spectroscopically Accurate Line Lists for Application in Sulphur Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, D. S.; Azzam, A. A. A.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Tennyson, J.

    2013-09-01

    Monitoring sulphur chemistry is thought to be of great importance for exoplanets. Doing this requires detailed knowledge of the spectroscopic properties of sulphur containing molecules such as hydrogen sulphide (H2S) [1], sulphur dioxide (SO2), and sulphur trioxide (SO3). Each of these molecules can be found in terrestrial environments, produced in volcano emissions on Earth, and analysis of their spectroscopic data can prove useful to the characterisation of exoplanets, as well as the study of planets in our own solar system, with both having a possible presence on Venus. A complete, high temperature list of line positions and intensities for H32 2 S is presented. The DVR3D program suite is used to calculate the bound ro-vibration energy levels, wavefunctions, and dipole transition intensities using Radau coordinates. The calculations are based on a newly determined, spectroscopically refined potential energy surface (PES) and a new, high accuracy, ab initio dipole moment surface (DMS). Tests show that the PES enables us to calculate the line positions accurately and the DMS gives satisfactory results for line intensities. Comparisons with experiment as well as with previous theoretical spectra will be presented. The results of this study will form an important addition to the databases which are considered as sources of information for space applications; especially, in analysing the spectra of extrasolar planets, and remote sensing studies for Venus and Earth, as well as laboratory investigations and pollution studies. An ab initio line list for SO3 was previously computed using the variational nuclear motion program TROVE [2], and was suitable for modelling room temperature SO3 spectra. The calculations considered transitions in the region of 0-4000 cm-1 with rotational states up to J = 85, and includes 174,674,257 transitions. A list of 10,878 experimental transitions had relative intensities placed on an absolute scale, and were provided in a form suitable

  6. Fast and accurate determination of the Wigner rotation matrices in the fast multipole method.

    PubMed

    Dachsel, Holger

    2006-04-14

    In the rotation based fast multipole method the accurate determination of the Wigner rotation matrices is essential. The combination of two recurrence relations and the control of the error accumulations allow a very precise determination of the Wigner rotation matrices. The recurrence formulas are simple, efficient, and numerically stable. The advantages over other recursions are documented. PMID:16626188

  7. Accurate oscillator strengths for interstellar ultraviolet lines of Cl I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schectman, R. M.; Federman, S. R.; Beideck, D. J.; Ellis, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Analyses on the abundance of interstellar chlorine rely on accurate oscillator strengths for ultraviolet transitions. Beam-foil spectroscopy was used to obtain f-values for the astrophysically important lines of Cl I at 1088, 1097, and 1347 A. In addition, the line at 1363 A was studied. Our f-values for 1088, 1097 A represent the first laboratory measurements for these lines; the values are f(1088)=0.081 +/- 0.007 (1 sigma) and f(1097) = 0.0088 +/- 0.0013 (1 sigma). These results resolve the issue regarding the relative strengths for 1088, 1097 A in favor of those suggested by astronomical measurements. For the other lines, our results of f(1347) = 0.153 +/- 0.011 (1 sigma) and f(1363) = 0.055 +/- 0.004 (1 sigma) are the most precisely measured values available. The f-values are somewhat greater than previous experimental and theoretical determinations.

  8. Predicting accurate line shape parameters for CO2 transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamache, Robert R.; Lamouroux, Julien

    2013-11-01

    The vibrational dependence of CO2 half-widths and line shifts are given by a modification of the model proposed by Gamache and Hartmann [Gamache R, Hartmann J-M. J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transfer 2004;83:119]. This model allows the half-widths and line shifts for a ro-vibrational transition to be expressed in terms of the number of vibrational quanta exchanged in the transition raised to a power and a reference ro-vibrational transition. Calculations were made for 24 bands for lower rotational quantum numbers from 0 to 160 for N2-, O2-, air-, and self-collisions with CO2. These data were extrapolated to J″=200 to accommodate several databases. Comparison of the CRB calculations with measurement gives very high confidence in the data. In the model a Quantum Coordinate is defined by (c1 |Δν1|+c2 |Δν2|+c3|Δν3|)p. The power p is adjusted and a linear least-squares fit to the data by the model expression is made. The procedure is iterated on the correlation coefficient, R, until [|R|-1] is less than a threshold. The results demonstrate the appropriateness of the model. The model allows the determination of the slope and intercept as a function of rotational transition, broadening gas, and temperature. From the data of the fits, the half-width, line shift, and the temperature dependence of the half-width can be estimated for any ro-vibrational transition, allowing spectroscopic CO2 databases to have complete information for the line shape parameters.

  9. Accurate Determination of Membrane Dynamics with Line-Scan FCS

    PubMed Central

    Ries, Jonas; Chiantia, Salvatore; Schwille, Petra

    2009-01-01

    Here we present an efficient implementation of line-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (i.e., one-dimensional spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy) using a commercial laser scanning microscope, which allows the accurate measurement of diffusion coefficients and concentrations in biological lipid membranes within seconds. Line-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy is a calibration-free technique. Therefore, it is insensitive to optical artifacts, saturation, or incorrect positioning of the laser focus. In addition, it is virtually unaffected by photobleaching. Correction schemes for residual inhomogeneities and depletion of fluorophores due to photobleaching extend the applicability of line-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to more demanding systems. This technique enabled us to measure accurate diffusion coefficients and partition coefficients of fluorescent lipids in phase-separating supported bilayers of three commonly used raft-mimicking compositions. Furthermore, we probed the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient in several model membranes, and in human embryonic kidney cell membranes not affected by temperature-induced optical aberrations. PMID:19254560

  10. Extensive and Highly Accurate Line Lists for Hydrogen Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Bernath, P. F.; Gordon, I. E.; Rothman, L. S.; Richard, C.; Le Roy, R. J.; Coxon, J. A.; Hajigeorgiou, P.

    2011-06-01

    New dipole moment functions (DMF) for the ground X 1Σ+ electronic states of the hydrogen halides (HF, HCl, HBr, HI) have been obtained using a direct fit approach that fits the best available and appropriately weighted experimental line intensity data for individual ro-vibrational transitions. Combining the newly developed (taking into account the most recent experiments) empirical potential energy functions and the DMFs, line positions and line intensities of the hydrogen halides and their isotopologues have been calculated numerically using program LEVEL. In addition, new semi-empirical algorithms for assigning line-shape parameters for these species have been developed. Using these improvements, new line lists for hydrogen halides were created to update the HITRAN spectroscopic database. These new lists are more accurate and significantly more extensive than those included in the current version of the database (HITRAN2008). R.J. Le Roy, ``LEVEL 8.0, 2007'', University of Waterloo Chemical Physics Research Report CP-663 (2007); see http://leroy.uwaterloo.ca/programs/. L.S. Rothman, I.E. Gordon, A. Barbe, D.C. Benner, P.F. Bernath, et al., ``The HITRAN 2008 Molecular Spectroscopic Database,'' JQSRT 110, 532-572 (2009).

  11. NH3 quantum rotators in Hofmann clathrates: intensity and width of rotational transition lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorderwisch, Peter; Sobolev, Oleg; Desmedt, Arnaud

    2004-07-01

    Inelastic structure factors for rotational transitions of uniaxial NH3 quantum rotators, measured in a Hofmann clathrate with biphenyl as guest molecule, agree with those calculated for free rotators. A finite intrinsic line width, found for rotational transitions involving the rotational level j=3 at low temperature, supports a recently suggested model based on resonant rotor-rotor coupling. Present address: LPCM, CNRS-Université de Bordeaux I, 351 Cours de Libération, Talence F-33405, France.

  12. In-line rotating capacitive torque sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring torques developed along a rotating mechanical assembly comprising a rotating inner portion and a stationary outer portion. The rotating portion has an electrically-conductive flexing section fitted between two coaxial shafts in a configuration which varies radially in accordance with applied torque. The stationary portion comprises a plurality of conductive plates forming a surface concentric with and having a diameter slightly larger than the diameter of the rotating portion. The capacitance between the outer, nonrotating and inner, rotating portion varies with changes in the radial configuration of the rotating portion. Signal output varies approximately linearly with torque for small torques, nonlinearly for larger torques. The sensor is preferably surrounded by a conductive shell to minimize electrical interference from external sources.

  13. In-line rotating capacitive torque sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-09-10

    Disclosed are a method and apparatus for measuring torques developed along a rotating mechanical assembly comprising a rotating inner portion and a stationary outer portion. The rotating portion has an electrically-conductive flexing section fitted between two coaxial shafts in a configuration which varies radially in accordance with applied torque. The stationary portion comprises a plurality of conductive plates forming a surface concentric with and having a diameter slightly larger than the diameter of the rotating portion. The capacitance between the outer, nonrotating and inner, rotating portion varies with changes in the radial configuration of the rotating portion. Signal output varies approximately linearly with torque for small torques, nonlinearly for larger torques. The sensor is preferably surrounded by a conductive shell to minimize electrical interference from external sources. 18 figures.

  14. Accurate in-line CD metrology for nanometer semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perng, Baw-Ching; Shieh, Jyu-Horng; Jang, S.-M.; Liang, M.-S.; Huang, Renee; Chen, Li-Chien; Hwang, Ruey-Lian; Hsu, Joe; Fong, David

    2006-03-01

    The need for absolute accuracy is increasing as semiconductor-manufacturing technologies advance to sub-65nm nodes, since device sizes are reducing to sub-50nm but offsets ranging from 5nm to 20nm are often encountered. While TEM is well-recognized as the most accurate CD metrology, direct comparison between the TEM data and in-line CD data might be misleading sometimes due to different statistical sampling and interferences from sidewall roughness. In this work we explore the capability of CD-AFM as an accurate in-line CD reference metrology. Being a member of scanning profiling metrology, CD-AFM has the advantages of avoiding e-beam damage and minimum sample damage induced CD changes, in addition to the capability of more statistical sampling than typical cross section metrologies. While AFM has already gained its reputation on the accuracy of depth measurement, not much data was reported on the accuracy of CD-AFM for CD measurement. Our main focus here is to prove the accuracy of CD-AFM and show its measuring capability for semiconductor related materials and patterns. In addition to the typical precision check, we spent an intensive effort on examining the bias performance of this CD metrology, which is defined as the difference between CD-AFM data and the best-known CD value of the prepared samples. We first examine line edge roughness (LER) behavior for line patterns of various materials, including polysilicon, photoresist, and a porous low k material. Based on the LER characteristics of each patterning, a method is proposed to reduce its influence on CD measurement. Application of our method to a VLSI nanoCD standard is then performed, and agreement of less than 1nm bias is achieved between the CD-AFM data and the standard's value. With very careful sample preparations and TEM tool calibration, we also obtained excellent correlation between CD-AFM and TEM for poly-CDs ranging from 70nm to 400nm. CD measurements of poly ADI and low k trenches are also

  15. Fast and accurate line scanner based on white light interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambelet, Patrick; Moosburger, Rudolf

    2013-04-01

    White-light interferometry is a highly accurate technology for 3D measurements. The principle is widely utilized in surface metrology instruments but rarely adopted for in-line inspection systems. The main challenges for rolling out inspection systems based on white-light interferometry to the production floor are its sensitivity to environmental vibrations and relatively long measurement times: a large quantity of data needs to be acquired and processed in order to obtain a single topographic measurement. Heliotis developed a smart-pixel CMOS camera (lock-in camera) which is specially suited for white-light interferometry. The demodulation of the interference signal is treated at the level of the pixel which typically reduces the acquisition data by one orders of magnitude. Along with the high bandwidth of the dedicated lock-in camera, vertical scan-speeds of more than 40mm/s are reachable. The high scan speed allows for the realization of inspection systems that are rugged against external vibrations as present on the production floor. For many industrial applications such as the inspection of wafer-bumps, surface of mechanical parts and solar-panel, large areas need to be measured. In this case either the instrument or the sample are displaced laterally and several measurements are stitched together. The cycle time of such a system is mostly limited by the stepping time for multiple lateral displacements. A line-scanner based on white light interferometry would eliminate most of the stepping time while maintaining robustness and accuracy. A. Olszak proposed a simple geometry to realize such a lateral scanning interferometer. We demonstrate that such inclined interferometers can benefit significantly from the fast in-pixel demodulation capabilities of the lock-in camera. One drawback of an inclined observation perspective is that its application is limited to objects with scattering surfaces. We therefore propose an alternate geometry where the incident light is

  16. Accurate Estimation of the Entropy of Rotation-Translation Probability Distributions.

    PubMed

    Fogolari, Federico; Dongmo Foumthuim, Cedrix Jurgal; Fortuna, Sara; Soler, Miguel Angel; Corazza, Alessandra; Esposito, Gennaro

    2016-01-12

    The estimation of rotational and translational entropies in the context of ligand binding has been the subject of long-time investigations. The high dimensionality (six) of the problem and the limited amount of sampling often prevent the required resolution to provide accurate estimates by the histogram method. Recently, the nearest-neighbor distance method has been applied to the problem, but the solutions provided either address rotation and translation separately, therefore lacking correlations, or use a heuristic approach. Here we address rotational-translational entropy estimation in the context of nearest-neighbor-based entropy estimation, solve the problem numerically, and provide an exact and an approximate method to estimate the full rotational-translational entropy. PMID:26605696

  17. Shifts of the Al-26 line due to Galactic rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skibo, Jeff; Ramaty, Reuven

    1991-01-01

    The shape of the Al-26 line is evaluated using a Galactic disk rotation curve and assuming various galactic distributions of radioactive aluminum. The line shape depends on galactic longitude, detector opening angle, and the assumed aluminum distribution. For a detector of 20 deg aperture and 2.5 keV resolution, the shift of the line peak can be as large as 0.4 keV. Such a shift could be detected with the proposed nuclear astrophysics explorer.

  18. Accurate Visual Heading Estimation at High Rotation Rate Without Oculomotor or Static-Depth Cues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Leland S.; Perrone, John A.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    It has been claimed that either oculomotor or static depth cues provide the signals about self-rotation necessary approx.-1 deg/s. We tested this hypothesis by simulating self-motion along a curved path with the eyes fixed in the head (plus or minus 16 deg/s of rotation). Curvilinear motion offers two advantages: 1) heading remains constant in retinotopic coordinates, and 2) there is no visual-oculomotor conflict (both actual and simulated eye position remain stationary). We simulated 400 ms of rotation combined with 16 m/s of translation at fixed angles with respect to gaze towards two vertical planes of random dots initially 12 and 24 m away, with a field of view of 45 degrees. Four subjects were asked to fixate a central cross and to respond whether they were translating to the left or right of straight-ahead gaze. From the psychometric curves, heading bias (mean) and precision (semi-interquartile) were derived. The mean bias over 2-5 runs was 3.0, 4.0, -2.0, -0.4 deg for the first author and three naive subjects, respectively (positive indicating towards the rotation direction). The mean precision was 2.0, 1.9, 3.1, 1.6 deg. respectively. The ability of observers to make relatively accurate and precise heading judgments, despite the large rotational flow component, refutes the view that extra-flow-field information is necessary for human visual heading estimation at high rotation rates. Our results support models that process combined translational/rotational flow to estimate heading, but should not be construed to suggest that other cues do not play an important role when they are available to the observer.

  19. Accurate rotational constant and bond lengths of hexafluorobenzene by femtosecond rotational Raman coherence spectroscopy and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Den, Takuya S.; Frey, Hans-Martin; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2014-11-21

    The gas-phase rotational motion of hexafluorobenzene has been measured in real time using femtosecond (fs) time-resolved rotational Raman coherence spectroscopy (RR-RCS) at T = 100 and 295 K. This four-wave mixing method allows to probe the rotation of non-polar gas-phase molecules with fs time resolution over times up to ∼5 ns. The ground state rotational constant of hexafluorobenzene is determined as B{sub 0} = 1029.740(28) MHz (2σ uncertainty) from RR-RCS transients measured in a pulsed seeded supersonic jet, where essentially only the v = 0 state is populated. Using this B{sub 0} value, RR-RCS measurements in a room temperature gas cell give the rotational constants B{sub v} of the five lowest-lying thermally populated vibrationally excited states ν{sub 7/8}, ν{sub 9}, ν{sub 11/12}, ν{sub 13}, and ν{sub 14/15}. Their B{sub v} constants differ from B{sub 0} by between −1.02 MHz and +2.23 MHz. Combining the B{sub 0} with the results of all-electron coupled-cluster CCSD(T) calculations of Demaison et al. [Mol. Phys. 111, 1539 (2013)] and of our own allow to determine the C-C and C-F semi-experimental equilibrium bond lengths r{sub e}(C-C) = 1.3866(3) Å and r{sub e}(C-F) = 1.3244(4) Å. These agree with the CCSD(T)/wCVQZ r{sub e} bond lengths calculated by Demaison et al. within ±0.0005 Å. We also calculate the semi-experimental thermally averaged bond lengths r{sub g}(C-C)=1.3907(3) Å and r{sub g}(C-F)=1.3250(4) Å. These are at least ten times more accurate than two sets of experimental gas-phase electron diffraction r{sub g} bond lengths measured in the 1960s.

  20. Accurate transition rates for intercombination lines of singly ionized nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Tayal, S. S.

    2011-01-15

    The transition energies and rates for the 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 2} {sup 3}P{sub 1,2}-2s2p{sup 3} {sup 5}S{sub 2}{sup o} and 2s{sup 2}2p3s-2s{sup 2}2p3p intercombination transitions have been calculated using term-dependent nonorthogonal orbitals in the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock approach. Several sets of spectroscopic and correlation nonorthogonal functions have been chosen to describe adequately term dependence of wave functions and various correlation corrections. Special attention has been focused on the accurate representation of strong interactions between the 2s2p{sup 3} {sup 1,3}P{sub 1}{sup o} and 2s{sup 2}2p3s {sup 1,3}P{sub 1}{sup o}levels. The relativistic corrections are included through the one-body mass correction, Darwin, and spin-orbit operators and two-body spin-other-orbit and spin-spin operators in the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. The importance of core-valence correlation effects has been examined. The accuracy of present transition rates is evaluated by the agreement between the length and velocity formulations combined with the agreement between the calculated and measured transition energies. The present results for transition probabilities, branching fraction, and lifetimes have been compared with previous calculations and experiments.

  1. Bifunctional Spin Labeling of Muscle Proteins: Accurate Rotational Dynamics, Orientation, and Distance by EPR.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Andrew R; Binder, Benjamin P; McCaffrey, Jesse E; Svensson, Bengt; Thomas, David D

    2015-01-01

    While EPR allows for the characterization of protein structure and function due to its exquisite sensitivity to spin label dynamics, orientation, and distance, these measurements are often limited in sensitivity due to the use of labels that are attached via flexible monofunctional bonds, incurring additional disorder and nanosecond dynamics. In this chapter, we present methods for using a bifunctional spin label (BSL) to measure muscle protein structure and dynamics. We demonstrate that bifunctional attachment eliminates nanosecond internal rotation of the spin label, thereby allowing the accurate measurement of protein backbone rotational dynamics, including microsecond-to-millisecond motions by saturation transfer EPR. BSL also allows for accurate determination of helix orientation and disorder in mechanically and magnetically aligned systems, due to the label's stereospecific attachment. Similarly, labeling with a pair of BSL greatly enhances the resolution and accuracy of distance measurements measured by double electron-electron resonance (DEER). Finally, when BSL is applied to a protein with high helical content in an assembly with high orientational order (e.g., muscle fiber or membrane), two-probe DEER experiments can be combined with single-probe EPR experiments on an oriented sample in a process we call BEER, which has the potential for ab initio high-resolution structure determination. PMID:26477249

  2. An accurate and efficient algorithm for Faraday rotation corrections for spaceborne microwave radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Malkiat; Bettenhausen, Michael H.

    2011-08-01

    Faraday rotation changes the polarization plane of linearly polarized microwaves which propagate through the ionosphere. To correct for ionospheric polarization error, it is necessary to have electron density profiles on a global scale that represent the ionosphere in real time. We use raytrace through the combined models of ionospheric conductivity and electron density (ICED), Bent, and Gallagher models (RIBG model) to specify the ionospheric conditions by ingesting the GPS data from observing stations that are as close as possible to the observation time and location of the space system for which the corrections are required. To accurately calculate Faraday rotation corrections, we also utilize the raytrace utility of the RIBG model instead of the normal shell model assumption for the ionosphere. We use WindSat data, which exhibits a wide range of orientations of the raypath and a high data rate of observations, to provide a realistic data set for analysis. The standard single-shell models at 350 and 400 km are studied along with a new three-shell model and compared with the raytrace method for computation time and accuracy. We have compared the Faraday results obtained with climatological (International Reference Ionosphere and RIBG) and physics-based (Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements) ionospheric models. We also study the impact of limitations in the availability of GPS data on the accuracy of the Faraday rotation calculations.

  3. Accurate rotational rest-frequencies of CH2NH at submillimetre wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dore, L.; Bizzocchi, L.; Degli Esposti, C.

    2012-08-01

    Context. Methanimine (CH2NH) has been detected in different astronomical sources, both galactic (as in several "hot cores", the circumstellar enevolope IRC+10216, and the L183 pre-stellar core) and extragalactic, and is considered a pre-biotic interstellar molecule. Its ground-state rotational spectrum has been studied in the laboratory up to 172 GHz, well below the spectral ranges covered by Herschel/HIFI and the ALMA bands 9 and 10. Aims: In this laboratory study, we extend into the submillimetre-wave region the detection of the rotational spectrum of CH2NH in its vibrational ground state. Methods: The investigation was carried out using a source-modulation microwave spectrometer equipped with a cell coupled to a pyrolysis apparatus working at 1150 °C. The spectrum was recorded in the frequency range 329-629 GHz, with the detection of 58 transitions. Results: The newly measured transition frequencies, along with those available from previous microwave studies, allow us to determine fairly accurate rotational constants of CH2NH and the complete sets of quartic and sextic centrifugal distortion constants, in addition to two octic constants. Several transitions have an hyperfine structure due to the 14N nucleus, which was accounted for in the analysis. Conclusions: The determined spectroscopic constants make it possible to build a list of very accurate rest-frequencies for astrophysical purposes in the THz region with 1σ uncertainties lower than 0.01 km s-1 in radial equivalent velocity. Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/544/A19

  4. Observations of Rotationally Resolved C3 in Translucent Sight Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ádámkovics, Máté; Blake, Geoffrey A.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2003-09-01

    The rotationally resolved spectrum of the A1Πu<--X1Σ+g 000-000 transition of C3, centered at 4051.6 Å, has been observed along 10 translucent lines of sight. To interpret these spectra, a new method for the determination of column densities and analysis of excitation profiles involving the simulation and fitting of observed spectra has been developed. The populations of lower rotational levels (J<=14) in C3 are best fitted by thermal distributions that are consistent with the kinetic temperatures determined from the excitation profile of C2. Just as in the case of C2, higher rotational levels (J>14) of C3 show increased nonthermal population distributions in clouds that have been determined to have total gas densities below ~500 cm-3.

  5. On-line phase measuring profilometry for a rotating object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Cao, Yiping; Yang, Xin; Peng, Kuang

    2014-11-01

    On-line phase measuring profilometry (OPMP) for a rotating object is proposed. N frames of circular sinusoidal grating patterns are designed in advance, in which the transmittance along the radial direction is sinusoidal and there is a fixed shifting phase pitch of 2π/N between every adjacent two grating patterns along the radial direction. While the measured object is rotating, the designed grating patterns are projected onto the rotating object by digital light processing and the corresponding deformed patterns caused by the object at different positions are captured by a charge coupled device camera. By pixel matching and rotation transformation with special marks, N frames of the deformed patterns of the object at the same position can be extracted. Hence, the rotating object can be reconstructed by the extracted deformed patterns. The results of computer emulation and experiment show the feasibility and validity of the proposed OPMP. Either the maximum measurement absolute error is 0.118 mm or the maximum root mean square error is 0.077 mm in the measured region of 0 to 25 mm.

  6. Rotation and emission lines in stars and accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Keith; Saar, Steven H.

    1991-01-01

    In the accretion disks of quiescent dwarf novae, Doppler mapping studies reveal that Balmer emission lines increase sharply toward the center of the disk, with surface brightnesses scaling roughly as R exp -3/2 varies as Omega(Kep). Similarly, among chromospherically active stars the H-alpha and Ca II H and K emission cores are stronger in the more rapidly rotating stars, with surface brightnesses scaling again roughly as Omega(rot). Since in both cases the emission lines scale linearly with the rotation frequency, it is proposed that the mechanism powering the emission lines in quiescent accretion disks is the same as that in chromospherically active stars, namely, the emergence of magnetic flux generated by the action of a dynamo, and its interaction with the atmosphere. If this empirical connection between disks and stars is in fact due to magnetic dynamos, the range of rotation rates available for testing dynamo theories expands from a factor of 1000 to 10 to the 7th.

  7. Absorption Line Profiles for 39 Rapidly Rotating Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckley, T. R.; Carroll, R. W.; Miller, R. D.

    1984-05-01

    Absorption lines of He II, HeI, MgII and other ions have been measured in 169 photographic coude spectra for 39 rapidly rotating B-type stars on the main sequence. All 1500 separate line profiles have been analysed with a procedure of differential corrections by least-squares to yield the following parameters and their error estimates: half-width, central depth, equivalent width and shape parameter. The shape parameter includes Voigt profiles and also `super-Gaussian' and `super-damping' profiles. Up to 15 separately measured line profiles in each star have been superimposed to yield better composite profiles with point scatter as small as 0.5 per cent. In addition, a preliminary value of V sin i is derived for each line of each star, and a mean value (including error bars) is derived for each star. Results are compared and discussed, with reference to forthcoming work incorporating stellar distortion, gravity darkening, and other second-order effects, which will allow determinations of axial inclination and differential rotation of individual stars, using the data sets presented here and elsewhere.

  8. Synthetic line profiles of rotationally distorted hot-star winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harries, Tim J.

    2000-07-01

    A new Monte Carlo stellar wind radiative-transfer code is presented. The code employs a three-dimensional opacity grid, and fully treats polarization and multiple scattering. Either Mie or Rayleigh scattering phase matrices may be used, and the line-transfer is treated by means of the Solobolev approximation. Variance reduction techniques are employed to increase computational efficiency. The results of several tests of the code are reported. It is confirmed that no continuum polarization is produced in the spherically symmetric wind case, and that the line profiles computed match those computed using established radiative-transfer codes. The continuum polarization produced by a latitudinally structured low-density wind is found to be in good agreement with that predicted by the single-scattering analytical treatment of Fox, while in the higher density regime the polarizations are consistent with the multiple-scattering code given by Hillier. Two illustrative applications of the code are described, using the wind parameters of ζ Puppis [O4I(n)f] as the base model. In the first the effect on the line profile of a corotating spiral density enhancement is examined. It is found that the spiral gives line profile variations on the order of 5 per cent, and that it produces an S-wave-like pattern as a function of rotational phase. It is noted that the accelerations described by the spiral wave may mimic those produced by tangentially accelerating wind clumps. The variable polarization produced by the spiral is found to have an amplitude of 0.1 per cent, with two maxima per rotational period in phase with the line emission modulation. The second application investigates the profiles and polarization produced in a clumped wind. Although the parameters of the discrete wind clumps are necessarily arbitrary, it is found that a clumped-wind model reproduces the level of spectroscopic variability found by Eversberg et al. It is shown that the wind emission `bumps' produced in

  9. Variable rotational line broadening in the Be star Achernar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivinius, Th.; Baade, D.; Townsend, R. H. D.; Carciofi, A. C.; Štefl, S.

    2013-11-01

    Aims: The main theoretical problem for the formation of a Keplerian disk around Be stars is how angular momentum is supplied from the star to the disk, even more so since Be stars probably rotate somewhat subcritically. For instance, nonradial pulsation may transport angular momentum to the stellar surface until (part of) this excess supports the disk-formation/replenishment. The nearby Be star Achernar is presently building a new disk and offers an excellent opportunity to observe this process from relatively close-up. Methods: Spectra from various sources and epochs are scrutinized to identify the salient stellar parameters characterizing the disk life cycle as defined by Hα emission. The variable strength of the non-radial pulsation is confirmed, but does not affect the other results. Results: For the first time it is demonstrated that the photospheric line width does vary in a Be star, by as much as Δv sini ≲ 35 km s-1. However, unlike assumptions in which a photospheric spin-up accumulates during the diskless phase and then is released into the disk as it is fed, the apparent photospheric spin-up is positively correlated with the appearance of Hα line emission. The photospheric line widths and circumstellar emission increase together, and the apparent stellar rotation declines to the value at quiescence after the Hα line emission becomes undetectable. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory at La Silla and Paranal, Chile, Prog. IDs: 62.H-0319, 64.H-0548, 072.C-0513, 073.C-0784, 074.C-0012, 073.D-0547, 076.C-0431, 077.D-0390, 077.D-0605, and the technical program IDs 60.A-9120 and 60.A-9036.Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  10. Mechanical Analysis and Hierarchies of Multi-digit Synergies during Accurate Object Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Olafsdottir, Halla B.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the mechanical variables (the grip force and the total moment of force) and multi-digit synergies at two levels (the virtual finger-thumb level, VF-TH, and the individual finger level, IMRL) of a hypothetical control hierarchy during accurate rotation of a hand-held instrumented handle. Synergies were defined as co-varied changes in elemental variables (forces and moments of force) that stabilize the output at a particular level. Indices of multi-digit synergies showed higher values at the hierarchically higher level (VF-TH) for both normal and tangential forces. The moment of force was stabilized at both hierarchical levels during the steady-state phases but not during the movement. The results support the principles of superposition and of mechanical advantage. They also support an earlier hypothesis on an inherent trade-off between synergies at the two hierarchical levels, although the controller showed more subtle and versatile synergic control than the one hypothesized earlier. PMID:19799165

  11. Control circuitry using electronic emulation of a synchro signal for accurate control of position and rate of rotation for shafts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, David E. (Inventor); Smith, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The invention disclosed is a digital circuit which emulates a synchro signal in a synchro-resolver follower system for precise control of shaft position and rotation at very low rotational rates. The invention replaces the synchro and drive motor in a synchro-resolver follower system with a digital and analog synchro emulation circuit for generating the resolver control signal. The synchro emulation circuit includes amplitude modulation means to provide relatively high frequency resolver excitation signals for accurate resolver response even with very low shaft rotation rates.

  12. Control Circuitry Using Electronic Emulation of a Synchro Signal for Accurate Control of Position and Rate of Rotation for Shafts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, David E. (Inventor); Smith, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    The invention herein disclosed is a digital circuit which emulates a synchro signal in a synchro-resolver follower system for precise control of shaft position and rotation at very low rotational rates. The subject invention replaces the synchro and drive motor in a synchroresolver follower system with a digital and analog synchro emulation circuit for generating the resolver control signal. The synchro emulation circuit includes amplitude modulation means to provide relatively high frequency resolver excitation signals for accurate resolver response even with very low shaft rotation rates.

  13. The rotations opening the Central and Northern Atlantic Ocean: compilation, drift lines, and flow lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, Bernd; Neugebauer, Joachim

    2013-07-01

    We provide an up-to-date compilation of Euler rotations that model the evolution of the Central and Northern Atlantic Ocean (Table 1). The data basis forms seafloor spreading magnetic anomalies of the Atlantic. We checked the published rotations and selected those that form a consistent model. The increments of the Euler rotations going back in time from magnetic anomaly to magnetic anomaly can be illustrated by chains of points on "drift lines" that are paths of motions from continent to continent. Along these paths, the continents bordering the Atlantic Ocean can be moved back to their Mesozoic position within Pangea. Other figures exhibit the early rifting of the North Atlantic, the drift of Iberia, and the evolution of the Greenland-Ellesmere region. The points on the drift lines do not correspond directly to the lines of magnetic anomalies or their "picks" displayed today symmetrically in the Atlantic Ocean. To acquire correspondence, symmetric "flow lines" are constructed analogous to the spreading procedure. But points on the flow lines constructed by half of the increments partially also deviate from the expected symmetric position and in this way quantify displacements or jumps of the axis of rifting or spreading. Most of the selected rotations are from the excellent analyses of previous work. Essential deviations from published rotations are the M 0 rotations of Eurasia and of the Porcupine unit with respect to North America (EUR-NAM and POR-NAM). They lead to a better coincidence between the back-rotated M 0 magnetic anomalies in the Bay of Biscay on the one side and a change of the first transform motions between Greenland and Svalbard on the other side. Through this explanation, an overlap in Pangea SW of Svalbard is avoided and transform motions instead of strong extension are predicted. Some additional data are needed to complete the model: the earliest part of the path of Iberia to North America (IBA-NAM) up to M 4 is calculated assuming that Iberia

  14. Detection of Vibration-Rotation CO Lines in beta Pic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkle, K. H.; Brittain, S. D.

    2005-12-01

    We report a detection of the 4.6 micron CO vibration-rotation lines in absorption in the spectrum of β Pic. From the R(1), R(2), and R(3) lines we find an excitation temperature of 19±5 K and a CO column density of (2.5±0.5) x 1015 cm-2. The observations were made with the NOAO Phoenix high-resolution, near-infrared spectrograph and the Gemini South telescope. The infrared CO column density is a factor of four larger than the CO column density derived by Roberge et al. (2000 ApJ 538 904) from ultraviolet observations of CO A-X lines. Assuming a solar carbon abundance, our observed CO column density corresponds to an H2 column density of 3 x 1020 cm-2. There is considerable disagreement in the literature over the β Pic disk gas mass. Brandeker et al. (2004 AA 413 681) observed various optical atomic emission lines. These imply a column density of H2 of at least 3 x 1018 cm-2. This column density is also in agreement with an upper limit placed by Lecavelier et al. (2001 Nature 412 706) based on the non-detection of ultraviolet H2 lines. A column density of 3 x 1018 cm-2 implies a total gas mass of 0.1 Mearth. However, this is inconsistent with results by Thi et al. (2001 ApJ 561 1074) based on the ISO detection of H2, which require approximately 50 times more gas. Our results will be discussed in light of this and other spectroscopy reported in the literature as well as recent theoretical work.

  15. NON-ZEEMAN CIRCULAR POLARIZATION OF MOLECULAR ROTATIONAL SPECTRAL LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Houde, Martin; Jones, Scott; Rajabi, Fereshte; Hezareh, Talayeh

    2013-02-10

    We present measurements of circular polarization from rotational spectral lines of molecular species in Orion KL, most notably {sup 12}CO (J = 2 {yields} 1), obtained at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory with the Four-Stokes-Parameter Spectral Line Polarimeter. We find levels of polarization of up to 1%-2% in general; for {sup 12}CO (J = 2 {yields} 1) this level is comparable to that of linear polarization also measured for that line. We present a physical model based on resonant scattering in an attempt to explain our observations. We discuss how slight differences in scattering amplitudes for radiation polarized parallel and perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, responsible for the alignment of the scattering molecules, can lead to the observed circular polarization. We also show that the effect is proportional to the square of the magnitude of the plane of the sky component of the magnetic field and therefore opens up the possibility of measuring this parameter from circular polarization measurements of Zeeman insensitive molecules.

  16. A Simple yet Accurate Method for Students to Determine Asteroid Rotation Periods from Fragmented Light Curve Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beare, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    Professional astronomers use specialized software not normally available to students to determine the rotation periods of asteroids from fragmented light curve data. This paper describes a simple yet accurate method based on Microsoft Excel[R] that enables students to find periods in asteroid light curve and other discontinuous time series data of…

  17. Accurate Ritz Wavelengths of Parity-forbidden [Co II] and [V II] Lines of Astrophysical Interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffoni, M. P.; Pickering, J. C.

    2013-08-01

    We report a comprehensive list of accurate Ritz wavelengths for parity-forbidden [Co II] and [V II] lines obtained from the analysis of energy levels measured in the laboratory with Fourier transform emission spectroscopy. Such lines, particularly those in the infrared, are in demand for the analysis of low-density astrophysical plasmas in and around objects such as planetary nebulae, star-forming regions, and active galactic nuclei. Transitions between all known metastable levels of Co II and V II are included in our analysis, producing wavelengths for 1477 [V II] lines and 782 [Co II] lines. Of these, 170 [V II] lines and 171 [Co II] lines arise from transitions with calculated transition probabilities greater than 1 × 10-2 s-1 and upper level excitations of less than 5 eV, and thus are likely to be observed in astrophysical spectra.

  18. ACCURATE RITZ WAVELENGTHS OF PARITY-FORBIDDEN [Co II] AND [V II] LINES OF ASTROPHYSICAL INTEREST

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffoni, M. P.; Pickering, J. C.

    2013-08-15

    We report a comprehensive list of accurate Ritz wavelengths for parity-forbidden [Co II] and [V II] lines obtained from the analysis of energy levels measured in the laboratory with Fourier transform emission spectroscopy. Such lines, particularly those in the infrared, are in demand for the analysis of low-density astrophysical plasmas in and around objects such as planetary nebulae, star-forming regions, and active galactic nuclei. Transitions between all known metastable levels of Co II and V II are included in our analysis, producing wavelengths for 1477 [V II] lines and 782 [Co II] lines. Of these, 170 [V II] lines and 171 [Co II] lines arise from transitions with calculated transition probabilities greater than 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} s{sup -1} and upper level excitations of less than 5 eV, and thus are likely to be observed in astrophysical spectra.

  19. Cyclotron resonant scattering in gamma-ray bursts - Line strengths and signature of neutron star rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, D. Q.; Wang, J. C. L.; Wasserman, I.

    1992-01-01

    We explain the relative line strengths in gamma-ray bursts in terms of cyclotron resonant scattering. We describe the line signature of neutron star rotation and discuss the possibility that variations seen in the strengths and widths of the lines in GB780325 and GB870303 are due to rotation.

  20. The impact of gas bulk rotation on the Lyα line

    SciTech Connect

    Garavito-Camargo, Juan N.; Forero-Romero, Jaime E.; Dijkstra, Mark E-mail: je.forero@uniandes.edu.co

    2014-11-10

    We present results of radiative transfer calculations to measure the impact of gas bulk rotation on the morphology of the Lyα emission line in distant galaxies. We model a galaxy as a sphere with an homogeneous mixture of dust and hydrogen at a constant temperature. These spheres undergo solid-body rotation with maximum velocities in the range 0-300 km s{sup –1} and neutral hydrogen optical depths in the range τ{sub H} = 10{sup 5}-10{sup 7}. We consider two types of source distributions in the sphere: central and homogeneous. Our main result is that rotation introduces a dependence of the line morphology with viewing angle and rotational velocity. Observations with a line of sight parallel to the rotation axis yield line morphologies similar to the static case. For lines of sight perpendicular to the rotation axis, both the intensity at the line center and the line width increase with rotational velocity. Along the same line of sight, the line becomes single peaked at rotational velocities close to half the line width in the static case. Notably, we find that rotation does not induce any spatial anisotropy in the integrated line flux, the escape fraction or the average number of scatterings. This is because Lyman scattering through a rotating solid-body proceeds identically to the static case. The only difference is the Doppler shift from the different regions in the sphere that move with respect to the observer. This allows us to derive an analytic approximation for the viewing-angle dependence of the emerging spectrum, as a function of rotational velocity.

  1. An Accurate Calibration Method Based on Velocity in a Rotational Inertial Navigation System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Lei; Liu, Zengjun; Feng, Peide

    2015-01-01

    Rotation modulation is an effective method to enhance the accuracy of an inertial navigation system (INS) by modulating the gyroscope drifts and accelerometer bias errors into periodically varying components. The typical RINS drives the inertial measurement unit (IMU) rotation along the vertical axis and the horizontal sensors’ errors are modulated, however, the azimuth angle error is closely related to vertical gyro drift, and the vertical gyro drift also should be modulated effectively. In this paper, a new rotation strategy in a dual-axis rotational INS (RINS) is proposed and the drifts of three gyros could be modulated, respectively. Experimental results from a real dual-axis RINS demonstrate that the maximum azimuth angle error is decreased from 0.04° to less than 0.01° during 1 h. Most importantly, the changing of rotation strategy leads to some additional errors in the velocity which is unacceptable in a high-precision INS. Then the paper studies the basic reason underlying horizontal velocity errors in detail and a relevant new calibration method is designed. Experimental results show that after calibration and compensation, the fluctuation and stages in the velocity curve disappear and velocity precision is improved. PMID:26225983

  2. An Accurate Calibration Method Based on Velocity in a Rotational Inertial Navigation System.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Lei; Liu, Zengjun; Feng, Peide

    2015-01-01

    Rotation modulation is an effective method to enhance the accuracy of an inertial navigation system (INS) by modulating the gyroscope drifts and accelerometer bias errors into periodically varying components. The typical RINS drives the inertial measurement unit (IMU) rotation along the vertical axis and the horizontal sensors' errors are modulated, however, the azimuth angle error is closely related to vertical gyro drift, and the vertical gyro drift also should be modulated effectively. In this paper, a new rotation strategy in a dual-axis rotational INS (RINS) is proposed and the drifts of three gyros could be modulated, respectively. Experimental results from a real dual-axis RINS demonstrate that the maximum azimuth angle error is decreased from 0.04° to less than 0.01° during 1 h. Most importantly, the changing of rotation strategy leads to some additional errors in the velocity which is unacceptable in a high-precision INS. Then the paper studies the basic reason underlying horizontal velocity errors in detail and a relevant new calibration method is designed. Experimental results show that after calibration and compensation, the fluctuation and stages in the velocity curve disappear and velocity precision is improved. PMID:26225983

  3. Bundle block adjustment of airborne three-line array imagery based on rotation angles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongjun; Zheng, Maoteng; Huang, Xu; Xiong, Jinxin

    2014-01-01

    In the midst of the rapid developments in electronic instruments and remote sensing technologies, airborne three-line array sensors and their applications are being widely promoted and plentiful research related to data processing and high precision geo-referencing technologies is under way. The exterior orientation parameters (EOPs), which are measured by the integrated positioning and orientation system (POS) of airborne three-line sensors, however, have inevitable systematic errors, so the level of precision of direct geo-referencing is not sufficiently accurate for surveying and mapping applications. Consequently, a few ground control points are necessary to refine the exterior orientation parameters, and this paper will discuss bundle block adjustment models based on the systematic error compensation and the orientation image, considering the principle of an image sensor and the characteristics of the integrated POS. Unlike the models available in the literature, which mainly use a quaternion to represent the rotation matrix of exterior orientation, three rotation angles are directly used in order to effectively model and eliminate the systematic errors of the POS observations. Very good experimental results have been achieved with several real datasets that verify the correctness and effectiveness of the proposed adjustment models. PMID:24811075

  4. Scanning-electron-microscope image processing for accurate analysis of line-edge and line-width roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraiwa, Atsushi; Nishida, Akio

    2012-03-01

    The control of line-edge or line-width roughness (LER/LWR) is a challenge especially for future devices that are fabricated using extreme-ultraviolet lithography. Accurate analysis of the LER/LWR plays an essential role in this challenge and requires the noise involved in scanning-electron-microscope (SEM) images to be reduced by appropriate image processing prior to analyses. In order to achieve this, the authors simulated SEM images using the Monte-Carlo method and detected line edges in experimental and these theoretical images after noise filtering using new imageanalysis software. The validity of these simulation and software was confirmed by a good agreement between the experimental and theoretical results. In the case when the image pixels aligned perpendicular (crosswise) to line edges were averaged, the variance var(φ) that was additionally induced by the image noise decreased with the number NPIX,X of averaged pixels but turned to increase for relatively large NPIX,X's. Real LER/LWR, however, remained unaffected. On the other hand, averaging image pixels aligned parallel (longitudinal) to line edges not only reduced var(φ) but smoothed the real LER/LWR. As a result, the nominal variance of the real LWR, obtained using simple arithmetic, monotonically decreased with the number NPIX,L of averaged pixels. Artifactual oscillations were additionally observed in power spectral densities. var(φ) in this case decreased in an inverse proportion to the square root of NPIX,L according to the statistical mechanism clarified here. In this way, image processing has a marked effect on the LER/LWR analysis and needs to be much more cared and appropriately applied. All the aforementioned results not only constitute a solid basis of but improve previous empirical instructions for accurate analyses. The most important instruction is to avoid the longitudinal averaging and to crosswise average an optimized number of image pixels consulting the equation derived in this

  5. Accurate mask registration on tilted lines for 6F2 DRAM manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeth, K. D.; Choi, W.; Lee, Y.; Kim, S.; Yim, D.; Laske, F.; Ferber, M.; Daneshpanah, M.; Kwon, E.

    2015-10-01

    193nm immersion lithography is the mainstream production technology for the 22nm half pitch (HP) DRAM manufacturing. Considering multi-patterning as the technology to solve the very low k1 situation in the resolution equation puts extreme pressure on the intra-field overlay, to which mask registration error may be a significant error contributor [3]. The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS [1]) requests a registration error below 4 nm for each mask of a multi-patterning set forming one layer on the wafer. For mask metrology at the 22nm HP node, maintaining a precision-to-tolerance (P/T) ratio below 0.25 will be very challenging. Mask registration error impacts intra-field wafer overlay directly and has a major impact on wafer yield. DRAM makers moved several years ago to 6F2 (figure 1, [2]) cell design and thus printing tilted lines at 15 or 30 degree. Overlay of contact layer over buried line has to be well controlled. However, measuring mask registration performance accurately on tilted lines was a challenge. KLA Tencor applied the model-based algorithm to enable the accurate registration measurement of tilted lines on the Poly layer as well as the mask-to-mask overlay to the adjacent contact layers. The metrology solution is discussed and measurement results are provided.

  6. Development of an accurate transmission line fault locator using the global positioning system satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Harry

    1994-01-01

    A highly accurate transmission line fault locator based on the traveling-wave principle was developed and successfully operated within B.C. Hydro. A transmission line fault produces a fast-risetime traveling wave at the fault point which propagates along the transmission line. This fault locator system consists of traveling wave detectors located at key substations which detect and time tag the leading edge of the fault-generated traveling wave as if passes through. A master station gathers the time-tagged information from the remote detectors and determines the location of the fault. Precise time is a key element to the success of this system. This fault locator system derives its timing from the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites. System tests confirmed the accuracy of locating faults to within the design objective of +/-300 meters.

  7. Accurate and robust line segment extraction using minimum entropy with Hough transform.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zezhong; Shin, Bok-Suk; Klette, Reinhard

    2015-03-01

    The Hough transform is a popular technique used in the field of image processing and computer vision. With a Hough transform technique, not only the normal angle and distance of a line but also the line-segment's length and midpoint (centroid) can be extracted by analysing the voting distribution around a peak in the Hough space. In this paper, a method based on minimum-entropy analysis is proposed to extract the set of parameters of a line segment. In each column around a peak in Hough space, the voting values specify probabilistic distributions. The corresponding entropies and statistical means are computed. The line-segment's normal angle and length are simultaneously computed by fitting a quadratic polynomial curve to the voting entropies. The line-segment's midpoint and normal distance are computed by fitting and interpolating a linear curve to the voting means. The proposed method is tested on simulated images for detection accuracy by providing comparative results. Experimental results on real-world images verify the method as well. The proposed method for line-segment detection is both accurate and robust in the presence of quantization error, background noise, or pixel disturbances. PMID:25561596

  8. A simple and reliable sensor for accurate measurement of angular speed for low speed rotating machinery.

    PubMed

    Kuosheng, Jiang; Guanghua, Xu; Tangfei, Tao; Lin, Liang; Yi, Wang; Sicong, Zhang; Ailing, Luo

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the theory and implementation of a novel sensor system for measuring the angular speed (AS) of a shaft rotating at a very low speed range, nearly zero speed. The sensor system consists mainly of an eccentric sleeve rotating with the shaft on which the angular speed to be measured, and an eddy current displacement sensor to obtain the profile of the sleeve for AS calculation. When the shaft rotates at constant speed the profile will be a pure sinusoidal trace. However, the profile will be a phase modulated signal when the shaft speed is varied. By applying a demodulating procedure, the AS can be obtained in a straightforward manner. The sensor system was validated experimentally based on a gearbox test rig and the result shows that the AS obtained are consistent with that obtained by a conventional encoder. However, the new sensor gives very smooth and stable traces of the AS, demonstrating its higher accuracy and reliability in obtaining the AS of the low speed operations with speed-up and down transients. In addition, the experiment also shows that it is easy and cost-effective to be realised in different applications such as condition monitoring and process control. PMID:24517806

  9. A simple and reliable sensor for accurate measurement of angular speed for low speed rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuosheng, Jiang; Guanghua, Xu; Tangfei, Tao; Lin, Liang; Yi, Wang; Sicong, Zhang; Ailing, Luo

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the theory and implementation of a novel sensor system for measuring the angular speed (AS) of a shaft rotating at a very low speed range, nearly zero speed. The sensor system consists mainly of an eccentric sleeve rotating with the shaft on which the angular speed to be measured, and an eddy current displacement sensor to obtain the profile of the sleeve for AS calculation. When the shaft rotates at constant speed the profile will be a pure sinusoidal trace. However, the profile will be a phase modulated signal when the shaft speed is varied. By applying a demodulating procedure, the AS can be obtained in a straightforward manner. The sensor system was validated experimentally based on a gearbox test rig and the result shows that the AS obtained are consistent with that obtained by a conventional encoder. However, the new sensor gives very smooth and stable traces of the AS, demonstrating its higher accuracy and reliability in obtaining the AS of the low speed operations with speed-up and down transients. In addition, the experiment also shows that it is easy and cost-effective to be realised in different applications such as condition monitoring and process control.

  10. Accurate on-line mass flow measurements in supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tarafder, Abhijit; Vajda, Péter; Guiochon, Georges

    2013-12-13

    This work demonstrates the possible advantages and the challenges of accurate on-line measurements of the CO2 mass flow rate during supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) operations. Only the mass flow rate is constant along the column in SFC. The volume flow rate is not. The critical importance of accurate measurements of mass flow rates for the achievement of reproducible data and the serious difficulties encountered in supercritical fluid chromatography for its assessment were discussed earlier based on the physical properties of carbon dioxide. In this report, we experimentally demonstrate the problems encountered when performing mass flow rate measurements and the gain that can possibly be achieved by acquiring reproducible data using a Coriolis flow meter. The results obtained show how the use of a highly accurate mass flow meter permits, besides the determination of accurate values of the mass flow rate, a systematic, constant diagnosis of the correct operation of the instrument and the monitoring of the condition of the carbon dioxide pump. PMID:24210558

  11. Signature for rotational to vibrational evolution along the yrast line

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, S. F.; Chen, Y. B.; Tang, B.; Xu, F. R.; Zheng, S. J.; Wen, T. D.

    2007-04-15

    The excitation spectra of nuclei in the regions 150rotational motion. In the present work, however, there is evidence indicating that the nuclei can evolve from rotation to vibration. We have used two simple models to discuss the collective motions of a nucleus for different spin ranges. In addition, in order to get the insight into the rotational-like properties of nuclei, as an example, shape calculations using the total Routhian surfaces (TRS) model have been carried out for positive-parity states in {sup 156}Gd. Also we have shown the result of the nucleus {sup 102}Ru which is given as an example of the reverse transition, i.e., vibration to rotation. The TRS plots reveal that, with increasing spin, the former nucleus becomes slightly soft in {gamma} and {beta} deformations, while the latter one becomes rigid in the {gamma} deformation.

  12. Accurate oscillator strengths for ultraviolet lines of Ar I - Implications for interstellar material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Federman, S. R.; Beideck, D. J.; Schectman, R. M.; York, D. G.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of absorption from interstellar Ar I in lightly reddened lines of sight provides information on the warm and hot components of the interstellar medium near the sun. The details of the analysis are limited by the quality of the atomic data. Accurate oscillator strengths for the Ar I lines at 1048 and 1067 A and the astrophysical implications are presented. From lifetimes measured with beam-foil spectroscopy, an f-value for 1048 A of 0.257 +/- 0.013 is obtained. Through the use of a semiempirical formalism for treating singlet-triplet mixing, an oscillator strength of 0.064 +/- 0.003 is derived for 1067 A. Because of the accuracy of the results, the conclusions of York and colleagues from spectra taken with the Copernicus satellite are strengthened. In particular, for interstellar gas in the solar neighborhood, argon has a solar abundance, and the warm, neutral material is not pervasive.

  13. All-reflective, highly accurate polarization rotator for high-power short-pulse laser systems.

    PubMed

    Keppler, S; Hornung, M; Bödefeld, R; Kahle, M; Hein, J; Kaluza, M C

    2012-08-27

    We present the setup of a polarization rotating device and its adaption for high-power short-pulse laser systems. Compared to conventional halfwave plates, the all-reflective principle using three zero-phase shift mirrors provides a higher accuracy and a higher damage threshold. Since plan-parallel plates, e.g. these halfwave plates, generate postpulses, which could lead to the generation of prepulses during the subsequent laser chain, the presented device avoids parasitic pulses and is therefore the preferable alternative for high-contrast applications. Moreover the device is easily scalable for large beam diameters and its spectral reflectivity can be adjusted by an appropriate mirror coating to be well suited for ultra-short laser pulses. PMID:23037123

  14. Noise filtering of scanning-electron-microscope images for accurate analysis of line-edge and line-width roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraiwa, Atsushi; Nishida, Akio

    2012-10-01

    The control of line-edge or line-width roughness (LER/LWR) is a challenge, especially for future devices that are fabricated using extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Accurate analysis of the LER/LWR plays an essential role in this challenge and requires the noise involved in scanning-electron-microscope (SEM) images to be reduced by appropriate noise filtering prior to analysis. To achieve this, we simulated the SEM images using a Monte Carlo method, and detected line edges in both experimental and theoretical images after noise filtering using new image-analysis software. The validity of this software and these simulations was confirmed by a good agreement between the experimental and theoretical results. In the case when the image pixels aligned perpendicular (crosswise) to line edges were averaged, the variance var(φ) that was additionally induced by the image noise decreased with a number N of averaged pixels, with exceptions when N was relatively large, whereupon the variance increased. The optimal N to minimize var(φ) was formulated based on a statistical mechanism of this change. LER/LWR statistics estimated using the crosswise filtering remained unaffected when N was smaller than the aforementioned optimal value, but monotonically changed when N was larger contrary to expectations. This change was possibly caused by an asymmetric scan-signal profile at edges. On the other hand, averaging image pixels aligned parallel (longitudinal) to line edges not only reduced var(φ) but smoothed real LER/LWR. As a result, the nominal variance of real LWR, obtained using simple arithmetic, monotonically decreased with a number N of averaged pixels. Artifactual oscillations were additionally observed in power spectral densities. Var(φ) in this case decreased in inverse proportion to the square root of N according to the statistical mechanism clarified here. In this way, the noise filtering has a marked effect on the LER/LWR analysis and needs to be appropriately

  15. Accurate Determination of Rotational Energy Levels in the Ground State of ^{12}CH_4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, M.; Iwakuni, K.; Okubo, S.; Sasada, H.

    2013-06-01

    We have measured absolute frequencies of saturated absorption of 183 allowed and 21 forbidden transitions in the νb{3} band of ^{12}CH_4 using an optical comb-referenced difference-frequency-generation spectrometer from 86.8 to 93.1 THz (from 2890 to 3100 wn). The pump and signal sources are a 1.06-μ m Nd:YAG laser and a 1.5-μ m extended-cavity laser diode. An enhanced-cavity absorption cell increases the optical electric field and enhances the sensitivity. The typical uncertainty is 3 kHz for the allowed transitions and 12 kHz for the forbidden transitions. Twenty combination differences are precisely determined, and the scalar rotational and centrifugal distortion constants of the ground state are thereby yielded as r@ = l@ r@ = l B_{{s}} (157 122 614.2 ± 1.5) kHz, D_{{s}} (3 328.545 ± 0.031) kHz, H_{{s}} (190.90 ± 0.26) Hz, and L_{{s}} (-13.16 ± 0.76) mHz. Here, B_{{s}} is the rotational constant and D_{{s}}, H_{{s}} and L_{{s}} are the scalar quartic, sextic, octic distortion constants. The relative uncertainties are considerably smaller than those obtained from global analysis of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. S. Okubo, H. Nakayama, K. Iwakuni, H. Inaba and H. Sasada, Opt. Express 19, 23878 (2011). M. Abe, K. Iwakuni, S. Okubo, and H. Sasada, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B (to be published). S. Albert, S. Bauerecker, V. Boudon, L. R. Brown, J. -P. Champion, M. Loëte, A. Nikitin, and M. Quack, Chem. Phys. 356, 131 (2009).

  16. Explicit off-line criteria for stable accurate time filtering of strongly unstable spatially extended systems.

    PubMed

    Majda, Andrew J; Grote, Marcus J

    2007-01-23

    Many contemporary problems in science involve making predictions based on partial observation of extremely complicated spatially extended systems with many degrees of freedom and physical instabilities on both large and small scales. Various new ensemble filtering strategies have been developed recently for these applications, and new mathematical issues arise. Here, explicit off-line test criteria for stable accurate discrete filtering are developed for use in the above context and mimic the classical stability analysis for finite difference schemes. First, constant coefficient partial differential equations, which are randomly forced and damped to mimic mesh scale energy spectra in the above problems are developed as off-line filtering test problems. Then mathematical analysis is used to show that under natural suitable hypothesis the time filtering algorithms for general finite difference discrete approximations to an sxs partial differential equation system with suitable observations decompose into much simpler independent s-dimensional filtering problems for each spatial wave number separately; in other test problems, such block diagonal models rigorously provide upper and lower bounds on the filtering algorithm. In this fashion, elementary off-line filtering criteria can be developed for complex spatially extended systems. The theory is illustrated for time filters by using both unstable and implicit difference scheme approximations to the stochastically forced heat equation where the combined effects of filter stability and model error are analyzed through the simpler off-line criteria. PMID:17227864

  17. Note: Improved line strengths of rovibrational and rotational transitions within the X3Σ- ground state of NH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooke, James S. A.; Bernath, Peter F.; Western, Colin M.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, a line list including positions and transition strengths was published for the NH X3Σ- rovibrational and rotational transitions. The calculation of the transition strengths requires a conversion of transition matrix elements from Hund's case (b) to (a). The method of this conversion has recently been improved during other work on the OH X2Π rovibrational transitions, by removing an approximation that was present previously. The adjusted method has been applied to the NH line list, resulting in more accurate transition strengths. An updated line list is presented that contains all possible transitions with v' and v″ up to 6, and J up to between 25 and 44, depending on the band.

  18. Accurate models for P-gp drug recognition induced from a cancer cell line cytotoxicity screen.

    PubMed

    Levatić, Jurica; Ćurak, Jasna; Kralj, Marijeta; Šmuc, Tomislav; Osmak, Maja; Supek, Fran

    2013-07-25

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp, MDR1) is a promiscuous drug efflux pump of substantial pharmacological importance. Taking advantage of large-scale cytotoxicity screening data involving 60 cancer cell lines, we correlated the differential biological activities of ∼13,000 compounds against cellular P-gp levels. We created a large set of 934 high-confidence P-gp substrates or nonsubstrates by enforcing agreement with an orthogonal criterion involving P-gp overexpressing ADR-RES cells. A support vector machine (SVM) was 86.7% accurate in discriminating P-gp substrates on independent test data, exceeding previous models. Two molecular features had an overarching influence: nearly all P-gp substrates were large (>35 atoms including H) and dense (specific volume of <7.3 Å(3)/atom) molecules. Seven other descriptors and 24 molecular fragments ("effluxophores") were found enriched in the (non)substrates and incorporated into interpretable rule-based models. Biological experiments on an independent P-gp overexpressing cell line, the vincristine-resistant VK2, allowed us to reclassify six compounds previously annotated as substrates, validating our method's predictive ability. Models are freely available at http://pgp.biozyne.com . PMID:23772653

  19. On-Line Schemes For Computing Rotation Angles For SVDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercegovac, Milos D.; Lang, Tomas

    1988-01-01

    Two floating-point radix-2 schemes using on-line arithmetic for implementing the direct two-angle method for SVDs are presented. The first scheme is an on-line variant of the cosine/sine approach and is the fastest of the schemes considered: it performs the 2x2 SVD step in about 2n clock cycles. However, it requires a relatively large number of modules; this number is reduced when some modules are reused, resulting in a time of 3n clock cycles. The number of modules of this on-line version is still larger than that of the conventional one, but this is compensated by the smaller number of bit-slices per module and by the digit-serial communication among modules. The corresponding speed-up ratios are of 5 and 3 with respect to a conventional arithmetic implementation. The second scheme uses an on-line CORDIC approach and performs the 2x2 SVD in about 7n clock cycles and is advantageous because it is more time-area efficient. It results in a speed-up of about 2.5 with respect to the conventional CORDIC implementation.

  20. Linear and nonlinear magneto-optical rotation on the narrow strontium intercombination line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, K.; Kwong, C. C.; Pramod, M. S.; Wilkowski, D.

    2016-05-01

    In the presence of an external static magnetic field, an atomic gas becomes optically active, showing magneto-optical rotation. In the saturated regime, the coherences among the excited substates give a nonlinear contribution to the rotation of the light polarization. In contrast with the linear magneto-optical rotation, the nonlinear counterpart is insensitive to Doppler broadening. By varying the temperature of a cold strontium gas, we observe both regimes by driving the J =0 →J =1 transition on the intercombination line. For this narrow transition, the sensitivity to the static magnetic field is typically three orders of magnitude larger than for a standard broad alkali-metal transition.

  1. Calculation of the water vapor line intensities for rotational transitions between high-excited energy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, O. V.; Voitsekhovskaya, O. K.; Kashirskii, D. E.

    2015-11-01

    The intensities of water vapor in the range of pure rotational transitions were calculated up to high quantum numbers (Jmax ~ 30 and Ka max ~ 25). The diagonalization of the effective rotational Hamiltonian, approximated by Pade-Borel method, is applied to obtain the eigenvectors. The centrifugal distortion perturbations in line intensities were taken into account by the traditional equations for matrix elements of the transformed dipole moment, including eight parameters, and previously developed by authors Pade approximant. Moreover, to conduct the calculations, the rotational wavefunctions of the symmetric rotor molecule were applied. The results were compared with the known theoretical data.

  2. Toward an Accurate Modeling of Hydrodynamic Effects on the Translational and Rotational Dynamics of Biomolecules in Many-Body Systems.

    PubMed

    Długosz, Maciej; Antosiewicz, Jan M

    2015-07-01

    Proper treatment of hydrodynamic interactions is of importance in evaluation of rigid-body mobility tensors of biomolecules in Stokes flow and in simulations of their folding and solution conformation, as well as in simulations of the translational and rotational dynamics of either flexible or rigid molecules in biological systems at low Reynolds numbers. With macromolecules conveniently modeled in calculations or in dynamic simulations as ensembles of spherical frictional elements, various approximations to hydrodynamic interactions, such as the two-body, far-field Rotne-Prager approach, are commonly used, either without concern or as a compromise between the accuracy and the numerical complexity. Strikingly, even though the analytical Rotne-Prager approach fails to describe (both in the qualitative and quantitative sense) mobilities in the simplest system consisting of two spheres, when the distance between their surfaces is of the order of their size, it is commonly applied to model hydrodynamic effects in macromolecular systems. Here, we closely investigate hydrodynamic effects in two and three-body systems, consisting of bead-shell molecular models, using either the analytical Rotne-Prager approach, or an accurate numerical scheme that correctly accounts for the many-body character of hydrodynamic interactions and their short-range behavior. We analyze mobilities, and translational and rotational velocities of bodies resulting from direct forces acting on them. We show, that with the sufficient number of frictional elements in hydrodynamic models of interacting bodies, the far-field approximation is able to provide a description of hydrodynamic effects that is in a reasonable qualitative as well as quantitative agreement with the description resulting from the application of the virtually exact numerical scheme, even for small separations between bodies. PMID:26068580

  3. The Latitudinal Excursion of Coronal Magnetic Field Lines in Response to Differential Rotation: MHD Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran; Riley, Pete

    2006-01-01

    Solar energetic particles, which are believed to originate from corotating interacting regions (CIRS) at low heliographic latitude, were observed by the Ulysses spacecraft even as it passed over the Sun's poles. One interpretation of this result is that high-latitude field lines intercepted by Ulysses connect to low-latitude CIRs at much larger heliocentric distances. The Fisk model explains the latitudinal excursion of magnetic field lines in the solar corona and heliosphere as the inevitable consequence of the interaction of a tilted dipole in a differentially rotating photosphere with rigidly rotating coronal holes. We use a time-dependent three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) algorithm to follow the evolution of a simple model of the solar corona in response to the differential rotation of the photospheric magnetic flux. We examine the changes of the coronal-hole boundaries, the redistribution of the line-of-sight magnetic field, and the precession of field lines in the corona. Our results confirm the basic idea of the Fisk model, that differential rotation leads to changes in the heliographic latitude of magnetic field lines. However, the latitudinal excursion of magnetic field lines in this simple "tilted dipole" model is too small to explain the Ulysses observations. Although coronal holes in our model rotate more rigidly than do photospheric features (in general agreement with observations), they do not rotate strictly rigidly as assumed by Fisk. This basic difference between our model and Fisk's will be explored in the future by considering more realistic magnetic flux distributions, as observed during Ulysses polar excursions.

  4. An accurate {ital ab initio} HOCl potential energy surface, vibrational and rotational calculations, and comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Skokov, S.; Peterson, K.A.; Bowman, J.M.

    1998-08-01

    Accurate {ital ab initio} multireference configuration interaction (CI) calculations with large correlation-consistent basis sets are performed for HOCl. After extrapolation to the complete basis set limit, the {ital ab initio} data are precisely fit to give a semiglobal three-dimensional potential energy surface to describe HOCl{r_arrow}Cl+OH from high overtone excitation of the OH-stretch. The average absolute deviation between the {ital ab initio} and fitted energies is 4.2thinspcm{sup {minus}1} for energies up to 60 kcal/mol relative to the HOCl minimum. Vibrational energies of HOCl including the six overtones of the OH-stretch are computed using a vibrational-Cl method on the fitted potential and also on a slightly adjusted potential. Near-spectroscopic accuracy is obtained using the adjusted potential; the average absolute deviation between theory and experiment for 19 experimentally reported states is 4.8thinspcm{sup {minus}1}. Very good agreement with experiment is also obtained for numerous rotational energies for the ground vibrational state, the ClO-stretch fundamental, and the fifth overtone of the OH-stretch. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Influence of line interference on the vibration-rotation band shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanin, M. O.; Dokuchaev, A. B.; Tonkov, M. V.; Filippov, N. N.

    1984-06-01

    The shapes of the CO, v3 CO2 and v3 N2O fundamental vibration-rotation bands have been studied at various temperatures and in the presence of several perturbing gases. Also the half-widths of CO vibration-rotation lines have been measured at 78 K. In the region of line wings, the measured absorption coefficients deviate from those given by the superposition of Lorentzian profiles. These deviations are explained by the collision-induced line interference that causes redistribution of absorption inside the band. A theory of line mixing is formulated which is based on Markov approximation and on the strong collision model. Simple analytical expressions are obtained for the band shape. The computed shapes are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental results. The deviations from the Lorentz absorption observed in pure CO and in CO-N2 at low temperature are partially ascribed to the formation of van der Waals dimers.

  6. Determination of very rapid molecular rotation by using the central electron paramagnetic resonance line.

    PubMed

    Kurban, Mark R

    2013-02-21

    Picosecond rotational correlation times of perdeuterated tempone (PDT) are found in alkane and aromatic liquids by directly using the spectral width of the central electron paramagnetic resonance line. This is done by mathematically eliminating the nonsecular spectral density from the spectral parameter equations, thereby removing the need to assume a particular form for it. This is preferable to fitting a constant correction factor to the spectral density, because such a factor does not fit well in the low picosecond range. The electron-nuclear spin dipolar interaction between the probe and solvent is shown to be negligible for the very rapid rotation of PDT in these liquids at the temperatures of the study. The rotational correlation times obtained with the proposed method generally agree to within experimental uncertainty with those determined by using the traditional parameters. Using the middle line width offers greater precision and smoother trends. Previous work with the central line width is discussed, and past discrepancies are explained as possibly resulting from residual inhomogeneous broadening. The rotational correlation time almost forms a common curve across all of the solvents when plotted with respect to isothermal compressibility, which shows the high dependence of rotation on liquid free volume. PMID:23320940

  7. Determination of Very Rapid Molecular Rotation by Using the Central EPR Line

    PubMed Central

    Kurban, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Picosecond rotational correlation times of perdeuterated tempone (PDT) are found in alkane and aromatic liquids by directly using the spectral width of the central electron paramagnetic resonance line. This is done by mathematically eliminating the non-secular spectral density from the spectral parameter equations, thereby removing the need to assume a particular form for it. This is preferable to fitting a constant correction factor to the spectral density, because such a factor does not fit well in the low picosecond range. The electron-nuclear spin dipolar interaction between the probe and solvent is shown to be negligible for the very rapid rotation of PDT in these liquids at the temperatures of the study. The rotational correlation times obtained with the proposed method generally agree to within experimental uncertainty with those determined by using the traditional parameters. Using the middle line width offers greater precision and smoother trends. Previous work with the central line width is discussed, and past discrepancies are explained as possibly resulting from residual inhomogeneous broadening. The rotational correlation time almost forms a common curve across all of the solvents when plotted with respect to isothermal compressibility, which shows the high dependence of rotation on liquid free volume. PMID:23320940

  8. First identification of pure rotation lines of NH in the infrared solar spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, M.; Farmer, C. B.; Norton, R. H.; Sauval, A. J.; Grevesse, N.

    1991-01-01

    Pure rotation lines of NH of the v = 0 level and v = 1 level are detected in high-resolution solar spectra obtained from the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experimental observations. It is pointed out that the identification of the lines is favored by the typical appearance of the triplet lines of nearly equal intensities. The observed equivalent widths of these triplet lines are compared with predicted intensities, and it is observed that these widths are systematically larger than the predicted values. It is noted that because these very faint lines are observed in a region where the signal is very low, a systematic error in the measurements of the equivalent widths cannot be ruled out; therefore, the disagreement between the observed and predicted intensities is not considered to be real.

  9. Spectroscopic line parameters of water vapor for rotation-vibration transitions near 7180 cm{sup -1}

    SciTech Connect

    Lisak, D.; Havey, D. K.; Hodges, J. T.

    2009-05-15

    We present low uncertainty measurements of line parameters for 15 rotation-vibration transitions of water vapor in the wave number range of 7170.27-7183.02 cm{sup -1}. These experiments incorporated frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy and a primary standard humidity generator which produced a stable and accurately known amount of water vapor in a nitrogen carrier gas stream. Intensities and line shape factors were derived by fitting high-resolution spectra to spectral models that account for collisional narrowing and speed-dependent broadening and shifting effects. For most transitions reported here, we estimate the relative combined standard uncertainty of the line intensities to be <0.4%, of which approximately one half this value we ascribe to limited knowledge of the line shape. Our measured intensities and broadening parameters are compared to experimental and theoretical literature values. Agreement between our experimental intensity measurements and those derived by recent ab initio calculations of the dipole moment surface of water vapor is within 1.5%.

  10. Solar Cycle Fine Structure and Surface Rotation from Ca II K-Line Time Series Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeff; Keil, Steve; Worden, Pete

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of three and a half decades of data from the NSO/AFRL/Sac Peak K-line monitoring program yields evidence for four components to the variation: (a) the solar cycle, with considerable fine structure and a quasi-periodicity of 122.4 days; (b) a stochastic process, faster than (a) and largely independent of it, (c) a quasi-periodic signal due to rotational modulation, and of course (d) observational errors (shown to be quite small). Correlation and power spectrum analyses elucidate periodic and aperiodic variation of these chromospheric parameters. Time-frequency analysis is especially useful for extracting information about differential rotation, and in particular elucidates the connection between its behavior and fine structure of the solar cycle on approximately one-year time scales. These results further suggest that similar analyses will be useful at detecting and characterizing differential rotation in stars from stellar light-curves such as those being produced at NASA's Kepler observatory.

  11. Polarization Rotation and Circular Dichroism Near the Potassium D2 Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conover, Charles; Thiha, Htet; Dahnke, Jennifer

    2010-03-01

    We have experimentally measured the Faraday rotation and the differential absorption of the two circular polarizations for light tuned near the D2 line in potassium (766.7 nm). In particular we have explored the vapor temperature and magnetic field dependence of the frequency of the zero crossings of the lineshapes from the circular analyzer and the balanced polarimeter used in the measurements. These signals are routinely used as frequency references for laser locking and we discuss the sensitivity to experimental parameters.

  12. On BWR regional oscillations with rotational symmetry line using SIMULATE-3K

    SciTech Connect

    Dokhane, A.; Ferroukhi, H.; Pautz, A.

    2013-07-01

    A new stability analysis methodology is being developed at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) using the best-estimate coupled neutronic/thermal- hydraulics code, SIMULATE-3K (S3K). This methodology has so far been validated against Leibstadt NPP (KKL) stability tests of C10, C13 and C19, which all show global (in-phase) oscillations. However, the methodology has not yet been validated for regional instabilities and to that aim, a special KKL cycle 07 stability test was selected. Indeed, during this test, the core not only showed growing power oscillation amplitudes in an out-of-phase regime but also an oscillating and rotating symmetry line. Thereby, it was selected in order to verify the S3K capability to predict regional instabilities and on that basis, obtain more insights towards understanding the causes for the oscillatory and rotational behaviour of symmetry lines. The results obtained so far are presented in this paper. First, it is found that the S3K results are in good agreement with measurements both qualitatively and quantitatively, although the resonance frequency is slightly over-predicted. Secondly, the excitation of the out-of-phase mode with oscillations as well as rotation of the symmetry line is also well captured i.e. in accordance to the experimental observations. Related to this, an in-depth analysis of LPRM signals indicates that two out-of-phase oscillation modes associated to two azimuthal neutronic modes are simultaneously excited. Furthermore, it is found that a superposition of these two modes will trigger the symmetry line dynamics and that the behaviour will be guided by the dominance ratio between these two modes. More precisely, the oscillatory behaviour is due to the superposition of the two azimuthal modes but with one dominant mode. The rotational behaviour is however due to the superposition of the two modes with comparable strengths. (authors)

  13. Hot chemistry in the diffuse medium: spectral signature in the H2 rotational lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraete, L.; Falgarone, E.; Pineau des Forets, G.; Flower, D.; Puget, J. L.

    1999-03-01

    Most of the diffuse interstellar medium is cold, but it must harbor pockets of hot gas to explain the large observed abundances of molecules like CH+ and HCO+. Because they dissipate locally large amounts of kinetic energy, MHD shocks and coherent vortices in turbulence can drive endothermic chemical reactions or reactions with large activation barriers. We predict the spectroscopic signatures in the H2 rotational lines of MHD shocks and vortices and compare them to those observed with the ISO-SWS along a line of sight through the Galaxy which samples 20 magnitudes of mostly diffuse gas.

  14. Line strengths of rovibrational and rotational transitions within the X^3Σ {^-} ground state of NH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooke, James S. A.; Bernath, Peter F.; Western, Colin M.; van Hemert, Marc C.; Groenenboom, Gerrit C.

    2014-08-01

    A new line list for rovibrational and rotational transitions, including fine structure, within the NH X^3Σ {^-} ground state has been created. It contains line intensities in the form of Einstein A and f-values, for all possible bands up to v' = 6, and for J up to between 25 and 44. The intensities are based on a new dipole moment function (DMF), which has been calculated using the internally contracted multi-reference configuration interaction method with an aug-cc-pV6Z basis set. The programs RKR1, LEVEL, and PGOPHER were used to calculate line positions and intensities using the most recent spectroscopic line position observations and the new DMF, including the rotational dependence on the matrix elements. The Hund's case (b) matrix elements from the LEVEL output (available as Supplement 1 of the supplementary material) have been transformed to the case (a) form required by PGOPHER. New relative intensities for the (1,0) band have been measured, and the calculated and observed Herman-Wallis effects are compared, showing good agreement. The line list (see Supplement 5 of the supplementary material) will be useful for the study of NH in astronomy, cold and ultracold molecular systems, and in the nitrogen chemistry of combustion.

  15. Line strength variations in gamma-ray bursts GB870303 - Possible evidence of neutron star rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graziani, C.; Fenimore, E. E.; Murakami, T.; Yoshida, A.; Lamb, D. Q.; Wang, J. C. L.; Loredo, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    An exhaustive search of the Ginga data on gamma-ray burst GB870303 reveals two separate time intervals during which statistically significant line features are evident. One (previously unreported) interval shows a single prominent line feature at about 20 keV; a second, corresponding to the interval reported by Murakami et al. (1988), shows two line features at 20 and 40 keV. From model fits to the data, we find that both sets of lines are well-described by cyclotron resonant scattering in a magnetic field B around 1.8 x 10 exp 12 G, and that the differences in the line strengths between the two intervals are significant. The variations are qualitatively similar to those produced by a change in the viewing angle theta relative to the magnetic field. We conjecture that the change in theta is due to rotation of the neutron star, and derive limits of 45-180 sec on the rotation period P.

  16. Line strength and self-broadening coefficient of the pure rotational S(1) quadrupole line in H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuter, Dennis C.; Sirota, J. Marcos

    1994-01-01

    The absolute intensity, S(sub 1), and self-broadening coefficient, gamma(sub L), for H2 S(sub zero)(1) pure rotational line at 17.0348 micrometers (587.032 cm(exp -1)) have been measured for the first time using a tunable diode laser spectrometer with a resolution of approximately 1 x 10(exp -3) cm(exp -1). By fitting a Galatry line shape convolved with a 1 x 10(exp -3) cm(exp -1) Gaussian instrument profile to absorption profiles, for H2 pressures ranging from 0.34 to 1.30 atm, values of s(sub 1) = (7.0 +/- 0.4) x 10(exp -8) cm(exp -2) atm(exp -1) and gamma(sub L) = (1.73 +/- 0.12) x 10(exp -3) cm(exp -1) atm(exp -1) were obtained.

  17. Accurate circuit analysis of resonant-type left handed transmission lines with inter-resonator coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, I.; Bonache, J.; Gil, M.; García-García, J.; Martín, F.; Marqués, R.

    2006-10-01

    In this paper, a circuit model for the description of left handed transmission lines based on complementary split rings resonators (CSRRs) is proposed. As compared to previous models, coupling between adjacent resonators is included in the present work. The conditions that make this coupling significant are discussed. Specifically, it will be shown that it is barely present when circular CSRRs are used to implement the left handed transmission line. However, if the line is loaded with rectangular CSRRs separated by a small distance, inter-resonator coupling is important and it significantly influences the electromagnetic behavior of the structures. It will be also shown that under low or moderate coupling, it is possible to describe the structures by means of a simplified model with modified parameters. Several prototype devices with different CSRR topologies and coupling levels have been fabricated to illustrate the phenomenology associated with these structures and the accuracy of their model descriptions. The results of this work can be of interest for the design of planar microwave circuits based on CSRR left handed lines.

  18. OBSERVATIONAL PROPERTIES OF ROTATIONALLY EXCITED MOLECULAR HYDROGEN IN TRANSLUCENT LINES OF SIGHT

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Adam G.; Sonneborn, George; Snow, Theodore P.; Rachford, Brian L. E-mail: George.Sonneborn@nasa.go E-mail: rachf7ac@erau.ed

    2010-03-10

    The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) has allowed precise determinations of the column densities of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) in Galactic lines of sight with a wide range of pathlengths and extinction properties. However, survey studies of lines of sight with greater extinction have been mostly restricted to the low-J states (lower total angular momentum) in which most molecular hydrogen is observed. This paper presents a survey of column densities for the molecular hydrogen in states of greater rotational excitation (J >= 2) in Galactic lines of sight with log N(H{sub 2}) {approx}> 20. This study is comprehensive through the highest excited state detectable in each line of sight. J = 5 is observed in every line of sight, and we detect J = 7 in four lines of sight, J = 8 in one line of sight, and vibrationally excited H{sub 2} in two lines of sight. We compared the apparent b-values and velocity offsets of the higher-J states relative to the dominant low-J states and we found no evidence of any trends that might provide insight into the formation of higher-J H{sub 2}, although these results are the most affected by the limits of the FUSE resolution. We also derive excitation temperatures based on the column densities of the different states. We confirm that at least two distinct temperatures are necessary to adequately describe these lines of sight, and that more temperatures are probably necessary. Total H{sub 2} column density is known to be correlated with other molecules; we explore if correlations vary as a function of J for several molecules, most importantly CH and CH{sup +}. Finally, we briefly discuss interpretations of selected lines of sight by comparing them to models computed using the Meudon PDR code.

  19. ExoMol molecular line lists - XIV: The rotation-vibration spectrum of hot SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Daniel S.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Huang, Xinchuan; Schwenke, David W.; Lee, Timothy J.; Clausen, Sønnik; Fateev, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Sulphur dioxide is well-known in the atmospheres of planets and satellites, where its presence is often associated with volcanism, and in circumstellar envelopes of young and evolved stars as well as the interstellar medium. This work presents a line list of 1.3 billion 32S16O2 vibration-rotation transitions computed using an empirically-adjusted potential energy surface and an ab initio dipole moment surface. The list gives complete coverage up to 8000 cm-1 (wavelengths longer than 1.25 μm) for temperatures below 2000 K. Infrared absorption cross sections are recorded at 300 and 500 C are used to validated the resulting ExoAmes line list. The line list is made available in electronic form as supplementary data to this article and at www.exomol.com.

  20. ExoMol molecular line lists - XIV. The rotation-vibration spectrum of hot SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Daniel S.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Huang, Xinchuan; Schwenke, David W.; Lee, Timothy J.; Clausen, Sønnik; Fateev, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Sulphur dioxide is well-known in the atmospheres of planets and satellites, where its presence is often associated with volcanism, and in circumstellar envelopes of young and evolved stars as well as the interstellar medium. This work presents a line list of 1.3 billion 32S16O2 vibration-rotation transitions computed using an empirically adjusted potential energy surface and an ab initio dipole moment surface. The list gives complete coverage up to 8000 cm-1 (wavelengths longer than 1.25 μm) for temperatures below 2000 K. Infrared absorption cross-sections are recorded at 300 and 500 C are used to validated the resulting ExoAmes line list. The line list is made available in electronic form as supplementary data to this article and at www.exomol.com.

  1. Propagation speed of rotation signals for field lines undergoing magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Goldman, Martin; Newman, David; Markidis, Stefano

    2013-10-15

    Reconnection is associated with two bending of the magnetic field lines. Considering the usual plane of a 2D reconnection simulation, the first bending is in-plane and produces the needed topological changes by bringing oppositely directed filed lines in proximity. The second is typical of fast reconnection and is out of plane, leading to the formation of the Hall magnetic field. This second rotation has recently been observed to proceed at superAlfvénic speeds and to carry substantial energy fluxes (Shay et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 065001 (2011)). We revisit these rotations with a new diagnostics based on dispersing a multitude of virtual probes into a kinetic simulation, akin the approach of multi spacecraft missions. The results of the new diagnostics are compared with the theory of characteristics applied to the two fluid model. The comparison of virtual probes and the method of characteristics confirm the findings relative to the out of plane rotation and uncover the existence of two families of characteristics. Both are observed in the simulation. The early stage of reconnection develops on the slower compressional branch and the later faster phase develops on the faster torsional branch. The superAlfvénic signal is only relevant in the second phase.

  2. Propagation speed of rotation signals for field lines undergoing magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Goldman, Martin; Newman, David; Markidis, Stefano

    2013-10-01

    Reconnection is associated with two bending of the magnetic field lines. Considering the usual plane of a 2D reconnection simulation, the first bending is in-plane and produces the needed topological changes by bringing oppositely directed filed lines in proximity. The second is typical of fast reconnection and is out of plane, leading to the formation of the Hall magnetic field. This second rotation has recently been observed to proceed at superAlfvénic speeds and to carry substantial energy fluxes (Shay et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 065001 (2011)). We revisit these rotations with a new diagnostics based on dispersing a multitude of virtual probes into a kinetic simulation, akin the approach of multi spacecraft missions. The results of the new diagnostics are compared with the theory of characteristics applied to the two fluid model. The comparison of virtual probes and the method of characteristics confirm the findings relative to the out of plane rotation and uncover the existence of two families of characteristics. Both are observed in the simulation. The early stage of reconnection develops on the slower compressional branch and the later faster phase develops on the faster torsional branch. The superAlfvénic signal is only relevant in the second phase.

  3. A Framework for the Comparative Assessment of Neuronal Spike Sorting Algorithms towards More Accurate Off-Line and On-Line Microelectrode Arrays Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Regalia, Giulia; Coelli, Stefania; Biffi, Emilia; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal spike sorting algorithms are designed to retrieve neuronal network activity on a single-cell level from extracellular multiunit recordings with Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs). In typical analysis of MEA data, one spike sorting algorithm is applied indiscriminately to all electrode signals. However, this approach neglects the dependency of algorithms' performances on the neuronal signals properties at each channel, which require data-centric methods. Moreover, sorting is commonly performed off-line, which is time and memory consuming and prevents researchers from having an immediate glance at ongoing experiments. The aim of this work is to provide a versatile framework to support the evaluation and comparison of different spike classification algorithms suitable for both off-line and on-line analysis. We incorporated different spike sorting "building blocks" into a Matlab-based software, including 4 feature extraction methods, 3 feature clustering methods, and 1 template matching classifier. The framework was validated by applying different algorithms on simulated and real signals from neuronal cultures coupled to MEAs. Moreover, the system has been proven effective in running on-line analysis on a standard desktop computer, after the selection of the most suitable sorting methods. This work provides a useful and versatile instrument for a supported comparison of different options for spike sorting towards more accurate off-line and on-line MEA data analysis. PMID:27239191

  4. A Framework for the Comparative Assessment of Neuronal Spike Sorting Algorithms towards More Accurate Off-Line and On-Line Microelectrode Arrays Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal spike sorting algorithms are designed to retrieve neuronal network activity on a single-cell level from extracellular multiunit recordings with Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs). In typical analysis of MEA data, one spike sorting algorithm is applied indiscriminately to all electrode signals. However, this approach neglects the dependency of algorithms' performances on the neuronal signals properties at each channel, which require data-centric methods. Moreover, sorting is commonly performed off-line, which is time and memory consuming and prevents researchers from having an immediate glance at ongoing experiments. The aim of this work is to provide a versatile framework to support the evaluation and comparison of different spike classification algorithms suitable for both off-line and on-line analysis. We incorporated different spike sorting “building blocks” into a Matlab-based software, including 4 feature extraction methods, 3 feature clustering methods, and 1 template matching classifier. The framework was validated by applying different algorithms on simulated and real signals from neuronal cultures coupled to MEAs. Moreover, the system has been proven effective in running on-line analysis on a standard desktop computer, after the selection of the most suitable sorting methods. This work provides a useful and versatile instrument for a supported comparison of different options for spike sorting towards more accurate off-line and on-line MEA data analysis. PMID:27239191

  5. Accurate Calculation of Oscillator Strengths for CI II Lines Using Non-orthogonal Wavefunctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    2004-01-01

    Non-orthogonal orbitals technique in the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock approach is used to calculate oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for allowed and intercombination lines in Cl II. The relativistic corrections are included through the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. The Cl II wave functions show strong term dependence. The non-orthogonal orbitals are used to describe the term dependence of radial functions. Large sets of spectroscopic and correlation functions are chosen to describe adequately strong interactions in the 3s(sup 2)3p(sup 3)nl (sup 3)Po, (sup 1)Po and (sup 3)Do Rydberg series and to properly account for the important correlation and relaxation effects. The length and velocity forms of oscillator strength show good agreement for most transitions. The calculated radiative lifetime for the 3s3p(sup 5) (sup 3)Po state is in good agreement with experiment.

  6. Highly Accurate Semi-Empirical IR Line Lists of Asymmetric SO2 Isotopologues: SO18O and SO17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.; Schwenke, D.; Lee, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    Atmosphere models and simulations of Venus, Mars, and Exo-planets will greatly benefit from complete and accurate Infrared spectra data of important molecules such as SO2 and CO2. Currently, high resolution spectra data for SO2 is very limited at 296K and mainly for the primary isotopologue 626. It cannot effectively support the observed data analysis and simulations. Recently we published a semi-empirically refined potential energy surface, denoted Ames-1, and Ames-296K IR line lists for SO2 626 and a few symmetric isotopologues including 646, 636, 666 and 828. The accuracy of line positions is around 0.01 - 0.03 cm-1 for most transitions. For intensities, most deviations are less than 5-15%. Now we have carried out new potential energy surface refinements by including latest experimental data and those of isotopologues. On the newly fitted surface, for the first time we have computed 296K line lists for the two most abundant asymmetric isotopologues, SO2 628 and SO2 627. We will present the spectra simulations of SO2 628 and SO2 627, and compare it with latest high resolution experimental spectroscopy of SO2 628. A composite "natural" line list at 296K is also available with terrestial abundances. These line lists will be available to download at http://huang.seti.org.

  7. Line strengths of rovibrational and rotational transitions in the X2 Π ground state of OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooke, James S. A.; Bernath, Peter F.; Western, Colin M.; Sneden, Christopher; Afşar, Melike; Li, Gang; Gordon, Iouli E.

    2016-01-01

    A new line list including positions and absolute transition strengths (in the form of Einstein A values and oscillator strengths) has been produced for the OH ground X2 Π state rovibrational (Meinel system) and pure rotational transitions. All possible transitions are included with v‧ and v ″ up to 13, and J up to between 9.5 and 59.5, depending on the band. An updated fit to determine molecular constants has been performed, which includes some new rotational data and a simultaneous fitting of all molecular constants. The absolute transition strengths are based on a new dipole moment function, which is a combination of two high level ab initio calculations. The calculations show good agreement with an experimental v = 1 lifetime, experimental μv values, and Δv=2 line intensity ratios from an observed spectrum. To achieve this good agreement, an alteration in the method of converting matrix elements from Hund's case (b) to (a) was made. Partitions sums have been calculated using the new energy levels, for the temperature range 5-6000 K, which extends the previously available (in HITRAN) 70-3000 K range. The resulting absolute transition strengths have been used to calculate O abundances in the Sun, Arcturus, and two red giants in the Galactic open and globular clusters M67 and M71. Literature data based mainly on [O I] lines are available for the Sun and Arcturus, and excellent agreement is found.

  8. Heterodyne detection of the 752.033-GHz H2O rotational absorption line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dionne, G. F.; Fitzgerald, J. F.; Chang, T. S.; Litvak, M. M.; Fetterman, H. R.

    1980-01-01

    A tunable high resolution two stage heterodyne radiometer was developed for the purpose of investigating the intensity and lineshape of the 752.033 GHz rotational transition of water vapor. Single-sideband system noise temperatures of approximately 45,000 K were obtained using a sensitive GaAs Schottky diode as the first stage mixer. First local oscillator power was supplied by a CO2 laser pumped formic acid laser (761.61 GHz), generating an X-band IF signal with theoretical line center at 9.5744 GHz. Second local oscillator power was provided by means of a 3 GHz waveguide cavity filter with only 9 dB insertion loss. In absorption measurements of the H2O taken from a laboratory simulation of a high altitude rocket plume, the center frequency of the 752 GHz line was determined to within 1 MHz of the reported value. A rotational temperature 75 K, a linewidth 5 MHz and a Doppler shift 3 MHz were measured with the line-of-sight intersecting the simulated-plume axis at a distance downstream of 30 nozzle diameters. These absorption data were obtained against continuum background radiation sources at temperatures of 1175 and 300 K.

  9. Computer program for determining rotational line intensity factors for diatomic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiting, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV computer program, that provides a new research tool for determining reliable rotational line intensity factors (also known as Honl-London factors), for most electric and magnetic dipole allowed diatomic transitions, is described in detail. This users manual includes instructions for preparing the input data, a program listing, detailed flow charts, and three sample cases. The program is applicable to spin-allowed dipole transitions with either or both states intermediate between Hund's case (a) and Hund's case (b) coupling and to spin-forbidden dipole transitions with either or both states intermediate between Hund's case (c) and Hund's case (b) coupling.

  10. Molecular line study of the very young protostar IRAM 04191 in Taurus: infall, rotation, and outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloche, A.; André, P.; Despois, D.; Blinder, S.

    2002-10-01

    We present a detailed millimeter spectroscopic study of the circumstellar environment of the low-luminosity Class 0 protostar IRAM 04191+1522 in the Taurus molecular cloud. Molecular line observations with the IRAM 30 m telescope demonstrate that the ~ 14 000 AU radius protostellar envelope is undergoing both extended infall and fast, differential rotation. Radiative transfer modeling of multitransition CS and C34S maps indicate an infall velocity vinf ~0.15 km s-1 at r ~ 1500 AU and v_inf ~ 0.1 km s-1 up to r ~ 11 000 AU, as well as a rotational angular velocity Omega ~ 3.9 x 10-13 rad s-1, strongly decreasing with radius beyond 3500 AU down to a value Omega ~ 1.5-3x 10-14 rad s-1 at ~ 11 000 AU. Two distinct regions, which differ in both their infall and their rotation properties, therefore seem to stand out: the inner part of the envelope (r lower .5ex<~ a 2000-4000 AU) is rapidly collapsing and rotating, while the outer part undergoes only moderate infall/contraction and slower rotation. These contrasted features suggest that angular momentum is conserved in the collapsing inner region but efficiently dissipated due to magnetic braking in the slowly contracting outer region. We propose that the inner envelope is in the process of decoupling from the ambient cloud and corresponds to the effective mass reservoir ( ~ 0.5 Msun) from which the central star is being built. Comparison with the rotational properties of other objects in Taurus suggests that IRAM 04191 is at a pivotal stage between a prestellar regime of constant angular velocity enforced by magnetic braking and a dynamical, protostellar regime of nearly conserved angular momentum. The rotation velocity profile we derive for the inner IRAM 04191 envelope should thus set some constraints on the distribution of angular momentum on the scale of the outer Solar system at the onset of protostar/disk formation.

  11. Order and chaos in the rotation and revolution of two massive line segments.

    PubMed

    Blaikie, Andrew; Saines, Alex D; Schmitthenner, Matthew; Lankford, Maggie; Pasteur, R Drew; Lindner, John F

    2014-04-01

    As a generalization of Newton's two body problem, we explore the dynamics of two massive line segments interacting gravitationally. The extension of each line segment or slash (/) provides extra degrees of freedom that enable the interplay between rotation and revolution in an especially simple example. This slash-slash (//) body problem can thereby elucidate the dynamics of nonspherical space structures, from asteroids to space stations. Fortunately, as we show, Newton's laws imply exact algebraic expressions for the force and torque between the slashes, and this greatly facilitates analysis. The diverse dynamics include a stable synchronous orbit, families of unstable periodic orbits, generic chaotic orbits, and spin-orbit coupling that can unbind the slashes. In particular, retrograde orbits where the slashes spin opposite to their orbits are stable, with regular dynamics and smooth parameter spaces, while prograde orbits are unstable, with chaotic dynamics and fractal parameter spaces. PMID:24827323

  12. High rotational CO lines in post-AGB stars and PNe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justtanont, K.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Skinner, C. J.; Haas, Michael R.

    1995-01-01

    A significant fraction of a star's initial mass is lost while it is on the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB). Mass loss rates range from 10(exp -7) solar mass/yr for early AGB stars to a few 10(exp -4) solar mass/yr for stars at the tip of the AGB. Dust grains condense from the outflow as the gas expands and form a dust shell around the central star. A superwind (approximately 10(exp -4) to 10(exp -3) solar mass/yr) is thought to terminate the AGB phase. In the post-AGB phase, the star evolves to a higher effective temperature, the mass loss decreases (approximately 10(exp -8) solar mass/yr), but the wind velocity increases (approximately 1000 km/s). During this evolution, dust and gas are exposed to an increasingly harsher radiation field and when T(sub eff) reaches about 30,000 K, the nebula is ionized and becomes a planetary nebula (PN). Photons from the central star can create a photodissociation region (PDR) in the expanding superwind. Gas can be heated through the photoelectric effect working on small grains and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's). This gas can cool via the atomic fine structure lines of O I (63 microns and 145 microns) and C II (158 microns), as well as the rotational lines of CO. In the post-AGB phase, the fast wind from the central star will interact with the material ejected during the AGB phase. The shock caused by this interaction will dissociate and heat the gas. This warm gas will cool through atomic fine structure lines of O I and the rotational lines of (newly formed) CO.

  13. Accurate spectroscopy of polycyclic aromatic compounds: from the rotational spectrum of fluoren-9-one in the millimeter wave region to its infrared spectrum.

    PubMed

    Maris, Assimo; Calabrese, Camilla; Melandri, Sonia; Blanco, Susana

    2015-01-14

    The rotational spectrum of fluoren-9-one, a small oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, has been recorded and assigned in the 52-74.4 GHz region. The determined small negative value of the inertia defect (-0.3 u Å(2)) has been explained in terms of vibrational-rotational coupling constants calculated at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Vibrational anharmonic analysis together with second-order vibrational perturbation theory approximation was applied both to fluorenone and its reduced form, fluorene, to predict the mid- and near-infrared spectra. The data presented here give precise indication on the fluorenone ground state structure, allow for an accurate spectral characterization in the millimeter wave and infrared regions, and hopefully will facilitate extensive radio astronomical searches with large radio telescopes. PMID:25591363

  14. Rotating Arc Jet Test Model: Time-Accurate Trajectory Heat Flux Replication in a Ground Test Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laub, Bernard; Grinstead, Jay; Dyakonov, Artem; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2011-01-01

    Though arc jet testing has been the proven method employed for development testing and certification of TPS and TPS instrumentation, the operational aspects of arc jets limit testing to selected, but constant, conditions. Flight, on the other hand, produces timevarying entry conditions in which the heat flux increases, peaks, and recedes as a vehicle descends through an atmosphere. As a result, we are unable to "test as we fly." Attempts to replicate the time-dependent aerothermal environment of atmospheric entry by varying the arc jet facility operating conditions during a test have proven to be difficult, expensive, and only partially successful. A promising alternative is to rotate the test model exposed to a constant-condition arc jet flow to yield a time-varying test condition at a point on a test article (Fig. 1). The model shape and rotation rate can be engineered so that the heat flux at a point on the model replicates the predicted profile for a particular point on a flight vehicle. This simple concept will enable, for example, calibration of the TPS sensors on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) aeroshell for anticipated flight environments.

  15. Rotational Sweepback of Magnetic Field Lines in Geometrical Models of Pulsar Radio Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyks, J.; Harding, Alice K.

    2004-01-01

    We study the rotational distortions of the vacuum dipole magnetic field in the context of geometrical models of the radio emission from pulsars. We find that at low altitudes the rotation deflects the local direction of the magnetic field by at most an angle of the order of r(sup 2 sub n), where r(sub n) = r/R(sub lc), r is the radial distance and R(sub lc) is the light cylinder radius. To the lowest (i.e. second) order in r(sub n) this distortion is symmetrical with respect to the plane containing the dipole axis and the rotation axis ((Omega, mu) plane). The lowest order distortion which is asymmetrical with respect to the (Omega, mu) plane is third order in r(sub n). These results confirm the common assumption that the rotational sweepback has negligible effect on the position angle (PA) curve. We show, however, that the influence of the sweep back on the outer boundary of the open field line region (open volume) is a much larger effect, of the order of r(sup 1/2 sub n). The open volume is shifted backwards with respect to the rotation direction by an angle delta(sub o nu) approx. 0.2 sin alpha r(sup 1/2 sub n) where alpha is the dipole inclination with respect to the rotation axis. The associated phase shift of the pulse profile Delta phi(sub o nu) approx. 0.2 r(sup 1/2 sub n) can easily exceed the shift due to combined effects of aberration and propagation time delays (approx. 2r(sub n)). This strongly affects the misalignment of the center of the PA curve and the center of the pulse profile, thereby modifying the delay radius relation. Contrary to intuition, the effect of sweepback dominates over other effects when emission occurs at low altitudes. For r(sub n) < or approx. 3 x 10(exp -3) the shift becomes negative, i.e. the center of the position angle curve precedes the profile center. With the sweepback effect included, the modified delay-radius relation predicts larger emission radii and is in much better agreement with the other methods of determining r

  16. SOLAR CYCLE VARIABILITY AND SURFACE DIFFERENTIAL ROTATION FROM Ca II K-LINE TIME SERIES DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.; Worden, Simon P.; Keil, Stephen L.

    2013-07-01

    Analysis of over 36 yr of time series data from the NSO/AFRL/Sac Peak K-line monitoring program elucidates 5 components of the variation of the 7 measured chromospheric parameters: (a) the solar cycle (period {approx} 11 yr), (b) quasi-periodic variations (periods {approx} 100 days), (c) a broadband stochastic process (wide range of periods), (d) rotational modulation, and (e) random observational errors, independent of (a)-(d). Correlation and power spectrum analyses elucidate periodic and aperiodic variation of these parameters. Time-frequency analysis illuminates periodic and quasi-periodic signals, details of frequency modulation due to differential rotation, and in particular elucidates the rather complex harmonic structure (a) and (b) at timescales in the range {approx}0.1-10 yr. These results using only full-disk data suggest that similar analyses will be useful for detecting and characterizing differential rotation in stars from stellar light curves such as those being produced by NASA's Kepler observatory. Component (c) consists of variations over a range of timescales, in the manner of a 1/f random process with a power-law slope index that varies in a systematic way. A time-dependent Wilson-Bappu effect appears to be present in the solar cycle variations (a), but not in the more rapid variations of the stochastic process (c). Component (d) characterizes differential rotation of the active regions. Component (e) is of course not characteristic of solar variability, but the fact that the observational errors are quite small greatly facilitates the analysis of the other components. The data analyzed in this paper can be found at the National Solar Observatory Web site http://nsosp.nso.edu/cak{sub m}on/, or by file transfer protocol at ftp://ftp.nso.edu/idl/cak.parameters.

  17. Solar Cycle Variability and Surface Differential Rotation from Ca II K-line Time Series Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.; Keil, Stephen L.; Worden, Simon P.

    2013-07-01

    Analysis of over 36 yr of time series data from the NSO/AFRL/Sac Peak K-line monitoring program elucidates 5 components of the variation of the 7 measured chromospheric parameters: (a) the solar cycle (period ~ 11 yr), (b) quasi-periodic variations (periods ~ 100 days), (c) a broadband stochastic process (wide range of periods), (d) rotational modulation, and (e) random observational errors, independent of (a)-(d). Correlation and power spectrum analyses elucidate periodic and aperiodic variation of these parameters. Time-frequency analysis illuminates periodic and quasi-periodic signals, details of frequency modulation due to differential rotation, and in particular elucidates the rather complex harmonic structure (a) and (b) at timescales in the range ~0.1-10 yr. These results using only full-disk data suggest that similar analyses will be useful for detecting and characterizing differential rotation in stars from stellar light curves such as those being produced by NASA's Kepler observatory. Component (c) consists of variations over a range of timescales, in the manner of a 1/f random process with a power-law slope index that varies in a systematic way. A time-dependent Wilson-Bappu effect appears to be present in the solar cycle variations (a), but not in the more rapid variations of the stochastic process (c). Component (d) characterizes differential rotation of the active regions. Component (e) is of course not characteristic of solar variability, but the fact that the observational errors are quite small greatly facilitates the analysis of the other components. The data analyzed in this paper can be found at the National Solar Observatory Web site http://nsosp.nso.edu/cak_mon/, or by file transfer protocol at ftp://ftp.nso.edu/idl/cak.parameters.

  18. Towards a more accurate microscopic description of the moving contact line problem - incorporating nonlocal effects through a statistical mechanics framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nold, Andreas; Goddard, Ben; Sibley, David; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2014-03-01

    Multiscale effects play a predominant role in wetting phenomena such as the moving contact line. An accurate description is of paramount interest for a wide range of industrial applications, yet it is a matter of ongoing research, due to the difficulty of incorporating different physical effects in one model. Important small-scale phenomena are corrections to the attractive fluid-fluid and wall-fluid forces in inhomogeneous density distributions, which often previously have been accounted for by the disjoining pressure in an ad-hoc manner. We systematically derive a novel model for the description of a single-component liquid-vapor multiphase system which inherently incorporates these nonlocal effects. This derivation, which is inspired by statistical mechanics in the framework of colloidal density functional theory, is critically discussed with respect to its assumptions and restrictions. The model is then employed numerically to study a moving contact line of a liquid fluid displacing its vapor phase. We show how nonlocal physical effects are inherently incorporated by the model and describe how classical macroscopic results for the contact line motion are retrieved. We acknowledge financial support from ERC Advanced Grant No. 247031 and Imperial College through a DTG International Studentship.

  19. eNAL++: a new and effective off-line correction protocol for rotational setup errors when using a robotic couch.

    PubMed

    Martens, Daan; Luesink, Mark; Huizenga, Henk; Pasma, Kasper L

    2015-01-01

    Cone-beam CTs (CBCTs) installed on a linear accelerator can be used to provide fast and accurate automatic six degrees of freedom (6DoF) vector displacement information of the patient position just prior to radiotherapy. These displacement corrections can be made with 6DoF couches, which are primarily used for patient setup correction during stereotactic treatments. When position corrections are performed daily prior to treatment, the correction is deemed "online". However, the interface between the first generation 6DoF couches and the imaging software is suboptimal. The system requires the user to select manually the patient and type the match result by hand. The introduction of 6DoF setup correction for treatments, other than stereotactic radiotherapy, is hindered by both the high workload associated with the online protocol and the interface issues. For these reasons, we developed software that fully integrates the 6DoF couch with the linear accelerator. To further reduce both the workload and imaging dose, three off-line 6DoF correction protocols were analyzed. While the protocols require significantly less imaging, the analysis assessed their ability to reduce the systematic rotation setup correction. CBCT scans were acquired for 19 patients with intracranial meningioma. The total number of CBCT scans was 856, acquired before and after radiotherapy treatment fractions. The patient positions were corrected online using a 6DoF robotic couch. The effects on the residual rotational setup error for three off-line protocols were simulated. The three protocols used were two known off-line protocols, the no action level (NAL) and the extended no action level (eNAL), and one new off-line protocol (eNAL++). The residual setup errors were compared using the systematic and random components of the total setup error. The reduction of the rotational setup error of these protocols was optimized with respect to the required workload (i.e., number of CBCTs required

  20. A new accurate ground-state potential energy surface of ethylene and predictions for rotational and vibrational energy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delahaye, Thibault; Nikitin, Andrei; Rey, Michaël; Szalay, Péter G.; Tyuterev, Vladimir G.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we report a new ground state potential energy surface for ethylene (ethene) C2H4 obtained from extended ab initio calculations. The coupled-cluster approach with the perturbative inclusion of the connected triple excitations CCSD(T) and correlation consistent polarized valence basis set cc-pVQZ was employed for computations of electronic ground state energies. The fit of the surface included 82 542 nuclear configurations using sixth order expansion in curvilinear symmetry-adapted coordinates involving 2236 parameters. A good convergence for variationally computed vibrational levels of the C2H4 molecule was obtained with a RMS(Obs.-Calc.) deviation of 2.7 cm-1 for fundamental bands centers and 5.9 cm-1 for vibrational bands up to 7800 cm-1. Large scale vibrational and rotational calculations for 12C2H4, 13C2H4, and 12C2D4 isotopologues were performed using this new surface. Energy levels for J = 20 up to 6000 cm-1 are in a good agreement with observations. This represents a considerable improvement with respect to available global predictions of vibrational levels of 13C2H4 and 12C2D4 and rovibrational levels of 12C2H4.

  1. Benchmarking density-functional theory calculations of NMR shielding constants and spin-rotation constants using accurate coupled-cluster calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teale, Andrew M.; Lutnæs, Ola B.; Helgaker, Trygve; Tozer, David J.; Gauss, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Accurate sets of benchmark nuclear-magnetic-resonance shielding constants and spin-rotation constants are calculated using coupled-cluster singles-doubles (CCSD) theory and coupled-cluster singles-doubles-perturbative-triples [CCSD(T)] theory, in a variety of basis sets consisting of (rotational) London atomic orbitals. The accuracy of the calculated coupled-cluster constants is established by a careful comparison with experimental data, taking into account zero-point vibrational corrections. Coupled-cluster basis-set convergence is analyzed and extrapolation techniques are employed to estimate basis-set-limit quantities, thereby establishing an accurate benchmark data set. Together with the set provided for rotational g-tensors and magnetizabilities in our previous work [O. B. Lutnæs, A. M. Teale, T. Helgaker, D. J. Tozer, K. Ruud, and J. Gauss, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 144104 (2009)], 10.1063/1.3242081, it provides a substantial source of consistently calculated high-accuracy data on second-order magnetic response properties. The utility of this benchmark data set is demonstrated by examining a wide variety of Kohn-Sham exchange-correlation functionals for the calculation of these properties. None of the existing approximate functionals provide an accuracy competitive with that provided by CCSD or CCSD(T) theory. The need for a careful consideration of vibrational effects is clearly illustrated. Finally, the pure coupled-cluster results are compared with the results of Kohn-Sham calculations constrained to give the same electronic density. Routes to future improvements are discussed in light of this comparison.

  2. In-line polarization rotator based on the quantum-optical analogy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Qu, Ke-Nan; Shen, Heng; Zhang, Wei-Gang; Chou, Keng C; Liu, Qian; Yan, Tie-Yi; Wang, Biao; Wang, Song

    2016-05-01

    An in-line polarization rotator (PR) is proposed based on the quantum-optical analogy (QOA). The proposed PR possesses an auxiliary E7 liquid crystal (LC) waveguide in the vicinity of the single-mode fiber (SMF) core. Because of the matched core size, the PR demonstrates good compatibility with the established backbone networks which are composed of conventional SMFs. With optimized parameters for the auxiliary waveguide, the PR offers a near 100% polarization conversion efficiency at the 1550 nm band with a bandwidth of ∼30  nm, a length of ∼4625.9  μm with a large tolerance of ∼550  μm, and a tolerance of the input light polarization angle and rotation angle of the E7 LC of ∼π/30 and ∼π/36  rad, respectively. The performance was verified by the full-vector finite-element method. The proposed PR can be easily fabricated based on the existing photonics crystal fiber manufacturing process, making it a potentially inexpensive device for applications in modern communication systems. Moreover, the QOA, compared with the previous supermode-theory design method, allows a designer to consider several waveguides separately. Therefore, various unique characteristics can be met simultaneously which is consistent with the trend of modern fiber design. PMID:27128087

  3. Herschel/HIFI observation of highly excited rotational lines of HNC toward IRC +10 216

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, F.; Agúndez, M.; Cernicharo, J.; De Beck, E.; Lombaert, R.; Decin, L.; Kahane, C.; Guélin, M.; Müller, H. S. P.

    2012-06-01

    We report the detection in emission of various highly excited rotational transitions of HNC (J = 6-5 through J = 12-11) toward the carbon-star envelope IRC +10 216 using the HIFI instrument on-board the Herschel Space Observatory. Observations of the J = 1-0 and J = 3-2 lines of HNC with the IRAM 30-m telescope are also presented. The lines observed with HIFI have upper level energies corresponding to temperatures between 90 and 340 degrees Kelvin, and trace a warm and smaller circumstellar region than that seen in the interferometric maps of the J = 1-0 transition, whose emission extends up to a radius of 20''. After a detailed chemical and radiative transfer modeling, we find that the presence of HNC in the circumstellar envelope of IRC +10 216 is consistent with formation from the precursor ion HCNH+, which in turn is produced through several proton transfer reactions which are triggered by cosmic-ray ionization. We also find that the radiative pumping through λ 21 μm photons to the first excited state of the bending mode ν2 plays a crucial role to populate the high-J HNC levels involved in the transitions observed with HIFI. Emission in these high-J rotational transitions of HNC is expected to be strong in regions which are warm and dense and/or have an intense infrared flux at wavelengths around 21 μm. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30-m telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain).

  4. Wall-locking of kink modes in a line-tied screw pinch with a rotating wall

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Soldan, C.; Brookhart, M. I.; Hegna, C. C.; Forest, C. B.

    2012-05-15

    The effect of rotating conducting walls on mode-locking is studied in a line-tied, linear screw pinch experiment and then compared to a torque balance model which has been extended to include differential wall rotation. Wall rotation is predicted to asymmetrically affect the mode-unlocking threshold, with fast rotation eliminating the locking bifurcation. Static error fields are observed to lock the resistive wall mode (RWM) variant of the current driven kink instability by modifying the electromagnetic torque. Using locked modes, the stabilizing effect of wall rotation on the RWM is experimentally demonstrated by illustrating a reduction of the RWM growth rate and an extension of the RWM-stable operation window.

  5. Cyclotron line strength variations in gamma-ray burst GB870303 - Possible evidence of neutron star rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graziani, Carlo; Fenimore, Edward E.; Murakami, Toshio; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Lamb, D. Q.; Wang, John C. L.; Loredo, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    An exhaustive search of the Ginga data on gamma-ray burst GB870303 reveals two separate time intervals during which statistically significant line features are evident. One interval shows a single prominent line feature at about 20 keV; a second, shows two line features at about 20 and 40 keV. From model fits to the data, we find that both sets of lines are well-described by cyclotron resonant scattering in a magnetic field B about 1.8 x 10 exp 12 G, and that the differences in the line strengths between the two intervals are significant. The variations are qualitatively similar to those produced by a change in the viewing angle theta relative to the magnetic field. We conjecture that the change in theta is due to rotation of the neutron star, and derive limits P = 45-180 sec on the rotation period P.

  6. First extragalactic detection of submillimeter CH rotational lines from the Herschel space observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Rangwala, Naseem; Maloney, Philip R.; Glenn, Jason; Kamenetzky, Julia; Wilson, Christine D.; Schirm, Maximilien R. P.; Spinoglio, Luigi; Pereira Santaella, Miguel

    2014-06-20

    We present the first extragalactic detections of several CH rotational transitions in the far-infrared in four nearby galaxies, NGC 1068, Arp 220, M82, and NGC 253, using the Herschel Space Observatory. The CH lines in all four galaxies are a factor of 2-4 brighter than the adjacent HCN and HCO{sup +} J = 6-5 lines (also detected in the same spectra). In the star-formation-dominated galaxies, M82, NGC 253, and Arp 220, the CH/CO abundance ratio is low (∼10{sup –5}), implying that the CH is primarily arising in diffuse and translucent gas where the chemistry is driven by UV radiation as found in the Milky Way interstellar matter. In NGC 1068, which has a luminous active galactic nucleus (AGN), the CH/CO ratio is an order of magnitude higher, suggesting that CH formation is driven by an X-ray-dominated region (XDR). Our XDR models show that both the CH and CO abundances in NGC 1068 can be explained by an XDR-driven chemistry for gas densities and molecular hydrogen column densities that are well constrained by the CO observations. We conclude that the CH/CO ratio may a good indicator of the presence of AGN in galaxies. We also discuss the feasibility of detecting CH in intermediate- to high-z galaxies with ALMA.

  7. Rotating kink modes in a non-line tied plasma column in the Reconnection Scaling experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madziwa-Nussinov, Tsitsi; Ryutov, Dmitri; Abbate, Sara

    2005-10-01

    The screw pinch is one of the simplest MHD equilibria, and is relevant to fusion physics, astro-physics, and basic plasma physics. It has been studied for many years, but usually in the context of a periodic toroidal plasma column. Reconnection Scaling Experiment (RSX)[1] is a cylindrical device built to study the linear and non-linear evolution of the current carrying screw pinch. A plasma column is injected into one end of the chamber from a plasma gun, and terminates at an anode that can be biased to draw current. This anode acts as an adjustable non-line tied end boundary for the column. Line-tying appears to give rise to several unexpected characteristics including finite rotation frequency, and a kink instability threshold less than the Kruskal Shafranov predictions. Experimental data is compared to a phenomenological theory of the kink instability developed for a slender plasma[2] column, including effects such as boundary conditions at the electrodes, finite plasma resistivity and axial flow. [1] I. Furno et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 74, 2324 (2003).2] D. Ryutov et al., to be submitted to Phys. Plasmas.

  8. An On-Line Algorithm for Measuring the Translational and Rotational Velocities of a Table Tennis Ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunfang; Hayakawa, Yoshikazu; Nakashima, Akira

    This paper proposes an on-line method for estimating both translational and rotational velocities of a table tennis ball by using only a few consecutive frames of image data which are sensed by two high speed cameras. In order to estimate the translational velocity, three-dimensional (3D) position of the ball's center at each instant of camera frame is obtained, where the on-line method of reconstructing the 3D position from the two-dimensional (2D) image data of two cameras is proposed without the pattern matching process. The proposed method of estimating the rotational velocity belongs to the image registration methods, where in order to avoid the pattern matching process too, a rotation model of the ball is used to make an estimated image data from an image data sensed at the previous instant of camera frame and then the estimated image data are compared with the image data sensed at the next instant of camera frame to obtain the most plausible rotational velocity by using the least square and the conjugate gradient method. The effectiveness of the proposed method is shown by some experimental results in the case of a ball rotated by a rotation machine as well as in the case of a flying ball shot from a catapult machine.

  9. Accurate modeling of fluorescence line narrowing difference spectra: Direct measurement of the single-site fluorescence spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reppert, Mike; Naibo, Virginia; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2010-07-01

    Accurate lineshape functions for modeling fluorescence line narrowing (FLN) difference spectra (ΔFLN spectra) in the low-fluence limit are derived and examined in terms of the physical interpretation of various contributions, including photoproduct absorption and emission. While in agreement with the earlier results of Jaaniso [Proc. Est. Acad. Sci., Phys., Math. 34, 277 (1985)] and Fünfschilling et al. [J. Lumin. 36, 85 (1986)], the derived formulas differ substantially from functions used recently [e.g., M. Rätsep et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 479, 140 (2009)] to model ΔFLN spectra. In contrast to traditional FLN spectra, it is demonstrated that for most physically reasonable parameters, the ΔFLN spectrum reduces simply to the single-site fluorescence lineshape function. These results imply that direct measurement of a bulk-averaged single-site fluorescence lineshape function can be accomplished with no complicated extraction process or knowledge of any additional parameters such as site distribution function shape and width. We argue that previous analysis of ΔFLN spectra obtained for many photosynthetic complexes led to strong artificial lowering of apparent electron-phonon coupling strength, especially on the high-energy side of the pigment site distribution function.

  10. ON-LINE SELF-CALIBRATING SINGLE CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION FOR ACCURATE AND RELIABLE COAL GASIFIER TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang; Zhengyu Huang

    2004-04-01

    This report summarizes technical progress over the third six month period of the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the BPDI sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Research efforts were focused on sensor probe design and machining, sensor electronics design, software algorithm design, sensor field installation procedures, and sensor remote data access and control. Field testing will begin in the next several weeks.

  11. On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2005-11-01

    This report summarizes technical progress April-September 2005 on the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Due to the difficulties described on the last report, field testing of the BPDI system has not continued to date. However, we have developed an alternative high temperature sensing solution, which is described in this report. The sensing system will be installed and tested at TECO's Polk Power Station. Following a site visit in June 2005, our efforts have been focused on preparing for that field test, including he design of the sensor mechanical packaging, sensor electronics, the data transfer module, and the necessary software codes to accommodate this application.. We are currently ready to start sensor fabrication.

  12. ON-LINE SELF-CALIBRATING SINGLE CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION FOR ACCURATE AND RELIABLE COAL GASIFIER TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2003-11-01

    This report summarizes technical progress over the second six month period of the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the BPDI sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Research efforts were focused on evaluating corrosion effects in single crystal sapphire at temperatures up to 1400 C, and designing the sensor mechanical packaging with input from Wabash River Power Plant. Upcoming meetings will establish details for the gasifier field test.

  13. ON-LINE SELF-CALIBRATING SINGLE CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION FOR ACCURATE AND RELIABLE COAL GASIFIER TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang; Zhengyu Huang; Yizheng Zhu

    2005-04-01

    This report summarizes technical progress October 2004-March 2005 on the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the BPDI sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Due to the difficulties described on the last report, field testing of the BPDI system has not continued to date. However, we have developed an alternative high temperature sensing solution, which is described in this report.

  14. ON-LINE SELF-CALIBRATING SINGLE CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION FOR ACCURATE AND RELIABLE COAL GASIFIER TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2003-04-01

    This report summarizes technical progress over the first six months of the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the BPDI sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Research efforts were focused on analyzing and testing factors that impact performance degradation of the initially designed sensor prototype, including sensing element movement within the sensing probe and optical signal quality degradation. Based these results, a new version of the sensing system was designed by combining the sapphire disk sensing element and the single crystal zirconia right angle light reflector into one novel single crystal sapphire right angle prism. The new sensor prototype was tested up to 1650 C.

  15. On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Anbo Wang

    2007-03-31

    This report summarizes technical progress October 2006 - March 2007 on the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. During the second phase, an alternative high temperature sensing system based on Fabry-Perot interferometry was developed that offers a number of advantages over the BPDI solution. The objective of this program is to bring the sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. The sapphire wafer-based interferometric sensing system that was installed at TECO's Polk Power Station remained in operation for seven months. Our efforts have been focused on monitoring and analyzing the real-time data collected, and preparing for a second field test.

  16. Molecular rotational line profiles from oxygen-rich red giant winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justtanont, K.; Skinner, C. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a radiative transfer model of the dust and gas envelopes around late-type stars. The gas kinetic temperature for each star is calculated by solving equations of motion and the energy balance simultaneously. The main processes include viscous heating and adiabatic and radiative cooling. Heating is dominated by viscosity as the grains stream outward through the gas, with some contribution in oxygen-rich stars by near-IR pumping of H2O followed by collisional de-excitation in the inner envelope. For O-rich stars, rotational H2O cooling is a dominant mechanism in the middle part of the envelope, with CO cooling being less significant. We have applied our model to three well-studied oxygen-rich red giant stars. The three stars cover a wide range of mass-loss rates, and hence they have different temperature structures. The derived temperature structures are used in calculating CO line profiles for these objects. Comparison of the dust and gas mass-loss rates suggests that mass-loss rates are not constant during the asymptotic giant branch phase. In particular, the results show that the low CO 1-0 antenna temperatures of OH/IR stars reflect an earlier phase of much lower mass-loss rate.

  17. Morphological Differentiation of Colon Carcinoma Cell Lines in Rotating Wall Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jessup, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to determine whether (1) microgravity permits unique, three-dimensional cultures of neoplastic human colon tissues and (2) this culture interaction produces novel intestinal growth and differentiation factors. The initial phase of this project tested the efficacy of simulated microgravity for the cultivation and differentiation of human colon carcinoma in rotating wall vessels (RWV's) on microcarrier beads. The RWV's simulate microgravity by randomizing the gravity vector in an aqueous medium under a low shear stress environment in unit gravity. This simulation achieves approximately a one-fifth g environment that allows cells to 'float' and form three-dimensional relationships with less shear stress than in other stirred aqueous medium bioreactors. In the second phase of this project we assessed the ability of human colon carcinoma lines to adhere to various substrates because adhesion is the first event that must occur to create three-dimensional masses. Finally, we tested growth factor production in the last phase of this project.

  18. Lighting the Dark Molecular Gas Using the Mid Infrared H2 Rotational Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togi, Aditya; Smith, JD

    2014-06-01

    The knowledge of molecular gas distribution is necessary to understand star formation in galaxies. The molecular gas content of galaxies must be inferred using indirect tracers since H2 which forms a major component of molecular gas in galaxies is not observable under typical conditions of interstellar medium. Physical processes causing enhancement and reduction of these tracers can cause misleading estimates of the molecular gas content in galaxies. We have devised a new method to measure molecular gas mass using quadrupole rotational lines of H2 found in the mid infrared spectra of various types of galaxies. We apply our model to derive the amount of molecular gas even in low metallicity galaxies where indirect tracers are unable to estimate the dark molecular gas mass. Bigiel, F., Leroy, A., Walter, F., et al. 2008, The Astronomical Journal, 136, 2846 (2008) Solomon, P. M., Rivolo, A. R., Barett, J., and Yahil, A. The Astrophysical Journal, 319, 730 (1987) Wolfire, M. G., Hollenbach, D., and McKee, C. F. The Astrophysical Journal, 716, 1191 (2010)

  19. Dynamic Simulation of Trapping and Controlled Rotation of a Microscale Rod Driven by Line Optical Tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghshenas-Jaryani, Mahdi; Bowling, Alan; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2013-03-01

    Since the invention of optical tweezers, several biological and engineering applications, especially in micro-nanofluid, have been developed. For example, development of optically driven micromotors, which has an important role in microfluidic applications, has vastly been considered. Despite extensive experimental studies in this field, there is a lack of theoretical work that can verify and analyze these observations. This work develops a dynamic model to simulate trapping and controlled rotation of a microscale rod under influence of the optical trapping forces. The laser beam, used in line optical tweezers with a varying trap's length, was modeled based on a ray-optics approach. Herein, the effects of viscosity of the surrounding fluid (water), gravity, and buoyancy were included in the proposed model. The predicted results are in overall agreement with the experimental observation, which make the theoretical model be a viable tool for investigating the dynamic behavior of small size objects manipulated by optical tweezers in fluid environments. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. MCB-1148541.

  20. Rotation planar chromatography coupled on-line with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Llave, Jonathan J; De Apadoca, Marilyn F; Ford, Michael J

    2004-01-15

    The coupling of a rotation planar preparative thin-layer chromatography system on-line with mass spectrometry is demonstrated using a simple plumbing scheme and a self-aspirating heated nebulizer probe of a corona discharge atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source. The self-aspiration of the heated nebulizer delivers approximately 20 microL/min of the 3.0 mL/min eluate stream to the mass spectrometer, eliminating the need for an external pump in the system. The viability of the coupling is demonstrated with a three-dye mixture composed of fat red 7B, solvent green 3, and solvent blue 35 separated and eluted from a silica gel-coated rotor using toluene. The real-time characterization of the dyes eluting from the rotor is illustrated in positive ion full-scan mode. Other self-aspirating ion source systems including atmospheric pressure photoionization, electrospray ionization, and inductively coupled plasma ionization, for example, might be configured and used in a similar manner coupled to the chromatograph to expand the types of analytes that could be ionized, detected, and characterized effectively. PMID:14719901

  1. A simple, efficient, and high-order accurate curved sliding-mesh interface approach to spectral difference method on coupled rotating and stationary domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Liang, Chunlei

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a simple, efficient, and high-order accurate sliding-mesh interface approach to the spectral difference (SD) method. We demonstrate the approach by solving the two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations on quadrilateral grids. This approach is an extension of the straight mortar method originally designed for stationary domains [7,8]. Our sliding method creates curved dynamic mortars on sliding-mesh interfaces to couple rotating and stationary domains. On the nonconforming sliding-mesh interfaces, the related variables are first projected from cell faces to mortars to compute common fluxes, and then the common fluxes are projected back from the mortars to the cell faces to ensure conservation. To verify the spatial order of accuracy of the sliding-mesh spectral difference (SSD) method, both inviscid and viscous flow cases are tested. It is shown that the SSD method preserves the high-order accuracy of the SD method. Meanwhile, the SSD method is found to be very efficient in terms of computational cost. This novel sliding-mesh interface method is very suitable for parallel processing with domain decomposition. It can be applied to a wide range of problems, such as the hydrodynamics of marine propellers, the aerodynamics of rotorcraft, wind turbines, and oscillating wing power generators, etc.

  2. Accurate ab initio potential energy curve of O2. II. Core-valence correlations, relativistic contributions, and vibration-rotation spectrum.

    PubMed

    Bytautas, Laimutis; Matsunaga, Nikita; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    2010-02-21

    In the first paper of this series, a very accurate ab initio potential energy curve of the (3)Sigma(g)(-) ground state of O(2) has been determined in the approximation that all valence shell electron correlations were calculated at the complete basis set limit. In the present study, the corrections arising from core electron correlations and relativity effects, viz., spin-orbit coupling and scalar relativity, are determined and added to the potential energy curve. From the 24 points calculated on this curve, an analytical expression in terms of even-tempered Gaussian functions is determined and, from it, the vibrational and rotational energy levels are calculated by means of the discrete variable representation. We find 42 vibrational levels. Experimental data (from the Schumann-Runge band system) only yield the lowest 36 levels due to significant reduction in the transition intensities of higher levels. For the 35 term values G(v), the mean absolute deviation between theoretical and experimental data is 12.8 cm(-1). The dissociation energy with respect to the lowest vibrational energy is calculated within 25 cm(-1) of the experimental value of 41,268.2+/-3 cm(-1). The theoretical crossing between the (3)Sigma(g)(-) state and the (1)Sigma(g)(+) state is found to occur at 2.22 A and the spin-orbit coupling in this region is analyzed. PMID:20170227

  3. Probing the mass-loss history of AGB and red supergiant stars from CO rotational line profiles. II. CO line survey of evolved stars: derivation of mass-loss rate formulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Beck, E.; Decin, L.; de Koter, A.; Justtanont, K.; Verhoelst, T.; Kemper, F.; Menten, K. M.

    2010-11-01

    Context. The evolution of intermediate and low-mass stars on the asymptotic giant branch is dominated by their strong dust-driven winds. More massive stars evolve into red supergiants with a similar envelope structure and strong wind. These stellar winds are a prime source for the chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium. Aims: We aim to (1) set up simple and general analytical expressions to estimate mass-loss rates of evolved stars, and (2) from those calculate estimates for the mass-loss rates of the asymptotic giant branch, red supergiant, and yellow hypergiant stars in our galactic sample. Methods: The rotationally excited lines of carbon monoxide (CO) are a classic and very robust diagnostic in the study of circumstellar envelopes. When sampling different layers of the circumstellar envelope, observations of these molecular lines lead to detailed profiles of kinetic temperature, expansion velocity, and density. A state-of-the-art, nonlocal thermal equilibrium, and co-moving frame radiative transfer code that predicts CO line intensities in the circumstellar envelopes of late-type stars is used in deriving relations between stellar and molecular-line parameters, on the one hand, and mass-loss rate, on the other. These expressions are applied to our extensive CO data set to estimate the mass-loss rates of 47 sample stars. Results: We present analytical expressions for estimating the mass-loss rates of evolved stellar objects for 8 rotational transitions of the CO molecule and thencompare our results to those of previous studies. Our expressions account for line saturation and resolving of the envelope, thereby allowing accurate determination of very high mass-loss rates. We argue that, for estimates based on a single rotational line, the CO(2-1) transition provides the most reliable mass-loss rate. The mass-loss rates calculated for the asympotic giant branch stars range from 4 × 10-8 M⊙ yr-1 up to 8 × 10-5 M⊙ yr-1. For red supergiants they reach

  4. Line Emission from an Accretion Disk Around a Rotating Black Hole: Toward a Measurement of Frame Dragging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bromley, Benjamin C.; Chen, Kaiyou; Miller, Warner A.

    1997-01-01

    Line emission from an accretion disk and a corotating hot spot about a rotating black hole are considered for possible signatures of the frame-dragging effect. We explicitly compare integrated line profiles from a geometrically thin disk about a Schwarzschild and an extreme Kerr black hole, and show that the line profile differences are small if the inner radius of the disk is near or above the Schwarzschild stable-orbit limit of radius 6GM/sq c. However, if the inner disk radius extends below this limit, as is Possible in the extreme Kerr spacetime, then differences can become significant, especially if the disk emissivity is stronger near the inner regions. We demonstrate that the first three moments of a line profile define a three-dimensional space in which the presence of material at small radii becomes quantitatively evident in broad classes of disk models. In the context of the simple, thin disk paradigm, this moment-mapping scheme suggests formally that the iron line detected by the Advanced Satellite,for Cosmology and Astrophysics mission from MCG --6-30-15 (Tanaka et al.) is approximately 3 times more likely to originate from a disk about a rotating black hole than from a Schwarzschild system. A statistically significant detection of black hole rotation in this way may be achieved after only modest improvements in the quality of data. We also consider light curves and frequency shifts in line emission as a function of time for corotating hot spots in extreme Kerr and Schwarzschild geometries. The frequency-shift profile is a valuable measure of orbital parameters and might possibly be used to detect frame dragging even at radii approaching 6GM/sq c if the inclination angle of the orbital plane is large. The light curve from a hot spot shows differences as well, although these too are pronounced only at large inclination angles.

  5. ExoMol molecular line lists - XVI. The rotation-vibration spectrum of hot H2S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzam, Ala'a. A. A.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Naumenko, Olga V.

    2016-08-01

    This work presents the AYT2 line list: a comprehensive list of 114 million $^{1}$H$_2$$^{32}$S vibration-rotation transitions computed using an empirically-adjusted potential energy surface and an {\\it ab initio} dipole moment surface. The line list gives complete coverage up to 11000 \\cm\\ (wavelengths longer than 0.91 $\\mu$m) for temperatures up to 2000 K. Room temperature spectra can be simulated up to 20000 \\cm\\ (0.5 $\\mu$m) but the predictions at visible wavelengths are less reliable. AYT2 is made available in electronic form as supplementary data to this article and at \\url{www.exomol.com}.

  6. ExoMol molecular line lists - XVI. The rotation-vibration spectrum of hot H2S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzam, Ala'a. A. A.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Naumenko, Olga V.

    2016-08-01

    This work presents the AYT2 line list: a comprehensive list of 115 million 1H232S vibration-rotation transitions computed using an empirically adjusted potential energy surface and an ab initio dipole moment surface. The line list gives complete coverage up to 11 000 cm-1 (wavelengths longer than 0.91 μm) for temperatures up to 2000 K. Room temperature spectra can be simulated up to 20 000 cm-1 (0.5 μm) but the predictions at visible wavelengths are less reliable. AYT2 is made available in electronic form as supplementary data to this paper at www.exomol.com.

  7. ExoMol line lists - IV. The rotation-vibration spectrum of methane up to 1500 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    A new hot line list is calculated for 12CH4 in its ground electronic state. This line list, called 10to10, contains 9.8 billion transitions and should be complete for temperatures up to 1500 K. It covers the wavelengths longer than 1 μm and includes all transitions to upper states with energies below hc · 18 000 cm-1 and rotational excitation up to J = 39. The line list is computed using the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of CH4 obtained by variational solution of the Schrödinger equation for the rotation-vibration motion of nuclei employing program TROVE and a new `spectroscopic' potential energy surface (PES) obtained by refining an ab initio PES (CCSD(T)-F12c/aug-cc-pVQZ) through least-squares fitting to the experimentally derived energies with J = 0-4 and a previously reported ab initio dipole moment surface (CCSD(T)-F12c/aug-cc-pVTZ). Detailed comparisons with other available sources of methane transitions including HITRAN, experimental compilations and other theoretical line lists show that these sources lack transitions both higher temperatures and near-infrared wavelengths. The 10to10 line list is suitable for modelling atmospheres of cool stars and exoplanets. It is available from the CDS data base as well as at www.exomol.com.

  8. Determination of vibration-rotation lines intensities from absorption Fourier spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandin, J. Y.

    1979-01-01

    The method presented allows the line intensities to be calculated from either their equivalent widths, heights, or quantities deduced from spectra obtained by Fourier spectrometry. This method has proven its effectiveness in measuring intensities of 60 lines of the molecule H2O with a precision of 10%. However, this method cannot be applied to isolated lines.

  9. Accurate rest frequencies for the submillimetre-wave lines of C{3}O in ground and vibrationally excited states below 400 cm-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzocchi, L.; Degli Esposti, C.; Dore, L.

    2008-12-01

    The submillimetre-wave spectrum of C3O (X^1Σ^+) has been investigated in the laboratory using a source-modulation microwave spectrometer equipped with a gas-phase flow pyrolysis system for the production of unstable chemical species. C3O was produced by thermal decomposition of fumaryl chloride at 900 °C. Thirty-seven new rotational transitions were observed in the frequency range 307-740 GHz for the ground vibrational state, reaching a J quantum number as high as 76. Additionally, new millimetre-wave and submillimetre-wave lines were recorded for the bending fundamental v5 = 1, and for its overtones v5 = 2 and v5 = 3 whose rotational spectra have been identified for the first time. The new laboratory measurements provide much improved rest frequencies in the submillimetre spectral region for the ground state spectra of C3O, and for the first levels of its low-energy v5 vibrational ladder, useful for the radioastronomical identification of their rotational lines in the ISM. Tables 5 to 8 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/492/875

  10. Filling in of Fraunhofer and gas-absorption lines in sky spectra as caused by rotational Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Sioris, C E; Evans, W F

    1999-04-20

    A line-by-line radiative-transfer model to quantify the Ring effect as caused by rotational Raman scattering has been developed for the 310-550-nm spectral interval. The solar zenith angle and the resolution are key input parameters, as is the sky spectrum (excluding inelastic atmospheric scattering), which was modeled with MODTRAN 3.5. The filling in is modeled for ground-based viewing geometry and includes surface reflection and single inelastic scattering. It is shown that O2 contributes half of the filling in of N2. A strong inverse relationship with wavelength is noted in the filling in. A comparison with observations shows moderate agreement. The largest filling in occurs in the Ca II K and H lines. PMID:18319844

  11. In-line rotating torque sensor with on-board amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1990-01-01

    A rotating torque sensor apparatus and method for measuring small torques comprising a shaft, a platform having a circuit board and a first moment arm attached to the shaft, a rotatable wheel coaxial with the shaft and having a second moment arm spaced apart from the first moment arm with a load cell therebetween for generating an electric signal as the torque is applied to the shaft and transferred through the moment arms to the load cell. The electrical signal is conducted from the load cell to the circuit board for filtering and amplification before being extracted from the torque assembly through a slip ring.

  12. THE INCOMPATIBILITY OF RAPID ROTATION WITH NARROW PHOTOSPHERIC X-RAY LINES IN EXO 0748-676

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Jinrong; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Oezel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios E-mail: deepto@mit.ed E-mail: dpsaltis@email.arizona.ed

    2010-11-10

    X-ray observations of EXO 0748-676 during thermonuclear bursts revealed a set of narrow ({Delta}{lambda}/{lambda} = 0.018) absorption lines that potentially originate from the stellar photosphere. The identification of these lines with particular atomic transitions led to the measurement of the surface gravitational redshift of the neutron star and to constraints on its mass and radius. However, the recent detection of 552 Hz oscillations at 15% rms amplitude revealed the spin frequency of the neutron star and brought into question the consistency of such a rapid spin with the narrow width of the absorption lines. Here, we calculate the amplitudes of burst oscillations and the width of absorption lines emerging from the surface of a rapidly rotating neutron star for a wide range of model parameters. We show that no combination of neutron star and geometric parameters can simultaneously reproduce the narrowness of the absorption lines, the high amplitude of the oscillations, and the observed flux at the time the oscillations were detected. We, therefore, conclude that the observed absorption lines are unlikely to originate from the surface of this neutron star.

  13. ExoMol line lists - VII. The rotation-vibration spectrum of phosphine up to 1500 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa-Silva, Clara; Al-Refaie, Ahmed F.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yurchenko, Sergei N.

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive hot line list is calculated for 31PH3 in its ground electronic state. This line list, called SAlTY, contains almost 16.8 billion transitions between 7.5 million energy levels and it is suitable for simulating spectra up to temperatures of 1500 K. It covers wavelengths longer than 1 μm and includes all transitions to upper states with energies below hc × 18 000 cm-1 and rotational excitation up to J = 46. The line list is computed by variational solution of the Schrödinger equation for the rotation-vibration motion employing the nuclear-motion program TROVE. A previously reported ab initio dipole moment surface is used as well as an updated `spectroscopic' potential energy surface, obtained by refining an existing ab initio surface through least-squares fitting to the experimentally derived energies. Detailed comparisons with other available sources of phosphine transitions confirms SAlTY's accuracy and illustrates the incompleteness of previous experimental and theoretical compilations for temperatures above 300 K. Atmospheric models are expected to severely underestimate the abundance of phosphine in disequilibrium environments, and it is predicted that phosphine will be detectable in the upper troposphere of many substellar objects. This list is suitable for modelling atmospheres of many astrophysical environments, namely carbon stars, Y dwarfs, T dwarfs, hot Jupiters and Solar system gas giant planets. It is available in full from the Strasbourg data centre, CDS, and at www.exomol.com.

  14. Magnetospheric accretion models for T Tauri stars. 1: Balmer line profiles without rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee; Hewett, Robert; Calvet, Nuria

    1994-01-01

    We argue that the strong emission lines of T Tauri stars are generally produced in infalling envelopes. Simple models of infall constrained to a dipolar magnetic field geometry explain many peculiarities of observed line profiles that are difficult, if not impossible, to reproduce with wind models. Radiative transfer effects explain why certain lines can appear quite symmetric while other lines simultaneously exhibit inverse P Cygni profiles, without recourse to complicated velocity fields. The success of the infall models in accounting for qualitative features of observed line profiles supports the proposal that stellar magnetospheres disrupt disk accretion in T Tauri stars, that true boundary layers are not usually present in T Tauri stars, and that the observed 'blue veiling' emission arises from the base of the magnetospheric accretion column.

  15. Toward Accurate Reaction Energetics for Molecular Line Growth at Surface: Quantum Monte Carlo and Density Functional Theory Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai, Y; Takeuchi, N

    2009-10-14

    We revisit the molecular line growth mechanism of styrene on the hydrogenated Si(001) 2x1 surface. In particular, we investigate the energetics of the radical chain reaction mechanism by means of diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. For the exchange correlation (XC) functional we use the non-empirical generalized-gradient approximation (GGA) and meta-GGA. We find that the QMC result also predicts the intra dimer-row growth of the molecular line over the inter dimer-row growth, supporting the conclusion based on DFT results. However, the absolute magnitudes of the adsorption and reaction energies, and the heights of the energy barriers differ considerably between the QMC and DFT with the GGA/meta-GGA XC functionals.

  16. Pressure broadening of the 2.5 THz H(Cl-35) rotational line by N2 and O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K.; Chance, K. V.; Nolt, I. G.; Radostitz, J. V.; Vanek, M. D.; Jennings, D. A.; Evenson, K. M.

    1991-01-01

    The pressure broadening coefficients of the 2.5 THz rotation line of H(Cl-35) by N2 and O2, for application to the analysis of far infrared spectra obtained in the stratosphere, are reported. The broadening coefficients were measured in absorption at 296 and 201 L using a tunable far infrared spectrometer. Results show that at room temperature the N2 pressure broadening coefficient is 0.0669 +/-0.0021/cm/atm (2sigma), with a temperature coefficient B of 0.58 +/-0.02.

  17. Highly Accurate Infrared Line Lists of SO2 Isotopologues Computed for Atmospheric Modeling on Venus and Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.; Schwenke, D.; Lee, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    Last year we reported a semi-empirical 32S16O2 spectroscopic line list (denoted Ames-296K) for its atmospheric characterization in Venus and other Exoplanetary environments. In order to facilitate the Sulfur isotopic ratio and Sulfur chemistry model determination, now we present Ames-296K line lists for both 626 (upgraded) and other 4 symmetric isotopologues: 636, 646, 666 and 828. The line lists are computed on an ab initio potential energy surface refined with most reliable high resolution experimental data, using a high quality CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV(Q+d)Z dipole moment surface. The most valuable part of our approach is to provide "truly reliable" predictions (and alternatives) for those unknown or hard-to-measure/analyze spectra. This strategy has guaranteed the lists are the best available alternative for those wide spectra region missing from spectroscopic databases such as HITRAN and GEISA, where only very limited data exist for 626/646 and no Infrared data at all for 636/666 or other minor isotopologues. Our general line position accuracy up to 5000 cm-1 is 0.01 - 0.02 cm-1 or better. Most transition intensity deviations are less than 5%, compare to experimentally measured quantities. Note that we have solved a convergence issue and further improved the quality and completeness of the main isotopologue 626 list at 296K. We will compare the lists to available models in CDMS/JPL/HITRAN and discuss the future mutually beneficial interactions between theoretical and experimental efforts.

  18. Accurate mass determination for double-lined spectroscopic binaries by digital cross-correlation spectroscopy: DM Virginis revisited.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, D. W.; Nordstroem, B.; Andersen, J.; Torres, G.; Stefanik, R. P.; Thaller, M.; Bester, M. J.

    1996-10-01

    Fundamental mass determinations in eclipsing binaries rely on radial velocities derived from double-lined spectra. We evaluate the performance of the CfA Digital Speedometers for deriving radial velocities of double-lined systems, using simulated observations of composite spectra. When XCSAO (Kurtz et al. 1992) is used to calculate a one-dimensional cross-correlation, simple fits to the double peaks in the correlation function can lead to systematic errors as large as 3km/s due to the effects of line blending. The two-dimensional correlation scheme TODCOR (Zucker & Mazeh 1994ApJ...420..806Z) can reduce the systematic errors by an order of magnitude. We apply TODCOR to a new mass determination for the F-type eclipsing binary DM Vir, achieving an accuracy of 0.6%. The improved physical properties of DM Vir agree very well with stellar evolution models incorporating the most recent opacity data, both with and without convective core overshooting, and for reasonable assumptions about the chemical composition. The age of DM Vir is found to be 1.75+/-0.20x10^9^yr, metallicity being the dominant source of uncertainty.

  19. Testing of the line element of special relativity with rotating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Jose G.; Torr, Douglas G.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments with rotating systems are examined from the point of view of a test theory of the Lorentz transformations (LTs), permitting, in principle, the verification of the simultaneity relation. The significance of the experiments involved in the testing of the LTs can be determined using Robertson's test theory (RTT). A revised RTT is discussed, and attention is given to the Ehrenfest paradox in connection with the testing of the LTs.

  20. Straylight correction to Doppler rotation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, B. N.

    1985-07-01

    The correction of the Pierce and LoPresto (1984) Doppler data on the plasma rotation rate for stray light increases the observed equatorial rotation velocity from 1977 to 2004 m/sec. This correction has an uncertainty of approximately 10 m/sec, because the accurate form of the stray light function is not available. The correction is noted to be largest for the blue lines, in virtue of increased scattering, and for the weak lines, due to the limb effect.

  1. Highly accurate potential energy surface, dipole moment surface, rovibrational energy levels, and infrared line list for ³²S¹⁶O₂ up to 8000 cm⁻¹.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinchuan; Schwenke, David W; Lee, Timothy J

    2014-03-21

    A purely ab initio potential energy surface (PES) was refined with selected (32)S(16)O2 HITRAN data. Compared to HITRAN, the root-mean-squares error (σ(RMS)) for all J = 0-80 rovibrational energy levels computed on the refined PES (denoted Ames-1) is 0.013 cm(-1). Combined with a CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV(Q+d)Z dipole moment surface (DMS), an infrared (IR) line list (denoted Ames-296K) has been computed at 296 K and covers up to 8000 cm(-1). Compared to the HITRAN and CDMS databases, the intensity agreement for most vibrational bands is better than 85%-90%. Our predictions for (34)S(16)O2 band origins, higher energy (32)S(16)O2 band origins and missing (32)S(16)O2 IR bands have been verified by most recent experiments and available HITRAN data. We conclude that the Ames-1 PES is able to predict (32/34)S(16)O2 band origins below 5500 cm(-1) with 0.01-0.03 cm(-1) uncertainties, and the Ames-296K line list provides continuous, reliable and accurate IR simulations. The K(a)-dependence of both line position and line intensity errors is discussed. The line list will greatly facilitate SO2 IR spectral experimental analysis, as well as elimination of SO2 lines in high-resolution astronomical observations. PMID:24655184

  2. Highly Accurate Potential Energy Surface, Dipole Moment Surface, Rovibrational Energy Levels, and Infrared Line List for (32)S(16)O2 up to 8000 cm(exp -1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xinchuan; Schwenke, David W.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    A purely ab initio potential energy surface (PES) was refined with selected (32)S(16)O2 HITRAN data. Compared to HITRAN, the root-mean-squares error (RMS) error for all J=0-80 rovibrational energy levels computed on the refined PES (denoted Ames-1) is 0.013 cm(exp -1). Combined with a CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV(Q+d)Z dipole moment surface (DMS), an infrared (IR) line list (denoted Ames-296K) has been computed at 296K and covers up to 8,000 cm(exp -1). Compared to the HITRAN and CDMS databases, the intensity agreement for most vibrational bands is better than 85-90%. Our predictions for (34)S(16)O2 band origins, higher energy (32)S(16)O2 band origins and missing (32)S(16)O2 IR bands have been verified by most recent experiments and available HITRAN data. We conclude that the Ames-1 PES is able to predict (32/34)S(16)O2 band origins below 5500 cm(exp -1) with 0.01-0.03 cm(exp -1) uncertainties, and the Ames-296K line list provides continuous, reliable and accurate IR simulations. The Ka-dependence of both line position and line intensity errors is discussed. The line list will greatly facilitate SO2 IR spectral experimental analysis, as well as elimination of SO2 lines in high-resolution astronomical observations.

  3. C II forbidden-line 158 micron mapping in Sagittarius A Rotation curve and mass distribution in the galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugten, J. B.; Genzel, R.; Crawford, M. K.; Townes, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    Based on data obtained with the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory 91.4 cm telescope, the 158-micron fine structure line emission of C(+) is mapped near the galactic center. The strongest emission comes from a 10-pc FWHM diameter disk centered on Sgr A West whose dominant motion is rotation. Extended C(+) emission is also found from the +50 km/s galactic center molecular cloud, and a second cloud at v(LSR) of about -35 km/s. The rotation curve and mass distribution within 10 pc of the galactic center are derived, and the C(+) profiles show a drop-off of rotation velocity between 2 and 10 pc. A mass model is suggested with 2-4 million solar masses in a central point mass, and a M/L ratio of the central stellar cluster of 0.5 solar masses/solar luminosities, suggesting a large abundance of giants and relatively recent star formation in the center.

  4. Finite number of vortices and bending of finite vortex lines in a confined rotating Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z. Z.; Ma, Y. L.

    2007-01-01

    The minimal energy configurations of finite Nv-body vortices in a rotating trapped Bose-Einstein condensate is studied analytically by extending the previous work [Y. Castin, R. Dum, Eur. Phys. J. D 7, 399 (1999)], and taking into account the finite size effects on z-direction and the bending of finite vortex lines. The calculation of the energy of the vortices as a function of the rotation frequency of the trap gives number, curvature, configuration of vortices and width of vortex cores self-consistently. The numerical results show that (1) the simplest regular polynomial of the several vortex configurations is energetically favored; while the hexagonal vortex lattice is more stable than square lattice; (2) bending is more stable then straight vortex line along the z-axis for λ<1; (3) the boundary effect is obvious: compared with the estimation made under infinite boundary, the finite size effect leads to a lower vortex density, while the adding vortex bending results in a less higher density because of the expansion. The results are in well agreement with the other authors' ones.

  5. The Accuracy of Measurements of the Spectral-Line Frequencies in the Studies of the Rotational Transitions of the 16O12C32S Molecule in the Millimeter and Submillimeter Wave Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubiatnikov, G. Yu; Belov, S. P.; Lapinov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    The absolute error of determining the center frequency of the molecule spectral line during a single measurement, which is obtained by fitting the line shape to the model profile, is usually significantly smaller than the statistical spread in the frequencies of the repeated measurements. We discuss the possible causes of the systematic errors leading to an increase in the uncertainty of measurements of the line-center frequency. For an example of the multiple spectral measurements of the rotational transitions of the 16O12C32S molecule in the millimeter- and submillimeter-wave ranges (with a frequency of up to 522 GHz), by the Lamb-dip method, we determine the absolute error of the performed measurements, which amounts to 0 .4 kHz. New precision values of the center frequencies of the rotational transitions of the 16O12C32S molecule and more accurate values of the rotational constants, which are calculated using the measured frequencies, are presented.

  6. Morphologic differentiation of colon carcinoma cell lines HT-29 and HT-29KM in rotating-wall vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; Jessup, J. M.; Wolf, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    A new low shear stress microcarrier culture system has been developed at NASA's Johnson Space Center that permits three-dimensional tissue culture. Two established human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines, HT-29, an undifferentiated, and HT-29KM, a stable, moderately differentiated subline of HT-29, were grown in new tissue culture bioreactors called Rotating-Wall Vessels (RWVs). RWVs are used in conjunction with multicellular cocultivation to develop a unique in vitro tissue modeling system. Cells were cultivated on Cytodex-3 microcarrier beads, with and without mixed normal human colonic fibroblasts, which served as the mesenchymal layer. Culture of the tumor lines in the absence of fibroblasts produced spheroidlike growth and minimal differentiation. In contrast, when tumor lines were co-cultivated with normal colonic fibroblasts, initial growth was confined to the fibroblast population until the microcarriers were covered. The tumor cells then commenced proliferation at an accelerated rate, organizing themselves into three-dimensional tissue masses that achieved 1.0- to 1.5-cm diameters. The masses displayed glandular structures, apical and internal glandular microvilli, tight intercellular junctions, desmosomes, cellular polarity, sinusoid development, internalized mucin, and structural organization akin to normal colon crypt development. Differentiated samples were subjected to transmission and scanning electron microscopy and histologic analysis, revealing embryoniclike mesenchymal cells lining the areas around the growth matrices. Necrosis was minimal throughout the tissue masses. These data suggest that the RWV affords a new model for investigation and isolation of growth, regulatory, and structural processes within neoplastic and normal tissue.

  7. THE ARAUCARIA PROJECT: AN ACCURATE DISTANCE TO THE LATE-TYPE DOUBLE-LINED ECLIPSING BINARY OGLE SMC113.3 4007 IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Graczyk, Dariusz; Pietrzynski, Grzegorz; Gieren, Wolfgang; Pilecki, Bogumil; Mennickent, Ronald E-mail: wgieren@astro-udec.cl; and others

    2012-05-10

    We have analyzed the long-period, double-lined eclipsing binary system OGLE SMC113.3 4007 (SC10 137844) in the Small Magellanic Cloud. The binary lies in the northeastern part of the galaxy and consists of two evolved, well-detached, non-active G8 giants. The orbit is eccentric with e = 0.311, and the orbital period is 371.6 days. Using extensive high-resolution spectroscopic and multi-color photometric data, we have determined a true distance modulus of the system of m - M = 18.83 {+-} 0.02 (statistical) {+-} 0.05 (systematic) mag using a surface-brightness-color relation for giant stars. This method is insensitive to metallicity and reddening corrections and depends only very little on stellar atmosphere model assumptions. Additionally, we derived very accurate, at the level of 1%-2%, physical parameters of both giant stars, particularly their masses and radii, making our results important for comparison with stellar evolution models. Our analysis underlines the high potential of late-type, double-lined detached binary systems for accurate distance determinations to nearby galaxies.

  8. Efficient and accurate determination of the overall rotational diffusion tensor of a molecule from 15N relaxation data using computer program ROTDIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Olivier; Varadan, Ranjani; Fushman, David

    2004-06-01

    We present a computer program ROTDIF for efficient determination of a complete rotational diffusion tensor of a molecule from NMR relaxation data. The derivation of the rotational diffusion tensor in the case of a fully anisotropic model is based on a six-dimensional search, which could be very time consuming, particularly if a grid search in the Euler angle space is involved. Here, we use an efficient Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm combined with Monte Carlo generation of initial guesses. The result is a dramatic, up to 50-fold improvement in the computational efficiency over the previous approaches [Biochemistry 38 (1999) 10225; J. Magn. Reson. 149 (2001) 214]. This method is demonstrated on a computer-generated and real protein systems. We also address the issue of sensitivity of the diffusion tensor determination from 15N relaxation measurements to experimental errors in the relaxation rates and discuss possible artifacts from applying higher-symmetry tensor model and how to recognize them.

  9. A model for developing job rotation schedules that eliminate sequential high workloads and minimize between-worker variability in cumulative daily workloads: Application to automotive assembly lines.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sang-Young; Ko, Jeonghan; Jung, Myung-Chul

    2016-07-01

    The aim of study is to suggest a job rotation schedule by developing a mathematical model in order to reduce cumulative workload from the successive use of the same body region. Workload assessment using rapid entire body assessment (REBA) was performed for the model in three automotive assembly lines of chassis, trim, and finishing to identify which body part exposed to relatively high workloads at workstations. The workloads were incorporated to the model to develop a job rotation schedule. The proposed schedules prevent the exposure to high workloads successively on the same body region and minimized between-worker variance in cumulative daily workload. Whereas some of workers were successively assigned to high workload workstation under no job rotation and serial job rotation. This model would help to reduce the potential for work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) without additional cost for engineering work, although it may need more computational time and relative complex job rotation sequences. PMID:26995031

  10. Line Shifts in Rotational Spectra of Polyatomic Chiral Molecules Caused by the Parity Violating Electroweak Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stohner, J.; Quack, M.

    2009-06-01

    Are findings in high-energy physics of any importance in molecular spectroscopy ? The answer is clearly `yes'. Energies of enantiomers were considered as exactly equal in an achiral environment, e.g. the gas phase. Today, however, it is well known that this is not valid. The violation of mirror-image symmetry (suggested theoretically and confirmed experimentally in 1956/57) was established in the field of nuclear, high-energy, and atomic physics since then, and it is also the cause for a non-zero energy difference between enantiomers. We expect today that the violation of mirror-image symmetry (parity violation) influences chemistry of chiral molecules as well as their spectroscopy. Progress has been made in the quantitative theoretical prediction of possible spectroscopic signatures of molecular parity violation. The experimental confirmation of parity violation in chiral molecules is, however, still open. Theoretical studies are helpful for the planning and important for a detailed analysis of rovibrational and tunneling spectra of chiral molecules. We report results on frequency shifts in rotational, vibrational and tunneling spectra of some selected chiral molecules which are studied in our group. If time permits, we shall also discuss critically some recent claims of experimental observations of molecular parity violation in condensed phase systems. T. D. Lee, C. N. Yang, Phys. Rev., 104, 254 (1956) C. S. Wu, E. Ambler, R. W. Hayward, D. D. Hoppes, R. P. Hudson, Phys. Rev., 105, 1413 (1957) M. Quack, Angew. Chem. Intl. Ed., 28, 571 (1989) Angew. Chem. Intl. Ed., 41, 4618 (2002) M. Quack, J. Stohner, Chimia, 59, 530 (2005) M. Quack, J. Stohner, M. Willeke, Ann Rev. Phys. Chem. 59, 741 (2008) M. Quack, J. Stohner, Phys. Rev. Lett., 84, 3807 (2000) M. Quack, J. Stohner, J. Chem. Phys., 119, 11228 (2003) J. Stohner, Int. J. Mass Spectrometry 233, 385 (2004) M. Gottselig, M. Quack, J. Stohner, M. Willeke, Int. J. Mass Spectrometry 233, 373 (2004) R. Berger, G

  11. Rotation of nilotinib and imatinib for first-line treatment of chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gugliotta, Gabriele; Castagnetti, Fausto; Breccia, Massimo; Gozzini, Antonella; Usala, Emilio; Carella, Angelo M; Rege-Cambrin, Giovanna; Martino, Bruno; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Albano, Francesco; Stagno, Fabio; Luciano, Luigia; D'Adda, Mariella; Bocchia, Monica; Cavazzini, Francesco; Tiribelli, Mario; Lunghi, Monia; Pia Falcone, Antonietta; Musolino, Caterina; Levato, Luciano; Venturi, Claudia; Soverini, Simona; Cavo, Michele; Alimena, Giuliana; Pane, Fabrizio; Martinelli, Giovanni; Saglio, Giuseppe; Rosti, Gianantonio; Baccarani, Michele

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of second-generation tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has generated a lively debate on the choice of first-line TKI in chronic phase, chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Despite the TKIs have different efficacy and toxicity profiles, the planned use of two TKIs has never been investigated. We report on a phase 2 study that was designed to evaluate efficacy and safety of a treatment alternating nilotinib and imatinib, in newly diagnosed BCR-ABL1 positive, chronic phase, CML patients. One hundred twenty-three patients were enrolled. Median age was 56 years. The probabilities of achieving a complete cytogenetic response, a major molecular response, and a deep molecular response (MR 4.0) by 2 years were 93%, 87%, and 61%, respectively. The 5-year overall survival and progression-free survival were 89%. Response rates and survival are in the range of those reported with nilotinib alone. Moreover, we observed a relatively low rate of cardiovascular adverse events (5%). These data show that the different efficacy and toxicity profiles of TKIs could be favorably exploited by alternating their use. Am. J. Hematol. 91:617-622, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26971721

  12. Theory of damped quantum rotation in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. III. Nuclear permutation symmetry of the line shape equation.

    PubMed

    Szymański, S

    2009-12-28

    The damped quantum rotation (DQR) theory describes manifestations in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the coherent and stochastic dynamics of N-fold molecular rotors composed of indistinguishable particles. The standard jump model is only a limiting case of the DQR approach; outside this limit, the stochastic motions of such rotors have no kinematic description. In this paper, completing the previous two of this series, consequences of nuclear permutation symmetry for the properties of the DQR line shape equation are considered. The systems addressed are planar rotors, such as aromatic hydrocarbons' rings, occurring inside of molecular crystals oriented in the magnetic field. Under such conditions, oddfold rotors can have nontrivial permutation symmetries only for peculiar orientations while evenfold ones always retain their intrinsic symmetry element, which is rotation by 180 degrees about the N-fold axis; in specific orientations the latter can gain two additional symmetry elements. It is shown that the symmetry selection rules applicable to the classical rate processes in fluids, once recognized as having two diverse aspects, macroscopic and microscopic, are also rigorously valid for the DQR processes in the solid state. However, formal justification of these rules is different because the DQR equation is based on the Pauli principle, which is ignored in the jump model. For objects like the benzene ring, exploitation of these rules in simulations of spectra using the DQR equation can be of critical significance for the feasibility of the calculations. Examples of such calculations for the proton system of the benzene ring in a general orientation are provided. It is also shown that, because of the intrinsic symmetries of the evenfold rotors, many of the DQR processes, which such rotors can undergo, are unobservable in NMR spectra. PMID:20059076

  13. Rotational line intensities of the c4‧1Σu+(1)-X1Σg+(0-2) bands of N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    C.; Lavín | A., M.; | I., Velasco; Martín

    2010-02-01

    Oscillator strengths and integrated cross-sections for rotational lines of the c4'1Σu+(1)-X1Σg+(0-2) bands of N 2 have been calculated with the molecular quantum defect orbital (MQDO) method. The known strong homogeneous interaction of the c4'1Σu+(1) Rydberg state with the b' 1Σu+(4) valence state has been presently dealt with through an interaction matrix for each value of the rotational quantum number, J. Because of perturbations, the intensity distribution of the rotational lines within each of the vibronic bands deviates from the predictions based on Hönl-London factors. Band oscillator strengths are also reported and their J-dependence has been analyzed.

  14. Line-profile tomography of exoplanet transits - II. A gas-giant planet transiting a rapidly rotating A5 star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier Cameron, A.; Guenther, E.; Smalley, B.; McDonald, I.; Hebb, L.; Andersen, J.; Augusteijn, Th.; Barros, S. C. C.; Brown, D. J. A.; Cochran, W. D.; Endl, M.; Fossey, S. J.; Hartmann, M.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Pollacco, D.; Skillen, I.; Telting, J.; Waldmann, I. P.; West, R. G.

    2010-09-01

    Most of our knowledge of extrasolar planets rests on precise radial-velocity measurements, either for direct detection or for confirmation of the planetary origin of photometric transit signals. This has limited our exploration of the parameter space of exoplanet hosts to solar- and later-type, sharp-lined stars. Here we extend the realm of stars with known planetary companions to include hot, fast-rotating stars. Planet-like transits have previously been reported in the light curve obtained by the SuperWASP survey of the A5 star HD15082 (WASP-33 V = 8.3, v sini = 86 km s-1). Here we report further photometry and time-series spectroscopy through three separate transits, which we use to confirm the existence of a gas-giant planet with an orbital period of 1.22d in orbit around HD15082. From the photometry and the properties of the planet signal travelling through the spectral line profiles during the transit, we directly derive the size of the planet, the inclination and obliquity of its orbital plane and its retrograde orbital motion relative to the spin of the star. This kind of analysis opens the way to studying the formation of planets around a whole new class of young, early-type stars, hence under different physical conditions and generally in an earlier stage of formation than in sharp-lined late-type stars. The reflex orbital motion of the star caused by the transiting planet is small, yielding an upper mass limit of 4.1MJupiter on the planet. We also find evidence of a third body of substellar mass in the system, which may explain the unusual orbit of the transiting planet. In HD 15082, the stellar line profiles also show evidence of non-radial pulsations, clearly distinct from the planetary transit signal. This raises the intriguing possibility that tides raised by the close-in planet may excite or amplify the pulsations in such stars. Based on observations at Tautenburg Observatory, McDonald Observatory and the Nordic Optical Telescope. E-mail: acc4@st-and.ac.uk

  15. ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROSCOPY OF RAPIDLY ROTATING SOLAR-MASS STARS: EMISSION-LINE REDSHIFTS AS A TEST OF THE SOLAR-STELLAR CONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Bushinsky, Rachel; Ayres, Tom; France, Kevin

    2012-07-20

    We compare high-resolution ultraviolet spectra of the Sun and thirteen solar-mass main-sequence stars with different rotational periods that serve as proxies for their different ages and magnetic field structures. In this, the second paper in the series, we study the dependence of ultraviolet emission-line centroid velocities on stellar rotation period, as rotation rates decrease from that of the Pleiades star HII314 (P{sub rot} = 1.47 days) to {alpha} Cen A (P{sub rot} = 28 days). Our stellar sample of F9 V to G5 V stars consists of six stars observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and eight stars observed with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on HST. We find a systematic trend of increasing redshift with more rapid rotation (decreasing rotation period) that is similar to the increase in line redshift between quiet and plage regions on the Sun. The fastest-rotating solar-mass star in our study, HII314, shows significantly enhanced redshifts at all temperatures above log T = 4.6, including the corona, which is very different from the redshift pattern observed in the more slowly rotating stars. This difference in the redshift pattern suggests that a qualitative change in the magnetic-heating process occurs near P{sub rot} = 2 days. We propose that HII314 is an example of a solar-mass star with a magnetic heating rate too large for the physical processes responsible for the redshift pattern to operate in the same way as for the more slowly rotating stars. HII314 may therefore lie above the high activity end of the set of solar-like phenomena that is often called the 'solar-stellar connection'.

  16. New Line Lists for Rovibrational and Rotational Transitions Within the NH X^3Σ{^-} and OH X^2Π Ground States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooke, James S. A.; Bernath, Peter F.; Western, Colin; Li, Gang; Groenenboom, Gerrit

    2014-06-01

    A new line list for rovibrational and rotational transitions within the NH X^3Σ{^-} ground state has been created, including line intensities in the form of Einstein A and f-values, for all possible bands up to v^'=6. The intensities are based on a new dipole moment function (DMF), which has been calculated using the internally contracted MRCI method with an aug-cc-pV6Z basis set. The programs RKR1, LEVEL and PGOPHER were used to calculate line positions and intensities using the most recent spectroscopic observations and the new DMF, and including the rotational dependence on the matrix elements. The Hund's case (b) matrix elements from the LEVEL output have been transformed to the case (a) form required by PGOPHER. Equivalent calculations have been performed for the OH X^2Π ground state. This includes a new DMF calculation using the internally contracted MR-ACPF method with an aug-cc-pV6Z basis set. A similar line list has been produced for rovibrational and rotational transitions for all possible transitions up to v^'=13.

  17. At-line bioprocess monitoring by immunoassay with rotationally controlled serial siphoning and integrated supercritical angle fluorescence optics.

    PubMed

    Nwankire, Charles E; Donohoe, Gerard G; Zhang, Xin; Siegrist, Jonathan; Somers, Martin; Kurzbuch, Dirk; Monaghan, Ruairi; Kitsara, Maria; Burger, Robert; Hearty, Stephen; Murrell, Julie; Martin, Christopher; Rook, Martha; Barrett, Louise; Daniels, Stephen; McDonagh, Colette; O'Kennedy, Richard; Ducrée, Jens

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we report a centrifugal microfluidic "lab-on-a-disc" system for at-line monitoring of human immunoglobulin G (hIgG) in a typical bioprocess environment. The novelty of this device is the combination of a heterogeneous sandwich immunoassay on a serial siphon-enabled microfluidic disc with automated sequential reagent delivery and surface-confined supercritical angle fluorescence (SAF)-based detection. The device, which is compact, easy-to-use and inexpensive, enables rapid detection of hIgG from a bioprocess sample. This was achieved with, an injection moulded SAF lens that was functionalized with aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) using plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) for the immobilization of protein A, and a hybrid integration with a microfluidic disc substrate. Advanced flow control, including the time-sequenced release of on-board liquid reagents, was implemented by serial siphoning with ancillary capillary stops. The concentration of surfactant in each assay reagent was optimized to ensure proper functioning of the siphon-based flow control. The entire automated microfluidic assay process is completed in less than 30 min. The developed prototype system was used to accurately measure industrial bioprocess samples that contained 10 mg mL(-1) of hIgG. PMID:23684465

  18. Infrared Space Observatory Observations of Far-Infrared Rotational Emission Lines of Water Vapor Toward the Supergiant Star VY Canis Majoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Feuchtgruber, Helmut; Harwit, Martin; Melnick, Gary J.

    1999-01-01

    We report the detection of numerous far-infrared emission lines of water vapor toward the supergiant star VY Canis Majoris. A 29.5-45 micron grating scan of VY CMa, obtained using the Short-Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) of the Infrared Space Observatory at a spectral resolving power lambda/delat.lambda of approximately 2000, reveals at least 41 spectral features due to water vapor that together radiate a total luminosity of approximately 25 solar luminosity . In addition to pure rotational transitions within the ground vibrational state, these features include rotational transitions within the (010) excited vibrational state. The spectrum also shows the (sup 2)product(sub 1/2) (J = 5/2) left arrow (sup 2)product(sub 3/2) (J = 3/2) OH feature near 34.6 micron in absorption. Additional SWS observations of VY CMa were carried out in the instrument's Fabry-Perot mode for three water transitions: the 7(sub 25)-6(sub 16) line at 29.8367 micron, the 4(sub 41)-3(sub 12) line at 31.7721 micron, and the 4(sub 32)-3(sub 03) line at 40.6909 micron. The higher spectral resolving power lambda/delta.lambda of approximately 30,000 thereby obtained permits the line profiles to be resolved spectrally for the first time and reveals the "P Cygni" profiles that are characteristic of emission from an outflowing envelope.

  19. The Relaxation Matrix for Symmetric Tops with Inversion Symmetry. I. Effects of Line Coupling on Self-Broadened v (sub 1) and Pure Rotational Bands of NH3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Q.; Boulet, C.

    2016-01-01

    The Robert-Bonamy formalism has been commonly used to calculate half-widths and shifts of spectral lines for decades. This formalism is based on several approximations. Among them, two have not been fully addressed: the isolated line approximation and the neglect of coupling between the translational and internal motions. Recently, we have shown that the isolated line approximation is not necessary in developing semi-classical line shape theories. Based on this progress, we have been able to develop a new formalism that enables not only to reduce uncertainties on calculated half-widths and shifts, but also to model line mixing effects on spectra starting from the knowledge of the intermolecular potential. In our previous studies, the new formalism had been applied to linear and asymmetric-top molecules. In the present study, the method has been extended to symmetric-top molecules with inversion symmetry. As expected, the inversion splitting induces a complete failure of the isolated line approximation. We have calculated the complex relaxation matrices of selfbroadened NH3. The half-widths and shifts in the ?1 and the pure rotational bands are reported in the present paper. When compared with measurements, the calculated half-widths match the experimental data very well, since the inapplicable isolated line approximation has been removed. With respect to the shifts, only qualitative results are obtained and discussed. Calculated off-diagonal elements of the relaxation matrix and a comparison with the observed line mixing effects are reported in the companion paper (Paper II).

  20. The Mg II resonance line emission at 2800 A in stars with different rotational velocities and different metal abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, E.

    1982-01-01

    In many investigations, a study of the Mg II 2800 A emission was conducted in order to derive more information about the correlation of chromospheric emission with the properties of the convection zone. It has been suggested by Ayres and Linsky (1980) that there is a positive correlation between rotation and chromospheric emission at least for binary stars. The present investigation is concerned with such a correlation between rotation and chromospheric emission. Since large differences in rotational velocities are observed for F stars for which also strong chromospheric emission is observable, this particular study deals mainly with F stars. On the basis of observations of the Mg II emission in F and G stars, it is found that the emission is abnormally strong in close binary F stars. This may be explained by the generation of a large differential rotation due to tidal effects which may give very efficient dynamo generation of a surface magnetic field.

  1. An in-line micro-pyrolysis system to remove contaminating organic species for precise and accurate water isotope analysis by spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panetta, R. J.; Hsiao, G.

    2011-12-01

    Trace levels of organic contaminants such as short alcohols and terpenoids have been shown to cause spectral interference in water isotope analysis by spectroscopic techniques. The result is degraded precision and accuracy in both δD and δ18O for samples such as beverages, plant extracts or slightly contaminated waters. An initial approach offered by manufacturers is post-processing software that analyzes spectral features to identify and flag contaminated samples. However, it is impossible for this software to accurately reconstruct the water isotope signature, thus it is primarily a metric for data quality. Here, we describe a novel in-line pyrolysis system (Micro-Pyrolysis Technology, MPT) placed just prior to the inlet of a cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzer that effectively removes interfering organic molecules without altering the isotope values of the water. Following injection of the water sample, N2 carrier gas passes the sample through a micro-pyrolysis tube heated with multiple high temperature elements in an oxygen-free environment. The temperature is maintained above the thermal decomposition threshold of most organic compounds (≤ 900 oC), but well below that of water (~2000 oC). The main products of the pyrolysis reaction are non-interfering species such as elemental carbon and H2 gas. To test the efficacy and applicability of the system, waters of known isotopic composition were spiked with varying amounts of common interfering alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol, hexanol, trans-2-hexenol, cis-3-hexanol up to 5 % v/v) and common soluble plant terpenoids (carveol, linalool, geraniol, prenol). Spiked samples with no treatment to remove the organics show strong interfering absorption peaks that adversely affect the δD and δ18O values. However, with the MPT in place, all interfering absorption peaks are removed and the water absorption spectrum is fully restored. As a consequence, the δD and δ18O values also return to their original

  2. An isotopic-independent highly accurate potential energy surface for CO2 isotopologues and an initial (12)C(16)O2 infrared line list.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinchuan; Schwenke, David W; Tashkun, Sergey A; Lee, Timothy J

    2012-03-28

    An isotopic-independent, highly accurate potential energy surface (PES) has been determined for CO(2) by refining a purely ab initio PES with selected, purely experimentally determined rovibrational energy levels. The purely ab initio PES is denoted Ames-0, while the refined PES is denoted Ames-1. Detailed tests are performed to demonstrate the spectroscopic accuracy of the Ames-1 PES. It is shown that Ames-1 yields σ(rms) (root-mean-squares error) = 0.0156 cm(-1) for 6873 J = 0-117 (12)C(16)O(2) experimental energy levels, even though less than 500 (12)C(16)O(2) energy levels were included in the refinement procedure. It is also demonstrated that, without any additional refinement, Ames-1 yields very good agreement for isotopologues. Specifically, for the (12)C(16)O(2) and (13)C(16)O(2) isotopologues, spectroscopic constants G(v) computed from Ames-1 are within ±0.01 and 0.02 cm(-1) of reliable experimentally derived values, while for the (16)O(12)C(18)O, (16)O(12)C(17)O, (16)O(13)C(18)O, (16)O(13)C(17)O, (12)C(18)O(2), (17)O(12)C(18)O, (12)C(17)O(2), (13)C(18)O(2), (13)C(17)O(2), (17)O(13)C(18)O, and (14)C(16)O(2) isotopologues, the differences are between ±0.10 and 0.15 cm(-1). To our knowledge, this is the first time a polyatomic PES has been refined using such high J values, and this has led to new challenges in the refinement procedure. An initial high quality, purely ab initio dipole moment surface (DMS) is constructed and used to generate a 296 K line list. For most bands, experimental IR intensities are well reproduced for (12)C(16)O(2) using Ames-1 and the DMS. For more than 80% of the bands, the experimental intensities are reproduced with σ(rms)(ΔI) < 20% or σ(rms)(ΔI∕δ(obs)) < 5. A few exceptions are analyzed and discussed. Directions for future improvements are discussed, though it is concluded that the current Ames-1 and the DMS should be useful in analyzing and assigning high-resolution laboratory or astronomical spectra. PMID:22462861

  3. Detection of 15NNH+ in L1544: non-LTE modelling of dyazenilium hyperfine line emission and accurate 14N/15N values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzocchi, L.; Caselli, P.; Leonardo, E.; Dore, L.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Samples of pristine solar system material found in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles are highly enriched in 15N. Conspicuous nitrogen isotopic anomalies have also been measured in comets, and the 14N/15N abundance ratio of the Earth is itself higher than the recognised presolar value by almost a factor of two. Low-temperature ion/molecule reactions in the proto-solar nebula have been repeatedly indicated as being responsible for these 15N-enhancements. Aims: We have searched for 15N variants of the N2H+ ion in L1544, a prototypical starless cloud core that is one of the best candidate sources for detection owing to its low central core temperature and high CO depletion. The goal is to evaluate accurate and reliable 14N/15N ratio values for this species in the interstellar gas. Methods: A deep integration of the 15NNH+(1-0) line at 90.4 GHz was obtained with the IRAM 30 m telescope. Non-LTE radiative transfer modelling was performed on the J = 1-0 emissions of the parent and 15N-containing dyazenilium ions, using a Bonnor-Ebert sphere as a model for the source. Results: A high-quality fit of the N2H+(1-0) hyperfine spectrum has allowed us to derive a revised value of the N2H+ column density in L1544. Analysis of the observed N15NH+ and 15NNH+ spectra yielded an abundance ratio N(N15NH+)/N(15NNH+) = 1.1 ± 0.3. The obtained 14N/15N isotopic ratio is ~1000 ± 200, suggestive of a sizeable 15N depletion in this molecular ion. Such a result is not consistent with the prediction of the current nitrogen chemical models. Conclusions: Since chemical models predict high 15N fractionation of N2H+, we suggest that 15N14N, or 15N in some other molecular form, tends to deplete onto dust grains. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m Telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain).Full Tables B.1-B.6 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http

  4. Solar rotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziembowski, W.

    Sunspot observations made by Johannes Hevelius in 1642 - 1644 are the first ones providing significant information about the solar differential rotation. In modern astronomy the determination of the rotation rate is done in a routine way by measuring positions of various structures on the solar surface as well as by studying the Doppler shifts of spectral lines. In recent years a progress in helioseismology enabled determination of the rotation rate in the layers inaccessible for direct observations. There are still uncertainties concerning, especially, the temporal variations of the rotation rate and its behaviour in the radiative interior. We are far from understanding the observations. Theoretical works have not yet resulted in a satisfactory model for the angular momentum transport in the convective zone.

  5. Influence of nanoconfinement on the rotational dependence of line half-widths for 2-0 band of carbon oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, A. A.; Petrova, T. M.; Ponomarev, Yu. N.; Solodov, A. M.

    2015-09-01

    Absorption spectra of carbon oxide, confined in nanoporous silica aerogel, have been measured within 4100-4400 cm-1 region at room temperature and at several pressures using Bruker IFS-125 HR Fourier spectrometer. Dependence of the half-width (HWHM) values on rotational quantum numbers is studied and compared with the data available in literature. It is found that variations in the half-width values for the confined CO at small quantum numbers are larger than at moderate ones. The influence of confinement tightness on rotational dependence is discussed.

  6. The Boundary Layer-White Dwarf Connection: CV White Dwarf Rotation and Line Formation Regions in the Prototype Dwarf Nova U Geminorum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sion, Edward

    1994-01-01

    The central accreting object in compact binaries and other accreting systems is usually hidden from direct observation, enshrouded by optically thick accretion disks which are opaque to the radiation emitted by the central object as it accretes matter. In the dwarf nova U Gem the underlying white dwarf accreter is clearly exposed in the far UV during dwarf nova quiescence. By probing the white dwarf with the sensitivity and velocity resolution of GHRS, just after the deposition of mass, energy and angular momentum into its envelope by the dwarf nova outburst event and also later in quiescence, we will obtain fundamental information such as: (1) the first rate of rotation of a CV white dwarf and hence the expected temperature and extent of the boundary layer during the high accretion (dwarf nova outburst) episode; (2) the delineation of the lower temperature line formation regions associated with the rotating, average (30-40,000K), photosphere of the white dwarf from the line formation region(s) of higher temperature ion species (e.g. NV 1238,1242) (boundary layer/accretion belt or putative hot corona?) surrounding the white dwarf; (3) the velocity amplitude and hence mass and gravitational redshift of the U Gem white dwarf; (4) the possible presence of persisting (but weaker in quiescence) radiation- driven selective ion wind (5) line profile variations to test physical mech- anisms that control the flow of accreted elements and hence abundance changes (diffusion, mixing, dilution, dredgeup and ongoing

  7. Quasi-bound complexes in collisions of different linear molecules: Classical trajectory study of their manifestations in rotational relaxation and spectral line broadening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Sergey V.

    2016-07-01

    Stable bimolecular complexes (tightly bound dimers) in the gas phase are usually created during third body stabilization of their unstable precursors-quasi-bound complexes (QCs). The latter can arise under the condition that at least one of the colliding partners has an internal degree of freedom. In this article, the principal difference between "orbitings" and QCs is demonstrated in the classical nonreactive scattering picture. Additionally, fractions of QCs in binary collisions of different linear molecules are compared. Also in the article the influence of QCs on rotational R-T relaxation and on vibration-rotational spectral line broadening is discussed. Explicit formulae shedding light on the QCs contribution to the R-T relaxation cross section and the line width and shift are presented. The obtained results emphasize the need for including QCs in every theoretical modeling of spectroscopic manifestation of intermolecular interactions. Besides the topics above, the possible manifestation of non-impact effects in the central regions of spectral lines due to QCs is stated. And finally, special consideration is given to the problem of adequate simulation of QCs formation at different pressures.

  8. The relaxation matrix for symmetric tops with inversion symmetry. I. Effects of line coupling on self-broadened ν1 and pure rotational bands of NH3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Q.; Boulet, C.

    2016-06-01

    The Robert-Bonamy formalism has been commonly used to calculate half-widths and shifts of spectral lines for decades. This formalism is based on several approximations. Among them, two have not been fully addressed: the isolated line approximation and the neglect of coupling between the translational and internal motions. Recently, we have shown that the isolated line approximation is not necessary in developing semi-classical line shape theories. Based on this progress, we have been able to develop a new formalism that enables not only to reduce uncertainties on calculated half-widths and shifts, but also to model line mixing effects on spectra starting from the knowledge of the intermolecular potential. In our previous studies, the new formalism had been applied to linear and asymmetric-top molecules. In the present study, the method has been extended to symmetric-top molecules with inversion symmetry. As expected, the inversion splitting induces a complete failure of the isolated line approximation. We have calculated the complex relaxation matrices of self-broadened NH3. The half-widths and shifts in the ν1 and the pure rotational bands are reported in the present paper. When compared with measurements, the calculated half-widths match the experimental data very well, since the inapplicable isolated line approximation has been removed. With respect to the shifts, only qualitative results are obtained and discussed. Calculated off-diagonal elements of the relaxation matrix and a comparison with the observed line mixing effects are reported in the companion paper (Paper II).

  9. The relaxation matrix for symmetric tops with inversion symmetry. I. Effects of line coupling on self-broadened ν1 and pure rotational bands of NH3.

    PubMed

    Ma, Q; Boulet, C

    2016-06-14

    The Robert-Bonamy formalism has been commonly used to calculate half-widths and shifts of spectral lines for decades. This formalism is based on several approximations. Among them, two have not been fully addressed: the isolated line approximation and the neglect of coupling between the translational and internal motions. Recently, we have shown that the isolated line approximation is not necessary in developing semi-classical line shape theories. Based on this progress, we have been able to develop a new formalism that enables not only to reduce uncertainties on calculated half-widths and shifts, but also to model line mixing effects on spectra starting from the knowledge of the intermolecular potential. In our previous studies, the new formalism had been applied to linear and asymmetric-top molecules. In the present study, the method has been extended to symmetric-top molecules with inversion symmetry. As expected, the inversion splitting induces a complete failure of the isolated line approximation. We have calculated the complex relaxation matrices of self-broadened NH3. The half-widths and shifts in the ν1 and the pure rotational bands are reported in the present paper. When compared with measurements, the calculated half-widths match the experimental data very well, since the inapplicable isolated line approximation has been removed. With respect to the shifts, only qualitative results are obtained and discussed. Calculated off-diagonal elements of the relaxation matrix and a comparison with the observed line mixing effects are reported in the companion paper (Paper II). PMID:27306003

  10. Stratospheric and mesospheric pressure-temperature profiles from rotational analysis of CO2 lines in atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy/ATLAS 1 infrared solar occultation spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiller, G. P.; Gunson, M. R.; Lowes, L. L.; Abrams, M. C.; Raper, O. F.; Farmer, C. B.; Zander, R.; Rinsland, C. P.

    1995-01-01

    A simple, classical, and expedient method for the retrieval of atmospheric pressure-temperature profiles has been applied to the high-resolution infrared solar absorption spectra obtained with the atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument. The basis for this method is a rotational analysis of retrieved apparent abundances from CO2 rovibrational absorption lines, employing existing constituent concentration retrieval software used in the analysis of data returned by ATMOS. Pressure-temperature profiles derived from spectra acquired during the ATLAS 1 space shuttle mission of March-April 1992 are quantitatively evaluated and compared with climatological and meteorological data as a means of assessing the validity of this approach.

  11. Stratospheric and mesospheric pressure-temperature profiles from rotational analysis of CO2 lines in atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy/ATLAS 1 infrared solar occultation spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Stiller, G.P.; Gunson, M.R.; Lowes, L.L.; Abrams, M.C.; Raper, O.F.; Farmer, C.B.; Zander, R.; Rinsland, C.P. |||

    1995-02-01

    A simple, classical, and expedient method for the retrieval of atmospheric pressure-temperature profiles has been applied to the high-resolution infrared solar absorption spectra obtained with the atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument. The basis for this method is a rotational analysis of retrieved apparent abundances from CO2 rovibrational absorption lines, employing existing constituent concentration retrieval software used in the analysis of data returned by ATMOS. Pressure-temperature profiles derived from spectra acquired during the ATLAS 1 space shuttle mission of March-April 1992 are quantitatively evaluated and compared with climatological and meteorological data as a means of assessing the validity of this approach.

  12. Modelling the VUV emission spectrum of N2: preliminary results on the effects of rotational interactions on line intensities.

    PubMed

    Edwards, S A; Tchang-Brillet, W U; Roncin, J Y; Launay, F; Rostas, F

    1995-01-01

    A theoretical model of the excited singlet ungerade electronic states of the nitrogen molecule is presented. This work is an extension of a previous study (D. Stahel, M. Leoni and K. Dressler, J. Chem. Phys. 79, 2541-2558, 1983) with the addition of rotational interactions between states of different symmetry. These rotational interactions together with the homogeneous couplings frequently lead to extreme mixing of the states. This model is being used to analyse the high resolution vacuum ultraviolet emission spectrum which is currently being recorded photoelectrically. The ultimate goal of this work is the reliable interpretation of the low resolution emission spectra observed from planetary atmospheres, notably that of Titan, and the transitions assigned as being important in the Voyager 1 spectra of Titan are discussed in detail. PMID:11538439

  13. The effect of solar flares, coronal mass ejections, and co-rotating interaction regions on the Venusian 557.7 nm oxygen green line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Candace L.; Chanover, Nancy; Slanger, Tom; Molaverdikhani, Karan; Peter, Kerstin; Häusler, Bernd; Tellmann, Silvia; Pätzold, Martin; Witasse, Olivier; Blelly, Pierre-Louis; Collinson, Glyn

    2015-11-01

    The Venusian 557.7nm OI (1S - 1D) (oxygen green line) nightglow emission is known to be highly temporally variable. The reason for this variability is unknown. We propose that the emission is due to electron precipitation from intense solar storms. For my dissertation, I observed the Venusian green line after solar flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and co-rotating interaction regions from December 2010 to April 2015 using the high resolution Astrophysical Research Consortium Echelle Spectrograph on the Apache Point Observatory 3.5-m telescope. Combining these observation with all other published observations, we find that the strongest detections occur after CME impacts and we conclude electron precipitation is required to produce green line emission. We do not detect emission from the 630.0nm OI (1D - 3P) oxygen red line for any observation.In an effort to determine the emitting altitude, thereby constraining the possible emission processes responsible for green line emission, and quantify the electron energy and flux entering the Venusian nightside, we conducted analyses of space-based observations of the Venusian nightglow and ionosphere collected by the Venus Express (VEX) spacecraft. We were unable to detect the green line but confirmed that electron energy and flux increases after CME impacts.In order to determine the effect of storm condition electron precipitation on the Venusian green line, we modeled the Venusian ionosphere using the TRANSCAR model (a 1-D magnetohydrodynamic ionospheric model that simulates auroral emission from electron precipitation) by applying observed electron energies and fluxes. We found that electron energy plays a primary role in producing increased green line emission in the Venusian ionosphere.Based on observation and modeling results, we conclude that the Venusian green line is an auroral-type emission that occurs after solar storms with the largest intensities observed after CMEs. Post-CME electron fluxes and energies

  14. Determinants of image quality of rotational angiography for on-line assessment of frame geometry after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Olivares, Ramón; El Faquir, Nahid; Rahhab, Zouhair; Maugenest, Anne-Marie; Van Mieghem, Nicolas M; Schultz, Carl; Lauritsch, Guenter; de Jaegere, Peter P T

    2016-07-01

    To study the determinants of image quality of rotational angiography using dedicated research prototype software for motion compensation without rapid ventricular pacing after the implantation of four commercially available catheter-based valves. Prospective observational study including 179 consecutive patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with either the Medtronic CoreValve (MCS), Edward-SAPIEN Valve (ESV), Boston Sadra Lotus (BSL) or Saint-Jude Portico Valve (SJP) in whom rotational angiography (R-angio) with motion compensation 3D image reconstruction was performed. Image quality was evaluated from grade 1 (excellent image quality) to grade 5 (strongly degraded). Distinction was made between good (grades 1, 2) and poor image quality (grades 3-5). Clinical (gender, body mass index, Agatston score, heart rate and rhythm, artifacts), procedural (valve type) and technical variables (isocentricity) were related with the image quality assessment. Image quality was good in 128 (72 %) and poor in 51 (28 %) patients. By univariable analysis only valve type (BSL) and the presence of an artefact negatively affected image quality. By multivariate analysis (in which BMI was forced into the model) BSL valve (Odds 3.5, 95 % CI [1.3-9.6], p = 0.02), presence of an artifact (Odds 2.5, 95 % CI [1.2-5.4], p = 0.02) and BMI (Odds 1.1, 95 % CI [1.0-1.2], p = 0.04) were independent predictors of poor image quality. Rotational angiography with motion compensation 3D image reconstruction using a dedicated research prototype software offers good image quality for the evaluation of frame geometry after TAVI in the majority of patients. Valve type, presence of artifacts and higher BMI negatively affect image quality. PMID:27139459

  15. Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mires, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    National Geography Standards for the middle school years generally stress the teaching of latitude and longitude. There are many creative ways to explain the great grid that encircles our planet, but the author has found that students in his college-level geography courses especially enjoy human-interest stories associated with lines of latitude…

  16. Towards automated firearm identification based on high resolution 3D data: rotation-invariant features for multiple line-profile-measurement of firing pin shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Robert; Vielhauer, Claus

    2015-03-01

    Understanding and evaluation of potential evidence, as well as evaluation of automated systems for forensic examinations currently play an important role within the domain of digital crime scene analysis. The application of 3D sensing and pattern recognition systems for automatic extraction and comparison of firearm related tool marks is an evolving field of research within this domain. In this context, the design and evaluation of rotation-invariant features for use on topography data play a particular important role. In this work, we propose and evaluate a 3D imaging system along with two novel features based on topography data and multiple profile-measurement-lines for automatic matching of firing pin shapes. Our test set contains 72 cartridges of three manufactures shot by six different 9mm guns. The entire pattern recognition workflow is addressed. This includes the application of confocal microscopy for data acquisition, preprocessing covers outlier handling, data normalization, as well as necessary segmentation and registration. Feature extraction involves the two introduced features for automatic comparison and matching of 3D firing pin shapes. The introduced features are called `Multiple-Circle-Path' (MCP) and `Multiple-Angle-Path' (MAP). Basically both features are compositions of freely configurable amounts of circular or straight path-lines combined with statistical evaluations. During the first part of evaluation (E1), we examine how well it is possible to differentiate between two 9mm weapons of the same mark and model. During second part (E2), we evaluate the discrimination accuracy regarding the set of six different 9mm guns. During the third part (E3), we evaluate the performance of the features in consideration of different rotation angles. In terms of E1, the best correct classification rate is 100% and in terms of E2 the best result is 86%. The preliminary results for E3 indicate robustness of both features regarding rotation. However, in future

  17. Observations of 13.5 micron rotation-vibration lines of SiS in IRC +10216

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R. J.; Keady, J. J.; Jennings, D. E.; Hirsch, K. L.; Wiedemann, G. R.

    1994-01-01

    We report the first observations of the 13.5 micron fundamental band of SiS in the spectrum of the heavily obscured carbon star IRC +10216. The lines are formed in the inner region of the circumstellar envelope where the gas is accerlerating and where the temperature ranges from 800-500 K. We have carried out a detailed model of the observed line profiles. Our observations are best fit by a gradient in the abundance of SiS. We derive an abundance relative to molecular hydrogen of x(SiS) = 4.3 x 10(exp -6) at a distance of twelve stellar radii from the central star rising to x(SiS) = 4.3 x 10(exp -5) at a few stellar radii from the surface of the star.

  18. Interaction of a laser beam with the rotational lines of nitrogen in the wavelength region of 5700 Å

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohain Barua, Anurup; Jois, Sankara S.; Bhuyan, Surajit

    2007-08-01

    Propagation of a dye laser beam of wavelength 5700 Å through nitrogen is considered. Values of transmittance, averaged over intervals of 0.5 cm-1, are obtained for absorber thicknesses of 0.1, 1, and 10 atm-cm, using the quasi-random model of molecular band absorption. From these values, intensities of the absorption lines in the first positive system of N2 are simulated in the frequency interval of 17,540-17,548 cm-1.

  19. Development of a wavelength-stabilized distributed bragg reflector laser diode to the Cs-D2 line for field use in accurate geophysical measurements.

    PubMed

    Hori, Teruhito; Araya, Akito; Moriwaki, Shigenori; Mio, Norikatsu

    2007-02-01

    We have developed a wavelength-stabilized laser diode (LD) for geophysical measurement devices, which benefit from the uniformity of laser light. Regarding this purpose, a system that has such characteristics as low power consumption, sturdiness against mechanical disturbances, and a long life with long-term frequency stability is especially required. Therefore, we adopt as the light source a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) LD because it has various advantages concerning such properties. This paper describes the durable and compact wavelength-stabilized laser system. Since our DBR-LD oscillates at 852 nm, we selected the Cs-D2 line (6 2S1/2-6 2P3/2 transition) as a frequency reference to obtain a long-term stability in wavelength. Stabilization is performed by a feedback system using a modulation transfer (MT) method, which is a kind of Doppler-free saturated absorption spectroscopy, to acquire a saturated absorption signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio. Using this system, we could continuously lock the laser frequency to the hyperfine component of the Cs-D2 line for more than one week. By an Allan standard deviation measurement, the uncertainty of the stabilized laser frequency was found to be better than 1 x 10(-10) (<40 kHz) in a Gatetime region longer than 100 s. PMID:17578154

  20. Speed dependence of CH335Cl-O2 line-broadening parameters probed on rotational transitions: Measurements and semi-classical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldyreva, J.; Margulès, L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Rohart, F.

    2013-11-01

    Relaxation parameters for K-components (K≤6) of six J→J+1 rotational transitions (J=6, 10, 17, 22, 31 and 33) of CH335Cl perturbed by O2 are measured at room temperature with Voigt, speed-dependent Voigt and Galatry profiles in order to probe the speed-dependence effects. With respect to the previous study of CH335Cl-N2 system [Guinet et al., J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transfer 2012;113:1113], higher active-gas pressures are reached, providing better signal-to-noise ratios, and the exact expression of the Beer-Lambert law is introduced in the fitting procedure, leading, among other advantages, to much more realistic low-pressure results. The broadening parameters of the considered lines are also computed by a semi-classical method for various relative velocities of colliders and the powers characterizing the dependence of the collisional cross-sections on relative speeds are deduced as functions of the rotational numbers J and K. Additional calculations performed with the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of velocities show no significant difference with the earlier results [Buldyreva et al., Phys Chem Chem Phys 2011;13:20326] obtained within the mean thermal velocity approximation. Weighted sums of the presently measured Voigt-profile O2-broadening parameters and of the previously published N2-broadening ones are calculated to yield experimental air-broadening coefficients for spectroscopic databases.

  1. Ultrasensitive and accelerated detection of ciguatoxin by capillary electrophoresis via on-line sandwich immunoassay with rotating magnetic field and nanoparticles signal enhancement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoxiang; Zhang, Chaoying; Luan, Wenxiu; Li, Xiufeng; Liu, Ying; Luo, Xiliang

    2015-08-12

    A sensitive and rapid on-line immunoassay for the determination of ciguatoxin CTX3C was developed based on a capillary mixing system, which was integrated with capillary electrophoresis (CE) separation and electrochemical (EC) detection. In the sandwich immunoassay system, anti-CTX3C-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles were used as immunosensing probes, and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and anti-CTX3C antibody were bound onto the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and used as recognition elements. Online formation of immunocomplex was realized in capillary inlet end with an external rotating magnetic field. Compared with classical HPLC-MS and ELISA, the assay adopting AuNPs as multienzyme carriers and online sandwich immunoassay format with rotating magnetic field exhibited higher sensitivity and shorter assay time. The linear range of the assay for CTX3C was from 0.6 to 150 ng/L with a correlation coefficient of 0.9948 (n = 2), and the detection limit (S/N = 3) was 0.09 ng/L. The developed assay showed satisfying reproducibility and stability, and it was successfully applied for the quantification of CTX3C in fish samples. PMID:26320955

  2. Highly accurate potential energy surface, dipole moment surface, rovibrational energy levels, and infrared line list for {sup 32}S{sup 16}O{sub 2} up to 8000 cm{sup −1}

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xinchuan E-mail: Timothy.J.Lee@nasa.gov; Schwenke, David W.; Lee, Timothy J. E-mail: Timothy.J.Lee@nasa.gov

    2014-03-21

    A purely ab initio potential energy surface (PES) was refined with selected {sup 32}S{sup 16}O{sub 2} HITRAN data. Compared to HITRAN, the root-mean-squares error (σ{sub RMS}) for all J = 0–80 rovibrational energy levels computed on the refined PES (denoted Ames-1) is 0.013 cm{sup −1}. Combined with a CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV(Q+d)Z dipole moment surface (DMS), an infrared (IR) line list (denoted Ames-296K) has been computed at 296 K and covers up to 8000 cm{sup −1}. Compared to the HITRAN and CDMS databases, the intensity agreement for most vibrational bands is better than 85%–90%. Our predictions for {sup 34}S{sup 16}O{sub 2} band origins, higher energy {sup 32}S{sup 16}O{sub 2} band origins and missing {sup 32}S{sup 16}O{sub 2} IR bands have been verified by most recent experiments and available HITRAN data. We conclude that the Ames-1 PES is able to predict {sup 32/34}S{sup 16}O{sub 2} band origins below 5500 cm{sup −1} with 0.01–0.03 cm{sup −1} uncertainties, and the Ames-296K line list provides continuous, reliable and accurate IR simulations. The K{sub a}-dependence of both line position and line intensity errors is discussed. The line list will greatly facilitate SO{sub 2} IR spectral experimental analysis, as well as elimination of SO{sub 2} lines in high-resolution astronomical observations.

  3. Vertical Distributions of PH3 in Saturn from Observations of Its 1-0 and 3-2 Rotational Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orton, G. S.; Serabyn, E.; Lee, Y. T.

    2000-01-01

    Far-infrared Fourier-transform spectrometer measurements of the 1-0 and 3-2 PH3 transitions in Saturn's disk near 267 and 800 GHz (8.9 and 26.7/cm), respectively, were analyzed simultaneously to derive a global mean profile for the PH3 vertical mixing ratio between 100 and 600 mbar total pressure. The far-infrared spectrum is relatively free from spectral interlopers, suffers minimal absorption or scattering by atmospheric particulates, and contains intrinsically weak PH3 lines that are sensitive to a range of atmospheric depths. The combined spectra are inconsistent with a uniform tropospheric mixing ratio, even with a stratospheric cut-off. They are consistent with a volume mixing ratio of PH3 that drops from 1.2 x 10(exp -5) at 645 mbar pressure to a value of 4.1 x 10(exp -7) at 150 mbar pressure, a decrease that is linear is log abundance vs log pressure. The mixing ratio could drop even more quickly at atmospheric pressures below 150 mbar and still be consistent with the data. The mixing ratio may well remain constant with depth for pressures above 630 mbar. The maximum PH3 mixing ratio in this model is consistent with a [P]/[H] ratio in the deep atmosphere that is about a factor of 10 higher than solar composition. Such a model is consistent with rapid mixing up to the radiative-convective boundary and transport by, for example, vertical waves just above this boundary. In the best fitting model, the eddy diffusion coefficient is approximately 10(exp 4) sq cm near 630 mbar, and it must increase with altitude. The predominant PH3 loss mechanisms are direct photolysis by UV radiation and scavenging by H atoms produced by the photolysis.

  4. On-line quality assurance of rotational radiotherapy treatment delivery by means of a 2D ion chamber array and the Octavius phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, Ann van; Clermont, Christian; Devillers, Magali; Iori, Mauro; Huyskens, Dominique P.

    2007-10-15

    For routine pretreatment verification of innovative treatment techniques such as (intensity modulated) dynamic arc therapy and helical TomoTherapy, an on-line and reliable method would be highly desirable. The present solution proposed by TomoTherapy, Inc. (Madison, WI) relies on film dosimetry in combination with up to two simultaneous ion chamber point dose measurements. A new method is proposed using a 2D ion chamber array (Seven29, PTW, Freiburg, Germany) inserted in a dedicated octagonal phantom, called Octavius. The octagonal shape allows easy positioning for measurements in multiple planes. The directional dependence of the response of the detector was primarily investigated on a dual energy (6 and 18 MV) Clinac 21EX (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) as no fixed angle incidences can be calculated in the Hi-Art TPS of TomoTherapy. The array was irradiated from different gantry angles and with different arc deliveries, and the dose distributions at the level of the detector were calculated with the AAA (Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm) photon dose calculation algorithm implemented in Eclipse (Varian). For validation on the 6 MV TomoTherapy unit, rotational treatments were generated, and dose distributions were calculated with the Hi-Art TPS. Multiple cylindrical ion chamber measurements were used to cross-check the dose calculation and dose delivery in Octavius in the absence of the 2D array. To compensate for the directional dependence of the 2D array, additional prototypes of Octavius were manufactured with built-in cylindrically symmetric compensation cavities. When using the Octavius phantom with a 2 cm compensation cavity, measurements with an accuracy comparable to that of single ion chambers can be achieved. The complete Octavius solution for quality assurance of rotational treatments consists of: The 2D array, two octagonal phantoms (with and without compensation layer), an insert for nine cylindrical ion chambers, and a set of inserts of

  5. On-line quality assurance of rotational radiotherapy treatment delivery by means of a 2D ion chamber array and the Octavius phantom.

    PubMed

    Van Esch, Ann; Clermont, Christian; Devillers, Magali; Iori, Mauro; Huyskens, Dominique P

    2007-10-01

    For routine pretreatment verification of innovative treatment techniques such as (intensity modulated) dynamic arc therapy and helical TomoTherapy, an on-line and reliable method would be highly desirable. The present solution proposed by TomoTherapy, Inc. (Madison, WI) relies on film dosimetry in combination with up to two simultaneous ion chamber point dose measurements. A new method is proposed using a 2D ion chamber array (Seven29, PTW, Freiburg, Germany) inserted in a dedicated octagonal phantom, called Octavius. The octagonal shape allows easy positioning for measurements in multiple planes. The directional dependence of the response of the detector was primarily investigated on a dual energy (6 and 18 MV) Clinac 21EX (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) as no fixed angle incidences can be calculated in the Hi-Art TPS of TomoTherapy. The array was irradiated from different gantry angles and with different arc deliveries, and the dose distributions at the level of the detector were calculated with the AAA (Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm) photon dose calculation algorithm implemented in Eclipse (Varian). For validation on the 6 MV TomoTherapy unit, rotational treatments were generated, and dose distributions were calculated with the Hi-Art TPS. Multiple cylindrical ion chamber measurements were used to cross-check the dose calculation and dose delivery in Octavius in the absence of the 2D array. To compensate for the directional dependence of the 2D array, additional prototypes of Octavius were manufactured with built-in cylindrically symmetric compensation cavities. When using the Octavius phantom with a 2 cm compensation cavity, measurements with an accuracy comparable to that of single ion chambers can be achieved. The complete Octavius solution for quality assurance of rotational treatments consists of: The 2D array, two octagonal phantoms (with and without compensation layer), an insert for nine cylindrical ion chambers, and a set of inserts of

  6. A new primary cleft lip repair technique tailored for Asian patients that combines three surgical concepts: Comparison with rotation--advancement and straight-line methods.

    PubMed

    Funayama, Emi; Yamamoto, Yuhei; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Murao, Naoki; Shichinohe, Ryuji; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Oyama, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Various techniques have been described for unilateral cleft lip repair. These may be broadly classified into three types of procedure/concept: the straight-line method (SL; Rose-Thompson effect); rotation-advancement (RA; upper-lip Z-plasty); and the triangular flap method (TA; lower-lip Z-plasty). Based on these procedures, cleft lip repair has evolved in recent decades. The cleft lip repair method in our institution has also undergone several changes. However, we have found that further modifications are needed for Asian patients who have wider philtral dimples and columns than Caucasians, while following the principles of the original techniques mentioned above. Here, we have incorporated the advantages of each procedure and propose a refined hybrid operating technique, seeking a more appropriate procedure for Asian patients. To evaluate our new technique, a comparison study was performed to evaluate RA, SL, and our technique. We have used our new technique to treat 137 consecutive cleft lip cases of all types and degrees of severity, with or without a cleft palate, since 2009. In the time since we adopted the hybrid technique, we have observed improved esthetics of the repaired lip. Our technique demonstrated higher glance impression average scores than RA/SL. PMID:26653337

  7. Erratum: ``The Pure Rotational Line Emission of Ortho-Water Vapor in Comets. I. Radiative Transfer Model'' (ApJ, 615, 531 [2004])

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensch, F.; Bergin, E. A.

    2007-04-01

    transitions, as detailed below. For a given (measured) line intensity, the corrected model gives a water production rate that is larger than quoted in the original paper. Corrected versions of Figures 5 to 9 and Tables 4, 5, and 6 are given here, and the implications for the relevant sections in the paper are discussed (§ 4, Model for the SWAS Observations of C/1999 T1 McNaught-Hartley § 5, Line Predictions for Future Observatories; § 7, Summary). Along with the model results, we correct a typo in Table 4 (Q29=QH2O/1029 s-1 for models M3 and M5 is 0.01). For the SWAS observations of comet C/1999 T1 (McNaught-Hartley) made on 2001 February 2, the corrected model gives a water production rate of QH2O=(5.72+/-0.85)×1028 s-1 for xne=1.0 and QH2O=(7.36+/-1.15)×1028 s-1 for xne=0.2, where xne is the scaling factor for the electron abundance (see § 2.4 of the original paper). For the average of the data observed between 2001 March 1 and 8, the corrected water production rate is QH2O=(1.69+/-0.45)×1028 s-1 (xne=1.0) and QH2O=(1.99+/-0.55)×1028 s-1 (xne=0.2), respectively. This is larger by 10%-57% than the results quoted in the original paper, but is still within 20%-40% of the water-production rates published in F. Bensch et al. ApJ, 615, 531 [2004], where the model by D. Bockelée-Morvan (ApJ, 615, 531 [2004]) is used. The difference of 20%-40% is of the order of the model accuracy due to the uncertainties in the electron abundance (compare the results for xne=1.0 and xne=0.2). However, this residual discrepancy possibly reflects the different numerical codes used to calculate the line excitation and radiation transfer, an accelerated Monte Carlo in ratran vs. an escape probability formalism in the model by D. Bockelée-Morvan (ApJ, 615, 531 [2004]). The low ratio of the expansion velocity over the local line-width, of a factor of 3, is close to the limit where an escape probability formalism can be applied. Systematic differences are therefore expected for the water-rotational

  8. Astrophysics and Astrochemistry: The role of Rotational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzzarini, Cristina

    2015-08-01

    The identification of a large variety of chemical compounds in space as well as planetary atmospheres has been made possible through the spectral signatures of astronomical bodies. For their interpretation, laboratory measurements are essential and rotational spectroscopy plays a leading role. On a general ground, the investigation of the phenomena that allow to understand the chemistry of the interstellar medium requires laboratory investigations, as astronomical observations require the knowledge of either the spectroscopic parameters or the transition frequencies involved.The knowledge of very accurate rest frequencies is important for astrophysical purposes: precise transition frequencies are essential, for instance, in studies of molecular excitation, radiative transfer, systematic velocity gradients, ambipolar diffusion in star-forming regions, and also for the identification of new species.Rotational spectroscopy, thanks to its intrinsic high resolution, is a powerful tool for providing most of the information mentioned above: accurate or even very accurate rotational transition frequencies, accurate spectroscopic as well as hyperfine parameters, accurate pressure-broadening coefficients and their temperature dependence. For instance, by exploiting the Lamb-dip technique it is possible to further increase the high resolution power of rotational spectroscopy and then resolve hyperfine structures and/or measure very accurate rest frequencies. With respect to collisional phenomena and line shape analysis studies, rotational spectroscopy may provide very good results: not only this technique does not produce uncontrollable instrumental distortions or broadenings, but also, having a high sensitivity, it is particularly suitable for this kind of investigations.A number of examples will be presented to illustrate the role of rotational spectroscopy in the field of astrophysical investigations with particular emphasis on the work carried out at the Laboratory of Mm

  9. Far-infrared rotational emission by carbon monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckee, C. F.; Storey, J. W. V.; Watson, D. M.; Green, S.

    1981-01-01

    Accurate theoretical collisional excitation rates are used to determine the emissivities of CO rotational lines 10 to the 4th power/cu cm n(H2), 100 K T 2000 K, and J 50. An approximate analytic expression for the emissitivities which is valid over most of this region is obtained. Population inversions in the lower rotational levels occur for densities n(H2) approximately 10 (to the 3rd to 5th power)/cu cm and temperatures T approximately 50 K. Interstellar shocks observed edge on are a potential source of millimeter wave CO maser emission. The CO rotational cooling function suggested by Hollenbach and McKee (1979) is verified, and accurate numerical values given. Application of these results to other linear molecules should be straightforward.

  10. ROTATING GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchini, P.; Varri, A. L.; Bertin, G.; Zocchi, A.

    2013-07-20

    Internal rotation is thought to play a major role in the dynamics of some globular clusters. However, in only a few cases has internal rotation been studied by the quantitative application of realistic and physically justified global models. Here, we present a dynamical analysis of the photometry and three-dimensional kinematics of {omega} Cen, 47 Tuc, and M15, by means of a recently introduced family of self-consistent axisymmetric rotating models. The three clusters, characterized by different relaxation conditions, show evidence of differential rotation and deviations from sphericity. The combination of line-of-sight velocities and proper motions allows us to determine their internal dynamics, predict their morphology, and estimate their dynamical distance. The well-relaxed cluster 47 Tuc is interpreted very well by our model; internal rotation is found to explain the observed morphology. For M15, we provide a global model in good agreement with the data, including the central behavior of the rotation profile and the shape of the ellipticity profile. For the partially relaxed cluster {omega} Cen, the selected model reproduces the complex three-dimensional kinematics; in particular, the observed anisotropy profile, characterized by a transition from isotropy to weakly radial anisotropy and then to tangential anisotropy in the outer parts. The discrepancy found for the steep central gradient in the observed line-of-sight velocity dispersion profile and for the ellipticity profile is ascribed to the condition of only partial relaxation of this cluster and the interplay between rotation and radial anisotropy.

  11. Rotational moulding.

    PubMed

    Crawford, R J; Kearns, M P

    2003-10-01

    Rotational moulding promises designers attractive economics and a low-pressure process. The benefits of rotational moulding are compared here with other manufacturing methods such as injection and blow moulding. PMID:14603714

  12. Rotating Vesta

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronomers combined 146 exposures taken by NASA's Hubble SpaceTelescope to make this 73-frame movie of the asteroid Vesta's rotation.Vesta completes a rotation every 5.34 hours.› Asteroid and...

  13. Vibration-rotation line shifts for 1 sigma g + H2/V,J/-1S/0/ He computed via close coupling - Temperature dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, G. E.; Chackerian, C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The density shifting of vibration-rotation transitions of H2 perturbed by He was computed (as a function of temperature) with no adjustable parameters. The calculation was carried out using the framework of the impact theory of Baranger with S-matrix elements obtained via close coupling calculations which incorporated the ab initio H2-H2 system potential of Tsapline et al.(1977). Vibrational and rotational inelasticity were neglected in the calculations; nevertheless good agreement with experimental data was obtained, up to moderate temperatures, for the density shift. A much poorer comparison was obtained for the density broadening.

  14. Mill profiler machines soft materials accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1966-01-01

    Mill profiler machines bevels, slots, and grooves in soft materials, such as styrofoam phenolic-filled cores, to any desired thickness. A single operator can accurately control cutting depths in contour or straight line work.

  15. Highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Jokiel, Jr., Bernhard; Ensz, Mark T.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-12-30

    Disclosed is a highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine, comprising a revolute joint, comprising a circular encoder wheel, having an axis of rotation; a plurality of marks disposed around at least a portion of the circumference of the encoder wheel; bearing means for supporting the encoder wheel, while permitting free rotation of the encoder wheel about the wheel's axis of rotation; and a sensor, rigidly attached to the bearing means, for detecting the motion of at least some of the marks as the encoder wheel rotates; a probe arm, having a proximal end rigidly attached to the encoder wheel, and having a distal end with a probe tip attached thereto; and coordinate processing means, operatively connected to the sensor, for converting the output of the sensor into a set of cylindrical coordinates representing the position of the probe tip relative to a reference cylindrical coordinate system.

  16. Comparison of Trajectory Models in Calculations of N2-broadened Half-widths and N2-induced Line Shifts for the Rotational Band of H2O-16 and Comparison with Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamouroux, J.; Gamache, R. R.; Laraia, A. L.; Ma, Q.; Tipping, R. H.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, Complex Robert-Bonamy calculations of half-widths and line shifts were done for N2-broadening of water for 1639 transitions in the rotational band using two models for the trajectories. The first is a model correct to second order in time, the Robert-Bonamy parabolic approximation. The second is the solution of Hamilton's equations. Both models use the isotropic part of the atom-atom potential to determine the trajectories. The present calculations used an intermolecular potential expanded to 20th order to assure the convergence of the half-widths and line shifts. The aim of the study is to assess if the difference in the half-widths and line shifts determined from the two trajectory models is greater than the accuracy requirements of the spectroscopic and remote sensing communities. The results of the calculations are compared with measurements of the half-widths and line shifts. It is shown that the effects of the trajectory model greatly exceed the needs of current remote sensing measurements and that line shape parameters calculated using trajectories determined by solving Hamilton's equations agree better with measurement.

  17. Far-infrared rotational emission by carbon monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckee, C. F.; Storey, J. W. V.; Watson, D. M.; Green, S.

    1982-01-01

    Accurate theoretical collisional excitation rates are used to determine the emissivities of CO rotational lines for an H2 molecule content of at least 10,000/cu cm, temperature in the range 100-3000 K, and J not more than 60 under the assumption that the lines are optically thin. An approximate analytic expression for the emissivities which is valid in this region is obtained. Population inversions in the lower rotational levels occur for densities of molecular H2 around 1000-100,000/cu cm and temperatures T not more than about 50 K provided photon trapping is unimportant. Interstellar shocks observed edge-on are a potential source of weak millimeter-wave CO maser emission.

  18. Rotating Wavepackets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekner, John

    2008-01-01

    Any free-particle wavepacket solution of Schrodinger's equation can be converted by differentiations to wavepackets rotating about the original direction of motion. The angular momentum component along the motion associated with this rotation is an integral multiple of [h-bar]. It is an "intrinsic" angular momentum: independent of origin and…

  19. Stellar Rotation and Precise Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, D. F.

    Two aspects will be considered. First, I will view the spectroscopic measurement of rotation rates as a differential precision radial velocity: how do we get rotation rates; what are the uncertainties stemming from differential rotation, time variable profiles caused by spots, uncertain limb darkening, and the presence of macroturbulence? What do we even mean by the rotation rate when there is differential rotation? Second, I will discuss the effects of rotation on specifying the precise position of spectral lines, i.e., the classical radial velocity of a star. I will present some thoughts on the effects of having our sharp markers of the Doppler effect degraded by rotation, the meaning of line position when the Doppler effects of rotation and convection interact, and the altered shapes of composite spectrum features with increased rotational smearing.

  20. Rotational superposition: a review of methods.

    PubMed

    Flower, D R

    1999-01-01

    Rotational superposition is one of the most commonly used algorithms in molecular modelling. Many different methods of solving superposition have been suggested. Of these, methods based on the quaternion parameterization of rotation are fast, accurate, and robust. Quaternion parameterization-based methods cannot result in rotation inversion and do not have special cases such as co-linearity or co-planarity of points. Thus, quaternion parameterization-based methods are the best choice for rotational superposition applications. PMID:10736782

  1. CRIRES spectroscopy and empirical line-by-line identification of FeH molecular absorption in an M dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wende, S.; Reiners, A.; Seifahrt, A.; Bernath, P. F.

    2010-11-01

    Molecular FeH provides a large number of sharp and isolated absorption lines that can be used to measure radial velocity, rotation, or magnetic field strength with high accuracy. Our aim is to provide an FeH atlas for M-type stars in the spectral region from 986 nm to 1077 nm (Wing-Ford band). To identify these lines in CRIRES spectra of the magnetically inactive, slowly rotating, M5.5 dwarf GJ1002, we calculated model spectra for the selected spectral region with theoretical FeH line data. In general this line list agrees with the observed data, but several individual lines differ significantly in position or in line strength. After identification of as many as possible FeH lines, we corrected the line data for position and line strength to provide an accurate atlas of FeH absorption lines for use in high precision spectroscopy of low mass stars. For all lines, we used a Voigt function to obtain their positions and equivalent widths. Identification with theoretical lines was done by hand. For confirmation of the identified lines, we used statistical methods, cross-correlation techniques, and line intensities. Eventually, we were able to identify FeH lines from the (0,0), (1,0), (1,1), (2,1), (2,2), (3,2), and (4,3) vibrational bands in the observed spectra and correct the positions of the lines if necessary. The deviations between theoretical and observed positions follow a normal distribution approximately around zero. In order to empirically correct the line strength, we determined Teff, instrumental broadening (rotational broadening) and a van der Waals enhancement factor for the FeH lines in GJ1002. We also give the scaling factors for the Einstein A values to correct the line strengths. With the identified lines, we derived rotational temperatures from the line intensities for GJ1002. We conclude that FeH lines can be used for a wide variety of applications in astrophysics. With the identified lines it will be possible for example to characterize magnetically

  2. On the possibility of analytical approximation of line forms during random disorders of the resonance frequencies in molecular vibration-rotation spectra for satellite sounding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fomin, V. V.

    1979-01-01

    The generalization spectral line contour concept and formulas for a two component mixture, as well as consequences of the general formula are discussed. The calculation procedure, initial information, calculation results and comparison of calculations with available experimental data, for radiation absorption in three CO2 bands are presented.

  3. Supergranulation rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schou, Jesper; Beck, John G.

    2001-01-01

    Simple convection models estimate the depth of supergranulation at approximately 15,000 km which suggests that supergranules should rotate at the rate of the plasma in the outer 2% of the Sun by radius. Previous measurements (Snodgrass & Ulrich, 1990; Beck & Schou, 2000) found that supergranules rotate significantly faster than this, with a size-dependent rotation rate. We expand on previous work and show that the torsional oscillation signal seen in the supergranules tracks that obtained for normal modes. We also find that the amplitudes and lifetimes of the supergranulation are size dependent.

  4. A highly accurate interatomic potential for argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Ronald A.

    1993-09-01

    A modified potential based on the individually damped model of Douketis, Scoles, Marchetti, Zen, and Thakkar [J. Chem. Phys. 76, 3057 (1982)] is presented which fits, within experimental error, the accurate ultraviolet (UV) vibration-rotation spectrum of argon determined by UV laser absorption spectroscopy by Herman, LaRocque, and Stoicheff [J. Chem. Phys. 89, 4535 (1988)]. Other literature potentials fail to do so. The potential also is shown to predict a large number of other properties and is probably the most accurate characterization of the argon interaction constructed to date.

  5. Rotational aerophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, N. H.; Tarnopolsky, A. Z.; Lai, J. C. S.

    2002-03-01

    Free rotational aerophones such as the bullroarer, which consists of a wooden slat whirled around on the end of a string, and which emits a loud pulsating roar, have been used in many ancient and traditional societies for ceremonial purposes. This article presents an experimental and theoretical investigation of this instrument. The aerodynamics of rotational behavior is elucidated, and relates slat rotation frequency to slat width and velocity through the air. Analysis shows that sound production is due to generation of an oscillating-rotating dipole across the slat, the role of the vortices shed by the slat being relatively minor. Apparent discrepancies between the behavior of a bullroarer slat and a slat mounted on an axle in a wind tunnel are shown to be due to viscous friction in the bearings of the wind-tunnel experiment.

  6. Conical Rotating Aperture Geometries In Digital Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Wong, Roland

    1981-11-01

    Applications of conical rotating aperture (RA) geometries to digital radiography are described. Two kinds of conical RA imaging systems are the conical scanning beam and the conical scanning grid assemblies. These assemblies comprise coaxial conical surface(s) the axis of which is collinear with the x-ray focal spot. This geometry allows accurate alignment and continuous focusing of the slits or the grid lines. Image receptors which use solid state photodiode arrays are described for each type of conical RA system: multiple linear arrays for the conical scanning beam assembly and multiple area arrays for the conical scanning grid assembly. The digital rotating-aperture systems combine the wide dynamic range characteristics of solid state detectors with the superior scatter-rejection advantages of scanned beam approaches. The high scanning-beam velocities attainable by the use of rotating apertures should make it possible to obtain digital images for those procedures such as chest radiography which require large fields of view and short exposure times.

  7. Grading More Accurately

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rom, Mark Carl

    2011-01-01

    Grades matter. College grading systems, however, are often ad hoc and prone to mistakes. This essay focuses on one factor that contributes to high-quality grading systems: grading accuracy (or "efficiency"). I proceed in several steps. First, I discuss the elements of "efficient" (i.e., accurate) grading. Next, I present analytical results…

  8. Torsion-rotation intensities in methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, John

    Methanol exists in numerous kinds of astronomical objects featuring a wide range of local conditions. The light nature of the molecule coupled with the internal rotation of the methyl group with respect to the hydroxyl group results in a rich, strong spectrum that spans the entire far-infrared region. As a result, any modest size observational window will have a number of strong methanol transitions. This has made it the gas of choice for testing THz receivers and to extract the local physical conditions from observations covering small frequency windows. The latter has caused methanol to be dubbed the Swiss army knife of astrophysics. Methanol has been increasingly used in this capacity and will be used even more for subsequent investigations into the Herschel archive, and with SOFIA and ALMA. Interpreting physical conditions on the basis of a few methanol lines requires that the molecular data, line positions, intensities, and collision rates, be complete, consistent and accurate to a much higher level than previously required for astrophysics. The need for highly reliable data is even more critical for modeling the two classes of widespread maser action and many examples of optical pumping through the torsional bands. Observation of the torsional bands in the infrared will be a unique opportunity to directly connect JWST observations with those of Herschel, SOFIA, and ALMA. The theory for the intensities of torsion-rotation transitions in a molecule featuring a single internally rotating methyl group is well developed after 70 years of research. However, other than a recent very preliminary and not completely satisfactory investigation of a few CH3OH torsional bands, this theory has never been experimentally tested for any C3V internal rotor. More alarming is a set of recent intensity calibrated microwave measurements that showed deviations relative to calculations of up to 50% in some ground state rotational transitions commonly used by astronomers to extract

  9. Einstein coefficients for rotational lines of the (0,0) band of the NO A2sigma(+)-X2Pi system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reisel, John R.; Carter, Campbell D.; Laurendeau, Normand M.

    1992-01-01

    A summary of the spectroscopic equations necessary for prediction of the molecular transition energies and the Einstein A and B coefficients for rovibronic lines of the gamma(0,0) band of nitric oxide (NO) is presented. The calculated molecular transition energies are all within 0.57/cm of published experimental values; in addition, over 95 percent of the calculated energies give agreement with measured results within 0.25/cm. Einstein coefficients are calculated from the band A00 value and the known Hoenl-London factors and are tabulated for individual rovibronic transitions in the NO A2sigma(+)-X2Pi(0,0) band.

  10. Slip at the surface of a translating-rotating sphere bisected by a free surface bounding a semi-infinite viscous fluid: Removal of the contact-line singularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, M. E.; Ranger, K. B.; Brenner, H.

    1986-04-01

    A linear slip, Basset-type, boundary condition having an experimentally adjustable phenomenological slip coefficient is used to remove the contact-line singularity that would otherwise prevent the movement of a partially penetrating sphere normal to a planar free surface F bounding a semi-infinite viscous fluid. Stokes flow calculations are presented for the quasistatic hydrodynamic force and torque resistance matrix for a half-submerged sphere that is instantaneously translating and rotating with vector velocities that are arbitrarily oriented relative to the free-surface unit normal vector. The singular components of this material matrix (arising either during translational motion normal to F or rotational motion about an axis lying within F) are shown to be finite for finite slip coefficients β, and to become logarithmically infinite in the traditional nonslip limit β→∞. The relative weakness of this logarithmic singularity suggests that a degree of slip as small as, say, 0.01%—which would presumably be kinematically indistinguishable from the no-slip case—could easily masquerade as a conventional ``wall effect'' on the Stokes drag. A small degree of slip is thus hypothesized as a mechanism that would permit the observed transport of Brownian corpuscles across interfacial regions.

  11. Rotational level-dependent collisional broadening and line shift of the A2Sigma(+)-X2Pi (1,0) band of OH in hydrogen-air combustion gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, W. J.; Allen, M. G.; Davis, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the collisional broadening and line shift of the (1,0) band of the A2Sigma(+)-X2Pi system of OH are reported in atmospheric pressure hydrogen-air combustion gases. The measurements were made using a single-mode, narrow linewidth, frequency-doubled ring dye laser operating near 283 nm. The OH was generated in the combustion gases of a flat flame H2-air burner. Collisional broadening parameters for equilibrium mixtures of H2, O2, H2O, and N2 were obtained spanning a range of fuel/air equivalence ratios from 0.6 to 1.6 and temperatures from 1500 to 2050 K. Measurements were obtained spanning rotational quantum numbers from 4.5 to 16.5. The collision induced frequency shift was determined to be 0.1 that of the collisional broadening.

  12. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  13. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  14. Accurate rest-frequencies of ketenimine (CH2CNH) at submillimetre wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degli Esposti, C.; Dore, L.; Bizzocchi, L.

    2014-05-01

    Context. Imine compounds are thought to have a role in the interstellar formation of complex organic species, including pre-biotic molecules. Ketenimine (CH2CNH) is one of the four imines discovered in space. It was identified in Sgr B2(N-LMH) through the detection of three rotational lines in absorption. Aims: We present an extensive laboratory study of the ground-state rotational spectrum of CH2CNH at submillimetre wavelengths, aimed at obtaining accurate rest-frequencies for radio-astronomical searches. Methods: The investigation was carried out using a source-modulation microwave spectrometer equipped with a cell that is coupled to a pyrolysis apparatus working at 1000°. The spectrum was recorded in the frequency range 80-620 GHz with the detection of 150 transitions. Results: The newly measured transition frequencies were analysed with previously available microwave and far-infrared data, yielding accurate rotational constants of CH2CNH, the complete sets of quartic and sextic centrifugal distortion constants, and three octic constants. Several transitions exhibit a hyperfine structure due to the quadrupole and spin-rotation couplings of the 14N nucleus, which were accounted for in the analysis. Conclusions: The determined spectroscopic constants allowed for the computation of a list of highly accurate rest-frequencies for astrophysical purposes in the submillimetre and THz region with 1σ uncertainties that are lower than 0.1 km s-1 in radial equivalent velocity. Full Tables 1 and 3 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/565/A66

  15. Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  16. Rotation Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In aircraft turbine engine research, certain investigations require extremely precise measurement of the position of a rotating part, such as the rotor, a disc-like part of the engine's compressor which revolves around a shaft at extremely high speeds. For example, in studies of airflow velocity within a compressor, researchers need to know-for data correlation the instantaneous position of a given spot on the rotor each time a velocity measurement is made. Earlier methods of measuring rotor shaft angle required a physical connection to the shaft, which limited the velocity of the rotating object.

  17. Modeling rigid magnetically rotated microswimmers: Rotation axes, bistability, and controllability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkati, Farshad; Fu, Henry Chien

    2014-12-01

    Magnetically actuated microswimmers have recently attracted attention due to many possible biomedical applications. In this study we investigate the dynamics of rigid magnetically rotated microswimmers with permanent magnetic dipoles. Our approach uses a boundary element method to calculate a mobility matrix, accurate for arbitrary geometries, which is then used to identify the steady periodically rotating orbits in a co-rotating body-fixed frame. We evaluate the stability of each of these orbits. We map the magnetoviscous behavior as a function of dimensionless Mason number and as a function of the angle that the magnetic field makes with its rotation axis. We describe the wobbling motion of these swimmers by investigating how the rotation axis changes as a function of experimental parameters. We show that for a given magnetic field strength and rotation frequency, swimmers can have more than one stable periodic orbit with different rotation axes. Finally, we demonstrate that one can improve the controllability of these types of microswimmers by adjusting the relative angle between the magnetic field and its axis of rotation.

  18. IMPROVED log(gf) VALUES FOR LINES OF Ti I AND ABUNDANCE DETERMINATIONS IN THE PHOTOSPHERES OF THE SUN AND METAL-POOR STAR HD 84937 (ACCURATE TRANSITION PROBABILITIES FOR Ti I)

    SciTech Connect

    Lawler, J. E.; Guzman, A.; Wood, M. P.; Sneden, C.; Cowan, J. J. E-mail: adrianaguzman2014@u.northwestern.edu E-mail: chris@verdi.as.utexas.edu

    2013-04-01

    New atomic transition probability measurements for 948 lines of Ti I are reported. Branching fractions from Fourier transform spectra and from spectra recorded using a 3 m echelle spectrometer are combined with published radiative lifetimes from laser-induced fluorescence measurements to determine these transition probabilities. Generally good agreement is found in comparisons to the NIST Atomic Spectra Database. The new Ti I data are applied to re-determine the Ti abundance in the photospheres of the Sun and metal-poor star HD 84937 using many lines covering a range of wavelength and excitation potential to explore possible non-local thermal equilibrium effects. The variation of relative Ti/Fe abundance with metallicity in metal-poor stars observed in earlier studies is supported in this study.

  19. Collisional quenching of highly rotationally excited HF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, B.; Walker, K. M.; Forrey, R. C.; Stancil, P. C.; Balakrishnan, N.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Collisional excitation rate coefficients play an important role in the dynamics of energy transfer in the interstellar medium. In particular, accurate rotational excitation rates are needed to interpret microwave and infrared observations of the interstellar gas for nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium line formation. Aims: Theoretical cross sections and rate coefficients for collisional deexcitation of rotationally excited HF in the vibrational ground state are reported. Methods: The quantum-mechanical close-coupling approach implemented in the nonreactive scattering code MOLSCAT was applied in the cross section and rate coefficient calculations on an accurate 2D HF-He potential energy surface. Estimates of rate coefficients for H and H2 colliders were obtained from the HF-He collisional data with a reduced-potential scaling approach. Results: The calculation of state-to-state rotational quenching cross sections for HF due to He with initial rotational levels up to j = 20 were performed for kinetic energies from 10-5 to 15 000 cm-1. State-to-state rate coefficients for temperatures between 0.1 and 3000 K are also presented. The comparison of the present results with previous work for lowly-excited rotational levels reveals significant differences. In estimating HF-H2 rate coefficients, the reduced-potential method is found to be more reliable than the standard reduced-mass approach. Conclusions: The current state-to-state rate coefficient calculations are the most comprehensive to date for HF-He collisions. We attribute the differences between previously reported data and our results to differences in the adopted interaction potential energy surfaces. The new He rate coefficients can be used in a variety of applications. The estimated H2 and H collision rates can also augment the smaller datasets previously developed for H2 and electrons. Rate coefficient tables are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130

  20. The Rotational Spectrum of CHF 3 in the Submillimeter-Wave and Far-Infrared Region: Observation of the K = 3 Line Splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzoli, G.; Cludi, L.; Cotti, G.; Dore, L.; Esposti, C. D.; Bellini, M.; Denatale, P.

    1994-02-01

    The milimeter-wave, submillimeter-wave. and FIR spectra of the ground state of CHF 3 have been observed and analyzed up to J = 78. The resulting spectroscopic constants are: B0/MHz = 10 348.8706(2), D J/kHz= 11.34482(13), D JK/kHz = -18.11765(50), H JJJ/Hz= 0.020069(24), H JJK/Hz = -0.08598(10), H KKJ/Hz 0.11372(27), L J/mHz = -0.669(16) × 10 -4, L JJK/mHz = 0.4953(80) × 10 -3, L JK/mHz = -0.1189(17) × 10 -2, and L JKK/mHz = -0.1115(31) × 10 -2. The splitting of the K = 3 ground state lines has been observed starting from the J = 29 ← 28 transition and the determined values of the splitting constants are h3/Hz = 0.29689(45) ×10 -2 and δ h3/Hz = -0.2054(52) × 10 -7.

  1. Relativity on Rotated Graph Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Roberto

    2011-11-01

    We present visual calculations in special relativity using spacetime diagrams drawn on graph paper that has been rotated by 45 degrees. The rotated lines represent lightlike directions in Minkowski spacetime, and the boxes in the grid (called light-clock diamonds) represent ticks of an inertial observer's lightclock. We show that many quantitative results can be read off a spacetime diagram by counting boxes, using a minimal amount of algebra.

  2. Rotational non-LTE in HCN in the thermosphere of Titan: Implications for the radiative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezac, L.; Kutepov, A. A.; Faure, A.; Hartogh, P.; Feofilov, A. G.

    2013-07-01

    Context. The thermal structure of Titan's thermosphere is determined by the balance between several heating and cooling processes. These processes must be accurately modeled to correctly interpret the available measurements and enhance our understanding of the formation and evolution of this atmosphere. One of the most important thermospheric cooling process for Titan is emission in the HCN rotational band. Aims: We aim to determine the validity of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) for the HCN rotational distribution in the thermosphere of Titan and the impact of its breakdown on the HCN radiative cooling rate in the thermosphere. Methods: A general non-LTE radiative transfer code for rotational lines based on the accelerated lambda iteration (ALI) was used to calculate the excitation of HCN rotational levels in Titan's atmosphere. These level populations were then used to calculate the associated cooling rate. Results: We show that the common assumption in the models of Titan's thermospheric energy balance, namely the LTE distribution of rotational lines of HCN, is generally not valid above about 1100 km, or ~0.025 nbar, which will affect the derived thermospheric cooling rates. The effect of non-LTE is to reduce the cooling rate to 15% of the LTE value at around the exobase altitudes depending on the given density of HCN and collisional partners (N2, CH4, H2, and electrons). Since collision state-to-state quenching rates of HCN rotational levels are poorly known, a sensitivity analysis of our results to these rates is also presented.

  3. Quantum Calculation of Inelastic CO Collisions with H. II. Pure Rotational Quenching of High Rotational Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Kyle M.; Song, L.; Yang, B. H.; Groenenboom, G. C.; van der Avoird, A.; Balakrishnan, N.; Forrey, R. C.; Stancil, P. C.

    2015-09-01

    Carbon monoxide is a simple molecule present in many astrophysical environments, and collisional excitation rate coefficients due to the dominant collision partners are necessary to accurately predict spectral line intensities and extract astrophysical parameters. We report new quantum scattering calculations for rotational deexcitation transitions of CO induced by H using the three-dimensional potential energy surface (PES) of Song et al. State-to-state cross sections for collision energies from 10-5 to 15,000 cm-1 and rate coefficients for temperatures ranging from 1 to 3000 K are obtained for CO (v = 0, j) deexcitation from j=1-45 to all lower j‧ levels, where j is the rotational quantum number. Close-coupling and coupled-states calculations were performed in full-dimension for j=1-5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, and 45 while scaling approaches were used to estimate rate coefficients for all other intermediate rotational states. The current rate coefficients are compared with previous scattering results using earlier PESs. Astrophysical applications of the current results are briefly discussed.

  4. Accurate measurement of time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itano, Wayne M.; Ramsey, Norman F.

    1993-07-01

    The paper discusses current methods for accurate measurements of time by conventional atomic clocks, with particular attention given to the principles of operation of atomic-beam frequency standards, atomic hydrogen masers, and atomic fountain and to the potential use of strings of trapped mercury ions as a time device more stable than conventional atomic clocks. The areas of application of the ultraprecise and ultrastable time-measuring devices that tax the capacity of modern atomic clocks include radio astronomy and tests of relativity. The paper also discusses practical applications of ultraprecise clocks, such as navigation of space vehicles and pinpointing the exact position of ships and other objects on earth using the GPS.

  5. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  6. The Solar Surface Differential Rotation from Disk-Integrated Chromospheric Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, Robert A.; Keil, Steven L.

    1995-06-01

    Disk-integrated solar chromospheric Ca ii K-line (3933.68 Å) fluxes have been measured almost daily at Sacramento Peak Observatory since 1977. Using observing windows selected to mimic seasonal windows for chromospheric measurements of lower Main-Sequence stars such as those observed by Mount Wilson Observatory's HK Project, we have measured the solar rotation from the modulation of the Ca ii K-line flux. We track the change of rotation period from the decline of cycle 21 through the maximum of cycle 22. This variation in rotation period is shown to behave as expected from the migration of active regions in latitude according to Maunder's ‘butterfly diagram’, including an abrupt change in rotation period at the transition from cycle 21 to cycle 22. These results indicate the successful detection of solar surface differential rotation from disk-integrated observations. We argue that the success of our study compared to previous investigations of the solar surface differential rotation from disk-integrated fluxes lies primarily with the choice of the length of the time-series window. Our selection of 200 days is shorter than in previous studies whose windows are typically on the order of one year. The 200-day window is long enough to permit an accurate determination of the rotation period, yet short enough to avoid complications arising from active region evolution. Thus, measurements of the variation of rotation period in lower Main-Sequence stars, especially those that appear to be correlated with long-term changes in chromospheric activity (i.e., cycles), are probably evidence for stellar surface differential rotation.

  7. Daytime operation of a pure rotational Raman lidar by use of a Fabry-Perot interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshinov, Yuri; Bobrovnikov, Sergey; Serikov, Ilya; Ansmann, Albert; Wandinger, Ulla; Althausen, Dietrich; Mattis, Ina; Müller, Detlef

    2005-06-01

    We propose to use a Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) in a pure rotational Raman lidar to isolate return signals that are due to pure rotational Raman scattering from atmospheric nitrogen against the sky background. The main idea of this instrumental approach is that a FPI is applied as a frequency comb filter with the transmission peaks accurately matched to a comb of practically equidistant lines of a pure rotational Raman spectrum (PRRS) of nitrogen molecules. Thus a matched FPI transmission comb cuts out the spectrally continuous sky background light from the spectral gaps between the PRRS lines of nitrogen molecules while it is transparent to light within narrow spectral intervals about these lines. As the width of the spectral gaps between the lines of the PRRS of nitrogen molecules is ~114 times the width of an individual spectral line, cutting out of the sky background from these gaps drastically improves the signal-to-background ratio of the pure rotational Raman lidar returns. This application of the FPI enables one to achieve daytime temperature profiling in the atmosphere with a pure rotational Raman lidar in the visible and near-UV spectral regions. We present an analysis of application of the FPI to filtering out the pure rotational Raman lidar returns against the solar background. To demonstrate the feasibility of the approach proposed, we present temperature profiles acquired during a whole-day measurement session in which a Raman lidar equipped with a FPI was used. For comparison, temperature profiles acquired with Vaisala radiosondes launched from the measurement site are also presented.

  8. Temperature-insensitive laser frequency locking near absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostinski, Natalie; Olsen, Ben A.; Marsland, Robert; McGuyer, Bart H.; Happer, William

    2011-03-01

    Combined magnetically induced circular dichroism and Faraday rotation of an atomic vapor are used to develop a variant of the dichroic atomic vapor laser lock that eliminates lock sensitivity to temperature fluctuations of the cell. Operating conditions that eliminate first-order sensitivity to temperature fluctuations can be determined by low-frequency temperature modulation. This temperature-insensitive gyrotropic laser lock can be accurately understood with a simple model, that is in excellent agreement with observations in potassium vapor at laser frequencies in a 2 GHz range about the 770.1 nm absorption line. The methods can be readily adapted for other absorption lines.

  9. Temperature-insensitive laser frequency locking near absorption lines

    SciTech Connect

    Kostinski, Natalie; Olsen, Ben A.; Marsland, Robert III; McGuyer, Bart H.; Happer, William

    2011-03-15

    Combined magnetically induced circular dichroism and Faraday rotation of an atomic vapor are used to develop a variant of the dichroic atomic vapor laser lock that eliminates lock sensitivity to temperature fluctuations of the cell. Operating conditions that eliminate first-order sensitivity to temperature fluctuations can be determined by low-frequency temperature modulation. This temperature-insensitive gyrotropic laser lock can be accurately understood with a simple model, that is in excellent agreement with observations in potassium vapor at laser frequencies in a 2 GHz range about the 770.1 nm absorption line. The methods can be readily adapted for other absorption lines.

  10. Estimating extragalactic Faraday rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppermann, N.; Junklewitz, H.; Greiner, M.; Enßlin, T. A.; Akahori, T.; Carretti, E.; Gaensler, B. M.; Goobar, A.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Pratley, L.; Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Stil, J. M.; Vacca, V.

    2015-03-01

    Observations of Faraday rotation for extragalactic sources probe magnetic fields both inside and outside the Milky Way. Building on our earlier estimate of the Galactic contribution, we set out to estimate the extragalactic contributions. We discuss the problems involved; in particular, we point out that taking the difference between the observed values and the Galactic foreground reconstruction is not a good estimate for the extragalactic contributions. We point out a degeneracy between the contributions to the observed values due to extragalactic magnetic fields and observational noise and comment on the dangers of over-interpreting an estimate without taking into account its uncertainty information. To overcome these difficulties, we develop an extended reconstruction algorithm based on the assumption that the observational uncertainties are accurately described for a subset of the data, which can overcome the degeneracy with the extragalactic contributions. We present a probabilistic derivation of the algorithm and demonstrate its performance using a simulation, yielding a high quality reconstruction of the Galactic Faraday rotation foreground, a precise estimate of the typical extragalactic contribution, and a well-defined probabilistic description of the extragalactic contribution for each data point. We then apply this reconstruction technique to a catalog of Faraday rotation observations for extragalactic sources. The analysis is done for several different scenarios, for which we consider the error bars of different subsets of the data to accurately describe the observational uncertainties. By comparing the results, we argue that a split that singles out only data near the Galactic poles is the most robust approach. We find that the dispersion of extragalactic contributions to observed Faraday depths is most likely lower than 7 rad/m2, in agreement with earlier results, and that the extragalactic contribution to an individual data point is poorly

  11. Rotation and Mass Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owocki, S.

    2008-06-01

    Stellar rotation can play an important role in structuring and enhancing the mass loss from massive stars. Initial 1D models focussed on the expected centrifugal enhancement of the line-driven mass flux from the equator of a rotating star, but the review here emphasizes that the loss of centrifugal support away from the stellar surface actually limits the steady mass flux to just the point-star CAK value, with models near critical rotation characterized by a slow, subcritical acceleration. Recent suggestions that such slow outflows might have high enough density to explain disks in Be or B[e] stars are examined in the context of 2D simulations of the ``Wind Compressed Disk'' (WCD) paradigm, together with a review of the tendency for poleward components of the line-driving force to inhibit WCD formation. When one accounts for equatorial gravity darkening, the net tendency is in fact for the relatively bright regions at higher latitude to drive a faster, denser ``bipolar'' outflow. I discuss the potential relevance for the bipolar form of nebulae from LBV stars like η Carinae, but emphasize that, since the large mass loss associated with the eruption of eta Carinae's Homunculus would heavily saturate line-driving, explaining its bipolar form requires development of analogous models for continuum-driven mass loss. I conclude with a discussion of how radiation seems inherently ill-suited to supporting or driving a geometrically thin, but optically thick disk or disk outflow. The disks inferred in Be and B[e] stars may instead be centrifugally ejected, with radiation inducing an ablation flow from the disk surface, and thus perhaps playing a greater role in destroying (rather than creating) an orbiting, circumstellar disk.

  12. Fine structure in proton radioactivity: An accurate tool to ascertain the breaking of axial symmetry in {sup 145}Tm

    SciTech Connect

    Arumugam, P.; Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.

    2008-10-15

    With a proper formalism for proton emission from triaxially deformed nuclei, we perform exact calculations of decay widths for the decays to ground and first excited 2{sup +} states in the daughter nucleus. Our results for rotational spectrum, decay width and fine structure in the case of the nucleus {sup 145}Tm lead for the first time to an accurate identification of triaxial deformation using proton emission. This work also puts in evidence the advantage of proton emission over the conventional probes to study nuclear structure at the proton drip-line.

  13. A room temperature CO2 line list with ab initio computed intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zak, Emil; Tennyson, Jonathan; Polyansky, Oleg L.; Lodi, Lorenzo; Zobov, Nikolay F.; Tashkun, Sergey A.; Perevalov, Valery I.

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations are being closely monitored by remote sensing experiments which rely on knowing line intensities with an uncertainty of 0.5% or better. We report a theoretical study providing rotation-vibration line intensities substantially within the required accuracy based on the use of a highly accurate ab initio dipole moment surface (DMS). The theoretical model developed is used to compute CO2 intensities with uncertainty estimates informed by cross comparing line lists calculated using pairs of potential energy surfaces (PES) and DMS's of similar high quality. This yields lines sensitivities which are utilized in reliability analysis of our results. The final outcome is compared to recent accurate measurements as well as the HITRAN2012 database. Transition frequencies are obtained from effective Hamiltonian calculations to produce a comprehensive line list covering all 12C16O2 transitions below 8000cm-1 and stronger than 10-30 cm/molecule at T = 296 K.

  14. Rotation frequency relay for hydrogenerator

    SciTech Connect

    Matveev, V.V.

    1980-09-01

    The rotation frequency relay (RFR) is one of the most critical elements of automatic control system of the hydrogenerators. Accurate fixing of braking, subsynchronous and acceleration angular speeds contribute to operational reliability of many units of mechanical and electrical parts of the hydrogenerator and vise versa. Both experimental and theoretical investigations were performed on hydrogenerators. It was concluded that the rotation frequency relay, where an integrated voltage of the regulator generator is used as reference voltage and the elements of comparison are executed on the operating amplifiers, has a fairly high accuracy and stability of settings, and practically does not require regulation for manufacture and operation.

  15. Space station rotational equations of motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rheinfurth, M. H.; Carroll, S. N.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic equations of motion are developed which describe the rotational motion for a large space structure having rotating appendages. The presence of the appendages produce torque coupling terms which are dependent on the inertia properties of the appendages and the rotational rates for both the space structure and the appendages. These equations were formulated to incorporate into the Space Station Attitude Control and Stabilization Test Bed to accurately describe the influence rotating solar arrays and thermal radiators have on the dynamic behavior of the Space Station.

  16. In-line rotating capacitive torque sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a proximity sensor based on a closed field circuit. The circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plates that creates an oscillating displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of objects to the plate array. Preferably the plates are in the form of a group of three pair of symmetric plates having a common center, arranged in a hexagonal pattern with opposing plates linked as a pair. The sensor produces logic level pulses suitable for interfacing with a computer or process controller. The proximity sensor can be incorporated into a load cell, a differential pressure gauge, or a device for measuring, the consistency of a characteristic of a material where a variation in the consistency causes the dielectric constant of the material to change.

  17. Current status of quantitative rotational spectroscopy for atmospheric research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drouin, Brian J.; Wlodarczak, Georges; Colmont, Jean-Marcel; Rohart, Francois

    2004-01-01

    Remote sensing of rotational transitions in the Earth's atmosphere has become an important method for the retrieval of geophysical temperatures, pressures and chemical composition profiles that requires accurate spectral information. This paper highlights the current status of rotational data that are useful for atmospheric measurements, with a discussion of the types the rotational lineshape measurements that are not generally available in either online repository.

  18. Rotating Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues currently being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  19. A redetermination of the Uranus rotation period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trauger, J. T.; Roesler, F. L.; Muench, G.

    1978-01-01

    The rotation velocity of Uranus has been measured by a comparison of spectroscopic profiles for the 5281.8 A Fraunhofer line reflected from Uranus and the moon. This method yields a rotation velocity which is insensitive to atmospheric seeing conditions. Our value for the equatorial velocity is 3.5 + or - 0.4 km/sec.

  20. Theoretical rotation-vibration spectrum of thioformaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Yachmenev, Andrey; Polyak, Iakov; Thiel, Walter

    2013-11-28

    We present a variational calculation of the first comprehensive T = 300 K rovibrational line list for thioformaldehyde, H{sub 2}CS. It covers 41 809 rovibrational levels for states up to J{sub max} = 30 with vibrational band origins up to 5000 cm{sup −1} and provides the energies and line intensities for 547 926 transitions from the ground vibrational state to these levels. It is based on our previously reported accurate ab initio potential energy surface and a newly calculated ab initio dipole moment surface. Minor empirical adjustments are made to the ab initio equilibrium geometry to reduce systematic errors in the predicted intra-band rotational energy levels. The rovibrational energy levels and transition intensities are computed variationally by using the methods implemented in the computer program TROVE. Transition wavelengths and intensities are found to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental data. The present calculations correctly reproduce the observed resonance effects, such as intensity borrowing, thus reflecting the high accuracy of the underlying ab initio surfaces. We report a detailed analysis of several vibrational bands, especially those complicated by strong Coriolis coupling, to facilitate future laboratory assignments.

  1. Theoretical rotation-vibration spectrum of thioformaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yachmenev, Andrey; Polyak, Iakov; Thiel, Walter

    2013-11-01

    We present a variational calculation of the first comprehensive T = 300 K rovibrational line list for thioformaldehyde, H2CS. It covers 41 809 rovibrational levels for states up to Jmax = 30 with vibrational band origins up to 5000 cm-1 and provides the energies and line intensities for 547 926 transitions from the ground vibrational state to these levels. It is based on our previously reported accurate ab initio potential energy surface and a newly calculated ab initio dipole moment surface. Minor empirical adjustments are made to the ab initio equilibrium geometry to reduce systematic errors in the predicted intra-band rotational energy levels. The rovibrational energy levels and transition intensities are computed variationally by using the methods implemented in the computer program TROVE. Transition wavelengths and intensities are found to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental data. The present calculations correctly reproduce the observed resonance effects, such as intensity borrowing, thus reflecting the high accuracy of the underlying ab initio surfaces. We report a detailed analysis of several vibrational bands, especially those complicated by strong Coriolis coupling, to facilitate future laboratory assignments.

  2. Theoretical rotation-vibration spectrum of thioformaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Yachmenev, Andrey; Polyak, Iakov; Thiel, Walter

    2013-11-28

    We present a variational calculation of the first comprehensive T = 300 K rovibrational line list for thioformaldehyde, H2CS. It covers 41,809 rovibrational levels for states up to J(max) = 30 with vibrational band origins up to 5000 cm(-1) and provides the energies and line intensities for 547,926 transitions from the ground vibrational state to these levels. It is based on our previously reported accurate ab initio potential energy surface and a newly calculated ab initio dipole moment surface. Minor empirical adjustments are made to the ab initio equilibrium geometry to reduce systematic errors in the predicted intra-band rotational energy levels. The rovibrational energy levels and transition intensities are computed variationally by using the methods implemented in the computer program TROVE. Transition wavelengths and intensities are found to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental data. The present calculations correctly reproduce the observed resonance effects, such as intensity borrowing, thus reflecting the high accuracy of the underlying ab initio surfaces. We report a detailed analysis of several vibrational bands, especially those complicated by strong Coriolis coupling, to facilitate future laboratory assignments. PMID:24289355

  3. Acoustic streaming flows and sample rotation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Eugene

    1998-11-01

    Levitated drops in a gas can be driven into rotation by altering their surrounding convective environment. When these drops are placed in an acoustic resonant chamber, the symmetry characteristics of the steady streaming flows in the vicinity of the drops determine the rotational motion of the freely suspended fluid particles. Using ultrasonic standing waves around 22 kHz and millimeter-size electrostatically levitated drops, we have investigated the correlation between the convective flow characteristics and their rotational behavior. The results show that accurate control of the drop rotation axis and rate can be obtained by carefully modifying the symmetry characteristics of the chamber, and that the dominant mechanism for rotation drive is the drag exerted by the air flow over the drop surface. In addition, we found that the rotational acceleration depends on the drop viscosity, suggesting that this torque is initially strongly influenced by differential flows within the drop itself. [Work sponsored by NASA].

  4. The Maximum Mass of Rotating Strange Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkudlarek, M.; Gondek-Rosiń; ska, D.; Villain, L.; Ansorg, M.

    2012-12-01

    Strange quark stars are considered as a possible alternative to neutron stars as compact objects (e.g. Weber 2003). A hot compact star (a proto-neutron star or a strange star) born in a supernova explosion or a remnant of neutron stars binary merger are expected to rotate differentially and be important sources of gravitational waves. We present results of the first relativistic calculations of differentially rotating strange quark stars for broad ranges of degree of differential rotation and maximum densities. Using a highly accurate, relativistic code we show that rotation may cause a significant increase of maximum allowed mass of strange stars, much larger than in the case of neutron stars with the same degree of differential rotation. Depending on the maximum allowed mass a massive neutron star (strange star) can be temporarily stabilized by differential rotation or collapse to a black hole.

  5. Exomol: Molecular Line Lists for Exoplanet and Other Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennyson, J.; Barber, R. J.; Azzam, A.; Down, M.; Hill, C.; Yurchenko, S. N.

    2011-06-01

    Spectral characterization of astrophysical objects cool enough to form molecules in their atmospheres (cool stars, extrosolar planets and planetary discs) requires considerable amount of fundamental molecular data. The existing molecular line lists (with some exceptions) are however not sufficiently accurate and complete. We present a new (five years) European Union project ExoMol aimed at bridging this gap: ExoMol will generate comprehensive line lists for all molecules likely to be observable in exoplanet atmospheres in the foreseeable future. This is a huge undertaking which will mean providing in excess of 1011 spectral lines for a large variety of molecular species. %Although the calculation of a rotation-vibration line list for molecules %with three atoms is becoming more routine, the issues involved in %calculating such lists for larger species are formidable. %This will also require developing new procedures, particularly to deal with %the larger molecules of interest which, up until now, have been considered %to be beyond the sort of detailed study anticipated here. The physics of molecular absorptions is complex and varies between different classes of absorbers. The project will therefore be divided into following topics (a) diatomic, (b) triatomics, (c) tetratomics, (d) methane and (e) larger molecules. Each of which will require special techniques will be required in each case. The majority of diatomic systems to be tackled are open shell species involving a transition metal atom; the opacity is provided by the transitions between the many low lying electronic states of the system. The calculation of rotation-vibration line lists for closed-shell triatomic systems is now relatively straightforward provided enough care is taken in deriving the potential energy surface. For H_2S calculations are in progress: the unusual properties of the dipole moment will also require careful treatment. Accurate rotation-vibration line lists for hot tetratomic molecules

  6. Stimulated rotational Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parazzoli, C. G.; Rafanelli, G. L.; Capps, D. M.; Drutman, C.

    1989-03-01

    The effect of Stimulated Rotational Raman Scattering (SRRS) processes on high energy laser directed energy weapon systems was studied. The program had 3 main objectives; achieving an accurate description of the physical processes involved in SRRS; developing a numerical algorithm to confidently evaluate SRRS-induced losses in the propagation of high energy laser beams in the uplink and downlink segments of the optical trains of various strategic defense system scenarios; and discovering possible methods to eliminate, or at least reduce, the deleterious effects of SRRS on the energy deposition on target. The following topics are discussed: the motivation for the accomplishments of the DOE program; the Semiclassical Theory of Non-Resonant SRRS for Diatomic Homonuclear Molecules; and then the following appendices; Calculation of the Dipole Transition Reduced Matrix Element, Guided Tour of Hughes SRRS Code, Running the Hughes SRRS Code, and Hughes SRRS Code Listing.

  7. Linear rotary optical delay lines.

    PubMed

    Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2014-05-19

    I present several classes of analytical and semi-analytical solutions for the design of high-speed rotary optical delay lines that use a combination of stationary and rotating curvilinear reflectors. Detailed analysis of four distinct classes of optical delay lines is presented. Particularly, I consider delay lines based on a single rotating reflector, a single rotating reflector and a single stationary reflector, two rotating reflectors, and two rotating reflectors and a single stationary reflector. I demonstrate that in each of these cases it is possible to design an infinite variety of the optical delay lines featuring linear dependence of the optical delay on the rotation angle. This is achieved via shape optimization of the rotating and stationary reflector surfaces. Moreover, in the case of two rotating reflectors a convenient spatial separation of the incoming and outgoing beams is possible. For the sake of example, all the blades presented in this paper are chosen to fit into a circle of 10 cm diameter and these delay lines feature in excess of 600 ps of optical delay. Finally, two prototypes of rotary delay lines were fabricated using CNC machining, and their optical properties are characterized. PMID:24921303

  8. Blast waves in rotating media.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossner, L. F.

    1972-01-01

    The model investigated involves a cylindrically symmetric blast wave generated by an infinitely long line explosion in a cold and homogeneous gas rotating rigidly in its self-gravitational field. It is found that within the context of rotation in a gravitational field a blast wave will not adopt the one-zone form familiar from similarity solutions but, rather, a two-zone form. The inner compression zone arises as a response to the presence of the restoring force, which drives a rarefaction wave into the outer compression zone.

  9. The Solar Twin Planet Search. IV. The Sun as a typical rotator and evidence for a new rotational braking law for Sun-like stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Leonardo A.; Meléndez, Jorge; do Nascimento, José-Dias; Bedell, Megan; Ramírez, Iván; Bean, Jacob L.; Asplund, Martin; Spina, Lorenzo; Dreizler, Stefan; Alves-Brito, Alan; Casagrande, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Context. It is still unclear how common the Sun is when compared to other similar stars in regards to some of its physical properties, such as rotation. Considering that gyrochronology relations are widely used today to estimate ages of stars in the main sequence, and that the Sun is used to calibrate it, it is crucial to assess whether these procedures are acceptable. Aims: We analyze the rotational velocities, limited by the unknown rotation axis inclination angle, of an unprecedented large sample of solar twins to study the rotational evolution of Sun-like stars, and assess whether the Sun is a typical rotator. Methods: We used high-resolution (R = 115 000) spectra obtained with the HARPS spectrograph and the 3.6 m telescope at La Silla Observatory. The projected rotational velocities for 81 solar twins were estimated by line profile fitting with synthetic spectra. Macroturbulence velocities were inferred from a prescription that accurately reflects their dependence with effective temperature and luminosity of the stars. Results: Our sample of solar twins include some spectroscopic binaries with enhanced rotational velocities, and we do not find any nonspectroscopic binaries with unusually high rotation velocities. We verified that the Sun does not have a peculiar rotation, but the solar twins exhibit rotational velocities that depart from the Skumanich relation. Conclusions: The Sun is a regular rotator when compared to solar twins with a similar age. Additionally, we obtain a rotational braking law that better describes the stars in our sample (v ∝ t-0.6) in contrast to previous, often-used scalings. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere under ESO programs 188.C-0265, 183.D-0729, 292.C-5004, 077.C-0364, 072.C-0488, 092.C-0721, 093.C-0409, 183.C-0972, 192.C-0852, 091.C-0936, 089.C-0732, 091.C-0034, 076.C-0155, 185.D-0056, 074.C-0364, 075.C-0332, 089.C-0415, 60.A-9036, 075.C-0202, 192

  10. Referral tracking system shows accurate bottom-line assessment.

    PubMed

    Henkel, J

    1990-12-01

    Rose Medical Center in Denver, Colo., needed a way to track referrals from its many offsite care centers to determine their impact on revenue. Programmers at Rose developed a microbased system, eventually bought by SMS, that measures profitability against investment to become a true decision support tool for hospital executives. PMID:10108212

  11. Accurate on line measurements of low fluences of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla, L.; Czelusniak, C.; Taccetti, F.; Carraresi, L.; Castelli, L.; Fedi, M. E.; Giuntini, L.; Maurenzig, P. R.; Sottili, L.; Taccetti, N.

    2015-03-01

    Ion beams supplied by the 3MV Tandem accelerator of LABEC laboratory (INFN-Firenze), have been used to study the feasibility of irradiating materials with ion fluences reproducible to about 1%. Test measurements have been made with 7.5 MeV 7Li2+ beams of different intensities. The fluence control is based on counting ions contained in short bursts generated by chopping the continuous beam with an electrostatic deflector followed by a couple of adjustable slits. Ions are counted by means of a micro-channel plate (MCP) detecting the electrons emitted from a thin layer of Al inserted along the beam path in between the pulse defining slits and the target. Calibration of the MCP electron detector is obtained by comparison with the response of a Si detector.

  12. Analysis of Petal Rotation Trajectory Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Rodney L.; Campagnola, Stefano; Buffington, Brent B.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the characteristics of petal rotation trajectories are explored in both the two-body and circular restricted three-body problem (CRTBP) models. Petal rotation trajectories alternate long and short resonances of different kinds to rotate the line of apsides. They are typically computed using the patched conic model, and they are used in a number of different missions and mission concepts including Cassini, JUICE, and Europa mission concepts. Petal rotation trajectories are first analyzed here using the patched conic model to quantify their characteristics and search for cases with fast rotation of the line of apsides. When they are computed in the CRTBP, they are unstable periodic orbits with corresponding stable and unstable manifolds. The characteristics of these orbits are explored from a dynamical systems perspective in the second phase of the study.

  13. Exomol: Molecular Line Lists for Exoplanet and Other Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennyson, Jonathan

    2013-06-01

    Spectral characterization of astrophysical objects cool enough to form molecules in their atmospheres (cool stars, extrosolar planets and planetary discs) requires considerable amounts of fundamental molecular data. The existing molecular line lists (with some exceptions) are generally not sufficiently accurate and complete. The ExoMol project is actively generating comprehensive line lists for all molecules likely to be observable in exoplanet atmospheres in the foreseeable future. This is a huge undertaking which will mean providing in excess of 10^{11} spectral lines for a large variety of molecular species, see Tennyson and Yurchenko (Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc., 425, 21 (2012)) The physics of molecular absorptions is complex and varies between different classes of absorbers. The project is therefore be divided into following topics (a) diatomic, (b) triatomics, (c) tetratomics, (d) methane and (e) larger molecules. Special techniques are being developed to treat each case. The majority of diatomic systems to be tackled are open shell species involving a transition metal atom; the opacity is provided by the transitions between the many low lying electronic states of the system. The calculation of rotation-vibration line lists for closed-shell triatomic systems is now relatively straightforward provided enough care is taken in deriving the potential energy and dipole surfaces. An H_2S line list is nearing completion and studies on C_3 have started. Accurate rotation-vibration line lists for hot tetratomic molecules such as ammonia (complete), phosphine (nearing completion), acetylene (initial study published), hydrogen peroxide (initial study complete), SO_3 (room temperature line list complete) and formaldehyde, test what is computationally possible at present. An inital line list for hot (1000 K) methane has been completed and is being improved. Work on systems larger than this is just commencing. Data from this project can be accessed at www.exomol.com.

  14. Rotator Cuff Tears

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctors because of a rotator cuff problem. A torn rotator cuff will weaken your shoulder. This means ... or more of the rotator cuff tendons is torn, the tendon no longer fully attaches to the ...

  15. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... others can be very painful. Treatment for a torn rotator cuff depends on age, health, how severe ... is, and how long you've had the torn rotator cuff. Treatment for torn rotator cuff includes: ...

  16. Rotator cuff problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... days, such as in painting and carpentry Poor posture over many years Aging Rotator cuff tears TEARS ... also help prevent rotator cuff problems. Practice good posture to keep your rotator cuff tendons and muscles ...

  17. Rotation, differential rotation, and gyrochronology of active Kepler stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhold, Timo; Gizon, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    most reliable. Explaining the bimodality in the age distribution is challenging, and limits accurate stellar age predictions. The relation between activity and age is interesting, and requires further investigation. The existence of cool stars with almost constant rotation period over more than three years of observation might be explained by synchronization with stellar companions, or a dynamo mechanism keeping the spot configurations extremely stable. Full Tables 2 and 4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/583/A65

  18. Fluid slip ring transfers coolant to rotating equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mains, D. K.

    1971-01-01

    Rotating fluid coupler, consisting of rotor and housing made of aluminum, that is concentric with electrical slip-ring assembly, transfers cooling fluid to instrumentation undergoing environmental tests on rotating platform. Rotating fluid coupler permits unlimited platform revolutions and eliminates danger of lines being pulled loose from supplies.

  19. LINE-BY-LINE CALCULATION OF SPECTRA FROM DIATOMIC MOLECULES AND ATOMS ASSUMING A VOIGT LINE PROFILE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiting, E. E.

    1994-01-01

    This program predicts the spectra resulting from electronic transitions of diatomic molecules and atoms in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The program produces a spectrum by accounting for the contribution of each rotational and atomic line considered. The integrated intensity of each line is distributed in the spectrum by an approximate Voigt profile. The program can produce spectra for optically thin gases or for cases where simultaneous emission and absorption occurs. In addition, the program can compute the spectrum resulting from the absorption of incident radiation by a column of cold gas or the high-temperature, self-absorbed emission spectrum from a nonisothermal gas. The computed spectrum can be output directly or combined with a slit function and sensitivity calibration to predict the output of a grating spectrograph or a fixed wavelength radiometer. Specifically, the program has the capability to include the following features in any computations: (1) Parallel transitions, in which spin splitting and lambda doubling are ignored (ignoring spin splitting and/or lambda doubling means that the total multiple strength is assumed to reside in a single "effective" line), (2) Perpendicular transitions, in which spin splitting and lambda doubling are ignored, (3) Sigma Pi transitions, in which lambda doubling is ignored, (4) Atomic lines, (5) Option to terminate rotational line calculations when the molecule dissociates due to rotation, (6) Option to include the alternation of line intensities for homonuclear molecules, (7) Use of an approximate Voigt profile for the line shape, and (8) Radiative energy transport in a nonisothermal gas. The output options available in the program are: (1) Tabulation of the spontaneous emission spectrum (i.e., optically thin spectrum) for a 1.0 cm path length, (2) Tabulation of the "true" spectrum, which incorporates spontaneous emission, induced emission, absorption, and externally incident radiation through the equation of

  20. NNLOPS accurate associated HW production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astill, William; Bizon, Wojciech; Re, Emanuele; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2016-06-01

    We present a next-to-next-to-leading order accurate description of associated HW production consistently matched to a parton shower. The method is based on reweighting events obtained with the HW plus one jet NLO accurate calculation implemented in POWHEG, extended with the MiNLO procedure, to reproduce NNLO accurate Born distributions. Since the Born kinematics is more complex than the cases treated before, we use a parametrization of the Collins-Soper angles to reduce the number of variables required for the reweighting. We present phenomenological results at 13 TeV, with cuts suggested by the Higgs Cross section Working Group.

  1. An Accurate Potential Energy Surface for H2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We have carried out extensive high quality ab initio electronic structure calculations of the ground state potential energy surface (PES) and dipole moment function (DMF) for H2O. A small adjustment is made to the PES to improve the agreement of line positions from theory and experiment. The theoretical line positions are obtained from variational ro-vibrational calculations using the exact kinetic energy operator. For the lines being fitted, the root-mean-square error was reduced from 6.9 to 0.08 /cm. We were then able to match 30,092 of the 30,117 lines from the HITRAN 96 data base to theoretical lines, and 80% of the line positions differed less than 0.1 /cm. About 3% of the line positions in the experimental data base appear to be incorrect. Theory predicts the existence of many additional weak lines with intensities above the cutoff used in the data base. To obtain results of similar accuracy for HDO, a mass dependent correction to the PH is introduced and is parameterized by simultaneously fitting line positions for HDO and D2O. The mass dependent PH has good predictive value for T2O and HTO. Nonadiabatic effects are not explicitly included. Line strengths for vibrational bands summed over rotational levels usually agree well between theory and experiment, but individual line strengths can differ greatly. A high temperature line list containing about 380 million lines has been generated using the present PES and DMF

  2. Insights from the rotational braking of solar twins: is the Sun a regular rotator?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dos Santos, Leonardo Augusto; Melendez, Jorge

    2016-06-01

    Although the Sun is widely used as a reference star in astrophysics, it is still unclear how regular it is when compared to other similar stars in regards to some of its physical properties, such as its rotation. We analyze the rotational velocities (limited by the unknown rotation axis inclination angle) of an unprecedented sample of solar twins in order to study how common the Sun is in its rotation. We use high-resolution (R = 115000) spectra obtained with the HARPS spectrograph and ESO’s 3.6 m telescope at La Silla Observatory. The projected rotational velocities for 71 solar twins are estimated through line profile fitting using synthetic spectra. We take into account the macroturbulence velocities in a separate analysis, for they are known to be difficult to disentangle from rotation. Our sample of solar twins include some spectroscopic binaries with enhanced rotational velocities, and we do not find any non-spectroscopic binaries with unusually high rotation velocities. The Sun does not have a peculiar rotation, but the solar twins exhibit rotational velocities that depart from the tried and tested Skumanich’s law. We conclude that the Sun is a regular rotator when compared to solar twins with a similar age, and obtain a rotational braking law that better describes the stars in our sample when compared to previous, often-used scalings.

  3. The galactic rotation curve from OH observations

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnik, I.G.; Yurevich, L.V.

    1985-11-01

    This paper shows that the galactic rotation curve is determined up to galactocentric distances of 16 kpc from the relation between the parameters of the absorption lines for molecular OH clouds and the distance to them. Results are given separately for the two galactocentric guadrants which border each along the line from the center of the Galaxy to the Sun. The rotation curve so obtained repeats the kinematical laws established from observed parameters of the hydroxyl absorption lines in order to determine the distances to the molecular clouds in the Galaxy. The distance of the Sun from the center of the Galaxy is estimated.

  4. Rotational diffusion of TEMPONE in the cytoplasm of Chinese hamster lung cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lepock, J R; Cheng, K H; Campbell, S D; Kruuv, J

    1983-01-01

    The correlation time for rotational diffusion (tau R) of 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone-N-oxide (TEMPONE) in Chinese hamster lung (V79) cells has been measured. For these cells in an isosmotic solution at 20 degrees C, tau R = 4.18 X 10(-11) s, approximately 3.6 times greater than tau R = 1.17 X 10(-11) s in water. The relationship between tau R and viscosity was investigated in a number of glycerol-water (0-50%) and sucrose-water (20-40%) solutions and a constant Stokes-Einstein volume of 44 A3 was found for TEMPONE in solutions of less than 20% glycerol and sucrose. This gives an average shear viscosity (for rotation of a small molecule) of 0.038 poise for the cytoplasm. When nonsecular terms were used in the calculation of tau R, the activation energies for rotation of TEMPONE in the above solutions correlated well with the activation energies for shear viscosity. The viscosity increases as the cell is shrunk in hypertonic solutions. It also increases with decreasing temperature with an activation energy of 3.7 kcal/mol, about the same as the activation energy for the viscosity of pure water. The rotational correlation times were carefully calculated considering inhomogeneous line broadening, non-Lorentzian line shapes, the need for accurate tensor values and nonsecular terms. PMID:6318842

  5. Rotational diffusion of TEMPONE in the cytoplasm of Chinese hamster lung cells.

    PubMed

    Lepock, J R; Cheng, K H; Campbell, S D; Kruuv, J

    1983-12-01

    The correlation time for rotational diffusion (tau R) of 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone-N-oxide (TEMPONE) in Chinese hamster lung (V79) cells has been measured. For these cells in an isosmotic solution at 20 degrees C, tau R = 4.18 X 10(-11) s, approximately 3.6 times greater than tau R = 1.17 X 10(-11) s in water. The relationship between tau R and viscosity was investigated in a number of glycerol-water (0-50%) and sucrose-water (20-40%) solutions and a constant Stokes-Einstein volume of 44 A3 was found for TEMPONE in solutions of less than 20% glycerol and sucrose. This gives an average shear viscosity (for rotation of a small molecule) of 0.038 poise for the cytoplasm. When nonsecular terms were used in the calculation of tau R, the activation energies for rotation of TEMPONE in the above solutions correlated well with the activation energies for shear viscosity. The viscosity increases as the cell is shrunk in hypertonic solutions. It also increases with decreasing temperature with an activation energy of 3.7 kcal/mol, about the same as the activation energy for the viscosity of pure water. The rotational correlation times were carefully calculated considering inhomogeneous line broadening, non-Lorentzian line shapes, the need for accurate tensor values and nonsecular terms. PMID:6318842

  6. Ultrasound determination of rotator cuff tear repairability

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Andrew K; Lam, Patrick H; Walton, Judie R; Hackett, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff repair aims to reattach the torn tendon to the greater tuberosity footprint with suture anchors. The present study aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound in predicting rotator cuff tear repairability and to assess which sonographic and pre-operative features are strongest in predicting repairability. Methods The study was a retrospective analysis of measurements made prospectively in a cohort of 373 patients who had ultrasounds of their shoulder and underwent rotator cuff repair. Measurements of rotator cuff tear size and muscle atrophy were made pre-operatively by ultrasound to enable prediction of rotator cuff repairability. Tears were classified following ultrasound as repairable or irreparable, and were correlated with intra-operative repairability. Results Ultrasound assessment of rotator cuff tear repairability has a sensitivity of 86% (p < 0.0001) and a specificity of 67% (p < 0.0001). The strongest predictors of rotator cuff repairability were tear size (p < 0.001) and age (p = 0.004). Sonographic assessments of tear size ≥4 cm2 or anteroposterior tear length ≥25 mm indicated an irreparable rotator cuff tear. Conclusions Ultrasound assessment is accurate in predicting rotator cuff tear repairability. Tear size or anteroposterior tear length and age were the best predictors of repairability. PMID:27582996

  7. How to accurately bypass damage

    PubMed Central

    Broyde, Suse; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation can cause cancer through DNA damage — specifically, by linking adjacent thymine bases. Crystal structures show how the enzyme DNA polymerase η accurately bypasses such lesions, offering protection. PMID:20577203

  8. New measurements of rotation and differential rotation in A-F stars: are there two populations of differentially rotating stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammler-von Eiff, M.; Reiners, A.

    2012-06-01

    Context. The Sun displays differential rotation that is intimately connected to the solar dynamo and hence related to solar activity, the solar cycle, and the solar wind. Considering the detectability and habitability of planets around other stars it is important to understand the role of differential rotation in other stars. Aims: We present projected rotational velocities and new measurements of the rotational profile of some 180 nearby stars with spectral types A-F. The results are consolidated by a homogeneous compilation of basic stellar data from photometry and the identification of multiple stellar systems. New and previous measurements of rotation by line profile analysis are compiled and made available. Methods: The overall broadening profile is derived analysing spectral line shape from hundreds of spectral lines by the method of least-squares deconvolution, reducing spectral noise to a minimum. The effect of differential rotation on the broadening profile is best measured in inverse wavelength space by the first two zeros of its Fourier transform. Results: Projected rotational velocity vsini is measured for more than 110 of the sample stars. Rigid and differential rotation can be distinguished in 56 cases where vsini > 12 km s-1. We detect differential rotation rates of δΩ/Ω = 5% and more. Ten stars with significant differential rotation rates are identified. The line shapes of 46 stars are consistent with rigid rotation, even though differential rotation at very low rates might still be possible in these cases. The strongest amount of relative differential rotation (54%) detected by line profile analysis is found among F stars. Conclusions: As of now, 33 differential rotators detected by line profile analysis have been confirmed. The frequency of differential rotators decreases towards high effective temperature and rapid rotation. There is evidence for two populations of differential rotators, one of rapidly rotating A stars at the granulation

  9. Accurate Evaluation of Quantum Integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, David C.; Goorvitch, D.

    1994-01-01

    Combining an appropriate finite difference method with Richardson's extrapolation results in a simple, highly accurate numerical method for solving a Schr\\"{o}dinger's equation. Important results are that error estimates are provided, and that one can extrapolate expectation values rather than the wavefunctions to obtain highly accurate expectation values. We discuss the eigenvalues, the error growth in repeated Richardson's extrapolation, and show that the expectation values calculated on a crude mesh can be extrapolated to obtain expectation values of high accuracy.

  10. Membrane protein structure from rotational diffusion☆

    PubMed Central

    Das, Bibhuti B.; Park, Sang Ho; Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    The motional averaging of powder pattern line shapes is one of the most fundamental aspects of sold-state NMR. Since membrane proteins in liquid crystalline phospholipid bilayers undergo fast rotational diffusion, all of the signals reflect the angles of the principal axes of their dipole–dipole and chemical shift tensors with respect to the axis defined by the bilayer normal. The frequency span and sign of the axially symmetric powder patterns that result from motional averaging about a common axis provide sufficient structural restraints for the calculation of the three-dimensional structure of a membrane protein in a phospholipid bilayer environment. The method is referred to as rotationally aligned (RA) solid-state NMR and demonstrated with results on full-length, unmodified membrane proteins with one, two, and seven trans-membrane helices. RA solid-state NMR is complementary to other solid-state NMR methods, in particular oriented sample (OS) solid-state NMR of stationary, aligned samples. Structural distortions of membrane proteins from the truncations of terminal residues and other sequence modifications, and the use of detergent micelles instead of phospholipid bilayers have also been demonstrated. Thus, it is highly advantageous to determine the structures of unmodified membrane proteins in liquid crystalline phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. RA solid-state NMR provides a general method for obtaining accurate and precise structures of membrane proteins under near-native conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: NMR Spectroscopy for Atomistic Views of Biomembranes and Cell Surfaces. PMID:24747039

  11. Pressure broadening and line coupling in bending bands of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Sheldon

    1989-01-01

    The pressure broadening and line coupling cross sections in the Fano-Ben Reuven theory of line shapes are calculated for bending bands of CO2 in a bath of He atoms. Molecular collision dynamics are simplified by invoking the infinite order sudden (IOS) approximation for molecular rotational and vibrational angular momentum in a manner similar to but not identical with the method developed by Clary and shown to be accurate for CO2-He. Numerical values are obtained using a pairwise additive interaction potential developed by Clary. Predictions are in good accord with data for various infrared bands and pure rotational Raman spectra. It is found that all pressure broadening and state-to-state cross sections depend on only a few dynamical factors (generalized IOS cross sections) and are therefore closely interrelated. Results are used to assess models developed previously to analyze line shapes in this and similar systems.

  12. Evaluation of Distal Femoral Rotational Alignment with Spiral CT Scan before Total Knee Arthroplasty (A Study in Iranian population)

    PubMed Central

    Jabalameli, Mahmoud; Moradi, Amin; Bagherifard, Abolfazl; Radi, Mehran; Mokhtari, Tahmineh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evaluating the landmarks for rotation of the distal femur is a challenge for orthopedic surgeons. Although the posterior femoral condyle axis is a good landmark for surgeons, the surgical transepicondylar axis may be a better option with the help of preoperative CT scanning. The purpose of this study was to ascertain relationships among the axes’ guiding distal femur rotational alignment in preoperative CT scans of Iranian patients who were candidates for total knee arthroplasty and the effects of age, gender, and knee alignment on these relationships. Methods: One hundred and eight cases who were admitted to two university hospitals for total knee arthroplasty were included in this study. The rotation of the distal femur was evaluated using single axial CT images through the femoral epicondyle. Four lines were drawn digitally in this view: anatomical and surgical transepicondylar axes, posterior condylar axis and the Whiteside anteroposterior line. The alignment of the extremity was evaluated in the standing alignment view. Then the angles were measured along these lines and their relationship was evaluated. Results: The mean angle between the anatomical transepicondylar axis and posterior condylar axis and between the surgical transepicondylar axis and posterior condylar axis were 5.9 ± 1.6 degrees and 1.6±1.7 degrees respectively. The mean angle between the Whiteside’s anteroposterior line and the line perpendicular to the posterior condylar axis was 3.7±2.1 degrees. Significant differences existed between the two genders in these relationships. No significant correlation between the age of patients and angles of the distal femur was detected. The anatomical surgical transepicondylar axis was in 4.3 degrees external rotation in relation to the surgical transepicondylar axis. Conclusion: Preoperative CT scanning can help accurately determine rotational landmarks of the distal femur. If one of the reference axes cannot be determined, other

  13. Rotational preference in gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Heinen, Thomas; Jeraj, Damian; Vinken, Pia M; Velentzas, Konstantinos

    2012-06-01

    In gymnastics, most skills incorporate rotations about one or more body axes. At present, the question remains open if factors such as lateral preference and/or vestibulo-spinal asymmetry are related to gymnast's rotational preference. Therefore, we sought to explore relationships in gymnast's rotation direction between different gymnastic skills. Furthermore, we sought to explore relationships between rotational preference, lateral preference, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry. In the experiment n = 30 non-experts, n = 30 near-experts and n = 30 experts completed a rotational preference questionnaire, a lateral preference inventory, and the Unterberger-Fukuda Stepping Test. The results revealed, that near-experts and experts more often rotate rightward in the straight jump with a full turn when rotating leftward in the round-off and vice versa. The same relationship was found for experts when relating the rotation preference in the handstand with a full turn to the rotation preference in the straight jump with a full turn. Lateral preference was positively related to rotational preference in non-expert gymnasts, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry was positively related to rotational preference in experts. We suggest, that gymnasts should explore their individual rotational preference by systematically practicing different skills with a different rotation direction, bearing in mind that a clearly developed structure in rotational preference between different skills may be appropriate to develop more complex skills in gymnastics. PMID:23486362

  14. Rotational Preference in Gymnastics

    PubMed Central

    Heinen, Thomas; Jeraj, Damian; Vinken, Pia M.; Velentzas, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    In gymnastics, most skills incorporate rotations about one or more body axes. At present, the question remains open if factors such as lateral preference and/or vestibulo-spinal asymmetry are related to gymnast’s rotational preference. Therefore, we sought to explore relationships in gymnast’s rotation direction between different gymnastic skills. Furthermore, we sought to explore relationships between rotational preference, lateral preference, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry. In the experiment n = 30 non-experts, n = 30 near-experts and n = 30 experts completed a rotational preference questionnaire, a lateral preference inventory, and the Unterberger-Fukuda Stepping Test. The results revealed, that near-experts and experts more often rotate rightward in the straight jump with a full turn when rotating leftward in the round-off and vice versa. The same relationship was found for experts when relating the rotation preference in the handstand with a full turn to the rotation preference in the straight jump with a full turn. Lateral preference was positively related to rotational preference in non-expert gymnasts, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry was positively related to rotational preference in experts. We suggest, that gymnasts should explore their individual rotational preference by systematically practicing different skills with a different rotation direction, bearing in mind that a clearly developed structure in rotational preference between different skills may be appropriate to develop more complex skills in gymnastics. PMID:23486362

  15. CENTRAL ROTATIONS OF MILKY WAY GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Fabricius, Maximilian H.; Rukdee, Surangkhana; Saglia, Roberto P.; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Thomas, Jens; Williams, Michael J.; Noyola, Eva; Opitsch, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Most Milky Way globular clusters (GCs) exhibit measurable flattening, even if on a very low level. Both cluster rotation and tidal fields are thought to cause this flattening. Nevertheless, rotation has only been confirmed in a handful of GCs, based mostly on individual radial velocities at large radii. We are conducting a survey of the central kinematics of Galactic GCs using the new Integral Field Unit instrument VIRUS-W. We detect rotation in all 11 GCs that we have observed so far, rendering it likely that a large majority of the Milky Way GCs rotate. We use published catalogs of GCs to derive central ellipticities and position angles. We show that in all cases where the central ellipticity permits an accurate measurement of the position angle, those angles are in excellent agreement with the kinematic position angles that we derive from the VIRUS-W velocity fields. We find an unexpected tight correlation between central rotation and outer ellipticity, indicating that rotation drives flattening for the objects in our sample. We also find a tight correlation between central rotation and published values for the central velocity dispersion, most likely due to rotation impacting the old dispersion measurements.

  16. Rotation of tokamak halo currents

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2012-05-15

    During tokamak disruptions, halo currents, which can be tenths of the total plasma current, can flow at the plasma edge along the magnetic field lines that intercept the chamber walls. Non-axisymmetric halo currents are required to maintain force balance as the plasma kinks when the edge safety factor drops to about two in a vertical displacement event. The plasma quickly assumes a definite toroidal velocity v{sub a}(r) with respect to that of the magnetic kink, v{sub k}, where v{sub a}(r) is set by the radial electric field required for ambipolarity. The plasma velocity, v{sub pl}=v{sub a}+v{sub k}, near the edge is influenced by the interaction with neutrals and with the potential in the halo required for quasi-neutrality on open magnetic field lines, and the plasma velocity in the core is influenced by external error fields. When plasma effects dominate magnetic locking, the magnetic kink should rotate at a diamagnetic speed of either the edge or the core. If the magnetic field lines of the halo plasma intercept the wall at locations of very different electrical conductivity, the toroidal rotation of the halo currents can intermittently stall at wall locations of high conductivity. Such stalling is seen in experiments. The toroidal phase difference between the stalled halo currents and the kink, which is expected to rotate smoothly, must satisfy {delta}{phi}<{+-}{pi}/2. A concern cited by ITER engineers is that the time varying force of the rotating halo could substantially increase the disruption loads on in-vessel components.

  17. Rotation of tokamak halo currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2012-05-01

    During tokamak disruptions, halo currents, which can be tenths of the total plasma current, can flow at the plasma edge along the magnetic field lines that intercept the chamber walls. Non-axisymmetric halo currents are required to maintain force balance as the plasma kinks when the edge safety factor drops to about two in a vertical displacement event. The plasma quickly assumes a definite toroidal velocity va(r) with respect to that of the magnetic kink, vk, where va(r) is set by the radial electric field required for ambipolarity. The plasma velocity, vpl=va+vk, near the edge is influenced by the interaction with neutrals and with the potential in the halo required for quasi-neutrality on open magnetic field lines, and the plasma velocity in the core is influenced by external error fields. When plasma effects dominate magnetic locking, the magnetic kink should rotate at a diamagnetic speed of either the edge or the core. If the magnetic field lines of the halo plasma intercept the wall at locations of very different electrical conductivity, the toroidal rotation of the halo currents can intermittently stall at wall locations of high conductivity. Such stalling is seen in experiments. The toroidal phase difference between the stalled halo currents and the kink, which is expected to rotate smoothly, must satisfy δϕ <±π/2. A concern cited by ITER engineers is that the time varying force of the rotating halo could substantially increase the disruption loads on in-vessel components.

  18. Shell model for warm rotating nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, M.; Yoshida, K.; Dossing, T.

    1996-12-31

    Utilizing a shell model which combines the cranked Nilsson mean-field and the residual surface and volume delta two-body forces, the authors discuss the onset of rotational damping in normal- and super-deformed nuclei. Calculation for a typical normal deformed nucleus {sup 168}Yb indicates that the rotational damping sets in at around 0.8 MeV above the yrast line, and about 30 rotational bands of various length exists at a given rotational frequency, in overall agreement with experimental findings. It is predicted that the onset of rotational damping changes significantly in different superdeformed nuclei due to the variety of the shell gaps and single-particle orbits associated with the superdeformed mean-field.

  19. nu-2 band of H2 O-16 - Line strengths and transition frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toth, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of H2 O-16 were recorded with a Fourier-transform spectrometer covering transitions in the (010)-(000) band from 1066 to 2582/cm. The measured line frequencies were used along with additional data taken from studies at microwave and far-infrared frequencies in an analysis to obtain rotational energies of levels in the (000) and (010) states. Measurements of the line strengths were fitted by least squares to a model in which the dipole moment matrix elements were represented by as many as 19 expansion coefficients. The results produced computed line strength values that are in excellent agreement, on the average, with the 874 experimental transitions included in the analysis. These results provide a more accurate representation of the line positions and strengths for the (010)-(000) band than are currently available on the HITRAN absorption line parameter compilation.

  20. Precise rotational alignment of x-ray transmission diffraction gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, S.L.

    1988-03-28

    Gold transmission diffraction gratings used for x-ray spectroscopy must sometimes be rotationally aligned to the axis of a diagnostic instrument to within sub-milliradian accuracy. We have fabricated transmission diffraction gratings with high line-densities (grating period of 200 and 300 nm) using uv holographic and x-ray lithography. Since the submicron features of the gratings are not optically visible, precision alignment is time consuming and difficult to verify in situ. We have developed a technique to write an optically visible alignment pattern onto these gratings using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). At high magnification (15000 X) several submicron lines of the grating are observable in the SEM, making it possible to write an alignment pattern parallel to the grating lines in an electron-beam-sensitive coating that overlays the grating. We create an alignment pattern by following a 1-cm-long grating line using the SEM's joystick-controlled translation stage. By following the same grating line we are assured the traveled direction of the SEM electron beam is parallel to the grating to better than 10 ..mu..radian. The electron-beam-exposed line-width can be large (5 to 15 ..mu..m wide) depending on the SEM magnification, and is therefore optically visible. The exposed pattern is eventually made a permanent feature of the grating by ion beam etching or gold electroplating. The pattern can be used to accurately align the grating to the axis of a diagnostic instrument. More importantly, the alignment of the grating can be quickly verified in situ.

  1. Power Harvesting from Rotation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicone, Carmen; Feng, Z. C.

    2008-01-01

    We show the impossibility of harvesting power from rotational motions by devices attached to the rotating object. The presentation is suitable for students who have studied Lagrangian mechanics. (Contains 2 figures.)

  2. Rotations with Rodrigues' Vector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, E.

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears…

  3. Mechanism of rotational relaxation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanyi, J. C.; Woodall, K. B.

    1972-01-01

    A model is presented which describes the characteristic pattern of relaxation of a nonthermal rotational distribution of hydrogen halide, peaked initially at high rotational quantum number J, to a thermal distribution without generating a peak at intermediate J. A method for correcting infrared chemiluminiscence data for modest rotational relaxation is also suggested.

  4. Faraday rotation system. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, L.E.; Wang, W.

    1994-07-01

    The Faraday Rotation System (FRS) is one of the advanced laser-based diagnostics developed at DIAL to provide support for the demonstration of prototype-scale coal-fired combustion magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power generation. Intended for application in the MHD channel, the system directly measures electron density through a measurement of the induced rotation in the polarization of a far infrared laser beam after passing through the MHD flow along the magnetic field lines. A measurement of the induced polarization ellipticity provides a measure of the electron collision frequency which together with the electron density gives the electron conductivity, a crucial parameter for MHD channel performance. The theory of the measurements, a description of the system, its capabilities, laboratory demonstration measurements on seeded flames with comparison to emission absorption measurements, and the current status of the system are presented in this final report.

  5. Quantitative rotating frame relaxometry methods in MRI.

    PubMed

    Gilani, Irtiza Ali; Sepponen, Raimo

    2016-06-01

    Macromolecular degeneration and biochemical changes in tissue can be quantified using rotating frame relaxometry in MRI. It has been shown in several studies that the rotating frame longitudinal relaxation rate constant (R1ρ ) and the rotating frame transverse relaxation rate constant (R2ρ ) are sensitive biomarkers of phenomena at the cellular level. In this comprehensive review, existing MRI methods for probing the biophysical mechanisms that affect the rotating frame relaxation rates of the tissue (i.e. R1ρ and R2ρ ) are presented. Long acquisition times and high radiofrequency (RF) energy deposition into tissue during the process of spin-locking in rotating frame relaxometry are the major barriers to the establishment of these relaxation contrasts at high magnetic fields. Therefore, clinical applications of R1ρ and R2ρ MRI using on- or off-resonance RF excitation methods remain challenging. Accordingly, this review describes the theoretical and experimental approaches to the design of hard RF pulse cluster- and adiabatic RF pulse-based excitation schemes for accurate and precise measurements of R1ρ and R2ρ . The merits and drawbacks of different MRI acquisition strategies for quantitative relaxation rate measurement in the rotating frame regime are reviewed. In addition, this review summarizes current clinical applications of rotating frame MRI sequences. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27100142

  6. Quantum unidirectional rotation directly imaged with molecules

    PubMed Central

    Mizuse, Kenta; Kitano, Kenta; Hasegawa, Hirokazu; Ohshima, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    A gas-phase molecular ensemble coherently excited to have an oriented rotational angular momentum has recently emerged as an appropriate microscopic system to illustrate quantum mechanical behavior directly linked to classical rotational motion, which has a definite direction. To realize an intuitive visualization of such a unidirectional molecular rotation, we report high-resolution direct imaging of direction-controlled rotational wave packets in nitrogen molecules. The rotational direction was regulated by a pair of time-delayed, polarization-skewed laser pulses, introducing the dynamic chirality to the system. The subsequent spatiotemporal propagation was tracked by a newly developed Coulomb explosion imaging setup. From the observed molecular movie, time-dependent detailed nodal structures, instantaneous alignment, angular dispersion, and fractional revivals of the wave packet are fully characterized while the ensemble keeps rotating in one direction. The present approach, providing an accurate view on unidirectional rotation in quantum regime, will guide more sophisticated molecular manipulations by utilizing its capability in capturing highly structured spatiotemporal evolution of molecular wave packets. PMID:26601205

  7. SEAL FOR ROTATING SHAFT

    DOEpatents

    Coffman, R.T.

    1957-12-10

    A seal is described for a rotatable shaft that must highly effective when the shaft is not rotating but may be less effective while the shaft is rotating. Weights distributed about a sealing disk secured to the shaft press the sealing disk against a tubular section into which the shiilt extends, and whem the shaft rotates, the centrifugal forces on the weights relieve the pressurc of the sealing disk against the tubular section. This action has the very desirible result of minimizing the wear of the rotating disk due to contact with the tubular section, while affording maximum sealing action when it is needed.

  8. Low-frequency rotational noise in closed-test-section wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosher, Marianne

    1987-01-01

    The effects of closed-section wind-tunnel walls on the sound field radiated from a helicopter rotor are investigated by means of numerical simulations, summarizing the findings reported by Mosher (1986). The techniques used to model the rotor and the test section (including geometry, wall absorption, and measurement location) are outlined, and the results are presented in extensive tables and graphs. It is found that first-harmonic acoustic measurements obtained in a hard-walled wind tunnel twice as wide as the rotor diameter do not accurately represent the free-field rotational noise, that the relationship between the sound-pressure levels in the wind tunnel and in the free field is complex, that multiple near-field measurements are needed to characterize the direct acoustic field of the rotor, and that absorptive linings are of little value in enlarging the accurate-measurement zone.

  9. Towards accurate and automatic morphing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Sharkey, Paul M.

    2005-10-01

    Image morphing has proved to be a powerful tool for generating compelling and pleasing visual effects and has been widely used in entertainment industry. However, traditional image morphing methods suffer from a number of drawbacks: feature specification between images is tedious and the reliance on 2D information ignores the possible advantages to be gained from 3D knowledge. In this paper, we utilize recent advantages of computer vision technologies to diminish these drawbacks. By analyzing multi view geometry theories, we propose a processing pipeline based on three reference images. We first seek a few seed correspondences using robust methods and then recover multi view geometries using the seeds, through bundle adjustment. Guided by the recovered two and three view geometries, a novel line matching algorithm across three views is then deduced, through edge growth, line fitting and two and three view geometry constraints. Corresponding lines on a novel image is then obtained by an image transfer method and finally matched lines are fed into the traditional morphing methods and novel images are generated. Novel images generated by this pipeline have advantages over traditional morphing methods: they have an inherent 3D foundation and are therefore physically close to real scenes; not only images located between the baseline connecting two reference image centers, but also extrapolated images away from the baseline are possible; and the whole processing can be either wholly automatic, or at least the tedious task of feature specification in traditional morphing methods can be greatly relieved.

  10. Rotator Cuff Tear Shape Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, David Steven; Kaplan, Daniel James; Fralinger, David; Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Meislin, Robert J.; Jazrawi, Laith M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Proper surgical planning requires accurate and reliable pre-operative patient information. The more comprehensive the data, the more the surgeon can tailor a general surgical technique to an individual patient’s unique anatomy. A previous retrospective study demonstrated that three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging more accurately characterized rotator cuff tears compared to two-dimensional images when checked against intra-operative pictures. The purpose of this study was to determine if three-dimensional MRI imaging would continue to be more accurate than two-dimensional imaging in a prospective study. Methods: Patients were prospectively included if they had a full-thickness primary rotator cuff tear on pre-operative MRI. Intra-op videos were taken from the posterior and lateral portals, with a grasper fully mobilizing the torn tendon in each view. 7 surgeons then reviewed the videos and independently characterized the shape of the tears into crescent, U-shaped tears, L-shaped tears, or massive tears. This was considered the gold-standard. Two musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed the corresponding MRI studies independently and blind to the arthroscopic findings and characterized the shape on the basis of the tear’s retraction and size 2D MRI. The 3D reconstructions of each cuff tear were reviewed by each radiologist to characterize the shape. Statistical analysis included 95% confidence intervals and fleiss’s kappa. Results: 37 patients were enrolled in the study. Among the 7 surgeons, agreement on cuff tear was 93% ( =.87). The accuracy for differentiating between crescent-shaped, longitudinal, and massive tears using measurements on 2D MRI was 73.4% for reader 1 and 71.2% for reader 2. The accuracy for tear shape characterization into crescent and longitudinal U- or L-shaped using 3D MRI was 92% for reader 1 and 94% for reader 2. When further characterizing the longitudinal tears as massive or not using 3D MRI, both readers had an

  11. Fortnightly Earth Rotation, Ocean Tides, and Mantle Anelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Egbert, Gary D.

    2011-01-01

    Sustained accurate measurements of earth rotation are one of the prime goals of Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS). We here concentrate on the fortnightly (Mf) tidal component of earth-rotation data to obtain new results concerning anelasticity of the mantle at this period. The study comprises three parts: (1) a new determination of the Mf component of polar motion and length-of-day from a multi-decade time series of space-geodetic data; (2) the use of the polar-motion determination as one constraint in the development of a hydrodynamic ocean model of the Mf tide; and (3) the use of these results to place new constraints on mantle anelasticity. Our model of the Mf ocean tide assimilates more than fourteen years of altimeter data from the Topex/Poseidon and Jason-1 satellites. The polar motion data, plus tide-gauge data and independent altimeter data, give useful additional information, with only the polar motion putting constraints on tidal current velocities. The resulting ocean-tide model, plus the dominant elastic body tide, leaves a small residual in observed length-of-day caused by mantle anelasticity. The inferred effective tidal 0 of the anelastic body tide is 90 and is in line with a omega-alpha frequency dependence with alpha in the range 0.2--0.3.

  12. Accurate equilibrium structures of fluoro- and chloroderivatives of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Natalja; Demaison, Jean; Rudolph, Heinz Dieter

    2014-11-01

    This work is a systematic study of molecular structure of fluoro-, chloro-, and fluorochloromethanes. For the first time, the accurate ab initio structure is computed for 10 molecules (CF4, CClF3, CCl2F2, CCl3F, CHClF2, CHCl2F, CH2F2, CH2ClF, CH2Cl2, and CCl4) at the coupled cluster level of electronic structure theory including single and double excitations augmented by a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations [CCSD(T)] with all electrons being correlated and Gaussian basis sets of at least quadruple-ζ quality. Furthermore, when possible, namely for the molecules CH2F2, CH2Cl2, CH2ClF, CHClF2, and CCl2F2, accurate semi-experimental equilibrium (rSEe) structure has also been determined. This is achieved through a least-squares structural refinement procedure based on the equilibrium rotational constants of all available isotopomers, determined by correcting the experimental ground-state rotational constants with computed ab initio vibration-rotation interaction constants and electronic g-factors. The computed and semi-experimental equilibrium structures are in excellent agreement with each other, but the rSEe structure is generally more accurate, in particular for the CF and CCl bond lengths. The carbon-halogen bond length is discussed within the framework of the ligand close-packing model as a function of the atomic charges. For this purpose, the accurate equilibrium structures of some other molecules with alternative ligands, such as CH3Li, CF3CCH, and CF3CN, are also computed.

  13. Measurement of turbulent wind velocities using a rotating boom apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Sandborn, V.A.; Connell, J.R.

    1984-04-01

    The present report covers both the development of a rotating-boom facility and the evaluation of the spectral energy of the turbulence measured relative to the rotating boom. The rotating boom is composed of a helicopter blade driven through a pulley speed reducer by a variable speed motor. The boom is mounted on a semiportable tower that can be raised to provide various ratios of hub height to rotor diameter. The boom can be mounted to rotate in either the vertical or horizontal plane. Probes that measure the three components of turbulence can be mounted at any location along the radius of the boom. Special hot-film sensors measured two components of the turbulence at a point directly in front of the rotating blade. By using the probe rotated 90/sup 0/ about its axis, the third turbulent velocity component was measured. Evaluation of the spectral energy distributions for the three components of velocity indicates a large concentration of energy at the rotational frequency. At frequencies slightly below the rotational frequency, the spectral energy is greatly reduced over that measured for the nonrotating case measurements. Peaks in the energy at frequencies that are multiples of the rotation frequency were also observed. We conclude that the rotating boom apparatus is suitable and ready to be used in experiments for developing and testing sensors for rotational measurement of wind velocity from wind turbine rotors. It also can be used to accurately measure turbulent wind for testing theories of rotationally sampled wind velocity.

  14. Accurate Measurements of the Local Deuterium Abundance from HST Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    1996-01-01

    An accurate measurement of the primordial value of D/H would provide a critical test of nucleosynthesis models for the early universe and the baryon density. I briefly summarize the ongoing HST observations of the interstellar H and D Lyman-alpha absorption for lines of sight to nearby stars and comment on recent reports of extragalactic D/H measurements.

  15. Rotation Frequencies of Small Jovian Trojan Asteroids: An Excess of Slow Rotators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Linda M.; Stephens, Robert D.; James, David J.; Coley, Daniel; Connour, Kyle

    2015-11-01

    Several lines of evidence support a common origin for, and possible hereditary link between, cometary nuclei and jovian Trojan asteroids. Due to their distance and low albedos, few comet-sized Trojans have been studied. We discuss the rotation properties of Jovian Trojan asteroids less than 30 km in diameter. Approximately half the 131 objects discussed here were studied using densely sampled lightcurves (French et al. 2015a, b); Stephens et al. 2015), and the other half were sparse lightcurves obtained by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF; Waszcazk et al. 2015).A significant fraction (~40%) of the objects in the ground-based sample rotate slowly (P > 24h), with measured periods as long as 375 h (Warner and Stephens 2011). The PTF data show a similar excess of slow rotators. Only 5 objects in the combined data set have rotation periods of less than six hours. Three of these fast rotators were contained in the data set of French et al. these three had a geometric mean rotation period of 5.29 hours. A prolate spheroid held together by gravity rotating with this period would have a critical density of 0.43 gm/cm3, a density similar to that of comets (Lamy et al. 2004).Harris et al. (2012) and Warner et al. (2011) have explored the possible effects on asteroid rotational statistics with the results from wide-field surveys. We will examine Trojan rotation statistics with and without the results from the PTF.

  16. Isomerism of Cyanomethanimine: Accurate Structural, Energetic, and Spectroscopic Characterization.

    PubMed

    Puzzarini, Cristina

    2015-11-25

    The structures, relative stabilities, and rotational and vibrational parameters of the Z-C-, E-C-, and N-cyanomethanimine isomers have been evaluated using state-of-the-art quantum-chemical approaches. Equilibrium geometries have been calculated by means of a composite scheme based on coupled-cluster calculations that accounts for the extrapolation to the complete basis set limit and core-correlation effects. The latter approach is proved to provide molecular structures with an accuracy of 0.001-0.002 Å and 0.05-0.1° for bond lengths and angles, respectively. Systematically extrapolated ab initio energies, accounting for electron correlation through coupled-cluster theory, including up to single, double, triple, and quadruple excitations, and corrected for core-electron correlation and anharmonic zero-point vibrational energy, have been used to accurately determine relative energies and the Z-E isomerization barrier with an accuracy of about 1 kJ/mol. Vibrational and rotational spectroscopic parameters have been investigated by means of hybrid schemes that allow us to obtain rotational constants accurate to about a few megahertz and vibrational frequencies with a mean absolute error of ∼1%. Where available, for all properties considered, a very good agreement with experimental data has been observed. PMID:26529434

  17. Aerodynamic pressure measurements on a rotating wind turbine blade

    SciTech Connect

    Butterfield, C.P.; Jenks, M.D.; Simms, D.A.; Musial, W.P.

    1990-05-01

    A microprocessor-controlled measurement system has been designed and built to make accurate measurements of low pressures on a rotating wind turbine blade. This Pressure System Controller (PSC) is capable of simultaneously operating four pressure scanners (128 channels total) while rotating on a wind turbine blade. Calibrations and purge sequences are performed automatically on all 128 channels while the turbine is rotating. Data are fed to a Pulse Code Modulation (PCM) data-acquisition system and recorded on magnetic tape for later processing. Accurate measurements have been made down to pressures of 11 microbars (0.00018 psi) for low Reynolds Number tests. These rotating-blade pressure measurements are used to compare with wind tunnel data to see how blade rotation alters airfoil performance. A description of the test setup and instrumentation design is given along with examples results. Recommendations for future work and changes in the design approach are also discussed. 7 refs., 13 figs.

  18. FAST FOSSIL ROTATION OF NEUTRON STAR CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Melatos, A.

    2012-12-10

    It is argued that the superfluid core of a neutron star super-rotates relative to the crust, because stratification prevents the core from responding to the electromagnetic braking torque, until the relevant dissipative (viscous or Eddington-Sweet) timescale, which can exceed {approx}10{sup 3} yr and is much longer than the Ekman timescale, has elapsed. Hence, in some young pulsars, the rotation of the core today is a fossil record of its rotation at birth, provided that magnetic crust-core coupling is inhibited, e.g., by buoyancy, field-line topology, or the presence of uncondensed neutral components in the superfluid. Persistent core super-rotation alters our picture of neutron stars in several ways, allowing for magnetic field generation by ongoing dynamo action and enhanced gravitational wave emission from hydrodynamic instabilities.

  19. Fast Fossil Rotation of Neutron Star Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melatos, A.

    2012-12-01

    It is argued that the superfluid core of a neutron star super-rotates relative to the crust, because stratification prevents the core from responding to the electromagnetic braking torque, until the relevant dissipative (viscous or Eddington-Sweet) timescale, which can exceed ~103 yr and is much longer than the Ekman timescale, has elapsed. Hence, in some young pulsars, the rotation of the core today is a fossil record of its rotation at birth, provided that magnetic crust-core coupling is inhibited, e.g., by buoyancy, field-line topology, or the presence of uncondensed neutral components in the superfluid. Persistent core super-rotation alters our picture of neutron stars in several ways, allowing for magnetic field generation by ongoing dynamo action and enhanced gravitational wave emission from hydrodynamic instabilities.

  20. Global Rotation of Non-Rotating Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, T.

    2001-11-01

    At its 24th General Assembly held at Manchester last year, the IAU has adopted the Celestial Ephemeris Origin (CEO) as a new longitude origin of the celestial coordinate system (Capitaine et al. 2000, IAU 2001). The CEO is the application of Guinot's non-rotating origin (NRO) to the Earth's equator (Guinot 1979, Capitaine et al. 1986, Capitaine 1990). By using the current IAU precession/nutation theory, we integrated the global orbit of CEO. It is a slightly curved zigzag pattern of the amplitude of around 23o moving secularly along the ecliptic. Among its kinematical features, we note that CEO has a large secular component of rotation with respect to the inertial reference frame. The current speed of this global rotation is as large as around -4.15 ''/yr. The negative sign shows that CEO rotates clockwise with respect to the inertial frame when viewed from the north celestial pole. Unfortunately this is a general property of NROs. On the other hand, such secular rotation does not exist for some geometrically-defined longitude origins like K, H, and Σ already discussed in Kovalevsky and McCarthy (1998). We think that the existence of a global secular rotaion means that the CEO, and NROs in general, is not appropriate to be specified as the x-axis of celestial coordinate systems.

  1. Rotating rigid motion in general relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, D.P.; Pooe, C.A.

    1987-11-01

    Kinematic and dynamic expressions are derived for the Lie derivative of vorticity along a particle world line in a rigid motion. It is found that the evolution of vorticity in a rigid motion is governed by the electric part of the Weyl tensor. Necessary and sufficient kinematic and dynamic conditions are established for a rotating rigid motion to be isometric.

  2. Equilibrium rotation in field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhauer, Loren

    2008-01-15

    The turbulence that drives anomalous transport in field-reversed configurations (FRCs) is believed to break the otherwise closed magnetic surfaces inside the separatrix. This places electrons in the core of the plasma in electrical contact with those in the periphery. This effect was proposed and investigated in the context of spheromaks [D. D. Ryutov, Phys. Plasmas 14, 022506 (2007)]. The opening up of internal magnetic field lines serves to regulate the electrostatic potential in the interior of the plasma, and in turn drives ion rotation. In effect, 'end-shorting', a well-known phenomenon in the FRC scrape-off layer, also extends into the plasma interior. For conditions relevant to experiments, the ion rotation can be expressed in terms of equilibrium properties (density and temperature gradients) and as such is the 'equilibrium' rotation. This theory is incomplete in that it neglects evolving, transport-related effects that modify the equilibrium and, indirectly, the rotation rate. Consequently, the equilibrium rotation theory is only partially successful in predicting experimental results: although it predicts the average rotation well, the estimated degree of rotational shear seems unlikely, especially at late times in the plasma lifetime.

  3. H{sub 2}-He vibrational line-shape parameters: Measurement and semiclassical calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Forsman, J.W.; Bonamy, J.; Robert, D.; Berger, J.P.; Saint-Loup, R.; Berger, H.

    1995-10-01

    High-resolution inverse Raman spectroscopy has been used to obtain the line shifting and line broadening coefficients of H{sub 2} perturbed by He. Measurements have been made for the {ital Q}-branch transitions ({ital J}=0{r_arrow}5) in a density range of 10 to 20 amagat and from 296 to 995 K. Up to 795 K we have directly deduced from the experimental broadening coefficients the inelastic rotational state-to-state and vibrational dephasing rates. At higher temperatures, owing to the larger number of channels of relaxation which occur, the results have been analyzed using a scaling law. The line shift and broadening coefficients exhibit a square root and a linear dependence on temperature, respectively, and a significant {ital J} dependence. Semiclassical calculations based on an accurate {ital ab} {ital initio} potential lead to line-shape parameters consistent with experiment. They allow a clear understanding of their observed temperature dependence.

  4. Mental Rotation of Dynamic, Three-Dimensional Stimuli by 3-Month-Old Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, David S.; Johnson, Scott P.

    2011-01-01

    Mental rotation involves transforming a mental image of an object so as to accurately predict how the object would look if it were rotated in space. This study examined mental rotation in male and female 3-month-olds, using the stimuli and paradigm developed by Moore and Johnson (2008). Infants were habituated to a video of a three-dimensional…

  5. Predict amine solution properties accurately

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, S.; Meisen, A.; Chakma, A.

    1996-02-01

    Improved process design begins with using accurate physical property data. Especially in the preliminary design stage, physical property data such as density viscosity, thermal conductivity and specific heat can affect the overall performance of absorbers, heat exchangers, reboilers and pump. These properties can also influence temperature profiles in heat transfer equipment and thus control or affect the rate of amine breakdown. Aqueous-amine solution physical property data are available in graphical form. However, it is not convenient to use with computer-based calculations. Developed equations allow improved correlations of derived physical property estimates with published data. Expressions are given which can be used to estimate physical properties of methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), monoethanolamine (MEA) and diglycolamine (DGA) solutions.

  6. Comparisons of 2D IR measured spectral diffusion in rotating frames using pulse shaping and in the stationary frame using the standard method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthick Kumar, S. K.; Tamimi, A.; Fayer, M. D.

    2012-11-01

    Multidimensional visible spectroscopy using pulse shaping to produce pulses with stable controllable phases and delays has emerged as an elegant tool to acquire electronic spectra faster and with greatly reduced instrumental and data processing errors. Recent migration of this approach using acousto-optic modulator (AOM) pulse shaping to the mid-infrared region has proved useful for acquiring two dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectra. The measurement of spectral diffusion in 2D IR experiments hinges on obtaining accurate 2D line shapes. To date, pulse shaping 2D IR has not been used to study the time-dependent spectral diffusion of a vibrational chromophore. Here we compare the spectral diffusion data obtained from a standard non-collinear 2D IR spectrometer using delay lines to the data obtained from an AOM pulse shaper based 2D IR spectrometer. The pulse shaping experiments are performed in stationary, partially rotating, and fully rotating reference frames and are the first in the infrared to produce 2D spectra collected in a fully rotating frame using a phase controlled pulse sequence. Rotating frame experiments provide a dramatic reduction in the number of time points that must be measured to obtain a 2D IR spectrum, with the fully rotating frame giving the greatest reduction. Experiments were conducted on the transition metal carbonyl complex tricarbonylchloro(1,10-phenanthroline)rhenium(I) in chloroform. The time dependent data obtained from the different techniques and with different reference frames are shown to be in agreement.

  7. Hot water emission spectra: Rotational energy levels of the (0 0 0) and (0 1 0) states of HD17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellau, Georg Ch.; Mikhailenko, Semen N.; Tyuterev, Vladimir G.

    2015-02-01

    The rotational transitions of the HD17O water isotopologue have been assigned in a high temperature emission spectrum between 320 and 520 cm-1 of water vapor enriched by deuterium and 17O. We assigned 169 emission lines to 189 partly overlapping transitions of pure rotational and the ν2-ν2 rotational bands. A new extended set of 390 rotational energy levels for the (0 0 0) and (0 1 0) vibration states of HD17O up to J = 17 and Ka = 13 was obtained by combination of the new line transitions with those reported in previous studies. We constructed an effective rotational Hamiltonian based on the generation function approach. For this Hamiltonian the deviation between calculated and measured eigenenergies is in the order of 0.001 cm-1. We report a new calculated linelist based on our new energy level list. Our linelist supersedes the IUPAC linelist for the HD17O water isotopologue as it is based on a substantially extended set of accurate transition wavenumbers.

  8. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, Cameron J.; Slattery, Ashley D.; Stapleton, Andrew J.; Shapter, Joseph G.; Gibson, Christopher T.

    2016-03-01

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  9. ALICCE: Atomic Lines Calibration using the Cross-Entropy Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Lucimara P.; Coelho, Paula; Caproni, Anderson; Vitoriano, Roberto

    2014-08-01

    Atomic line opacities play a crucial role in stellar astrophysics. They strongly modify the radiative transfer in stars, therefore, impacting their physical structure. Ultimately, most of our knowledge of stellar population systems (stars, clusters, galaxies, etc.) relies on the accuracy with which we understand and reproduce the stellar spectra. With such a wide impact on astronomy, it would be ideal to have access to a complete, accurate and precise list of atomic transitions. This, unfortunately, is not the case. Few atomic transitions had their parameters actually measured in the laboratory, and for most of the lines the parameters were calculated with low-precision atomic energy levels. Only a small fraction of the lines were calibrated empirically. For the purpose of computing a stellar spectral grid with a complete coverage of spectral types and luminosity classes, this situation is rather limiting. We have implemented an innovative method to perform a robust calibration of atomic line lists used by spectral synthesis codes called ALICCE: Atomic Lines Calibration using the Cross-Entropy algorithm. Here, we describe the implementation and validation of the method, using synthetic spectra which simulates the signal-to-noise, spectral resolution and rotational velocities typical of high-quality observed spectra. We conclude that the method is efficient for calibrating atomic line lists.

  10. The spatial rotator.

    PubMed

    Rasmusson, A; Hahn, U; Larsen, J O; Gundersen, H J G; Jensen, E B Vedel; Nyengaard, J R

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a new local volume estimator, the spatial rotator, which is based on measurements on a virtual 3D probe, using computer assisted microscopy. The basic design of the probe builds upon the rotator principle which requires only a few manual intersection markings, thus making the spatial rotator fast to use. Since a 3D probe is involved, it is expected that the spatial rotator will be more efficient than the the nucleator and the planar rotator, which are based on measurements in a single plane. An extensive simulation study shows that the spatial rotator may be more efficient than the traditional local volume estimators. Furthermore, the spatial rotator can be seen as a further development of the Cavalieri estimator, which does not require randomization of sectioning or viewing direction. The tissue may thus be sectioned in any arbitrary direction, making it easy to identify the specific tissue region under study. In order to use the spatial rotator in practice, however, it is necessary to be able to identify intersection points between cell boundaries and test rays in a series of parallel focal planes, also at the peripheral parts of the cell boundaries. In cases where over- and underprojection phenomena are not negligible, they should therefore be corrected for if the spatial rotator is to be applied. If such a correction is not possible, it is needed to avoid these phenomena by using microscopy with increased resolution in the focal plane. PMID:23488880

  11. Emission Line Variability In The HgMn Star 11 Per

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlgren, Glenn Michael; Bohlender, D.; Melendez, M.

    2012-01-01

    High spectral resolution observations of the HgMn star 11 Per (HD 16727, B7p) have revealed temporal variability in weak emission lines of Mn II. The observations were obtained on three epochs (JD 2455549.728, 2455555.800, 2455560.693) with the CFHT ESPaDOnS instrument during December 2010, and were complemented with an earlier epoch (JD 2452514.623) NOT SOFIN observation and a spectrum obtained with the CFHT Gecko instrument (JD 2451420.641, presented in Wahlgren & Hubrig 2000, A&A 362, L13). Lines of Mn II multiplet 13 (6120 - 6135 A) are observed in emission at each epoch, but their observed intensities are not in relative proportion to their respective gf-values. The intrinsically strongest line, the J(lower) = 4 to J(upper) = 5 transition at 6122.434A is observed to be a simple emission line on JD 5549 and JD 5560, while on JD 5555 and the two earliest epochs its appearance is that of a P Cyg profile with absorption component on the red side of the line profile. The similar appearance of Mn II multiplet 11 on JD 5549 and JD 5555, along with the similar appearing spectra at the three other epochs suggest that the variability may be rotationally modulated. For main sequence stars of spectral type B5 to B9, the stellar radius ranges from 7 to 2.5 solar radii, respectively, which along with an upper limit of the rotational velocity (v = vsin(i) = 5 km/s, Wahlgren & Hubrig) leads to the determination of a range in the rotation period of approximately 70 to 25 days. This range is greater than the difference between epochs JD 5549 and JD 5560, where the Mn II lines appear roughly similar. Future high resolution spectral observations obtained at a higher cadence are needed to enable a more accurate determination of the rotation period.

  12. Terminal velocities of the winds from rapidly rotating OB stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friend, David B.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents measurements of terminal velocities of OB stars which are rapid rotators, based on archival high-dispersion IUE spectra of the C IV resonance doublet. The terminal velocities of the most rapidly rotating stars appear to be systematically lower than those of the less rapidly rotating stars (at least for the cooler stars), although the number of very rapid rotators is only three. The modified line-radiation driven wind model of Friend and Abbott, which takes into account the finite size of the star as well as its rotation, predicts that the terminal velocity should drop with increasing rotational velocity. However, when a smaller but very homogeneous subset of the data is used (BO giants only), the correlation between terminal velocity and rotational velocity disappears.

  13. Accurate, meshless methods for magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Raives, Matthias J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we explored new meshless finite-volume Lagrangian methods for hydrodynamics: the `meshless finite mass' (MFM) and `meshless finite volume' (MFV) methods; these capture advantages of both smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) schemes. We extend these to include ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The MHD equations are second-order consistent and conservative. We augment these with a divergence-cleaning scheme, which maintains nabla \\cdot B≈ 0. We implement these in the code GIZMO, together with state-of-the-art SPH MHD. We consider a large test suite, and show that on all problems the new methods are competitive with AMR using constrained transport (CT) to ensure nabla \\cdot B=0. They correctly capture the growth/structure of the magnetorotational instability, MHD turbulence, and launching of magnetic jets, in some cases converging more rapidly than state-of-the-art AMR. Compared to SPH, the MFM/MFV methods exhibit convergence at fixed neighbour number, sharp shock-capturing, and dramatically reduced noise, divergence errors, and diffusion. Still, `modern' SPH can handle most test problems, at the cost of larger kernels and `by hand' adjustment of artificial diffusion. Compared to non-moving meshes, the new methods exhibit enhanced `grid noise' but reduced advection errors and diffusion, easily include self-gravity, and feature velocity-independent errors and superior angular momentum conservation. They converge more slowly on some problems (smooth, slow-moving flows), but more rapidly on others (involving advection/rotation). In all cases, we show divergence control beyond the Powell 8-wave approach is necessary, or all methods can converge to unphysical answers even at high resolution.

  14. A computed room temperature line list for phosphine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa-Silva, Clara; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2013-06-01

    An accurate and comprehensive room temperature rotation-vibration transition line list for phosphine (31PH3) is computed using a newly refined potential energy surface and a previously constructed ab initio electric dipole moment surface. Energy levels, Einstein A coefficients and transition intensities are computed using these surfaces and a variational approach to the nuclear motion problem as implemented in the program TROVE. A ro-vibrational spectrum is computed, covering the wavenumber range 0-8000 cm-1. The resulting line list, which is appropriate for temperatures up to 300 K, consists of a total of 137 million transitions between 5.6 million energy levels. Several of the band centres are shifted to better match experimental transition frequencies. The line list is compared to the most recent HITRAN database and other laboratorial sources. Transition wavelengths and intensities are generally found to be in good agreement with the existing experimental data, with particularly close agreement for the rotational spectrum. An analysis of the comparison between the theoretical data created and the existing experimental data is performed, and suggestions for future improvements and assignments to the HITRAN database are made.

  15. The importance of accurate atmospheric modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Dylan; Schroeder, John; Liang, Pang

    2014-11-01

    This paper will focus on the effect of atmospheric conditions on EO sensor performance using computer models. We have shown the importance of accurately modeling atmospheric effects for predicting the performance of an EO sensor. A simple example will demonstrated how real conditions for several sites in China will significantly impact on image correction, hyperspectral imaging, and remote sensing. The current state-of-the-art model for computing atmospheric transmission and radiance is, MODTRAN® 5, developed by the US Air Force Research Laboratory and Spectral Science, Inc. Research by the US Air Force, Navy and Army resulted in the public release of LOWTRAN 2 in the early 1970's. Subsequent releases of LOWTRAN and MODTRAN® have continued until the present. Please verify that (1) all pages are present, (2) all figures are correct, (3) all fonts and special characters are correct, and (4) all text and figures fit within the red margin lines shown on this review document. Complete formatting information is available at http://SPIE.org/manuscripts Return to the Manage Active Submissions page at http://spie.org/submissions/tasks.aspx and approve or disapprove this submission. Your manuscript will not be published without this approval. Please contact author_help@spie.org with any questions or concerns. The paper will demonstrate the importance of using validated models and local measured meteorological, atmospheric and aerosol conditions to accurately simulate the atmospheric transmission and radiance. Frequently default conditions are used which can produce errors of as much as 75% in these values. This can have significant impact on remote sensing applications.

  16. Accurate ab Initio Spin Densities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We present an approach for the calculation of spin density distributions for molecules that require very large active spaces for a qualitatively correct description of their electronic structure. Our approach is based on the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm to calculate the spin density matrix elements as a basic quantity for the spatially resolved spin density distribution. The spin density matrix elements are directly determined from the second-quantized elementary operators optimized by the DMRG algorithm. As an analytic convergence criterion for the spin density distribution, we employ our recently developed sampling-reconstruction scheme [J. Chem. Phys.2011, 134, 224101] to build an accurate complete-active-space configuration-interaction (CASCI) wave function from the optimized matrix product states. The spin density matrix elements can then also be determined as an expectation value employing the reconstructed wave function expansion. Furthermore, the explicit reconstruction of a CASCI-type wave function provides insight into chemically interesting features of the molecule under study such as the distribution of α and β electrons in terms of Slater determinants, CI coefficients, and natural orbitals. The methodology is applied to an iron nitrosyl complex which we have identified as a challenging system for standard approaches [J. Chem. Theory Comput.2011, 7, 2740]. PMID:22707921

  17. Modeling rapidly rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, M.

    2006-06-01

    We review the quest of modeling rapidly rotating stars during the past 40 years and detail the challenges to be taken up by models facing new data from interferometry, seismology, spectroscopy... We then present the progress of the ESTER project aimed at giving a physically self-consistent model for the structure and evolution of rapidly rotating stars.

  18. Rotatable shear plate interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Duffus, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotatable shear plate interferometer comprises a transparent shear plate mounted obliquely in a tubular supporting member at 45.degree. with respect to its horizontal center axis. This tubular supporting member is supported rotatably around its center axis and a collimated laser beam is made incident on the shear plate along this center axis such that defocus in different directions can be easily measured.

  19. CONTROL ROD ROTATING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Baumgarten, A.; Karalis, A.J.

    1961-11-28

    A threaded rotatable shaft is provided which rotates in response to linear movement of a nut, the shaft being surrounded by a pair of bellows members connected to either side of the nut to effectively seal the reactor from leakage and also to store up energy to shut down the reactor in the event of a power failure. (AEC)

  20. THE OLD ROTATION, 2005

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Old Rotation (circa 1896) is the oldest, continuous cotton experiment in the world. Its 13 plots on 1 acre of land on the campus of Auburn University continue to document the long-term effects of crop rotations with and without winter legumes (crimson clover) as a source of nitrogen for cotton,...

  1. A robust method for rotation estimation using spherical harmonics representation.

    PubMed

    Althloothi, Salah; Mahoor, Mohammad H; Voyles, Richard M

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a robust method for 3D object rotation estimation using spherical harmonics representation and the unit quaternion vector. The proposed method provides a closed-form solution for rotation estimation without recurrence relations or searching for point correspondences between two objects. The rotation estimation problem is casted as a minimization problem, which finds the optimum rotation angles between two objects of interest in the frequency domain. The optimum rotation angles are obtained by calculating the unit quaternion vector from a symmetric matrix, which is constructed from the two sets of spherical harmonics coefficients using eigendecomposition technique. Our experimental results on hundreds of 3D objects show that our proposed method is very accurate in rotation estimation, robust to noisy data, missing surface points, and can handle intra-class variability between 3D objects. PMID:23475364

  2. The rotation of the Sun's core.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterno, L.; Sofia, S.; di Mauro, M. P.

    1996-10-01

    The rotation of the Sun's core, below 0.3Rsun_, is inferred from two independent new results. The first is based on the recent oblateness measurements carried out by the Solar Disk Sextant (SDS) instrument outside the Earth's atmosphere, and the second on the very accurate measurements of rotational splittings of the lowest degree acoustic modes, carried out in the framework of the helioseismic network IRIS. By using the theory of slowly rotating stars applied to a solar standard model, we deduce a set of rotational laws for the innermost layers, which are consistent with both the measured oblateness value and the results of the inversion of helioseismic data. The SDS and IRIS results indicate that the Sun's central regions rotate at a rate in between 1.5 and 2 times the surface equatorial angular velocity. As a result of our analysis, we deduce a quadrupole moment J_2_=2.22x10^-7^, which implies an advance of Mercury's perihelion of 42.98arcsec/c, in agreement with the theory of General Relativity and the measurements of Mercury's orbit by means of planetary radar ranging. However, very recent results obtained by the helioseismic network BISON indicate that core rotation is even slower than the polar surface rotation and therefore imply a completely different scenario than that proposed here. If we assume the intermediate solution of rigid body rotation, an alternate source of the oblateness may be attributed to a magnetic field of the order of 10^5^Gauss in the interior of the Sun.

  3. Beam Profile Monitor With Accurate Horizontal And Vertical Beam Profiles

    DOEpatents

    Havener, Charles C [Knoxville, TN; Al-Rejoub, Riad [Oak Ridge, TN

    2005-12-26

    A widely used scanner device that rotates a single helically shaped wire probe in and out of a particle beam at different beamline positions to give a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is modified by the addition of a second wire probe. As a result, a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a first beamline position, and a second pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a second beamline position. The simple modification not only provides more accurate beam profiles, but also provides a measurement of the beam divergence and quality in a single compact device.

  4. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Stephen S; Lo, Ian K Y

    2006-06-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is being performed by an increasing number of orthopaedic surgeons. The principles, techniques, and instrumentation have evolved to the extent that all patterns and sizes of rotator cuff tear, including massive tears, can now be repaired arthroscopically. Achieving a biomechanically stable construct is critical to biologic healing. The ideal repair construct must optimize suture-to-bone fixation, suture-to-tendon fixation, abrasion resistance of suture, suture strength, knot security, loop security, and restoration of the anatomic rotator cuff footprint (the surface area of bone to which the cuff tendons attach). By achieving optimized repair constructs, experienced arthroscopic surgeons are reporting results equal to those of open rotator cuff repair. As surgeons' arthroscopic skill levels increase through attendance at surgical skills courses and greater experience gained in the operating room, there will be an increasing trend toward arthroscopic repair of most rotator cuff pathology. PMID:16757673

  5. Interferometry for rotating sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velle, S.; Mehrabi Pari, S.; Csernai, L. P.

    2016-06-01

    The two particle interferometry method to determine the size of the emitting source after a heavy ion collision is extended. Following the extension of the method to spherical expansion dynamics, here we extend the method to rotating systems. It is shown that rotation of a cylindrically symmetric system leads to modifications, which can be perceived as spatial asymmetry by the "azimuthal HBT" method. We study an exact rotating and expanding solution of the fluid dynamical model of heavy ion reactions. We consider a source that is azimuthally symmetric in space around the axis of rotation, and discuss the features of the resulting two particle correlation function. This shows the azimuthal asymmetry arising from the rotation. We show that this asymmetry leads to results similar to those given by spatially asymmetric sources.

  6. Rotation sensor switch

    DOEpatents

    Sevec, John B.

    1978-01-01

    A protective device to provide a warning if a piece of rotating machinery slows or stops comprises a pair of hinged weights disposed to rotate on a rotating shaft of the equipment. When the equipment is rotating, the weights remain in a plane essentially perpendicular to the shaft and constitute part of an electrical circuit that is open. When the shaft slows or stops, the weights are attracted to a pair of concentric electrically conducting disks disposed in a plane perpendicular to the shaft and parallel to the plane of the weights when rotating. A disk magnet attracts the weights to the electrically conducting plates and maintains the electrical contact at the plates to complete an electrical circuit that can then provide an alarm signal.

  7. Rotational partition functions for linear molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, Robin S.

    1988-01-01

    An accurate closed-form expression for the rotational partition function of linear polyatomic molecules in 1Sigma electronic states is derived, including the effect of nuclear spin (significant at very low temperatures) and of quartic and sextic centrifugal distortion terms (significant at moderate and high temperatures). The proper first-order quantum correction to the classical rigid-rotator partition function is shown to yield Qr = about 1/beta exp beta/3, where beta is defined as hcB / kT and B is the rotational constant in per cm; for beta of 0.2 or greater additional power-series terms in beta are necessary. Comparison between the results of this treatment and exact summations are made for HCN and C2H2 at temperatures from 2 to 5000 K, including separate evaluation of the conributions of nuclear spin and centrifugal distortion.

  8. Complex Mixture Analysis Using Rotational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Michael

    Owing to its very high intrinsic resolution, exceeding ppm levels in supersonic jet sources, rotational spectroscopy is a powerful analytical tool to analyze complex mixtures that consist of both familiar and exotic molecules. We present here an experimental method to rapidly sort rotational lines in broadband spectra and assign them to individual chemical compounds in the cm-band. This method combines a chirped-pulse FT microwave (CP-FTMW) spectrometer with follow-up analysis using an automated cavity FTMW spectrometer with double resonance (DR) capabilities. The CP-FTMW spectrum acts as a filter, identifying only those regions of frequency space that contain molecular signal, and discarding the vast majority of frequency space that is devoid of molecular information. With superior sensitivity and resolution per unit time, a cavity spectrometer is then used for follow-up assays on these bright spectral lines, to group transitions which share common characteristics, such as elemental composition, etc. These groups can be further partitioned into smaller sub-groups by exhaustive DR experiments whereby only those rotational lines that share a common energy level from the same molecule are linked together. From these series of measurements and assays, rotational transitions of multiple, individual chemical compounds can be empirically sorted and identified, without the need for any theoretical guidance or input. Significant automation greatly enhances the overall efficiency, enabling rapid, exhaustive testing with little oversight. Examples illustrating the power of this methodology for rapid analysis of broadband spectra will be presented.

  9. Rotation and macroturbulence in bright giants

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.F.; Toner, C.G.

    1986-11-01

    Spectral line profiles of 35 F, G, and K bright giants were analyzed to obtain rotation rates, v sin i, and macroturbulence dispersion. This sample indicates that rotation rates of cool class II giants is less than 11 km/s, in contrast with some recent periodicity measurements. Macroturbulence dispersion generally increases with effective temperature, but the range of values at a given effective temperature is much larger than seen for lower luminosity classes; this is interpreted in terms of red-giant and blue-loop evolution. No evidence is found for angular momentum dissipation on the first crossing of the H-R diagram. 57 references.

  10. Rotating reactor studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Glyn O.

    1991-01-01

    Undesired gravitational effects such as convection or sedimentation in a fluid can sometimes be avoided or decreased by the use of a closed chamber uniformly rotated about a horizontal axis. In a previous study, the spiral orbits of a heavy or buoyant particle in a uniformly rotating fluid were determined. The particles move in circles, and spiral in or out under the combined effects of the centrifugal force and centrifugal buoyancy. A optimization problem for the rotation rate of a cylindrical reactor rotated about its axis and containing distributed particles was formulated and solved. Related studies in several areas are addressed. A computer program based on the analysis was upgraded by correcting some minor errors, adding a sophisticated screen-and-printer graphics capability and other output options, and by improving the automation. The design, performance, and analysis of a series of experiments with monodisperse polystyrene latex microspheres in water were supported to test the theory and its limitations. The theory was amply confirmed at high rotation rates. However, at low rotation rates (1 rpm or less) the assumption of uniform solid-body rotation of the fluid became invalid, and there were increasingly strong secondary motions driven by variations in the mean fluid density due to variations in the particle concentration. In these tests the increase in the mean fluid density due to the particles was of order 0.015 percent. To a first approximation, these flows are driven by the buoyancy in a thin crescent-shaped depleted layer on the descending side of the rotating reactor. This buoyancy distribution is balanced by viscosity near the walls, and by the Coriolis force in the interior. A full analysis is beyond the scope of this study. Secondary flows are likely to be stronger for buoyant particles, which spiral in towards the neutral point near the rotation axis under the influence of their centrifugal buoyancy. This is because the depleted layer is

  11. Rotatable seal assembly. [Patent application; rotating targets

    DOEpatents

    Logan, C.M.; Garibaldi, J.L.

    1980-11-12

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

  12. The transverse and rotational motions of magnetohydrodynamic kink waves in the solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Goossens, M.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Soler, R.; Terradas, J.; Verth, G.

    2014-06-10

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink waves have now been observed to be ubiquitous throughout the solar atmosphere. With modern instruments, they have now been detected in the chromosphere, interface region, and corona. The key purpose of this paper is to show that kink waves do not only involve purely transverse motions of solar magnetic flux tubes, but the velocity field is a spatially and temporally varying sum of both transverse and rotational motion. Taking this fact into account is particularly important for the accurate interpretation of varying Doppler velocity profiles across oscillating structures such as spicules. It has now been shown that, as well as bulk transverse motions, spicules have omnipresent rotational motions. Here we emphasize that caution should be used before interpreting the particular MHD wave mode/s responsible for these rotational motions. The rotational motions are not necessarily signatures of the classic axisymmetric torsional Alfvén wave alone, because kink motion itself can also contribute substantially to varying Doppler velocity profiles observed across these structures. In this paper, the displacement field of the kink wave is demonstrated to be a sum of its transverse and rotational components, both for a flux tube with a discontinuous density profile at its boundary, and one with a more realistic density continuum between the internal and external plasma. Furthermore, the Doppler velocity profile of the kink wave is forward modeled to demonstrate that, depending on the line of sight, it can either be quite distinct or very similar to that expected from a torsional Alfvén wave.

  13. Time-Domain MW Spectroscopy: Fundamental Physics from Molecular Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2011-06-01

    In the past, it was a great triumph of Dirac's theory to predict the fine structure in the energy levels of the simplest atom. Nevertheless, even the relativistic Dirac theory did not completely describe the spectrum of the electron in an H-atom. However, at that time, attempts to obtain accurate information through a study of the Balmer lines have been frustrated by the large Doppler width in comparison to the small shifts. Obtaining more accurate information was the key to provide a delicate test of the relativistic wave equation as well as finding confirmation for line shifts due to coupling of the atom with the radiation field and any non-Coulombic interaction. Then, the advances in microwave (MW) techniques resulted in new physical tools, making it possible to observe the small energy difference of terms that were degenerate in Dirac's theory. This, as well as the small deviation of the electron's gyromagnetic ratio g_e from the value 2, provided an excellent test for the validity of quantum electrodynamics (QED). At present, the electron electric dipole moment (e-EDM) is a particularly good place to find, as proposed by Purcell and Ramsey, a new source for P and T violation that may, in fact, be linked to the matter-antimatter asymmetry of our Universe and - in a wider sense - be responsible for our existence. Since the Standart Modell's (SM) prediction is negligible, any observed d_e ≠ 0 is direct evidence for "New Physics" beyond the SM. Many supersymmetric theories in extension to the SM, indeed, predict an e-EDM within two orders of magnitude from the current limit |d_e| < 1.6 × 10-27 e \\cdot cm. However, this limit was published already in 2002, nine years ago. Since then, no progress was made. As at the time when Dirac's equation was put to test, attempts to obtain accurate information through a spectroscopic study are mostly frustrated by the large Doppler width in comparison to the small shifts. Again, obtaining more accurate information will

  14. Chaotic rotation of Hyperion?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binzel, R. P.; Green, J. R.; Opal, C. B.

    1986-01-01

    Thomas et al. (1984) analyzed 14 Voyager 2 images of Saturn's satellite Hyperion and interpreted them to be consistent with a coherent (nonchaotic) rotation period of 13.1 days. This interpretation was criticized by Peale and Wisdom (1984), who argued that the low sampling frequency of Voyager data does not allow chaotic or nonchaotic rotation to be distinguished. New observations obtained with a higher sampling frequency are reported here which conclusively show that the 13.1 day period found by Thomas et al. was not due to coherent rotation.

  15. Acoustic rotation control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Croonquist, A. P.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A system is described for acoustically controlled rotation of a levitated object, which avoids deformation of a levitated liquid object. Acoustic waves of the same wavelength are directed along perpendicular directions across the object, and with the relative phases of the acoustic waves repeatedly switched so that one wave alternately leads and lags the other by 90 deg. The amount of torque for rotating the object, and the direction of rotation, are controlled by controlling the proportion of time one wave leads the other and selecting which wave leads the other most of the time.

  16. Rotational Spectra in Service of Particle Physics - Zeeman & Hyperfine Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawhorter, Richard J.; Baum, Alexander L.; Glassmann, Zachary; Girodas, Benjamin; Sears, Trevor; Shafer-Ray, Neil E.; Alphei, Lukas; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2013-06-01

    Motivated by the ongoing search for the parity violating effects originated by an electron electric dipole moment (e-EDM) or a nuclear anapole moment,the rotational spectra of heavy atom diatomic radicals like, e.g., ^{2}Π_{1/2} PbF are studied at the unrivalled resolution offered by supersonic-jet Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Obtaining accurate information on such relativistically behaving systems wil be the key to provide a delicate test to the proposed theories in extension to the Standard Model of Physics. Employment of an MW method to hunt down these tiny effects, easily obscured by the linewidth inherent to other techniques, in rotational transitions is a promising approach to observe the tiny energy difference of terms that are degenerate without parity violation. Already before an experiment sensitive to parity violation, the exceptional resolution of the microwave time-domain technique can be exploited to provide accurate tests on the quantum chemical predictions that are part of the calculation of the anticipated e-EDM or anapole moment sensitivity of a given species since nuclear quadrupole and magnetic hyperfine effects in the rotational spectra are closely related. In our current experiment, transitions can be observed with 0.2 kHz accuracy for unblended lines over a range of 2 - 26.5 GHz. The observation of field dependent spectra (in magnetic fields up to 4 Gauss) allows for the determination of the two body fixed g-factors, G_{perp} and G_{allel} which can then be compared with recent theoretical values. YbF provides the current e-EDM upper limit. Although it is more sensitive to magnetic fields, the nuclear quadrupole hyperfine structure of ^{173}YbF constitutes a direct probe on the electric field gradient and thus can help characterize the critical electric field at the heavy atom nucleus. We will report on 14 GHz transitions for 3 of the less abundant even isotopologues of YbF as well as the ^{207}PbF analogue ^{171}YbF, important

  17. Rotational Doppler effect in x-ray photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yuping; Wang Chuankui; Gel'mukhanov, Faris

    2010-11-15

    The energy of the photoelectron experiences a red or blue Doppler shift when the molecule recedes from the detector or approaches him. This results in a broadening of the photoelectron line due to the translational thermal motion. However, the molecules also have rotational degrees of freedom and we show that the translational Doppler effect has its rotational counterpart. This rotational Doppler effect leads to an additional broadening of the spectral line of the same magnitude as the Doppler broadening caused by translational thermal motion. The rotational Doppler broadening as well as the rotational recoil broadening is sensitive to the molecular orbital from which the photoelectron is ejected. This broadening should be taken into account in analysis of x-ray photoemission spectra of super-high resolution and it can be directly observed using x-ray pump-probe spectroscopy.

  18. ``Ultimate'' information content in solar and stellar spectra. Photospheric line asymmetries and wavelength shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dravins, Dainis

    2008-12-01

    Context: Spectral-line asymmetries (displayed as bisectors) and wavelength shifts are signatures of the hydrodynamics in solar and stellar atmospheres. Theory may precisely predict idealized lines, but accuracies in real observed spectra are limited by blends, few suitable lines, imprecise laboratory wavelengths, and instrumental imperfections. Aims: We extract bisectors and shifts until the “ultimate” accuracy limits in highest-quality solar and stellar spectra, so as to understand the various limits set by (i) stellar physics (number of relevant spectral lines, effects of blends, rotational line broadening); by (ii) observational techniques (spectral resolution, photometric noise); and by (iii) limitations in laboratory data. Methods: Several spectral atlases of the Sun and bright solar-type stars were examined for those thousands of “unblended” lines with the most accurate laboratory wavelengths, yielding bisectors and shifts as averages over groups of similar lines. Representative data were obtained as averages over groups of similar lines, thus minimizing the effects of photometric noise and of random blends. Results: For the solar-disk center and integrated sunlight, the bisector shapes and shifts were extracted for previously little-studied species (Fe II, Ti I, Ti II, Cr II, Ca I, C I), using recently determined and very accurate laboratory wavelengths. In Procyon and other F-type stars, a sharp blueward bend in the bisector near the spectral continuum is confirmed, revealing line saturation and damping wings in upward-moving photospheric granules. Accuracy limits are discussed: “astrophysical” noise due to few measurable lines, finite instrumental resolution, superposed telluric absorption, inaccurate laboratory wavelengths, and calibration noise in spectrometers, together limiting absolute lineshift studies to ≈50-100 m s-1. Conclusions: Spectroscopy with resolutions λ/Δλ ≈ 300 000 and accurate wavelength calibration will enable

  19. Lineshape analysis of the J = 3 ← 2 and J = 5 ← 4 rotational transitions of room temperature CO broadened by N 2, O 2, CO 2 and noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colmont, Jean-Marcel; Nguyen, Linh; Rohart, François; Wlodarczak, Georges

    2007-11-01

    Collisional relaxation has been considered for millimeter lines of carbon monoxide at room temperature. Accurate measurements of carbon dioxide- and rare gases-broadened widths have been performed on the J = 3 ← 2 rotational line of 12CO by using a video-type spectrometer. Measurements of nitrogen-, oxygen-, and xenon-broadened widths of the J = 5 ← 4 rotational line of 13CO were also carried by using a frequency-modulated spectrometer. A lineshape study performed on all the investigated binary systems provide confirmation that Voigt profile is not a suitable model to analyse experimental lines in the millimeter-waves region. On one hand, using this profile in the low pressure range, i.e. in the Doppler regime, the retrieved collisional linewidths do not follow a linear variation with the perturbing gas pressure. On the other hand, regardless of the pressure, lineshapes exhibit a narrowed profile. An accurate analysis of the pressure dependence of relaxation rates show that the Galatry profile is not appropriate and that experimental lineshapes are actually Speed Dependent Voigt profiles. Accurate broadening parameters were retrieved from this profile and compared to previous reported values and predictions calculated from the Robert-Bonamy formalism. Finally a variation of the ratio of relaxation speed dependence to broadening parameters versus relative masses of the collision partners is presented.

  20. Accurate evaluation of homogenous and nonhomogeneous gas emissivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Lee, K. P.

    1984-01-01

    Spectral transmittance and total band adsorptance of selected infrared bands of carbon dioxide and water vapor are calculated by using the line-by-line and quasi-random band models and these are compared with available experimental results to establish the validity of the quasi-random band model. Various wide-band model correlations are employed to calculate the total band absorptance and total emissivity of these two gases under homogeneous and nonhomogeneous conditions. These results are compared with available experimental results under identical conditions. From these comparisons, it is found that the quasi-random band model can provide quite accurate results and is quite suitable for most atmospheric applications.

  1. Rotationally resolved infrared spectroscopy of adamantane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirali, O.; Boudon, V.; Oomens, J.; Vervloet, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first rotationally resolved spectra of adamantane (C10H16) applying gas-phase Fourier transform infrared (IR) absorption spectroscopy. High-resolution IR spectra are recorded in the 33-4500 cm-1range using as source of IR radiation both synchrotron radiation (at the AILES beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron) as well as a classical globar. Adamantane is a spherical top molecule with tetrahedral symmetry (Td point group) and has no permanent dipole moment in its vibronic ground state. Of the 72 fundamental vibrational modes in adamantane, only 11 are IR active. Here we present rotationally resolved spectra for seven of them: ν30, ν28, ν27, ν26, ν25, ν24, and ν23. The typical rotational structure of spherical tops is observed and analyzed using the STDS software developed in the Dijon group, which provides the first accurate energy levels and rotational constants for seven fundamental modes. Rotational levels with quantum numbers as high as J = 107 have been identified and included in the fit leading to a typical standard deviation of about 10-3 cm-1.

  2. Accurate interpretation of the Lachman test.

    PubMed

    Frank, C

    1986-12-01

    In a consecutive series of patients with knee complaints, tibial rotation consistently affected the interpretation of the Lachman test (passive anterior tibial translation in slight knee flexion). To perform the Lachman test correctly, the anterior tibial force must be applied posteromedially on the proximal tibia. This is best achieved by having the leg under examination on the same side of the bed as the examiner, and with slight external tibial rotation. Reaching across the bed to examine either leg can create either false positive or false negative Lachman results due to inadvertent tibial rotation (internal tibial rotation decreases translation) and inaccurate comparisons of the injured and normal legs. The importance of tibial rotation must be recognized if the Lachman test is to be used reliably and with maximum sensitivity. PMID:3780086

  3. Accurate eye center location through invariant isocentric patterns.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Roberto; Gevers, Theo

    2012-09-01

    Locating the center of the eyes allows for valuable information to be captured and used in a wide range of applications. Accurate eye center location can be determined using commercial eye-gaze trackers, but additional constraints and expensive hardware make these existing solutions unattractive and impossible to use on standard (i.e., visible wavelength), low-resolution images of eyes. Systems based solely on appearance are proposed in the literature, but their accuracy does not allow us to accurately locate and distinguish eye centers movements in these low-resolution settings. Our aim is to bridge this gap by locating the center of the eye within the area of the pupil on low-resolution images taken from a webcam or a similar device. The proposed method makes use of isophote properties to gain invariance to linear lighting changes (contrast and brightness), to achieve in-plane rotational invariance, and to keep low-computational costs. To further gain scale invariance, the approach is applied to a scale space pyramid. In this paper, we extensively test our approach for its robustness to changes in illumination, head pose, scale, occlusion, and eye rotation. We demonstrate that our system can achieve a significant improvement in accuracy over state-of-the-art techniques for eye center location in standard low-resolution imagery. PMID:22813958

  4. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... cuff are common. They include tendinitis, bursitis, and injuries such as tears. Rotator cuff tendons can become ... cuff depends on age, health, how severe the injury is, and how long you've had the ...

  5. The Rotating Mirror.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses theory of the rotating mirror, its use in measuring the velocity of the electrical signal in wires, and the velocity of light. Concludes with a description of the manometric flame apparatus developed for analyzing sound waves. (SK)

  6. Rotating mobile launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    Apparatus holds remotely piloted arm that accelerates until launching speed is reached. Then vehicle and counterweight at other end of arm are released simultaneously to avoid structural damage from unbalanced rotating forces.

  7. Rotator cuff problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... tear occurs when one of the tendons is torn from the bone from overuse or injury. Causes ... surgery with a larger incision) to repair the torn tendon. Outlook (Prognosis) With rotator cuff tendinitis, rest, ...

  8. Rotator cuff repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... already torn from chronic rotator cuff problems. A partial tear may not require surgery. Instead, rest and ... Follow any discharge and self-care instructions you are given. You will be wearing a sling when you leave the hospital. ...

  9. Stellar Rotation Effects in Polarimetric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajadian, Sedighe

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that the polarization signal in microlensing events of hot stars is larger than that of main-sequence stars. Most hot stars rotate rapidly around their stellar axes. The stellar rotation creates ellipticity and gravity-darkening effects that break the spherical symmetry of the source's shape and the circular symmetry of the source's surface brightness respectively. Hence, it causes a net polarization signal for the source star. This polarization signal should be considered in polarimetric microlensing of fast rotating stars. For moderately rotating stars, lensing can magnify or even characterize small polarization signals due to the stellar rotation through polarimetric observations. The gravity-darkening effect due to a rotating source star creates asymmetric perturbations in polarimetric and photometric microlensing curves whose maximum occurs when the lens trajectory crosses the projected position of the rotation pole on the sky plane. The stellar ellipticity creates a time shift (i) in the position of the second peak of the polarimetric curves in transit microlensing events and (ii) in the peak position of the polarimetric curves with respect to the photometric peak position in bypass microlensing events. By measuring this time shift via polarimetric observations of microlensing events, we can evaluate the ellipticity of the projected source surface on the sky plane. Given the characterizations of the FOcal Reducer and low dispersion Spectrograph (FORS2) polarimeter at the Very Large Telescope, the probability of observing this time shift is very small. The more accurate polarimeters of the next generation may well measure these time shifts and evaluate the ellipticity of microlensing source stars.

  10. Characteristic impedance of microstrip lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.; Deshpande, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    The dyadic Green's function for a current embedded in a grounded dielectric slab is used to analyze microstrip lines at millimeter wave frequencies. The dyadic Green's function accounts accurately for fringing fields and dielectric cover over the microstrip line. Using Rumsey's reaction concept, an expression for the characteristic impedance is obtained. The numerical results are compared with other reported results.

  11. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  12. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  13. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  14. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  15. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  16. Accurate calculations of bound rovibrational states for argon trimer

    SciTech Connect

    Brandon, Drew; Poirier, Bill

    2014-07-21

    This work presents a comprehensive quantum dynamics calculation of the bound rovibrational eigenstates of argon trimer (Ar{sub 3}), using the ScalIT suite of parallel codes. The Ar{sub 3} rovibrational energy levels are computed to a very high level of accuracy (10{sup −3} cm{sup −1} or better), and up to the highest rotational and vibrational excitations for which bound states exist. For many of these rovibrational states, wavefunctions are also computed. Rare gas clusters such as Ar{sub 3} are interesting because the interatomic interactions manifest through long-range van der Waals forces, rather than through covalent chemical bonding. As a consequence, they exhibit strong Coriolis coupling between the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom, as well as highly delocalized states, all of which renders accurate quantum dynamical calculation difficult. Moreover, with its (comparatively) deep potential well and heavy masses, Ar{sub 3} is an especially challenging rare gas trimer case. There are a great many rovibrational eigenstates to compute, and a very high density of states. Consequently, very few previous rovibrational state calculations for Ar{sub 3} may be found in the current literature—and only for the lowest-lying rotational excitations.

  17. Accurate calculations of bound rovibrational states for argon trimer.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Drew; Poirier, Bill

    2014-07-21

    This work presents a comprehensive quantum dynamics calculation of the bound rovibrational eigenstates of argon trimer (Ar3), using the ScalIT suite of parallel codes. The Ar3 rovibrational energy levels are computed to a very high level of accuracy (10(-3) cm(-1) or better), and up to the highest rotational and vibrational excitations for which bound states exist. For many of these rovibrational states, wavefunctions are also computed. Rare gas clusters such as Ar3 are interesting because the interatomic interactions manifest through long-range van der Waals forces, rather than through covalent chemical bonding. As a consequence, they exhibit strong Coriolis coupling between the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom, as well as highly delocalized states, all of which renders accurate quantum dynamical calculation difficult. Moreover, with its (comparatively) deep potential well and heavy masses, Ar3 is an especially challenging rare gas trimer case. There are a great many rovibrational eigenstates to compute, and a very high density of states. Consequently, very few previous rovibrational state calculations for Ar3 may be found in the current literature-and only for the lowest-lying rotational excitations. PMID:25053315

  18. Iron Line Diagnostics of Narrow Emission Line Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nousek, John A.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the activities at Penn State University supported by NASA Grant NAG5-2528, 'Iron Line Diagnostics of Narrow Emission Line Galaxies'. The aim of this investigation was to accurately measure the iron (Fe K) line emission in two X-ray selected Seyfert 2 galaxies (NGC 2992 and MCG-5-23-16). The astrophysics being probed was to determine whether the Fe line was narrow, broad or both. The broad line component is very important as a probe of the nature of the innermost accretion onto the central engine in AGN's.

  19. Electromagnetic rotational actuation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Alexander Lee

    2010-08-01

    There are many applications that need a meso-scale rotational actuator. These applications have been left by the wayside because of the lack of actuation at this scale. Sandia National Laboratories has many unique fabrication technologies that could be used to create an electromagnetic actuator at this scale. There are also many designs to be explored. In this internship exploration of the designs and fabrications technologies to find an inexpensive design that can be used for prototyping the electromagnetic rotational actuator.

  20. Rotational rate sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Steven L.

    2002-01-01

    A rate sensor for angular/rotational acceleration includes a housing defining a fluid cavity essentially completely filled with an electrolyte fluid. Within the housing, such as a toroid, ions in the fluid are swept during movement from an excitation electrode toward one of two output electrodes to provide a signal for directional rotation. One or more ground electrodes within the housing serve to neutralize ions, thus preventing any effect at the other output electrode.

  1. Robot Grasps Rotating Object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian H.; Tso, Kam S.; Litwin, Todd E.; Hayati, Samad A.; Bon, Bruce B.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental robotic system semiautomatically grasps rotating object, stops rotation, and pulls object to rest in fixture. Based on combination of advanced techniques for sensing and control, constructed to test concepts for robotic recapture of spinning artificial satellites. Potential terrestrial applications for technology developed with help of system includes tracking and grasping of industrial parts on conveyor belts, tracking of vehicles and animals, and soft grasping of moving objects in general.

  2. Instability in Rotating Machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings contain 45 papers on a wide range of subjects including flow generated instabilities in fluid flow machines, cracked shaft detection, case histories of instability phenomena in compressors, turbines, and pumps, vibration control in turbomachinery (including antiswirl techniques), and the simulation and estimation of destabilizing forces in rotating machines. The symposium was held to serve as an update on the understanding and control of rotating machinery instability problems.

  3. Rotating arc spark plug

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Tsai, Chin-Chi

    2003-05-27

    A spark plug device includes a structure for modification of an arc, the modification including arc rotation. The spark plug can be used in a combustion engine to reduce emissions and/or improve fuel economy. A method for operating a spark plug and a combustion engine having the spark plug device includes the step of modifying an arc, the modifying including rotating the arc.

  4. Heterodyne spectroscopy of carbon monoxide lines perturbed by hydrogen and helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannucci, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    Infrared heterodyne spectroscopy has been used for the first time to measure the widths and shifts of CO rovibrational spectra perturbed by H2 and He. A spectral resolution of 20 MHz was achieved. The CO-He line-broadening measurements were accurate enough to distinguish between two proposed intermolecular potential models of this system. Also, a measured increase in the broadening coefficient as a function of rotational quantum number j was observed for CO-He at temperatures of 80 K. This is not easy to explain in the context of so-called 'sudden approximations' which have been used to interpret pressure broadening data for this system.

  5. Rotational Spectrum of Sarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, A. R. Hight; Suenram, R. D.; Samuels, Alan; Jensen, James; Ellzy, Michael W.; Lochner, J. Michael; Zeroka, Daniel

    2001-05-01

    As part of an effort to examine the possibility of using molecular-beam Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy to unambiguously detect and monitor chemical warfare agents, we report the first observation and assignment of the rotational spectrum of the nerve agent Sarin (GB) (Methylphosphonofluoridic acid 1-methyl-ethyl ester, CAS #107-44-8) at frequencies between 10 and 22 GHz. Only one of the two low-energy conformers of this organophosphorus compound (C4H10FO2P) was observed in the rotationally cold (Trot<2 K) molecular beam. The experimental asymmetric-rotor ground-state rotational constants of this conformer are A=2874.0710(9) MHz, B=1168.5776(4) MHz, C=1056.3363(4) MHz (Type A standard uncertainties are given, i.e., 1σ), as obtained from a least-squares analysis of 74 a-, b-, and c-type rotational transitions. Several of the transitions are split into doublets due to the internal rotation of the methyl group attached to the phosphorus. The three-fold-symmetry barrier to internal rotation estimated from these splittings is 677.0(4) cm-1. Ab initio electronic structure calculations using Hartree-Fock, density functional, and Moller-Plesset perturbation theories have also been made. The structure of the lowest-energy conformer determined from a structural optimization at the MP2/6-311G** level of theory is consistent with our experimental findings.

  6. Rotation Rates of the Giant Planets (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, G.; Helled, R.; Anderson, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    It has been generally believed that a rotation period could be assigned to each of the giant planets. Accepted values of these periods, till now, are 9h 55m 29s, 10h 39m 22s, 17h 14m 24s, and 16h 06m 36s for Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, respectively. The rotation period of Jupiter is based on the periodic variations in the planet’s kilometric radiation and magnetic field, periodicities that have been unchanged since the Voyager flybys. The association of these periodicities with Jupiter’s internal rotation period is based on the idea that the radio and magnetic phenomena are tied to the planet’s magnetic field lines anchored deep within Jupiter. The periodic variations of the Saturnian Kilometric Radiation (SKR), unlike those of Jupiter, have not been rock solid, however; the periodicity has changed from 10h 39m 22s at the time of Voyager to 10h 45m 45s at the time of Cassini. Clearly, the SKR period does not represent the internal rotation period of Saturn, and it raises the possibility that the rotation periods of the other giant planets are uncertain. In fact, we must seriously reconsider whether the interiors of the giant planets are in solid body rotation with a single period. Even for Jupiter, the 9h 55m 29s rotation period might represent only the rotation of the region in which the magnetic field is generated. The dynamo region could extend from some unknown inner radius out to about 0.9 Jovian radius. The deeper Jovian interior could be rotating with a different period. A recent attempt to model the interior of Jupiter with new equation of state data concluded that the gravitational coefficients of Jupiter could not be fit unless Jupiter’s internal rotation rate was constant on cylinders parallel to the rotation axis (Militzer, B., W.B. Hubbard, J. Vorberger, I. Tamblyn, and S.A. Bonev, A massive core in Jupiter predicted from first-principles simulations, 2008, ApJ, 688, L45-L48 [doi: 10.1086/594364]). For Saturn, two studies of the

  7. Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Cherbas, Lucy; Gong, Lei

    2014-01-01

    We review the properties and uses of cell lines in Drosophila research, emphasizing the variety of lines, the large body of genomic and transcriptional data available for many of the lines, and the variety of ways the lines have been used to provide tools for and insights into the developmental, molecular, and cell biology of Drosophila and mammals. PMID:24434506

  8. Ring wormholes via duality rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, Gary W.; Volkov, Mikhail S.

    2016-09-01

    We apply duality rotations and complex transformations to the Schwarzschild metric to obtain wormhole geometries with two asymptotically flat regions connected by a throat. In the simplest case these are the well-known wormholes supported by phantom scalar field. Further duality rotations remove the scalar field to yield less well known vacuum metrics of the oblate Zipoy-Voorhees-Weyl class, which describe ring wormholes. The ring encircles the wormhole throat and can have any radius, whereas its tension is always negative and should be less than -c4 / 4 G. If the tension reaches the maximal value, the geometry becomes exactly flat, but the topology remains non-trivial and corresponds to two copies of Minkowski space glued together along the disk encircled by the ring. The geodesics are straight lines, and those which traverse the ring get to the other universe. The ring therefore literally produces a hole in space. Such wormholes could perhaps be created by negative energies concentrated in toroidal volumes, for example by vacuum fluctuations.

  9. Relativity on rotated graph paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Roberto B.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a method for constructing spacetime diagrams for special relativity on graph paper that has been rotated by 45°. The diagonal grid lines represent light-flash worldlines in Minkowski spacetime, and the boxes in the grid (called "clock diamonds") represent units of measurement corresponding to the ticks of an inertial observer's light clock. We show that many quantitative results can be read off a spacetime diagram simply by counting boxes, with very little algebra. In particular, we show that the squared interval between two events is equal to the signed area of the parallelogram on the grid (called the "causal diamond") with opposite vertices corresponding to those events. We use the Doppler effect—without explicit use of the Doppler formula—to motivate the method.

  10. Pure rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy in mixtures of CO and N2.

    PubMed

    Afzelius, Mikael; Brackmann, Christian; Vestin, Fredrik; Bengtsson, Per-Erik

    2004-12-20

    We present a model for quantitative measurements in binary mixtures of nitrogen and carbon monoxide by the use of dual-broadband rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. The model has been compared with experimental rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectra recorded within the temperature range of 294-702 K. Temperatures and concentrations were evaluated by spectral fits using libraries of theoretically calculated spectra. The relative error of the temperature measurements was 1-2%, and the absolute error of the CO concentration measurements was <0.5% for temperatures < or =600 K. For higher temperatures, the gas composition was not chemically stable, and we observed a conversion of CO to CO2. The influence of important spectroscopic parameters such as the anisotropic polarizability and Raman line-broadening coefficients are discussed in terms of concentration measurements. In particular, it is shown that the CO concentration measurement was more accurate if N2-CO and CO-N2 line-broadening coefficients were included in the calculation. The applicability of the model for quantitative flame measurements is demonstrated by measuring CO concentrations in ethylene/air flames. PMID:15646786

  11. The Rotational Spectrum of Singly and Doubly 13C-SUBSTITUTED Dimethylether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koerber, Monika; Endres, Christian P.; Lewen, Frank; Giesen, Thomas F.; Schlemmer, Stephan; Pohl, Roland; Klein, Axel

    2010-06-01

    Dimethylether (DME) is a nearly prolate asymmetric top with two internal rotors (methyl groups) which undergo periodic large amplitude motions and show a complicated torsional splitting of each rotational energy level. Due to its complex spectrum and its high abundance in hot cores such as Orion KL or Sagittarius B2 at temperatures exceeding 100 K, DME is very prominent in astronomical line surveys and contributes to spectral line confusion of such sources. The interpretation of astronomical observations therefore depends on the knowledge of accurate rest frequencies and reliable intensities. Precise predictions for the ground state of DME's main isotopologue are now available up to 2.1 THz In contrast, very little is known about 13C-substituted DME. Only a few data are available on singly 13C-substituted DME, 12CH_3O13CH_3. However, no data are available on doubly 13C-substituted DME, (13CH_3)_2O, yet. While in (13CH_3)_2O the two internal rotating methyl groups are equivalent and the splitting of rotational energy levels into four substates is comparable to the main isotopologue, singly 13C-substituted DME has two non-equivalent internal rotors resulting in torsional splitting of rotational energy levels into five substates. The purpose of our new laboratory measurements is to extend the knowledge on the astrophysically relevant species 12CH_3O13CH_3. To analyze the complicated spectrum resulting from a 13C-enriched sample of DME, containing all different 13C-substituted species as well as the main isotopologue, also precise data on doubly 13C-substituted DME are inevitable. We performed measurements in the frequency region 35-120 GHz using an all solid state spectrometer. Rotational as well as torsional parameters have been obtained for (13CH_3)_2O as well as 12CH_3O13CH_3 by fitting the assigned transitions to an effective rotational Hamiltonian introduced by Peter Groner. C. Comito et al., Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 156, 127-167 (2005) C. P. Endres et al

  12. Faraday Rotation Observations of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, S.; Spangler, S. R.

    1998-05-01

    Faraday rotation measures the path integral of the product of electron density and line of sight component of the magnetic field from the observer to a source of linearly polarized radio emission. For our observations, the line of sight passes through the solar corona. These observations were made with the NRAO Very Large Array at frequencies of 1465 and 1635 MHz. Observations at two frequencies can confirm the lambda (2) dependence of position angle rotation characteristic of Faraday rotation. We observed the extended radio source 0036+030 (4C+03.01) on March 28, 1997, when the source was 8.6 Rsun from the center of the Sun. Nearly continuous observations were made over an 11 hour period. Our observations measure an average rotation measure (RM) of about +7 radians/m(2) attributable to the corona. The RM showed slow variations during the observing session, with a total change of about 3 radians/m(2) . This variation is attributed to large scale gradients and static plasma structures in the corona, and is the same for two source components separated by 30 arcseconds (22000 km). We have also detected RM variations on time scales of 15 minutes to one hour, which may be coronal Alfven waves. We measure an rms variation of 0.57 radians/m(2) for such fluctuations, which is comparable to previous reports.

  13. Generalization of the rotated parabolic equation to variable slopes.

    PubMed

    Outing, Donald A; Siegmann, William L; Collins, Michael D; Westwood, Evan K

    2006-12-01

    The rotated parabolic equation [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 87, 1035-1037 (1990)] is generalized to problems involving ocean-sediment interfaces of variable slope. The approach is based on approximating a variable slope in terms of a series of constant slope regions. The original rotated parabolic equation algorithm is used to march the field through each region. An interpolation-extrapolation approach is used to generate a starting field at the beginning of each region beyond the one containing the source. For the elastic case, a series of operators is applied to rotate the dependent variable vector along with the coordinate system. The variable rotated parabolic equation should provide accurate solutions to a large class of range-dependent seismo-acoustics problems. For the fluid case, the accuracy of the approach is confirmed through comparisons with reference solutions. For the elastic case, variable rotated parabolic equation solutions are compared with energy-conserving and mapping solutions. PMID:17225384

  14. Conformational Slippage Determines Rotational Frequency in Five-Component Nanorotors.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Soumen K; Rana, Anup; Schmittel, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Several five-component nanorotors ROT-3 that rotate at different rates were prepared by adding phenanthrolines of distinct lateral size as brake blocks to the four-component nanorotor ROT-2. The brake blocks interfere with the 180° rotor causing the rotational frequency to drop from 97 kHz to 5 kHz. The effect of the rotating brake blocks on the rotational frequency in ROT-3 is accurately predicted by a nanomechanical model called "conformational slippage". For quantification, the interaction of the brake blocks with the trajectory of the main rotator is gauged based on the number of interfering vs. non-interfering conformations as computed by PM6. PMID:26836349

  15. Rotating copper plasmoid in external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Pramod K.; Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-02-15

    Effect of nonuniform magnetic field on the expanding copper plasmoid in helium and argon gases using optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging is presented. We report a peculiar oscillatory rotation of plasmoid in magnetic field and argon ambient. The temporal variation and appearance of the dip in the electron temperature show a direct evidence of the threading and expulsion of the magnetic field lines from the plasmoid. Rayleigh Taylor instability produced at the interface separating magnetic field and plasma is discussed.

  16. MODELING MOLECULAR HYPERFINE LINE EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Keto, Eric; Rybicki, George

    2010-06-20

    In this paper, we discuss two approximate methods previously suggested for modeling hyperfine spectral line emission for molecules whose collisional transition rates between hyperfine levels are unknown. Hyperfine structure is seen in the rotational spectra of many commonly observed molecules such as HCN, HNC, NH{sub 3}, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and C{sup 17}O. The intensities of these spectral lines can be modeled by numerical techniques such as {Lambda}-iteration that alternately solve the equations of statistical equilibrium and the equation of radiative transfer. However, these calculations require knowledge of both the radiative and collisional rates for all transitions. For most commonly observed radio frequency spectral lines, only the net collisional rates between rotational levels are known. For such cases, two approximate methods have been suggested. The first method, hyperfine statistical equilibrium, distributes the hyperfine level populations according to their statistical weight, but allows the population of the rotational states to depart from local thermal equilibrium (LTE). The second method, the proportional method, approximates the collision rates between the hyperfine levels as fractions of the net rotational rates apportioned according to the statistical degeneracy of the final hyperfine levels. The second method is able to model non-LTE hyperfine emission. We compare simulations of N{sub 2}H{sup +} hyperfine lines made with approximate and more exact rates and find that satisfactory results are obtained.

  17. Ayty: a New Line-List for Hot Formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Refaie, Ahmed Faris; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yachmenev, Andrey

    2015-06-01

    The ExoMol [1] project aims at providing spectroscopic data for key molecules that can be used to characterize the atmospheres of exoplanets and cool stars. Formaldehyde (H2CO) is of growing importance in studying and modelling terrestrial atmospheric chemistry and dynamics. It also has relevance in astrophysical phenomena that include interstellar medium abundance, proto-planetary and cometary ice chemistry and masers from extra-galactic sources. However there gaps in currently available absolute intensities and a lack of higher rotational excitations that makes it unfeasible to accurately model high temperature systems such as hot Jupiters. Here we present AYTY [2], a new line list for formaldehyde applicable to temperatures up to 1500 K. AYTY contains almost 10 million states reaching rotational excitations up to J=70 and over 10 billion transitions at up to 10 000 cm-1. The line list was computed using the variational ro-vibrational solver TROVE with a refined ab-initio potential energy surface and dipole moment surface. J.~Tennyson and S.~N. Yurchenko MNRAS, 425:21--33, 2012. A.~F. Al-Refaie, S.~N. Yurchenko, A.~Yachmenev, and J.~Tennyson MNRAS, 2015.

  18. Tubing rotator reduces tubing wear in rod pumped wells

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, M. ); Brown, C. )

    1994-04-04

    Tubing failures are both expensive and time-consuming. The most common failure results from rod cutting, or, erosion of the tubing ID because of continuous, reciprocating contact with the rod string. Installation of tubing rotators has decreased tubing failures in West Texas waterflood sucker-rod pumped wells. Pumping unit movement powers the rotator system, turning the tubing string at about 1 revolution/day. The rotator system has both surface and subsurface components. A reduction gear box attached to the walking beam converts the pumping unit's reciprocating strokes into rotary motion. A drive line transfers this rotary motion to a gear-driven suspension mandrel in the rotating tubing hanger. Near the bottom of the tubing string, a rotating tubing anchor/catcher allows the entire tubing string, including the tail pipe, seating nipple, and gas and mud anchor to rotate. The rotator hanger suspends the weight of the tubing string on a bearing system. One model of the hanger has a load capacity of 135,000 lb. A surface swivel allows rotation below the pumping tee so that the flow lines remain stationary. Also included in the string is a safety shear coupling to prevent over torquing the tubing.

  19. An accurate measurement of the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation with heavily gas-dominated ALFALFA galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papastergis, E.; Adams, E. A. K.; van der Hulst, J. M.

    2016-09-01

    We use a sample of 97 galaxies selected from the Arecibo legacy fast ALFA (ALFALFA) 21 cm survey to make an accurate measurement of the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation (BTFR). These galaxies are specifically selected to be heavily gas-dominated (Mgas/M∗ ≳ 2.7) and to be oriented edge-on. The former property ensures that the error on the galactic baryonic mass is small, despite the large systematic uncertainty involved in galactic stellar mass estimates. The latter property means that rotational velocities can be derived directly from the width of the 21 cm emission line, without any need for inclination corrections. We measure a slope for the linewidth-based BTFR of α = 3.75 ± 0.11, a value that is somewhat steeper than (but in broad agreement with) previous literature results. The relation is remarkably tight, with almost all galaxies being located within a perpendicular distance of ± 0.1 dex from the best fit line. The low observational error budget for our sample enables us to establish that, despite its tightness, the measured linewidth-based BTFR has some small (i.e., non-zero) intrinsic scatter. We furthermore find a systematic difference in the BTFR of galaxies with "double-horned" 21 cm line profiles - suggestive of flat outer galactic rotation curves - and those with "peaked" profiles - suggestive of rising rotation curves. When we restrict our sample of galaxies to objects in the former category, we measure a slightly steeper slope of α = 4.13 ± 0.15. Overall, the high-accuracy measurement of the BTFR presented in this article is intended as a reliable observational benchmark against which to test theoretical expectations. Here we consider a representative set of semi-analytic models and hydrodynamic simulations in the lambda cold dark matter (ΛCDM) context, as well as modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND). In the near future, interferometric follow-up observations of several sample members will enable us to further refine the BTFR measurement, and

  20. Rotating Aperture System

    DOEpatents

    Rusnak, Brian; Hall, James M.; Shen, Stewart; Wood, Richard L.

    2005-01-18

    A rotating aperture system includes a low-pressure vacuum pumping stage with apertures for passage of a deuterium beam. A stator assembly includes holes for passage of the beam. The rotor assembly includes a shaft connected to a deuterium gas cell or a crossflow venturi that has a single aperture on each side that together align with holes every rotation. The rotating apertures are synchronized with the firing of the deuterium beam such that the beam fires through a clear aperture and passes into the Xe gas beam stop. Portions of the rotor are lapped into the stator to improve the sealing surfaces, to prevent rapid escape of the deuterium gas from the gas cell.

  1. Rotating ice blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorbolo, Stephane; Adami, Nicolas; Grasp Team

    2014-11-01

    The motion of ice discs released at the surface of a thermalized bath was investigated. As observed in some rare events in the Nature, the discs start spinning spontaneously. The motor of this motion is the cooling of the water close to the ice disc. As the density of water is maximum at 4°C, a downwards flow is generated from the surface of the ice block to the bottom. This flow generates the rotation of the disc. The speed of rotation depends on the mass of the ice disc and on the temperature of the bath. A model has been constructed to study the influence of the temperature of the bath. Finally, ice discs were put on a metallic plate. Again, a spontaneous rotation was observed. FNRS is thanked for financial support.

  2. IO Rotation Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    During its 1979 flyby, Voyager 2 observed Io only from a distance. However, the volcanic activity discovered by Voyager 1 months earlier was readily visible. This sequence of nine color images was collected using the Blue, Green and Orange filters from about 1.2 million kilometers. A 2.5 hour period is covered during which Io rotates 7 degrees.

    Rotating into view over the limb of Io are the plumes of the volcanoes Amirani (top) and Maui (lower). These plumes are very distinct against the black sky because they are being illuminated from behind. Notice that as Io rotates, the proportion of Io which is sunlit decreases greatly. This changing phase angle is because Io is moving between the spacecraft and the Sun.

    This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1985.

  3. Lattice QCD in rotating frames.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Arata; Hirono, Yuji

    2013-08-23

    We formulate lattice QCD in rotating frames to study the physics of QCD matter under rotation. We construct the lattice QCD action with the rotational metric and apply it to the Monte Carlo simulation. As the first application, we calculate the angular momenta of gluons and quarks in the rotating QCD vacuum. This new framework is useful to analyze various rotation-related phenomena in QCD. PMID:24010426

  4. Ergometer calibrator. [for any ergometer utilizing rotating shaft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gause, R. L. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An apparatus is presented for accurately calibrating ergometers so that the work rate produced by the particular ergometer being calibrated is accurate. The apparatus includes a dc motor which is coupled directly to the ergometer for rotating it at various speeds. Positioned on the shaft between the dc motor and the ergometer is a torque sensor and tachometer, which feed signals to a power computer for subsequent recording. A speed controller is utilized with the dc motor.

  5. Rotation of Giant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissin, Yevgeni; Thompson, Christopher

    2015-07-01

    The internal rotation of post-main sequence stars is investigated, in response to the convective pumping of angular momentum toward the stellar core, combined with a tight magnetic coupling between core and envelope. The spin evolution is calculated using model stars of initial mass 1, 1.5, and 5 {M}⊙ , taking into account mass loss on the giant branches. We also include the deposition of orbital angular momentum from a sub-stellar companion, as influenced by tidal drag along with the excitation of orbital eccentricity by a fluctuating gravitational quadrupole moment. A range of angular velocity profiles {{Ω }}(r) is considered in the envelope, extending from solid rotation to constant specific angular momentum. We focus on the backreaction of the Coriolis force, and the threshold for dynamo action in the inner envelope. Quantitative agreement with measurements of core rotation in subgiants and post-He core flash stars by Kepler is obtained with a two-layer angular velocity profile: uniform specific angular momentum where the Coriolis parameter {Co}\\equiv {{Ω }}{τ }{con}≲ 1 (here {τ }{con} is the convective time), and {{Ω }}(r)\\propto {r}-1 where {Co}≳ 1. The inner profile is interpreted in terms of a balance between the Coriolis force and angular pressure gradients driven by radially extended convective plumes. Inward angular momentum pumping reduces the surface rotation of subgiants, and the need for a rejuvenated magnetic wind torque. The co-evolution of internal magnetic fields and rotation is considered in Kissin & Thompson, along with the breaking of the rotational coupling between core and envelope due to heavy mass loss.

  6. Characterizing Exoplanet Atmospheres : A Complete Line List for Phosphine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa-Silva, C.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Tennyson, J.

    2013-09-01

    The ability to characterise the atmospheres of cool stars, brown dwarfs and exoplanets requires fundamental data for all species contributing significantly to their opacity. However, with notable exceptions such as water and ammonia, existing molecular line lists are not sufficiently accurate or complete to allow for a full spectroscopic analysis of these bodies. ExoMol (www.exomol.com [1]) is a project that aims to rectify this by generating comprehensive line lists for all molecules likely to be detected in the atmospheres of cool astrophysical objects in the foreseeable future. The spectral data is generated by employing ab initio quantum mechanical methods, performing empirical refinement based on experimental spectroscopic data and harnessing high performance computing. Here we present our work on phosphine, (PH3), an equilateral pyramidal molecule (the phosphorus analogue to ammonia). Phosphine is known to be important for the atmospheres of giant-planets, cool stars and many other astronomical bodies. Rotational transition features of phosphine have been found in the far- infrared spectra of Saturn and Jupiter [2, 3], where it is a marker for vertical convection zones. A computed room temperature line list of phosphine is presented here [4], illustrated in the accompanying figure 1. This line list is a precursor to a high temperature equivalent to be produced in the near future, necessary for the analysis of cool stars and brown dwarfs. All the transitions' energy levels and Einstein A-coefficients were computed using the program TROVE [5].

  7. Rotating flexible drag mill

    DOEpatents

    Pepper, W.B.

    1984-05-09

    A rotating parachute for decelerating objects travelling through atmosphere at subsonic or supersonic deployment speeds includes a circular canopy having a plurality of circumferentially arranged flexible panels projecting radially from a solid central disk. A slot extends radially between adjacent panels to the outer periphery of the canopy. Upon deployment, the solid disk diverts air radially to rapidly inflate the panels into a position of maximum diameter. Air impinging on the panels adjacent the panel slots rotates the parachute during its descent. Centrifugal force flattens the canopy into a constant maximum diameter during terminal descent for maximum drag and deceleration.

  8. Rotating bubble membrane radiator

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Brent J.; Coomes, Edmund P.

    1988-12-06

    A heat radiator useful for expelling waste heat from a power generating system aboard a space vehicle is disclosed. Liquid to be cooled is passed to the interior of a rotating bubble membrane radiator, where it is sprayed into the interior of the bubble. Liquid impacting upon the interior surface of the bubble is cooled and the heat radiated from the outer surface of the membrane. Cooled liquid is collected by the action of centrifical force about the equator of the rotating membrane and returned to the power system. Details regarding a complete space power system employing the radiator are given.

  9. Rotating shielded crane system

    DOEpatents

    Commander, John C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotating, radiation shielded crane system for use in a high radiation test cell, comprises a radiation shielding wall, a cylindrical ceiling made of radiation shielding material and a rotatable crane disposed above the ceiling. The ceiling rests on an annular ledge intergrally attached to the inner surface of the shielding wall. Removable plugs in the ceiling provide access for the crane from the top of the ceiling into the test cell. A seal is provided at the interface between the inner surface of the shielding wall and the ceiling.

  10. New 360-deg. rotation profilometry and its application in engine design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi; Sun, Ping; Wang, Haifeng

    2002-05-01

    A new automatic measurement technique for 360 degrees surface topography of 3D diffuse objects is proposed in this paper. The technique bases on a new structured illumination method, called step projection, and a new algorithm. The principle, hardware and software of the automated measurement system are completely expressed. Some researchers are carried out on the accuracy of step projection. It is suitable for 360 degrees objects like asymmetrical cylinder, especially for objects with irregular surface. Besides this, it has many advantages, such as simple optical setting, lower cost, and easy determination of deformed line's position. Using the technique a 360 degrees 3D object with greater grads change on its surface can be reconstructed. The shape of flow passage of engine valve is very irregular. By using the automated rotation profilometry, it can be measured accurately. The experimental results are offered.

  11. Detection of Formaldehyde Emission in Comet C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) at Infrared Wavelengths: Line-by-Line Validation of Modeled Fluorescent Intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiSanti, M. A.; Bonev, B. P.; Magee-Sauer, K.; Dello Russo, N.; Mumma, M. J.; Reuter, D. C.; Villanueva, G. L.

    2006-10-01

    Formaldehyde (H2CO) was observed in comet C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) with spectral resolving power λ/Δλ~2.5×104 using the Cryogenic Echelle Spectrometer (CSHELL) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, on UT 2004 May 5, 7, and 9. The observations, which sampled emission in the ν1 and ν5 rovibrational bands between 3.53 and 3.62 μm, represent the first spectrally resolved detection, at infrared wavelengths, of monomeric H2CO spanning a range of rotational energies. A comparison of measured line intensities with an existing fluorescence model permitted extraction of rotational temperatures and production rates. Two complementary approaches were used: (1) a correlation analysis that provided a direct global comparison of the observed cometary emissions with the model and (2) an excitation analysis that provided a robust line-by-line comparison. Our results validate the fluorescence model. The overall correlation coefficient was near or above 0.9 in our two principal grating settings. The excitation analysis provided accurate measures of rotational excitation (rotational temperature) on all three dates, with retrieved values of Trot clustering near 100 K. Through simultaneous measurement of OH prompt emission, which we use as a proxy for H2O, we obtained native production rates and mixing ratios for H2CO. The native production of H2CO varied from day to day, but its abundance relative to H2O, Xnative, remained approximately constant within the errors, which may suggest an overall homogeneous composition of the nucleus. We measured a mean mixing ratio Xnative= (0.79+/-0.09) × 10-2 for the three dates.

  12. Issues in the analysis and interpretation of cyclotron lines in gamma ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, D. Q.

    1992-01-01

    The Bayesian approach is discussed to establishing the existence of lines, the importance of observing multiple cyclotron harmonics in determining physical parameters from the lines, and evidence from cyclotron lines of neutron star rotation.

  13. Measure Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crissman, Sally

    2011-01-01

    One tool for enhancing students' work with data in the science classroom is the measure line. As a coteacher and curriculum developer for The Inquiry Project, the author has seen how measure lines--a number line in which the numbers refer to units of measure--help students not only represent data but also analyze it in ways that generate…

  14. Adaptive modification of vestibularly perceived rotation.

    PubMed

    Bloomberg, J; Melvill Jones, G; Segal, B

    1991-01-01

    Results from Bloomberg et al. (1991) led to the hypothesis that saccades which accompany the dark-tested vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) tend to move the eyes towards a vestibularly derived percept of an intended oculomotor goal: also that this is so even when that percept has been adaptively modified by suitably prolonged visual-vestibular conflict. The present experiments investigate these implications by comparing the combined VOR + saccade performance with a presumed "motor readout" of the normal and adaptively modified vestibular percept. The methods employed were similar to those of an earlier study Bloomberg et al. (1988) in which it was found that after cessation of a brief passive whole body rotation in the dark, a previously seen earth-fixed target can be accurately located by saccadic eye movements based on a vestibular memory of the preceding head rotation; the so-called "Vestibular Memory-Contingent Saccade" (VMCS) paradigm. The results showed that the vestibular perceptual response, as measured after rotation by means of the VMCS paradigm, was on average indistinguishable from the combined VOR + saccade response measured during rotation. Furthermore, this was so in both the normal and adapted states. We conclude that these findings substantiate the above hypothesis. The results incidentally reaffirm the adaptive modifiability of vestibular perception, emphasing the need for active maintenance of its proper calibration according to behavioural context. PMID:1855564

  15. Sensitivity to full-field visual movement compatible with head rotation: variations among axes of rotation.

    PubMed

    Harris, L R; Lott, L A

    1995-01-01

    Movement detection thresholds for full-field visual motion about various axes were measured in three subjects using a two-alternative forced-choice staircase method. Thresholds for 1-s exposures to rotation about different rotation axes varied significantly over the range 0.139 +/- 0.05 deg/s to 0.463 +/- 0.166 deg/s. The highest thresholds were found in response to rotation about axes closely aligned to the line of sight. Variations among the thresholds for different axes could not be explained by different movement patterns in the fovea or variations in motion sensitivity with eccentricity. The variations can be well simulated by a three-channel model for coding the axis and velocity of full-field visual motion. A three-channel visual coding system would be well suited for extracting information about self-rotation from a complex pattern of retinal image motion containing components due to both rotation and translation. A three-channel visual motion system would also be readily compatible with vestibular information concerning self-rotation arising from the semicircular canals. PMID:8527373

  16. Inhibited rotational quenching in oriented ultra-high rotational states of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toro, Carlos; Liu, Qingnan; Echebiri, Geraldine O.; Mullin, Amy S.

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate long-lived rotational orientation of CO2 molecules originally prepared in an optical centrifuge. The optical centrifuge traps molecules in a strong optical field and spins them to high rotational states by angular acceleration of the optical field. In the case of CO2, the optical centrifuge creates ultra-high rotational states with J ≥ 220. Polarisation-dependent, high-resolution transient infrared (IR) absorption was used to measure the spatial orientation of CO2 molecules in the (0000, J = 76) state following the optical centrifuge pulse and subsequent collisional energy transfer. Transient Doppler-broadened line profiles show that CO2 molecules in J = 76 probed with an IR transition dipole parallel to the initial plane of rotation are more plentiful and have higher translational temperatures than molecules with an IR transition dipole perpendicular to this plane. Time-dependent data show that the initial angular momentum orientation persists even after thousands of collisions, indicating that molecules in an optical centrifuge behave as quantum gyroscopes. These observations demonstrate that the optical centrifuge prepares an anisotropic rotational distribution and that molecules in oriented, ultra-high angular momentum states require many more collisions to randomise their orientation than do those in low rotational states.

  17. Research on motor rotational speed measurement in regenerative braking system of electric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Chaofeng; Chen, Liao; Chen, Long; Jiang, Haobin; Li, Zhongxing; Wang, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    Rotational speed signals acquisition and processing techniques are widely used in rotational machinery. In order to realized precise and real-time control of motor drive and regenerative braking process, rotational speed measurement techniques are needed in electric vehicles. Obtaining accurate motor rotational speed signal will contribute to the regenerative braking force control steadily and realized higher energy recovery rate. This paper aims to develop a method that provides instantaneous speed information in the form of motor rotation. It addresses principles of motor rotational speed measurement in the regenerative braking systems of electric vehicle firstly. The paper then presents ideal and actual Hall position sensor signals characteristics, the relation between the motor rotational speed and the Hall position sensor signals is revealed. Finally, Hall position sensor signals conditioning and processing circuit and program for motor rotational speed measurement have been carried out based on measurement error analysis.

  18. Small Jovian Trojan Asteroids: An Excess of Slow Rotators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Linda M.

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence support a common origin for, and possible hereditary link between, cometary nuclei and jovian Trojan asteroids. Due to their distance and low albedos, few comet-sized Trojans have been studied. We discuss the rotation properties of Jovian Trojan asteroids less than 30 km in diameter. Approximately half of the objects discussed here were studied using densely sampled lightcurves (French et al. 2015a, b); Stephens et al. 2015), and the other half were sparse lightcurves obtained by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF; Waszcazk et al. 2015). A significant fraction (~40%) of the objects in the ground-based sample rotate slowly (P > 24h), with measured periods as long as 375 h (Warner and Stephens 2011). The PTF data show a similar excess of slow rotators. Only 5 objects in the combined data set have rotation periods of less than six hours. Three of these fast rotators were contained in the data set of French et al. these three had a geometric mean rotation period of 5.29 hours. A prolate spheroid held together by gravity rotating with this period would have a critical density of 0.43 gm/cm3, a density similar to that of comets (Lamy et al. 2004). Harris et al. (2012) and Warner et al. (2011) have explored the possible effects on asteroid rotational statistics with the results from wide-field surveys. We will examine Trojan rotation statistics with and without the results from the PTF.

  19. Tests of Rotating Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Elliott G

    1924-01-01

    Tests were made in the no. 1 wind tunnel at Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory to determine the air forces acting on rotating cylinders with axes perpendicular to the direction of motion. One cylinder had a circular cross-section, the other that of a greek cross.

  20. Rotational waves in geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerus, Artyom; Vikulin, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The rotation model of a geoblock with intrinsic momentum was constructed by A.V. Vikulin and A.G. Ivanchin [9, 10] to describe seismicity within the Pacific Ocean margin. It is based on the idea of a rotational motion of geoblocks as the parts of the rotating body of the Earth that generates rotary deformation waves. The law of the block motion was derived in the form of the sine-Gordon equation (SG) [5, 9]; the dimensionless form of the equation is: δ2θ δ2θ δξ2 - δη2 = sinθ, (1) where θ = β/2, ξ = k0z and η = v0k0t are dimensionless coordinates, z - length of the chain of masses (blocks), t - time, β - turn angle, ν0 - representative velocity of the process, k0 - wave number. Another case analyzed was a chain of nonuniformly rotating blocks, with deviation of force moments from equilibrium positions μ, considering friction forces α along boundaries, which better matched a real-life seismic process. As a result, the authors obtained the law of motion for a block in a chain in the form of the modified SG equation [8]: δ2θ δ2θ δθ- δξ2 - δ η2 = sin θ+ α δη + μδ(ξ)sin θ (2)

  1. Troubleshooting rotating equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.F. )

    1992-10-01

    This paper reports that equipment problems in a Peruvian refinery illustrate the process engineer's role as a troubleshooter. Examples show that rotating equipment problems can stem from mechanical or process factors and involve both inspection/maintenance specialists and process engineers.

  2. Rotatable stem and lock

    DOEpatents

    Deveney, Joseph E.; Sanderson, Stephen N.

    1984-01-01

    A valve stem and lock include a housing surrounding a valve stem, a solenoid affixed to an interior wall of the housing, an armature affixed to the valve stem and a locking device for coupling the armature to the housing body. When the solenoid is energized, the solenoid moves away from the housing body, permitting rotation of the valve stem.

  3. Rotational clutter metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Salem; Halford, Carl; Moyer, Steve; Gundy, Matthew

    2009-08-01

    A new approach to linear discriminant analysis (LDA), called orthogonal rotational LDA (ORLDA) is presented. Using ORLDA and properly accounting for target size allowed development of a new clutter metric that is based on the Laplacian pyramid (LP) decomposition of clutter images. The new metric achieves correlation exceeding 98% with expert human labeling of clutter levels in a set of 244 infrared images. Our clutter metric is based on the set of weights for the LP levels that best classify images into clutter levels as manually classified by an expert human observer. LDA is applied as a preprocessing step to classification. LDA suffers from a few limitations in this application. Therefore, we propose a new approach to LDA, called ORLDA, using orthonormal geometric rotations. Each rotation brings the LP feature space closer to the LDA solution while retaining orthogonality in the feature space. To understand the effects of target size on clutter, we applied ORLDA at different target sizes. The outputs are easily related because they are functions of orthogonal rotation angles. Finally, we used Bayesian decision theory to learn class boundaries for clutter levels at different target sizes.

  4. Concepts in crop rotations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop rotations have been a part of civilization since the Middle Ages. With colonization of what would become the United States came new crops of tobacco, cotton, and corn, the first two of which would play significant roles in both the economic beginnings and social fabric of the new country, how ...

  5. Anisotropy in rotating drums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povall, Timothy; McBride, Andrew; Govender, Indresan

    2015-11-01

    An anisotropic relationship between the stress and the strain rate has been observed in two-dimensional simulations of rotating drums. The objective of this work is to investigate the structure of the constitutive relation using three-dimensional discrete-element-method simulations of a rotating drum containing identical rigid spheres for a range of rotational speeds. Anisotropy is quantified from the alignment of the stress and strain rate tensors, with the strain rate computed using a least-squares fit. It is shown that in certain regions there is a strong anisotropic relationship, regardless of the speed of rotation. The effective friction coefficient is examined in order to determine the phase space in which the μ (I) rheology is valid. Lastly, a depth-averaged approach through the flowing layer is employed to determine the relationship between the velocity tangential to the equilibrium surface and the height of the flowing layer. A power-law relationship that approaches linear at high speeds is observed. Supported by NRF/DST Scarce Skills (South Africa).

  6. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  7. Rotatable stem and lock

    DOEpatents

    Deveney, J.E.; Sanderson, S.N.

    1981-10-27

    A valve stem and lock is disclosed which includes a housing surrounding a valve stem, a solenoid affixed to an interior wall of the housing, an armature affixed to the valve stem and a locking device for coupling the armature to the housing body. When the solenoid is energized, the solenoid moves away from the housing body, permitting rotation of the valve stem.

  8. Rotating Saddle Paul Trap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueckner, Wolfgang; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a demonstration in which a ball is placed in an unstable position on a saddle shape. The ball becomes stable when it is rotated above some threshold angular velocity. The demonstration is a mechanical analog of confining a particle in a "Paul Trap". (DDR)

  9. Rotating Responsibility Reaps Rewards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Barbara; Schullery, Nancy

    2000-01-01

    Describes a process used for group assignments in a business communication course which holds all group members accountable by using a structure of rotating responsibility. Discusses selecting assignments and implementing the process, noting how this structure requires equivalent advance preparation from all members and provides opportunities for…

  10. Rotationally Actuated Prosthetic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell G., Jr.; Carden, James R.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand attached to end of remaining part of forearm and to upper arm just above elbow. Pincerlike fingers pushed apart to degree depending on rotation of forearm. Simpler in design, simpler to operate, weighs less, and takes up less space.

  11. Rotational Dynamics with Tracker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eadkhong, T.; Rajsadorn, R.; Jannual, P.; Danworaphong, S.

    2012-01-01

    We propose the use of Tracker, freeware for video analysis, to analyse the moment of inertia ("I") of a cylindrical plate. Three experiments are performed to validate the proposed method. The first experiment is dedicated to find the linear coefficient of rotational friction ("b") for our system. By omitting the effect of such friction, we derive…

  12. Sharp Interface Tracking in Rotating Microflows of Solvent Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Glimm, James; Almeida, Valmor de; Jiao, Xiangmin; Sims, Brett; Li, Xaiolin

    2013-01-08

    The objective of this project is to develop a specialized sharp interface tracking simulation capability for predicting interaction of micron-sized drops and bubbles in rotating flows relevant to optimized design of contactor devices used in solvent extraction processes of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. The primary outcomes of this project include the capability to resolve drops and bubbles micro-hydrodynamics in solvent extraction contactors, determining from first principles continuum fluid mechanics how micro-drops and bubbles interact with each other and the surrounding shearing fluid for realistic flows. In the near term, this effort will play a central role in providing parameters and insight into the flow dynamics of models that average over coarser scales, say at the millimeter unit length. In the longer term, it will prove to be the platform to conduct full-device, detailed simulations as parallel computing power reaches the exaflop level. The team will develop an accurate simulation tool for flows containing interacting droplets and bubbles with sharp interfaces under conditions that mimic those found in realistic contactor operations. The main objective is to create an off-line simulation capability to model drop and bubble interactions in a domain representative of the averaged length scale. The technical approach is to combine robust interface tracking software, subgrid modeling, validation quality experiments, powerful computational hardware, and a team with simulation modeling, physical modeling and technology integration experience. Simulations will then fully resolve the microflow of drops and bubbles at the microsecond time scale. This approach is computationally intensive but very accurate in treating important coupled physical phenomena in the vicinity of interfaces. The method makes it possible to resolve spatial scales smaller than the typical distance between bubbles and to model some non-equilibrium thermodynamic features such as finite

  13. Identification of interstellar methanol lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, E. C.; Herbst, Eric

    1988-10-01

    The extended internal axis method Hamiltonian of Herbst et al. has been employed to study the rotational spectrum of methanol out to high values of the rotational quantum number J. For 12CH3OH the available laboratory data, consisting of 783 lines out to J = 22, have been fitted with a Hamiltonian containing 32 free parameters. For 13CH3OH a Hamiltonian with 23 free parameters is sufficient for fitting 455 lines, also out to J = 22. Frequency predictions based on these fits have permitted the identification of a number of previously unidentified interstellar lines from OMC-1. The majority of these are b-type R-branch transitions of 12CH3OH.

  14. Wigner rotations in laser cavities.

    PubMed

    Başkal, S; Kim, Y S

    2002-08-01

    The Wigner rotation is important in many branches of physics, chemistry, and engineering sciences. It is a group theoretical effect resulting from two Lorentz boosts. The net effect is one boost followed or preceded by a rotation. While the term "Wigner rotation" is derived from Wigner's little group whose transformations leave the four-momentum of a given particle invariant, it is shown that the Wigner rotation is different from the rotations in the little group. This difference is clearly spelled out, and it is shown to be possible to construct the corresponding Wigner rotation from the little-group rotation. It is shown also that the ABCD matrix for light beams in a laser cavity shares the same mathematics as the little-group rotation, from which the Wigner rotation can be constructed. PMID:12241308

  15. ROTATIONAL SPLITTING OF PULSATION MODES

    SciTech Connect

    Deupree, Robert G.; Beslin, Wilfried

    2010-10-01

    Mode splittings produced by uniform rotation and a particular form of differential rotation are computed for two-dimensional rotating 10 M{sub sun} zero-age main sequence stellar models. The change in the character of the mode splitting is traced as a function of uniform rotation rate, and it is found that only relatively slow rotation rates are required before the mode splitting becomes asymmetric about the azimuthally symmetric (m = 0) mode. Increased rotation produces a progressively altered pattern of the individual modes with respect to each other. Large mode splittings begin to overlap with the mode splittings produced by different radial and latitudinal modes at relatively low rotation rates. The mode-splitting pattern for the differentially rotating stars we model is different than that for uniformly rotating stars, making the mode splitting a possible discriminant of the internal angular momentum distribution if one assumes that the formidable challenge of mode identification can be overcome.

  16. Precise spectroscopic parameters for solar-type stars with moderate-to-high rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsantaki, M.; Sousa, S.; Santos, N. C.; Montalto, M.

    2014-07-01

    One of the primary objectives of Gaia is to survey billions stars and build the most precise 3D map of the Milky Way. Automated techniques of spectral analysis are needed to perform a rapid and homogeneous processing of the data to provide precise and accurate stellar parameters, such as for the GAIA-ESO survey. In this context, our recent work is based on the spectral synthesis technique to derive parameters for both slowly and fast rotating stars (Tsantaki et al. 2014). The spectroscopic analysis was performed using the package Spectroscopy Made Easy (SME; Valenti & Piskunov 1996) and a specific methodology to deal with fast rotators (υsini up to 50 km/s). The spectral regions, including the atomic data of all the lines in our analysis are available online in SME readable format http://mariatsantaki.weebly.com;. A comparison between the parameters derived with our methodology and with the iron ionization and excitation method (e.g. Sousa et al. 2008; Tsantaki et al. 2013) shows that both results are on the same scale. Additionally, for fast rotating stars, our results are in good agreement with literature values when comparing to other methods. We are now able to provide parameters for a very wide group of stars: from giants to dwarfs and from slowly to fast rotating stars. Except for galactic studies, stellar parameters are important for the planetary characterization. We provided updated stellar and planetary properties for ten systems. The stellar parameters were compiled in the SWEET-Catalogue (https://www.astro.up.pt/resources/sweet-cat/).

  17. Diatomic predissociation line widths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    Predissociation by rotation and curve crossing in diatomic molecules is discussed. The pattern of predissociation line widths is seen as providing a highly sensitive yardstick for the determination of unknown potential curves. In addition, the computation of such a pattern for given potential curves is considered a matter of routine, unless the predissociation happens to occur from an adiabatic potential curve. Analytic formulas are used to provide physical insight into the details of the predissociation pattern, to the extent that a direct inversion procedure is developed for determination of the repulsive potential curves for Type 1 predissociations.

  18. Rotating Shaft Tilt Angle Measurement Using an Inclinometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jun; Wang, Zhiqian; Shen, Chengwu; Wen, Zhuoman; Liu, Shaojin; Cai, Sheng; Li, Jianrong

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes a novel measurement method to accurately measure the rotating shaft tilt angle of rotating machine for alignment or compensation using a dual-axis inclinometer. A model of the rotating shaft tilt angle measurement is established using a dual-axis inclinometer based on the designed mechanical structure, and the calculation equation between the rotating shaft tilt angle and the inclinometer axes outputs is derived under the condition that the inclinometer axes are perpendicular to the rotating shaft. The reversal measurement method is applied to decrease the effect of inclinometer drifts caused by temperature, to eliminate inclinometer and rotating shaft mechanical error and inclinometer systematic error to attain high measurement accuracy. The uncertainty estimation shows that the accuracy of rotating shaft tilt angle measurement depends mainly on the inclinometer uncertainty and its uncertainty is almost the same as the inclinometer uncertainty in the simulation. The experimental results indicate that measurement time is 4 seconds; the range of rotating shaft tilt angle is 0.002° and its standard deviation is 0.0006° using NS-5/P2 inclinometer, whose precision and resolution are ±0.01° and 0.0005°, respectively.

  19. Dynamical analysis of sea-breeze hodograph rotation in Sardinia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisseeva, N.; Steyn, D. G.

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the diurnal evolution of sea-breeze rotation over an island in the mid-latitudes. Earlier research on sea-breezes in Sardinia shows that the onshore winds around various coasts of the island exhibit both the theoretically predicted clockwise rotation as well as seemingly anomalous anti-clockwise rotation. A non-hydrostatic fully compressible numerical model (WRF) is used to simulate wind fields on and around the island on previously-studied sea-breeze days and is shown to accurately capture the circulation on all coasts. Diurnal rotation of wind is examined and patterns of clockwise and anti-clockwise rotation are identified. A dynamical analysis is performed by extracting individual forcing terms from the horizontal momentum equations. Analysis of several regions around the island shows that the direction of rotation is a result of a complex interaction between near-surface and synoptic pressure gradient, Coriolis and advection forcings. An idealized simulation is performed over an artificial island with dramatically simplified topography, yet similar dimensions and latitude to Sardinia. Dynamical analysis of the idealized case reveals a rather different pattern of hodograph rotation to the real Sardinia, yet similar underlying dynamics. The research provides new insights into the dynamics underlying sea-breeze hodograph rotation, especially in coastal zones with complex topography and/or coastline.

  20. Dynamical analysis of sea-breeze hodograph rotation in Sardinia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisseeva, N.; Steyn, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates the diurnal evolution of sea-breeze (SB) rotation over an island at the middle latitudes. Earlier research on sea breezes in Sardinia shows that the onshore winds around various coasts of the island exhibit both the theoretically predicted clockwise rotation as well as seemingly anomalous anticlockwise rotation. A non-hydrostatic fully compressible numerical model (WRF) is used to simulate wind fields on and around the island on previously studied sea-breeze days, and is shown to capture the circulation on all coasts accurately. Diurnal rotation of wind is examined, and patterns of clockwise and anticlockwise rotation are identified. A dynamical analysis is performed by extracting individual forcing terms from the horizontal momentum equations. Analysis of several regions around the island shows that the direction of rotation is a result of a complex interaction between near-surface and synoptic pressure gradient, Coriolis and advection forcings. An idealized simulation is performed over an artificial island with dramatically simplified topography yet similar dimensions and latitude to Sardinia. Dynamical analysis of the idealized case reveals a rather different pattern of hodograph rotation to the real Sardinia, yet similar underlying dynamics. The research provides new insights into the dynamics underlying sea-breeze hodograph rotation, especially in coastal zones with a complex topography and/or coastline.

  1. 360-deg panoramic camera using a mirror rotation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, Toshiyasu; Kashitani, Atsushi

    2000-12-01

    In this paper, we describe a new panoramic camera that incorporates a 2-axes mirror rotation mechanism and image mosaicing software to get high-resolution panoramic images in a short time. The mirror is located in front of the camera via the mirror rotation mechanism to move the camera's view. Partial images taken with the mirror rotation are merged into a high-resolution panoramic image by mosaicing software. The 2-axes mirror rotation mechanism consist of a mirror pedestal and a cam. The image mosaicing software projects each partial image onto a projection surface around the rotation center of the mirror. In that process, the projection center is shifted from the original principal point of the lens or the viewpoint to the mirror rotation center, and the projection positions for each pixel of partial images are calculated by using the limiting point. With these features, our panoramic camera has four advantages: (1) accurate, continuous, high-resolution, large and endless (360 degrees wide) panoramic images; (2) short panoramic image acquisition time with fast mirror rotation; (3) small body size; and (4) endless (360 degrees wide) fast mirror rotation. We also describe its prototype and its application to the Internet broadcasting of a tennis game.

  2. Terrestrial Planets: Volatiles Loss & Speed of Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    There is a close relation between orbiting frequencies of terrestrial planets and intensities of their outgassing [1]. ``Sweeping'' out volatiles of their bodies is provoked and facilitated by body shaking (wave oscillations) caused by movement of celestial bodies in elliptical orbits. Non-round orbits cause inertia-gravity warpings in all spheres of the bodies producing their tectonic granulation. The higher orbiting frequency -- the smaller tectonic granula -- more thorough interior degassing. Sizes of tectonic granulas inversely proportional to orbiting frequencies are: Mars π R/2, Earth π R/4, Venus π R/6, Mercury π R/16. The atmospheric masses increase from Mars through Earth to Venus as ˜ 0. 01 : 1 : 90 (radiogenic/primordial Ar is 3000 : 300 : 1, marking degassing intensity). Mercury in this sequence should have been even more outgassed (˜ 500 times comparative to Venus, having in mind different planetary masses [2]). But now it possesses only very weak atmosphere of noble gases, Na, K -- remnants of past significant outgassing now witnessed by a great amount of small deep structurally controlled pits (craters), lobate scarps caused by strong contraction and slow rotation. The slow rotation is due to loss of angular momentum to the atmosphere now wiped out by the solar wind. The same partitioning of angular momentum occurs at Venus: slowly rotating solid body is wrapped in rapidly rotating massive atmosphere (the solid surface exposes many features of contraction due to subsidence -- vast areas of wrinkle ridges). On the contrary to slow Mercury and Venus, Earth and Mars keep their moderate rotation corresponding to their moderate and mild degassing [3]. Still further from Sun weakly outgassed gas giants rotate very rapidly. Sun itself with slowly rotating photosphere and corresponding supergranula size π R/60 is a strongly outgassed object (some think that Sun lost upto 10% of its original mass). In line with the established regularity between

  3. Pulsations of rapidly rotating stars. I. The ACOR numerical code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouazzani, R.-M.; Dupret, M.-A.; Reese, D. R.

    2012-11-01

    Context. Very high precision seismic space missions such as CoRoT and Kepler provide the means of testing the modeling of transport processes in stellar interiors. For some stars, such as solar-like and red giant stars, a rotational splitting is measured. However, to fully exploit these splittings and constrain the rotation profile, one needs to be able to calculate them accurately. For some other stars, such as δ Scuti and Be stars, for instance, the observed pulsation spectra are modified by rotation to such an extent that a perturbative treatment of the effects of rotation is no longer valid. Aims: We present here a new two-dimensional non-perturbative code called ACOR (adiabatic code of oscillation including rotation) that allows us to compute adiabatic non-radial pulsations of rotating stars without making any assumptions on the sphericity of the star, the fluid properties (i.e., baroclinicity) or the rotation profile. Methods: The 2D non-perturbative calculations fully take into account the centrifugal distortion of the star and include the full influence of the Coriolis acceleration. The numerical method is based on a spectral approach for the angular part of the modes and a fourth-order finite differences approach for the radial part. Results: We test and evaluate the accuracy of the calculations by comparing them with those coming from the TOP (two-dimensional oscillation program) for the same polytropic models. We illustrate the effects of rapid rotation on stellar pulsations through the phenomenon of avoided crossings. Conclusions: As shown by the comparison with the TOP for simple models, the code is stable, and gives accurate results up to near-critical rotation rates.

  4. THE CM-, MM-, AND SUB-MM-WAVE SPECTRUM OF ALLYL ISOCYANIDE AND RADIOASTRONOMICAL OBSERVATIONS IN ORION KL AND THE SgrB2 LINE SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Haykal, I.; Margulès, L.; Huet, T. R.; Motyienko, R. A.; Écija, P.; Cocinero, E. J.; Basterretxea, F.; Fernández, J. A.; Castaño, F.; Guillemin, J. C.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.

    2013-11-10

    Organic isocyanides have an interesting astrochemistry and some of these molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium (ISM). However, rotational spectral data for this class of compounds are still scarce. We provide laboratory spectra of the four-carbon allyl isocyanide covering the full microwave region, thus allowing a potential astrophysical identification in the ISM. We assigned the rotational spectrum of the two cis (synperiplanar) and gauche (anticlinal) conformations of allyl isocyanide in the centimeter-wave region (4-18 GHz), resolved its {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling (NQC) hyperfine structure, and extended the measurements into the millimeter and submillimeter-wave (150-900 GHz) ranges for the title compound. Rotational constants for all the monosubstituted {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N isotopologues are additionally provided. Laboratory observations are supplemented with initial radioastronomical observations. Following analysis of an extensive dataset (>11000 rotational transitions), accurate ground-state molecular parameters are reported for the cis and gauche conformations of the molecule, including rotational constants, NQC parameters, and centrifugal distortion terms up to octic contributions. Molecular parameters have also been obtained for the two first excited states of the cis conformation, with a dataset of more than 3300 lines. The isotopic data allowed determining substitution and effective structures for the title compound. We did not detect allyl isocyanide either in the IRAM 30 m line survey of Orion KL or in the PRIMOS survey toward SgrB2. Nevertheless, we provided an upper limit to its column density in Orion KL.

  5. Accurate and efficient spin integration for particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abell, Dan T.; Meiser, Dominic; Ranjbar, Vahid H.; Barber, Desmond P.

    2015-02-01

    Accurate spin tracking is a valuable tool for understanding spin dynamics in particle accelerators and can help improve the performance of an accelerator. In this paper, we present a detailed discussion of the integrators in the spin tracking code gpuSpinTrack. We have implemented orbital integrators based on drift-kick, bend-kick, and matrix-kick splits. On top of the orbital integrators, we have implemented various integrators for the spin motion. These integrators use quaternions and Romberg quadratures to accelerate both the computation and the convergence of spin rotations. We evaluate their performance and accuracy in quantitative detail for individual elements as well as for the entire RHIC lattice. We exploit the inherently data-parallel nature of spin tracking to accelerate our algorithms on graphics processing units.

  6. Accurate positioning of long, flexible ARM's (Articulated Robotic Manipulator)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malachowski, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    An articulated robotic manipulator (ARM) system is being designed for space applications. Work being done on a concept utilizing an infinitely stiff laser beam for position reference is summarized. The laser beam is projected along the segments of the ARM, and the position is sensed by the beam rider modules (BRM) mounted on the distal ends of the segments. The BRM concept is the heart of the system. It utilizes a combination of lateral displacements and rotational and distance measurement sensors. These determine the relative position of the two ends of the segments with respect to each other in six degrees of freedom. The BRM measurement devices contain microprocessor controlled data acquisition and active positioning components. An indirect adaptive controller is used to accurately control the position of the ARM.

  7. Two Dimensional Symmetric Correlation Functions of the S Operator and Two Dimensional Fourier Transforms: Considering the Line Coupling for P and R Lines of Linear Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Q.; Boulet, C.; Tipping, R. H.

    2014-01-01

    The refinement of the Robert-Bonamy (RB) formalism by considering the line coupling for isotropic Raman Q lines of linear molecules developed in our previous study [Q. Ma, C. Boulet, and R. H. Tipping, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 034305 (2013)] has been extended to infrared P and R lines. In these calculations, the main task is to derive diagonal and off-diagonal matrix elements of the Liouville operator iS1 - S2 introduced in the formalism. When one considers the line coupling for isotropic Raman Q lines where their initial and final rotational quantum numbers are identical, the derivations of off-diagonal elements do not require extra correlation functions of the ^S operator and their Fourier transforms except for those used in deriving diagonal elements. In contrast, the derivations for infrared P and R lines become more difficult because they require a lot of new correlation functions and their Fourier transforms. By introducing two dimensional correlation functions labeled by two tensor ranks and making variable changes to become even functions, the derivations only require the latters' two dimensional Fourier transforms evaluated at two modulation frequencies characterizing the averaged energy gap and the frequency detuning between the two coupled transitions. With the coordinate representation, it is easy to accurately derive these two dimensional correlation functions. Meanwhile, by using the sampling theory one is able to effectively evaluate their two dimensional Fourier transforms. Thus, the obstacles in considering the line coupling for P and R lines have been overcome. Numerical calculations have been carried out for the half-widths of both the isotropic Raman Q lines and the infrared P and R lines of C2H2 broadened by N2. In comparison with values derived from the RB formalism, new calculated values are significantly reduced and become closer to measurements.

  8. Two dimensional symmetric correlation functions of the S-circumflex operator and two dimensional Fourier transforms: Considering the line coupling for P and R lines of linear molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Q.; Tipping, R. H.

    2014-03-14

    The refinement of the Robert-Bonamy (RB) formalism by considering the line coupling for isotropic Raman Q lines of linear molecules developed in our previous study [Q. Ma, C. Boulet, and R. H. Tipping, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 034305 (2013)] has been extended to infrared P and R lines. In these calculations, the main task is to derive diagonal and off-diagonal matrix elements of the Liouville operator iS{sub 1} − S{sub 2} introduced in the formalism. When one considers the line coupling for isotropic Raman Q lines where their initial and final rotational quantum numbers are identical, the derivations of off-diagonal elements do not require extra correlation functions of the S-circumflex operator and their Fourier transforms except for those used in deriving diagonal elements. In contrast, the derivations for infrared P and R lines become more difficult because they require a lot of new correlation functions and their Fourier transforms. By introducing two dimensional correlation functions labeled by two tensor ranks and making variable changes to become even functions, the derivations only require the latters’ two dimensional Fourier transforms evaluated at two modulation frequencies characterizing the averaged energy gap and the frequency detuning between the two coupled transitions. With the coordinate representation, it is easy to accurately derive these two dimensional correlation functions. Meanwhile, by using the sampling theory one is able to effectively evaluate their two dimensional Fourier transforms. Thus, the obstacles in considering the line coupling for P and R lines have been overcome. Numerical calculations have been carried out for the half-widths of both the isotropic Raman Q lines and the infrared P and R lines of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} broadened by N{sub 2}. In comparison with values derived from the RB formalism, new calculated values are significantly reduced and become closer to measurements.

  9. ROTATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS DURING ERUPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, B. J.; Li, Y.; Luhmann, J. G.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R. E-mail: yanli@ssl.berkeley.edu E-mail: spiro.k.antiochos@nasa.gov

    2009-06-01

    Understanding the connection between coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and their interplanetary counterparts (ICMEs) is one of the most important problems in solar-terrestrial physics. We calculate the rotation of erupting field structures predicted by numerical simulations of CME initiation via the magnetic breakout model. In this model, the initial potential magnetic field has a multipolar topology and the system is driven by imposing a shear flow at the photospheric boundary. Our results yield insight on how to connect solar observations of the orientation of the filament or polarity inversion line (PIL) in the CME source region, the orientation of the CME axis as inferred from coronagraph images, and the ICME flux rope orientation obtained from in situ measurements. We present the results of two numerical simulations that differ only in the direction of the applied shearing motions (i.e., the handedness of the sheared-arcade systems and their resulting CME fields). In both simulations, eruptive flare reconnection occurs underneath the rapidly expanding sheared fields transforming the ejecta fields into three-dimensional flux rope structures. As the erupting flux ropes propagate through the low corona (from 2 to 4 R{sub sun}) the right-handed breakout flux rope rotates clockwise and the left-handed breakout flux rope rotates counterclockwise, in agreement with recent observations of the rotation of erupting filaments. We find that by 3.5 R {sub sun} the average rotation angle between the flux rope axes and the active region PIL is approximately 50 deg. We discuss the implications of these results for predicting, from the observed chirality of the pre-eruption filament and/or other properties of the CME source region, the direction and amount of rotation that magnetic flux rope structures will experience during eruption. We also discuss the implications of our results for CME initiation models.

  10. Acquiring New Spatial Intuitions: Learning to Reason about Rotations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pani, John R.; Chariker, Julia H.; Dawson, Thomas E.; Johnson, Nathan

    2005-01-01

    There are certain simple rotations of objects that most people cannot reason about accurately. Reliable gaps in the understanding of a fundamental physical domain raise the question of how learning to reason in that domain might proceed. Using virtual reality techniques, this project investigated the nature of learning to reason across the domain…

  11. Wave-driven Rotation in Supersonically Rotating Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    A. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2010-02-15

    Supersonic rotation in mirrors may be produced by radio frequency waves. The waves produce coupled diffusion in ion kinetic and potential energy. A population inversion along the diffusion path then produces rotation. Waves may be designed to exploit a natural kinetic energy source or may provide the rotation energy on their own. Centrifugal traps for fusion and isotope separation may benefit from this wave-driven rotation.

  12. Dynamics of rotating multicomponent turbomachinery systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Charles

    1993-01-01

    The ultimate objective of turbomachinery vibration analysis is to predict both the overall, as well as component dynamic response. To accomplish this objective requires complete engine structural models, including multistages of bladed disk assemblies, flexible rotor shafts and bearings, and engine support structures and casings. In the present approach each component is analyzed as a separate structure and boundary information is exchanged at the inter-component connections. The advantage of this tactic is that even though readily available detailed component models are utilized, accurate and comprehensive system response information may be obtained. Sample problems, which include a fixed base rotating blade and a blade on a flexible rotor, are presented.

  13. Foliage discrimination using a rotating ladar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castano, A.; Matthies, L.

    2003-01-01

    We present a real time algorithm that detects foliage using range from a rotating laser. Objects not classified as foliage are conservatively labeled as non-driving obstacles. In contrast to related work that uses range statistics to classify objects, we exploit the expected localities and continuities of an obstacle, in both space and time. Also, instead of attempting to find a single accurate discriminating factor for every ladar return, we hypothesize the class of some few returns and then spread the confidence (and classification) to other returns using the locality constraints. The Urbie robot is presently using this algorithm to descriminate drivable grass from obstacles during outdoor autonomous navigation tasks.

  14. Manipulator for rotating and examining small spheres

    DOEpatents

    Weinstein, Berthold W. [Livermore, CA; Willenborg, David L. [Livermore, CA

    1980-02-12

    A manipulator which provides fast, accurate rotational positioning of a small sphere, such as an inertial confinement fusion target, which allows inspecting of the entire surface of the sphere. The sphere is held between two flat, flexible tips which move equal amounts in opposite directions. This provides rolling of the ball about two orthogonal axes without any overall translation. The manipulator may be controlled, for example, by an x- and y-axis driven controlled by a mini-computer which can be programmed to generate any desired scan pattern.

  15. Manipulator for rotating and examining small spheres

    DOEpatents

    Weinstein, B.W.; Willenborg, D.L.

    1980-02-12

    A manipulator is disclosed which provides fast, accurate rotational positioning of a small sphere, such as an inertial confinement fusion target, which allows inspecting of the entire surface of the sphere. The sphere is held between two flat, flexible tips which move equal amounts in opposite directions. This provides rolling of the ball about two orthogonal axes without any overall translation. The manipulator may be controlled, for example, by an x- and y-axis driven controlled by a mini-computer which can be programmed to generate any desired scan pattern. 8 figs.

  16. Rotation-induced nonlinear wavepackets in internal waves

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, A. J. Johnson, E. R.

    2014-05-15

    The long time effect of weak rotation on an internal solitary wave is the decay into inertia-gravity waves and the eventual formation of a localised wavepacket. Here this initial value problem is considered within the context of the Ostrovsky, or the rotation-modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV), equation and a numerical method for obtaining accurate wavepacket solutions is presented. The flow evolutions are described in the regimes of relatively-strong and relatively-weak rotational effects. When rotational effects are relatively strong a second-order soliton solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation accurately predicts the shape, and phase and group velocities of the numerically determined wavepackets. It is suggested that these solitons may form from a local Benjamin-Feir instability in the inertia-gravity wave-train radiated when a KdV solitary wave rapidly adjusts to the presence of strong rotation. When rotational effects are relatively weak the initial KdV solitary wave remains coherent longer, decaying only slowly due to weak radiation and modulational instability is no longer relevant. Wavepacket solutions in this regime appear to consist of a modulated KdV soliton wavetrain propagating on a slowly varying background of finite extent.

  17. Method for Accurately Calibrating a Spectrometer Using Broadband Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Stephen; Youngquist, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A novel method has been developed for performing very fine calibration of a spectrometer. This process is particularly useful for modern miniature charge-coupled device (CCD) spectrometers where a typical factory wavelength calibration has been performed and a finer, more accurate calibration is desired. Typically, the factory calibration is done with a spectral line source that generates light at known wavelengths, allowing specific pixels in the CCD array to be assigned wavelength values. This method is good to about 1 nm across the spectrometer s wavelength range. This new method appears to be accurate to about 0.1 nm, a factor of ten improvement. White light is passed through an unbalanced Michelson interferometer, producing an optical signal with significant spectral variation. A simple theory can be developed to describe this spectral pattern, so by comparing the actual spectrometer output against this predicted pattern, errors in the wavelength assignment made by the spectrometer can be determined.

  18. Improvement of the edge rotation diagnostic spectrum analysis via simulation.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Zhuang, G; Cheng, Z F; Zhang, X L; Hou, S Y; Cheng, C

    2014-11-01

    The edge rotation diagnostic (ERD) system has been developed on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak to measure the edge toroidal rotation velocity by observing the shifted wavelength of carbon V (C V 227.09 nm). Since the measured spectrum is an integrated result along the viewing line from the plasma core to the edge, a method via simulation has been developed to analyze the ERD spectrum. With the necessary parameters such as C V radiation profile and the ion temperature profile, a local rotation profile at the normalized minor radius of 0.5-1 is obtained. PMID:25430334

  19. Note on Maxwell's equations in relativistically rotating frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kichenassamy, S.; Krikorian, R. A.

    1994-11-01

    It is shown that the relativistic rotation transformation of Trocheris and Takeno restores the full Lorentz covariance of electrodynamics, lost in previous investigations using the Galilean rotation transformation along with the Frenet-Serret tetrad associated to the world line of a rotating observer of velocity v=ωΛr; it also recovers, at the approximation of small velocities, the results of the anholonomic approach corresponding to the use of the ``instantaneous'' Lorentz transformation of Galilean velocity v=ωr (in domains restricted by r

  20. Improvement of the edge rotation diagnostic spectrum analysis via simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J.; Zhuang, G. Cheng, Z. F.; Zhang, X. L.; Hou, S. Y.; Cheng, C.

    2014-11-15

    The edge rotation diagnostic (ERD) system has been developed on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak to measure the edge toroidal rotation velocity by observing the shifted wavelength of carbon V (C V 227.09 nm). Since the measured spectrum is an integrated result along the viewing line from the plasma core to the edge, a method via simulation has been developed to analyze the ERD spectrum. With the necessary parameters such as C V radiation profile and the ion temperature profile, a local rotation profile at the normalized minor radius of 0.5-1 is obtained.

  1. Improvement of the edge rotation diagnostic spectrum analysis via simulationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, J.; Zhuang, G.; Cheng, Z. F.; Zhang, X. L.; Hou, S. Y.; Cheng, C.

    2014-11-01

    The edge rotation diagnostic (ERD) system has been developed on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak to measure the edge toroidal rotation velocity by observing the shifted wavelength of carbon V (C V 227.09 nm). Since the measured spectrum is an integrated result along the viewing line from the plasma core to the edge, a method via simulation has been developed to analyze the ERD spectrum. With the necessary parameters such as C V radiation profile and the ion temperature profile, a local rotation profile at the normalized minor radius of 0.5-1 is obtained.

  2. Slim hole MWD tool accurately measures downhole annular pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Burban, B.; Delahaye, T. )

    1994-02-14

    Measurement-while-drilling of downhole pressure accurately determines annular pressure losses from circulation and drillstring rotation and helps monitor swab and surge pressures during tripping. In early 1993, two slim-hole wells (3.4 in. and 3 in. diameter) were drilled with continuous real-time electromagnetic wave transmission of downhole temperature and annular pressure. The data were obtained during all stages of the drilling operation and proved useful for operations personnel. The use of real-time measurements demonstrated the characteristic hydraulic effects of pressure surges induced by drillstring rotation in the small slim-hole annulus under field conditions. The interest in this information is not restricted to the slim-hole geometry. Monitoring or estimating downhole pressure is a key element for drilling operations. Except in special cases, no real-time measurements of downhole annular pressure during drilling and tripping have been used on an operational basis. The hydraulic effects are significant in conventional-geometry wells (3 1/2-in. drill pipe in a 6-in. hole). This paper describes the tool and the results from the field test.

  3. Recent VLA Observations of Coronal Faraday Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Fischer, P. D.; Buffo, J. J.; Spangler, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    Proposed mechanisms for coronal heating and acceleration of the fast solar wind, such as Joule heating by coronal currents or dissipation of Alfvén waves, depend on the magnetic field structure and plasma characteristics of the corona within heliocentric distances of 5 solar radii. Faraday rotation observations can provide unique information on the magnetic field in this region of the corona. We report on sensitive full-polarization observations of the radio galaxy 3C228 through the solar corona at heliocentric distances of 4.6 - 5.0 solar radii. The observations were made with the VLA in August of 2011. We performed these observations at 5.0 and 6.1 GHz (each with a bandwidth of 128 MHz), permitting measurements deeper in the corona than previous VLA observations at 1.4 and 1.7 GHz. While the measured Faraday rotation was lower than our a priori expectations, we can understand the magnitude of the observed Faraday rotation in terms of observed properties of the corona on the day of observation. For coronal remote sensing, an advantage of using extended extragalactic radio sources such as 3C228 is that such observations provide multiple lines of sight through the corona. Our data provide two lines of sight (separated by 46″, 33,000 km in the corona), one to a northern hotspot and the other to a southern hotspot with fractional polarizations of 14% and 8% respectively. We detected three periods over the eight-hour observing session during which there appeared to be a difference in the Faraday rotation between these two closely spaced lines of sight. These measurements yield an estimate of 2 - 4 GA for coronal currents. We did not directly detect rotation measure fluctuations. Our data impose upper limits on rotation measure fluctuations caused by coronal waves. The observed upper limits were 3.3 and 6.4 rad/m2 and are comparable to and not inconsistent with some models for Alfvén wave heating. This research was supported at the University of Iowa by grants ATM09

  4. Spectroscopic line parameters of NH3 and PH3 in the far infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Husson, N.; Goldman, A.; Orton, G.

    1982-01-01

    NH3 and PH3 rotation and rotation-inversion line parameters in the far to medium IR are calculated for remote sounding purposes of planetary atmospheres; 1607 lines of (N-14)H3, 362 lines of (N-15)H3 and 325 lines of PH3 are compiled. The absolute intensity formulation has been reviewed in the case of rotation and rotation-inversion lines of molecules with C(3v) symmetry. The justification for the general agreement between the authors, and comparisons with other published expressions are given.

  5. Spectroscopic parameters for solar-type stars with moderate-to-high rotation. New parameters for ten planet hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsantaki, M.; Sousa, S. G.; Santos, N. C.; Montalto, M.; Delgado-Mena, E.; Mortier, A.; Adibekyan, V.; Israelian, G.

    2014-10-01

    Context. Planetary studies demand precise and accurate stellar parameters as input for inferring the planetary properties. Different methods often provide different results that could lead to biases in the planetary parameters. Aims: In this work, we present a refinement of the spectral synthesis technique designed to treat fast rotating stars better. This method is used to derive precise stellar parameters, namely effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and rotational velocity. The procedure is tested for FGK stars with low and moderate-to-high rotation rates. Methods: The spectroscopic analysis is based on the spectral synthesis package Spectroscopy Made Easy (SME), which assumes Kurucz model atmospheres in LTE. The line list where the synthesis is conducted is comprised of iron lines, and the atomic data are derived after solar calibration. Results: The comparison of our stellar parameters shows good agreement with literature values, both for slowly and for fast rotating stars. In addition, our results are on the same scale as the parameters derived from the iron ionization and excitation method presented in our previous works. We present new atmospheric parameters for 10 transiting planet hosts as an update to the SWEET-Cat catalog. We also re-analyze their transit light curves to derive new updated planetary properties. Based on observations collected at the La Silla Observatory, ESO (Chile) with the FEROS spectrograph at the 2.2 m telescope (ESO runs ID 089.C-0444(A), 088.C-0892(A)) and with the HARPS spectrograph at the 3.6 m telescope (ESO runs ID 072.C-0488(E), 079.C-0127(A)); at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP, CNRS/OAMP), France, with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the 1.93 m telescope and at the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées (CNRS), France, with the NARVAL spectrograph at the 2 m Bernard Lyot Telescope (Run ID L131N11).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  6. Rotational excitation of hydrogen molecules by collisions with hydrogen atoms. [interstellar gas energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S.; Truhlar, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    Rate constants for rotational excitation of hydrogen molecules by collisions with hydrogen atoms have been obtained from quantum-mechanical calculations for kinetic temperatures between 100 and 5000 K. These calculations involve the rigid-rotator approximation, but other possible sources of error should be small. The calculations indicate that the early values of Nishimura are larger than accurate rigid-rotator values by about a factor of 20 or more.

  7. On the rotation and skew-symmetric forms for incompressible flow simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Thomas A.

    1991-01-01

    A variety of numerical simulations of transition and turbulence in incompressible flow are presented to compare the commonly used rotation form with the skew-symmetric (and other) forms of the nonlinear terms. The results indicate that the rotation form is much less accurate than the other forms for spectral algorithms which include aliasing errors. For de-aliased methods the difference is minimal.

  8. THE ROTATIONAL SPECTRUM OF HCl{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, H.; Drouin, B. J.; Pearson, J. C.

    2012-06-01

    The rotational spectrum of the radical ion HCl{sup +} has been detected at high resolution in the laboratory, confirming the identification reported in the accompanying Letter by De Luca et al., in diffuse clouds toward W31C and W49N. Three rotational transitions, one in the ground-state {sup 2}{Pi}{sub 3/2} ladder and two in the {sup 2}{Pi}{sub 1/2} ladder (643 cm{sup -1} above ground), were observed in a microwave discharge of He and HCl. Well-resolved chlorine hyperfine structure and {Lambda}-doubling, and the detection of lines of H{sup 37}Cl{sup +} at precisely the expected isotopic shift, provide conclusive evidence for the laboratory identification. Detection of rotational transitions in the {sup 2}{Pi}{sub 1/2} ladder of HCl{sup +} for the first time allows an experimental determination of the individual hyperfine coupling constants of chlorine and yields a precise value of eQq{sub 2}. The spectroscopic constants obtained by fitting a Hamiltonian simultaneously to our data and more than 8000 optical transitions are so precise that they allow us to calculate the frequencies of the {sup 2}{Pi}{sub 3/2} J = 5/2 - 3/2 transition observed in space to within 0.2 km s{sup -1}, and indeed, those of the strongest rotational transitions below 7.5 THz, to better than 1 km s{sup -1}.

  9. Rotation lightcurves of small jovian Trojan asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Linda M.; Stephens, Robert D.; Coley, Daniel; Wasserman, Lawrence H.; Sieben, Jennifer

    2015-07-01

    Several lines of evidence support a common origin for, and possible hereditary link between, cometary nuclei and jovian Trojan asteroids. Due to their distance and low albedos, few comet-sized Trojans have been studied. We present new lightcurve information for 19 Trojans ≲ 30 km in diameter, more than doubling the number of objects in this size range for which some rotation information is known. The minimum densities for objects with complete lightcurves are estimated and are found to be comparable to those measured for cometary nuclei. A significant fraction (∼40%) of this observed small Trojan population rotates slowly (P > 24 h), with measured periods as long as 375 h (Warner, B.D., Stephens, R.D. [2011]. Minor Planet Bull. 38, 110-111). The excess of slow rotators may be due to the YORP effect. Results of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test suggest that the distribution of Trojan rotation rates is dissimilar to those of Main Belt Asteroids of the same size. Concerted observations of a large number of Trojans could establish the spin barrier (Warner, B.D., Harris, A.W., Pravec, P. [2009]. Icarus 202, 134-146), making it possible to estimate densities for objects near the critical period.

  10. Solar Internal Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schou, J.; SOE Internal Rotation Team

    With the flood of high quality helioseismic data from the instruments on the SOHO spacecraft (MDI/VIRGO/GOLF) and ground based instruments (eg. GONG and LOWL) we have been able to get increasingly detailed information on the rotation and other large scale flows in the solar interior. In this talk I will discuss some of the highlights of what we have learned so far and what we may expect to learn in the near future. Among the recent advances have been tighter constraints on the tachocline at the bottom of the convection zone, detection of details in the surface rotation rate similar to the torsional oscillations found in the surface Doppler shift and helioseismic evidence for meridional flows. The MDI project is supported by NASA contract NAG5-3077 at Stanford University.

  11. Rotatable seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Logan, Clinton M.; Garibaldi, Jack L.

    1982-01-01

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

  12. Muon spin rotation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The bulk of the muon spin rotation research work centered around the development of the muon spin rotation facility at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The collimation system was both designed and fabricated at Virginia State University. This improved collimation system, plus improvements in detectors and electronics enabled the acquisition of spectra free of background out to 15 microseconds. There were two runs at Brookhaven in 1984, one run was devoted primarily to beam development and the other run allowed several successful experiments to be performed. The effect of uniaxial strain on an Fe(Si) crystal at elevated temperature (360K) was measured and the results are incorporated herein. A complete analysis of Fe pulling data taken earlier is included.

  13. A call for rotators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountain, Gregory

    “Needed: highly motivated geoscientists willing to slow the pace of their research for 1-2 years while managing federal government support of their discipline. Assured: change of perspective; no change in pay. Contact your National Science Foundation Program Director for details.—No, this isn't an NSF job announcement; this is an open letter to members of the Earth science community from a recently “retired” NSF rotator concerned by the small number of researchers interested in a Washington tour. I learned firsthand the extent to which an individual in this position is entrusted with decision-making powers, and as a result, I believe that each of us in the research community should feel responsible for ensuring that highly qualified people serve as rotators.

  14. Rotation of FK Comae

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, S.M. )

    1990-03-01

    V sin i for the rapidly rotating G-type giant FK Com is estimated using high-resolution coude spectra and the Fourier transform approach. The result, V sin i = 159 + or - 4 km/s, agrees well with recent determinations which used direct comparison of FK Com spectra with those of artificially broadened standards. If FK Com does not differ drastically in its internal structure from more normal stars, its angular momentum is a few (perhaps 10) times larger than for single rapidly rotating stars following standard relations for the upper main sequence. It angular momentum is about 3 times smaller than that of the orbital motion in a typical W UMa-type system. 30 refs.

  15. Rotational spectrum of tryptophan

    SciTech Connect

    Sanz, M. Eugenia Cabezas, Carlos Mata, Santiago Alonso, Josè L.

    2014-05-28

    The rotational spectrum of the natural amino acid tryptophan has been observed for the first time using a combination of laser ablation, molecular beams, and Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Independent analysis of the rotational spectra of individual conformers has conducted to a definitive identification of two different conformers of tryptophan, with one of the observed conformers never reported before. The analysis of the {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants is of particular significance since it allows discrimination between structures, thus providing structural information on the orientation of the amino group. Both observed conformers are stabilized by an O–H···N hydrogen bond in the side chain and a N–H···π interaction forming a chain that reinforce the strength of hydrogen bonds through cooperative effects.

  16. A Translational Polarization Rotator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T.; Wollack, Edward J.; Pisano, Giampaolo; Ackiss, Sheridan; U-Yen, Kongpop; Ng, Ming wah

    2012-01-01

    We explore a free-space polarization modulator in which a variable phase introduction between right- and left-handed circular polarization components is used to rotate the linear polarization of the outgoing beam relative to that of the incoming beam. In this device, the polarization states are separated by a circular polarizer that consists of a quarter-wave plate in combination with a wire grid. A movable mirror is positioned behind and parallel to the circular polarizer. As the polarizer-mirror distance is separated, an incident liear polarization will be rotated through an angle that is proportional to the introduced phase delay. We demonstrate a prototype device that modulates Stokes Q and U over a 20% bandwidth.

  17. Pink-Beam, Highly-Accurate Compact Water Cooled Slits

    SciTech Connect

    Lyndaker, Aaron; Deyhim, Alex; Jayne, Richard; Waterman, Dave; Caletka, Dave; Steadman, Paul; Dhesi, Sarnjeet

    2007-01-19

    Advanced Design Consulting, Inc. (ADC) has designed accurate compact slits for applications where high precision is required. The system consists of vertical and horizontal slit mechanisms, a vacuum vessel which houses them, water cooling lines with vacuum guards connected to the individual blades, stepper motors with linear encoders, limit (home position) switches and electrical connections including internal wiring for a drain current measurement system. The total slit size is adjustable from 0 to 15 mm both vertically and horizontally. Each of the four blades are individually controlled and motorized. In this paper, a summary of the design and Finite Element Analysis of the system are presented.

  18. Accurate energy levels for singly ionized platinum (Pt II)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reader, Joseph; Acquista, Nicolo; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Engleman, Rolf, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    New observations of the spectrum of Pt II have been made with hollow-cathode lamps. The region from 1032 to 4101 A was observed photographically with a 10.7-m normal-incidence spectrograph. The region from 2245 to 5223 A was observed with a Fourier-transform spectrometer. Wavelength measurements were made for 558 lines. The uncertainties vary from 0.0005 to 0.004 A. From these measurements and three parity-forbidden transitions in the infrared, accurate values were determined for 28 even and 72 odd energy levels of Pt II.

  19. Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pate, Brooks

    2014-06-01

    The past decade has seen several major technology advances in electronics operating at microwave frequencies making it possible to develop a new generation of spectrometers for molecular rotational spectroscopy. High-speed digital electronics, both arbitrary waveform generators and digitizers, continue on a Moore's Law-like development cycle that started around 1993 with device bandwidth doubling about every 36 months. These enabling technologies were the key to designing chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectrometers which offer significant sensitivity enhancements for broadband spectrum acquisition in molecular rotational spectroscopy. A special feature of the chirped-pulse spectrometer design is that it is easily implemented at low frequency (below 8 GHz) where Balle-Flygare type spectrometers with Fabry-Perot cavity designs become technologically challenging due to the mirror size requirements. The capabilities of CP-FTMW spectrometers for studies of molecular structure will be illustrated by the collaborative research effort we have been a part of to determine the structures of water clusters - a project which has identified clusters up to the pentadecamer. A second technology trend that impacts molecular rotational spectroscopy is the development of high power, solid state sources in the mm-wave/THz regions. Results from the field of mm-wave chirped-pulse Fourier transform spectroscopy will be described with an emphasis on new problems in chemical dynamics and analytical chemistry that these methods can tackle. The third (and potentially most important) technological trend is the reduction of microwave components to chip level using monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC) - a technology driven by an enormous mass market in communications. Some recent advances in rotational spectrometer designs that incorporate low-cost components will be highlighted. The challenge to the high-resolution spectroscopy community - as posed by Frank De

  20. On rotational conical flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrari, Carlo

    1952-01-01

    Some general properties of isoenergetic rotational conical fields are determined. For such fields, provided the physical parameters of the fluid flow are known on a conical reference surface, it being understood that they satisfy certain imposed conditions, it is shown how to construct the hodographs in the various meridional semiplanes, as the envelope of either the tangents to the hodographs or of the osculatory circles.

  1. Rotating Brush Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lattime, S. B.; Braun, M. J.; Choy. F. K.; Hendricks, R. C.; Steinetz, B. M.

    2006-01-01

    The proven technology of brush seals has been extended to the mitigation of problems arising from friction and wear at the bristle-rotor interface at high surface speeds. In prototype testing, the brush is mounted on, and free to rotate with the shaft, thus providing a complaint primary seal. A face seal positioned between the backing plate of the brush seal and the housing provides a secondary seal. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the interaction between the brush bristles and the shaft at high surface speeds as well as introduce a numerical model to simulate the bristle behavior. A test facility was constructed to study the effects of centrifugal forces on bristle deflection in a single rotating brush seal. The bristle-rotor interface was observed through a video camera, which utilized a high magnification borescope and a high frequency strobe light source. Rotational speeds of the rotor and the brush seal were measured by a magnetic and optical speed sensor, respectively. Preliminary results with speeds up to 11,000 rpm show no speed differential between the brush seal and rotor, or any instability problems associated with the brush seal. Bristle liftoff from the rotor is successfully captured on video.

  2. Rotational magnetic induction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakic, Adnan; Eskandarnia, Neda; Keong Li, Bing; Weber, Ewald; Wang, Hua; Crozier, Stuart

    2012-02-01

    In magnetic induction tomography (MIT), an array of excitation coils is typically used to apply time-varying magnetic fields to induce eddy currents in the material to be studied. The magnetic fields from the eddy currents are then detected by an array of sensing coils to form an image of passive electromagnetic properties (i.e. conductivity, permittivity and permeability). Increasing the number of transmitters and receivers can provide a better image quality at the expense of a larger and more expensive MIT system. Instead of increasing the number of coils, this study investigates the possibility of rotating a single transmit-receive coil to image the electrical properties of the sample, by emulating an array of 200 transmit-receive coils by time-division multiplexing. Engineering details on the electromechanical design and development of a rotating MIT system are presented. The experimental results indicate that representative images of conductive samples can be obtained at 5 MHz by rotating a single transmit-receive coil.

  3. Bioreactor rotating wall vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Cell constructs grown in a rotating bioreactor on Earth (left) eventually become too large to stay suspended in the nutrient media. In the microgravity of orbit, the cells stay suspended. Rotation then is needed for gentle stirring to replenish the media around the cells.

  4. Air brake-dynamometer accurately measures torque

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Air brake-dynamometer assembly combines the principles of the air turbine and the air pump to apply braking torque. The assembly absorbs and measures power outputs of rotating machinery over a wide range of shaft speeds. It can also be used as an air turbine.

  5. On the accuracy of CO line positions for high resolution IR stellar spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauval, A. J.; Farrenq, R.; Guelachvili, G.; Grevesse, N.; Farmer, C. B.; Norton, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The paper demonstrates the high accuracy of line positions derived from improved sets of Dunham coefficients for the four more abundant isotopic species of carbon monoxide - (C-12)(O-16), (C-13)(O-16), (C-12)(O-18), and (C-12)(O-17) - which are present in the sun and in cool stellar atmospheres. These new spectroscopic constants make it possible to predict very accurate positions of CO lines at any J-values, especially at very high rotational excitation (up to J around 135). Earlier proposed identifications of CO lines at large J-values are checked, and some incorrect identifications in sunspot spectra are found. The present accurate line positions are also compared with predictions from other available sets of molecular constants. It is concluded that the present improved sets of molecular constants are the most appropriate to all problems of high-resolution stellar and solar spectroscopy at any J- and v-values, particularly for synthetic spectra of cool stars.

  6. A systematic study of the inner rotation curves of galaxies observed as part of the GASS and COLD GASS surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffmann, Guinevere; Huang, Mei-Ling; Moran, Sean; Heckman, Timothy M.

    2015-07-01

    We present a systematic analysis of the rotation curves of 187 galaxies with stellar masses greater than 1010 M⊙, with atomic gas masses from the GALEX Arecibo Sloan Survey (GASS) and with follow-up long-slit spectroscopy from the MMT. Our analysis focuses on stellar rotation curves derived by fitting stellar template spectra to the galaxy spectra binned along the slit. In this way, we are able to obtain accurate rotation velocity measurements for a factor of 2 more galaxies than possible with the Hα line. Galaxies with high atomic gas mass fractions are the most dark-matter-dominated galaxies in our sample and have dark matter halo density profiles that are to first order well described by Navarro-Frenk-White profiles with an average concentration parameter of 10. The inner slopes of the rotation curves correlate more strongly with stellar population age than with galaxy mass or structural parameters. At fixed stellar mass, the rotation curves of more actively star-forming galaxies have steeper inner slopes than less actively star-forming galaxies. The ratio between the galaxy specific angular momentum and the total specific angular momentum of its dark matter halo, Rj, correlates strongly with galaxy mass, structure and gas content. Low-mass, disc-dominated galaxies with atomic gas mass fractions greater than 20 per cent have median values of Rj of around 1, but massive, bulge-dominated galaxies have Rj = 0.2-0.3. We argue that these trends can be understood in a picture where gas inflows triggered by disc instabilities lead to the formation of passive, bulge-dominated galaxies with low specific angular momentum.

  7. Remote balance weighs accurately amid high radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggenberger, D. N.; Shuck, A. B.

    1969-01-01

    Commercial beam-type balance, modified and outfitted with electronic controls and digital readout, can be remotely controlled for use in high radiation environments. This allows accurate weighing of breeder-reactor fuel pieces when they are radioactively hot.

  8. Coordinate-Free Rotation Operator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leubner, C.

    1979-01-01

    Suggests the use of a coordinate-free rotation operator for the teaching of rotations in Euclidean three space because of its twofold didactic advantage. Illustrates the potentialities of the coordinate-free rotation operator approach by a number of examples. (Author/GA)

  9. Goniometer-rotation-angle recorder

    SciTech Connect

    Shchagin, A.V.

    1985-12-01

    This paper describes a goniometer-rotation-angle recorder with a discrete drive. The rotation angle in a given plane is recorded by bidirectional sign counter of positive and negative drive-actuation numbers for rotations in positive and negative directions. The maximum capacity of the counter is + or - 9 decimal digits.

  10. Drift waves in rotating plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.; Liu, J.

    1983-09-01

    The stability of the electron drift wave is investigated in the presence of E x B plasma rotation typical of the central cell plasma in tandem mirrors. It is shown that a rotationally-driven drift wave may occur at low azimuthal mode numbers. Conditions for rotational instabilities are derived. Quasilinear formulas are given for the anomalous transport associated with the unstable fluctuations.

  11. On the Product of Rotations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trenkler, G.; Trenkler, D.

    2008-01-01

    Using the elementary tools of matrix theory, we show that the product of two rotations in the three-dimensional Euclidean space is a rotation again. For this purpose, three types of rotation matrices are identified which are of simple structure. One of them is the identity matrix, and each of the other two types can be uniquely characterized by…

  12. Rotating plug bearing and seal

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1977-01-01

    A bearing and seal structure for nuclear reactors utilizing rotating plugs above the nuclear reactor vessel. The structure permits lubrication of bearings and seals of the rotating plugs without risk of the lubricant draining into the reactor vessel below. The structure permits lubrication by utilizing a rotating outer race bearing.

  13. Doppler observations of solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, P. H.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Daily observations of the photospheric equatorial rotation rate using the Doppler effect are made at the Stanford Solar Observatory. These observations show no variations in the rotation rate that exceed the observational error of about 1%. The average rotation rate is indistinguishable from that of sunspots and large-scale magnetic field structures.

  14. Doppler observations of solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    Daily observations of the photospheric equatorial rotation rate using the Doppler effect mode at the Sanford Solar Observatory are presented. These observations show no variations in the rotation rate that exceed the observational error of about one percent. The average rotation rate is indistinguishable from that of sunspots and large scale magnetic field structures.

  15. Understanding the Code: keeping accurate records.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard

    2015-10-01

    In his continuing series looking at the legal and professional implications of the Nursing and Midwifery Council's revised Code of Conduct, Richard Griffith discusses the elements of accurate record keeping under Standard 10 of the Code. This article considers the importance of accurate record keeping for the safety of patients and protection of district nurses. The legal implications of records are explained along with how district nurses should write records to ensure these legal requirements are met. PMID:26418404

  16. Rotational alignment of the tibial component in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Graceffa, Angelo; Marcucci, Massimiliano; Baldini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Many surgical techniques, correlated to different anatomical landmarks, have been proposed to allow a satisfactory rotational alignment of the tibial component in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Unfortunately, an accurate landmark has not yet been established although many computer models using CT reconstructions and standard radiologic studies have been performed. In this review article, the authors propose a new anatomical rotational reference for a correct positioning of the tibial component during primary TKA; the authors compared the results of their studies with the current literature on rotational alignment references and previously proposed surgical techniques. The authors also analyzed the correlation between classic and newer tibial baseplate designs and different tibial rotational landmarks. PMID:26855939

  17. Rotational spectroscopy of pyridazine and its isotopologs from 235-360 GHz: equilibrium structure and vibrational satellites.

    PubMed

    Esselman, Brian J; Amberger, Brent K; Shutter, Joshua D; Daane, Mitchell A; Stanton, John F; Woods, R Claude; McMahon, Robert J

    2013-12-14

    The rotational spectrum of pyridazine (o-C4H4N2), the ortho disubstituted nitrogen analog of benzene, has been measured and analyzed in the gas phase. For the ground vibrational state of the normal isotopolog, over 2000 individual rotational transitions have been identified between 238 and 360 GHz and have been fit to 13 parameters of a 6th-order centrifugal distortion Hamiltonian. All transitions in this frequency region can now be predicted from this model to near experimental accuracy, i.e., well enough for the purpose of any future radio-astronomical search for this species. Three isotopologs, [3-(13)C]-C4H4N2, [4-(13)C]-C4H4N2, and [1-(15)N]-C4H4N2, have been detected in natural abundance, and several hundred lines have been measured for each of these species and fit to 6th-order Hamiltonians. Ten additional isotopologs were synthesized with enhanced deuterium substitution and analyzed to allow for a complete structure determination. The equilibrium structure (Re) of pyridazine was obtained by correcting the experimental rotational constants for the effects of vibration-rotation coupling using interaction constants predicted from CCSD(T) calculations with an ANO0 basis set and further correcting for the effect of electron mass. The final Re structural parameters are determined with excellent accuracy, as evidenced by their ability to predict 28 independent moments of inertia (Ia and Ib for 14 isotopologs) very well from 9 structural parameters. The rotational spectra of the six lowest-energy fundamental vibrational satellites of the main isotopolog have been detected. The rotational spectra of the five lowest-energy vibrational satellites have been assigned and fit to yield accurate rotational and distortion constants, while the fit and assignment for the sixth is less complete. The resultant vibration-rotation interaction (α) constants are found to be in excellent agreement with ones predicted from coupled-cluster calculations, which proved to be the key

  18. Rotational spectroscopy of pyridazine and its isotopologs from 235–360 GHz: Equilibrium structure and vibrational satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Esselman, Brian J.; Amberger, Brent K.; Shutter, Joshua D.; Daane, Mitchell A.; Woods, R. Claude; McMahon, Robert J.; Stanton, John F.

    2013-12-14

    The rotational spectrum of pyridazine (o-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}), the ortho disubstituted nitrogen analog of benzene, has been measured and analyzed in the gas phase. For the ground vibrational state of the normal isotopolog, over 2000 individual rotational transitions have been identified between 238 and 360 GHz and have been fit to 13 parameters of a 6th-order centrifugal distortion Hamiltonian. All transitions in this frequency region can now be predicted from this model to near experimental accuracy, i.e., well enough for the purpose of any future radio-astronomical search for this species. Three isotopologs, [3-{sup 13}C]-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}, [4-{sup 13}C]-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}, and [1-{sup 15}N]-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}, have been detected in natural abundance, and several hundred lines have been measured for each of these species and fit to 6th-order Hamiltonians. Ten additional isotopologs were synthesized with enhanced deuterium substitution and analyzed to allow for a complete structure determination. The equilibrium structure (R{sub e}) of pyridazine was obtained by correcting the experimental rotational constants for the effects of vibration-rotation coupling using interaction constants predicted from CCSD(T) calculations with an ANO0 basis set and further correcting for the effect of electron mass. The final R{sub e} structural parameters are determined with excellent accuracy, as evidenced by their ability to predict 28 independent moments of inertia (I{sub a} and I{sub b} for 14 isotopologs) very well from 9 structural parameters. The rotational spectra of the six lowest-energy fundamental vibrational satellites of the main isotopolog have been detected. The rotational spectra of the five lowest-energy vibrational satellites have been assigned and fit to yield accurate rotational and distortion constants, while the fit and assignment for the sixth is less complete. The resultant vibration-rotation interaction (α) constants are found to

  19. Accurate spectral modeling for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Gupta, S. K.

    1977-01-01

    Direct line-by-line integration and quasi-random band model techniques are employed to calculate the spectral transmittance and total band absorptance of 4.7 micron CO, 4.3 micron CO2, 15 micron CO2, and 5.35 micron NO bands. Results are obtained for different pressures, temperatures, and path lengths. These are compared with available theoretical and experimental investigations. For each gas, extensive tabulations of results are presented for comparative purposes. In almost all cases, line-by-line results are found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental values. The range of validity of other models and correlations are discussed.

  20. On the importance of having accurate data for astrophysical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lique, Francois

    2016-06-01

    The Herschel telescope and the ALMA and NOEMA interferometers have opened new windows of observation for wavelengths ranging from far infrared to sub-millimeter with spatial and spectral resolutions previously unmatched. To make the most of these observations, an accurate knowledge of the physical and chemical processes occurring in the interstellar and circumstellar media is essential.In this presentation, I will discuss what are the current needs of astrophysics in terms of molecular data and I will show that accurate molecular data are crucial for the proper determination of the physical conditions in molecular clouds.First, I will focus on collisional excitation studies that are needed for molecular lines modelling beyond the Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) approach. In particular, I will show how new collisional data for the HCN and HNC isomers, two tracers of star forming conditions, have allowed solving the problem of their respective abundance in cold molecular clouds. I will also present the last collisional data that have been computed in order to analyse new highly resolved observations provided by the ALMA interferometer.Then, I will present the calculation of accurate rate constants for the F+H2 → HF+H and Cl+H2 ↔ HCl+H reactions, which have allowed a more accurate determination of the physical conditions in diffuse molecular clouds. I will also present the recent work on the ortho-para-H2 conversion due to hydrogen exchange that allow more accurate determination of the ortho-to-para-H2 ratio in the universe and that imply a significant revision of the cooling mechanism in astrophysical media.

  1. Magnetic field models of nine CP stars from "accurate" measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glagolevskij, Yu. V.

    2013-01-01

    The dipole models of magnetic fields in nine CP stars are constructed based on the measurements of metal lines taken from the literature, and performed by the LSD method with an accuracy of 10-80 G. The model parameters are compared with the parameters obtained for the same stars from the hydrogen line measurements. For six out of nine stars the same type of structure was obtained. Some parameters, such as the field strength at the poles B p and the average surface magnetic field B s differ considerably in some stars due to differences in the amplitudes of phase dependences B e (Φ) and B s (Φ), obtained by different authors. It is noted that a significant increase in the measurement accuracy has little effect on the modelling of the large-scale structures of the field. By contrast, it is more important to construct the shape of the phase dependence based on a fairly large number of field measurements, evenly distributed by the rotation period phases. It is concluded that the Zeeman component measurement methods have a strong effect on the shape of the phase dependence, and that the measurements of the magnetic field based on the lines of hydrogen are more preferable for modelling the large-scale structures of the field.

  2. Basic principles and recent observations of rotationally sampled wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, James R.

    1995-01-01

    The concept of rotationally sampled wind speed is described. The unusual wind characteristics that result from rotationally sampling the wind are shown first for early measurements made using an 8-point ring of anemometers on a vertical plane array of meteorological towers. Quantitative characterization of the rotationally sampled wind is made in terms of the power spectral density function of the wind speed. Verification of the importance of the new concept is demonstrated with spectral analyses of the response of the MOD-OA blade flapwise root bending moment and the corresponding rotational analysis of the wind measured immediately upwind of the MOD-OA using a 12-point ring of anemometers on a 7-tower vertical plane array. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) theory of the rotationally sampled wind speed power spectral density function is tested successfully against the wind spectrum measured at the MOD-OA vertical plane array. A single-tower empirical model of the rotationally sampled wind speed is also successfully tested against the measurements from the full vertical plane array. Rotational measurements of the wind velocity with hotfilm anemometers attached to rotating blades are shown to be accurate and practical for research on winds at the blades of wind turbines. Some measurements at the rotor blade of a MOD-2 turbine using the hotfilm technique in a pilot research program are shown. They are compared and contrasted to the expectations based upon application of the PNL theory of rotationally sampled wind to the MOD-2 size and rotation rate but without teeter, blade bending, or rotor induction accounted for. Finally, the importance of temperature layering and of wind modifications due to flow over complex terrain is demonstrated by the use of hotfilm anemometer data, and meteorological tower and acoustic doppler sounder data from the MOD-2 site at Goodnoe Hills, Washington.

  3. Rotation and Rotation-Vibration Spectroscopy of the 0+-0- Inversion Doublet in Deuterated Cyanamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisiel, Zbigniew; Kraśnicki, Adam; Jabs, Wolfgang; Herbst, Eric; Winnewisser, Brenda P.; Winnewisser, Manfred

    2013-10-01

    The pure rotation spectrum of deuterated cyanamide was recorded at frequencies from 118 to 649 GHz, which was complemented by measurement of its high-resolution rotation-vibration spectrum at 8-350 cm-1. For D2NCN the analysis revealed considerable perturbations between the lowest Ka rotational energy levels in the 0+ and 0- substates of the lowest inversion doublet. The final data set for D2NCN exceeded 3000 measured transitions and was successfully fitted with a Hamiltonian accounting for the 0+ - 0- coupling. A smaller data set, consisting only of pure rotation and rotation-vibration lines observed with microwave techniques was obtained for HDNCN, and additional transitions of this type were also measured for H2NCN. The spectroscopic data for all three isotopic species were fitted with a unified, robust Hamiltonian allowing confident prediction of spectra well into the terahertz frequency region, which is of interest to contemporary radioastronomy. The isotopic dependence of the determined inversion splitting, -E = 16.4964789(8), 32.089173(3), and 49.567770(6) cm-1, for D2NCN, HDNCN, and H2NCN, respectively, is found to be in good agreement with estimates from a simple reduced quartic-quadratic double minimum potential.

  4. IMPROVED LINE DATA FOR THE SWAN SYSTEM {sup 12}C{sup 13}C ISOTOPOLOGUE

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, Ram S.; Brooke, James S. A.; Bernath, Peter F.; Sneden, Christopher; Lucatello, Sara E-mail: rr662@york.ac.uk E-mail: chris@verdi.as.utexas.edu

    2014-03-01

    We present new, accurate predictions for rotational line positions, excitation energies, and transition probabilities of the {sup 12}C{sup 13}C isotopologue Swan d{sup 3}Π-a{sup 3}Π system 0-0, 0–1, 0–2, 1–0, 1–1, 1–2, 2–0, 2–1, and 2–2 vibrational bands. The line positions and energy levels were predicted through new analyses of published laboratory data for the {sup 12}C{sup 13}C lines. Transition probabilities were derived from recent computations of transition dipole moments and related quantities. The {sup 12}C{sup 13}C line data were combined with similar data for {sup 12}C{sub 2,} reported in a companion paper, and applied to produce synthetic spectra of carbon-rich metal-poor stars that have strong C{sub 2} Swan bands. The matches between synthesized and observed spectra were used to estimate band head positions for a few of the {sup 12}C{sup 13}C vibrational bands and to verify that the new computed line data match observed spectra. The much weaker C{sub 2} lines of the bright red giant Arcturus were also synthesized in the band head regions.

  5. Computed Tomography Analysis of Postsurgery Femoral Component Rotation Based on a Force Sensing Device Method versus Hypothetical Rotational Alignment Based on Anatomical Landmark Methods: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kreuzer, Stefan W.; Pourmoghaddam, Amir; Leffers, Kevin J.; Johnson, Clint W.; Dettmer, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Rotation of the femoral component is an important aspect of knee arthroplasty, due to its effects on postsurgery knee kinematics and associated functional outcomes. It is still debated which method for establishing rotational alignment is preferable in orthopedic surgery. We compared force sensing based femoral component rotation with traditional anatomic landmark methods to investigate which method is more accurate in terms of alignment to the true transepicondylar axis. Thirty-one patients underwent computer-navigated total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis with femoral rotation established via a force sensor. During surgery, three alternative hypothetical femoral rotational alignments were assessed, based on transepicondylar axis, anterior-posterior axis, or the utilization of a posterior condyles referencing jig. Postoperative computed tomography scans were obtained to investigate rotation characteristics. Significant differences in rotation characteristics were found between rotation according to DKB and other methods (P < 0.05). Soft tissue balancing resulted in smaller deviation from anatomical epicondylar axis than any other method. 77% of operated knees were within a range of ±3° of rotation. Only between 48% and 52% of knees would have been rotated appropriately using the other methods. The current results indicate that force sensors may be valuable for establishing correct femoral rotation. PMID:26881086

  6. Rotation of the outer layer of the sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouaoudia, Samir

    The problem of differential rotation in the radiative regions of slowly rotating main-sequence stars is addressed. Inhomogeneous compositions and magnetic fields are ignored. Although this is a classical problem is astrophysics, several fundamental questions regarding the basic magnitude and structure of the flow remain unanswered. Von Zeipel pioneered the study of this problem by showing that solid-body rotation is not possible in radiatively stable zones. The goal is to find alternatives to pure sold-body rotation. A numerical approach was tried, but found to be too ill-conditioned to give accurate results. However, in setting up the equations for numerical solutions, we solved the long-standing computational problem of how to compute efficiently high-order solutions at a coordinate singularity. The classical derivation of the von Zeipel paradox is derived analytically to be incorrect for slowly rotating stars and a new proof is shown. This new derivation shows that solid-body rotation is allowed if certain conditions are fulfilled, and that those conditions are approximately fulfilled in the outer regions of the radiative zones of solar-like stars. A first-order perturbation is used to compute the differential rotation.

  7. Novel rotating field probe for inspection of tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, J.; Tarkleson, E.; Lei, N.; Udpa, L.; Udpa, S. S.

    2012-05-01

    Inspection of steam generator tubes in nuclear power plants is extremely critical for safe operation of the power plant. In the nuclear industry, steam generator tube inspection using eddy current techniques has evolved over the years from a single bobbin coil, to rotating probe coil (RPC) and array probe, in an attempt to improve the speed and reliability of inspection. The RPC probe offers the accurate spatial resolution but involves complex mechanical rotation. This paper presents a novel design of eddy current probes based on rotating fields produced by three identical coils excited by a balanced three-phase supply. The sensor thereby achieves rotating probe functionality by electronic means and eliminates the need for mechanical rotation. The field generated by the probe is largely radial that result in induced currents that flow circularly around the radial axis and rotating around the tube at a synchronous speed effectively producing induced eddy currents that are multidirectional. The probe will consequently be sensitive to cracks of all orientations in the tube wall. The finite element model (FEM) results of the rotating fields and induced currents are presented. A prototype probe is being built to validate simulation results.

  8. Novel rotating field probe for inspection of tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, J.; Tarkleson, E.; Lei, N.; Udpa, L.; Udpa, S. S.

    2012-05-17

    Inspection of steam generator tubes in nuclear power plants is extremely critical for safe operation of the power plant. In the nuclear industry, steam generator tube inspection using eddy current techniques has evolved over the years from a single bobbin coil, to rotating probe coil (RPC) and array probe, in an attempt to improve the speed and reliability of inspection. The RPC probe offers the accurate spatial resolution but involves complex mechanical rotation. This paper presents a novel design of eddy current probes based on rotating fields produced by three identical coils excited by a balanced three-phase supply. The sensor thereby achieves rotating probe functionality by electronic means and eliminates the need for mechanical rotation. The field generated by the probe is largely radial that result in induced currents that flow circularly around the radial axis and rotating around the tube at a synchronous speed effectively producing induced eddy currents that are multidirectional. The probe will consequently be sensitive to cracks of all orientations in the tube wall. The finite element model (FEM) results of the rotating fields and induced currents are presented. A prototype probe is being built to validate simulation results.

  9. An accurate analytic representation of the water pair potential.

    PubMed

    Cencek, Wojciech; Szalewicz, Krzysztof; Leforestier, Claude; van Harrevelt, Rob; van der Avoird, Ad

    2008-08-28

    The ab initio water dimer interaction energies obtained from coupled cluster calculations and used in the CC-pol water pair potential (Bukowski et al., Science, 2007, 315, 1249) have been refitted to a site-site form containing eight symmetry-independent sites in each monomer and denoted as CC-pol-8s. Initially, the site-site functions were assumed in a B-spline form, which allowed a precise optimization of the positions of the sites. Next, these functions were assumed in the standard exponential plus inverse powers form. The root mean square error of the CC-pol-8s fit with respect to the 2510 ab initio points is 0.10 kcal mol(-1), compared to 0.42 kcal mol(-1) of the CC-pol fit (0.010 kcal mol(-1) compared to 0.089 kcal mol(-1) for points with negative interaction energies). The energies of the stationary points in the CC-pol-8s potential are considerably more accurate than in the case of CC-pol. The water dimer vibration-rotation-tunneling spectrum predicted by the CC-pol-8s potential agrees substantially and systematically better with experiment than the already very accurate spectrum predicted by CC-pol, while specific features that could not be accurately predicted previously now agree very well with experiment. This shows that the uncertainties of the fit were the largest source of error in the previous predictions and that the present potential sets a new standard of accuracy in investigations of the water dimer. PMID:18688514

  10. Absolute intensities and self-, N2-, and air-broadened Lorentz halfwidths for selected lines in the nu3 band of (C-12)H3D from measurements with a tunable diode laser spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malathy Devi, V.; Benner, D. C.; Rinsland, C. P.; Smith, M. A. H.; Thakur, K. B.

    1986-01-01

    Absolute intensities and self-, air- and N2-broadened half-widths have been determined for the first time for individual lines in the nu3(A1) band of (C-12)H3D near 7.6 microns from measurements of individual vibration-rotation lines using a tunable diode laser spectrometer. The intensity measurements are believed to be accurate to within three percent. Within experimental uncertainties, equal broadening efficiencies are found for both air and nitrogen. Self-broadened half-widths determined for three transitions yield an average half-width value of 0.803 + or -0.0010/cm/atm at 296 K.

  11. The 13CH4 absorption spectrum in the Icosad range (6600-7692 cm-1) at 80 K and 296 K: Empirical line lists and temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campargue, A.; Béguier, S.; Zbiri, Y.; Mondelain, D.; Kassi, S.; Karlovets, E. V.; Nikitin, A. V.; Rey, M.; Starikova, E. N.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.

    2016-08-01

    The 13CH4 absorption spectrum has been recorded at 296 K and 80 K in the Icosad range between 6600 and 7700 cm-1. The achieved noise equivalent absorption of the spectra recorded by differential absorption spectroscopy (DAS) is about αmin ≈ 1.5 × 10-7 cm-1. Two empirical line lists were constructed including 17,792 and 24,139 lines at 80 K and 296 K, respectively. For comparison, the HITRAN database provides only 1040 13CH4 lines in the region determined from methane spectra with natural isotopic abundance. Empirical values of the lower state energy level, Eemp, were systematically derived from the intensity ratios of the lines measured at 80 K and 296 K. Overall 10,792 Eemp values were determined providing accurate temperature dependence for most of the 13CH4 absorption in the region (93% and 82% at 80 K and 296 K, respectively). The quality of the derived empirical values of the lower state rotational quantum number, Jemp, is illustrated by their clear propensity to be close to an integer. A good agreement is achieved between our small Jemp values, with previous accurate determinations obtained by applying the 2T method to jet and 80 K spectra. The line lists at 296 K and 80 K which are provided as Supplementary material will be used for future rovibrational assignments based on accurate variational calculations.

  12. Comparisons of 2D IR measured spectral diffusion in rotating frames using pulse shaping and in the stationary frame using the standard method.

    PubMed

    Karthick Kumar, S K; Tamimi, A; Fayer, M D

    2012-11-14

    Multidimensional visible spectroscopy using pulse shaping to produce pulses with stable controllable phases and delays has emerged as an elegant tool to acquire electronic spectra faster and with greatly reduced instrumental and data processing errors. Recent migration of this approach using acousto-optic modulator (AOM) pulse shaping to the mid-infrared region has proved useful for acquiring two dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectra. The measurement of spectral diffusion in 2D IR experiments hinges on obtaining accurate 2D line shapes. To date, pulse shaping 2D IR has not been used to study the time-dependent spectral diffusion of a vibrational chromophore. Here we compare the spectral diffusion data obtained from a standard non-collinear 2D IR spectrometer using delay lines to the data obtained from an AOM pulse shaper based 2D IR spectrometer. The pulse shaping experiments are performed in stationary, partially rotating, and fully rotating reference frames and are the first in the infrared to produce 2D spectra collected in a fully rotating frame using a phase controlled pulse sequence. Rotating frame experiments provide a dramatic reduction in the number of time points that must be measured to obtain a 2D IR spectrum, with the fully rotating frame giving the greatest reduction. Experiments were conducted on the transition metal carbonyl complex tricarbonylchloro(1,10-phenanthroline)rhenium(I) in chloroform. The time dependent data obtained from the different techniques and with different reference frames are shown to be in agreement. PMID:23163363

  13. STRUCTURE IN THE ROTATION MEASURE SKY

    SciTech Connect

    Stil, J. M.; Taylor, A. R.; Sunstrum, C.

    2011-01-01

    An analysis of structure in rotation measure (RM) across the sky based on the RM catalog of Taylor et al. is presented. Several resolved RM structures are identified with structure in the local interstellar medium, including radio loops I, II, and III, the Gum nebula, and the Orion-Eridanus superbubble. Structure functions (SFs) of RM are presented for selected areas, and maps of SF amplitude and slope across the sky are compared with H{alpha} intensity and diffuse polarized intensity. RM variance on an angular scale of 1{sup 0} is correlated with length of the line of sight through the Galaxy, with a contribution from local structures. The slope of the SFs is less concentrated to the Galactic plane and less correlated with length of the line of sight through the Galaxy, suggesting a more local origin for RM structure on angular scales {approx}10{sup 0}. The RM variance is a factor of {approx}2 higher toward the South Galactic Pole than toward the North Galactic Pole, reflecting a more wide-spread asymmetry between the northern and southern Galactic hemispheres. Depolarization of diffuse Galactic synchrotron emission at latitudes <30{sup 0} can be explained largely by Faraday dispersion related to small-scale variance in RM, but the errors allow a significant contribution from differential Faraday rotation along the line of sight.

  14. WAVELENGTH MEASUREMENTS OF K TRANSITIONS OF OXYGEN, NEON, AND MAGNESIUM WITH X-RAY ABSORPTION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Jinyuan; Zhang Shuangnan; Yao Yangsen

    2013-09-10

    Accurate atomic transition data are important in many astronomical research areas, especially for studies of line spectroscopy. Whereas transition data of He-like and H-like ions (i.e., ions in high-charge states) have been accurately calculated, the corresponding data of K transitions of neutral or low-ionized metal elements are still very uncertain. Spectroscopy of absorption lines produced in the interstellar medium (ISM) has been proven to be an effective way to measure the central wavelengths of these atomic transitions. In this work, we analyze 36 Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating observations to search for and measure the ISM absorption lines along sight lines to 11 low-mass X-ray binaries. We correct the Galactic rotation velocity to the rest frame for every observation and then use two different methods to merge all the corrected spectra to a co-added spectrum. However, the co-added spectra obtained by this method exhibit biases, toward to either observations with high counts or lines with high signal-to-noise ratios. We do a Bayesian analysis of several significantly detected lines to obtain the systematic uncertainty and the bias correction for other lines. Compared to previous studies, our results improve the wavelength accuracy by a factor of two to five and significantly reduce the systematic uncertainties and biases. Several weak transitions (e.g., 1s-2p of Mg IV and Mg V; 1s-3p of Mg III and Mg V) are also detected for the first time, albeit with low significance; future observations with improved accuracy are required to confirm these detections.

  15. Rotating-Pump Design Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James F.; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Scheer, Dean D.

    2006-01-01

    Pump Design (PUMPDES) is a computer program for designing a rotating pump for liquid hydrogen, liquid oxygen, liquid nitrogen, water, methane, or ethane. Using realistic properties of these fluids provided by another program called GASPAK, this code performs a station-by-station, mean-line analysis along the pump flow path, obtaining thermodynamic properties of the pumped fluid at each station and evaluating hydraulic losses along the flow path. The variables at each station are obtained under constraints that are consistent with the underlying physical principles. The code evaluates the performance of each stage and the overall pump. In addition, by judiciously choosing the givens and the unknowns, the code can perform a geometric inverse design function: that is, it can compute a pump geometry that yields a closest approximation of given design point. The code contains two major parts: one for an axial-rotor/inducer and one for a multistage centrifugal pump. The inducer and the centrifugal pump are functionally integrated. The code can be used in designing and/or evaluating the inducer/centrifugal-pump combination or the centrifugal pump alone. The code is written in standard Fortran 77.

  16. Evaluating rotational diffusion from protein MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Wong, Vance; Case, David A

    2008-05-15

    It is now feasible to carry out molecular dynamics simulations of proteins in water that are long compared to the overall tumbling of the molecule. Here, we examine rotational diffusion in four small, globular proteins (ubiquitin, binase, lysozyme, and fragment B3 of protein G) with the TIP3P, TIP4P/EW, and SPC/E water models, in simulations that are 6 to 60 times as long as the mean rotational tumbling time. We describe a method for extracting diffusion tensors from such simulations and compare the results to experimental values extracted from NMR relaxation measurements. The simulation results accurately follow a diffusion equation, even for spherical harmonic correlation functions with l as large as 8. However, the best-fit tensors are significantly different from experiment, especially for the commonly used TIP3P water model. Simulations that are 20 to 100 times longer than the rotational tumbling times are needed for good statistics. A number of residues exhibit internal motions on the nanosecond time scale, but in all cases examined here, a product of internal and overall time-correlation functions matches the total time-correlation function well. PMID:18052365

  17. Ocean tidal effects on Earth rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Richard S.

    2009-12-01

    Tidal forces due to the tide-raising potential deform the solid and fluid regions of the Earth, causing the Earth's inertia tensor to change, and hence causing the Earth's rate of rotation and length-of-day to change. Because both the tide-raising potential and the solid Earth's elastic response to the tidal forces caused by this potential are well-known, accurate models for the effects of the elastic solid body tides on the Earth's rotation are available. However, models for the effect of the ocean tides on the Earth's rotation are more problematic because of the need to model the dynamic response of the oceans to the tidal forces. Hydrodynamic ocean tide models that have recently become available are evaluated here for their ability to account for long-period ocean tidal signals in length-of-day observations. Of the models tested here, the older altimetric data-constrained model of Kantha et al. (1998) is shown to still do the best job of accounting for ocean tidal effects in length-of-day, particularly at the fortnightly tidal frequency. The model currently recommended by the IERS is shown to do the worst job.

  18. Rotational excitation of formaldehyde by hydrogen molecules: ortho-H_2CO at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troscompt, N.; Faure, A.; Wiesenfeld, L.; Ceccarelli, C.; Valiron, P.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: Rate coefficients for the rotational excitation of the ten lowest levels of ortho-H_2CO by collisions with H2 molecules are computed for kinetic temperatures in the range 5-100 K. Methods: Cross sections are obtained from extensive, fully converged, quantum-mechanical scattering calculations using a highly accurate potential energy surface computed at the CCSD(T) level with a basis set extrapolation procedure. Scattering calculations are carried out for H2 molecules in both para and ortho rotational levels. Results: The present rates are shown to differ significantly from those available in the literature. Moreover, the strength of propensity rules is found to depend on the para/ortho form of H2. Radiative transfer modeling also shows that the new rates have a significant impact on H_2CO emission line fluxes and that they should be adopted in any detailed radiative transfer model of ortho-H_2CO in cold environments (T ⪉ 30 K). This paper is dedicated to the memory of our friend and colleague, Pierre Valiron, who died on 31 August 2008. Table of rate coefficients is available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/493/687

  19. Interferometric rotation sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, T. M. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An interferometric rotation sensor and control system is provided which includes a compound prism interferometer and an associated direction control system. Light entering the interferometer is split into two paths with the light in the respective paths being reflected an unequal number of times, and then being recombined at an exit aperture in phase differing relationships. Incoming light is deviated from the optical axis of the device by an angle, alpha. The angle causes a similar displacement of the two component images at the exit aperture which results in a fringe pattern. Fringe numbers are directly related to angle alpha. Various control systems of the interferometer are given.

  20. ROTATING PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Boyer, K.; Hammel, J.E.; Longmire, C.L.; Nagle, D.E.; Ribe, F.L.; Tuck, J.L.

    1961-10-24

    ABS>A method and device are described for obtaining fusion reactions. The basic concept is that of using crossed electric and magnetic fields to induce a plasma rotation in which the ionized particles follow a circumferential drift orbit on wldch a cyclotron mode of motion is superimposed, the net result being a cycloidal motion about the axis of symmetry. The discharge tube has a radial electric field and a longitudinal magnetic field. Mirror machine geometry is utilized. The device avoids reliance on the pinch effect and its associated instability problems. (AEC)