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Sample records for accurate soil water

  1. Hydrologic modeling of soil water storage in landfill cover systems

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, F.J.; Rodgers, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    The accuracy of modeling soil water storage by two hydrologic models, CREAMS and HELP, was tested by comparing simulation results with field measurements of soil moisture in eight experimental landfill cover systems having a range of well-defined soil profiles and vegetative covers. Regression analysis showed that CREAMS generally represented soil moisture more accurately than HELP simulations. Soil profiles that more closely resembled natural agricultural soils were more accurately modeled than highly artificial layered soil profiles. Precautions for determining parameter values for model input and for interpreting simulation results are discussed.

  2. Crop Residue and Soil Water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop yield is greatly influenced by the amount of water that moves from the soil, through the plant, and out into the atmosphere. Winter wheat yield responds linearly to available soil water content at planting (bu/a = 5.56 + 5.34*inches). Therefore, storing precipitation in the soil during non-crop...

  3. Physically Accurate Soil Freeze-Thaw Processes in a Global Land Surface Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, M.; Haverd, V.

    2013-12-01

    Transfer of energy and moisture in frozen soil, and hence the active layer depth, are strongly influenced by the soil freezing curve which specifies liquid moisture content as a function of temperature. However, the curve is typically not represented in global land surface models, with less physically-based approximations being used instead. In this work, we develop a physically accurate model of soil freeze-thaw processes, suitable for use in a global land surface scheme. We incorporated soil freeze-thaw processes into an existing detailed model for the transfer of heat, liquid water and water vapor in soils, including isotope diagnostics - Soil-Litter-Iso (SLI, Haverd & Cuntz 2010), which has been used successfully for water and carbon balances of the Australian continent (Haverd et al. 2013). A unique feature of SLI is that fluxes of energy and moisture are coupled using a single system of linear equations. The extension to include freeze-thaw processes and snow maintains this elegant coupling, requiring only coefficients in the linear equations to be modified. No impedance factor for hydraulic conductivity is needed because of the formulation by matric flux potential rather than pressure head. Iterations are avoided which results in the same computational speed as without freezing. The extended model is evaluated extensively in stand-alone mode (against theoretical predictions, lab experiments and field data) and as part of the CABLE global land surface scheme. SLI accurately solves the classical Stefan problem of a homogeneous medium undergoing a phase change. The model also accurately reproduces the freezing front, which is observed in laboratory experiments (Hansson et al. 2004). SLI was further tested against observations at a permafrost site in Tibet (Weismüller et al. 2011). It reproduces seasonal thawing and freezing of the active layer to within 3 K of the observed soil temperature and to within 10% of the observed volumetric liquid soil moisture

  4. Physically Accurate Soil Freeze-Thaw Processes in a Global Land Surface Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, Matthias; Haverd, Vanessa

    2014-05-01

    Transfer of energy and moisture in frozen soil, and hence the active layer depth, are strongly influenced by the soil freezing curve which specifies liquid moisture content as a function of temperature. However, the curve is typically not represented in global land surface models, with less physically-based approximations being used instead. In this work, we develop a physically accurate model of soil freeze-thaw processes, suitable for use in a global land surface scheme. We incorporated soil freeze-thaw processes into an existing detailed model for the transfer of heat, liquid water and water vapor in soils, including isotope diagnostics - Soil-Litter-Iso (SLI, Haverd & Cuntz 2010), which has been used successfully for water and carbon balances of the Australian continent (Haverd et al. 2013). A unique feature of SLI is that fluxes of energy and moisture are coupled using a single system of linear equations. The extension to include freeze-thaw processes and snow maintains this elegant coupling, requiring only coefficients in the linear equations to be modified. No impedance factor for hydraulic conductivity is needed because of the formulation by matric flux potential rather than pressure head. Iterations are avoided which results in the same computational speed as without freezing. The extended model is evaluated extensively in stand-alone mode (against theoretical predictions, lab experiments and field data) and as part of the CABLE global land surface scheme. SLI accurately solves the classical Stefan problem of a homogeneous medium undergoing a phase change. The model also accurately reproduces the freezing front, which is observed in laboratory experiments (Hansson et al. 2004). SLI was further tested against observations at a permafrost site in Tibet (Weismüller et al. 2011). It reproduces seasonal thawing and freezing of the active layer to within 3 K of the observed soil temperature and to within 10% of the observed volumetric liquid soil moisture

  5. Container Soil-Water Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spomer, L. Art; Hershey, David R.

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an activity that illustrates the relationship between the soil found in containers and soil in the ground including the amount of air and water found in each. Sponges are used to represent soil. Materials, procedures, and probable results are described. (KR)

  6. Accurately measuring volume of soil samples using low cost Kinect 3D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Sterre, B.; Hut, R.; Van De Giesen, N.

    2012-12-01

    The 3D scanner of the Kinect game controller can be used to increase the accuracy and efficiency of determining in situ soil moisture content. Soil moisture is one of the principal hydrological variables in both the water and energy interactions between soil and atmosphere. Current in situ measurements of soil moisture either rely on indirect measurements (of electromagnetic constants or heat capacity) or on physically taking a sample and weighing it in a lab. The bottleneck in accurately retrieving soil moisture using samples is the determining of the volume of the sample. Currently this is mostly done by the very time consuming "sand cone method" in which the volume were the sample used to sit is filled with sand. We show that 3D scanner that is part of the $150 game controller extension "Kinect" can be used to make 3D scans before and after taking the sample. The accuracy of this method is tested by scanning forms of known volume. This method is less time consuming and less error-prone than using a sand cone.

  7. Accurately measuring volume of soil samples using low cost Kinect 3D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Sterre, Boy-Santhos; Hut, Rolf; van de Giesen, Nick

    2013-04-01

    The 3D scanner of the Kinect game controller can be used to increase the accuracy and efficiency of determining in situ soil moisture content. Soil moisture is one of the principal hydrological variables in both the water and energy interactions between soil and atmosphere. Current in situ measurements of soil moisture either rely on indirect measurements (of electromagnetic constants or heat capacity) or on physically taking a sample and weighing it in a lab. The bottleneck in accurately retrieving soil moisture using samples is the determining of the volume of the sample. Currently this is mostly done by the very time consuming "sand cone method" in which the volume were the sample used to sit is filled with sand. We show that 3D scanner that is part of the 150 game controller extension "Kinect" can be used to make 3D scans before and after taking the sample. The accuracy of this method is tested by scanning forms of known volume. This method is less time consuming and less error-prone than using a sand cone.

  8. Remote sensing of soil water content at large scales

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water content at the near surface is a critical parameter for understanding land surface atmosphere interactions, influencing surface energy balances. Using microwave radiometry, an accurate global map of surface soil water content can be generated on a near daily basis. The accuracy of the p...

  9. Characterization of soil water content variability and soil texture using GPR groundwave techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, K.; Anger, C.; Kelly, B.; Hubbard, S.; Rubin, Y.

    2010-08-15

    Accurate characterization of near-surface soil water content is vital for guiding agricultural management decisions and for reducing the potential negative environmental impacts of agriculture. Characterizing the near-surface soil water content can be difficult, as this parameter is often both spatially and temporally variable, and obtaining sufficient measurements to describe the heterogeneity can be prohibitively expensive. Understanding the spatial correlation of near-surface soil water content can help optimize data acquisition and improve understanding of the processes controlling soil water content at the field scale. In this study, ground penetrating radar (GPR) methods were used to characterize the spatial correlation of water content in a three acre field as a function of sampling depth, season, vegetation, and soil texture. GPR data were acquired with 450 MHz and 900 MHz antennas, and measurements of the GPR groundwave were used to estimate soil water content at four different times. Additional water content estimates were obtained using time domain reflectometry measurements, and soil texture measurements were also acquired. Variograms were calculated for each set of measurements, and comparison of these variograms showed that the horizontal spatial correlation was greater for deeper water content measurements than for shallower measurements. Precipitation and irrigation were both shown to increase the spatial variability of water content, while shallowly-rooted vegetation decreased the variability. Comparison of the variograms of water content and soil texture showed that soil texture generally had greater small-scale spatial correlation than water content, and that the variability of water content in deeper soil layers was more closely correlated to soil texture than were shallower water content measurements. Lastly, cross-variograms of soil texture and water content were calculated, and co-kriging of water content estimates and soil texture

  10. Soil and Water: Some Teaching Suggestions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Richard B.

    1987-01-01

    Outlines six soil and water investigations that students can pursue outdoors, in nature centers, or in classrooms: soil characteristics; relationship between soil ph and plant life; what aggregates tell us; differences in soil structure; differences in rate of water absorption by soil; and soil exploration with a Berlesi funnel. (NEC)

  11. Profiling soil water content sensor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A waveguide-on-access-tube (WOAT) sensor system based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) principles was developed to sense soil water content and bulk electrical conductivity in 20-cm (8 inch) deep layers from the soil surface to depths of 3 m (10 ft) (patent No. 13/404,491 pending). A Cooperative R...

  12. Successional stage of biological soil crusts: an accurate indicator of ecohydrological condition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, Jayne; Wilcox, Bradford P.; Van Scoyoc, Matthew V.; Phillips, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    Biological soil crusts are a key component of many dryland ecosystems. Following disturbance, biological soil crusts will recover in stages. Recently, a simple classification of these stages has been developed, largely on the basis of external features of the crusts, which reflects their level of development (LOD). The classification system has six LOD classes, from low (1) to high (6). To determine whether the LOD of a crust is related to its ecohydrological function, we used rainfall simulation to evaluate differences in infiltration, runoff, and erosion among crusts in the various LODs, across a range of soil depths and with different wetting pre-treatments. We found large differences between the lowest and highest LODs, with runoff and erosion being greatest from the lowest LOD. Under dry antecedent conditions, about 50% of the water applied ran off the lowest LOD plots, whereas less than 10% ran off the plots of the two highest LODs. Similarly, sediment loss was 400 g m-2 from the lowest LOD and almost zero from the higher LODs. We scaled up the results from these simulations using the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model. Modelling results indicate that erosion increases dramatically as slope length and gradient increase, especially beyond the threshold values of 10 m for slope length and 10% for slope gradient. Our findings confirm that the LOD classification is a quick, easy, nondestructive, and accurate index of hydrological condition and should be incorporated in field and modelling assessments of ecosystem health.

  13. Pink-Beam, Highly-Accurate Compact Water Cooled Slits

    SciTech Connect

    Lyndaker, Aaron; Deyhim, Alex; Jayne, Richard; Waterman, Dave; Caletka, Dave; Steadman, Paul; Dhesi, Sarnjeet

    2007-01-19

    Advanced Design Consulting, Inc. (ADC) has designed accurate compact slits for applications where high precision is required. The system consists of vertical and horizontal slit mechanisms, a vacuum vessel which houses them, water cooling lines with vacuum guards connected to the individual blades, stepper motors with linear encoders, limit (home position) switches and electrical connections including internal wiring for a drain current measurement system. The total slit size is adjustable from 0 to 15 mm both vertically and horizontally. Each of the four blades are individually controlled and motorized. In this paper, a summary of the design and Finite Element Analysis of the system are presented.

  14. Tightly bound soil water introduces isotopic memory effects on mobile and extractable soil water pools.

    PubMed

    Newberry, Sarah L; Prechsl, Ulrich E; Pace, Matthew; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2017-03-23

    Cryogenic vacuum extraction is the well-established method of extracting water from soil for isotopic analyses of waters moving through the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. We investigate if soils can alter the isotopic composition of water through isotope memory effects, and determined which mechanisms are responsible for it. Soils with differing physicochemical properties were re-wetted with reference water and subsequently extracted by cryogenic water distillation. Results suggest some reference waters bind tightly to the soil and not all of this tightly bound water is removed during cryogenic vacuum extraction. Kinetic isotopic fractionation occurring when reference water binds to the soil is likely responsible for the (18)O-depletion of re-extracted reference water, suggesting an enrichment of the tightly bound soil water pool. Further re-wetting of cryogenically extracted soils indicates an isotopic memory effect of tightly bound soil water on water added to the soil. The data suggest tightly bound soil water can influence the isotopic composition of mobile soil water. Findings show that soils influence the isotope composition of soil water by (i) kinetic fractionation when water is bound to the soil and (ii) equilibrium fractionation between different soil water pools. These findings could be relevant for plant water uptake investigations and complicate ecohydrological and paleohydrological studies.

  15. Cumulative soil water evaporation as a function of depth and time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water evaporation is an important component of the surface water balance and the surface energy balance. Accurate and dynamic measurements of soil water evaporation enhance the understanding of water and energy partitioning at the land-atmosphere interface. The objective of this study is to mea...

  16. Modeling the soil system: Bridging the gap between pedology and soil-water physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braudeau, Erik; Mohtar, Rabi H.

    2009-05-01

    The biological and geochemical processes in soil such as organic matter mineralization, microbiological activity, and plant alimentation can be accurately assessed and modeled only with the knowledge of the thermodynamic status of the soil medium where these processes take place. However, current soil water models do not define and characterize the soil structure or the thermodynamic state of the soil water interacting with this structure. This article presents a new paradigm in characterizing and modeling the organized soil medium and the physical properties resulting from this organization. It describes a framework of the modeling approach as a contribution to the General Systems theory. The basic concept of Representative Elementary Volume (REV) in soil physics and hydrology was transformed into the concept of Structure Representative Volume (SREV) which takes into account the hierarchical organization of the structured soil medium. The pedostructure is defined as the SREV of the soil medium and this concept is at the basis of the new paradigm including variables, equations, parameters, and units in soil physics, in a similar way that the REV is at the basis of the continuous porous media mechanics applied to soils. The paradigm allows for a thermodynamic characterization of the structured soil medium with respect to soil water content then bridging the gap between pedology and soil physics. We show that the two points of view (REV and SREV) are complementary and must be used in the scaling of information. This approach leads to a new dimension in soil-water properties characterization that ensures a physically based modeling of processes in soil and the transfer of information from the physical scale of processes (pedostructure or laboratory measurements scale) to the application scale of the other disciplines (modeling and mapping scale).

  17. The utility of surface temperature measurements for the remote sensing of surface soil water status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idso, S. B.; Jackson, R. D.; Reginato, R. J.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments carried out on an Avondale loam soil indicated that the thermal inertia concept of soil water content detection is reasonably sound. The volumetric water contents of surface soil layers between 2 and 4 cm thick were found to be linear functions of the amplitude of the diurnal surface soil temperature wave for clear day-night periods. They were also found to be linear functions of the daily maximum value of the surface soil-air-temperature differential. Tests on three additional soils ranging from sandy loam to clay indicated that the relations determined for Avondale loam could not be accurately applied to these other soil types. When the moisture characteristic curves of each soil were used to transform water contents into pressure potentials, however, it was found that soil water pressure potential could be determined without prior knowledge of soil type, and thus its value as a potential soil water status survey tool was significantly enhanced.

  18. Microwave remote sensing of soil water content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cihlar, J.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1975-01-01

    Microwave remote sensing of soils to determine water content was considered. A layered water balance model was developed for determining soil water content in the upper zone (top 30 cm), while soil moisture at greater depths and near the surface during the diurnal cycle was studied using experimental measurements. Soil temperature was investigated by means of a simulation model. Based on both models, moisture and temperature profiles of a hypothetical soil were generated and used to compute microwave soil parameters for a clear summer day. The results suggest that, (1) soil moisture in the upper zone can be predicted on a daily basis for 1 cm depth increments, (2) soil temperature presents no problem if surface temperature can be measured with infrared radiometers, and (3) the microwave response of a bare soil is determined primarily by the moisture at and near the surface. An algorithm is proposed for monitoring large areas which combines the water balance and microwave methods.

  19. Semiempirical model of soil water hysteresis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    In order to represent hysteretic soil water retention curves accurately using as few measurements as possible, a new semiempirical model has been developed. It has two postulates related to physical characteristics of the medium, and two parameters, each with a definite physical interpretation, whose values are determined empirically for a given porous medium. Tests of the model show that it provides high-quality optimized fits to measured water content vs. matric pressure wetting curves for a wide variety of media. A practical use of this model is to provide a complete simulated main wetting curve for a medium where only a main drying curve and two points on the wetting curve have been measured. -from Author

  20. Soil Water and Temperature System (SWATS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, D

    2005-01-01

    The soil water and temperature system (SWATS) provides vertical profiles of soil temperature, soil-water potential, and soil moisture as a function of depth below the ground surface at hourly intervals. The temperature profiles are measured directly by in situ sensors at the Central Facility and many of the extended facilities of the SGP climate research site. The soil-water potential and soil moisture profiles are derived from measurements of soil temperature rise in response to small inputs of heat. Atmospheric scientists use the data in climate models to determine boundary conditions and to estimate the surface energy flux. The data are also useful to hydrologists, soil scientists, and agricultural scientists for determining the state of the soil.

  1. Data assimilation with soil water content sensors and pedotransfer functions in soil water flow modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water flow models are based on a set of simplified assumptions about the mechanisms, processes, and parameters of water retention and flow. That causes errors in soil water flow model predictions. Soil water content monitoring data can be used to reduce the errors in models. Data assimilation (...

  2. Guidelines and techniques for obtaining water samples that accurately represent the water chemistry of an aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Claassen, Hans C.

    1982-01-01

    Obtaining ground-water samples that accurately represent the water chemistry of an aquifer is a complex task. Before a ground-water sampling program can be started, an understanding of the kind of chemical data needed and the potential changes in water chemistry resulting from various drilling, well-completion, and sampling techniques is needed. This report provides a basis for such an evaluation and permits a choice of techniques that will result in obtaining the best possible data for the time and money allocated.

  3. Comparison of soil water potential sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degre, Aurore; van der Ploeg, Martine; Caldwell, Todd; Gooren, Harm

    2015-04-01

    Temporal and spatial monitoring of soil water potential and soil water content are necessary for quantifying water flow in the domains of hydrology, soil science and crop production as knowledge of the soil water retention curve is important for solving Richards' equation. Numerous measurement techniques exist nowadays that use various physical properties of the soil-water complex to record changes in soil water content or soil water potential. Laboratory techniques are very useful to determine static properties of the soil water retention curve, and have been used to show the impacts of hysteresis. Yet, other spatiotemporal dynamics resulting from for example growing root systems, biological activity, periodic tillage and their impact on the soil structure cannot satisfactory be quantified in static setups in the laboratory. ). To be able to quantify the influence of soil heterogeneity, and spatiotemporal dynamics on the soil water retention curve, an in situ approach combining soil moisture and soil water potential measurements could provide useful data. Such an in situ approach would require sensors that can measure a representative part of the soil water retention curve. The volumetric soil water content is often measured using time domain reflectometry, and has gained widespread acceptance as a standard electronic means of volumetric water content measurement. To measure the soil water potential, water filled tensiometers are used in most studies. Unfortunately, their range remains limited due to cavitation. Recently, several new sensors for use under in situ conditions have been proposed to cover a wider range of pressure head: Polymer tensiometers, MPS (Decagon) and pF-meter (ecoTech). In this study, we present the principles behind each measurement technique. Then we present the results of a fully controlled experiment where we compared two MPS sensors, two pF-meter sensors and two POT sensors in the same repacked soil. It allows us to discuss advantages

  4. Least limiting water range of soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The least limiting water range (LLWR) has been developed as an index of the soil structural quality. The LLWR was defined as the region bounded by the upper and lower soil water content over which water, oxygen, and mechanical resistance become major limitations for root growth. Thus, it combines th...

  5. A modified soil water based Richards equation for layered soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinka, F.; Ahrens, B.

    2010-09-01

    Most Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Transfer (SVAT) models like TERRA-ML (implemented e.g. in the CCLM model (www.clm-community.eu)) use the soil moisture based Richards equation to simulate vertical water fluxes in soils, assuming a homogeneous soil type. Recently, high-resolution soil type datasets (e.g. BüK 1000, only for Germany (Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources, BGR, www.bgr.bund.de) or Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD, version 1.1, FAO/IIASA/ISRIC/ISSCAS/JRC, March 2009)) have been developed. Deficiencies in the numerical solution of the soil moisture based Richards equation may occur if inhomogeneous soil type data is implemented, because there are possibly discontinuities in soil moisture due to various soil type characteristics. One way to fix this problem is to use the potential based Richards equation, but this may lead to problems in conservation of mass. This presentation will suggest a possible numerical solution of the soil moisture based Richards equation for inhomogeneous soils. The basic idea is to subtract the equilibrium state of it from soil moisture fluxes. This should reduce discontinuities because each soil layer aspires the equilibrium state and therefore differences might be of the same order. First sensitivity studies have been done for the Main river basin, Germany.

  6. Soil water repellency characteristic curves for soil profiles with natural organic carbon gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Ken; Müller, Karin; Moldrup, Per; de Jonge, Lis; Clothier, Brent; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Komatsu, Toshiko

    2014-05-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) is a phenomenon that influences many soil hydrologic processes such as reduction of infiltration, increase in overland flow, and enhanced preferential flow. SWR has been observed in various soil types and textures, and the degree of SWR is greatly controlled by soil moisture content and levels of organic matter and clay. One of the key topics in SWR research is how to describe accurately the seasonal and temporal variation of SWR with the controlling factors such as soil moisture, organic matter, and clay contents for soil profiles with natural organic carbon gradients. In the present study, we summarize measured SWR data for soil profiles under different land uses and vegetation in Japan and New Zealand, and compared these with literature data. We introduce the contact angle-based evaluation of SWR and predictive models for soil water repellency characteristic curves, in which the contact angle is a function of the moisture content. We also discuss a number of novel concepts, including i) the reduction in the contact angle with soil-water contact time to describe the time dependence of SWR, ii) the relationship between the contact angles from the measured scanning curves under controlled wetting and drying cycles, and iii) the initial contact angles measured by the sessile drop method.

  7. Modeling the soil water retention properties of same-textured soils with different initial void ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Fang; Zhou, Wan-Huan; Yuen, Ka-Veng

    2016-11-01

    This study presents a method of predicting the soil water retention curve (SWRC) of a soil using a set of measured SWRC data from a soil with the same texture but different initial void ratio. The relationships of the volumetric water contents and the matric suctions between two samples with different initial void ratios are established. An adjustment parameter (β) is introduced to express the relationships between the matric suctions of two soil samples. The parameter β is a function of the initial void ratio, matric suction or volumetric water content. The function can take different forms, resulting in different predictive models. The optimal predictive models of β are determined for coarse-grained and fine-grained soils using the Bayesian method. The optimal models of β are validated by comparing the estimated matric suction and measured data. The comparisons show that the proposed method produces more accurate SWRCs than do other models for both coarse-grained and fine-grained soils. Furthermore, the influence of the model parameters of β on the predicted matric suction and SWRC is evaluated using Latin Hypercube sampling. An uncertainty analysis shows that the reliability of the predicted SWRC decreases with decreasing water content in fine-grained soils, and the initial void ratio has no apparent influence on the reliability of the predicted SWRCs in coarse-grained and fine-grained soils.

  8. Can tritiated water-dilution space accurately predict total body water in chukar partridges

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, B.G.; Williams, J.B.; Nagy, K.A.

    1985-11-01

    Total body water (TBW) volumes determined from the dilution space of injected tritiated water have consistently overestimated actual water volumes (determined by desiccation to constant mass) in reptiles and mammals, but results for birds are controversial. We investigated potential errors in both the dilution method and the desiccation method in an attempt to resolve this controversy. Tritiated water dilution yielded an accurate measurement of water mass in vitro. However, in vivo, this method yielded a 4.6% overestimate of the amount of water (3.1% of live body mass) in chukar partridges, apparently largely because of loss of tritium from body water to sites of dissociable hydrogens on body solids. An additional source of overestimation (approximately 2% of body mass) was loss of tritium to the solids in blood samples during distillation of blood to obtain pure water for tritium analysis. Measuring tritium activity in plasma samples avoided this problem but required measurement of, and correction for, the dry matter content in plasma. Desiccation to constant mass by lyophilization or oven-drying also overestimated the amount of water actually in the bodies of chukar partridges by 1.4% of body mass, because these values included water adsorbed onto the outside of feathers. When desiccating defeathered carcasses, oven-drying at 70 degrees C yielded TBW values identical to those obtained from lyophilization, but TBW was overestimated (0.5% of body mass) by drying at 100 degrees C due to loss of organic substances as well as water.

  9. Plant Water Uptake in Drying Soils1

    PubMed Central

    Lobet, Guillaume; Couvreur, Valentin; Meunier, Félicien; Javaux, Mathieu; Draye, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, investigations on root water uptake have evolved toward a deeper integration of the soil and roots compartment properties, with the goal of improving our understanding of water acquisition from drying soils. This evolution parallels the increasing attention of agronomists to suboptimal crop production environments. Recent results have led to the description of root system architectures that might contribute to deep-water extraction or to water-saving strategies. In addition, the manipulation of root hydraulic properties would provide further opportunities to improve water uptake. However, modeling studies highlight the role of soil hydraulics in the control of water uptake in drying soil and call for integrative soil-plant system approaches. PMID:24515834

  10. Accurate predictions for the production of vaporized water

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, E.; Montel, F.

    1995-12-31

    The production of water vaporized in the gas phase is controlled by the local conditions around the wellbore. The pressure gradient applied to the formation creates a sharp increase of the molar water content in the hydrocarbon phase approaching the well; this leads to a drop in the pore water saturation around the wellbore. The extent of the dehydrated zone which is formed is the key controlling the bottom-hole content of vaporized water. The maximum water content in the hydrocarbon phase at a given pressure, temperature and salinity is corrected by capillarity or adsorption phenomena depending on the actual water saturation. Describing the mass transfer of the water between the hydrocarbon phases and the aqueous phase into the tubing gives a clear idea of vaporization effects on the formation of scales. Field example are presented for gas fields with temperatures ranging between 140{degrees}C and 180{degrees}C, where water vaporization effects are significant. Conditions for salt plugging in the tubing are predicted.

  11. Fractal processes in soil water retention

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, S.W.; Wheatcraft, S.W. )

    1990-05-01

    The authors propose a physical conceptual model for soil texture and pore structure that is based on the concept of fractal geometry. The motivation for a fractal model of soil texture is that some particle size distributions in granular soils have already been shown to display self-similar scaling that is typical of fractal objects. Hence it is reasonable to expect that pore size distributions may also display fractal scaling properties. The paradigm that they used for the soil pore size distribution is the Sierpinski carpet, which is a fractal that contains self similar holes (or pores) over a wide range of scales. The authors evaluate the water retention properties of regular and random Sierpinski carpets and relate these properties directly to the Brooks and Corey (or Campbell) empirical water retention model. They relate the water retention curves directly to the fractal dimension of the Sierpinski carpet and show that the fractal dimension strongly controls the water retention properties of the Sierpinski carpet soil. Higher fractal dimensions are shown to mimic clay-type soils, with very slow dewatering characteristics and relatively low fractal dimensions are shown to mimic a sandy soil with relatively rapid dewatering characteristics. Their fractal model of soil water retention removes the empirical fitting parameters from the soil water retention models and provides paramters which are intrinsic to the nature of the fractal porous structure. The relative permeability functions of Burdine and Mualem are also shown to be fractal directly from fractal water retention results.

  12. Water as a Reagent for Soil Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaweera, Indira S.; Marti-Perez, Montserrat; Diaz-Ferrero, Jordi; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2003-03-06

    SRI International conducted experiments in a two-year, two-phase process to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology, also known as hot water extraction (HWE) technology, for remediating petroleum-contaminated soils. The bench-scale demonstration of the process has shown great promise, and the implementation of this technology will revolutionize the conventional use of water in soil remediation technologies and provide a standalone technology for removal of both volatile and heavy components from contaminated soil.

  13. America's Soil and Water: Condition and Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1981

    A review of conditions and trends regarding soil and water resources of rural nonfederal lands of the United States is presented in this publication. Maps, charts, and graphs illustrate the data collected on various aspects of soil and water use and practice. Topic areas considered include: (1) land use patterns; (2) classes of land; (3)…

  14. Soil water sensors for irrigation management-What works, what doesn't, and why

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation scheduling can be greatly improved if accurate soil water content data are available. There are a plethora of available soil water sensing systems, but those that are practical for irrigation scheduling are divided into two major types: the frequency domain (capacitance) sensors and the t...

  15. Heat pulse probe measurements of soil water evaporation in a corn field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Latent heat fluxes from cropped fields consist of soil water evaporation and plant transpiration. It is difficult to accurately separate evapotranspiration into evaporation and transpiration. Heat pulse probes have been used to measure bare field subsurface soil water evaporation, however, the appl...

  16. Characteristics of water infiltration in layered water repellent soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrophobic soil can influence soil water infiltration, but information regarding the impacts of different levels of hydrophobicity within a layered soil profile is limited. An infiltration study was conducted to determine the effects of different levels of hydrophobicity and the position of the hyd...

  17. Soil water content and green water estimations in a small farmed semiarid catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekki, I.; Voltz, M.; Ben Mechlia, N.; Albergel, J.

    2012-04-01

    The main objective of this work is to analyze the spatial and temporal variation of soil water content and green water production over a farmed water harvesting catchment, located in north-eastern Tunisia. The area has a typical Mediterranean climate with a hot dry summer and a cool season, extending from October to April, where rainfall normally meets the water requirements of the usually grown cereals and legumes (500mm). The catchment has an area of 2.6 km2 and comprises at its outlet a dam, which retains the runoff water in a reservoir. Soil water balance measurements were carried out, about weekly, over two successive cropping cycles (2000-2002) on a network of eleven plots of 2 m2 each, representing the main land use and soil types. Soil water store investigations targeted the different individual plots as well as the entire catchment. We used a simple water balance model, where the root zone is considered as a single reservoir, to simulate soil water content variations. Results show a fairly good agreement between the calculated and measured water store for all experimental sites. The model reproduces accurately the soil water content during the beginning of the rainy season but underestimates it during the season when heavy rains occur. On heavy soils, simulated soil moisture was lower than measured values, giving differences as high as 25% between simulated water store amounts and the neutron probe measurement values. For the cereals/legume/pasture based cropping systems, most of rainfall water is stored in the soil and returns to the atmosphere by evapotranspiration. The 0-0.3 m soil layer is most active for water uptake by crops and intermittent replenishment by rainfall during the growing period; whereas drying involves the entire soil profile over the summer season (May-Seeptmber). The available water holding capacity of the soil turned out to be about seven times the storage capacity of the reservoir, showing the order of magnitude of rainfall

  18. Prediction of water content at different potentials from soil property data in Jazan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alturki, Ali; Ibrahim, Hesham

    2016-04-01

    In dry regions effective irrigation management is crucial to maintain crop production and sustain limited water resources. Effective irrigation requires good knowledge of soil water content in the root zone. However, measurement of soil water in the root zone over time is extremely expensive and time consuming. On the other hand, weather and basic soil property data are more available, either from existing databases or by direct measurement in the field. Simulation models can be used to efficiently and accurately estimate soil water content and subsequent irrigation requirements based on the available weather and soil data. In this study we investigated three hierarchical approaches to predict water content at variable potentials (0, 10, 33, 60, 100, 300, 500, 800, 1000, and 1500 kPa) using the Rosetta model: soil texture class (STC); percent of sand, silt, and clay (SSC); bulk density, percent of sand, silt, and clay, and water content measurements at 33 and 1500 kPa (SSC+WC). Estimation of soil water content at 43 locations in Jazan region using the three hierarchical approaches was compared with gravimetric water content. Results showed that the three approaches failed to describe water content accurately at saturation conditions (<10kPa). At water potentials lower than 10 kPa, good agreement was obtained, in general, between measured and simulated soil water content indicating that soil property data can be used to provide adequate estimates of the average soil water content in the root zone. The third approach gave the best results as indicated by an average NSCE value of 0.75 as compared to 0.16 and 0.18 for the first and second approaches, respectively. The ability to predict the amount of available water in the soil profile will facilitate the accurate estimate of irrigation requirements and achieve effective irrigation scheduling especially in locations where only limited weather and soil date are available.

  19. Increasing Efficiency of Water Use in Agriculture through Management of Soil Water Repellency to Optimize Soil and Water Productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Demie; Kostka, Stan; McMillan, Mica; Gadd, Nick

    2010-05-01

    Water's ability to infiltrate and disperse in soils, and soil's ability to receive, transport, retain, filter and release water are important factors in the efficient use of water in agriculture. Deteriorating soil conditions, including development of soil water repellency, negatively impact hydrological processes and, consequently, the efficiency of rainfall and irrigation. Soil water repellency is increasingly being identified in diverse soils and cropping systems. Recently research has been conducted on the use of novel soil surfactants (co-formulations of alkyl polyglycoside and block copolymer surfactants) to avoid or overcome soil water repellency and enhance water distribution in soils. Results indicate that this is an effective and affordable approach to maintaining or restoring soil and water productivity in irrigated cropping systems. Results from studies conducted in Australia and the United States to determine how this technology modifies soil hydrological behavior and crop yields will be presented. A range of soils and various crops, including potatoes, corn, apples and grapes, were included. Several rates were compared to controls for effect on soil moisture levels, soil water distribution, and crop yield. An economic analysis was also conducted in some trials. Treatments improved rootzone water status, significantly increased crop yield and quality, and in some cases allowed significant reductions in water requirements. Where assessed, a positive economic return was generated. This technology holds promise as a strategy for increasing efficiency of water use in agriculture.

  20. Hygrometric Measurement of Soil Water Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, C. D.; Tyner, J. S.

    2004-12-01

    Knowledge of soil water potential as a function of water content is required to make unsaturated flow and transport predictions. Although numerous methods are available to measure soil water potential, they are largely difficult and time consuming procedures. The goal of the research is to develop a hygrometric method that will perform satisfactorily with minimal required hardware or technician time. The volume of a drop of saline water will change due to evaporation or condensation until its salinity, and hence osmotic potential, is equal to the water potential in the adjacent gas phase. This relationship is exploited by our method to measure soil moisture potential. To begin, a drop of KCl solution with known mass and KCL concentration is placed adjacent to a soil sample with known water content inside a hermetically sealed container. The mass of the KCl drop is recorded over time with an electronic balance. As thermodynamic equilibrium is achieved, the mass of water within the KCl drop changes until its osmotic potential is equal to the capillary potential of water within the soil sample. After the mass of the KCl drop reaches equilibrium, the KCl concentration is calculated, which enables direct determination of the water potential within the soil sample. Unlike transient hygrometric measurements of water potential using psychrometers, no calibration is required.

  1. Difficulties in the evaluation and measuring of soil water infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla-Sentís, Ildefonso

    2013-04-01

    Soil water infiltration is the most important hydrological parameter for the evaluation and diagnosis of the soil water balance and soil moisture regime. Those balances and regimes are the main regulating factors of the on site water supply to plants and other soil organisms and of other important processes like runoff, surface and mass erosion, drainage, etc, affecting sedimentation, flooding, soil and water pollution, water supply for different purposes (population, agriculture, industries, hydroelectricity), etc. Therefore the evaluation and measurement of water infiltration rates has become indispensable for the evaluation and modeling of the previously mentioned processes. Infiltration is one of the most difficult hydrological parameters to evaluate or measure accurately. Although the theoretical aspects of the process of soil water infiltration are well known since the middle of the past century, when several methods and models were already proposed for the evaluation of infiltration, still nowadays such evaluation is not frequently enough accurate for the purposes being used. This is partially due to deficiencies in the methodology being used for measuring infiltration, including some newly proposed methods and equipments, and in the use of non appropriate empirical models and approaches. In this contribution we present an analysis and discussion about the main difficulties found in the evaluation and measurement of soil water infiltration rates, and the more commonly committed errors, based on the past experiences of the author in the evaluation of soil water infiltration in many different soils and land conditions, and in their use for deducing soil water balances under variable and changing climates. It is concluded that there are not models or methods universally applicable to any soil and land condition, and that in many cases the results are significantly influenced by the way we use a particular method or instrument, and by the alterations in the soil

  2. Performance evaluation of TDT soil water content and watermark soil water potential sensors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the performance of digitized Time Domain Transmissometry (TDT) soil water content sensors (Acclima, Inc., Meridian, ID) and resistance-based soil water potential sensors (Watermark 200, Irrometer Company, Inc., Riverside, CA) in two soils. The evaluation was performed by compar...

  3. Produced water toxicity tests accurately measure the produced water toxicity in marine environments?

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, W.S.; Veil, J.A.

    1996-10-01

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region VI has issued a general permit for offshore oil and gas discharges to the Gulf of Mexico that places numerical limits on whole effluent toxicity (WEI) for produced water. Recently proposed EPA general permits for other produced water discharges in Regions VI and X also include enforceable numerical limits on WET. Clearly, the industry will be conducting extensive produced water WET testing. Unfortunately, the WET test may not accurately measure the toxicity of the chemical constituents of produced water. Rather the mortality of test organisms may be attributable to (1) the high salinity of produced water, which causes salinity shock to the organisms, or (2) an ionic imbalance caused by excesses or deficiencies of one or more of seawater`s essential ions in the test chambers. Both of these effects are likely to be mitigated in actual offshore discharge settings, where the receiving water will be seawater and substantial dilution will be probable. Thus, the additional salinity of produced water will be rapidly assimilated, and the proper marine ionic balance will be quickly restored. Regulatory authorities should be aware of these factors when interpreting WET test results.

  4. Water movement in stony soils: The influence of stoniness on soil water content profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Viliam; Knava, Karol

    2010-05-01

    WATER MOVEMENT IN STONY SOILS: THE INFLUENCE OF STONINESS ON SOIL WATER CONTENT PROFILES Viliam Novák, Karol Kňava Institute of Hydrology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Racianska 75, 831 02 Bratislava 3, Slovakia, e-mail: novak@uh.savba.sk Soils containing rock fragments are widespread over the world, on Europe such soil account for 30%, 60% in Mediterranean region. In comparison to fine earth soils (soil particles are less then 2 mm) stony soils contain rock fragments characterized by the low retention capacity and hydraulic conductivity. So, for stony soils -in comparison to the fine-earth soils - is typical lower hydraulic conductivity and retention capacity, which lead to the decrease decrease of infiltration rate and low water retention. So, water movement and its modeling in stony soil would differ from fine earth (usually agricultural) soil. The aim of this contribution is to demonstrate the differences in water movement in homogeneous soil (fine earth) and stony soil. The influence of different stoniness on soil water content and soil water dynamics was studied too. Windthrow at High Tatra mountains in Slovakia (November 2004) cleared nearly 12 000 ha of 80 year conifers and this event initiated complex research of windthrow impact on the ecosystem. The important part of this study was water movement in impacted area. Specific feature of the soil in this area was moraine soil consisting of fine earth, characterized as silty sand, with the relative stone content up to 0.49, increasing with depth. Associated phenomenon to the forest clearing is the decrease of rain interception and higher undercanopy precipitation. Conifers interception capacity can be three times higher than low canopy interception, and can reach up to 40% of annual precipitation in Central Europe. Stones in the soil are decreasing infiltration rate, but paradoxically increased understorey precipitation and followingly the increased cumulative infiltration led to the increase of the soil

  5. Compost improves urban soil and water quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Construction in urban zones compacts the soil, which hinders root growth and infiltration and may increase erosion, which may degrade water quality. The purpose of our study was to determine the whether planting prairie grasses and adding compost to urban soils can mitigate these concerns. We simula...

  6. Intrusion of Soil Water through Pipe Cracks

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes a series of experiments conducted at U.S. EPA’s Test and Evaluation Facility in 2013-2014 to study the intrusion of contaminated soil water into a pipe crack during simulated backflow events. A test rig was used consisting of a 3’ x 3’ x 3’ acrylic soil bo...

  7. Soil water evaporation and crop residues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop residues have value when left in the field and also when removed from the field and sold as a commodity. Reducing soil water evaporation (E) is one of the benefits of leaving crop residues in place. E was measured beneath a corn canopy at the soil suface with nearly full coverage by corn stover...

  8. New soil water sensors for irrigation management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective irrigation management is key to obtaining the most crop production per unit of water applied and increasing production in the face of competing demands on water resources. Management methods have included calculating crop water needs based on weather station measurements, calculating soil ...

  9. A new electromagnetic induction sensor using Vector Network Analyzer technology for accurate characterisation of soil electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, F.; Lambot, S.; Moghadas, D.; Vereecken, H.

    2009-04-01

    Electromagnetic induction (EMI) has been widely used since the 70s to retrieve soil physico-chemical properties through the measurement of soil electrical conductivity. Soil electrical conductivity integrates several factors, mainly soil water content, salinity, clay content and temperature, and to a lesser extent, mineralogy, porosity, structure, cation exchange capacity, organic matter and bulk density. EMI has been shown to be useful for a wide range of environmental applications. EMI is non invasive and individual measurements are almost instantaneous, which permits to characterise large areas with fine spatial and/or temporal resolutions. Nevertheless, current EMI systems present some limitations. First, EMI usually operates at a single or at a limited number of fixed frequencies, which limits the information that can be retrieved from the subsurface. In addition, the calibration of existing commercial sensors is generally rather empirical and not accurate, which reduces the reliability of the data. Finally, the data processing techniques that are used to retrieve the soil electrical properties from EMI data often rely on strong simplifying assumptions with respect to wave propagation through the antenna-air-soil system. Performing EMI measurements with Vector Network Analyzer (VNA) technology would overcome a part of these limitations, allowing to work simultaneously at a wide range of frequencies and to readily perform robust calibrations, which are defined as an international standard. On that basis, we have developed a new algorithm for off-ground, zero-offset, frequency domain EMI based on full-waveform inverse modelling. The EMI forward model is based on a linear system of complex transfer functions for describing the loop antenna and its interactions with soil and an exact solution of Maxwell's equations for wave propagation in three-dimensional multilayered media. The approach has been validated in laboratory conditions for measurements at different

  10. WATER AS A REAGENT FOR SOIL REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Indira S. Jayaweera; Montserrat Marti-Perez; Jordi Diaz-Ferrero; Angel Sanjurjo

    2001-11-12

    SRI International conducted experiments in a two-year, two-phase process to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology, also known as hot water extraction (HWE) technology, to separate petroleum-related contaminants and other hazardous pollutants from soil and sediments. In this process, water with added electrolytes (inexpensive and environmentally friendly) is used as the extracting solvent under subcritical conditions (150-300 C). The use of electrolytes allows us to operate reactors under mild conditions and to obtain high separation efficiencies that were hitherto impossible. Unlike common organic solvents, water under subcritical conditions dissolves both organics and inorganics, thus allowing opportunities for separation of both organic and inorganic material from soil. In developing this technology, our systematic approach was to (1) establish fundamental solubility data, (2) conduct treatability studies with industrial soils, and (3) perform a bench-scale demonstration using a highly contaminated soil. The bench-scale demonstration of the process has shown great promise. The next step of the development process is the successful pilot demonstration of this technology. Once pilot tested, this technology can be implemented quite easily, since most of the basic components are readily available from mature technologies (e.g., steam stripping, soil washing, thermal desorption). The implementation of this technology will revolutionize the conventional use of water in soil remediation technologies and will provide a stand-alone technology for removal of both volatile and heavy components from contaminated soil.

  11. Passive Microwave Observation of Soil Water Infiltration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Thomas J.; Schmugge, Thomas J.; Rawls, Walter J.; ONeill, Peggy E.; Parlange, Marc B.

    1997-01-01

    Infiltration is a time varying process of water entry into soil. Experiments were conducted here using truck based microwave radiometers to observe small plots during and following sprinkler irrigation. Experiments were conducted on a sandy loam soil in 1994 and a silt loam in 1995. Sandy loam soils typically have higher infiltration capabilities than clays. For the sandy loam the observed brightness temperature (TB) quickly reached a nominally constant value during irrigation. When the irrigation was stopped the TB began to increase as drainage took place. The irrigation rates in 1995 with the silt loam soil exceeded the saturated conductivity of the soil. During irrigation the TB values exhibited a pattern that suggests the occurrence of coherent reflection, a rarely observed phenomena under natural conditions. These results suggested the existence of a sharp dielectric boundary (wet over dry soil) that was increasing in depth with time.

  12. Soil water balance scenario studies using predicted soil hydraulic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemes, A.; Wösten, J. H. M.; Bouma, J.; Várallyay, G.

    2006-03-01

    Pedotransfer functions (PTFs) have become a topic drawing increasing interest within the field of soil and environmental research because they can provide important soil physical data at relatively low cost. Few studies, however, explore which contributions PTFs can make to land-use planning, in terms of examining the expected outcome of certain changes in soil and water management practices. This paper describes three scenario studies that show some aspects of how PTFs may help improve decision making about land management practices. We use an exploratory research approach using simulation modelling to explore the potential effect of alternative solutions in land management. We: (i) evaluate benefits and risks when irrigating a field, and the impact of soil heterogeneity; (ii) examine which changes can be expected (in terms of soil water balance and supply) if organic matter content is changed as a result of an alternative management system; (iii) evaluate the risk of leaching to deeper horizons in some soils of Hungary. Using this research approach, quantitative answers are provided to what if? type questions, allowing the distinction of trends and potential problems, which may contribute to the development of sustainable management systems.

  13. Pore-Scale Effects of Soil Structure And Microbial EPS Production On Soil Water Retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orner, E.; Anderson, E.; Rubinstein, R. L.; Chau, J. F.; Shor, L. M.; Gage, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Climate-induced changes to the hydrological cycle will increase the frequency of extreme weather events including powerful storms and prolonged droughts. Moving forward, one of the major factors limiting primary productivity in terrestrial ecosystems will be sub-optimal soil moisture. We focus here on the ability of soils to retain moisture under drying conditions. A soil's ability to retain moisture is influenced by many factors including its texture, its structure, and the activities of soil microbes. In soil microcosms, the addition of small amounts of microbially-produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) can dramatically shift moisture retention curves. The objective of this research is to better understand how soil structure and EPS may act together to retain moisture in unsaturated soils. Replicate micromodels with exactly-conserved 2-D physical geometry were initially filled with aqueous suspensions of one of two types of bacteria: one mutant was ultra- muccoid and the other was non-muccoid. Replicate micromodels were held at a fixed, external, relative humidity, and the position of the air-water interface was imaged over time as water evaporates. There was no forced convection of air or water inside the micromodels: drying was achieved by water evaporation and diffusion alone. We used a fully automated, inverted microscope to image replicate drying lanes each with dimensions of 1 mm x 10 mm. A complete set of images was collected every 30 minutes for 30 hours. The results show devices loaded with the highly muccoid strain remained >40% hydrated for 13 h, while devices loaded with the non-muccoid remained >40% hydrated for only 6 h, and were completely dry by 13 h. Current work is comparing interfacial water fluxes in structured and unstructured settings, and is attempting to model the synergistic effects of soil structure and EPS content on moisture retention in real soils. This research may allow more accurate description of naturally

  14. Measured and simulated soil water evaporation from four Great Plains soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The amount of soil water lost during stage one and stage two soil water evaporation is of interest to crop water use modelers. The ratio of measured soil surface temperature (Ts) to air temperature (Ta) was tested as a signal for the transition in soil water evaporation from stage one to stage two d...

  15. Accurate structures and binding energies for small water clusters: The water trimer

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, I.M.; Seidl, E.T.; Janssen, C.L.

    1999-05-01

    The global minimum on the water trimer potential energy surface has been investigated by means of second-order Mo/ller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory employing the series of correlation-consistent basis sets aug-cc-pVXZ (X = D, T, Q, 5, 6), the largest of which contains 1329 basis functions. Definitive predictions are made for the binding energy and equilibrium structure, and improved values are presented for the harmonic vibrational frequencies. A value of 15.82{plus_minus}0.05 kcal mol{sup {minus}1} is advanced for the infinite basis set frozen core MP2 binding energy, obtained by extrapolation of MP2 correlation energies computed at the aug-cc-pVQZ MP2 geometry. Inclusion of core correlation, using the aug-cc-pCV5Z basis set, has been found to increase the binding energy by 0.08 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}, and after consideration of core correlation and higher-order correlation effects, the classical binding energy for the water trimer is estimated to be 15.9{plus_minus}0.2 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}. A zero-point vibrational correction of {minus}5.43 kcal mol{sup {minus}1} has been computed from aug-cc-pVTZ MP2 harmonic vibrational frequencies. The accuracy of different computational schemes for obtaining the binding energies of the water dimer and trimer has been investigated, and computationally feasible methods are suggested for obtaining accurate structures and binding energies for larger water clusters.{copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Temperature dependence of soil water potential

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, A.M.O.; Yong, R.N. ); Cheung, S.C.H. )

    1992-12-01

    To understand the process of coupled heat and water transport, the relationship between temperature and soil water potential must be known. Two clays, Avonlea bentonite and Lake Agassiz clay, are being considered as the clay-based sealing materials for the Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault. Avonlea bentonite is distinguished from Lake Agassiz clay by its high sealing potential in water. A series of experiments was performed in which the two clays were mixed with equal amounts of sand and were compacted to a dry density of 1.67 Mg/m[sup 3] under various moisture contents and temperatures. A psychrometer was placed within the compacted clay-sand to measure the soil water potential based on the electromotive force measured by the psychrometer. The results indicate that the soil water potential at a particular temperature is higher for both clay-sand mixtures than predicted by the change in the surface tension of water; this effect is much more prominent in the Avonlea bentonite and at low moisture contents. The paper presents empirical equations relating the soil water potential with the moisture content and temperature of the two clay-sand mixtures. 24 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Hysteresis and uncertainty in soil water-retention curve parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Likos, William J.; Lu, Ning; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate estimates of soil hydraulic parameters representing wetting and drying paths are required for predicting hydraulic and mechanical responses in a large number of applications. A comprehensive suite of laboratory experiments was conducted to measure hysteretic soil-water characteristic curves (SWCCs) representing a wide range of soil types. Results were used to quantitatively assess differences and uncertainty in three simplifications frequently adopted to estimate wetting-path SWCC parameters from more easily measured drying curves. They are the following: (1) αw=2αd, (2) nw=nd, and (3) θws=θds, where α, n, and θs are fitting parameters entering van Genuchten’s commonly adopted SWCC model, and the superscripts w and d indicate wetting and drying paths, respectively. The average ratio αw/αd for the data set was 2.24±1.25. Nominally cohesive soils had a lower αw/αd ratio (1.73±0.94) than nominally cohesionless soils (3.14±1.27). The average nw/nd ratio was 1.01±0.11 with no significant dependency on soil type, thus confirming the nw=nd simplification for a wider range of soil types than previously available. Water content at zero suction during wetting (θws) was consistently less than during drying (θds) owing to air entrapment. The θws/θds ratio averaged 0.85±0.10 and was comparable for nominally cohesive (0.87±0.11) and cohesionless (0.81±0.08) soils. Regression statistics are provided to quantitatively account for uncertainty in estimating hysteretic retention curves. Practical consequences are demonstrated for two case studies.

  18. Effect of corn or soybean row position on soil water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop plants can funnel water to the soil and increase water content more in the row relative to the interrow. Because the row intercepts more soil water after rains and higher root density, the soil may also dry out more between rains than does soil in the interrow. The purpose of this study was to ...

  19. Hugoniot Measurements on Dry and Water-Saturated Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, M.; Stewart, S. T.; Kraus, R. G.

    2012-12-01

    The shock response of soils is an important component of planetary cratering events, including deposition of ejecta blankets and secondary cratering. Here, we present a series of shock Hugoniot experiments on two types of soil samples in both dry and water-saturated states. We measured the shock states induced via planar impact experiments on the Harvard 40-mm gas gun. Shock wave velocities in the soil samples were measured using both VISAR and piezoelectric pins. A Monte Carlo technique was developed to accurately propagate formal error through the impedance match calculations and generate a 1-sigma error ellipse in shock-velocity (US) vs. particle velocity (up) space and pressure vs. volume space. The two soils were composed primarily of quartz with different mass fractions of phyllosilicates and amorphous material. Using initial particle sizes ranging from 150 to 300 microns, the samples were pressed to densities ranging from 1.89 to 1.93 g~cm-3 (about 25% porous). Water-saturated samples had densities ranging from 2.2 to 2.6 g~cm-3. We find that the dry soils have a linear US-u_p relation that is similar to dry quartz sand with the same initial density. The water-saturated samples are less compressible and have much greater scatter in shock velocities. The VISAR measurement records the dispersion around the mean shock state that arises from reflections between grains, and we compare the VISAR data to meso-scale hydrocode simulations of the experiment. These data will be used to generate more accurate rheological models for hydrocode simulations of the shock response of heterogeneous granular materials in the low-pressure regime (<10~GPa). We thank Marcos Hankin and Will Steinhardt for their technical support. We acknowledge support from Army Research Office grant #W911NF-10-1-037.

  20. Interaction of soil, water and TNT during degradation of TNT on contaminated soil using subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Kalderis, Dimitrios; Hawthorne, Steven B; Clifford, Anthony A; Gidarakos, Evangelos

    2008-11-30

    Subcritical water was used at laboratory scale to reveal information with respect to the degradation mechanism of TNT on contaminated soil. Highly contaminated soil (12% TNT) was heated with water at four different temperatures, 150, 175, 200 and 225 degrees C and samples were obtained at appropriate time intervals. At the same time, similar experiments were performed with TNT spiked on to clean soil, sand and pure water in order to compare and eliminate various factors that may be present in the more complex contaminated soil system. Subcritical water was successful at remediating TNT-contaminated soil. TNT destruction percentages ranged between 98 and 100%. The aim of this work was to study the soil-water-contaminant interaction and determine the main physical parameters that affect TNT degradation. It was shown that the rate-limiting step of the process is the extraction/diffusion of TNT molecules from the soil core to the soil surface, where they degrade. Additionally, it was determined that the soil matrix also catalyses degradation to a lesser extent. Autocatalytic effects were not clearly observed.

  1. Soil water repellency affects production and transport of CO2 and CH4 in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanek, Emilia; Qassem, Khalid

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture is known to be vital in controlling both the production and transport of C gases in soil. Water availability regulates the decomposition rates of soil organic matter by the microorganisms, while the proportion of water/air filled pores controls the transport of gases within the soil and at the soil-atmosphere interface. Many experimental studies and process models looking at soil C gas fluxes assume that soil water is uniformly distributed and soil is easily wettable. Most soils, however, exhibit some degree of soil water repellency (i.e. hydrophobicity) and do not wet spontaneously when dry or moderately moist. They have restricted infiltration and conductivity of water, which also results in extremely heterogeneous soil water distribution. This is a world-wide occurring phenomenon which is particularly common under permanent vegetation e.g. forest, grass and shrub vegetation. This study investigates the effect of soil water repellency on microbial respiration, CO2 transport within the soil and C gas fluxes between the soil and the atmosphere. The results from the field monitoring and laboratory experiments show that soil water repellency results in non-uniform water distribution in the soil which affects the CO2 and CH4 gas fluxes. The main conclusion from the study is that water repellency not only affects the water relations in the soil, but has also a great impact on greenhouse gas production and transport and therefore should be included as an important parameter during the sites monitoring and modelling of gas fluxes.

  2. Hugoniot Measurements on Dry and Water-Saturated Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Matthew; Stewart, Sarah; Kraus, Richard

    2015-06-01

    To better understand the shock properties of granular materials, we present a series of shock Hugoniot experiments on three types of soil in both dry and water-saturated states. We measured the shock states induced via planar impact experiments on the Harvard 40-mm gas gun. Shock wave velocities in the soils were measured using both VISAR and piezo-pins. The soils were composed primarily of quartz with different mass fractions of phyllosilicates and amorphous material. Using initial particle sizes ranging from 150 to 300 microns, the samples were pressed to densities ranging from 1.89 to 1.93 g cm-3 (about 25% porous). Water-sat samples had densities ranging from 2.2 to 2.6 g cm-3. We find that the dry soils have a linear Us -up relation that is similar to dry quartz sand with the same initial density. The water-sat samples are less compressible and have much greater scatter in shock velocities. The VISAR measurement records the dispersion around the mean shock state that arises from reflections between grains, and we compare the VISAR data to meso-scale hydrocode simulations. These data will be used to generate more accurate rheological models for hydrocode simulations of the shock response of heterogeneous granular materials in the low-pressure regime (< 10 GPa). We acknowledge support from Army Research Office Grant #W911NF-10-1-037.

  3. Soil Water: Advanced Crop and Soil Science. A Course of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Larry E.

    The course of study represents the fourth of six modules in advanced crop and soil science and introduces the agriculture student to the topic of soil water. Upon completing the three day module, the student will be able to classify water as to its presence in the soil, outline the hydrological cycle, list the ways water is lost from the soil,…

  4. Prediction of soil water retention using soil physical data and terrain attributes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Nunzio; Palladino, Mario

    2002-08-01

    Characterization of soil hydraulic behavior at large scales using traditional methods is time-consuming and very costly. Efficient and cheap means of providing hydrological models with such information are procedures based on pedotransfer functions (PTFs) that estimate soil hydraulic parameters from easily measurable or already available soil physical data. Major objectives of this study are to compare the prediction performance of some published PTFs and to improve their predictive capability by accounting for certain landscape variables, such as slope, aspect, and wetness index, for example. This additional information can be easily extracted from a digital elevation model of the area under study. While topographic attributes have shown potential for mapping soil properties over a region with higher precision and simplifying estimation of some model parameters, the challenge is also to examine whether, and to what extent, ancillary data of this kind can specifically contribute to improve the predictions of soil hydraulic characteristics. Since the most recent distributed hydrological models rely even more on an accurate representation of landscape features, improving PTFs with the inclusion of topographic variables is in line with this tendency. Statistical indices of goodness-of-fit are calculated to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology. It is shown, for example, that systematic biases in water retention predictions from an original PTF can be conveniently corrected by adding some primary or compound terrain attributes. The results confirm the role of terrain variables in assessing the spatial patterns of soil hydraulic characteristics.

  5. Responses of Water and Salt Parameters to Groundwater Levels for Soil Columns Planted with Tamarix chinensis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jiangbao; Zhao, Ximei; Chen, Yinping; Fang, Ying; Zhao, Ziguo

    2016-01-01

    Groundwater is the main water resource for plant growth and development in the saline soil of the Yellow River Delta in China. To investigate the variabilities and distributions of soil water and salt contents at various groundwater level (GL), soil columns with planting Tamarix chinensis Lour were established at six different GL. The results demonstrated the following: With increasing GL, the relative soil water content (RWC) declined significantly, whereas the salt content (SC) and absolute soil solution concentration (CS) decreased after the initial increase in the different soil profiles. A GL of 1.2 m was the turning point for variations in the soil water and salt contents, and it represented the highest GL that could maintain the soil surface moist within the soil columns. Both the SC and CS reached the maximum levels in these different soil profiles at a GL of 1.2 m. With the raise of soil depth, the RWC increased significantly, whereas the SC increased after an initial decrease. The mean SC values reached 0.96% in the top soil layer; however, the rates at which the CS and RWC decreased with the GL were significantly reduced. The RWC and SC presented the greatest variations at the medium (0.9-1.2 m) and shallow water levels (0.6 m) respectively, whereas the CS presented the greatest variation at the deep water level (1.5-1.8 m).The RWC, SC and CS in the soil columns were all closely related to the GL. However, the correlations among the parameters varied greatly within different soil profiles, and the most accurate predictions of the GL were derived from the RWC in the shallow soil layer or the SC in the top soil layer. A GL at 1.5-1.8 m was moderate for planting T. chinensis seedlings under saline groundwater conditions.

  6. Responses of Water and Salt Parameters to Groundwater Levels for Soil Columns Planted with Tamarix chinensis

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jiangbao; Zhao, Ximei; Chen, Yinping; Fang, Ying; Zhao, Ziguo

    2016-01-01

    Groundwater is the main water resource for plant growth and development in the saline soil of the Yellow River Delta in China. To investigate the variabilities and distributions of soil water and salt contents at various groundwater level (GL), soil columns with planting Tamarix chinensis Lour were established at six different GL. The results demonstrated the following: With increasing GL, the relative soil water content (RWC) declined significantly, whereas the salt content (SC) and absolute soil solution concentration (CS) decreased after the initial increase in the different soil profiles. A GL of 1.2 m was the turning point for variations in the soil water and salt contents, and it represented the highest GL that could maintain the soil surface moist within the soil columns. Both the SC and CS reached the maximum levels in these different soil profiles at a GL of 1.2 m. With the raise of soil depth, the RWC increased significantly, whereas the SC increased after an initial decrease. The mean SC values reached 0.96% in the top soil layer; however, the rates at which the CS and RWC decreased with the GL were significantly reduced. The RWC and SC presented the greatest variations at the medium (0.9–1.2 m) and shallow water levels (0.6 m) respectively, whereas the CS presented the greatest variation at the deep water level (1.5–1.8 m).The RWC, SC and CS in the soil columns were all closely related to the GL. However, the correlations among the parameters varied greatly within different soil profiles, and the most accurate predictions of the GL were derived from the RWC in the shallow soil layer or the SC in the top soil layer. A GL at 1.5–1.8 m was moderate for planting T. chinensis seedlings under saline groundwater conditions. PMID:26730602

  7. Estimating root zone soil water content using limited soils information and surface soil moisture data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heathman, Gary Claude

    2001-10-01

    The various hydrologic processes of infiltration, redistribution, drainage, evaporation, and water uptake by plants are strongly interdependent, as they occur sequentially or simultaneously. An important state variable that strongly influences the magnitude to which these rate processes occur is the amount of water present within the root zone, and in particular, the top few centimeters near the soil surface. Traditionally, measurements of soil moisture have been limited to point measurements made in the field. In general, averages of point measurements are used to characterize the soil moisture of an area, but these averages seldom yield information that is adequate to characterize large scale hydrologic processes. Recent advancements in remote sensing now make it possible to obtain areal estimates of surface soil moisture. The use of remotely sensed data to estimate surface soil moisture, combined with soil water and hydrologic modeling, provides a unique opportunity to advance our understanding of hydrologic processes at a much larger scale. Standard techniques for measuring soil moisture have been well documented, with commercial instrumentation being widely available. Various computer models have been developed to estimate soil moisture in the root and vadose zone, although their application over large scales is limited due to varying spatial and temporal field conditions. It is the combination of ground-based data (in-situ measurements), near-surface soil moisture data, and modeling that form the basis for this research. The interactive use of field research, remote sensing ground truth data, and integrated systems modeling is used to describe surface and profile soil moisture conditions at several locations within a large watershed. Successful application of this approach should improve our capabilities for estimating soil hydraulic properties and to better estimate water and chemical transport in the root zone, thus enhancing water use efficiency and plant

  8. Soil and Water Conservation Activities for Scouts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soil Conservation Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    The purpose of the learning activities outlined in this booklet is to help Scouts understand some conservation principles which hopefully will lead to the development of an attitude of concern for the environment and a commitment to help with the task of using and managing soil, water, and other natural resources for long range needs as well as…

  9. Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil

    SciTech Connect

    Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

    1991-03-30

    Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

  10. Design and field tests of an access-tube soil water sensor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate soil profile water content monitoring at multiple depths until now, has been possible only using the neutron probe (NP), but with great effort and at infrequent time intervals. Despite the existence of several electromagnetic sensor systems for profile water content measurements, accuracy ...

  11. Evaluating the accuracy of soil water sensors for irrigation scheduling to conserve freshwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganjegunte, Girisha K.; Sheng, Zhuping; Clark, John A.

    2012-06-01

    In the Trans-Pecos area, pecan [ Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh) C. Koch] is a major irrigated cash crop. Pecan trees require large amounts of water for their growth and flood (border) irrigation is the most common method of irrigation. Pecan crop is often over irrigated using traditional method of irrigation scheduling by counting number of calendar days since the previous irrigation. Studies in other pecan growing areas have shown that the water use efficiency can be improved significantly and precious freshwater can be saved by scheduling irrigation based on soil moisture conditions. This study evaluated the accuracy of three recent low cost soil water sensors (ECH2O-5TE, Watermark 200SS and Tensiometer model R) to monitor volumetric soil water content (θv) to develop improved irrigation scheduling in a mature pecan orchard in El Paso, Texas. Results indicated that while all three sensors were successful in following the general trends of soil moisture conditions during the growing season, actual measurements differed significantly. Statistical analyses of results indicated that Tensiometer provided relatively accurate soil moisture data than ECH2O-5TE and Watermark without site-specific calibration. While ECH2O-5TE overestimated the soil water content, Watermark and Tensiometer underestimated. Results of this study suggested poor accuracy of all three sensors if factory calibration and reported soil water retention curve for study site soil texture were used. This indicated that sensors needed site-specific calibration to improve their accuracy in estimating soil water content data.

  12. Assessment of a calibration procedure to estimate soil water content with Sentek Diviner 2000 capacitance probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rallo, G.; Giordano, G.; Provenzano, G.

    2012-04-01

    In irrigated systems, soil water content is a major factor determining plant growth. Irrigation scheduling criteria are often related to measurements of soil water content or matric potential. Strategies to manage irrigation can be used to optimize irrigation water use or to maximize crop yield and/or quality, in order to increase the net return for the farmer. Of course, whatever criterion is adopted to schedule irrigation and in particular when crop water stress conditions are considered, the accurate monitoring of the water content in the soil profile, could allow to verify the exact irrigation timing, defined according to the crop response to water stress. Currently many methods are available for determining soil water content on a volume basis (m3m-3) or a tension basis (MPa), as described by Robinson (2008). Recently, distributed fiber optic temperature measurement, has been assessed as a new technique for indirect and precise estimation of soil water contents. Over the past decade Frequency Domain Reflectometry (FDR) probes, allowing to measure the apparent dielectric constant of the soil (K), indirectly related to the volumetric water content (θv), have been improved, due to the good potentiality of capacitance based sensors to in situ measurements of soil water content. However, due to the high variability of K with soil minerals and dry plants tissues, it necessary to proceed to a specific calibration of the sensor for each soil (Baumhardt et al., 2000), even to take into account the effect of soil temperature, bulk density and water salinity (Al Ain et al., 2009). . According to Paltineanu and Starr (1997), the precision of the calibration equation, obtained with in situ measurements, mainly depends on the errors related to the sampling of the soil volume investigated by the sensor, that must be done accurately. For swelling/shrinking soils, the changes of soil bulk volume with water content cause modifications in the geometry of some if not all the

  13. Displacement of soil pore water by trichloroethylene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.; Aiken, G.R.; Imbrigiotta, T.E.; Goldberg, M.C.

    1994-01-01

    Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLS) are important pollutants because of their widespread use as chemical and industrial solvents. An example of the pollution caused by the discharge of DNAPLs is found at the Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, where trichloroethylene (TCE) has been discharged directly into the unsaturated zone. This discharge has resulted in the formation of a plume of TCE-contaminated water in the aquifer downgradient of the discharge. A zone of dark-colored groundwater containing a high dissolved organic C content has been found near the point of discharge of the TCE. The colored-water plume extends from the point of discharge at least 30 m (100 feet) downgradient. Fulvic acids isolated from the colored-waters plume, from water from a background well that has not been affected by the discharge of chlorinated solvents, and from soil pore water collected in a lysimeter installed at an uncontaminated site upgradient of the study area have been compared. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the fulvic acids from the colored waters and from the lysimeter are very similar, but are markedly different from the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the fulvic acid from the background well. The three-dimensional fluorescence spectrum and the DOC fractionation profile of the colored groundwater and the soil pore water are very similar to each other, but quite different from those of the background water. It is proposed from these observations that this colored water is soil pore water that has been displaced by a separate DNAPL liquid phase downward to the saturated zone.

  14. Displacement of soil pore water by trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Wershaw, R.L.; Aiken, G.R.; Imbrigiotta, T.E.

    1994-07-01

    Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLS) are important pollutants because of their widespread use as chemical and industrial solvents. An example of the pollution caused by the discharge of DNAPLs is found at the Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, where trichloroethylene (TCE) has been discharged directly into the unsaturated zone. This discharge has resulted in the formation of a plume of TCE-contaminated water in the aquifer downgradient of the discharge. A zone of dark-colored groundwater containing a high dissolved organic C content has been found near the point of discharge of the TCE. The colored-water plume extends from the point of discharge at least 30 m (100 feet) downgradient. Fulvic acids isolated from the colored-waters plume, from water from a background well that has not been affected by the discharge of chlorinated solvents, and from soil pore water collected in a lysimeter installed at an uncontaminated site upgradient of the study area have been compared. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the fulvic acids from the colored waters and from the lysimeter am very similar, but are markedly different from the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the fulvic acid from the background well. The three-dimensional fluorescence spectrum and the DOC fractionation profile of the colored groundwater and the soil pore water are very similar to each other, but quite different from those of the background water. It is proposed from these observations that this colored water is soil pore water that has been displaced by a separate DNAPL liquid phase downward to the saturated zone. 15 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Capacitive Soil Moisture Sensor for Plant Watering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Thomas; Kamm, Lukas

    2016-04-01

    How can you realize a water saving and demand-driven plant watering device? To achieve this you need a sensor, which precisely detects the soil moisture. Designing such a sensor is the topic of this poster. We approached this subject with comparing several physical properties of water, e.g. the conductivity, permittivity, heat capacity and the soil water potential, which are suitable to detect the soil moisture via an electronic device. For our project we have developed a sensor device, which measures the soil moisture and provides the measured values for a plant watering system via a wireless bluetooth 4.0 network. Different sensor setups have been analyzed and the final sensor is the result of many iterative steps of improvement. In the end we tested the precision of our sensor and compared the results with theoretical values. The sensor is currently being used in the Botanical Garden of the Friedrich-Alexander-University in a long-term test. This will show how good the usability in the real field is. On the basis of these findings a marketable sensor will soon be available. Furthermore a more specific type of this sensor has been designed for the EU:CROPIS Space Project, where tomato plants will grow at different gravitational forces. Due to a very small (15mm x 85mm x 1.5mm) and light (5 gramm) realisation, our sensor has been selected for the space program. Now the scientists can monitor the water content of the substrate of the tomato plants in outer space and water the plants on demand.

  16. Modeling structural influences on soil water retention

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    A new model quantities the effect of soil structure, considered as the arrangement of particles in the soil, on soil water retention. The model partitions the pore space into texture-related and structure-related components, the textural component being what can be deduced to exist if the arrangement of the particles were random, and the structural component being the remainder. An existing model, based on particle-size distributions, represents the textural component, and a new model, based on aggregate-size distributions, represents the structural component. This new model makes use of generalized properties that vary little from one medium to another, thereby eliminating any need for empirically tilted parameters. It postulates a particular character of the structural pore space that in same ways resembles texture-related pore space, but with pore shape related to the breadth of the aggregate-size distribution. To predict a soil water retention curve, this model requires the soil's porosity and particle- and aggregate-size distributions. Tested with measurements for 17 samples from two sources, it fits the data much better than does a model based on texture alone. Goodness of fit indicated by correlation coefficients ranged from 0.908 to 0.998 for the new model, compared with a range of 0.686 in 0.955 for the texture-based model.

  17. WATER AS A REAGENT FOR SOIL REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Indira S. Jayaweera; Jordi Diaz-Ferraro

    2000-02-28

    SRI International is conducting experiments to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology for remediating petroleum-contaminated soils. Most current remediation practices generally fail (or are cost prohibitive) to remove the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) found in petroleum-contaminated sites or they require the use of organic solvents to achieve removal, at the expense of additional contamination and with the added cost of recycling solvents. Hydrothermal extraction offers the promise of efficiently extracting PAHs and other kinds of organics from contaminated soils at moderate temperatures and pressures, using only water and inorganic salts such as carbonate. Initial work is being conducted at SRI to measure the solubility and rate of solubilization of selected PAHs (anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and chrysene) in water, using SRI's hydrothermal optical cell with the addition of varying amounts of sodium carbonate to evaluate the efficiency of the technology for removing PAHs from the soil. Preliminary results with pyrene and fluoranthene in water clearly indicate a significant enhancement of solubility with increase in temperature. During this quarter, we conducted experiments with pyrene in the temperature range 200 to 300 C and observed a great enhancement in solubility with an increase in temperature. We also started experiments with real-world soil samples purchased from the subcontractor.

  18. Behavior of fenhexamid in soil and water.

    PubMed

    Abbate, Cristina; Borzì, Daniela; Caboni, Pierluigi; Baglieri, Andrea; Gennari, Mara

    2007-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate fenhexamid (FEX) behavior in soil and in water. FEX proved to be rather stable at acid pH but showed slight degradation at neutral and alkaline pH. After 101 days of FEX spiking of a soil sample, 94% at pH 4, 12% at pH 7 and 23% at pH 9 of the active ingredient was still present. In natural water the rate of FEX disappearance appeared to be slow which may be due to abiotic rather than biotic processes. The soil degradation tests showed low persistence of the active ingredient if a good microflora activity is guaranteed (DT(50) about 1 day). Moreover, in absence of microorganisms, FEX proved to be stable. Humidities of 25 and 50% of Water Holding Capacity (WHC) influenced in equal measure the rate of degradation. From the same soil, a bacterium was isolated and identified as Bacillus megaterium, which was able to metabolize FEX with the hydroxylation of the cyclohexane ring. Moreover, FEX showed an elevated affinity for humic acid (73%), smectite (31%), and ferrihydrite(20%) and low affinity for vermiculite (11%) and kaolinite (7%).

  19. Simulation of Soil Water Content Variability in a Heavy Clay Soil under Contrasting Soil Managements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrera, A.; Vanderlinden, K.; Martínez, G.; Espejo, A. J.; Giráldez, J. V.

    2012-04-01

    Soil water content (SWC) is a key variable for numerous physical, chemical and biological processes that take place at or near the soil surface. Understanding the spatial and temporal variability of SWC at the field scale is of prime importance for implementing efficient measurement strategies in applications. The aim of this study was to characterize the spatial and temporal variation of gravimetric SWC in a heavy clay soil, in a wheat-sunflower-legume rotation under conventional (CT) and no-till (NT) using a simple water balance model. An experimental field in SW Spain, where conventional (CT) and no-till (NT) management of a heavy clay soil are being compared since 1983, was sampled for gravimetric SWC on 38 occasions during 2008 and 2009. Topsoil clay content across the six plots was on average 55%, with a standard deviation of 2.7%. The soil profile was sampled at 54 locations, evenly distributed over the three CT and NT plots, at depths of 0-10, 25-35, and 55-65 cm. Topsoil water retention curves (SWRC) were determined in the laboratory on undisturbed soil samples from each of the 54 locations. A weather station recorded daily precipitation and evapotranspiration, as calculated by the Penman-Monteith FAO equation. The water balance was calculated using the Thornthwaite-Mather model with a daily time step. Three parameters, water holding capacity, and water evaporation corrector coefficients for each of the two years, were inversely estimated at the 54 SWC observation points and probability density functions were identified. Spatial variability of SWC was estimated using a Monte Carlo approach, and simulated and observed variability were compared. This Monte Carlo scheme, using a simple water balance model with only three parameters, was found to be useful for evaluating the influence of soil management on the variability of SWC in heavy clay soils.

  20. [Soil water and its karst effect in epikarst dynamic system].

    PubMed

    Deng, Yan; Qin, Xing-Ming; Jiang, Zhong-Cheng; Luo, Wei-Qun; Qi, Xiao-Fan

    2009-07-01

    This paper studied the soil physical properties, soil CO2, soil water and spring water chemistry in a mature forest and a shrub in Nongla of Guangxi, China, as well as the relationships between the chemistry of soil water and spring water, aimed to understand the karst effect of the soil water in Nongla epikarst dynamic system. Significant differences were observed in the soil bulk density and non-capillary porosity under forest and shrub, which affected soil water content. The fixed CO2 in soil water had a significant negative correlation with soil CO2, and the free CO2 in soil water was 0 mg x m(-3) in the forest and 5.33 x 10(3) mg x m(-3) in the shrub. In soil water and spring water, there was a negative correlation between pH and Ca2+, Mg2+, and Cl- concentrations, and a positive correlation between K+, Na+, and HCO3- concentrations and organic C content. After the eluviation of rain water, the ion concentrations in leached soil water increased greatly, and accordingly, its corrosion ability enhanced greatly. The karst process in forest environment was stable and intensive, while that in shrub environment was active but weak.

  1. Soil Water Sensing-Focus on Variable Rate Irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation scheduling using soil water sensors is an exercise in maintaining the water content of the crop root zone soil above a lower limit defined by the management allowed depletion (MAD) for that soil and crop, but not so wet that too much water is lost to deep percolation. The management allow...

  2. Sensible heat observations reveal soil-water evaporation dynamics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water evaporation is important at scales ranging from microbial ecology to large-scale climate. Yet, routine measurments are unable to capture rapidly shifting near-surface soil heat and water processes involved in soil-water evaporation. The objective of this study was to determine the depth a...

  3. Soil organic carbon covariance with soil water content; a geostatistical analysis in cropland fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manns, H. R.; Berg, A. A.; von Bertoldi, P.

    2013-12-01

    Soil texture has traditionally represented the rate of soil water drainage influencing soil water content (WC) in the soil characteristic curves, hydrological models and remote sensing field studies. Although soil organic carbon (OC) has been shown to significantly increase the water holding capacity of soil in individual field studies, evidence is required to consider soil OC as a significant factor in soil WC variability at the scale of a remote sensing footprint (25 km2). The relationship of soil OC to soil WC was evaluated over 50 fields during the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) soil WC field sampling campaign over southern Manitoba, Canada. On each field, soil WC was measured at 16 sample points, at 100 m spacing to 5 cm depth with Stevens hydra probe sensors on 16 sampling dates from June 7 to July 19, 2012. Soil cores were also taken at sampling sites on each field, each sampling day, to determine gravimetric moisture, bulk density and particle size distribution. On 4 of the sampling dates, soil OC was also determined by loss on ignition on the dried soil samples from all fields. Semivariograms were created from the field mean soil OC and field mean surface soil WC sampled at midrow, over all cropland fields and averaged over all sampling dates. The semivariogram models explained a distinct relationship of both soil OC and WC within the soil over a range of 5 km with a Gaussian curve. The variance in soil that soil OC and WC have in common was a similar Gaussian curve in the cross variogram. Following spatial interpolation with Kriging, the spatial maps of soil OC and WC were also very similar with high covariance over the majority of the sampling area. The close correlation between soil OC and WC suggests they are structurally related in the soil. Soil carbon could thus assist in improving downscaling methods for remotely sensed soil WC and act as a surrogate for interpolation of soil WC.

  4. Estimating soil water evaporation using radar measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadeghi, Ali M.; Scott, H. D.; Waite, W. P.; Asrar, G.

    1988-01-01

    Field studies were conducted to evaluate the application of radar reflectivity as compared with the shortwave reflectivity (albedo) used in the Idso-Jackson equation for the estimation of daily evaporation under overcast sky and subhumid climatic conditions. Soil water content, water potential, shortwave and radar reflectivity, and soil and air temperatures were monitored during three soil drying cycles. The data from each cycle were used to calculate daily evaporation from the Idso-Jackson equation and from two other standard methods, the modified Penman and plane of zero-flux. All three methods resulted in similar estimates of evaporation under clear sky conditions; however, under overcast sky conditions, evaporation fluxes computed from the Idso-Jackson equation were consistently lower than the other two methods. The shortwave albedo values in the Idso-Jackson equation were then replaced with radar reflectivities and a new set of total daily evaporation fluxes were calculated. This resulted in a significant improvement in computed soil evaporation fluxes from the Idso-Jackson equation, and a better agreement between the three methods under overcast sky conditions.

  5. Effects of soil heterogeneity on steady state soil water pressure head under a surface line source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. Fred; Parkin, Gary W.; Kachanoski, R. Gary; Smith, James E.

    2002-07-01

    There are numerous analytical solutions available for flow in unsaturated homogeneous porous media. In this paper, the stream tube model for one-dimensional water movement is extended to two-dimensional (2-D) water movement from a line source as the stream plane model. As well, new solutions are derived to predict the mean and variance of pressure head of water movement under a surface line source in heterogeneous soil using the perturbation method with first-order approximation (PM1) and with second-order approximation (PM2). A variance expression was also developed based on the spectral relationship presented by Yeh et al. [1985a]. The new solutions were tested using the 2-D stream plane model with parameters A = ln(α) and Y = ln(KS) and measurements from field experiments. Results show that the mean of steady state pressure head below the line source is not only a function of the mean parameter values but also a function of the variances of A and Y and the linear cross-correlation coefficient (ρ) between A and Y. The PM2 model can predict the mean pressure head accurately in heterogeneous soils at any level of correlation between A and Y, except when both the soil variability and ρ are high. The pressure head variance estimation based on the PM1 model predicts the measured variance well only when both the soil variability and ρ are low. The field experimental results show that both the PM1 and the spectral models give reasonable predictions of the pressure head variance. Both the measured and predicted values of the variance of pressure head using the two models increase with the depth of soil. Both models show that the variance of pressure head decreases as the source strength increases, but on average, the pressure head variance was underestimated by both models.

  6. Sensor-based soil water monitoring to more effectively manage agricultural water resources in coastal plain soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellamy, Christopher A.

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is widely grown in the United States with 5.7 million ha grown nationally and 1.2 million ha grown in the humid southeastern states in 2005. From 1969 to 2003, agricultural irrigated farmland acreage and total water applied increased by over 40% and 11% respectively to include a total of 55.3 million acres in 2002. Combined with recent and more frequent drought periods and legal water conflicts between states, there has been an increased interest in more effective southeastern water management, thus making the need to develop improved irrigation scheduling methods and enhanced water use efficiency of cotton cultivars. Several irrigation scheduling methods (soil moisture monitoring, pan evaporation, and climate based) tested at Clemson and elsewhere have shown that sensor-based irrigation significantly increased cotton yields and provided a monetary savings compared to other methods. There is however limited information on capacitance based soil moisture analysis techniques in the southeastern coastal plain soils and also limited locally developed crop coefficients used in scheduling the ET based treatments. The first objective of this study was to determine and improve the feasibility of utilizing sensor-based soil water monitoring techniques in Southeastern Coastal Plain soils to more effectively manage irrigation and increase water use efficiency of several cotton cultivars. The second objective was to develop two weighing lysimeters equipped with wireless data acquisition system to determine a crop coefficient for cotton under southeastern humid conditions. Two multi-sensor capacitance probes, AquaSpy(TM) and Sentek EnviroSCAN RTM, were calibrated in this study. It was found that positive linear calibrations can be used to describe the relationship between the soil volumetric moisture content (VMC) and sensor readings found for both probes and that multi-sensor capacitance probes can be used to accurately measure volumetric soil

  7. Water movement through an experimental soil liner

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krapac, I.G.; Cartwright, K.; Panno, S.V.; Hensel, B.R.; Rehfeldt, K.R.; Herzog, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    A field-scale soil liner was constructed to test whether compacted soil barriers in cover and liner systems could be built to meet the U.S. EPA saturated hydraulic conductivity requirement (???1 x 10-7 cm s-1). The 8 x 15 x 0.9m liner was constructed in 15 cm compacted lifts using a 20,037 kg pad-foot compactor and standard engineering practices. Water infiltration into the liner has been monitored for one year. Monitoring will continue until water break through at the base of the liner occurs. Estimated saturated hydraulic conductivities were 2.5 x 10-9, 4.0 x 10-8, and 5.0 x 10-8 cm s-1 based on measurements of water infiltration into the liner by large- and small-ring infiltrometers and a water balance analysis, respectively. Also investigated in this research was the variability of the liner's hydraulic properties and estimates of the transit times for water and tracers. Small variances exhibited by small-ring flux data suggested that the liner was homogeneous with respect to infiltration fluxes. The predictions of water and tracer breakthrough at the base of the liner ranged from 2.4-12.6 y, depending on the method of calculation and assumptions made. The liner appeared to be saturated to a depth between 18 and 33 cm at the end of the first year of monitoring. Transit time calculations cannot be verified yet, since breakthrough has not occurred. The work conducted so far indicates that compacted soil barriers can be constructed to meet the saturated hydraulic conductivity requirement established by the U.S. EPA.A field-scale soil liner was constructed to test whether compacted soil barriers in cover and liner systems could be built to meet the U.S. EPA saturated hydraulic conductivity requirement (??? 1 ?? 10-7 cm s-1). The 8 ?? 15 ?? 0.9 m liner was constructed in 15 cm compacted lifts using a 20.037 kg pad-foot compactor and standard engineering practices. Water infiltration into the liner has been monitored for one year. Monitoring will continue until water

  8. In situ soil water extraction: a review.

    PubMed

    Weihermüller, L; Siemens, J; Deurer, M; Knoblauch, S; Rupp, H; Göttlein, A; Pütz, T

    2007-01-01

    The knowledge of the composition and fluxes of vadose zone water is essential for a wide range of scientific and practical fields, including water-use management, pesticide registration, fate of xenobiotics, monitoring of disposal from mining and industries, nutrient management of agricultural and forest ecosystems, ecology, and environmental protection. Nowadays, water and solute flow can be monitored using either in situ methods or minimally invasive geophysical measurements. In situ information, however, is necessary to interpret most geophysical data sets and to determine the chemical composition of seepage water. Therefore, we present a comprehensive review of in situ soil water extraction methods to monitor solute concentration, solute transport, and to calculate mass balances in natural soils. We distinguished six different sampling devices: porous cups, porous plates, capillary wicks, pan lysimeters, resin boxes, and lysimeters. For each of the six sampling devices we discuss the basic principles, the advantages and disadvantages, and limits of data acquisition. We also give decision guidance for the selection of the appropriate sampling system. The choice of material is addressed in terms of potential contamination, filtering, and sorption of the target substances. The information provided in this review will support scientists and professionals in optimizing their experimental set-up for meeting their specific goals.

  9. Accurate description of argon and water adsorption on surfaces of graphene-based carbon allotropes.

    PubMed

    Kysilka, Jiří; Rubeš, Miroslav; Grajciar, Lukáš; Nachtigall, Petr; Bludský, Ota

    2011-10-20

    Accurate interaction energies of nonpolar (argon) and polar (water) adsorbates with graphene-based carbon allotropes were calculated by means of a combined density functional theory (DFT)-ab initio computational scheme. The calculated interaction energy of argon with graphite (-9.7 kJ mol(-1)) is in excellent agreement with the available experimental data. The calculated interaction energy of water with graphene and graphite is -12.8 and -14.6 kJ mol(-1), respectively. The accuracy of combined DFT-ab initio methods is discussed in detail based on a comparison with the highly precise interaction energies of argon and water with coronene obtained at the coupled-cluster CCSD(T) level extrapolated to the complete basis set (CBS) limit. A new strategy for a reliable estimate of the CBS limit is proposed for systems where numerical instabilities occur owing to basis-set near-linear dependence. The most accurate estimate of the argon and water interaction with coronene (-8.1 and -14.0 kJ mol(-1), respectively) is compared with the results of other methods used for the accurate description of weak intermolecular interactions.

  10. Mapping regional soil water erosion risk in the Brittany-Loire basin for water management agency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degan, Francesca; Cerdan, Olivier; Salvador-Blanes, Sébastien; Gautier, Jean-Noël

    2014-05-01

    Soil water erosion is one of the main degradation processes that affect soils through the removal of soil particles from the surface. The impacts for environment and agricultural areas are diverse, such as water pollution, crop yield depression, organic matter loss and reduction in water storage capacity. There is therefore a strong need to produce maps at the regional scale to help environmental policy makers and soil and water management bodies to mitigate the effect of water and soil pollution. Our approach aims to model and map soil erosion risk at regional scale (155 000 km²) and high spatial resolution (50 m) in the Brittany - Loire basin. The factors responsible for soil erosion are different according to the spatial and time scales considered. The regional scale entails challenges about homogeneous data sets availability, spatial resolution of results, various erosion processes and agricultural practices. We chose to improve the MESALES model (Le Bissonnais et al., 2002) to map soil erosion risk, because it was developed specifically for water erosion in agricultural fields in temperate areas. The MESALES model consists in a decision tree which gives for each combination of factors the corresponding class of soil erosion risk. Four factors that determine soil erosion risk are considered: soils, land cover, climate and topography. The first main improvement of the model consists in using newly available datasets that are more accurate than the initial ones. The datasets used cover all the study area homogeneously. Soil dataset has a 1/1 000 000 scale and attributes such as texture, soil type, rock fragment and parent material are used. The climate dataset has a spatial resolution of 8 km and a temporal resolution of mm/day for 12 years. Elevation dataset has a spatial resolution of 50 m. Three different land cover datasets are used where the finest spatial resolution is 50 m over three years. Using these datasets, four erosion factors are characterized and

  11. Improved Algorithms for Accurate Retrieval of UV - Visible Diffuse Attenuation Coefficients in Optically Complex, Inshore Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Fang; Fichot, Cedric G.; Hooker, Stanford B.; Miller, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Photochemical processes driven by high-energy ultraviolet radiation (UVR) in inshore, estuarine, and coastal waters play an important role in global bio geochemical cycles and biological systems. A key to modeling photochemical processes in these optically complex waters is an accurate description of the vertical distribution of UVR in the water column which can be obtained using the diffuse attenuation coefficients of down welling irradiance (Kd()). The Sea UV Sea UVc algorithms (Fichot et al., 2008) can accurately retrieve Kd ( 320, 340, 380,412, 443 and 490 nm) in oceanic and coastal waters using multispectral remote sensing reflectances (Rrs(), Sea WiFS bands). However, SeaUVSeaUVc algorithms are currently not optimized for use in optically complex, inshore waters, where they tend to severely underestimate Kd(). Here, a new training data set of optical properties collected in optically complex, inshore waters was used to re-parameterize the published SeaUVSeaUVc algorithms, resulting in improved Kd() retrievals for turbid, estuarine waters. Although the updated SeaUVSeaUVc algorithms perform best in optically complex waters, the published SeaUVSeaUVc models still perform well in most coastal and oceanic waters. Therefore, we propose a composite set of SeaUVSeaUVc algorithms, optimized for Kd() retrieval in almost all marine systems, ranging from oceanic to inshore waters. The composite algorithm set can retrieve Kd from ocean color with good accuracy across this wide range of water types (e.g., within 13 mean relative error for Kd(340)). A validation step using three independent, in situ data sets indicates that the composite SeaUVSeaUVc can generate accurate Kd values from 320 490 nm using satellite imagery on a global scale. Taking advantage of the inherent benefits of our statistical methods, we pooled the validation data with the training set, obtaining an optimized composite model for estimating Kd() in UV wavelengths for almost all marine waters. This

  12. Mucilage exudation facilitates root water uptake in dry soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mutez; Kroener, Eva; Holz, Maire; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Carminati, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    As plant roots take up water and the soil dries, water depletion is expected to occur in the rhizosphere. However, recent experiments showed that the rhizosphere of lupines was wetter than the bulk soil during root water uptake. On the other hand, after irrigation the rhizosphere remained markedly dry and it rewetted only after one-two days. We hypothesize that: 1) drying/wetting rates of the rhizosphere are controlled by mucilage exuded by roots; 2) mucilage alters the soil hydraulic conductivity: in particular, wet mucilage increases the soil hydraulic conductivity and dry mucilage makes the soil water repellent; 3) mucilage exudation favors root water uptake in dry soil; and 4) dry mucilage limits water loss from roots to dry soils. We used a root pressure probe to measure the hydraulic conductance of artificial roots sitting in soils. As an artificial root we employed a suction cup with a diameter of 2 mm and a length of 45 mm. The root pressure probe gave the hydraulic conductance of the soil-root continuum during pulse experiments in which water was injected into or sucked from the soil. First, we performed experiments with roots in a relatively dry soil with a volumetric water content of 0.03. Then, we repeated the experiment with artificial roots covered with mucilage and then placed into the soil. As a model for mucilage, we collected mucilage from Chia seeds. The water contents (including that of mucilage) in the experiments with and without mucilage were equal. The pressure curves were fitted with a model of root water that includes rhizosphere dynamics. We found that the artificial roots covered with wet mucilage took up water more easily. In a second experimental set-up we measured the outflow of water from the artificial roots into dry soils. We compared two soils: 1) a sandy soil and 2) the same soil wetted with mucilage from Chia seeds and then let dry. The latter soil became water repellent. Due to the water repellency, the outflow of water from

  13. Biodegradability of soil water soluble organic carbon extracted from seven different soils.

    PubMed

    Scaglia, Barbara; Adani, Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    Water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) is considered the most mobile and reactive soil carbon source and its characterization is an important issue for soil ecology study. A biodegradability test was set up to study WSOC extracted from 7 soils differently managed. WSOC was extracted from soil with water (soil/water ratio of 1:2, W/V) for 30 min, and then tested for biodegradability by a liquid state respirometric test. Result obtained confirmed the finding that WSOC biodegradability depended on the both land use and management practice. These results suggested the biodegradability test as suitable method to characterize WSOC, and provided useful information to soil fertility.

  14. Importance of soil-water relation in assessment endpoint in bioremediated soils: Plant growth and soil physical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Sawatsky, N.

    1995-12-31

    Much effort has been focused on defining the end-point of bioremediated soils by chemical analysis (Alberta Tier 1 or CCME Guideline for Contaminated Soils) or toxicity tests. However, these tests do not completely assess the soil quality, or the capability of soil to support plant growth after bioremediation. This study compared barley (Hordeum vulgare) growth on: (i) non-contaminated, agricultural topsoil, (2) oil-contaminated soil (4% total extractable hydrocarbons, or TEH), and (3) oil-contaminated soil treated by bioremediation (< 2% TEH). Soil physical properties including water retention, water uptake, and water repellence were measured. The results indicated that the growth of barley was significantly reduced by oil-contamination of agricultural topsoil. Furthermore, bioremediation did not improve the barley yield. The lack of effects from bioremediation was attributed to development of water repellence in hydrocarbon contaminated soils. There seemed to be a critical water content around 18% to 20% in contaminated soils. Above this value the water uptake by contaminated soil was near that of the agricultural topsoil. For lower water contents, there was a strong divergence in sorptivity between contaminated and agricultural topsoil. For these soils, water availability was likely the single most important parameter controlling plant growth. This parameter should be considered in assessing endpoint of bioremediation for hydrocarbon contaminated soils.

  15. Short, multi-needle FDR sensor suitable for measuring soil water content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Time domain reflectometry (TDR) is a well-established electromagnetic technique used to measure soil water content. TDR sensors have been combined with heat pulse sensors to produce thermo-TDR sensors. Thermo-TDR sensors are restricted to having relatively short needles in order to accurately measur...

  16. A complex permittivity model for field estimation of soil water contents using time domain reflectometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate electromagnetic sensing of soil water contents (') under field conditions is complicated by the dependence of permittivity on specific surface area, temperature, and apparent electrical conductivity, all which may vary across space or time. We present a physically-based mixing model to pred...

  17. New down-hole TDR method for deep profile soil water content and bulk electrical conductivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comprehensive irrigation and salinity management both require accurate knowledge of field soil water content and bulk electrical conductivity to depths greater than the root zone depth in agricultural fields. Scientists at the USDA-ARS Conservation & Production Research Laboratory, Bushland, Texas, ...

  18. Modeling of Water Flow Processes in the Soil-Plant-Atmosphere System: The Soil-Tree-Atmosphere Continuum Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoud, E. C.; Vrugt, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Trees and forests play a key role in controlling the water and energy balance at the land-air surface. This study reports on the calibration of an integrated soil-tree-atmosphere continuum (STAC) model using Bayesian inference with the DREAM algorithm and temporal observations of soil moisture content, matric head, sap flux, and leaf water potential from the King's River Experimental Watershed (KREW) in the southern Sierra Nevada mountain range in California. Water flow through the coupled system is described using the Richards' equation with both the soil and tree modeled as a porous medium with nonlinear soil and tree water relationships. Most of the model parameters appear to be reasonably well defined by calibration against the observed data. The posterior mean simulation reproduces the observed soil and tree data quite accurately, but a systematic mismatch is observed between early afternoon measured and simulated sap fluxes. We will show how this points to a structural error in the STAC-model and suggest and test an alternative hypothesis for root water uptake that alleviates this problem.

  19. Using measured soil water contents to estimate evapotranspiration and root water uptake profiles - a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guderle, M.; Hildebrandt, A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of plants in soil water relations, and thus ecosystem functioning, requires information about root water uptake. We evaluated four different complex water balance methods to estimate sink term patterns and evapotranspiration directly from soil moisture measurements. We tested four methods. The first two take the difference between two measurement intervals as evapotranspiration, thus neglecting vertical flow. The third uses regression on the soil water content time series and differences between day and night to account for vertical flow. The fourth accounts for vertical flow using a numerical model and iteratively solves for the sink term. None of these methods requires any a priori information of root distribution parameters or evapotranspiration, which is an advantage compared to common root water uptake models. To test the methods, a synthetic experiment with numerical simulations for a grassland ecosystem was conducted. Additionally, the time series were perturbed to simulate common sensor errors, like those due to measurement precision and inaccurate sensor calibration. We tested each method for a range of measurement frequencies and applied performance criteria to evaluate the suitability of each method. In general, we show that methods accounting for vertical flow predict evapotranspiration and the sink term distribution more accurately than the simpler approaches. Under consideration of possible measurement uncertainties, the method based on regression and differentiating between day and night cycles leads to the best and most robust estimation of sink term patterns. It is thus an alternative to more complex inverse numerical methods. This study demonstrates that highly resolved (temporally and spatially) soil water content measurements may be used to estimate the sink term profiles when the appropriate approach is used.

  20. Analysis of hydraulic fracturing flowback and produced waters using accurate mass: identification of ethoxylated surfactants.

    PubMed

    Thurman, E Michael; Ferrer, Imma; Blotevogel, Jens; Borch, Thomas

    2014-10-07

    Two series of ethylene oxide (EO) surfactants, polyethylene glycols (PEGs from EO3 to EO33) and linear alkyl ethoxylates (LAEs C-9 to C-15 with EO3-EO28), were identified in hydraulic fracturing flowback and produced water using a new application of the Kendrick mass defect and liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The Kendrick mass defect differentiates the proton, ammonium, and sodium adducts in both singly and doubly charged forms. A structural model of adduct formation is presented, and binding constants are calculated, which is based on a spherical cagelike conformation, where the central cation (NH4(+) or Na(+)) is coordinated with ether oxygens. A major purpose of the study was the identification of the ethylene oxide (EO) surfactants and the construction of a database with accurate masses and retention times in order to unravel the mass spectral complexity of surfactant mixtures used in hydraulic fracturing fluids. For example, over 500 accurate mass assignments are made in a few seconds of computer time, which then is used as a fingerprint chromatogram of the water samples. This technique is applied to a series of flowback and produced water samples to illustrate the usefulness of ethoxylate "fingerprinting", in a first application to monitor water quality that results from fluids used in hydraulic fracturing.

  1. Global distribution of plant-extractable water capacity of soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunne, K.A.; Willmott, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    Plant-extractable water capacity of soil is the amount of water that can be extracted from the soil to fulfill evapotranspiration demands. It is often assumed to be spatially invariant in large-scale computations of the soil-water balance. Empirical evidence, however, suggests that this assumption is incorrect. In this paper, we estimate the global distribution of the plant-extractable water capacity of soil. A representative soil profile, characterized by horizon (layer) particle size data and thickness, was created for each soil unit mapped by FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)/Unesco. Soil organic matter was estimated empirically from climate data. Plant rooting depths and ground coverages were obtained from a vegetation characteristic data set. At each 0.5?? ?? 0.5?? grid cell where vegetation is present, unit available water capacity (cm water per cm soil) was estimated from the sand, clay, and organic content of each profile horizon, and integrated over horizon thickness. Summation of the integrated values over the lesser of profile depth and root depth produced an estimate of the plant-extractable water capacity of soil. The global average of the estimated plant-extractable water capacities of soil is 8??6 cm (Greenland, Antarctica and bare soil areas excluded). Estimates are less than 5, 10 and 15 cm - over approximately 30, 60, and 89 per cent of the area, respectively. Estimates reflect the combined effects of soil texture, soil organic content, and plant root depth or profile depth. The most influential and uncertain parameter is the depth over which the plant-extractable water capacity of soil is computed, which is usually limited by root depth. Soil texture exerts a lesser, but still substantial, influence. Organic content, except where concentrations are very high, has relatively little effect.

  2. WATER AS A REAGENT FOR SOIL REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Indira S. Jayaweera; Montserrat Marti-Perez; Jordi Diaz-Ferrero; Angel Sanjurjo

    2001-03-29

    SRI International is conducting experiments to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology or hot water extraction (HWE) technology for remediating petroleum-contaminated soils. Most current remediation practices either fail to remove the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) found in petroleum-contaminated sites, are too costly, or require the use of organic solvents at the expense of additional contamination and with the added cost of recycling solvents. Hydrothermal extraction offers the promise of efficiently extracting PAHs and other kinds of organics from contaminated soils at moderate temperatures and pressures, using only water and inorganic salts such as carbonate. SRI has conducted experiments to measure the solubility and rate of solubilization of selected PAHs (fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, 9,10-dimethylanthracene) in water using SRI's hydrothermal optical cell with the addition of varying amounts of sodium carbonate to evaluate the efficiency of the technology for removing PAHs from the soil. SRI data shows a very rapid increase in solubility of PAHs with increase in temperature in the range 25-275 C. SRI also measured the rate of solubilization, which is a key factor in determining the reactor parameters. SRI results for fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, and 9,10-dimethylanthracene show a linear relationship between rate of solubilization and equilibrium solubility. Also, we have found the rate of solubilization of pyrene at 275 C to be 6.5 ppm/s, indicating that the equilibrium solubilization will be reached in less than 3 min at 275 C; equilibrium solubility of pyrene at 275 C is 1000 ppm. Also, pyrene and fluoranthene appear to have higher solubilities in the presence of sodium carbonate. In addition to this study, SRI studied the rate of removal of selected PAHs from spiked samples under varying conditions (temperature, pore sizes, and pH). We have found a higher removal of PAHs in the presence of sodium carbonate in both sand and

  3. Partitioning of hydrophobic pesticides within a soil-water-anionic surfactant system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Keller, Arturo A

    2009-02-01

    Surfactants can be added to pesticide-contaminated soils to enhance the treatment efficiency of soil washing. Our results showed that pesticide (atrazine and diuron) partitioning and desorbability within a soil-water-anionic surfactant system is soil particle-size dependent and is significantly influenced by the presence of anionic surfactant. Anionic surfactant (linear alkylbenzene sulphonate, LAS) sorption was influenced by its complexation with both the soluble and exchangeable divalent cations in soils (e.g. Ca2+, Mg2+). In this study, we propose a new concept: soil system hardness which defines the total amount of soluble and exchangeable divalent cations associated with a soil. Our results showed that anionic surfactant works better with soils having lower soil system hardness. It was also found that the hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) sorbed onto the LAS-divalent cation precipitate, resulting in a significant decrease in the aqueous concentration of HOC. Our results showed that the effect of exchangeable cations and sorption of HOC onto the surfactant precipitates needs to be considered to accurately predict HOC behavior within soil-water-anionic surfactant systems.

  4. Soil CO2 Dynamics in a Tree Island Soil of the Pantanal: The Role of Soil Water Potential

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Mark S.; Couto, Eduardo Guimarães; Pinto Jr, Osvaldo B.; Milesi, Juliana; Santos Amorim, Ricardo S.; Messias, Indira A. M.; Biudes, Marcelo Sacardi

    2013-01-01

    The Pantanal is a biodiversity hotspot comprised of a mosaic of landforms that differ in vegetative assemblages and flooding dynamics. Tree islands provide refuge for terrestrial fauna during the flooding period and are particularly important to the regional ecosystem structure. Little soil CO2 research has been conducted in this region. We evaluated soil CO2 dynamics in relation to primary controlling environmental parameters (soil temperature and soil water). Soil respiration was computed using the gradient method using in situ infrared gas analyzers to directly measure CO2 concentration within the soil profile. Due to the cost of the sensors and associated equipment, this study was unreplicated. Rather, we focus on the temporal relationships between soil CO2 efflux and related environmental parameters. Soil CO2 efflux during the study averaged 3.53 µmol CO2 m−2 s−1, and was equivalent to an annual soil respiration of 1220 g C m−2 y−1. This efflux value, integrated over a year, is comparable to soil C stocks for 0–20 cm. Soil water potential was the measured parameter most strongly associated with soil CO2 concentrations, with high CO2 values observed only once soil water potential at the 10 cm depth approached zero. This relationship was exhibited across a spectrum of timescales and was found to be significant at a daily timescale across all seasons using conditional nonparametric spectral Granger causality analysis. Hydrology plays a significant role in controlling CO2 efflux from the tree island soil, with soil CO2 dynamics differing by wetting mechanism. During the wet-up period, direct precipitation infiltrates soil from above and results in pulses of CO2 efflux from soil. The annual flood arrives later, and saturates soil from below. While CO2 concentrations in soil grew very high under both wetting mechanisms, the change in soil CO2 efflux was only significant when soils were wet from above. PMID:23762259

  5. Soil CO₂ dynamics in a tree island soil of the Pantanal: the role of soil water potential.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mark S; Couto, Eduardo Guimarães; Pinto, Osvaldo B; Milesi, Juliana; Santos Amorim, Ricardo S; Messias, Indira A M; Biudes, Marcelo Sacardi

    2013-01-01

    The Pantanal is a biodiversity hotspot comprised of a mosaic of landforms that differ in vegetative assemblages and flooding dynamics. Tree islands provide refuge for terrestrial fauna during the flooding period and are particularly important to the regional ecosystem structure. Little soil CO₂ research has been conducted in this region. We evaluated soil CO₂ dynamics in relation to primary controlling environmental parameters (soil temperature and soil water). Soil respiration was computed using the gradient method using in situ infrared gas analyzers to directly measure CO₂ concentration within the soil profile. Due to the cost of the sensors and associated equipment, this study was unreplicated. Rather, we focus on the temporal relationships between soil CO₂ efflux and related environmental parameters. Soil CO₂ efflux during the study averaged 3.53 µmol CO₂ m⁻² s⁻¹, and was equivalent to an annual soil respiration of 1220 g C m⁻² y⁻¹. This efflux value, integrated over a year, is comparable to soil C stocks for 0-20 cm. Soil water potential was the measured parameter most strongly associated with soil CO₂ concentrations, with high CO₂ values observed only once soil water potential at the 10 cm depth approached zero. This relationship was exhibited across a spectrum of timescales and was found to be significant at a daily timescale across all seasons using conditional nonparametric spectral Granger causality analysis. Hydrology plays a significant role in controlling CO₂ efflux from the tree island soil, with soil CO₂ dynamics differing by wetting mechanism. During the wet-up period, direct precipitation infiltrates soil from above and results in pulses of CO₂ efflux from soil. The annual flood arrives later, and saturates soil from below. While CO₂ concentrations in soil grew very high under both wetting mechanisms, the change in soil CO₂ efflux was only significant when soils were wet from above.

  6. Soil water sensor response to bulk electrical conductivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water monitoring using electromagnetic (EM) sensors can facilitate observations of water content at high temporal and spatial resolutions. These sensors measure soil dielectric permittivity (Ka) which is largely a function of volumetric water content. However, bulk electrical conductivity BEC c...

  7. STABLE ISOTOPES AS INDICATORS OF SOIL WATER DYNAMICS IN WATERSHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stream water quality and quantity depend on discharge rates of water and nutrients from soils. However, soil-water storage is very dynamic and strongly influenced by plants. We analyzed stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen to quantify spatial and temporal changes in evaporati...

  8. Water and temperature relations of soil Actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Andrew; Hallsworth, John E

    2014-12-01

    Actinobacteria perform essential functions within soils, and are dependent on available water to do so. We determined the water-activity (aw ) limits for cell division of Streptomyces albidoflavus, Streptomyces rectiviolaceus, Micromonospora grisea and Micromonospora (JCM 3050) over a range of temperatures, using culture media supplemented with a biologically permissive solute (glycerol). Each species grew optimally at 0.998 aw (control; no added glycerol) and growth rates were near-optimal in the range 0.971-0.974 (1 M glycerol) at permissive temperatures. Each was capable of cell division at 0.916-0.924 aw (2 M glycerol), but only S. albidoflavus grew at 0.895 or 0.897 aw (3 M glycerol, at 30 and 37°C respectively). For S. albidoflavus, however, no growth occurred on media at ≤ 0.870 (4 M glycerol) during the 40-day assessment period, regardless of temperature, and a theoretical limit of 0.877 aw was derived by extrapolation of growth curves. This level of solute tolerance is high for non-halophilic bacteria, but is consistent with reported limits for the growth and metabolic activities of soil microbes. The limit, within the range 0.895-0.870 aw , is very much inferior to those for obligately halophilic bacteria and extremely halophilic or xerophilic fungi, and is inconsistent with earlier reports of cell division at 0.500 aw . These findings are discussed in relation to planetary protection policy for space exploration and the microbiology of arid soils.

  9. Reflectance of vegetation, soil, and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The ability to read the 24-channel MSS CCT tapes, select specified agricultural land use areas from the CCT, and perform multivariate statistical and pattern recognition analyses has been demonstrated. The 5 optimum channels chosen for classifying an agricultural scene were, in the order of their selection the far red visible, short reflective IR, visible blue, thermal infrared, and ultraviolet portions of the electromagnetic spectrum, respectively. Although chosen by a training set containing only vegetal categories, the optimum 4 channels discriminated pavement, water, bare soil, and building roofs, as well as the vegetal categories. Among the vegetal categories, sugar cane and cotton had distinctive signatures that distinguished them from grass and citrus. Acreages estimated spectrally by the computer for the test scene were acceptably close to acreages estimated from aerial photographs for cotton, sugar cane, and water. Many nonfarmable land resolution elements representing drainage ditch, field road, and highway right-of-way as well as farm headquarters area fell into the grass, bare soil plus weeds, and citrus categories and lessened the accuracy of the farmable acreage estimates in these categories. The expertise developed using the 24-channel data will be applied to the ERTS-1 data.

  10. Recharge in northern clime calcareous sandy soils: soil water chemical and carbon-14 evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reardon, E. J.; Mozeto, A. A.; Fritz, P.

    1980-11-01

    Chemical analyses were performed on soil water extracted from two cores taken from a sandy calcareous soil near Delhi, Ontario. Calcite saturation is attained within the unsaturated zone over short distances and short periods of time, whereas dolomite undersaturation persists to the groundwater table. The progressive dissolution of dolomite by soil water, within the unsaturated zone, after calcite saturation is reached results in calcite supersaturation. Deposition of iron and manganese oxyhydroxide phases occurs at the carbonate leached/unleached zone boundary. This is a result of soil water neutralization due to carbonate dissolution during infiltration but may also reflect the increased rate of oxidation of dissolved ferrous and manganous ions at higher pH's. The role of bacteria in this process has not been investigated. The depth of the carbonate leached/unleached zone boundary in a calcareous soil has important implications for 14C groundwater dating. The depth of this interface at the study site (-2 m) does not appear to limit 14C diffusion from the root zone to the depth at which carbonate dissolution occurs. Thus, soil water achieves open system isotopic equilibrium with the soil CO 2 gas phase. It is calculated that in soils with similar physical properties to the study soil but with depths of leaching of 5 m or more, complete 14C isotopic equilibration of soil water with soil gas would not occur. Soil water, under these conditions would recharge to the groundwater exhibiting some degree of closed system 14C isotopic evolution.

  11. Mucilage exudation facilitates root water uptake in dry soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. A.; Carminati, A.; Kroener, E.; Holz, M.; Zarebanadkouki, M.

    2014-12-01

    As plant roots take up water and the soil dries, water depletion is expected to occur in the rhizosphere. However, recent experiments showed that the rhizosphere was wetter than the bulk soil during root water uptake. We hypothesise that the increased water content in the rhizosphere was caused by mucilage exuded by roots. It is probably that the higher water content in the rhizosphere results in higher hydraulic conductivity of the root-soil interface. In this case, mucilage exudation would favour the uptake of water in dry soils. To test this hypothesis, we covered a suction cup, referred to as an artificial root, with mucilage. We placed it in soil with a water content of 0.03 cm3 cm-3, and used the root pressure probe technique to measure the hydraulic conductivity of the root-soil continuum. The results were compared with measurements with roots not covered with mucilage. The root pressure relaxation curves were fitted with a model of root water uptake including rhizosphere dynamics. The results demonstrated that when mucilage is added to the root surface, it keeps the soil near the roots wet and hydraulically well conductive, facilitating the water flow from dry soils towards the root surface. Mucilage exudation seems to be an optimal plant trait that favours the capture of water when water is scarce.

  12. Ecohydrology of dry regions: storage versus pulse soil water dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lauenroth, William K.; Schlaepfer, Daniel R.; Bradford, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Although arid and semiarid regions are defined by low precipitation, the seasonal timing of temperature and precipitation can influence net primary production and plant functional type composition. The importance of precipitation seasonality is evident in semiarid areas of the western U.S., which comprise the Intermountain (IM) zone, a region that receives important winter precipitation and is dominated by woody plants and the Great Plains (GP), a region that receives primarily summer precipitation and is dominated by perennial grasses. Although these general relationships are well recognized, specific differences in water cycling between these regions have not been well characterized. We used a daily time step soil water simulation model and twenty sites from each region to analyze differences in soil water dynamics and ecosystem water balance. IM soil water patterns are characterized by storage of water during fall, winter, and spring resulting in relatively reliable available water during spring and early summer, particularly in deep soil layers. By contrast, GP soil water patterns are driven by pulse precipitation events during the warm season, resulting in fluctuating water availability in all soil layers. These contrasting patterns of soil water—storage versus pulse dynamics—explain important differences between the two regions. Notably, the storage dynamics of the IN sites increases water availability in deep soil layers, favoring the deeper rooted woody plants in that region, whereas the pulse dynamics of the Great Plains sites provide water primarily in surface layers, favoring the shallow-rooted grasses in that region. In addition, because water received when plants are either not active or only partially so is more vulnerable to evaporation and sublimation than water delivered during the growing season, IM ecosystems use a smaller fraction of precipitation for transpiration (47%) than GP ecosystems (49%). Recognizing the pulse-storage dichotomy in

  13. Predicting and mapping soil available water capacity in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Suk Young; Han, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Yihyun; Lee, Kyungdo

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge on the spatial distribution of soil available water capacity at a regional or national extent is essential, as soil water capacity is a component of the water and energy balances in the terrestrial ecosystem. It controls the evapotranspiration rate, and has a major impact on climate. This paper demonstrates a protocol for mapping soil available water capacity in South Korea at a fine scale using data available from surveys. The procedures combined digital soil mapping technology with the available soil map of 1:25,000. We used the modal profile data from the Taxonomical Classification of Korean Soils. The data consist of profile description along with physical and chemical analysis for the modal profiles of the 380 soil series. However not all soil samples have measured bulk density and water content at −10 and −1500 kPa. Thus they need to be predicted using pedotransfer functions. Furthermore, water content at −10 kPa was measured using ground samples. Thus a correction factor is derived to take into account the effect of bulk density. Results showed that Andisols has the highest mean water storage capacity, followed by Entisols and Inceptisols which have loamy texture. The lowest water retention is Entisols which are dominated by sandy materials. Profile available water capacity to a depth of 1 m was calculated and mapped for Korea. The western part of the country shows higher available water capacity than the eastern part which is mountainous and has shallower soils. The highest water storage capacity soils are the Ultisols and Alfisols (mean of 206 and 205 mm, respectively). Validation of the maps showed promising results. The map produced can be used as an indication of soil physical quality of Korean soils. PMID:23646290

  14. Analytical solution for soil water redistribution during evaporation process.

    PubMed

    Teng, Jidong; Yasufuku, Noriyuki; Liu, Qiang; Liu, Shiyu

    2013-01-01

    Simulating the dynamics of soil water content and modeling soil water evaporation are critical for many environmental and agricultural strategies. The present study aims to develop an analytical solution to simulate soil water redistribution during the evaporation process. This analytical solution was derived utilizing an exponential function to describe the relation of hydraulic conductivity and water content on pressure head. The solution was obtained based on the initial condition of saturation and an exponential function to model the change of surface water content. Also, the evaporation experiments were conducted under a climate control apparatus to validate the theoretical development. Comparisons between the proposed analytical solution and experimental result are presented from the aspects of soil water redistribution, evaporative rate and cumulative evaporation. Their good agreement indicates that this analytical solution provides a reliable way to investigate the interaction of evaporation and soil water profile.

  15. Soil water monitoring using heated distributed temperature sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Striegl, A. M.; Loheide, S. P.

    2010-12-01

    Traditionally, soil water measurements could only be obtained as point-in-time and point-in-space samples. These methods result in uncertainty in understanding the soil water dynamics of a site because of issues of scale, soil and vegetation spatial heterogeneity, and temporal variability of climatic conditions. Previous researchers have demonstrated the feasibility of obtaining distributed soil water content measurements using the heat pulse method with fiber optic temperature sensing. Numerical simulations of multiple proposed hybrid cable cross-sections guided the design and fabrication of a custom bundle of fiber optics, resistance heating conductors, and protective coatings for soil water monitoring. The conductors introduce a heat pulse to the surrounding soil, while temperature rise versus time is monitored with a Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) system using the fiber optics in the bundle. The temperature rise versus time response is related to the matric potential and water content of the soil surrounding the cable. In order to monitor the near-surface hydrology of a recently restored southwestern Wisconsin floodplain, the cable was buried at a depth of 20cm along a transect perpendicular to the Upper East Branch of the Pecatonica River near Barneveld, Wisconsin. Spatial variations of soil water can be readily observed with this technology as the cable spans various vegetation communities, soil types, and moisture conditions at this site. This new technology will help bridge the existing gaps of scale in soil water monitoring networks by providing high resolution, continuous measurements over large spatial scales.

  16. Moss δ(13) C: an accurate proxy for past water environments in polar regions.

    PubMed

    Bramley-Alves, Jessica; Wanek, Wolfgang; French, Kristine; Robinson, Sharon A

    2015-06-01

    Increased aridity is of global concern. Polar regions provide an opportunity to monitor changes in bioavailable water free of local anthropogenic influences. However, sophisticated proxy measures are needed. We explored the possibility of using stable carbon isotopes in segments of moss as a fine-scale proxy for past bioavailable water. Variation in δ(13) C with water availability was measured in three species across three peninsulas in the Windmill Islands, East Antarctica and verified using controlled chamber experiments. The δ(13) C from Antarctic mosses accurately recorded long-term variations in water availability in the field, regardless of location, but significant disparities in δ(13) C between species indicated some make more sensitive proxies. δ(13) CSUGAR derived from living tissues can change significantly within the span of an Antarctic season (5 weeks) in chambers, but under field conditions, slow growth means that this technique likely represents multiple seasons. δ(13) CCELLULOSE provides a precise and direct proxy for bioavailable water, allowing reconstructions for coastal Antarctica and potentially other cold regions over past centuries.

  17. Effects of soil management techniques on soil water erosion in apricot orchards.

    PubMed

    Keesstra, Saskia; Pereira, Paulo; Novara, Agata; Brevik, Eric C; Azorin-Molina, Cesar; Parras-Alcántara, Luis; Jordán, Antonio; Cerdà, Artemi

    2016-05-01

    Soil erosion is extreme in Mediterranean orchards due to management impact, high rainfall intensities, steep slopes and erodible parent material. Vall d'Albaida is a traditional fruit production area which, due to the Mediterranean climate and marly soils, produces sweet fruits. However, these highly productive soils are left bare under the prevailing land management and marly soils are vulnerable to soil water erosion when left bare. In this paper we study the impact of different agricultural land management strategies on soil properties (bulk density, soil organic matter, soil moisture), soil water erosion and runoff, by means of simulated rainfall experiments and soil analyses. Three representative land managements (tillage/herbicide/covered with vegetation) were selected, where 20 paired plots (60 plots) were established to determine soil losses and runoff. The simulated rainfall was carried out at 55mmh(-1) in the summer of 2013 (<8% soil moisture) for one hour on 0.25m(2) circular plots. The results showed that vegetation cover, soil moisture and organic matter were significantly higher in covered plots than in tilled and herbicide treated plots. However, runoff coefficient, total runoff, sediment yield and soil erosion were significantly higher in herbicide treated plots compared to the others. Runoff sediment concentration was significantly higher in tilled plots. The lowest values were identified in covered plots. Overall, tillage, but especially herbicide treatment, decreased vegetation cover, soil moisture, soil organic matter, and increased bulk density, runoff coefficient, total runoff, sediment yield and soil erosion. Soil erosion was extremely high in herbicide plots with 0.91Mgha(-1)h(-1) of soil lost; in the tilled fields erosion rates were lower with 0.51Mgha(-1)h(-1). Covered soil showed an erosion rate of 0.02Mgha(-1)h(-1). These results showed that agricultural management influenced water and sediment dynamics and that tillage and herbicide

  18. Modeling as a tool for management of saline soils and irrigation waters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimal management of saline soils and irrigation waters requires consideration of many interrelated factors including, climate, water applications and timing, water flow, plant water uptake, soil chemical reactions, plant response to salinity and solution composition, soil hydraulic properties and ...

  19. Effect of Thickness of a Water Repellent Soil Layer on Soil Evaporation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, S.; Im, S.; Doerr, S.

    2012-04-01

    A water repellent soil layer overlying wettable soil is known to affect soil evaporation. This effect can be beneficial for water conservation in areas where water is scarce. Little is known, however, about the effect of the thickness of the water repellent layer. The thickness of this layer can vary widely, and particularly after wildfire, with the soil temperature reached and the duration of the fire. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of thickness of a top layer of water repellent soil on soil evaporation rate. In order to isolate the thickness from other possible factors, fully wettable standard sand (300~600 microns) was used. Extreme water repellency (WDPT > 24 hours) was generated by 'baking' the sand mixed with oven-dried pine needles (fresh needles of Pinus densiflora) at the mass ratio of 1:13 (needle:soil) at 185°C for 18 hours. The thicknesses of water repellent layers were 1, 2, 3 and 7 cm on top of wettable soil. Fully wettable soil columns were prepared as a control. Soil columns (8 cm diameter, 10 cm height) were covered with nylon mesh. Tap water (50 ml, saturating 3 cm of a soil column) was injected with hypoderm syringes from three different directions at the bottom level. The injection holes were sealed with hot-melt adhesive immediately after injection. The rate of soil evaporation through the soil surface was measured by weight change under isothermal condition of 40°C. Five replications were made for each. A trend of negative correlation between the thickness of water repellent top layer and soil evaporation rate is discussed in this contribution.

  20. Simulations and field observations of root water uptake in plots with different soil water availability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Gaochao; Vanderborght, Jan; Couvreur, Valentin; Javaux, Mathieu; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Root water uptake is a main process in the hydrological cycle and vital for water management in agronomy. In most models of root water uptake, the spatial and temporal soil water status and plant root distributions are required for water flow simulations. However, dynamic root growth and root distributions are not easy and time consuming to measure by normal approaches. Furthermore, root water uptake cannot be measured directly in the field. Therefore, it is necessary to incorporate monitoring data of soil water content and potential and root distributions within a modeling framework to explore the interaction between soil water availability and root water uptake. But, most models are lacking a physically based concept to describe water uptake from soil profiles with vertical variations in soil water availability. In this contribution, we present an experimental setup in which root development, soil water content and soil water potential are monitored non-invasively in two field plots with different soil texture and for three treatments with different soil water availability: natural rain, sheltered and irrigated treatment. Root development is monitored using 7-m long horizontally installed minirhizotubes at six depths with three replicates per treatment. The monitoring data are interpreted using a model that is a one-dimensional upscaled version of root water uptake model that describes flow in the coupled soil-root architecture considering water potential gradients in the system and hydraulic conductances of the soil and root system (Couvreur et al., 2012). This model approach links the total root water uptake to an effective soil water potential in the root zone. The local root water uptake is a function of the difference between the local soil water potential and effective root zone water potential so that compensatory uptake in heterogeneous soil water potential profiles is simulated. The root system conductance is derived from inverse modelling using

  1. Teaching Soil and Water Conservation: A Classroom and Field Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Albert B.; Fox, Adrian C.

    Compiled in this booklet are 22 activities designed to develop awareness of the importance of conservation and the wise use of soil and moisture on croplands, grasslands, and woodlands. They have been selected by Soil Conservation Service (SCS) personnel and consultants to show that the way we manage our basic natural resources, soil and water,…

  2. Microbial enhancement of hydrazine degradation in soil and water

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, L.T.; Street, J.J.

    1987-09-01

    In an early study, the authors reported that hydrazine was rapidly degraded in Arredondo fine sand. By comparing the degradation results in sterile and nonsterile soils, it was concluded that biological degradation was responsible for about 20% of hydrazine disappearance from soils. They isolated a heterotrophic bacterium, Achromobacter sp., from the Arredondo soil and found that the organism had a high capacity to degrade hydrazine to the nontoxic product dinitrogen gas. In the present study, the authors attempted to enhance hydrazine degradation in water and soil samples by inoculating with a hydrazine-degrading bacterium, Achromobacter sp. Factors that influence hydrazine degradation in water and soil are discussed.

  3. Nonequilibrium water dynamics in the rhizosphere: How mucilage affects water flow in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, Eva; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kaestner, Anders; Carminati, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    The flow of water from soil to plant roots is controlled by the properties of the narrow region of soil close to the roots, the rhizosphere. In particular, the hydraulic properties of the rhizosphere are altered by mucilage, a polymeric gel exuded by the roots. In this paper we present experimental results and a conceptual model of water flow in unsaturated soils mixed with mucilage. A central hypothesis of the model is that the different drying/wetting rate of mucilage compared to the bulk soil results in nonequilibrium relations between water content and water potential in the rhizosphere. We coupled this nonequilibrium relation with the Richards equation and obtained a constitutive equation for water flow in soil and mucilage. To test the model assumptions, we measured the water retention curve and the saturated hydraulic conductivity of sandy soil mixed with mucilage from chia seeds. Additionally, we used neutron radiography to image water content in a layer of soil mixed with mucilage during drying and wetting cycles. The radiographs demonstrated the occurrence of nonequilibrium water dynamics in the soil-mucilage mixture. The experiments were simulated by numerically solving the nonequilibrium model. Our study provides conceptual and experimental evidences that mucilage has a strong impact on soil water dynamics. During drying, mucilage maintains a greater soil water content for an extended time, while during irrigation it delays the soil rewetting. We postulate that mucilage exudation by roots attenuates plant water stress by modulating water content dynamics in the rhizosphere.

  4. Dynamic soil water repellency during infiltration of water, ethanol, and aqueous ethanol solutions in post wildfire soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beatty, Sarah; Smith, James

    2015-04-01

    Contact angle dynamics, the temporal dependence of repellency, and the persistence of repellency are all terms used to describe dynamic changes in soil water repellency with time. Studied over varied spatial and temporal scales, much remains to be known about dynamic soil water repellency and its role during infiltration. Of those approaches used to characterize dynamic soil water repellency and develop mechanistic insight, tension infiltration has become an important one. Removing positive pore water pressures through tension infiltration facilitates the observation of infiltration initiated by capillary pull and experimentally eliminates one of the competing mechanisms that generates non-uniqueness. This makes tension infiltrometers and the data they generate uniquely sensitive to (primary) changes in contact angles and fractional wettability. Changes, which are subsumed when positive pore water pressures are the primary drivers of infiltration, as is the case during ponded infiltration in water repellent soils. One pressing challenge, however, is that analytical approaches, based on idealized wettable-system principles (e.g. 0° and/or static contact angles), yield suspect results in non-wetting / fractionally wettable / dynamic systems. Consequently, complex infiltration behaviours, and linkages between fundamental process oriented understanding and real-world problems, remain poorly understood. This persistently impedes our ability to accurately describe, model, and predict flow in water repellent systems. To help address this knowledge gap, this work presents suites of in situ field (3D) and laboratory (1D) experimental data collected in naturally repellent post wildfire soils using tension infiltrometers (4.4cm and 8cm, respectively) and different infiltrating fluids. In the field, 49 infiltration tests using water, ethanol (95%), and Molarity of Ethanol Drop (MED)-derived aqueous ethanol solutions indicated that early- and late-time infiltration behaviours

  5. Percolation behavior of tritiated water into a soil packed bed

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, T.; Katayama, K.; Uehara, K.; Fukada, S.; Takeishi, T.

    2015-03-15

    A large amount of cooling water is used in a D-T fusion reactor. The cooling water will contain tritium with high concentration because tritium can permeate metal walls at high temperature easily. A development of tritium handling technology for confining tritiated water in the fusion facility is an important issue. In addition, it is also important to understand tritium behavior in environment assuming severe accidents. In this study, percolation experiments of tritiated water in soil packed bed were carried out and tritium behavior in soil was discussed. Six soil samples were collected in Hakozaki campus of Kyushu University. These particle densities were of the same degree as that of general soils and moisture contents were related to BET surface area. For two soil samples used in the percolation experiment of tritiated water, saturated hydraulic conductivity agreed well with the estimating value by Creager. Tritium retention ratio in the soil packed bed was larger than water retention. This is considered to be due to an effect of tritium sorption on the surface of soil particles. The isotope exchange capacity estimated by assuming that H/T ratio of supplied tritiated water and H/T ratio of surface water of soil particle was equal was comparable to that on cement paste and mortar which were obtained by exposure of tritiated water vapor. (authors)

  6. Root-soil air gap and resistance to water flow at the soil-root interface of Robinia pseudoacacia.

    PubMed

    Liu, X P; Zhang, W J; Wang, X Y; Cai, Y J; Chang, J G

    2015-12-01

    During periods of water deficit, growing roots may shrink, retaining only partial contact with the soil. In this study, known mathematical models were used to calculate the root-soil air gap and water flow resistance at the soil-root interface, respectively, of Robinia pseudoacacia L. under different water conditions. Using a digital camera, the root-soil air gap of R. pseudoacacia was investigated in a root growth chamber; this root-soil air gap and the model-inferred water flow resistance at the soil-root interface were compared with predictions based on a separate outdoor experiment. The results indicated progressively greater root shrinkage and loss of root-soil contact with decreasing soil water potential. The average widths of the root-soil air gap for R. pseudoacacia in open fields and in the root growth chamber were 0.24 and 0.39 mm, respectively. The resistance to water flow at the soil-root interface in both environments increased with decreasing soil water potential. Stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that soil water potential and soil temperature were the best predictors of variation in the root-soil air gap. A combination of soil water potential, soil temperature, root-air water potential difference and soil-root water potential difference best predicted the resistance to water flow at the soil-root interface.

  7. Moditored unsaturated soil transport processes as a support for large scale soil and water management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanclooster, Marnik

    2010-05-01

    The current societal demand for sustainable soil and water management is very large. The drivers of global and climate change exert many pressures on the soil and water ecosystems, endangering appropriate ecosystem functioning. The unsaturated soil transport processes play a key role in soil-water system functioning as it controls the fluxes of water and nutrients from the soil to plants (the pedo-biosphere link), the infiltration flux of precipitated water to groundwater and the evaporative flux, and hence the feed back from the soil to the climate system. Yet, unsaturated soil transport processes are difficult to quantify since they are affected by huge variability of the governing properties at different space-time scales and the intrinsic non-linearity of the transport processes. The incompatibility of the scales between the scale at which processes reasonably can be characterized, the scale at which the theoretical process correctly can be described and the scale at which the soil and water system need to be managed, calls for further development of scaling procedures in unsaturated zone science. It also calls for a better integration of theoretical and modelling approaches to elucidate transport processes at the appropriate scales, compatible with the sustainable soil and water management objective. Moditoring science, i.e the interdisciplinary research domain where modelling and monitoring science are linked, is currently evolving significantly in the unsaturated zone hydrology area. In this presentation, a review of current moditoring strategies/techniques will be given and illustrated for solving large scale soil and water management problems. This will also allow identifying research needs in the interdisciplinary domain of modelling and monitoring and to improve the integration of unsaturated zone science in solving soil and water management issues. A focus will be given on examples of large scale soil and water management problems in Europe.

  8. The efficacy of combining satellite water storage and soil moisture observations as constraints on water balance estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Siyuan; van Dijk, Albert; Renzullo, Luigi; Tregoning, Paul; Walker, Jeffrey; Pauwels, Valentijn

    2016-04-01

    The ability to accurately estimate terrestrial water storage (TWS) and its components (e.g. soil moisture, groundwater, surface water and snow) is of considerable value to water resources assessment. Due to the imperfection of both model predictions and observations, data assimilation methods have been widely applied to hydrological problems for optimal combination of model and observations. Recent studies on the assimilation of TWS data have shown its capability to improve simulated groundwater storages, but the assimilation of TWS only does not guarantee accurate estimation of surface soil moisture (SSM). We investigated the efficiency of data assimilation combining TWS change estimates, derived from temporal changes in Earth's gravity field measured by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), with SSM, retrieved from emitted microwave radiation at L-band observed by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite. The global World Wide Water (W3) water balance model was used. The specific satellite data products used were the SMOS CATDS level 3 daily SSM product and the JPL mascon monthly GRACE product. Both the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and smoother (EnKS) were implemented to determine the best option for the assimilation of SSM observations only and the joint assimilation of SSM and TWS. The observation models, which map model states into observation space, are the top-layer soil relative wetness and monthly average TWS (i.e. aggregated daily top-, shallow-, deep-layer soil water storage, ground- and surface water storages). Three assimilation experiments were conducted with each method: a) assimilation of SSM data only; b) assimilation of TWS data only; c) joint assimilation of SSM and TWS data. Results were compared against in-situ soil moisture and groundwater observations, and the performance assessed with respect to open-loop results. Results for the Murray-Darling Basin in Australia demonstrate that the assimilation of SSM data only

  9. Soil and Water Challenges for Pacific Northwest Agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil and water conservation has been a major concern in the Inland Pacific Northwest since the onset of farming 125 years ago. Some of the highest historic water erosion rates in the USA have occurred on steep slopes in the Palouse region where soil loss averaged 45 Mg ha-1 yr-1 and could reach 450 ...

  10. Automated soil water balance sensing: From layers to control volumes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continuous sensing of soil water status has been possible in some ways since the advent of chart recorders, but the widespread adoption of soil water sensing systems did not occur until relatively inexpensive dataloggers became available in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Early systems relied on pre...

  11. Comparison of corn transpiration, eddy covariance, and soil water loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem flow gages are used to estimate plant transpiration, but only a few studies compare transpiration with other measures of soil water loss. The purpose of this study was to compare transpiration from stem flow measurements with soil water changes estimated by daily neutron probe readings. Monitor...

  12. Monitoring soil water content at a heterogeneous oil sand reclamation site using a cosmic-ray soil moisture probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigouin, Mark J. P.; Dyck, Miles; Si, Bing Cheng; Hu, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Soil water content (SWC) measurements are important for numerous applications including climate and weather prediction, agriculture and irrigation activities, and monitoring the progress of reclamation on land disturbed by mining or other industrial activities. We assessed the SWC measurement accuracy of a cosmic-ray soil moisture probe (CRP) and explored the possibility of downscaling the CRP measurement to the plot scale. The experiments were conducted at a highly heterogeneous reclamation site in the Alberta Oil Sands near Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada. The study site is unique because it consists of 36 one hectare plots composed of 12 different reclamation covers made up of various layering schemes of peat and coarse-textured soil. The one-hectare plots also contain different vegetation (species and density). A CRP was installed in the center of the reclamation study site and calibrated using soil core samples. CRP-measured SWC was compared to weighted average SWC measured from soil cores and a network of soil moisture probes within the CRP footprint over two summers. The CRP responded clearly to precipitation events with peaks in the measured SWC and the CRP estimates of SWC were very close to SWC estimated with soil cores and in-situ soil moisture probes with a RMSE of 0.027 cm3 cm-3 and 0.027 cm3 cm-3, respectively, over the two summers. We also attempted to downscale the CRP measurements from the 2014 season to the plot scale using HYDRUS-1D modeling and the known soil texture in order to unweight the CRP-measured SWC. The modeled SWC (optimized with the CRP measurements) within the CRP footprint was relatively close to the CRP-measured SWC with a RMSE of 0.047 cm3 cm-3. Overall, the CRP provided accurate average SWC measurements at the reclamation site despite the soil and vegetation heterogeneity.

  13. Effects of water addition on soil arthropods and soil characteristics in a precipitation-limited environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikoski, Jennifer M.; Ferguson, Steven H.; Meyer, Lense

    2006-09-01

    We investigated the effect of water addition and season on soil arthropod abundance and soil characteristics (%C, %N, C:N, moisture, pH). The experimental design consisted of 24 groups of five boxes distributed within a small aspen stand in Saskatchewan, Canada. The boxes depressed the soil to create a habitat with suitable microclimate for soil arthropods, and by overturning boxes we counted soil arthropods during weekly surveys from April to September 1999. Soil samples were collected at two-month intervals and water was added once per week to half of the plots. Of the eleven recognizable taxonomic units identified, only mites (Acari) and springtails (Collembola) responded to water addition by increasing abundance, whereas ants decreased in abundance with water addition. During summer, springtail numbers increased with water addition, whereas pH was a stronger determinant of mite abundance. In autumn, springtails were positively correlated with water and negatively correlated with mites, whereas mite abundance was negatively correlated with increasing C:N ratio, positively correlated to water addition, and negatively correlated with springtail abundance. Although both mite and springtail numbers decreased in autumn with a decrease in soil moisture, mites became more abundant than springtails suggesting a predator-prey (mite-springtail) relationship. Water had a significant effect on both springtails and mites in summer and autumn supporting the assertion that prairie soil communities are water limited.

  14. Intermolecular potentials and the accurate prediction of the thermodynamic properties of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvab, I.; Sadus, Richard J.

    2013-11-01

    The ability of intermolecular potentials to correctly predict the thermodynamic properties of liquid water at a density of 0.998 g/cm3 for a wide range of temperatures (298-650 K) and pressures (0.1-700 MPa) is investigated. Molecular dynamics simulations are reported for the pressure, thermal pressure coefficient, thermal expansion coefficient, isothermal and adiabatic compressibilities, isobaric and isochoric heat capacities, and Joule-Thomson coefficient of liquid water using the non-polarizable SPC/E and TIP4P/2005 potentials. The results are compared with both experiment data and results obtained from the ab initio-based Matsuoka-Clementi-Yoshimine non-additive (MCYna) [J. Li, Z. Zhou, and R. J. Sadus, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 154509 (2007)] potential, which includes polarization contributions. The data clearly indicate that both the SPC/E and TIP4P/2005 potentials are only in qualitative agreement with experiment, whereas the polarizable MCYna potential predicts some properties within experimental uncertainty. This highlights the importance of polarizability for the accurate prediction of the thermodynamic properties of water, particularly at temperatures beyond 298 K.

  15. Accurate integral equation theory for the central force model of liquid water and ionic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiye, Toshiko; Haymet, A. D. J.

    1988-10-01

    The atom-atom pair correlation functions and thermodynamics of the central force model of water, introduced by Lemberg, Stillinger, and Rahman, have been calculated accurately by an integral equation method which incorporates two new developments. First, a rapid new scheme has been used to solve the Ornstein-Zernike equation. This scheme combines the renormalization methods of Allnatt, and Rossky and Friedman with an extension of the trigonometric basis-set solution of Labik and co-workers. Second, by adding approximate ``bridge'' functions to the hypernetted-chain (HNC) integral equation, we have obtained predictions for liquid water in which the hydrogen bond length and number are in good agreement with ``exact'' computer simulations of the same model force laws. In addition, for dilute ionic solutions, the ion-oxygen and ion-hydrogen coordination numbers display both the physically correct stoichiometry and good agreement with earlier simulations. These results represent a measurable improvement over both a previous HNC solution of the central force model and the ex-RISM integral equation solutions for the TIPS and other rigid molecule models of water.

  16. New accurate benchmark energies for large water clusters: DFT is better than expected.

    PubMed

    Anacker, Tony; Friedrich, Joachim

    2014-03-30

    In this work, we use MP2 and coupled-cluster with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)] as well as their corresponding explicitly correlated (F12) counterparts to compute the interaction energies of water icosamers. The incremental scheme is used to compute benchmark energies at the CCSD(T)/CBS(45) and CCSD(T)(F12*)/cc-pVQZ-F12 level of theory. The four structures, dodecahedron, edge sharing, face sharing, and fused cubes, are part of the WATER27 test set and therefore, highly accurate interaction energies are required. All methods applied in this work lead to new benchmark energies for these four systems. To obtain these values, we carefully analyze the convergence of the interaction energies with respect to the basis set. Furthermore, we investigate the influence of the basis set superposition error and the core-valence correlation. The interaction energies are: dodecahedron -198.6 kcal/mol, edge sharing -209.7 kcal/mol, face sharing -208.0 kcal/mol, and fused cubes -208.0 kcal/mol. For water clusters, we recommend to use the PW6B95 density functional of Truhlar in combination with Grimme's dispersion correction (D3), as the mean absolute error is 0.9 and the root mean-squared deviation is only 1.4 kcal/mol.

  17. Intermolecular potentials and the accurate prediction of the thermodynamic properties of water.

    PubMed

    Shvab, I; Sadus, Richard J

    2013-11-21

    The ability of intermolecular potentials to correctly predict the thermodynamic properties of liquid water at a density of 0.998 g∕cm(3) for a wide range of temperatures (298-650 K) and pressures (0.1-700 MPa) is investigated. Molecular dynamics simulations are reported for the pressure, thermal pressure coefficient, thermal expansion coefficient, isothermal and adiabatic compressibilities, isobaric and isochoric heat capacities, and Joule-Thomson coefficient of liquid water using the non-polarizable SPC∕E and TIP4P∕2005 potentials. The results are compared with both experiment data and results obtained from the ab initio-based Matsuoka-Clementi-Yoshimine non-additive (MCYna) [J. Li, Z. Zhou, and R. J. Sadus, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 154509 (2007)] potential, which includes polarization contributions. The data clearly indicate that both the SPC∕E and TIP4P∕2005 potentials are only in qualitative agreement with experiment, whereas the polarizable MCYna potential predicts some properties within experimental uncertainty. This highlights the importance of polarizability for the accurate prediction of the thermodynamic properties of water, particularly at temperatures beyond 298 K.

  18. Intermolecular potentials and the accurate prediction of the thermodynamic properties of water

    SciTech Connect

    Shvab, I.; Sadus, Richard J.

    2013-11-21

    The ability of intermolecular potentials to correctly predict the thermodynamic properties of liquid water at a density of 0.998 g/cm{sup 3} for a wide range of temperatures (298–650 K) and pressures (0.1–700 MPa) is investigated. Molecular dynamics simulations are reported for the pressure, thermal pressure coefficient, thermal expansion coefficient, isothermal and adiabatic compressibilities, isobaric and isochoric heat capacities, and Joule-Thomson coefficient of liquid water using the non-polarizable SPC/E and TIP4P/2005 potentials. The results are compared with both experiment data and results obtained from the ab initio-based Matsuoka-Clementi-Yoshimine non-additive (MCYna) [J. Li, Z. Zhou, and R. J. Sadus, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 154509 (2007)] potential, which includes polarization contributions. The data clearly indicate that both the SPC/E and TIP4P/2005 potentials are only in qualitative agreement with experiment, whereas the polarizable MCYna potential predicts some properties within experimental uncertainty. This highlights the importance of polarizability for the accurate prediction of the thermodynamic properties of water, particularly at temperatures beyond 298 K.

  19. Improving irrigation efficiency of sandy soils by subsurface water retaining membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guber, Andrey; Smucker, Alvin; Berhanu, Samrawi

    2014-05-01

    Sustainable crop production in sandy soils is challenging due to low soil water holding capacity and high water permeability. The subsurface water retention technology (SWRT) is a relatively new long-term approach that offers precision control of water and nutrients in the root zone. However, multiple design of SWRT membrane configurations and spatial distributions require more modeling for best application in arid regions with relevant irrigation methods. The objective of this study was to define optimal geometric parameters of the SWRT membranes and the most accurate irrigation rates for corn production in sandy soils. HYDRUS-2D model, that describes two-dimensional water flow in unsaturated soil, was calibrated and validated on data in a large sand-filled lysimeter with SWRT membranes installed at different depths with different aspect ratios. The model adequately reproduced soil water content dynamics measured at 12 locations inside the sand profile. Then HYDRUS-2D simulations were repeated with different SWRT installation depths and aspect ratios. The installation depths in these simulations were 20 cm, 40 cm, and 60 cm, while the aspect ratios were 2:1, 3:1, 5:1 and 10:1. The results of simulations confirmed water holding capacity of the soil can be differentially controlled by aspect ratios of SWRT membranes. SWRT membranes with an aspect ratio of 2:1 substantially increased soil water content at 20-cm soil layer above the membrane, and this effect diminished with increasing aspect ratio of the membrane. Installation depth within the soil profile had no significant effect on water loss. The HYDRUS-2D simulations were repeated with SWRT installed at depth of 20 cm for sprinkle, surface drip and subsurface drip irrigation. Corn irrigation was triggered at pressure head of -30cm at a depth of 15 cm for all irrigation techniques. Simulated water losses by deep infiltration in sands without SWRT membranes approached 60% with approximately 15% losses when SWRT

  20. Soil water availability as controlling factor for actual evapotranspiration in urban soil-vegetation-systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Simon; Reisdorff, Christoph; Gröngröft, Alexander; Jensen, Kai; Eschenbach, Annette

    2015-04-01

    The City of Hamburg is characterized by a large number of greens, parks and roadside trees: 600.000 trees cover about 14% of the city area, and moreover, 245.000 roadside trees can be found here. Urban vegetation is generally known to positively contribute to the urban micro-climate via cooling by evapotranspiration (ET). The water for ET is predominantly stored in the urban soils. Hence, the actual evapotranspiration (ETa) is - beside atmospheric drivers - determined by soil water availability at the soil surface and in the rooting zones of the respective vegetation. The overall aim of this study is to characterize soil water availability as a regulative factor for ETa in urban soil-vegetation systems. The specific questions addressed are: i) What is the spatio-temporal variation in soil water availability at the study sites? ii) Which soil depths are predominantly used for water uptake by the vegetation forms investigated? and iii) Which are the threshold values of soil water tension and soil water content (Θ), respectively, that limit ETa under dry conditions on both grass-dominated and tree-dominated sites? Three study areas were established in the urban region of Hamburg, Germany. We selected areas featuring both single tree stands and grass-dominated sites, both representing typical vegetation forms in Hamburg. The areas are characterized by relatively dry soil conditions. However, they differ in regard to soil water availability. At each area we selected one site dominated by Common Oak (Quercus ruber L.) with ages from 40 to 120 years, and paired each oak tree site with a neighboring grass-dominated site. All field measurements were performed during the years 2013 and 2014. At each site, we continuously measured soil water tension and Θ up to 160 cm depth, and xylem sap flux of each of three oak trees per site in a 15 min-resolution. Furthermore, we measured soil hydraulic properties as pF-curve, saturated and unsaturated conductivity at all sites

  1. Seasonal transfer of oxygen isotopes from precipitation and soil to the tree ring: source water versus needle water enrichment.

    PubMed

    Treydte, Kerstin; Boda, Sonja; Graf Pannatier, Elisabeth; Fonti, Patrick; Frank, David; Ullrich, Bastian; Saurer, Matthias; Siegwolf, Rolf; Battipaglia, Giovanna; Werner, Willy; Gessler, Arthur

    2014-05-01

    For accurate interpretation of oxygen isotopes in tree rings (δ(18) O), it is necessary to disentangle the mechanisms underlying the variations in the tree's internal water cycle and to understand the transfer of source versus leaf water δ(18) O to phloem sugars and stem wood. We studied the seasonal transfer of oxygen isotopes from precipitation and soil water through the xylem, needles and phloem to the tree rings of Larix decidua at two alpine sites in the Lötschental (Switzerland). Weekly resolved δ(18) O records of precipitation, soil water, xylem and needle water, phloem organic matter and tree rings were developed. Week-to-week variations in needle-water (18) O enrichment were strongly controlled by weather conditions during the growing season. These short-term variations were, however, not significantly fingerprinted in tree-ring δ(18) O. Instead, seasonal trends in tree-ring δ(18) O predominantly mirrored trends in the source water, including recent precipitation and soil water pools. Modelling results support these findings: seasonal tree-ring δ(18) O variations are captured best when the week-to-week variations of the leaf water signal are suppressed. Our results suggest that climate signals in tree-ring δ(18) O variations should be strongest at temperate sites with humid conditions and precipitation maxima during the growing season.

  2. Soil water characteristics of two soil catenas in Illinois: Implications for irrigation

    SciTech Connect

    Schaetzl, R.J. ); Kirsch, S.W. ); Hendrie, L.K.

    1989-10-01

    Soil water was monitored by neutron scattering in six soils, three each within two drainage catenas in east-central Illinois, over a 15-month time span. The prairie soils have formed in: (1) 76-152 cm of silt loam, eolian sediments (loess) over glacial till (Catlin-Flanagan-Drummer catena), and (2) loess greater than 152 cm in thickness (Tama-Ipava-Sable catena). The authors characterized the water content of these soils over the total time span and for wet and dry climatic subsets, as an aid to potential irrigation decisions. Soils of the thin loess, C-F-D catena dried out to lower water contents and had greater soil water variability than did the thick loess soils. Under wet conditions, soil water contents in the two catenas were quite similar. Alleviation of surface and subsurface drying via irrigation would thus be more advantageous to yields on the C-F-D soils than on the T-I-S soils.

  3. Retrieving soil water contents from soil temperature measurements by using linear regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qin; Zhou, Binbin

    2003-11-01

    A simple linear regression method is developed to retrieve daily averaged soil water content from diurnal variations of soil temperature measured at three or more depths. The method is applied to Oklahoma Mesonet soil temperature data collected at the depths of 5, 10, and 30 cm during 11 20 June 1995. The retrieved bulk soil water contents are compared with direct measurements for one pair of nearly collocated Mesonet and ARM stations and also compared with the retrievals of a previous method at 14 enhanced Oklahoma Mesonet stations. The results show that the current method gives more persistent retrievals than the previous method. The method is also applied to Oklahoma Mesonet soil temperature data collected at the depths of 5, 25, 60, and 75 cm from the Norman site during 20 30 July 1998 and 1 31 July 2000. The retrieved soil water contents are verified by collocated soil water content measurements with rms differences smaller than the soil water observation error (0.05 m3 m-3). The retrievals are found to be moderately sensitive to random errors (±0.1 K) in the soil temperature observations and errors in the soil type specifications.

  4. Effect of soil water content on soil thermal conductivity under field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vico, G.; Daly, E.; Manzoni, S.; Porporato, A.

    2008-12-01

    Knowledge of the thermal properties of soils is required in many areas of engineering, meteorology, agronomy, and ecosystem and soil science. Soil thermal conductivity varies in time and space, since it is influenced by soil properties as well as soil temperature and moisture conditions. We use the one dimensional heat conduction equation in conjunction with two-year data measured in a grass-covered field in North Carolina Piedmont to estimate soil thermal conductivity and to investigate how it is impacted by water content. In agreement with laboratory experiments reported in the literature, our results suggest that under dry conditions soil thermal conductivity increases across a relatively narrow range of soil water contents, above which a further increase in water content does not significantly change thermal conductivity. However, when soil approaches saturation, heat transfer is further improved, a fact not previously noted. This nonlinear behavior is consistent with the formation at high water contents of a continuous film of liquid water in soil aggregates of mineral and organic matter.

  5. Volatilization of lindance from water in soil-free and flooded soil systems.

    PubMed

    Siddaramppa, R; Sethunathan, N

    1976-01-01

    Volatilization of 14C-lindane from water in planchets and under flooded soil ecosystem was investigated. Lindane disappeared faster than parathion from planchets. More rapid loss of both insecticides occurred from water than from chloroform. Loss of lindane and parathion was related to measured losses of water by evaporation. During 5-day incubation under flooded soil conditions, disappearance of lindane was faster from open vials than from sealed vials, whereas in nonflooded soil, no volatile loss of the insecticide was evident despite water evaporation. Over 5 day incubation under flooded conditions, greater volatile loss of lindane occurred in sandy soil than in alluvial soil apparanetly due to greater adsorption to the soil colloids decreasing the insecticide concentration in the standing water on the laterite soil. Under identical conditions of water evaporation, lindane loss was directly proportional to its initial concentration in the water. These results suggest that considerable loss of soil applied pesticides can occur by volatilization from the standing water in flooded rice fields, particularly under tropical conditions.

  6. Wood chip mulch thickness effects on soil water, soil temperature, weed growth, and landscape plant growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wood chip mulches are used in landscapes to reduce soil water evaporation and competition from weeds. A study was conducted over a three-year period to determine soil water content at various depths under four wood chip mulch treatments and to evaluate the effects of wood chip thickness on growth of...

  7. Assessing burn severity and comparing soil water repellency, Hayman Fire, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Sarah A.; Wu, Joan Q.; Robichaud, Peter R.

    2006-01-01

    An important element of evaluating a large wildfire is to assess its effects on the soil in order to predict the potential watershed response. After the 55 000 ha Hayman Fire on the Colorado Front Range, 24 soil and vegetation variables were measured to determine the key variables that could be used for a rapid field assessment of burn severity. The percentage of exposed mineral soil and litter cover proved to be the best predictors of burn severity in this environment. Two burn severity classifications, one from a statistical classification tree and the other a Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) burn severity map, were compared with measured ground truth burn severity at 183 plots and were 56% and 69% accurate, respectively.This study also compared water repellency measurements made with the water drop penetration time (WDPT) test and a mini-disk infiltrometer (MDI) test. At the soil surface, the moderate and highly burned sites had the strongest water repellency, yet were not significantly different from each other. Areas burned at moderate severity had 1.5 times more plots that were strongly water repellent at the surface than the areas burned at high severity. However, the high severity plots most likely had a deeper water repellent layer that was not detected with our surface tests. The WDPT and MDI values had an overall correlation of r = -0.64(p < 0.0001) and appeared to be compatible methods for assessing soil water repellency in the field. Both tests represent point measurements of a soil characteristic that has large spatial variability; hence, results from both tests reflect that variability, accounting for much of the remaining variance. The MDI is easier to use, takes about 1 min to assess a strongly water repellent soil and provides two indicators of water repellency: the time to start of infiltration and a relative infiltration rate.

  8. Fractal behavior of soil water storage at multiple depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wenjun; Lin, Mi; Biswas, Asim; Si, Bing C.; Chau, Henry W.; Cresswell, Hamish P.

    2016-08-01

    Spatiotemporal behavior of soil water is essential to understand the science of hydrodynamics. Data intensive measurement of surface soil water using remote sensing has established that the spatial variability of soil water can be described using the principle of self-similarity (scaling properties) or fractal theory. This information can be used in determining land management practices provided the surface scaling properties are kept at deep layers. The current study examined the scaling properties of sub-surface soil water and their relationship to surface soil water, thereby serving as supporting information for plant root and vadose zone models. Soil water storage (SWS) down to 1.4 m depth at seven equal intervals was measured along a transect of 576 m for 5 years in Saskatchewan. The surface SWS showed multifractal nature only during the wet period (from snowmelt until mid- to late June) indicating the need for multiple scaling indices in transferring soil water variability information over multiple scales. However, with increasing depth, the SWS became monofractal in nature indicating the need for a single scaling index to upscale/downscale soil water variability information. In contrast, all soil layers during the dry period (from late June to the end of the growing season in early November) were monofractal in nature, probably resulting from the high evapotranspirative demand of the growing vegetation that surpassed other effects. This strong similarity between the scaling properties at the surface layer and deep layers provides the possibility of inferring about the whole profile soil water dynamics using the scaling properties of the easy-to-measure surface SWS data.

  9. Citrus orchards management and soil water repellency in Eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdà, A.; González Peñaloza, F. A.; Jordán, A.; Zavala, L. M.

    2012-04-01

    Water repellent soils are found around the world, although originally was found on fire affected soil (DeBano, 1981). However, for decades, water repellency was found to be a rare soil property. One of the pioneer research that shown that water repellency was a common soil property is the Wander (1949) publication in Science. Wander researched the water repellency on citrus groves, and since then, no information is available about the water repellency on citrus plantations. The Mediterranean soils are prone to water repellency due to the summer dry conditions (Cerdà and Doerr, 2007). And Land Use and Land Management are key factors (Harper et al., 2000; Urbanek et al., 2007) to understand the water repellency behaviour of agriculture soils. Valencia region (Eastern Spain) is the largest exporter in the world and citrus plantations located in the alluvial plains and fluvial terraces are moving to alluvial fans and slopes where the surface wash is very active (Cerdà et al., 2009). This research aims to show the water repellency on citrus orchards located on the sloping terrain (< 15 % angle slope). Measurement were conducted in four experimental plots located in the Canyoles River watershed to assess the soil water repellency in citrus orchards under different managements: annual addition of plant residues and manure with no tilling and no fertilizer (MNT), annual addition of plant residues with no tillage (NT), application of conventional herbicides and no tilling (HNT) and conventional tillage in June (CT). The period for each type of management ranged from 2 and 27 (MNT), 1 and 25 (NT), 2 and 27 (HNT) and 3 and 29 years (CT). At each plot, a ten points were selected every 10 cm along inter-rows and water drop penetration time test (WDTP; DeBano, 1981) was performed. The results show that the MNT treatment induced slight water repellency in citrus-cropped soils compared to other treatments. Small but significant soil water repellency was observed under NT and HNT

  10. Rock fragments induce patchy distribution of soil water repellency in burned soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo-Rivero, Ángel; García-Moreno, Jorge; Bárcenas-Moreno, Gema; Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio T.; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Jordán, Antonio; Zavala, Lorena M.

    2013-04-01

    Forest fires are recurrent phenomena in the Mediterranean area and are one of the main causes of changes in the Mediterranean ecosystems, increasing the risk of soil erosion and desertification. Fire is an important agent which can induce important changes in the chemical and physical characteristics of soils. During wildfires, only a small part of the heat generated is transmitted to the first centimetres of the soil profile. The intensity of the changes produced in the physical and chemical characteristics of the soil depends on the temperatures reached at different soil depths, the time of residence of temperature peaks, and the stability of the different soil components. One of the soil physical properties strongly affected by fire is soil water repellency (WR). Depending on temperature, time of heating, type of soil and fuel, fire can induce, enhance or destroy soil WR. Soil WR is a key factor in controlling soil hydrology and water availability in burnt soils together with other factors as texture or aggregation. Although the occurrence and consequences of fire-induced soil WR have been deeply studied, some gaps still exist, as the influence of rock fragment cover during burning. During combustion of litter and aerial biomass, the soil surface under rock fragments is heated and reachs temperature peaks after a certain delay respect to exposed areas. In contrast, temperature peaks are longer, increasing the time of residence of high temperature. In consequence, rock fragments may change the expected spatial distribution of soil WR. Up to date, very scarce research concerns the effect of rock fragments at the soil surface on the fire-induced pattern of soil water repellency. METHODS Two experiments were carried out in this research. In the first case, an experiment was conducted in an experimental farm in Sevilla (southern Spain). The effect of a low severity prescribed fire was studied in soil plots under different rock fragment covers (0, 15, 30, 45 and 60

  11. Development of an Accurate Feed-Forward Temperature Control Tankless Water Heater

    SciTech Connect

    David Yuill

    2008-06-30

    The following document is the final report for DE-FC26-05NT42327: Development of an Accurate Feed-Forward Temperature Control Tankless Water Heater. This work was carried out under a cooperative agreement from the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, with additional funding from Keltech, Inc. The objective of the project was to improve the temperature control performance of an electric tankless water heater (TWH). The reason for doing this is to minimize or eliminate one of the barriers to wider adoption of the TWH. TWH use less energy than typical (storage) water heaters because of the elimination of standby losses, so wider adoption will lead to reduced energy consumption. The project was carried out by Building Solutions, Inc. (BSI), a small business based in Omaha, Nebraska. BSI partnered with Keltech, Inc., a manufacturer of electric tankless water heaters based in Delton, Michigan. Additional work was carried out by the University of Nebraska and Mike Coward. A background study revealed several advantages and disadvantages to TWH. Besides using less energy than storage heaters, TWH provide an endless supply of hot water, have a longer life, use less floor space, can be used at point-of-use, and are suitable as boosters to enable alternative water heating technologies, such as solar or heat-pump water heaters. Their disadvantages are their higher cost, large instantaneous power requirement, and poor temperature control. A test method was developed to quantify performance under a representative range of disturbances to flow rate and inlet temperature. A device capable of conducting this test was designed and built. Some heaters currently on the market were tested, and were found to perform quite poorly. A new controller was designed using model predictive control (MPC). This control method required an accurate dynamic model to be created and required significant tuning to the controller before good control was achieved. The MPC design

  12. Measuring Low Concentrations of Liquid Water in Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus has been developed for measuring the low concentrations of liquid water and ice in relatively dry soil samples. Designed as a prototype of instruments for measuring the liquidwater and ice contents of Lunar and Martian soils, the apparatus could also be applied similarly to terrestrial desert soils and sands. The apparatus is a special-purpose impedance spectrometer: Its design is based on the fact that the electrical behavior of a typical soil sample is well approximated by a network of resistors and capacitors in which resistances decrease and capacitances increase (and, hence, the magnitude of impedance decreases) with increasing water content.

  13. Phosphorus runoff from two water sources on a calcareous soil.

    PubMed

    Aase, J K; Bjorneberg, D L; Westermann, D T

    2001-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) in irrigation runoff may enrich offsite water bodies and streams and be influenced by irrigation water quality and antecedent soil surface conditions. Runoff, soil loss, and P fractions in runoff using reverse osmosis (RO) water or mixed RO and well water (RO/ Tap) were studied in a laboratory sprinkler study to evaluate water source effects on P transport. A top- or subsoil Portneuf silt loam (coarse-silty, mixed, superactive, mesic Durinodic Xeric Haplocalcid), either amended or not amended with manure and/or with cheese whey, with Olsen P from 20 to 141 mg kg(-1) and lime from 108 to 243 g kg(-1), was placed in 1.5 x 1.2 x 0.2-m-deep containers with 2.4% slope and irrigated three times from a 3-m height for 15 min, applying 20 mm of water. The first irrigation was on a dry loose surface, the second on a wet surface, and the third on a dry crusted surface. Surface (ca. 2 cm) soil samples, prior to the first irrigation, were analyzed for Olsen P, water-soluble P (Pws), and iron-oxide impregnated paper-extractable P (FeO-P) analyses. Following each irrigation we determined runoff, sediment, dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) in a 0.45-microm filtered sample, and FeO-P and total P in unfiltered samples. Soil surface conditions had no effect on P runoff relationships. Water source had no significant effect on the relationship between DRP or FeO-P runoff and soil test P, except for DRP in RO runoff versus water-soluble soil P (r2 = 0.90). Total P in RO runoff versus soil P were not related; but weakly correlated for RO/Tap (r2 < 0.50). Water source and soil surface conditions had little or no effect on P runoff from this calcareous soil.

  14. Evaluation of different field methods for measuring soil water infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla-Sentís, Ildefonso; Fonseca, Francisco

    2010-05-01

    Soil infiltrability, together with rainfall characteristics, is the most important hydrological parameter for the evaluation and diagnosis of the soil water balance and soil moisture regime. Those balances and regimes are the main regulating factors of the on site water supply to plants and other soil organisms and of other important processes like runoff, surface and mass erosion, drainage, etc, affecting sedimentation, flooding, soil and water pollution, water supply for different purposes (population, agriculture, industries, hydroelectricity), etc. Therefore the direct measurement of water infiltration rates or its indirect deduction from other soil characteristics or properties has become indispensable for the evaluation and modelling of the previously mentioned processes. Indirect deductions from other soil characteristics measured under laboratory conditions in the same soils, or in other soils, through the so called "pedo-transfer" functions, have demonstrated to be of limited value in most of the cases. Direct "in situ" field evaluations have to be preferred in any case. In this contribution we present the results of past experiences in the measurement of soil water infiltration rates in many different soils and land conditions, and their use for deducing soil water balances under variable climates. There are also presented and discussed recent results obtained in comparing different methods, using double and single ring infiltrometers, rainfall simulators, and disc permeameters, of different sizes, in soils with very contrasting surface and profile characteristics and conditions, including stony soils and very sloping lands. It is concluded that there are not methods universally applicable to any soil and land condition, and that in many cases the results are significantly influenced by the way we use a particular method or instrument, and by the alterations in the soil conditions by the land management, but also due to the manipulation of the surface

  15. The effect of soil: water ratios on the mineralisation of phenanthrene: LNAPL mixtures in soil.

    PubMed

    Doick, Kieron J; Semple, Kirk T

    2003-03-14

    Contamination of soil by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is frequently associated with non-aqueous-phase liquids. Measurement of the catabolic potential of a soil or determination of the biodegradable fraction of a contaminant can be done using a slurried soil respirometric system. This work assessed the impact of increasing the concentration of transformer oil and soil:water ratio on the microbial catabolism of [(14)C]phenanthrene to (14)CO(2) by a phenanthrene-degrading inoculum. Slurrying (1:1, 1:2, 1:3 and 1:5 soil:water ratios) consistently resulted in statistically higher rates and extents of mineralisation than the non-slurried system (2:1 soil:water ratio; P<0.01). The maximum extents of mineralisation observed occurred in the 1:2-1:5 soil:water ratio microcosms irrespective of transformer oil concentration. Transformer oil concentrations investigated displayed no statistically significant effect on total mineralisation (P>0.05). Soil slurries 1:2 or greater, but less than 1:5 (soil:water), are recommended for bioassay determinations of total contaminant bioavailability due to greater overall mineralisation and improved reproducibility.

  16. Distinct Soil Microbial Communities in habitats of differing soil water balance on the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuntao; Adams, Jonathan; Shi, Yu; Wang, Hao; He, Jin-Sheng; Chu, Haiyan

    2017-04-12

    Global change may be a severe threat to natural and agricultural systems, partly through its effects in altering soil biota and processes, due to changes in water balance. We studied the potential influence of changing soil water balance on soil biota by comparing existing sites along a natural water balance gradient in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. In this study, the community structure of bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes differed between the different soil water conditions. Soil moisture was the strongest predictor of bacterial and eukaryotic community structure, whereas C/N ratio was the key factor predicting variation in the archaeal community. Bacterial and eukaryotic diversity was quite stable among different soil water availability, but archaeal diversity was dramatically different between the habitats. The auxotype of methanogens also varied significantly among different habitats. The co-varying soil properties among habitats shaped the community structure of soil microbes, with archaea being particularly sensitive in terms of community composition, diversity and functional groups. Bacterial and archaeal phylogenetic community turnover was mainly driven by deterministic processes while stochastic processes had stronger effects on eukaryotic phylogenetic community turnover. Our work provides insight into microbial community, functional group and phylogenetic turnover under different soil conditions in low-latitude alpine ecosystem.

  17. The role of Soil Water Retention Curve in slope stability analysis in unsaturated and heterogeneous soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antinoro, Chiara; Arnone, Elisa; Noto, Leonardo V.

    2015-04-01

    The mechanisms of rainwater infiltration causing slope instability had been analyzed and reviewed in many scientific works. Rainwater infiltration into unsaturated soil increases the degree of saturation, hence affecting the shear strength properties and thus the probability of slope failure. It has been widely proved that the shear strength properties change with the soil water suction in unsaturated soils; therefore, the accuracy to predict the relationship between soil water content and soil water suction, parameterized by the soil-water characteristic curve, has significant effects on the slope stability analysis. The aim of this study is to investigate how the characterization of SWRC of differently structured unsaturated soils affects the slope stability on a simple infinite slope. In particular, the unimodal and bimodal distributions of the soil pore size were compared. Samples of 40 soils, highly different in terms of structure and texture, were collected and used to calibrate two bimodal SWRCs, i.e. Ross and Smettem (1993) and Dexter et al., (2008). The traditional unimodal van Genuchten (1980) model was also applied for comparison. Slope stability analysis was conducted in terms of Factor of Safety (FS) by applying the infinite slope model for unsaturated soils. In the used formulation, the contribution of the suction effect is tuned by a parameter 'chi' in a rate proportional to the saturation conditions. Different parameterizations of this term were also compared and analyzed. Results indicated that all three SWRC models showed good overall performance in fitting the sperimental SWRCs. Both the RS and DE models described adequately the water retention data for soils with a bimodal behavior confirmed from the analysis of pore size distribution, but the best performance was obtained by DE model confirmed. In terms of FS, the tree models showed very similar results as soil moisture approached to the saturated condition; however, within the residual zone

  18. [Effects of soil texture and water content on the mineralization of soil organic carbon in paddy soils].

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhong-lin; Wu, Jin-shui; Ge, Ti-da; Tang, Guo-yong; Tong, Cheng-li

    2009-01-01

    To understand how soil texture and water content affect the mineralization of organic C in paddy soil, 3 selected soils (sandy loam, clay loam, and silty clay) were incubated (25 degrees C) with 14 C-labelled rice straw (1.0 g x kg(-1)) at water content varied from 45% to 105% of water holding capacity (WHC). Data indicated that, in the sandy loam and clay loam, the mineralization rate of 14 C-labelled rice straw reached the maximum at 75% WHC, as 53% and 58% of the straw C mineralized in the incubation period of 160 d, whereas in the silty clay, it increased gradually (from 41.8% to 49.0%) as water content increased up to 105% WHC. For all of the three soils, the mineralization rate of soil native organic C reached the maximum at 75% WHC, with 5.8% of the organic C mineralized in the same period for the sandy loam, and 8.0% and 4.8% for the clay loam and silty clay, respectively. As water content increased further, the mineralization rate of native organic C in the three soils significantly declined. The mineralization rate of added rice straw and native organic C in all the three soils, was well fitted with a conic curve. These results suggest that water-logging can decrease the mineralization of organic C in paddy soils.

  19. Water repellent soils as they occur on UK golf greens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    York, C. A.; Canaway, P. M.

    2000-05-01

    Water repellent soils have been identified as a major problem in the management of golf greens in the UK for over 60 years. The cause of this problem has provoked much speculation, but prior to this work, no research into the possible cause of water repellent soils in the UK had been completed. One of the commonly believed links with water repellent soils on UK golf greens was the activity of basidiomycete fungi. This was proposed as a possible causal factor because the symptoms expressed on the turf above affected soils, were similar in many instances to those symptoms expressed by the activity of superficial fairy rings. Since it was impractical to study superficial fairy rings, it was decided to observe other basidiomycete fairy rings (Type 1 fairy rings) to see if any water-repellence could be identified as being associated with them. Three of these rings, caused by the fungus Marasmius oreades (Bolt ex. Fr) Fr., were studied on each of the two different sites. Soil samples were removed at intervals from the centre of the rings, across the obvious symptoms of the rings (i.e. the zone of dead grass bordered on both sides by a zone of stimulated grass growth) and beyond, into the uncolonised soil. These samples were taken to the laboratory, allowed to air dry and were then tested to determine relative levels of water repellence. It was found that on the 'outside' of the fairy rings where the fungus had not yet colonised, the soils were less water repellent than they were in the other zones of the rings (i.e. the dead zone and the inner zone). In the region of the dead zone of these fairy rings, the soil was very water repellent. This may have been expected because the fungus was present in this area in large quantities and the fungus itself repels water. However, of particular interest, were the results from the inner part of the ring where the fungus had been present in the past, but where it no longer colonised the soil. In these soil samples, the rootzone soil

  20. A comparison of two models for simulating the water balance of soil covers under semi-arid conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chammas, G.A.; Geddis, M.; McCaulou, D.R.

    1999-07-01

    Numerical water-balance modeling of store-and-release soil covers for hypothetical mine tailings was conducted using the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) and SoilCover models. The objective of the modeling was to compare the utility of both models in a semi-arid environment. Although values for input parameters were chosen to make simulations as identical as possible between models, differences in model solution methods and discretization led to different water-balance predictions. Specifically, SoilCover predicted less percolation than HELP, because HELP uses simplified water-routing algorithms which may over predict infiltration and under predict subsequent evapotranspiration. Since SoilCover explicitly solves physically based governing equations for heat and water flow, its predictions more accurately represent the water balance in semi-arid regions where evapotranspiration dominates, HELP can only conservatively predict percolation in dry environments.

  1. Linking fractional wettability and contact angle dynamics in water repellent soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beatty, Sarah; Smith, James

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic soil water repellency has become a highly documented soil phenomenon across a range of environmental conditions and investigated within a range of disciplines. With global climate change at the environmental science fore, there is growing concern and need for accurate quantification of fundamental soil hydraulic properties and model parameterization. In the presence of soil water repellency, however, substantial unknowns remain in terms of characterizing repellency and drawing linkages to fundamental hydraulic parameters. This is often related to the complexity of investigating soil water repellency, which is often a challenging environment because of its spatially and temporally variable nature. To help bridge this gap, this work reports on different approaches using various technologies to explore opportunities that yield greater quantification and parametrization of soil water repellency in natural hydrologic systems at different scales. These approaches include X-ray microtomography (μXCT), Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis (ADSA), Drop Penetration tests (MED/WDPT), and Tension Infiltrometry. This work has shown the strength of conceptually linking contact angle dynamics and fractional wettability as a means to understand the nature of infiltration in water repellent soils and provide a mechanistic foundation upon which repellency can be quantified and related to fundamental hydraulic properties. Contact angle dynamics and fractional wettability are complimentary terminology that appear in the multiphase flow and soil physics literature, but have largely/essentially only been applied in synthetic systems. Their utility in natural environments is potentially significant and conceptually useful since they can readily incorporate existing characterizations while providing greater opportunity for articulating and defining specific behaviours in systems with high spatial and temporal heterogeneity.

  2. Formation of Soil Water Repellency by Laboratory Burning and Its Effect on Soil Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sujung; Im, Sangjun

    2010-05-01

    Fire-induced soil water repellency can vary with burning conditions, and may lead to significant changes in soil hydraulic properties. However, isolation of the effects of soil water repellency from other factors is difficult, particularly under field conditions. This study was conducted to (i) investigate the effects of burning using different plant leaf materials and (ii) of different burning conditions on the formation of soil water repellency, and (iii) isolate the effects of the resulting soil water repellency on soil evaporation from other factors. Burning treatments were performed on the surface of homogeneous fully wettable sand soil contained in a steel frame (60 x 60 cm; 40 cm depth). As controls a sample without a heat treatment, and a heated sample without fuel, were also used. Ignition and heat treatments were carried out with a gas torch. For comparing the effects of different burning conditions, fuel types included oven-dried pine needles (fresh needles of Pinus densiflora), pine needle litter (litter on a coniferous forest floor, P. densiflora + P. rigida), and broad-leaf litter (Quercus mongolica + Q. aliena + Prunus serrulata var. spontanea + other species); fuel loads were 200 g, 300 g, and 500 g; and heating duration was 40 s, 90 s and 180 s. The heating duration was adjusted to control the temperature, based on previous experiments. The temperature was measured continuously at 3-second intervals and logged with two thermometers. After burning, undisturbed soil columns were sampled for subsequent experiments. Water Drop Penetration Time (WDPT) test was performed at every 1 mm depth of the soil columns to measure the severity of soil water repellency and its vertical extent. Soil water repellency was detected following all treatments. As the duration of heating increased, the thickness of the water repellent layer increased, whilst the severity of soil water repellency decreased. As regards fuel amount, the most severe soil water repellency was

  3. Numerical and Experimental Quantification of coupled water and water vapor fluxes in very dry soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madi, Raneem; de Rooij, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions with deep groundwater and very dry soils, vapor movement in the vadose zone may be a major component in the total water flux. Therefore, the coupled movement of liquid water, water vapor and heat transport in the unsaturated zone should be explicitly considered to quantify subsurface water fluxes in such regions. Only few studies focused on the importance of vapor water diffusion in dry soils and in many water flow studies in soil it was neglected. We are interested in the importance of water vapor diffusion and condensation in very dry sand. A version of Hydrus-1D capable of solving the coupled water vapor and heat transport equations will be used to do the numerical modeling. The soil hydraulic properties will be experimentally determined. A soil column experiment was developed with negligible liquid flow in order to isolate vapor flux for testing. We have used different values of initial water contents trying to generate different scenarios to assess the role of the water vapor transport in arid and semi-arid soils and how it changes the soil water content using different soil hydraulic parametrization functions. In the session a preliminary experimental and modelling results of vapor and water fluxes will be presented.

  4. Performance of chromatographic systems to model soil-water sorption.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Rodríguez, Marta; Fuguet, Elisabet; Ràfols, Clara; Rosés, Martí

    2012-08-24

    A systematic approach for evaluating the goodness of chromatographic systems to model the sorption of neutral organic compounds by soil from water is presented in this work. It is based on the examination of the three sources of error that determine the overall variance obtained when soil-water partition coefficients are correlated against chromatographic retention factors: the variance of the soil-water sorption data, the variance of the chromatographic data, and the variance attributed to the dissimilarity between the two systems. These contributions of variance are easily predicted through the characterization of the systems by the solvation parameter model. According to this method, several chromatographic systems besides the reference octanol-water partition system have been selected to test their performance in the emulation of soil-water sorption. The results from the experimental correlations agree with the predicted variances. The high-performance liquid chromatography system based on an immobilized artificial membrane and the micellar electrokinetic chromatography systems of sodium dodecylsulfate and sodium taurocholate provide the most precise correlation models. They have shown to predict well soil-water sorption coefficients of several tested herbicides. Octanol-water partitions and high-performance liquid chromatography measurements using C18 columns are less suited for the estimation of soil-water partition coefficients.

  5. Field-measured, hourly soil water evaporation stages in relation to reference evapotranspiration rate and soil to air temperature ratio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water evaporation takes critical water supplies away from crops, especially in areas where both rainfall and irrigation water are limited. This study measured bare soil water evaporation from clay loam, silt loam, sandy loam, and fine sand soils. It found that on average almost half of the ir...

  6. Integrating water by plant roots over spatially distributed soil salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homaee, Mehdi; Schmidhalter, Urs

    2010-05-01

    In numerical simulation models dealing with water movement and solute transport in vadose zone, the water budget largely depends on uptake patterns by plant roots. In real field conditions, the uptake pattern largely changes in time and space. When dealing with soil and water salinity, most saline soils demonstrate spatially distributed osmotic head over the root zone. In order to quantify such processes, the major difficulty stems from lacking a sink term function that adequately accounts for the extraction term especially under variable soil water osmotic heads. The question of how plants integrate such space variable over its rooting depth remains as interesting issue for investigators. To move one step forward towards countering this concern, a well equipped experiment was conducted under heterogeneously distributed salinity over the root zone with alfalfa. The extraction rates of soil increments were calculated with the one dimensional form of Richards equation. The results indicated that the plant uptake rate under different mean soil salinities preliminary reacts to soil salinity, whereas at given water content and salinity the "evaporative demand" and "root activity" become more important to control the uptake patterns. Further analysis revealed that root activity is inconstant when imposed to variable soil salinity. It can be concluded that under heterogeneously distributed salinity, most water is taken from the less saline increment while the extraction from other root zone increments with higher salinities never stops.

  7. Investigating Unstable Water Infiltration into Alcohol Contaminated Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, H. C.; Smith, J. E.; Henry, E. J.; Brodsky, Y.

    2009-05-01

    A new mechanism causing highly focused, unstable flow exists in soils contaminated with alcohols due to their surface-activity. For example, surface-active compounds can significantly decrease the interfacial tension of the air-water interface and change the pressure-head of the soil water; directly affecting water flow and solute transport in the vadose zone. This study evaluated the fundamental effects of surface-active alcohols on water infiltration into contaminated soils under controlled laboratory conditions. A small scale 3-D glass flow cell and a mini disk tension infiltrometer were used to monitor the rates and physical characteristics of water infiltration from a constant head point source into sands of various textures contaminated with a butanol solution. The results confirmed that water infiltration into these soils is fundamentally and substantially different than the current understanding of infiltration patterns, including previously described mechanisms of wetting front instability. In butanol-contaminated soils, the wetting fronts exhibited highly focused flow with smaller wetted soil volumes, deeper penetration and substantially higher infiltration rates. In addition, the extent of fingered focused flow was confirmed to be texturally dependent, decreasing with grain size and dependent on the constant head boundary. This study characterized a new mechanism of focused, unstable flow with significant implications for groundwater management and solute transport in alcohol contaminated soils.

  8. Soil Water Retention as Indicator for Soil Physical Quality - Examples from Two SoilTrEC European Critical Zone Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseva, Svetla; Kercheva, Milena; Shishkov, Toma; Dimitrov, Emil; Nenov, Martin; Lair, Georg J.; Moraetis, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Soil water retention is of primary importance for majority of soil functions. The characteristics derived from Soil Water Retention Curve (SWRC) are directly related to soil structure and soil water regime and can be used as indicators for soil physical quality. The aim of this study is to present some parameters and relationships based on the SWRC data from the soil profiles characterising the European SoilTrEC Critical Zone Observatories Fuchsenbigl and Koiliaris. The studied soils are representative for highly productive soils managed as arable land in the frame of soil formation chronosequence at "Marchfeld" (Fuchsenbigl CZO), Austria and heavily impacted soils during centuries through intensive grazing and farming, under severe risk of desertification in context of climatic and lithological gradient at Koiliaris, Crete, Greece. Soil water retention at pF ≤ 2.52 was determined using the undisturbed soil cores (100 cm3 and 50 cm3) by a suction plate method. Water retention at pF = 4.2 was determined by a membrane press method and at pF ≥ 5.6 - by adsorption of water vapour at controlled relative humidity, both using ground soil samples. The soil physical quality parameter (S-parameter) was defined as the slope of the water retention curve at its inflection point (Dexter, 2006), determined with the obtained parameters of van Genuhten (1980) water retention equation. The S-parameter values were categorised to assess soil physical quality as follows: S < 0.020 very poor, 0.020 ≤ S < 0.035 poor, 0.035 ≤ S < 0.050 good, S ≥ 0.050 very good (Dexter, 2004). The results showed that most of the studied topsoil horizons have good physical quality according to both the S-parameter and the Plant-Available Water content (PAW), with the exception of the soils from croplands at CZO Fuxenbigl (F4, F5) which are with poor soil structure. The link between the S-parameter and the indicator of soil structure stability (water stable soil aggregates with size 1-3 mm) is not

  9. [Characteristics of water infiltration in urban soils of Nanjing City].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin-Ling; Zhang, Gan-Lin; Yuan, Da-Gang

    2008-02-01

    By using dual-ring method, this paper measured the water infiltration rate in urban soils under representative land use patterns in Nanjing City, and studied the characteristics of water infiltration in the soils with different compaction degree. The results showed that there was a great difference in the infiltration rate among the soils with different compactness. Soil infiltration rate decreased with increasing bulk density and decreasing porosity, and the water-transport-limiting layer existed in heavily compacted soils resulted in a dramatic decrease of final stabilized infiltration rate. There was a significant linear relationship between the initial and final infiltration rates in the same soil though their absolute values had a great difference. The urban soils in Nanjing City had a wide range of final infiltration rate varied from 1 mm X h(-1) to 679 mm X h(-1), which was highly related to the soil compactness, structural status, and skeleton grain contents. The decrease of urban soil infiltration rate could induce the increase of runoff and of the probability and intensity of flooding.

  10. The chemistry of salt-affected soils and waters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of the chemistry of salt affected soils and waters is necessary for management of irrigation in arid and semi-arid regions. In this chapter we review the origin of salts in the landscape, the major chemical reactions necessary for prediction of the soil solution composition, and the use of...

  11. Measurement of soil water content with dielectric dispersion frequency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Frequency domain reflectometry (FDR) is an inexpensive and attractive methodology for repeated measurements of soil water content (SWC). Although there are some known measurement limitations for dry soil and sand, a fixed-frequency method is commonly employed using commercially available FDR probes....

  12. A review on temporal stability of soil water contents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temporal stability of soil water content (TS SWC) has been observed across a wide range of soil types, landscapes, climates and scales. A better understanding of TS SWC controls and their interactions needs to be developed. The objective of this work is to develop a comprehensive inventory of publis...

  13. Augmenting soil water storage using uncharred switchgrass and pyrolyzed biochars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biochar is an amendment that can augment soil water storage; however, its projected cost per ton could be financially limiting at field application scales. It may be more monetarily convenient if an alternate amendment were available that could deliver similar soil enhancements. We compared two swi...

  14. Occurrence of soil water repellency in arid and humid climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, D. F.; Dekker, L. W.; Ritsema, C. J.; Hendrickx, J. M. H.

    2000-05-01

    Soil water repellency generally tends to increase during dry weather while it decreases or completely vanishes after heavy precipitation or during extended periods with high soil water contents. These observations lead to the hypothesis that soil water repellency is common in dry climates and rare in humid climates. The study objective is to test this hypothesis by examining the occurrence of soil water repellency in an arid and humid climate. The main conclusion of this study is that the effect of climate on soil water repellency is very limited. Field observations in the arid Middle Rio Grande Basin in New Mexico (USA) and the humid Piedras Blancas Watershed in Colombia show that the main impact of climate seems to be in which manner it affects the production of organic matter. An extremely dry climate will result in low organic matter production rates and, therefore, less potential for the development of soil water repellency. On the other hand, a very humid climate is favorable for organic matter production and, therefore, for the development of water repellency.

  15. The estimation of soil water fluxes using lysimeter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegehenkel, M.

    2009-04-01

    The validation of soil water balance models regarding soil water fluxes in the field is still a problem. This requires time series of measured model outputs. In our study, a soil water balance model was validated using lysimeter time series of measured model outputs. The soil water balance model used in our study was the Hydrus-1D-model. This model was tested by a comparison of simulated with measured daily rates of actual evapotranspiration, soil water storage, groundwater recharge and capillary rise. These rates were obtained from twelve weighable lysimeters with three different soils and two different lower boundary conditions for the time period from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 1998. In that period, grass vegetation was grown on all lysimeters. These lysimeters are located in Berlin, Germany. One potential source of error in lysimeter experiments is preferential flow caused by an artificial channeling of water due to the occurrence of air space between the soil monolith and the inside wall of the lysimeters. To analyse such sources of errors, Hydrus-1D was applied with different modelling procedures. The first procedure consists of a general uncalibrated appli-cation of Hydrus-1D. The second one includes a calibration of soil hydraulic parameters via inverse modelling of different percolation events with Hydrus-1D. In the third procedure, the model DUALP_1D was applied with the optimized hydraulic parameter set to test the hy-pothesis of the existence of preferential flow paths in the lysimeters. The results of the different modelling procedures indicated that, in addition to a precise determination of the soil water retention functions, vegetation parameters such as rooting depth should also be taken into account. Without such information, the rooting depth is a calibration parameter. However, in some cases, the uncalibrated application of both models also led to an acceptable fit between measured and simulated model outputs.

  16. Reductive Dehalogenation of Organic Contaminants in Soils and Ground Water

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Reductive dehalogenation is a process which may prove to be of paramount importance in dealing with a particularly persistent class of contaminants often found in soil and ground water at superfund sites.

  17. Studies of soil-water transport by MRI.

    PubMed

    Amin, M H; Richards, K S; Chorley, R J; Gibbs, S J; Carpenter, T A; Hall, L D

    1996-01-01

    Sequential spin-echo spin-warp MRI pulse sequences have been used to study soil-water transport processes including infiltration, redistribution, and drainage of water in soil columns. Those images provide a means for monitoring and quantifying spatial and temporal changes of soil-water distributions and the movement of wetting fronts. In addition, temporal-geometric changes of unstable wetting fronts during water redistribution were estimated from 2D images and the temporal development of the longest length of finger was described by a fractal relation t approximately L1.38. Bulk dispersion-time-dependent displacement and velocity spectra, as well as 2D maps of flow velocities and dispersion coefficients in soil macropores during saturated steady-state flow, were reconstructed from data obtained using the alternating-pulsed-field-gradient (APFG) pulse sequences.

  18. Soil water samplers in ion balance studies on acidic forest soils

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, L.; Joergensen, P.; Kruse, S.

    1986-04-01

    During the last years an increasing consciousness has appeared of the injurious effects of acid rain on the forest ecosystems both in Europe and North America. At several localities ion balance studies have been implemented in order to evaluate the impact of the atmospheric deposition of acidic substances and heavy metals on the forest ecosystem. In many localities the leaching of material to the ground water or output from the ecosystem has to be determined by means of tensiometer measurements and soil water sampling. Many different soil water samplers are available on the market and they show useful applicability under the given circumstances. But in many cases soil water samples taken with different equipment give incommensurable results leading to differing explanations of the effects of acid precipitation on elements and their cycling in the ecosystem. The purpose of the present study is twofold. Firstly, the sorption characteristics of different types of soil water samplers are examined under acidic soil conditions both by installation in the field and by laboratory experiments. Secondly, a new method is introduced for current and constant soil water sampling under varying soil suctions in the unsaturated zone.

  19. Soil Surface Structure: A key factor for the degree of soil water repellency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, S.; Doerr, S. H.; Douglas, P.; Bryant, R.; Hamlett, C.; McHale, G.; Newton, M.; Shirtcliffe, N.

    2012-04-01

    Despite of considerable efforts, the degree of water repellency has not always been fully explained by chemical property of soil (termed hydrophobicity). That might be because the structure of a soil surface was not considered properly, which is another main factor determining the severity of soil water repellency. Surface structure has only recently been considered in soil science, whilst it has been paid attention for several decades in materials science due to its relevance to industrial applications. In this contribution, comparison of critical contact angles measured on different surface structures (made with glass beads, glass shards and beach sands) is presented and the effect of surface structure on manifestation of soil water repellency is discussed in terms of several different variables such as the individual particles shape, and areal and structural factors of the actual surface.

  20. Quasi 3D modelling of water flow in the sandy soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, Meisam; Seuntjens, Piet; Joris, Ingeborg; Boënne, Wesley; De Pue, Jan; Cornelis, Wim

    2016-04-01

    parameters showed that changes in soil water content are mainly affected by the soil saturated hydraulic conductivity Ks in a two-layered soil. Results demonstrated the large spatial variability of Ks (CV = 86.21%). A significant negative correlation was found between ln Ks and ECa (r = 0.83; P≤0.01). This site-specific relation between ln Ks and ECa was used to predict Ks for the whole field after validation using an independent dataset of measured Ks. Result showed that this approach can accurately determine the field scale irrigation requirements, taking into account variations in boundary conditions and spatial variations of model parameters across the field. We found that uniform distribution of water using standard gun sprinkler irrigation is not an efficient approach since at locations with shallow groundwater, the amount of water applied will be excessive as compared to the crop requirements, while in locations with a deeper groundwater table, the crop irrigation requirements will not be met during crop water stress. Numerical results showed that optimal irrigation scheduling using the aforementioned water stress calculations can save up to ~25% irrigation water as compared to the current irrigation regime. This resulted in a yield increase of ~7%, simulated by the crop growth model.

  1. Soil Management Plan For The Potable Water System Upgrades Project

    SciTech Connect

    Field, S. M.

    2007-04-01

    This plan describes and applies to the handling and management of soils excavated in support of the Y-12 Potable Water Systems Upgrades (PWSU) Project. The plan is specific to the PWSU Project and is intended as a working document that provides guidance consistent with the 'Soil Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex' (Y/SUB/92-28B99923C-Y05) and the 'Record of Decision for Phase II Interim Remedial Actions for Contaminated Soils and Scrapyard in Upper East Fork Popular Creek, Oak Ridge, Tennessee' (DOE/OR/01-2229&D2). The purpose of this plan is to prevent and/or limit the spread of contamination when moving soil within the Y-12 complex. The major feature of the soil management plan is the decision tree. The intent of the decision tree is to provide step-by-step guidance for the handling and management of soil from excavation of soil through final disposition. The decision tree provides a framework of decisions and actions to facilitate Y-12 or subcontractor decisions on the reuse of excavated soil on site and whether excavated soil can be reused on site or managed as waste. Soil characterization results from soil sampling in support of the project are also presented.

  2. The Role of Vegetation Dynamics on the Soil Water Balance in Water-Limited Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montaldo, N.; Rondena, R.; Albertson, J. D.; Mancini, M.

    2003-12-01

    The structure and function of the vegetation regulates the exchange of mass, energy and momentum across the biosphere-atmosphere interface. Vegetation dynamics are usually neglected, other than seasonal phenology, in land surface models (LSMs). However, changes in vegetation densities, influencing the partitioning of incoming solar energy into sensible and latent heat fluxes, can result in long-term changes in both local and global climates (e.g., precipitation and temperature), which in turn will feedback to affect the vegetation growth. In semi-arid regions, this may result in persistent drought and desertification, with substantial impacts on the human populations of these regions through reduction in agricultural productivity and reduction in quantity and quality of water supply. With an objective of finding a simple vegetation model able to accurately simulate the leaf area index (LAI) dynamics, vegetation models of different level of complexity (e.g., including or not the modeling of the root biomass or the modeling of the dead biomass) are developed and compared. The vegetation dynamics models are coupled to a LSM, with the vegetation models providing the green biomass and the LAI evolution through time, and the LSM using this information in the computation of the land surface fluxes and updating the soil water content in the root-zone. We explore the models on a case study of a water limited grass field in California. Results show that a simple vegetation model that simulates the living aboveground green biomass (i.e., with low parameterization and computational efforts) is able to accurately simulate the LAI. Results also highlight the importance of including the plant growth model in the LSM when studying the climate-soil-vegetation interactions and the impact of watershed management practices on the scarce water resources over moderate to long time scales. The inclusion of the vegetation model in the LSM is demonstrated to be essential for assessing the

  3. Simultaneous measurement of unfrozen water content and ice content in frozen soil using gamma ray attenuation and TDR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaohai; Zhou, Jian; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang; Stauffer, Fritz

    2014-12-01

    The freezing temperature of water in soil is not constant but varies over a range determined by soil texture. Consequently, the amounts of unfrozen water and ice change with temperature in frozen soil, which in turn affects hydraulic, thermal, and mechanical properties of frozen soil. In this paper, an Am-241 gamma ray source and time-domain reflectometry (TDR) were combined to measure unfrozen water content and ice content in frozen soil simultaneously. The gamma ray attenuation was used to determine total water content. The TDR was used to determine the dielectric constant of the frozen soil. Based on a four-phase mixing model, the amount of unfrozen water content in the frozen soil could be determined. The ice content was inferred by the difference between total water content and unfrozen water content. The gamma ray attenuation and the TDR were both calibrated by a gravimetric method. Water contents measured by gamma ray attenuation and TDR in an unfrozen silt column under infiltration were compared and showed that the two methods have the same accuracy and response to changes of water content. Unidirectional column freezing experiments were performed to apply the combined method of gamma ray attenuation and TDR for measuring unfrozen water content and ice content. The measurement error of the gamma ray attenuation and TDR was around 0.02 and 0.01 m3/m3, respectively. The overestimation of unfrozen water in frozen soil by TDR alone was quantified and found to depend on the amount of ice content. The higher the ice content, the larger the overestimation. The study confirmed that the combined method could accurately determine unfrozen water content and ice content in frozen soil. The results of soil column freezing experiments indicate that total water content distribution is affected by available pore space and the freezing front advance rate. It was found that there is similarity between the soil water characteristic and the soil freezing characteristic of

  4. Causes and consequences of fire-induced soil water repellency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letey, J.

    2001-10-01

    A wettable surface layer overlying a water-repellent layer is commonly observed following a fire on a watershed. High surface temperatures burn off organic materials and create vapours that move downward in response to a temperature gradient and then condense on soil particles causing them to become water repellent. Water-repellent soils have a positive water entry pressure hp that must be exceeded or all the water will runoff. Water ponding depths ho that exceeds hp will cause infiltration, but the profile is not completely wetted. Infiltration rate and soil wetting increase as the value of ho/hp increases. The consequence is very high runoff, which also contributes to high erosion on fire-induced water-repellent soils during rain storms. Grass establishment is impaired by seeds being eroded and lack of soil water for seeds that do remain and germinate. Extrapolation of these general findings to catchment or watershed scales is difficult because of the very high temporal and spatial variabilities that occur in the field.

  5. Measurement and modeling of soil-water dynamics and evapotranspiration of drained peatland soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural peat soils serve as important sinks for nutrients, organic components, and water. Peat soils can pose major environmental problems when they are drained for agricultural production, which may change their role in the landscape from a sink to a source. To successfully restore and conserve pea...

  6. Soil permittivity response to bulk electrical conductivity for selected soil water sensors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bulk electrical conductivity can dominate the low frequency dielectric loss spectrum in soils, masking changes in the real permittivity and causing errors in estimated water content. We examined the dependence of measured apparent permittivity (Ka) on bulk electrical conductivity in contrasting soil...

  7. Improving soil moisture simulation to support Agricultural Water Resource Management using Satellite-based water cycle observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Manika; Bolten, John; Lakshmi, Venkat

    2016-04-01

    Efficient and sustainable irrigation systems require optimization of operational parameters such as irrigation amount which are dependent on the soil hydraulic parameters that affect the model's accuracy in simulating soil water content. However, it is a scientific challenge to provide reliable estimates of soil hydraulic parameters and irrigation estimates, given the absence of continuously operating soil moisture and rain gauge network. For agricultural water resource management, the in-situ measurements of soil moisture are currently limited to discrete measurements at specific locations, and such point-based measurements do not represent the spatial distribution at a larger scale accurately, as soil moisture is highly variable both spatially and temporally (Wang and Qu 2009). In the current study, flood irrigation scheme within the land surface model is triggered when the root-zone soil moisture deficit reaches below a threshold of 25%, 50% and 75% with respect to the maximum available water capacity (difference between field capacity and wilting point) and applied until the top layer is saturated. An additional important criterion needed to activate the irrigation scheme is to ensure that it is irrigation season by assuming that the greenness vegetation fraction (GVF) of the pixel exceed 0.40 of the climatological annual range of GVF (Ozdogan et al. 2010). The main hypothesis used in this study is that near-surface remote sensing soil moisture data contain useful information that can describe the effective hydrological conditions of the basin such that when appropriately inverted, it would provide field capacity and wilting point soil moisture, which may be representative of that basin. Thus, genetic algorithm inverse method is employed to derive the effective parameters and derive the soil moisture deficit for the root zone by coupling of AMSR-E soil moisture with the physically based hydrological model. Model performance is evaluated using MODIS

  8. Soil water content plays an important role in soil-atmosphere exchange of carbonyl sulfide (OCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zhigang; Behrendt, Thomas; Bunk, Rüdiger; Wu, Dianming; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is a quite stable gas in the troposphere and is transported up to the stratosphere, where it contributes to the sulfate aerosol layer (Crutzen 1976). The tropospheric concentration seems to be quite constant, indicating a balance between sinks and sources. Recent work by Sandoval-Soto et al. (2005) demonstrated the enormous strength of the vegetation sink and the urgent needs to understand the sinks and sources. The role of soils is a matter of discussion (Kesselmeier et al., 1999; Van Diest and Kesselmeier, 2008; Maseyk et al., 2014; Whelan et al., 2015). To better understand the influence of soil water content and OCS mixing ratio on OCS fluxes, we used an OCS analyzer (LGR COS/CO Analyzer 907-0028, Los Gatos, CA, USA) coupled with automated soil chamber system (Behrendt et al., 2014) to measure the OCS fluxes with a slow drying of four different types of soil (arable wheat soil in Mainz, blueberry soil in Waldstein, spruce soil in Waldstein and needle forest soil in Finland). Results showed that OCS fluxes as well as the optimum soil water content for OCS uptake varied significantly for different soils. The net production rates changed significantly with the soil drying out from 100% to about 5% water holding capacity (WHC), implying that soil water content play an important role in the uptake processes. The production and uptake processes were distinguished by the regression of OCS fluxes under different OCS mixing ratios. OCS compensation points (CP) were found to differ significantly for different soil types and water content, with the lowest CP at about 20% WHC, implying that when estimating the global budgets of OCS, especially for soils fluxes, soil water content should be taken into serious consideration. References Crutzen, P. J. 1976, Geophys. Res. Lett., 3, 73-76. Sandoval-Soto, L. et al., 2005, Biogeosciences, 2, 125-132. Kesselmeier, J. et al., 1999, J. Geophys. Res., 104, 11577-11584. Van Diest, H. and Kesselmeier, J. 2008

  9. Study of variations in soil water potential with the incorporation of charcoal and carbon nanotubes through infrared thermal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaseñor-Mora, Carlos; González-Vega, Arturo; Hernández, Víctor H.

    2016-09-01

    Different concentrations of charcoal and carbon nanotubes were incorporated in different mix types of soil samples, these were previously chemically characterized, and physically grain standardized, then the water potential was measured by traditional procedures, which need to consider the water composition and the soil salinity to achieve an accurate measurement, and by infrared thermal images where the water potential was correlated with the superficial emissivity. It was observed that the organic incorporation increases the water potential but it depends of soil gradation, a biggest increment of the water potential was observed in a poorly graded soil than that observed in a well graded soil; the nanotubes in low concentrations do not present considerable changes in the water potential, and in high concentrations the cost is not profitable. It was analyzed the minimum concentration changes of charcoal and nanotubes in the soil that can be measured with thermal emissivity, and the deepness at which the infrared thermal images can measure, also it was studied the rate of water drain in the different soils, and the ability of follow this with thermal sequence of images.

  10. Soil specific re-calibration of water content sensors for a field-scale sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasch, Caley K.; Brown, David J.; Anderson, Todd; Brooks, Erin S.; Yourek, Matt A.

    2015-04-01

    Obtaining accurate soil moisture data from a sensor network requires sensor calibration. Soil moisture sensors are factory calibrated, but multiple site specific factors may contribute to sensor inaccuracies. Thus, sensors should be calibrated for the specific soil type and conditions in which they will be installed. Lab calibration of a large number of sensors prior to installation in a heterogeneous setting may not be feasible, and it may not reflect the actual performance of the installed sensor. We investigated a multi-step approach to retroactively re-calibrate sensor water content data from the dielectric permittivity readings obtained by sensors in the field. We used water content data collected since 2009 from a sensor network installed at 42 locations and 5 depths (210 sensors total) within the 37-ha Cook Agronomy Farm with highly variable soils located in the Palouse region of the Northwest United States. First, volumetric water content was calculated from sensor dielectric readings using three equations: (1) a factory calibration using the Topp equation; (2) a custom calibration obtained empirically from an instrumented soil in the field; and (3) a hybrid equation that combines the Topp and custom equations. Second, we used soil physical properties (particle size and bulk density) and pedotransfer functions to estimate water content at saturation, field capacity, and wilting point for each installation location and depth. We also extracted the same reference points from the sensor readings, when available. Using these reference points, we re-scaled the sensor readings, such that water content was restricted to the range of values that we would expect given the physical properties of the soil. The re-calibration accuracy was assessed with volumetric water content measurements obtained from field-sampled cores taken on multiple dates. In general, the re-calibration was most accurate when all three reference points (saturation, field capacity, and wilting

  11. Simulation of the soil water balance of an undeveloped prairie in west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bidlake, W.R.; Boetcher, P.F.

    1996-01-01

    A one-dimensional numerical model was developed to simulate the soil water balance of a densely vegetated prairie site in west-central Florida. Transient simulations of the soil water balance were performed using field-measured soil and vegetation properties. Simulated and measured soil water content generally agreed to within 0.04; however, simulated water storage and recharge were sensitive to air-entry soil-water pressure potential and depth to the water table.

  12. mySoil: Crowd-Sourcing Soil Water Repellency Data to Create a Global Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallin, Ingrid; Robinson, David A.; Doerr, Stefan H.; Douglas, Peter; Lawley, Russell; Shelley, Wayne; Urbanek, Emilia

    2014-05-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) alters the way water interacts with soil by impacting hydrological and biogeochemical cycling to an extent which is not yet fully understood. Most studies have focused on SWR in specific environments and habitats, mostly in Mediterranean climates, but SWR has been increasingly observed in a range of habitats from the tropics to the northern latitudes. To better assess the distribution of this phenomenon, we propose using citizen science to create a means of crowd-sourcing SWR data from around the globe using the mySoil app. The water drop penetration time (WDPT) test, in which the length of time a drop of water remains on the soil surface is measured and a corresponding qualitative water repellency class is assigned to the soil, provides useful data and is easy to use. We propose adding a simple, standardised WDPT protocol to the mySoil app and web portal so both academics and non-scientists can contribute to the collection of SWR data from around the world. The protocol would include guidelines on drop size and the number of drops to apply, and would encourage inclusion of details such as vegetation cover, soil moisture conditions, last rainfall, and broad habitat. By initially engaging with researchers to create a back bone of respondents, we believe we can develop a global assessment that will reveal the distribution of the SWR phenomenon.

  13. Water table fluctuations and soil biogeochemistry: An experimental approach using an automated soil column system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezanezhad, F.; Couture, R.-M.; Kovac, R.; O'Connell, D.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2014-02-01

    Water table fluctuations significantly affect the biological and geochemical functioning of soils. Here, we introduce an automated soil column system in which the water table regime is imposed using a computer-controlled, multi-channel pump connected to a hydrostatic equilibrium reservoir and a water storage reservoir. The potential of this new system is illustrated by comparing results from two columns filled with 45 cm of the same homogenized riparian soil. In one soil column the water table remained constant at -20 cm below the soil surface, while in the other the water table oscillated between the soil surface and the bottom of the column, at a rate of 4.8 cm d-1. The experiment ran for 75 days at room temperature (25 ± 2 °C). Micro-sensors installed at -10 and -30 cm below the soil surface in the stable water table column recorded constant redox potentials on the order of 600 and -200 mV, respectively. In the fluctuating water table column, redox potentials at the same depths oscillated between oxidizing (∼700 mV) and reducing (∼-100 mV) conditions. Pore waters collected periodically and solid-phase analyses on core material obtained at the end of the experiment highlighted striking geochemical differences between the two columns, especially in the time series and depth distributions of Fe, Mn, K, P and S. Soil CO2 emissions derived from headspace gas analysis exhibited periodic variations in the fluctuating water table column, with peak values during water table drawdown. Transient redox conditions caused by the water table fluctuations enhanced microbial oxidation of soil organic matter, resulting in a pronounced depletion of particulate organic carbon in the midsection of the fluctuating water table column. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed the onset of differentiation of the bacterial communities in the upper (oxidizing) and lower (reducing) soil sections, although no systematic differences in microbial community structure

  14. Constraining Gas Diffusivity-Soil Water Content Relationships in Forest Soils Using Surface Chamber Fluxes and Depth Profiles of Multiple Trace Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dore, J. E.; Kaiser, K.; Seybold, E. C.; McGlynn, B. L.

    2012-12-01

    Forest soils are sources of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere and can act as either sources or sinks of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), depending on redox conditions and other factors. Soil moisture is an important control on microbial activity, redox conditions and gas diffusivity. Direct chamber measurements of soil-air CO2 fluxes are facilitated by the availability of sensitive, portable infrared sensors; however, corresponding CH4 and N2O fluxes typically require the collection of time-course physical samples from the chamber with subsequent analyses by gas chromatography (GC). Vertical profiles of soil gas concentrations may also be used to derive CH4 and N2O fluxes by the gradient method; this method requires much less time and many fewer GC samples than the direct chamber method, but requires that effective soil gas diffusivities are known. In practice, soil gas diffusivity is often difficult to accurately estimate using a modeling approach. In our study, we apply both the chamber and gradient methods to estimate soil trace gas fluxes across a complex Rocky Mountain forested watershed in central Montana. We combine chamber flux measurements of CO2 (by infrared sensor) and CH4 and N2O (by GC) with co-located soil gas profiles to determine effective diffusivity in soil for each gas simultaneously, over-determining the diffusion equations and providing constraints on both the chamber and gradient methodologies. We then relate these soil gas diffusivities to soil type and volumetric water content in an effort to arrive at empirical parameterizations that may be used to estimate gas diffusivities across the watershed, thereby facilitating more accurate, frequent and widespread gradient-based measurements of trace gas fluxes across our study system. Our empirical approach to constraining soil gas diffusivity is well suited for trace gas flux studies over complex landscapes in general.

  15. Soil water balance changes in engineered soil surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Saskschewsky, M.R.; Kemp, C.J.; Link, S.O.; Waugh, W.J.

    1995-03-01

    Permanent disposal of radioactive waste requires the construction of isolation barriers that minimize both recharge and erosion. Recharge can be prevented by storing precipitation near the surface so that it will be returned to the atmosphere via evapotranspiration. Erosion can be reduced with gravel mulch, but thick gravel layers may increase recharge. Gravel mixed into the surface soil may provide erosion protection without increasing recharge. To comprae the effects that erosion control has on infiltration, two lysimeter experiments were conducted to examine the effects of sand and gravel mulches and gravel admixitures, using two precipitation regimens and with or without vegetation.

  16. Fire and grazing effects on wind erosion, soil water content, and soil temperature.

    PubMed

    Vermeire, Lance T; Wester, David B; Mitchell, Robert B; Fuhlendorf, Samuel D

    2005-01-01

    Selective grazing of burned patches can be intense if animal distribution is not controlled and may compound the independent effects of fire and grazing on soil characteristics. Our objectives were to quantify the effects of patch burning and grazing on wind erosion, soil water content, and soil temperature in sand sagebrush (Artemisia filifolia Torr.) mixed prairie. We selected 24, 4-ha plots near Woodward, OK. Four plots were burned during autumn (mid-November) and four during spring (mid-April), and four served as nonburned controls for each of two years. Cattle were given unrestricted access (April-September) to burned patches (<2% of pastures) and utilization was about 78%. Wind erosion, soil water content, and soil temperature were measured monthly. Wind erosion varied by burn, year, and sampling height. Wind erosion was about 2 to 48 times greater on autumn-burned plots than nonburned plots during the dormant period (December-April). Growing-season (April-August) erosion was greatest during spring. Erosion of spring-burned sites was double that of nonburned sites both years. Growing-season erosion from autumn-burned sites was similar to nonburned sites except for one year with a dry April-May. Soil water content was unaffected by patch burn treatments. Soils of burned plots were 1 to 3 degrees C warmer than those of nonburned plots, based on mid-day measurements. Lower water holding and deep percolation capacity of sandy soils probably moderated effects on soil water content and soil temperature. Despite poor growing conditions following fire and heavy selective grazing of burned patches, no blowouts or drifts were observed.

  17. Environmental monitoring of chromium in air, soil, and water.

    PubMed

    Vitale, R J; Mussoline, G R; Rinehimer, K A

    1997-08-01

    Historical uses of chromium have resulted in its widespread release into the environment. In recent years, a significant amount of research has evaluated the impact of chromium on human health and the environment. Additionally, numerous analytical methods have been developed to identify and quantitate chromium in environmental media in response to various state and federal mandates such as CERCLA, RCRA, CWA, CAA, and SWDA. Due to the significant toxicity differences between trivalent [Cr(III)] and hexavalent [Cr(VI)] chromium, it is essential that chromium be quantified in these two distinct valence states to assess the potential risks to exposure to each in environmental media. Speciation is equally important because of their marked differences in environmental behavior. As the knowledge of risks associated with each valence state has grown and regulatory requirements have evolved, methods to accurately quantitate these species at ever-decreasing concentrations within environmental media have also evolved. This paper addresses the challenges of chromium species quantitation and some of the most relevant current methods used for environmental monitoring, including ASTM Method D5281 for air, SW-846 Methods 3060A, 7196A and 7199 for soils, sediments, and waste, and U.S. EPA Method 218.6 for water.

  18. Influence of soil pH on properties of the soil-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Doerte

    2010-05-01

    Surface characteristics of soils are one of the main factors controlling processes at the soil-water interface like wetting, sorption or dissolution processes and, thereby, have a high impact on natural soil functions like habitat, filter, buffer, storage and transformation functions. Since surface characteristics, like wettability or repellency, are not static soil properties but continuously changing, the relevant processes and mechanisms are in the focus of the presented study. These mechanisms help to gain further insight into the behaviour of soil and its dynamics under changing environmental conditions. The influence of water content, relative air humidity and drying temperature on soil water repellency has been investigated in many studies. In contrast, few studies have systematically investigated the relationship between soil water repellency (SWR) and soil pH. Several studies found alkaline soils to be less prone to SWR compared to acidic soils (e.g., Cerdà, and Doerr 2007; Mataix-Solera et al. 2007). Furthermore, SWR has been successfully reduced in acidic soils by increasing soil pH via liming (e.g., Karnok et al. 1993; Roper 2005). However, SWR has also been reported in calcareous soils in the Netherlands (Dekker and Jungerius 1990), California, USA (Holzhey 1968) and Spain (Mataix-Solera and Doerr 2004). The hypothesis that the pH may control repellency via changes in the variable surface charge of soil material has not yet been tested. Previously it has been shown that it is necessary to eliminate the direct influence of changes in soil moisture content so that the unique relationship between pH and SWR can be isolated (Bayer and Schaumann 2007). A method has been developed which allows adjustment of the pH of soils with low moisture content via the gas phase with minimal change in moisture content. The method was applied to 14 soil samples from Germany, Netherlands, the UK and Australia, using the water drop penetration time (WDPT) as the indicator

  19. Water Drainage from Unsaturated Soils in a Centrifuge Permeameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ornelas, G.; McCartney, J.; Zhang, M.

    2013-12-01

    This study involves an analysis of water drainage from an initially saturated silt layer in a centrifuge permeameter to evaluate the hydraulic properties of the soil layer in unsaturated conditions up to the point where the water phase becomes discontinuous. These properties include the soil water retention curve (SWRC) and the hydraulic conductivity function (HCF). The hydraulic properties of unsaturated silt are used in soil-atmosphere interaction models that take into account the role of infiltration and evaporation of water from soils due to atmospheric interaction. These models are often applied in slope stability analyses, landfill cover design, aquifer recharge analyses, and agricultural engineering. The hydraulic properties are also relevant to recent research concerning geothermal heating and cooling, as they can be used to assess the insulating effects of soil around underground heat exchangers. This study employs a high-speed geotechnical centrifuge to increase the self-weight of a compacted silt specimen atop a filter plate. Under a centrifuge acceleration of N times earth's gravity, the concept of geometric similitude indicates that the water flow process in a small-scale soil layer will be similar to those in a soil layer in the field that is N times thicker. The centrifuge acceleration also results in an increase in the hydraulic gradient across the silt specimen, which causes water to flow out of the pores following Darcy's law. The drainage test was performed until the rate of liquid water flow out of the soil layer slowed to a negligible level, which corresponds to the transition point at which further water flow can only occur due to water vapor diffusion following Fick's law. The data from the drainage test in the centrifuge were used to determine the SWRC and HCF at different depths in the silt specimen, which compared well with similar properties defined using other laboratory tests. The transition point at which liquid water flow stopped (and

  20. [Characteristics of soil water movement using stable isotopes in red soil hilly region of northwest Hunan].

    PubMed

    Tian, Ri-Chang; Chen, Hong-Song; Song, Xian-Fang; Wang, Ke-Lin; Yang, Qing-Qing; Meng, Wei

    2009-09-15

    Stable isotope techniques provide a new approach to study soil water movement. The process of water movement in soils under two kinds of plant types (oil tea and corn) were studied based on the observed values of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes of precipitation and soil water at different depths in red-soil sloping land. The results showed that stable isotopes of precipitation in this area had obvious seasonal effect and rainfall effect. The stable isotopes at 0-50 cm depth in oil tea forestland and at 0-40 cm depth in corn cropland increased with the increase in depth, respectively, but they had the opposite tendency after rainfall in arid time. The stable isotopes decreased with the increase in depth below 50 cm depth in oil tea forestland and below 40 cm depth in corn cropland where evaporation influence was weak. The infiltrate rate of soil in oil tea land was affected by precipitation obviously, and it was about 50-100 mm/d after 2-3 days in heavy rain, slowed sharply later, and soil water at 50 cm depth often became a barrier layer. The permeability of soil in corn land was poor and the infiltration rate was lower. The change of stable isotopes in soil water in red soil hilly region was mainly affected by the mixing water which was formed by the antecedent precipitation, and evaporation effect took the second place. The evaporation intensity in oil tea land was lower than that in corn land, but the evaporation depth was higher.

  1. Water and heat transport in boreal soils: implications for soil response to climate change.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhaosheng; Neff, Jason C; Harden, Jennifer W; Zhang, Tingjun; Veldhuis, Hugo; Czimczik, Claudia I; Winston, Gregory C; O'Donnell, Jonathan A

    2011-04-15

    Soil water content strongly affects permafrost dynamics by changing the soil thermal properties. However, the movement of liquid water, which plays an important role in the heat transport of temperate soils, has been under-represented in boreal studies. Two different heat transport models with and without convective heat transport were compared to measurements of soil temperatures in four boreal sites with different stand ages and drainage classes. Overall, soil temperatures during the growing season tended to be over-estimated by 2-4°C when movement of liquid water and water vapor was not represented in the model. The role of heat transport in water has broad implications for site responses to warming and suggests reduced vulnerability of permafrost to thaw at drier sites. This result is consistent with field observations of faster thaw in response to warming in wet sites compared to drier sites over the past 30 years in Canadian boreal forests. These results highlight that representation of water flow in heat transport models is important to simulate future soil thermal or permafrost dynamics under a changing climate.

  2. Water and heat transport in boreal soils: Implications for soil response to climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fan, Z.; Neff, J.C.; Harden, J.W.; Zhang, T.; Veldhuis, H.; Czimczik, C.I.; Winston, G.C.; O'Donnell, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Soil water content strongly affects permafrost dynamics by changing the soil thermal properties. However, the movement of liquid water, which plays an important role in the heat transport of temperate soils, has been under-represented in boreal studies. Two different heat transport models with and without convective heat transport were compared to measurements of soil temperatures in four boreal sites with different stand ages and drainage classes. Overall, soil temperatures during the growing season tended to be over-estimated by 2-4??C when movement of liquid water and water vapor was not represented in the model. The role of heat transport in water has broad implications for site responses to warming and suggests reduced vulnerability of permafrost to thaw at drier sites. This result is consistent with field observations of faster thaw in response to warming in wet sites compared to drier sites over the past 30. years in Canadian boreal forests. These results highlight that representation of water flow in heat transport models is important to simulate future soil thermal or permafrost dynamics under a changing climate. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Water content determination of soil surface in an intensive apple orchard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riczu, Péter; Nagy, Gábor; Tamás, János

    2015-04-01

    Currently in Hungary, less than 100,000 hectares of orchards can be found, from which cultivation of apple is one of the most dominant ones. Production of marketable horticulture products can be difficult without employing advanced and high quality horticulture practices, which, in turn, depends on appropriate management and irrigation systems, basically. The got out water amount depend on climatic, edafic factors and the water demand of plants as well. The soil water content can be determined by traditional and modern methods. In order to define soil moisture content, gravimetry measurement is one of the most accurate methods, but it is time consuming and sometimes soil sampling and given results are in different times. Today, IT provides the farmers such tools, like global positioning system (GPS), geographic information system (GIS) and remote sensing (RS). These tools develop in a great integration rapidly. RS methods are ideal to survey larger area quick and accurate. Laser scanning is a novel technique which analyses a real-world or object environment to collect structural and spectral data. In order to obtain soil moisture information, the Leica ScanStation C10 terrestrial 3D laser scanner was used on an intensive apple orchard on the Study and Regional Research Farm of the University of Debrecen, near Pallag. Previously, soil samples from the study area with different moisture content were used as reference points. Based on the return intensity values of the laser scanner can be distinguished the different moisture content areas of soil surface. Nevertheless, the error of laser distance echo were examined and statistically evaluated. This research was realized in the frames of TÁMOP 4.2.4. A/2-11-1-2012-0001 "National Excellence Program - Elaborating and operating an inland student and researcher personal support system". The project was subsidized by the European Union and co-financed by the European Social Fund.

  4. COSMOS soil water sensing affected by crop biomass and water status

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water sensing methods are widely used to characterize water content in the root zone and below, but only a few are capable of sensing soil volumes larger than a few hundred liters. Scientists with the USDA-ARS Conservation & Production Research Laboratory, Bushland, Texas, evaluated: a) the Cos...

  5. Evaluation of pedotransfer functions for estimating the soil water retention points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahmani, Omid; Palangi, Sahar

    2016-06-01

    Direct measurement of soil moisture has been often expensive and time-consuming. The aim of this study was determining the best method to estimate the soil moisture using the pedotransfer functions in the soil par2 model. Soil samples selected from the database UNSODA in three textures include sandy loam, silty loam and clay. In clay soil, the Campbell model indicated better results at field capacity (FC) and wilting point (WP) with RMSE = (0.06, 0.09) and d = (0.65, 0.55) respectively. In silty loam soil, the Epic model had accurate estimation with MBE = 0.00 at FC and Campbell model had the acceptable result of WP with RMSE = 0.03 and d = 0.77. In sandy loam, Hutson and Campbell models had a better result to estimation the FC and WP than others. Also Hutson model had an acceptable result to estimation the TAW (Total Available Water) with RMSE = (0.03, 0.04, 0.04) and MBE = (0.02, 0.01, 0.01) for clay, sandy loam and silty loam, respectively. These models demonstrate the moisture points had the internal linkage with the soil textures. Results indicated that the PTFs models simulate the agreement results with the experimental observations.

  6. Mechanical impedance of soil crusts and water content in loamy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josa March, Ramon; Verdú, Antoni M. C.; Mas, Maria Teresa

    2013-04-01

    Soil crust development affects soil water dynamics and soil aeration. Soil crusts act as mechanical barriers to fluid flow and, as their mechanical impedance increases with drying, they also become obstacles to seedling emergence. As a consequence, the emergence of seedling cohorts (sensitive seeds) might be reduced. However, this may be of interest to be used as an effective system of weed control. Soil crusting is determined by several factors: soil texture, rain intensity, sedimentation processes, etc. There are different ways to characterize the crusts. One of them is to measure their mechanical impedance (MI), which is linked to their moisture level. In this study, we measured the evolution of the mechanical impedance of crusts formed by three loamy soil types (clay loam, loam and sandy clay loam, USDA) with different soil water contents. The aim of this communication was to establish a mathematical relationship between the crust water content and its MI. A saturated soil paste was prepared and placed in PVC cylinders (50 mm diameter and 10 mm height) arranged on a plastic tray. Previously the plastic tray was sprayed with a hydrophobic liquid to prevent the adherence of samples. The samples on the plastic tray were left to air-dry under laboratory conditions until their IM was measured. To measure IM, a food texture analyzer was used. The equipment incorporates a mobile arm, a load cell to apply force and a probe. The arm moves down vertically at a constant rate and the cylindrical steel probe (4 mm diameter) penetrates the soil sample vertically at a constant rate. The equipment is provided with software to store data (time, vertical distance and force values) at a rate of up to 500 points per second. Water content in crust soil samples was determined as the loss of weight after oven-drying (105°C). From the results, an exponential regression between MI and the water content was obtained (determination coefficient very close to 1). This methodology allows

  7. Improving Estimates of Root-zone Soil Water Content Using Soil Hydrologic Properties and Remotely Sensed Soil Moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, D. C.; Miller, D. A.; Singha, K.; Davis, K. J.; Smithwick, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    Newly defined relationships between remotely sensed soil moisture and soil hydraulic parameters were used to develop fine-scale (100 m) maps of root-zone soil moisture (RZSM) content at the regional scale on a daily time-step. There are several key outcomes from our research: (1) the first multi-layer regional dataset of soil hydraulic parameters developed from gSSURGO data for hydrologic modeling efforts in the Chequemegon Ecosystem Atmospheric Study (ChEAS) region, (2) the operation and calibration of a new model for estimating soil moisture flow through the root-zone at eddy covariance towers across the U.S. using remotely sensed active and passive soil moisture products, and (3) region-wide maps of estimated root-zone soil moisture content. The project links soil geophysical analytical approaches (pedotransfer functions) to new applications in remote sensing of soil moisture that detect surface moisture (~5 cm depth). We answer two key questions in soil moisture observation and prediction: (1) How do soil hydrologic properties of U.S. soil types quantitatively relate to surface-to-subsurface water loss? And (2) Does incorporation of fine-scale soil hydrologic parameters with remotely sensed soil moisture data provide improved hindcasts of in situ RZSM content? The project meets several critical research needs in estimation of soil moisture from remote sensing. First, soil moisture is known to vary spatially with soil texture and soil hydraulic properties that do not align well with the spatial resolution of current remote sensing products of soil moisture (~ 50 km2). To address this, we leveraged new advances in gridded soil parameter information (gSSURGO) together with existing remotely sensed estimates of surface soil moisture into a newly emerging semi-empirical modeling approach called SMAR (Soil Moisture Analytical Relationship). The SMAR model was calibrated and cross-validated using existing soil moisture data from a portion of AMERIFLUX tower sites and

  8. Water Intake by Soil, Experiments for High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1969

    Presented are a variety of surface run-off experiments for high school students. The experiments are analogies to basic concepts about water intake, as related to water delivery, soil properties and management, floods, and conservation measures. The materials needed to perform the experiments are easily obtainable. The experiments are followed by…

  9. Earthworm effects on movement of water and solutes in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Trojan, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine and model the effects of earthworms on water and solute movement in soil. Microrelief and rainfall effects on water and solute movement were determined in packed buckets inoculated with earthworms (Aporrectodea tuberculata). A solution of Br[sup [minus

  10. Gas Transport Parameters for Landfill Cover Soils: Effects of Soil Compaction and Water Blockages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramarachchi, P. N.; Hamamoto, S.; Kawamoto, K.; Nawagamuwa, U.; Komatsu, T.; Moldrup, P.

    2009-12-01

    Recently, landfill sites have been emerging in greenhouse warming scenarios as a significant source of atmospheric CH4. landfill management strategies have mainly addressed the problem of preventing groundwater contamination and reduction of leachate generation. Being one of the largest source of anthropogenic CH4 emission , the final cover system should also be designed for minimizing the biogas migration into the atmosphere or the areas surrounding the landfill. Compared to the intensive research efforts on hydraulic performances of landfill final cover soil , there are few studies about gas transport characteristics of landfill cover soils. Therefore, the effects of soil physical properties such as bulk density (i.e., compaction level), soil particle size and water blockage effects on the gas exchange in t highly compacted final cover soil are largely unknown. The gas exchange through the final cover soils is controlled by advective and diffusive gas transport. Air permeability (ka) governs the advective gas transport while the soil-gas diffusion coefficient (Dp) governs diffusive gas transport . In this study, the effects of compaction level and water blockage effects on ka and Dp for two landfill final cover soils were investigated. The disturbed soil samples were taken from landfill final covers in Japan and Sri Lanka. A compaction tests were performed for the soil samples with two different size fractions (< 35 mm and < 2.0 mm). In the compaction tests at field water content , the soil samples were repacked into soil cores (i.d. 15-cm, length 12-cm) at two different compaction levels (2700 kN/m2 and 600 kN/m2). After the compaction tests, ka and Dp were measured and then samples were saturated and subsequently drained at different soil-water matric potential (pF; pF equals to log(-ɛ) where ɛ is soil-water matric potential in cm H2O) of 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 4.1, and with air-dried (pF 6.0) and oven-dried (pF 6.9) conditions. Results showed that measured Dp values

  11. Closing the loop of the soil water retention curve

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Ning; Alsherif, N; Wayllace, Alexandra; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2015-01-01

    The authors, to their knowledge for the first time, produced two complete principal soil water retention curves (SWRCs) under both positive and negative matric suction regimes. An innovative testing technique combining the transient water release and imbibition method (TRIM) and constant flow method (CFM) was used to identify the principal paths of SWRC in the positive pore-water pressure regime under unsaturated conditions. A negative matric suction of 9.8 kPa is needed to reach full saturation or close the loop of the SWRC for a silty soil. This work pushes the understanding of the interaction of soil and water into new territory by quantifying the boundaries of the SWRC over the entire suction domain, including both wetting and drying conditions that are relevant to field conditions such as slope wetting under heavy rainfall or rapid groundwater table rise in earthen dams or levees.

  12. Towards accurate assessments of CH4 and N2O soil-atmosphere exchange rates with the combination of automated systems and new detection techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Pinés, E.; Wolf, B.; Kiese, R.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.

    2012-04-01

    Soils can be either a source or a sink of CH4 and N2O. Accurate assessment of CH4 and N2O soil-atmosphere exchange processes is necessary in order to estimate the contribution of soil to the global warming potential under current and future conditions. Soil-atmosphere exchange processes of both CH4 and N2O depend on a combination of soil temperature and soil moisture status, as well as on nutrient availability and various microbial processes. The task of measuring CH4 and N2O exchange processes is challenging due to, among other factors: high spatial ("hot spots") and temporal heterogeneity ("hot moments") in the emissions of these species. In addition, accurate determination of CH4 and N2O concentrations is still difficult. So far, this prevents from a full understanding and contributes to a high uncertainty degree in the assessment of CH4 and N2O soil-atmosphere exchange rates across different ecosystems. Aiming at the achievement of a deeper understanding of the role of the soil in the GHG balance, we have combined new laser spectroscopy detection techniques (Quantum Cascade Laser, QCL) with automatic and semi-automatic chamber measurement systems. Therefore, different applications will be presented: A three-month-long field campaign in a poplar plantation in NE Romania allowed us to demonstrate the feasibility of the QCL coupled with automatic chambers to accurately estimate the soil-atmosphere GHG exchange at a high time resolution with a very low detection limit. A new semi-automatic system with relatively low human-maintenance requirements was tested in a poplar plantation in SW Germany. The system is not able to record fine-scale temporal variations of the GHG exchange processes; however, cumulative fluxes obtained with the semi-automatic system were very close to those measured with an automatic system with high temporal resolution. Within a climate change experiment in grassland ecosystems, an application of the QCL in combination with a robotized chamber

  13. Relating soil pore geometry to soil water content dynamics decomposed at multiple frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Mingming; Gimenez, Daniel; Cooper, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Soil structure is a critical factor determining the response of soil water content to meteorological inputs such as precipitation. Wavelet analysis can be used to filter a signal into several wavelet components, each characterizing a given frequency. The purpose of this research was to investigate relationships between the geometry of soil pore systems and the various wavelet components derived from soil water content dynamics. The two study sites investigated were located in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Each site was comprised of five soil profiles, the first site was situated along a 300-meter transect with about 10% slope in a tropical semi-deciduous forest, while the second one spanned 230-meter over a Brazilian savanna with a slope of about 6%. For each profile, between two to four Water Content Reflectometer CS615 (Campbell Scientific, Inc.) probes were installed according to horizonation at depths varying between 0.1 m and 2.3 m. Bulk soil, three soil cores, and one undisturbed soil block were sampled from selected horizons for determining particle size distributions, water retention curves, and pore geometry, respectively. Pore shape and size were determined from binary images obtained from resin-impregnated blocks and used to characterize pore geometry. Soil water contents were recorded at a 20-minute interval over a 4-month period. The Mexican hat wavelet was used to decompose soil water content measurements into wavelet components. The responses of wavelet components to wetting and drying cycles were characterized by the median height of the peaks in each wavelet component and were correlated with particular pore shapes and sizes. For instance, large elongated and irregular pores, largely responsible for the transmission of water, were significantly correlated with wavelet components at high frequencies (40 minutes to 48 hours) while rounded pores, typically associated to water retention, were only significantly correlated to lower frequency ranges

  14. Surfactant-enhanced remediation of organic contaminated soil and water.

    PubMed

    Paria, Santanu

    2008-04-21

    Surfactant based remediation technologies for organic contaminated soil and water (groundwater or surface water) is of increasing importance recently. Surfactants are used to dramatically expedite the process, which in turn, may reduce the treatment time of a site compared to use of water alone. In fact, among the various available remediation technologies for organic contaminated sites, surfactant based process is one of the most innovative technologies. To enhance the application of surfactant based technologies for remediation of organic contaminated sites, it is very important to have a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in this process. This paper will provide an overview of the recent developments in the area of surfactant enhanced soil and groundwater remediation processes, focusing on (i) surfactant adsorption on soil, (ii) micellar solubilization of organic hydrocarbons, (iii) supersolubilization, (iv) density modified displacement, (v) degradation of organic hydrocarbon in presence surfactants, (vi) partitioning of surfactants onto soil and liquid organic phase, (vii) partitioning of contaminants onto soil, and (viii) removal of organics from soil in presence of surfactants. Surfactant adsorption on soil and/or sediment is an important step in this process as it results in surfactant loss reduced the availability of the surfactants for solubilization. At the same time, adsorbed surfactants will retained in the soil matrix, and may create other environmental problem. The biosurfactants are become promising in this application due to their environmentally friendly nature, nontoxic, low adsorption on to soil, and good solubilization efficiency. Effects of different parameters like the effect of electrolyte, pH, soil mineral and organic content, soil composition etc. on surfactant adsorption are discussed here. Micellar solubilization is also an important step for removal of organic contaminants from the soil matrix, especially for low aqueous

  15. Spatial probability of soil water repellency in an abandoned agricultural field in Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Paulo; Misiūnė, Ieva

    2015-04-01

    Water repellency is a natural soil property with implications on infiltration, erosion and plant growth. It depends on soil texture, type and amount of organic matter, fungi, microorganisms, and vegetation cover (Doerr et al., 2000). Human activities as agriculture can have implications on soil water repellency (SWR) due tillage and addition of organic compounds and fertilizers (Blanco-Canqui and Lal, 2009; Gonzalez-Penaloza et al., 2012). It is also assumed that SWR has a high small-scale variability (Doerr et al., 2000). The aim of this work is to study the spatial probability of SWR in an abandoned field testing several geostatistical methods, Organic Kriging (OK), Simple Kriging (SK), Indicator Kriging (IK), Probability Kriging (PK) and Disjunctive Kriging (DK). The study area it is located near Vilnius urban area at (54 49' N, 25 22', 104 masl) in Lithuania (Pereira and Oliva, 2013). It was designed a experimental plot with 21 m2 (07x03 m). Inside this area it was measured SWR was measured every 50 cm using the water drop penetration time (WDPT) (Wessel, 1998). A total of 105 points were measured. The probability of SWR was classified in 0 (No probability) to 1 (High probability). The methods accuracy was assessed with the cross validation method. The best interpolation method was the one with the lowest Root Mean Square Error (RMSE). The results showed that the most accurate probability method was SK (RMSE=0.436), followed by DK (RMSE=0.437), IK (RMSE=0.448), PK (RMSE=0.452) and OK (RMSE=0.537). Significant differences were identified among probability tests (Kruskal-Wallis test =199.7597 p<0.001). On average the probability of SWR was high with the OK (0.58±0.08) followed by PK (0.49±0.18), SK (0.32±0.16), DK (0.32±0.15) and IK (0.31±0.16). The most accurate probability methods predicted a lower probability of SWR in the studied plot. The spatial distribution of SWR was different according to the tested technique. Simple Kriging, DK, IK and PK methods

  16. Mulch tillage for conserving soil water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mulching is the practice of maintaining organic or inorganic materials on or applying them to the soil surface. It is an ancient practice, but through the years clean tillage that incorporated crop residues and also controlled weeds became the norm. Frequent and deep tillage often was promoted to co...

  17. Measurements of soil temperature for monitoring of the soil water behavior in an embankment slope during periodic rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, M.; Takakura, S.; Ishizawa, T.; Sakai, N.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most common causes of slope disaster (e.g. landslide, slope failure and debris flow) is heavy rainfall. Distributions of soil moisture and soil suction stress are changed by rain water infiltration. Monitoring of soil water behavior is crucial for prediction of the slope disaster. This study focuses on soil temperatures of a slope as a detector for monitoring soil water behavior. Soil temperature is varied by soil water condition, this is, infiltrating water transports thermal energy downward and thermal property of soil is shifted by containing of soil water. The purpose of this study is to detect the changes in soil water behavior caused by infiltration of rainfalls using measurement of soil temperature. For this purpose, we had carried out the measurements of soil temperature during various rainfalls (Yoshioka et al., 2013). In addition, we measured soil temperature and soil water content at several depths in a slope of an experimental embankment during various intensities of periodic and/or continuous rainfalls. In this presentation, we represent the details of the experiments and the results. Experiments were performed using the experimental embankment at NIED in Japan, which is about 7.3 meters tall and 27 meters wide. The embankment is located in a large-scale rainfall simulator. This facility is about 73 meters long, 48 meters wide and 20 meters tall. We measured soil temperature and volumetric water contents in the slope of the embankment, meteorological condition and rain water temperature. The rainfall intensities were 30, 60, 90 and 120 mm/h. The artificial rainfalls were carried out 10th, 17th, 24th, 31st, May and 10th, 11th, 12th June, 2013. As the results, soil temperature at many points in all experimental days rose caused by rainfalls, but the temperature at some points didn't change. We had two forms of soil temperature changes; one was a steep rise and the other was a gradual rise. In the case of periodic rainfall, soil temperature at

  18. Determining evaporation in the model of water transfer in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasukhin, Sergey

    2016-10-01

    In considered model a process of vertical water transfer in soil is described by one-dimensional nonlinear parabolic equation. Evaporation is one of most hard-determined component of the model. Determination of evaporation is formulated as an optimal control problem. In this problem, the objective function is mean-square deviation of soil moisture obtained by the model at various depths from some prescribed values. The sensitivity of soil moisture to changes of evaporation is estimated. These estimates allowed to determine an effective subsurface soil layer where it is advisable to compare calculated values of soil moisture with prescribed ones and to compute the objective function. This region definition has accelerated the convergence of numeric optimization process and has reduced the time of its execution.

  19. Wetting properties of fungi mycelium alter soil infiltration and soil water repellency in a γ-sterilized wettable and repellent soil.

    PubMed

    Chau, Henry Wai; Goh, Yit Kheng; Vujanovic, Vladimir; Si, Bing Cheng

    2012-12-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) has a drastic impact on soil quality resulting in reduced infiltration, increased runoff, increased leaching, reduced plant growth, and increased soil erosion. One of the causes of SWR is hydrophobic fungal structures and exudates that change the soil-water relationship. The objective of this study was to determine whether SWR and infiltration could be manipulated through inoculation with fungi. The effect of fungi on SWR was investigated through inoculation of three fungal strains (hydrophilic -Fusarium proliferatum, chrono-amphiphilic -Trichoderma harzianum, and hydrophobic -Alternaria sp.) on a water repellent soil (WR-soil) and a wettable soil (W-soil). The change in SWR and infiltration was assessed by the water repellency index and cumulative infiltration respectively. F. proliferatum decreased the SWR on WR-soil and slightly increased SWR in W-soil, while Alternaria sp. increased SWR in both the W-soil and the WR-soil. Conversely T. harzianum increased the SWR in the W-soil and decreased the SWR in the WR-soil. All strains showed a decrease in infiltration in W-soil, while only the F. proliferatum and T. harzianum strain showed improvement in infiltration in the WR-soil. The ability of fungi to alter the SWR and enmesh soil particles results in changes to the infiltration dynamics in soil.

  20. Maxwell-Wagner relaxation in common minerals and a desert soil at low water contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcone, Steven A.; Boitnott, Ginger E.

    2012-06-01

    Penetration of 100- to 1000-MHz ground-penetrating radar (GPR) signals is virtually non-existent in arid and desert soils despite their low water content and moderate conductivity, the latter of which cannot explain the loss. Under the hypothesis that strong dielectric relaxation supplements DC conductivity to cause high intrinsic attenuation rates, we compared the complex permittivity of a desert soil sample with that of controlled samples of quartz, feldspars, calcite, coarse and crystallite gypsum, kaolinite and montmorillonite. The soil had 80% quartz, 10% feldspars and 10% gypsum by weight, with the latter composed of crystallites and crustations. All samples had 4-7% volumetric water content. We measured permittivity most accurately from 1.6 MHz to 4 GHz with Fourier Transform time domain reflectometry, and used grain sizes less than 53 μm. All samples show low-frequency dispersion with the soil, gypsum crystallites and montmorillonite having the strongest below 100 MHz, the highest attenuation rates, and conductivity values unable to account for these rates. The soil rate exceeded 100 dB m- 1 by 1 GHz. Through modeling we find that a broadened relaxation centered from 2 to 16 MHz sufficiently supplements losses caused by conductivity and free water relaxation to account for loss rates in all our samples, and accounts for low-frequency dispersion below 1 GHz. We interpret the relaxation to be of the Maxwell-Wagner (MW) type because of the 2- to 16-MHz values, relaxation broadening, the lack of salt, clay and magnetic minerals, and insufficient surface area to support adsorbed water. The likely MW dipolar soil inclusions within the predominantly quartz matrix were gypsum particles coated with water containing ions dissolved from the gypsum, and the conducting water layers themselves. The inclusions for the monomineralic soils were likely ionized partially or completely water-filled interstices, and partially filled galleries for the montmorillonite. The low

  1. Upscaled soil-water retention using van Genuchten's function

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, T.R.; Constantz, J.E.; Freyberg, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    Soils are often layered at scales smaller than the block size used in numerical and conceptual models of variably saturated flow. Consequently, the small-scale variability in water content within each block must be homogenized (upscaled). Laboratory results have shown that a linear volume average (LVA) of water content at a uniform suction is a good approximation to measured water contents in heterogeneous cores. Here, we upscale water contents using van Genuchten's function for both the local and upscaled soil-water-retention characteristics. The van Genuchten (vG) function compares favorably with LVA results, laboratory experiments under hydrostatic conditions in 3-cm cores, and numerical simulations of large-scale gravity drainage. Our method yields upscaled vG parameter values by fitting the vG curve to the LVA of water contents at various suction values. In practice, it is more efficient to compute direct averages of the local vG parameter values. Nonlinear power averages quantify a feasible range of values for each upscaled vG shape parameter; upscaled values of N are consistently less than the harmonic means, reflecting broad pore-size distributions of the upscaled soils. The vG function is useful for modeling soil-water retention at large scales, and these results provide guidance for its application.

  2. An accurate retrieval of leaf water content from mid to thermal infrared spectra using continuous wavelet analysis.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Saleem; Skidmore, Andrew K; Naeem, Mohammad; Schlerf, Martin

    2012-10-15

    Leaf water content determines plant health, vitality, photosynthetic efficiency and is an important indicator of drought assessment. The retrieval of leaf water content from the visible to shortwave infrared spectra is well known. Here for the first time, we estimated leaf water content from the mid to thermal infrared (2.5-14.0 μm) spectra, based on continuous wavelet analysis. The dataset comprised 394 spectra from nine plant species, with different water contents achieved through progressive drying. To identify the spectral feature most sensitive to the variations in leaf water content, first the Directional Hemispherical Reflectance (DHR) spectra were transformed into a wavelet power scalogram, and then linear relations were established between the wavelet power scalogram and leaf water content. The six individual wavelet features identified in the mid infrared yielded high correlations with leaf water content (R(2)=0.86 maximum, 0.83 minimum), as well as low RMSE (minimum 8.56%, maximum 9.27%). The combination of four wavelet features produced the most accurate model (R(2)=0.88, RMSE=8.00%). The models were consistent in terms of accuracy estimation for both calibration and validation datasets, indicating that leaf water content can be accurately retrieved from the mid to thermal infrared domain of the electromagnetic radiation.

  3. Water and heat fluxes in desert soils: 2. Numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Bridget R.; Milly, P. C. D.

    1994-03-01

    Transient one-dimensional fluxes of soil water (liquid and vapor) and heat in response to 1 year of atmospheric forcing were simulated numerically for a site in the Chihuahuan Desert of Texas. The model was initialized and evaluated using the monitoring data presented in a companion paper (Scanlon, this issue). Soil hydraulic and thermal properties were estimated a priori from a combination of laboratory measurements, models, and other published information. In the first simulation, the main drying curves were used to describe soil water retention, and hysteresis was ignored. Remarkable consistency was found between computed and measured water potentials and temperatures. Attenuation and phase shift of the seasonal cycle of water potentials below the shallow subsurface active zone (0.0- to 0.3-m depth) were similar to those of temperatures, suggesting that water potential fluctuations were driven primarily by temperature changes. Water fluxes in the upper 0.3 m of soil were dominated by downward and upward liquid fluxes that resulted from infiltration of rain and subsequent evaporation from the surface. Upward flux was vapor dominated only in the top several millimeters of the soil during periods of evaporation. Below a depth of 0.3 m, water fluxes varied slowly and were dominated by downward thermal vapor flux that decreased with depth, causing a net accumulation of water. In a second simulation, nonhysteretic water retention was instead described by the estimated main wetting curves; the resulting differences in fluxes were attributed to lower initial water contents (given fixed initial water potential) and unsaturated hydraulic conductivities that were lower than they were in the first simulation. Below a depth of 0.3 m, the thermal vapor fluxes dominated and were similar to those in the first simulation. Two other simulations were performed, differing from the first only in the prescription of different (wetter) initial water potentials. These three simulations

  4. Estimating net rainfall, evaporation and water storage of a bare soil from sequential L-band emissivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroosnijder, L.; Lascano, R. J.; Newton, R. W.; Vanbavel, C. H. M.

    1984-01-01

    A general method to use a time series of L-band emissivities as an input to a hydrological model for continuously monitoring the net rainfall and evaporation as well as the water content over the entire soil profile is proposed. The model requires a sufficiently accurate and general relation between soil emissivity and surface moisture content. A model which requires the soil hydraulic properties as an additional input, but does not need any weather data was developed. The method is shown to be numerically consistent.

  5. SCREENING TO IDENTIFY AND PREVENT URBAN STORM WATER PROBLEMS: ESTIMATING IMPERVIOUS AREA ACCURATELY AND INEXPENSIVELY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Complete identification and eventual prevention of urban water quality problems pose significant monitoring, "smart growth" and water quality management challenges. Uncontrolled increase of impervious surface area (roads, buildings, and parking lots) causes detrimental hydrologi...

  6. High Resolution Soil Water from Regional Databases and Satellite Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Robin D.; Smelyanskly, Vadim N.; Coughlin, Joseph; Dungan, Jennifer; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the ways in which plant growth can be inferred from satellite data and can then be used to infer soil water. There are several steps in this process, the first of which is the acquisition of data from satellite observations and relevant information databases such as the State Soil Geographic Database (STATSGO). Then probabilistic analysis and inversion with the Bayes' theorem reveals sources of uncertainty. The Markov chain Monte Carlo method is also used.

  7. Zinc movement in sewage-sludge-treated soils as influenced by soil properties, irrigation water quality, and soil moisture level

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welch, J.E.; Lund, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    A soil column study was conducted to assess the movement of Zn in sewage-sludge-amended soils. Varables investigated were soil properties, irrigation water quality, and soil moisture level. Bulk samples of the surface layer of six soil series were packed into columns, 10.2 cm in diameter and 110 cm in length. An anaerobically digested municipal sewage sludge was incorporated into the top 20 cm of each column at a rate of 300 mg ha-1. The columns were maintained at moisture levels of saturation and unsaturation and were leached with two waters of different quality. At the termination of leaching, the columns were cut open and the soil was sectioned and analyzed. Zinc movement was evaluated by mass balance accounting and correlation and regression analysis. Zinc movement in the unsaturated columns ranged from 3 to 30 cm, with a mean of 10 cm. The difference in irrigation water quality did not have an effect on Zn movement. Most of the Zn applied to the unsaturated columns remained in the sludge-amended soil layer (96.1 to 99.6%, with a mean of 98.1%). The major portion of Zn leached from the sludge-amended soil layer accumulated in the 0- to 3-cm depth (35.7 to 100%, with a mean of 73.6%). The mean final soil pH values decreased in the order: saturated columns = sludge-amended soil layer > untreated soils > unsaturated columns. Total Zn leached from the sludge-amended soil layer was correlated negatively at P = 0.001 with final pH (r = -0.85). Depth of Zn movement was correlated negatively at P = 0.001 with final pH (r = -0.91). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the final pH accounted for 72% of the variation in the total amounts of Zn leached from the sludge-amended soil layer of the unsaturated columns and accounted for 82% of the variation in the depth of Zn movement among the unsaturated columns. A significant correlation was not found between Zn and organic carbon in soil solutions, but a negative correlation significant at P = 0.001 was found

  8. Observing plants dealing with soil water stress: Daily soil moisture fluctuations derived from polymer tensiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Ploeg, Martine; de Rooij, Gerrit

    2014-05-01

    Periods of soil water deficit often occur within a plant's life cycle, even in temperate deciduous and rain forests (Wilson et al. 2001, Grace 1999). Various experiments have shown that roots are able to sense the distribution of water in the soil, and produce signals that trigger changes in leaf expansion rate and stomatal conductance (Blackman and Davies 1985, Gollan et al. 1986, Gowing et al. 1990 Davies and Zhang 1991, Mansfield and De Silva 1994, Sadras and Milroy 1996). Partitioning of water and air in the soil, solute distribution in soil water, water flow through the soil, and water availability for plants can be determined according to the distribution of the soil water potential (e.g. Schröder et al. 2013, Kool et al. 2014). Understanding plant water uptake under dry conditions has been compromised by hydrological instrumentation with low accuracy in dry soils due to signal attenuation, or a compromised measurement range (Whalley et al. 2013). Development of polymer tensiometers makes it possible to study the soil water potential over a range meaningful for studying plant responses to water stress (Bakker et al. 2007, Van der Ploeg et al. 2008, 2010). Polymer tensiometer data obtained from a lysimeter experiment (Van der Ploeg et al. 2008) were used to analyse day-night fluctuations of soil moisture in the vicinity of maize roots. To do so, three polymer tensiometers placed in the middle of the lysimeter from a control, dry and very dry treatment (one lysimeter per treatment) were used to calculate water content changes over 12 hours. These 12 hours corresponded with the operation of the growing light. Soil water potential measurements in the hour before the growing light was turned on or off were averaged. The averaged value was used as input for the van Genuchten (1980) model. Parameters for the model were obtained from laboratory determination of water retention, with a separate model parameterization for each lysimeter setup. Results show daily

  9. Soil Moisture: The Hydrologic Interface Between Surface and Ground Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engman, Edwin T.

    1997-01-01

    A hypothesis is presented that many hydrologic processes display a unique signature that is detectable with microwave remote sensing. These signatures are in the form of the spatial and temporal distributions of surface soil moisture. The specific hydrologic processes that may be detected include groundwater recharge and discharge zones, storm runoff contributing areas, regions of potential and less than potential evapotranspiration (ET), and information about the hydrologic properties of soils. In basin and hillslope hydrology, soil moisture is the interface between surface and ground waters.

  10. Association of water spectral indices with plant and soil water relations in contrasting wheat genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Mario; Reynolds, Matthew P.; Klatt, Arthur R.

    2010-01-01

    Spectral reflectance indices can be used to estimate the water status of plants in a rapid, non-destructive manner. Water spectral indices were measured on wheat under a range of water-deficit conditions in field-based yield trials to establish their relationship with water relations parameters as well as available volumetric soil water (AVSW) to indicate soil water extraction patterns. Three types of wheat germplasm were studied which showed a range of drought adaptation; near-isomorphic sister lines from an elite/elite cross, advanced breeding lines, and lines derived from interspecific hybridization with wild relatives (synthetic derivative lines). Five water spectral indices (one water index and four normalized water indices) based on near infrared wavelengths were determined under field conditions between the booting and grain-filling stages of crop development. Among all water spectral indices, one in particular, which was denominated as NWI-3, showed the most consistent associations with water relations parameters and demonstrated the strongest associations in all three germplasm sets. NWI-3 showed a strong linear relationship (r2 >0.6–0.8) with leaf water potential (ψleaf) across a broad range of values (–2.0 to –4.0 MPa) that were determined by natural variation in the environment associated with intra- and inter-seasonal affects. Association observed between NWI-3 and canopy temperature (CT) was consistent with the idea that genotypes with a better hydration status have a larger water flux (increased stomatal conductance) during the day. NWI-3 was also related to soil water potential (ψsoil) and AVSW, indicating that drought-adapted lines could extract more water from deeper soil profiles to maintain favourable water relations. NWI-3 was sufficiently sensitive to detect genotypic differences (indicated by phenotypic and genetic correlations) in water status at the canopy and soil levels indicating its potential application in precision phenotyping

  11. Water dynamics in hyperarid soils of Antarctica including water adsorption and salt hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, B.; Sletten, R. S.

    2009-12-01

    Soils in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica contain ice and considerable amounts of salt. Ice often occurs at shallow depth throughout the dry valleys and other areas of hyperarid permafrost, notably on Mars. This common occurrence of shallow ice is enigmatic; however, since according to published sublimation models it should disappear relatively quickly (at rates of order 0.1 mm a-1) due to vapor loss to the atmosphere. The disagreement between the occurrence of ice on one hand and process-based vapor transport models on other hand suggests that processes in addition to vapor transport have influence on ice stability. From a number of possible processes, infiltration of snowmelt during summer month and vapor trapping due to overlaying snow cover in winter have been discussed in more detail and both processes are likely to slow down ice sublimation. At this point, however, there are only limited field-observations to confirm the presence of such processes. The present study aims to investigate the effect of water adsorption, salt hydration, and freezing point depression on water transport and ice stability. We hypothesize that hydration of salts and water adsorption on grain surfaces play an important role in the survival of ground ice and as water reservoir in these areas and should be taken into account when modeling vapor transport. Furthermore, there is evidence that salt content in ground ice is high enough to cause formation of brines at subfreezing temperatures that can lead to a growth of ground ice. To support our hypothesis we set up a field experiment by monitoring soil temperature, soil humidity, and soil moisture along with climate data and snow cover. In addition we collected soil samples to measure water potential, salt composition, ice content, and soil texture. Soil samples were extracted with water to measure soluble salt content along dry and ice rich soil profiles. In addition we measured soil moisture retention curves at different vapor

  12. Effects of white grubs on soil water infiltration.

    PubMed

    Romero-López, A A; Rodríguez-Palacios, E; Alarcón-Gutiérrez, E; Geissert, D; Barois, I

    2015-04-01

    Water infiltration rates k were measured in mesocosms with soil and "white grubs" of Ancognatha falsa (Arrow) (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae). Three third instars of A. falsa and three adult earthworms Pontoscolex corethrurus were selected, weighted, and introduced into the mesocosms setting three treatments: soil + A. falsa, soil + P. corethrurus, and control (soil without any macroorganism). The experiment had a completely random design with four replicates per treatment (n = 4). The infiltration rates of soil matrix were assessed in each mesocosms with a minidisk tension infiltrometer. Six measurements were made along the experiment. Results showed that larvae of A. falsa promoted a higher water infiltration in the soil, compared to the control. On day 7, k values were similar among treatments, but k values after 28 days and up to 100 days were much higher in the A. falsa treatment (k = 0.00025 cm s(-1)) if compared to control (k = 0.00011 cm s(-1)) and P. corethrurus (k = 0.00008 cm s(-1)) treatments. The k values were significantly higher in the presence of larvae of A. falsa compared to the control and P. corethrurus treatments. The larvae of A. falsa are potential candidates for new assays on soil water infiltration with different tensions to evaluate the role of pores and holes created by the larvae on soils.

  13. Sorption of nonionic organic compounds in soil-water systems containing a micelle-forming surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, S.; Inskeep, W.P.; Boyd, S.A. |

    1994-12-31

    The solubility enhancement of nonionic organic compounds (NOCs) by surfactants may represent an important tool in chemical and biological remediation of contaminated soils. In aqueous systems, the presence of dissolved surfactant emulsions or micelles may enhance the solubility of NOCs by acting as a hydrophobic partitioning phase for the NOCs. However, most environmental remediation efforts involve soil-water or sediment-water systems, where surfactant molecules may also interact with the solid phase. An understanding of the effect of surfactants on the sorption and distribution of NOCs in soil or sediment environments will provide an essential basis for utilizing surfactants in environmental remediation. In this study, the authors examined the effect of a micelle-forming surfactant (Triton X-100) on the sorption of 2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5,5{prime}-PCB, 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane (p,p{prime}-DDT) and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (1,2,4-TCB). A conceptual model, which accurately describes the functional dependence of K* on Triton X-100 concentration, was developed based on the partition coefficients of these NOCs by soil, soil-surfactant, surfactant monomer and surfactant micelle phases. This model can be further modified to provide quantitative prediction of K* of a given NOC at different surfactant concentrations.

  14. Coupled Soil Water and Heat Transport Near the Land Surface in Arid and Semiarid Regions - Multi-Domain Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Binayak; Yang, Zhenlei

    2016-04-01

    Understanding and simulating coupled water and heat transfer appropriately in the shallow subsurface is of vital significance for accurate prediction of soil evaporation that would improve the coupling between land surface and atmosphere, which consequently could enhance the reliability of weather as well as climate forecast. The theory of Philip and de Vries (1957), accounting for water vapor diffusion only, was considered physically incomplete and consequently extended and improved by several researchers by explicitly taking water vapor convection, dispersion or air flow into account. It is generally believed that the soil moisture is usually low in the near surface layer under highly transient field conditions, particularly in arid and semiarid regions, and that accurate characterization of water vapor transport is critical when modeling simultaneous water and heat transport in the shallow field soils. The first objective of this study is thus mainly to test existing coupled water and heat transport theories and to develop reasonable and simplified numerical models using field experimental data collected under semi-arid and arid hydro-climatic conditions. In addition, more complex multi-domain models are developed for ubiquitous heterogeneous terrestrial surfaces such as horizontal textural contrasts or structured heterogeneity including macropores (fractures, cracks, root channels, etc.). This would make coupled water and heat transfer models applicable in such non-homogeneous soils more meaningful and enhance the skill of land-atmosphere interaction models at a larger context.

  15. Temporal and soil management effects on soil infiltration and water content in a hillslope vineyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biddoccu, Marcella; Ferraris, Stefano; Cavallo, Eugenio

    2015-04-01

    The maintenance of bare soil in the vineyard's inter-rows with tillage, as well as other mechanized operations which increase the vehicle traffic, expose the soil to degradation, favoring overland flow and further threats as compaction, reduction of soil water holding capacity and water infiltration. Water infiltration is strongly controlled by field-saturated hydraulic conductivity, which depends primarily on soil texture and structure, and it is characterized by high spatial and temporal variability. Beyond the currently adopted soil management, some major causes in variability of infiltration rates are the history of cultivation and the structure of the first centimeters of the vineyard's soil. A study was carried out in two experimental vineyard plots included in the 'Tenuta Cannona Experimental Vine and Wine Centre of Regione Piemonte', located in NW Italy. The study was addressed to evaluate the temporal variations of the field-saturated hydraulic conductivity, in relation to the soil management adopted in the inter-rows of a hillslope vineyard. The investigation was carried out in a vineyard comparing the adoption of two different soil managements in the inter-rows: 1) conventional tillage and 2) controlled grass cover. Several series of double-ring of infiltration tests were carried out during a 2-years period of observation, using the simplified falling head technique (SFH). In order to take into account the effect of tractor traffic, the tests were done both inside the the track, the portion of soil affected by the transit of tractor wheels or tracks, and outside the track. Before the execution of each test, bulk density and initial soil water content close to the investigated area were determined. Relations among infiltration behavior and these parameters were analyzed. Field-saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kfs) at different sampling dates showed high variability, especially in the vineyard with cultivated soil. Indeed, highest infiltration rates were

  16. Reflectance of vegetation, soil, and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L. (Principal Investigator); Gausman, H. W.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J.; Gerbermann, A. H.; Torline, R. J.; Gautreaux, M. R.; Everitt, J. H.; Guellar, J. A.; Rodriguez, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Bands 4, 5, and 7 and 5, 6, and 7 were best for distinguishing among crop and soil categories in ERTS-1 SCENES 1182-16322 (1-21-73) and 1308-16323 (5-21-73) respectively. Chlorotic sorghum areas 2.8 acres or larger in size were identified on a computer printout of band 5 data. Reflectance of crop residues was more often different from bare soil in band 4 than in bands 5, 6, and 7. Simultaneously acquired aircraft and spacecraft MSS data indicated that spacecraft surveys are as reliable as aircraft surveys. ERTS-1 data were successfully used to estimate acreage of citrus, cotton, and sorghum as well as idle crop land.

  17. Stemflow-induced processes of soil water storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germer, Sonja

    2013-04-01

    Compared to stemflow production studies only few studies deal with the fate of stemflow at the near-stem soil. To investigate stemflow contribution to the root zone soil moisture by young and adult babassu palms (Attalea speciosa Mart.), I studied stemflow generation, subsequent soil water percolation and root distributions. Rainfall, stemflow and perched water tables were monitored on an event basis. Perched water tables were monitored next to adult palms at two depths and three stem distances. Dye tracer experiments monitored stemflow-induced preferential flow paths. Root distributions of fine and coarse roots were related to soil water redistribution. Average rainfall-collecting area per adult palm was 6.4 m², but variability between them was high. Funneling ratios ranged between 16-71 and 4-55 for adult and young palms, respectively. Nonetheless, even very small rainfall events of 1 mm can generate stemflow. On average, 9 liters of adult palm stemflow were intercepted and stemflow tended to decrease for-high intensity rainfall events. Young babassu palms funneled rainfall via their fronds, directly to their subterranean stems. The funneling of rainfall towards adult palm stems, in contrast, led to great stemflow fluxes down to the soil and induced initial horizontal water flows through the soil, leading to perched water tables next to palms, even after small rainfall events. The perched water tables extended, however, only a few decimeters from palm stems. After perched water tables became established, vertical percolation through the soil dominated. To my knowledge, this process has not been described before, and it can be seen as an addition to the two previously described stemflow-induced processes of Horton overland flow and fast, deep percolation along roots. This study has demonstrated that Babassu palms funnel water to their stems and subsequently store it in the soil next to their stems in areas where coarse root length density is very high. This might

  18. Coupled simulation of surface runoff and soil water flow using multi-objective parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhne, John Maximilian; Wöhling, Thomas; Pot, Valérie; Benoit, Pierre; Leguédois, Sophie; Le Bissonnais, Yves; Šimůnek, Jirka

    2011-06-01

    SummaryA comprehensive description of water flow in environmental and agricultural systems requires an account of both surface and subsurface pathways. We present a new model which combines a 1D overland flow model and the 2D subsurface flow HYDRUS-2D model, and uses the multi-objective global search method AMALGAM for inverse parameter estimation. Furthermore, we present data from bench-scale flow experiments which were conducted with two 5-m long replicate soil channels. While rainfall was applied, surface runoff was recorded at the downstream end of the soil channel, subsurface drainage waters were sampled at three positions equally spaced along the channels, and pressure heads were recorded at five depths. The experimental observations were used to evaluate the performance of our modeling system. The complexity of the modeling approach was increased in three steps. First, only runoff and total drainage were simulated, then drainage flows from individual compartments were additionally evaluated, and finally a surface crust and immobile soil water were also considered. The results showed that a good match between measured and observed surface runoff and total drainage does not guarantee accurate representation of the flow process. An inspection of the Pareto results of different multiobjective calibration runs revealed a significant trade-off between individual objectives, showing that no single solution existed to match spatial variability in the flow. In spite of the observed crust formation, its consideration in the more complex model structure did not significantly improve the fit between the model and measurements. Accounting for immobile water regions only slightly improved the fit for one of the two replicate soil channels. Discrepancies between relatively complex model simulations and seemingly simple soil channel experiments suggest the presence of additional unknowns, such as heterogeneity of the soil hydraulic properties. Nevertheless, with its

  19. Sorption of nonionic organic compounds in soil-water systems containing petroleum sulfonate-oil surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, S.; Boyd, S.A.

    1993-07-01

    The effects of petroleum sulfonate-oil (PSO) surfactants (commercial petronates) on sorption of representative nonionic organic contaminants naphthalene, phenanthrene, and 2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5,5{prime}-hexachlorobiphenyl(2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5,5{prime}-PCB) in an Oahtemo (B) soil-water system are presented in this report. In the range of petronate equilibrium aqueous concentrations from 0 to 170 mg L{sup -1}, we have observed a slight increase of the soil-water distribution coefficient (K) for naphthalene, a moderate decrease of K for phenanthrene, and a large (202-fold) decrease of K for 2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5,5{prime}-PCB. Both aqueous and soil-sorbed PSO surfactant act as partition phases for NOCs. Solute partition coefficients between water and the PSO emulsions in the solution and soil-sorbed form, K{sup -em} and K{sup -sem}, respectively, were determined. The K{sup -em} values were consistently but only slightly larger (1.1-3 times) than K{sup -sem}, demonstrating that sorbed PSO is nearly as effective as aqueous-phase PSO emulsion as a partition phase for phenanthrene and 2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5,5{prime}-PCB. The ratios of K{sup -sem} to K{sup -em} for phenanthrene and 2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5,5{prime}-PCB were consistently about four, indicating that on a unit mass basis sorbed PSO is about four times more effective as a sorptive phase for these contaminants than natural soil organic matter. We have developed and evaluated a model that can predict accurately the apparent soil-water distribution coefficient of a nonionic organic compound at different petronate concentrations. 19 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Investigation of indigenous water, salt and soil for solar ponds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    The existence of salt-gradient solar ponds in nature is a strong indication that the successful exploitation of this phenomenon must account adequately for the influences of the local setting. Sun, weather and other general factors are treated elsewhere. This paper deals with water, salt, and soil. A general methodology for evaluating and, where feasible, adjusting the effects of these elements is under development. Eight essential solar pond characteristics have been identified, along with a variety of their dependencies upon properties of water, salt and soil. The comprehensive methodology, when fully developed, will include laboratory investigation in such diverse areas as brine physical chemistry, light transmission, water treatment, brine-soil interactions, sealants, and others. With the Salton Sea solar pond investigation as an example, some methods under development will be described.

  1. A Rapid, Accurate, and Efficient Method to Map Heavy Metal-Contaminated Soils of Abandoned Mine Sites Using Converted Portable XRF Data and GIS.

    PubMed

    Suh, Jangwon; Lee, Hyeongyu; Choi, Yosoon

    2016-12-01

    The use of portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) increases the rapidity and accuracy of soil contamination mapping, respectively. In practice, it is often necessary to repeat the soil contamination assessment and mapping procedure several times during soil management within a limited budget. In this study, we have developed a rapid, inexpensive, and accurate soil contamination mapping method using a PXRF data and geostatistical spatial interpolation. To obtain a large quantity of high quality data for interpolation, in situ PXRF data analyzed at 40 points were transformed to converted PXRF data using the correlation between PXRF and ICP-AES data. The method was applied to an abandoned mine site in Korea to generate a soil contamination map for copper and was validated for investigation speed and prediction accuracy. As a result, regions that required soil remediation were identified. Our method significantly shortened the time required for mapping compared to the conventional mapping method and provided copper concentration estimates with high accuracy similar to those measured by ICP-AES. Therefore, our method is an effective way of mapping soil contamination if we consistently construct a database based on the correlation between PXRF and ICP-AES data.

  2. A Rapid, Accurate, and Efficient Method to Map Heavy Metal-Contaminated Soils of Abandoned Mine Sites Using Converted Portable XRF Data and GIS

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jangwon; Lee, Hyeongyu; Choi, Yosoon

    2016-01-01

    The use of portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) increases the rapidity and accuracy of soil contamination mapping, respectively. In practice, it is often necessary to repeat the soil contamination assessment and mapping procedure several times during soil management within a limited budget. In this study, we have developed a rapid, inexpensive, and accurate soil contamination mapping method using a PXRF data and geostatistical spatial interpolation. To obtain a large quantity of high quality data for interpolation, in situ PXRF data analyzed at 40 points were transformed to converted PXRF data using the correlation between PXRF and ICP-AES data. The method was applied to an abandoned mine site in Korea to generate a soil contamination map for copper and was validated for investigation speed and prediction accuracy. As a result, regions that required soil remediation were identified. Our method significantly shortened the time required for mapping compared to the conventional mapping method and provided copper concentration estimates with high accuracy similar to those measured by ICP-AES. Therefore, our method is an effective way of mapping soil contamination if we consistently construct a database based on the correlation between PXRF and ICP-AES data. PMID:27916970

  3. Soil water retention dynamics in Luvisols at contrasting slope positions in lysimeter monoliths from an eroded soil landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbrich, Marcus; Gerke, Horst H.; Sommer, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Modeling water flow and solute transport in variably saturated soils requires the proper description of the soil water retention curve. The problem is that under field conditions, water retention may be hysteretic or otherwise changing in time due to changing soil properties. In arable soil landscapes, these changes may depend on the erosion history which created spatial patterns of soil properties such as texture and organic matter content and differences in crop development. The objective of this study was to analyze the dynamics in field-measured water retention data for Luvisols in 10 cm, 30 cm and 50 cm soil depth (Ap, E, and Bt horizons) at two contrasting at slope positions characterized by different degrees of soil erosion under intensive agricultural cultivation. Drying and wetting water retention was obtained from tensiometer/MPS and TDR data in depths representing same soil horizons. For comparison, we used drying retention data obtained from soil cores using the evaporation method (Hyprop). Drying data were fitted to the unconstrained water retention function proposed by van Genuchten (1980) and the bimodal model of Durner (1994). For wetting data, hydraulic model parameters were determined by using the Pedroso-Williams model (2010). The water contents of wetting and drying branches were dynamically changing. These changes in water retention were different for several horizons of the more eroded Luvisol as compared to the less eroded one. Differences in water retention dynamics could be related to soil tillage and the erosion history at the different slope positions. The water differences in retention could be explained by hysteresis and temporal changes in soil water repellency. Field and lab retention data differed as reported earlier. The results suggest that estimation of soil water retention curves without resorting to time-consuming field measurements remains challenging. The results suggest that for erosion-affected arable soils of the hummocky

  4. Modelling Soil Water Characteristic Curves for the Investigation of Hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallin, Ingrid; Matthews, Peter; Laudone, Maurizio; Van Keulen, Geertje; Doerr, Stefan; Francis, Lewis; Dudley, Ed; Gazze, Andrea; Quinn, Gerry; Whalley, Richard; Ashton, Rhys

    2016-04-01

    Soil hydrophobicity presents a major challenge for the future, as it reduces both plant-available water and irrigation efficiency, and can increase flooding hazards and erosion. A collaborative research project has been set up in the UK to study hydrophobicity over a wide range of length scales. At core scale, we are investigating the wetting behaviour of water repellent soils in order to model percolation through hydrophobic pore spaces. To that end, water retention measurements were carried out on both wettable and forcibly-wetted water-repellent soils collected from three locations in England and Wales. The data were then fitted with both the commonly used Van Genuchten model and an alternative model from PoreXpert, a software program that analyses and models porous materials. The Van Genuchten model fits a curve to the data using parameters related to air entry suction, irreducible water content and pore size distribution. By contrast, PoreXpert uses a Boltzmann-annealed simplex to find a best-fit curve based on parameters directly related to the void structure of the soil: the size of the voids, the shape of the void size distribution, and how the voids are connected to each other. Both Van Genuchten and PoreXpert fit the experimental data well, but where Van Genuchten forces an S-shaped curve that can mask small variations, PoreXpert gives a closer fit of no pre-defined shape that captures subtle differences between data points. This allows us to calculate differences in the effective pore and throat size distributions, and provides a mechanistic framework from which to model additional hydrologic behaviour in water repellent soil. Simulations of capillary induced wetting based on these mechanistic postulates are then compared to wicking experiments at the core scale, which can then be upscaled and applied to other soils.

  5. Mediterranean shrub vegetation: soil protection vs. water availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Estringana, Pablo; Nieves Alonso-Blázquez, M.; Alegre, Alegre; Cerdà, Artemi

    2014-05-01

    Soil Erosion and Land Degradation are closely related to the changes in the vegetation cover (Zhao et al., 2013). Although other factors such as rainfall intensiy or slope (Ziadat and Taimeh, 2013) the plant covers is the main factor that controls the soil erosion (Haregeweyn, 2013). Plant cover is the main factor of soil erosion processes as the vegetation control the infiltration and runoff generation (Cerdà, 1998a; Kargar Chigani et al., 2012). Vegetation cover acts in a complex way in influencing on the one hand on runoff and soil loss and on the other hand on the amount and the way that rainfall reaches the soil surface. In arid and semiarid regions, where erosion is one of the main degradation processes and water is a scant resource, a minimum percentage of vegetation coverage is necessary to protect the soil from erosion, but without compromising the availability of water (Belmonte Serrato and Romero Diaz, 1998). This is mainly controlled by the vegetation distribution (Cerdà, 1997a; Cammeraat et al., 2010; Kakembo et al., 2012). Land abandonment is common in Mediterranean region under extensive land use (Cerdà, 1997b; García-Ruiz, 2010). Abandoned lands typically have a rolling landscape with steep slopes, and are dominated by herbaceous communities that grow on pasture land interspersed by shrubs. Land abandonment use to trigger an increase in soil erosion, but the vegetation recovery reduces the impact of the vegetation. The goal of this work is to assess the effects of different Mediterranean shrub species (Dorycnium pentaphyllum Scop., Medicago strasseri, Colutea arborescens L., Retama sphaerocarpa, L., Pistacia Lentiscus L. and Quercus coccifera L.) on soil protection (runoff and soil losses) and on rainfall reaching soil surface (rainfall partitioning fluxes). To characterize the effects of shrub vegetation and to evaluate their effects on soil protection, two field experiments were carried out. The presence of shrub vegetation reduced runoff by

  6. Impact of regression methods on improved effects of soil structure on soil water retention estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Phuong Minh; De Pue, Jan; Le, Khoa Van; Cornelis, Wim

    2015-06-01

    Increasing the accuracy of pedotransfer functions (PTFs), an indirect method for predicting non-readily available soil features such as soil water retention characteristics (SWRC), is of crucial importance for large scale agro-hydrological modeling. Adding significant predictors (i.e., soil structure), and implementing more flexible regression algorithms are among the main strategies of PTFs improvement. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the improved effect of categorical soil structure information on estimating soil-water content at various matric potentials, which has been reported in literature, could be enduringly captured by regression techniques other than the usually applied linear regression. Two data mining techniques, i.e., Support Vector Machines (SVM), and k-Nearest Neighbors (kNN), which have been recently introduced as promising tools for PTF development, were utilized to test if the incorporation of soil structure will improve PTF's accuracy under a context of rather limited training data. The results show that incorporating descriptive soil structure information, i.e., massive, structured and structureless, as grouping criterion can improve the accuracy of PTFs derived by SVM approach in the range of matric potential of -6 to -33 kPa (average RMSE decreased up to 0.005 m3 m-3 after grouping, depending on matric potentials). The improvement was primarily attributed to the outperformance of SVM-PTFs calibrated on structureless soils. No improvement was obtained with kNN technique, at least not in our study in which the data set became limited in size after grouping. Since there is an impact of regression techniques on the improved effect of incorporating qualitative soil structure information, selecting a proper technique will help to maximize the combined influence of flexible regression algorithms and soil structure information on PTF accuracy.

  7. Multiscale Bayesian neural networks for soil water content estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Raghavendra B.; Mohanty, Binayak P.; Springer, Everett P.

    2008-08-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANN) have been used for some time now to estimate soil hydraulic parameters from other available or more easily measurable soil properties. However, most such uses of ANNs as pedotransfer functions (PTFs) have been at matching spatial scales (1:1) of inputs and outputs. This approach assumes that the outputs are only required at the same scale as the input data. Unfortunately, this is rarely true. Different hydrologic, hydroclimatic, and contaminant transport models require soil hydraulic parameter data at different spatial scales, depending upon their grid sizes. While conventional (deterministic) ANNs have been traditionally used in these studies, the use of Bayesian training of ANNs is a more recent development. In this paper, we develop a Bayesian framework to derive soil water retention function including its uncertainty at the point or local scale using PTFs trained with coarser-scale Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO)-based soil data. The approach includes an ANN trained with Bayesian techniques as a PTF tool with training and validation data collected across spatial extents (scales) in two different regions in the United States. The two study areas include the Las Cruces Trench site in the Rio Grande basin of New Mexico, and the Southern Great Plains 1997 (SGP97) hydrology experimental region in Oklahoma. Each region-specific Bayesian ANN is trained using soil texture and bulk density data from the SSURGO database (scale 1:24,000), and predictions of the soil water contents at different pressure heads with point scale data (1:1) inputs are made. The resulting outputs are corrected for bias using both linear and nonlinear correction techniques. The results show good agreement between the soil water content values measured at the point scale and those predicted by the Bayesian ANN-based PTFs for both the study sites. Overall, Bayesian ANNs coupled with nonlinear bias correction are found to be very suitable tools for deriving soil

  8. Transport of PCBs with leachate water from the contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Kobasić, Vedranka Hodak; Picer, Mladen; Picer, Nena; Calić, Violeta

    2008-08-01

    Contaminated soil was taken from the area around the damaged capacitor of an electrical transformer station in Zadar (Croatia) and a phytoremediation experimental field was constructed with lysimeters. The levels of PCBs in the leachate water samples were measured nearly 3 years. The experiment was conducted under natural climatic conditions, through hot summers and mild winters. Although the amounts of leachated PCBs from the polluted soil were relatively small, their concentrations in leachate water samples from 1,500 to 29,000 ng L(-1) substantially exceeded the maximum allowed concentration of the total PCBs in the fishponds of Croatia (1 ng L(-1)).

  9. Organic compounds in hot-water-soluble fractions from water repellent soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassova, Irena; Doerr, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Water repellency (WR) is a soil property providing hydrophobic protection and preventing rapid microbial decomposition of organic matter entering the soil with litter or plant residues. Global warming can cause changes in WR, thus influencing water storage and plant productivity. Here we assess two different approaches for analysis of organic compounds composition in hot water extracts from accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) of water repellent soils. Extracts were lyophilized, fractionated on SiO2 (sand) and SPE cartridge, and measured by GC/MS. Dominant compounds were aromatic acids, short chain dicarboxylic acids (C4-C9), sugars, short chain fatty acids (C8-C18), and esters of stearic and palmitic acids. Polar compounds (mainly sugars) were adsorbed on applying SPE clean-up procedure, while esters were highly abundant. In addition to the removal of polar compounds, hydrophobic esters and hydrocarbons (alkanes and alkenes < C20) were extracted through desorption of complex colloids stabilized as micelles in dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Water repellency was completely eliminated by hot water under high pressure. The molecular composition of HWSC can play a critical role in stabilization and destabilization of soil organic matter (SOM), particle wettability and C dynamics in soils. Key words: soil water repellency, hot water soluble carbon (HWSC), GC/MS, hydrophobic compounds

  10. Improved Instrument for Detecting Water and Ice in Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin; Chin, Keith; Keymeulen, Didler; McCann, Timothy; Seshadri, Suesh; Anderson, Robert

    2009-01-01

    An instrument measures electrical properties of relatively dry soils to determine their liquid water and/or ice contents. Designed as a prototype of instruments for measuring the liquid-water and ice contents of lunar and planetary soils, the apparatus could also be utilized for similar purposes in research and agriculture involving terrestrial desert soils and sands, and perhaps for measuring ice buildup on aircraft surfaces. This instrument is an improved version of the apparatus described in Measuring Low Concentrations of Liquid Water and Ice in Soil (NPO-41822), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 33, No. 2 (February 2009), page 22. The designs of both versions are based on the fact that the electrical behavior of a typical soil sample is well approximated by a network of resistors and capacitors in which resistances decrease and capacitances increase (and the magnitude and phase angle of impedance changes accordingly) with increasing water content. The previous version included an impedance spectrometer and a jar into which a sample of soil was placed. Four stainless-steel screws at the bottom of the jar were used as electrodes of a fourpoint impedance probe connected to the spectrometer. The present instrument does not include a sample jar and can be operated without acquiring or handling samples. Its impedance probe consists of a compact assembly of electrodes housed near the tip of a cylinder. The electrodes protrude slightly from the cylinder (see Figure 1). In preparation for measurements, the cylinder is simply pushed into the ground to bring the soil into contact with the electrodes.

  11. Monitoring of soil water content and quality inside and outside the water curtain cultivation facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, K.; Kim, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Water curtain cultivation system is an energy saving technique for winter season by splashing groundwater on the inner roof of green house. Artificial groundwater recharge application to the water curtain cultivation facilities was adopted and tested to use groundwater sustainably in a rural region of Korea. The groundwater level in the test site shows natural trend corresponding rainfall pattern except during mid-November to early April when groundwater levels decline sharply due to groundwater abstraction for water curtain cultivation. Groundwater levels are also affected by surface water such as stream, small dams in the stream and agricultural ditches. Infiltration data were collected from lysimeter installation and monitoring inside and outside water cultivation facility and compared with each other. The infiltration data were well correlated with rainfall outside the facility, but the data in the facility showed very different from the other. The missing infiltration data were attributed to groundwater level rise and level sensor location below water table. Soil water contents in the unsaturated zone indicated rainfall infiltration propagation at depth and with time outside the facility. According to rainfall amount and water condition at the initial stage of a rainfall event, the variation of soil water content was shown differently. Soil water contents and electrical conductivities were closely correlated with each other, and they reflected rainfall infiltration through the soil and water quality changes. The monitoring results are useful to reveal the hydrological processes from the infiltration to groundwater recharge, and water management planning in the water cultivation areas.

  12. Optimizing operational water management with soil moisture data from Sentinel-1 satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezij, Michiel; Augustijn, Denie; Hendriks, Dimmie; Hulscher, Suzanne

    2016-04-01

    In the Netherlands, regional water authorities are responsible for management and maintenance of regional water bodies. Due to socio-economic developments (e.g. agricultural intensification and on-going urbanisation) and an increase in climate variability, the pressure on these water bodies is growing. Optimization of water availability by taking into account the needs of different users, both in wet and dry periods, is crucial for sustainable developments. To support timely and well-directed operational water management, accurate information on the current state of the system as well as reliable models to evaluate water management optimization measures are essential. Previous studies showed that the use of remote sensing data (for example soil moisture data) in water management offers many opportunities (e.g. Wanders et al. (2014)). However, these data are not yet used in operational applications at a large scale. The Sentinel-1 satellites programme offers high spatiotemporal resolution soil moisture data (1 image per 6 days with a spatial resolution of 10 by 10 m) that are freely available. In this study, these data will be used to improve the Netherlands Hydrological Instrument (NHI). The NHI consists of coupled models for the unsaturated zone (MetaSWAP), groundwater (iMODFLOW) and surface water (Mozart and DM). The NHI is used for scenario analyses and operational water management in the Netherlands (De Lange et al., 2014). Due to the lack of soil moisture data, the unsaturated zone model is not yet thoroughly validated and its output is not used by regional water authorities for decision-making. Therefore, the newly acquired remotely sensed soil moisture data will be used to improve the skill of the MetaSWAP-model and the NHI as whole. The research will focus among other things on the calibration of soil parameters by comparing model output (MetaSWAP) with the remotely sensed soil moisture data. Eventually, we want to apply data-assimilation to improve

  13. Reflectance of vegetation, soil, and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. This report deals with the selection of the best channels from the 24-channel aircraft data to represent crop and soil conditions. A three-step procedure has been developed that involves using univariate statistics and an F-ratio test to indicate the best 14 channels. From the 14, the 10 best channels are selected by a multivariate stochastic process. The third step involves the pattern recognition procedures developed in the data analysis plan. Indications are that the procedures in use are satsifactory and will extract the desired information from the data.

  14. Transport of PCBs with leachate water from contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Kobasić, Vedranka Hodak; Picer, Mladen; Picer, Nena; Calić, Violeta

    2008-08-01

    Natural soil contaminated with PCBs was used in this study. The soil was excavated from the area around the damaged capacitor of an electrical transformer station in Zadar (ETS 110/35 kV). A lysimeter experiment was conducted for 17 months under natural climatic conditions and designed to measure the concentration of PCB in the soil and leachates. Our research field was composed of four plots and there were three lysimeters on each plot. After 12 months, a negligible quantity of Aroclor 1248 (an average of 0.24%) and the Sigma 7 key PCB congeners (SigmaPCB(7); IUPAC No.: PCB 28, PCB 52, PCB 101, PCB 118, PCB 138, PCB 153 and PCB 180) were leached from the soils into the water collected under the lysimeters (an average of 0.32%). During two soil samplings, the soil was taken at three depths from each lysimeter. The distribution of Aroclor 1248 and 7 individual PCB congeners in the soil layers was determined before and after planting. Plot No. 1 had the highest percentage of contaminant removal after 12 months. The data indicate that the Sigma 7 key PCBs in the surface soil layers of all the plots decreased and the removal percentages ranged between 19.0% (Plot No. 2) and 47.6% (Plot No. 1). Volatilization from the soil surface may be the most important mechanism for the loss of these "more volatile" PCB congeners. The results showed an accumulation of PCBs in the deepest level of the soil plots, probably due to the vertical transfer of the PCBs and the lack of volatilization.

  15. Impact of alfalfa on soil and water quality

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, P.; Moncrief, J.; Gupta, S.

    1997-10-30

    Dominance of row crop agriculture in rolling landscapes of western and Southwestern Minnesota is identified as a primary, non-point source of sediments and associated pollutants reaching the Minnesota River. Currently as a biomass energy project, alfalfa is being promoted in western Minnesota to harvest the leaves for animal feed and stems to generate electricity. As a perennial, leguminous crop grown with minimum inputs, introduction of alfalfa in row cropped lands has potential to improve both in-situ soil productivity and downstream water quality. A field study was initiated in 1996 to compare the volume of runoff and pollutants coming from alfalfa an com-soybean fields in western Minnesota. Two pair of alfalfa and corn-soybean watersheds were instrumented at Morris in the Fall of 1996 to measure rainfall, runoff, and sample water for sediment load, phosphorus, nitrogen, biochemical oxygen demand, and chemical oxygen demand. Simulated rainfall-runoff experiments were conducted on an existing crop rotation - input management study plots at Lamberton to evaluate soil quality effects of the inclusion of alfalfa in a corn-soybean rotation under manure and fertilization management schemes. Alfalfa soil water use as a function of frequency of harvest was also monitored at Morris to evaluate the effect of cutting schedule on soil water use. During the growing season of 1997, alfalfa under a two-cut management scheme used about 25-mm (an inch) more soil water than under a three-cut schedule. The mean differences between the treatments were not significant. The conclusions drawn in this report come from analysis of data collected during one winter-summer hydrologic and crop management cycle. Continued observations through a period of at least 3-5 years is recommended to improve the instrumentation robustness and discern the variability due to climate, soil, and crop management factors.

  16. Water percolation through the root-soil interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benard, Pascal; Kroener, Eva; Vontobel, Peter; Kaestner, Anders; Carminati, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Plant roots exude a significant fraction of the carbon assimilated via photosynthesis into the soil. The mucilaginous fraction of root exudates affects the hydraulic properties of the soil near the roots, the so called rhizosphere, in a remarkable and dynamic way. After drying, mucilage becomes hydrophobic and limits the rewetting of the rhizosphere. Here, we aim to find a quantitative relation between rhizosphere rewetting, particle size, soil matric potential and mucilage concentration. We used a pore-network model in which mucilage was randomly distributed in a cubic lattice. The general idea was that the mucilage concentration per solid soil surface increases the contact angle between the liquid and solid phases consequently limiting the rewetting of pores covered with dry mucilage. We used the Young-Laplace equation to calculate the mucilage concentration at which pores are not wettable for varying particle sizes and matric potentials. Then, we simulated the percolation of water across a cubic lattice. Our simulations predicted that above a critical mucilage concentration water could not flow through the porous medium. The critical mucilage concentration decreased with increasing particle size and decreasing matric potential. The model was compared with experiments of capillary rise in soils of different particle size and mucilage concentration. The experiments confirmed the percolation behaviour of the rhizosphere rewetting. Mucilage turned hydrophobic at concentrations above 0.1 mg/cm2. The critical mucilage concentration at matric potential of -2.5 hPa was ca. 1% [g/g] for fine sand and 0.1 % [g/g] for coarse sand. Our conceptual model is a first step towards a better understanding of the water dynamics in the rhizosphere during rewetting and it can be used to predict in what soil textures rhizosphere water repellency becomes a critical issue for root water uptake.

  17. [Ecological effect of hygroscopic and condensate water on biological soil crusts in Shapotou region of China].

    PubMed

    Pan, Yan-Xia; Wang, Xin-Ping; Zhang, Ya-Feng; Hu, Rui

    2013-03-01

    By the method of field experiment combined with laboratory analysis, this paper studied the ecological significance of hygroscopic and condensate water on the biological soil crusts in the vegetation sand-fixing area in Shapotou region of China. In the study area, 90% of hygroscopic and condensate water was within the 3 cm soil depth, which didn' t affect the surface soil water content. The hygroscopic and condensate water generated at night involved in the exchange process of soil surface water and atmosphere water vapor, made up the loss of soil water due to the evaporation during the day, and made the surface soil water not reduced rapidly. The amount of the generated hygroscopic and condensate water had a positive correlation with the chlorophyll content of biological soil crusts, indicating that the hygroscopic and condensate water could improve the growth activity of the biological soil crusts, and thus, benefit the biomass accumulation of the crusts.

  18. Subsurface drip irrigation emitter spacing effects on soil water redistribution, corn yield, and water productivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emitter spacings of 0.3 to 0.6 m are commonly used for subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) of corn on the deep, silt loam soils of the United States Great Plains. Subsurface drip irrigation emitter spacings of 0.3, 0.6, 0.9 and 1.2 m were examined for the resulting differences in soil water redistribut...

  19. Microbial dynamics and arsenic speciation in rice paddy soil under two water management practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arsenic (As) undergoes several microbial transformations, including oxidation/reduction, methylation/demethylation, and volatilization in soil, which impact As bioavailability. Different water management systems for rice cultivation alter soil-redox conditions and As biogeochemistry. Soil microbial ...

  20. Mobility of organic solvents in water-saturated soil materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roy, W.R.; Griffin, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    This investigation presents an analysis of the mobility of 37 organic solvents in saturated soil-water systems, focusing on adsorption phenomena at the solid-liquid interface This analysis was made, in part, by applying predictive expressions that estimate the potential magnitude of adsorption by soil materials Of the 37 solvents considered, 19 were classified as either "very highly mobile" or "highly mobile" and, thus, would have little tendency to be retained by soils to a significant extent, 12 were considered to have medium mobility and 6 low mobility None of these solvents were in the immobile class The limited information available indicates that these predictive expressions yield satisfactory first approximations of the magnitude of adsorption of these solvents by soil materials ?? 1985 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  1. Soil erodibility and processes of water erosion on hillslope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Rorke B.

    2000-03-01

    The importance of the inherent resistance of soil to erosional processes, or soil erodibility, is generally recognized in hillslope and fluvial geomorphology, but the full implications of the dynamic soil properties that affect erodibility are seldom considered. In Canada, a wide spectrum of soils and erosional processes has stimulated much research related to soil erodibility. This paper aims to place this work in an international framework of research on water erosion processes, and to identify critical emerging research questions. It focuses particularly on experimental research on rill and interrill erosion using simulated rainfall and recently developed techniques that provide data at appropriate temporal and spatial scales, essential for event-based soil erosion prediction. Results show that many components of erosional response, such as partitioning between rill and interrill or surface and subsurface processes, threshold hydraulic conditions for rill incision, rill network configuration and hillslope sediment delivery, are strongly affected by spatially variable and temporally dynamic soil properties. This agrees with other recent studies, but contrasts markedly with long-held concepts of soil credibility as an essentially constant property for any soil type. Properties that determine erodibility, such as soil aggregation and shear strength, are strongly affected by climatic factors such as rainfall distribution and frost action, and show systematic seasonal variation. They can also change significantly over much shorter time scales with subtle variations in soil water conditions, organic composition, microbiological activity, age-hardening and the structural effect of applied stresses. Property changes between and during rainstorms can dramatically affect the incidence and intensity of rill and interrill erosion and, therefore, both short and long-term hillslope erosional response. Similar property changes, linked to climatic conditions, may also

  2. Sensible heat balance measurements of soil water evaporation beneath a maize canopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water evaporation is an important component of the water budget in a cropped field. Few methods are available for continuous and independent measurement of soil water evaporation. A sensible heat balance (SHB) approach has recently been demonstrated for continuously determining soil water evapo...

  3. Morphology of Rain Water Channeling in Systematically Varied Model Sandy Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yuli; Cejas, Cesare M.; Barrois, Rémi; Dreyfus, Rémi; Durian, Douglas J.

    2014-10-01

    We visualize the formation of fingered flow in dry model sandy soils under different rain conditions using a quasi-2D experimental setup and systematically determine the impact of the soil grain diameter and surface wetting properties on the water channeling phenomenon. The model sandy soils we use are random closely packed glass beads with varied diameters and surface treatments. For hydrophilic sandy soils, our experiments show that rain water infiltrates a shallow top layer of soil and creates a horizontal water wetting front that grows downward homogeneously until instabilities occur to form fingered flows. For hydrophobic sandy soils, in contrast, we observe that rain water ponds on the top of the soil surface until the hydraulic pressure is strong enough to overcome the capillary repellency of soil and create narrow water channels that penetrate the soil packing. Varying the raindrop impinging speed has little influence on water channel formation. However, varying the rain rate causes significant changes in the water infiltration depth, water channel width, and water channel separation. At a fixed rain condition, we combine the effects of the grain diameter and surface hydrophobicity into a single parameter and determine its influence on the water infiltration depth, water channel width, and water channel separation. We also demonstrate the efficiency of several soil water improvement methods that relate to the rain water channeling phenomenon, including prewetting sandy soils at different levels before rainfall, modifying soil surface flatness, and applying superabsorbent hydrogel particles as soil modifiers.

  4. A method to extract soil water for stable isotope analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Revesz, K.; Woods, P.H.

    1990-01-01

    A method has been developed to extract soil water for determination of deuterium (D) and 18O content. The principle of this method is based on the observation that water and toluene form an azeotropic mixture at 84.1??C, but are completely immiscible at ambient temperature. In a specially designed distillation apparatus, the soil water is distilled at 84.1??C with toluene and is separated quantitatively in the collecting funnel at ambient temperature. Traces of toluene are removed and the sample can be analyzed by mass spectrometry. Kerosene may be substituted for toluene. The accuracy of this technique is ?? 2 and ?? 0.2???, respectively, for ??D and ??18O. Reduced accuracy is obtained at low water contents. ?? 1990.

  5. Effect of Clay Content and Soil-water Potential On Mobilization and Leaching of Colloids In Unsaturated Macroporous Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjaergaard, C.; de Jonge, L. W.; Moldrup, P.

    The transport of strongly sorbed environmental contaminants may be enhanced due to sorption to mobile soil colloids. The most common source of mobile colloids in soil is the in-situ release of water-dispersible colloids (WDC), however experimental investigations of colloid mobilization in unsaturated macroporous soil are scarce. An understanding of the arrangement of colloids in aggregates, and the influence of clay on the development of the soil fabric and pore-size distributions is essential for the in- terpretation of colloid mobilization in soils. This emphasizes the important role of clay content, when evaluating the susceptibility of soils to release colloids and associated contaminants. This study was conducted to determine the effect of clay content and initial soil- water potential on colloid mobilization and leaching. Intact soil cores were sampled from an arable field at six locations along a naturally occurring texture gradient. Soil dispersibility was investigated using capillary saturation and drainage of field-moist packed aggregates. The amount of WDC in the soil was measured for each com- bination of clay content and initial soil-water potential (-2.5, -98 and -15530 hPa). Mobilization and leaching of colloids was investigated from unsaturated intact soil cores. The soils were irrigated at low intensity (1 mm/h), and effluent sampling was conducted at 5 cm tension. The results showed that colloid dispersion was significantly affected by both clay con- tent and initial soil-water potential. With a soil-water potential of -15530 hPa the col- loid release was generally low and no variation occurred between the soils. With in- creasing soil-water potential there was an increase in the amount of WDC for all soils. The increase in WDC was negatively correlated with clay content. The leaching of colloids from intact soil cores also decreased with increasing clay content at an ini- tial soil-water potential of -98 and -2.5 hPa, and no difference between

  6. Soil properties evolution after irrigation with reclaimed water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, M.; González-Naranjo, V.; de Miguel, A.; Martínez-Hernández, V.; Lillo, J.

    2012-04-01

    Many arid and semi-arid countries are forced to look for new and alternative water sources. The availability of suitable quality water for agriculture in these regions often is threatened. In this context of water scarcity, the reuse of treated wastewater for crop irrigation could represent a feasible solution. Through rigorous planning and management, irrigation with reclaimed water presents some advantages such as saving freshwater, reducing wastewater discharges into freshwater bodies and decreasing the amount of added fertilizers due to the extra supply of nutrients by reclaimed water. The current study, which involves wastewater reuse in agriculture, has been carried out in the Experimental Plant of Carrión de los Céspedes (Sevile, Spain). Here, two survey parcels equally designed have been cultivated with Jatropha curcas L, a bioenergetic plant and a non-interfering food security crop. The only difference between the two parcels lies on the irrigation water quality: one is irrigated with groundwater and another one with reclaimed water. The main aim of this study focuses on analysing the outstanding differences in soil properties derived from irrigation with two water qualities, due to their implications for plant growth. To control and monitor the soil variables, soil samples were collected before and after irrigation in the two parcels. pH, electrical conductivity, cation exchange capacity, exchangeable cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+ and K+), kjeldahl nitrogen, organic matter content and nutrients (boron, phosphorus, nitrogen, potassium) were measured. Data were statistically analyzed using the R package. To evaluate the variance ANOVA test was used and to obtain the relations between water quality and soil parameters, Pearson correlation coefficient was computed. According to other authors, a decrease in the organic matter content and an increase of parameters such as pH, electrical conductivity and some exchangeable cations were expected. To date and after

  7. SCREENING TO IDENTIFY AND PREVENT URBAN STORM WATER PROBLEMS: ESTIMATING IMPERVIOUS AREA ACCURATELY AND CHEAPLY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Complete identification and eventual prevention of urban/suburban water quality problems pose significant monitoring challenges. Uncontrolled growth of impervious surfaces (roads, buildings and parking) causes detrimental hydrologic changes, stream channel erosion, habitat degra...

  8. Application of minidisk infiltrometer to estimate soil water repellency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alagna, Vincenzo; Iovino, Massimo; Bagarello, Vincenzo; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Lichner, Ľubomír

    2016-04-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) reduces affinity of soils to water resulting in detrimental implication for plants growth as well as for hydrological processes. During the last decades, it has become clear that SWR is much more widespread than formerly thought, having been reported for a wide variety of soils, land uses and climatic conditions. The repellency index (RI), based on soil-water to soil-ethanol sorptivity ratio, was proposed to characterize subcritical SWR that is the situation where a low degree of repellency impedes infiltration but does not prevent it. The minidisk infiltrometer allows adequate field assessment of RI inherently scaled to account for soil physical properties other than hydrophobicity (e.g., the volume, connectivity and the geometry of pores) that directly influence the hydrological processes. There are however some issues that still need consideration. For example, use of a fixed time for both water and ethanol sorptivity estimation may lead to inaccurate RI values given that water infiltration could be negligible whereas ethanol sorptivity could be overestimated due to influence of gravity and lateral diffusion that rapidly come into play when the infiltration process is very fast. Moreover, water and ethanol sorptivity values need to be determined at different infiltration sites thus implying that a large number of replicated runs should be carried out to obtain a reliable estimate of RI for a given area. Minidisk infiltrometer tests, conducted under different initial soil moisture and management conditions in the experimental sites of Ciavolo, Trapani (Italy) and Javea, Alicante (East Spain), were used to investigate the best applicative procedure to estimate RI. In particular, different techniques to estimate the water, Sw, and ethanol, Se, sorptivities were compared including i) a fixed 1-min time interval, ii) the slope of early-time 1D infiltration equation and iii) the two-term transient 3D infiltration equation that explicitly

  9. Plant Response to Differential Soil Water Content and Salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, A. B.; Dara, A.; Kamai, T.; Ngo, A.; Walker, R.; Hopmans, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Root-zone soil water content is extremely dynamic, governed by complex and coupled processes such as root uptake, irrigation, evaporation, and leaching. Root uptake of water and nutrients is influenced by these conditions and the processes involved. Plant roots are living and functioning in a dynamic environment that is subjected to extreme changes over relatively short time and small distances. In order to better manage our agricultural resources and cope with increasing constraints of water limitation, environmental concerns and climate change, it is vital to understand plants responses to these changes in their environment. We grew chick pea (Cicer arietinum) plants, in boxes of 30 x 25 x 1 cm dimensions filled with fine sand. Layers of coarse sand (1.5 cm thick) were embedded in the fine-sand media to divide the root growth environment into sections that were hydraulically disconnected from each other. This way, each section could be independently treated with differential levels of water and salinity. The root growth and distribution in the soil was monitored on daily bases using neutron radiography. Daily water uptake was measured by weighing the containers. Changes of soil water content in each section of the containers were calculated from the neutron radiographs. Plants that part of their root system was stressed with drought or salinity showed no change in their daily water uptake rate. The roots in the stressed sections stayed turgid during the stress period and looked healthy in the neutron images. However the uptake rate was severely affected when the soil in the non-stressed section started to dry. The plants were then fully irrigated with water and the water uptake rate recovered to its initial rate shortly after irrigation. The neutron radiographs clearly illustrated the shrinkage and recovery of the roots under stress and the subsequent relief. This cycle was repeated a few times and the same trend could be reproduced. Our results show that plants

  10. External exposure to radionuclides in air, water, and soil

    SciTech Connect

    Eckerman, K.F.; Ryman, J.C.

    1996-05-01

    Federal Guidance Report No. 12 tabulates dose coefficients for external exposure to photons and electrons emitted by radionuclides distributed in air, water, and soil. The dose coefficients are intended for use by Federal Agencies in calculating the dose equivalent to organs and tissues of the body.

  11. 30 year soil water trends along an elevation gradient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many of the issues associated with ongoing global climate change hinge on the impacts of the documented physical changes (e.g., rising temperature) on the ecological systems that sustain life. A primary interface between these two is the soil, where water and nutrients are stored for plant consumpti...

  12. Effect of soil pollution on water for mixing of concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, M. Cecilia Soto; Tapia Alvarez, Carolina; Decinti Weiss, Alejandra; Zamorano Vargas, Macarena; Corail Sanchez, Camila; Hurtado Nuñez, Camilo; Guzman Hermosilla, Matías; Pardo Fabregat, Francisco; Vidal, Manuel Miguel Jordan; Borras, Jaume Bech; Roca, Nuria

    2016-04-01

    ISO 12439, in addition to chemical and physical requirements, establishes maximum levels for harmful substances that may be present in the mixing water of concrete, when they come from natural sources from contaminated soils. These harmful substances considered in the ISO are sugars, phosphates (P2O5), nitrate (NO3-), lead (P2+) and zinc (Zn2+). As an alternative to the maximum values, ISO verifies the effect of these substances in water from contaminated soils. This measurement is made on the effect on the mechanical strength of the concrete (compression at 7 and 28 days) and the setting times (start and end setting). This paper presents the results obtained on samples of concrete made with smaller, similar and more content to the maximum levels set by ISO 12439 are presented. The results establish that in the case of nitrate, a substance present in many contaminated soils margins resistance variation or setting times allowed by ISO 12439 are not met. Finally, it is concluded that in case of presence of these pollutants should be performed strength tests and setting times before authorizing the use of water. Keywords: Harmful substances, contaminated soils, water pollution.

  13. Using Gypsum to Affect Soil Erosion Processes and Water Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A driving force in soil erosion is the low electrolyte content of rain water. Various electrolyte sources have proven useful in serving as electrolyte sources such as phosphogypsum, lime and various salts, however, each has other potential problems. We performed a number of studies on low cost gypsu...

  14. Effective Calibration of Low-Cost Soil Water Content Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Bogena, Heye Reemt; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Schilling, Bernd; Weuthen, Ansgar; Vereecken, Harry

    2017-01-01

    Soil water content is a key variable for understanding and modelling ecohydrological processes. Low-cost electromagnetic sensors are increasingly being used to characterize the spatio-temporal dynamics of soil water content, despite the reduced accuracy of such sensors as compared to reference electromagnetic soil water content sensing methods such as time domain reflectometry. Here, we present an effective calibration method to improve the measurement accuracy of low-cost soil water content sensors taking the recently developed SMT100 sensor (Truebner GmbH, Neustadt, Germany) as an example. We calibrated the sensor output of more than 700 SMT100 sensors to permittivity using a standard procedure based on five reference media with a known apparent dielectric permittivity (1 < Ka < 34.8). Our results showed that a sensor-specific calibration improved the accuracy of the calibration compared to single “universal” calibration. The associated additional effort in calibrating each sensor individually is relaxed by a dedicated calibration setup that enables the calibration of large numbers of sensors in limited time while minimizing errors in the calibration process. PMID:28117731

  15. Quantification of soil water evaporation using TDR-microlysimetry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water evaporation is conventionally measured using microlysimeters by evaluating the daily change in mass. Daily removal is laborious and replacement immediately after irrigation events is impractical because of field wetness which leads to delays and an underestimation of evaporation. Irrigati...

  16. Fractional Wetting and Contact Angle Dynamics in Water Repellent Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beatty, S. M.; Smith, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    Soil water repellency is a vadose zone phenomenon most often associated with reduced or impeded infiltration for some time. Even if only short-lived, problems caused by soil water repellency are numerous and significant. In recent years, a substantial interdisciplinary research effort has advanced our knowledge of soil water behavior in these highly complex and non-linear hydrologic systems. However, fundamental understanding of the interdependent relationship between static conditions and dynamic processes is still largely undeveloped. In this study we used Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis (ADSA) and instrumented infiltration experiments to systematically measure and quantify static controls and dynamic processes in hydrophobic media. Using natural materials collected from a wildfire site approximately 1.5 years post-fire, we show that infiltration processes within these materials are largely governed by the spatial and temporal variation of wettable and non-wettable fractions. The approach taken 1) facilitated the development of our understanding of the interdependent nature of static and dynamic variables on soil water behavior in these materials and 2) indicates that the dynamic nature of these hydrophobic materials is well expressed empirically over centimeter spatial scales and temporal scales on the order of 10’s of minutes to hours.

  17. A new soil water and bulk eletrical conductivity sensor technology for irrigation and salinity management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many soil water sensors, especially those based on electromagnetic (EM) properties of soils, have been shown to be unsuitable in salt-affected or clayey soils. Most available soil water content sensors are of this EM type, particularly the so-called capacitance sensors. They often over estimate and ...

  18. Sensible Heat Measurements Indicating Depth and Magnitude of Subsurface Soil Water Evaporation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water evaporation is typically determined by techniques that assume the latent heat flux originates from the soil surface. Here, we describe a new technique for determining in situ soil water evaporation dynamics from fine-scale measurements of soil temperature and thermal properties with heat ...

  19. A Manual on Conservation of Soil and Water. Appropriate Technologies for Development. R-38.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    In order to keep the land productive, a good conservation program is imperative. The primary purpose of soil and water conservation is to prevent soil erosion and heal its scars. This handbook explains the causes, processes, and consequences of soil erosion and depletion, and describes major soil- and water-conservation measures. This book was…

  20. Aerobic degradation and photolysis of tylosin in water and soil.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dingfei; Coats, Joel R

    2007-05-01

    Veterinary antibiotics enter the environment through the application of organic fertilizers to cropland. In this study, the aerobic degradation of tylosin, a widely used antibiotic in the production of livestock and poultry, was conducted in water and in soil in an effort to further investigate its environmental fate. Tylosin is a macrolide antibiotic, which consists of four factors (A, B, C, D). Water and soil were sampled at selected times and analyzed for tylosin and its degradation products by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), with product identification confirmed by HPLC-mass spectrometry. Tylosin A is degraded with a half-life of 200 d in the light in water, and the total loss of tylosin A in the dark is 6% of the initial spiked amount during the experimental period. Tylosin C and D are relatively stable except in ultrapure water in the light. Slight increases of tylosin B after two months and formation of two photoreaction isomers of tylosin A were observed under exposure to light. However, tylosin probably would degrade faster if the experimental containers did not prevent ultraviolet transmission. In soil, tylosin A has a dissipation half-life of 7 d, and tylosin D is slightly more stable, with a dissipation half-life of 8 d in unsterilized and sterilized soil. Sorption and abiotic degradation are the major factors influencing the loss of tylosin in the environment, and no biotic degradation was observed at the test concentration either in pond water or in an agronomic soil, as determined by comparing dissipation profiles in sterilized and unsterilized conditions.

  1. How can climate, soil, and monitoring schedule affect temporal stability of soil water contents?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, G.; Pachepsky, Y. A.; Vereecken, H.

    2012-12-01

    Temporal stability (TS) of soil water content (SWC) reflects the spatio-temporal organization of soil water. The TS SWC was originally recognized as a phenomenon that can be used to provide temporal average SWC of an area of interest from observations at a representative location(s). Currently application fields of TS SWC are numerous, e.g. up- and downscaling SWC, SWC monitoring and data assimilation, precision farming, and sensor network design and optimization. However, the factors that control the SWC organization and TS SWC are not completely understood. Among these factors are soil hydraulic properties that are considered as local controls, weather patterns, and the monitoring schedule. The objective of this work was to use modeling to assess the effect of these factors on the spatio-temporal patterns of SWC. We ran the HYDRUS6 code to simulate four years of SWC in 4-m long soil columns. The columns were assumed homogeneous, soil hydraulic conductivity was drawn from lognormal distributions. Sets of columns were generated separately for sandy loam and loamy soils, soil water retention was set to typical values for those soil textures. Simulations were carried out for four climates present at the continental US. The climate-specific weather patterns were obtained with the CLIGEN code using climate-specific weather observation locations that were humid subtropical from College Station (TX), humid continental from Indianapolis (IN), cold semiarid from Moscow (ID) and hot semiarid from Tucson (AZ). We evaluated the TS and representative location (RL) selections by comparing i) different climates; ii) for the same climates different years; iii) different time intervals between samplings; iv) one year duration surveys vs. one month summer campaigns; and v) different seasons of the same year. Spatial variability of the mean relative differences (MRD) differed among climates for both soils, as the probability of observing the same variance in the MRD was lower than

  2. Subcritical Water Extraction of Amino Acids from Atacama Desert Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Pelletier, Christine C.; Kirby, James P.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    Amino acids are considered organic molecular indicators in the search for extant and extinct life in the Solar System. Extraction of these molecules from a particulate solid matrix, such as Martian regolith, will be critical to their in situ detection and analysis. The goals of this study were to optimize a laboratory amino acid extraction protocol by quantitatively measuring the yields of extracted amino acids as a function of liquid water temperature and sample extraction time and to compare the results to the standard HCl vapor- phase hydrolysis yields for the same soil samples. Soil samples from the Yungay region of the Atacama Desert ( Martian regolith analog) were collected during a field study in the summer of 2005. The amino acids ( alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine, serine, and valine) chosen for analysis were present in the samples at concentrations of 1 - 70 parts- per- billion. Subcritical water extraction efficiency was examined over the temperature range of 30 - 325 degrees C, at pressures of 17.2 or 20.0 MPa, and for water- sample contact equilibration times of 0 - 30 min. None of the amino acids were extracted in detectable amounts at 30 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), suggesting that amino acids are too strongly bound by the soil matrix to be extracted at such a low temperature. Between 150 degrees C and 250 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), the extraction efficiencies of glycine, alanine, and valine were observed to increase with increasing water temperature, consistent with higher solubility at higher temperatures, perhaps due to the decreasing dielectric constant of water. Amino acids were not detected in extracts collected at 325 degrees C ( at 20.0 MPa), probably due to amino acid decomposition at this temperature. The optimal subcritical water extraction conditions for these amino acids from Atacama Desert soils were achieved at 200 degrees C, 17.2 MPa, and a water- sample contact equilibration time of 10 min.

  3. Soil erosion by water - model concepts and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Juergen

    2010-05-01

    Soil erosion is not a continuous process but the result of isolated surface runoff events, whose erosional effects are determined by numerous temporally and spatially varying variables. Thus the monitoring of soil loss by direct observation is extremely limited with respect to space and time. Usually observation plots cover an area of less than 100 m2 and the observation period is less than 10 years. In order to estimate soil losses by water erosion for others than empirically observable conditions, mathematical models are needed, which are able to describe the interaction of the different physical mechanisms involved either statistically or on the basis of physical algorithms. Such models are absolutely essential for risk prognoses on catchment and regional scale. Besides the aspect of soil conservation the delivery of sediments and sediment bound pollutants into surface water bodies are of increasing relevance in this context. Based on an exemplary selection of existing water erosion models this contribution aims to give an overview over different mathematical approaches used for the description of particle detachment, transport and deposition of soil particles. According to the chronology in the development of soil erosion models empirical algorithms will be presented first based on the USLE approach. However, since purely empirical models like USLE are limited to the estimation of annual soil loss further attempts in soil erosion modelling are focussed on event based estimations considering the fact that soil erosion is not a continuous process but the result of isolated runoff events. One of the first models of this type was CREAMS using physically based algorithms in combination with empirical ones in order to describe the basic erosion processes. Today there are diverse soil erosion models available following in principle the CREAMS concept but using different algorithms in detail. Concerning particle detachment, transport and deposition alternative

  4. Soil quality assessment of urban green space under long-term reclaimed water irrigation.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Sidan; Chen, Weiping

    2016-03-01

    Reclaimed water is widely used for landscape irrigation with the benefits of saving fresh water and ameliorating soil quality. Field samples were collected from seven parks in Beijing irrigated reclaimed water with different irrigation history in 2011 and 2014 to evaluate the long-term impacts of reclaimed water irrigation on soil quality. Soil quality index method was used to assess the comprehensive effects of reclaimed water irrigation on soil. Results showed that the effects of reclaimed water irrigation on the soil nutrient conditions were limited. Compared with tap water irrigation, soil salinity was significantly higher in 2011, while the difference was insignificant in 2014; soil heavy metals were slightly higher by 0.5-10.6 % in 2011 and 2014, while the differences were insignificant. Under reclaimed water irrigation, soil biological activities were significantly improved in both years. Total nitrogen in reclaimed water had a largest effect on soil quality irrigated reclaimed water. Soil quality irrigated with reclaimed water increased by 2.6 and 6.8 % respectively in 2011 and 2014, while the increases were insignificant. Soil quality of almost half samples was more than or closed to soil quality of natural forest in Beijing. Soil quality was ameliorated at some extent with long-term reclaimed water irrigation.

  5. Governing equations of transient soil water flow and soil water flux in multi-dimensional fractional anisotropic media and fractional time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavvas, M. Levent; Ercan, Ali; Polsinelli, James

    2017-03-01

    In this study dimensionally consistent governing equations of continuity and motion for transient soil water flow and soil water flux in fractional time and in fractional multiple space dimensions in anisotropic media are developed. Due to the anisotropy in the hydraulic conductivities of natural soils, the soil medium within which the soil water flow occurs is essentially anisotropic. Accordingly, in this study the fractional dimensions in two horizontal and one vertical directions are considered to be different, resulting in multi-fractional multi-dimensional soil space within which the flow takes place. Toward the development of the fractional governing equations, first a dimensionally consistent continuity equation for soil water flow in multi-dimensional fractional soil space and fractional time is developed. It is shown that the fractional soil water flow continuity equation approaches the conventional integer form of the continuity equation as the fractional derivative powers approach integer values. For the motion equation of soil water flow, or the equation of water flux within the soil matrix in multi-dimensional fractional soil space and fractional time, a dimensionally consistent equation is also developed. Again, it is shown that this fractional water flux equation approaches the conventional Darcy equation as the fractional derivative powers approach integer values. From the combination of the fractional continuity and motion equations, the governing equation of transient soil water flow in multi-dimensional fractional soil space and fractional time is obtained. It is shown that this equation approaches the conventional Richards equation as the fractional derivative powers approach integer values. Then by the introduction of the Brooks-Corey constitutive relationships for soil water into the fractional transient soil water flow equation, an explicit form of the equation is obtained in multi-dimensional fractional soil space and fractional time. The

  6. Soil water and transpirable soil water fraction variability within vineyards of the Penedès DO (NE Spain) affected by management practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concepción Ramos, Maria

    2015-04-01

    This work investigated the variability in soil water recorded within the vineyard plots related to soil properties and management practices and its influence on the transpirable sol water fraction. The study was carried out in vineyards in the Penedès Designation of Origin, planted with Chardonnay, with different disturbance degree and with compost treated and untreated areas within the plots. The response in years with different rainfall distributions, included years with extreme situations were evaluated. The main soil types are Typic Xerorthent and Calcixerollic Xerorthent and soil is bare most of the time. Soil water content was measured at different depths using TDR probes. The transpirable soil water fraction was estimated as the ratio between available soil water (ASW) at a given date and the total transpirable soil water (TTSW). TTSW was estimated as the soil water reserve held between an upper and lower limit (respectively, the soil water content near field capacity and soil water content at the end of a dry summer) and integrated over the estimated effective rooting depth. Both minimum and maximum soil water values varied within the plot at all depths. On the surface the minimum values ranged between 4.45 to about 10%, while on deeper layers it ranged between 7.8 and 17.8%. Regarding the maximum value varied between 17.45 and 24.8%. The transpirable soil water fraction for a given year varied significantly within the plot, with differences greater than 20% between the treated and untreated areas. The results were more exacerbated in the driest years an in those with more irregular distribution. Water available has a significant effect on yield. The results indicate the need of using different strategies for water management within the plots.

  7. Reflectance of vegetation, soil, and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A ratio of MSS channels 5 and 7 (5/7) and 5 to 6 (5/6) signals resulted in a correct recognition of 86.9% of the members of representative crop and soil conditions, compared with recognitions of 60.0, 64.1, 74.1, and 81.4% for channels 4, 5, 6, and 7 taken individually. Based on this result a satellite channel ratio procedure has been developed that enhances line printer gray maps for more efficient experimental test site location in the CCT data. Because independent estimates are not available to judge acreage estmates derived from ERTS-1 data against, except for a few crops, an interpenetrating sample constituting 3.5% of the county is ground truthed periodically. The crop of land uses and their acreages, respectively, as estimated from the interpenetrating samples, are: cotton, 129, 714; sorghum, 182,783; mixed citrus, 53,954; oranges, 16,929; grapefruit, 13,863; rangeland, 137,845; and, improved pastures, 57.169.

  8. Reflectance of vegetation, soil, and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The Kubelka-Munk model, a regression model, and a combination of these models were used to extract plant, soil, and shadow reflectance components of vegetated surfaces. The combination model was superior to the others; it explained 86% of the variation in band 5 reflectance of corn and sorghum, and 90% of the variation in band 6 reflectance of cotton. A fractional shadow term substantially increased the proportion of the digital count sum of squares explained when plant parameters alone explained 85% or less of the variation. Overall recognition of 94 agricultural fields using simultaneously acquired aircraft and spacecraft MSS data was 61.8 and 62.8%, respectively; recognition of vegetable fields larger than 10 acres and taller than 25 cm, rose to 88.9 and 100% for aircraft and spacecraft, respectively. Agriculture and rangeland, were well discriminated for the entire county but level 2 categories of vegetables, citrus, and idle cropland, except for citrus, were not.

  9. Reflectance of vegetation, soil, and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Gausman, H. W.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J.; Gerbermann, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Iron deficient and normal grain sorghum plants were sufficiently different spectrally in ERTS-1 band 5 CCT data to detect chlorotic sorghum areas 2.8 acres (1.1 hectares) or larger in size in computer printouts of the MSS data. The ratio of band 5 to band 7 or band 7 minus band 5 relates to vegetation ground cover conditions and helps to select training samples representative of differing vegetation maturity or vigor classes and to estimate ground cover or green vegetation density in the absence of ground information. The four plant parameters; leaf area index, plant population, plant cover, and plant height explained 87 to 93% of the variability in band 6 digital counts and from 59 to 90% of the variation in bands 4 and 5. A ground area 2244 acres in size was classified on a pixel by pixel basis using simultaneously acquired aircraft support and ERTS-1 data. Overall recognition for vegetables, immature crops and mixed shrubs, and bare soil categories was 64.5% for aircraft and 59.6% for spacecraft data, respectively. Overall recognition results on a per field basis were 61.8% for aircraft and 62.8% for ERTS-1 data.

  10. Daily potential evapotranspiration and diurnal climate forcings: influence on the numerical modelling of soil water dynamics and evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Siqing; Graham, Wendy D.; Jacobs, Jennifer M.

    2005-07-01

    A physically based, variably saturated flow model was developed to predict soil water dynamics, evapotranspiration (ET) from the vadose zone, and recharge to (or exfiltration from) the saturated zone using mean daily atmospheric forcings and to identify the value of diurnal climate forcings on those predictions. The vadose zone flow is modelled using the Galerkin finite element technique to solve Richards' equation in one-dimension. The model was able to accurately predict measured soil moisture, water table elevation and actual ET at Paynes Prairie State Preserve in Florida. The forecast Nash-Sutcliffe efficiencies of actual ET, water table and average soil moisture content increased modestly, from 0.605-0.653, 0.888-0.916 to 0.902-0.913, respectively, when the average daily ET forcing was replaced with a diurnal evaporation cycle. Several additional numerical experiments were conducted to evaluate the influence of the evaporation cycle disaggregation approach on modelled ET and soil moisture content for different soil textures, vegetation surfaces, and water table depth. The results show that the enhanced predictive value of the diurnal ET cycle increases with decreasing vegetation, decreasing clay content, and increasing water table depth. Using numerical studies, actual evaporation is shown to be higher for daily average evaporation as compared to the diurnal cycle evaporation for specific ranges of shallow water table depth. For clay soils, this range occurs from approximately 40 to 300 cm below land surface for bare soils and from approximately 40 to well below 300 cm below land surface for vegetated soils. The range for sandy soils is approximately 80-200 cm below land surface for both bare and vegetated soils. Within this range, the maximum difference of the actual to potential evapotranspiration ratio for the clay soil, resulting from using different forcing methods, is 20 and 10% for bare soil and vegetated conditions, respectively. The forcing method

  11. Archaeol: an indicator of methanogenesis in water-saturated soils.

    PubMed

    Lim, Katie L H; Pancost, Richard D; Hornibrook, Edward R C; Maxfield, Peter J; Evershed, Richard P

    2012-01-01

    Oxic soils typically are a sink for methane due to the presence of high-affinity methanotrophic Bacteria capable of oxidising methane. However, soils experiencing water saturation are able to host significant methanogenic archaeal communities, potentially affecting the capacity of the soil to act as a methane sink. In order to provide insight into methanogenic populations in such soils, the distribution of archaeol in free and conjugated forms was investigated as an indicator of fossilised and living methanogenic biomass using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with selected ion monitoring. Of three soils studied, only one organic matter-rich site contained archaeol in quantifiable amounts. Assessment of the subsurface profile revealed a dominance of archaeol bound by glycosidic headgroups over phospholipids implying derivation from fossilised biomass. Moisture content, through control of organic carbon and anoxia, seemed to govern trends in methanogen biomass. Archaeol and crenarchaeol profiles differed, implying the former was not of thaumarcheotal origin. Based on these results, we propose the use of intact archaeol as a useful biomarker for methanogen biomass in soil and to track changes in moisture status and aeration related to climate change.

  12. Soil water repellency and infiltration in coarse-textured soils of burned and unburned sagebrush ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Millions of dollars are spent each year in the United States to mitigate the effects of wildfires and reduce the risk of flash floods and debris flows. Research from forested, chaparral, and rangeland communities indicate severe wildfires can cause significant increases in soil water repellency res...

  13. Role of soil adsorption and microbial degradation on dissipation of mesotrione in plant available soil water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mesotrione is a carotenoid biosynthesis-inhibiting herbicide labeled for pre-emergence and post emergent weed control in corn production. Understanding the factors that influence the dissipation of mesotrione in soil and in the plant available water (PAW) is important for both the environmental fat...

  14. Influence of the initial soil water content on Beerkan water infiltration experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassabatere, L.; Loizeau, S.; Angulo-Jaramillo, R.; Winiarski, T.; Rossier, Y.; Delolme, C.; Gaudet, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    Understanding and modeling of water flow in the vadose zone are important with regards water management and infiltration devices design. Water infiltration process clearly depends on initial soil water content, in particular for sandy soils with high organic matter content. This study investigates the influence of initial water content on water infiltration in a hydrophobic sandy soil and on the related derivation of hydraulic parameters using the BEST algorithm (Lassabatere et al., 2006). The studied sandy soil has a high total organic content decreasing from 3.5% (w/w) at the surface to 0.5% (w/w) below 1cm depth. The highest TOC at surface was due to the presence of a dense biofilm and resulted in a high surface hydrophobicity under dry conditions (low initial water contents). The water infiltration experiments consisted in infiltrating known volumes of water through a simple ring at null pressure head (Beerkan method). The infiltrations were performed during three successive days after a dry period with a storm event between the first and the second day (5 mm) and another between the second and the third day (35 mm). These events resulted in an increase in initial water contents, from less than 5% for the first day to around 10% for the last day. Experiments were performed for appropriate conditions for Beerkan experiments: initial water contents below 1/4 of the saturated water content and uniform water profile resulting from water redistribution after each rainfall event. The analysis of the infiltration data clearly highlights the strong effect of hydrophobicity. For the driest initial conditions (first day), infiltration rates increased with time, whereas they decreased with time for wetter conditions. Such a decrease agreed with the principles of water infiltration without hydrophobicity. In addition, total cumulative infiltrations were far higher for the wettest conditions. Regarding hydraulic characterization, only the data obtained during the last

  15. Generation of Accurate Lateral Boundary Conditions for a Surface-Water Groundwater Interaction Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khambhammettu, P.; Tsou, M.; Panday, S. M.; Kool, J.; Wei, X.

    2010-12-01

    The 106 mile long Peace River in Florida flows south from Lakeland to Charlotte Harbor and has a drainage basin of approximately 2,350 square miles. A long-term decline in stream flows and groundwater potentiometric levels has been observed in the region. Long-term trends in rainfall, along with effects of land use changes on runoff, surface-water storage, recharge and evapotranspiration patterns, and increased groundwater and surface-water withdrawals have contributed to this decline. The South West Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) has funded the development of the Peace River Integrated Model (PRIM) to assess the effects of land use, water use, and climatic changes on stream flows and to evaluate the effectiveness of various management alternatives for restoring stream flows. The PRIM was developed using MODHMS, a fully integrated surface-water groundwater flow and transport simulator developed by HydroGeoLogic, Inc. The development of the lateral boundary conditions (groundwater inflow and outflow) for the PRIM in both historical and predictive contexts is discussed in this presentation. Monthly-varying specified heads were used to define the lateral boundary conditions for the PRIM. These head values were derived from the coarser Southern District Groundwater Model (SDM). However, there were discrepancies between the simulated SDM heads and measured heads: the likely causes being spatial (use of a coarser grid) and temporal (monthly average pumping rates and recharge rates) approximations in the regional SDM. Finer re-calibration of the SDM was not feasible, therefore, an innovative approach was adopted to remove the discrepancies. In this approach, point discrepancies/residuals between the observed and simulated heads were kriged with an appropriate variogram to generate a residual surface. This surface was then added to the simulated head surface of the SDM to generate a corrected head surface. This approach preserves the trends associated with

  16. Wide-range and accurate modeling of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) adsorption/desorption on agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Oliver-Rodríguez, B; Zafra-Gómez, A; Reis, M S; Duarte, B P M; Verge, C; de Ferrer, J A; Pérez-Pascual, M; Vílchez, J L

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, rigorous data and adequate models about linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) adsorption/desorption on agricultural soil are presented, contributing with a substantial improvement over available adsorption works. The kinetics of the adsorption/desorption phenomenon and the adsorption/desorption equilibrium isotherms were determined through batch studies for total LAS amount and also for each homologue series: C10, C11, C12 and C13. The proposed multiple pseudo-first order kinetic model provides the best fit to the kinetic data, indicating the presence of two adsorption/desorption processes in the general phenomenon. Equilibrium adsorption and desorption data have been properly fitted by a model consisting of a Langmuir plus quadratic term, which provides a good integrated description of the experimental data over a wide range of concentrations. At low concentrations, the Langmuir term explains the adsorption of LAS on soil sites which are highly selective of the n-alkyl groups and cover a very small fraction of the soil surface area, whereas the quadratic term describes adsorption on the much larger part of the soil surface and on LAS retained at moderate to high concentrations. Since adsorption/desorption phenomenon plays a major role in the LAS behavior in soils, relevant conclusions can be drawn from the obtained results.

  17. Soil and water characteristics of a young surface mine wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew Cole, C.; Lefebvre, Eugene A.

    1991-05-01

    Coal companies are reluctant to include wetland development in reclamation plans partly due to a lack of information on the resulting characteristics of such sites. It is easier for coal companies to recreate terrestrial habitats than to attempt experimental methods and possibly face significant regulatory disapproval. Therefore, we studied a young (10 years) wetland on a reclaimed surface coal mine in southern Illinois so as to ascertain soil and water characteristics such that the site might serve as a model for wetland development on surface mines. Water pH was not measured because of equipment problems, but evidence (plant life, fish, herpetofauna) suggests suitable pH levels. Other water parameters (conductivity, salinity, alkalinity, chloride, copper, total hardness, iron, manganese, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, and sulfate) were measured, and only copper was seen in potentially high concentrations (but with no obvious toxic effects). Soil variables measured included pH, nitrate, nitrite, ammonia, potassium, calcium, magnesium, manganese, aluminum, iron, sulfate, chloride, and percent organic matter. Soils were slightly alkaline and most parameters fell within levels reported for other studies on both natural and manmade wetlands. Aluminum was high, but this might be indicative more of large amounts complexed with soils and therefore unavailable, than amounts actually accessible to plants. Organic matter was moderate, somewhat surprising given the age of the system.

  18. Mapping soil water content under sparse vegetation and changeable sky conditions: comparison of two thermal inertia approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltese, Antonino; Capodici, Fulvio; Ciraolo, Giuseppe; La Loggia, Goffredo

    2013-01-01

    A critical analysis of a thermal inertia approach to map surface soil water content on bare and sparsely vegetated soils by means of remotely sensed data is reported. The study area is an experimental field located in Barrax, Spain. In situ data were acquired within the Barrax 2011 research project. An advanced hyperspectral scanner airborne imager provides images in the visible/near-infrared and thermal infrared bands. Images were acquired both in day and night times by the Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial between 12th and 13th of June 2011. The scene covers a corn irrigation pivot surrounded by bare soil, where a set of in situ data have been collected both previously and simultaneously to overpasses. To validate remotely sensed estimations, an ad hoc dataset has been produced by measuring spectra, radiometric temperatures, surface soil water content, and soil thermal properties. These data were collected on two transects covering bare and sparsely vegetated soils. This ground dataset was used (1) to verify if a thermal inertia method can be applied to map the water content on soil covered by sparse vegetation and (2) to quantify a correction factor accounting for solar radiation reduction due to sky cloudiness. The experiment intended to test a spatially constant and a spatially distributed approach to estimate the phase difference. Both methods were then applied to the airborne images collected during the following days to obtain the spatial distribution of surface soil water content. Results confirm that the thermal inertia method can be applied to sparsely vegetated soil characterized by low fractional cover if the solar radiation reaching the ground is accurately estimated. A spatially constant value of the phase difference allows a good assessment of thermal inertia, whereas the comparison with the three-temperature approach did not give conclusive responses. Results also show that clear sky, only at the time of the acquisition, does not provide

  19. Integrated double mulching practices optimizes soil temperature and improves soil water utilization in arid environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Wen; Feng, Fuxue; Zhao, Cai; Yu, Aizhong; Hu, Falong; Chai, Qiang; Gan, Yantai; Guo, Yao

    2016-09-01

    Water shortage threatens agricultural sustainability in many arid and semiarid areas of the world. It is unknown whether improved water conservation practices can be developed to alleviate this issue while increasing crop productivity. In this study, we developed a "double mulching" system, i.e., plastic film coupled with straw mulch, integrated together with intensified strip intercropping. We determined (i) the responses of soil evaporation and moisture conservation to the integrated double mulching system and (ii) the change of soil temperature during key plant growth stages under the integrated systems. Experiments were carried out in northwest China in 2009 to 2011. Results show that wheat-maize strip intercropping in combination with plastic film and straw covering on the soil surface increased soil moisture (mm) by an average of 3.8 % before sowing, 5.3 % during the wheat and maize co-growth period, 4.4 % after wheat harvest, and 4.9 % after maize harvest, compared to conventional practice (control). The double mulching decreased total evapotranspiration of the two intercrops by an average of 4.6 % ( P < 0.05), compared to control. An added feature was that the double mulching system decreased soil temperature in the top 10-cm depth by 1.26 to 1.31 °C in the strips of the cool-season wheat, and by 1.31 to 1.51 °C in the strips of the warm-season maize through the 2 years. Soil temperature of maize strips higher as 1.25 to 1.94 °C than that of wheat strips in the top 10-cm soil depth under intercropping with the double mulching system; especially higher as 1.58 to 2.11 °C under intercropping with the conventional tillage; this allows the two intercrops to grow in a well "collaborative" status under the double mulching system during their co-growth period. The improvement of soil moisture and the optimization of soil temperature for the two intercrops allow us to conclude that wheat-maize intensification with the double mulching system can be used as an

  20. Integrated double mulching practices optimizes soil temperature and improves soil water utilization in arid environments.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wen; Feng, Fuxue; Zhao, Cai; Yu, Aizhong; Hu, Falong; Chai, Qiang; Gan, Yantai; Guo, Yao

    2016-09-01

    Water shortage threatens agricultural sustainability in many arid and semiarid areas of the world. It is unknown whether improved water conservation practices can be developed to alleviate this issue while increasing crop productivity. In this study, we developed a "double mulching" system, i.e., plastic film coupled with straw mulch, integrated together with intensified strip intercropping. We determined (i) the responses of soil evaporation and moisture conservation to the integrated double mulching system and (ii) the change of soil temperature during key plant growth stages under the integrated systems. Experiments were carried out in northwest China in 2009 to 2011. Results show that wheat-maize strip intercropping in combination with plastic film and straw covering on the soil surface increased soil moisture (mm) by an average of 3.8 % before sowing, 5.3 % during the wheat and maize co-growth period, 4.4 % after wheat harvest, and 4.9 % after maize harvest, compared to conventional practice (control). The double mulching decreased total evapotranspiration of the two intercrops by an average of 4.6 % (P < 0.05), compared to control. An added feature was that the double mulching system decreased soil temperature in the top 10-cm depth by 1.26 to 1.31 °C in the strips of the cool-season wheat, and by 1.31 to 1.51 °C in the strips of the warm-season maize through the 2 years. Soil temperature of maize strips higher as 1.25 to 1.94 °C than that of wheat strips in the top 10-cm soil depth under intercropping with the double mulching system; especially higher as 1.58 to 2.11 °C under intercropping with the conventional tillage; this allows the two intercrops to grow in a well "collaborative" status under the double mulching system during their co-growth period. The improvement of soil moisture and the optimization of soil temperature for the two intercrops allow us to conclude that wheat-maize intensification with the double mulching system can be

  1. Novel Robotic Platforms for the Accurate Sampling and Monitoring of Water Columns.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Roemi; Apalkov, Andrey; Armada, Manuel

    2016-08-29

    The hydrosphere contains large amounts of suspended particulate material, including living and non-living material that can be found in different compositions and concentrations, and that can be composed of particles of different sizes. The study of this particulate material along water columns plays a key role in understanding a great variety of biological, chemical, and physical processes. This paper presents the conceptual design of two patented robotic platforms that have been conceived for carrying out studies of water properties at desired depths with very high accuracy in the vertical positioning. One platform has been specially designed for operating near to a reservoir bottom, while the other is intended to be used near the surface. Several experimental tests have been conducted in order to validate the proposed approaches.

  2. More accurate X-ray scattering data of deeply supercooled bulk liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Neuefeind, Joerg C; Benmore, Chris J; Weber, Richard; Paschek, Dietmar

    2011-01-01

    Deeply supercooled water droplets held container-less in an acoustic levitator are investigated with high energy X-ray scattering. The temperature dependence X-ray structure function is found to be non-linear. Comparison with two popular computer models reveals that structural changes are predicted too abrupt by the TIP5P model, while the rate of change predicted by TIP4P is in much better agreement with experiment. The abrupt structural changes predicted by the TIP5P model to occur in the temperature range between 260-240K as water approaches the homogeneous nucleation limit are unrealistic. Both models underestimate the distance between neighbouring oxygen atoms and overestimate the sharpness of the OO distance distribution, indicating that the strength of the H-bond is overestimated in these models.

  3. Novel Robotic Platforms for the Accurate Sampling and Monitoring of Water Columns

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Roemi; Apalkov, Andrey; Armada, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The hydrosphere contains large amounts of suspended particulate material, including living and non-living material that can be found in different compositions and concentrations, and that can be composed of particles of different sizes. The study of this particulate material along water columns plays a key role in understanding a great variety of biological, chemical, and physical processes. This paper presents the conceptual design of two patented robotic platforms that have been conceived for carrying out studies of water properties at desired depths with very high accuracy in the vertical positioning. One platform has been specially designed for operating near to a reservoir bottom, while the other is intended to be used near the surface. Several experimental tests have been conducted in order to validate the proposed approaches. PMID:27589745

  4. An Accurate and Complete Empirical Line List for Water Vapor Between 5850 and 7920 CM-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailenko, Semen; Mondelain, Didier; Kassi, Samir; Campargue, Alain

    2014-06-01

    An empirical line list has been constructed for "natural" water vapor at 296 K in the 5850 - 7920 wn region. It was obtained by gathering separate line lists recently published on the basis of spectra recorded by high sensitivity Continuous Wave Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CW-CRDS) of natural water, complemented with literature data for the strongest lines. The list includes 38318 transitions of four major water isotopologues (H_216O, H_218O, H_217O and HD16O) with an intensity cut-off of 1x10-29 cm/molecule at 296 K. The list is made mostly complete over the whole spectral region by including a large number of weak lines with positions calculated using experimentally determined energy levels and intensities obtained from variational calculations. In addition, we provide HD18O and HD17O lists in the same region for transitions with intensities larger than 1x10-29 cm/molecule. The HD18O and HD17O lists (1972 lines in total) were obtained using empirical energy levels available in the literature and variational intensities. The global list (40290 transitions) for water including the contribution of the six major isotopologues will be adopted for the next edition of the GEISA database in the region. The advantages and drawbacks of our list are discussed in comparison with the list provided for the same region in the 2012 edition of the HITRAN database. The direct comparison of the CRDS spectra to simulations based on the HITRAN list has revealed some insufficiencies which could easily be corrected: missing HDO lines, duplicated lines, inaccurate line positions or line intensities from variational calculations.

  5. An accurate and complete empirical line list for water vapor between 5850 and 7920 cm-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailenko, S. N.; Mondelain, D.; Kassi, S.; Campargue, A.

    2014-06-01

    An empirical line list has been constructed for “natural” water vapor at 296 K in the 5850-7920 cm-1 region. It was obtained by gathering separate line lists recently published on the basis of spectra recorded by high sensitivity Continuous Wave Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CW-CRDS) of natural water, complemented with literature data for the strongest lines. The list includes 38,318 transitions of four major water isotopologues (H216O, H218O, H217O and HD16O) with an intensity cut-off of 1×10-29 cm/molecule at 296 K. The list is made mostly complete over the whole spectral region by including a large number of weak lines with positions calculated using experimentally determined energy levels and intensities obtained from variational calculations. In addition, we provide HD18O and HD17O lists in the same region for transitions with intensities larger than 1×10-29 cm/molecule. The HD18O and HD17O lists (1972 lines in total) were obtained using empirical energy levels available in the literature and variational intensities. The global list (40,290 transitions) for water including the contribution of the six major isotopologues will be adopted for the next edition of the GEISA database in the region. The advantages and drawbacks of our list are discussed in comparison with the list provided for the same region in the 2012 edition of the HITRAN database. The direct comparison of the CRDS spectra to simulations based on the HITRAN list has revealed some insufficiencies which could easily be corrected: missing HDO lines, duplicated lines, inaccurate line positions or line intensities from variational calculations.

  6. Leachate concentrations from water leach and column leach tests on fly ash-stabilized soils

    SciTech Connect

    Bin-Shafique, S.; Benson, C.H.; Edil, T.B.; Hwang, K.

    2006-01-15

    Batch water leaching tests (WLTs) and column leaching tests (CLTs) were conducted on coal-combustion fly ashes, soil, and soil-fly ash mixtures to characterize leaching of Cd, Cr, Se, and Ag. The concentrations of these metals were also measured in the field at two sites where soft fine-grained soils were mechanically stabilized with fly ash. Concentrations in leachate from the WLTs on soil-fly ash mixtures are different from those on fly ash alone and cannot be accurately estimated based on linear dilution calculations using concentrations from WLTs on fly ash alone. The concentration varies nonlinearly with fly ash content due to the variation in pH with fly ash content. Leachate concentrations are low when the pH of the leachate or the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the soil is high. Initial concentrations from CLTs are higher than concentrations from WLTs due to differences in solid-liquid ratio, pH, and solid-liquid contact. However, both exhibit similar trends with fly ash content, leachate pH, and soil properties. Scaling factors can be applied to WLT concentrations (50 for Ag and Cd, 10 for Cr and Se) to estimate initial concentrations for CLTs. Concentrations in leachate collected from the field sites were generally similar or slightly lower than concentrations measured in CLTs on the same materials. Thus, CLTs appear to provide a good indication of conditions that occur in the field provided that the test conditions mimic the field conditions. In addition, initial concentrations in the field can be conservatively estimated from WLT concentrations using the aforementioned scaling factors provided that the pH of the infiltrating water is near neutral.

  7. Plant uptake of elements in soil and pore water: field observations versus model assumptions.

    PubMed

    Raguž, Veronika; Jarsjö, Jerker; Grolander, Sara; Lindborg, Regina; Avila, Rodolfo

    2013-09-15

    Contaminant concentrations in various edible plant parts transfer hazardous substances from polluted areas to animals and humans. Thus, the accurate prediction of plant uptake of elements is of significant importance. The processes involved contain many interacting factors and are, as such, complex. In contrast, the most common way to currently quantify element transfer from soils into plants is relatively simple, using an empirical soil-to-plant transfer factor (TF). This practice is based on theoretical assumptions that have been previously shown to not generally be valid. Using field data on concentrations of 61 basic elements in spring barley, soil and pore water at four agricultural sites in mid-eastern Sweden, we quantify element-specific TFs. Our aim is to investigate to which extent observed element-specific uptake is consistent with TF model assumptions and to which extent TF's can be used to predict observed differences in concentrations between different plant parts (root, stem and ear). Results show that for most elements, plant-ear concentrations are not linearly related to bulk soil concentrations, which is congruent with previous studies. This behaviour violates a basic TF model assumption of linearity. However, substantially better linear correlations are found when weighted average element concentrations in whole plants are used for TF estimation. The highest number of linearly-behaving elements was found when relating average plant concentrations to soil pore-water concentrations. In contrast to other elements, essential elements (micronutrients and macronutrients) exhibited relatively small differences in concentration between different plant parts. Generally, the TF model was shown to work reasonably well for micronutrients, whereas it did not for macronutrients. The results also suggest that plant uptake of elements from sources other than the soil compartment (e.g. from air) may be non-negligible.

  8. Wildfire impacts on soil-water retention in the Colorado Front Range, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ebel, Brian A.

    2012-01-01

    This work examined the plot-scale differences in soil-water retention caused by wildfire in the area of the 2010 Fourmile Canyon Fire in the Colorado Front Range, United States. We measured soil-water retention curves on intact cores and repacked samples, soil particle-size distributions, and organic matter content. Estimates were also made of plant-available water based on the soil-water retention curves. Parameters for use in soil-hydraulic property models were estimated; these parameters can be used in unsaturated flow modeling for comparing burned and unburned watersheds. The primary driver for measured differences in soil-water retention in burned and unburned soils was organic matter content and not soil-particle size distribution. The tendency for unburned south-facing soils to have greater organic matter content than unburned north-facing soils in this field area may explain why unburned south-facing soils had greater soil-water retention than unburned north-facing soils. Our results suggest that high-severity wildfire can “homogenize” soil-water retention across the landscape by erasing soil-water retention differences resulting from organic matter content, which for this site may be affected by slope aspect. This homogenization could have important implications for ecohydrology and plant succession/recovery in burned areas, which could be a factor in dictating the window of vulnerability of the landscape to flash floods and erosion that are a common consequence of wildfire.

  9. Wildfire impacts on soil-water retention in the Colorado Front Range, United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebel, Brian A.

    2012-12-01

    This work examined the plot-scale differences in soil-water retention caused by wildfire in the area of the 2010 Fourmile Canyon Fire in the Colorado Front Range, United States. We measured soil-water retention curves on intact cores and repacked samples, soil particle-size distributions, and organic matter content. Estimates were also made of plant-available water based on the soil-water retention curves. Parameters for use in soil-hydraulic property models were estimated; these parameters can be used in unsaturated flow modeling for comparing burned and unburned watersheds. The primary driver for measured differences in soil-water retention in burned and unburned soils was organic matter content and not soil-particle size distribution. The tendency for unburned south-facing soils to have greater organic matter content than unburned north-facing soils in this field area may explain why unburned south-facing soils had greater soil-water retention than unburned north-facing soils. Our results suggest that high-severity wildfire can "homogenize" soil-water retention across the landscape by erasing soil-water retention differences resulting from organic matter content, which for this site may be affected by slope aspect. This homogenization could have important implications for ecohydrology and plant succession/recovery in burned areas, which could be a factor in dictating the window of vulnerability of the landscape to flash floods and erosion that are a common consequence of wildfire.

  10. Monitoring Changes in Soil Water Content Using Subsurface Displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrash, C. J.; Miller, S.; Murdoch, L. C.; Germanovich, L. N.; Gates, J. B.; Volkmer, A.; Weinburg, A.

    2013-12-01

    Closing the water balance is important in many research and water resource applications, but it can be difficult to accomplish due to a variety of factors. A new technique that measures vertical displacement of soil in order to estimate the change in mass of water stored in overlying material is being developed. The measurement technique uses an extensometer that functions as a lysimeter, and we refer to the technique as Displacement Extensometry for Lysimetric Terrain Analysis (DELTA). DELTA extensometers are 2-m-long devices deployed by creating a friction fit with intact soil below a cased borehole. The instrument measures small displacements (better than 10 nm resolution) in response to changes of mass in the overlying soil, or other factors. The instrument averages over a region that scales with the depth of installation (the radius of influence is approximately 2x the depth). The spatial averaging of this instrument extends over regions representative of agricultural fields, hydrologic model grid blocks, and small watersheds. Five DELTA extensometers have been deployed at a field site near Clemson, SC at depths of 3, 6, and 9 m within saprolite derived from biotite gneiss. Barometric pressure, precipitation, and soil moisture are being measured along with displacement. Signals from the co-located extensometers are remarkably similar, demonstrating reproducibility of the technique. Rainfall causes soil compression, and at 6 m depth there is approximately 200 nm of compression per 1 mm of rainfall. There is gradual expansion, which ranges from 0.15 to 1.75 μm/day, following rainfall. The gradual unloading of the soil is interpreted as water loss due to evapotranspiration. Superimposed on the signal are diurnal fluctuations of 0.5 to 1 μm, which correlate to changes in barometric pressure. Four DELTA extensometers were recently deployed in hard, clayey sediments at two field locations south of Amarillo, TX. The instruments will compliment current research on

  11. Links between soil water availability and soil respiration in semi-arid ecosystems along the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, K.; Anderson, D. E.; Blanken, P.

    2013-12-01

    Drylands cover approximately 40% of the world's terrestrial ecosystems, and this includes mostly arid and semi-arid regions. As water-limited environments, they are sensitive to changes in soil water content which may result in large carbon efflux from soils in response to precipitation events. Previous research has demonstrated that soil temperature and soil water content (e.g. volumetric or gravimetric) are the primary controls on soil respiration (Rs), however, few studies relate soil water potential to Rs, although it may be a better metric for representing how water is available to soil microbes and vegetation. Therefore, resolving how episodic changes in soil water potential cause arid/semi-arid ecosystems to shift from a carbon sink to a source is important for improving future estimates of terrestrial ecosystem fluxes in these areas. Our study focuses on above and belowground fluxes of CO2 and water at two grassland sites and one montane forest site in Colorado. Continuous (hourly) soil CO2 concentration profile measurements, at 5 cm, 10 cm and 20 cm (15 cm in the grasslands) are coupled with continuous (30 minute), collocated soil water content and soil temperature (Ts) measurements. Soil water availability is determined by using tensiometers at each site to relate volumetric water content to matric potential values. All of the sites have ongoing eddy covariance-based surface measurements of water, carbon and energy fluxes, including net ecosystem exchange (NEE). To estimate Rs at the surface, discrete fluxes of CO2 are measured with a portable photosynthesis system (chamber) and soil surface CO2 concentration measurements. To characterize changes in aboveground biomass, vegetation samples are routinely collected from each of the sites and leaf area index (LAI) and dry biomass are determined. Time-series plots of Rs are compared with aboveground fluxes of CO2 as well as soil water, Ts, precipitation, air temperature (Ta), photosynthetically active

  12. Identification of an accurate soil suspension/dispersion modeling method for use in estimating health-based soil cleanup levels of hexavalent chromium in chromite ore processing residues.

    PubMed

    Scott, P K; Finley, B L; Sung, H M; Schulze, R H; Turner, D B

    1997-07-01

    The primary health concern associated with chromite ore processing residues (COPR) at sites in Hudson County, NJ, is the inhalation of Cr(VI) suspended from surface soils. Since health-based soil standards for Cr(VI) will be derived using the inhalation pathway, soil suspension modeling will be necessary to estimate site-specific, health-based soil cleanup levels (HBSCLs). The purpose of this study was to identify the most appropriate particulate emission and air dispersion models for estimating soil suspension at these sites based on their theoretical underpinnings, scientific acceptability, and past performance. The identified modeling approach, the AP-42 particulate emission model and the fugitive dust model (FDM), was used to calculate concentrations of airborne Cr(VI) and TSP at two COPR sites. These estimated concentrations were then compared to concentrations measured at each site. The TSP concentrations calculated using the AP-42/FDM soil suspension modeling approach were all within a factor of 3 of the measured concentrations. The majority of the estimated air concentrations were greater than the measured, indicating that the AP-42/FDM approach tends to overestimate on-site concentrations. The site-specific Cr(VI) HBSCLs for these two sites calculated using this conservative soil suspension modeling approach ranged from 190 to 420 mg/kg.

  13. Laboratory assessment of the mobility of water-dispersed engineered nanoparticles in a red soil (Ultisol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dengjun; Su, Chunming; Zhang, Wei; Hao, Xiuzhen; Cang, Long; Wang, Yujun; Zhou, Dongmei

    2014-11-01

    Soils are major sinks of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) as results of land applications of sewage sludge, accidental spills, or deliberate applications of ENPs (e.g., nano-pesticides). In this study, the transport behaviors of four widely used ENPs (i.e., titanium dioxide [TiO2], buckminsterfullerene [C60], single-walled carbon nanotube [SWNT], and elemental silver [Ag0]) were investigated in water-saturated columns packed with either a quartz sand, a red soil (Ultisol), or sand/soil mixtures with soil mass fraction (λ) from 0% to 100% at slightly acidic solution pH (4.0-5.0). The mobility of tested ENPs decreased significantly with increasing λ, which was attributed to increased surface area and/or retention sites imparted by iron oxides, clay minerals, and organic matter in the red soil. Breakthrough curves of all ENPs exhibited blocking effects (decreasing deposition rate over time) and were well-described using an unfavorable and favorable, two-site kinetic attachment model accounting for random sequential adsorption on the favorable site. Modeled maximum retention capacity and first-order attachment rate coefficient on the favorable site both increased linearly with increasing λ, suggesting that transport parameters of ENPs in natural soils may be accurately extrapolated from transport parameters in the sand/soil mixtures. In addition, the mobility of three negatively charged ENPs (C60, SWNT, and Ag0 NPs) was reversely correlated with their average hydrodynamic diameters, highlighting that the average hydrodynamic diameter of negatively charged ENPs is the dominant physicochemical characteristics controlling their mobility in the Ultisol.

  14. Contact angles of wetting and water stability of soil structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodov, V. A.; Yaroslavtseva, N. V.; Yashin, M. A.; Frid, A. S.; Lazarev, V. I.; Tyugai, Z. N.; Milanovskiy, E. Yu.

    2015-06-01

    From the soddy-podzolic soils and typical chernozems of different texture and land use, dry 3-1 mm aggregates were isolated and sieved in water. As a result, water-stable aggregates and water-unstable particles composing dry 3-1 mm aggregates were obtained. These preparations were ground, and contact angles of wetting were determined by the static sessile drop method. The angles varied from 11° to 85°. In most cases, the values of the angles for the water-stable aggregates significantly exceeded those for the water-unstable components. In terms of carbon content in structural units, there was no correlation between these parameters. When analyzing the soil varieties separately, the significant positive correlation between the carbon content and contact angle of aggregates was revealed only for the loamy-clayey typical chernozem. Based on the multivariate analysis of variance, the value of contact wetting angle was shown to be determined by the structural units belonging to water-stable or water-unstable components of macroaggregates and by the land use type. In addition, along with these parameters, the texture has an indirect effect.

  15. 26 CFR 1.175-1 - Soil and water conservation expenditures; in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Soil and water conservation expenditures; in... Corporations (continued) § 1.175-1 Soil and water conservation expenditures; in general. Under section 175, a farmer may deduct his soil or water conservation expenditures which do not give rise to a deduction...

  16. 26 CFR 1.175-1 - Soil and water conservation expenditures; in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Soil and water conservation expenditures; in... Corporations (continued) § 1.175-1 Soil and water conservation expenditures; in general. Under section 175, a farmer may deduct his soil or water conservation expenditures which do not give rise to a deduction...

  17. 26 CFR 1.175-2 - Definition of soil and water conservation expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Definition of soil and water conservation... Corporations (continued) § 1.175-2 Definition of soil and water conservation expenditures. (a) Expenditures... for the purpose of soil or water conservation in respect of land used in farming, or for...

  18. 26 CFR 1.175-1 - Soil and water conservation expenditures; in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Soil and water conservation expenditures; in... Corporations (continued) § 1.175-1 Soil and water conservation expenditures; in general. Under section 175, a farmer may deduct his soil or water conservation expenditures which do not give rise to a deduction...

  19. Soil water sensing: Implications of sensor capabilities for variable rate irrigation management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation scheduling using soil water sensors aims at maintaining the soil water content in the crop root zone above a lower limit defined by the management allowed depletion (MAD) for that soil and crop, but not so wet that too much water is lost to deep percolation, evaporation and runoff or that...

  20. Soil water sensing methods-Usefulness for evapotranspiration monitoring and links to remote sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water sensing methods are widely used to characterize the rhizosphere and below, but only a few are capable of delivering water content data with accuracy for the entire soil profile such that evapotranspiration (ET) can be determined by soil water balance with minimal error. One such is the ne...

  1. 26 CFR 1.175-2 - Definition of soil and water conservation expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Definition of soil and water conservation... Corporations (continued) § 1.175-2 Definition of soil and water conservation expenditures. (a) Expenditures... for the purpose of soil or water conservation in respect of land used in farming, or for...

  2. 26 CFR 1.175-1 - Soil and water conservation expenditures; in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Soil and water conservation expenditures; in... Corporations (continued) § 1.175-1 Soil and water conservation expenditures; in general. Under section 175, a farmer may deduct his soil or water conservation expenditures which do not give rise to a deduction...

  3. 26 CFR 1.175-2 - Definition of soil and water conservation expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of soil and water conservation... (continued) § 1.175-2 Definition of soil and water conservation expenditures. (a) Expenditures treated as a... of soil or water conservation in respect of land used in farming, or for the prevention of erosion...

  4. 26 CFR 1.175-1 - Soil and water conservation expenditures; in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Soil and water conservation expenditures; in... (continued) § 1.175-1 Soil and water conservation expenditures; in general. Under section 175, a farmer may deduct his soil or water conservation expenditures which do not give rise to a deduction for...

  5. CONVERGING PATTERNS OF UPTAKE AND HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION OF SOIL WATER IN CONTRASTING WOODY VEGETATION TYPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used concurrent measurements of soil water content and soil water potential (Ysoil) to assess the effects of Ysoil on uptake and hydraulic redistribution (HR) of soil water by roots during seasonal drought cycles in six sites characterized by different types and amounts of woo...

  6. COSMOS soil water sensor compared with EM sensor network & weighing lysimeter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water sensing methods are widely used to characterize the root zone and below, but only a few are capable of delivering water content data with accuracy for the entire soil profile such that evapotranspiration (ET) can be determined by soil water balance and irrigations can be scheduled with mi...

  7. HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION OF SOIL WATER DURING SUMMER DROUGHT IN TWO CONTRASTING PACIFIC NORTHWEST CONIFEROUS FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The magnitude of hydraulic redistribution of soil water by roots and its impact on soil water balance were estimated by monitoring time courses of soil water status at multiple depths and root sap flow during droughted conditions in a dry ponderosa pine ecosystem and a moist Doug...

  8. Soil water and vegetation management for cleanup of selenium contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-05-01

    Over the past year scientists have initiatived a new effort aimed at developing a soil water and vegetation management plan for Kesterson Reservoir. The plan is intended to result in a gradual depletion of the inventory of soluble selenium at the Reservoir through a combination agriculturally oriented practices that enhance dissipation of selenium from near surface soils. Agriculturally oriented processes that will contribute to depletion include microbial volatilization from the soils, direct volatilization by living plants, decomposition and volatilization of selenium-bearing vegetation, harvest and removal of seleniferous vegetation, and leaching. The benefits of using this integrated approach are that (1) no single mechanism needs to be relied upon to detoxify the soils, (2) a stable plant community can be established during this period so that impacts to wildlife can be more easily evaluated and controlled, (3) cleanup and management of the site can be carried out in a cost-effective manner. The management plan is also intended to facilitate control over wildlife exposure to selenium contaminated biota by creating a well managed environment. The majority of research associated with this new effort is being carried out at a 200 m by 50 m test plot in Pond 7. A two-line irrigation system , providing local groundwater as an irrigation supply, has been installed. Through an intensive program of soil water sampling, soil gas sampling, vegetation sampling, groundwater monitoring, and soil moisture monitoring, the mass balance for selenium under irrigated conditions is being evaluated. These studies, in conjunction with supplementary laboratory experiments will provide the information needed to develop an optimal management plan for the site. 23 refs., 38 figs., 10 tabs.

  9. Premelted liquid water in frozen soils and its interaction with bio-molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen-Goos, H.; Wettlaufer, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    While liquid water in bulk is unstable on the surface of Mars, there is a possibility for the persistence of thin films of liquid water in the Martian regolith as a result of interfacial forces between the interstitial ice and the soil grains even below the bulk melting temperature. This is referred to as premelting. We present a calculation of the liquid fraction of frozen soils which takes into account premelting in combination with the effect of ionic impurities and the curvature induced freezing point depression (Gibbs-Thomson effect). We introduce a revised density functional theory which accurately treats a simple model for confined liquid water. We use the theory to study how biological matter (antifreeze proteins in particular) inside a narrow liquid cavity in ice interacts with the surrounding ice-water interface. Because in this case the interface is concave and hence the Gibbs-Thomson effect is antagonistic to the liquid phase, the protein-ice interaction is responsible for the persistence of liquid water.

  10. Soil, water, and vegetation conditions in south Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Gausman, H. W.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J.; Everitt, J. H.; Gerbermann, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Software development for a computer-aided crop and soil survey system is nearing completion. Computer-aided variety classification accuracies using LANDSAT-1 MSS data for a 600 hectare citrus farm were 83% for Redblush grapefruit and 91% for oranges. These accuracies indicate that there is good potential for computer-aided inventories of grapefruit and orange citrus orchards with LANDSAT-type MSS data. Mean digital values of clouds differed statistically from those for crop, soil, and water entities, and those for cloud shadows were enough lower than sunlit crop and soil to be distinguishable. The standard errors of estimate for the calibration of computer compatible tape coordinate system (pixel and record) to earth coordinate system (longitude and latitude) for 6 LANDSAT scenes ranged from 0.72 to 1.50 pixels and from 0.58 to 1.75 records.

  11. [Effect of reclaimed water irrigation on soil properties and vertical distribution of heavy metal].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zong-Ming; Chen, Wei-Ping; Jiao, Wen-Tao; Wang, Mei-E

    2012-12-01

    Utilization of reclaimed water is one of the important methods to alleviate water shortage. The effect of reclaimed water irrigation on soil is always a concern. To understand the effect of long time reclaimed water irrigation on soil, typical farmland irrigated with reused water was selected. Soil properties and heavy metal concentration of soil and water samples were analyzed to identify the effect of the irrigation on heavy metal vertical distribution and organic matter content, total carbon, total nitrogen and pH value in soil. The results show that heavy metal contents of irrigation water used in Liangshuihe farmland are 2.5 to 10.5 times higher than that of Beiyechang farmland, and reclaimed water irrigation could cause changes of soil properties that soil organic matter content, total carbon, total nitrogen were increased and pH values were reduced. Based on the field investigation results, the soil nutrient conditions benefit from irrigate reclaimed water, however, the accumulation of heavy metal in soil could raise the risk. As a source of soil heavy metal, reclaimed water irrigation could make differences on the accumulation and mobility of soil heavy metal. Also the distribution and mobility of soil heavy metal are influenced by soil organic matter content and there are more heavy metal were taken up by plants or transferred to the deeper area in Liangshuihe farmland.

  12. Optimal construction of a fast and accurate polarisable water potential based on multipole moments trained by machine learning.

    PubMed

    Handley, Chris M; Hawe, Glenn I; Kell, Douglas B; Popelier, Paul L A

    2009-08-14

    To model liquid water correctly and to reproduce its structural, dynamic and thermodynamic properties warrants models that account accurately for electronic polarisation. We have previously demonstrated that polarisation can be represented by fluctuating multipole moments (derived by quantum chemical topology) predicted by multilayer perceptrons (MLPs) in response to the local structure of the cluster. Here we further develop this methodology of modeling polarisation enabling control of the balance between accuracy, in terms of errors in Coulomb energy and computing time. First, the predictive ability and speed of two additional machine learning methods, radial basis function neural networks (RBFNN) and Kriging, are assessed with respect to our previous MLP based polarisable water models, for water dimer, trimer, tetramer, pentamer and hexamer clusters. Compared to MLPs, we find that RBFNNs achieve a 14-26% decrease in median Coulomb energy error, with a factor 2.5-3 slowdown in speed, whilst Kriging achieves a 40-67% decrease in median energy error with a 6.5-8.5 factor slowdown in speed. Then, these compromises between accuracy and speed are improved upon through a simple multi-objective optimisation to identify Pareto-optimal combinations. Compared to the Kriging results, combinations are found that are no less accurate (at the 90th energy error percentile), yet are 58% faster for the dimer, and 26% faster for the pentamer.

  13. Direct and accurate measurement of size dependent wetting behaviors for sessile water droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jimin; Han, Hyung-Seop; Kim, Yu-Chan; Ahn, Jae-Pyeong; Ok, Myoung-Ryul; Lee, Kyung Eun; Lee, Jee-Wook; Cha, Pil-Ryung; Seok, Hyun-Kwang; Jeon, Hojeong

    2015-12-01

    The size-dependent wettability of sessile water droplets is an important matter in wetting science. Although extensive studies have explored this problem, it has been difficult to obtain empirical data for microscale sessile droplets at a wide range of diameters because of the flaws resulting from evaporation and insufficient imaging resolution. Herein, we present the size-dependent quantitative change of wettability by directly visualizing the three phase interfaces of droplets using a cryogenic-focused ion beam milling and SEM-imaging technique. With the fundamental understanding of the formation pathway, evaporation, freezing, and contact angle hysteresis for sessile droplets, microdroplets with diameters spanning more than three orders of magnitude on various metal substrates were examined. Wetting nature can gradually change from hydrophobic at the hundreds-of-microns scale to super-hydrophobic at the sub-μm scale, and a nonlinear relationship between the cosine of the contact angle and contact line curvature in microscale water droplets was demonstrated. We also showed that the wettability could be further tuned in a size-dependent manner by introducing regular heterogeneities to the substrate.

  14. Direct and accurate measurement of size dependent wetting behaviors for sessile water droplets

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jimin; Han, Hyung-Seop; Kim, Yu-Chan; Ahn, Jae-Pyeong; Ok, Myoung-Ryul; Lee, Kyung Eun; Lee, Jee-Wook; Cha, Pil-Ryung; Seok, Hyun-Kwang; Jeon, Hojeong

    2015-01-01

    The size-dependent wettability of sessile water droplets is an important matter in wetting science. Although extensive studies have explored this problem, it has been difficult to obtain empirical data for microscale sessile droplets at a wide range of diameters because of the flaws resulting from evaporation and insufficient imaging resolution. Herein, we present the size-dependent quantitative change of wettability by directly visualizing the three phase interfaces of droplets using a cryogenic-focused ion beam milling and SEM-imaging technique. With the fundamental understanding of the formation pathway, evaporation, freezing, and contact angle hysteresis for sessile droplets, microdroplets with diameters spanning more than three orders of magnitude on various metal substrates were examined. Wetting nature can gradually change from hydrophobic at the hundreds-of-microns scale to super-hydrophobic at the sub-μm scale, and a nonlinear relationship between the cosine of the contact angle and contact line curvature in microscale water droplets was demonstrated. We also showed that the wettability could be further tuned in a size-dependent manner by introducing regular heterogeneities to the substrate. PMID:26657208

  15. Reconciling seasonal hydraulic risk and plant water use through probabilistic soil-plant dynamics.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xue; Dawson, Todd E; Ackerly, David D; Santiago, Louis S; Thompson, Sally E

    2017-01-28

    Current models used for predicting vegetation responses to climate change are often guided by the dichotomous needs to resolve either (i) internal plant water status as a proxy for physiological vulnerability or (ii) external water and carbon fluxes and atmospheric feedbacks. Yet, accurate representation of fluxes does not always equate to accurate predictions of vulnerability. We resolve this discrepancy using a hydrodynamic framework that simultaneously tracks plant water status and water uptake. We couple a minimalist plant hydraulics model with a soil moisture model and, for the first time, translate rainfall variability at multiple timescales - with explicit descriptions at daily, seasonal, and interannual timescales - into a physiologically meaningful metric for the risk of hydraulic failure. The model, parameterized with measured traits from chaparral species native to Southern California, shows that apparently similar transpiration patterns throughout the dry season can emerge from disparate plant water potential trajectories, and vice versa. The parsimonious set of parameters that captures the role of many traits across the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum is then used to establish differences in species sensitivities to shifts in seasonal rainfall statistics, showing that co-occurring species may diverge in their risk of hydraulic failure despite minimal changes to their seasonal water use. The results suggest potential shifts in species composition in this region due to species-specific changes in hydraulic risk. Our process-based approach offers a quantitative framework for understanding species sensitivity across multiple timescales of rainfall variability and provides a promising avenue toward incorporating interactions of temporal variability and physiological mechanisms into drought response models.

  16. Water and soil pollution in vineyards of central Thailand.

    PubMed

    Joannon, G; Poss, R; Korpraditskul, R; Brunet, D; Boonsook, P

    2001-01-01

    Very intensive cultivation systems have been developed in the delta of the Chao Phraya River for about a century. The objective of the study was to determine the fate of the fertilisers and pesticides applied to vineyards grown on raised beds. Water samples were collected from the outlet of a vineyard to determine the discharge of pollutants in the canal. The accumulation of elements in the soil was investigated by analysing soil samples from different fields. Fertilisation was estimated at 670 kg N, 300 kg P, and 560 kg K year(-1) ha(-1). Insecticides and fungicides were applied every four days on average, using up to 23 different molecules. Little N and no P were discharged in the canals in solution and discharge in suspension was minor. Pesticides were detected in 36% of the water samples. The topsoil contained 1600 mg kg(-1) Bray II P, 936 mg kg(-1) exchangeable K, 170 mg kg(-1) total Cu, and 167 mg kg(-1) total Zn. Pesticides were detected in 62% of the fruits after peeling. Overuse of fertilisers did not lead to water pollution, but overuse of pesticides resulted in pollution of the water bodies and of the fruits. Most applied elements accumulated in the soil, resulting in high values of P, K, Cu, and Zn.

  17. System for high throughput water extraction from soil material for stable isotope analysis of water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major limitation in the use of stable isotope of water in ecological studies is the time that is required to extract water from soil and plant samples. Using vacuum distillation the extraction time can be less than one hour per sample. Therefore, assembling a distillation system that can process m...

  18. Mapping tree root system in dikes using induced polarization: Focus on the influence of soil water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mary, Benjamin; Saracco, Ginette; Peyras, Laurent; Vennetier, Michel; Mériaux, Patrice; Camerlynck, Christian

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we assessed induced polarization as potential non-destructive method for root detection in dike embankments. We used both laboratory and field experiment to describe the electrical signal with a focus on soil water content. Our objective was to determine in which hydric state of the soil, and related electrical properties, roots could be accurately discriminated. We hypothesized that preferential water zone absorption near the roots could, in some conditions, contribute to locate them. During the laboratory experiments, we compared the response of containers filled with the same homogeneous silty clay bare material, and without (A) or with freshly cut root (B) at different levels of soil water content. Resistivity and phase variations with soil water content indicated that it was preferable to work in dry conditions since the contrast was higher. Interactions and overlapping between polarization effects of both root and soil made it difficult to interpret first chargeability maps. This led us to study temporal-spatial variations by considering the dynamics of water absorption during a field experiment. High resolution time lapses images showed a correlation between root location and complex resistivity anomalies. Although these first results have to be confirmed by further measurements, induced polarization seems to add useful information to interpret anomalies produced by woody roots.

  19. Determination of water absorption and water holding capacities of different soil mixtures with MINIDRAIN system to enhance the plant growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudan Acharya, Madhu; Rauchecker, Markus; Wu, Wei

    2014-05-01

    Soil water holding capacity is the amount of water that a given soil can hold against the force of gravity. Soil texture and organic matter are the key components that determine soil water holding capacity. Soils with smaller particle sizes, such as silt and clay have larger surface area can hold more water compared to sand which has large particle sizes which results in smaller surface area. A study report showed that 1% increase in soil humus will result in a 4% increase in stored soil water (Morris, 2004) and 1 part humus holds 4 parts of water (Wheeler and Ward, 1998). Therefore, the more humus that can be added to the soil, the greater the water holding capacity of the soil. As the level of organic matter increases in a soil, the water holding capacity also increases due to the affinity of organic matter for water. The water holding capacity of the soil is determined by the amount of water held in the soil sample vs. the dry weight of the sample. MINIDRAIN is a patented system made of geo-fabric (fleece) or combination of geosynthetics and humus. MINIDRAIN and vegetation nets developed by the company ÖKO-TEX (Linz, Austria) will improve the distribution of water and air in the soils, increase the growth of vegetation and reduce the soil erosion. Depending on the physical configuration, there are four different combinations of MINIDRAIN systems developed by ÖKO-TEX. a) Geotextile (fleece) strips of different sizes (e.g. 5x10x250 mm) b) Net formed strips (drainage nets) of different sizes c) Multilayer geotextile mats with humus, seeds or compost of different sizes (e.g. 10x30x200 mm) d) Multilayer geotextile net formed mats with humus, seeds or compost This paper describes the experimental results of the water absorption and water holding capacity of different forms of MINIDRAIN under different soil mixes. In this experiment, potting soil, coarse sand and LECA (Light weight clay aggregates) balls are mixed with different proportion of MINIDRAIN systems and

  20. Soil layer condensation peak as a response to soil water properties under Sudanese climatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, S.; Motelica-Heino, M.; Ozier-Lafontaine, H.

    2012-04-01

    The soil apparent density is strongly dependent on their physico-chemical properties. It can be negatively impacted by human activities such as soil work or animal pasture or natural salinity influenced by irrigation.. In contrast it can be improved for different depths by agricultural practices. A « condensation peak » defined as an increase in the apparent density was found for the heterogeneous soils of Niger for several profiles of 5 soil classes and for a very shallow depth (10 cm maximum) with a very variable extreme depth (from 35 to 150 cm) associated with extreme density values (from 1.45 to 2). The depth of this peak, for soils neither saline nor vertic, varies inversely with the proportion of soil fine elements (silts+clays). However it corresponds to an average value of useful water (AWC) of 100mm (CV=24.4%). In sodic and alkaline soils this peak can be observed at shallow depths (from 53 to 61cm with a CV from 15 to 40%), thus for much lower AWC values (from 74 to 87cm with a CV from 26 to 47%). It can be found either below or above an impermeable horizon of a maximal density of 2.. This peak is likely to be associated with a multi-annual alternance of humectation-dessication at this depth. Its occurrence is based on an interplay of intrinsic physical and hydric soil properties but also on extrisnic parameters sch as the pluviometry, the location at the scale of the watershed and the micromodelling.

  1. Soil-water contact angle of some soils of the Russian Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykova, Galina; Tyugai, Zemfira; Milanovskiy, Evgeny; Shein, Evgeny

    2016-04-01

    INTRODUCTION Soil wettability affects the aggregate water resistance, the movement of moisture and dissolved substances, preferential flows, etc. There are many factors affecting the soil's wettability (the content of organic matter (OM), soil's mineralogical composition, particle size distribution), so it can reflect changes in the soil, including results of human impact. The quantitative characteristic of soil wettability is a contact angle (CA), its measurement is a new and difficult problem because of the complexity, heterogeneity and polydispersity of the object of investigation. The aim of this work is to study soil-water CA of some soils of the Russian Plane. MATERIALS AND METHODS The objects of study were sod-podzolic (Umbric Albeluvisols Abruptic, Eutric Podzoluvisols), grey forest non-podzolised (Greyic Phaeozems Albic, Haplic Greyzems), typical Chernozems (Voronic Chernozems pachic, Haplic Chernozems) - profiles under the forest and the arable land, and the chestnut (Haplic Kastanozems Chromic, Haplic Kastanozems) soils. The CA's determination was performed by a Drop Shape Analyzer DSA100 by the static sessile drop method. For all samples was determined the content of total and organic carbon (OC and TC) by dry combustion in oxygen flow. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION There is CA increasing from 85,1° (5 cm) to 40-45° (deeper, than 45 cm) in the sod-podzolic soil; OC content is changed at the same depths from 1,44 to 0.22%. We can see the similar picture in profiles of chernozems. In the forest profile the highest OC content and CA value are achieved on the surface of profile (6,41% and 78,1°), and by 90 cm these values are 1.9% and 50.2°. In the chernozem under the arable land the OC content is almost two times less and the profile is more wettable (from 50° to 19° at 5 and 100 cm). Corresponding with the OC content, the curve describing changes of CA in the profile of grey forest soil is S-shaped with peaks at 20 and 150 cm (81,3° and 70° respectively

  2. Soil water content inverse profiling from single TDR waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, R.

    2006-02-01

    An inverse procedure for the estimation of soil water content profiles along TDR probes is presented. A TDR metallic probe is considered as a transmission line, for which relevant partial derivatives equations apply. The direct problem consists in the integration of transmission line equations, providing V( x, t) along the line. To this aim, the unit length parameters of the transmission line must be known. In particular, unit length capacitance C( x) and transverse conductance G( x) depend on water content distribution along the probe θ( x) through relative permittivity ɛr( x) and bulk soil electrical conductivity σ( x), respectively. The inverse procedure consists in finding the water content distribution, and the relevant unit length parameters, giving rise to the best fit between the numerically simulated voltage V(x¯,t) at the beginning of the line and the experimental voltage trace V(x¯,t) measured by a cable tester. In order to reduce the ill-posedness of the inverse problem, unknown water content profiles are expressed by means of a four parameters functional form. The search for the best fitting parameters vector is carried out with a genetic algorithm. The proposed inverse procedure is successfully applied to the determination of vertical water content profiles along a soil sample in the laboratory by means of a single three rods metallic TDR probe. Water content profiles estimated either in steady flow conditions, or during controlled infiltration-evaporation transients are compared with independent water content measurements carried out by means of horizontal TDR probes at various depths, showing in all cases good agreement.

  3. Amend soils with residues from water-treatment processes

    SciTech Connect

    Makansi, J.

    1993-09-01

    This article reports that land application is emerging as a viable disposal/reuse method for water-treatment-process residues. In many cases, these residues actually enhance soil quality and arrest fertilizer loss. Water treatment usually generates solid residues requiring disposal. These include sludges from lime softening and related pretreatment processes and spent ion-exchange resins and adsorbents used for softening, dealkalization, and deionization of surface and well water. Although it may not appear so at first glance, according to consultant Dr. Robert Kunin, these materials have properties that can benefit the soil for agricultural and horticultural needs. Treating water with lime is popular and effective for removing hardness, phosphates, and some silica. Small amounts of alum, chlorine, and/or organic flocculants may also be added in lime-softening processes. Resulting sludge consists of calcium carbonate (CaCO[sub 3]), magnesium hydroxide, and calcium/magnesium/phosphate compounds, along with humic matter and related organic compounds that originate in the raw water. If softening is conducted at high temperatures, large, dense CaCO[sub 3] particles form as the compound crystallizes around sand particles. Disposal of this sludge is often considered a major disadvantage of lime softening. But if the water being treated meets EPA regulations for heavy metals, especially arsenic, then chemical analysis suggests benefits for soils. This has been well-described in texts addressing water treatment. For example, the sludge serves as a mild liming agent and may even supply various plant nutrients. Note that this application is different from municipal wastewater treatment plant sludge, which is difficult to land apply.

  4. Using a hybrid model to predict solute transfer from initially saturated soil into surface runoff with controlled drainage water.

    PubMed

    Tong, Juxiu; Hu, Bill X; Yang, Jinzhong; Zhu, Yan

    2016-06-01

    The mixing layer theory is not suitable for predicting solute transfer from initially saturated soil to surface runoff water under controlled drainage conditions. By coupling the mixing layer theory model with the numerical model Hydrus-1D, a hybrid solute transfer model has been proposed to predict soil solute transfer from an initially saturated soil into surface water, under controlled drainage water conditions. The model can also consider the increasing ponding water conditions on soil surface before surface runoff. The data of solute concentration in surface runoff and drainage water from a sand experiment is used as the reference experiment. The parameters for the water flow and solute transfer model and mixing layer depth under controlled drainage water condition are identified. Based on these identified parameters, the model is applied to another initially saturated sand experiment with constant and time-increasing mixing layer depth after surface runoff, under the controlled drainage water condition with lower drainage height at the bottom. The simulation results agree well with the observed data. Study results suggest that the hybrid model can accurately simulate the solute transfer from initially saturated soil into surface runoff under controlled drainage water condition. And it has been found that the prediction with increasing mixing layer depth is better than that with the constant one in the experiment with lower drainage condition. Since lower drainage condition and deeper ponded water depth result in later runoff start time, more solute sources in the mixing layer are needed for the surface water, and larger change rate results in the increasing mixing layer depth.

  5. New explicit equations for the accurate calculation of the growth and evaporation of hydrometeors by the diffusion of water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R. C.; Coen, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    The traditional explicit growth equation has been widely used to calculate the growth and evaporation of hydrometeors by the diffusion of water vapor. This paper reexamines the assumptions underlying the traditional equation and shows that large errors (10-30 percent in some cases) result if it is used carelessly. More accurate explicit equations are derived by approximating the saturation vapor-density difference as a quadratic rather than a linear function of the temperature difference between the particle and ambient air. These new equations, which reduce the error to less than a few percent, merit inclusion in a broad range of atmospheric models.

  6. Impact of particle nanotopology on water transport through hydrophobic soils.

    PubMed

    Truong, Vi Khanh; Owuor, Elizabeth A; Murugaraj, Pandiyan; Crawford, Russell J; Mainwaring, David E

    2015-12-15

    The impact of non- and poorly wetting soils has become increasingly important, due to its direct influence on the water-limited potential yield of rain-fed grain crops at a time of enhanced global competition for fresh water. This study investigates the physical and compositional mechanisms underlying the influence of soil organic matter (SOM) on the wetting processes of model systems. These model systems are directly related to two sandy wheat-producing soils that have contrasting hydrophobicities. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angle and Raman micro-spectroscopy measurements on model planar and particulate SOM-containing surfaces demonstrated the role of the hierarchical surface structure on the wetting dynamics of packed particulate beds. It was found that a nanoscale surface topology is superimposed over the microscale roughness of the packed particles, and this controls the extent of water ingress into particulate packed beds of these particles. Using two of the dominant component organic species found in the SOM of the two soils used in this study, it was found that the specific interactions taking place between the SOM components, rather than their absolute quantities, dictated the formation of highly hydrophobic surface nanotopologies. This hydrophobicity was demonstrated, using micro-Raman imaging, to arise from the surface being in a composite Cassie-Baxter wetting state. Raman imaging demonstrated that the particle surface nanotopography influenced the degree of air entrapment in the interstices within the particle bed. The influence of a conventional surfactant on the wetting kinetics of both the model planar surfaces and packed particulate beds was quantified in terms of their respective advancing contact angles and the capillary wetting force vector. The information obtained for all of the planar and particulate surfaces, together with that obtained for the two soils, allowed linear relationships to be obtained in plots of the contact angle

  7. Modifying soil water status and improving stand establishment in a water repellent soil using surfactant coated seed.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostka, Stanley; Lampe, Mark; van Mondfrans, Jan; Madsen, Matthew; McMillan, Mica

    2015-04-01

    Surfactant seed coating (SSC) is a technology being developed cooperatively by scientists at the USDA, Agricultural Research Service and Aquatrols to improve stand establishment in water repellent soils, particularly under arid conditions. Early SSC studies have demonstrated that surfactant coatings can dramatically increase soil water content, turfgrass density, cover, and biomass for Kentucky bluegrass, tall fescue and perennial ryegrass sown in water repellent soils under greenhouse conditions. However, in these studies, surfactant loads were excessive (≥ 40 wt% of seed mass). The objective of the current study was to ascertain if a lower surfactant treatment level (10 wt%) would improve emergence and stand establishment in a severely water repellent sandy soil under field conditions. Research was conducted on a golf course near Utrecht, NL. At the time of planting water drop penetration time (WDPT) of the soil was approximately 300 s, indicating severe water repellency. Chewings fescue (Festuca rubra subsp. commutata) seed was treated with ASET-4001 surfactant at a loading rate of 10 wt% using two different proprietary coating procedures (US Patent Application 20100267554). The two different ASET-4001 coatings were compared against untreated seed in a randomized complete block design with four replicates. In order to maximize abiotic stresses, the only applied water came from rainfall. Assessments of stand establishment were made every 7-14 days for three months using a subjective visual assessment of percent grass cover and sward quality based on a 1-10 scale (where 10 is best). At six months post-sowing, 20 mm x 300 mm soil cores were randomly removed from each plot and soil wetting front depth measured. Improved emergence of the surfactant coated seeds over the untreated seeds began to appear 7 days after sowing. However, there were no differences between the two SSC treatments. Establishment was influenced by weather conditions. From mid-June to early

  8. Soil water repellency as a vegetation-driven strategy for soil moisture sequestration in Banksia woodlands (Western Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam; Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio T.; González-Pérez, José A.; Zavala, Lorena M.; Stevens, Jason; Jordán, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Water repellency is a property of some soils that inhibits or delays the rainwater infiltration. When a surface or subsurface soil horizon is water repellent, water is retained for periods of time that vary according to the severity of hydrophobicity, soil moisture and other parameters. Water repellency is caused by hydrophobic organic substances released by plant residues, roots or soil microorganisms. Certain abiotic agents, like fire, can increase the severity of soil water repellency in certain cases. Under water-repellent conditions, water can infiltrate only when the pressure of the water column is high enough or when macropores allow it. These macropores may be formed by galleries excavated by animals, dead roots or gaps between aggregate or rock fragments. Banksia plants have a dimorphic root morphology. Proteoid roots are formed by clusters of densely compacted short lateral rootlets that radiate from the parent root. These clusters spread just some centimeters below the soil surface constituting a thick dense sheet of roots and are known to secrete large amounts of organic acids and phenolics to increase the uptake of P and other minerals. In contrast, the parent root penetrates soil deeply, reaching the water table. Sandy soils below banksia woodlands from Western Australia coastal dunes show a characteristic vertical distribution of water repellency. We observed that the first soil layer (just some millimeters of depth) was formed by a wettable sand particles transported by wind, covering a wettable or subcritically water-repellent subsurface layer (0-20 cm). A second soil layer (20-40 cm) was formed by a severely water-repellent layer with aggregates bulked by dominant banksia proteoid roots. Below this layer, soil water repellency decreased with depth until soil material rendered wettable at depths between 40 and 80 cm under field conditions. It is hypothesized that banksia roots are capable of inducing soil water repellency, causing the occurrence of

  9. Soil-water dynamics and tree water uptake in the Sacramento Mountains of New Mexico (USA): a stable isotope study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierke, Casey; Newton, B. Talon; Phillips, Fred M.

    2016-06-01

    In the southwestern United States, precipitation in the high mountains is a primary source of groundwater recharge. Precipitation patterns, soil properties and vegetation largely control the rate and timing of groundwater recharge. The interactions between climate, soil and mountain vegetation thus have important implications for the groundwater supply. This study took place in the Sacramento Mountains, which is the recharge area for multiple regional aquifers in southern New Mexico. The stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen were used to determine whether infiltration of precipitation is homogeneously distributed in the soil or whether it is partitioned among soil-water `compartments', from which trees extract water for transpiration as a function of the season. The results indicate that "immobile" or "slow" soil water, which is derived primarily from snowmelt, infiltrates soils in a relatively uniform fashion, filling small pores in the shallow soils. "Mobile" or "fast" soil water, which is mostly associated with summer thunderstorms, infiltrates very quickly through macropores and along preferential flow paths, evading evaporative loss. It was found that throughout the entire year, trees principally use immobile water derived from snowmelt mixed to differing degrees with seasonally available mobile-water sources. The replenishment of these different water pools in soils appears to depend on initial soil-water content, the manner in which the water was introduced to the soil (snowmelt versus intense thunderstorms), and the seasonal variability of the precipitation and evapotranspiration. These results have important implications for the effect of climate change on recharge mechanisms in the Sacramento Mountains.

  10. Water quality transformations during soil aquifer treatment at the Mesa Northwest Water Reclamation Plant, USA.

    PubMed

    Fox, P; Narayanaswamy, K; Genz, A; Drewes, J E

    2001-01-01

    Water quality transformations during soil aquifer treatment at the Mesa Northwest Water Reclamation Plant (NWWRP) were evaluated by sampling a network of groundwater monitoring wells located within the reclaimed water plume. The Mesa Northwest Water Reclamation Plant has used soil aquifer treatment (SAT) since it began operation in 1990 and the recovery of reclaimed water from the impacted groundwater has been minimal. Groundwater samples obtained represent travel times from several days to greater than five years. Samples were analyzed for a wide range of organic and inorganic constituents. Sulfate was used as a tracer to estimate travel times and define reclaimed water plume movement. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations were reduced to approximately 1 mg/L after 12 to 24 months of soil aquifer treatment with an applied DOC concentration from the NWWRP of 5 to 7 mg/L. The specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) increased during initial soil aquifer treatment on a time-scale of days and then decreased as longer term soil aquifer treatment removed UV absorbing compounds. The trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) was a function of the dissolved organic carbon concentration and ranged from 50 to 65 micrograms THMFP/mg DOC. Analysis of trace organics revealed that the majority of trace organics were removed as DOC was removed with the exception of organic iodine. The majority of nitrogen was applied as nitrate-nitrogen and the reclaimed water plume had lower nitrate-nitrogen concentrations as compared to the background groundwater. The average dissolved organic carbon concentrations in the reclaimed water plume were less than 50% of the drinking water dissolved organic concentrations from which the reclaimed water originated.

  11. Influence of microsprinkler irrigation amount on water, soil, and pH profiles in a coastal saline soil.

    PubMed

    Chu, Linlin; Kang, Yaohu; Wan, Shuqin

    2014-01-01

    Microsprinkler irrigation is a potential method to alleviate soil salinization. After conducting a homogeneous, highly saline, clayey, and coastal soil from the Bohai Gulf in northern China in a column experiment, the results show that the depth of the wetting front increased as the water amount applied increased, low-salinity and low-SAR enlarged after irrigation and water redistribution, and the soil pH increased with an increase in irrigation amount. We concluded that a water amount of 207 mm could be used to reclaim the coastal saline soil in northern China.

  12. Influence of Microsprinkler Irrigation Amount on Water, Soil, and pH Profiles in a Coastal Saline Soil

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Linlin; Kang, Yaohu; Wan, Shuqin

    2014-01-01

    Microsprinkler irrigation is a potential method to alleviate soil salinization. After conducting a homogeneous, highly saline, clayey, and coastal soil from the Bohai Gulf in northern China in a column experiment, the results show that the depth of the wetting front increased as the water amount applied increased, low-salinity and low-SAR enlarged after irrigation and water redistribution, and the soil pH increased with an increase in irrigation amount. We concluded that a water amount of 207 mm could be used to reclaim the coastal saline soil in northern China. PMID:25147843

  13. Fluorescent probes for understanding soil water repellency: the novel application of a chemist's tool to soil science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balshaw, Helen M.; Davies, Matthew L.; Doerr, Stefan H.; Douglas, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Food security and production is one of the key global issues faced by society. It has become essential to work the land efficiently, through better soil management and agronomy whilst protecting the environment from air and water pollution. The failure of soil to absorb water - soil water repellency can lead to major environmental problems such as increased overland flow and soil erosion, poor uptake of agricultural chemicals, and increased risk of groundwater pollution due to the rapid transfer of contaminants and nutrient leaching through uneven wetting and preferential flow pathways. Understanding the causes of soil hydrophobicity is essential for the development of effective methods for its amelioration, supporting environmental stability and food security. Organic compounds deposited on soil mineral or aggregate surfaces have long been recognised as a major factor in causing soil water repellency. It is widely accepted that the main groups of compounds responsible are long-chain acids, alkanes and other organic compounds with hydrophobic properties. However, when reapplied to sands and soils, the degree of water repellency induced by these compounds and mixtures varied widely with compound type, amount, and mixture, in a seemingly unpredictable way. Fluorescent and phosphorescent probes are widely used in chemistry and biochemistry due to their sensitive response to their physical and chemical environment, such as polarity, and viscosity. However, they have to-date not been used to study soil water repellency. Here we present preliminary work on the evaluation of fluorescent probes as tools to study two poorly understood features that determine the degree of wettability for water repellent soils: (i) the distribution of organics on soils; (ii) the changes in polarity at soil surfaces required for water drops to infiltrate. In our initial work we have examined probes adsorbed onto model soils, prepared by adsorption of specific organics onto acid washed sand

  14. Aggregating available soil water holding capacity data for crop yield models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seubert, C. E.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Holt, D. A.; Baumgardner, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    The total amount of water available to plants that is held against gravity in a soil is usually estimated as the amount present at -0.03 MPa average water potential minus the amount present at -1.5 MPa water potential. This value, designated available water-holding capacity (AWHC), is a very important soil characteristic that is strongly and positively correlated to the inherent productivity of soils. In various applications, including assessing soil moisture status over large areas, it is necessary to group soil types or series as to their productivity. Current methods to classify AWHC of soils consider only total capacity of soil profiles and thus may group together soils which differ greatly in AWHC as a function of depth in the profile. A general approach for evaluating quantitatively the multidimensional nature of AWHC in soils is described. Data for 902 soil profiles, representing 184 soil series, in Indiana were obtained from the Soil Characterization Laboratory at Purdue University. The AWHC for each of ten 150-mm layers in each soil was established, based on soil texture and parent material. A multivariate clustering procedure was used to classify each soil profile into one of 4, 8, or 12 classes based upon ten-dimensional AWHC values. The optimum number of classes depends on the range of AWHC in the population of oil profiles analyzed and on the sensitivity of a crop to differences in distribution of water within the soil profile.

  15. The effect of land use on spatial variability of soil water repelency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrabovský, Andrej; Dlapa, Pavel; Chrenková, Katarína; Šimkovic, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Soil water repellency was identified as a fundamental phenomenon during a soil survey dedicated to soil hydrological properties and processes in watersheds of the Little Carpathians Mts. (SW Slovakia). The investigated area represents the viticulture region with various soil management practices. Thus, soils of the region are influenced by deep ploughing during vineyard establishment, by cultivation of vineyards, by reforestation of abandoned vineyards as well as by long-term forestry practices. The soils developed from granitic rocks are naturally susceptible to water repellency development. The obtained results showed marked variability in physical and chemical soil properties. In particular, the soil pH values, the clay and organic carbon contents differed significantly depending on soil management. Due to these differences, the soil water repellency increased from wettable to extremely water repellent approximately in order: deeply ploughed vineyard soils < cultivated vineyard soils < abandoned vineyard soils < afforested vineyard soils < original forest soils. The impact of soil water repellency on infiltration process was observed by means of field experiments.

  16. Analytic technique measures aromatics in soil and water

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, K.A.

    1990-12-01

    This paper reports on a technique for detecting aromatic compounds in soil and water. The technique traces its roots to a chemical reaction discovered in 1877. The reaction is an organic synthesis process that has been harnessed for the production of high-octane gasoline, synthetic rubber, plastics and synthetic detergents. More than a century later the same chemistry is used as the basis for an analytical technique that quantifies contamination caused by products.

  17. Soil water content assessment: seasonal effects on the triangle method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltese, A.; Capodici, F.; Ciraolo, G.; La Loggia, G.; Cammalleri, C.

    2016-10-01

    Among indirect estimations of the soil water content in the upper layer, the "triangle method" is based on the relationship between the optical and thermal features sensed via Earth Observation. These features are controlled by water content at surface and within root zone, but also by meteorological forcing including air temperature and humidity, and solar radiation. Night and day-time MODIS composite land-surface temperature (LST) allowed applying the thermal admittance version of the method; by taking into account the temporal admittance of the soil, this version was previously found achieving high accuracy in estimate the soil water content at high spatial resolution within a short time period (a single irrigation season). In this study, the method has been applied on a long time series to analyse the seasonal influence of the meteorological forcing on the triangle method index (or temperature vegetation index, TVX). The Imera Meridionale hydrological basin (≍ 2000 km2, Sicily) has been chosen to test the method over a decade time series, since its climate varies during the year from arid to temperate. The climate is arid for ≍3-7 months (from April-May to August- October) depending on altitude. The temporal analysis reveals that NDVI and LST pairs moves circularly within the optical and thermal diachronic feature space. Concordantly, the boundaries of the triangle move during the seasons. Results suggest that the contribution of soil water content fluctuations need to be isolated from other environmental stress factors, or at least, the conceptual meaning of TVX have to be better interpreted.

  18. Impact of interfacial high-density water layer on accurate estimation of adsorption free energy by Jarzynski's equality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhisen; Wu, Tao; Wang, Qi; Pan, Haihua; Tang, Ruikang

    2014-01-01

    The interactions between proteins/peptides and materials are crucial to research and development in many biomedical engineering fields. The energetics of such interactions are key in the evaluation of new proteins/peptides and materials. Much research has recently focused on the quality of free energy profiles by Jarzynski's equality, a widely used equation in biosystems. In the present work, considerable discrepancies were observed between the results obtained by Jarzynski's equality and those derived by umbrella sampling in biomaterial-water model systems. Detailed analyses confirm that such discrepancies turn up only when the target molecule moves in the high-density water layer on a material surface. Then a hybrid scheme was adopted based on this observation. The agreement between the results of the hybrid scheme and umbrella sampling confirms the former observation, which indicates an approach to a fast and accurate estimation of adsorption free energy for large biomaterial interfacial systems.

  19. DAN measures water in the soil of the Gale crater: new results from Curiosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, Igor; Litvak, Maxim; Sanin, Anton; Starr, Richard; Lisov, Denis; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Behar, Alberto; Boynton, William; Hardgrove, Craig; Harshman, Karl; Jun, Ionsoo; Miliken, Ralf; Mischna, Michael; Moersch, Jeffry; Tate, Criss

    2014-05-01

    The Gale crater was selected as the landing site for NASA's rover Curiosity (1). Since the landing in the August 2012, the neutron active instrument DAN (2) is performing active testing measurements of ground water and chlorine content along the traverse of the rover. The best model for the water content in the subsurface was found to be the 2-layer one, with the traverse-averaged contents of water in the top and bottom layers 1.51±0.42 wt% and 2.97±1.16 wt%, respectively. The traverse-average thickness of the top layer is about 18.5±8.0 cm, and the traverse-average content of chlorine is about 1.14±0.25 wt%. The uncertainties of the values above represent the physical dispersion of measurements along the traverse, while the uncertainties of individual measurements are much smaller for each tested spot. These values are not consistent with the predictions for the ground water and chlorine in the Gale, which were based on the orbital measurements by GRS suite onboard Mars Odyssey (3). The average content of water around Gale, provided it is depth independent, was found to be about 5 wt%. More accurate estimations based on 2-layer model provide even much more water in the subsurface. The content of chlorine was determined from the orbit, about 0.5 wt%. The difference between water content estimations based on the orbital and surface data are larger than the statistical uncertainty, and one cannot explain the difference by different depth of neutron sensing by DAN and GRS. Therefore, one should consider the physical reason for depletion of ground water and enhancement of chlorine in Gale in comparison with the content in the soil of the surrounding area. The Gale was not the natural site of soil hydratation, the soil around the crater has the water at higher content. During the epoch of wet Mars, the transport of soil by creeks and rivers into the Gale lake was probably associated with some selection process, which predominantly supply particles with larger sizes

  20. Soil-water fluxes modelling in a green roof

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamera, Carlotta; Rulli, Maria Cristina; Becciu, Gianfranco; Rosso, Renzo

    2014-05-01

    Green roofs differ from a natural environment as they are on top of a building and are not connected to the natural ground; therefore it is critical that soils can drain and retain water simultaneously and that they work even in very shallow systems. The soil or growing medium used for green roofs is specifically engineered to provide the vegetation with nutrients, discharging any excess water into the drainage layer, and releasing stored water back into the substrate. In this way, medium depth and porosity plays an important role in stormwater retention and plant growth in a green roof. Due to the lack of a good understanding about the hydraulic efficiency of each green roof's layer in rainwater management, a detailed analysis of the hydrological dynamics, connected with the green roof technical design is essential in order to obtain a full characterization of the hydrologic behavior of a green roof system and its effects on the urban water cycle components. The purpose of this research is analyzing the soil-water dynamics through the different components of a green roof and modeling these processes though a detailed but clear subsurface hydrology module, based on green roof vertical soil water movement reproduction, in relation to climate forcing, basic technology components and geometric characteristics of green roof systems (thickness of the stratigraphy, soil layers and materials, vegetation typology and density). A multi-layer bucket model has been applied to examine the hydrological response of the green roof system under a temperate maritime climate, by varying the physical and geometric parameters that characterize the different components of the vegetated cover. Following a stage of validation and calibration, results confirm the suitability of the model to describe the hydrologic response of the green roof during the observed rainfall events: the discharge hydrograph profile, volume and timing, predicted by the model, matched experimental measurements

  1. Determination of antibiotic residues in manure, soil, and surface waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christian, T.; Schneider, R.J.; Farber, H.A.; Skutlarek, D.; Meyer, M.T.; Goldbach, H.E.

    2003-01-01

    In the last years more and more often detections of antimicrobially active compounds ("antibiotics") in surface waters have been reported. As a possible input pathway in most cases municipal sewage has been discussed. But as an input from the realm of agriculture is conceivable as well, in this study it should be investigated if an input can occur via the pathway application of liquid manure on fields with the subsequent mechanisms surface run-off/interflow, leaching, and drift. For this purpose a series of surface waters, soils, and liquid manures from North Rhine-Westphalia (Northwestern Germany) were sampled and analyzed for up to 29 compounds by HPLC-MS/MS. In each of the surface waters antibiotics could be detected. The highest concentrations were found in samples from spring (300 ng/L of erythromycin). Some of the substances detected (e.g., tylosin), as well as characteristics in the landscape suggest an input from agriculture in some particular cases. In the investigation of different liquid manure samples by a fast immunoassay method sulfadimidine could be detected in the range of 1...2 mg/kg. Soil that had been fertilized with this liquid manure showed a content of sulfadimidine extractable by accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) of 15 ??g/kg dry weight even 7 months after the application. This indicates the high stability of some antibiotics in manure and soil.

  2. Influence of development stage and disturbance of physical and biological soil crusts on soil water erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamizo, S.; Cantón, Y.; Lázaro, R.; Solé-Benet, A.; Calvo-Cases, A.; Miralles, I.; Domingo, F.

    2009-04-01

    Most soils exposed to rainfall are prone to sealing and crusting processes causing physical soil crusts (PSCs). When climate and soil stability conditions are suitable, PSCs can be consolidated by a complex community consisting of cyanobacteria, bacteria, green algae, microfungi, lichens and bryophytes, which are collectively known as biological soil crust (BSC). The influence of soil crusts on erosion processes is complex: crusts may reduce detachment, increasing soil stability and protecting soil against raindrop impact, although that protection will depend on the type of soil crust and the stage of development; they can also build up runoff, suggesting that downstream erosion may actually be increased or favoured water harvesting to vegetated areas. On the other hand, BSCs have been demonstrated to be very vulnerable to disturbance which in turn can lead to accelerate soil erosion and other forms of land degradation. Incorporation of the response of different type of soil crusts and the effects of their disturbance is highly likely to improve the prediction of runoff and water erosion models in arid and semi-arid catchments. The objective of this work is to analyse the erosional response of PSCs and BSCs in different stages of their development and subject to distinct disturbances when extreme rainfalls intensities are applied at plot scale in semiarid environments. Small plots on the most representative crust types, corresponding to different stages of crust development, in two semiarid ecosystems in SE Spain, El Cautivo (in the Tabernas Desert) and Amoladeras (in the Natural Park Cabo de Gata-Níjar), were selected and three disturbance treatments were applied on each crust type: a) no disturbance (control), b) trampling, stepping 100 times over the crust and c) scraping. Two consecutive rainfall simulation experiments (50 mm/h rainfall intensity) were carried out on each plot: the first on dry soil and the second, 30 minutes later, on wet soil conditions

  3. Spatial variability in the soil water content of a Mediterranean agroforestry system with high soil heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, Antonio Jaime; Llorens, Pilar; Aranda, Xavier; Savé, Robert; Biel, Carmen

    2013-04-01

    Variability of soil water content is known to increase with the size of spatial domain in which measurements are taken. At field scale, heterogeneity in soil, vegetation, topography, water input volume and management affects, among other factors, hydrologic plot behaviour under different mean soil water contents. The present work studies how the spatial variability of soil water content (SWC) is affected by soil type (texture, percentage of stones and the combination of them) in a timber-orientated plantation of cherry tree (Prunus avium) under Mediterranean climatic conditions. The experimental design is a randomized block one with 3 blocks * 4 treatments, based on two factors: irrigation (6 plots irrigated versus 6 plots not irrigated) and soil management (6 plots tillaged versus 6 plots not tillaged). SWC is continuously measured at 25, 50 and 100 cm depth with FDR sensors, located at two positions in each treatment: under tree influence and 2.5 m apart. This study presents the results of the monitoring during 2012 of the 24 sensors located at the 25 cm depth. In each of the measurement point, texture and percentage of stones were measured. Sandy-loam, sandy-clay-loam and loam textures were found together with a percentage of stones ranging from 20 to 70 %. The results indicated that the relationship between the daily mean SWC and its standard deviation, a common procedure used to study spatial variability, changed with texture, percentage of stones and the estimation of field capacity from the combination of both. Temporal stability analysis of SWC showed a clear pattern related to field capacity, with the measurement points of the sandy-loam texture and the high percentage of stones showing the maximun negative diference with the global mean. The high range in the mean relative difference observed (± 75 %), could indicate that the studied plot may be considered as a good field-laboratory to extrapolate results at higher spatial scales. Furthermore, the

  4. Root-zone plant available water estimation using the SMOS-derived soil water index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Zamora, Ángel; Sánchez, Nilda; Martínez-Fernández, José; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2016-10-01

    Currently, there are several space missions capable of measuring surface soil moisture, owing to the relevance of this variable in meteorology, hydrology and agriculture. However, the Plant Available Water (PAW), which in some fields of application could be more important than the soil moisture itself, cannot be directly measured by remote sensing. Considering the root zone as the first 50 cm of the soil, in this study, the PAW at 25 cm and 50 cm and integrated between 0 and 50 cm of soil depth was estimated using the surface soil moisture provided by the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. For this purpose, the Soil Water Index (SWI) has been used as a proxy of the root-zone soil moisture, involving the selection of an optimal T (Topt), which can be interpreted as a characteristic soil water travel time. In this research, several tests using the correlation coefficient (R), the Nash-Sutcliffe score (NS), several error estimators and bias as predictor metrics were applied to obtain the Topt, making a comprehensive study of the T parameter. After analyzing the results, some differences were found between the Topt obtained using R and NS as decision metrics, and that obtained using the errors and bias, but the SWI showed good results as an estimator of the root-zone soil moisture. This index showed good agreement, with an R between 0.60 and 0.88. The method was tested from January 2010 to December 2014, using the database of the Soil Moisture Measurements Stations Network of the University of Salamanca (REMEDHUS) in Spain. The PAW estimation showed good agreement with the in situ measurements, following closely the dry-downs and wetting-up events, with R ranging between 0.60 and 0.92, and error values lower than 0.05 m3m-3. A slight underestimation was observed for both the PAW and root-zone soil moisture at the different depths; this could be explained by the underestimation pattern observed with the SMOS L2 soil moisture product, in line with previous

  5. Colloid Mobilization in a Fractured Soil: Effect of Pore-Water Exchange between Preferential Flow Paths and Soil Matrix.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sanjay K; Saiers, James E; Ryan, Joseph N

    2016-03-01

    Exchange of water and solutes between contaminated soil matrix and bulk solution in preferential flow paths has been shown to contribute to the long-term release of dissolved contaminants in the subsurface, but whether and how this exchange can affect the release of colloids in a soil are unclear. To examine this, we applied rainfall solutions of different ionic strength on an intact soil core and compared the resulting changes in effluent colloid concentration through multiple sampling ports. The exchange of water between soil matrix and the preferential flow paths leading to each port was characterized on the basis of the bromide (conservative tracer) breakthrough time at the port. At individual ports, two rainfalls of a certain ionic strength mobilized different amounts of colloids when the soil was pre-exposed to a solution of lower or higher ionic strength. This result indicates that colloid mobilization depended on rainfall solution history, which is referred as colloid mobilization hysteresis. The extent of hysteresis was increased with increases in exchange of pore water and solutes between preferential flow paths and matrix. The results indicate that the soil matrix exchanged the old water from the previous infiltration with new infiltrating water during successive infiltration and changed the pore water chemistry in the preferential flow paths, which in turn affected the release of soil colloids. Therefore, rainfall solution history and soil heterogeneity must be considered to assess colloid mobilization in the subsurface. These findings have implications for the release of colloids, colloid-associated contaminants, and pathogens from soils.

  6. Influence of liquid water and soil temperature on petroleum hydrocarbon toxicity in Antarctic soil.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Alexis N; Snape, Ian; Siciliano, Steven D

    2009-07-01

    Fuel spills in Antarctica typically occur in rare ice-free oases along the coast, which are areas of extreme seasonal freezing. Spills often occur at subzero temperatures, but little is known of ecosystem sensitivity to pollutants, in particular the influence that soil liquid water and low temperature have on toxicity of petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) in Antarctic soil. To evaluate PHC toxicity, 32 locations at an aged diesel spill site in Antarctica were sampled nine times to encompass frozen, thaw, and refreeze periods. Toxicity was assessed using potential activities of substrate-induced respiration, basal respiration, nitrification, denitrification, and metabolic quotient as well as microbial community composition and bacterial biomass. The most sensitive indicator was community composition with a PHC concentration effecting 25% of the population (EC25) of 800 mg/kg, followed by nitrification (2,000 mg/kg), microbial biomass (2,400 mg/kg), and soil respiration (3,500 mg/kg). Despite changes in potential microbial activities and composition over the frozen, thaw, and refreeze period, the sensitivity of these endpoints to PHC did not change with liquid water or temperature. However, the variability associated with ecotoxicity data increased at low liquid water contents. As a consequence of this variability, highly replicated (n = 50) experiments are needed to quantify a 25% ecological impairment by PHCs in Antarctic soils at a 95% level of significance. Increases in biomass and respiration associated with changes in community composition suggest that PHC contamination in Antarctic soils may have irrevocable effects on the ecosystem.

  7. [Simulation of effects of soil properties and plants on soil water-salt movement with reclaimed water irrigation by ENVIRO-GRO model].

    PubMed

    Lü, Si-Dan; Chen, Wei-Ping; Wang, Mei-E

    2012-12-01

    In order to promote safe irrigation with reclaimed water and prevent soil salinisation, the dynamic transport of salts in urban soils of Beijing under irrigation of reclaimed water was simulated by ENVIRO-GRO model in this study. The accumulation trends and profile distribution of soil salinity were predicted. Simultaneously, the effects of different soil properties and plants on soil water-salt movement and salt accumulation were investigated. Results indicated that soil salinity in the profiles reached uniform equilibrium conditions by repeated simulation, with different initial soil salinity. Under the conditions of loam and clay loam soil, salinity in the profiles increased over time until reaching equilibrium conditions, while under the condition of sandy loam soil, salinity in the profiles decreased over time until reaching equilibrium conditions. The saturated soil salinity (EC(e)) under equilibrium conditions followed an order of sandy loam < loam < clay loam. Salt accumulations in Japan euonymus and Chinese pine were less than that in Blue grass. The temporal and spatial distributions of soil salinity were also different in these three types of plants. In addition, the growth of the plants was not influenced by soil salinity (except clay loam), but mild soil salinization occurred under all conditions (except sandy loam).

  8. [Effects of soil wetting pattern on the soil water-thermal environment and cotton root water consumption under mulched drip irrigation].

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-wei; Li, Ming-si; Liu, Dong; Lyu, Mou-chao; Jia, Yan-hui

    2015-08-01

    Abstract: To explore the effects of soil wetting pattern on soil water-thermal environment and water consumption of cotton root under mulched drip irrigation, a field experiment with three drip intensities (1.69, 3.46 and 6.33 L · h(-1)), was carried out in Shihezi, Xinjiang Autonomous Region. The soil matric potential, soil temperature, cotton root distribution and water consumption were measured during the growing period of cotton. The results showed that the main factor influencing the soil temperature of cotton under plastic mulch was sunlight. There was no significant difference in the soil temperature and root water uptake under different treatments. The distribution of soil matrix suction in cotton root zone under plastic mulch was more homogeneous under ' wide and shallow' soil wetting pattern (W633). Under the 'wide and shallow' soil wetting pattern, the average difference of cotton root water consumption between inner row and outer row was 0.67 mm · d(-1), which was favorable to the cotton growing trimly at both inner and outer rows; for the 'narrow and deep' soil wetting pattern (W169), the same index was 0.88 mm · d(-1), which was unfavorable to cotton growing uniformly at both inner and outer rows. So, we should select the broad-shallow type soil wetting pattern in the design of drip irrigation under mulch.

  9. Chromium cycling in soils and water: links, gaps, and methods.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, R J

    1991-01-01

    The major links in the cycling of chromium in soils and in natural waters are between chromium(III) and chromium (VI). Between the larger links are lesser links involving processes of mobilization and oxidation of CrIII and reduction of CrVI. The gaps are mainly in our understanding of the factors that control these processes. If soluble CrIII is added to an "average" soil, a portion of it will become immediately oxidized by manganese oxides to CrVI. The rest of the CrIII may remain reduced for long periods of time, even in the presence of electron-accepting manganese oxides. However, this less available CrIII can be mobilized by low molecular weight organic complexers and then oxidized where redox conditions are optimal. Usually part of any CrVI added to a soil or sediment will be reduced instantly, especially under acid conditions. On the other hand, high concentrations of polluting CrVI may quickly exhaust the readily available reducing power of the matrix material and excess CrVI, the thermodynamically stable form in air, may persist for years in soils or lagoons without reduction. Cleanup of chromium pollution must involve the surrounding of both CrIII and CrVI with excesses of slowly available reducing substances and sealing them permanently from inputs of atmospheric oxygen. Monitoring the effectiveness of the measures is mandatory, but fortunately the chemical testing for CrVI in soil and water is simple and problem free compared with most colorimetric determinations. PMID:1935847

  10. Predicting soil water repellency by hydrophobic organic compounds and their vegetation origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Nierop, K. G. J.; Rietkerk, M.; Dekker, S. C.

    2015-02-01

    It is widely accepted that soil water repellency (SWR) is mainly caused by plant-derived hydrophobic organic compounds in soils; such hydrophobic compounds are defined as SWR-markers. However, the detailed influence of SWR-markers on SWR is yet unclear and the knowledge of their original sources is still limited. The aims of this study are to select important SWR-markers to predict SWR based on their correlation with SWR and to determine their origin. In our study, sandy soils with different SWR were collected, along with their covering vegetation, i.e. plant leaves/needles and roots. A sequential extraction procedure was applied to the soils to obtain three organic fractions: DCM / MeOH soluble fraction (D), DCM / MeOH insoluble fraction of IPA / NH3 extract (AI) and DCM / MeOH soluble fraction of IPA / NH3 extract (AS), which were subdivided into ten dominant SWR-marker groups: (D) fatty acid, (D) alcohol, (D) alkane, (AI) fatty acid, (AI) alcohol, (AI) ω-hydroxy fatty acid, (AI) α, ω-dicarboxylic acid, (AS) fatty acid, (AS) alcohol and (AS) ω-hydroxy fatty acid. Waxes and biopolyesters of the vegetation were also sequentially extracted from plants. In short, the soils with higher SWR have significantly higher relative concentrations of (AS) alcohols. A number of indications suggest that (AS) alcohols are mainly derived from roots and most likely produced by microbial hydrolysis of biopolyesters/suberins. In addition, the strong correlation between the biomarkers of plant tissues and SWR-markers in soils suggests that it is more accurate to predict SWR of topsoils using ester-bound alcohols from roots, and to predict SWR of subsoils using root-derived ω-hydroxy fatty acids and α, ω-dicarboxylic acids. Our analysis indicates that plant roots have a primary role influencing SWR relative to plant leaves.

  11. Analysis of the NASA AirMOSS Root Zone Soil Water and Soil Temperature from Three North American Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagimoto, Y.; Cuenca, R. H.

    2015-12-01

    Root zone soil water and temperature are controlling factors for soil organic matter accumulation and decomposition which contribute significantly to the CO2 flux of different ecosystems. An in-situ soil observation protocol developed at Oregon State University has been deployed to observe soil water and temperature dynamics in seven ecological research sites in North America as part of the NASA AirMOSS project. Three instrumented profiles defining a transect of less than 200 m are installed at each site. All three profiles collect data for in-situ water and temperature dynamics employing seven soil water and temperature sensors installed at seven depth levels and one infrared surface temperature sensor monitoring the top of the profile. In addition, two soil heat flux plates and associated thermocouples are installed at one of three profiles at each site. At each profile, a small 80 cm deep access hole is typically made, and all below ground sensors are installed into undisturbed soil on the side of the hole. The hole is carefully refilled and compacted so that root zone soil water and temperature dynamics can be observed with minimum site disturbance. This study focuses on the data collected from three sites: a) Tonzi Ranch, CA; b) Metolius, OR and c) BERMS Old Jack Pine Site, Saskatchewan, Canada. The study describes the significantly different seasonal root zone water and temperature dynamics under the various physical and biological conditions at each site. In addition, this study compares the soil heat flux values estimated by the standard installation using the heat flux plates and thermocouples installed near the surface with those estimated by resolving the soil heat storage based on the soil water and temperature data collected over the total soil profile.

  12. The effect of soil water repellency on water and chemicals distribution in the soil profile for effluent and fresh water irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallach, Rony; Rahav, Matan; Brindt, Naaran; Furman, Alex

    2015-04-01

    Water repellency (WR) has been reported for many vegetation types and soils and for effluent irrigation. Citrus trees have been found in a previous and in the current study to render sandy soils hydrophobic. The presented study focuses on the synergistic effect of the uneven wetting patterns and preferential flow pathways, known to occur in WR soils, and irrigation water quality on the spatial distribution of salinity and nutrients in the citrus trees' root zone. The study was performed in a commercial grapefruit orchard that is located at the coastal plain of Israel. The soil is sandy (80 % sand, 9 % silt and 11% clay). An experimental orchard area of 1500 m2 was divided into ten plots - five are irrigated with fresh water and five with secondary treated sewage water (effluent) using a drip irrigation system. Each plot contains 12 trees with spacing of 2x6 m. Soil texture, water repellency persistence (WDPT), and OM were measured for all 10 plots. The spatial and temporal water content distribution in the trees' root zone during and between subsequent irrigation events was measured undisturbedly by the electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method. Soil water content within the root zone was indeed found highly heterogeneous in space and in time. Using ERT scans, two sites with relatively wet soil underneath and two with relatively dry soil underneath were chosen in each plot for further investigation. Disturbed soil samples from two depths, 0-20 and 20-40 cm, were taken from each site and tested in the laboratory for weight-based saturation, current water content, pH, EC, Cl, Na, Mg, NO3, P, K, and OM. The overall finding was that the uneven distribution of water content in the water repellent soil has a substantial effect on the salinity and nutrients distribution in the soil profile. Higher salinity and nutrients concentrations were found in the effluent irrigated plots compared to the fresh water plots. In particular, salinity was higher in the dry spots and

  13. Water and heat transport in hilly red soil of southern China: I. Experiment and analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Huang, Zhi-Zhen; Han, Xiao-Fei

    2005-05-01

    Studies on coupled transfer of soil moisture and heat have been widely carried out for decades. However, little work has been done on red soils, widespread in southern China. The simultaneous transfer of soil moisture and heat depended on soil physical properties and the climate conditions. Red soil is heavy clay and high content of free iron and aluminum oxide. The climate conditions are characterized by the clear four seasons and the serious seasonal drought. The great air temperature differences annually and diurnally result in significant fluctuation in soil temperature in top layer. The closed and evaporating columns experiments with red soil were conducted to simulate the coupled transfer of soil water and heat under the overlaying and opening fields' conditions, and to analyze the effects of soil temperature gradient on the water transfer and the effects of initial soil water contents on the transfer of soil water and heat. The closed and evaporating columns were designed similarly with about 18 degrees C temperatures differences between the top and bottom boundary, except of the upper end closed or exposed to the air, respectively. Results showed that in the closed column, water moved towards the cold end driven by temperature gradient, while the transported water decreased with the increasing initial soil water content until the initial soil water content reached to field capacity equivalent, when almost no changes for the soil moisture profile. In the evaporating column, the net transport of soil water was simultaneously driven by evaporation and temperature gradients, and the drier soil was more influenced by temperature gradient than by evaporation. In drier soil, it took a longer time for the temperature to reach equilibrium, because of more net amount of transported water.

  14. Pine straw harvesting effects on water content of a forest soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study addresses concerns that harvesting pine straw from forests may decrease timber productivity by accelerating evaporation of soil water. Pine needles that accumulate on the forest floor help to conserve soil moisture, protect the soil surface against erosion, moderate soil temperature, inh...

  15. Use of advanced information technologies for water conservation on salt-affected soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water conservation on arid and semi-arid soils must be done with constant and careful consideration of the distribution of salinity across the landscape and through the soil profile. Soil salinity can be managed through leaching and the application of various soil amendments. The field-scale manag...

  16. Vadose zone monitoring strategies to control water flux dynamics and changes in soil hydraulic properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdes-Abellan, Javier; Jiménez-Martínez, Joaquin; Candela, Lucila

    2013-04-01

    For monitoring the vadose zone, different strategies can be chosen, depending on the objectives and scale of observation. The effects of non-conventional water use on the vadose zone might produce impacts in porous media which could lead to changes in soil hydraulic properties, among others. Controlling these possible effects requires an accurate monitoring strategy that controls the volumetric water content, θ, and soil pressure, h, along the studied profile. According to the available literature, different monitoring systems have been carried out independently, however less attention has received comparative studies between different techniques. An experimental plot of 9x5 m2 was set with automatic and non-automatic sensors to control θ and h up to 1.5m depth. The non-automatic system consisted of ten Jet Fill tensiometers at 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 cm (Soil Moisture®) and a polycarbonate access tube of 44 mm (i.d) for soil moisture measurements with a TRIME FM TDR portable probe (IMKO®). Vertical installation was carefully performed; measurements with this system were manual, twice a week for θ and three times per week for h. The automatic system composed of five 5TE sensors (Decagon Devices®) installed at 20, 40, 60, 90 and 120 cm for θ measurements and one MPS1 sensor (Decagon Devices®) at 60 cm depth for h. Installation took place laterally in a 40-50 cm length hole bored in a side of a trench that was excavated. All automatic sensors hourly recorded and stored in a data-logger. Boundary conditions were controlled with a volume-meter and with a meteorological station. ET was modelled with Penman-Monteith equation. Soil characterization include bulk density, gravimetric water content, grain size distribution, saturated hydraulic conductivity and soil water retention curves determined following laboratory standards. Soil mineralogy was determined by X-Ray difractometry. Unsaturated soil hydraulic parameters were model-fitted through SWRC-fit code and

  17. Predicting soil and water acidification: proceedings of a workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    A three-day workshop was held at the Hilton Hotel in Knoxville, Tennessee on March 27-29, 1984, preceded by a one-day tour of sites at or near ORNL. Funding for the workshop was provided by the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program by the US Environmental Protection Agency. One of the goals of this workshop was to develop a consensus among the participant as to sensitivity criteria for acid deposition effects on both soils and surface waters. As the meeting evolved, the workshop participants spent most of their time in a very productive discussion of important processes and hypotheses regarding soil and water acidification, primarily from the theoretical standpoint, using empirical data to illustrate specific points. Only in the afternoon of the last day were sensitivity criteria as such as discussed, but all of the preceding discussions clearly related to this issue as well. The workshop discussions, including sensitivity criteria, are summarized in this document. A major highlight of this workshop was a meeting of minds among aquatic and terrestrial scientists as to important mechanisms for surface water acidification. This paved the way for assessment activities, probably is association with modeling efforts. No such consensus or knowledge is available for forest effects, however, because the important mechanisms of forest effects are not known. A concensus was reached as to appropriate sensitivity criteria for soil acidification and aluminum mobilization but there was no consensus as to whether these processes in themselves are responsible for reported widespread forest dieback and decline. Thus, assigning forest effects sensitivity criteria at this time would be premature. Two major areas of research were identified as most in need of further research: nitrogen cycling and soil weathering.

  18. Field scale spatio-temporal soil moisture variability for trafficability and crop water availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carranza, Coleen; van der Ploeg, Martine; Ritsema, Coen

    2016-04-01

    Spatio-temporal patterns of soil moisture have been studied mostly for inputs in land surface models for weather and climate predictions. Remote sensing techniques for estimation of soil moisture have been explored because of the good spatial coverage at different scales. Current available satellite data provide surface soil moisture as microwave systems only measure soil moisture content up to 5cm soil depth. The OWAS1S project will focus on estimation of soil moisture from freely available Sentinel-1 datasets for operational water management in agricultural areas. As part of the project, it is essential to develop spatio-temporal methods to estimate root zone soil moisture from surface soil moisture. This will be used for crop water availability and trafficability in selected agricultural fields in the Netherlands. A network of single capacitance sensors installed per field will provide continuous measurements of soil moisture in the study area. Ground penetrating radar will be used to measure soil moisture variability within a single field for different time periods. During wetter months, optimal conditions for traffic will be assessed using simultaneous soil strength and soil moisture measurements. Towards water deficit periods, focus is on the relation (or the lack thereof) between surface soil moisture and root zone soil moisture to determine the amount of water for crops. Spatio-temporal distribution will determine important physical controls for surface and root zone soil moisture and provide insights for root-zone soil moisture. Existing models for field scale soil-water balance and data assimilation methods (e.g. Kalman filter) will be combined to estimate root zone soil moisture. Furthermore, effects of root development on soil structure and soil hydraulic properties and subsequent effects on trafficability and crop water availability will be investigated. This research project has recently started, therefore we want to present methods and framework of

  19. Errors in determination of soil water content using time-domain reflectometry caused by soil compaction around wave guides

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezzehei, T.A.

    2008-05-29

    Application of time domain reflectometry (TDR) in soil hydrology often involves the conversion of TDR-measured dielectric permittivity to water content using universal calibration equations (empirical or physically based). Deviations of soil-specific calibrations from the universal calibrations have been noted and are usually attributed to peculiar composition of soil constituents, such as high content of clay and/or organic matter. Although it is recognized that soil disturbance by TDR waveguides may have impact on measurement errors, to our knowledge, there has not been any quantification of this effect. In this paper, we introduce a method that estimates this error by combining two models: one that describes soil compaction around cylindrical objects and another that translates change in bulk density to evolution of soil water retention characteristics. Our analysis indicates that the compaction pattern depends on the mechanical properties of the soil at the time of installation. The relative error in water content measurement depends on the compaction pattern as well as the water content and water retention properties of the soil. Illustrative calculations based on measured soil mechanical and hydrologic properties from the literature indicate that the measurement errors of using a standard three-prong TDR waveguide could be up to 10%. We also show that the error scales linearly with the ratio of rod radius to the interradius spacing.

  20. Hydrologic characterization of desert soils with varying degrees of pedogenesis: 1. field experiments evaluating plant-relevant soil water behavior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, J.R.; Perkins, K.S.; Schmidt, K.M.; Miller, D.M.; Stock, J.D.; Singha, K.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the eff ect of pedogenesis on the soil moisture dynamics infl uencing the character and quality of ecological habitat, we conducted infi ltration and redistribution experiments on three alluvial deposits in the Mojave National Preserve: (i) recently deposited active wash sediments, (ii) a soil of early Holocene age, and (iii) a highly developed soil of late Pleistocene age. At each, we ponded water in a 1-m-diameter infi ltration ring for 2.3 h and monitored soil water content and matric pressure during and atier infi ltration, using probes and electrical resistivity imaging (ERI). Infi ltration and downward fl ow rates were greater in younger material, favoring deep-rooted species. Deep-rooted species tend to colonize the margins of washes, where they are unaff ected by sediment transport that inhibits colonization. The ERI results support important generalizations, for example that shallower than 0.5 m, infi ltrated water persists longer in highly developed soil, favoring shallow-rooted species. Soil moisture data for the two youngest soils suggested that saturation overshoot, which may have signifi cant but unexplored hydroecologic and pedogenic eff ects, occurred at the horizontally advancing weting front. Spatial heterogeneity of soil properties generally increased with pedogenic development. Evidence suggested that some early-stage developmental processes may promote uniformity; the intermediate- age soil appeared to have the least heterogeneity in terms of textural variation with depth, and also the least anisotropy. Lateral heterogeneity was pronounced in older soil, having a multitude of eff ects on the distribution and retention of soil water, and may facilitate certain water-conserving strategies of plants over what would be possible in a laterally homogeneous soil. ?? Soil Science Society of America.

  1. Effect of some surface and subsurface attributes on soil water erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertol, Ildegardis; César Ramos, Júlio; Vidal Vázquez, Eva; Mirás Avalos, José Manuel

    2013-04-01

    Soil erosion is a complex phenomenon depending on climate, topography, soil intrinsic characteristics, crop and residue cover, and management and conservation practices that may be accelerated by man activities. Within the above mentioned factors, soil cover and soil management most influence soil erosion. Soil management includes mechanical mobilization and in soil conservationist systems soil residues are mobilized for increasing soil surface roughness. Even if soil roughness is ephemeral, it increases soil water storage and sediment retention in surface microdepressions, which contributes to decrease water erosion. Conservationist soil management systems also maintain the soil surface covered by crop residues, which are more persistent than roughness and contribute to dissipate kinetic energy from raindrops and partly also from runoff. Crop residues are more efficient than soil roughness in controlling water erosion because of its ability to retain detached soil particles. The objective of this study was to assess the efficiency of both soil cover by crop residues and soil surface roughness in controlling water erosion. A field experiments was performed on an Inceptisol in South Brazil under simulated rainfall conditions during 2012. The following treatments were evaluated: 1) residues of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum), 2) residues of common vetch (Vicia sativa), 3) scarification after cultivation of Italian ryegrass, 4) scarification after cultivation of common vetch, 5) scarified bare soil with high roughness as a control. Treatments #1 and 2 involved no-tilled soil with a rather smooth soil surface, where roots and crop residues of the previous crop were maintained. Treatments # 3 and 4 involved a rather high roughness, absence of previous crop residues and maintenance of antecedent roots. Experimental plots were 11 m long and 3.5 m wide with an area of 38.5 m2. Six successive simulated rainfall tests were applied using a rotating-boom rain simulator

  2. Soil water retention and maximum capillary drive from saturation to oven dryness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morel-Seytoux, H. J.; Nimmo, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides an alternative method to describe the water retention curve over a range of water contents from saturation to oven dryness. It makes two modifications to the standard Brooks and Corey [1964] (B-C) description, one at each end of the suction range. One expression proposed by Rossi and Nimmo [1994] is used in the high-suction range to a zero residual water content. (This Rossi-Nimmo modification to the Brooks-Corey model provides a more realistic description of the retention curve at low water contents.) Near zero suction the second modification eliminates the region where there is a change in suction with no change in water content. Tests on seven soil data sets, using three distinct analytical expressions for the high-, medium-, and low-suction ranges, show that the experimental water retention curves are well fitted by this composite procedure. The high-suction range of saturation contributes little to the maximum capillary drive, defined with a good approximation for a soil water and air system as H(cM) = {???)/(o) k(rw) dh(c), where k(rw) is relative permeability (or conductivity) to water and h(c) is capillary suction, a positive quantity in unsaturated soils. As a result, the modification suggested to describe the high-suction range does not significantly affect the equivalence between Brooks-Corey (B-C) and van Genuchten [1980] parameters presented earlier. However, the shape of the retention curve near 'natural saturation' has a significant impact on the value of the capillary drive. The estimate using the Brooks-Corey power law, extended to zero suction, will exceed that obtained with the new procedure by 25 to 30%. It is not possible to tell which procedure is appropriate. Tests on another data set, for which relative conductivity data are available, support the view of the authors that measurements of a retention curve coupled with a speculative curve of relative permeability as from a capillary model are not sufficient to accurately

  3. A new direct absorption measurement for high precision and accurate measurement of water vapor in the UT/LS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, M. R.; Sayres, D. S.; Smith, J. B.; Anderson, J.

    2011-12-01

    Highly accurate and precise water vapor measurements in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere are critical to understanding the climate feedbacks of water vapor and clouds in that region. However, the continued disagreement among water vapor measurements (~1 - 2 ppmv) are too large to constrain the role of different hydration and dehydration mechanisms operating in the UT/LS, with model validation dependent upon which dataset is chosen. In response to these issues, we present a new instrument for measurement of water vapor in the UT/LS that was flown during the April 2011 MACPEX mission out of Houston, TX. The dual axis instrument combines the heritage and validated accuracy of the Harvard Lyman-alpha instrument with a newly designed direct IR absorption instrument, the Harvard Herriott Hygrometer (HHH). The Lyman-alpha detection axis has flown aboard NASA's WB-57 and ER2 aircraft since 1994, and provides a requisite link between the new HHH instrument and the long history of Harvard water vapor measurements. The instrument utilizes the highly sensitive Lyman-alpha photo-fragment fluorescence detection method; its accuracy has been demonstrated though rigorous laboratory calibrations and in situ diagnostic procedures. The Harvard Herriott Hygrometer employs a fiber coupled near-IR laser with state-of-the-art electronics to measure water vapor via direct absorption in a spherical Herriott cell of 10 cm length. The instrument demonstrated in-flight precision of 0.1 ppmv (1-sec, 1-sigma) at mixing ratios as low as 5 ppmv with accuracies of 10% based on careful laboratory calibrations and in-flight performance. We present a description of the measurement technique along with our methodology for calibration and details of the measurement uncertainties. The simultaneous utilization of radically different measurement techniques in a single duct in the new Harvard Water Vapor (HWV) instrument allows for the constraint of systematic errors inherent in each technique

  4. Surfactant and irrigation effects on wettable soils: Runoff, erosion, and water retention responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surfactants are chemical compounds that change the contact angle of water on solid surfaces and are commonly used to increase infiltration into hydrophobic soil. Since production fields with water-repellent soil often contain areas of wettable soil, surfactants applied to such fields will likely be ...

  5. Surfactant and Irrigation Effects on Runoff, Erosion, and Water Retention of Three Wettable Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surfactants are chemical compounds that change the contact angle of water on solid surfaces and are commonly used to increase infiltration into hydrophobic soil. Since production fields with water-repellent soil often contain areas of wettable soil, surfactants applied to such fields will likely be ...

  6. Influence of Landscape Position on Soil Water Flux in a Cropped Field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Automated soil moisture equipment can be used to compare landscape position effect on soil water fluxes; unfortunately, site-specific calibrations are often needed for the newer soil moisture probes. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate functional calibration of water content reflectometers ...

  7. Soil and Water Conservation for a Better America. A Framework Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soil Conservation Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Through this framework plan, the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) takes a look ahead to its soil and water conservation mission, a look at its direction and thrust in helping create a desirable America in the decades ahead. The plan attempts to define the nature of soil and water conservation efforts, to put them in perspective, and to present a…

  8. HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION OF SOIL WATER: ECOSYSTEM IMPLICATIONS FOR PACIFIC NORTHWEST FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The physical process of hydraulic redistribution (HR) is driven by competing soil, tree and atmospheric water potential gradients, and may delay severe water stress for roots and other biota associated with the upper soil profile. We monitored soil moisture characteristics across...

  9. Soil-water evaporation dynamics determined with measurement of sensible heat transfer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil-water evaporation is important in both the hydrologic cycle and the surface energy balance. Yet, routine measurements are unable to capture rapidly shifting near-surface soil heat and water processes involved in evaporation. Recent improvements for fine-scale measurement of soil thermal propert...

  10. Concurrent temporal stability of the apparent electrical conductivity and soil water content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of spatio-temporal soil water content (SWC) variability within agricultural fields is useful to improve crop management. Spatial patterns of soil water contents can be characterized using the temporal stability analysis, however high density sampling is required. Soil apparent electrical c...

  11. Surfactant seed coating - a strategy to improve turfgrass establishment on water repellent soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Turfgrass managers can experience poor seeding success when trying to establish golf course greens and sports fields on water repellent soils. Nonionic soil surfactant formulations based on ethylene oxide-propylene oxide (EO/PO) block copolymers are commonly used to treat water repellent soils. Rece...

  12. Estimating water retention curves for sandy soils at the Doñana National Park, SW Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prados Garcia, M. Luisa; Vanderlinden, Karl; Guardiola-Albert, Carolina; Giraldez Cervera, Juan Vicente; Guber, Andrey K.; Pachepsky, Yakov A.

    2010-05-01

    and weaknesses with respect to accurate estimation of SWRCs in sandy soils and to improve the estimation of water fluxes and recharge.

  13. A Review on Temporal Stability of Soil Water Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderlinden, Karl; Vereecken, Harry; Hardelauf, Horst; Herbst, Michael; Martínez, Gonzalo; Cosh, Michael H.; Pachepsky, Yakov A.

    2013-04-01

    Temporal stability of soil water content (TS SWC) has been observed across a wide range of soil types, landscapes, climates and scales. A better understanding of TS SWC controls and their interactions needs to be developed. The objective of this work is to develop a comprehensive inventory of published data on TC SWC and to determine knowledge gaps. Mean relative difference (MRD) values and associated standard deviations (SDRD) were digitized from 157 graphs in 37 publications and analyzed. The MRD followed generally a Gaussian distribution with the determination coefficient R2 > 0.84. The standard deviation of MRD (SDMRD) showed a trend of increase with scale. No relationship between SDMRD and R2 was observed. The smallest R2 values were mostly found for negatively skewed and platykurtic MRD distributions. An analysis of seven measurement-, terrain-, and climate-related TS SWC controls suggested strong interactions and showed that combined effects are typically observed. Many of the existing datasets on TS WCS are mostly byproducts of soil water dynamics studies in agronomic or environmental projects. Future research should include more focused TS SWC studies tailored to understand interactions of controls, underlying mechanisms, and efficiency of applications.

  14. On the structural factors of soil humic matter related to soil water repellence in fire-affected soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almendros, G.; González-Vila, F. J.; González-Pérez, J. A.; Knicker, H.; De la Rosa, J. M.; Dettweiler, C.; Hernández, Z.

    2012-04-01

    In order to elucidate the impact of forest fires on physical and chemical properties of the soils as well as on the chemical composition of the soil organic matter, samples from two Mediterranean soils with contrasted characteristics and vegetation (O horizon, Lithic Leptosols under Quercus ilex and Pinus pinaster) and one agricultural soil (Ap horizon, Luvisol) were heated at 350 °C in laboratory conditions for three successive steps up to 600 s. The C- and N-depletion in the course of the heating showed small changes up to an oxidation time of 300 s. On the other side, and after 600 s, considerable C-losses (between 21% in the Luvisol and 50% in the Leptosols) were observed. The relatively low N-depletion ca. 4% (Luvisol) and 21% (Leptosol under pine) suggested preferential loss of C and the subsequent relative enrichment of nitrogen. Paralleling the progressive depletion of organic matter, the Leptosols showed a significant increase of both pH and electrical conductivity. The former change paralleled the rapid loss of carboxyl groups, whereas the latter point to the relative enrichment of ash with a bearing on the concentration of inorganic ions, which could be considered a positive effect for the post-fire vegetation. The quantitative and qualitative analyses by solid-state 13C NMR spectra of the humic fractions in the samples subjected to successive heating times indicate significant concentration of aromatic structures newly-formed in the course of the dehydration and cyclization of carbohydrates (accumulation of black carbon-type polycyclic aromatic structures), and probably lipids and peptides. The early decarboxylation, in addition to the depletion of O-alkyl hydrophilic constituents and further accumulation of secondary aromatic structures resulted in the dramatic increase in the soil water drop penetration time. It was confirmed that this enhancement of the soil hydrophobicity is not related to an increased concentration of soil free lipid, but is

  15. Ensemble kalman filtering to perform data assimilation with soil water content probes and pedotransfer functions in modeling water flow in variably saturated soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data from modern soil water contents probes can be used for data assimilation in soil water flow modeling, i.e. continual correction of the flow model performance based on observations. The ensemble Kalman filter appears to be an appropriate method for that. The method requires estimates of the unce...

  16. Runoff simulation sensitivity to remotely sensed initial soil water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, D. C.; Schmugge, T. J.; Jackson, T. J.; Unkrich, C. L.; Keefer, T. O.; Parry, R.; Bach, L. B.; Amer, S. A.

    1994-05-01

    A variety of aircraft remotely sensed and conventional ground-based measurements of volumetric soil water content (SW) were made over two subwatersheds (4.4 and 631 ha) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service Walnut Gulch experimental watershed during the 1990 monsoon season. Spatially distributed soil water contents estimated remotely from the NASA push broom microwave radiometer (PBMR), an Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics (IRE) multifrequency radiometer, and three ground-based point methods were used to define prestorm initial SW for a distributed rainfall-runoff model (KINEROS; Woolhiser et al., 1990) at a small catchment scale (4.4 ha). At a medium catchment scale (631 ha or 6.31 km2) spatially distributed PBMR SW data were aggregated via stream order reduction. The impacts of the various spatial averages of SW on runoff simulations are discussed and are compared to runoff simulations using SW estimates derived from a simple daily water balance model. It was found that at the small catchment scale the SW data obtained from any of the measurement methods could be used to obtain reasonable runoff predictions. At the medium catchment scale, a basin-wide remotely sensed average of initial water content was sufficient for runoff simulations. This has important implications for the possible use of satellite-based microwave soil moisture data to define prestorm SW because the low spatial resolutions of such sensors may not seriously impact runoff simulations under the conditions examined. However, at both the small and medium basin scale, adequate resources must be devoted to proper definition of the input rainfall to achieve reasonable runoff simulations.

  17. Effect of top soil wettability on water evaporation and plant growth.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Bharat; Shah, D O; Mishra, Brijesh; Joshi, P A; Gandhi, Vimal G; Fougat, R S

    2015-07-01

    In general, agricultural soil surfaces being hydrophilic in nature get easily wetted by water. The water beneath the soil moves through capillary effect and comes to the surface of the soil and thereafter evaporates into the surrounding air due to atmospheric conditions such as sunlight, wind current, temperature and relative humidity. To lower the water loss from soil, an experiment was designed in which a layer of hydrophobic soil was laid on the surface of ordinary hydrophilic soil. This technique strikingly decreased loss of water from the soil. The results indicated that the evaporation rate significantly decreased and 90% of water was retained in the soil in 83 h by the hydrophobic layer of 2 cm thickness. A theoretical calculation based on diffusion of water vapour (gas phase) through hydrophobic capillaries provide a meaningful explanation of experimental results. A greater retention of water in the soil by this approach can promote the growth of plants, which was confirmed by growing chick pea (Cicer arietinum) plants and it was found that the length of roots, height of shoot, number of branches, number of leaves, number of secondary roots, biomass etc. were significantly increased upon covering the surface with hydrophobic soil in comparison to uncovered ordinary hydrophilic soil of identical depth. Such approach can also decrease the water consumption by the plants particularly grown indoors in residential premises, green houses and poly-houses etc. and also can be very useful to prevent water loss and enhance growth of vegetation in semi-arid regions.

  18. Water-extractable priority contaminants in LUFA 2.2 soil: back to basics, contextualisation and implications for use as natural standard soil.

    PubMed

    Bastos, A C; Prodana, M; Oliveira, J M M; Calhôa, C F; Santos, M J G; Soares, A M V M; Loureiro, S

    2014-11-01

    The natural LUFA 2.2 standard soil has been extensively used in hazard assessment of soil contaminants, combining representation with ecological relevance for accurate risk evaluation. This study revisited the water-extractable fraction of LUFA 2.2 soil, through consecutive soil wet-dry cycles and discusses implications of use as standard substrate in derivation of ecotoxicological data and toxicity thresholds. Potentially bioavailable contents of metals (177.9-888.7 µg/l) and the 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs; 0.064-0.073 µg/l) were dependent on the number of soil wetting-drying cycles applied. Such contents were screened based on current EU guidelines for surface waters and reported toxicological benchmarks for aquatic organisms. Aqueous concentrations generally fit within recommended Environmental Quality Standards (EQS), except for Hg (0.13-0.22 µg/l; >Maximum Allowable Concentration-MAC-of 0.07 µg/l) and for the sum of benzo(g,h,i)perylene and indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene (0.005 µg/l; >double the Annual Average of 0.002 µg/l). Further, aqueous As, Zn, Cd, Ni and Cr concentrations exceeded 'lower benchmark' values for aquatic organisms, possibly reflecting an inadequate derivation for ecotoxicological data. In turn, PAHs in LUFA 2.2 soil aqueous extracts, whilst individually, are not likely to constitute a hazard to test biota exposed to its aqueous fractions. This study urges for potentially bioavailable fractions of reference and standard natural soils to be adequately characterized and addressed as part of the research aim, experimental approach and design, as well as the expected scope of the outcomes.

  19. Accurate path integral molecular dynamics simulation of ab-initio water at near-zero added cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elton, Daniel; Fritz, Michelle; Soler, José; Fernandez-Serra, Marivi

    It is now established that nuclear quantum motion plays an important role in determining water's structure and dynamics. These effects are important to consider when evaluating DFT functionals and attempting to develop better ones for water. The standard way of treating nuclear quantum effects, path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD), multiplies the number of energy/force calculations by the number of beads, which is typically 32. Here we introduce a method whereby PIMD can be incorporated into a DFT molecular dynamics simulation at virtually zero cost. The method is based on the cluster (many body) expansion of the energy. We first subtract the DFT monomer energies, using a custom DFT-based monomer potential energy surface. The evolution of the PIMD beads is then performed using only the more-accurate Partridge-Schwenke monomer energy surface. The DFT calculations are done using the centroid positions. Various bead thermostats can be employed to speed up the sampling of the quantum ensemble. The method bears some resemblance to multiple timestep algorithms and other schemes used to speed up PIMD with classical force fields. We show that our method correctly captures some of key effects of nuclear quantum motion on both the structure and dynamics of water. We acknowledge support from DOE Award No. DE-FG02-09ER16052 (D.E.) and DOE Early Career Award No. DE-SC0003871 (M.V.F.S.).

  20. A systematic approach for the accurate and rapid measurement of water vapor transmission through ultra-high barrier films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiese, Sandra; Kücükpinar, Esra; Reinelt, Matthias; Miesbauer, Oliver; Ewender, Johann; Langowski, Horst-Christian

    2017-02-01

    Flexible organic electronic devices are often protected from degradation by encapsulation in multilayered films with very high barrier properties against moisture and oxygen. However, metrology must be improved to detect such low quantities of permeants. We therefore developed a modified ultra-low permeation measurement device based on a constant-flow carrier-gas system to measure both the transient and stationary water vapor permeation through high-performance barrier films. The accumulation of permeated water vapor before its transport to the detector allows the measurement of very low water vapor transmission rates (WVTRs) down to 2 × 10-5 g m-2 d-1. The measurement cells are stored in a temperature-controlled chamber, allowing WVTR measurements within the temperature range 23-80 °C. Differences in relative humidity can be controlled within the range 15%-90%. The WVTR values determined using the novel measurement device agree with those measured using a commercially available carrier-gas device from MOCON®. Depending on the structure and quality of the barrier film, it may take a long time for the WVTR to reach a steady-state value. However, by using a combination of the time-dependent measurement and the finite element method, we were able to estimate the steady-state WVTR accurately with significantly shorter measurement times.

  1. Effects of soil erosion on water quality and water uses in the upper Phong watershed.

    PubMed

    Sthiannopkao, S; Takizawa, S; Wirojanagud, W

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to simulate the effects of soil erosion on river water quality and on agricultural production as a result of the transformation of forestlands in the catchment of the upstream Phong River. Suspended solids carry down attached nutrients and agricultural chemicals causing water pollution in the downstream. There are four different types of land use in this simulation, namely forestlands, flatland and highland sugarcane plantation areas, and paddy fields. The highest mean annual amount of soil erosion is from paddy fields (585,700 tons/year), followed by highland (73,800 tons/year) and flatland (63,950 tons/year) sugarcane plantation areas and forestlands (41,800 tons/year), respectively. However, as most of paddy fields are located in a low land and are wet type cultivations, the soil erosion occurred has less impact on river water quality and its production compared to the soil erosion from the steeper slopes of highland plantation areas. Under the resource-based agriculture, the sugarcane production is mainly increased by expanding the plantation areas leading to a significant loss of topsoil and a considerable reduction of agricultural production. Soil erosion contributes to an increase in the average annual suspended solids concentration by 72 mg/l.

  2. Holistic irrigation water management approach based on stochastic soil water dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, H.; Mousavi, S. J.

    2012-04-01

    Appreciating the essential gap between fundamental unsaturated zone transport processes and soil and water management due to low effectiveness of some of monitoring and modeling approaches, this study presents a mathematical programming model for irrigation management optimization based on stochastic soil water dynamics. The model is a nonlinear non-convex program with an economic objective function to address water productivity and profitability aspects in irrigation management through optimizing irrigation policy. Utilizing an optimization-simulation method, the model includes an eco-hydrological integrated simulation model consisting of an explicit stochastic module of soil moisture dynamics in the crop-root zone with shallow water table effects, a conceptual root-zone salt balance module, and the FAO crop yield module. Interdependent hydrology of soil unsaturated and saturated zones is treated in a semi-analytical approach in two steps. At first step analytical expressions are derived for the expected values of crop yield, total water requirement and soil water balance components assuming fixed level for shallow water table, while numerical Newton-Raphson procedure is employed at the second step to modify value of shallow water table level. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm, combined with the eco-hydrological simulation model, has been used to solve the non-convex program. Benefiting from semi-analytical framework of the simulation model, the optimization-simulation method with significantly better computational performance compared to a numerical Mote-Carlo simulation-based technique has led to an effective irrigation management tool that can contribute to bridging the gap between vadose zone theory and water management practice. In addition to precisely assessing the most influential processes at a growing season time scale, one can use the developed model in large scale systems such as irrigation districts and agricultural catchments. Accordingly

  3. Large Plate Lysimeter Efficiency for Collecting Water Transported from Soil to Ground Water

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, W; Stone, E L; Hamilton, T

    2004-04-14

    A large, zero-tension, plate lysimeter (3.05 x 2.13 m) was installed to intercept percolating soil water at Bikini Atoll (11 35'N, 165 25'E), a former nuclear test-site. In two experiments controlled amounts of irrigation water were applied over the lysimeter and leachate water was collected. Evapotranspiration (ET) calculations were made using the Penman-Monteith equation and climate data collected at the atoll. The efficiency of the lysimeter was essentially 100% in contrast to low efficiencies reported for smaller plate lysimeters. Lysimeter design, installation, and water balance results are discussed.

  4. Accurate vibrational spectra via molecular tailoring approach: a case study of water clusters at MP2 level.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Nityananda; Gadre, Shridhar R

    2015-01-07

    In spite of the recent advents in parallel algorithms and computer hardware, high-level calculation of vibrational spectra of large molecules is still an uphill task. To overcome this, significant effort has been devoted to the development of new algorithms based on fragmentation methods. The present work provides the details of an efficient and accurate procedure for computing the vibrational spectra of large clusters employing molecular tailoring approach (MTA). The errors in the Hessian matrix elements and dipole derivatives arising due to the approximation nature of MTA are reduced by grafting the corrections from a smaller basis set. The algorithm has been tested out for obtaining vibrational spectra of neutral and charged water clusters at Møller-Plesset second order level of theory, and benchmarking them against the respective full calculation (FC) and/or experimental results. For (H2O)16 clusters, the estimated vibrational frequencies are found to differ by a maximum of 2 cm(-1) with reference to the corresponding FC values. Unlike the FC, the MTA-based calculations including grafting procedure can be performed on a limited hardware, yet take a fraction of the FC time. The present methodology, thus, opens a possibility of the accurate estimation of the vibrational spectra of large molecular systems, which is otherwise impossible or formidable.

  5. Accurate vibrational spectra via molecular tailoring approach: A case study of water clusters at MP2 level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Nityananda; Gadre, Shridhar R.

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the recent advents in parallel algorithms and computer hardware, high-level calculation of vibrational spectra of large molecules is still an uphill task. To overcome this, significant effort has been devoted to the development of new algorithms based on fragmentation methods. The present work provides the details of an efficient and accurate procedure for computing the vibrational spectra of large clusters employing molecular tailoring approach (MTA). The errors in the Hessian matrix elements and dipole derivatives arising due to the approximation nature of MTA are reduced by grafting the corrections from a smaller basis set. The algorithm has been tested out for obtaining vibrational spectra of neutral and charged water clusters at Møller-Plesset second order level of theory, and benchmarking them against the respective full calculation (FC) and/or experimental results. For (H2O)16 clusters, the estimated vibrational frequencies are found to differ by a maximum of 2 cm-1 with reference to the corresponding FC values. Unlike the FC, the MTA-based calculations including grafting procedure can be performed on a limited hardware, yet take a fraction of the FC time. The present methodology, thus, opens a possibility of the accurate estimation of the vibrational spectra of large molecular systems, which is otherwise impossible or formidable.

  6. Short and long term effects of bioturbation on soil erosion, water resources and soil development in an arid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yair, A.

    1995-09-01

    The importance of vegetal cover on soil erosion processes has been recognized for a long time. However, the short and long term effects of faunal activity on soil erosion and soil development had been largely overlooked by geomorphologists. The study of runoff and erosion processes in the Negev desert indicated pronounced systematic differences in sediment concentration and soil erosion rates between rocky and colluvial surfaces. Erosion rates were always higher on the former than on the latter. Field observations drew attention to an intense burrowing and digging activity conducted mainly by Isopods and Porcupines. The monitoring of this activity, based on a grid system, which consists of rows 5 m wide, lasted ten consecutive years. Data obtained suggest the existence of a strong link between the spatial pattern of bioturbation and that of soil erosion. The study also examines, through feedback processes, the regulatory role of bioturbation on the spatial distribution of water availability; soil moisture and soil forming processes. Due to bioturbation two distinct environments were recognised. The rocky environment which is characterized by a positive feedback with a high water availability and low soil salinity; and the soil covered areas where a negative feedback results in low water availability and a high soil salinity.

  7. Determination of Martian soil mineralogy and water content using the Thermal Analyzer for Planetary Soils (TAPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, James L.; Ming, Douglas W.; Allton, Judith H.; Byers, Terry B.; Dunn, Robert P.; Gibbons, Frank L.; Pate, Daniel B.; Polette, Thomas M.

    1992-01-01

    Physical and chemical interactions between the surface and atmosphere of Mars can be expected to embody a strong cause-and-effect relationship with the minerals comprising the martian regolith. Many of the minerals in soils and sediments are probably products of chemical weathering (involving surface/atmosphere or surface/hydrosphere reactions) that could be expected to subsequently influence the sorption of atmospheric gases and water vapor. Therefore, identification of the minerals in martian surface soils and sediments is essential for understanding both past and present interactions between the Mars surface and atmosphere. Clearly, the most definitive mineral analyses would be achieved with well-preserved samples returned to Earth-based laboratories. In advance of a Mars sample return mission, however, significant progress could be made with in situ experiments that fill current voids in knowledge about the presence or abundance of key soil minerals such as clays (layered-structured silicates), zeolites, and various salts, including carbonates. TAPS is intended to answer that challenge by providing first-order identification of soil and sediment minerals.

  8. Measurement of the matric potential of soil water in the rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Whalley, W R; Ober, E S; Jenkins, M

    2013-10-01

    The availability of soil water, and the ability of plants to extract it, are important variables in plant research. The matric potential has been a useful way to describe water status in a soil-plant system. In soil it is the potential that is derived from the surface tension of water menisci between soil particles. The magnitude of matric potential depends on the soil water content, the size of the soil pores, the surface properties of the soil particles, and the surface tension of the soil water. Of all the measures of soil water, matric potential is perhaps the most useful for plant scientists. In this review, the relationship between matric potential and soil water content is explored. It is shown that for any given soil type, this relationship is not unique and therefore both soil water content and matric potential need to be measured for the soil water status to be fully described. However, in comparison with water content, approaches for measuring matric potential have received less attention until recently. In this review, a critique of current methods to measure matric potential is presented, together with their limitations as well as underexploited opportunities. The relative merits of both direct and indirect methods to measure matric potential are discussed. The different approaches needed in wet and dry soil are outlined. In the final part of the paper, the emerging technologies are discussed in so far as our current imagination allows. The review draws upon current developments in the field of civil engineering where the measurement of matric potential is also important. The approaches made by civil engineers have been more imaginative than those of plant and soil scientists.

  9. Seasonal Incidence of Bacterial Temperature Types in Louisiana Soil and Water

    PubMed Central

    Larkin, John M.

    1970-01-01

    Psychrophilic bacteria were not detected in soil, mud, and water in the summer. In winter, they were present in water and mud and constituted a significant portion of the bacterial flora in lake water. PMID:4921063

  10. Contact-angle of water drop on a sloped water repellent soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arye, Gilboa; Bachmann, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    Soil water repellency is a well-known phenomenon worldwide and currently well documented in the scientific literature. Most methods used to characterize the magnitude and/or persistency of soil water repellency is directly or indirectly related to the initial advancing contact angle at the solid-liquid-vapor interface. These methods are commonly involved by placing a water (or solution) drops on horizontal surface of water repellent soil (WRS)particles attached to a plane surface. Under natural conditions, however, a soil surface layer is mostly sloped due to micro and/or macro topography. Therefore, the formation of advancing contact angle (downhill) and receding contact angle (uphill) should be considered, rather than a unique value of the contact angle. The difference between the advancing and receding contact angle values is defined as the contact angle hysteresis, commonly attributed to surface roughness and/or chemical heterogeneities. For a given tilt angle, a water drop exceeding a critical volume will slide downhill. Alternatively, for a given drop volume, a critical sliding angle can be defined. Measurements of advancing, receding and sliding angles on sloped WRS is indispensable for our understanding on water adhesion due to hysteresis and may provide critical values for predicting the initiation of water runoff in sloped landscapes on the micro and macro scales of WRS. Accordingly, the main objective of this study was to measure the advancing and receding contact angles on a sloped WRS as a function of: i) water drop volume, ii) particle size distribution and iii) surface slope. The measurements of contact angles on sloped WRS were taken with an advanced goniometer microscope (OCA20, DataPhysics) with external tilting device and SCA20 software for analyzing contact angles highly resolved with respect to time and spatial scales. The results obtained will be presented and the rolling-drop-criteria will be discussed.

  11. Water quality and surfactant effects on the water repellency of a sandy soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehrsch, G. A.; Sojka, R. E.

    2011-06-01

    SummaryDifferences in irrigation water quality may affect the water repellency of soils treated or untreated with surfactants. Using simulated irrigations, we evaluated water quality and surfactant application rate effects upon the water repellency of a Quincy sand (Xeric Torripsamment). We used a split plot design with two irrigation water qualities, three surfactant application rates, two irrigations, and 12 sampling depths as fixed effects, with four replications. Each water quality × rate × irrigation combination was a main plot and depth was a repeated-measures subplot. A slightly water repellent Quincy soil (average water drop penetration time, WDPT, of 2.5 s) was packed in 25-mm lifts (or layers) to a bulk density of 1.6 Mg m -3 into 0.15-m-high × 0.105-m-diameter plastic columns. We studied a nonionic surfactant, a blend of an ethylene oxide/propylene oxide block copolymer and an alkyl polyglycoside. We sprayed the surfactant at rates of 0, 9.4, and 46.8 L ha -1, diluted with reverse osmosis water (RW) to apply 187 L ha -1 of solution, onto the soil surface of each packed column. About 1 and 5 days after surfactant application, columns were sprinkler irrigated with either RW or well water (WW). The WDPT was then measured with depth on soil air-dried after the first and after the second irrigation. After the first irrigation, WDPT at depths from 97 to 117 mm averaged across surfactant rates reached a maximum of 28 s, regardless of irrigation water quality. WDPT was greatest at 117 mm with RW but only at 97 mm with WW. After the second irrigation, maximum WDPT was 1202 s at 139 mm with RW but only 161 s at 117 mm with WW, nearly 7.5 fold less than with RW. WDPT was greatest near the wetting front, irrespective of water quality. We conclude that irrigation water containing modest amounts of electrolytes or salts, in this case mostly salts of Ca 2+, reduces water repellency in the presence or absence of surfactant. Our experimental results may also help

  12. Soil organic carbon as a factor in passive microwave retrievals of soil water content over agricultural croplands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manns, Hida R.; Berg, Aaron A.; Colliander, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    Remote sensing has the potential to deliver global soil water content (SWC) on vast scales with frequent revisit times for progress in the fields of climate, weather forecasting, agriculture and hydrology. Although surface roughness, vegetation and soil texture have been established as sources of variability in passive microwave interpretation, soil organic carbon (SOC) has not typically been considered as a factor that affects SWC estimation during field sampling campaigns. SOC was observed along with soil texture and bulk density during the Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment in 2012 (SMAPVEX12), the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite algorithm development field sampling campaign held June 6 to July 19 in Southern Manitoba, Canada. Aerial measurements from the PALS (Passive Active L-band System) instrument were recorded over agricultural fields and forest areas from aircraft while SWC was measured simultaneously on the ground with resistance probes on 17 sampling dates. Additionally, fields were sampled for surface roughness, vegetation growth and water content, soil and vegetation temperature and soil physical characteristics. A soil core was collected on each field each sampling time to assess bulk density, soil particle size and SOC. SOC accounted for more variability in the anomalies between PALS and ground sampled SWC than sand, clay or bulk density, although all soil variables explained significant variability. With analysis by partial least squares multiple regression over 11 sampling dates and 39 fields where both ground and PALS data were well represented, only SOC contributed significantly to the regression of SWC beyond the variance all soil variables had in common. The significance of SOC in the relative SWC anomalies was highest in very wet and very dry conditions and in loam soil over all sampling dates, while bulk density was more significant in sand soils. This analysis suggests SOC is a simple variable that incorporates

  13. Subcritical water extractor for Mars analog soil analysis.

    PubMed

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Grunthaner, Frank J; Patrick, Steven B; Yung, Pun To

    2008-06-01

    Abstract Technologies that enable rapid and efficient extraction of biomarker compounds from various solid matrices are a critical requirement for the successful implementation of in situ chemical analysis of the martian regolith. Here, we describe a portable subcritical water extractor that mimics multiple organic solvent polarities by tuning the dielectric constant of liquid water through adjustment of temperature and pressure. Soil samples, collected from the Yungay region of the Atacama Desert (martian regolith analogue) in the summer of 2005, were used to test the instrument's performance. The total organic carbon was extracted from the samples at concentrations of 0.2-55.4 parts per million. The extraction data were compared to the total organic carbon content in the bulk soil, which was determined via a standard analytical procedure. The instrument's performance was examined over the temperature range of 25-250 degrees C at a fixed pressure of 20.7 MPa. Under these conditions, water remains in a subcritical fluid state with a dielectric constant varying between approximately 80 (at 25 degrees C) and approximately 30 (at 250 degrees C).

  14. Soil Water Cycling Links to Carbon Content between Ecosystems in the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, K. M.; Anderson, D. E.; Stannard, D. I.; Mladinich, C. S.; Thienelt, T. S.; Blanken, P.

    2011-12-01

    Near surface soil-water content is crucial to the sustainability of an ecosystem. Additionally, the feedbacks between soil water and soil carbon improve the ability to predict carbon sequestration rates. Organic-carbon content in surface soils influences soil texture and, subsequently, water holding capacity. Preliminary research for two growing seasons (2010 and 2011) compares soil water, temperature, heat flux, and evapotranspiration (ET) with soil organic carbon content at several sites in the Colorado Front Range. Continuous measurements of precipitation, soil moisture and temperature, and energy fluxes were conducted from eddy covariance flux towers at three sites around metropolitan Denver: one urban site and two adjacent sites, a montane forest (Flying J Ranch Open Space), and a native tallgrass prairie (Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge (NWR)). Irrigation data were obtained for the Denver urban site and added to its precipitation to obtain total water inputs. Soil samples (0-5cm) were collected at each tower site and analyzed for bulk density, volumetric water content, and organic carbon content. Soil water inputs and losses (as ET) were analyzed for each site and compared to soil organic carbon content. Rocky Flats NWR soils contained the highest organic carbon content (20-30 percent), while the urban site and Flying J Ranch soils contained between 10-15 percent. Comparing grassland sites, the urban soil received 5 times higher water input (600mm, more than half from irrigation) in 2010 than those of Rocky Flats. Despite less water input, the Rocky Flats site developed more soil organic carbon, possibly due to large amounts of grassland biomass mineralization and moderate soil moisture conditions through the season. The Denver urban site demonstrated less soil moisture variability in response to surface-water inputs from precipitation compared to soils at the native grassland and montane sites, perhaps limiting the conditions under which soil carbon

  15. Water in the critical zone: soil, water and life from profile to planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    Earth is unique in the combination of abundant liquid water, plate tectonics and life, providing the broad context within which the critical zone exists, as the surface skin of the land. Global differences in the availability of water provide a major control on the balance of processes operating in the soil, allowing the development of environments as diverse as those dominated by organic soils, by salty deserts or by deeply weathered lateritic profiles. Within the critical zone, despite the importance of water, the complexity of its relationships with the soil material continue to provide many fundamental barriers to our improved understanding, at the scales of pore, hillslope and landscape. Water is also a vital resource for the survival of increasing human populations. Intensive agriculture first developed in semi-arid areas where the availability of solar energy could be combined with irrigation water from more humid areas, minimising the problems of weed control with primitive tillage techniques. Today the challenge to feed the world requires improved, and perhaps novel, ways to optimise the combination of solar energy and water at a sustainable economic and environmental cost.

  16. Soil-water dynamics and unsaturated storage during snowmelt following wildfire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ebel, Brian A.; Hinckley, E.S.; Martin, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Many forested watersheds with a substantial fraction of precipitation delivered as snow have the potential for landscape disturbance by wildfire. Little is known about the immediate effects of wildfire on snowmelt and near-surface hydrologic responses, including soil-water storage. Montane systems at the rain-snow transition have soil-water dynamics that are further complicated during the snowmelt period by strong aspect controls on snowmelt and soil thawing. Here we present data from field measurements of snow hydrology and subsurface hydrologic and temperature responses during the first winter and spring after the September 2010 Fourmile Canyon Fire in Colorado, USA. Our observations of soil-water content and soil temperature show sharp contrasts in hydrologic and thermal conditions between north- and south-facing slopes. South-facing burned soils were ∼1–2 °C warmer on average than north-facing burned soils and ∼1.5 °C warmer than south-facing unburned soils, which affected soil thawing during the snowmelt period. Soil-water dynamics also differed by aspect: in response to soil thawing, soil-water content increased approximately one month earlier on south-facing burned slopes than on north-facing burned slopes. While aspect and wildfire affect soil-water dynamics during snowmelt, soil-water storage at the end of the snowmelt period reached the value at field capacity for each plot, suggesting that post-snowmelt unsaturated storage was not substantially influenced by aspect in wildfire-affected areas. Our data and analysis indicate that the amount of snowmelt-driven groundwater recharge may be larger in wildfire-impacted areas, especially on south-facing slopes, because of earlier soil thaw and longer durations of soil-water contents above field capacity in those areas.

  17. Sorption of acidic organic solute onto kaolinitic soils from methanol-water mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juhee; Kim, Minhee; Hyun, Seunghun; Kim, Jeong-Gyu; Ok, Yong Sik

    2012-01-01

    The fate of the acidic organic solute from the soil-water-solvent system is not well-understood. In this study, the effect of the acidic functional group of organic solute in the sorption from cosolvent system was evaluated. The sorption of naphthalene (NAP) and 1-naphthoic acid (1-NAPA) by three kaolinitic soils and two model sorbents (kaolinite and humic acid) were measured as functions of the methanol volume fractions (f (c) ≤ 0.4) and ionic compositions (CaCl(2) and KCl). The solubility of 1-NAPA was also measured in various ionic compositions. The sorption data were interpreted using the cosolvency-induced sorption model. The K (m) values (= the linear sorption coefficient) of NAP with kaolinitic soil for both ionic compositions was log linearly decreased with f (c). However, the K (m) values of 1-NAPA with both ionic compositions remained relatively constant over the f (c) range. For the model sorbent, the K (m) values of 1-NAPA with kaolinite for the KCl system and with humic acid for both ionic compositions decreased with f (c), while the sorption of 1-NAPA with kaolinite for the CaCl(2) system was increased with f (c). From the solubility data of 1-NAPA with f (c), no significant difference was observed with the different ionic compositions, indicating an insignificant change in the aqueous activity of the liquid phase. In conclusion, the enhanced 1-NAPA sorption, greater than that predicted from the cosolvency-induced model, was due to an untraceable interaction between the carboxylate and hydrophilic soil domain in the methanol-water system. Therefore, in order to accurately predict the environmental fate of acidic pesticides and organic solutes, an effort to quantitatively incorporate the enhanced hydrophilic sorption into the current cosolvency-induced sorption model is required.

  18. The effect of soil hydrology on the oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions of plants' source water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Kuilian; Feng, Xiahong

    2001-02-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that the isotopic composition of plants' source water is the main factor affecting the isotopic composition of tree rings. Because of soil hydrological processes, soil water as the source water for plants may isotopically differ from precipitation that contains climatic information (such as surface temperature). This study addresses the effects of soil hydrological processes on the isotopic compositions of soil water and discusses how these effects affect interpretations of tree ring data in isotopic dendroclimatology. We collected precipitation, soil gas at two depths (20 and 50 cm), and twigs from a maple tree ( Acer saccharum) on a biweekly basis during the growing season in 1997-1999 at Hanover, NH, USA. Water was extracted from the twig samples by vacuum distillation. All water samples were analyzed for both δD and δ 18O. Soil CO 2 was extracted from soil gas and measured for the δ 18O values, and using the soil temperature and assuming isotopic equilibrium between CO 2 and H 2O, we calculated the δ 18O values of soil water. Comparisons among the isotopic time series of each type of sample indicate the following. (1) The isotopic composition of soil water is much less variable than that of precipitation, suggesting isotopic mixing between waters of different precipitation events. (2) In early spring, soil water at all depths is isotopically similar to winter precipitation, but with time the surface soil water becomes progressively enriched in deuterium and 18O due to infiltration of summer rain and enrichment through soil water evaporation. (3) The influence of summer precipitation decreases with increasing depth, and soil at 50 cm can only receive water from large storms. (4) Replacement of old soil water with new infiltrating water is dependent upon frequency and intensity of growing season precipitation, and it is generally more efficient in a wet year than in a dry year. (5) The tree we studied uses water mainly from near

  19. Proteomic profiling: a novel approach to understanding the biological causes of soil water repellency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Keulen, Geertje; Doerr, Stefan H.; Urbanek, Emilia; Jones, Alun; Dudley, Ed

    2010-05-01

    Soil water repellency is a common phenomenon affecting a wide range of soil and land use types in different climates and is considered "the norm rather than the exception with its degree being variable". In all but the most severe cases, soil water repellency is transient with soils wetting eventually after prolonged wet weather and returning, when soil moisture content falls below the critical value. Despite the far-reaching environmental and (agro-)economic consequences, the fundamental biological causes of soil water repellency and its transient behaviour remain poorly understood. It is widely accepted that soil water repellency is caused by organic compounds coating soil particle surfaces. This reduces the particle's surface tension to values lower than that of water, which, as a net effect, inhibits the intrusion of liquid water into the soil pore space. Microbial as well as plant-derived substances have been implicated as sources of these organic materials, while some microbes have also been identified as degraders and/or emulsifiers of hydrophobic compounds. Common hydrophobic compounds and metabolites (e.g. alkanes and fatty acids) have been isolated from both wettable and water repellent soils in similar amounts indicating that their relevance is ambiguous. Even greater uncertainty exists about the role of soil micro-organisms in the development, reduction and temporal variability of soil water repellency. Importantly, certain filamentous fungi and actinomycete bacteria are able to render their hydrophilic cell surface hydrophobic, for example, during spore formation and hyphal foraging through air-containing pores in soil, by producing extracellular hydrophobic proteins. Beyond their own cell surface, the extracellular proteins can form highly recalcitrant hydrophobic surfaces on the hydrophilic side of amphiphilic, i.e. air-water or soil particle, interfaces. Remarkably, the proteins from fungi can also adhere to hydrophobic surfaces under drying

  20. Utilization of oil in soil and water by microbial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Surzhko, L.F.; Yankevich, M.I.; Yakovlev, V.I.

    1995-05-01

    Pure cultures and culture associations actively utilizing aliphatic and aromatic fractions of oil of the Romashkinskoe oil field were selected. Biopreparations based on vermiculite-immobilized active oil-degrading strains were developed. The ability of the preparations to decompose oil in soil and water was shown. The preparation containing an association of yeast and the bacterium Acinetobacter sp. 725 proved most efficient. In field lysimetric experiments, the introduction of the preparations accelerated oil decomposition by up to 65-78% compared to the control. 6 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Environmental Immunoassays: Alternative Techniques for Soil and Water Analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of soil and water samples for environmental studies and compliance testing can be formidable, time consuming, and costly. As a consequence, immunochemical techniques have become popular for environmental analysis because they are reliable, rapid, and cost effective. During the past 5 years, the use of immunoassays for environmental monitoring has increased substantially, and their use as an integral analytical tool in many environmental laboratories is now commonplace. This chapter will present the basic concept of immunoassays, recent advances in the development of immunochemical methods, and examples of successful applications of immunoassays in environmental analysis.

  2. Soil-pore water distribution of silver and gold engineered nanoparticles in undisturbed soils under unsaturated conditions.

    PubMed

    Tavares, D S; Rodrigues, S M; Cruz, N; Carvalho, C; Teixeira, T; Carvalho, L; Duarte, A C; Trindade, T; Pereira, E; Römkens, P F A M

    2015-10-01

    Release of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) to soil is well documented but little is known on the subsequent soil-pore water distribution of ENPs once present in soil. In this study, the availability and mobility of silver (Ag) and gold (Au) ENPs added to agricultural soils were assessed in two separate pot experiments. Pore water samples collected from pots from day 1 to 45 using porous (<0.17 μm) membrane samplers suggest that both Ag and Au are retained almost completely within 24 h with less than 13% of the total added amount present in pore water on day 1. UV-Vis and TEM results showed that AuENPs in pore water were present as both homoaggregates and heteroaggregates until day 3 after which the concentration in pore water was too low to detect the presence of aggregates. A close relation between the concentration of Au and Fe in pore water suggests that the short term solubility of Au is partly controlled by natural soil colloids. Results suggest that under normal aerated soil conditions the actual availability of Ag and AuENPs is low which is relevant in view of risk assessment even though the impact of environmental conditions and soil properties on the reactivity of ENPs (and/or large ENPs aggregates) retained in the solid matrix need to be addressed further.

  3. Predicting soil water repellency using hydrophobic organic compounds and their vegetation origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Nierop, K. G. J.; Rietkerk, M.; Dekker, S. C.

    2015-06-01

    It is widely accepted that soil water repellency (SWR) is mainly caused by plant-derived hydrophobic organic compounds in soils; such hydrophobic compounds are defined as SWR markers. However, the detailed influence of SWR markers on SWR is yet unclear and the knowledge of their original sources is still limited. The aims of this study are to select important SWR markers to predict SWR based on their correlation with SWR and to determine their origin. In our study, sandy soils with different SWR were collected, along with their covering vegetation, i.e. plant leaves/needles and roots. A sequential extraction procedure was applied to the soils to obtain three organic fractions: dichloromethane (DCM)/MeOH soluble fraction (D), DCM/MeOH insoluble fraction of isopropanol/ammonia solution (IPA/NH3) extract (AI) and DCM/MeOH soluble fraction of IPA/NH3 extract (AS), which were subdivided into 10 dominant SWR marker groups: D fatty acid, D alcohol, D alkane, AI fatty acid, AI alcohol, AI ω-hydroxy fatty acid, AI α,ω-dicarboxylic acid, AS fatty acid, AS alcohol and AS ω-hydroxy fatty acid. Waxes and biopolyesters of the vegetation were also sequentially extracted from plants. The soils with higher SWR have significantly higher relative concentrations of AS alcohols. A number of indications suggest that AS alcohols are mainly derived from roots and most likely produced by microbial hydrolysis of biopolyesters (mainly suberins). In addition, the strong correlation between the biomarkers of plant tissues and SWR markers in soils suggests that it is more accurate to predict SWR of topsoils using ester-bound alcohols from roots, and to predict SWR of subsoils using root-derived ω-hydroxy fatty acids and α,ω-dicarboxylic acids. Considering the sandy soils studied here, the relationships we obtained need to be tested for other types of soils. Our analysis indicates that plant roots have a primary role influencing SWR relative to plant leaves.

  4. An easily implemented agro-hydrological procedure with dynamic root simulation for water transfer in the crop-soil system: Validation and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dejun; Zhang, Tuqiao; Zhang, Kefeng; Greenwood, Duncan J.; Hammond, John P.; White, Philip J.

    2009-05-01

    SummaryModels for water transfer in the crop-soil system are key components of agro-hydrological models for irrigation, fertilizer and pesticide practices. Many of the hydrological models for water transfer in the crop-soil system are either too approximate due to oversimplified algorithms or employ complex numerical schemes. In this paper we developed a simple and sufficiently accurate algorithm which can be easily adopted in agro-hydrological models for the simulation of water dynamics. We used a dual crop coefficient approach proposed by the FAO for estimating potential evaporation and transpiration, and a dynamic model for calculating relative root length distribution on a daily basis. In a small time step of 0.001 d, we implemented algorithms separately for actual evaporation, root water uptake and soil water content redistribution by decoupling these processes. The Richards equation describing soil water movement was solved using an integration strategy over the soil layers instead of complex numerical schemes. This drastically simplified the procedures of modeling soil water and led to much shorter computer codes. The validity of the proposed model was tested against data from field experiments on two contrasting soils cropped with wheat. Good agreement was achieved between measurement and simulation of soil water content in various depths collected at intervals during crop growth. This indicates that the model is satisfactory in simulating water transfer in the crop-soil system, and therefore can reliably be adopted in agro-hydrological models. Finally we demonstrated how the developed model could be used to study the effect of changes in the environment such as lowering the groundwater table caused by the construction of a motorway on crop transpiration.

  5. Relationship between specific surface area and the dry end of the water retention curve for soils with varying clay and organic carbon contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resurreccion, Augustus C.; Moldrup, Per; Tuller, Markus; Ferré, T. P. A.; Kawamoto, Ken; Komatsu, Toshiko; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen

    2011-06-01

    Accurate description of the soil water retention curve (SWRC) at low water contents is important for simulating water dynamics and biochemical vadose zone processes in arid environments. Soil water retention data corresponding to matric potentials of less than -10 MPa, where adsorptive forces dominate over capillary forces, have also been used to estimate soil specific surface area (SA). In the present study, the dry end of the SWRC was measured with a chilled-mirror dew point psychrometer for 41 Danish soils covering a wide range of clay (CL) and organic carbon (OC) contents. The 41 soils were classified into four groups on the basis of the Dexter number (n = CL/OC), and the Tuller-Or (TO) general scaling model describing water film thickness at a given matric potential (<-10 MPa) was evaluated. The SA estimated from the dry end of the SWRC (SA_SWRC) was in good agreement with the SA measured with ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (SA_EGME) only for organic soils with n > 10. A strong correlation between the ratio of the two surface area estimates and the Dexter number was observed and applied as an additional scaling function in the TO model to rescale the soil water retention curve at low water contents. However, the TO model still overestimated water film thickness at potentials approaching ovendry condition (about -800 MPa). The semi-log linear Campbell-Shiozawa-Rossi-Nimmo (CSRN) model showed better fits for all investigated soils from -10 to -800 MPa and yielded high correlations with CL and SA. It is therefore recommended to apply the empirical CSRN model for predicting the dry part of the water retention curve (-10 to -800 MPa) from measured soil texture or surface area. Further research should aim to modify the more physically based TO model to obtain better descriptions of the SWRC in the very dry range (-300 to -800 MPa).

  6. In situ separation of root hydraulic redistribution of soil water from liquid and vapor transport

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Jeffrey; Brooks, J Renee; Dragila, Maria; Meinzer, Rick

    2011-01-01

    Nocturnal increases in water potential ( ) and water content (WC) in the upper soil profile are often attributed to root water efflux into the soil, a process termed hydraulic lift or hydraulic redistribution (HR). We have previously reported HR values up to ~0.29 mm day-1 in the upper soil for a seasonally dry old-growth ponderosa pine site. However, unsaturated liquid or vapor flux of water between soil layers independent of roots also contributes to the diurnal patterns in WC, confounding efforts to determine the actual magnitude of HR. In this study, we estimated liquid (Jl) and vapor (Jv) soil water fluxes and their impacts on quantifying HR in situ by applying existing data sets of , WC, temperature (T) and soil physical properties to soil water transport equations. Under moist conditions, Jl between layers was estimated to be larger than necessary to account for measured nocturnal increases in WC of upper soil layers. However, as soil drying progressed unsaturated hydraulic conductivity declined rapidly such that Jl was irrelevant (< 2E-06 cm hr-1 at 0-60 cm depths) to total water flux by early August. In surface soil at depths above 15 cm, large T fluctuations can impact Jv leading to uncertainty concerning the role, if any, of HR in nocturnal WC dynamics. Vapor flux was estimated to be the highest at the shallowest depths measured (20 - 30 cm) where it could contribute up to 40% of hourly increases in nocturnal soil moisture depending on thermal conditions. While both HR and net soil water flux between adjacent layers contribute to WC in the 15-65 cm soil layer, HR was the dominant process and accounted for at least 80% of the diurnal increases in WC. While the absolute magnitude of HR is not easily quantified, total diurnal fluctuations in upper soil water content can be quantified and modeled, and remain highly applicable for establishing the magnitude and temporal dynamics of total ecosystem water flux.

  7. Water erosion as a cause for agricultural soil loss: modeling of dynamic processes using high-resolution ground based LiDAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oz, Imri; Filin, Sagi; Assouline, Shmuel; Shtain, Zachi; Furman, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Soil erosion by rainfall and water flow is a frequent natural geomorphic process shaping the earth's surface at various scales. Conventional agrotechnical methods enhance soil erosion at the field scale and are at the origin of the reduction of the upper soil layer depth. This reduction is expressed in two aspects: decrease of soil depth, mainly due to erosion, and the diminution of soil quality, mainly due to the loss of fine material, nutrients and organic matter. Rain events, not even the most extremes, cause detachment and transport of fertile soil rich in organic matter and nutrients away from the fields, filling and plugging drainage channels, blocking infrastructure and contaminating water sources. Empirical, semi-empirical and mechanistic models are available to estimate soil erosion by water flow and sediment transport (e.g. WEPP, KINEROSS, EUROSEM). Calibration of these models requires data measured at high spatial and temporal resolutions. Development of high-resolution measurement tools (for both spatial and temporal aspects) should improve the calibration of functions related to particles detachment and transport from the soil surface. In addition, despite the great impact of different tillage systems on the soil erosion process, the vast majority of the models ignore this fundamental factor. The objective of this study is to apply high-resolution ground-based LiDAR measurements to different tillage schemes and scales to improve the ability of models to accurately describe the process of soil erosion induced by rainfall and overland flow. Ground-based laser scans provide high resolution accurate and subtle geomorphic changes, as well as larger-scale deformations. As such, it allows frequent monitoring, so that even the effect of a single storm can be measured, thus improving the calibration of the erosion models. Preliminary results for scans made in the field show the potential and limitations of ground-based LiDAR, and at this point qualitatively can

  8. [Effects of brackish water irrigation on soil enzyme activity, soil CO2 flux and organic matter decomposition].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-qian; Wang, Fei; Liu, Tao; Chu, Gui-xin

    2015-09-01

    Brackish water irrigation utilization is an important way to alleviate water resource shortage in arid region. A field-plot experiment was set up to study the impact of the salinity level (0.31, 3.0 or 5.0 g · L(-1) NaCl) of irrigated water on activities of soil catalase, invertase, β-glucosidase, cellulase and polyphenoloxidase in drip irrigation condition, and the responses of soil CO2 flux and organic matter decomposition were also determined by soil carbon dioxide flux instrument (LI-8100) and nylon net bag method. The results showed that in contrast with fresh water irrigation treatment (CK), the activities of invertase, β-glucosidase and cellulase in the brackish water (3.0 g · L(-1)) irrigation treatment declined by 31.7%-32.4%, 29.7%-31.6%, 20.8%-24.3%, respectively, while soil polyphenoloxidase activity was obviously enhanced with increasing the salinity level of irrigated water. Compared to CK, polyphenoloxidase activity increased by 2.4% and 20.5%, respectively, in the brackish water and saline water irrigation treatments. Both soil microbial biomass carbon and microbial quotient decreased with increasing the salinity level, whereas, microbial metabolic quotient showed an increasing tendency with increasing the salinity level. Soil CO2 fluxes in the different treatments were in the order of CK (0.31 g · L(-1)) > brackish water irrigation (3.0 g · L(-1)) ≥ saline water irrigation (5.0 g · L(-1)). Moreover, CO2 flux from plastic film mulched soil was always much higher than that from no plastic film mulched soil, regardless the salinity of irrigated water. Compared with CK, soil CO2 fluxes in the saline water and brackish water treatments decreased by 29.8% and 28.2% respectively in the boll opening period. The decomposition of either cotton straw or alfalfa straw in the different treatments was in the sequence of CK (0.31 g · L(-1)) > brackish water irrigation (3.0 g · L(-1)) > saline water treatment (5.0 g · L(-1)). The organic matter

  9. Nuclear Quantum Effects in Liquid Water: A Highly Accurate ab initio Path-Integral Molecular Dynamics Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Distasio, Robert A., Jr.; Santra, Biswajit; Ko, Hsin-Yu; Car, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we report highly accurate ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics (AI-PIMD) simulations on liquid water at ambient conditions utilizing the recently developed PBE0+vdW(SC) exchange-correlation functional, which accounts for exact exchange and a self-consistent pairwise treatment of van der Waals (vdW) or dispersion interactions, combined with nuclear quantum effects (via the colored-noise generalized Langevin equation). The importance of each of these effects in the theoretical prediction of the structure of liquid water will be demonstrated by a detailed comparative analysis of the predicted and experimental oxygen-oxygen (O-O), oxygen-hydrogen (O-H), and hydrogen-hydrogen (H-H) radial distribution functions as well as other structural properties. In addition, we will discuss the theoretically obtained proton momentum distribution, computed using the recently developed Feynman path formulation, in light of the experimental deep inelastic neutron scattering (DINS) measurements. DOE: DE-SC0008626, DOE: DE-SC0005180.

  10. A comparative modeling study of soil water dynamics in a desert ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Paul R.; Reynolds, James F.; Pachepsky, Yakov; Chen, Jia-Lin

    1997-01-01

    We compared three different soil water models to evaluate the extent to which variation in plant growth form and cover and soil texture along a topographic gradient interact to affect relative rates of evaporation and transpiration under semiarid conditions. The models all incorporated one-dimensional distribution of water in the soil and had separate functions for loss of water through transpiration and soil evaporation but differed in the degree of mechanism and emphasis. PALS-SW (Patch Arid Lands Simulator-Soil Water) is a mechanistic model that includes soil water fluxes and emphasizes the physiological control of water loss by different plant life forms along the gradient. 2DSOIL is a mechanistic model that emphasizes the physical aspects of soil water fluxes. SWB (Soil Water Budget) is a simple water budget model that has no soil water redistribution and includes simplified schemes for soil evaporation and transpiration by different life forms. The model predictions were compared to observed soil water distributions at five positions along the gradient. All models predicted soil water distributions reasonably well and, for the most part, predicted similar trends along the transect in the fractions of water lost as soil evaporation versus transpiration. Transpiration was lowest (about 40% of total evapotranspiration (ET)) for the creosote bush community, which had the lowest plant cover (30% peak cover). The fraction of ET as transpiration increased with increasing plant cover, with 2DSOIL predicting the highest transpiration (60% of total ET) for the mixed vegetation community (60% peak cover) on relatively fine textured soil and PALSr SW predicting highest transpiration (69% of total ET) for the mixed vegetation community (70% peak cover) on relatively coarse textured soil. The community type had an effect on the amount of water lost as transpiration primarily via depth and distribution of roots. In this respect, PALS-SW predicted greatest differences among

  11. Simulation of large-scale soil water systems using groundwater data and satellite based soil moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreye, Phillip; Meon, Günter

    2016-04-01

    Complex concepts for the physically correct depiction of dominant processes in the hydrosphere are increasingly at the forefront of hydrological modelling. Many scientific issues in hydrological modelling demand for additional system variables besides a simulation of runoff only, such as groundwater recharge or soil moisture conditions. Models that include soil water simulations are either very simplified or require a high number of parameters. Against this backdrop there is a heightened demand of observations to be used to calibrate the model. A reasonable integration of groundwater data or remote sensing data in calibration procedures as well as the identifiability of physically plausible sets of parameters is subject to research in the field of hydrology. Since this data is often combined with conceptual models, the given interfaces are not suitable for such demands. Furthermore, the application of automated optimisation procedures is generally associated with conceptual models, whose (fast) computing times allow many iterations of the optimisation in an acceptable time frame. One of the main aims of this study is to reduce the discrepancy between scientific and practical applications in the field of hydrological modelling. Therefore, the soil model DYVESOM (DYnamic VEgetation SOil Model) was developed as one of the primary components of the hydrological modelling system PANTA RHEI. DYVESOMs structure provides the required interfaces for the calibrations made at runoff, satellite based soil moisture and groundwater level. The model considers spatial and temporal differentiated feedback of the development of the vegetation on the soil system. In addition, small scale heterogeneities of soil properties (subgrid-variability) are parameterized by variation of van Genuchten parameters depending on distribution functions. Different sets of parameters are operated simultaneously while interacting with each other. The developed soil model is innovative regarding concept

  12. An integrated soil-crop system model for water and nitrogen management in North China

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hao; Hu, Kelin; Batchelor, William D.; Qi, Zhiming; Li, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    An integrated model WHCNS (soil Water Heat Carbon Nitrogen Simulator) was developed to assess water and nitrogen (N) management in North China. It included five main modules: soil water, soil temperature, soil carbon (C), soil N, and crop growth. The model integrated some features of several widely used crop and soil models, and some modifications were made in order to apply the WHCNS model under the complex conditions of intensive cropping systems in North China. The WHCNS model was evaluated using an open access dataset from the European International Conference on Modeling Soil Water and N Dynamics. WHCNS gave better estimations of soil water and N dynamics, dry matter accumulation and N uptake than 14 other models. The model was tested against data from four experimental sites in North China under various soil, crop, climate, and management practices. Simulated soil water content, soil nitrate concentrations, crop dry matter, leaf area index and grain yields all agreed well with measured values. This study indicates that the WHCNS model can be used to analyze and evaluate the effects of various field management practices on crop yield, fate of N, and water and N use efficiencies in North China. PMID:27181364

  13. An integrated soil-crop system model for water and nitrogen management in North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Hao; Hu, Kelin; Batchelor, William D.; Qi, Zhiming; Li, Baoguo

    2016-05-01

    An integrated model WHCNS (soil Water Heat Carbon Nitrogen Simulator) was developed to assess water and nitrogen (N) management in North China. It included five main modules: soil water, soil temperature, soil carbon (C), soil N, and crop growth. The model integrated some features of several widely used crop and soil models, and some modifications were made in order to apply the WHCNS model under the complex conditions of intensive cropping systems in North China. The WHCNS model was evaluated using an open access dataset from the European International Conference on Modeling Soil Water and N Dynamics. WHCNS gave better estimations of soil water and N dynamics, dry matter accumulation and N uptake than 14 other models. The model was tested against data from four experimental sites in North China under various soil, crop, climate, and management practices. Simulated soil water content, soil nitrate concentrations, crop dry matter, leaf area index and grain yields all agreed well with measured values. This study indicates that the WHCNS model can be used to analyze and evaluate the effects of various field management practices on crop yield, fate of N, and water and N use efficiencies in North China.

  14. Fire-induced water-repellent soils, an annotated bibliography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalendovsky, M.A.; Cannon, S.H.

    1997-01-01

    The development and nature of water-repellent, or hydrophobic, soils are important issues in evaluating hillslope response to fire. The following annotated bibliography was compiled to consolidate existing published research on the topic. Emphasis was placed on the types, causes, effects and measurement techniques of water repellency, particularly with respect to wildfires and prescribed burns. Each annotation includes a general summary of the respective publication, as well as highlights of interest to this fo