Science.gov

Sample records for accurate source location

  1. Accurate source location from waves scattered by surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nian; Shen, Yang; Flinders, Ashton; Zhang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Accurate source locations of earthquakes and other seismic events are fundamental in seismology. The location accuracy is limited by several factors, including velocity models, which are often poorly known. In contrast, surface topography, the largest velocity contrast in the Earth, is often precisely mapped at the seismic wavelength (>100 m). In this study, we explore the use of P coda waves generated by scattering at surface topography to obtain high-resolution locations of near-surface seismic events. The Pacific Northwest region is chosen as an example to provide realistic topography. A grid search algorithm is combined with the 3-D strain Green's tensor database to improve search efficiency as well as the quality of hypocenter solutions. The strain Green's tensor is calculated using a 3-D collocated-grid finite difference method on curvilinear grids. Solutions in the search volume are obtained based on the least squares misfit between the "observed" and predicted P and P coda waves. The 95% confidence interval of the solution is provided as an a posteriori error estimation. For shallow events tested in the study, scattering is mainly due to topography in comparison with stochastic lateral velocity heterogeneity. The incorporation of P coda significantly improves solution accuracy and reduces solution uncertainty. The solution remains robust with wide ranges of random noises in data, unmodeled random velocity heterogeneities, and uncertainties in moment tensors. The method can be extended to locate pairs of sources in close proximity by differential waveforms using source-receiver reciprocity, further reducing errors caused by unmodeled velocity structures.

  2. Alignment of leading-edge and peak-picking time of arrival methods to obtain accurate source locations

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.; Symbalisty, E.; Fox, C.; and Vanderlinde, O.

    2009-08-01

    The location of a radiating source can be determined by time-tagging the arrival of the radiated signal at a network of spatially distributed sensors. The accuracy of this approach depends strongly on the particular time-tagging algorithm employed at each of the sensors. If different techniques are used across the network, then the time tags must be referenced to a common fiducial for maximum location accuracy. In this report we derive the time corrections needed to temporally align leading-edge, time-tagging techniques with peak-picking algorithms. We focus on broadband radio frequency (RF) sources, an ionospheric propagation channel, and narrowband receivers, but the final results can be generalized to apply to any source, propagation environment, and sensor. Our analytic results are checked against numerical simulations for a number of representative cases and agree with the specific leading-edge algorithm studied independently by Kim and Eng (1995) and Pongratz (2005 and 2007).

  3. Nonexposure Accurate Location K-Anonymity Algorithm in LBS

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This paper tackles location privacy protection in current location-based services (LBS) where mobile users have to report their exact location information to an LBS provider in order to obtain their desired services. Location cloaking has been proposed and well studied to protect user privacy. It blurs the user's accurate coordinate and replaces it with a well-shaped cloaked region. However, to obtain such an anonymous spatial region (ASR), nearly all existent cloaking algorithms require knowing the accurate locations of all users. Therefore, location cloaking without exposing the user's accurate location to any party is urgently needed. In this paper, we present such two nonexposure accurate location cloaking algorithms. They are designed for K-anonymity, and cloaking is performed based on the identifications (IDs) of the grid areas which were reported by all the users, instead of directly on their accurate coordinates. Experimental results show that our algorithms are more secure than the existent cloaking algorithms, need not have all the users reporting their locations all the time, and can generate smaller ASR. PMID:24605060

  4. Nonexposure accurate location K-anonymity algorithm in LBS.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jinying; Zhang, Fengli

    2014-01-01

    This paper tackles location privacy protection in current location-based services (LBS) where mobile users have to report their exact location information to an LBS provider in order to obtain their desired services. Location cloaking has been proposed and well studied to protect user privacy. It blurs the user's accurate coordinate and replaces it with a well-shaped cloaked region. However, to obtain such an anonymous spatial region (ASR), nearly all existent cloaking algorithms require knowing the accurate locations of all users. Therefore, location cloaking without exposing the user's accurate location to any party is urgently needed. In this paper, we present such two nonexposure accurate location cloaking algorithms. They are designed for K-anonymity, and cloaking is performed based on the identifications (IDs) of the grid areas which were reported by all the users, instead of directly on their accurate coordinates. Experimental results show that our algorithms are more secure than the existent cloaking algorithms, need not have all the users reporting their locations all the time, and can generate smaller ASR.

  5. Source Identification and Location Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weir, Donald; Bridges, James; Agboola, Femi; Dougherty, Robert

    2001-01-01

    Mr. Weir presented source location results obtained from an engine test as part of the Engine Validation of Noise Reduction Concepts program. Two types of microphone arrays were used in this program to determine the jet noise source distribution for the exhaust from a 4.3 bypass ratio turbofan engine. One was a linear array of 16 microphones located on a 25 ft. sideline and the other was a 103 microphone 3-D "cage" array in the near field of the jet. Data were obtained from a baseline nozzle and from numerous nozzle configuration using chevrons and/or tabs to reduce the jet noise. Mr. Weir presented data from two configurations: the baseline nozzle and a nozzle configuration with chevrons on both the core and bypass nozzles. This chevron configuration had achieved a jet noise reduction of 4 EPNdB in small scale tests conducted at the Glenn Research Center. IR imaging showed that the chevrons produced significant improvements in mixing and greatly reduced the length of the jet potential core. Comparison of source location data from the 1-D phased array showed a shift of the noise sources towards the nozzle and clear reductions of the sources due to the noise reduction devices. Data from the 3-D array showed a single source at a frequency of 125 Hz. located several diameters downstream from the nozzle exit. At 250 and 400 Hz., multiple sources, periodically spaced, appeared to exist downstream of the nozzle. The trend of source location moving toward the nozzle exit with increasing frequency was also observed. The 3-D array data also showed a reduction in source strength with the addition of chevrons. The overall trend of source location with frequency was compared for the two arrays and with classical experience. Similar trends were observed. Although overall trends with frequency and addition of suppression devices were consistent between the data from the 1-D and the 3-D arrays, a comparison of the details of the inferred source locations did show differences. A

  6. Accurate shear measurement with faint sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Foucaud, Sebastien; Luo, Wentao E-mail: walt@shao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    For cosmic shear to become an accurate cosmological probe, systematic errors in the shear measurement method must be unambiguously identified and corrected for. Previous work of this series has demonstrated that cosmic shears can be measured accurately in Fourier space in the presence of background noise and finite pixel size, without assumptions on the morphologies of galaxy and PSF. The remaining major source of error is source Poisson noise, due to the finiteness of source photon number. This problem is particularly important for faint galaxies in space-based weak lensing measurements, and for ground-based images of short exposure times. In this work, we propose a simple and rigorous way of removing the shear bias from the source Poisson noise. Our noise treatment can be generalized for images made of multiple exposures through MultiDrizzle. This is demonstrated with the SDSS and COSMOS/ACS data. With a large ensemble of mock galaxy images of unrestricted morphologies, we show that our shear measurement method can achieve sub-percent level accuracy even for images of signal-to-noise ratio less than 5 in general, making it the most promising technique for cosmic shear measurement in the ongoing and upcoming large scale galaxy surveys.

  7. Hydrogen atoms can be located accurately and precisely by x-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Woińska, Magdalena; Grabowsky, Simon; Dominiak, Paulina M; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2016-05-01

    Precise and accurate structural information on hydrogen atoms is crucial to the study of energies of interactions important for crystal engineering, materials science, medicine, and pharmacy, and to the estimation of physical and chemical properties in solids. However, hydrogen atoms only scatter x-radiation weakly, so x-rays have not been used routinely to locate them accurately. Textbooks and teaching classes still emphasize that hydrogen atoms cannot be located with x-rays close to heavy elements; instead, neutron diffraction is needed. We show that, contrary to widespread expectation, hydrogen atoms can be located very accurately using x-ray diffraction, yielding bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms (A-H) that are in agreement with results from neutron diffraction mostly within a single standard deviation. The precision of the determination is also comparable between x-ray and neutron diffraction results. This has been achieved at resolutions as low as 0.8 Å using Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR). We have applied HAR to 81 crystal structures of organic molecules and compared the A-H bond lengths with those from neutron measurements for A-H bonds sorted into bonds of the same class. We further show in a selection of inorganic compounds that hydrogen atoms can be located in bridging positions and close to heavy transition metals accurately and precisely. We anticipate that, in the future, conventional x-radiation sources at in-house diffractometers can be used routinely for locating hydrogen atoms in small molecules accurately instead of large-scale facilities such as spallation sources or nuclear reactors.

  8. Hydrogen atoms can be located accurately and precisely by x-ray crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Woińska, Magdalena; Grabowsky, Simon; Dominiak, Paulina M.; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2016-01-01

    Precise and accurate structural information on hydrogen atoms is crucial to the study of energies of interactions important for crystal engineering, materials science, medicine, and pharmacy, and to the estimation of physical and chemical properties in solids. However, hydrogen atoms only scatter x-radiation weakly, so x-rays have not been used routinely to locate them accurately. Textbooks and teaching classes still emphasize that hydrogen atoms cannot be located with x-rays close to heavy elements; instead, neutron diffraction is needed. We show that, contrary to widespread expectation, hydrogen atoms can be located very accurately using x-ray diffraction, yielding bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms (A–H) that are in agreement with results from neutron diffraction mostly within a single standard deviation. The precision of the determination is also comparable between x-ray and neutron diffraction results. This has been achieved at resolutions as low as 0.8 Å using Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR). We have applied HAR to 81 crystal structures of organic molecules and compared the A–H bond lengths with those from neutron measurements for A–H bonds sorted into bonds of the same class. We further show in a selection of inorganic compounds that hydrogen atoms can be located in bridging positions and close to heavy transition metals accurately and precisely. We anticipate that, in the future, conventional x-radiation sources at in-house diffractometers can be used routinely for locating hydrogen atoms in small molecules accurately instead of large-scale facilities such as spallation sources or nuclear reactors. PMID:27386545

  9. Wave equation based microseismic source location and velocity inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yikang; Wang, Yibo; Chang, Xu

    2016-12-01

    The microseismic event locations and velocity information can be used to infer the stress field and guide hydraulic fracturing process, as well as to image the subsurface structures. How to get accurate microseismic event locations and velocity model is the principal problem in reservoir monitoring. For most location methods, the velocity model has significant relation with the accuracy of the location results. The velocity obtained from log data is usually too rough to be used for location directly. It is necessary to discuss how to combine the location and velocity inversion. Among the main techniques for locating microseismic events, time reversal imaging (TRI) based on wave equation avoids traveltime picking and offers high-resolution locations. Frequency dependent wave equation traveltime inversion (FWT) is an inversion method that can invert velocity model with source uncertainty at certain frequency band. Thus we combine TRI with FWT to produce improved event locations and velocity model. In the proposed approach, the location and model information are interactively used and updated. Through the proposed workflow, the inverted model is better resolved and the event locations are more accurate. We test this method on synthetic borehole data and filed data of a hydraulic fracturing experiment. The results verify the effectiveness of the method and prove it has potential for real-time microseismic monitoring.

  10. Locating the source of spreading in temporal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qiangjuan; Zhao, Chengli; Zhang, Xue; Yi, Dongyun

    2017-02-01

    The topological structure of many real networks changes with time. Thus, locating the sources of a temporal network is a creative and challenging problem, as the enormous size of many real networks makes it unfeasible to observe the state of all nodes. In this paper, we propose an algorithm to solve this problem, named the backward temporal diffusion process. The proposed algorithm calculates the shortest temporal distance to locate the transmission source. We assume that the spreading process can be modeled as a simple diffusion process and by consensus dynamics. To improve the location accuracy, we also adopt four strategies to select which nodes should be observed by ranking their importance in the temporal network. Our paper proposes a highly accurate method for locating the source in temporal networks and is, to the best of our knowledge, a frontier work in this field. Moreover, our framework has important significance for controlling the transmission of diseases or rumors and formulating immediate immunization strategies.

  11. Locating POPs Sources with Tree Bark.

    PubMed

    Peverly, Angela A; Salamova, Amina; Hites, Ronald A

    2015-12-01

    Locating sources of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) to the atmosphere can sometimes be difficult. We suggest that tree bark makes an excellent passive atmospheric sampler and that spatial analysis of tree bark POPs concentrations can often pinpoint their sources. This is an effective strategy because tree bark is lipophilic and readily adsorbs and collects POPs from the atmosphere. As such, tree bark is an ideal sampler to find POPs sources globally, regionally, or locally. This article summarizes some work on this subject with an emphasis on kriged maps and a simple power-law model, both of which have been used to locate sources. Three of the four examples led directly to the pollutant's manufacturing plant.

  12. Locating Microseism Sources in Offshore Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, X.; Clayton, R. W.

    2007-12-01

    We use the broadband stations from the S. California network to locate the apparent origin of secondary microseisms energy (5-8 Hz band). The procedure is to grid the offshore region and using each grid point as the source point, predict the response of a Rayleigh wave at each station. These predicted waveforms are then correlated with the data over a time window that is typically a 1/2 hour in length and composited at the grid point. The length of the time window controls a tradeoff between the spatial-temporal resolution of the sources and the robustness on the image. The procedure is valid for multiple sources. This results show that during periods of high microseism activity the sources are distinct at several locations in a region approximately 50-100 km offshore. For an 11/09/2002 Southern Ocean storm, for example, two zones parallel to each other and perpendicular to the coast are imaged.

  13. Accurate relative location estimates for the North Korean nuclear tests using empirical slowness corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, S. J.; Pabian, F.; Näsholm, S. P.; Kværna, T.; Mykkeltveit, S.

    2017-01-01

    Declared North Korean nuclear tests in 2006, 2009, 2013 and 2016 were observed seismically at regional and teleseismic distances. Waveform similarity allows the events to be located relatively with far greater accuracy than the absolute locations can be determined from seismic data alone. There is now significant redundancy in the data given the large number of regional and teleseismic stations that have recorded multiple events, and relative location estimates can be confirmed independently by performing calculations on many mutually exclusive sets of measurements. Using a 1-D global velocity model, the distances between the events estimated using teleseismic P phases are found to be approximately 25 per cent shorter than the distances between events estimated using regional Pn phases. The 2009, 2013 and 2016 events all take place within 1 km of each other and the discrepancy between the regional and teleseismic relative location estimates is no more than about 150 m. The discrepancy is much more significant when estimating the location of the more distant 2006 event relative to the later explosions with regional and teleseismic estimates varying by many hundreds of metres. The relative location of the 2006 event is challenging given the smaller number of observing stations, the lower signal-to-noise ratio and significant waveform dissimilarity at some regional stations. The 2006 event is however highly significant in constraining the absolute locations in the terrain at the Punggye-ri test-site in relation to observed surface infrastructure. For each seismic arrival used to estimate the relative locations, we define a slowness scaling factor which multiplies the gradient of seismic traveltime versus distance, evaluated at the source, relative to the applied 1-D velocity model. A procedure for estimating correction terms which reduce the double-difference time residual vector norms is presented together with a discussion of the associated uncertainty. The modified

  14. Accurate Relative Location Estimates for the North Korean Nuclear Tests Using Empirical Slowness Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, S. J.; Pabian, F.; Näsholm, S. P.; Kværna', T.; Mykkeltveit, S.

    2016-10-01

    Declared North Korean nuclear tests in 2006, 2009, 2013, and 2016 were observed seismically at regional and teleseismic distances. Waveform similarity allows the events to be located relatively with far greater accuracy than the absolute locations can be determined from seismic data alone. There is now significant redundancy in the data given the large number of regional and teleseismic stations that have recorded multiple events, and relative location estimates can be confirmed independently by performing calculations on many mutually exclusive sets of measurements. Using a 1-dimensional global velocity model, the distances between the events estimated using teleseismic P phases are found to be approximately 25% shorter than the distances between events estimated using regional Pn phases. The 2009, 2013, and 2016 events all take place within 1 km of each other and the discrepancy between the regional and teleseismic relative location estimates is no more than about 150 m. The discrepancy is much more significant when estimating the location of the more distant 2006 event relative to the later explosions with regional and teleseismic estimates varying by many hundreds of meters. The relative location of the 2006 event is challenging given the smaller number of observing stations, the lower signal-to-noise ratio, and significant waveform dissimilarity at some regional stations. The 2006 event is however highly significant in constraining the absolute locations in the terrain at the Punggye-ri test-site in relation to observed surface infrastructure. For each seismic arrival used to estimate the relative locations, we define a slowness scaling factor which multiplies the gradient of seismic traveltime versus distance, evaluated at the source, relative to the applied 1-d velocity model. A procedure for estimating correction terms which reduce the double-difference time residual vector norms is presented together with a discussion of the associated uncertainty. The

  15. Continuous wavelet transform analysis and modal location analysis acoustic emission source location for nuclear piping crack growth monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Mohd, Shukri; Holford, Karen M.; Pullin, Rhys

    2014-02-12

    Source location is an important feature of acoustic emission (AE) damage monitoring in nuclear piping. The ability to accurately locate sources can assist in source characterisation and early warning of failure. This paper describe the development of a novelAE source location technique termed 'Wavelet Transform analysis and Modal Location (WTML)' based on Lamb wave theory and time-frequency analysis that can be used for global monitoring of plate like steel structures. Source location was performed on a steel pipe of 1500 mm long and 220 mm outer diameter with nominal thickness of 5 mm under a planar location test setup using H-N sources. The accuracy of the new technique was compared with other AE source location methods such as the time of arrival (TOA) techniqueand DeltaTlocation. Theresults of the study show that the WTML method produces more accurate location resultscompared with TOA and triple point filtering location methods. The accuracy of the WTML approach is comparable with the deltaT location method but requires no initial acoustic calibration of the structure.

  16. Locating industrial VOC sources with aircraft observations.

    PubMed

    Toscano, P; Gioli, B; Dugheri, S; Salvini, A; Matese, A; Bonacchi, A; Zaldei, A; Cupelli, V; Miglietta, F

    2011-05-01

    Observation and characterization of environmental pollution, focussing on Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), in a high-risk industrial area, are particularly important in order to provide indications on a safe level of exposure, indicate eventual priorities and advise on policy interventions. The aim of this study is to use the Solid Phase Micro Extraction (SPME) method to measure VOCs, directly coupled with atmospheric measurements taken on a small aircraft environmental platform, to evaluate and locate the presence of VOC emission sources in the Marghera industrial area. Lab analysis of collected SPME fibres and subsequent analysis of mass spectrum and chromatograms in Scan Mode allowed the detection of a wide range of VOCs. The combination of this information during the monitoring campaign allowed a model (Gaussian Plume) to be implemented that estimates the localization of emission sources on the ground.

  17. Simultaneous head tissue conductivity and EEG source location estimation

    PubMed Central

    Acar, Can E.; Makeig, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Accurate electroencephalographic (EEG) source localization requires an electrical head model incorporating accurate geometries and conductivity values for the major head tissues. While consistent conductivity values have been reported for scalp, brain, and cerebrospinal fluid, measured brain-to-skull conductivity ratio (BSCR) estimates have varied between 8 and 80, likely reflecting both inter-subject and measurement method differences. In simulations, mis-estimation of skull conductivity can produce source localization errors as large as 3 cm. Here, we describe an iterative gradient-based approach to Simultaneous tissue Conductivity And source Location Estimation (SCALE). The scalp projection maps used by SCALE are obtained from near-dipolar effective EEG sources found by adequate independent component analysis (ICA) decomposition of sufficient high-density EEG data. We applied SCALE to simulated scalp projections of 15 cm2-scale cortical patch sources in an MR image-based electrical head model with simulated BSCR of 30. Initialized either with a BSCR of 80 or 20, SCALE estimated BSCR as 32.6. In Adaptive Mixture ICA (AMICA) decompositions of (45-min, 128-channel) EEG data from two young adults we identified sets of 13 independent components having near-dipolar scalp maps compatible with a single cortical source patch. Again initialized with either BSCR 80 or 25, SCALE gave BSCR estimates of 34 and 54 for the two subjects respectively. The ability to accurately estimate skull conductivity non-invasively from any well-recorded EEG data in combination with a stable and non-invasively acquired MR imaging-derived electrical head model could remove a critical barrier to using EEG as a sub-cm2-scale accurate 3-D functional cortical imaging modality. PMID:26302675

  18. Accurate Simulation of Acoustic Emission Sources in Composite Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.; Gorman, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) signals propagate as the extensional and flexural plate modes in thin composite plates and plate-like geometries such as shells, pipes, and tubes. The relative amplitude of the two modes depends on the directionality of the source motion. For source motions with large out-of-plane components such as delaminations or particle impact, the flexural or bending plate mode dominates the AE signal with only a small extensional mode detected. A signal from such a source is well simulated with the standard pencil lead break (Hsu-Neilsen source) on the surface of the plate. For other sources such as matrix cracking or fiber breakage in which the source motion is primarily in-plane, the resulting AE signal has a large extensional mode component with little or no flexural mode observed. Signals from these type sources can also be simulated with pencil lead breaks. However, the lead must be fractured on the edge of the plate to generate an in-plane source motion rather than on the surface of the plate. In many applications such as testing of pressure vessels and piping or aircraft structures, a free edge is either not available or not in a desired location for simulation of in-plane type sources. In this research, a method was developed which allows the simulation of AE signals with a predominant extensional mode component in composite plates requiring access to only the surface of the plate.

  19. Accurate radio and optical positions for southern radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Bruce R.; Jauncey, David L.; White, Graeme L.; Nothnagel, Axel; Nicolson, George D.; Reynolds, John E.; Morabito, David D.; Bartel, Norbert

    1992-01-01

    Accurate radio positions with a precision of about 0.01 arcsec are reported for eight compact extragalactic radio sources south of -45-deg declination. The radio positions were determined using VLBI at 8.4 GHz on the 9589 km Tidbinbilla (Australia) to Hartebeesthoek (South Africa) baseline. The sources were selected from the Parkes Catalogue to be strong, flat-spectrum radio sources with bright optical QSO counterparts. Optical positions of the QSOs were also measured from the ESO B Sky Survey plates with respect to stars from the Perth 70 Catalogue, to an accuracy of about 0.19 arcsec rms. These radio and optical positions are as precise as any presently available in the far southern sky. A comparison of the radio and optical positions confirms the estimated optical position errors and shows that there is overall agreement at the 0.1-arcsec level between the radio and Perth 70 optical reference frames in the far south.

  20. Development of an accurate transmission line fault locator using the global positioning system satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Harry

    1994-01-01

    A highly accurate transmission line fault locator based on the traveling-wave principle was developed and successfully operated within B.C. Hydro. A transmission line fault produces a fast-risetime traveling wave at the fault point which propagates along the transmission line. This fault locator system consists of traveling wave detectors located at key substations which detect and time tag the leading edge of the fault-generated traveling wave as if passes through. A master station gathers the time-tagged information from the remote detectors and determines the location of the fault. Precise time is a key element to the success of this system. This fault locator system derives its timing from the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites. System tests confirmed the accuracy of locating faults to within the design objective of +/-300 meters.

  1. An efficient sliding window strategy for accurate location of eukaryotic protein coding regions.

    PubMed

    Rao, Nini; Lei, Xu; Guo, Jianxiu; Huang, Hao; Ren, Zhenglong

    2009-04-01

    The sliding window is one of important factors that seriously affect the accuracy of coding region prediction and location for the methods based on power spectrum technique. It is very difficult to select the appropriate sliding step and the window length for different organisms. In this study, a novel sliding window strategy is proposed on the basis of power spectrum analysis for the accurate location of eukaryotic protein coding regions. The proposed sliding window strategy is very simple and the sliding step of window is changeable. Our tests show that the average location error for the novel method is 12 bases. Compared with the previous location error of 54 bases using the fixed sliding step, the novel sliding window strategy increased the location accuracy greatly. Further, the consumed CPU time to run the novel strategy is much shorter than the strategy of the fixed length sliding step. So, the computational complexity for the novel method is decreased greatly.

  2. Combining heterogeneous data sources for accurate functional annotation of proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Combining heterogeneous sources of data is essential for accurate prediction of protein function. The task is complicated by the fact that while sequence-based features can be readily compared across species, most other data are species-specific. In this paper, we present a multi-view extension to GOstruct, a structured-output framework for function annotation of proteins. The extended framework can learn from disparate data sources, with each data source provided to the framework in the form of a kernel. Our empirical results demonstrate that the multi-view framework is able to utilize all available information, yielding better performance than sequence-based models trained across species and models trained from collections of data within a given species. This version of GOstruct participated in the recent Critical Assessment of Functional Annotations (CAFA) challenge; since then we have significantly improved the natural language processing component of the method, which now provides performance that is on par with that provided by sequence information. The GOstruct framework is available for download at http://strut.sourceforge.net. PMID:23514123

  3. Fast, accurate, robust and Open Source Brain Extraction Tool (OSBET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namias, R.; Donnelly Kehoe, P.; D'Amato, J. P.; Nagel, J.

    2015-12-01

    The removal of non-brain regions in neuroimaging is a critical task to perform a favorable preprocessing. The skull-stripping depends on different factors including the noise level in the image, the anatomy of the subject being scanned and the acquisition sequence. For these and other reasons, an ideal brain extraction method should be fast, accurate, user friendly, open-source and knowledge based (to allow for the interaction with the algorithm in case the expected outcome is not being obtained), producing stable results and making it possible to automate the process for large datasets. There are already a large number of validated tools to perform this task but none of them meets the desired characteristics. In this paper we introduced an open source brain extraction tool (OSBET), composed of four steps using simple well-known operations such as: optimal thresholding, binary morphology, labeling and geometrical analysis that aims to assemble all the desired features. We present an experiment comparing OSBET with other six state-of-the-art techniques against a publicly available dataset consisting of 40 T1-weighted 3D scans and their corresponding manually segmented images. OSBET gave both: a short duration with an excellent accuracy, getting the best Dice Coefficient metric. Further validation should be performed, for instance, in unhealthy population, to generalize its usage for clinical purposes.

  4. The accurate location of the injection-induced microearthquakes in German Continental Deep Drilling Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Yi-Min; Chen, Yun-Tai

    2002-11-01

    From August 21, 2000 to October 20, 2000 a fluid injection-induced seismicity experiment has been carried out in the KTB (German Continental Deep Drilling Program). The KTB seismic network recorded more than 2 700 events. Among them 237 events were of high signal-to-noise ratio, and were processed and accurately located. When the events were located, non KTB events were weeded out by Wadati’s method. The standard deviation, mean and median were obtained by Jackknife’s technique, and finally the events were accurately located by Geiger’s method so that the mean error is about 0.1 km. No earthquakes with focal depth greater than 9.3 km, which is nearly at the bottom of the hole, were detected. One of the explanation is that at such depths the stress levels may not close to the rock’s frictional strength so that failure could not be induced by the relatively small perturbation in pore pressure. Or at these depths there may be no permeable, well-oriented faults. This depth may be in close proximity to the bottom of the hole to the brittle-ductile transition, even in this relatively stable interior of the interaplate. This phenomenon is explained by the experimental results and geothermal data from the superdeep borehole.

  5. Location of Sources of Radiation Using a Weighted Hyperbolic Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, E. M.

    1995-01-01

    The specific problem objective was to locate the sources of radiated electric field from lightning using an overdetermined set of measurements of time-of-arrival. A similar problem exists for epicentral sources in earthquake location, acoustic sources of thunder, and terrestrial navigation using LORAN and GPS.

  6. Accurate Damage Location in Complex Composite Structures and Industrial Environments using Acoustic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, M.; Pearson, M.; Lee, W.; Pullin, R.

    2015-07-01

    The ability to accurately locate damage in any given structure is a highly desirable attribute for an effective structural health monitoring system and could help to reduce operating costs and improve safety. This becomes a far greater challenge in complex geometries and materials, such as modern composite airframes. The poor translation of promising laboratory based SHM demonstrators to industrial environments forms a barrier to commercial up take of technology. The acoustic emission (AE) technique is a passive NDT method that detects elastic stress waves released by the growth of damage. It offers very sensitive damage detection, using a sparse array of sensors to detect and globally locate damage within a structure. However its application to complex structures commonly yields poor accuracy due to anisotropic wave propagation and the interruption of wave propagation by structural features such as holes and thickness changes. This work adopts an empirical mapping technique for AE location, known as Delta T Mapping, which uses experimental training data to account for such structural complexities. The technique is applied to a complex geometry composite aerospace structure undergoing certification testing. The component consists of a carbon fibre composite tube with varying wall thickness and multiple holes, that was loaded under bending. The damage location was validated using X-ray CT scanning and the Delta T Mapping technique was shown to improve location accuracy when compared with commercial algorithms. The onset and progression of damage were monitored throughout the test and used to inform future design iterations.

  7. Accelerated food source location in aging Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Egenriether, Sada M; Chow, Eileen S; Krauth, Nathalie; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M

    2015-10-01

    Adequate energy stores are essential for survival, and sophisticated neuroendocrine mechanisms evolved to stimulate foraging in response to nutrient deprivation. Food search behavior is usually investigated in young animals, and it is not known how aging alters this behavior. To address this question in Drosophila melanogaster, we compared the ability to locate food by olfaction in young and old flies using a food-filled trap. As aging is associated with a decline in motor functions, learning, and memory, we expected that aged flies would take longer to enter the food trap than their young counterparts. Surprisingly, old flies located food with significantly shorter latency than young ones. Robust food search behavior was associated with significantly lower fat reserves and lower starvation resistance in old flies. Food-finding latency (FFL) was shortened in young wild-type flies that were starved until their fat was depleted but also in heterozygous chico mutants with reduced insulin receptor activity and higher fat deposits. Conversely, food trap entry was delayed in old flies with increased insulin signaling. Our results suggest that the difference in FFL between young and old flies is linked to age-dependent differences in metabolic status and may be mediated by reduced insulin signaling.

  8. Distributed fiber sensing system with wide frequency response and accurate location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yi; Feng, Hao; Zeng, Zhoumo

    2016-02-01

    A distributed fiber sensing system merging Mach-Zehnder interferometer and phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometer (Φ-OTDR) is demonstrated for vibration measurement, which requires wide frequency response and accurate location. Two narrow line-width lasers with delicately different wavelengths are used to constitute the interferometer and reflectometer respectively. A narrow band Fiber Bragg Grating is responsible for separating the two wavelengths. In addition, heterodyne detection is applied to maintain the signal to noise rate of the locating signal. Experiment results show that the novel system has a wide frequency from 1 Hz to 50 MHz, limited by the sample frequency of data acquisition card, and a spatial resolution of 20 m, according to 200 ns pulse width, along 2.5 km fiber link.

  9. Locating the source of projectile fluid droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varney, Christopher R.; Gittes, Fred

    2011-08-01

    The ill-posed projectile problem of finding the source height from spattered droplets of viscous fluid is a longstanding obstacle to accident reconstruction and crime-scene analysis. It is widely known how to infer the impact angle of droplets on a surface from the elongation of their impact profiles. However, the lack of velocity information makes finding the height of the origin from the impact position and angle of individual drops not possible. From aggregate statistics of the spatter and basic equations of projectile motion, we introduce a reciprocal correlation plot that is effective when the polar launch angle is concentrated in a narrow range. The vertical coordinate depends on the orientation of the spattered surface and equals the tangent of the impact angle for a level surface. When the horizontal plot coordinate is twice the reciprocal of the impact distance, we can infer the source height as the slope of the data points in the reciprocal correlation plot. If the distribution of launch angles is not narrow, failure of the method is evident in the lack of linear correlation. We perform a number of experimental trials, as well as numerical calculations and show that the height estimate is relatively insensitive to aerodynamic drag. Besides its possible relevance for crime investigation, reciprocal-plot analysis of spatter may find application to volcanism and other topics and is most immediately applicable for undergraduate science and engineering students in the context of crime-scene analysis.

  10. Accurate Vehicle Location System Using RFID, an Internet of Things Approach.

    PubMed

    Prinsloo, Jaco; Malekian, Reza

    2016-06-04

    Modern infrastructure, such as dense urban areas and underground tunnels, can effectively block all GPS signals, which implies that effective position triangulation will not be achieved. The main problem that is addressed in this project is the design and implementation of an accurate vehicle location system using radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology in combination with GPS and the Global system for Mobile communication (GSM) technology, in order to provide a solution to the limitation discussed above. In essence, autonomous vehicle tracking will be facilitated with the use of RFID technology where GPS signals are non-existent. The design of the system and the results are reflected in this paper. An extensive literature study was done on the field known as the Internet of Things, as well as various topics that covered the integration of independent technology in order to address a specific challenge. The proposed system is then designed and implemented. An RFID transponder was successfully designed and a read range of approximately 31 cm was obtained in the low frequency communication range (125 kHz to 134 kHz). The proposed system was designed, implemented, and field tested and it was found that a vehicle could be accurately located and tracked. It is also found that the antenna size of both the RFID reader unit and RFID transponder plays a critical role in the maximum communication range that can be achieved.

  11. Accurate Vehicle Location System Using RFID, an Internet of Things Approach

    PubMed Central

    Prinsloo, Jaco; Malekian, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Modern infrastructure, such as dense urban areas and underground tunnels, can effectively block all GPS signals, which implies that effective position triangulation will not be achieved. The main problem that is addressed in this project is the design and implementation of an accurate vehicle location system using radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology in combination with GPS and the Global system for Mobile communication (GSM) technology, in order to provide a solution to the limitation discussed above. In essence, autonomous vehicle tracking will be facilitated with the use of RFID technology where GPS signals are non-existent. The design of the system and the results are reflected in this paper. An extensive literature study was done on the field known as the Internet of Things, as well as various topics that covered the integration of independent technology in order to address a specific challenge. The proposed system is then designed and implemented. An RFID transponder was successfully designed and a read range of approximately 31 cm was obtained in the low frequency communication range (125 kHz to 134 kHz). The proposed system was designed, implemented, and field tested and it was found that a vehicle could be accurately located and tracked. It is also found that the antenna size of both the RFID reader unit and RFID transponder plays a critical role in the maximum communication range that can be achieved. PMID:27271638

  12. Location of long-period events below Kilauea Volcano using seismic amplitudes and accurate relative relocation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglia, J.; Got, J.-L.; Okubo, P.

    2003-01-01

    We present methods for improving the location of long-period (LP) events, deep and shallow, recorded below Kilauea Volcano by the permanent seismic network. LP events might be of particular interest to understanding eruptive processes as their source mechanism is assumed to directly involve fluid transport. However, it is usually difficult or impossible to locate their source using traditional arrival time methods because of emergent wave arrivals. At Kilauea, similar LP waveform signatures suggest the existence of LP multiplets. The waveform similarity suggests spatially close sources, while catalog solutions using arrival time estimates are widely scattered beneath Kilauea's summit caldera. In order to improve estimates of absolute LP location, we use the distribution of seismic amplitudes corrected for station site effects. The decay of the amplitude as a function of hypocentral distance is used for inferring LP location. In a second stage, we use the similarity of the events to calculate their relative positions. The analysis of the entire LP seismicity recorded between January 1997 and December 1999 suggests that a very large part of the LP event population, both deep and shallow, is generated by a small number of compact sources. Deep events are systematically composed of a weak high-frequency onset followed by a low-frequency wave train. Aligning the low-frequency wave trains does not lead to aligning the onsets indicating the two parts of the signal are dissociated. This observation favors an interpretation in terms of triggering and resonance of a magmatic conduit. Instead of defining fault planes, the precise relocation of similar LP events, based on the alignment of the high-energy low-frequency wave trains, defines limited size volumes. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Accurate prediction of V1 location from cortical folds in a surface coordinate system

    PubMed Central

    Hinds, Oliver P.; Rajendran, Niranjini; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Augustinack, Jean C.; Wiggins, Graham; Wald, Lawrence L.; Rosas, H. Diana; Potthast, Andreas; Schwartz, Eric L.; Fischl, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated substantial variability of the location of primary visual cortex (V1) in stereotaxic coordinates when linear volume-based registration is used to match volumetric image intensities (Amunts et al., 2000). However, other qualitative reports of V1 location (Smith, 1904; Stensaas et al., 1974; Rademacher et al., 1993) suggested a consistent relationship between V1 and the surrounding cortical folds. Here, the relationship between folds and the location of V1 is quantified using surface-based analysis to generate a probabilistic atlas of human V1. High-resolution (about 200 μm) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 7 T of ex vivo human cerebral hemispheres allowed identification of the full area via the stria of Gennari: a myeloarchitectonic feature specific to V1. Separate, whole-brain scans were acquired using MRI at 1.5 T to allow segmentation and mesh reconstruction of the cortical gray matter. For each individual, V1 was manually identified in the high-resolution volume and projected onto the cortical surface. Surface-based intersubject registration (Fischl et al., 1999b) was performed to align the primary cortical folds of individual hemispheres to those of a reference template representing the average folding pattern. An atlas of V1 location was constructed by computing the probability of V1 inclusion for each cortical location in the template space. This probabilistic atlas of V1 exhibits low prediction error compared to previous V1 probabilistic atlases built in volumetric coordinates. The increased predictability observed under surface-based registration suggests that the location of V1 is more accurately predicted by the cortical folds than by the shape of the brain embedded in the volume of the skull. In addition, the high quality of this atlas provides direct evidence that surface-based intersubject registration methods are superior to volume-based methods at superimposing functional areas of cortex, and therefore are better

  14. Three precise gamma-ray burst source locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Teegarden, B. J.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Evans, W. D.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    The precise source regions of three moderately intense gamma ray bursts are derived. These events were observed with the first interplanetary burst sensor network. The optimum locations of the detectors, widely separated throughout the inner solar system, allowed for high accuracy, over-determined source fields of size 0.7 to 7.0 arc-min(2). All three locations are at fairly high galactic latitude in regions of low source confusion; none can be identified with a steady source object. Archived photographs were searched for optical transients that are able to be associated with these source fields; one such association was made.

  15. Sequential Optimal Monitoring Network Design using Iterative Kriging for Identification of Unknown Groundwater Pollution Sources Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, O.; Datta, B.

    2011-12-01

    Identification of unknown groundwater pollution source characteristics, in terms of location, magnitude and activity duration is important for designing an effective pollution remediation strategy. Precise source characterization also becomes very important to ascertain liability, and to recover the cost of remediation from parties responsible for the groundwater pollution. Due to the uncertainties in accurately predicting the aquifer response to source flux injection, generally encountered sparsity of concentration observation data in the field, and the non uniqueness in the aquifer response to the subjected hydraulic and chemical stresses, groundwater pollution source characterization remains a challenging task. A scientifically designed pollutant concentration monitoring network becomes imperative for accurate pollutant source characterization. The efficiency of the unknown source locations identification process is largely determined by locations of monitoring wells where the pollutant concentration is observed. The proposed method combines spatial interpolation of concentration measurements and Simulated Annealing as optimization algorithm to find the optimum locations for monitoring wells. Initially, the observed concentration data at few sparsely and arbitrarily distributed wells are used to interpolate the concentration data for the aquifer study area. The concentration information is passed to the optimization algorithm (decision model) as concentration gradient which in turn finds the optimum locations for implementing the next sequence of monitoring wells. Concentration measurement data from these designed monitoring wells and already implemented monitoring network are iteratively used as feedback information for potential groundwater pollution source locations identification. The potential applicability of the developed methodology is demonstrated for an illustrative study area.

  16. Locating the source of diffusion in complex networks by time-reversal backward spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhesi; Cao, Shinan; Wang, Wen-Xu; Di, Zengru; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2016-03-01

    Locating the source that triggers a dynamical process is a fundamental but challenging problem in complex networks, ranging from epidemic spreading in society and on the Internet to cancer metastasis in the human body. An accurate localization of the source is inherently limited by our ability to simultaneously access the information of all nodes in a large-scale complex network. This thus raises two critical questions: how do we locate the source from incomplete information and can we achieve full localization of sources at any possible location from a given set of observable nodes. Here we develop a time-reversal backward spreading algorithm to locate the source of a diffusion-like process efficiently and propose a general locatability condition. We test the algorithm by employing epidemic spreading and consensus dynamics as typical dynamical processes and apply it to the H1N1 pandemic in China. We find that the sources can be precisely located in arbitrary networks insofar as the locatability condition is assured. Our tools greatly improve our ability to locate the source of diffusion in complex networks based on limited accessibility of nodal information. Moreover, they have implications for controlling a variety of dynamical processes taking place on complex networks, such as inhibiting epidemics, slowing the spread of rumors, pollution control, and environmental protection.

  17. Locating the source of diffusion in complex networks by time-reversal backward spreading.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhesi; Cao, Shinan; Wang, Wen-Xu; Di, Zengru; Stanley, H Eugene

    2016-03-01

    Locating the source that triggers a dynamical process is a fundamental but challenging problem in complex networks, ranging from epidemic spreading in society and on the Internet to cancer metastasis in the human body. An accurate localization of the source is inherently limited by our ability to simultaneously access the information of all nodes in a large-scale complex network. This thus raises two critical questions: how do we locate the source from incomplete information and can we achieve full localization of sources at any possible location from a given set of observable nodes. Here we develop a time-reversal backward spreading algorithm to locate the source of a diffusion-like process efficiently and propose a general locatability condition. We test the algorithm by employing epidemic spreading and consensus dynamics as typical dynamical processes and apply it to the H1N1 pandemic in China. We find that the sources can be precisely located in arbitrary networks insofar as the locatability condition is assured. Our tools greatly improve our ability to locate the source of diffusion in complex networks based on limited accessibility of nodal information. Moreover, they have implications for controlling a variety of dynamical processes taking place on complex networks, such as inhibiting epidemics, slowing the spread of rumors, pollution control, and environmental protection.

  18. 48 CFR 19.202-2 - Locating small business sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locating small business... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 19.202-2 Locating small business sources. The contracting officer must, to the extent practicable, encourage maximum participation by small...

  19. 48 CFR 2919.202-2 - Locating small business sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Locating small business... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS AND SMALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS CONCERNS Policies 2919.202-2 Locating small business sources. Any procurement conducted on an unrestricted basis will include solicitations...

  20. 48 CFR 319.202-2 - Locating small business sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locating small business... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 319.202-2 Locating small business sources. (a) OPDIVs shall foster, to the extent practicable, maximum participation by small businesses in HHS...

  1. 48 CFR 2919.202-2 - Locating small business sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locating small business... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS AND SMALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS CONCERNS Policies 2919.202-2 Locating small business sources. Any procurement conducted on an unrestricted basis will include solicitations...

  2. 48 CFR 2919.202-2 - Locating small business sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Locating small business... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS AND SMALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS CONCERNS Policies 2919.202-2 Locating small business sources. Any procurement conducted on an unrestricted basis will include solicitations...

  3. 48 CFR 319.202-2 - Locating small business sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Locating small business... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 319.202-2 Locating small business sources. (a) OPDIVs shall foster, to the extent practicable, maximum participation by small businesses in HHS...

  4. 48 CFR 19.202-2 - Locating small business sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Locating small business... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 19.202-2 Locating small business sources. The contracting officer must, to the extent practicable, encourage maximum participation by small...

  5. 48 CFR 319.202-2 - Locating small business sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Locating small business... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 319.202-2 Locating small business sources. (a) OPDIVs shall foster, to the extent practicable, maximum participation by small businesses in HHS...

  6. 48 CFR 319.202-2 - Locating small business sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Locating small business... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 319.202-2 Locating small business sources. (a) OPDIVs shall foster, to the extent practicable, maximum participation by small businesses in HHS...

  7. 48 CFR 319.202-2 - Locating small business sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Locating small business... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 319.202-2 Locating small business sources. (a) OPDIVs shall foster, to the extent practicable, maximum participation by small businesses in HHS...

  8. 48 CFR 19.202-2 - Locating small business sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Locating small business... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 19.202-2 Locating small business sources. The contracting officer must, to the extent practicable, encourage maximum participation by small...

  9. Determining low-frequency source location from acoustic phase measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Travis L.; Frisk, George V.

    2002-11-01

    For low-frequency cw sound sources in shallow water, the time rate-of-change of the measured acoustic phase is well approximated by the time rate-of-change of the source-receiver separation distance. An algorithm for determining a locus of possible source locations based on this idea has been developed. The locus has the general form of a hyperbola, which can be used to provide a bearing estimation at long ranges, and an estimate of source location at short ranges. The algorithm uses only acoustic phase data and receiver geometry as input, and can be used even when the source frequency is slightly unstable and/or imprecisely known. The algorithm has been applied to data from low-frequency experiments (20-300 Hz), both for stable and unstable source frequencies, and shown to perform well. [Work supported by ONR and WHOI Academic Programs Office.

  10. Locating an atmospheric contamination source using slow manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wenbo; Haller, George; Baik, Jong-Jin; Ryu, Young-Hee

    2009-04-01

    Finite-size particle motion in fluids obeys the Maxey-Riley equations, which become singular in the limit of infinitesimally small particle size. Because of this singularity, finding the source of a dispersed set of small particles is a numerically ill-posed problem that leads to exponential blowup. Here we use recent results on the existence of a slow manifold in the Maxey-Riley equations to overcome this difficulty in source inversion. Specifically, we locate the source of particles by projecting their dispersed positions on a time-varying slow manifold, and by advecting them on the manifold in backward time. We use this technique to locate the source of a hypothetical anthrax release in an unsteady three-dimensional atmospheric wind field in an urban street canyon.

  11. A Novel Method for Separating and Locating Multiple Partial Discharge Sources in a Substation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pengfei; Zhou, Wenjun; Yang, Shuai; Liu, Yushun; Tian, Yan; Wang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    To separate and locate multi-partial discharge (PD) sources in a substation, the use of spectrum differences of ultra-high frequency signals radiated from various sources as characteristic parameters has been previously reported. However, the separation success rate was poor when signal-to-noise ratio was low, and the localization result was a coordinate on two-dimensional plane. In this paper, a novel method is proposed to improve the separation rate and the localization accuracy. A directional measuring platform is built using two directional antennas. The time delay (TD) of the signals captured by the antennas is calculated, and TD sequences are obtained by rotating the platform at different angles. The sequences are separated with the TD distribution feature, and the directions of the multi-PD sources are calculated. The PD sources are located by directions using the error probability method. To verify the method, a simulated model with three PD sources was established by XFdtd. Simulation results show that the separation rate is increased from 71% to 95% compared with the previous method, and an accurate three-dimensional localization result was obtained. A field test with two PD sources was carried out, and the sources were separated and located accurately by the proposed method. PMID:28134812

  12. Providing Source-Location Privacy in Wireless Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yun; Ren, Jian

    Wireless sensor networks (WSN) have been widely used in many areas for unattended event monitoring. Mainly due to lack of a protected physical boundary, wireless communications are vulnerable to unauthorized detection, interception and and even node capture. Privacy is becoming one of the major issues that jeopardize the successful deployment and survivability of wireless sensor networks. While confidentiality of the message can be ensured through content encryption, it is much more difficult to adequately address the source-location privacy. For WSN, source-location privacy service is further complicated by the fact that the sensor nodes consist of low-cost and low-power radio devices, computationally intensive cryptographic algorithms (such as public-key cryptosystems) and large scale broadcasting-based protocols are not suitable for WSN. In this paper, we propose a two-step routing strategy for the messages to be routed from the actual source node to the SINK node through either a single, or multiple, randomly selected intermediate node(s) away from the source node so that it is to make it infeasible for the adversaries to trace back to the source node through hop-by-hop routing analysis. In the first protocol, the messages will be routed to a single intermediate node. This scheme can provide very good local source-location privacy. We also propose routing through multiple randomly selected intermediate nodes based on angle and quadrant to further improve the performance and security. While providing source-location privacy for WSN, our simulation results demonstrate that the proposed schemes are very efficient in energy consumption, and transmission latency. The proposed schemes can also assurance high message delivery ratio. Therefore, they can be used for many practical applications.

  13. Locating and estimating air emissions from sources of epichlorohydrin

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    To assist groups interested in inventorying air emissions of various potentially toxic substances, EPA is preparing a series of documents such as this to compile available information on sources and emissions of these substances. This document deals specifically with epichlorohydrin. Its intended audience includes Federal, State and local air pollution personnel and others interested in locating potential emitters of epichlorohydrin in making gross estimates of air emissions therefrom. This document presents information on 1) the types of sources that may emit epichlorohydrin; 2) process variations and release points that may be expected within these sources; and 3) available emissions information indicating the potential for epichlorohydrin release into the air from each operation.

  14. Source location of the 19 February 2008 Oregon bolide using seismic networks and infrasound arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Kristoffer T.; Hedlin, Michael A. H.; de Groot-Hedlin, Catherine; Vergoz, Julien; Le Pichon, Alexis; Drob, Douglas P.

    2010-12-01

    On 19 February 2008 a bolide traveled across the sky along a southern trajectory ending in a terminal burst above Oregon. The event was well recorded by the USArray, other seismic networks, four infrasound arrays, and several video cameras. We compare the results of locating the burst using these different sensor networks. Specifically, we reverse time migrate acoustic-to-seismic coupled signals recorded by the USArray out to 800 km range to image the source in 2-D space and time. We also apply a grid search over source altitude and time, minimizing the misfit between observed and predicted arrival times using 3-D ray tracing with a high-resolution atmospheric velocity model. Our seismic and video results suggest a point source rather than a line source associated with a hypersonic trajectory. We compare the seismic source locations to those obtained by using different combinations of observed infrasound array signal back azimuths and arrival times. We find that all locations are consistent. However, the seismic location is more accurate than the infrasound locations due to the larger number of seismic sensors, a more favorable seismic source-receiver geometry, and shorter ranges to the seismometers. For the infrasound array locations, correcting for the wind improved the accuracy, but implementing arrival times while increasing the precision reduced the accuracy presumably due to limitations of the source location method and/or atmospheric velocity model. We show that despite known complexities associated with acoustic-to-seismic coupling, aboveground infrasound sources can be located with dense seismic networks with remarkably high accuracy and precision.

  15. Modeling of Jovian Hectometric Radiation Source Locations: Ulysses Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Reiner, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    The Unified Radio and Plasma Wave (URAP) experiment on Ulysses has provided unique high latitude measurements of Jovian hectometric radiation (HOM) during its encounter with Jupiter in February 1992. URAP was the first radio instrument in the Jovian environment with radio direction-finding capability, which was previously used to determine the HOM source locations in the Jovian magnetosphere. These initial source location determinations were based on several assumptions, including the neglect of refractive effects, which may be tested. We have, for the first time, combined the measured incident ray-direction at the spacecraft with a model magnetosphere to directly trace the rays back to the HOM source. We concentrate on the observations of HOM from high northern latitudes when Ulysses was at distances less than 15 R(sub j). The three- dimensional ray-tracing calculations presented here indicate that the HOM sources probably lie on L shells in the range 3 less than or approximately equal to L less than 7 (tilted dipole magnetic field model) consistent with previous determinations that ignored the effects of refraction. The ray-tracing results, however, indicate that wave refraction due to the Io torus and the magnetic field can significantly influence the precise source location. We show that constraints on the locations imposed by the gyroemission mechanism suggest that the lo torus density may have experienced temporal and/or spatial fluctuations during the Ulysses observations of HOM. Finally, in the cold plasma approximation we demonstrate that even if the emission were nearly linearly polarized near the source region, almost circular polarization will be observed at Ulysses, in agreement with observations.

  16. An inverse source location algorithm for radiation portal monitor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Karen A; Charlton, William S

    2010-01-01

    Radiation portal monitors are being deployed at border crossings throughout the world to prevent the smuggling of nuclear and radiological materials; however, a tension exists between security and the free-flow of commerce. Delays at ports-of-entry have major economic implications, so it is imperative to minimize portal monitor screening time. We have developed an algorithm to locate a radioactive source using a distributed array of detectors, specifically for use at border crossings. To locate the source, we formulated an optimization problem where the objective function describes the least-squares difference between the actual and predicted detector measurements. The predicted measurements are calculated by solving the 3-D deterministic neutron transport equation given an estimated source position. The source position is updated using the steepest descent method, where the gradient of the objective function with respect to the source position is calculated using adjoint transport calculations. If the objective function is smaller than the convergence criterion, then the source position has been identified. This paper presents the derivation of the underlying equations in the algorithm as well as several computational test cases used to characterize its accuracy.

  17. Accurate identification of centromere locations in yeast genomes using Hi-C.

    PubMed

    Varoquaux, Nelle; Liachko, Ivan; Ay, Ferhat; Burton, Joshua N; Shendure, Jay; Dunham, Maitreya J; Vert, Jean-Philippe; Noble, William S

    2015-06-23

    Centromeres are essential for proper chromosome segregation. Despite extensive research, centromere locations in yeast genomes remain difficult to infer, and in most species they are still unknown. Recently, the chromatin conformation capture assay, Hi-C, has been re-purposed for diverse applications, including de novo genome assembly, deconvolution of metagenomic samples and inference of centromere locations. We describe a method, Centurion, that jointly infers the locations of all centromeres in a single genome from Hi-C data by exploiting the centromeres' tendency to cluster in three-dimensional space. We first demonstrate the accuracy of Centurion in identifying known centromere locations from high coverage Hi-C data of budding yeast and a human malaria parasite. We then use Centurion to infer centromere locations in 14 yeast species. Across all microbes that we consider, Centurion predicts 89% of centromeres within 5 kb of their known locations. We also demonstrate the robustness of the approach in datasets with low sequencing depth. Finally, we predict centromere coordinates for six yeast species that currently lack centromere annotations. These results show that Centurion can be used for centromere identification for diverse species of yeast and possibly other microorganisms.

  18. Sequential optimal monitoring network design and iterative spatial estimation of pollutant concentration for identification of unknown groundwater pollution source locations.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Om; Datta, Bithin

    2013-07-01

    One of the difficulties in accurate characterization of unknown groundwater pollution sources is the uncertainty regarding the number and the location of such sources. Only when the number of source locations is estimated with some degree of certainty that the characterization of the sources in terms of location, magnitude, and activity duration can be meaningful. A fairly good knowledge of source locations can substantially decrease the degree of nonuniqueness in the set of possible aquifer responses to subjected geochemical stresses. A methodology is developed to use a sequence of dedicated monitoring network design and implementation and to screen and identify the possible source locations. The proposed methodology utilizes a combination of spatial interpolation of concentration measurements and simulated annealing as optimization algorithm for optimal design of the monitoring network. These monitoring networks are to be designed and implemented sequentially. The sequential design is based on iterative pollutant concentration measurement information from the sequentially designed monitoring networks. The optimal monitoring network design utilizes concentration gradient information from the monitoring network at previous iteration to define the objective function. The capability of the feedback information based iterative methodology is shown to be effective in estimating the source locations when no such information is initially available. This unknown pollution source locations identification methodology should be very useful as a screening model for subsequent accurate estimation of the unknown pollution sources in terms of location, magnitude, and activity duration.

  19. Autonomous robotic platforms for locating radio sources buried under rubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasu, A. S.; Anchidin, L.; Tamas, R.; Paun, M.; Danisor, A.; Petrescu, T.

    2016-12-01

    This paper deals with the use of autonomous robotic platforms able to locate radio signal sources such as mobile phones, buried under collapsed buildings as a result of earthquakes, natural disasters, terrorism, war, etc. This technique relies on averaging position data resulting from a propagation model implemented on the platform and the data acquired by robotic platforms at the disaster site. That allows us to calculate the approximate position of radio sources buried under the rubble. Based on measurements, a radio map of the disaster site is made, very useful for locating victims and for guiding specific rubble lifting machinery, by assuming that there is a victim next to a mobile device detected by the robotic platform; by knowing the approximate position, the lifting machinery does not risk to further hurt the victims. Moreover, by knowing the positions of the victims, the reaction time is decreased, and the chances of survival for the victims buried under the rubble, are obviously increased.

  20. Acoustic emission source location in complex structures using full automatic delta T mapping technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jumaili, Safaa Kh.; Pearson, Matthew R.; Holford, Karen M.; Eaton, Mark J.; Pullin, Rhys

    2016-05-01

    An easy to use, fast to apply, cost-effective, and very accurate non-destructive testing (NDT) technique for damage localisation in complex structures is key for the uptake of structural health monitoring systems (SHM). Acoustic emission (AE) is a viable technique that can be used for SHM and one of the most attractive features is the ability to locate AE sources. The time of arrival (TOA) technique is traditionally used to locate AE sources, and relies on the assumption of constant wave speed within the material and uninterrupted propagation path between the source and the sensor. In complex structural geometries and complex materials such as composites, this assumption is no longer valid. Delta T mapping was developed in Cardiff in order to overcome these limitations; this technique uses artificial sources on an area of interest to create training maps. These are used to locate subsequent AE sources. However operator expertise is required to select the best data from the training maps and to choose the correct parameter to locate the sources, which can be a time consuming process. This paper presents a new and improved fully automatic delta T mapping technique where a clustering algorithm is used to automatically identify and select the highly correlated events at each grid point whilst the "Minimum Difference" approach is used to determine the source location. This removes the requirement for operator expertise, saving time and preventing human errors. A thorough assessment is conducted to evaluate the performance and the robustness of the new technique. In the initial test, the results showed excellent reduction in running time as well as improved accuracy of locating AE sources, as a result of the automatic selection of the training data. Furthermore, because the process is performed automatically, this is now a very simple and reliable technique due to the prevention of the potential source of error related to manual manipulation.

  1. Use of Loran-C navigation system to accurately determine sampling site location in an above ground cooling reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, R.E.; Blankinship, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    Environmental monitoring programs often require accurate determination of sampling site locations in aquatic environments. This is especially true when a {open_quotes}picture{close_quotes} of high resolution is needed for observing a changing variable in a given area and location is assumed to be important to the distribution of that variable. Sample site location can be difficult if few visible land marks are available for reference on a large body of water. The use of navigational systems such as Global Positioning System (GPS) and its predecessor, Loran-C, provide an excellent method for sample site location. McFarland (1992) discusses the practicality of GPS for location determination. This article discusses the use of Loran-C in a sampling scheme implemented at the South Texas Project Electrical Generating Station (STPEGS), Wadsworth, Texas.

  2. Preserving Source Location Privacy for Energy Harvesting WSNs.

    PubMed

    Huang, Changqin; Ma, Ming; Liu, Yuxin; Liu, Anfeng

    2017-03-30

    Fog (From cOre to edGe) computing employs a huge number of wireless embedded devices to enable end users with anywhere-anytime-to-anything connectivity. Due to their operating nature, wireless sensor nodes often work unattended, and hence are exposed to a variety of attacks. Preserving source-location privacy plays a key role in some wireless sensor network (WSN) applications. In this paper, a redundancy branch convergence-based preserved source location privacy scheme (RBCPSLP) is proposed for energy harvesting sensor networks, with the following advantages: numerous routing branches are created in non-hotspot areas with abundant energy, and those routing branches can merge into a few routing paths before they reach the hotspot areas. The generation time, the duration of routing, and the number of routing branches are then decided independently based on the amount of energy obtained, so as to maximize network energy utilization, greatly enhance privacy protection, and provide long network lifetimes. Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the RBCPSLP scheme allows a several-fold improvement of the network energy utilization as well as the source location privacy preservation, while maximizing network lifetimes.

  3. Accurate estimation of object location in an image sequence using helicopter flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Yuan-Liang; Kasturi, Rangachar

    1994-01-01

    In autonomous navigation, it is essential to obtain a three-dimensional (3D) description of the static environment in which the vehicle is traveling. For a rotorcraft conducting low-latitude flight, this description is particularly useful for obstacle detection and avoidance. In this paper, we address the problem of 3D position estimation for static objects from a monocular sequence of images captured from a low-latitude flying helicopter. Since the environment is static, it is well known that the optical flow in the image will produce a radiating pattern from the focus of expansion. We propose a motion analysis system which utilizes the epipolar constraint to accurately estimate 3D positions of scene objects in a real world image sequence taken from a low-altitude flying helicopter. Results show that this approach gives good estimates of object positions near the rotorcraft's intended flight-path.

  4. Accurate GPS measurement of the location and orientation of a floating platform. [for sea floor geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purcell, G. H., Jr.; Young, L. E.; Wolf, S. K.; Meehan, T. K.; Duncan, C. B.; Fisher, S. S.; Spiess, F. N.; Austin, G.; Boegeman, D. E.; Lowenstein, C. D.

    1990-01-01

    This article describes the design and initial tests of the GPS portion of a system for making seafloor geodesy measurements. In the planned system, GPS antennas on a floating platform will be used to measure the location of an acoustic transducer, attached below the platform, which interrogates an array of transponders on the seafloor. Since the GPS antennas are necessarily some distance above the transducer, a short-baseline GPS interferometer consisting of three antennas is used to measure the platform's orientation. A preliminary test of several crucial elements of the system was performed. The test involved a fixed antenna on the pier and a second antenna floating on a buoy about 80 m away. GPS measurements of the vertical component of this baseline, analyzed independently by two groups using different software, agree with each other and with an independent measurement within a centimeter. The first test of an integrated GPS/acoustic system took place in the Santa Cruz Basin off the coast of southern California in May 1990. In this test a much larger buoy, designed and built at SIO, was equipped with three GPS antennas and an acoustic transducer that interrogated a transponder on the ocean floor. Preliminary analysis indicates that the horizontal position of the transponder can be determined with a precision of about a centimeter.

  5. Accurate GPS measurement of the location and orientation of a floating platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purcell, G. H., Jr.; Young, L. E.; Wolf, S. K.; Meehan, T. K.; Duncan, C. B.; Fisher, S. S.; Spiess, F. N.; Austin, G.; Boegeman, D. E.; Lowenstein, C. D.

    This article describes the design and initial tests of the GPS portion of a system for making seafloor geodesy measurements. In the planned system, GPS antennas on a floating platform will be used to measure the location of an acoustic transducer, attached below the platform, which interrogates an array of transponders on the seafloor. Since the GPS antennas are necessarily some distance above the transducer, a short-baseline GPS interferometer consisting of three antennas is used to measure the platform's orientation. A preliminary test of several crucial elements of the system was performed. The test involved a fixed antenna on the pier and a second antenna floating on a buoy about 80 m away. GPS measurements of the vertical component of this baseline, analyzed independently by two groups using different software, agree with each other and with an independent measurement within a centimeter. The first test of an integrated GPS/acoustic system took place in the Santa Cruz Basin off the coast of southern California in May 1990. In this test a much larger buoy, designed and built at SIO, was equipped with three GPS antennas and an acoustic transducer that interrogated a transponder on the ocean floor. Preliminary analysis indicates that the horizontal position of the transponder can be determined with a precision of about a centimeter.

  6. Locating tritium sources in a research reactor building.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Masami

    2005-10-01

    Despite renovation of the D2O facility, tritium concentrations in the condensates of reactor room air showed tens of Bq mL before venting resumption on July 1997. This suggested the presence of tritium sources in the research reactor-containment building. An investigation was therefore initiated to locate the source and determine the distribution of tritium in the containment building. Air monitoring in the working area using a dish of water placed in the building suggested that the source of tritium was near the reactor core. Monitoring exhaust air from the two facilities (a cold neutron source and a D(2)O tank) showed high specific activity on the order of 10 Bq mL(-1), suggesting the presence of tritium in condensates near the reactor core. The major concern was whether the leakage of liquid deuterium (4 L) and heavy water (2 x 10(3) L) used as a moderator had occurred. The concentration of tritium in condensates has not increased over the past few years in either the exhaust line or working area, and the deuterium itself has not been found in the surrounding environment. The concentration of tritium measured using an ionization chamber after Ar decay was dependent on the thermal output of the research reactor, indicating that the tritium was produced by the irradiation process within shielding/moderator materials or cover gas with neutrons.

  7. Possible Source Location of the Terrestrial Myriametric Radio Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, S. F.; Shao, X.; Frey, H. U.; Garcia, L. N.

    2013-12-01

    Fung et al. [2013] reported recently the identification of a terrestrial myriametric radio burst (TMRB) that was possibly a result from a dayside high latitude reconnection process. The TMRB was observed simultaneously by the IMAGE and Geotail satellites when the satellites were located at widely different latitudes on opposite sides of the Earth in nearly the same meridional plane. The TMRB was observed when the interplanetary field was northward. Its intensity seemed to be modulated by the IMF Bz component while the source directions (relative to the Geotail positions over the TMRB interval) also seemed to respond to the changes in the IMF By component. In this paper, we will present further observations from the IMAGE FUV data during the TMRB interval, revealing the presence of a bright proton aurora spot at the cusp foot print and thus confirming the presence of high-latitude dayside reconnection at the time. We have also performed a CCMC run-on-request of a global magnetospheric simulation for a time period over the TMRB interval. We will present the CCMC results and discuss the possible identification of the location of the TMRB source. Fung, S. F., K. Hashimoto, H. Kojima, S. A. Boardsen, L. N. Garcia, H. Matsumoto, J. L. Green, and B. W. Reinisch (2013), Terrestrial myriametric radio burst observed by IMAGE and Geotail satellites, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 118, 1101-1111, doi:10.1002/jgra.50149.

  8. Neptune's non-thermal radio emissions - Phenomenology and source locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabl, Gerald K. F.; Ladreiter, H.-P.; Rucker, Helmut O.; Kaiser, Michael L.

    1992-01-01

    During the inbound and the outbound leg of Voyager 2's encounter with Neptune, the Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) experiment aboard the spacecraft detected short radio bursts at frequencies within the range of about 500-1300 kHz, and broad-banded smoothly varying emission patterns within the frequency range from about 40-800 kHz. Both emissions can be described in terms of a period of 16.1 hours determining Neptune's rotation period. Furthermore, just near closest approach, a narrow-banded smoothly varying radio component was observed occurring between 600 and 800 kHz. After giving a brief overview about some general characteristics of Neptune's nonthermal radio emission, the source locations of Neptune's emission components are determined, using an offset tilted dipole model for Neptune's magnetic field. Assuming that the emission originates near the electron gyrofrequency a geometrical beaming model is developed in order to fit the observed emission episodes.

  9. MEMS directional acoustic sensor for locating sound sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunasiri, Gamani; Alves, Fabio; Swan, William

    2016-02-01

    The conventional directional sound sensing systems employ an array of spatially separated microphones to achieve directional sensing. However, there are insects such as Ormia ochracea fly that can determine the direction of sound using a miniature hearing organ much smaller than the wavelength of sound it detects. The MEMS based sensors mimicking the fly's hearing system was fabricated using SOI substrate with 25 micrometer device layer. The sensor was designed to operate around 1.7 kHz, consists of two 1.2 mm × 1.2 mm wings connected in the middle by a 3 mm × 30 micrometer bridge. The entire structure is connected to the substrate by two torsional legs at the center. The sensor operates at its bending resonance frequency and has cosine directional characteristics similar to that of a pressure gradient microphone. For unambiguously determining the direction of sound, two sensors were assembled with a canted angle and outputs of the two sensors were processed to uniquely locate the bearing. At the bending resonant frequency (1.7 kHz) an output voltage of about 25 V/Pa was measured. The uncertainty of the bearing of sound ranged from less than 0.3 degrees close to the normal axis (0 degree) to 3 degrees at the limits of coverage (+/- 60 degrees) based on the 30 degree canted angle used. These findings indicate the potential use of a dual MEMS direction finding sensor assembly to locate sound sources with high accuracy.

  10. Accurate and efficient long-range lightning geo-location using a VLF radio atmospheric waveform bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Ryan Khalil

    2009-07-01

    On average there are ˜50 lightning flashes worldwide every second, with activity varying by region and season. Many systems currently exist that detect and locate lightning flashes for a broad range of commercial and scientific applications, including air traffic control, insurance claims, climate modeling, and the investigation of secondary atmospheric and magnetospheric electrical phenomena. These lightning detection systems have varying degrees of coverage area and location accuracy. Commercial ground-based systems that excel at locating return strokes in cloud-to-ground lightning use radio detection in the LF (30-300 kHz) band to provide very accurate location data, with a typical accuracy of ˜0.5 km, but they require a dense network of receivers separated by ˜400 km and are therefore primarily limited to monitoring the land areas within the network. In addition to radiating in the LF band, each lightning strike generates a broadband electromagnetic pulse containing frequencies from a few Hz through to the optical band with a peak component at VLF (3-30 kHz). Radio waves at VLF propagate through the waveguide formed by the Earth and the ionosphere with relatively low attenuation (˜3 dB per 1000 km), enabling the detection of these pulses, called radio atmospherics, at great distances from the lightning strike. Several existing networks utilize this efficient guiding to geo-locate lightning strikes often at distances greater than 5000 km from a given receiver. However, the Earth-ionosphere waveguide also presents a complex and time-varying channel that heavily disperses the pulse as it propagates away from the strike location. These networks fail to adequately address the path-dependence of the received impulse and suffer a lower location accuracy as a result (˜20 km). A new technique of long-range global lightning location is presented that both takes advantage of the efficient propagation at VLF and addresses the path-dependence of the propagation channel

  11. Fast accurate MEG source localization using a multilayer perceptron trained with real brain noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Sung Chan; Pearlmutter, Barak A.; Nolte, Guido

    2002-07-01

    Iterative gradient methods such as Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) are in widespread use for source localization from electroencephalographic (EEG) and magnetoencephalographic (MEG) signals. Unfortunately, LM depends sensitively on the initial guess, necessitating repeated runs. This, combined with LM's high per-step cost, makes its computational burden quite high. To reduce this burden, we trained a multilayer perceptron (MLP) as a real-time localizer. We used an analytical model of quasistatic electromagnetic propagation through a spherical head to map randomly chosen dipoles to sensor activities according to the sensor geometry of a 4D Neuroimaging Neuromag-122 MEG system, and trained a MLP to invert this mapping in the absence of noise or in the presence of various sorts of noise such as white Gaussian noise, correlated noise, or real brain noise. A MLP structure was chosen to trade off computation and accuracy. This MLP was trained four times, with each type of noise. We measured the effects of initial guesses on LM performance, which motivated a hybrid MLP-start-LM method, in which the trained MLP initializes LM. We also compared the localization performance of LM, MLPs, and hybrid MLP-start-LMs for realistic brain signals. Trained MLPs are much faster than other methods, while the hybrid MLP-start-LMs are faster and more accurate than fixed-4-start-LM. In particular, the hybrid MLP-start-LM initialized by a MLP trained with the real brain noise dataset is 60 times faster and is comparable in accuracy to random-20-start-LM, and this hybrid system (localization error: 0.28 cm, computation time: 36 ms) shows almost as good performance as optimal-1-start-LM (localization error: 0.23 cm, computation time: 22 ms), which initializes LM with the correct dipole location. MLPs trained with noise perform better than the MLP trained without noise, and the MLP trained with real brain noise is almost as good an initial guesser for LM as the correct dipole location.

  12. Closed-form analytical solutions of the time difference of arrival source location problem for minimal element monitoring arrays.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Steven J

    2010-05-01

    Closed-form analytical solutions are found for the time difference of arrival (TDOA) source location problem. Solutions are found for both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) source location by formulating the TDOA equations in, respectively, polar and spherical coordinate systems, with the radial direction coincident with the assumed geodesic path of signal propagation to a reference sensor. Quadratic equations for TDOA 2D and 3D source location based on the spherical intersection (SX) scheme, in some cases permitting dual physical solutions, are found for three and four sensor element monitoring arrays, respectively. A method of spherical intersection subarrays (SXSAs) is developed to derive from these quadratic equations globally unique closed-form analytical solutions for TDOA 2D and 3D source location, for four and five sensor element monitoring arrays, respectively. Errors in 2D source location for introduced bias in time differences of arrival are shown to have a strong geometrical dependence. The SXSA and SX methods perform well in terms of accuracy and precision at high levels of arrival time bias for both 2D and 3D source location and are much more efficient than nonlinear least-squares schemes. The SXSA scheme may have particular applicability to accurately solving source location problems in demanding real-time situations.

  13. Travel-time source-specific station correction improves location accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuntini, Alessandra; Materni, Valerio; Chiappini, Stefano; Carluccio, Roberto; Console, Rodolfo; Chiappini, Massimo

    2013-04-01

    Accurate earthquake locations are crucial for investigating seismogenic processes, as well as for applications like verifying compliance to the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Earthquake location accuracy is related to the degree of knowledge about the 3-D structure of seismic wave velocity in the Earth. It is well known that modeling errors of calculated travel times may have the effect of shifting the computed epicenters far from the real locations by a distance even larger than the size of the statistical error ellipses, regardless of the accuracy in picking seismic phase arrivals. The consequences of large mislocations of seismic events in the context of the CTBT verification is particularly critical in order to trigger a possible On Site Inspection (OSI). In fact, the Treaty establishes that an OSI area cannot be larger than 1000 km2, and its larger linear dimension cannot be larger than 50 km. Moreover, depth accuracy is crucial for the application of the depth event screening criterion. In the present study, we develop a method of source-specific travel times corrections based on a set of well located events recorded by dense national seismic networks in seismically active regions. The applications concern seismic sequences recorded in Japan, Iran and Italy. We show that mislocations of the order of 10-20 km affecting the epicenters, as well as larger mislocations in hypocentral depths, calculated from a global seismic network and using the standard IASPEI91 travel times can be effectively removed by applying source-specific station corrections.

  14. Source location of the narrowbanded radio bursts at Uranus - Evidence of a cusp source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.; Kurth, W. S.

    1990-03-01

    While Voyager 2 was inbound to Uranus, radio bursts of narrow bandwidth (less than 5 kHz) were detected between 17-116 kHz. These R-X mode bursts, designated n-bursts, were of short duration, tended to occur when the north magnetic pole tipped toward the spacecraft, and increased in occurrence with increasing solar wind density. An explicit determination of the burst source location is presented, based upon fitting the region of detection at high and low frequencies to field-aligned, symmetric cones. The region of good fits was located between the north magnetic pole and the rotational pole, corresponding approximately to the northern polar cusp.

  15. Evidence for Different Reactive Hg Sources and Chemical Compounds at Adjacent Valley and High Elevation Locations.

    PubMed

    Sexauer Gustin, Mae; Pierce, Ashley M; Huang, Jiaoyan; Miller, Matthieu B; Holmes, Heather A; Loria-Salazar, S Marcela

    2016-11-15

    The spatial distribution of chemical compounds and concentration of reactive mercury (RM), defined as the sum of gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) and <3 μm particulate bound mercury (PBM), are poorly characterized. The objective of this study was to understand the chemistry, concentration, and spatial and temporal distribution of GOM at adjacent locations (12 km apart) with a difference in elevation of ∼1000 m. Atmospheric GOM measurements were made with passive and active samplers using membranes, and at one location, a Tekran mercury measurement system was used. The chemistry of GOM varied across time and location. On the basis of data collected, chemistry at the low elevation site adjacent to a highway was primarily influenced by pollutants generated by mobile sources (GOM = nitrogen and sulfur-based compounds), and the high elevation site (GOM = halogen-based compounds) was affected by long-range transport in the free troposphere over the marine boundary layer into Nevada. Data collected at these two locations demonstrate that different GOM compounds exist depending on the oxidants present in the air. Measurements of GOM made by the KCl denuder in the Tekran instrument located at the low elevation site were lower than that measured using membranes by 1.7-13 times. Accurate measurements of atmospheric concentrations and chemistry of RM are necessary for proper assessment of environmental impacts, and field measurements are essential for atmospheric models, which in turn influence policy decisions.

  16. Accurate Analysis of the Change in Volume, Location, and Shape of Metastatic Cervical Lymph Nodes During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Takao, Seishin; Tadano, Shigeru; Taguchi, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Koichi; Onimaru, Rikiya; Ishikawa, Masayori; Bengua, Gerard; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Shirato, Hiroki

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To establish a method for the accurate acquisition and analysis of the variations in tumor volume, location, and three-dimensional (3D) shape of tumors during radiotherapy in the era of image-guided radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Finite element models of lymph nodes were developed based on computed tomography (CT) images taken before the start of treatment and every week during the treatment period. A surface geometry map with a volumetric scale was adopted and used for the analysis. Six metastatic cervical lymph nodes, 3.5 to 55.1 cm{sup 3} before treatment, in 6 patients with head and neck carcinomas were analyzed in this study. Three fiducial markers implanted in mouthpieces were used for the fusion of CT images. Changes in the location of the lymph nodes were measured on the basis of these fiducial markers. Results: The surface geometry maps showed convex regions in red and concave regions in blue to ensure that the characteristics of the 3D tumor geometries are simply understood visually. After the irradiation of 66 to 70 Gy in 2 Gy daily doses, the patterns of the colors had not changed significantly, and the maps before and during treatment were strongly correlated (average correlation coefficient was 0.808), suggesting that the tumors shrank uniformly, maintaining the original characteristics of the shapes in all 6 patients. The movement of the gravitational center of the lymph nodes during the treatment period was everywhere less than {+-}5 mm except in 1 patient, in whom the change reached nearly 10 mm. Conclusions: The surface geometry map was useful for an accurate evaluation of the changes in volume and 3D shapes of metastatic lymph nodes. The fusion of the initial and follow-up CT images based on fiducial markers enabled an analysis of changes in the location of the targets. Metastatic cervical lymph nodes in patients were suggested to decrease in size without significant changes in the 3D shape during radiotherapy. The movements of the

  17. Public directory data sources do not accurately characterize the food environment in two predominantly rural states.

    PubMed

    Longacre, Meghan R; Primack, Brian A; Owens, Peter M; Gibson, Lucinda; Beauregard, Sandy; Mackenzie, Todd A; Dalton, Madeline A

    2011-04-01

    Communities are being encouraged to develop locally based interventions to address environmental risk factors for obesity. Online public directories represent an affordable and easily accessible mechanism for mapping community food environments, but may have limited utility in rural areas. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of public directories vs rigorous onsite field verification to characterize the community food environment in 32 geographically dispersed towns from two rural states covering 1,237.6 square miles. Eight types of food outlets were assessed in 2007, including food markets and eating establishments, first using two publically available online directories followed by onsite field verification by trained coders. χ(2) and univariate binomial regression were used to determine whether the proportion of outlets accurately listed varied by food outlet type or town population. Among 1,340 identified outlets, only 36.9% were accurately listed through public directories; 29.6% were not listed but were located during field observation. Accuracy varied by outlet type, being most accurate for big box stores and least accurate for farm/produce stands. Overall, public directories accurately identified fewer than half of the food outlets. Accuracy was significantly lower for rural and small towns compared to mid-size and urban towns (P<0.001). In this geographic sample, public directories seriously misrepresented the actual distribution of food outlets, particularly for rural and small towns. To inform local obesity-prevention efforts, communities should strongly consider using field verification to characterize the food environment in low-population areas.

  18. Finding Faces Among Faces: Human Faces are Located More Quickly and Accurately than Other Primate and Mammal Faces

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Elizabeth A.; Buchin, Zachary; Werner, Katie; Worrell, Rey; Jakobsen, Krisztina V.

    2014-01-01

    We tested the specificity of human face search efficiency by examining whether there is a broad window of detection for various face-like stimuli—human and animal faces—or whether own-species faces receive greater attentional allocation. We assessed the strength of the own-species face detection bias by testing whether human faces are located more efficiently than other animal faces, when presented among various other species’ faces, in heterogeneous 16-, 36-, and 64-item arrays. Across all array sizes, we found that, controlling for distractor type, human faces were located faster and more accurately than primate and mammal faces, and that, controlling for target type, searches were faster when distractors were human faces compared to animal faces, revealing more efficient processing of human faces regardless of their role as targets or distractors (Experiment 1). Critically, these effects remained when searches were for specific species’ faces (human, chimpanzee, otter), ruling out a category-level explanation (Experiment 2). Together, these results suggest that human faces may be processed more efficiently than animal faces, both when task-relevant (targets), and when task-irrelevant (distractors), even when in direct competition with other faces. These results suggest that there is not a broad window of detection for all face-like patterns, but that human adults process own-species’ faces more efficiently than other species’ faces. Such own-species search efficiencies may arise through experience with own-species faces throughout development, or may be privileged early in development, due to the evolutionary importance of conspecifics’ faces. PMID:25113852

  19. Source location of the narrowbanded radio bursts at Uranus: Evidence of a cusp source

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, W.M.; Desch, M.D.; Kaiser, M.L. ); Kurth, W.S. )

    1990-03-01

    While Voyager 2 was inbound to Uranus, radio bursts of narrow bandwidth (< 5 kHz) were detected between 17-116 kHz by both the Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) and Plasma Wave (PWS) experiments. These R-X mode bursts, designated n-bursts, were of short duration (about 250 msec), tended to occur when the north magnetic pole tipped toward the spacecraft, and increased in occurrence with increasing solar wind density. In this report, the authors present an explicit determination of the burst source location based upon fitting the region of detection at high and low frequencies to field-aligned, symmetric cones. The region of good fits was located between the north magnetic pole an the rotational pole, corresponding approximately to the northern polar cusp. Based upon the emission power, it is suspected that at certain times large amounts of auroral input power may originate in this cusp.

  20. 43 CFR 3746.1 - Mining locations for fissionable source materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mining locations for fissionable source... MINERAL DEVELOPMENT Fissionable Source Materials § 3746.1 Mining locations for fissionable source... (68 Stat. 921), it is clear that after enactment of said Act of August 13, 1954, valid...

  1. 43 CFR 3746.1 - Mining locations for fissionable source materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mining locations for fissionable source... MINERAL DEVELOPMENT Fissionable Source Materials § 3746.1 Mining locations for fissionable source... (68 Stat. 921), it is clear that after enactment of said Act of August 13, 1954, valid...

  2. Canonical Decomposition of Ictal Scalp EEG and Accurate Source Localisation: Principles and Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    De Vos, Maarten; De Lathauwer, Lieven; Vanrumste, Bart; Van Huffel, Sabine; Van Paesschen, W.

    2007-01-01

    Long-term electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings are important in the presurgical evaluation of refractory partial epilepsy for the delineation of the ictal onset zones. In this paper, we introduce a new concept for an automatic, fast, and objective localisation of the ictal onset zone in ictal EEG recordings. Canonical decomposition of ictal EEG decomposes the EEG in atoms. One or more atoms are related to the seizure activity. A single dipole was then fitted to model the potential distribution of each epileptic atom. In this study, we performed a simulation study in order to estimate the dipole localisation error. Ictal dipole localisation was very accurate, even at low signal-to-noise ratios, was not affected by seizure activity frequency or frequency changes, and was minimally affected by the waveform and depth of the ictal onset zone location. Ictal dipole localisation error using 21 electrodes was around 10.0 mm and improved more than tenfold in the range of 0.5–1.0 mm using 148 channels. In conclusion, our simulation study of canonical decomposition of ictal scalp EEG allowed a robust and accurate localisation of the ictal onset zone. PMID:18301715

  3. Australasian tektites: source parameters and crater location reviewed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stecher, O.; Storey, M.; Hopper, J. R.

    2009-12-01

    Tektites of the Australasian strewn field cover an area from SE-Asia, through the Southwestern part of the Pacific Ocean and parts of the Indian Ocean, down to Australia. The impact crater has until now not been positively located, but it is generally assumed to be located somewhere in Indochina, where tektites also are more abundant and larger. 40Ar/39Ar dated Australasian tektites consistently give ages around 800 ka (1,2), and our new laser step-heating determinations on a Thailand tektite are in agreement. Australasian tektites show a marked coherence in physical, chemical and isotopic parameters. Refractive indices of tektite fragments, numbers of vesicles, abundance of relict minerals, tektite mass/m2, major elements compositions from tektites covering the whole strewn field can be contoured with more or less elliptical curves with slightly varying center positions, located within a few 100 km of the Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam junction. Isotope data suggest that sediments of the impact area consisted of ~1500 Ma old denudation material (Nd-isotope data (3,4)) and that this material was eroded within the last 170 Ma (Sr-isotope data (3,4)). Fine-grained minerals and particularly soils are effective scavengers of cosmogenic 10Be, and the high values reported for Australasian tektites (5) suggest that clay minerals are a significant and variable component in the target material. The highest 10Be-values are from tektites found furthest from the impact site. In the impact process, the top layer of the target - with its young sedimentation ages and higher 10Be values - will be projected the furthest away from the impact site. The next layer down consists of slightly older material with lower 10Be, and the impact process will propel these tektites to areas closer to the impact site. The 10Be distribution in tektites shows this variation and defines a broad center (~17°N, ~107°E) off the coast of Vietnam (5). La-ICPMS Pb/Pb-isotope data from tektites show small

  4. PyVCI: A flexible open-source code for calculating accurate molecular infrared spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibaev, Marat; Crittenden, Deborah L.

    2016-06-01

    The PyVCI program package is a general purpose open-source code for simulating accurate molecular spectra, based upon force field expansions of the potential energy surface in normal mode coordinates. It includes harmonic normal coordinate analysis and vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) algorithms, implemented primarily in Python for accessibility but with time-consuming routines written in C. Coriolis coupling terms may be optionally included in the vibrational Hamiltonian. Non-negligible VCI matrix elements are stored in sparse matrix format to alleviate the diagonalization problem. CPU and memory requirements may be further controlled by algorithmic choices and/or numerical screening procedures, and recommended values are established by benchmarking using a test set of 44 molecules for which accurate analytical potential energy surfaces are available. Force fields in normal mode coordinates are obtained from the PyPES library of high quality analytical potential energy surfaces (to 6th order) or by numerical differentiation of analytic second derivatives generated using the GAMESS quantum chemical program package (to 4th order).

  5. Poynting-vector based method for determining the bearing and location of electromagnetic sources

    DOEpatents

    Simons, David J.; Carrigan, Charles R.; Harben, Philip E.; Kirkendall, Barry A.; Schultz, Craig A.

    2008-10-21

    A method and apparatus is utilized to determine the bearing and/or location of sources, such as, alternating current (A.C.) generators and loads, power lines, transformers and/or radio-frequency (RF) transmitters, emitting electromagnetic-wave energy for which a Poynting-Vector can be defined. When both a source and field sensors (electric and magnetic) are static, a bearing to the electromagnetic source can be obtained. If a single set of electric (E) and magnetic (B) sensors are in motion, multiple measurements permit location of the source. The method can be extended to networks of sensors allowing determination of the location of both stationary and moving sources.

  6. Fast Grid Search Algorithm for Seismic Source Location

    SciTech Connect

    ALDRIDGE,DAVID F.

    2000-07-01

    The spatial and temporal origin of a seismic energy source are estimated with a first grid search technique. This approach has greater likelihood of finding the global rninirnum of the arrival time misiit function compared with conventional linearized iterative methods. Assumption of a homogeneous and isotropic seismic velocity model allows for extremely rapid computation of predicted arrival times, but probably limits application of the method to certain geologic environments and/or recording geometries. Contour plots of the arrival time misfit function in the vicinity of the global minimum are extremely useful for (i) quantizing the uncertainty of an estimated hypocenter solution and (ii) analyzing the resolving power of a given recording configuration. In particular, simultaneous inversion of both P-wave and S-wave arrival times appears to yield a superior solution in the sense of being more precisely localized in space and time. Future research with this algorithm may involve (i) investigating the utility of nonuniform residual weighting schemes, (ii) incorporating linear and/or layered velocity models into the calculation of predicted arrival times, and (iii) applying it toward rational design of microseismic monitoring networks.

  7. DEM sourcing guidelines for computing 1 Eö accurate terrain corrections for airborne gravity gradiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annecchione, Maria; Hatch, David; Hefford, Shane W.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we investigate digital elevation model (DEM) sourcing requirements to compute gravity gradiometry terrain corrections accurate to 1 Eötvös (Eö) at observation heights of 80 m or more above ground. Such survey heights are typical in fixed-wing airborne surveying for resource exploration where the maximum signal-to-noise ratio is sought. We consider the accuracy of terrain corrections relevant for recent commercial airborne gravity gradiometry systems operating at the 10 Eö noise level and for future systems with a target noise level of 1 Eö. We focus on the requirements for the vertical gradient of the vertical component of gravity (Gdd) because this element of the gradient tensor is most commonly interpreted qualitatively and quantitatively. Terrain correction accuracy depends on the bare-earth DEM accuracy and spatial resolution. The bare-earth DEM accuracy and spatial resolution depends on its source. Two possible sources are considered: airborne LiDAR and Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The accuracy of an SRTM DEM is affected by vegetation height. The SRTM footprint is also larger and the DEM resolution is thus lower. However, resolution requirements relax as relief decreases. Publicly available LiDAR data and 1 arc-second and 3 arc-second SRTM data were selected over four study areas representing end member cases of vegetation cover and relief. The four study areas are presented as reference material for processing airborne gravity gradiometry data at the 1 Eö noise level with 50 m spatial resolution. From this investigation we find that to achieve 1 Eö accuracy in the terrain correction at 80 m height airborne LiDAR data are required even when terrain relief is a few tens of meters and the vegetation is sparse. However, as satellite ranging technologies progress bare-earth DEMs of sufficient accuracy and resolution may be sourced at lesser cost. We found that a bare-earth DEM of 10 m resolution and 2 m accuracy are sufficient for

  8. Rapid estimation of tsunami source centroid location using a dense offshore observation network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, N.; Hirata, K.; Aoi, S.; Suzuki, W.; Nakamura, H.; Kunugi, T.

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a rapid method of estimating tsunami source locations using real-time ocean-bottom hydrostatic pressure data from a dense offshore observation network. We defined two characteristic locations representing the real-time tsunami disturbance and the initial sea surface height distribution. First, we defined the tsunami centroid location (TCL), which is the centroid location of the maximum absolute amplitude of the real-time ocean-bottom hydrostatic pressure changes. Second, we defined the centroid location of the absolute values of the initial sea surface height displacements. To determine whether the TCL can approximate the centroid location of the tsunami source, we examined approximately 1000 near-field synthetic tsunami scenarios and a realistic tsunami scenario of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake in the Japan Trench. From these examinations, it was confirmed that in most scenarios, the TCLs obtained within a few minutes after the occurrence of an earthquake were close to the actual corresponding tsunami source locations.

  9. Neutron stars as sources of gamma-ray bursts: Constraints from X-ray observations of source locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzichini, G.; Cline, T. L.; Desai, U.; Teegarden, B. J.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Evans, W. D.; Fenimore, E. E.; Klebesadel, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    Results for three burst locations observed with the imaging proportional counter of the Einstein Observatory are given. The observations are used to determine temperature and accretion constraints for the burst source.

  10. Fast, Accurate and Precise Mid-Sagittal Plane Location in 3D MR Images of the Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergo, Felipe P. G.; Falcão, Alexandre X.; Yasuda, Clarissa L.; Ruppert, Guilherme C. S.

    Extraction of the mid-sagittal plane (MSP) is a key step for brain image registration and asymmetry analysis. We present a fast MSP extraction method for 3D MR images, based on automatic segmentation of the brain and on heuristic maximization of the cerebro-spinal fluid within the MSP. The method is robust to severe anatomical asymmetries between the hemispheres, caused by surgical procedures and lesions. The method is also accurate with respect to MSP delineations done by a specialist. The method was evaluated on 64 MR images (36 pathological, 20 healthy, 8 synthetic), and it found a precise and accurate approximation of the MSP in all of them with a mean time of 60.0 seconds per image, mean angular variation within a same image (precision) of 1.26o and mean angular difference from specialist delineations (accuracy) of 1.64o.

  11. One dimensional P wave velocity structure of the crust beneath west Java and accurate hypocentre locations from local earthquake inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Supardiyono; Santosa, Bagus Jaya

    2012-06-20

    A one-dimensional (1-D) velocity model and station corrections for the West Java zone were computed by inverting P-wave arrival times recorded on a local seismic network of 14 stations. A total of 61 local events with a minimum of 6 P-phases, rms 0.56 s and a maximum gap of 299 Degree-Sign were selected. Comparison with previous earthquake locations shows an improvement for the relocated earthquakes. Tests were carried out to verify the robustness of inversion results in order to corroborate the conclusions drawn out from our reasearch. The obtained minimum 1-D velocity model can be used to improve routine earthquake locations and represents a further step toward more detailed seismotectonic studies in this area of West Java.

  12. Helicopter Based Magnetic Detection Of Wells At The Teapot Dome (Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 Oilfield: Rapid And Accurate Geophysical Algorithms For Locating Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbert, W.; Hammack, R.; Veloski, G.; Hodge, G.

    2011-12-01

    In this study Airborne magnetic data was collected by Fugro Airborne Surveys from a helicopter platform (Figure 1) using the Midas II system over the 39 km2 NPR3 (Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3) oilfield in east-central Wyoming. The Midas II system employs two Scintrex CS-2 cesium vapor magnetometers on opposite ends of a transversely mounted, 13.4-m long horizontal boom located amidships (Fig. 1). Each magnetic sensor had an in-flight sensitivity of 0.01 nT. Real time compensation of the magnetic data for magnetic noise induced by maneuvering of the aircraft was accomplished using two fluxgate magnetometers mounted just inboard of the cesium sensors. The total area surveyed was 40.5 km2 (NPR3) near Casper, Wyoming. The purpose of the survey was to accurately locate wells that had been drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood to enhance oil recovery, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells that are missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The well location method used combined an input dataset (for example, leveled total magnetic field reduced to the pole), combined with first and second horizontal spatial derivatives of this input dataset, which were then analyzed using focal statistics and finally combined using a fuzzy combination operation. Analytic signal and the Shi and Butt (2004) ZS attribute were also analyzed using this algorithm. A parameter could be adjusted to determine sensitivity. Depending on the input dataset 88% to 100% of the wells were located, with typical values being 95% to 99% for the NPR3 field site.

  13. Location of volatile odor sources by ghost crabOcypode quadrata (Fabricius).

    PubMed

    Wellins, C A; Rittschof, D; Wachowiak, M

    1989-04-01

    The ghost crab,Ocypode quadrata, was tested in the field for its ability to locate sources of volatile cues. The pure compound skatole, 3-methylindole, was a potent attractant. Crabs also located sources of complex odors such as dead fish,Lutjanus campechanus, dead mole crabs,Emerita talpoida; and peeled bananas. Ghost crabs possess concealed and reduced antennules that may not be the primary olfactory organs. Chemosensory hairs borne on the dactyls may be the primary detection system.

  14. Detection and Location of Gamma-Ray Sources with a Modulating Coded Mask

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Dale N.; Stromswold, David C.; Wunschel, Sharon C.; Peurrung, Anthony J.; Hansen, Randy R.

    2006-01-31

    This paper presents methods of detecting and locating a concelaed nuclear gamma-ray source with a coded aperture mask. Energetic gamma rays readily penetrate moderate amounts of shielding material and can be detected at distances of many meters. The detection of high energy gamma-ray sources is vitally important to national security for several reasons, including nuclear materials smuggling interdiction, monitoring weapon components under treaties, and locating nuclear weapons and materials in the possession terrorist organizations.

  15. Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer: Mission Design for Rapid, Accurate Location of Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bundas, David J.

    2004-01-01

    The Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer is a NASA Mid-sized Explorer (MIDEX) with the primary mission of determining the origins of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). It will be the first mission to autonomously respond to newly-discovered GRBs and provide immediate follow-up with narrow field instruments capable of multi-wavelength (UV, Optical, X-ray) observations. The characteristics of GRBs that are the key mission design drivers, are their non-repeating and brief duration bursts of multi-wavelength photons. In addition, rapid notification of the location and characteristics of the GRBs to ground-and-space-based observatories drive the end-to-end data analysis and distribution requirements.

  16. Locating and quantifying gas emission sources using remotely obtained concentration data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Bill; Jonathan, Philip; González del Cueto, Fernando; Randell, David; Kosut, Oliver

    2013-08-01

    We describe a method for detecting, locating and quantifying sources of gas emissions to the atmosphere using remotely obtained gas concentration data; the method is applicable to gases of environmental concern. We demonstrate its performance using methane data collected from aircraft. Atmospheric point concentration measurements are modelled as the sum of a spatially and temporally smooth atmospheric background concentration, augmented by concentrations due to local sources. We model source emission rates with a Gaussian mixture model and use a Markov random field to represent the atmospheric background concentration component of the measurements. A Gaussian plume atmospheric eddy dispersion model represents gas dispersion between sources and measurement locations. Initial point estimates of background concentrations and source emission rates are obtained using mixed ℓ2 - ℓ1 optimisation over a discretised grid of potential source locations. Subsequent reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo inference provides estimated values and uncertainties for the number, emission rates and locations of sources unconstrained by a grid. Source area, atmospheric background concentrations and other model parameters, including plume model spreading and Lagrangian turbulence time scale, are also estimated. We investigate the performance of the approach first using a synthetic problem, then apply the method to real airborne data from a 1600 km2 area containing two landfills, then a 225 km2 area containing a gas flare stack.

  17. Novel in situ method for locating virtual source in high-rate electron-beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, M. S.

    1994-07-01

    The concept of virtual source simplifies calculation of thickness distribution on extended substrates in high rate vacuum coating employing electron-beam heating. The height of the point (virtual source), from which vapor can be assumed to emanate in accordance with Knudsen's cosine law, to yield the experimentally obtained thickness distribution, is calculated and this establishes the position of virtual source. Such as post facto determination is cumbersome as it is valid for the prescribed material evaporating at a certain rate in a specified geometry. A change in any of these entails a fresh measurement. Experimenters who use a large number of materials and deposit at different rates therefore have to carry out a number of trials before they can locate the virtual source at the desired deposition parameters. An in situ method for obtaining virtual source position can go a long way in reducing the labor of these experiments. A novel in situ method is described to locate the virtual source.

  18. Precise source location of the anomalous 1979 March 5 gamma ray transient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Teegarden, B. J.; Evans, W. D.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.

    1981-01-01

    Refinements in the source direction analysis of the observations of the unusual gamma ray transient are presented. The final results from the interplanetary gamma ray burst network produce a 0.1 arc sq. min. error box. It is nested inside the initially determined 2 arc sq min. source region. This smaller source location is within both the optical and X-ray contours of N49 although not positioned at either contour center.

  19. Bayesian statistics applied to the location of the source of explosions at Stromboli Volcano, Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saccorotti, G.; Chouet, B.; Martini, M.; Scarpa, R.

    1998-01-01

    We present a method for determining the location and spatial extent of the source of explosions at Stromboli Volcano, Italy, based on a Bayesian inversion of the slowness vector derived from frequency-slowness analyses of array data. The method searches for source locations that minimize the error between the expected and observed slowness vectors. For a given set of model parameters, the conditional probability density function of slowness vectors is approximated by a Gaussian distribution of expected errors. The method is tested with synthetics using a five-layer velocity model derived for the north flank of Stromboli and a smoothed velocity model derived from a power-law approximation of the layered structure. Application to data from Stromboli allows for a detailed examination of uncertainties in source location due to experimental errors and incomplete knowledge of the Earth model. Although the solutions are not constrained in the radial direction, excellent resolution is achieved in both transverse and depth directions. Under the assumption that the horizontal extent of the source does not exceed the crater dimension, the 90% confidence region in the estimate of the explosive source location corresponds to a small volume extending from a depth of about 100 m to a maximum depth of about 300 m beneath the active vents, with a maximum likelihood source region located in the 120- to 180-m-depth interval.

  20. Seismic monitoring of EGS tests at the Coso Geothermal area, California, using accurate MEQ locations and full moment tensors

    SciTech Connect

    Foulger, Gillian R.; Julian, Bruce R.; Monastero, Francis C.

    2008-03-31

    In this study, we studied high-resolution relative locations and full moment tensors of microearthquakes (MEQs) occurring before, during and following Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) experiments in two wells at the Coso geothermal area, California. The objective was to map new fractures, determine the mode and sense of failure, and characterize the stress cycle associated with injection. New software developed for this work combines waveform cross-correlation measurement of arrival times with relative relocation methods, and assesses confidence regions for moment tensors derived using linear-programming methods. For moment tensor determination we also developed a convenient Graphical User Interface (GUI), to streamline the work. We used data from the U.S. Navy’s permanent network of three-component digital borehole seismometers and from 14 portable three-component digital instruments. The latter supplemented the permanent network during injection experiments in well 34A-9 in 2004 and well 34-9RD2 in 2005. In the experiment in well 34A-9, the co-injection earthquakes were more numerous, smaller, more explosive and had more horizontal motion, compared with the pre-injection earthquakes. In the experiment in well 34-9RD2 the relocated hypocenters reveal a well-defined planar structure, 700 m long and 600 m high in the depth range 0.8 to 1.4 km below sea level, striking N 20° E and dipping at 75° to the WNW. The moment tensors show that it corresponds to a mode I (opening) crack. Finally, for both wells, the perturbed stress state near the bottom of the well persisted for at least two months following the injection.

  1. Toward a probabilistic acoustic emission source location algorithm: A Bayesian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Thomas; Straub, Daniel; Higgins, Christopher

    2012-09-01

    Acoustic emissions (AE) are stress waves initiated by sudden strain releases within a solid body. These can be caused by internal mechanisms such as crack opening or propagation, crushing, or rubbing of crack surfaces. One application for the AE technique in the field of Structural Engineering is Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). With piezo-electric sensors mounted to the surface of the structure, stress waves can be detected, recorded, and stored for later analysis. An important step in quantitative AE analysis is the estimation of the stress wave source locations. Commonly, source location results are presented in a rather deterministic manner as spatial and temporal points, excluding information about uncertainties and errors. Due to variability in the material properties and uncertainty in the mathematical model, measures of uncertainty are needed beyond best-fit point solutions for source locations. This paper introduces a novel holistic framework for the development of a probabilistic source location algorithm. Bayesian analysis methods with Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation are employed where all source location parameters are described with posterior probability density functions (PDFs). The proposed methodology is applied to an example employing data collected from a realistic section of a reinforced concrete bridge column. The selected approach is general and has the advantage that it can be extended and refined efficiently. Results are discussed and future steps to improve the algorithm are suggested.

  2. Location and release time identification of pollution point source in river networks based on the Backward Probability Method.

    PubMed

    Ghane, Alireza; Mazaheri, Mehdi; Mohammad Vali Samani, Jamal

    2016-09-15

    The pollution of rivers due to accidental spills is a major threat to environment and human health. To protect river systems from accidental spills, it is essential to introduce a reliable tool for identification process. Backward Probability Method (BPM) is one of the most recommended tools that is able to introduce information related to the prior location and the release time of the pollution. This method was originally developed and employed in groundwater pollution source identification problems. One of the objectives of this study is to apply this method in identifying the pollution source location and release time in surface waters, mainly in rivers. To accomplish this task, a numerical model is developed based on the adjoint analysis. Then the developed model is verified using analytical solution and some real data. The second objective of this study is to extend the method to pollution source identification in river networks. In this regard, a hypothetical test case is considered. In the later simulations, all of the suspected points are identified, using only one backward simulation. The results demonstrated that all suspected points, determined by the BPM could be a possible pollution source. The proposed approach is accurate and computationally efficient and does not need any simplification in river geometry and flow. Due to this simplicity, it is highly recommended for practical purposes.

  3. Characterization of Source and Wave Propagation Effects of Volcano-seismic Events and Tremor Using the Amplitude Source Location Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, H.; Londono, J. M.; López, C. M.; Ruiz, M. C.; Mothes, P. A.; Maeda, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We propose application of the amplitude source location (ASL) method to characterize source and wave propagation effects of volcano-seismic events and tremor observed at different volcanoes. We used this method to estimate the source location and source amplitude from high-frequency (5-10 Hz) seismic amplitudes under the assumption of isotropic S-wave radiation. We estimated the cumulative source amplitude (Is) as the offset value of the time-integrated envelope of the vertical seismogram corrected for geometrical spreading and medium attenuation in the 5-10 Hz band. We studied these parameters of tremor signals associated with eruptions and explosion events at Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador; long-period (LP) events at Cotopaxi volcano, Ecuador; and LP events at Nevado del Ruiz volcano, Colombia. We identified two types of eruption tremor at Tungurahua; noise-like inharmonic waveforms and harmonic oscillatory signals. We found that Is increased linearly with increasing source amplitude for explosion events and LP events, and that Is increased exponentially with increasing source amplitude for inharmonic eruption tremor signals. The source characteristics of harmonic eruption tremor signals differed from those of inharmonic tremor signals. The Is values we estimated for inharmonic eruption tremor were consistent with previous estimates of volumes of tephra fallout. The linear relationship between the source amplitude and Is for LP events can be explained by the wave propagation effects in the diffusion model for multiple scattering assuming a diffusion coefficient of 105 m2/s and an intrinsic Q factor of around 50. The resultant mean free path is approximately 100 m. Our results suggest that Cotopaxi and Nevado del Ruiz volcanoes have similar highly scattering and attenuating structures. Our approach provides a systematic way to compare the size of volcano-seismic signals observed at different volcanoes. The scaling relations among source parameters that we identified

  4. Lithospheric Models of the Middle East to Improve Seismic Source Parameter Determination/Event Location Accuracy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    structure of Saudi Arabia through data collection from broadband stations. Figure 2. (Left) Map of Arabian Plate showing major tectonic ...State Award Nos. DE-AC52-07NA27344/24.2.3.2 and DOS_SIAA-11-AVC/NMA-1 ABSTRACT The Middle East is a tectonically complex and seismically...active region. The ability to accurately locate earthquakes and other seismic events in this region is complicated by tectonics , the uneven

  5. Underwater Source-Level Estimation using Sparsity-Cognizant Source-Location Mapping

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    while being robust to environmental mismatch. Equation 3 can be cast as a convex optimization problem that forces sparsity and coherence, in the source...Baxley Pedro A. Forero SSC Pacific, 53560 Hull Street, San Diego, CA 92152–5001 TR 2060 Naval Innovative Science and...Engineering (NISE) Program (Basic Research) SSC Pacific, 53560 Hull Street, San Diego, CA 92152–5001 Approved for public release. This is work

  6. Quantification of Methane Source Locations and Emissions in AN Urban Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosson, E.; Richardson, S.; Tan, S. M.; Whetstone, J.; Bova, T.; Prasad, K. R.; Davis, K. J.; Phillips, N. G.; Turnbull, J. C.; Shepson, P. B.; Cambaliza, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    The regulation of methane emissions from urban sources such as landfills and waste-water treatment facilities is currently a highly debated topic in the US and in Europe. This interest is fueled, in part, by recent measurements indicating that urban emissions are a significant source of Methane (CH4) and in fact may be substantially higher than current inventory estimates(1). As a result, developing methods for locating and quantifying emissions from urban methane sources is of great interest to industries such as landfill and wastewater treatment facility owners, watchdog groups, and the governmental agencies seeking to evaluate or enforce regulations. In an attempt to identify major methane source locations and emissions in Boston, Indianapolis, and the Bay Area, systematic measurements of CH4 concentrations and meteorology data were made at street level using a vehicle mounted cavity ringdown analyzer. A number of discrete sources were detected at concentration levels in excess of 15 times background levels. Using Gaussian plume models as well as tomographic techniques, methane source locations and emission rates will be presented. In addition, flux chamber measurements of discrete sources such as those found in natural gas leaks will also be presented. (1) Wunch, D., P.O. Wennberg, G.C. Toon, G. Keppel-Aleks, and Y.G. Yavin, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from a North American Megacity, Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 36, L15810, doi:10.1029/2009GL)39825, 2009.

  7. Surface Properties Associated With Dust Storm Plume's Point-Source Locations In The Border Region Of The US And Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleiweiss, M. P.; DuBois, D. W.; Flores, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    Dust storms in the border region of the Southwest US and Northern Mexico are a serious problem for air quality (PM10 exceedances), health (Valley Fever is pandemic in the region) and transportation (road closures and deadly traffic accidents). In order to better understand the phenomena, we are attempting to identify critical characteristics of dust storm sources so that, possibly, one can perform more accurate predictions of events and, thus, mitigate some of the deleterious effects. Besides the emission mechanisms for dust storm production that are tied to atmospheric dynamics, one must know those locations whose source characteristics can be tied to dust production and, therefore, identify locations where a dust storm is eminent under favorable atmospheric dynamics. During the past 13 years, we have observed, on satellite imagery, more than 500 dust events in the region and are in the process of identifying the source regions for the dust plumes that make up an event. Where satellite imagery exists with high spatial resolution (less than or equal to 250m), dust 'plumes' appear to be made up of individual and merged plumes that are emitted from a 'point source' (smaller than the resolution of the imagery). In particular, we have observed events from the ASTER sensor whose spatial resolution is 15m as well as Landsat whose spatial resolution is 30m. Tying these source locations to surface properties such as NDVI, albedo, and soil properties (percent sand, silt, clay, and gravel; soil moisture; etc.) will identify regions with enhanced capability to produce a dust storm. This, along with atmospheric dynamics, will allow the forecast of dust events. The analysis of 10 events from the period 2004-2013, for which we have identified 1124 individual plumes, will be presented.

  8. Reconstruction of the activity of point sources for the accurate characterization of nuclear waste drums by segmented gamma scanning.

    PubMed

    Krings, Thomas; Mauerhofer, Eric

    2011-06-01

    This work improves the reliability and accuracy in the reconstruction of the total isotope activity content in heterogeneous nuclear waste drums containing point sources. The method is based on χ(2)-fits of the angular dependent count rate distribution measured during a drum rotation in segmented gamma scanning. A new description of the analytical calculation of the angular count rate distribution is introduced based on a more precise model of the collimated detector. The new description is validated and compared to the old description using MCNP5 simulations of angular dependent count rate distributions of Co-60 and Cs-137 point sources. It is shown that the new model describes the angular dependent count rate distribution significantly more accurate compared to the old model. Hence, the reconstruction of the activity is more accurate and the errors are considerably reduced that lead to more reliable results. Furthermore, the results are compared to the conventional reconstruction method assuming a homogeneous matrix and activity distribution.

  9. All-Direction Random Routing for Source-Location Privacy Protecting against Parasitic Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Na; Zeng, Jiwen

    2017-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks are deployed to monitor the surrounding physical environments and they also act as the physical environments of parasitic sensor networks, whose purpose is analyzing the contextual privacy and obtaining valuable information from the original wireless sensor networks. Recently, contextual privacy issues associated with wireless communication in open spaces have not been thoroughly addressed and one of the most important challenges is protecting the source locations of the valuable packages. In this paper, we design an all-direction random routing algorithm (ARR) for source-location protecting against parasitic sensor networks. For each package, the routing process of ARR is divided into three stages, i.e., selecting a proper agent node, delivering the package to the agent node from the source node, and sending it to the final destination from the agent node. In ARR, the agent nodes are randomly chosen in all directions by the source nodes using only local decisions, rather than knowing the whole topology of the networks. ARR can control the distributions of the routing paths in a very flexible way and it can guarantee that the routing paths with the same source and destination are totally different from each other. Therefore, it is extremely difficult for the parasitic sensor nodes to trace the packages back to the source nodes. Simulation results illustrate that ARR perfectly confuses the parasitic nodes and obviously outperforms traditional routing-based schemes in protecting source-location privacy, with a marginal increase in the communication overhead and energy consumption. In addition, ARR also requires much less energy than the cloud-based source-location privacy protection schemes. PMID:28304367

  10. All-Direction Random Routing for Source-Location Privacy Protecting against Parasitic Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Zeng, Jiwen

    2017-03-17

    Wireless sensor networks are deployed to monitor the surrounding physical environments and they also act as the physical environments of parasitic sensor networks, whose purpose is analyzing the contextual privacy and obtaining valuable information from the original wireless sensor networks. Recently, contextual privacy issues associated with wireless communication in open spaces have not been thoroughly addressed and one of the most important challenges is protecting the source locations of the valuable packages. In this paper, we design an all-direction random routing algorithm (ARR) for source-location protecting against parasitic sensor networks. For each package, the routing process of ARR is divided into three stages, i.e., selecting a proper agent node, delivering the package to the agent node from the source node, and sending it to the final destination from the agent node. In ARR, the agent nodes are randomly chosen in all directions by the source nodes using only local decisions, rather than knowing the whole topology of the networks. ARR can control the distributions of the routing paths in a very flexible way and it can guarantee that the routing paths with the same source and destination are totally different from each other. Therefore, it is extremely difficult for the parasitic sensor nodes to trace the packages back to the source nodes. Simulation results illustrate that ARR perfectly confuses the parasitic nodes and obviously outperforms traditional routing-based schemes in protecting source-location privacy, with a marginal increase in the communication overhead and energy consumption. In addition, ARR also requires much less energy than the cloud-based source-location privacy protection schemes.

  11. Improvements in mining induced microseismic source locations at the Lucky Friday mine using an automated whole-waveform analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodge, Douglas A.; Sprenke, Kenneth F.

    1992-09-01

    For years, severe rockburst problems at the Lucky Friday mine in northern Idaho have been a persistent safety hazard and an impediment to production. An MP250 based microseismic monitoring system, which uses simple voltage threshold picking of first arrivals, has been used in this mine since 1973 to provide source locations and energy estimates of seismic events. Recently, interest has been expressed in developing a whole waveform microseismic monitoring system for the mine to provide more accurate source locations and information about source characteristics. For this study, we have developed a prototype whole-waveform microseismic monitoring system based on a 80386 computer equipped with a 50 kHz analog-digital convertor board. The software developed includes a data collection program, a data analysis program, and an event detection program. Whole-waveform data collected and analyzed using this system during a three-day test have been employed to investigate sources of error in the hypocenter location process and to develop an automatic phase picker appropriate for microseismic events. Comparison of hypocenter estimates produced by the MP250 system to those produced by the whole-waveform system shows that significant timing errors are common in the MP250 system and that these errors caused a large part of the scatter evident in the daily activity plots produced at the mine. Simulations and analysis of blast data show that analytical control over the solutions is strongly influenced by the array geometry. Within the geophone array, large errors in the velocity model or moderate timing errors may result in small changes in the solution, but outside the array, the solution is very sensitive to small changes in the data. Our whole-waveform detection program picks event onset times and determines event durations by analysis of a segmented envelope function (SEF) derived from the microseismic signal. The detection program has been tested by comparing its arrival time

  12. Acoustic Emission Source Location in Unidirectional Carbon-Fibre-Reinforced Plastic Plates Using Virtually Trained Artificial Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Caprino, G.; Lopresto, V.; Leone, C.; Papa, I.

    2010-06-02

    Acoustic emission source location in a unidirectional carbon-fibre-reinforced plastic plate was attempted employing Artificial Neural Network (ANN) technology. The acoustic emission events were produced by a lead break, and the response wave received by piezoelectric sensors, type VS150-M resonant at 150 kHz. The waves were detected by a Vallen AMSY4 eight-channel instrumentation. The time of arrival, determined through the conventional threshold crossing technique, was used to measure the dependence of wave velocity on fibre orientation. A simple empirical formula, relying on classical lamination and suggested by wave propagation theory, was able to accurately model the experimental trend. Based on the formula, virtual training and testing data sets were generated for the case of a plate monitored by three transducers, and adopted to select two potentially effective ANN architectures. For final validation, experimental tests were carried out, positioning the source at predetermined points evenly distributed within the plate area. A very satisfactory correlation was found between the actual source locations and the ANN predictions.

  13. Source location of the smooth high-frequency radio emissions from Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, W.M.; Calvert, W. )

    1989-05-01

    The source location of the smooth high-frequency (SHF) radio emissions from Uranus has been determined using a technique differing from those applied previously. Specifically, by fitting the signal dropouts which occurred as Voyager traversed the hollow center for the emission pattern to a symmetrical cone centered on the source magnetic field direction at the cyclotron frequency, a southern-hemisphere (nightside) source was found at approximately 56{degree} S, 219{degree} W. The half-angle for the hollow portion of the emission pattern was found to be 13{degree}.

  14. An Active Global Attack Model for Sensor Source Location Privacy: Analysis and Countermeasures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Zhu, Sencun; Cao, Guohong; Laporta, Thomas

    Source locations of events are sensitive contextual information that needs to be protected in sensor networks. Previous work focuses on either an active local attacker that traces back to a real source in a hop-by-hop fashion, or a passive global attacker that eavesdrops/analyzes all network traffic to discover real sources. An active global attack model, which is more realistic and powerful than current ones, has not been studied yet. In this paper, we not only formalize this strong attack model, but also propose countermeasures against it.

  15. A Procedure to Determine the Optimal Sensor Positions for Locating AE Sources in Rock Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duca, S.; Occhiena, C.; Sambuelli, L.

    2015-03-01

    Within a research work aimed to better understand frost weathering mechanisms of rocks, laboratory tests have been designed to specifically assess a theoretical model of crack propagation due to ice segregation process in water-saturated and thermally microcracked cubic samples of Arolla gneiss. As the formation and growth of microcracks during freezing tests on rock material is accompanied by a sudden release of stored elastic energy, the propagation of elastic waves can be detected, at the laboratory scale, by acoustic emission (AE) sensors. The AE receiver array geometry is a sensitive factor influencing source location errors, for it can greatly amplify the effect of small measurement errors. Despite the large literature on the AE source location, little attention, to our knowledge, has been paid to the description of the experimental design phase. As a consequence, the criteria for sensor positioning are often not declared and not related to location accuracy. In the present paper, a tool for the identification of the optimal sensor position on a cubic shape rock specimen is presented. The optimal receiver configuration is chosen by studying the condition numbers of each of the kernel matrices, used for inverting the arrival time and finding the source location, and obtained for properly selected combinations between sensors and sources positions.

  16. Accurately mapping the location of the binding site for the interaction between hepatitis B virus X protein and cytochrome c oxidase III

    PubMed Central

    LI, DAN; DING, JIAN; CHEN, ZHIXIN; CHEN, YUN; LIN, NA; CHEN, FENGLIN; WANG, XIAOZHONG

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein (HBx) plays an important pathogenetic role in hepatocarcinoma tumorigenesis. As HBx does not have the ability to bind to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), protein-protein interaction is crucial for HBx functions. In a previous study, we screened a novel HBx-interacting protein, the cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (COXIII). In the present study, we aimed to accurately map the location of the binding site for the interaction of HBx with COXIII. Two fragments of HBx mutants (X1 aa1-72 and X2 aa1-117) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and separately inserted into the pAS2-1 plasmid. PCR and gene sequencing confirmed the correct insertion of the mutant fragments in the plasmid. The tanscription of the mutant fragments in yeast cells was demonstrated by RT-PCR and western blot analysis confirmed that they were accurately translated into fusion proteins. Hybridization on solid medium and the detection of β-galactosidase (β-gal) activity indicated that the binding site for the interaction between HBx and COXIII was located between aa72 and aa117. Specific interactions between the HBxX2 protein and COXIII were verified by co-immunoprecipitation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing to demonstrate that aa72-117 in HBx is the key region for binding with COXIII. PMID:25483779

  17. A dual-plane co-RASOR technique for accurate and rapid tracking and position verification of an Ir-192 source for single fraction HDR brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leeuw, Hendrik; Moerland, Marinus A.; van Vulpen, Marco; Seevinck, Peter R.; Bakker, Chris J. G.

    2013-11-01

    Effective high-dose-rate (HDR) treatment requires accurate and independent treatment verification to ensure that the treatment proceeds as prescribed, in particular if a high dose is given, as in single fraction therapy. Contrary to CT imaging and fluoroscopy, MR imaging provides high soft tissue contrast. Conventional MR techniques, however, do not offer the temporal resolution in combination with the 3D spatial resolution required for accurate brachytherapy source localization. We have developed an MR imaging method (center-out RAdial Sampling with Off-Resonance (co-RASOR)) that generates high positive contrast in the geometrical center of field perturbing objects, such as HDR brachytherapy sources. co-RASOR generates high positive contrast in the geometric center of an Ir-192 source by applying a frequency offset to center-out encoded data. To obtain high spatial accuracy in 3D with adequate temporal resolution, two orthogonal center-out encoded 2D images are applied instead of a full 3D acquisition. Its accuracy in 3D is demonstrated by 3D MRI and CT. The 2D images show high positive contrast in the geometric center of non-radioactive Ir-192 sources, with signal intensities up to 160% of the average signal intensity in the surrounding medium. The accuracy with which the center of the Ir-192 source is located by the dual-plane MRI acquisition corresponds closely to the accuracy obtained by 3D MRI and CT imaging. The positive contrast is shown to be obtained in homogeneous and in heterogeneous tissue. The dual-plane MRI technique allows the brachytherapy source to be tracked in 3D with millimeter accuracy with a temporal resolution of approximately 4 s.

  18. Handbook for the identification, location and investigation of pollution sources affecting ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Oudijk, G.; Mujica, K.

    1989-01-01

    Due to environmental pollution associated with increased urbanization and industrial development in wellhead areas, many public and domestic supply wells are becoming polluted at an ever-increasing rate. To prevent continued pollution of underground drinking water supplies, investigations must be conducted to locate and identify the sources of pollution. To conduct such investigations requires a diverse knowledge of hydrogeology, chemistry, urban planning, industrial and commercial processes, environmental law, and many other disciplines. Groundwater pollution investigations can be subdivided into the following five phases: (1) the background investigation (historical land usage, aerial photographs, pollutant characteristics, local hydrogeology); (2) the field pollution survey (site inspections, initial waste characterization); (3) the site-specific groundwater pollution investigation (monitoring wells, groundwater sampling); (4) data analysis (groundwater elevation contour maps, statistical analysis); and (5) source identification. This process may be used by investigators in order to locate pollution sources affecting aquifers, potable wells, and/or well fields.

  19. Revision of earthquake hypocentre locations in global bulletin data sets using source-specific station terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooshiri, Nima; Saul, Joachim; Heimann, Sebastian; Tilmann, Frederik; Dahm, Torsten

    2017-02-01

    Global earthquake locations are often associated with very large systematic travel-time residuals even for clear arrivals, especially for regional and near-regional stations in subduction zones because of their strongly heterogeneous velocity structure. Travel-time corrections can drastically reduce travel-time residuals at regional stations and, in consequence, improve the relative location accuracy. We have extended the shrinking-box source-specific station terms technique to regional and teleseismic distances and adopted the algorithm for probabilistic, nonlinear, global-search location. We evaluated the potential of the method to compute precise relative hypocentre locations on a global scale. The method has been applied to two specific test regions using existing P- and pP-phase picks. The first data set consists of 3103 events along the Chilean margin and the second one comprises 1680 earthquakes in the Tonga-Fiji subduction zone. Pick data were obtained from the GEOFON earthquake bulletin, produced using data from all available, global station networks. A set of timing corrections varying as a function of source position was calculated for each seismic station. In this way, we could correct the systematic errors introduced into the locations by the inaccuracies in the assumed velocity structure without explicitly solving for a velocity model. Residual statistics show that the median absolute deviation of the travel-time residuals is reduced by 40-60 per cent at regional distances, where the velocity anomalies are strong. Moreover, the spread of the travel-time residuals decreased by ˜20 per cent at teleseismic distances (>28°). Furthermore, strong variations in initial residuals as a function of recording distance are smoothed out in the final residuals. The relocated catalogues exhibit less scattered locations in depth and sharper images of the seismicity associated with the subducting slabs. Comparison with a high-resolution local catalogue reveals that

  20. Infrasonic source location imaging with the USArray: Application to one year of seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, K. T.; Shelby, R.; Hedlin, M. A.; Degroot-Hedlin, C. D.

    2010-12-01

    The USArray directly measures ground motion, which can mostly be attributed to ocean waves, earthquakes, volcanoes, and weather systems that load the Earth’s surface. Another source of ground motion is the transfer of atmospheric acoustic energy into seismic energy at the Earth’s surface. Infrasound (low frequency sound below ~20 Hz) can travel great distances unattenuated in atmospheric ducts. The infrasonic wave field is rich due to a variety of anthropogenic and geophysical phenomena including earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, meteors, lightning and sprites, auroras, and oceanic and atmospheric processes. Globally spaced microbarometer arrays with apertures of 100 m to 2 km are typically used to study these sources. However, these arrays are separated by thousands of kilometers, which places considerable limits on what they can teach us about infrasound source physics. The USArray is in a position to study infrasound sources in unprecedented detail. Here we apply reverse-time migration to acoustic-to-seismic coupled signals recorded by the USArray to detect and locate in two-dimensional space and time several hundred infrasound sources in the western U.S. that occurred during 2008. Each event is visually inspected and assigned a quality rating. Confidence regions are determined using a bootstrap technique. The highest quality signals can be observed out to at least 1500 km range. We report the source location parameters for these events and investigate detection and location patterns. These results suggest that seismic networks near nuclear test monitoring infrasound arrays could be used to reduce the false alarm rate by identifying nearby, repeating sources of infrasound that create signals that are detected by the infrasound arrays. More fundamentally, these detected events comprise a ground truth database that can be used to validate or improve atmospheric velocity models.

  1. Evidence for opponent process analysis of sound source location in humans.

    PubMed

    Briley, Paul M; Kitterick, Pádraig T; Summerfield, A Quentin

    2013-02-01

    Research with barn owls suggested that sound source location is represented topographically in the brain by an array of neurons each tuned to a narrow range of locations. However, research with small-headed mammals has offered an alternative view in which location is represented by the balance of activity in two opponent channels broadly tuned to the left and right auditory space. Both channels may be present in each auditory cortex, although the channel representing contralateral space may be dominant. Recent studies have suggested that opponent channel coding of space may also apply in humans, although these studies have used a restricted set of spatial cues or probed a restricted set of spatial locations, and there have been contradictory reports as to the relative dominance of the ipsilateral and contralateral channels in each cortex. The current study used electroencephalography (EEG) in conjunction with sound field stimulus presentation to address these issues and to inform the development of an explicit computational model of human sound source localization. Neural responses were compatible with the opponent channel account of sound source localization and with contralateral channel dominance in the left, but not the right, auditory cortex. A computational opponent channel model reproduced every important aspect of the EEG data and allowed inferences about the width of tuning in the spatial channels. Moreover, the model predicted the oft-reported decrease in spatial acuity measured psychophysically with increasing reference azimuth. Predictions of spatial acuity closely matched those measured psychophysically by previous authors.

  2. Source location impact on relative tsunami strength along the U.S. West Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, L.; Bromirski, P. D.; Miller, A. J.; Arcas, D.; Flick, R. E.; Hendershott, M. C.

    2015-07-01

    Tsunami propagation simulations are used to identify which tsunami source locations would produce the highest amplitude waves on approach to key population centers along the U.S. West Coast. The reasons for preferential influence of certain remote excitation sites are explored by examining model time sequences of tsunami wave patterns emanating from the source. Distant bathymetric features in the West and Central Pacific can redirect tsunami energy into narrow paths with anomalously large wave height that have disproportionate impact on small areas of coastline. The source region generating the waves can be as little as 100 km along a subduction zone, resulting in distinct source-target pairs with sharply amplified wave energy at the target. Tsunami spectral ratios examined for transects near the source, after crossing the West Pacific, and on approach to the coast illustrate how prominent bathymetric features alter wave spectral distributions, and relate to both the timing and magnitude of waves approaching shore. To contextualize the potential impact of tsunamis from high-amplitude source-target pairs, the source characteristics of major historical earthquakes and tsunamis in 1960, 1964, and 2011 are used to generate comparable events originating at the highest-amplitude source locations for each coastal target. This creates a type of "worst-case scenario," a replicate of each region's historically largest earthquake positioned at the fault segment that would produce the most incoming tsunami energy at each target port. An amplification factor provides a measure of how the incoming wave height from the worst-case source compares to the historical event.

  3. Multiband array detection and location of seismic sources recorded by dense seismic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poiata, Natalia; Satriano, Claudio; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Bernard, Pascal; Obara, Kazushige

    2016-06-01

    We present a new methodology for detection and space-time location of seismic sources based on multiscale, frequency-selective coherence of the wave field recorded by dense large-scale seismic networks and local antennas. The method is designed to enhance coherence of the signal statistical features across the array of sensors and consists of three steps: signal processing, space-time imaging, and detection and location. The first step provides, for each station, a simplified representation of seismic signal by extracting multiscale non-stationary statistical characteristics, through multiband higher-order statistics or envelopes. This signal processing scheme is designed to account for a priori unknown transients, potentially associated with a variety of sources (e.g. earthquakes, tremors), and to prepare data for a better performance in posterior steps. Following space-time imaging is carried through 3-D spatial mapping and summation of station-pair time-delay estimate functions. This step produces time-series of 3-D spatial images representing the likelihood that each pixel makes part of a source. Detection and location is performed in the final step by extracting the local maxima from the 3-D spatial images. We demonstrate the efficiency of the method in detecting and locating seismic sources associated with low signal-to-noise ratio on an example of the aftershock earthquake records from local stations of International Maule Aftershock Deployment in Central Chile. The performance and potential of the method to detect, locate and characterize the energy release associated with possibly mixed seismic radiation from earthquakes and low-frequency tectonic tremors is further tested on continuous data from southwestern Japan.

  4. A noninvasive method for locating a cardiac dipolar source in humans.

    PubMed

    Salu, Y; Bischof, C; Pandian, N

    1982-01-01

    A noninvasive method for locating isolated areas of cardiac electrical activity, such as an ectopic focus, is introduced and evaluated. Surface electric potentials due to the source are recorded at 20-25 points on the chest. Each chest is measured and its configuration is approximated by a grid of 126 points. A computer program utilizes these data to calculate the x, y, z coordinates of the cardiac source, and this calculated location is displayed on the bi-plane chest x-rays of the patient. Errors that may occur in other methods that utilize average torso shape and average heart position are eliminated in the proposed method. The method was evaluated by using it for locating the electrodes of implanted pacemakers from their "spikes" in the ECG's, and also from the potentials at the onset of the induced QRS complexes. The results were compared with bi-plane x-rays of the same patients. It was found that the average errors in locating the electrodes from their "spikes" in the ECG's were 1.3 cm in the frontal view and 1.4 cm in the lateral view. The errors in locating the paced myocardial area at the beginning of the QRS complex were similar. The errors in the lateral view are systematic and may be attributed to the effects of the intracavity blood volume (Brody's effect), which are neglected in this method.

  5. Source location and mechanism analysis of an earthquake triggered by the 2016 Kumamoto, southwestern Japan, earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takeshi; Aoi, Shin

    2017-01-01

    The 2016 Kumamoto earthquake ( Mw 7.0) occurred in the central part of Kyushu Island, southwestern Japan, on April 16, 2016. The mainshock triggered an event of maximum acceleration 700 gal that caused severe damage to infrastructure and thousands of homes. We investigate the source location of the triggered event, and the timing of large energy release, by employing the back-projection method for strong-motion network data. The optimal location is estimated to be [33.2750°, 131.3575°] (latitude, longitude) at a depth of 5 km, which is 80 km northeast of the epicenter of the mainshock. The timing is 33.5 s after the origin time of the mainshock. We also investigate the source mechanism by reproducing observed displacement waveforms at a near-source station. The waveforms at smaller-sized events, convolved with the source time function of a pulse width 1 s, are similar to the signature of the observed waveforms of the triggered event. The observations are also reproduced by synthetic waveforms for a normal-fault mechanism and a normal-fault with strike-slip components at the estimated locations. Although our approach does not constrain the strike direction well, our waveform analysis indicates that the triggered earthquake occurred near the station that observed the strong motions, primarily via a normal-fault mechanism or a normal-fault with strike-slip components.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Acoustic emission source location on large plate-like structures using a local triangular sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljets, Dirk; Chong, Alex; Wilcox, Steve; Holford, Karen

    2012-07-01

    A new acoustic emission (AE) source location method was developed for large plate-like structures, which evaluates the location of the source using a combined time of flight and modal source location algorithm. Three sensors are installed in a triangular array with a sensor to sensor distance of just a few centimeters. The direction from the sensor array to the AE source can be established by analysing the arrival times of the A0 component of the signal to the three sensors whilst the distance can be evaluated using the separation of S0 and A0 mode at each sensor respectively. The close positioning of the sensors allows the array to be installed in a single housing. This simplifies mounting, wiring and calibration procedures for non-destructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. Furthermore, this array could reduce the number of sensors needed to monitor large structures compared to other methods. An automatic wave mode identification method is also presented.

  7. Energy intakes of US children and adults by food purchase location and by specific food source

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To our knowledge, no studies have examined energy intakes by food purchase location and food source using a representative sample of US children, adolescents and adults. Evaluations of purchase location and food sources of energy may inform public health policy. Methods Analyses were based on the first day of 24-hour recall for 22,852 persons in the 2003-4, 2005-6, and 2007-8 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES). The most common food purchase locations were stores (grocery store, supermarket, convenience store, or specialty store), quick-service restaurants/pizza (QSR), full-service restaurants (FSR), school cafeterias, or food from someone else/gifts. Specific food sources of energy were identified using the National Cancer Institute aggregation scheme. Separate analyses were conducted for children ages 6-11y, adolescents ages 12-19y, and adults aged 20-50y and ≥51y. Results Stores (grocery, convenience, and specialty) were the food purchase locations for between 63.3% and 70.3% of dietary energy in the US diet. Restaurants provided between 16.9% and 26.3% of total energy. Depending on the respondents’ age, QSR provided between 12.5% and 17.5% of energy, whereas FSR provided between 4.7% and 10.4% of energy. School meals provided 9.8% of energy for children and 5.5% for adolescents. Vending machines provided <1% of energy. Pizza from QSR, the top food away from home (FAFH) item, provided 2.2% of energy in the diets of children and 3.4% in the diets of adolescents. Soda, energy, and sports drinks from QSR provided approximately 1.2% of dietary energy. Conclusions Refining dietary surveillance approaches by incorporating food purchase location may help inform public health policy. Characterizing the important sources of energy, in terms of both purchase location and source may be useful in anticipating the population-level impacts of proposed policy or educational interventions. These data show that stores provide a majority of

  8. Quantifying uncertainties in location and source mechanism for Long-Period events at Mt Etna, Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauchie, Léna; Saccorotti, Gilberto; Bean, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    The manifestation of Long-Period events is documented at many volcanoes worldwide. However the mechanism at their origin is still object of discussion. Models proposed so far involve (i) the resonance of fluid-filled cracks or conduits that are triggered by fluid instabilities or the brittle failure of high viscous magmas and (ii) the slow-rupture earthquakes in the shallow portion of volcanic edifices. Since LP activity usually precedes and accompanies volcanic eruption, the understanding of these sources is important in terms of hazard assessment and eruption early warning. The work is thus primarily aimed at the assessment of the uncertainties in the determination of LP source properties as a consequence of poor knowledge of the velocity structure and location errors. We used data from temporary networks deployed on Mt Etna in 2005. During August, 2005, about 13000 LP events were detected through a STA/LTA approach, and were classified into two families on the basis of waveform similarity. For each family of events, we located the source using three different approaches: (1) a single-station-location method based on the back-propagation of the polarization vector estimated from covariance analysis of three-component signals; (2) multi-channel analysis of data recorded by two seismic arrays; (3) relative locations based on inversion of differential times obtained through cross-correlation of similar waveforms. For all these three different methods, the solutions are very sensitive to the chosen velocity model. We thus iterated the location procedure for different medium properties; the preferred velocity is that for which the results obtained with the three different methods are consistent each other. For each family, we then defined a volume of possible source location and performed a full-waveform, moment tensor (MT) inversion for the entire catalog of events. In this manner, we obtained a MT solution for each grid node of the investigated volume. The MT

  9. 40 CFR 55.14 - Requirements that apply to OCS sources located within 25 miles of States' seaward boundaries, by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... located within 25 miles of States' seaward boundaries, by State. 55.14 Section 55.14 Protection of... REGULATIONS § 55.14 Requirements that apply to OCS sources located within 25 miles of States' seaward... requirements. State and local requirements promulgated by EPA as applicable to OCS sources located within...

  10. Gravitational wave hotspots: Ranking potential locations of single-source gravitational wave emission

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Joseph; Polin, Abigail; Lommen, Andrea; Christy, B; Stappers, Ben; Finn, Lee Samuel; Jenet, F. A.

    2014-03-20

    The steadily improving sensitivity of pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) suggests that gravitational waves (GWs) from supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) systems in the nearby universe will be detectable sometime during the next decade. Currently, PTAs assume an equal probability of detection from every sky position, but as evidence grows for a non-isotropic distribution of sources, is there a most likely sky position for a detectable single source of GWs? In this paper, a collection of Galactic catalogs is used to calculate various metrics related to the detectability of a single GW source resolvable above a GW background, assuming that every galaxy has the same probability of containing an SMBHB. Our analyses of these data reveal small probabilities that one of these sources is currently in the PTA band, but as sensitivity is improved regions of consistent probability density are found in predictable locations, specifically around local galaxy clusters.

  11. Hard X-ray and microwave sources located around the apex of a solar flare loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, S.; Shimojo, M.; Watanabe, K.; Minoshima, T.; Yaji, K.

    2010-12-01

    The apex of a flare loop is one of important regions to understand particle acceleration in solar flares, under the framework of the flare model based on magnetic reconnection. At that portion, nonthermal emissions are observed in hard X-rays and microwave. These two emissions are originated from electrons accelerated/energized in different energy ranges. Hard X-rays (~ 50 - 100 keV ) are emitted by relatively lower-energy (~ 100 keV) accelerated electrons. On the other hand, microwaves (17 GHz) are emitted by relatively higher-energy (~ 1 MeV) electrons. The locations (heights) of these two emitting regions impose considerable constraints on the acceleration/transport/loss processes of electrons in solar flares. To compare hard X-ray and microwave sources, we chose twenty-three events among all events detected by Nobeyama Radio Heliograph (NoRH) during the almost whole period of its operation (1992 - 2008). The criteria are (1) limb event, (2) simultaneous observation with Yohkoh/HXT or RHESSI, (3) enough number of photons in the energy range of 33 - 53 keV, and (4) microwave source large enough to resolve the flare loop into footpoint and looptop sources. However, only seven events among them can be used for this study. The remaining sixteen events are displaced from the list due to no hard X-ray looptop source, too complex structure of multiple loops, and so force. Among the seven events, six events show that the looptop hard X-ray source is located at a higher altitude than the looptop microwave source. This result suggests that lower-energy accelerated electrons (~ 100 keV) are located at a higher altitude than higher-energy (~ 1 MeV) electrons. What makes this height difference? We discuss the cause of it from various kinds of viewpoints, e.g. emission mechanism, trapping effect, transport process, loss process.

  12. Acoustic emission non-destructive testing of structures using source location techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, Alan G.

    2013-09-01

    The technology of acoustic emission (AE) testing has been advanced and used at Sandia for the past 40 years. AE has been used on structures including pressure vessels, fire bottles, wind turbines, gas wells, nuclear weapons, and solar collectors. This monograph begins with background topics in acoustics and instrumentation and then focuses on current acoustic emission technology. It covers the overall design and system setups for a test, with a wind turbine blade as the object. Test analysis is discussed with an emphasis on source location. Three test examples are presented, two on experimental wind turbine blades and one on aircraft fire extinguisher bottles. Finally, the code for a FORTRAN source location program is given as an example of a working analysis program. Throughout the document, the stress is on actual testing of real structures, not on laboratory experiments.

  13. Precise tremor source locations and amplitude variations along the lower-crustal central San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelly, David R.; Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2010-07-01

    We precisely locate 88 tremor families along the central San Andreas Fault using a 3D velocity model and numerous P and S wave arrival times estimated from seismogram stacks of up to 400 events per tremor family. Maximum tremor amplitudes vary along the fault by at least a factor of 7, with by far the strongest sources along a 25 km section of the fault southeast of Parkfield. We also identify many weaker tremor families, which have largely escaped prior detection. Together, these sources extend 150 km along the fault, beneath creeping, transitional, and locked sections of the upper crustal fault. Depths are mostly between 18 and 28 km, in the lower crust. Epicenters are concentrated within 3 km of the surface trace, implying a nearly vertical fault. A prominent gap in detectible activity is located directly beneath the region of maximum slip in the 2004 magnitude 6.0 Parkfield earthquake.

  14. Precise tremor source locations and amplitude variations along the lower-crustal central San Andreas Fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelly, David R.; Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2010-01-01

    We precisely locate 88 tremor families along the central San Andreas Fault using a 3D velocity model and numerous P and S wave arrival times estimated from seismogram stacks of up to 400 events per tremor family. Maximum tremor amplitudes vary along the fault by at least a factor of 7, with by far the strongest sources along a 25 km section of the fault southeast of Parkfield. We also identify many weaker tremor families, which have largely escaped prior detection. Together, these sources extend 150 km along the fault, beneath creeping, transitional, and locked sections of the upper crustal fault. Depths are mostly between 18 and 28 km, in the lower crust. Epicenters are concentrated within 3 km of the surface trace, implying a nearly vertical fault. A prominent gap in detectible activity is located directly beneath the region of maximum slip in the 2004 magnitude 6.0 Parkfield earthquake.

  15. Locating and estimating air emissions from sources of perchloroethylene and trichloroethylene. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Most, C.C.

    1989-08-01

    To assist groups interested in inventorying air emissions of various potentially toxic substances, EPA is preparing a series of documents to compile available information on sources and emissions of these substances. This document deals specifically with perchloroethylene and trichloroethylene. Its intended audience includes Federal, State, and local air-pollution personnel and others in locating potential emitters of perchloroethylene and trichloroethylene and in making gross estimates of air emissions therefrom. The document presents information on the types of sources that may emit perchloroethylene and trichloroethylene, process variations and release points that may be expected within these sources, and available emissions information indicating the potential for trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene releases into the air from each operation.

  16. Statistical study of coronal mass ejection source locations: Understanding CMEs viewed in coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuming; Chen, Caixia; Gui, Bin; Shen, Chenglong; Ye, Pinzhong; Wang, S.

    2011-04-01

    How to properly understand coronal mass ejections (CMEs) viewed in white light coronagraphs is crucial to many relative researches in solar and space physics. The issue is now particularly addressed in this paper through studying the source locations of all the 1078 Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) CMEs listed in Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW) CME catalog during 1997-1998 and their correlation with CMEs' apparent parameters. By manually checking LASCO and Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) movies of these CMEs, we find that, except 231 CMEs whose source locations cannot be identified due to poor data, there are 288 CMEs with location identified on the frontside solar disk, 234 CMEs appearing above solar limb, and 325 CMEs without evident eruptive signatures in the field of view of EIT. On the basis of the statistical results of CMEs' source locations, there are four physical issues: (1) the missing rate of CMEs by SOHO LASCO and EIT, (2) the mass of CMEs, (3) the causes of halo CMEs, and (4) the deflections of CMEs in the corona, are exhaustively analyzed. It is found that (1) about 32% frontside CMEs cannot be recognized by SOHO, (2) the brightness of a CME at any heliocentric distance is roughly positively correlated with its speed, and the CME mass derived from the brightness is probably overestimated, (3) both projection effect and violent eruption are the major causes of halo CMEs, and especially for limb halo CMEs the latter is the primary one, and (4) most CMEs deflected toward equator near the solar minimum; these deflections can be classified into three types: the asymmetrical expansion, the nonradial ejection, and the deflected propagation.

  17. An Improved Source-Scanning Algorithm for Locating Earthquake Clusters or Aftershock Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Y.; Kao, H.; Hsu, S.

    2010-12-01

    The Source-scanning Algorithm (SSA) was originally introduced in 2004 to locate non-volcanic tremors. Its application was later expanded to the identification of earthquake rupture planes and the near-real-time detection and monitoring of landslides and mud/debris flows. In this study, we further improve SSA for the purpose of locating earthquake clusters or aftershock sequences when only a limited number of waveform observations are available. The main improvements include the application of a ground motion analyzer to separate P and S waves, the automatic determination of resolution based on the grid size and time step of the scanning process, and a modified brightness function to utilize constraints from multiple phases. Specifically, the improved SSA (named as ISSA) addresses two major issues related to locating earthquake clusters/aftershocks. The first one is the massive amount of both time and labour to locate a large number of seismic events manually. And the second one is to efficiently and correctly identify the same phase across the entire recording array when multiple events occur closely in time and space. To test the robustness of ISSA, we generate synthetic waveforms consisting of 3 separated events such that individual P and S phases arrive at different stations in different order, thus making correct phase picking nearly impossible. Using these very complicated waveforms as the input, the ISSA scans all model space for possible combination of time and location for the existence of seismic sources. The scanning results successfully associate various phases from each event at all stations, and correctly recover the input. To further demonstrate the advantage of ISSA, we apply it to the waveform data collected by a temporary OBS array for the aftershock sequence of an offshore earthquake southwest of Taiwan. The overall signal-to-noise ratio is inadequate for locating small events; and the precise arrival times of P and S phases are difficult to

  18. Determination of the Best Ground Penetrating Radar Source Signal Type for the Accurate Location of Underground Utilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    of RF modulation used by the GPR. :n essence , this is a key performance criterion of any GPR system. 3.3 DESIGNLNG THE GPR SYSTEM This section...emulsion of oil , water, and salt to achieve the required properties of the model dielectric. Dr. Glenn Smith of the Georgia Institute of Technology has...emulsion created for use in the liquid tank could be made to model selected soil dielectrics. Dr. Smith uses a high-grade, light mineral oil , water, and

  19. Transport of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) from an arctic glacier to downstream locations: implications for sources.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Karen Y; Yamazaki, Eriko; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Taniyasu, Sachi; Murphy, Margaret B; Horii, Yuichi; Petrick, Gert; Kallerborn, Roland; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Murano, Kentaro; Lam, Paul K S

    2013-03-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) have been globally detected in various environmental matrices, yet their fate and transport to the Arctic is still unclear, especially for the European Arctic. In this study, concentrations of 17 PFAS were quantified in two ice cores (n=26), surface snow (n=9) and surface water samples (n=14) collected along a spatial gradient in Svalbard, Norway. Concentrations of selected ions (Na(+), SO4(2-), etc.) were also determined for tracing the origins and sources of PFAS. Perfluorobutanoate (PFBA), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorononanoate (PFNA) were the dominant compounds found in ice core samples. Taking PFOA, PFNA and perfluorooctane-sulfonate (PFOS) as examples, higher concentrations were detected in the middle layers of the ice cores representing the period of 1997-2000. Lower concentrations of C8-C12 perfluorocarboxylates (PFCAs) were detected in comparison with concentrations measured previously in an ice core from the Canadian Arctic, indicating that contamination levels in the European Arctic are lower. Average PFAS concentrations were found to be lower in surface snow and melted glacier water samples, while increased concentrations were observed in river water downstream near the coastal area. Perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS) was detected in the downstream locations, but not in the glacier, suggesting existence of local sources of this compound. Long-range atmospheric transport of PFAS was the major deposition pathway for the glaciers, while local sources (e.g., skiing activities) were identified in the downstream locations.

  20. Honeybees perform optimal scale-free searching flights when attempting to locate a food source.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Andrew M; Smith, Alan D; Reynolds, Don R; Carreck, Norman L; Osborne, Juliet L

    2007-11-01

    The foraging strategies used by animals are key to their success in spatially and temporally heterogeneous environments. We hypothesise that when a food source at a known location ceases to be available, flying insects will exhibit search patterns that optimise the rediscovery of such resources. In order to study these searching patterns, foraging honeybees were trained to an artificial feeder that was then removed, and the subsequent flight patterns of the bees were recorded using harmonic radar. We show that the flight patterns have a scale-free (Lévy-flight) characteristic that constitutes an optimal searching strategy for the location of the feeder. It is shown that this searching strategy would remain optimal even if the implementation of the Lévy-flights was imprecise due, for example, to errors in the bees' path integration system or difficulties in responding to variable wind conditions. The implications of these findings for animal foraging in general are discussed.

  1. BlueDetect: An iBeacon-Enabled Scheme for Accurate and Energy-Efficient Indoor-Outdoor Detection and Seamless Location-Based Service.

    PubMed

    Zou, Han; Jiang, Hao; Luo, Yiwen; Zhu, Jianjie; Lu, Xiaoxuan; Xie, Lihua

    2016-02-22

    The location and contextual status (indoor or outdoor) is fundamental and critical information for upper-layer applications, such as activity recognition and location-based services (LBS) for individuals. In addition, optimizations of building management systems (BMS), such as the pre-cooling or heating process of the air-conditioning system according to the human traffic entering or exiting a building, can utilize the information, as well. The emerging mobile devices, which are equipped with various sensors, become a feasible and flexible platform to perform indoor-outdoor (IO) detection. However, power-hungry sensors, such as GPS and WiFi, should be used with caution due to the constrained battery storage on mobile device. We propose BlueDetect: an accurate, fast response and energy-efficient scheme for IO detection and seamless LBS running on the mobile device based on the emerging low-power iBeacon technology. By leveraging the on-broad Bluetooth module and our proposed algorithms, BlueDetect provides a precise IO detection service that can turn on/off on-board power-hungry sensors smartly and automatically, optimize their performances and reduce the power consumption of mobile devices simultaneously. Moreover, seamless positioning and navigation services can be realized by it, especially in a semi-outdoor environment, which cannot be achieved by GPS or an indoor positioning system (IPS) easily. We prototype BlueDetect on Android mobile devices and evaluate its performance comprehensively. The experimental results have validated the superiority of BlueDetect in terms of IO detection accuracy, localization accuracy and energy consumption.

  2. BlueDetect: An iBeacon-Enabled Scheme for Accurate and Energy-Efficient Indoor-Outdoor Detection and Seamless Location-Based Service

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Han; Jiang, Hao; Luo, Yiwen; Zhu, Jianjie; Lu, Xiaoxuan; Xie, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    The location and contextual status (indoor or outdoor) is fundamental and critical information for upper-layer applications, such as activity recognition and location-based services (LBS) for individuals. In addition, optimizations of building management systems (BMS), such as the pre-cooling or heating process of the air-conditioning system according to the human traffic entering or exiting a building, can utilize the information, as well. The emerging mobile devices, which are equipped with various sensors, become a feasible and flexible platform to perform indoor-outdoor (IO) detection. However, power-hungry sensors, such as GPS and WiFi, should be used with caution due to the constrained battery storage on mobile device. We propose BlueDetect: an accurate, fast response and energy-efficient scheme for IO detection and seamless LBS running on the mobile device based on the emerging low-power iBeacon technology. By leveraging the on-broad Bluetooth module and our proposed algorithms, BlueDetect provides a precise IO detection service that can turn on/off on-board power-hungry sensors smartly and automatically, optimize their performances and reduce the power consumption of mobile devices simultaneously. Moreover, seamless positioning and navigation services can be realized by it, especially in a semi-outdoor environment, which cannot be achieved by GPS or an indoor positioning system (IPS) easily. We prototype BlueDetect on Android mobile devices and evaluate its performance comprehensively. The experimental results have validated the superiority of BlueDetect in terms of IO detection accuracy, localization accuracy and energy consumption. PMID:26907295

  3. Locating and Quantifying Broadband Fan Sources Using In-Duct Microphones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, Robert P.; Walker, Bruce E.; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2010-01-01

    In-duct beamforming techniques have been developed for locating broadband noise sources on a low-speed fan and quantifying the acoustic power in the inlet and aft fan ducts. The NASA Glenn Research Center's Advanced Noise Control Fan was used as a test bed. Several of the blades were modified to provide a broadband source to evaluate the efficacy of the in-duct beamforming technique. Phased arrays consisting of rings and line arrays of microphones were employed. For the imaging, the data were mathematically resampled in the frame of reference of the rotating fan. For both the imaging and power measurement steps, array steering vectors were computed using annular duct modal expansions, selected subsets of the cross spectral matrix elements were used, and the DAMAS and CLEAN-SC deconvolution algorithms were applied.

  4. Rapid Bayesian point source inversion using pattern recognition --- bridging the gap between regional scaling relations and accurate physical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, A. P.; Kaeufl, P.; De Wit, R. W. L.; Trampert, J.

    2014-12-01

    Obtaining knowledge about source parameters in (near) real-time during or shortly after an earthquake is essential for mitigating damage and directing resources in the aftermath of the event. Therefore, a variety of real-time source-inversion algorithms have been developed over recent decades. This has been driven by the ever-growing availability of dense seismograph networks in many seismogenic areas of the world and the significant advances in real-time telemetry. By definition, these algorithms rely on short time-windows of sparse, local and regional observations, resulting in source estimates that are highly sensitive to observational errors, noise and missing data. In order to obtain estimates more rapidly, many algorithms are either entirely based on empirical scaling relations or make simplifying assumptions about the Earth's structure, which can in turn lead to biased results. It is therefore essential that realistic uncertainty bounds are estimated along with the parameters. A natural means of propagating probabilistic information on source parameters through the entire processing chain from first observations to potential end users and decision makers is provided by the Bayesian formalism.We present a novel method based on pattern recognition allowing us to incorporate highly accurate physical modelling into an uncertainty-aware real-time inversion algorithm. The algorithm is based on a pre-computed Green's functions database, containing a large set of source-receiver paths in a highly heterogeneous crustal model. Unlike similar methods, which often employ a grid search, we use a supervised learning algorithm to relate synthetic waveforms to point source parameters. This training procedure has to be performed only once and leads to a representation of the posterior probability density function p(m|d) --- the distribution of source parameters m given observations d --- which can be evaluated quickly for new data.Owing to the flexibility of the pattern

  5. Affective attitudes to face images associated with intracerebral EEG source location before face viewing.

    PubMed

    Pizzagalli, D; Koenig, T; Regard, M; Lehmann, D

    1999-01-01

    We investigated whether different, personality-related affective attitudes are associated with different brain electric field (EEG) sources before any emotional challenge (stimulus exposure). A 27-channel EEG was recorded in 15 subjects during eyes-closed resting. After recording, subjects rated 32 images of human faces for affective appeal. The subjects in the first (i.e., most negative) and fourth (i.e., most positive) quartile of general affective attitude were further analyzed. The EEG data (mean=25+/-4. 8 s/subject) were subjected to frequency-domain model dipole source analysis (FFT-Dipole-Approximation), resulting in 3-dimensional intracerebral source locations and strengths for the delta-theta, alpha, and beta EEG frequency band, and for the full range (1.5-30 Hz) band. Subjects with negative attitude (compared to those with positive attitude) showed the following source locations: more inferior for all frequency bands, more anterior for the delta-theta band, more posterior and more right for the alpha, beta and 1.5-30 Hz bands. One year later, the subjects were asked to rate the face images again. The rating scores for the same face images were highly correlated for all subjects, and original and retest affective mean attitude was highly correlated across subjects. The present results show that subjects with different affective attitudes to face images had different active, cerebral, neural populations in a task-free condition prior to viewing the images. We conclude that the brain functional state which implements affective attitude towards face images as a personality feature exists without elicitors, as a continuously present, dynamic feature of brain functioning.

  6. Lightning source locations from VHF radiation data for a flash at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustan, P. L.; Uman, M. A.; Childers, D. G.; Beasley, W. H.; Lennon, C. L.

    1980-09-01

    A comprehensive study of a three-stroke lightning flash that struck the 150-m weather tower at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) was recently reported by Uman et al. (1978). Here we supplement that study by presenting three-dimensional locations of the sources of VHF (30-50 MHz) radiation generated by the KSC flash. These locations were obtained by measuring with the KSC lightning detection and ranging (LDAR) system the difference in the time of arrival (DTOA) of radiated pulses at four ground stations and then by calculating the locations from the DTOA data. The DTOA data were obtained via a newly developed computer-implemented multiple time series analysis which uses cross-correlation and pattern recognition techniques. About 48,000 sequential VHF sources were located during the flash. We compared these locations with correlated wide band electric field records to provide a better understanding of the physics of the following discharge phases: preliminary breakdown, stepped leader, return strokes, dart leader, stepped-dart leader, J changes, solitary pulses, and intracloud discharge. Some of the more interesting new results obtained follow: before the stepped leader preceding the first return stroke, there was a primarily vertical discharge in the cloud between a height of 7.2 and 5.1 km. This preliminary breakdown has uniquely different VHF characteristics from those of the stepped leader which followed and was not accompanied by significant electric field change as was the stepped leader. The stepped leader propagated downward from the bottom of the preliminary breakdown. The only significant VHF radiation during the dart leader preceding the second return stroke came from within the cloud. The third return stroke was initiated by a stepped leader which propagated from about 8 km height, the bottom of the previous J process, down to about 3.3 km where it apparently joined the channel of the previous return stroke and became a dart leader. The VHF source locations

  7. Reconstruction of source location in a network of gravitational wave interferometric detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalier, Fabien; Barsuglia, Matteo; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Brisson, Violette; Clapson, Andre-Claude; Davier, Michel; Hello, Patrice; Kreckelbergh, Stephane; Leroy, Nicolas; Varvella, Monica

    2006-10-15

    This paper deals with the reconstruction of the direction of a gravitational wave source using the detection made by a network of interferometric detectors, mainly the LIGO and Virgo detectors. We suppose that an event has been seen in coincidence using a filter applied on the three detector data streams. Using the arrival time (and its associated error) of the gravitational signal in each detector, the direction of the source in the sky is computed using a {chi}{sup 2} minimization technique. For reasonably large signals (SNR>4.5 in all detectors), the mean angular error between the real location and the reconstructed one is about 1 deg. . We also investigate the effect of the network geometry assuming the same angular response for all interferometric detectors. It appears that the reconstruction quality is not uniform over the sky and is degraded when the source approaches the plane defined by the three detectors. Adding at least one other detector to the LIGO-Virgo network reduces the blind regions and in the case of 6 detectors, a precision less than 1 deg. on the source direction can be reached for 99% of the sky.

  8. UTILIZING RESULTS FROM INSAR TO DEVELOP SEISMIC LOCATION BENCHMARKS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR SEISMIC SOURCE STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    M. BEGNAUD; ET AL

    2000-09-01

    Obtaining accurate seismic event locations is one of the most important goals for monitoring detonations of underground nuclear teats. This is a particular challenge at small magnitudes where the number of recording stations may be less than 20. Although many different procedures are being developed to improve seismic location, most procedures suffer from inadequate testing against accurate information about a seismic event. Events with well-defined attributes, such as latitude, longitude, depth and origin time, are commonly referred to as ground truth (GT). Ground truth comes in many forms and with many different levels of accuracy. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) can provide independent and accurate information (ground truth) regarding ground surface deformation and/or rupture. Relating surface deformation to seismic events is trivial when events are large and create a significant surface rupture, such as for the M{sub w} = 7.5 event that occurred in the remote northern region of the Tibetan plateau in 1997. The event, which was a vertical strike slip even appeared anomalous in nature due to the lack of large aftershocks and had an associated surface rupture of over 180 km that was identified and modeled using InSAR. The east-west orientation of the fault rupture provides excellent ground truth for latitude, but is of limited use for longitude. However, a secondary rupture occurred 50 km south of the main shock rupture trace that can provide ground truth with accuracy within 5 km. The smaller, 5-km-long secondary rupture presents a challenge for relating the deformation to a seismic event. The rupture is believed to have a thrust mechanism; the dip of the fimdt allows for some separation between the secondary rupture trace and its associated event epicenter, although not as much as is currently observed from catalog locations. Few events within the time period of the InSAR analysis are candidates for the secondary rupture. Of these, we have

  9. Measurement of Jovian decametric Io-related source location and beam shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, K.; Carr, T. D.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents new information on the locations of the Io-related sources A and C (i.e., Io-A and Io-C) and on the shapes of their emission beams on the basis of measurements of the Jovian decametric activity that was recorded by Voyager 1 and 2. In two instances, the same dynamic spectral arc event in the recorded data of the two spacecraft was recorded, providing in each case an opportunity to observe the same emission beam over a wide range of frequencies from two considerably different directions. The propagation-corrected centroid times of each of the Voyager-1 arcs are found to be coincident with those of the corresponding Voyager-2 arc in a particular frequency range, but not at other frequencies. The hypothesis that emission beams are in the form of thin, almost conical sheets, the cone opening angle decreasing with increasing frequency, is confirmed. It is demonstrated that both the Io-A and Io-C sources were located near the northern foot of the magnetic flux tube that was connected to Io.

  10. Using physics-based priors in a Bayesian algorithm to enhance infrasound source location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcillo, Omar; Arrowsmith, Stephen; Whitaker, Rod; Anderson, Dale; Nippress, Alexandra; Green, David N.; Drob, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    We show improvements in the precision of the Bayesian infrasound source localization (BISL) method by incorporating semi-empirical model-based prior information. Given a set of backazimuths and delay times at ≥2 arrays, BISL scans a parameter space (that comprises the horizontal coordinates, celerity and origin time) for the most likely solution. A key element of BISL is its flexibility; the method allows the incorporation of prior information to constrain the parameters. Our research focuses on generating model-based propagation catalogues using a comprehensive set of atmospheric scenarios, extracting celerity distributions based on range and azimuth from the catalogues and using these distributions as prior probability density functions to enhance the location solution from BISL. To illustrate the improvements in source location precision, we compare the BISL results computed using uniform celerity distribution priors with those using enhanced priors; as applied to: (1) a set of events recorded across a regional network and (2) a large accidental chemical explosion recorded by six infrasound arrays in Eurasia. Finally, we discuss efforts to improve the numerical implementation of BISL by expanding the parameter space to cover a richer set of parameters that can include station-specific celerity distributions.

  11. Solving seismological problems using SGRAPH program: I-source parameters and hypocentral location

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelwahed, Mohamed F.

    2012-09-26

    SGRAPH program is considered one of the seismological programs that maintain seismic data. SGRAPH is considered unique for being able to read a wide range of data formats and manipulate complementary tools in different seismological subjects in a stand-alone Windows-based application. SGRAPH efficiently performs the basic waveform analysis and solves advanced seismological problems. The graphical user interface (GUI) utilities and the Windows facilities such as, dialog boxes, menus, and toolbars simplified the user interaction with data. SGRAPH supported the common data formats like, SAC, SEED, GSE, ASCII, and Nanometrics Y-format, and others. It provides the facilities to solve many seismological problems with the built-in inversion and modeling tools. In this paper, I discuss some of the inversion tools built-in SGRAPH related to source parameters and hypocentral location estimation. Firstly, a description of the SGRAPH program is given discussing some of its features. Secondly, the inversion tools are applied to some selected events of the Dahshour earthquakes as an example of estimating the spectral and source parameters of local earthquakes. In addition, the hypocentral location of these events are estimated using the Hypoinverse 2000 program operated by SGRAPH.

  12. Lamb wave detection and source location using fiber Bragg gratin rosettes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, Daniel C.; Thursby, Graham; Culshaw, Brian; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.

    2003-07-01

    We describe a novel fiber-optic system that is able to detect both ultrasonic Lamb waves and the location of their source. The aim of the system is to detect damage in structures such as those found in aerospace applications. Our system involves the use of fiber Bragg gratings, which may be either bonded to the surface of the material or embedded within it in order to detect the linear strain component produced by the acoustic waves. Interrogation of the Bragg gratings is carried out using a laser, which is tuned to the wavelength that gives the maximum sensitivity on the grating response curve. An amplitude modulated signal is produced by the interaction of the Lamb wave with the grating. The well defined directional properties of the Bragg grating (compared to the isotropic response of the more commonly used piezoceramic disc transducers) are used to determine the direction of propagation of the acoustic waves by mounting three of the gratings in a rosette configuration. Two suitably spaced rosettes are used to locate the source of the ultrasound by taking the intersection of the directions given by each rosette. This will become important when we extend the technique to include the study of the use of changes in the propagation properties of Lamb waves as a method of damage detection. We will present both theoretical and practical results on the interaction of the Lamb waves with the grating and the extraction of directional information from the response of the rosettes.

  13. Solving seismological problems using SGRAPH program: I-source parameters and hypocentral location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelwahed, Mohamed F.

    2012-09-01

    SGRAPH program [1] is considered one of the seismological programs that maintain seismic data. SGRAPH is considered unique for being able to read a wide range of data formats and manipulate complementary tools in different seismological subjects in a stand-alone Windows-based application. SGRAPH efficiently performs the basic waveform analysis and solves advanced seismological problems. The graphical user interface (GUI) utilities and the Windows facilities such as, dialog boxes, menus, and toolbars simplified the user interaction with data. SGRAPH supported the common data formats like, SAC, SEED, GSE, ASCII, and Nanometrics Y-format, and others. It provides the facilities to solve many seismological problems with the built-in inversion and modeling tools. In this paper, I discuss some of the inversion tools built-in SGRAPH related to source parameters and hypocentral location estimation. Firstly, a description of the SGRAPH program is given discussing some of its features. Secondly, the inversion tools are applied to some selected events of the Dahshour earthquakes as an example of estimating the spectral and source parameters of local earthquakes. In addition, the hypocentral location of these events are estimated using the Hypoinverse 2000 program [2] operated by SGRAPH.

  14. Investigation of source location determination from Magsat magnetic anomalies: The Euler method approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravat, Dhananjay

    1996-01-01

    The applicability of the Euler method of source location determination was investigated on several model situations pertinent to satellite-data scale situations as well as Magsat data of Europe. Our investigations enabled us to understand the end-member cases for which the Euler method will work with the present satellite magnetic data and also the cases for which the assumptions implicit in the Euler method will not be met by the present satellite magnetic data. These results have been presented in one invited lecture at the Indo-US workshop on Geomagnetism in Studies of the Earth's Interior in August 1994 in Pune, India, and at one presentation at the 21st General Assembly of the IUGG in July 1995 in Boulder, CO. A new method, called Anomaly Attenuation Rate (AAR) Method (based on the Euler method), was developed during this study. This method is scale-independent and is appropriate to locate centroids of semi-compact three dimensional sources of gravity and magnetic anomalies. The method was presented during 1996 Spring AGU meeting and a manuscript describing this method is being prepared for its submission to a high-ranking journal. The grant has resulted in 3 papers and presentations at national and international meetings and one manuscript of a paper (to be submitted shortly to a reputable journal).

  15. Auditory Selective Attention Reveals Preparatory Activity in Different Cortical Regions for Selection Based on Source Location and Source Pitch

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Adrian K. C.; Rajaram, Siddharth; Xia, Jing; Bharadwaj, Hari; Larson, Eric; Hämäläinen, Matti S.; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G.

    2012-01-01

    In order to extract information in a rich environment, we focus on different features that allow us to direct attention to whatever source is of interest. The cortical network deployed during spatial attention, especially in vision, is well characterized. For example, visuospatial attention engages a frontoparietal network including the frontal eye fields (FEFs), which modulate activity in visual sensory areas to enhance the representation of an attended visual object. However, relatively little is known about the neural circuitry controlling attention directed to non-spatial features, or to auditory objects or features (either spatial or non-spatial). Here, using combined magnetoencephalography (MEG) and anatomical information obtained from MRI, we contrasted cortical activity when observers attended to different auditory features given the same acoustic mixture of two simultaneous spoken digits. Leveraging the fine temporal resolution of MEG, we establish that activity in left FEF is enhanced both prior to and throughout the auditory stimulus when listeners direct auditory attention to target location compared to when they focus on target pitch. In contrast, activity in the left posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS), a region previously associated with auditory pitch categorization, is greater when listeners direct attention to target pitch rather than target location. This differential enhancement is only significant after observers are instructed which cue to attend, but before the acoustic stimuli begin. We therefore argue that left FEF participates more strongly in directing auditory spatial attention, while the left STS aids auditory object selection based on the non-spatial acoustic feature of pitch. PMID:23335874

  16. Relation Between Sprite Distribution and Source Locations of VHF Pulses Derived From JEM- GLIMS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Mitsuteru; Mihara, Masahiro; Ushio, Tomoo; Morimoto, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Adachi, Toru; Suzuki, Makoto; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Takahashi, Yukihiro

    2015-04-01

    JEM-GLIMS is continuing the comprehensive nadir observations of lightning and TLEs using optical instruments and electromagnetic wave receivers since November 2012. For the period between November 20, 2012 and November 30, 2014, JEM-GLIMS succeeded in detecting 5,048 lightning events. A total of 567 events in 5,048 lightning events were TLEs, which were mostly elves events. To identify the sprite occurrences from the transient optical flash data, it is necessary to perform the following data analysis: (1) a subtraction of the appropriately scaled wideband camera data from the narrowband camera data; (2) a calculation of intensity ratio between different spectrophotometer channels; and (3) an estimation of the polarization and CMC for the parent CG discharges using ground-based ELF measurement data. From a synthetic comparison of these results, it is confirmed that JEM-GLISM succeeded in detecting sprite events. The VHF receiver (VITF) onboard JEM-GLIMS uses two patch-type antennas separated by a 1.6-m interval and can detect VHF pulses emitted by lightning discharges in the 70-100 MHz frequency range. Using both an interferometric technique and a group delay technique, we can estimate the source locations of VHF pulses excited by lightning discharges. In the event detected at 06:41:15.68565 UT on June 12, 2014 over central North America, sprite was distributed with a horizontal displacement of 20 km from the peak location of the parent lightning emission. In this event, a total of 180 VHF pulses were simultaneously detected by VITF. From the detailed data analysis of these VHF pulse data, it is found that the majority of the source locations were placed near the area of the dim lightning emission, which may imply that the VHF pulses were associated with the in-cloud lightning current. At the presentation, we will show detailed comparison between the spatiotemporal characteristics of sprite emission and source locations of VHF pulses excited by the parent lightning

  17. Long Period (LP) volcanic earthquake source location at Merapi volcano by using dense array technics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxian, Jean Philippe; Budi Santoso, Agus; Laurin, Antoine; Subandriyo, Subandriyo; Widyoyudo, Wiku; Arshab, Ghofar

    2015-04-01

    Since 2010, Merapi shows unusual activity compared to last decades. Powerful phreatic explosions are observed; some of them are preceded by LP signals. In the literature, LP seismicity is thought to be originated within the fluid, and therefore to be representative of the pressurization state of the volcano plumbing system. Another model suggests that LP events are caused by slow, quasi-brittle, low stress-drop failure driven by transient upper-edifice deformations. Knowledge of the spatial distribution of LP events is fundamental for better understanding the physical processes occurring in the conduit, as well as for the monitoring and the improvement of eruption forecasting. LP events recorded at Merapi have a spectral content dominated by frequencies between 0.8 and 3 Hz. To locate the source of these events, we installed a seismic antenna composed of 4 broadband CMG-6TD Güralp stations. This network has an aperture of 300 m. It is located on the site of Pasarbubar, between 500 and 800 m from the crater rim. Two multi-parameter stations (seismic, tiltmeter, S-P) located in the same area, equipped with broadband CMG-40T Güralp sensors may also be used to complete the data of the antenna. The source of LP events is located by using different approaches. In the first one, we used a method based on the measurement of the time delays between the early beginnings of LP events for each array receiver. The observed differences of time delays obtained for each pair of receivers are compared to theoretical values calculated from the travel times computed between grid nodes, which are positioned in the structure, and each receiver. In a second approach, we estimate the slowness vector by using MUSIC algorithm applied to 3-components data. From the slowness vector, we deduce the back-azimuth and the incident angle, which give an estimation of LP source depth in the conduit. This work is part of the Domerapi project funded by French Agence Nationale de la Recherche (https

  18. Comparisons of radial plume mapping algorithms for locating gaseous emission sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chang-fu; Chang, Shih-ying

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents the simulation and field evaluation results for two mathematical algorithms applied in the horizontal radial plume mapping (HRPM) technique with optical remote sensing instruments. In the simulation study, 450 test maps with skewed distributions (i.e., bivariate lognormal distribution) were generated in a two-dimensional domain. The HRPM techniques with the smooth basis function minimization (SBFM) algorithm and non-negative least square (NNLS) algorithm were then applied to reconstruct the plumes, assuming a nine-beam scanning beam geometry. The SBFM algorithm was able to identify the peak locations better than the NNLS algorithm when the plumes were near the origin. On the other hand, the NNLS performed better when the plumes were away from the origin. In the field validation study, four experiments were conducted in an open space with the same nine-beam geometry. In each experiment, two tracer gases were released simultaneously at two different locations, and an OP-FTIR was set up to collect the IR spectra. The collected path-integrated concentration data were then used to reconstruct the source locations. The results confirm the conclusions obtained in the simulation study of a better performance from the SBFM algorithm than from the NNLS algorithm for plumes near the origin. We also developed a screening criterion to determine which algorithm results should be chosen as the final estimates in future field applications.

  19. Induced seismicity during the construction of the Gotthard Base Tunnel, Switzerland: hypocenter locations and source dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husen, Stephan; Kissling, Edi; von Deschwanden, Angela

    2013-01-01

    A series of 112 earthquakes was recorded between October 2005 and August 2007 during the excavation of the MFS Faido, the southernmost access point of the new Gotthard Base Tunnel. Earthquakes were recorded at a dense network of 11 stations, including 2 stations in the tunnel. Local magnitudes computed from Wood-Anderson-filtered horizontal component seismograms ranged from -1.0 to 2.4; the largest earthquake was strongly felt at the surface and caused considerable damage in the tunnel. Hypocenter locations obtained routinely using a regional 3-D P-wave velocity model and a constant Vp/Vs ratio 1.71 were about 2 km below the tunnel. The use of seismic velocities calibrated from a shot in the tunnel revealed that routinely obtained hypocenter locations were systematically biased to greater depth and are now relocated to be on the tunnel level. Relocation of the shot using these calibrated velocities yields a location accuracy of 25 m in longitude, 70 m in latitude, and 250 m in focal depth. Double-difference relative relocations of two clusters with highly similar waveforms showed a NW-SE striking trend that is consistent with the strike of mapped faults in the MFS Faido. Source dimensions computed using the quasidynamic model of Madariaga (Bull Seismo Soc Am 66(3):639-666, 1976) range from 50 to 170 m. Overlapping source dimensions for earthquakes within the two main clusters suggests that the same fault patch was ruptured repeatedly. The observed seismicity was likely caused by stress redistribution due to the excavation work in the MFS Faido.

  20. Accurate Source Depths and Focal Mechanisms of Shallow Earthquakes in Western South America and in the New Hebrides Island Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinn, Douglas S.; Isacks, Bryan L.

    1983-12-01

    Synthetic seismograms are matched to long-period P waveforms in order to obtain accurate depths of shallow earthquakes with known focal mechanisms. Accurate depths are obtained for a large sample of moderate-sized (6 < Ms < 7) events which produced relatively simple P waveforms and do not require intensive analysis. The estimated error in the determination of depth is about ±5 km or less for most of the events considered. The procedure is applied to two suites of events, one in South America (83 events) and one in the New Hebrides (61 events). In these two areas of contrasting styles of subduction, the accurate depths provide new information on the bending of descending plates near trenches, the seismicity and tectonics of the upper plate, and the geometry and structure of the zone of contact between the upper and descending plates. Depths of suboceanic earthquakes which occurred near the trench and which have either tensional and compressional horizontal stress axes agree well with Chapple and Forsyth's (1979) preferred model of a bending elastic-perfectly plastic plate. However, an unusually deep event occurred beneath the Fiji plateau in an area of young ocean floor supposed to have been formed by sea floor spreading processes only since late Miocene time. The calculated depth of the event, 48 km, places it below the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary derived from thermal models. Vertical cross sections through the shallow parts of the subduction zones show that most of the earthquakes with thrust faulting focal mechanisms can be interpreted to be interplate events located in a thin (<10 km thick) curved zone of contact dipping arcward or landward from the trench axis. However, a few events with focal mechanisms similar to the interplate events do not fit on the inferred thin zone of contact. These events would be accommodated by an interplate zone 15 km thick. In both subduction zones, interplate events occur at depths between about 15 and 50 km. However, the

  1. Atmospheric Transport Modelling confining potential source location of East-Asian radionuclide detections in May 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, J. Ole; Ceranna, Lars

    2016-04-01

    The radionuclide component of the International Monitoring System (IMS) to verify compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) is in place to detect tiny traces of fission products from nuclear explosions in the atmosphere. The challenge for the interpretation of IMS radionuclide data is to discriminate radionuclide sources of CTBT relevance against emissions from nuclear facilities. Remarkable activity concentrations of Ba/La-140 occurred at the IMS radionuclide stations RN 37 (Okinawa) and RN 58 (Ussurysk) mid of May 2010. In those days also an elevated Xe-133 level was measured at RN 38 (Takasaki). Additional regional measurements of radioxenon were reported in the press and further analyzed in various publications. The radionuclide analysis gives evidence for the presence of a nuclear fission source between 10 and 12 May 2010. Backward Atmospheric Transport Modelling (ATM) with HYSPLIT driven by 0.2° ECMWF meteorological data for the IMS samples indicates that, assuming a single source, a wide range of source regions is possible including the Korean Peninsula, the Sea of Japan (East Sea), and parts of China and Russia. Further confinement of the possible source location can be provided by atmospheric backtracking for the assumed sampling periods of the reported regional xenon measurements. New studies indicate a very weak seismic event at the DPRK test site on early 12 May 2010. Forward ATM for a pulse release caused by this event shows fairly good agreement with the observed radionuclide signature. Nevertheless, the underlying nuclear fission scenario remains quite unclear and speculative even if assuming a connection between the waveform and the radionuclide event.

  2. The impact of runoff generation mechanisms on the location of critical source areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyon, S.W.; McHale, M.R.; Walter, M.T.; Steenhuis, T.S.

    2006-01-01

    Identifying phosphorus (P) source areas and transport pathways is a key step in decreasing P loading to natural water systems. This study compared the effects of two modeled runoff generation processes - saturation excess and infiltration excess - on total phosphorus (TP) and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentrations in 10 catchment streams of a Catskill mountain watershed in southeastern New York. The spatial distribution of runoff from forested land and agricultural land was generated for both runoff processes; results of both distributions were consistent with Soil Conservation Service-Curve Number (SCS-CN) theory. These spatial runoff distributions were then used to simulate stream concentrations of TP and SRP through a simple equation derived from an observed relation between P concentration and land use; empirical results indicate that TP and SRP concentrations increased with increasing percentage of agricultural land. Simulated TP and SRP stream concentrations predicted for the 10 catchments were strongly affected by the assumed runoff mechanism. The modeled TP and SRP concentrations produced by saturation excess distribution averaged 31 percent higher and 42 percent higher, respectively, than those produced by the infiltration excess distribution. Misrepresenting the primary runoff mechanism could not only produce erroneous concentrations, it could fail to correctly locate critical source areas for implementation of best management practices. Thus, identification of the primary runoff mechanism is critical in selection of appropriate models in the mitigation of nonpoint source pollution. Correct representation of runoff processes is also critical in the future development of biogeochemical transport models, especially those that address nutrient fluxes.

  3. Outbreaks source: A new mathematical approach to identify their possible location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscema, Massimo; Grossi, Enzo; Breda, Marco; Jefferson, Tom

    2009-11-01

    Classical epidemiology has generally relied on the description and explanation of the occurrence of infectious diseases in relation to time occurrence of events rather than to place of occurrence. In recent times, computer generated dot maps have facilitated the modeling of the spread of infectious epidemic diseases either with classical statistics approaches or with artificial “intelligent systems”. Few attempts, however, have been made so far to identify the origin of the epidemic spread rather than its evolution by mathematical topology methods. We report on the use of a new artificial intelligence method (the H-PST Algorithm) and we compare this new technique with other well known algorithms to identify the source of three examples of infectious disease outbreaks derived from literature. The H-PST algorithm is a new system able to project a distances matrix of points (events) into a bi-dimensional space, with the generation of a new point, named hidden unit. This new hidden unit deforms the original Euclidean space and transforms it into a new space (cognitive space). The cost function of this transformation is the minimization of the differences between the original distance matrix among the assigned points and the distance matrix of the same points projected into the bi-dimensional map (or any different set of constraints). For many reasons we will discuss, the position of the hidden unit shows to target the outbreak source in many epidemics much better than the other classic algorithms specifically targeted for this task. Compared with main algorithms known in the location theory, the hidden unit was within yards of the outbreak source in the first example (the 2007 epidemic of Chikungunya fever in Italy). The hidden unit was located in the river between the two village epicentres of the spread exactly where the index case was living. Equally in the second (the 1967 foot and mouth disease epidemic in England), and the third (1854 London Cholera epidemic

  4. Stress Tolerance Variations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains from Diverse Ecological Sources and Geographical Locations

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yan-Lin; Wang, Shi-An

    2015-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a platform organism for bioethanol production from various feedstocks and robust strains are desirable for efficient fermentation because yeast cells inevitably encounter stressors during the process. Recently, diverse S. cerevisiae lineages were identified, which provided novel resources for understanding stress tolerance variations and related shaping factors in the yeast. This study characterized the tolerance of diverse S. cerevisiae strains to the stressors of high ethanol concentrations, temperature shocks, and osmotic stress. The results showed that the isolates from human-associated environments overall presented a higher level of stress tolerance compared with those from forests spared anthropogenic influences. Statistical analyses indicated that the variations of stress tolerance were significantly correlated with both ecological sources and geographical locations of the strains. This study provides guidelines for selection of robust S. cerevisiae strains for bioethanol production from nature. PMID:26244846

  5. Source location of long period seismicity at Volcàn de Colima, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosino, Simona; Cusano, Paola; La Rocca, Mario; Galluzzo, Danilo; Orozco-Rojas, Justo; Bretón, Mauricio; Ibáñez, Jesus; Del Pezzo, Edoardo

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents an analysis of seismicity associated with the volcanic activity of Volcàn de Colima (México) and recorded in the period November 2005-April 2006 during a field survey by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV)-Osservatorio Vesuviano, the Observatorio Vulcanologico de Colima of Colima University and the Instituto Andaluz de Geofisica, University of Granada. Three different types of volcanic earthquakes have been identified on the basis of their spectral properties: Type A (0.3-1 Hz), Type B (1-5 Hz) and Type C (3-4 Hz). Results of polarization analysis applied to Type A events show a predominance of radial motion, indicating that the wavefield comprises compressional waves (P) and shear waves polarized in the vertical plane (SV), while the signal always begins with a negative polarity. Type A, B and C earthquakes have been located using both a flat layered model and a 3D model including topography. Hypocentre distributions indicate that the source of Type A signals is very shallow and confined to a small volume lying about 1 km below the crater. In contrast, the source of Type B and C events is significantly deeper, with most hypocentres located in a volume of about 1 km3 centred at 2.5-3 km depth. A cluster analysis based on the cross-correlation among the waveforms of different events recorded at the same station was applied to Type A earthquakes. Only two clusters, which include only a small percentage of events were found, indicating that earthquake families were uncommon during the period of our survey.

  6. Accurately computing the optical pathlength difference for a michelson interferometer with minimal knowledge of the source spectrum.

    PubMed

    Milman, Mark H

    2005-12-01

    Astrometric measurements using stellar interferometry rely on precise measurement of the central white light fringe to accurately obtain the optical pathlength difference of incoming starlight to the two arms of the interferometer. One standard approach to stellar interferometry uses a channeled spectrum to determine phases at a number of different wavelengths that are then converted to the pathlength delay. When throughput is low these channels are broadened to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Ultimately the ability to use monochromatic models and algorithms in each of the channels to extract phase becomes problematic and knowledge of the spectrum must be incorporated to achieve the accuracies required of the astrometric measurements. To accomplish this an optimization problem is posed to estimate simultaneously the pathlength delay and spectrum of the source. Moreover, the nature of the parameterization of the spectrum that is introduced circumvents the need to solve directly for these parameters so that the optimization problem reduces to a scalar problem in just the pathlength delay variable. A number of examples are given to show the robustness of the approach.

  7. Explosion Source Location Study Using Collocated Acoustic and Seismic Networks in Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsky, V.; Gitterman, Y.; Arrowsmith, S.; Ben-Horin, Y.

    2013-12-01

    infrasonic phases of the two distant arrays; 2) a standard robust grid-search location procedure based on phase picks and a constant celerity for a phase (tropospheric or stratospheric) was applied; 3) a joint coordinate grid-search procedure using array waveforms and phase picks was tested, 4) the Bayesian Infrasonic Source Localization (BISL) method, incorporating semi-empirical model-based prior information, was modified for array+network configuration and applied to the ground-truth events. For this purpose we accumulated data of the former observations of the air-to-ground infrasonic phases to compute station specific ground-truth Celerity-Range Histograms (ssgtCRH) and/or model-based CRH (mbCRH), which allow to essentially improve the location results. For building the mbCRH the local meteo-data and the ray-tracing modeling in 3 available azimuth ranges, accounting seasonal variations of winds directivity (quadrants North:315-45, South: 135-225, East 45-135) have been used.

  8. Location, Location, Location!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsdell, Kristin

    2004-01-01

    Of prime importance in real estate, location is also a key element in the appeal of romances. Popular geographic settings and historical periods sell, unpopular ones do not--not always with a logical explanation, as the author discovered when she conducted a survey on this topic last year. (Why, for example, are the French Revolution and the…

  9. Seismic precursors of vulcanian explosions at Ubinas volcano (Peru) : Statistical analysis and source locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Métaxian, J.-P.; Macedo, O.; Lengline, O.; Monteiller, V.; Taipe, E.

    2009-04-01

    Ubinas stratovolcano (5672 m), located 60 km east from Arequipa city is historically the most active volcano in Peru. The present eruption began on March 25th 2006. A lava plug has been observed at the bottom of the pit crater situated in the south part of the caldeira. The eruptive activity involves very brought closer exhalations rising a few hundred meters above the crater rim to larger plumes produced by explosions that may reach up to 3 kilometers. The seismic activity is characterized by high rates of long-period (LP) event production accompanying eruptive activity and very long period (VLP) events observed at the same time as vulcanian explosions. The LP and VLP events have a spectral content respectively dominated by frequencies between 2-5 Hz and 0.3-0.9 Hz. The vulcanian explosive activity is characterized by the occurrence of LP swarm preceding most of the VLPs by about 2 hours. In some occasions, the LP swarm merges into tremor about half an hour before the explosion. LPs belonging to the same swarm have similar waveform suggesting a unique source area, which could be the conduit and/or the lava plug surface. The monitoring system includes 4 seismic stations, among which one is equipped with a broadband sensor and 2 tiltmeters. In this work we analyzed a catalogue of data including more than 40000 LP events and 130 VLP events recorded between May 2006 and December 2008. The evolution of the average number of LP events preceding explosions was computed. The variation of the LP rate is clearly diverging from the background rate ~ 0.1 days before explosions. In particular, the most energetic explosions are correlated with the biggest increases of seismicity. However this general behavior is not observed for every single explosion. A direct test is now under study in order to check if the earthquake rate can be used as an alert tool for future explosions. To locate the source of LP events belonging to the swarms, we used a method based on the measurement of

  10. Locating Groundwater Pollution Source using Breakthrough Curve Characteristics and Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, J.; Jain, A.; Srivastava, R.

    2005-12-01

    are peak concentration, time to peak concentration, the widths of the breakthrough curves at 50% and 75% of the peak concentration, and the time base of the breakthrough curve. The second ANN model employs only the first four parameters leaving out the time base. The measurement of breakthrough curve at an observation well involves very high costs in sample collection at suitable time intervals and analysis for various contaminants. The receding portions of the breakthrough curves are normally very long and excluding the time base from modeling would result in considerable cost savings. The feed-forward multi-layer perceptron (MLP) type neural networks trained using the back-propagation algorithm, are employed in this study. The ANN models for the two approaches were developed using simulated data generated for conservative pollutant transport through a homogeneous aquifer. A new approach for ANN training using back-propagation is employed that considers two different error statistics to prevent over-training and under-training of the ANNs. The preliminary results indicate that the ANNs are able to identify the location of the pollution source very efficiently from both the methods of the breakthrough curves characterization.

  11. A Review of Advancements in Particulate Matter Sampling and Analysis and its Application to Identifying Source Impacts at Receptor Locations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Time-integrated (typically 24-hr) filter-based methods (historical methods) form the underpinning of our understanding of the fate, impact of source emissions at receptor locations (source impacts), and potential health and welfare effects of particulate matter (PM) in air. Over...

  12. Locating non-volcanic tremor along the San Andreas Fault using a multiple array source imaging technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryberg, T.; Haberland, C.H.; Fuis, G.S.; Ellsworth, W.L.; Shelly, D.R.

    2010-01-01

    Non-volcanic tremor (NVT) has been observed at several subduction zones and at the San Andreas Fault (SAF). Tremor locations are commonly derived by cross-correlating envelope-transformed seismic traces in combination with source-scanning techniques. Recently, they have also been located by using relative relocations with master events, that is low-frequency earthquakes that are part of the tremor; locations are derived by conventional traveltime-based methods. Here we present a method to locate the sources of NVT using an imaging approach for multiple array data. The performance of the method is checked with synthetic tests and the relocation of earthquakes. We also applied the method to tremor occurring near Cholame, California. A set of small-aperture arrays (i.e. an array consisting of arrays) installed around Cholame provided the data set for this study. We observed several tremor episodes and located tremor sources in the vicinity of SAF. During individual tremor episodes, we observed a systematic change of source location, indicating rapid migration of the tremor source along SAF. ?? 2010 The Authors Geophysical Journal International ?? 2010 RAS.

  13. How drone flies (Eristalis tenax L., Syrphidae, Diptera) use floral guides to locate food sources.

    PubMed

    Dinkel, T; Lunau, K

    2001-09-01

    In this study we show how inexperienced syrphid flies, Eristalis tenax, orient on artificial flowers by means of floral guides. To test the effect of floral guides such as line and ring markings on the probability and speed of the location of a potential food source, we exploited the spontaneous proboscis reaction triggered by yellow colour stimuli. We tested whether and how fast the flies, when placed on the edge of a circular dummy flower, found a small central yellow spot and touched it with the proboscis extended. The flies found the central yellow spot more often and faster if guide lines from the margin to the yellow spot were present. The effect of guide lines was dependent on the colour of the dummy flower, and independent of the colour of the guide lines, except for yellow guide lines releasing the proboscis reaction. The effect of guide lines was stronger if the yellow spot was hidden in a 2 mm deep depression and thus not as easily visible to the flies. Ring guides had a significant effect on performance only when the intensity of the central yellow spot was low.

  14. Location of the Norma transient with the HEAO 1 scanning modulation collimator. [X ray source in Norma Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabbiano, G.; Gursky, H.; Schwartz, D. A.; Schwarz, J.; Bradt, H. V.; Doxsey, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    A precise position has been obtained for an X-ray transient source in Norma. The location uncertainty includes a variable star previously suggested to be the optical counterpart. This transient is associated with the steady X-ray source MX 1608-52 and probably with an X-ray burst source. A binary system containing a low-mass primary and a neutron-star or black-hole secondary of a few solar masses is consistent with the observations.

  15. Predicted mineral intake utilizing both water and forage analysis varies by source and location of livestock water in Eastern Montana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Livestock water can play an important role in contributing to mineral intake of cows grazing rangelands. Mineral analysis of both forage and water is needed to accurately assess mineral intake compared to animal requirements. Therefore, 93 pasture and water source combinations were sampled in May ...

  16. Characterization and applications of VLF/LF source locations from lightning using the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitzer, Phillip M.; Christian, Hugh J.; Stewart, Mike; Burchfield, Jeff; Podgorny, Scott; Corredor, David; Hall, John; Kuznetsov, Evgeny; Franklin, Veronica

    2013-04-01

    Arrays that detect and locate the four-dimensional spacetime positions of radiation sources from lightning have largely utilized sensors sensitive to the very high frequency (VHF) regime with ˜ 15 km baselines or very low frequency/low frequency (VLF/LF) regime with ˜ 100 km baselines. This paper details initial results from the newly developed Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array (HAMMA), consisting of Marx meters (electric field change meters) sensitive to a frequency band ˜ 1 Hz to 400 kHz. The arrival time of HAMMA waveforms due to radiation sources from lightning are used to determine the spacetime position of these sources. The locations are compared with two well-documented and operational arrays, the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) and the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA). The standard deviation of the difference between HAMMA and NLDN locations of return strokes is 305 and 266 m in x and y, respectively, while the standard deviation of the difference between HAMMA and NALMA sources is 237, 226, and 688 m in x, y and z, respectively. We further show that NLDN intracloud locations differ in horizontal distance from the corresponding HAMMA locations by a median value of 479 m. In addition, we use HAMMA source locations to map several lightning flashes in the VLF/LF and show HAMMA sources largely map out the same electrical extent as VHF sources and provide unique insights to the properties of the discharges occurring. Finally, we show that VLF/LF sources can determine the leader polarity in several example flashes but not necessarily whether a flash comes to ground. Copyright 2013 American Geophysical Union. All rights reserved.

  17. Tracking the MSL-SAM methane detection source location Through Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla-García, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    1. Introduction: The putative in situ detection of methane by Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on Curiosi-ty at Gale crater has garnered significant attention because of the potential implications for the presence of geological methane sources or indigenous Martian organisms [1, 2]. SAM reported detection of back-ground levels of atmospheric methane of mean value 0.69±0.25 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) at the 95% confidence interval (CI). Additionally, in four sequential measurements spanning a 60-sol period, SAM observed elevated levels of methane of 7.2±2.1 ppbv (95% CI), implying that Mars is episodically producing methane from an additional unknown source. There are many major unresolved questions regard-ing this detection: 1) What are the potential sources of the methane release? 2) What causes the rapid decrease in concentration? and 3) Where is the re-lease location? 4) How spatially extensive is the re-lease? 5) For how long is CH4 released? Regarding the first question, the source of methane, is so far not identified. It could be related with geo-logical process like methane release from clathrates [3], serpentinisation [4] and volcanism [5]; or due to biological activity from methanogenesis [6]. To answer the second question, the rapid decrease in concentration, it is important to note that the photo-chemical lifetime of methane is of order 100 years, much longer than the atmospheric mixing time scale, and thus the gas should tend to be well mixed except near a source or shortly after an episodic release. The observed spike of 7 ppb from the background of <1 ppb, and then the rapid return to the background lev-el could be due to a sink (destruction) or due to at-mospheric mixing. A wind mediated erosion process of ordinary quartz crystals was proposed to produce activated quartz grains, which sequester methane by forming covalent Si-C bonds. If this process is op-erational on Mars today, which some recent prelimi-nary studies on

  18. Slow Temporal Integration Enables Robust Neural Coding and Perception of a Cue to Sound Source Location

    PubMed Central

    Tollin, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, localization of sound sources in azimuth depends on sensitivity to interaural differences in sound timing (ITD) and level (ILD). Paradoxically, while typical ILD-sensitive neurons of the auditory brainstem require millisecond synchrony of excitatory and inhibitory inputs for the encoding of ILDs, human and animal behavioral ILD sensitivity is robust to temporal stimulus degradations (e.g., interaural decorrelation due to reverberation), or, in humans, bilateral clinical device processing. Here we demonstrate that behavioral ILD sensitivity is only modestly degraded with even complete decorrelation of left- and right-ear signals, suggesting the existence of a highly integrative ILD-coding mechanism. Correspondingly, we find that a majority of auditory midbrain neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (of chinchilla) effectively encode ILDs despite complete decorrelation of left- and right-ear signals. We show that such responses can be accounted for by relatively long windows of bilateral excitatory-inhibitory interaction, which we explicitly measure using trains of narrowband clicks. Neural and behavioral data are compared with the outputs of a simple model of ILD processing with a single free parameter, the duration of excitatory-inhibitory interaction. Behavioral, neural, and modeling data collectively suggest that ILD sensitivity depends on binaural integration of excitation and inhibition within a ≳3 ms temporal window, significantly longer than observed in lower brainstem neurons. This relatively slow integration potentiates a unique role for the ILD system in spatial hearing that may be of particular importance when informative ITD cues are unavailable. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In mammalian hearing, interaural differences in the timing (ITD) and level (ILD) of impinging sounds carry critical information about source location. However, natural sounds are often decorrelated between the ears by reverberation and background noise

  19. Surveillance of nasal and bladder cancer to locate sources of exposure to occupational carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Teschke, K; Morgan, M S; Checkoway, H; Franklin, G; Spinelli, J J; van Belle, G; Weiss, N S

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To locate sources of occupational exposure to nasal and bladder carcinogens for surveillance follow up in British Columbia, Canada. METHODS: Incident cases of nasal cancer (n = 48), bladder cancer (n = 105), and population based controls (n = 159) matched for sex and age, were interviewed about their jobs, exposures, and smoking histories. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for 57 occupational groups with stratified exact methods to control for age, sex, and smoking. RESULTS: Occupational groups at increased risk of nasal cancer included: textile workers (six cases, OR 7.6); miners, drillers, and blasters (six cases, OR 3.5); welders (two cases, OR 3.5); pulp and paper workers (three cases, OR 3.1); and plumbers and pipefitters (two cases, OR 3.0). Nasal cancer ORs were not increased in occupations exposed to wood dust, possibly due to low exposures in local wood industries. Strongly increased risks of bladder cancer were found for sheet metal workers (four cases, OR 5.3), miners (19 cases, OR 4.5), gardeners (six cases, OR 3.7), and hairdressers (three cases, OR 3.2). Among occupations originally considered at risk, the following had increased risks of bladder cancer: painters (four cases, OR 2.8); laundry workers (five cases, OR 2.3); chemical and petroleum workers (15 cases, OR 1.8); machinists (eight cases, OR 1.6); and textile workers (three cases, OR 1.5). CONCLUSIONS: Occupational groups with increased risks and three or more cases with similar duties were selected for surveillance follow up. For nasal cancer, these included textile workers (five were garment makers) and pulp and paper workers (three performed maintenance tasks likely to entail stainless steel welding). For bladder cancer, these included miners (12 worked underground), machinists (five worked in traditional machining), hairdressers (three had applied hair dyes), and laundry workers (three were drycleaners). PMID:9245952

  20. Source Population and Acceleration Location of Suprathermal Heavy Ions in Corotating Interaction Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filwett, R. J.; Desai, M. I.; Dayeh, M. A.; Broiles, T. W.

    2017-03-01

    We have analyzed the ∼20–320 keV nucleon‑1 suprathermal (ST) heavy ion abundances in 41 corotating interaction regions (CIRs) observed by the Wind spacecraft from 1995 January to 2008 December. Our results are: (1) the CIR Fe/CNO and NeS/CNO ratios vary with the sunspot number, with values being closer to average solar energetic particle event values during solar maxima and lower than nominal solar wind values during solar minima. The physical mechanism responsible for the depleted abundances during solar minimum remains an open question. (2) The Fe/CNO increases with energy in the 6 events that occurred during solar maximum, while no such trends are observed for the 35 events during solar minimum. (3) The Fe/CNO shows no correlation with the average solar wind speed. (4) The Fe/CNO is well correlated with the corresponding upstream ∼20–320 keV nucleon‑1 Fe/CNO and not with the solar wind Fe/O measured by ACE in 31 events. Using the correlations between the upstream ∼20–40 keV nucleon‑1 Fe/CNO and the ∼20–320 keV nucleon‑1 Fe/CNO in CIRs, we estimate that, on average, the ST particles traveled ∼2 au along the nominal Parker spiral field line, which corresponds to upper limits for the radial distance of the source or acceleration location of ∼1 au beyond Earth orbit. Our results are consistent with those obtained from recent surveys, and confirm that CIR ST heavy ions are accelerated more locally, and are at odds with the traditional viewpoint that CIR ions seen at 1 au are bulk solar wind ions accelerated between 3 and 5 au.

  1. Nature and location of the source of plasma sheet boundary layer ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elphic, R. C.; Onsager, T. G.; Thomsen, M. F.; Gosling, J. T.

    1995-01-01

    Onsager et al. (1991) have put forward a model of the formation of the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) which relies on a steady source of plasma from a spatially extended plasma sheet, together with steady equatorward and earthward ExB convection of field lines due to reconnection at a downtail neutral line. This model is a synthesis of earlier proposals and it explains such features as an electron layer exterior to the ion boundary layer, ion velocity dispersion, counter streaming beams, low-speed cutoffs in the beams. It also explains the apparent evolution of the ion beams through 'kidney bean' shaped velocity-space distributions toward quasi-isotropic shells without invoking pitch angle scattering or energy diffusion. In this paper we explore two ramifications of the model. In principle we can map, as a function of time, the downtail neutral line distance and establish whether or not it is retreating during substorm recovery. We can also reconstruct the plasma distribution function near the neutral line to see if it is most consistent with mantle or plasma sheet plasma. We perform this analysis using International Sun Earth Explorer (ISEE) Fast Plasma Experiment (FPE) data for two plasma sheet recovery events, one on March 1, 1978, and the other on April 18, 1978. On March 1, 1978, we find evidence for an initial retreat from around 110 to 160 R(sub E) in the first 15 min; little further retreat occurs thereafter. On April 18, 1978, the neutral line location ranges from as little as 40 R(sub E) tailward of the satellite to as much as 200 R(sub E), but there is no evidence for a systematic retreat. The reconstructed ion distributions for these events are most consistent with a plasma sheet origin for the March 1 case and possibly plasma mantle or low-latitude boundary layer for the April 18 case.

  2. Do Skilled Elementary Teachers Hold Scientific Conceptions and Can They Accurately Predict the Type and Source of Students' Preconceptions of Electric Circuits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jing-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Holding scientific conceptions and having the ability to accurately predict students' preconceptions are a prerequisite for science teachers to design appropriate constructivist-oriented learning experiences. This study explored the types and sources of students' preconceptions of electric circuits. First, 438 grade 3 (9 years old) students were…

  3. Identifying elements of the plumbing system beneath Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, from the source locations of very-long-period signals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Almendros, J.; Chouet, B.; Dawson, P.; Bond, T.

    2002-01-01

    We analyzed 16 seismic events recorded by the Hawaiian broad-band seismic network at Kilauca Volcano during the period September 9-26, 1999. Two distinct types of event are identified based on their spectral content, very-long-period (VLP) waveform, amplitude decay pattern and particle motion. We locate the VLP signals with a method based on analyses of semblance and particle motion. Different source regions are identified for the two event types. One source region is located at depths of ~1 km beneath the northeast edge of the Halemaumau pit crater. A second region is located at depths of ~8 km below the northwest quadrant of Kilauea caldera. Our study represents the first time that such deep sources have been identified in VLP data at Kilauea. This discovery opens the possibility of obtaining a detailed image of the location and geometry of the magma plumbing system beneath this volcano based on source locations and moment tensor inversions of VLP signals recorded by a permanent, large-aperture broad-band network.

  4. 40 CFR Table 2c to Subpart Zzzz of... - Requirements for Existing Compression Ignition Stationary RICE Located at a Major Source of HAP...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Ignition Stationary RICE Located at a Major Source of HAP Emissions and Existing Spark Ignition Stationary RICE â¤500 HP Located at a Major Source of HAP Emissions 2c Table 2c to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63... Stationary RICE Located at a Major Source of HAP Emissions and Existing Spark Ignition Stationary RICE...

  5. 40 CFR Table 2c to Subpart Zzzz of... - Requirements for Existing Compression Ignition Stationary RICE Located at a Major Source of HAP...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Ignition Stationary RICE Located at a Major Source of HAP Emissions and Existing Spark Ignition Stationary RICE ⤠500 HP Located at a Major Source of HAP Emissions 2c Table 2c to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63... Stationary RICE Located at a Major Source of HAP Emissions and Existing Spark Ignition Stationary RICE ≤...

  6. 40 CFR Table 2c to Subpart Zzzz of... - Requirements for Existing Compression Ignition Stationary RICE Located at a Major Source of HAP...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Ignition Stationary RICE Located at a Major Source of HAP Emissions and Existing Spark Ignition Stationary RICE â¤500 HP Located at a Major Source of HAP Emissions 2c Table 2c to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63... Stationary RICE Located at a Major Source of HAP Emissions and Existing Spark Ignition Stationary RICE...

  7. 40 CFR Table 2c to Subpart Zzzz of... - Requirements for Existing Compression Ignition Stationary RICE Located at a Major Source of HAP...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Ignition Stationary RICE Located at a Major Source of HAP Emissions and Existing Spark Ignition Stationary RICE ⤠500 HP Located at a Major Source of HAP Emissions 2c Table 2c to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63... Stationary RICE Located at a Major Source of HAP Emissions and Existing Spark Ignition Stationary RICE ≤...

  8. The Role of Color Cues in Facilitating Accurate and Rapid Location of Aided Symbols by Children with and without Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Krista; Carlin, Michael; Thistle, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This research examined how the color distribution of symbols within a visual aided augmentative and alternative communication array influenced the speed and accuracy with which participants with and without Down syndrome located a target picture symbol. Method: Eight typically developing children below the age of 4 years, 8 typically…

  9. A comparison of summertime secondary organic aerosol source contributions at contrasting urban locations.

    PubMed

    Stone, Elizabeth A; Zhou, Jiabin; Snyder, David C; Rutter, Andrew P; Mieritz, Mark; Schauer, James J

    2009-05-15

    Primary and secondary sources contributing to atmospheric organic aerosol during the months of July and August were quantitatively assessed in three North American urban areas: Cleveland, Ohio, and Detroit, Michigan, in the Midwest region and Riverside, California, in the Los Angeles Air Basin. Organic molecular marker species unique to primary aerosol sources and secondarytracers derived from isoprene, alpha-pinene, beta-caryophyllene, and toluene were measured using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Source contributions from motor vehicles, biomass burning, vegetative detritus, and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) were estimated using chemical mass balance (CMB) modeling. In Cleveland, primary sources accounted for 37 +/- 2% of ambient organic carbon, measured biogenic and anthropogenic secondary sources contributed 46 +/- 6%, and other unknown sources contributed 17 +/- 4%. Similarly, Detroit aerosol was determined to be 44 +/- 5% primary and 37 +/- 3% secondary, while 19 +/- 7% was unaccounted for by measured sources. In Riverside, 21 +/- 3% of organic carbon came from primary sources, 26 +/- 5% was attributed to measured secondary sources, and 53 +/- 3% came from other sources that were expected to be secondary in nature. The comparison of samples across these two regions demonstrated that summertime SOA in the Midwestern United States was substantially different from the summertime SOA in the Los Angeles Air Basin and indicated the need to exert caution when generalizing about the sources and nature of SOA across different urban areas. Furthermore, the results of this study suggestthatthe contemporary understanding of SOA sources and formation mechanisms is satisfactory to explainthe majority of SOA in the Midwest Additional SOA sources and mechanisms of formation are needed to explain the majority of SOA in the Los Angeles Air Basin.

  10. Estimation of source location and ground impedance using a hybrid multiple signal classification and Levenberg-Marquardt approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Kai-Chung; Lau, Siu-Kit; Tang, Shiu-Keung

    2016-07-01

    A microphone array signal processing method for locating a stationary point source over a locally reactive ground and for estimating ground impedance is examined in detail in the present study. A non-linear least square approach using the Levenberg-Marquardt method is proposed to overcome the problem of unknown ground impedance. The multiple signal classification method (MUSIC) is used to give the initial estimation of the source location, while the technique of forward backward spatial smoothing is adopted as a pre-processer of the source localization to minimize the effects of source coherence. The accuracy and robustness of the proposed signal processing method are examined. Results show that source localization in the horizontal direction by MUSIC is satisfactory. However, source coherence reduces drastically the accuracy in estimating the source height. The further application of Levenberg-Marquardt method with the results from MUSIC as the initial inputs improves significantly the accuracy of source height estimation. The present proposed method provides effective and robust estimation of the ground surface impedance.

  11. Efficient Location of Research Reference Sources in the Field of Dance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissinger, Pat; Jay, Danielle

    More than 45 basic dance reference research sources that would be useful to students, scholars, teachers, historians, and therapists are discussed in this bibliographic essay. Aspects of dance covered include choreography, criticism, teaching principles, aesthetic theory, dance therapy, and history. Sources are grouped by type: dictionaries and…

  12. Wave field synthesis of a virtual source located in proximity to a loudspeaker array.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Min; Choi, Jung-Woo; Kim, Yang-Hann

    2013-09-01

    For the derivation of 2.5-dimensional operator in wave field synthesis, a virtual source is assumed to be positioned far from a loudspeaker array. However, such far-field approximation inevitably results in a reproduction error when the virtual source is placed adjacent to an array. In this paper, a method is proposed to generate a virtual source close to and behind a continuous line array of loudspeakers. A driving function is derived by reducing a surface integral (Rayleigh integral) to a line integral based on the near-field assumption. The solution is then combined with the far-field formula of wave field synthesis by introducing a weighting function that can adjust the near- and far-field contribution of each driving function. This enables production of a virtual source anywhere in relation to the array. Simulations show the proposed method can reduce the reproduction error to below -18 dB, regardless of the virtual source position.

  13. Source estimates for MEG/EEG visual evoked responses constrained by multiple, retinotopically-mapped stimulus locations.

    PubMed

    Hagler, Donald J; Halgren, Eric; Martinez, Antigona; Huang, Mingxiong; Hillyard, Steven A; Dale, Anders M

    2009-04-01

    Studying the human visual system with high temporal resolution is a significant challenge due to the limitations of the available, noninvasive measurement tools. MEG and EEG provide the millisecond temporal resolution necessary for answering questions about intracortical communication involved in visual processing, but source estimation is ill-posed and unreliable when multiple; simultaneously active areas are located close together. To address this problem, we have developed a retinotopy-constrained source estimation method to calculate the time courses of activation in multiple visual areas. Source estimation was disambiguated by: (1) fixing MEG/EEG generator locations and orientations based on fMRI retinotopy and surface tessellations constructed from high-resolution MRI images; and (2) solving for many visual field locations simultaneously in MEG/EEG responses, assuming source current amplitudes to be constant or varying smoothly across the visual field. Because of these constraints on the solutions, estimated source waveforms become less sensitive to sensor noise or random errors in the specification of the retinotopic dipole models. We demonstrate the feasibility of this method and discuss future applications such as studying the timing of attentional modulation in individual visual areas.

  14. Location of odor sources and the affected population in Imperial County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, J.L.

    1981-08-01

    This report is divided into four sections. The first two sections contain general background information on Imperial County. The third section is a general discussion of odor sources in Imperial County, and the fourth maps the specific odor sources, the expected areas of perception, and the affected populations. this mapping is done for the Imperial Valley and each of the four Imperial County KGRA's (Known Geothermal Resource Areas) where odor from the development of the geothermal energy may affect population.

  15. Source location determination of Uranian kilometric radiation from ray tracing and emission lobe modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    We use an analytical fit to an emission lobe profile together with three-dimensional ray tracing to model the broad-banded smooth Uranian kilometric radiation (UKR). We assume the radiation is gyroemission from sources along magnetic field lines. Using an iterative technique that modifies the lobe function and source region, the results are compared to observations at a frequency of 481 kHz. The best-fit calculations are compared to previously published models and to recent ultraviolet (UV) observations.

  16. 43 CFR 3746.1 - Mining locations for fissionable source materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... said Atomic Energy Act, would have been locatable under such mining laws, shall, insofar as adversely...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) PUBLIC LAW 585; MULTIPLE... materials. (a) In view of the amendment of section 5(b)(7) of the Atomic Energy Act of 1946 by section...

  17. The role of cognitive switching in head-up displays. [to determine pilot ability to accurately extract information from either of two sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, E.

    1979-01-01

    The pilot's ability to accurately extract information from either one or both of two superimposed sources of information was determined. Static, aerial, color 35 mm slides of external runway environments and slides of corresponding static head-up display (HUD) symbology were used as the sources. A three channel tachistoscope was utilized to show either the HUD alone, the scene alone, or the two slides superimposed. Cognitive performance of the pilots was assessed by determining the percentage of correct answers given to two HUD related questions, two scene related questions, or one HUD and one scene related question.

  18. Fuel from wastewater : harnessing a potential energy source in Canada through the co-location of algae biofuel production to sources of effluent, heat and CO2.

    SciTech Connect

    Passell, Howard David; Whalen, Jake; Pienkos, Philip P.; O'Leary, Stephen J.; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Moreland, Barbara D.; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

    2010-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is collaborating with the National Research Council (NRC) Canada and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop a decision-support model that will evaluate the tradeoffs associated with high-latitude algae biofuel production co-located with wastewater, CO2, and waste heat. This project helps Canada meet its goal of diversifying fuel sources with algae-based biofuels. The biofuel production will provide a wide range of benefits including wastewater treatment, CO2 reuse and reduction of demand for fossil-based fuels. The higher energy density in algae-based fuels gives them an advantage over crop-based biofuels as the 'production' footprint required is much less, resulting in less water consumed and little, if any conversion of agricultural land from food to fuel production. Besides being a potential source for liquid fuel, algae have the potential to be used to generate electricity through the burning of dried biomass, or anaerobically digested to generate methane for electricity production. Co-locating algae production with waste streams may be crucial for making algae an economically valuable fuel source, and will certainly improve its overall ecological sustainability. The modeling process will address these questions, and others that are important to the use of water for energy production: What are the locations where all resources are co-located, and what volumes of algal biomass and oil can be produced there? In locations where co-location does not occur, what resources should be transported, and how far, while maintaining economic viability? This work is being funded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Biomass Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and is part of a larger collaborative effort that includes sampling, strain isolation, strain characterization and cultivation being performed by the NREL and Canada's NRC. Results from the NREL / NRC collaboration including specific

  19. 40 CFR Table 2d to Subpart Zzzz of... - Requirements for Existing Stationary RICE Located at Area Sources of HAP Emissions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... RICE Located at Area Sources of HAP Emissions 2d Table 2d to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63 Protection of... 2d Table 2d to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63—Requirements for Existing Stationary RICE Located at Area... requirements for existing stationary RICE located at area sources of HAP emissions: For each . . . You...

  20. 40 CFR Table 2d to Subpart Zzzz of... - Requirements for Existing Stationary RICE Located at Area Sources of HAP Emissions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... RICE Located at Area Sources of HAP Emissions 2d Table 2d to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63 Protection of... 2d Table 2d to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63—Requirements for Existing Stationary RICE Located at Area... requirements for existing stationary RICE located at area sources of HAP emissions: For each . . . You...

  1. 40 CFR Table 2d to Subpart Zzzz of... - Requirements for Existing Stationary RICE Located at Area Sources of HAP Emissions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... RICE Located at Area Sources of HAP Emissions 2d Table 2d to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63 Protection of... 2d Table 2d to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63—Requirements for Existing Stationary RICE Located at Area... requirements for existing stationary RICE located at area sources of HAP emissions: For each . . . You...

  2. 40 CFR Table 2d to Subpart Zzzz of... - Requirements for Existing Stationary RICE Located at Area Sources of HAP Emissions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... RICE Located at Area Sources of HAP Emissions 2d Table 2d to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63 Protection of... 2d Table 2d to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63—Requirements for Existing Stationary RICE Located at Area... requirements for existing stationary RICE located at area sources of HAP emissions: For each . . . You...

  3. Fast 3D elastic micro-seismic source location using new GPU features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Qingfeng; Wang, Yibo; Chang, Xu

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we describe new GPU features and their applications in passive seismic - micro-seismic location. Locating micro-seismic events is quite important in seismic exploration, especially when searching for unconventional oil and gas resources. Different from the traditional ray-based methods, the wave equation method, such as the method we use in our paper, has a remarkable advantage in adapting to low signal-to-noise ratio conditions and does not need a person to select the data. However, because it has a conspicuous deficiency due to its computation cost, these methods are not widely used in industrial fields. To make the method useful, we implement imaging-like wave equation micro-seismic location in a 3D elastic media and use GPU to accelerate our algorithm. We also introduce some new GPU features into the implementation to solve the data transfer and GPU utilization problems. Numerical and field data experiments show that our method can achieve a more than 30% performance improvement in GPU implementation just by using these new features.

  4. Identifying constituent spectra sources in multispectral images to quantify and locate cervical neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Kevin C.; Bambot, Shabbir

    2011-02-01

    Optical spectroscopy has been shown to be an effective method for detecting neoplasia. Guided Therapeutics has developed LightTouch, a non invasive device that uses a combination of reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy for identifying early cancer of the human cervix. The combination of the multispectral information from the two spectroscopic modalities has been shown to be an effective method to screen for cervical cancer. There has however been a relative paucity of work in identifying the individual spectral components that contribute to the measured fluorescence and reflectance spectra. This work aims to identify the constituent source spectra and their concentrations. We used non-negative matrix factorization (NNMF) numerical methods to decompose the mixed multispectral data into the constituent spectra and their corresponding concentrations. NNMF is an iterative approach that factorizes the measured data into non-negative factors. The factors are chosen to minimize the root-mean-squared residual error. NNMF has shown promise for feature extraction and identification in the fields of text mining and spectral data analysis. Since both the constituent source spectra and their corresponding concentrations are assumed to be non-negative by nature NNMF is a reasonable approach to deconvolve the measured multispectral data. Supervised learning methods were then used to determine which of the constituent spectra sources best predict the amount of neoplasia. The constituent spectra sources found to best predict neoplasia were then compared with spectra of known biological chromophores.

  5. Technique to determine location of radio sources from measurements taken on spinning spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fainberg, J.

    1979-01-01

    The procedure developed to extract average source direction and average source size from spin-modulated radio astronomy data measured on the IMP-6 spacecraft is described. Because all measurements are used, rather than just finding maxima or minima in the data, the method is very sensitive, even in the presence of large amounts of noise. The technique is applicable to all experiments with directivity characteristics. It is suitable for onboard processing on satellites to reduce the data flow to Earth. The application to spin-modulated nonpolarized radio astronomy data is made and includes the effects of noise, background, and second source interference. The analysis was tested with computer simulated data and the results agree with analytic predictions. Applications of this method with IMP-6 radio data have led to: (1) determination of source positions of traveling solar radio bursts at large distances from the Sun; (2) mapping of magnetospheric radio emissions by radio triangulation; and (3) detection of low frequency radio emissions from Jupiter and Saturn.

  6. Effect of Anisotropic Velocity Structure on Acoustic Emission Source Location during True-Triaxial Deformation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghofrani Tabari, Mehdi; Goodfellow, Sebastian; Young, R. Paul

    2016-04-01

    Although true-triaxial testing (TTT) of rocks is now more extensive worldwide, stress-induced heterogeneity due to the existence of several loading boundary effects is not usually accounted for and simplified anisotropic models are used. This study focuses on the enhanced anisotropic velocity structure to improve acoustic emission (AE) analysis for an enhanced interpretation of induced fracturing. Data from a TTT on a cubic sample of Fontainebleau sandstone is used in this study to evaluate the methodology. At different stages of the experiment the True-Triaxial Geophysical Imaging Cell (TTGIC), armed with an ultrasonic and AE monitoring system, performed several velocity surveys to image velocity structure of the sample. Going beyond a hydrostatic stress state (poro-elastic phase), the rock sample went through a non-dilatational elastic phase, a dilatational non-damaging elasto-plastic phase containing initial AE activity and finally a dilatational and damaging elasto-plastic phase up to the failure point. The experiment was divided into these phases based on the information obtained from strain, velocity and AE streaming data. Analysis of the ultrasonic velocity survey data discovered that a homogeneous anisotropic core in the center of the sample is formed with ellipsoidal symmetry under the standard polyaxial setup. Location of the transducer shots were improved by implementation of different velocity models for the sample starting from isotropic and homogeneous models going toward anisotropic and heterogeneous models. The transducer shot locations showed a major improvement after the velocity model corrections had been applied especially at the final phase of the experiment. This location improvement validated our velocity model at the final phase of the experiment consisting lower-velocity zones bearing partially saturated fractures. The ellipsoidal anisotropic velocity model was also verified at the core of the cubic rock specimen by AE event location of

  7. Location of usual source of care among children and adolescents in the US, 1997–2013

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Alan E.; Rossen, Lauren; Schoendorf, Kenneth C.; Larson, Kandyce; Olson, Lynn M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine national trends in the percentage of children whose usual source of care is at a clinic, health center, or hospital outpatient department (hereafter “clinics”) and whether trends differ by sociodemographic subpopulations. Clinics have a greater percentage of patients from vulnerable populations than do physician’s offices and trends in their use as a usual source of care have not previously been described. Study design Analysis of serial, cross-sectional, nationally representative in-person household surveys, the 1997–2013 National Health Interview Surveys, was conducted to identify children with a usual source of care (n=190,571), and the percentage receiving that care in a clinic. We used Joinpoint regression to identify changes in linear trends, and logistic regression with predictive margins to obtain per-year changes in percentages, both unadjusted and adjusted for sociodemographic factors. Interaction terms in logistic regressions were used to assess whether trends varied by sociodemographic subgroups. Results Of all children with a usual source of care, the percentage receiving that care in a clinic declined 0.44 percentage points per year (p<0.001) from 22.97% in 1997 to 19.31% in 2002. Thereafter, it increased approximately 0.57 percentage points per year (p<0.001), reaching 26.1% in 2013. Trends for some sociodemographic subgroups varied from these overall trends. No changes were observed between 2003 and 2013 for non-Hispanic black and Medicaid/SCHIP insured children. Conclusions This study shows that, although the percentage of children with a usual source of care in a clinic declined between 1997 and 2002, it has steadily increased since that time. PMID:26454575

  8. Acoustic source location in a jet-blown flap using a cross-correlation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. S.; Maus, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The acoustic source strength distribution in a turbulent flow field was measured for two far field microphones at 45 deg above and below the plane of the flap surface. A processed signal from an inclined hot-film anemometry probe was cross correlated with the signal from the appropriate far field microphone. The contribution made by the sources associated with the fluctuating pressure on the flap surface to the sound received at far field microphone was estimated by cross correlating the processed signals of microphones which were embedded in the flap surface with the far field microphone signals. In addition, detailed fluid dynamic measurements were made in the flow field of the jet flap using dual sensor hot-film anemometry probes.

  9. Locating very high energy gamma ray sources with arc minute accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akerlof, C. W.; Cawley, M. F.; Chantell, M.; Fegan, D. J.; Harris, K.; Hillas, A. M.; Jennings, D. G.; Lamb, R. C.; Lawrence, M. A.; Lang, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The angular accuracy of gamma-ray detectors is intrinsically limited by the physical processes involved in photon detection. Although a number of point-like sources were detected by the COS-B satellite, only two were unambiguously identified by time signature with counterparts at longer wavelengths. By taking advantage of the extended longitudinal structure of Very High Energy gamma-ray showers, measurements in the TeV energy range can pinpoint source coordinates to arc minute accuracy. This was demonstrated using Cerenkov air shower imaging techniques. With two telescopes in coincidence, the individual event circular probable error will be 0.13 deg. The half-cone angle of the field of view is effectively 1 deg.

  10. Can Handheld Plastic Detectors Do Both Gamma and Neutron Isotopic Identification with Directional Source Location?

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Hayes

    2008-04-18

    This paper demonstrates, through MCNPX simulations, that a compact hexagonal array of detectors can be utilized to do both gamma isotopic identification (ID) along with neutron identification while simultaneously finding the direction of the source relative to the detector array. The detector array itself is composed of seven borated polyvinyl toluene (PVT) hexagonal light pipes approximately 4 inches long and with a 1.25 inch face-to-face thickness assembled in a tight configuration. The gamma ID capability is realized through judicious windowing algorithms as is the neutron spectral unfolding. By having multiple detectors in different relative positions, directional determination of the source can be realized. By further adding multiplicity counters to the neutron counts, fission events can be measured.

  11. [Discrimination of the dynamic properties of sound source spatial location in humans (electrophysiology and psychophysics)].

    PubMed

    Al'tman, Ia A; Vaĭtulevich, S F; Petropavlovskaia, E A; Shestopalova, L B

    2010-01-01

    The spatial resolution of human auditory system has been studied while the localization of sound source has been changed according to the different temporal patterns of interaural time delay. Two experimental procedures have been run in the same group of subjects: psychophysical procedure (the transformed staircase method) and electrophysiological one (which requires recording of mismatch negativity, the auditory evoked response component). It has been established that 1) the magnitude of the mismatch negativity reflects the extent of spatial deviance of the sound source 2) the mismatch negativity is elicited even at minimal (20 micros) interaural time delays under both temporal patterns (abrupt azimuth change and gradual sound movement at various velocities) 3) the abrupt change of the sound source azimuth results in greater mismatch negativity than the gradual sound movement does, if the interaural time delay exceeds 40 micros 4) the discrimination threshold values of the interaural delay obtained in the psychophysical procedure are greater than the minimal interaural delays that elicit the mismatch negativity, with the exception of the expert listeners who has shown no significant difference.

  12. Source Apportionment of Particle Bound Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons at an Industrial Location in Agra, India

    PubMed Central

    Lakhani, Anita

    2012-01-01

    16 US EPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were quantified in total suspended ambient particulate matter (TSPM) collected from an industrial site in Agra (India) using gas chromatography. The major industrial activities in Agra are foundries that previously used coal and coke as fuel in cupola furnaces. These foundries have now switched over to natural gas. In addition, use of compressed natural gas has also been promoted and encouraged in automobiles. This study attempts to apportion sources of PAH in the ambient air and the results reflect the advantages associated with the change of fuel. The predominant PAHs in TSPM include high molecular weight (HMW) congeners BghiP, DbA, IP, and BaP. The sum of 16 priority PAHs had a mean value of 72.7 ± 4.7 ng m−3. Potential sources of PAHs in aerosols were identified using diagnostic ratios and principal component analysis. The results reflect a blend of emissions from diesel and natural gas as the major sources of PAH in the city along with contribution from emission of coal, coke, and gasoline. PMID:22606062

  13. Source apportionment of particle bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at an industrial location in Agra, India.

    PubMed

    Lakhani, Anita

    2012-01-01

    16 U.S. EPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were quantified in total suspended ambient particulate matter (TSPM) collected from an industrial site in Agra (India) using gas chromatography. The major industrial activities in Agra are foundries that previously used coal and coke as fuel in cupola furnaces. These foundries have now switched over to natural gas. In addition, use of compressed natural gas has also been promoted and encouraged in automobiles. This study attempts to apportion sources of PAH in the ambient air and the results reflect the advantages associated with the change of fuel. The predominant PAHs in TSPM include high molecular weight (HMW) congeners BghiP, DbA, IP, and BaP. The sum of 16 priority PAHs had a mean value of 72.7 ± 4.7 ng m(-3). Potential sources of PAHs in aerosols were identified using diagnostic ratios and principal component analysis. The results reflect a blend of emissions from diesel and natural gas as the major sources of PAH in the city along with contribution from emission of coal, coke, and gasoline.

  14. Argon Cluster Sputtering Source for ToF-SIMS Depth Profiling of Insulating Materials: High Sputter Rate and Accurate Interfacial Information.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoying; Liu, Bingwen; Zhao, Evan W; Jin, Ke; Du, Yingge; Neeway, James J; Ryan, Joseph V; Hu, Dehong; Zhang, Kelvin H L; Hong, Mina; Le Guernic, Solenne; Thevuthasan, Suntharampilai; Wang, Fuyi; Zhu, Zihua

    2015-08-01

    The use of an argon cluster ion sputtering source has been demonstrated to perform superiorly relative to traditional oxygen and cesium ion sputtering sources for ToF-SIMS depth profiling of insulating materials. The superior performance has been attributed to effective alleviation of surface charging. A simulated nuclear waste glass (SON68) and layered hole-perovskite oxide thin films were selected as model systems because of their fundamental and practical significance. Our results show that high sputter rates and accurate interfacial information can be achieved simultaneously for argon cluster sputtering, whereas this is not the case for cesium and oxygen sputtering. Therefore, the implementation of an argon cluster sputtering source can significantly improve the analysis efficiency of insulating materials and, thus, can expand its applications to the study of glass corrosion, perovskite oxide thin film characterization, and many other systems of interest.

  15. XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATIONS OF FIVE INTEGRAL SOURCES LOCATED TOWARD THE SCUTUM ARM

    SciTech Connect

    Bodaghee, A.; Tomsick, J. A.; Rodriguez, J.

    2012-07-01

    Results are presented for XMM-Newton observations of five hard X-ray sources discovered by INTEGRAL in the direction of the Scutum Arm. Each source received {approx}>20 ks of effective exposure time. We provide refined X-ray positions for all five targets enabling us to pinpoint the most likely counterpart in optical/infrared archives. Spectral and timing information (much of which is provided for the first time) allow us to give a firm classification for IGR J18462-0223 and to offer tentative classifications for the others. For IGR J18462-0223, we discovered a coherent pulsation period of 997 {+-} 1 s, which we attribute to the spin of a neutron star in a highly obscured (N{sub H} =2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}) high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB). This makes IGR J18462-0223 the seventh supergiant fast X-ray transient candidate with a confirmed pulsation period. IGR J18457+0244 is a highly absorbed (N{sub H} =8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}) source in which the possible detection of an iron line suggests an active galactic nucleus (AGN) of type Sey-2 situated at z = 0.07(1). A periodic signal at 4.4 ks could be a quasi-periodic oscillation which would make IGR J18457+0244 one of a handful of AGNs in which such features have been claimed, but a slowly rotating neutron star in an HMXB cannot be ruled out. IGR J18482+0049 represents a new obscured HMXB candidate with N{sub H} =4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}. We tentatively propose that IGR J18532+0416 is either an AGN or a pulsar in an HMXB system. The X-ray spectral properties of IGR J18538-0102 are consistent with the AGN classification that has been proposed for this source.

  16. Source locations for impulsive electric signals seen in the night ionosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Von Dornum, M.; Scarf, F. L.

    1989-01-01

    A mapping of the rate of occurrence of impulsive VLF noise bursts in Venus' dark low altitude ionosphere, which increases rapidly with decreasing altitude, as a function of latitude and longitude indicates enhanced occurrence rates over Atla. In a 30-sec observing period, there are impulsive signals 70 percent of the time at 160 km in the region of maximum occurrence; the occurrence rates, moreover, increase with decreasing latitude, so that the equatorial rate is of the order of 1.6 times that at 30 deg latitude. These phenomena are in keeping with lightning-generated wave sources.

  17. Arcsec source location measurements in gamma-ray astronomy from a lunar observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, David G.; Hughes, E. B.

    1990-01-01

    The physical processes typically used in the detection of high energy gamma-rays do not permit good angular resolution, which makes difficult the unambiguous association of discrete gamma-ray sources with objects emitting at other wavelengths. This problem can be overcome by placing gamma-ray detectors on the moon and using the horizon as an occulting edge to achieve arcsec resolution. For the purpose of discussion, this concept is examined for gamma rays above about 20 MeV for which pair production dominates the detection process and locally-generated nuclear gamma rays do not contribute to the background.

  18. Metamaterials-based sensor to detect and locate nonlinear elastic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Gliozzi, Antonio S.; Scalerandi, Marco; Miniaci, Marco; Bosia, Federico; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2015-10-19

    In recent years, acoustic metamaterials have attracted increasing scientific interest for very diverse technological applications ranging from sound abatement to ultrasonic imaging, mainly due to their ability to act as band-stop filters. At the same time, the concept of chaotic cavities has been recently proposed as an efficient tool to enhance the quality of nonlinear signal analysis, particularly in the ultrasonic/acoustic case. The goal of the present paper is to merge the two concepts in order to propose a metamaterial-based device that can be used as a natural and selective linear filter for the detection of signals resulting from the propagation of elastic waves in nonlinear materials, e.g., in the presence of damage, and as a detector for the damage itself in time reversal experiments. Numerical simulations demonstrate the feasibility of the approach and the potential of the device in providing improved signal-to-noise ratios and enhanced focusing on the defect locations.

  19. Beryllium-10 in Australasian tektites: Constraints on the location of the source crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, P.; Aggrey, K.; Tonzola, C.; Schnabel, C.; de Nicola, P.; Herzog, G. F.; Wasson, J. T.; Glass, B. P.; Brown, L.; Tera, F.; Middleton, R.; Klein, J.

    2004-10-01

    By using accelerator mass spectrometry we have measured the 10Be concentrations of 86 Australasian tektites. Corrected to the time of tektite production ˜0.8 My ago, the 10Be concentrations (10 6 atom/g) range from 59 for a layered tektite from Huai Sai, Thailand, to 280 for an australite from New South Wales, Australia. The average value is 143 ± 50. When tektites are sorted by country, their average measured 10Be concentrations increase slowly with increasing distance from Southeast Asia, the probable location of the tektite producing event, from 59 ± 9 for 6 layered tektites from Laos to 136 ± 20 for 20 splash-form tektites from Australia. The lowest 10Be concentrations for tektites fall on or within a contour centered off the shore of Vietnam, south of the Gulf of Tonkin (107°E; 17°N), but also encompassing two other locations in the area of northeastern Thailand previously proposed for the site of a single tektite-producing impact. The 10Be concentrations of layered tektites show only a weak anticorrelation (R ˜ -0.3) with the numbers of relict crystalline inclusions. Loosely consolidated, fine-grained terrestrial sediments or recently consolidated sedimentary rocks are the most likely precursor materials. Dilution of sediments with other kinds of rock raises problems in mixing and is not supported by petrographic data. Sedimentary columns that have the right range of 10Be concentrations occur off the coasts of places where sedimentation rates are high relative to those in the deep sea. A single impact into such a region, 15 to 300 m thick, could have propelled near-surface, high- 10Be material farthest—to Australia—while keeping the deeper-lying, low- 10Be layers closer to home. We do not rule out, however, other proposed mechanisms for tektite formation.

  20. On the location of microseismic sources in instable rock slope areas: heterogeneous vs. homogenous 3D velocity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coviello, Velio; Manconi, Andrea; Occhiena, Cristina; Arattano, Massimo; Scavia, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    Rock-falls are one of the most common and hazardous phenomena occurring in mountainous areas. The formation of cracks in rocks is often accompanied by a sudden release of energy, which propagates in form of elastic waves and can be detected by a suitable transducer array. Therefore, geophones are among the most effective monitoring devices to investigate eventual precursors of rock-fall phenomena. However, the identification of an efficient procedure to forecast rock-fall occurrence in space and time is still an open challenge. In this study, we aim at developing an efficient procedure to locate microseismic sources relevant to cracking mechanisms, and thus gather indications on eventual precursors of rock-fall phenomena. Common seismic location tools usually implement homogeneous or multilayered velocity models but, in case of high slope gradients and heavily fractured rock masses, these simplifications may lead to errors on the correct estimation of the source location. Thus, we analyzed how the consideration of 3D material properties on the propagation medium may influence the location. In the framework of the Alcotra 2007-2013 Project MASSA (Medium And Small Size rock-fall hazard Assessment), a monitoring system composed by 8 triaxial geophones was installed in 2010 at the J.A. Carrel hut (3829 m a.s.l., Matterhorn, NW Italian Alps) and during the first year of operation the network recorded more than 600 natural events that exceeded a fixed threshold [1]. Despite the harsh environmental conditions of the study area, eighteen points distributed as uniformly as possible in space were selected for hammering. The artificial source dataset of known coordinates was used to constrain a 3D heterogeneous velocity model through a Simultaneous Iterative Reconstructive Technique. In order to mitigate the intrinsic uncertainties of the inversion procedure, bootstrapping was performed to extend the dataset and a statistical analysis was issued to improve the model

  1. Determining the seismic source mechanism and location for an explosive eruption with limited observational data: Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, P.B.; Chouet, B.A.; Power, J.

    2011-01-01

    Waveform inversions of the very-long-period components of the seismic wavefield produced by an explosive eruption that occurred on 11 January, 2006 at Augustine Volcano, Alaska constrain the seismic source location to near sea level beneath the summit of the volcano. The calculated moment tensors indicate the presence of a volumetric source mechanism. Systematic reconstruction of the source mechanism shows the source consists of a sill intersected by either a sub-vertical east-west trending dike or a sub-vertical pipe and a weak single force. The trend of the dike may be controlled by the east-west trending Augustine-Seldovia arch. The data from the network of broadband sensors is limited to fourteen seismic traces, and synthetic modeling confirms the ability of the network to recover the source mechanism. The synthetic modeling also provides a guide to the expected capability of a broadband network to resolve very-long-period source mechanisms, particularly when confronted with limited observational data. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Determining the seismic source mechanism and location for an explosive eruption with limited observational data: Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Phillip B.; Chouet, Bernard A.; Power, John

    2011-02-01

    Waveform inversions of the very-long-period components of the seismic wavefield produced by an explosive eruption that occurred on 11 January, 2006 at Augustine Volcano, Alaska constrain the seismic source location to near sea level beneath the summit of the volcano. The calculated moment tensors indicate the presence of a volumetric source mechanism. Systematic reconstruction of the source mechanism shows the source consists of a sill intersected by either a sub-vertical east-west trending dike or a sub-vertical pipe and a weak single force. The trend of the dike may be controlled by the east-west trending Augustine-Seldovia arch. The data from the network of broadband sensors is limited to fourteen seismic traces, and synthetic modeling confirms the ability of the network to recover the source mechanism. The synthetic modeling also provides a guide to the expected capability of a broadband network to resolve very-long-period source mechanisms, particularly when confronted with limited observational data.

  3. The role of context, colour and location cues in socially learned novel food source preferences in starlings, Sternus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Root-Bernstein, Meredith

    2010-06-01

    Although the opportunity for errors in social learning is widely recognised, as yet little research has been directed towards understanding specific inaccuracies, biases and limitations in social learning and the mechanisms that give rise to them. In two experiments I ask how starlings, Sternus vulgaris, identify exemplars of novel feeders previously learned about socially. I find that starlings have a stronger response to feeders in the same context as that in which social learning took place, compared to identical and nonidentical feeders in a different context. Within a context that matches where social learning took place, starlings prefer feeders that show the same location and colour as the feeder demonstrated by the demonstrator starling, and show no preference when colour and location cues are dissociated. This suggests that starlings are relatively accurate social learners, since they show strong responses to novel foraging options only if they match the context, colour and location of options learned about socially, and they do so after very few trials. Furthermore, the responses of the subjects were compatible with conditioned learning-like mechanisms, which provide a useful basis for the further investigation of the origins and implications of errors in social learning.

  4. Site Characterization of the Source Physics Experiment Phase II Location Using Seismic Reflection Data

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, Emily; Snelson, Catherine M; Chipman, Veraun D; Emer, Dudley; White, Bob; Emmit, Ryan; Wright, Al; Drellack, Sigmund; Huckins-Gang, Heather; Mercadante, Jennifer; Floyd, Michael; McGowin, Chris; Cothrun, Chris; Bonal, Nedra

    2013-12-05

    An objective of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is to identify low-yield nuclear explosions from a regional distance. Low-yield nuclear explosions can often be difficult to discriminate among the clutter of natural and man-made explosive events (e.g., earthquakes and mine blasts). The SPE is broken into three phases. Phase I has provided the first of the physics-based data to test the empirical models that have been used to discriminate nuclear events. The Phase I series of tests were placed within a highly fractured granite body. The evolution of the project has led to development of Phase II, to be placed within the opposite end member of geology, an alluvium environment, thereby increasing the database of waveforms to build upon in the discrimination models. Both the granite and alluvium sites have hosted nearby nuclear tests, which provide comparisons for the chemical test data. Phase III of the SPE is yet to be determined.

  5. Source characteristics and locations of hectometric radio emissions from the northern Jovian hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    Northern Jovian hectometric (HOM) radio emissions, detected from high Jovian latitudes by the Unified Radio and Plasma Wave experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft, were observed at all Jovian longitudes. This emission was observed to be predominantly right-hand circularly polarized, but some left-hand circular polarization was observed implying the presence of O mode emissions from the northern Jovian hemisphere. Intense HOM emissions, with well-defined directions and polarizations, were often confined to similar longitudinal regions where intense HOM emissions were previously observed at low latitudes. The present analysis confirms that these northern HOM sources lie in the Jovian polar regions on magnetic field lines that pass through the Io plasma torus. The observations may be consistent with emission from either a filled cone beam or a longitudinal distribution of thin hollow cones.

  6. Effect of tides and source location on nearshore tsunami-induced currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayca, Aykut; Lynett, Patrick J.

    2016-12-01

    Here we present the results of a numerical modeling study that investigates how event-maximum tsunami-induced currents vary due to the dynamic effects of tides and wave directivity. First, analyses of tide-tsunami interaction are presented in three harbors by coupling the tsunami with the tide, and allowing the initial tsunami wave to arrive at various tidal phases. We find that tsunami-tide interaction can change the event-maximum current speed experienced in a harbor by up to 25% for the events and harbors studied, and we note that this effect is highly site-specific. Second, to evaluate the effect of wave directionality on event-maximum currents, earthquakes sources were placed throughout the Pacific, with magnitudes tuned to create the same maximum near-coast amplitude at the harbor of study. Our analysis also shows that, for the harbor and sources examined, the effect of offshore directionality and tsunami frequency content has a weak effect on the event-maximum currents experienced in the harbor. The more important dependency of event-maximum currents is the near-harbor amplitude of the wave, indicating that event-maximum currents in a harbor from a tsunami generated by a large far-field earthquake may be reasonably well predicted with only information about the predicted local maximum tsunami amplitude. This study was motivated by the hope of constructing a basis for understanding the dynamic effects of tides and wave directivity on current-based tsunami hazards in a coastal zone. The consideration of these aspects is crucial and yet challenging in the modeling of tsunami currents.

  7. Directionality of Ambient Noise on the Juan de Fuca Plate: Implications for Source Locations of the Primary and Secondary Microseism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Ritzwoller, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    Based on cross-correlations computed from 61 ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) within the Juan de Fuca plate from the Cascadia Initiative experiment and 42 continental stations near the western US coast, we investigate the generation locations of the primary (11-20 sec period) and secondary (5-10 sec period) microseisms in the northern Pacific Ocean by analyzing the directionality of the microseism signals received in this region. (1) Ambient noise observed across the array is much different in the primary and secondary microseism bands, both in its azimuthal content and seasonal variation, indicating different source generation locations. (2) The principal secondary microseism signals propagate toward the east, consistent with source generation in deep water of the North Pacific, perhaps coincident with the region of body wave excitation observed by Gerstoft et al. [2008] and Landès et al. [2010]. (3) Local primary microseism sources within and near the Juan de Fuca plate are implied by observations of the azimuthal dependence of the fundamental mode Rayleigh wave amplitudes as well as observations of precursory arrivals in cross-correlations of ambient noise. The strongest local generation region is observed northwest of the Juan de Fuca plate near the coast of British Columbia perhaps near Graham Island. Weaker local sources appear to be oceanward of Vancouver Island and southern Oregon. (4) High quality Green's functions are derived from cross-correlations between deep water OBSs and continental stations proving that deep water generated signals can efficiently propagate onto the continent and are well recorded by continental seismic stations, at least at periods longer than about 5 sec.In conclusion, the primary and secondary microseisms are generated at different locations, with the secondary microseism dominantly coming from deep-water sources and the source of primary microseism having a significant component in the shallow waters of the eastern Pacific

  8. Characterizing and locating air pollution sources in a complex industrial district using optical remote sensing technology and multivariate statistical modeling.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pao-Erh Paul; Yang, Jen-Chih Rena; Den, Walter; Wu, Chang-Fu

    2014-09-01

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are most frequent environmental nuisance complaints in urban areas, especially where industrial districts are nearby. Unfortunately, identifying the responsible emission sources of VOCs is essentially a difficult task. In this study, we proposed a dynamic approach to gradually confine the location of potential VOC emission sources in an industrial complex, by combining multi-path open-path Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (OP-FTIR) measurement and the statistical method of principal component analysis (PCA). Close-cell FTIR was further used to verify the VOC emission source by measuring emitted VOCs from selected exhaust stacks at factories in the confined areas. Multiple open-path monitoring lines were deployed during a 3-month monitoring campaign in a complex industrial district. The emission patterns were identified and locations of emissions were confined by the wind data collected simultaneously. N,N-Dimethyl formamide (DMF), 2-butanone, toluene, and ethyl acetate with mean concentrations of 80.0 ± 1.8, 34.5 ± 0.8, 103.7 ± 2.8, and 26.6 ± 0.7 ppbv, respectively, were identified as the major VOC mixture at all times of the day around the receptor site. As the toxic air pollutant, the concentrations of DMF in air samples were found exceeding the ambient standard despite the path-average effect of OP-FTIR upon concentration levels. The PCA data identified three major emission sources, including PU coating, chemical packaging, and lithographic printing industries. Applying instrumental measurement and statistical modeling, this study has established a systematic approach for locating emission sources. Statistical modeling (PCA) plays an important role in reducing dimensionality of a large measured dataset and identifying underlying emission sources. Instrumental measurement, however, helps verify the outcomes of the statistical modeling. The field study has demonstrated the feasibility of

  9. Deep Wideband Single Pointings and Mosaics in Radio Interferometry: How Accurately Do We Reconstruct Intensities and Spectral Indices of Faint Sources?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, U.; Bhatnagar, S.; Owen, F. N.

    2016-11-01

    Many deep wideband wide-field radio interferometric surveys are being designed to accurately measure intensities, spectral indices, and polarization properties of faint source populations. In this paper, we compare various wideband imaging methods to evaluate the accuracy to which intensities and spectral indices of sources close to the confusion limit can be reconstructed. We simulated a wideband single-pointing (C-array, L-Band (1-2 GHz)) and 46-pointing mosaic (D-array, C-Band (4-8 GHz)) JVLA observation using a realistic brightness distribution ranging from 1 μJy to 100 mJy and time-, frequency-, polarization-, and direction-dependent instrumental effects. The main results from these comparisons are (a) errors in the reconstructed intensities and spectral indices are larger for weaker sources even in the absence of simulated noise, (b) errors are systematically lower for joint reconstruction methods (such as Multi-Term Multi-Frequency-Synthesis (MT-MFS)) along with A-Projection for accurate primary beam correction, and (c) use of MT-MFS for image reconstruction eliminates Clean-bias (which is present otherwise). Auxiliary tests include solutions for deficiencies of data partitioning methods (e.g., the use of masks to remove clean bias and hybrid methods to remove sidelobes from sources left un-deconvolved), the effect of sources not at pixel centers, and the consequences of various other numerical approximations within software implementations. This paper also demonstrates the level of detail at which such simulations must be done in order to reflect reality, enable one to systematically identify specific reasons for every trend that is observed, and to estimate scientifically defensible imaging performance metrics and the associated computational complexity of the algorithms/analysis procedures. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  10. Seismic swarm associated with the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi Volcano, Alaska: Earthquake locations and source parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, N.A.; Prejean, S.; Hansen, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    An energetic seismic swarm accompanied an eruption of Kasatochi Volcano in the central Aleutian volcanic arc in August of 2008. In retrospect, the first earthquakes in the swarm were detected about 1 month prior to the eruption onset. Activity in the swarm quickly intensified less than 48 h prior to the first large explosion and subsequently subsided with decline of eruptive activity. The largest earthquake measured as moment magnitude 5.8, and a dozen additional earthquakes were larger than magnitude 4. The swarm exhibited both tectonic and volcanic characteristics. Its shear failure earthquake features were b value = 0.9, most earthquakes with impulsive P and S arrivals and higher-frequency content, and earthquake faulting parameters consistent with regional tectonic stresses. Its volcanic or fluid-influenced seismicity features were volcanic tremor, large CLVD components in moment tensor solutions, and increasing magnitudes with time. Earthquake location tests suggest that the earthquakes occurred in a distributed volume elongated in the NS direction either directly under the volcano or within 5-10 km south of it. Following the MW 5.8 event, earthquakes occurred in a new crustal volume slightly east and north of the previous earthquakes. The central Aleutian Arc is a tectonically active region with seismicity occurring in the crusts of the Pacific and North American plates in addition to interplate events. We postulate that the Kasatochi seismic swarm was a manifestation of the complex interaction of tectonic and magmatic processes in the Earth's crust. Although magmatic intrusion triggered the earthquakes in the swarm, the earthquakes failed in context of the regional stress field. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Seismic swarm associated with the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi Volcano, Alaska: earthquake locations and source parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Natalia G.; Prejean, Stephanie G.; Hansen, Roger A.

    2011-01-01

    An energetic seismic swarm accompanied an eruption of Kasatochi Volcano in the central Aleutian volcanic arc in August of 2008. In retrospect, the first earthquakes in the swarm were detected about 1 month prior to the eruption onset. Activity in the swarm quickly intensified less than 48 h prior to the first large explosion and subsequently subsided with decline of eruptive activity. The largest earthquake measured as moment magnitude 5.8, and a dozen additional earthquakes were larger than magnitude 4. The swarm exhibited both tectonic and volcanic characteristics. Its shear failure earthquake features were b value = 0.9, most earthquakes with impulsive P and S arrivals and higher-frequency content, and earthquake faulting parameters consistent with regional tectonic stresses. Its volcanic or fluid-influenced seismicity features were volcanic tremor, large CLVD components in moment tensor solutions, and increasing magnitudes with time. Earthquake location tests suggest that the earthquakes occurred in a distributed volume elongated in the NS direction either directly under the volcano or within 5-10 km south of it. Following the MW 5.8 event, earthquakes occurred in a new crustal volume slightly east and north of the previous earthquakes. The central Aleutian Arc is a tectonically active region with seismicity occurring in the crusts of the Pacific and North American plates in addition to interplate events. We postulate that the Kasatochi seismic swarm was a manifestation of the complex interaction of tectonic and magmatic processes in the Earth's crust. Although magmatic intrusion triggered the earthquakes in the swarm, the earthquakes failed in context of the regional stress field.

  12. Locating the sources of an invasive pest, grape phylloxera, using a mitochondrial DNA gene genealogy.

    PubMed

    Downie, D A

    2002-10-01

    Range expansions through human introductions have increased with global commerce and have led to the extinction of native species, alterations in community structure and pest status of the invasive species. Inferring the evolutionary history of invasive species can help to build a firmer footing for management tactics. This study used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence comparisons of samples collected from the native and introduced ranges of a pest herbivore of cultivated grapes, grape phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae Fitch, Phylloxeridae) to infer the sources and pattern of introductions into worldwide viticulture. Introductions into viticulture from its native North American range first occurred in the mid-19th century. The pattern of spread has suggested a focus of introduction into France, but independent introductions may have occurred elsewhere. The results show that the introduced population represents a limited subsample of the native genetic diversity. The data suggest that most grape phylloxera in viticulture, including all European, have originated in the northeastern USA where the grape species Vitis riparia dominates. There was evidence for independent introductions into South Africa and California. Most California haplotypes were most closely related to native grape phylloxera from the Atlantic Coast on V. vulpina. It is likely that subsequent spread from California into Australia, New Zealand and Peru has occurred.

  13. Fuel from Wastewater - Harnessing a Potential Energy Source in Canada through the Co-location of Algae Biofuel Production to Sources of Effluent, Heat and CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klise, G. T.; Roach, J. D.; Passell, H. D.; Moreland, B. D.; O'Leary, S. J.; Pienkos, P. T.; Whalen, J.

    2010-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is collaborating with the National Research Council (NRC) Canada and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop a decision-support model that will evaluate the tradeoffs associated with high-latitude algae biofuel production co-located with wastewater, CO2, and waste heat. This project helps Canada meet its goal of diversifying fuel sources with algae-based biofuels. The biofuel production will provide a wide range of benefits including wastewater treatment, CO2 reuse and reduction of demand for fossil-based fuels. The higher energy density in algae-based fuels gives them an advantage over crop-based biofuels as the “production” footprint required is much less, resulting in less water consumed and little, if any conversion of agricultural land from food to fuel production. Besides being a potential source for liquid fuel, algae have the potential to be used to generate electricity through the burning of dried biomass, or anaerobically digested to generate methane for electricity production. Co-locating algae production with waste streams may be crucial for making algae an economically valuable fuel source, and will certainly improve its overall ecological sustainability. The modeling process will address these questions, and others that are important to the use of water for energy production: What are the locations where all resources are co-located, and what volumes of algal biomass and oil can be produced there? In locations where co-location does not occur, what resources should be transported, and how far, while maintaining economic viability? This work is being funded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Biomass Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and is part of a larger collaborative effort that includes sampling, strain isolation, strain characterization and cultivation being performed by the NREL and Canada’s NRC. Results from the NREL / NRC collaboration including specific

  14. Location and source mechanism of the Karlsruhe earthquake of 24 September 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    On 24 September 2014, a ML 2.3 earthquake occurred southwest of the urban area of Karlsruhe, Germany, which was felt by a few people (maximum intensity I 0 = III). It was the first seismic event in this highly populated area since an I 0 = VII earthquake in 1948. Data of 35 permanent and temporary seismometers were analysed to localise the event and to determine the focal mechanism to compare it to previous seismicity. Restricting the data to P- and S-phases from 18 nearby stations and optimising the local earth model result in an epicentre in the southwest of the city at 48.986°N/8.302°E and in a hypocentral depth of 10 km. To calculate the focal mechanism, 22 P- and 5 SH-polarities were determined that constrain a stable left lateral strike-slip focal mechanism with a minor thrusting component and nodal planes striking NE-SW and NW-SE. The epicentre lies in the vicinity of the I 0 = VII earthquake of 1948. Both events are part of the graben-parallel flower structure beneath the Upper Rhine Graben, parallel to the active Rastatt source zone, which runs 5 km further east and included the epicentre of the 1933 Rastatt I 0 = VII earthquake. The focal mechanisms of the 2014 and 1948 earthquakes show NE-SW striking nodal planes that dip to the southeast. However, for the 1948 event, a normal faulting mechanism was determined earlier. Taking the uncertainty of the epicentre and focal mechanism in 1948 and its fault dimensions into account, both events might have happened on the same fault plane.

  15. Towards an Accurate Alignment of the VLBI Frame and the Future Gaia Optical Frame: Global VLBI Imaging Observations of a Sample of Candidate Sources for this Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourda, G.; Collioud, A.; Charlot, P.; Porcas, R.; Garrington, S.

    2012-12-01

    The space astrometry mission Gaia will construct a dense optical QSO-based celestial reference frame. For consistency between optical and radio positions, it will be important to align the Gaia and VLBI frames with the highest accuracy. However, the number of quasars that are bright at optical wavelengths (for the best position accuracy with Gaia), that have a compact core (to be detectable on VLBI scales), and that do not exhibit complex structures (to ensure a good astrometric quality) was found to be limited. It was then realized that the densification of the list of such objects was necessary. Therefore, we initiated a multi-step VLBI observational project, dedicated to finding additional suitable radio sources for aligning the two frames. The sample consists of ~450 optically- bright weak extragalactic radio sources, which have been selected by cross-correlating optical and radio catalogs. The initial observations, aimed at checking whether these sources are detectable with VLBI, and conducted with the European VLBI Network (EVN) in 2007, showed an excellent ~90% detection rate. The second step, dedicated to identifying the most point-like sources of the sample, by imaging their VLBI structures, was initiated in 2008. Approximately 25% of the detected targets were observed with the Global VLBI array (EVN+VLBA; Very Long Baseline Array) during a pilot imaging experiment, revealing that approximately 50% of them are point-like sources on VLBI scales. The rest of the sources were observed during three additional imaging experiments in March 2010, November 2010, and March 2011. In this paper, we present the results of these imaging campaigns and report plans for the final stage of the project, which will be dedicated to accurately measuring the VLBI position of the most point-like sources.

  16. Shifting primary energy source and NOx emission location with plug-in hybrid vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karman, Deniz

    2011-06-01

    Plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHEVs) present an interesting technological opportunity for using non-fossil primary energy in light duty passenger vehicles, with the associated potential for reducing air pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions, to the extent that the electric power grid is fed by non-fossil sources. This perspective, accompanying the article by Thompson et al (2011) in this issue, will touch on two other studies that are directly related: the Argonne study (Elgowainy et al 2010) and a PhD thesis from Utrecht (van Vliet 2010). Thompson et al (2011) have examined air quality effects in a case where the grid is predominantly fossil fed. They estimate a reduction of 7.42 tons/day of NOx from motor vehicles as a result of substituting electric VMTs for 20% of the light duty gasoline vehicle miles traveled. To estimate the impact of this reduction on air quality they also consider the increases in NOx emissions due to the increased load on electricity generating units. The NOx emission increases are estimated as 4.0, 5.5 and 6.3 tons for the Convenience, Battery and Night charging scenarios respectively. The net reductions are thus in the 1.1-3.4 tons/day range. The air quality modelling results presented show that the air quality impact from a ground-level ozone perspective is favorable overall, and while the effect is stronger in some localities, the difference between the three scenarios is small. This is quite significant and suggests that localization of the NOx emissions to point sources has a more pronounced effect than the absolute reductions achieved. Furthermore it demonstrates that localization of NOx emissions to electricity generating units by using PHEVs in vehicle traffic has beneficial effects for air quality not only by minimizing direct human exposure to motor vehicle emissions, but also due to reduced exposure to secondary pollutants (i.e. ozone). In an electric power grid with a smaller share of fossil fired generating units, the beneficial

  17. A comparison of feed-forward networks and maximum likelihood on a point-source location problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Andrew R.

    1991-04-01

    The problem of point source location using a multibeam focal plane staring array radar is considered. It is viewed as one in functional approximation in which the position of the source is regarded as a nonlinear function of the sampled radar image. An approximant is constructed, using a training set, which minimizes the mean square error in the position estimate. The problem of generalization is discussed. Two feed forward network architectures are considered: a particular radial basis function network which arises as a consequence of the minimum mean square error solution and is appropriate when the signal to noise ratio is 'small', and a multilayer perceptron, chosen for high signal to noise ratio approximation. The errors in the position estimates for each of these approaches are compared with a maximum likelihood position estimation method. The maximum likelihood method gives better overall performance and has the advantage that it is not dependent on the signal to noise ratio.

  18. Near-Infrared Image Reconstruction of Newborns' Brains: Robustness to Perturbations of the Source/Detector Location.

    PubMed

    Ahnen, L; Wolf, M; Hagmann, C; Sanchez, S

    2016-01-01

    The brain of preterm infants is the most vulnerable organ and can be severely injured by cerebral ischemia. We are working on a near-infrared imager to early detect cerebral ischemia. During imaging of the brain, movements of the newborn infants are inevitable and the near-infrared sensor has to be able to function on irregular geometries. Our aim is to determine the robustness of the near-infrared image reconstruction to small variations of the source and detector locations. In analytical and numerical simulations, the error estimations for a homogeneous medium agree well. The worst case estimates of errors in reduced scattering and absorption coefficient for distances of r=40 mm are acceptable for a single source-detector pair. The optical properties of an inhomogeneity representing an ischemia are reconstructed correctly within a homogeneous medium, if the error in placement is random.

  19. 40 CFR Table 2d to Subpart Zzzz of... - Requirements for Existing Compression Ignition Stationary RICE Located at Area Sources of HAP...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Ignition Stationary RICE Located at Area Sources of HAP Emissions 2d Table 2d to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63... Stationary RICE Located at Area Sources of HAP Emissions As stated in §§ 63.6600 and 63.6640, you must comply with the following emission and operating limitations for existing compression ignition stationary...

  20. 40 CFR Table 2c to Subpart Zzzz of... - Requirements for Existing Compression Ignition Stationary Rice Located at Major Sources of HAP...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Ignition Stationary Rice Located at Major Sources of HAP Emissions 2c Table 2c to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63... Stationary Rice Located at Major Sources of HAP Emissions As stated in §§ 63.6600 and 63.6640, you must comply with the following requirements for existing compression ignition stationary RICE: For...

  1. Development of a Persistent Reactive Treatment Zone for Containment of Sources Located in Lower-Permeability Strata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marble, J.; Carroll, K. C.; Brusseau, M. L.; Plaschke, M.; Brinker, F.

    2013-12-01

    Source zones located in relatively deep, low-permeability formations provide special challenges for remediation. Application of permeable reactive barriers, in-situ thermal, or electrokinetic methods would be expensive and generally impractical. In addition, the use of enhanced mass-removal approaches based on reagent injection (e.g., ISCO, enhanced-solubility reagents) is likely to be ineffective. One possible approach for such conditions is to create a persistent treatment zone for purposes of containment. This study examines the efficacy of this approach for containment and treatment of contaminants in a lower permeability zone using potassium permanganate (KMnO4) as the reactant. A localized 1,1-dichloroethene (DCE) source zone is present in a section of the Tucson International Airport Area (TIAA) Superfund Site. Characterization studies identified the source of DCE to be located in lower-permeability strata adjacent to the water table. Bench-scale studies were conducted using core material collected from boreholes drilled at the site to measure DCE concentrations and determine natural oxidant demand. The reactive zone was created by injecting ~1.7% KMnO4 solution into multiple wells screened within the lower-permeability unit. The site has been monitored for ~8 years to characterize the spatial distribution of DCE and permanganate. KMnO4 continues to persist at the site, demonstrating successful creation of a long-term reactive zone. Additionally, the footprint of the DCE contaminant plume in groundwater has decreased continuously with time. This project illustrates the application of ISCO as a reactive-treatment system for lower-permeability source zones, which appears to effectively mitigate persistent mass flux into groundwater.

  2. Locating sources of surf zone pollution: a mass budget analysis of fecal indicator bacteria at Huntington Beach, California.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Ha; Grant, Stanley B; McGee, Charles D; Sanders, Brett F; Largier, John L

    2004-05-01

    The surf zone is the unique environment where ocean meets land and a place of critical ecological, economic, and recreational importance. In the United States, this natural resource is increasingly off-limits to the public due to elevated concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria and other contaminants, the sources of which are often unknown. In this paper, we describe an approach for calculating mass budgets of pollutants in the surf zone from shoreline monitoring data. The analysis reveals that fecal indicator bacteria pollution in the surf zone at several contiguous beaches in Orange County, California, originates from well-defined locations along the shore, including the tidal outlets of the Santa Ana River and Talbert Marsh. Fecal pollution flows into the ocean from the Santa Ana River and Talbert Marsh outlets during ebb tides and from there is transported parallel to the shoreline by wave-driven surf zone currents and/or offshore tidal currents, frequently contaminating >5 km of the surf zone. The methodology developed here for locating and quantifying sources of surf zone pollution should be applicable to a wide array of contaminants and coastal settings.

  3. Spatial variability and source apportionment of PM2.5 across multiple sampling locations in southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, F.; Xie, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Chengdu Plain, which is located in the west of the Sichuan Basin, is the largest plain and the fastest-growing area in southwest China. The Chengdu Plain is considered one of the hotspot areas in China. The pollution pattern in this area is unique due to the hilly topography, humid and stagnant weather. To investigate the composition and major sources of the ambient PM2.5, a one-year observation was performed at five sites in the Chengdu Plain during August, 2013 to August, 2014. The five sites contained three urban background sites and two rural background sites. Samples were analyzed for major water-soluble ions, organic carbon (OC), element carbon (EC), and trace elements. The Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model based on the combined data from five locations was applied to identify and quantify the likely sources. The annual mean mass concentration of PM2.5 in Chengdu Plain was 81 μg·m-3 with the maximum in winter and the minimum in summer. Eight main factors were identified for the PM2.5 fraction: vehicle emission, secondary nitrate, biomass burning and waste incineration emission, secondary sulfate, Mo-related manufacturing, fugitive dust, coal combustion and industry pollution. The five-site annual mean contributions of each source were 13%, 19%, 9%, 25%, 2%, 13%, 9% and 10%,respectively, to PM2.5, while exhibiting large spatial variability. The contribution of secondary sulfate to the PM2.5 mass was largest at all sites, indicating severe secondary pollution in the region. Biomass burning and waste incineration emission made larger proportion at rural sites than that of urban sites, while the vehicle emission was larger at urban sites. The Enrichment factors for Cd, Zn, Pb, As, Cu and Mo in PM2.5 were larger than 100 indicated that those elements were largely from anthropogenic origins. Cd, As and Cu can mainly originate from nonferrous metal industry, while Mo may mainly generated from ferromolybdenum and Mo powder manufacture. The

  4. Consumption of added sugars among US children and adults by food purchase location and food source123

    PubMed Central

    Drewnowski, Adam; Rehm, Colin D

    2014-01-01

    Background: The proposed changes to the Nutrition Facts Label by the US Food and Drug Administration will include information on added sugars for the first time. Objective: The objective was to evaluate the sources of added sugars in the diets of a representative sample of US children and adults by food purchase location and food source (eg, food group). Design: This cross-sectional study among 31,035 children, adolescents, and adults aged ≥6 y from the 2003–2004, 2005–2006, 2007–2008, and 2009–2010 NHANES used data from a 24-h dietary recall to evaluate consumption of added sugars. Food locations of origin were identified as stores (supermarket or grocery store), quick-service restaurants/pizza (QSRs), full-service restaurants (FSRs), schools, and others (eg, vending machines or gifts). Added sugars consumption by food purchase location was evaluated by age, family income-to-poverty ratio, and race-ethnicity. Food group sources of added sugars were identified by using the National Cancer Institute food categories. Results: Added sugars accounted for ∼14.1% of total dietary energy. Between 65% and 76% of added sugars came from stores, 6% and 12% from QSRs, and 4% and 6% from FSRs, depending on age. Older adults (aged ≥51 y) obtained a significantly greater proportion of added sugars from stores than did younger adults. Lower-income adults obtained a significantly greater proportion of added sugars from stores than did higher-income adults. Intake of added sugars did not vary by family income among children/adolescents. Soda and energy and sports drinks were the largest food group sources of added sugars (34.4%), followed by grain desserts (12.7%), fruit drinks (8.0%), candy (6.7%), and dairy desserts (5.6%). Conclusions: Most added sugars came from foods obtained from stores. The proposed changes to the Nutrition Facts Label should capture the bulk of added sugars in the US food supply, which suggests that the recommended changes have the potential to

  5. Sodium intakes of US children and adults from foods and beverages by location of origin and by specific food source.

    PubMed

    Drewnowski, Adam; Rehm, Colin D

    2013-05-28

    Sodium intakes, from foods and beverages, of 22,852 persons in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES 2003-2008) were examined by specific food source and by food location of origin. Analyses were based on a single 24-h recall. Separate analyses were conducted for children (6-11 years of age), adolescents (12-19), and adults (20-50 and ≥51 years). Grouping of like foods (e.g., food sources) used a scheme proposed by the National Cancer Institute, which divides foods/beverages into 96 food subgroups (e.g., pizza, yeast breads or cold cuts). Food locations of origin were stores (e.g., grocery, convenience and specialty stores), quick-service restaurant/pizza (QSR), full-service restaurant (FSR), school, or other. Food locations of sodium were also evaluated by race/ethnicity amongst adults. Stores provided between 58.1% and 65.2% of dietary sodium, whereas QSR and FSR together provided between 18.9% and 31.8% depending on age. The proportion of sodium from QSR varied from 10.1% to 19.9%, whereas that from FSR varied from 3.4% to 13.3%. School meals provided 10.4% of sodium for 6-11 year olds and 6.0% for 12-19 year olds. Pizza from QSR, the top away from home food item, provided 5.4% of sodium in adolescents. QSR pizza, chicken, burgers and Mexican dishes combined provided 7.8% of total sodium in adult diets. Most sodium came from foods purchased in stores. Food manufacturers, restaurants, and grocery stores all have a role to play in reducing the amount of sodium in the American diet.

  6. Location and Source Characteristics of the January 6, 2016 North Korean Nuclear Test Constrained by InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Meng

    2017-02-01

    The interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data from the JAXA ALOS-2 satellite show possible deformation associated with the January 6, 2016 North Korean nuclear test whereas the ESA Sentinel-1A data are decorrelated. This is the first time that deformation related to a nuclear test has been measured since 1992. Here, I present two interpretations of the observed deformation: First, the deformation can be explained by a triggered landslide on the western slope of Mt. Mantap, with a displacement of up to 10 cm across a patch of 1 km2. Second, the observation may be from uplift created by the nuclear explosion. In the second interpretation, the location, depth, and cavity size can be estimated from a topography-corrected homogenous half-space model (Mogi). The preferred location of the January 6, 2016 event is 41.2993°N 129.0715°E, with an uncertainty of 100 m. The estimated depth is 420-700 m, and the cavity radius is 23-27 m. Based on empirical data and the assumption of granite as the host rock, the yield is estimated to be 11.6-24.4 kilotons of TNT, which is consistent with previous results based on seismic data. With these two interpretations, I demonstrate that InSAR data provide an independent tool to locate and estimate source characteristics of nuclear tests in North Korea. The ambiguity of interpretation is mainly due to the limited InSAR data acquisition. Future frequent data collection by current and upcoming InSAR satellites will allow full use of InSAR for nuclear monitoring and characterization in North Korea and around the world.

  7. Joint inversion of seismic velocities and source location without rays using the truncated Newton and the adjoint-state method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virieux, J.; Bretaudeau, F.; Metivier, L.; Brossier, R.

    2013-12-01

    Simultaneous inversion of seismic velocities and source parameters have been a long standing challenge in seismology since the first attempts to mitigate trade-off between very different parameters influencing travel-times (Spencer and Gubbins 1980, Pavlis and Booker 1980) since the early development in the 1970s (Aki et al 1976, Aki and Lee 1976, Crosson 1976). There is a strong trade-off between earthquake source positions, initial times and velocities during the tomographic inversion: mitigating these trade-offs is usually carried empirically (Lemeur et al 1997). This procedure is not optimal and may lead to errors in the velocity reconstruction as well as in the source localization. For a better simultaneous estimation of such multi-parametric reconstruction problem, one may take benefit of improved local optimization such as full Newton method where the Hessian influence helps balancing between different physical parameter quantities and improving the coverage at the point of reconstruction. Unfortunately, the computation of the full Hessian operator is not easily computed in large models and with large datasets. Truncated Newton (TCN) is an alternative optimization approach (Métivier et al. 2012) that allows resolution of the normal equation H Δm = - g using a matrix-free conjugate gradient algorithm. It only requires to be able to compute the gradient of the misfit function and Hessian-vector products. Traveltime maps can be computed in the whole domain by numerical modeling (Vidale 1998, Zhao 2004). The gradient and the Hessian-vector products for velocities can be computed without ray-tracing using 1st and 2nd order adjoint-state methods for the cost of 1 and 2 additional modeling step (Plessix 2006, Métivier et al. 2012). Reciprocity allows to compute accurately the gradient and the full Hessian for each coordinates of the sources and for their initial times. Then the resolution of the problem is done through two nested loops. The model update Δm is

  8. Source contributions to PM2.5 and PM10 at an urban background and a street location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keuken, M. P.; Moerman, M.; Voogt, M.; Blom, M.; Weijers, E. P.; Röckmann, T.; Dusek, U.

    2013-06-01

    The contribution of regional, urban and traffic sources to PM2.5 and PM10 in an urban area was investigated in this study. The chemical composition of PM2.5 and PM10 was measured over a year at a street location and up- and down-wind of the city of Rotterdam, the Netherlands. The 14C content in EC and OC concentrations was also determined, to distinguish the contribution from "modern" carbon (e.g., biogenic emissions, biomass burning and wildfires) and fossil fuel combustion. It was concluded that the urban background of PM2.5 and PM10 is dominated by the regional background, and that primary and secondary PM emission by urban sources contribute less than 15%. The 14C analysis revealed that 70% of OC originates from modern carbon and 30% from fossil fuel combustion. The corresponding percentages for EC are, respectively 17% and 83%. It is concluded that in particular the urban population living in street canyons with intense road traffic has potential health risks. This is due to exposure to elevated concentrations of a factor two for EC from exhaust emissions in PM2.5 and a factor 2-3 for heavy metals from brake and tyre wear, and re-suspended road dust in PM10. It follows that local air quality management may focus on local measures to street canyons with intense road traffic.

  9. Lunar Pickup Ions Observed by ARTEMIS: Spatial and Temporal Distribution and Constraints on Species and Source Locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halekas, Jasper S.; Poppe, A. R.; Delory, G. T.; Sarantos, M.; Farrell, W. M.; Angelopoulos, V.; McFadden, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    ARTEMIS observes pickup ions around the Moon, at distances of up to 20,000 km from the surface. The observed ions form a plume with a narrow spatial and angular extent, generally seen in a single energy/angle bin of the ESA instrument. Though ARTEMIS has no mass resolution capability, we can utilize the analytically describable characteristics of pickup ion trajectories to constrain the possible ion masses that can reach the spacecraft at the observation location in the correct energy/angle bin. We find that most of the observations are consistent with a mass range of approx. 20-45 amu, with a smaller fraction consistent with higher masses, and very few consistent with masses below 15 amu. With the assumption that the highest fluxes of pickup ions come from near the surface, the observations favor mass ranges of approx. 20-24 and approx. 36-40 amu. Although many of the observations have properties consistent with a surface or near-surface release of ions, some do not, suggesting that at least some of the observed ions have an exospheric source. Of all the proposed sources for ions and neutrals about the Moon, the pickup ion flux measured by ARTEMIS correlates best with the solar wind proton flux, indicating that sputtering plays a key role in either directly producing ions from the surface, or producing neutrals that subsequently become ionized.

  10. Identifying sources of ozone to three rural locations in Nevada, USA, using ancillary gas pollutants, aerosol chemistry, and mercury.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthieu B; Fine, Rebekka; Pierce, Ashley M; Gustin, Mae S

    2015-10-15

    Ozone (O3) is a secondary air pollutant of long standing and increasing concern for environmental and human health, and as such, the US Environmental Protection Agency will revise the National Ambient Air Quality Standard of 75 ppbv to ≤ 70 ppbv. Long term measurements at the Great Basin National Park (GBNP) indicate that O3 in remote areas of Nevada will exceed a revised standard. As part of the Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative, measurements of O3 and other air pollutants were made at 3 remote sites between February 2012 and March 2014, GBNP, Paradise Valley (PAVA), and Echo Peak (ECHO). Exceptionally high concentrations of each air pollutant were defined relative to each site as mixing ratios that exceeded the 90th percentile of all hourly data. Case studies were analyzed for all periods during which mean daily O3 exceeded the 90th percentile concurrently with a maximum 8-h average (MDA8) O3 that was "exceptionally high" for the site (65 ppbv at PAVA, 70 ppbv at ECHO and GBNP), and of potential regulatory significance. An MDA8 ≥ 65 ppbv occurred only five times at PAVA, whereas this occurred on 49 and 65 days at GBNP and ECHO, respectively. The overall correlation between O3 and other pollutants was poor, consistent with the large distance from significant primary emission sources. Mean CO at these locations exceeded concentrations reported for background sites in 2000. Trajectory residence time calculations and air pollutant concentrations indicate that exceedances at GBNP and ECHO were promoted by air masses originating from multiple sources, including wildfires, transport of pollution from southern California and the marine boundary layer, and transport of Asian pollution plumes. Results indicate that the State of Nevada will exceed a revised O3 standard due to sources that are beyond their control.

  11. Sources of Caffeine in Diets of US Children and Adults: Trends by Beverage Type and Purchase Location.

    PubMed

    Drewnowski, Adam; Rehm, Colin D

    2016-03-10

    New sources of caffeine, besides coffee and tea, have been introduced into the US food supply. Data on caffeine consumption age and purchase location can help guide public health policy. National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) were used to estimate population-level caffeine intakes, using data from 24-h dietary recall. First, caffeine intakes by age-group and beverage type were estimated using the most recent 2011-2012 data (n = 7456). Second, fourteen years trends in caffeine consumption, overall and by beverage type, were evaluated for adults and children. Trend analyses were conducted by age groups. Last, trends in caffeine intakes by purchase location and beverage type were estimated. In 2011-2012, children aged four to eight years consumed the least caffeine (15 mg/day), and adults aged 51-70 years consumed the most (213 mg/day). The population mean (age ≥ four years) was 135 mg/day, driven largely by coffee (90 mg/day), tea (25 mg/day), and soda (21 mg/day). For the 14-19 years and 20-34 years age-groups, energy drinks contributed 6 mg/day (9.9%) and 5 mg/day (4.5%), respectively. The bulk of caffeine came from store-bought coffee and tea. Among both children and adults combined, caffeine intakes declined from 175 mg/day (1999-2000) to 142 mg/day (2011-2012), largely driven by a drop in caffeine from soda (41 mg/day to 21 mg/day). Store-bought coffee and tea remain principal drivers of caffeine intake in the US. Sodas and energy drinks make minor contributions to overall caffeine intakes.

  12. Sources of Caffeine in Diets of US Children and Adults: Trends by Beverage Type and Purchase Location

    PubMed Central

    Drewnowski, Adam; Rehm, Colin D.

    2016-01-01

    New sources of caffeine, besides coffee and tea, have been introduced into the US food supply. Data on caffeine consumption age and purchase location can help guide public health policy. National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) were used to estimate population-level caffeine intakes, using data from 24-h dietary recall. First, caffeine intakes by age-group and beverage type were estimated using the most recent 2011–2012 data (n = 7456). Second, fourteen years trends in caffeine consumption, overall and by beverage type, were evaluated for adults and children. Trend analyses were conducted by age groups. Last, trends in caffeine intakes by purchase location and beverage type were estimated. In 2011–2012, children aged four to eight years consumed the least caffeine (15 mg/day), and adults aged 51–70 years consumed the most (213 mg/day). The population mean (age ≥ four years) was 135 mg/day, driven largely by coffee (90 mg/day), tea (25 mg/day), and soda (21 mg/day). For the 14–19 years and 20–34 years age-groups, energy drinks contributed 6 mg/day (9.9%) and 5 mg/day (4.5%), respectively. The bulk of caffeine came from store-bought coffee and tea. Among both children and adults combined, caffeine intakes declined from 175 mg/day (1999–2000) to 142 mg/day (2011–2012), largely driven by a drop in caffeine from soda (41 mg/day to 21 mg/day). Store-bought coffee and tea remain principal drivers of caffeine intake in the US. Sodas and energy drinks make minor contributions to overall caffeine intakes. PMID:26978391

  13. Location of and landing on a source of human body odour by female Culex quinquefasciatus in still and moving air

    PubMed Central

    LACEY, EMERSON S.; CARDÉ, RING T.

    2014-01-01

    The orientation to and landing on a source of human odour by female Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae) is observed in a wind tunnel without an airflow or with a laminar airflow of 0.2 m s-1. Odours from human feet are collected by ‘wearing’ clean glass beads inside a stocking and presenting beads in a Petri dish in a wind tunnel. Mosquitoes are activated by brief exposure to a 1 L min-1 jet of 4% CO2 positioned 10 cm from the release cage. In moving air at 0.2 m s-1, a mean of 3.45 ± 0.49 landings are observed in 10 min trials (5 mosquitoes per trial), whereas 6.50 ± 0.96 landings are recorded in still air. Furthermore, 1.45 ± 0.31mosquitoes are recorded on beads at any one time in moving air (a measure of individuals landing versus one landing multiple times) compared to 3.10 ± 0.31 in still air. Upwind flight to beads in moving air is demonstrated by angular headings of flight immediately prior to landing, whereas approaches to beads in still air are oriented randomly. The mean latency until first landing is 226.7 ± 17.98 s in moving air compared to 122.5 ± 24.18 in still air. Strategies used to locate a prospective host at close range in still air are considered. PMID:26472918

  14. Accurate tuning of emission of GaInAsP/InP heterostructures in multiwafer gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelarge, F.; Gaborit, F.; Gentner, J. L.

    2005-03-01

    Photoluminescence wavelength emission of Ga xIn 1-xAs yP 1-y/InP heterostructures grown in multiwafer gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy (GSMBE) is studied in detail for both bulk and multiple quantum well (MQWs) heterostructures. Excellent photoluminescence wavelength uniformity is reported in 4×2-in. configuration, demonstrating the compatibility of GSMBE process with large-scale 1.55 μm telecom laser production. A strong dependence of wavelength uniformity on group-V/group-III flux ratio is reported and analyzed quantitatively. An empirical model based on the interplay between group-V elements incorporation and gas distribution is proposed to predict the influence of AsH 3 and PH 3 fluxes on As content in the solid. This understanding opens the way to an accurate tuning of wavelength dispersion of Ga xIn 1-xAs yP 1-y/InP MQWs grown in multiwafer GSMBE system.

  15. Directionality of ambient noise on the Juan de Fuca plate: implications for source locations of the primary and secondary microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; Ritzwoller, Michael H.

    2015-04-01

    Based on cross-correlations of ambient seismic noise computed using 61 ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) within the Juan de Fuca (JdF) plate from the Cascadia Initiative experiment and 42 continental stations near the coast of the western United States, we investigate the locations of generation of the primary (11-20 s period) and secondary (5-10 s period) microseisms in the northern Pacific Ocean by analysing the directionality and seasonality of the microseism (Rayleigh wave) signals received in this region. We conclude that (1) the ambient noise observed across the array is much different in the primary and secondary microseism bands, both in its azimuthal content and seasonal variation. (2) The principal secondary microseism signals propagate towards the east, consistent with their generation in deep waters of the North Pacific, perhaps coincident both with the region of observed body wave excitation and the predicted wave-wave interaction region from recent studies. (3) The primary microseism, as indicated by observations of the azimuthal dependence of the fundamental mode Rayleigh wave as well as observations of precursory arrivals, derives significantly from the shallow waters of the eastern Pacific near to the JdF plate but also has a component generated at greater distance of unknown origin. (4) These observations suggest different physical mechanisms for generating the two microseisms: the secondary microseisms are likely to be generated by non-linear wave-wave interaction over the deep Pacific Ocean, while the primary microseism may couple directly into the solid earth locally in shallow waters from ocean gravity waves. (5) Above 5 s period, high quality empirical Green's functions are observed from cross-correlations between deep water OBSs and continental stations, which illustrates that microseisms propagate efficiently from either deep or shallow water source regions onto the continent and are well recorded by continental seismic stations.

  16. a Synoptic Climatological Approach to Assessment of Visibility and Pollutant Source Locations, Grand Canyon National Park Area.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Kathleen Valimont

    Visibility at six southwestern United States sites was investigated using a year-round synoptic climatological index to determine potential weather/air quality associations and to investigate possible pollutant source locations for the Grand Canyon National Park. Principal component analysis and k-means clustering were applied to 20 years of various surface and upper-level thermal, moisture, and flow indicators. Median fine mass and particle scattering data were then determined for the resulting categories, and the meteorological characteristics of the most and least offensive categories were evaluated by season. Seasonally high pollutant categories were most associated with upper-level height patterns which favored comparatively warm, moist, 500 mb flow from urban California areas or southern Arizona, possibly assisting movement of urban/industrial pollutants into northern Arizona. In contrast, low pollutant categories were often relatively cool and dry. Corresponding air masses arrived from "clean corridor" regions such as Canada, the Pacific Northwest, and Baja California. While cyclone cool sectors and associated precipitation were found in connection with reduced pollutant levels, warm-sector air masses and lack of precipitation were often related to elevated levels. Consecutive day analyses of meteorological conditions leading to visibility episodes emphasized the relative importance of current -day features. While the highest fine mass categories were associated with light westerly zonal flow aloft, those related to the highest levels of particle scattering showed deep troughs situated over California, resulting in warm, moist southwest winds aloft. Spatial variations in visibility data suggest that the impact of emissions from an electric-generating facility near Glen Canyon, Utah on visibility at the rim of the Grand Canyon is relatively small. Rather, data suggest southwestern urban/industrial areas are responsible. In addition, conditions which would

  17. Late Neogene Volcanic Stratigraphy in the Southern Puertecitos Volcanic Province of Baja California: Time Constraints and Vent Source Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Carrillo, P.; Martin, A.; Lopez-Martinez, M.; Cañon, E.

    2007-05-01

    during the opening of the Lower Delfin basin has been accommodated to the east. Our data support multiple source vents located offshore the central Puertecitos Volcanic Province. These pyroclastic flows may constitute useful marker horizons in marine seismic lines for reconstructing the timing and amount of extension across conjugate margins in the Lower Delfin basin.

  18. LOCATING NEARBY SOURCES OF AIR POLLUTION BY NONPARAMETRIC REGRESSION OF ATMOSPHERIC CONCENTRATIONS ON WIND DIRECTION. (R826238)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship of the concentration of air pollutants to wind direction has been determined by nonparametric regression using a Gaussian kernel. The results are smooth curves with error bars that allow for the accurate determination of the wind direction where the concentrat...

  19. Source locations of teleseismic P, SV, and SH waves observed in microseisms recorded by a large aperture seismic array in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiaoxia; Koper, Keith D.; Burlacu, Relu; Ni, Sidao; Wang, Fuyun; Zou, Changqiao; Wei, Yunhao; Gal, Martin; Reading, Anya M.

    2016-09-01

    Transversely polarized seismic waves are routinely observed in ambient seismic energy across a wide range of periods, however their origin is poorly understood because the corresponding source regions are either undefined or weakly constrained, and nearly all models of microseism generation incorporate a vertically oriented single force as the excitation mechanism. To better understand the origin of transversely polarized energy in the ambient seismic wavefield we make the first systematic attempt to locate the source regions of teleseismic SH waves observed in microseismic (2.5-20 s) noise. We focus on body waves instead of surface waves because the source regions can be constrained in both azimuth and distance using conventional array techniques. To locate microseismic sources of SH waves (as well as SV and P waves) we continuously backproject the vertical, radial, and transverse components of the ambient seismic wavefield recorded by a large-aperture array deployed in China during 2013-2014. As expected, persistent P wave sources are observed in the North Atlantic, North Pacific, and Indian Oceans, mainly at periods of 2.5-10 s, in regions with the strong ocean wave interactions needed to produce secondary microseisms. SV waves are commonly observed to originate from locations indistinguishable from the P wave sources, but with smaller signal-to-noise ratios. We also observe SH waves with about half or less the signal-to-noise ratio of SV waves. SH source regions are definitively located in deep water portions of the Pacific, away from the sloping continental shelves that are thought to be important for the generation of microseismic Love waves, but nearby regions that routinely generate teleseismic P waves. The excitation mechanism for the observed SH waves may therefore be related to the interaction of P waves with small-wavelength bathymetric features, such as seamounts and basins, through some sort of scattering process.

  20. Historical Thinking in Information Rich Environments: An Exploration of Eighth Grade Students' Actions Locating and Analyzing Digital Historical Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    List, Jonathan S.

    2012-01-01

    This study uses a bounded case to investigate how students engage in historical inquiry using digital historical sources. Drawing on research and theory related to historical thinking, digital history and new literacies, this study explores how students located historical documents in an online archive and then analyzed those documents given…

  1. 40 CFR 55.14 - Requirements that apply to OCS sources located within 25 miles of States' seaward boundaries, by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... California Requirements Applicable to OCS Sources, February 2006. (ii) Local requirements. (A)-(D) (E) San Luis Obispo County Air Pollution Control District Requirements Applicable to OCS Sources, February 2000...), 75 Hawthorne Street, San Francisco, CA 94105; and U.S. EPA Region 10 (Alaska), 1200 Sixth...

  2. Contribution of a 3D velocity model and of beam forming method for the location of microseismic sources generated in soft rock landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Floriane; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Helmstetter, Agnès; Doubre, Cécile; Gance, Julien

    2016-04-01

    Microseismicity monitoring has proven to be an important tool for a better understanding of the deformation occurring in slow-sliding landslides. However locating the seismic sources generated by a landslide remains a challenging problem due to (1) the small sizes of the landslide, (b) the heterogenous and time-changing petro-physical properties of the landslide material, (c) the complexity of the recorded signals with unclear discriminations of the wave onsets, and (d) the difficulties to install and maintain a dense seismological network on-site close to the seismic sources. We studied the seismic sources generated by the deformation of the clay-rich Super-Sauze landslide (South French Alps). Previous studies show that the most active zone is the uphill part of the landslide within a zone of 300x300m2. Two seismic antennas have been installed on the sides of this zone and a seismic campaign was conducted to build a 3D velocity model of the area. Calibration shots were performed to test the performance of the location method. We show that the use of a 3D velocity model integrated in a beam forming location method slightly improves the accuracy of the shot location epicenter. However, this approach does not help to interpret with confidence the location of the natural events because the horizontal error remains larger than 50m for more than 50% of the shots. Nevertheless, adding station corrections and constraining the grid search area with additional informations based on the signal and the landslide behavior such as SNR, seismic event typology, and surface kinematics of the landslide allow obtaining reliable results. More than 70% of the calibration shots could be located with a horizontal error of less than 40m. The lack of sensor installed in depth as well as the the lack of calibration shots realized at different depths does not permit us to identify the depth of the sources.

  3. Atomic physics measurements using an ECR ion source located on a 350-kV high-voltage platform

    SciTech Connect

    Dunford, R.W.; Berry, H.G.; Liu, C.J.; Hass, M.; Pardo, R.C.; Raphaelian, M.L.A.; Zabransky, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    We report on a new atomic physics facility at the Argonne PII ECR ion source which was built for the Uranium Upgrade of the ATLAS heavy-ion accelerator. An important feature of our ECR ion source is that it is on a high-voltage platform which provides beam energies of up to 350q keV, where q is the charge of the ion. We discuss the experimental program in progress at this ion source which includes measurements of state-selective electron capture cross sections, photon and electron spectroscopy, studies of quasi-molecular collisions, and polarization studies using an optically pumped Na target. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  4. The Mechanism of Microearthquakes Related to a Gas Storage Using Differently Constrained Source Models: A Case Study of the Háje Location, Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jechumtálová, Zuzana; Šílený, Jan; Málek, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    The resolution of a source mechanism is investigated in terms of three differently constrained source models: the moment tensor, the shear-tensile crack source model, and the double couple source model. The moment tensor (MT) is an unconstrained description of a general dipole source; the shear-tensile crack (STC) represents a slip along a fault with an off-plane component and the double couple (DC) corresponds to a simple shear slip along a fault. The inversion of body wave amplitudes is applied on microseismic events located in the vicinity of underground gas storage Háje (Czech Republic) where volume changes in the source can be expected. The orientation of the simple shear fracture component is resolved almost always well, independently of the source model used. On the other hand, the non-shear components differ largely among the source models considered, from both the model definition and robustness of the inversion. A comparison of the inversion results for the three alternative source models permits an assessment of the reliability of the non-shear components retrieved. Application of the STC model to all events appears to be the most appropriate. The analysis confirms a shear slip for three events and a tensile fracturing for other three events.

  5. Seismic Source Locations and Parameters for Sparse Networks by Matching Observed Seismograms to Semi-Empirical Synthetic Seismograms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-06

    2002. International Seismological Centre, On-line Bulletin, http://www.isc.ac.uk, Internatl. Seis. Cent., Thatcham, United Kingdom, 2001. Kanamori ...times for global earthquake location and phase identification, Geophys. J. Int. 105: 429–465, 1991. 38 Kikuchi, M. and H. Kanamori , Inversion of

  6. A linear gradient line source facilitates the use of diffusion models with high order approximation for efficient, accurate turbid sample optical properties recovery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Wei; Hung, Cheng-Hung; Liao, Jung-Li; Cheng, Nan-Yu; Hou, Ming-Feng; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that a scanning MEMS mirror can be employed to create a linear gradient line source that is equivalent to a planar source. This light source setup facilitates the use of diffusion models of increased orders of approximation having closed form solution, and thus enhance the efficiency and accuracy in sample optical properties recovery. In addition, compared with a regular planar light source, the linear gradient line source occupies much less source area and has an elevated measurement efficiency. We employed a δ-P1 diffusion equation with a closed form solution and carried out a phantom study to understand the performance of this new method in determining the absorption and scattering properties of turbid samples. Moreover, our Monte Carlo simulation results indicated that this geometry had probing depths comparable to those of the conventional diffuse reflectance measurement geometry with a source-detector separation of 3 mm. We expect that this new source setup would facilitate the investigating of superficial volumes of turbid samples in the wavelength regions where tissue absorption coefficients are comparable to scattering coefficients.

  7. Drinking water from alternative water sources: differences in beliefs, social norms and factors of perceived behavioural control across eight Australian locations.

    PubMed

    Dolnicar, S; Hurlimann, A

    2009-01-01

    Australia is facing serious challenges in the management of water in various urban and regional locations. Two popular responses to these challenges are increasing supply through alternative water sources such as recycled and desalinated water. However, significant gaps exist in our knowledge of community attitudes to these alternative sources of water, particularly for potable use. This paper reports results from an Australian study of community attitudes to alternative water sources. Sixty six qualitative interviews were held at eight locations with distinctly different water situations. This paper explores all three antecedents to the behaviour of drinking recycled water and desalinated water as postulated by the Theory of Planned Behaviour: attitudes, social norms and factors of perceived behavioural control. Key results indicate that while people hold both positive and negative beliefs (mostly cost, health and environmental concerns) about water from alternative sources, nearly all of them are willing to drink it if the water crisis were to deteriorate further. People also feel they lack knowledge and state that information from scientists would influence their decision to drink recycled and desalinated water most. Friends and relatives are most influential in preventing people from drinking recycled water. The findings reported in this paper have major implications for water policy, and will be of particular interest to water engineers. The paper raises a provocative question: Is it better to avoid public consultation in introducing water from alternative sources?

  8. The need for harmonization of methods for finding locations and magnitudes of air pollution sources using observations of concentrations and wind fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Steven R.; Young, George S.

    2017-01-01

    What do the terms "top-down", "inverse", "backwards", "adjoint", "sensor data fusion", "receptor", "source term estimation (STE)", to name several appearing in the current literature, have in common? These varied terms are used by different disciplines to describe the same general methodology - the use of observations of air pollutant concentrations and knowledge of wind fields to identify air pollutant source locations and/or magnitudes. Academic journals are publishing increasing numbers of papers on this topic. Examples of scenarios related to this growing interest, ordered from small scale to large scale, are: use of real-time samplers to quickly estimate the location of a toxic gas release by a terrorist at a large public gathering (e.g., Haupt et al., 2009);

  9. Locating the sources for cross-modal interactions and decision making during judging the visual-affected auditory intensity change.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Ge, Xiaoli; Sun, Junfeng; Tong, Shanbao

    2011-01-01

    Audiovisual interaction has been one of the most important topics in cognitive neurosciences. Visual stimuli could significantly impact the auditory perception, and vice versa. Nevertheless, how much the change in visual stimuli would influence the perception of auditory change remains to be investigated. In this paper, we designed an audiovisual experiment in which subjects were required to judge whether there is a change in the intensities of two sounds with 150 ms interval, while there are two simultaneously presented size-changed visual stimuli. Behavioral results demonstrated that incongruent audiovisual change could result in the illusory perception of the change in sound intensity. For the correctly judged trials, source analysis showed two characteristic windows post the first auditory stimulus, i.e., (i) the 160-200 ms window including the auditory P200 and visual N100 wave, which was related to audiovisual interaction and working memory of the first stimulus with localized sources in insula and agranular retrolimbic area; and (ii) the 300-400 ms window for P300 with sources in premotor cortex and caudate nucleus, which were related to later audiovisual interaction, change discrimination and working memory. These preliminary results implied two stages in the audiovisual change perception task, with the involvement of insula, agranular retrolimbic, premotor cortex and caudate nucleus.

  10. Particle sized-resolved source apportionment of primary and secondary organic tracer compounds at urban and rural locations in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Drooge, B. L.; Grimalt, J. O.

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM) was fractionated in six aerodynamic sizes, > 7.2, 7.2-3, 3-1.5, 1.5-1, 1-0.5, < 0.5 μm, using a cascade impactor. These fractions were collected at urban and rural sites during warm and cold seasons. Analysis of the organic tracer compounds by gas-chromatography coupled to mass-spectrometry showed that the composition in the smallest size fractions (< 0.5 μm) was more uniform than in the larger sizes (7.2 > PM > 0.5 μm). Thus, markers of photochemically synthesized organic compounds or combustion sources, either biomass burning or traffic emissions, were predominantly observed in the fraction < 0.5 μm whereas the larger particles were composed of mixed sources from combustion processes, vegetation emissions, soil re-suspension, road dust, urban life-style activities and photochemically synthesized organic compounds. Important seasonal differences were observed at the rural site. In the < 0.5 μm fraction these were related to strong predominance of biomass burning in the cold period and photochemically transformed biogenic organic compounds in the warm period. In the 7.2 > PM > 0.5 μm fractions the differences involved predominant soil-sourced compounds in the warm period and mixed combustion sources, photochemical products and vegetation emissions in the cold. Multivariate Curve Resolution Alternating Least Squares showed that these organic aerosols essentially originated from six source components. Four of them reflected primary emissions related with either natural products, e.g. vegetation emissions and up whirled soil dust, or anthropogenic contributions, e.g. combustion products and compounds related with urban life-style activities, mainly vehicular exhausts and tobacco smoking. Two secondary organic aerosol components were identified. They accumulated in the smallest (< 0.5 μm) or in the larger fractions (> 0.5 μm) and involved strong or mild photochemical transformations of vegetation precursor molecules

  11. Particle size-resolved source apportionment of primary and secondary organic tracer compounds at urban and rural locations in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Drooge, B. L.; Grimalt, J. O.

    2015-07-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM) was fractionated in six aerodynamic sizes, > 7.2, 7.2-3, 3-1.5, 1.5-1, 1-0.5 and < 0.5 μm, using a cascade impactor. These fractions were collected at urban and rural sites during warm and cold seasons. Organic tracer compounds, such as levoglucosan, isoprene, pinene oxidation products, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and quinones, were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. These analyses showed that the composition in the smallest size fractions (< 0.5 μm) was more uniform than in the larger sizes (7.2> PM > 0.5 μm). Thus, markers of photochemically synthesized organic compounds or combustion sources, either biomass burning or traffic emissions, were predominantly observed in the fraction < 0.5 μm, whereas the larger particles were composed of mixed sources from combustion processes, vegetation emissions, soil resuspension, road dust, urban lifestyle activities and photochemically synthesized organic compounds. Important seasonal differences were observed at the rural site. In the < 0.5 μm fraction these were related to a strong predominance of biomass burning in the cold period and photochemically transformed biogenic organic compounds in the warm period. In the 7.2 > PM > 0.5 μm fractions the differences involved predominantly soil-sourced compounds in the warm period and mixed combustion sources, photochemical products and vegetation emissions in the cold. Multivariate curve resolution/alternating least squares showed that these organic aerosols essentially originated from six source components. Four of them reflected primary emissions related to either natural products, e.g., vegetation emissions and upwhirled soil dust, or anthropogenic contributions, e.g., combustion products and compounds related to urban lifestyle activities like vehicular exhaust and tobacco smoking. Two secondary organic aerosol components were identified. They accumulated in the smallest (< 0.5 μm) or in the larger

  12. Brominated flame retardants and polychlorinated biphenyls in human breast milk from several locations in India: potential contaminant sources in a municipal dumping site.

    PubMed

    Devanathan, Gnanasekaran; Subramanian, Annamalai; Sudaryanto, Agus; Takahashi, Shin; Isobe, Tomohiko; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2012-02-01

    This study investigated the status of contamination of organohalogen compounds (OCs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and brominated flame retardant (BFRs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) in human milk samples from several locations in India. The levels of OCs were significantly higher in the milk of mothers living in and near municipal dumping site than other locations indicating that the open dumping sites for municipal wastes act as potential sources of these contaminants in India. The PCB concentrations observed in this study tended to decrease compared to those in the matched locations reported previously, probably due to the restriction of technical PCB usage in India. PBDE levels in human milk were two to three folds lower than those of PCBs in all the sampling locations investigated. Congener profiles of PCBs and PBDEs were different between samples from the dumping site mothers and general populations in other areas suggesting the presence of region-specific sources and pathways. HBCDs were detected in human milk from only two sites, with much lower concentrations and detection frequencies compared to PCBs and PBDEs. When hazard quotients (HQs) of PCBs and PBDEs were estimated for infant health risk, the HQs in some milk samples from the dumping site exceeded the threshold value (HQ>1) of PCBs, indicating the potential risk for infants in the specific site.

  13. High Velocity Jet Noise Source Location and Reduction. Task 3 - Experimental Investigation of Suppression Principles. Volume II - Parametric Testing and Source Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-01

    hardware was installed 27 ... . .. .. Chute Shallow-Chute Spoke Flow WCIS. W FS D Chute/spoke Tubo e W ut’’WiPh~ ( a)~C w ~ S ch ematict ofJt T u b o e...1.248 inch diameter choked venturi . The inner noezle air supply was metered through either a 1.1398-inch or 0.3985-inch diameter choked venturi ...diameter choked venturi meter, located as shown in Figure 4-2. The flow rate was calculated using the measured gas total temperature and pres- sure, TTVO

  14. Controls of tectonics and sediment source locations on along-strike variations in transgressive deposits on the northern California margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spinelli, G.A.; Field, M.E.

    2003-01-01

    We identify two surfaces in the shallow subsurface on the Eel River margin offshore northern California, a lowstand erosion surface, likely formed during the last glacial maximum, and an overlying surface likely formed during the most recent transgression of the shoreline. The lowstand erosion surface, which extends from the inner shelf to near the shelfbreak and from the Eel River to Trinidad Head (???80 km), truncates underlying strata on the shelf. Above the surface, inferred transgressive coastal and estuarine sedimentary units separate it from the transgressive surface on the shelf. Early in the transgression, Eel River sediment was likely both transported down the Eel Canyon and dispersed on the slope, allowing transgressive coastal sediment from the smaller Mad River to accumulate in a recognizable deposit on the shelf. The location of coastal Mad River sediment accumulation was controlled by the location of the paleo-Mad River. Throughout the remainder of the transgression, dispersed sediment from the Eel River accumulated an average of 20 m of onlapping shelf deposits. The distribution and thickness of these transgressive marine units was strongly modified by northwest-southeast trending folds. Thick sediment packages accumulated over structural lows in the lowstand surface. The thinnest sediment accumulations (0-10 m) were deposited over structural highs along faults and uplifting anticlines. The Eel margin, an active margin with steep, high sediment-load streams, has developed a thick transgressive systems tract. On this margin sediment accumulates as rapidly as the processes of uplift and downwarp locally create and destroy accommodation space. Sequence stratigraphic models of tectonically active margins should account for variations in accommodation space along margins as well as across them. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Array analysis methods for detection, classification and location of seismic sources: a first evaluation for aftershock analysis using dense temporary post-seismic array network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poiata, N.; Satriano, C.; Vilotte, J.; Bernard, P.

    2012-12-01

    Detection, separation, classification and location of distributed non stationary seismic sources in broadband noisy environment is an important problem in seismology, in particular for monitoring the high-level post-seismic activity following large subduction earthquakes, like the off-shore Maule (Mw 8.8, 2010) earthquake in Central Chile. Multiple seismic arrays, and local antenna, distributed over a region allow exploiting frequency selective coherence of the signals that arrive at widely-separated array stations, leading to improved detection, convolution blind source separation, and location of distributed non stationary sources. We present here first results on the investigation of time-frequency adaptive array analysis techniques for detection and location of broadband distributed seismic events recorded by the dense temporary seismic network (International Maule Aftershock Deployment, IMAD) installed for monitoring the high-level seismic activity following the 27 February 2010 Maule earthquake (Mw 8.8). This seismic network is characterized by a large aperture, with variable inter-station distances, corroborated with a high level of distributed near and far field seismic source activity and noise. For this study, we first extract from the post-seismic network a number of seismic arrays distributed over the region covered by this network. A first aspect is devoted to passive distributed seismic sources detection, classification and separation. We investigate a number of narrow and wide band signal analysis methods both in time and time-frequency domains for energy arrival detection and tracking, including time adaptive higher order statistics, e.g. like kurtosis, and multiband band-pass filtering, together with adaptive time-frequency transformation and extraction techniques. We demonstrate that these techniques provide superior resolution and robustness than classical STA/LTA techniques in particular in the case of distributed sources with potential signal

  16. Magnetic Data Interpretation for the Source-Edge Locations in Parts of the Tectonically Active Transition Zone of the Narmada-Son Lineament in Central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, G. K.

    2016-02-01

    The study has been carried out in the transition zone of the Narmada-Son lineament (NSL) which is seismically active with various geological complexities, upwarp movement of the mantle material into the crust through fault, fractures lamination and upwelling. NSL is one of the most prominent lineaments in central India after the Himalaya in the Indian geology. The area of investigation extends from longitude 80.25°E to 81.50°E and latitude 23.50°N to 24.37°N in the central part of the Indian continent. Different types of subsurface geological formations viz. alluvial, Gondwana, Deccan traps, Vindhyan, Mahakoshal, Granite and Gneisses groups exist in this area with varying geological ages. In this study area tectonic movement and crustal variation have been taken place during the past time and which might be reason for the variation of magnetic field. Magnetic anomaly suggests that the area has been highly disturbed which causes the Narmada-Son lineament trending in the ENE-WSW direction. Magnetic anomaly variation has been taken place due to the lithological variations subject to the changes in the geological contacts like thrusts and faults in this area. Shallow and deeper sources have been distinguished using frequency domain analysis by applying different filters. To enhance the magnetic data, various types of derivatives to identify the source-edge locations of the causative source bodies. The present study carried out the interpretation using total horizontal derivative, tilt angle derivative, horizontal tilt angle derivative and Cos (θ) derivative map to get source-edge locations. The results derived from various derivatives of magnetic data have been compared with the basement depth solutions calculated from 3D Euler deconvolution. It is suggested that total horizontal derivative, tilt angle derivative and Cos (θ) derivative are the most useful tools for identifying the multiple source edge locations of the causative bodies in this tectonically active

  17. Argon Cluster Sputtering Source for ToF-SIMS Depth Profiling of Insulating Materials: High Sputter Rate and Accurate Interfacial Information

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhaoying; Liu, Bingwen; Zhao, Evan; Jin, Ke; Du, Yingge; Neeway, James J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Hu, Dehong; Zhang, Hongliang; Hong, Mina; Le Guernic, Solenne; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Wang, Fuyi; Zhu, Zihua

    2015-08-01

    For the first time, the use of an argon cluster ion sputtering source has been demonstrated to perform superiorly relative to traditional oxygen and cesium ion sputtering sources for ToF-SIMS depth profiling of insulating materials. The superior performance has been attributed to effective alleviation of surface charging. A simulated nuclear waste glass, SON68, and layered hole-perovskite oxide thin films were selected as model systems due to their fundamental and practical significance. Our study shows that if the size of analysis areas is same, the highest sputter rate of argon cluster sputtering can be 2-3 times faster than the highest sputter rates of oxygen or cesium sputtering. More importantly, high quality data and high sputter rates can be achieved simultaneously for argon cluster sputtering while this is not the case for cesium and oxygen sputtering. Therefore, for deep depth profiling of insulating samples, the measurement efficiency of argon cluster sputtering can be about 6-15 times better than traditional cesium and oxygen sputtering. Moreover, for a SrTiO3/SrCrO3 bi-layer thin film on a SrTiO3 substrate, the true 18O/16O isotopic distribution at the interface is better revealed when using the argon cluster sputtering source. Therefore, the implementation of an argon cluster sputtering source can significantly improve the measurement efficiency of insulating materials, and thus can expand the application of ToF-SIMS to the study of glass corrosion, perovskite oxide thin films, and many other potential systems.

  18. The May 29 2008 earthquake aftershock sequence within the South Iceland Seismic Zone: Fault locations and source parameters of aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandsdottir, B.; Parsons, M.; White, R. S.; Gudmundsson, O.; Drew, J.

    2010-12-01

    The mid-Atlantic plate boundary breaks up into a series of segments across Iceland. The South Iceland Seismic Zone (SISZ) is a complex transform zone where left-lateral E-W shear between the Reykjanes Peninsula Rift Zone and the Eastern Volcanic Zone is accommodated by bookshelf faulting along N-S lateral strike-slip faults. The SISZ is also a transient feature, migrating sideways in response to the southward propagation of the Eastern Volcanic Zone. Sequences of large earthquakes (M > 6) lasting from days to years and affecting most of the seismic zone have occurred repeatedly in historical time (last 1100 years), separated by intervals of relative quiescence lasting decades to more than a century. On May 29 2008, a Mw 6.1 earthquake struck the western part of the South Iceland Seismic Zone, followed within seconds by a slightly smaller event on a second fault ~5 km further west. Aftershocks, detected by a temporal array of 11 seismometers and three permanent Icelandic Meteorological Office stations were located using an automated Coalescence Microseismic Mapping technique. The epicenters delineate two major and several smaller N-S faults as well as an E-W zone of activity stretching further west into the Reykjanes Peninsula Rift Zone. Fault plane solutions show both right lateral and oblique strike slip mechanisms along the two major N-S faults. The aftershocks deepen from 3-5 km in the north to 8-9 km in the south, suggesting that the main faults dip southwards. The faulting is interpreted to be driven by the local stress due to transform motion between two parallel segments of the divergent plate boundary crossing Iceland.

  19. Mitigation of nonpoint source pesticide contamination in a artificial wetland located at the outlet of a vineyard catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payraudeau, S.; Gregoire, C.; Imfeld, G.

    2009-04-01

    The use of artificial wetlands for mitigating nonpoint source pesticide contamination from surface water runoff of agricultural origin represents an innovative approach, whose potential should be evaluated. The EU LIFE project ArtWET assesses the application of ecological bioengineering methods based on various types of artificial wetlands throughout Europe. In this framework, this study focused on the mitigation of pesticides in a storm basin (320 m2; 1500m3; planted with Phragmites australis Cav.) collecting runoff from a vineyard catchment area (42 ha; Rouffach, Alsace, France) over the cultural period (March to October 2008), and whose the hydraulic design has been modified in order to enhance the mitigation process. Discharge measurements and water samples collections were carried out in parallel at the inflow and the outflow of the basin for 17 runoff events in order to evaluate the load of 17 pesticides. Among the target pesticides, Glyphosate, AMPA, its metabolites, and Diuron predominated and runoff event pesticides loads strongly varied throughout cultural period. The depletion of the Glyphosate and AMPA concentration values recorded over the runoff event between the inflow and outflow of the system exceeded 70 %, and reached 90% when considering the total loads over the runoff event. The high mitigation capacity observed in the storm water wetland was likely due to both degradation and sorption processes. Current efforts focus on characterizing the variability over the cropping season of the wetland system performance in terms of reduction of pesticide loads in relationship with the biogeochemical conditions within the storm basin.

  20. Spatial distribution of source locations for particulate nitrate and sulfate in the upper-midwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weixiang; Hopke, Philip K.; Zhou, Liming

    Two back-trajectory analysis methods designed to be used with multiple site data, simplified quantitative transport bias analysis (SQTBA) and residence time weighted concentration (RTWC), were applied to nitrate and sulfate concentration data from two rural sites (the Mammoth Cave National Park and the Great Smoky Mountain National Park) and five urban sites (Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, Indianapolis, and St. Louis) for an intensive investigation on the spatial patterns of origins for these two species in the upper-midwestern area. The study was made by dividing the data into five categories: all sites and all seasons, rural sites in summer, rural sites in winter, urban sites in summer, and urban sites in winter. A general conclusion was that the origins of the nitrate in these seven sites were mainly in the upper-midwestern areas, while the sulfate in these seven sites were mainly from the Ohio and Tennessee River Valley areas. The upper-midwestern areas are regions of high ammonia emissions rather than high NO x emissions. In the winter, metropolitan areas showed the highest nitrate emission potential suggesting the importance of local NO x emissions. In the summer, ammonia emissions from fertilizer application in the lower midwestern area made a significant contribution to nitrate in the rural sites of this study. The impact of the wind direction prevalence on the source spatial patterns was observed by comparing the urban and rural patterns of the summer. The differences between the results of two methods are discussed and suggestions for applying these methods are also provided.

  1. [Correlating landscape pattern with total nitrogen concentration using a location-weighted sink-source landscape index in the Haihe River Basin, China].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ran-Hao; Chen, Li-Ding; Wang, Wei; Wang, Zhao-Ming

    2012-06-01

    Understanding the effect of land cover pattern on nutrient losses is of great importance in management of water resources. The extensive application of mechanism models is limited in large-scale watersheds owing to the intensive data and calibration requirements. On the other hand, the traditional landscape indexes only take the areas and types of land cover into account, considering less about their topographic features and spatial patterns. We constructed a location-weighted landscape index (LWLI) based on the Lorenz curve, which plots the cumulative proportion of areas for sink and source landscapes respectively against cumulative proportion of their relative location to the outlet in a watershed, including relative elevation, distance and slope. We assessed the effect of land cover pattern on total nitrogen losses in the Haihe River. Firstly, 26 watersheds were derived from 1: 250 000 digital elevation model (DEM), and their "source" and "sink" landscape types were identified from Landsat TM images in 2007. The source" landscapes referred to the paddy land, dry land and residential area, correspondingly the "sink" landscapes referred to the forest and grassland. Secondly, LWLI was calculated according to the landscape types and spatial patterns for each watershed. Thirdly, we accessed the effect of land cover pattern on total nitrogen (TN) flux according to the value of LWLI, comparing with the area proportion of sink-source landscapes. The correlation coefficients were different in three parts of Haihe River, i. e., 0.86, 0.67 and 0.65 in the Yanshan Mts, Taihang Mts and lower Haihe River. The results showed strong correlations between TN and LWLI in contrast to the weak correlations between TN and area proportion of sink and source landscape types. This study indicates the spatial pattern of land cover is essential for accessing the nutrient losses, and the location-weighted landscape pattern analysis may be an alternate to existing water quality models

  2. Fast and accurate Monte Carlo modeling of a kilovoltage X-ray therapy unit using a photon-source approximation for treatment planning in complex media

    PubMed Central

    Zeinali-Rafsanjani, B.; Mosleh-Shirazi, M. A.; Faghihi, R.; Karbasi, S.; Mosalaei, A.

    2015-01-01

    To accurately recompute dose distributions in chest-wall radiotherapy with 120 kVp kilovoltage X-rays, an MCNP4C Monte Carlo model is presented using a fast method that obviates the need to fully model the tube components. To validate the model, half-value layer (HVL), percentage depth doses (PDDs) and beam profiles were measured. Dose measurements were performed for a more complex situation using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) placed within a Rando phantom. The measured and computed first and second HVLs were 3.8, 10.3 mm Al and 3.8, 10.6 mm Al, respectively. The differences between measured and calculated PDDs and beam profiles in water were within 2 mm/2% for all data points. In the Rando phantom, differences for majority of data points were within 2%. The proposed model offered an approximately 9500-fold reduced run time compared to the conventional full simulation. The acceptable agreement, based on international criteria, between the simulations and the measurements validates the accuracy of the model for its use in treatment planning and radiobiological modeling studies of superficial therapies including chest-wall irradiation using kilovoltage beam. PMID:26170553

  3. An Aneurysmal Left Circumflex Artery-to-Right Atrium Fistula in a Patient with Ischemic Symptoms: Accurate Diagnosis with Dual-Source CT Angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Oncel, Dilek Oncel, Guray

    2008-07-15

    In this report, we present a 55-year-old female patient with a left circumflex artery-to-right atrial fistula associated with a huge saccular aneurysm. She had undergone conventional angiography due to ischemic symptoms. In conventional angiography, a very dilated and tortuous vessel originating from the circumflex artery and continuous with a huge saccular aneurysm was visualized but the drainage site could not be demonstrated. With dual-source CT coronary angiography, the exact anatomy of this fistula was demonstrated and surgery was planned.

  4. Calibration and operational data for a compact photodiode detector useful for monitoring the location of moving sources of positron emitting radioisotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsland, M. G.; Dehnel, M. P.; Johansson, S.; Rajander, J.; Solin, O.; Theroux, J.; Stewart, T. M.; Christensen, T.; Hollinger, C.

    2013-04-01

    D-Pace has developed a compact cost-effective gamma detector system based on technology licensed from TRIUMF [1]. These photodiode detectors are convenient for detecting the presence of positron emitting radioisotopes, particularly for the case of transport of radioisotopes from a PET cyclotron to hotlab, or from one location to another in an automated radiochemistry processing unit. This paper describes recent calibration experiments undertaken at the Turku PET Centre for stationary and moving sources of F18 and C11 in standard setups. The practical diagnostic utility of using several of these devices to track the transport of radioisotopes from the cyclotron to hotlab is illustrated. For example, such a detector system provides: a semi-quantitative indication of total activity, speed of transport, location of any activity lost en route and effectiveness of follow-up system flushes, a means of identifying bolus break-up, feedback useful for deciding when to change out tubing.

  5. Calibration and operational data for a compact photodiode detector useful for monitoring the location of moving sources of positron emitting radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Marsland, M. G.; Dehnel, M. P.; Theroux, J.; Christensen, T.; Hollinger, C.; Johansson, S.; Rajander, J.; Solin, O.; Stewart, T. M.

    2013-04-19

    D-Pace has developed a compact cost-effective gamma detector system based on technology licensed from TRIUMF. These photodiode detectors are convenient for detecting the presence of positron emitting radioisotopes, particularly for the case of transport of radioisotopes from a PET cyclotron to hotlab, or from one location to another in an automated radiochemistry processing unit. This paper describes recent calibration experiments undertaken at the Turku PET Centre for stationary and moving sources of F18 and C11 in standard setups. The practical diagnostic utility of using several of these devices to track the transport of radioisotopes from the cyclotron to hotlab is illustrated. For example, such a detector system provides: a semi-quantitative indication of total activity, speed of transport, location of any activity lost en route and effectiveness of follow-up system flushes, a means of identifying bolus break-up, feedback useful for deciding when to change out tubing.

  6. Field and laboratory studies of moving and temporally variable noise sources (aircraft); perception of location, movement, and direction.

    PubMed

    Gunn, W J; Shigehisa, T; Shepherd, W T

    1979-10-01

    The conditions were examined under which more valid and reliable estimates could be made of the effects of aircraft noise on people. In Exper. 1, 12 Ss in 2 different houses directly under the flight path of a major airport (JFK) indicated 1 of 12 possible flight paths (4 directly overhead and 8 to one side) for each of 3 jet aircraft flyovers: 3% of cases in House A and 56% in House B (which had open windows) were correctly identified. Despite judgment inaccuracy, Ss were more than moderately certain of the correctness of their judgments. In Exper. II. Ss either inside or outside of 2 houses in Wallops Station, Virginia, indicated on diagrams the direction of flyovers. Each of 4 aircraft (Boeing 737, C-54, UE-1 helicopter, Queenaire) made 8 flyovers directly over the houses and 8 to one side. Windows were either open or closed. All flyovers and conditions were counterbalanced. All sound sources under all conditions were usually judged to be overhead and moving, but for Ss indoors with windows closed the to-the-side flyovers were judged to be off to the side in 24% of cases. Outdoor Ss reported correct direction in 75% of cases while indoor Ss were correct in only 25% (windows open) or 18% (windows closed). Judgments "to the side" were significantly better (p = less than .02) with windows open vs closed, while with windows closed judgments were significantly better (p = less than .05) for flyovers overhead vs to the side. In Exper. III, Ss localized in azimuth and in the vertical plane recorded noises (10 1-oct noise bands of CF = 28.12 c/s - 14.4kc/s, spoken voice, and jet aircraft takeoffs and landings), presented through 1, 2, or 4 floor-level loudspeakers at each corner of a simulated living room (4.2 x 5.4m)built inside an IAC soundproof room. Aircraft noises presented by 4 loudspeakers were localized as "directly" overhead 80% of the time and "generally overhead" about 90% of the time; other sounds were so localized about 50% and 75% of the time respectively

  7. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  8. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  9. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  10. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  11. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  12. Application of a Persistent Dissolved-phase Reactive Treatment Zone for Mitigation of Mass Discharge from Sources Located in Lower-Permeability Sediments.

    PubMed

    Marble, J C; Brusseau, M L; Carroll, K C; Plaschke, M; Fuhrig, L; Brinker, F

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the development and effectiveness of a persistent dissolved-phase treatment zone, created by injecting potassium permanganate solution, for mitigating discharge of contaminant from a source zone located in a relatively deep, low-permeability formation. A localized 1,1-dichloroethene (DCE) source zone comprising dissolved- and sorbed-phase mass is present in lower permeability strata adjacent to a sand/gravel unit in a section of the Tucson International Airport Area (TIAA) Superfund Site. The results of bench-scale studies conducted using core material collected from boreholes drilled at the site indicated that natural oxidant demand was low, which would promote permanganate persistence. The reactive zone was created by injecting a permanganate solution into multiple wells screened across the interface between the lower-permeability and higher-permeability units. The site has been monitored for nine years to characterize the spatial distribution of DCE and permanganate. Permanganate continues to persist at the site, and a substantial and sustained decrease in DCE concentrations in groundwater has occurred after the permanganate injection.. These results demonstrate successful creation of a long-term, dissolved-phase reactive-treatment zone that reduced mass discharge from the source. This project illustrates the application of in-situ chemical oxidation as a persistent dissolved-phase reactive-treatment system for lower-permeability source zones, which appears to effectively mitigate persistent mass discharge into groundwater.

  13. Application of a Persistent Dissolved-phase Reactive Treatment Zone for Mitigation of Mass Discharge from Sources Located in Lower-Permeability Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Marble, J.C.; Brusseau, M.L.; Carroll, K.C.; Plaschke, M.; Fuhrig, L.; Brinker, F.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the development and effectiveness of a persistent dissolved-phase treatment zone, created by injecting potassium permanganate solution, for mitigating discharge of contaminant from a source zone located in a relatively deep, low-permeability formation. A localized 1,1-dichloroethene (DCE) source zone comprising dissolved- and sorbed-phase mass is present in lower permeability strata adjacent to a sand/gravel unit in a section of the Tucson International Airport Area (TIAA) Superfund Site. The results of bench-scale studies conducted using core material collected from boreholes drilled at the site indicated that natural oxidant demand was low, which would promote permanganate persistence. The reactive zone was created by injecting a permanganate solution into multiple wells screened across the interface between the lower-permeability and higher-permeability units. The site has been monitored for nine years to characterize the spatial distribution of DCE and permanganate. Permanganate continues to persist at the site, and a substantial and sustained decrease in DCE concentrations in groundwater has occurred after the permanganate injection.. These results demonstrate successful creation of a long-term, dissolved-phase reactive-treatment zone that reduced mass discharge from the source. This project illustrates the application of in-situ chemical oxidation as a persistent dissolved-phase reactive-treatment system for lower-permeability source zones, which appears to effectively mitigate persistent mass discharge into groundwater. PMID:26300570

  14. Directly attributing methane emissions to point source locations using the next generation Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, A. K.; Thompson, D. R.; Frankenberg, C.; Aubrey, A. D.; Bue, B. D.; Green, R. O.; Kort, E. A.; Eastwood, M. L.; Helmlinger, M. C.; Nolte, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    Imaging spectrometers like the next generation Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG) are well suited for identifying methane point sources by covering large regions with the high spatial resolution necessary to resolve emissions. A controlled release experiment at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) showed detectable methane plumes at multiple flux rates and flight altitudes. Images of plumes agreed with wind direction measured at ground stations and were consistently present for fluxes as low as 0.09 kt/year (14.16 cubic meters per hour; 500 standard cubic feet per hour, scfh). In some cases plumes were detected as low as 0.02 kt/year (3.40 cubic meters per hour; 120 scfh), indicating that AVIRIS-NG has the capability of detecting a number of fugitive methane source categories for natural gas fields. Following the RMOTC campaign, real time detection and geolocation of methane plumes has been implemented using an operator interface that overlays plumes on a true color image acquired by AVIRIS-NG. This has facilitated surveys over existing oil and gas fields to identify and attribute methane emissions to individual point source locations, including well pads known to use hydraulic fracturing and natural gas pipelines. An imaging spectrometer built exclusively for detection, quantification, and attribution of methane plumes would have improved sensitivity compared to AVIRIS-NG. The Airborne Methane Plume Spectrometer (AMPS) instrument concept is mature, ready for development, and would provide a spectral resolution of 1 nm and a detection threshold of approximately 0.28 cubic meters per hour (10 scfh). By offering the potential to identify point source locations, airborne imaging spectrometers could have particular utility for resolving the large uncertainties associated with anthropogenic emissions, including industrial point source emissions and fugitive methane from the oil and gas industry. Fig.1: True color image subset with

  15. Locating Desired Source Rocks by Using Shallow Ground Penetrating Radar and Seismic Survey Methods in western Washington, Pacific Northwest of the U.S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakir, R.; Meng, X.; Butler, Q.; Jenkins, J.; Keck, J.; Walsh, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Washington State Department of Natural Resources (WADNR) manages 2.1 million acres of forested state trust lands in Washington. WADNR sells timber and other agricultural products to help fund local services and the construction of institutions such as public schools and universities. Quality of rocks used as a surface on the roads built to access the timber is the essential and selecting appropriate rock quarry locations is challenging. Traditional borehole drilling methods only provide information from discrete locations. The study was conducted in the Capitol Forest area of western Washington. In our previous study, we suggested that a combination of P-wave seismic and ground penetrating radar (GPR) can be a rapid, comprehensive and cost effective alternative for identifying desired rock sources. In this study, we further improved upon that method and accomplished the following: 1) rock quality at a relatively fine resolution was distinguished and 2) the spatial variability of the rock was identified. Both 450 MHz and 80 MHz GPR antennas were used to obtain high resolution radargrams in the near-surface zone with 5m maximum penetration depth and lower resolution radargrams in the deeper subsurface zone with about 20m maximum penetration depth. We then correlated the GPR radargrams with P-wave velocities using the refraction survey data as well as S-wave velocities, estimated using Multi-Channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) survey data. Additionally, nearby test pits and boreholes (maximum depth = 15 meters) were used to confirm the geophysical measurements. Our study results demonstrate that the combination of GPR, using the two antennas, and seismic surveys provides very useful subsurface information regarding quality and spatial distribution of the rocks beneath the overburden. Subsurface images gathered from these combined geophysical methods do assist quarry operators to rapidly locate the desired rock sources.

  16. Locating radiation hazards and sources within contaminated areas by implementing a reverse ray tracing technique in the RadBall™ technology.

    PubMed

    Farfán, Eduardo B; Stanley, Steven; Holmes, Christopher; Lennox, Kathryn; Oldham, Mark; Clift, Corey; Thomas, Andrew; Adamovics, John

    2012-02-01

    RadBall™ is a novel technology that can locate unknown radioactive hazards within contaminated areas, hot cells, and gloveboxes. The device consists of a colander-like outer tungsten collimator that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer semisphere. The collimator has a number of small holes; as a result, specific areas of the polymer are exposed to radiation, becoming increasingly more opaque in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer semisphere is imaged in an optical computed tomography scanner that produces a high resolution three-dimensional map of optical attenuation coefficients. A subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation data, using a reverse ray tracing technique, provides information on the spatial distribution of gamma-ray sources in a given area, forming a three-dimensional characterization of the area of interest. The RadBall™ technology and its reverse ray tracing technique were investigated using known radiation sources at the Savannah River Site's Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory and unknown sources at the Savannah River National Laboratory's Shielded Cells facility.

  17. The Use of LiDAR Elevation Data and Satellite Imagery to Locate Critical Source Areas to Diffuse Pollution in Agricultural Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouin, Ariane; Michaud, Aubert; Thériault, Georges; Beaudin, Isabelle; Rodrigue, Jean-François; Denault, Jean-Thomas; Desjardins, Jacques; Côté, Noémi

    2013-04-01

    In Quebec / Canada, water quality improvement in rural areas greatly depends on the reduction of diffuse pollution. Indeed, point source pollution has been reduced significantly in Canada in recent years by creating circumscribed pits for manure and removing animals from stream. Diffuse pollution differs from point source pollution because it is spread over large areas. In agricultural areas, sediment loss by soil and riverbank erosion along with loss of nutrients (phosphorus, nitrogen, etc.) and pesticides from fields represent the main source of non-point source pollution. The factor mainly responsible for diffuse pollution in agricultural areas is surface runoff occurring in poorly drained areas in fields. The presence of these poorly drained areas is also one of the most limiting factors in crop productivity. Thus, a reconciliation of objectives at the farm (financial concern for farmers) and off-farm concerns (environmental concern) is possible. In short, drainage, runoff, erosion, water quality and crop production are all interconnected issues that need to be tackled together. Two complementary data sources are mainly used in the diagnosis of drainage, surface runoff and erosion : elevation data and multispectral satellite images. In this study of two watersheds located in Québec (Canada), LiDAR elevation data and satellite imagery (QuickBird, Spot and Landsat) were acquired. The studied territories have been partitioned in hydrologic response units (HRUs) according to sub-basins, soils, elevation (topographic index) and land use. These HRUs are afterwards used in a P index software (P-Edit) that calculates the quantities of sediments and phosphorus exported from each HRUs. These exports of sediments and phosphorus are validated with hydrometric and water quality data obtain in two sub-basins and are also compared to soil brightness index derived from multispectral images. This index is sensitive to soil moisture and thus highlights areas where the soil is

  18. Data on milk dioxin contamination linked with the location of fodder croplands allow to hypothesize the origin of the pollution source in an Italian valley.

    PubMed

    Desiato, Rosanna; Bertolini, Silvia; Baioni, Elisa; Crescio, Maria Ines; Scortichini, Giampiero; Ubaldi, Alessandro; Sparagna, Bruno; Cuttica, Giancarlo; Ru, Giuseppe

    2014-11-15

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs) have similar toxic, endocrine-disrupting, and carcinogenic activity. They are classified as persistent organic pollutants accumulating in the environment and the tissues of living organisms. High concentrations of PCDD/F and dl-PCB have been detected in bovine milk collected in a Piedmont valley (Northwestern Italy) since 2004. This geographic study describes the local distribution of pollution from PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs. Since their presence in animal products could be traced back to the ingestion of contaminated fodder, dioxin levels in cow milk were related to the distribution of fodder cropland parcels. Specifically, the aim of the study was to determine, through an exploratory approach, whether the contamination was consistent with one common point source of contamination or different scattered sources. Data for PCDD/F and dl-PCB concentrations in the bulk milk from 27 herds, sampled over a 4-year period (2004-2007), were matched to the georeferenced land parcels the dairy farmers used for growing fodder. Isopleth maps of dioxin concentrations were estimated with ordinary kriging. The highest level of pollution for both PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs was geographically juxtaposed: in both instances, the location of the local steel plant was within this extremely highly polluted area. The study results support the hypothesis for one common point source of contamination in the valley. The exploratory spatial analysis applied in this research may provide a valuable, novel approach to straightforward identification of a highly likely source of dioxin contamination of dairy products (even in the absence of top soil contamination data).

  19. Development of double-pair double difference earthquake location algorithm for improving earthquake locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hao; Zhang, Haijiang

    2017-01-01

    Event-pair double-difference (DD) earthquake location method, as incorporated in hypoDD, has been widely used to improve relative earthquake locations by using event-pair differential arrival times from pairs of events to common stations because some common path anomalies outside the source region can be cancelled out due to similar ray paths. Similarly, station-pair differential arrival times from one event to pairs of stations can also be used to improve earthquake locations by cancelling out the event origin time and some path anomalies inside the source region. To utilize advantages of both DD location methods, we have developed a new double-pair DD location method to use differential times constructed from pairs of events to pairs of stations to determine higher-precision relative earthquake locations. Compared to the event-pair and station-pair DD location methods, the new method can remove event origin times and station correction terms from the inversion system and cancel out path anomalies both outside and inside the source region at the same time. The new method is tested on earthquakes around the San Andreas Fault, California to validate its performance. From earthquake relocations it is demonstrated that the double-pair DD location method is able to better sharpen the images of seismicity with smaller relative location uncertainties compared to the event-pair DD location method and thus to reveal more fine-scale structures. In comparison, among three DD location methods, station-pair DD location method can better improve the absolute earthquake locations. For this reason, we further propose a hybrid double-pair DD location method combining station-pair and double-pair differential times to determine accurate absolute and relative locations at the same time, which is validated by both synthetic and real data sets.

  20. Constraints on the Location of the Gamma-Ray Emission Region for the Gamma-Ray-loud Radio Source GB 1310+487

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Shi-Ju

    2017-03-01

    We employ a single-zone leptonic jet model, with synchrotron, synchrotron self-Compton, and external Compton (EC) processes, to reproduce the quasi-simultaneous multi-wavelength spectral energy distributions in active and quiescent states of the narrow-line gamma-ray-loud radio source GB 1310+487. In the case of the EC process, the external seed photons from both the broad line region (BLR) and the dust torus are considered by assuming that the gamma-ray emission region is located at the outside boundary of the BLR and inside the dust torus. Comparing the energy density of external photon fields {U}{BLR} obtained by model fitting with that constrained from the BLR observations. We find that the location of the gamma-ray-emitting region of GB 1310+487 can be tightly constrained at the outer edge of the BLR (the dissipation distance of the γ-ray emission region from central black hole {r}{diss}∼ {{a}} {few} {times} {of} {R}{BLR}). The ratio of magnetic energy and emitting-electron energy in the radiation blob ({ε }B={L}B/{L}{{e}}) is gradually increased from Flare 1, to Flare 2, to Post-flare, where the magnetic energy increases and the matter energy decreases. These results suggest that the conversion of the magnetic field and the matter (radiation electrons) energy and the location of the γ-ray emission region (or ambient photon field) may play an important role in different radiation states of GB 1310+487.

  1. Characterization and treatment of water used for human consumption from six sources located in the Cameron/Tuba City abandoned uranium mining area.

    PubMed

    Orescanin, Visnja; Kollar, Robert; Nad, Karlo; Mikelic, Ivanka Lovrencic; Kollar, Iris

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was the characterization and improvement of the quality of water used for human consumption of unregulated/regulated water sources located in the Cameron/Tuba City abandoned uranium mining area (NE Arizona, western edge of the Navajo Nation). Samples were collected at six water sources which included regulated sources: Wind Mill (Tank 3T-538), Badger Springs and Paddock Well as well as unregulated sources: Willy Spring, Water Wall and Water Hole. Samples taken from Wind Mill, Water Wall and Water Hole were characterized with high turbidity and color as well as high level of manganese, iron and nickel and elevated value of molybdenum. High level of iron was also found in Badger Spring, Willy Spring, and Paddock Well. These three water sources were also characterized with elevated values of fluoride and vanadium. Significant amounts of zinc were found in Water Wall and Water Hole samples. Water Wall sample was also characterized with high level of Cr(VI). Compared to primary or secondary Navajo Nation Environmental Protection Agency (NNEPA) water quality standard the highest enrichment was found for turbidity (50.000 times), color (up to 1.796 times) and manganese (71 times), Cr(VI) (17.5 times), iron (7.4 times) and arsenic (5.2 times). Activities of (226)Ra and (238)U in water samples were still in agreement with the maximum contaminant levels. In order to comply with NNEPA water quality standard water samples were subjected to electrochemical treatment. This method was selected due to its high removal efficiency for heavy metals and uranium, lower settlement time, production of smaller volume of waste mud and higher stability of waste mud compared to physico-chemical treatment. Following the treatment, concentrations of heavy metals and activities of radionuclides in all samples were significantly lower compared to NNEPA or WHO regulated values. The maximum removal efficiencies for color, turbidity, arsenic, manganese, molybdenum and

  2. Location Privacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaofeng; Chen, Jidong

    With rapid development of sensor and wireless mobile devices, it is easy to access mobile users' location information anytime and anywhere. On one hand, LBS is becoming more and more valuable and important. On the other hand, location privacy issues raised by such applications have also gained more attention. However, due to the specificity of location information, traditional privacy-preserving techniques in data publishing cannot be used. In this chapter, we will introduce location privacy, and analyze the challenges of location privacy-preserving, and give a survey of existing work including the system architecture, location anonymity and query processing.

  3. Accurate method for computing correlated color temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Changjun; Cui, Guihua; Melgosa, Manuel; Ruan, Xiukai; Zhang, Yaoju; Ma, Long; Xiao, Kaida; Luo, M Ronnier

    2016-06-27

    For the correlated color temperature (CCT) of a light source to be estimated, a nonlinear optimization problem must be solved. In all previous methods available to compute CCT, the objective function has only been approximated, and their predictions have achieved limited accuracy. For example, different unacceptable CCT values have been predicted for light sources located on the same isotemperature line. In this paper, we propose to compute CCT using the Newton method, which requires the first and second derivatives of the objective function. Following the current recommendation by the International Commission on Illumination (CIE) for the computation of tristimulus values (summations at 1 nm steps from 360 nm to 830 nm), the objective function and its first and second derivatives are explicitly given and used in our computations. Comprehensive tests demonstrate that the proposed method, together with an initial estimation of CCT using Robertson's method [J. Opt. Soc. Am. 58, 1528-1535 (1968)], gives highly accurate predictions below 0.0012 K for light sources with CCTs ranging from 500 K to 106 K.

  4. Strength Restoration of Cracked Sandstone and Coal under a Uniaxial Compression Test and Correlated Damage Source Location Based on Acoustic Emissions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaowei; Zhang, Nong; Zheng, Xigui; Pan, Dongjiang

    2015-01-01

    Underground rock masses have shown a general trend of natural balance over billions of years of ground movement. Nonetheless, man-made underground constructions disturb this balance and cause rock stability failure. Fractured rock masses are frequently encountered in underground constructions, and this study aims to restore the strength of rock masses that have experienced considerable fracturing under uniaxial compression. Coal and sandstone from a deep-buried coal mine were chosen as experimental subjects; they were crushed by uniaxial compression and then carefully restored by a chemical adhesive called MEYCO 364 with an innovative self-made device. Finally, the restored specimens were crushed once again by uniaxial compression. Axial stress, axial strain, circumferential strain, and volumetric strain data for the entire process were fully captured and are discussed here. An acoustic emission (AE) testing system was adopted to cooperate with the uniaxial compression system to provide better definitions for crack closure thresholds, crack initiation thresholds, crack damage thresholds, and three-dimensional damage source locations in intact and restored specimens. Several remarkable findings were obtained. The restoration effects of coal are considerably better than those of sandstone because the strength recovery coefficient of the former is 1.20, whereas that of the latter is 0.33, which indicates that MEYCO 364 is particularly valid for fractured rocks whose initial intact peak stress is less than that of MEYCO 364. Secondary cracked traces of restored sandstone almost follow the cracked traces of the initial intact sandstone, and the final failure is mainly caused by decoupling between the adhesive and the rock mass. However, cracked traces of restored coal only partially follow the traces of intact coal, with the final failure of the restored coal being caused by both bonding interface decoupling and self-breakage in coal. Three-dimensional damage source

  5. Strength Restoration of Cracked Sandstone and Coal under a Uniaxial Compression Test and Correlated Damage Source Location Based on Acoustic Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaowei; Zhang, Nong; Zheng, Xigui; Pan, Dongjiang

    2015-01-01

    Underground rock masses have shown a general trend of natural balance over billions of years of ground movement. Nonetheless, man-made underground constructions disturb this balance and cause rock stability failure. Fractured rock masses are frequently encountered in underground constructions, and this study aims to restore the strength of rock masses that have experienced considerable fracturing under uniaxial compression. Coal and sandstone from a deep-buried coal mine were chosen as experimental subjects; they were crushed by uniaxial compression and then carefully restored by a chemical adhesive called MEYCO 364 with an innovative self-made device. Finally, the restored specimens were crushed once again by uniaxial compression. Axial stress, axial strain, circumferential strain, and volumetric strain data for the entire process were fully captured and are discussed here. An acoustic emission (AE) testing system was adopted to cooperate with the uniaxial compression system to provide better definitions for crack closure thresholds, crack initiation thresholds, crack damage thresholds, and three-dimensional damage source locations in intact and restored specimens. Several remarkable findings were obtained. The restoration effects of coal are considerably better than those of sandstone because the strength recovery coefficient of the former is 1.20, whereas that of the latter is 0.33, which indicates that MEYCO 364 is particularly valid for fractured rocks whose initial intact peak stress is less than that of MEYCO 364. Secondary cracked traces of restored sandstone almost follow the cracked traces of the initial intact sandstone, and the final failure is mainly caused by decoupling between the adhesive and the rock mass. However, cracked traces of restored coal only partially follow the traces of intact coal, with the final failure of the restored coal being caused by both bonding interface decoupling and self-breakage in coal. Three-dimensional damage source

  6. Accurate spectral color measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltunen, Jouni; Jaeaeskelaeinen, Timo; Parkkinen, Jussi P. S.

    1999-08-01

    Surface color measurement is of importance in a very wide range of industrial applications including paint, paper, printing, photography, textiles, plastics and so on. For a demanding color measurements spectral approach is often needed. One can measure a color spectrum with a spectrophotometer using calibrated standard samples as a reference. Because it is impossible to define absolute color values of a sample, we always work with approximations. The human eye can perceive color difference as small as 0.5 CIELAB units and thus distinguish millions of colors. This 0.5 unit difference should be a goal for the precise color measurements. This limit is not a problem if we only want to measure the color difference of two samples, but if we want to know in a same time exact color coordinate values accuracy problems arise. The values of two instruments can be astonishingly different. The accuracy of the instrument used in color measurement may depend on various errors such as photometric non-linearity, wavelength error, integrating sphere dark level error, integrating sphere error in both specular included and specular excluded modes. Thus the correction formulas should be used to get more accurate results. Another question is how many channels i.e. wavelengths we are using to measure a spectrum. It is obvious that the sampling interval should be short to get more precise results. Furthermore, the result we get is always compromise of measuring time, conditions and cost. Sometimes we have to use portable syste or the shape and the size of samples makes it impossible to use sensitive equipment. In this study a small set of calibrated color tiles measured with the Perkin Elmer Lamda 18 and the Minolta CM-2002 spectrophotometers are compared. In the paper we explain the typical error sources of spectral color measurements, and show which are the accuracy demands a good colorimeter should have.

  7. Accurate, reliable prototype earth horizon sensor head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, F.; Cohen, H.

    1973-01-01

    The design and performance is described of an accurate and reliable prototype earth sensor head (ARPESH). The ARPESH employs a detection logic 'locator' concept and horizon sensor mechanization which should lead to high accuracy horizon sensing that is minimally degraded by spatial or temporal variations in sensing attitude from a satellite in orbit around the earth at altitudes in the 500 km environ 1,2. An accuracy of horizon location to within 0.7 km has been predicted, independent of meteorological conditions. This corresponds to an error of 0.015 deg-at 500 km altitude. Laboratory evaluation of the sensor indicates that this accuracy is achieved. First, the basic operating principles of ARPESH are described; next, detailed design and construction data is presented and then performance of the sensor under laboratory conditions in which the sensor is installed in a simulator that permits it to scan over a blackbody source against background representing the earth space interface for various equivalent plant temperatures.

  8. Physician Location Selection and Distribution. A Bibliography of Relevant Articles, Reports and Data Sources. Health Manpower Policy Discussion Paper Series No. D3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, Stephen C.; Reynolds, Juanita

    This bibliography provides background material on two general issues of how physicians are distributed geographically and how physicians choose a practice location. The report is divided into five major categories of information: overview summary of annotated articles, reference key to location decision factors, reference key to public policy…

  9. Earthquake location in island arcs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engdahl, E.R.; Dewey, J.W.; Fujita, K.

    1982-01-01

    -velocity lithospheric slab. In application, JHD has the practical advantage that it does not require the specification of a theoretical velocity model for the slab. Considering earthquakes within a 260 km long by 60 km wide section of the Aleutian main thrust zone, our results suggest that the theoretical velocity structure of the slab is presently not sufficiently well known that accurate locations can be obtained independently of locally recorded data. Using a locally recorded earthquake as a calibration event, JHD gave excellent results over the entire section of the main thrust zone here studied, without showing a strong effect that might be attributed to spatially varying source-station anomalies. We also calibrated the ray-tracing method using locally recorded data and obtained results generally similar to those obtained by JHD. ?? 1982.

  10. Tectonic tremor locations using template matching of low frequency earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoumal, R.; Colella, H. V.; Holtkamp, S. G.; Brudzinski, M. R.; Schlanser, K. M.; Shelly, D. R.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.

    2012-12-01

    Tectonic (non-volcanic) tremor is difficult to locate due to its emergent nature, but critical to assess what impact it has on the plate interface slip budget. Recent studies have found that tectonic tremor is primarily composed of a swarm of low frequency earthquakes, such that identifying individual low frequency earthquakes can provide opportunities to improve source characterizations. This study seeks to refine the tremor source locations by stacking families of similar low frequency earthquakes to enhance the signal to noise ratio and clarify P- and S-wave arrivals, and to better characterize the time history of specific "famlies" of tremor events. Short, well-defined tremor bursts identified from previous source location analysis are used to define template waveforms that are cross-correlated over several years of recording. Since multi-station template matching algorithms are particularly sensitive to source location, accurate time histories of event families can be produced. These time histories provide an important additional constraint on episodic tremor and slip events (and an independent test of both procedures) since they do not depend on station amplitudes as more traditional techniques do, which may impart a detection bias. Stacking similar events clarifies arrival times that are then used to refine the source locations. This approach is being applied to the Oaxaca region of Mexico and southern Cascadia, where lower network density has limited detailed tremor source location analysis.

  11. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  12. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  13. Estimating locations and total magnetization vectors of compact magnetic sources from scalar, vector, or tensor magnetic measurements through combined Helbig and Euler analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, J.D.; Nabighian, M.N.; Smith, D.V.; Li, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The Helbig method for estimating total magnetization directions of compact sources from magnetic vector components is extended so that tensor magnetic gradient components can be used instead. Depths of the compact sources can be estimated using the Euler equation, and their dipole moment magnitudes can be estimated using a least squares fit to the vector component or tensor gradient component data. ?? 2007 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  14. Location of Impulsive Acoustic Sources in Urban Environments Using Finite-Difference, Time-Domain Modeling of Time Reversal with Data from Small Sensor Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    the environment that causes the sound scattering (such as buildings) can be modeled on a computer and adequate sensor data can be collected, one can...way, for example, high-energy ultrasound can be precisely focused to break up a gallstone or kidney stone.6, 7 In the process of locating a sound

  15. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  16. Development and evaluation of a decision-supporting model for identifying the source location of microbial intrusions in real gravity sewer systems.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minyoung; Choi, Christopher Y; Gerba, Charles P

    2013-09-01

    Assuming a scenario of a hypothetical pathogenic outbreak, we aimed this study at developing a decision-support model for identifying the location of the pathogenic intrusion as a means of facilitating rapid detection and efficient containment. The developed model was applied to a real sewer system (the Campbell wash basin in Tucson, AZ) in order to validate its feasibility. The basin under investigation was divided into 14 sub-basins. The geometric information associated with the sewer network was digitized using GIS (Geological Information System) and imported into an urban sewer network simulation model to generate microbial breakthrough curves at the outlet. A pre-defined amount of Escherichia coli (E. coli), which is an indicator of fecal coliform bacteria, was hypothetically introduced into 56 manholes (four in each sub-basin, chosen at random), and a total of 56 breakthrough curves of E. coli were generated using the simulation model at the outlet. Transport patterns were classified depending upon the location of the injection site (manhole), various known characteristics (peak concentration and time, pipe length, travel time, etc.) extracted from each E. coli breakthrough curve and the layout of sewer network. Using this information, we back-predicted the injection location once an E. coli intrusion was detected at a monitoring site using Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). The results showed that ANNs identified the location of the injection sites with 57% accuracy; ANNs correctly recognized eight out of fourteen expressions with relying on data from a single detection sensor. Increasing the available sensors within the basin significantly improved the accuracy of the simulation results (from 57% to 100%).

  17. High Velocity Jet Noise Source Location and Reduction. Task 2 Supplement. Computer Program for Calculating the Aeroacoustic Characteristics of Jets form Nozzles of Arbitrary Shape.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-01

    noise) by specifying RMIN as input, but with NCBDY = 0. This option causes the computation to begin at r = RMIN(KA), where KA is the axial station...39990 70 COMPUTATION OF AFRO-ACOJ-TIC P’OPf-PTIFS O SI.PPPSSOM N)7ZLS CASE NO, I CkD 7-TIIPF AP=2.i N077LF - VJ=??00 FP, - rTJ=i600 nEr-p AXIAL LOCATION

  18. Static and wind tunnel near-field/far-field jet noise measurements from model scale single-flow baseline and suppressor nozzles. Volume 1: Noise source locations and extrapolation of static free-field jet noise data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaeck, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    A test was conducted in the Boeing Large Anechoic Chamber to determine static jet noise source locations of six baseline and suppressor nozzle models, and establish a technique for extrapolating near field data into the far field. The test covered nozzle pressure ratios from 1.44 to 2.25 and jet velocities from 412 to 594 m/s at a total temperature of 844 K.

  19. C5-C12 volatile organic compounds at roadside, residential, and background locations in Ankara, Turkey: temporal and spatial variations and sources.

    PubMed

    Kuntasal, Oznur Oğuz; Kilavuz, Seda Aslan; Karman, Deniz; Wang, Daniel; Tuncel, Gürdal

    2013-10-01

    Concentrations of 91 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) ranging from C5 to C12 were measured at three sites in Ankara, the capital of Turkey, in the summer of 2003 and winter of 2004. Samples were collected at roadside, residential and background stations at consecutive 4-hr intervals over a 24-hr period for six weeks in each season. Air samples were collected onto cartridges packed with Tenax TA and Carbopack B resins and analyzed by thermal desorption, followed by gas chromatography coupled to a mass selective detector (GC/MSD). Time resolved data provided information on ambient levels, temporal and spatial variations and sources of VOCs in Ankara. Toluene is the most abundant compound at all sites with and average concentration of 13.1 ?g m(-3). The mean concentrations of benzene are 12.6, 5.2, and 2.4 ?g m(-3) during winter at roadside, residential and background stations, respectively. Diurnal variation in the data together with toluene to benzene concentration ratio (T:B) that is close to 2.0 indicated the influence of traffic related emissions at residential and roadside stations during winter season. Higher T:B ratio observed at residential and background stations during summer period and correlation analysis indicated additional VOC sources. Temporal variations and low m,p-xylene to ethylbenzene ratio (mpX:E) indicated that transported air mass is the major VOC source influencing VOC concentrations measured at the background station.

  20. BIOACCESSIBILITY TESTS ACCURATELY ESTIMATE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hazards of soil-borne Pb to wild birds may be more accurately quantified if the bioavailability of that Pb is known. To better understand the bioavailability of Pb to birds, we measured blood Pb concentrations in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) fed diets containing Pb-contaminated soils. Relative bioavailabilities were expressed by comparison with blood Pb concentrations in quail fed a Pb acetate reference diet. Diets containing soil from five Pb-contaminated Superfund sites had relative bioavailabilities from 33%-63%, with a mean of about 50%. Treatment of two of the soils with P significantly reduced the bioavailability of Pb. The bioaccessibility of the Pb in the test soils was then measured in six in vitro tests and regressed on bioavailability. They were: the “Relative Bioavailability Leaching Procedure” (RBALP) at pH 1.5, the same test conducted at pH 2.5, the “Ohio State University In vitro Gastrointestinal” method (OSU IVG), the “Urban Soil Bioaccessible Lead Test”, the modified “Physiologically Based Extraction Test” and the “Waterfowl Physiologically Based Extraction Test.” All regressions had positive slopes. Based on criteria of slope and coefficient of determination, the RBALP pH 2.5 and OSU IVG tests performed very well. Speciation by X-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrated that, on average, most of the Pb in the sampled soils was sorbed to minerals (30%), bound to organic matter 24%, or present as Pb sulfate 18%. Ad

  1. Separatrix location in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Frederick; Maingi, Rajesh; Maqueda, Ricky; Menard, Jon; Leblanc, Ben; Bell, Ron; Paul, Stephen

    2008-11-01

    The separatrix location and corresponding plasma parameters in NSTX were estimated for H-mode discharge 117125 containing both MARFEs and ELMs and for Type V ELMy H-mode discharge 128337. Since equilibrium reconstructions with LRDFIT did not accurately locate the LFS separatrix, a method based on the strong electron parallel heat conductivity was used to map the LFS magnetic flux surfaces to the HFS since the innermost Thomson scattering measurement of Te(R) is the most accurate. During a MARFE or at MARFE onset in NSTX shot 117125, this method estimated the electron temperature at the LFS separatrix, Te,sep, to vary between 31 and 41 eV. At times with no MARFE or ELM, Te,sep ranged between 41 and 93 eV. These Te,sep values compare well with Te,sep values (28-35 eV) in TEXTOR just before MARFE onset.^1 In NSTX shot 128337 late in the Type V ELMy phase, Te,sep was estimated to be ˜100 eV. These separatrix locations place the Er well outside the separatrix. [1] F.A. Kelly, W.M. Stacey, J. Rapp and M. Brix, Phys. Plasmas 8 (2001) 3382.

  2. NGC 5548: LACK OF A BROAD Fe K{alpha} LINE AND CONSTRAINTS ON THE LOCATION OF THE HARD X-RAY SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Brenneman, L. W.; Elvis, M.; Krongold, Y.; Liu, Y.; Mathur, S.

    2012-01-01

    We present an analysis of the co-added and individual 0.7-40 keV spectra from seven Suzaku observations of the Sy 1.5 galaxy NGC 5548 taken over a period of eight weeks. We conclude that the source has a moderately ionized, three-zone warm absorber, a power-law continuum, and exhibits contributions from cold, distant reflection. Relativistic reflection signatures are not significantly detected in the co-added data, and we place an upper limit on the equivalent width of a relativistically broad Fe K{alpha} line at EW {<=} 26 eV at 90% confidence. Thus NGC 5548 can be labeled as a 'weak' type 1 active galactic nucleus (AGN) in terms of its observed inner disk reflection signatures, in contrast to sources with very broad, strong iron lines such as MCG-6-30-15, which are likely much fewer in number. We compare physical properties of NGC 5548 and MCG-6-30-15 that might explain this difference in their reflection properties. Though there is some evidence that NGC 5548 may harbor a truncated inner accretion disk, this evidence is inconclusive, so we also consider light bending of the hard X-ray continuum emission in order to explain the lack of relativistic reflection in our observation. If the absence of a broad Fe K{alpha} line is interpreted in the light-bending context, we conclude that the source of the hard X-ray continuum lies at radii r{sub s} {approx}> 100 r{sub g}. We note, however, that light-bending models must be expanded to include a broader range of physical parameter space in order to adequately explain the spectral and timing properties of average AGNs, rather than just those with strong, broad iron lines.

  3. Location-assured, multifactor authentication on smartphones via LTE communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuseler, Torben; Lami, Ihsan A.; Al-Assam, Hisham

    2013-05-01

    With the added security provided by LTE, geographical location has become an important factor for authentication to enhance the security of remote client authentication during mCommerce applications using Smartphones. Tight combination of geographical location with classic authentication factors like PINs/Biometrics in a real-time, remote verification scheme over the LTE layer connection assures the authenticator about the client itself (via PIN/biometric) as well as the client's current location, thus defines the important aspects of "who", "when", and "where" of the authentication attempt without eaves dropping or man on the middle attacks. To securely integrate location as an authentication factor into the remote authentication scheme, client's location must be verified independently, i.e. the authenticator should not solely rely on the location determined on and reported by the client's Smartphone. The latest wireless data communication technology for mobile phones (4G LTE, Long-Term Evolution), recently being rolled out in various networks, can be employed to enhance this location-factor requirement of independent location verification. LTE's Control Plane LBS provisions, when integrated with user-based authentication and independent source of localisation factors ensures secure efficient, continuous location tracking of the Smartphone. This feature can be performed during normal operation of the LTE-based communication between client and network operator resulting in the authenticator being able to verify the client's claimed location more securely and accurately. Trials and experiments show that such algorithm implementation is viable for nowadays Smartphone-based banking via LTE communication.

  4. Underwater hydrophone location survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Jack B.

    1993-01-01

    The Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC) is a U.S. Navy test range located on Andros Island, Bahamas, and a Division of the Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC), Newport, RI. The Headquarters of AUTEC is located at a facility in West Palm Beach, FL. AUTEC's primary mission is to provide the U.S. Navy with a deep-water test and evaluation facility for making underwater acoustic measurements, testing and calibrating sonars, and providing accurate underwater, surface, and in-air tracking data on surface ships, submarines, aircraft, and weapon systems. Many of these programs are in support of Antisubmarine Warfare (ASW), undersea research and development programs, and Fleet assessment and operational readiness trials. Most tests conducted at AUTEC require precise underwater tracking (plus or minus 3 yards) of multiple acoustic signals emitted with the correct waveshape and repetition criteria from either a surface craft or underwater vehicle.

  5. Modeling and locating underground water pipe leak with microseismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Jiangping; Liu, Hao; Tian, Zhijian; Cheng, Fei

    2017-01-01

    Traditional pipeline leak locating methods require that geophones have to be placed on the pipe wall. While if the exact location of the pipeline is unknown, the leaks may not be identified accurately. To solve this problem, considering the characteristics of pipeline leak, a continuous random seismic source model is proposed and geological models are established. Based on the two dimensional (2D) viscoacoustic equations and the staggered grid finite-difference (FD) algorithm, the microseismic wave field generated by a leaking pipe is modeled. Cross-correlation analysis and the simulated annealing (SA) algorithm are employed to obtain the time difference and the leak location. Analysis and discussions of the effects of number of recorded traces, survey layout, and offset and trace interval on the accuracy of the estimated location are also conducted. Simulation and data field experiment results indicate that: (1) A continuous random source can realistically represent the leak microseismic wave field in a simulation using 2D viscoacoustic equations and staggered grid FD algorithm. (2) For the leak microseismic wave field, the cross-correlation method is effective for calculating time difference of the direct wave relative to the reference trace. However, outside the refraction blind zone, accuracy of the time difference is reduced by the effects of refracted wave. (3) The SA algorithm based upon time difference, helps to identify the leak location effectively, even in the presence of noise. Estimation of the horizontal distance is more accurate than that of the depth, and the locating errors increase with increasing number of traces and offset. Moreover, in the refraction blind zone, trace interval has almost no impact on the accuracy of the location estimate. And the symmetrical array provides a higher estimate accuracy than the asymmetrical array. (4) The acquisition method of time difference based on the microseismic theory and SA algorithm has a great potential

  6. Method and system for determining depth distribution of radiation-emitting material located in a source medium and radiation detector system for use therein

    DOEpatents

    Benke, Roland R.; Kearfott, Kimberlee J.; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2003-03-04

    A method, system and a radiation detector system for use therein are provided for determining the depth distribution of radiation-emitting material distributed in a source medium, such as a contaminated field, without the need to take samples, such as extensive soil samples, to determine the depth distribution. The system includes a portable detector assembly with an x-ray or gamma-ray detector having a detector axis for detecting the emitted radiation. The radiation may be naturally-emitted by the material, such as gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides, or emitted when the material is struck by other radiation. The assembly also includes a hollow collimator in which the detector is positioned. The collimator causes the emitted radiation to bend toward the detector as rays parallel to the detector axis of the detector. The collimator may be a hollow cylinder positioned so that its central axis is perpendicular to the upper surface of the large area source when positioned thereon. The collimator allows the detector to angularly sample the emitted radiation over many ranges of polar angles. This is done by forming the collimator as a single adjustable collimator or a set of collimator pieces having various possible configurations when connected together. In any one configuration, the collimator allows the detector to detect only the radiation emitted from a selected range of polar angles measured from the detector axis. Adjustment of the collimator or the detector therein enables the detector to detect radiation emitted from a different range of polar angles. The system further includes a signal processor for processing the signals from the detector wherein signals obtained from different ranges of polar angles are processed together to obtain a reconstruction of the radiation-emitting material as a function of depth, assuming, but not limited to, a spatially-uniform depth distribution of the material within each layer. The detector system includes detectors having

  7. CD34+ stromal cells/fibroblasts/fibrocytes/telocytes as a tissue reserve and a principal source of mesenchymal cells. Location, morphology, function and role in pathology.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Flores, L; Gutiérrez, R; García, M P; Sáez, F J; Díaz-Flores, L; Valladares, F; Madrid, J F

    2014-07-01

    We review the morphofunctional characteristics of CD34+ stromal fibroblastic/fibrocytic cells (CD34+ SFCs) and report our observations. We consider the following aspects of CD34+ SFCs: A) The confusing terms applied to this cell type, often combining the prefix CD34 with numerous names, including fibroblasts, fibrocytes, dendrocytes, keratocytes, telocytes and stromal, dendritic, adventitial, supraadventitial, perivascular, paravascular and delimiting cells; B) Changes in their immunophenotype, e.g., loss of CD34 expression and gain of other markers, such as those defining mesenchymal and derivate cells (myofibroblasts, osteoblasts, chondroblasts, adipocytes); C) Morphology (elongated or triangular cell body and thin, moniliform, bipolar or multipolar cytoplasmic processes), immunohistochemistry (co-expression of and changes in molecular expression) and structure (characteristics of nucleus and cytoplasmic organelles, and points of contact and junctions in quiescent and activated stages by light and electron microscopy); D) Location and distribution in the vessels (adventitia or external layer), in the tissues (connective, adipose, blood, muscle and nervous) and in the organs and systems (skin, oral cavity and oropharynx, respiratory, digestive, urinary, male, female, endocrine and lymphoid systems, serosal and synovial membranes, heart, eye and meninges); E) Origin from the mesoderm and cranial neural crest in the embryo, and from stem cells (themselves or other cells) and/or peripheral blood pluripotent stem cells (circulating progenitor cells) in post-natal life; F) Functions, such as synthesis of different molecules, progenitor of mesenchymal cells, immunomodulation, parenchymal regulation (growth, maturation and differentiation of adjacent cells), induction of angiogenesis, scaffolding support of other cells and phagocytic properties. Since CD34+ SFCs are the main reservoir of tissue mesenchymal cells (great mesenchymal potential, probably higher than that

  8. Lead fluxes and 206Pb/207Pb isotope ratios in rime and snow collected at remote mountain-top locations (Czech Republic, Central Europe): Patterns and sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimova, Nikoleta; Novak, Martin; Chrastny, Vladislav; Curik, Jan; Veselovsky, Frantisek; Blaha, Vladimir; Prechova, Eva; Pasava, Jan; Houskova, Marie; Bohdalkova, Leona; Stepanova, Marketa; Mikova, Jitka; Krachler, Michael; Komarek, Arnost

    2016-10-01

    During three winter seasons (2009-2011), Pb concentrations were measured in precipitation at 10 high-elevation sites in the Czech Republic, close to the borders with Austria, Germany, Poland, and Slovakia. Soluble and insoluble Pb forms were quantified in snow (vertical deposition), and rime (horizontal deposition). The objective was to compare Pb input fluxes into ecosystems via vertical and horizontal deposition, and to identify the residual Pb pollution sources in an era of rapidly decreasing industrial pollution. Lead soluble in diluted HNO3 made up 96% of total Pb deposition, with the remaining 4% Pb bound mainly in silicates. Three times higher concentrations of soluble Pb in rime than in snow, and 2.5 times higher concentrations of insoluble Pb in rime than in snow were associated with slightly different Pb isotope ratios. On average, the 206Pb/207Pb ratios in rime were higher than those in snow. Higher mean 206Pb/207Pb ratios of insoluble Pb (1.175) than in soluble Pb (1.165) may indicate an increasing role of geogenic Pb in recent atmospheric deposition. A distinct reversal to more radiogenic 206Pb/207Pb ratios in snow and rime in 2010, compared to literature data from rain-fed Sphagnum peatlands (1800-2000 A.D.), documented a recent decrease in anthropogenic Pb in the atmosphere of Central Europe. Since the early 1980s, Pb concentrations in snow decreased 18 times in the rural south of the Czech Republic, but only twice in the industrial north of the Czech Republic. Isotope signatures indicated that Pb in today's atmospheric deposition is mainly derived from Mesozoic ores mined/processed in Poland and coal combustion in the Czech Republic and Poland.

  9. Robust and Accurate Seismic(acoustic) Ray Tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debski, W.; Ando, M.

    Recent development of high resolution seismic tomography as well as a need for a high precision seismic (acoustic) source locations calls for robust and very precise numeri- cal methods of an estimation of seismic (acoustic) travel times and ray paths. Here we present a method based on a parametrisation of the ray path by a series of the Cheby- shev polynomials. This pseudo-spectral method, combined with the accurate Gauss- Lobbato integration procedure allows to reach a very high relative travel time accu- racy t/t 10-7. At the same time use of the Genetic Algorithm based optimizer (Evolutionary Algorithm) assures an extreme robustness which allows the method to be used in complicated 3D geological structures like multi-fault areas, mines, or real engineering applications, constructions, etc.

  10. Automated microseismic event location using Master-Event Waveform Stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoli, Francesco; Cesca, Simone; Krieger, Lars; Kriegerowski, Marius; Gammaldi, Sergio; Horalek, Josef; Priolo, Enrico; Dahm, Torsten

    2016-05-01

    Accurate and automated locations of microseismic events are desirable for many seismological and industrial applications. The analysis of microseismicity is particularly challenging because of weak seismic signals with low signal-to-noise ratio. Traditional location approaches rely on automated picking, based on individual seismograms, and make no use of the coherency information between signals at different stations. This strong limitation has been overcome by full-waveform location methods, which exploit the coherency of waveforms at different stations and improve the location robustness even in presence of noise. However, the performance of these methods strongly depend on the accuracy of the adopted velocity model, which is often quite rough; inaccurate models result in large location errors. We present an improved waveform stacking location method based on source-specific station corrections. Our method inherits the advantages of full-waveform location methods while strongly mitigating the dependency on the accuracy of the velocity model. With this approach the influence of an inaccurate velocity model on the results is restricted to the estimation of travel times solely within the seismogenic volume, but not for the entire source-receiver path. We finally successfully applied our new method to a realistic synthetic dataset as well as real data.

  11. Automated microseismic event location using Master-Event Waveform Stacking

    PubMed Central

    Grigoli, Francesco; Cesca, Simone; Krieger, Lars; Kriegerowski, Marius; Gammaldi, Sergio; Horalek, Josef; Priolo, Enrico; Dahm, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and automated locations of microseismic events are desirable for many seismological and industrial applications. The analysis of microseismicity is particularly challenging because of weak seismic signals with low signal-to-noise ratio. Traditional location approaches rely on automated picking, based on individual seismograms, and make no use of the coherency information between signals at different stations. This strong limitation has been overcome by full-waveform location methods, which exploit the coherency of waveforms at different stations and improve the location robustness even in presence of noise. However, the performance of these methods strongly depend on the accuracy of the adopted velocity model, which is often quite rough; inaccurate models result in large location errors. We present an improved waveform stacking location method based on source-specific station corrections. Our method inherits the advantages of full-waveform location methods while strongly mitigating the dependency on the accuracy of the velocity model. With this approach the influence of an inaccurate velocity model on the results is restricted to the estimation of travel times solely within the seismogenic volume, but not for the entire source-receiver path. We finally successfully applied our new method to a realistic synthetic dataset as well as real data. PMID:27185465

  12. Constraining Source Locations of Shallow Subduction Megathrust Earthquakes in 1-D and 3-D Velocity Models - A Case Study of the 2002 Mw=6.4 Osa Earthquake, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevemeyer, I.; Arroyo, I. G.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake source locations are generally routinely constrained using a global 1-D Earth model. However, the source location might be associated with large uncertainties. This is definitively the case for earthquakes occurring at active continental margins were thin oceanic crust subducts below thick continental crust and hence large lateral changes in crustal thickness occur as a function of distance to the deep-sea trench. Here, we conducted a case study of the 2002 Mw 6.4 Osa thrust earthquake in Costa Rica that was followed by an aftershock sequence. Initial relocations indicated that the main shock occurred fairly trenchward of most large earthquakes along the Middle America Trench off central Costa Rica. The earthquake sequence occurred while a temporary network of ocean-bottom-hydrophones and land stations 80 km to the northwest were deployed. By adding readings from permanent Costa Rican stations, we obtain uncommon P wave coverage of a large subduction zone earthquake. We relocated this catalog using a nonlinear probabilistic approach using a 1-D and two 3-D P-wave velocity models. The 3-D model was either derived from 3-D tomography based on onshore stations and a priori model based on seismic refraction data. All epicentres occurred close to the trench axis, but depth estimates vary by several tens of kilometres. Based on the epicentres and constraints from seismic reflection data the main shock occurred 25 km from the trench and probably along the plate interface at 5-10 km depth. The source location that agreed best with the geology was based on the 3-D velocity model derived from a priori data. Aftershocks propagated downdip to the area of a 1999 Mw 6.9 sequence and partially overlapped it. The results indicate that underthrusting of the young and buoyant Cocos Ridge has created conditions for interpolate seismogenesis shallower and closer to the trench axis than elsewhere along the central Costa Rica margin.

  13. Synchronized sampling improves fault location

    SciTech Connect

    Kezunovic, M.; Perunicic, B.

    1995-04-01

    Transmission line faults must be located accurately to allow maintenance crews to arrive at the scene and repair the faulted section as soon as possible. Rugged terrain and geographical layout cause some sections of power transmission lines to be difficult to reach. In the past, a variety of fault location algorithms were introduced as either an add-on feature in protective relays or stand-alone implementation in fault locators. In both cases, the measurements of current and voltages were taken at one terminal of a transmission line only. Under such conditions, it may become difficult to determine the fault location accurately, since data from other transmission line ends are required for more precise computations. In the absence of data from the other end, existing algorithms have accuracy problems under several circumstances, such as varying switching and loading conditions, fault infeed from the other end, and random value of fault resistance. Most of the one-end algorithms were based on estimation of voltage and current phasors. The need to estimate phasors introduces additional difficulty in high-speed tripping situations where the algorithms may not be fast enough in determining fault location accurately before the current signals disappear due to the relay operation and breaker opening. This article introduces a unique concept of high-speed fault location that can be implemented either as a simple add-on to the digital fault recorders (DFRs) or as a stand-alone new relaying function. This advanced concept is based on the use of voltage and current samples that are synchronously taken at both ends of a transmission line. This sampling technique can be made readily available in some new DFR designs incorporating receivers for accurate sampling clock synchronization using the satellite Global Positioning System (GPS).

  14. Selecting Electricity Generation Sources in Remote Locations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    94, 725-743. Ozgener, O., & Ozgener, L. (2006). Exergy and Reliability Analysis of Wind Turbine Systems : A Case Study. Renewable... energy hybrid systems are also becoming prevalent around the world. In certain cases, more than one type of solution has the potential to address the...renewable energy systems . However, the application of these methods for inhabitants with more restricted means of availability remains insufficient

  15. Seismic Regionalization, Signal Detector and Source Locator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    access to the school’s Internet so free data transfer to server in our office. An additional benefit is access to the Internet Time Servers with... free ). For school installations with free Internet connection the latter is preferable as precision is always better than 25 msec. Station sensitivity...34 becomes very attractive in terms of enthusiastic students and free Internet access equivalent to an elimination of operational costs. The obvious penalty

  16. Accurate Evaluation of Quantum Integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, D. C.; Goorvitch, D.; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Combining an appropriate finite difference method with Richardson's extrapolation results in a simple, highly accurate numerical method for solving a Schrodinger's equation. Important results are that error estimates are provided, and that one can extrapolate expectation values rather than the wavefunctions to obtain highly accurate expectation values. We discuss the eigenvalues, the error growth in repeated Richardson's extrapolation, and show that the expectation values calculated on a crude mesh can be extrapolated to obtain expectation values of high accuracy.

  17. Impact of primary and secondary organic sources on the oxidative potential of quasi-ultrafine particles (PM0.25) at three contrasting locations in the Los Angeles Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffari, Arian; Hasheminassab, Sina; Wang, Dongbin; Shafer, Martin M.; Schauer, James J.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the changing contribution of primary and secondary sources on the oxidative potential of particulate matter (PM) in a real-world urban atmosphere, 7 sets of quasi-ultrafine particles (PM0.25) were collected at three contrasting locations in the Los Angeles Basin, California, USA. Samples were collected in the coastal area of Long Beach during the morning rush hour period, representing fresh primary emissions from nearby freeways and the LA port; in central Los Angeles during midday, representing a mixture of fresh primary emissions and early products of photochemical secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation; and at a downwind site (Upland) during afternoon, when the impacts of photochemically aged secondary PM are significant. Chemical composition showed distinctive trends, with the lowest fraction of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and other organic tracers of SOA formation (e.g. organic acids) at Long Beach, and the lowest abundance of organic tracers of primary vehicular emissions (such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and hopanes) at Upland. A molecular marker-based chemical mass balance (MM-CMB) model indicated that 72% of the total organic carbon at Long Beach was comprised of primary vehicular sources (combined heavy duty and light duty vehicles), while the vehicular fraction was found to be 50% and 39% at Los Angeles and Upland, respectively. Regression analysis suggested that at Long Beach, the variation in oxidative potential of PM0.25 (quantified using a macrophage-based reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay) was mainly driven by mobile vehicular emissions and the water-insoluble fraction of the organic carbon. In contrast, at Upland, where photochemical processing and secondary aerosol formation was the highest, WSOC and secondary organics were the major drivers of the oxidative potential variation. The multivariate regression analysis also indicated that as much as 58% of the overall spatial and temporal variation in the oxidative

  18. Quantifying Methane Fluxes Simply and Accurately: The Tracer Dilution Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rella, Christopher; Crosson, Eric; Green, Roger; Hater, Gary; Dayton, Dave; Lafleur, Rick; Merrill, Ray; Tan, Sze; Thoma, Eben

    2010-05-01

    Methane is an important atmospheric constituent with a wide variety of sources, both natural and anthropogenic, including wetlands and other water bodies, permafrost, farms, landfills, and areas with significant petrochemical exploration, drilling, transport, or processing, or refining occurs. Despite its importance to the carbon cycle, its significant impact as a greenhouse gas, and its ubiquity in modern life as a source of energy, its sources and sinks in marine and terrestrial ecosystems are only poorly understood. This is largely because high quality, quantitative measurements of methane fluxes in these different environments have not been available, due both to the lack of robust field-deployable instrumentation as well as to the fact that most significant sources of methane extend over large areas (from 10's to 1,000,000's of square meters) and are heterogeneous emitters - i.e., the methane is not emitted evenly over the area in question. Quantifying the total methane emissions from such sources becomes a tremendous challenge, compounded by the fact that atmospheric transport from emission point to detection point can be highly variable. In this presentation we describe a robust, accurate, and easy-to-deploy technique called the tracer dilution method, in which a known gas (such as acetylene, nitrous oxide, or sulfur hexafluoride) is released in the same vicinity of the methane emissions. Measurements of methane and the tracer gas are then made downwind of the release point, in the so-called far-field, where the area of methane emissions cannot be distinguished from a point source (i.e., the two gas plumes are well-mixed). In this regime, the methane emissions are given by the ratio of the two measured concentrations, multiplied by the known tracer emission rate. The challenges associated with atmospheric variability and heterogeneous methane emissions are handled automatically by the transport and dispersion of the tracer. We present detailed methane flux

  19. Accurate radio positions with the Tidbinbilla interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batty, M. J.; Gulkis, S.; Jauncey, D. L.; Rayner, P. T.

    1979-01-01

    The Tidbinbilla interferometer (Batty et al., 1977) is designed specifically to provide accurate radio position measurements of compact radio sources in the Southern Hemisphere with high sensitivity. The interferometer uses the 26-m and 64-m antennas of the Deep Space Network at Tidbinbilla, near Canberra. The two antennas are separated by 200 m on a north-south baseline. By utilizing the existing antennas and the low-noise traveling-wave masers at 2.29 GHz, it has been possible to produce a high-sensitivity instrument with a minimum of capital expenditure. The north-south baseline ensures that a good range of UV coverage is obtained, so that sources lying in the declination range between about -80 and +30 deg may be observed with nearly orthogonal projected baselines of no less than about 1000 lambda. The instrument also provides high-accuracy flux density measurements for compact radio sources.

  20. Pan-information Location Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X. Y.; Guo, W.; Huang, L.; Hu, T.; Gao, W. X.

    2013-11-01

    A huge amount of information, including geographic, environmental, socio-economic, personal and social network information, has been generated from diverse sources. Most of this information exists separately and is disorderly even if some of it is about the same person, feature, phenomenon or event. Users generally need to collect related information from different sources and then utilize them in applications. An automatic mechanism, therefore, for establishing a connection between potentially-related information will profoundly expand the usefulness of this huge body of information. A connection tie is semantic location describing semantically concepts and attributes of locations as well as relationships between locations, since 80% of information contains some kind of geographic reference but not all of geographic reference has explicit geographic coordinates. Semantic location is an orthogonal form of location representation which can be represented as domain ontology or UML format. Semantic location associates various kinds of information about a same object to provide timely information services according to users' demands, habits, preferences and applications. Based on this idea, a Pan-Information Location Map (PILM) is proposed as a new-style 4D map to associates semantic location-based information dynamically to organize and consolidate the locality and characteristics of corresponding features and events, and delivers on-demand information with a User-Adaptive Smart Display (UASD).

  1. METHOD OF LOCATING GROUNDS

    DOEpatents

    Macleish, K.G.

    1958-02-11

    ABS>This patent presents a method for locating a ground in a d-c circult having a number of parallel branches connected across a d-c source or generator. The complete method comprises the steps of locating the ground with reference to the mildpoint of the parallel branches by connecting a potentiometer across the terminals of the circuit and connecting the slider of the potentiometer to ground through a current indicating instrument, adjusting the slider to right or left of the mildpoint so as to cause the instrument to indicate zero, connecting the terminal of the network which is farthest from the ground as thus indicated by the potentiometer to ground through a condenser, impressing a ripple voltage on the circuit, and then measuring the ripple voltage at the midpoint of each parallel branch to find the branch in which is the lowest value of ripple voltage, and then measuring the distribution of the ripple voltage along this branch to determine the point at which the ripple voltage drops off to zero or substantially zero due to the existence of a ground. The invention has particular application where a circuit ground is present which will disappear if the normal circuit voltage is removed.

  2. Source Estimation by Full Wave Form Inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Sjögreen, Björn; Petersson, N. Anders

    2013-08-07

    Given time-dependent ground motion recordings at a number of receiver stations, we solve the inverse problem for estimating the parameters of the seismic source. The source is modeled as a point moment tensor source, characterized by its location, moment tensor components, the start time, and frequency parameter (rise time) of its source time function. In total, there are 11 unknown parameters. We use a non-linear conjugate gradient algorithm to minimize the full waveform misfit between observed and computed ground motions at the receiver stations. An important underlying assumption of the minimization problem is that the wave propagation is accurately described by the elastic wave equation in a heterogeneous isotropic material. We use a fourth order accurate finite difference method, developed in [12], to evolve the waves forwards in time. The adjoint wave equation corresponding to the discretized elastic wave equation is used to compute the gradient of the misfit, which is needed by the non-linear conjugated minimization algorithm. A new source point moment source discretization is derived that guarantees that the Hessian of the misfit is a continuous function of the source location. An efficient approach for calculating the Hessian is also presented. We show how the Hessian can be used to scale the problem to improve the convergence of the non-linear conjugated gradient algorithm. Numerical experiments are presented for estimating the source parameters from synthetic data in a layer over half-space problem (LOH.1), illustrating rapid convergence of the proposed approach.

  3. Tuned in: plant roots use sound to locate water.

    PubMed

    Gagliano, Monica; Grimonprez, Mavra; Depczynski, Martial; Renton, Michael

    2017-04-05

    Because water is essential to life, organisms have evolved a wide range of strategies to cope with water limitations, including actively searching for their preferred moisture levels to avoid dehydration. Plants use moisture gradients to direct their roots through the soil once a water source is detected, but how they first detect the source is unknown. We used the model plant Pisum sativum to investigate the mechanism by which roots sense and locate water. We found that roots were able to locate a water source by sensing the vibrations generated by water moving inside pipes, even in the absence of substrate moisture. When both moisture and acoustic cues were available, roots preferentially used moisture in the soil over acoustic vibrations, suggesting that acoustic gradients enable roots to broadly detect a water source at a distance, while moisture gradients help them to reach their target more accurately. Our results also showed that the presence of noise affected the abilities of roots to perceive and respond correctly to the surrounding soundscape. These findings highlight the urgent need to better understand the ecological role of sound and the consequences of acoustic pollution for plant as well as animal populations.

  4. Magnetic ranging tool accurately guides replacement well

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, J.B.; Wesson, J.P. )

    1992-12-21

    This paper reports on magnetic ranging surveys and directional drilling technology which accurately guided a replacement well bore to intersect a leaking gas storage well with casing damage. The second well bore was then used to pump cement into the original leaking casing shoe. The repair well bore kicked off from the surface hole, bypassed casing damage in the middle of the well, and intersected the damaged well near the casing shoe. The repair well was subsequently completed in the gas storage zone near the original well bore, salvaging the valuable bottom hole location in the reservoir. This method would prevent the loss of storage gas, and it would prevent a potential underground blowout that could permanently damage the integrity of the storage field.

  5. Accurate measurement of unsteady state fluid temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaremkiewicz, Magdalena

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, two accurate methods for determining the transient fluid temperature were presented. Measurements were conducted for boiling water since its temperature is known. At the beginning the thermometers are at the ambient temperature and next they are immediately immersed into saturated water. The measurements were carried out with two thermometers of different construction but with the same housing outer diameter equal to 15 mm. One of them is a K-type industrial thermometer widely available commercially. The temperature indicated by the thermometer was corrected considering the thermometers as the first or second order inertia devices. The new design of a thermometer was proposed and also used to measure the temperature of boiling water. Its characteristic feature is a cylinder-shaped housing with the sheath thermocouple located in its center. The temperature of the fluid was determined based on measurements taken in the axis of the solid cylindrical element (housing) using the inverse space marching method. Measurements of the transient temperature of the air flowing through the wind tunnel using the same thermometers were also carried out. The proposed measurement technique provides more accurate results compared with measurements using industrial thermometers in conjunction with simple temperature correction using the inertial thermometer model of the first or second order. By comparing the results, it was demonstrated that the new thermometer allows obtaining the fluid temperature much faster and with higher accuracy in comparison to the industrial thermometer. Accurate measurements of the fast changing fluid temperature are possible due to the low inertia thermometer and fast space marching method applied for solving the inverse heat conduction problem.

  6. Concurrent and Accurate Short Read Mapping on Multicore Processors.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Héctor; Tárraga, Joaquín; Medina, Ignacio; Barrachina, Sergio; Castillo, Maribel; Dopazo, Joaquín; Quintana-Ortí, Enrique S

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a parallel aligner with a work-flow organization for fast and accurate mapping of RNA sequences on servers equipped with multicore processors. Our software, HPG Aligner SA (HPG Aligner SA is an open-source application. The software is available at http://www.opencb.org, exploits a suffix array to rapidly map a large fraction of the RNA fragments (reads), as well as leverages the accuracy of the Smith-Waterman algorithm to deal with conflictive reads. The aligner is enhanced with a careful strategy to detect splice junctions based on an adaptive division of RNA reads into small segments (or seeds), which are then mapped onto a number of candidate alignment locations, providing crucial information for the successful alignment of the complete reads. The experimental results on a platform with Intel multicore technology report the parallel performance of HPG Aligner SA, on RNA reads of 100-400 nucleotides, which excels in execution time/sensitivity to state-of-the-art aligners such as TopHat 2+Bowtie 2, MapSplice, and STAR.

  7. Locative Inversion in Cantonese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mok, Sui-Sang

    This study investigates the phenomenon of "Locative Inversion" in Cantonese. The term "Locative Inversion" indicates that the locative phrase (LP) syntactic process in Cantonese and the appears at the sentence-initial position and its logical subject occurs postverbally. It is demonstrated that this Locative Inversion is a…

  8. Location, Location, Location: Development of Spatiotemporal Sequence Learning in Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkham, Natasha Z.; Slemmer, Jonathan A.; Richardson, Daniel C.; Johnson, Scott P.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated infants' sensitivity to spatiotemporal structure. In Experiment 1, circles appeared in a statistically defined spatial pattern. At test 11-month-olds, but not 8-month-olds, looked longer at a novel spatial sequence. Experiment 2 presented different color/shape stimuli, but only the location sequence was violated during test;…

  9. Distance scaling method for accurate prediction of slowly varying magnetic fields in satellite missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, Panagiotis P.; Chatzineofytou, Elpida G.; Spantideas, Sotirios T.; Capsalis, Christos N.

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, the determination of the magnetic behavior of localized magnetic sources from near-field measurements is examined. The distance power law of the magnetic field fall-off is used in various cases to accurately predict the magnetic signature of an equipment under test (EUT) consisting of multiple alternating current (AC) magnetic sources. Therefore, parameters concerning the location of the observation points (magnetometers) are studied towards this scope. The results clearly show that these parameters are independent of the EUT's size and layout. Additionally, the techniques developed in the present study enable the placing of the magnetometers close to the EUT, thus achieving high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Finally, the proposed method is verified by real measurements, using a mobile phone as an EUT.

  10. Improved integrated sniper location system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figler, Burton D.; Spera, Timothy J.

    1999-01-01

    In July of 1995, Lockheed Martin IR Imaging Systems, of Lexington, Massachusetts began the development of an integrated sniper location system for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and for the Department of the Navy's Naval Command Control & Ocean Surveillance Center, RDTE Division in San Diego, California. The I-SLS integrates acoustic and uncooled infrared sensing technologies to provide an affordable and highly effective sniper detection and location capability. This system, its performance and results from field tests at Camp Pendleton, California, in October 1996 were described in a paper presented at the November 1996 SPIE Photonics East Symposium1 on Enabling Technologies for Law Enforcement and Security. The I-SLS combines an acoustic warning system with an uncooled infrared warning system. The acoustic warning system has been developed by SenTech, Inc., of Lexington, Massachusetts. This acoustic warning system provides sniper detection and coarse location information based upon the muzzle blast of the sniper's weapon and/or upon the shock wave produced by the sniper's bullet, if the bullet is supersonic. The uncooled infrared warning system provides sniper detection and fine location information based upon the weapon's muzzle flash. In addition, the uncooled infrared warning system can provide thermal imagery that can be used to accurately locate and identify the sniper. Combining these two technologies improves detection probability, reduces false alarm rate and increases utility. In the two years since the last report of the integrated sniper location system, improvements have been made and a second field demonstration was planned. In this paper, we describe the integrated sniper location system modifications in preparation for the new field demonstration. In addition, fundamental improvements in the uncooled infrared sensor technology continue to be made. These improvements include higher sensitivity (lower minimum resolvable temperature

  11. Sleeping at work: not all about location, location, location.

    PubMed

    Jay, Sarah M; Aisbett, Brad; Sprajcer, Madeline; Ferguson, Sally A

    2015-02-01

    Working arrangements in industries that use non-standard hours sometimes necessitate an 'onsite' workforce where workers sleep in accommodation within or adjacent to the workplace. Of particular relevance to these workers is the widely held (and largely anecdotal) assumption that sleep at home is better than sleep away, particularly when away for work. This narrative review explores the idea that sleep outcomes in these unique work situations are the product of an interaction between numerous factors including timing and duration of breaks, commute length, sleeping environment (noise, movement, vibration, light), circadian phase, demographic factors and familiarity with the sleep location. Based on the data presented in this review, it is our contention that the location of sleep, whilst important, is secondary to other factors such as the timing and duration of sleep periods. We suggest that future research should include measures that allow conceptualisation of other critical factors such as familiarity with the sleeping environment.

  12. Accurate upper body rehabilitation system using kinect.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sanjana; Bhowmick, Brojeshwar; Chakravarty, Kingshuk; Sinha, Aniruddha; Das, Abhijit

    2016-08-01

    The growing importance of Kinect as a tool for clinical assessment and rehabilitation is due to its portability, low cost and markerless system for human motion capture. However, the accuracy of Kinect in measuring three-dimensional body joint center locations often fails to meet clinical standards of accuracy when compared to marker-based motion capture systems such as Vicon. The length of the body segment connecting any two joints, measured as the distance between three-dimensional Kinect skeleton joint coordinates, has been observed to vary with time. The orientation of the line connecting adjoining Kinect skeletal coordinates has also been seen to differ from the actual orientation of the physical body segment. Hence we have proposed an optimization method that utilizes Kinect Depth and RGB information to search for the joint center location that satisfies constraints on body segment length and as well as orientation. An experimental study have been carried out on ten healthy participants performing upper body range of motion exercises. The results report 72% reduction in body segment length variance and 2° improvement in Range of Motion (ROM) angle hence enabling to more accurate measurements for upper limb exercises.

  13. On numerically accurate finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagtegaal, J. C.; Parks, D. M.; Rice, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A general criterion for testing a mesh with topologically similar repeat units is given, and the analysis shows that only a few conventional element types and arrangements are, or can be made suitable for computations in the fully plastic range. Further, a new variational principle, which can easily and simply be incorporated into an existing finite element program, is presented. This allows accurate computations to be made even for element designs that would not normally be suitable. Numerical results are given for three plane strain problems, namely pure bending of a beam, a thick-walled tube under pressure, and a deep double edge cracked tensile specimen. The effects of various element designs and of the new variational procedure are illustrated. Elastic-plastic computation at finite strain are discussed.

  14. ION SOURCE FOR A CALUTRON

    DOEpatents

    Lofgren, E.J.

    1959-04-14

    This patcnt relates to calutron devices and deals particularly with the mechanism used to produce the beam of ions wherein a charge material which is a vapor at room temperature is used. A charge container located outside the tank is connected through several conduits to various points along the arc chamber of the ion source. In addition, the rate of flow of the vapor to the arc chamber is controlled by a throttle valve in each conduit. By this arrangement the arc can be regulated accurately and without appreciable time lag, inasmuch as the rate of vapor flow is immediately responsive to the manipulation of the throttle valves.

  15. Location, Location, Location: Where Do Location-Based Services Fit into Your Institution's Social Media Mix?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nekritz, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Foursquare is a location-based social networking service that allows users to share their location with friends. Some college administrators have been thinking about whether and how to take the leap into location-based services, which are also known as geosocial networking services. These platforms, which often incorporate gaming elements like…

  16. Locatives in Kpelle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuha, Mai

    This paper examines the differences between locative expressions in Kpelle and English, based on the dialect of one native speaker of Kpelle. It discusses the crucial role of the reference object in defining the meaning of locatives in Kpelle, in contrast to English, where the characteristics of the object to be located are less important. An…

  17. Accurate ab Initio Spin Densities.

    PubMed

    Boguslawski, Katharina; Marti, Konrad H; Legeza, Ors; Reiher, Markus

    2012-06-12

    We present an approach for the calculation of spin density distributions for molecules that require very large active spaces for a qualitatively correct description of their electronic structure. Our approach is based on the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm to calculate the spin density matrix elements as a basic quantity for the spatially resolved spin density distribution. The spin density matrix elements are directly determined from the second-quantized elementary operators optimized by the DMRG algorithm. As an analytic convergence criterion for the spin density distribution, we employ our recently developed sampling-reconstruction scheme [J. Chem. Phys.2011, 134, 224101] to build an accurate complete-active-space configuration-interaction (CASCI) wave function from the optimized matrix product states. The spin density matrix elements can then also be determined as an expectation value employing the reconstructed wave function expansion. Furthermore, the explicit reconstruction of a CASCI-type wave function provides insight into chemically interesting features of the molecule under study such as the distribution of α and β electrons in terms of Slater determinants, CI coefficients, and natural orbitals. The methodology is applied to an iron nitrosyl complex which we have identified as a challenging system for standard approaches [J. Chem. Theory Comput.2011, 7, 2740].

  18. Memory for parking location in large lots.

    PubMed

    Means, L W; Lutz, J; Long, T E; High, K M

    1995-06-01

    The recall of automobile parking location was assessed over five consecutive workdays. Completed data from 36 women and 19 men provided measures of accuracy and a survey of specific strategies. Analysis showed a significant recency effect with memory for the most recent parking locations being superior. Less variation in parking location and shorter distance from parking location to building entrance were associated with better recall. Contrary to prevalent belief, older subjects had more accurate recall. Older subjects parked closer to the entrance and used fewer spaces which were also located closer together. The most frequently reported strategy was "favorite location" which was used more often by older subjects. Whereas laboratory tasks show memory deficits with increasing age, some studies in the natural environment have exhibited less such decline; the current data showed an actual improvement. It may be that older people adopt and practice compensatory strategies in the natural environment while laboratory tasks give little opportunity for establishing or practicing such devices.

  19. Application of near real-time radial semblance to locate the shallow magmatic conduit at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, P.; Whilldin, D.; Chouet, B.

    2004-01-01

    Radial Semblance is applied to broadband seismic network data to provide source locations of Very-Long-Period (VLP) seismic energy in near real time. With an efficient algorithm and adequate network coverage, accurate source locations of VLP energy are derived to quickly locate the shallow magmatic conduit system at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. During a restart in magma flow following a brief pause in the current eruption, the shallow magmatic conduit is pressurized, resulting in elastic radiation from various parts of the conduit system. A steeply dipping distribution of VLP hypocenters outlines a region extending from sea level to about 550 m elevation below and just east of the Halemaumau Pit Crater. The distinct hypocenters suggest the shallow plumbing system beneath Halemaumau consists of a complex plexus of sills and dikes. An unconstrained location for a section of the conduit is also observed beneath the region between Kilauea Caldera and Kilauea Iki Crater.

  20. Extracting Time-Accurate Acceleration Vectors From Nontrivial Accelerometer Arrangements.

    PubMed

    Franck, Jennifer A; Blume, Janet; Crisco, Joseph J; Franck, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Sports-related concussions are of significant concern in many impact sports, and their detection relies on accurate measurements of the head kinematics during impact. Among the most prevalent recording technologies are videography, and more recently, the use of single-axis accelerometers mounted in a helmet, such as the HIT system. Successful extraction of the linear and angular impact accelerations depends on an accurate analysis methodology governed by the equations of motion. Current algorithms are able to estimate the magnitude of acceleration and hit location, but make assumptions about the hit orientation and are often limited in the position and/or orientation of the accelerometers. The newly formulated algorithm presented in this manuscript accurately extracts the full linear and rotational acceleration vectors from a broad arrangement of six single-axis accelerometers directly from the governing set of kinematic equations. The new formulation linearizes the nonlinear centripetal acceleration term with a finite-difference approximation and provides a fast and accurate solution for all six components of acceleration over long time periods (>250 ms). The approximation of the nonlinear centripetal acceleration term provides an accurate computation of the rotational velocity as a function of time and allows for reconstruction of a multiple-impact signal. Furthermore, the algorithm determines the impact location and orientation and can distinguish between glancing, high rotational velocity impacts, or direct impacts through the center of mass. Results are shown for ten simulated impact locations on a headform geometry computed with three different accelerometer configurations in varying degrees of signal noise. Since the algorithm does not require simplifications of the actual impacted geometry, the impact vector, or a specific arrangement of accelerometer orientations, it can be easily applied to many impact investigations in which accurate kinematics need to

  1. Processing locational and orientational information.

    PubMed

    Maki, R H; Maki, W S; Marsh, L G

    1977-09-01

    In choice reaction time (RT) tasks, college students verified the truth of displays expressing spatial relations between two objects. The relations werelocational (A is left of B) ororientational (A and B are horizontal). The objects were names of states in the United States, symbols, or letter arrays. The objects were memorized prior to the display (states and letters) or were presented as part of the display (symbols and letters). In the location tasks with both states and symbols, locatives were spatial (right, left, above, below) or compass (north, south, east, west). Distance between states was also varied. When location was judged, horizontally aligned stimuli resulted in slower responses than vertically aligned stimuli, independently of materials and locative set. Reaction time was inversely related to distance. When orientation was judged, responses to horizontal pairs of states were slower than responses to vertical pairs of states, responses to horizontal pairs of letters were faster than responses to vertical pairs, and RT did not depend upon the orientation of symbols. This pattern of results suggests that orientational judgments are influenced by type of materials and the entext to which the material has been encoded (i.e., memorized). Locational judgments reflect a potent source of difficulty not present in orientation tasks, namely, telling left from right. Alternative explanations of the right-left effect are discussed.

  2. System and Method of Locating Lightning Strikes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor); Starr, Stanley O. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A system and method of determining locations of lightning strikes has been described. The system includes multiple receivers located around an area of interest, such as a space center or airport. Each receiver monitors both sound and electric fields. The detection of an electric field pulse and a sound wave are used to calculate an area around each receiver in which the lighting is detected. A processor is coupled to the receivers to accurately determine the location of the lighting strike. The processor can manipulate the receiver data to compensate for environmental variables such as wind, temperature, and humidity. Further, each receiver processor can discriminate between distant and local lightning strikes.

  3. Assessment of User Home Location Geoinference Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Joshua J.; Bell, Eric B.; Corley, Courtney D.; Dowling, Chase P.; Cowell, Andrew J.

    2015-05-29

    This study presents an assessment of multiple approaches to determine the home and/or other important locations to a Twitter user. In this study, we present a unique approach to the problem of geotagged data sparsity in social media when performing geoinferencing tasks. Given the sparsity of explicitly geotagged Twitter data, the ability to perform accurate and reliable user geolocation from a limited number of geotagged posts has proven to be quite useful. In our survey, we have achieved accuracy rates of over 86% in matching Twitter user profile locations with their inferred home locations derived from geotagged posts.

  4. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOEpatents

    Salzer, Leander J.; Foreman, Larry R.

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved.

  5. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOEpatents

    Salzer, L.J.; Foreman, L.R.

    1999-08-31

    This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved. 7 figs.

  6. Heterogeneity of nervous system mitochondria: location, location, location!

    PubMed

    Dubinsky, Janet M

    2009-08-01

    Mitochondrial impairments have been associated with many neurological disorders, from inborn errors of metabolism or genetic disorders to age and environmentally linked diseases of aging (DiMauro S., Schon E.A. 2008. Mitochondrial disorders in the nervous system. Annu. Rev., Neurosci. 31, 91-123.). In these disorders, specific nervous system components or brain regions appear to be initially more susceptible to the triggering event or pathological process. Such regional variation in susceptibility to multiple types of stressors raises the possibility that inherent differences in mitochondrial function may mediate some aspect of pathogenesis. Regional differences in the distribution or number of mitochondria, mitochondrial enzyme activities, enzyme expression levels, mitochondrial genes or availability of necessary metabolites become attractive explanations for selective vulnerability of a nervous system structure. While regionally selective mitochondrial vulnerability has been documented, regional variations in other cellular and tissue characteristics may also contribute to metabolic impairment. Such environmental variables include high tonic firing rates, neurotransmitter phenotype, location of mitochondria within a neuron, or the varied tissue perfusion pressure of different cerebral arterial branches. These contextual variables exert regionally distinct regulatory influences on mitochondria to tune their energy production to local demands. Thus to understand variations in mitochondrial functioning and consequent selective vulnerability to injury, the organelle must be placed within the context of its cellular, functional, developmental and neuroanatomical environment.

  7. A novel method to accurately locate and count large numbers of steps by photobleaching

    PubMed Central

    Tsekouras, Konstantinos; Custer, Thomas C.; Jashnsaz, Hossein; Walter, Nils G.; Pressé, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Photobleaching event counting is a single-molecule fluorescence technique that is increasingly being used to determine the stoichiometry of protein and RNA complexes composed of many subunits in vivo as well as in vitro. By tagging protein or RNA subunits with fluorophores, activating them, and subsequently observing as the fluorophores photobleach, one obtains information on the number of subunits in a complex. The noise properties in a photobleaching time trace depend on the number of active fluorescent subunits. Thus, as fluorophores stochastically photobleach, noise properties of the time trace change stochastically, and these varying noise properties have created a challenge in identifying photobleaching steps in a time trace. Although photobleaching steps are often detected by eye, this method only works for high individual fluorophore emission signal-to-noise ratios and small numbers of fluorophores. With filtering methods or currently available algorithms, it is possible to reliably identify photobleaching steps for up to 20–30 fluorophores and signal-to-noise ratios down to ∼1. Here we present a new Bayesian method of counting steps in photobleaching time traces that takes into account stochastic noise variation in addition to complications such as overlapping photobleaching events that may arise from fluorophore interactions, as well as on-off blinking. Our method is capable of detecting ≥50 photobleaching steps even for signal-to-noise ratios as low as 0.1, can find up to ≥500 steps for more favorable noise profiles, and is computationally inexpensive. PMID:27654946

  8. Reconstructing Spatial Distributions from Anonymized Locations

    SciTech Connect

    Horey, James L; Forrest, Stephanie; Groat, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Devices such as mobile phones, tablets, and sensors are often equipped with GPS that accurately report a person's location. Combined with wireless communication, these devices enable a wide range of new social tools and applications. These same qualities, however, leave location-aware applications vulnerable to privacy violations. This paper introduces the Negative Quad Tree, a privacy protection method for location aware applications. The method is broadly applicable to applications that use spatial density information, such as social applications that measure the popularity of social venues. The method employs a simple anonymization algorithm running on mobile devices, and a more complex reconstruction algorithm on a central server. This strategy is well suited to low-powered mobile devices. The paper analyzes the accuracy of the reconstruction method in a variety of simulated and real-world settings and demonstrates that the method is accurate enough to be used in many real-world scenarios.

  9. Location, location, location: finding a suitable home among the noise

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Jenni A.; Radford, Craig A.; Jeffs, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    While sound is a useful cue for guiding the onshore orientation of larvae because it travels long distances underwater, it also has the potential to convey valuable information about the quality and type of the habitat at the source. Here, we provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence that settlement-stage coastal crab species can interpret and show a strong settlement and metamorphosis response to habitat-related differences in natural underwater sound. Laboratory- and field-based experiments demonstrated that time to metamorphosis in the settlement-stage larvae of common coastal crab species varied in response to different underwater sound signatures produced by different habitat types. The megalopae of five species of both temperate and tropical crabs showed a significant decrease in time to metamorphosis, when exposed to sound from their optimal settlement habitat type compared with other habitat types. These results indicate that sounds emanating from specific underwater habitats may play a major role in determining spatial patterns of recruitment in coastal crab species. PMID:22673354

  10. Reversible micromachining locator

    SciTech Connect

    Salzer, Leander J.; Foreman, Larry R.

    2002-01-01

    A locator with a part support is used to hold a part onto the kinematic mount of a tooling machine so that the part can be held in or replaced in exactly the same position relative to the cutting tool for machining different surfaces of the part or for performing different machining operations on the same or different surfaces of the part. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls placed at equidistant positions around the planar surface of the locator and the kinematic mount has a plurality of magnets which alternate with grooves which accommodate the portions of the steel balls projecting from the locator. The part support holds the part to be machined securely in place in the locator. The locator can be easily detached from the kinematic mount, turned over, and replaced onto the same kinematic mount or another kinematic mount on another tooling machine without removing the part to be machined from the locator so that there is no need to touch or reposition the part within the locator, thereby assuring exact replication of the position of the part in relation to the cutting tool on the tooling machine for each machining operation on the part.

  11. Preliminary Design of a Lightning Optical Camera and ThundEr (LOCATE) Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phanord, Dieudonne D.; Koshak, William J.; Rybski, Paul M.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The preliminary design of an optical/acoustical instrument is described for making highly accurate real-time determinations of the location of cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning. The instrument, named the Lightning Optical Camera And ThundEr (LOCATE) sensor, will also image the clear and cloud-obscured lightning channel produced from CGs and cloud flashes, and will record the transient optical waveforms produced from these discharges. The LOCATE sensor will consist of a full (360 degrees) field-of-view optical camera for obtaining CG channel image and azimuth, a sensitive thunder microphone for obtaining CG range, and a fast photodiode system for time-resolving the lightning optical waveform. The optical waveform data will be used to discriminate CGs from cloud flashes. Together, the optical azimuth and thunder range is used to locate CGs and it is anticipated that a network of LOCATE sensors would determine CG source location to well within 100 meters. All of this would be accomplished for a relatively inexpensive cost compared to present RF lightning location technologies, but of course the range detection is limited and will be quantified in the future. The LOCATE sensor technology would have practical applications for electric power utility companies, government (e.g. NASA Kennedy Space Center lightning safety and warning), golf resort lightning safety, telecommunications, and other industries.

  12. Automatic vehicle location system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, G. R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An automatic vehicle detection system is disclosed, in which each vehicle whose location is to be detected carries active means which interact with passive elements at each location to be identified. The passive elements comprise a plurality of passive loops arranged in a sequence along the travel direction. Each of the loops is tuned to a chosen frequency so that the sequence of the frequencies defines the location code. As the vehicle traverses the sequence of the loops as it passes over each loop, signals only at the frequency of the loop being passed over are coupled from a vehicle transmitter to a vehicle receiver. The frequencies of the received signals in the receiver produce outputs which together represent a code of the traversed location. The code location is defined by a painted pattern which reflects light to a vehicle carried detector whose output is used to derive the code defined by the pattern.

  13. Antarctic Meteorite Location Map Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, John (Editor); Fessler, Brian (Editor); Cassidy, William (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Antarctica has been a prolific source of meteorites since meteorite concentrations were discovered in 1969. The Antarctic Search For Meteorites (ANSMET) project has been active over much of the Trans-Antarctic Mountain Range. The first ANSMET expedition (a joint U.S.-Japanese effort) discovered what turned out to be a significant concentration of meteorites at the Allan Hills in Victoria Land. Later reconnaissance in this region resulted in the discovery of meteorite concentrations on icefields to the west of the Allan Hills, at Reckling Moraine, and Elephant Moraine. Antarctic meteorite location maps (reduced versions) of the Allan Hills main, near western, middle western, and far western icefields and the Elephant Moraine icefield are presented. Other Antarctic meteorite location maps for the specimens found by the ANSMET project are being prepared.

  14. A fast and accurate frequency estimation algorithm for sinusoidal signal with harmonic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinghua; Pan, Mengchun; Zeng, Zhidun; Hu, Jiafei; Chen, Dixiang; Tian, Wugang; Zhao, Jianqiang; Du, Qingfa

    2016-10-01

    Frequency estimation is a fundamental problem in many applications, such as traditional vibration measurement, power system supervision, and microelectromechanical system sensors control. In this paper, a fast and accurate frequency estimation algorithm is proposed to deal with low efficiency problem in traditional methods. The proposed algorithm consists of coarse and fine frequency estimation steps, and we demonstrate that it is more efficient than conventional searching methods to achieve coarse frequency estimation (location peak of FFT amplitude) by applying modified zero-crossing technique. Thus, the proposed estimation algorithm requires less hardware and software sources and can achieve even higher efficiency when the experimental data increase. Experimental results with modulated magnetic signal show that the root mean square error of frequency estimation is below 0.032 Hz with the proposed algorithm, which has lower computational complexity and better global performance than conventional frequency estimation methods.

  15. Sensors Locate Radio Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    After receiving a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from Kennedy Space Center, Soneticom Inc., based in West Melbourne, Florida, created algorithms for time difference of arrival and radio interferometry, which it used in its Lynx Location System (LLS) to locate electromagnetic interference that can disrupt radio communications. Soneticom is collaborating with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to install and test the LLS at its field test center in New Jersey in preparation for deploying the LLS at commercial airports. The software collects data from each sensor in order to compute the location of the interfering emitter.

  16. Geoacoustic and source tracking using particle filtering: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Yardim, Caglar; Gerstoft, Peter; Hodgkiss, William S

    2010-07-01

    A particle filtering (PF) approach is presented for performing sequential geoacoustic inversion of a complex ocean acoustic environment using a moving acoustic source. This approach treats both the environmental parameters [e.g., water column sound speed profile (SSP), water depth, sediment and bottom parameters] at the source location and the source parameters (e.g., source depth, range and speed) as unknown random variables that evolve as the source moves. This allows real-time updating of the environment and accurate tracking of the moving source. As a sequential Monte Carlo technique that operates on nonlinear systems with non-Gaussian probability densities, the PF is an ideal algorithm to perform tracking of environmental and source parameters, and their uncertainties via the evolving posterior probability densities. The approach is demonstrated on both simulated data in a shallow water environment with a sloping bottom and experimental data collected during the SWellEx-96 experiment.

  17. Electronic apex locators.

    PubMed

    Gordon, M P J; Chandler, N P

    2004-07-01

    Prior to root canal treatment at least one undistorted radiograph is required to assess canal morphology. The apical extent of instrumentation and the final root filling have a role in treatment success, and are primarily determined radiographically. Electronic apex locators reduce the number of radiographs required and assist where radiographic methods create difficulty. They may also indicate cases where the apical foramen is some distance from the radiographic apex. Other roles include the detection of root canal perforation. A review of the literature focussed first on the subject of electronic apex location. A second review used the names of apex location devices. From the combined searches, 113 pertinent articles in English were found. This paper reviews the development, action, use and types of electronic apex locators.

  18. Smart Location Mapping

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Smart Location Database, Access to Jobs and Workers via Transit, and National Walkability Index tools can help assess indicators related to the built environment, transit accessibility, and walkability.

  19. Uranium Location Database Compilation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has compiled mine location information from federal, state, and Tribal agencies into a single database as part of its investigation into the potential environmental hazards of wastes from abandoned uranium mines in the western United States.

  20. Lunar Impact Flash Locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, D. E.; Suggs, R. M.; Kupferschmidt, L.; Feldman, J.

    2015-01-01

    A bright impact flash detected by the NASA Lunar Impact Monitoring Program in March 2013 brought into focus the importance of determining the impact flash location. A process for locating the impact flash, and presumably its associated crater, was developed using commercially available software tools. The process was successfully applied to the March 2013 impact flash and put into production on an additional 300 impact flashes. The goal today: provide a description of the geolocation technique developed.

  1. Deep space target location with Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and Hipparcos data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Null, George W.

    1988-01-01

    Interplanetary spacecraft navigation requires accurate a priori knowledge of target positions. A concept is presented for attaining improved target ephemeris accuracy using two future Earth-orbiting optical observatories, the European Space Agency (ESA) Hipparcos observatory and the Nasa Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Assuming nominal observatory performance, the Hipparcos data reduction will provide an accurate global star catalog, and HST will provide a capability for accurate angular measurements of stars and solar system bodies. The target location concept employs HST to observe solar system bodies relative to Hipparcos catalog stars and to determine the orientation (frame tie) of these stars to compact extragalactic radio sources. The target location process is described, the major error sources discussed, the potential target ephemeris error predicted, and mission applications identified. Preliminary results indicate that ephemeris accuracy comparable to the errors in individual Hipparcos catalog stars may be possible with a more extensive HST observing program. Possible future ground and spacebased replacements for Hipparcos and HST astrometric capabilities are also discussed.

  2. The Acquisition of Locative Constructions in Cantonese Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Sik Lee

    A study investigated how Cantonese children acquire word order in the locative system, which is very complex in their native language. Focus was on three semantic categories: static location, locative source, and locative goal. Subjects were 32 monolingual Cantonese children aged 2.5 to 5.9 in four age groups. Each subject performed four tasks,…

  3. Accuracy of teleseismic event locations in the Middle East and North Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, J.J.

    1996-12-04

    Seismic characterization at the regional level requires accurate determination of phases and travel times for many combinations of stations and events. An important consideration in the process is the accuracy of event locations. The LLNL Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Research Program is currently working on data from the Middle East and North Africa, where seismic station coverage is relatively sparse and ``ground truth`` seismic source information is practically nonexistent. In this report the investigator use after shock studies as a source of local ground truth. He evaluates teleseismic location accuracy by comparing hypocenters determined by local networks with those determined teleseismically [e.g. the International Seismological Center (ISC) and the National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC)]. Epicentral locations, origin times, and depth determinations of events from three aftershocks studies (Algeria, Armenia, and Iran) and one local network study (Iran) are compared with ISC and NEIC locations for the same events. The key parameter for the ISC locations is the number of observations used in the location determination. For more than 40-50 observations, the agreement rapidly diminishes and ISC locations can differ from local determinations by as much as 80 km or more. Events in Iran show a distinct bias of ISC location errors toward the northeast; events in Armenia and Algeria show no directional bias. This study shows that only events with ISC M{sub b} {gt} 4.4-4.5 or NEIS M{sub b} {gt} 4.7-4. should be used for compiling travel time information from teleseismic bulletins in the Middle East/North Africa region when locations from the NEIC and ISC bulletins are used.

  4. Accurate Land Company, Inc., Acadia Subdivision, Plat 1 and Plat 2

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA is providing notice of an Administrative Penalty Assessment in the form of an Expedited Storm Water Settlement Agreement against Accurate Land Company, Inc., a business located at 12035 University Ave., Suite 100, Clive, IA 50235, for alleged viola

  5. A time-domain inverse technique for the localization and quantification of rotating sound sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Zheng; Bi, Chuan-Xing; Zhang, Yong-Bin; Xu, Liang

    2017-06-01

    A time-domain inverse technique based on the time-domain equivalent source method is proposed for the localization and quantification of rotating sound sources. In this technique, the actual rotating sound sources are modeled by a series of rotating equivalent sources distributed on the source surface. The strengths of these equivalent sources are solved based on the exact transfer relationship between the measured pressure at the receiver time and the desired equivalent source strengths at the source time. Compared to the known time-domain rotating beamforming that just owns the function of source localization, the proposed inverse technique not only can locate rotating sources accurately but also can predict sound fields quantitatively. Moreover, due to the use of retarded time approach, the proposed inverse technique avoids the interpolation of measured pressure that is needed in the time-domain rotating beamforming, thus providing the ability of real-time calculation of source strengths. Numerical simulations and experiments examine the validity of the proposed technique and demonstrate its advantages of locating sources more accurately and enabling to predict sound fields quantitatively by comparing with the time-domain rotating beamforming.

  6. RFI emitter location techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. L. J.

    1973-01-01

    The possibility is discussed of using Doppler techniques for determining the location of ground based emitters causing radio frequency interference with low orbiting satellites. An error analysis indicates that it is possible to find the emitter location within an error range of 2 n.mi. The parameters which determine the required satellite receiver characteristic are discussed briefly along with the non-real time signal processing which may by used in obtaining the Doppler curve. Finally, the required characteristics of the satellite antenna are analyzed.

  7. Marine cable location system

    SciTech Connect

    Zachariadis, R.G.

    1984-05-01

    An acoustic positioning system locates a marine cable at an exploration site, such cable employing a plurality of hydrophones at spaced-apart positions along the cable. A marine vessel measures water depth to the cable as the vessel passes over the cable and interrogates the hydrophones with sonar pulses along a slant range as the vessel travels in a parallel and horizontally offset path to the cable. The location of the hydrophones is determined from the recordings of water depth and slant range.

  8. Leak Location in Plates: Compensation for Multi-Mode dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strei, M.; Roberts, R.; Holland, S.; Chimenti, D. E.

    2004-02-01

    The problem of noise source location in a plate-like structure using time of flight data recorded at sparsely distributed measurement locations is examined. The cross-correlation approach to source triangulation is not generally applicable to signals carried by multiple dispersive plate wave modes. This work examines the extensions to the principles of cross-correlation-based triangulation needed to robustly determine source location.

  9. Accurate Biomass Estimation via Bayesian Adaptive Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, K.; Knuth, K.; Castle, P.

    2005-12-01

    Typical estimates of standing wood derived from remote sensing sources take advantage of aggregate measurements of canopy heights (e.g. LIDAR) and canopy diameters (segmentation of IKONOS imagery) to obtain a wood volume estimate by assuming homogeneous species and a fixed function that returns volume. The validation of such techniques use manually measured diameter at breast height records (DBH). Our goal is to improve the accuracy and applicability of biomass estimation methods to heterogeneous forests and transitional areas. We are developing estimates with quantifiable uncertainty using a new form of estimation function, active sampling, and volumetric reconstruction image rendering for species specific mass truth. Initially we are developing a Bayesian adaptive sampling method for BRDF associated with the MISR Rahman model with respect to categorical biomes. This involves characterizing the probability distributions of the 3 free parameters of the Rahman model for the 6 categories of biomes used by MISR. Subsequently, these distributions can be used to determine the optimal sampling methodology to distinguish biomes during acquisition. We have a remotely controlled semi-autonomous helicopter that has stereo imaging, lidar, differential GPS, and spectrometers covering wavelengths from visible to NIR. We intend to automatically vary the way points of the flight path via the Bayesian adaptive sampling method. The second critical part of this work is in automating the validation of biomass estimates via using machine vision techniques. This involves taking 2-D pictures of trees of known species, and then via Bayesian techniques, reconstructing 3-D models of the trees to estimate the distribution moments associated with wood volume. Similar techniques have been developed by the medical imaging community. This then provides probability distributions conditional upon species. The final part of this work is in relating the BRDF actively sampled measurements to species

  10. Geolocating Russian sources for Arctic black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Meng-Dawn

    2014-08-01

    To design and implement an effective emission control strategy for black carbon (BC), the locations and strength of BC sources must be identified. Lack of accurate source information from the Russian Federation has created difficulty for a range of research and policy activities in the Arctic because Russia occupies the largest landmass in the Arctic Circle. A project was initiated to resolve emission sources of BC in the Russian Federation by using the Potential Source Contribution Function (PSCF). It used atmospheric BC data from two Arctic sampling stations at Alert Nunavut, Canada, and Tiksi Bay, Russia. The geographical regions of BC emission sources in Russia were identified and summarized as follows: (1) a region surrounding Moscow, (2) regions in Eurasia stretching along the Ural Mountains from the White Sea to the Black Sea, and (3) a number of scattered areas from western Siberia to the Russian Far East. Particulate potassium ions, non-marine sulfate, and vanadium were used to assist in resolving the source types: forest fire/biomass burning, coal-fired power plant, and oil combustion. Correlating these maps with the BC map helped to resolve source regions of BC emissions and connect them to their corresponding source types. The results imply that a region south of Moscow and another north of the Ural Mountains could be significant BC sources, but none of the grid cells in these regions could be linked to forest fires, oil combustion, or coal-fired power plants based on these three markers.

  11. Localization of auditory response sources using magnetoencephalography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Papanicolaou, A C; Baumann, S; Rogers, R L; Saydjari, C; Amparo, E G; Eisenberg, H M

    1990-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography offers the possibility of localizing accurately and noninvasively the source of intracranial currents associated with normal and abnormal brain activity. The purpose of this study was to assess the validity and across-subject reliability of localization of cortical sources responding to ipsilateral and contralateral auditory stimulation. Magnetic evoked fields to both stimulation conditions were measured in eight consecutive normal subjects, and the cortical sources of these fields were estimated on the basis of these measurements. Subsequent projection of the source location coordinates onto magnetic resonance images showed that in all subjects the sources were accurately estimated to fall in the vicinity of the auditory cortex and that two separate sources may account for the response to ipsilateral and contralateral stimulation.

  12. Uranium Location Database

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A GIS compiled locational database in Microsoft Access of ~15,000 mines with uranium occurrence or production, primarily in the western United States. The metadata was cooperatively compiled from Federal and State agency data sets and enables the user to conduct geographic and analytical studies on mine impacts on the public and environment.

  13. Optimal Facility-Location.

    PubMed

    Goldman, A J

    2006-01-01

    Dr. Christoph Witzgall, the honoree of this Symposium, can count among his many contributions to applied mathematics and mathematical operations research a body of widely-recognized work on the optimal location of facilities. The present paper offers to non-specialists a sketch of that field and its evolution, with emphasis on areas most closely related to Witzgall's research at NBS/NIST.

  14. Particle impact location detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, S. O.

    1974-01-01

    Detector includes delay lines connected to each detector surface strip. When several particles strike different strips simultaneously, pulses generated by each strip are time delayed by certain intervals. Delay time for each strip is known. By observing time delay in pulse, it is possible to locate strip that is struck by particle.

  15. LOCATING AREAS OF CONCERN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple method to locate changes in vegetation cover, which can be used to identify areas under stress. The method only requires inexpensive NDVI data. The use of remotely sensed data is far more cost-effective than field studies and can be performed more quickly. Local knowledg...

  16. Locating gravitational potential energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeports, David

    2017-01-01

    Where does gravitational potential energy reside when a ball is in the air? The perfectly correct answer is that it is located in the ball-Earth system. Still, mechanical energy conservation problems are routinely solved by assigning a potential energy to the ball alone. Provided here is a proof that such an assignment introduces only an entirely undetectable error.

  17. VA Health Care Facilities Locator

    MedlinePlus

    ... VA » Locations » Find Locations Locations Find Locations The javascript used here is for validation purpose only. Your browser doesn't seem to support javascript or has it disabled. This site is a ...

  18. gitter: a robust and accurate method for quantification of colony sizes from plate images.

    PubMed

    Wagih, Omar; Parts, Leopold

    2014-03-20

    Colony-based screens that quantify the fitness of clonal populations on solid agar plates are perhaps the most important source of genome-scale functional information in microorganisms. The images of ordered arrays of mutants produced by such experiments can be difficult to process because of laboratory-specific plate features, morphed colonies, plate edges, noise, and other artifacts. Most of the tools developed to address this problem are optimized to handle a single setup and do not work out of the box in other settings. We present gitter, an image analysis tool for robust and accurate processing of images from colony-based screens. gitter works by first finding the grid of colonies from a preprocessed image and then locating the bounds of each colony separately. We show that gitter produces comparable colony sizes to other tools in simple cases but outperforms them by being able to handle a wider variety of screens and more accurately quantify colony sizes from difficult images. gitter is freely available as an R package from http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/gitter under the LGPL. Tutorials and demos can be found at http://omarwagih.github.io/gitter.

  19. Location capability of a sparse regional network (RSTN) using a multi-phase earthquake location algorithm (REGLOC)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchings, L.

    1994-01-01

    The Regional Seismic Test Network (RSTN) was deployed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to determine whether data recorded by a regional network could be used to detect and accurately locate seismic events that might be clandestine nuclear tests. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the location capability of the RSTN. A major part of this project was the development of the location algorithm REGLOC and application of Basian a prior statistics for determining the accuracy of the location estimates. REGLOC utilizes all identifiable phases, including backazimuth, in the location. Ninty-four events, distributed throughout the network area, detected by both the RSTN and located by local networks were used in the study. The location capability of the RSTN was evaluated by estimating the location accuracy, error ellipse accuracy, and the percentage of events that could be located, as a function of magnitude. The location accuracy was verified by comparing the RSTN results for the 94 events with published locations based on data from the local networks. The error ellipse accuracy was evaluated by determining whether the error ellipse includes the actual location. The percentage of events located was assessed by combining detection capability with location capability to determine the percentage of events that could be located within the study area. Events were located with both an average crustal model for the entire region, and with regional velocity models along with station corrections obtained from master events. Most events with a magnitude <3.0 can only be located with arrivals from one station. Their average location errors are 453 and 414 km for the average- and regional-velocity model locations, respectively. Single station locations are very unreliable because they depend on accurate backazimuth estimates, and backazimuth proved to be a very unreliable computation.

  20. IncM Plasmid R1215 Is the Source of Chromosomally Located Regions Containing Multiple Antibiotic Resistance Genes in the Globally Disseminated Acinetobacter baumannii GC1 and GC2 Clones

    PubMed Central

    Blackwell, Grace A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clear similarities between antibiotic resistance islands in the chromosomes of extensively antibiotic-resistant isolates from the two dominant, globally distributed Acinetobacter baumannii clones, GC1 and GC2, suggest a common origin. A close relative of the likely progenitor of both of these regions was found in R1215, a conjugative IncM plasmid from a Serratia marcescens strain isolated prior to 1980. The 37.8-kb resistance region in R1215 lies within the mucB gene and includes aacC1, aadA1, aphA1b, blaTEM, catA1, sul1, and tetA(A), genes that confer resistance to gentamicin, streptomycin and spectinomycin, kanamycin and neomycin, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline, respectively. The backbone of this region is derived from Tn1721 and is interrupted by a hybrid Tn2670 (Tn21)-Tn1696-type transposon, Tn6020, and an incomplete Tn1. After minor rearrangements, this R1215 resistance island can generate AbGRI2-0*, the predicted earliest form of the IS26-bounded AbGRI2-type resistance island of GC2 isolates, and to the multiple antibiotic resistance region (MARR) of AbaR0, the precursor of this region in AbaR-type resistance islands in the GC1 group. A 29.9-kb circle excised by IS26 has been inserted into the A. baumannii chromosome to generate AbGRI2-0*. To create the MARR of AbaR0, a different circular form, again generated by IS26 from an R1215 resistance region variant, has been opened at a different point by recombination with a copy of the sul1 gene already present in the AbaR precursor. Recent IncM plasmids related to R1215 have a variant resistance island containing a blaSHV gene in the same location. IMPORTANCE Two lineages of extensively antibiotic-resistant A. baumannii currently plaguing modern medicine each acquired resistance to all of the original antibiotics (ampicillin, tetracycline, kanamycin, and sulfonamides) by the end of the 1970s and then became resistant to antibiotics from newer families after they were

  1. Aquatic Nuisance Species Locator

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Data in this map has been collected by the United States Geological Survey's Nonindigenous Aquatic Species program located in Gainesville, Florida (http://nas.er.usgs.gov/default.aspx). This dataset may have some inaccuracies and is only current to June 15, 2012. The species identified in this dataset are not inclusive of all aquatic nuisance species, but rather a subset identified to be at risk for transport by recreational activities such as boating and angling. Additionally, the locations where organisims have been identified are also not inclusive and should be treated as a guide. Organisms are limited to the following: American bullfrog, Asian clam, Asian shore crab, Asian tunicate, Australian spotted jellyfish, Chinese mitten crab, New Zealand mudsnail, Colonial sea squirt, Alewife, Bighead carp, Black carp, Flathead catfish, Grass carp, Green crab, Lionfish, Northern snakehead, Quagga mussel, Round Goby, Ruffe, Rusty crayfish, Sea lamprey, Silver carp, Spiny water flea, Veined rapa whelk, Zebra mussel

  2. Electric current locator

    DOEpatents

    King, Paul E [Corvallis, OR; Woodside, Charles Rigel [Corvallis, OR

    2012-02-07

    The disclosure herein provides an apparatus for location of a quantity of current vectors in an electrical device, where the current vector has a known direction and a known relative magnitude to an input current supplied to the electrical device. Mathematical constants used in Biot-Savart superposition equations are determined for the electrical device, the orientation of the apparatus, and relative magnitude of the current vector and the input current, and the apparatus utilizes magnetic field sensors oriented to a sensing plane to provide current vector location based on the solution of the Biot-Savart superposition equations. Description of required orientations between the apparatus and the electrical device are disclosed and various methods of determining the mathematical constants are presented.

  3. The application of fuzzy neural network in distribution center location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongpan; Liu, Yong

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, the establishment of the fuzzy neural network model for logistics distribution center location applied the fuzzy method to the input value of BP algorithm and took the experts' evaluation value as the expected output. At the same time, using the network learning to get the optimized selection and furthermore get a more accurate evaluation to the programs of location.

  4. Coso MT Site Locations

    DOE Data Explorer

    Doug Blankenship

    2011-05-04

    This data includes the locations of the MT data collected in and around the Coso Geothermal field that covered the West Flank area. These are the data that the 3D MT models were created from that were discussed in Phase 1 of the West Flank FORGE project. The projected coordinate system is NAD 1927 State Plane California IV FIPS 0404 and the Projection is Lambert Conformal Conic. Units are in feet.

  5. Magnetic Location Indicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegman, Thomas W.

    1992-01-01

    Ferrofluidic device indicates point of highest magnetic-flux density in workspace. Consists of bubble of ferrofluid in immiscible liquid carrier in clear plastic case. Used in flat block or tube. Axes of centering circle on flat-block version used to mark location of maximum flux density when bubble in circle. Device used to find point on wall corresponding to known point on opposite side of wall.

  6. Ammonia Leak Locator Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, Franklin T.; Wuest, Martin P.; Deffenbaugh, Danny M.

    1995-01-01

    The thermal control system of International Space Station Alpha will use liquid ammonia as the heat exchange fluid. It is expected that small leaks (of the order perhaps of one pound of ammonia per day) may develop in the lines transporting the ammonia to the various facilities as well as in the heat exchange equipment. Such leaks must be detected and located before the supply of ammonia becomes critically low. For that reason, NASA-JSC has a program underway to evaluate instruments that can detect and locate ultra-small concentrations of ammonia in a high vacuum environment. To be useful, the instrument must be portable and small enough that an astronaut can easily handle it during extravehicular activity. An additional complication in the design of the instrument is that the environment immediately surrounding ISSA will contain small concentrations of many other gases from venting of onboard experiments as well as from other kinds of leaks. These other vapors include water, cabin air, CO2, CO, argon, N2, and ethylene glycol. Altogether, this local environment might have a pressure of the order of 10(exp -7) to 10(exp -6) torr. Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) was contracted by NASA-JSC to provide support to NASA-JSC and its prime contractors in evaluating ammonia-location instruments and to make a preliminary trade study of the advantages and limitations of potential instruments. The present effort builds upon an earlier SwRI study to evaluate ammonia leak detection instruments [Jolly and Deffenbaugh]. The objectives of the present effort include: (1) Estimate the characteristics of representative ammonia leaks; (2) Evaluate the baseline instrument in the light of the estimated ammonia leak characteristics; (3) Propose alternative instrument concepts; and (4) Conduct a trade study of the proposed alternative concepts and recommend promising instruments. The baseline leak-location instrument selected by NASA-JSC was an ion gauge.

  7. Locating the stranger rapist.

    PubMed

    Davies, A; Dale, A

    1996-04-01

    As part of a larger project evaluating aspects of offender profiling, an initial study was undertaken of the geographic aspects of approximately 300 sexual offences carried out by 79 stranger rapists. The objective was to focus further research on the topic into potentially useful channels, but information thought to be of immediate use to investigating officers was also produced. It was ascertained that at least one-fifth of the sample of stranger rapists were itinerant to a greater or lesser extent. Analysis of the cases where both the offender's address and the location where he approached the victim were known, indicated that the majority of attacks (75 per cent) were initiated within five miles of the offenders' homes. The apparent reasons for victims being approached unusually far away included targeting of locations where numbers of suitable victims were available; raping during relatively sophisticated property offences; 'prowling' or 'hunting' over large areas by subjects who spent considerable amounts of time so doing; access to transport; and familiarity with widely dispersed neighbourhoods, often due to the offender having lived in two or more locations. As a result of this work, future research on the geography of rape will be directed towards those aspects of the offences which have been identified as relevant to the distance between an offender's base and the site where he approached his victim.

  8. Accurate adjoint design sensitivities for nano metal optics.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Paul; Hesselink, Lambertus

    2015-09-07

    We present a method for obtaining accurate numerical design sensitivities for metal-optical nanostructures. Adjoint design sensitivity analysis, long used in fluid mechanics and mechanical engineering for both optimization and structural analysis, is beginning to be used for nano-optics design, but it fails for sharp-cornered metal structures because the numerical error in electromagnetic simulations of metal structures is highest at sharp corners. These locations feature strong field enhancement and contribute strongly to design sensitivities. By using high-accuracy FEM calculations and rounding sharp features to a finite radius of curvature we obtain highly-accurate design sensitivities for 3D metal devices. To provide a bridge to the existing literature on adjoint methods in other fields, we derive the sensitivity equations for Maxwell's equations in the PDE framework widely used in fluid mechanics.

  9. Semantic Location Extraction from Crowdsourced Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koswatte, S.; Mcdougall, K.; Liu, X.

    2016-06-01

    Crowdsourced Data (CSD) has recently received increased attention in many application areas including disaster management. Convenience of production and use, data currency and abundancy are some of the key reasons for attracting this high interest. Conversely, quality issues like incompleteness, credibility and relevancy prevent the direct use of such data in important applications like disaster management. Moreover, location information availability of CSD is problematic as it remains very low in many crowd sourced platforms such as Twitter. Also, this recorded location is mostly related to the mobile device or user location and often does not represent the event location. In CSD, event location is discussed descriptively in the comments in addition to the recorded location (which is generated by means of mobile device's GPS or mobile communication network). This study attempts to semantically extract the CSD location information with the help of an ontological Gazetteer and other available resources. 2011 Queensland flood tweets and Ushahidi Crowd Map data were semantically analysed to extract the location information with the support of Queensland Gazetteer which is converted to an ontological gazetteer and a global gazetteer. Some preliminary results show that the use of ontologies and semantics can improve the accuracy of place name identification of CSD and the process of location information extraction.

  10. Machine tool locator

    DOEpatents

    Hanlon, John A.; Gill, Timothy J.

    2001-01-01

    Machine tools can be accurately measured and positioned on manufacturing machines within very small tolerances by use of an autocollimator on a 3-axis mount on a manufacturing machine and positioned so as to focus on a reference tooling ball or a machine tool, a digital camera connected to the viewing end of the autocollimator, and a marker and measure generator for receiving digital images from the camera, then displaying or measuring distances between the projection reticle and the reference reticle on the monitoring screen, and relating the distances to the actual position of the autocollimator relative to the reference tooling ball. The images and measurements are used to set the position of the machine tool and to measure the size and shape of the machine tool tip, and examine cutting edge wear. patent

  11. Precision of multi-frequency electronic apex locators.

    PubMed

    George, Roy

    2016-09-01

    Data sourcesCochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Medline, Embase and Scopus databases.Study selectionStudies that reported the precision of electronic apex locators (EALs) in locating the apical constriction (AC) in primary root canal treatment of human teeth compared with a histologic evaluation of the AC were considered.Data extraction and synthesisData were extracted and quality assessed independently by two reviewers.ResultsTen studies were included, reporting on 1105 EAL measurements. Seven studies were considered to be at high risk of bias and three at low risk. Four different EALs were evaluated; Root ZX (J Morita, Tokyo, Japan), Justy II (Hager & Werken GmbH & Co, Duisburg, Germany), Endy 5000 (Loser Co, Leverkusen, Germany) and Endox (Lysis Co, Milan, Italy). Three EALs, Root ZX, Justy II and Endy 5000 were more accurate than the Endox in determining the distance between the file tip and the apical constriction. Pulp status was only available for 194 (17.55%) of the measurements. The status of the pulp (vital or necrotic) had no significant effect on precision.ConclusionsThe precision of electronic working length measurement depends on the device used and the type of irrigation and is not influenced by the status of the pulp tissue.

  12. Microwave holographic imaging of aircraft with spaceborne illuminating source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkowitz, R. S.; Dzekov, T. A.

    1976-01-01

    The conceptual development of a method for the high angular resolution and accurate angular position estimates for the surveillance and traffic control of aircraft is considered. A target volume several hundred kilometers in diameter is illuminated by a CW microwave source located on a satellite in geosynchronous orbit. Signals are received by a large array of random, conformally located receiving elements. Each element receives the direct signal from the satellite plus signals reflected from aircraft in the illuminated volume. Coherent combination of the signals received from the individual elements permits the equivalent of holographic imaging or multiple beam formation from which the useful target data can be obtained.

  13. Mill profiler machines soft materials accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1966-01-01

    Mill profiler machines bevels, slots, and grooves in soft materials, such as styrofoam phenolic-filled cores, to any desired thickness. A single operator can accurately control cutting depths in contour or straight line work.

  14. Improved phase arrival estimate and location for local earthquakes in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, E. A.; Rowe, C. A.; Begnaud, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    The Korean Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) and the Korean Meteorological Agency (KMA) regularly report local (distance < ~1200 km) seismicity recorded with their networks; we obtain preliminary event location estimates as well as waveform data, but no phase arrivals are reported, so the data are not immediately useful for earthquake location. Our goal is to identify seismic events that are sufficiently well-located to provide accurate seismic travel-time information for events within the KIGAM and KMA networks, and also recorded by some regional stations. Toward that end, we are using a combination of manual phase identification and arrival-time picking, with waveform cross-correlation, to cluster events that have occurred in close proximity to one another, which allows for improved phase identification by comparing the highly correlating waveforms. We cross-correlate the known events with one another on 5 seismic stations and cluster events that correlate above a correlation coefficient threshold of 0.7, which reveals few clusters containing few events each. The small number of repeating events suggests that the online catalogs have had mining and quarry blasts removed before publication, as these can contribute significantly to repeating seismic sources in relatively aseismic regions such as South Korea. The dispersed source locations in our catalog, however, are ideal for seismic velocity modeling by providing superior sampling through the dense seismic station arrangement, which produces favorable event-to-station ray path coverage. Following careful manual phase picking on 104 events chosen to provide adequate ray coverage, we re-locate the events to obtain improved source coordinates. The re-located events are used with Thurber's Simul2000 pseudo-bending local tomography code to estimate the crustal structure on the Korean Peninsula, which is an important contribution to ongoing calibration for events of interest in the region.

  15. Locating waterfowl observations on aerial surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, W.I.; Hodges, J.I.; Stehn, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    We modified standard aerial survey data collection to obtain the geographic location for each waterfowl observation on surveys in Alaska during 1987-1993. Using transect navigation with CPS (global positioning system), data recording on continuously running tapes, and a computer data input program, we located observations with an average deviation along transects of 214 m. The method provided flexibility in survey design and data analysis. Although developed for geese nesting near the coast of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, the methods are widely applicable and were used on other waterfowl surveys in Alaska to map distribution and relative abundance of waterfowl. Accurate location data with GIS analysis and display may improve precision and usefulness of data from any aerial transect survey.

  16. Sonar Locator Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An underwater locator device called a Pinger is attached to an airplane's flight recorder for recovery in case of a crash. Burnett Electronics Pinger Model 512 resulted from a Burnett Electronics Laboratory, Inc./Langley Research Center contract for development of a search system for underwater mines. The Pinger's battery-powered transmitter is activated when immersed in water, and sends multidirectional signals for up to 500 hours. When a surface receiver picks up the signal, a diver can retrieve the pinger and the attached airplane flight recorder. Other pingers are used to track whales, mark underwater discoveries and assist oil drilling vessels.

  17. Location of Planet X

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, R.S.

    1988-10-01

    Observed positions of Uranus and Neptune along with residuals in right ascension and declination are used to constrain the location of a postulated tenth planet. The residuals are converted into residuals in ecliptic longitude and latitude. The results are then combined into seasonal normal points, producing average geocentric residuals spaced slightly more than a year apart that are assumed to represent the equivalent heliocentric average residuals for the observed oppositions. Such a planet is found to most likely reside in the region of Scorpius, with considerably less likelihood that it is in Taurus. 8 references.

  18. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shortis, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems. PMID:26690172

  19. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems.

    PubMed

    Shortis, Mark

    2015-12-07

    Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems.

  20. Improving the Level of Seismic Hazard Parameters in Saudi Arabia Using Earthquake Location and Magnitude Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Amri, A. M.; Rodgers, A. J.

    2004-05-01

    Saudi Arabia is an area, which is characterized very poorly seismically and for which little existing data is available. While for the most parts, particularly, Arabian Shield and Arabian Platform are aseismic, the area is ringed with regional seismic sources in the tectonically active areas of Iran and Turkey to the northeast, the Red Sea Rift bordering the Shield to the southwest, and the Dead Sea Transform fault zone to the north. Therefore, this paper aims to improve the level of seismic hazard parameters by improving earthquake location and magnitude estimates with the Saudi Arabian National Digital Seismic Network (SANDSN). We analyzed earthquake data, travel times and seismic waveform data from the SANDSN. KACST operates the 38 station SANDSN, consisting of 27 broadband and 11 short-period stations. The SANDSN has good signal detection capabilities because the sites are relatively quiet. Noise surveys at a few stations indicate that seismic noise levels at SANDSN stations are quite low for frequencies between 0.1 and 1.0 Hz, however cultural noise appears to affect some stations at frequencies above 1.0 Hz. Locations of regional earthquakes estimated by KACST were compared with locations from global bulletins. Large differences between KACST and global catalog locations are likely the result of inadequacies of the global average earth model (iasp91) used by the KACST system. While this model is probably adequate for locating distant (teleseismic) events in continental regions, it leads to large location errors, as much as 50-100 km, for regional events. We present detailed analysis of some events and Dead Sea explosions where we found gross errors in estimated locations. Velocity models are presented that should improve estimated locations of regional events in three specific regions: 1. Gulf of Aqabah - Dead Sea region 2. Arabian Shield and 3. Arabian Platform. Recently, these models are applied to the SANDSN to improve local and teleseismic event locations

  1. Locating Job Information. ERIC Digest No. 85.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Judith O.

    How to locate information that can be used in career decision making is the subject of this digest. The first section lists the career/occupational information collections generally found in public libraries, including printed resources, information about associations, information about local sources of job information, information on specific…

  2. Halo-lensing or Self-lensing? Locating the MACHO Lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, C. A.; Cook, K. H.; Popowski, P.; Drake, A. J.; Marshall, S. L.; Griest, K.; Vandehei, T.; Alcock, C.; Allsman, R. A.; Axelrod, T. S.; Freeman, K. C.; Peterson, B. A.; Alves, D. R.; Becker, A. C.; Stubbs, C. W.; Tomaney, A. B.; Bennett, D. P.; Geha, M.; Lehner, M. J.; Minniti, D.; Pratt, M. R.; Quinn, P. J.; Sutherland, W.; Welch, D.; MACHO Collaboration

    2000-12-01

    There are two principle geometrical arrangements which may explain Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) microlensing: a) halo-lensing, in which the lensed object is part of the Milky Way galactic halo and b) self-lensing, in which the lensed object is part of the LMC. Self-lensing in turn may be broken into two categories: LMC-LMC self-lensing, in which both the source and the lens reside in the LMC and background self-lensing, in which the lens is a star in the LMC and the source star is drawn from some population behind the LMC. Models suggest the contribution of LMC-LMC self-lensing is small, so the nature of LMC microlensing may be estimated from the location of the microlensing source stars. If the source stars are in the LMC then microlensing is dominated by halo-lensing; conversely if the source stars are located behind the LMC then microlensing is dominated by self-lensing. Since background populations reside behind the LMC, we expect them to be both redder and fainter then the average population of the LMC. We attempt to determine if the MACHO source stars come from such a background population by comparing the HST color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of source stars to the CMD of the average population of the LMC and looking for the effects of extra reddening and extinction. The microlensing source stars are identified by deriving accurate centroids in the ground-based MACHO images using difference image analysis (DIA) and then transforming the DIA coordinates to the HST frame. Preliminary results suggest that halo-lensing accounts for ≳ 40% of the observed microlensing results. Support provided by NASA, DOE, NSF and NPSC.

  3. Multimodal spatial calibration for accurately registering EEG sensor positions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianhua; Chen, Jian; Chen, Shengyong; Xiao, Gang; Li, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a fast and accurate calibration method to calibrate multiple multimodal sensors using a novel photogrammetry system for fast localization of EEG sensors. The EEG sensors are placed on human head and multimodal sensors are installed around the head to simultaneously obtain all EEG sensor positions. A multiple views' calibration process is implemented to obtain the transformations of multiple views. We first develop an efficient local repair algorithm to improve the depth map, and then a special calibration body is designed. Based on them, accurate and robust calibration results can be achieved. We evaluate the proposed method by corners of a chessboard calibration plate. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can achieve good performance, which can be further applied to EEG source localization applications on human brain.

  4. Fixed-Wing Micro Aerial Vehicle for Accurate Corridor Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehak, M.; Skaloud, J.

    2015-08-01

    In this study we present a Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) equipped with precise position and attitude sensors that together with a pre-calibrated camera enables accurate corridor mapping. The design of the platform is based on widely available model components to which we integrate an open-source autopilot, customized mass-market camera and navigation sensors. We adapt the concepts of system calibration from larger mapping platforms to MAV and evaluate them practically for their achievable accuracy. We present case studies for accurate mapping without ground control points: first for a block configuration, later for a narrow corridor. We evaluate the mapping accuracy with respect to checkpoints and digital terrain model. We show that while it is possible to achieve pixel (3-5 cm) mapping accuracy in both cases, precise aerial position control is sufficient for block configuration, the precise position and attitude control is required for corridor mapping.

  5. Close binding of identity and location in visual feature perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, J. C.; Pashler, H.

    1990-01-01

    The binding of identity and location information in disjunctive feature search was studied. Ss searched a heterogeneous display for a color or a form target, and reported both target identity and location. To avoid better than chance guessing of target identity (by choosing the target less likely to have been seen), the difficulty of the two targets was equalized adaptively; a mathematical model was used to quantify residual effects. A spatial layout was used that minimized postperceptual errors in reporting location. Results showed strong binding of identity and location perception. After correction for guessing, no perception of identity without location was found. A weak trend was found for accurate perception of target location without identity. We propose that activated features generate attention-calling "interrupt" signals, specifying only location; attention then retrieves the properties at that location.

  6. Radiation Source Mapping with Bayesian Inverse Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hykes, Joshua Michael

    We present a method to map the spectral and spatial distributions of radioactive sources using a small number of detectors. Locating and identifying radioactive materials is important for border monitoring, accounting for special nuclear material in processing facilities, and in clean-up operations. Most methods to analyze these problems make restrictive assumptions about the distribution of the source. In contrast, the source-mapping method presented here allows an arbitrary three-dimensional distribution in space and a flexible group and gamma peak distribution in energy. To apply the method, the system's geometry and materials must be known. A probabilistic Bayesian approach is used to solve the resulting inverse problem (IP) since the system of equations is ill-posed. The probabilistic approach also provides estimates of the confidence in the final source map prediction. A set of adjoint flux, discrete ordinates solutions, obtained in this work by the Denovo code, are required to efficiently compute detector responses from a candidate source distribution. These adjoint fluxes are then used to form the linear model to map the state space to the response space. The test for the method is simultaneously locating a set of 137Cs and 60Co gamma sources in an empty room. This test problem is solved using synthetic measurements generated by a Monte Carlo (MCNP) model and using experimental measurements that we collected for this purpose. With the synthetic data, the predicted source distributions identified the locations of the sources to within tens of centimeters, in a room with an approximately four-by-four meter floor plan. Most of the predicted source intensities were within a factor of ten of their true value. The chi-square value of the predicted source was within a factor of five from the expected value based on the number of measurements employed. With a favorable uniform initial guess, the predicted source map was nearly identical to the true distribution

  7. Influence of sound source width on human sound localization.

    PubMed

    Greene, Nathaniel T; Paige, Gary D

    2012-01-01

    Free-field sound localization experiments generally assume that a loudspeaker can be approximated by a point-source; however, a large loudspeaker may extend beyond the width that two sources can be discriminated. Humans can accurately discriminate sound source locations within a few degrees, thus one might expect localization precision to decrease as a function of sound source diameter, much as precision is lower for localizing the center of a wide, blurry light source. In order to test the degree to which humans differentially localize small and large sound sources, auditory targets were presented using a single 25.4 cm by 10.2 cm elliptical loudspeaker with the primary axis oriented both horizontally and vertically in different sessions. Subjects were seated with their heads fixed by a bite bar in a darkened, echo-attenuating room facing a cylindrical, acoustically transparent screen at a distance of 2 meters. Auditory targets consisted of repeating bursts (5 Hz) of low frequency band-pass noise (0.2 - 1 kHz, 75 dB SPL). Subjects were instructed to quickly and accurately guide a laser pointer mounted on a cylindrical joystick towards targets, presented randomly within a field ± 40° in azimuth by ± 10° in elevation, with oversampled points located every ten degrees along the primary meridians. Localization accuracy and precision (mean and standard deviation of localization error at oversampled locations) were not significantly different between speaker orientations, and were comparable to baseline measurements recorded using a 7.6 cm circular speaker. We conclude that low frequency sound localization performance is not dependent upon the size of the sound source as predicted theoretically, and is well approximated by a point source.

  8. A source-attractor approach to network detection of radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Qishi; Barry, M. L..; Grieme, M.; Sen, Satyabrata; Rao, Nageswara S; Brooks, Richard R

    2016-01-01

    Radiation source detection using a network of detectors is an active field of research for homeland security and defense applications. We propose Source-attractor Radiation Detection (SRD) method to aggregate measurements from a network of detectors for radiation source detection. SRD method models a potential radiation source as a magnet -like attractor that pulls in pre-computed virtual points from the detector locations. A detection decision is made if a sufficient level of attraction, quantified by the increase in the clustering of the shifted virtual points, is observed. Compared with traditional methods, SRD has the following advantages: i) it does not require an accurate estimate of the source location from limited and noise-corrupted sensor readings, unlike the localizationbased methods, and ii) its virtual point shifting and clustering calculation involve simple arithmetic operations based on the number of detectors, avoiding the high computational complexity of grid-based likelihood estimation methods. We evaluate its detection performance using canonical datasets from Domestic Nuclear Detection Office s (DNDO) Intelligence Radiation Sensors Systems (IRSS) tests. SRD achieves both lower false alarm rate and false negative rate compared to three existing algorithms for network source detection.

  9. Accurate and precise zinc isotope ratio measurements in urban aerosols.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Simone; Weiss, Dominik; Coles, Barry; Arnold, Tim; Babinski, Marly

    2008-12-15

    We developed an analytical method and constrained procedural boundary conditions that enable accurate and precise Zn isotope ratio measurements in urban aerosols. We also demonstrate the potential of this new isotope system for air pollutant source tracing. The procedural blank is around 5 ng and significantly lower than published methods due to a tailored ion chromatographic separation. Accurate mass bias correction using external correction with Cu is limited to Zn sample content of approximately 50 ng due to the combined effect of blank contribution of Cu and Zn from the ion exchange procedure and the need to maintain a Cu/Zn ratio of approximately 1. Mass bias is corrected for by applying the common analyte internal standardization method approach. Comparison with other mass bias correction methods demonstrates the accuracy of the method. The average precision of delta(66)Zn determinations in aerosols is around 0.05 per thousand per atomic mass unit. The method was tested on aerosols collected in Sao Paulo City, Brazil. The measurements reveal significant variations in delta(66)Zn(Imperial) ranging between -0.96 and -0.37 per thousand in coarse and between -1.04 and 0.02 per thousand in fine particular matter. This variability suggests that Zn isotopic compositions distinguish atmospheric sources. The isotopic light signature suggests traffic as the main source. We present further delta(66)Zn(Imperial) data for the standard reference material NIST SRM 2783 (delta(66)Zn(Imperial) = 0.26 +/- 0.10 per thousand).

  10. Source Repeatability of Time-Lapse Offset VSP Surveys for Monitoring CO2 Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Huang, L.; Rutledge, J. T.; Denli, H.; Zhang, H.; McPherson, B. J.; Grigg, R.

    2009-12-01

    Time-lapse vertical seismic profiling (VSP) surveys have the potential to remotely track the migration of injected CO2 within a geologic formation. To accurately detect small changes due to CO2 injection, the sources of time-lapse VSP surveys must be located exactly at the same positions. However, in practice, the source locations can vary from one survey to another survey. Our numerical simulations demonstrate that a variation of a few meters in the VSP source locations can result in significant changes in time-lapse seismograms. To address the source repeatability issue, we apply double-difference tomography to downgoing waves of time-lapse offset VSP data to invert for the source locations and the velocity structures simultaneously. In collaboration with Resolute Natural Resources, Navajo National Oil and Gas Company, and the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration under the support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, one baseline and two repeat offset VSP datasets were acquired in 2007-2009 for monitoring CO2 injection at the Aneth oil field in Utah. A cemented geophone string was used to acquire the data for one zero-offset and seven offset source locations. During the data acquisition, there was some uncertainty in the repeatability of the source locations relative to the baseline survey. Our double-difference tomography results of the Aneth time-lapse VSP data show that the source locations for different surveys are separated up to a few meters. Accounting for these source location variations during VSP data analysis will improve reliability of time-lapse VSP monitoring.

  11. Development and Validation of a Multidisciplinary Tool for Accurate and Efficient Rotorcraft Noise Prediction (MUTE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yi; Anusonti-Inthra, Phuriwat; Diskin, Boris

    2011-01-01

    A physics-based, systematically coupled, multidisciplinary prediction tool (MUTE) for rotorcraft noise was developed and validated with a wide range of flight configurations and conditions. MUTE is an aggregation of multidisciplinary computational tools that accurately and efficiently model the physics of the source of rotorcraft noise, and predict the noise at far-field observer locations. It uses systematic coupling approaches among multiple disciplines including Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Computational Structural Dynamics (CSD), and high fidelity acoustics. Within MUTE, advanced high-order CFD tools are used around the rotor blade to predict the transonic flow (shock wave) effects, which generate the high-speed impulsive noise. Predictions of the blade-vortex interaction noise in low speed flight are also improved by using the Particle Vortex Transport Method (PVTM), which preserves the wake flow details required for blade/wake and fuselage/wake interactions. The accuracy of the source noise prediction is further improved by utilizing a coupling approach between CFD and CSD, so that the effects of key structural dynamics, elastic blade deformations, and trim solutions are correctly represented in the analysis. The blade loading information and/or the flow field parameters around the rotor blade predicted by the CFD/CSD coupling approach are used to predict the acoustic signatures at far-field observer locations with a high-fidelity noise propagation code (WOPWOP3). The predicted results from the MUTE tool for rotor blade aerodynamic loading and far-field acoustic signatures are compared and validated with a variation of experimental data sets, such as UH60-A data, DNW test data and HART II test data.

  12. Atom location by electron channeling analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, S.J.

    1984-07-01

    For many years the orientation dependence of the characteristic x-ray emission close to a Bragg reflection has been regarded as a hindrance to accurate microanalysis, and a random incident beam direction has always been recommended for accurate composition analysis. However, this orientation dependence can be put to use to extract information on the lattice location of foreign atoms within the crystalline matrix. Here a generalization of the technique is described which is applicable to any crystal structure including monatomic crystals, and can quantitatively determine substitutional fractions of impurities. The technique was referred to as electron channeling analysis, by analogy with the closely related and widely used bulk technique of ion channeling analysis, and was developed for lattice location studies of dopants in semiconductors at high spatial resolution. Only two spectra are required for each channeling analysis, one in each of the channeling conditions described above. If the matrix and dopant x-ray yields vary identically between the two orientations then the dopant necessarily lies within the reflecting matrix planes. If the dopant x-ray yield does not vary the dopant atoms are randomly located with respect to the matrix planes. 10 references, 2 figures.

  13. Method and apparatus for accurately manipulating an object during microelectrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Parvin, Bahram A.; Maestre, Marcos F.; Fish, Richard H.; Johnston, William E.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus using electrophoresis provides accurate manipulation of an object on a microscope stage for further manipulations add reactions. The present invention also provides an inexpensive and easily accessible means to move an object without damage to the object. A plurality of electrodes are coupled to the stage in an array whereby the electrode array allows for distinct manipulations of the electric field for accurate manipulations of the object. There is an electrode array control coupled to the plurality of electrodes for manipulating the electric field. In an alternative embodiment, a chamber is provided on the stage to hold the object. The plurality of electrodes are positioned in the chamber, and the chamber is filled with fluid. The system can be automated using visual servoing, which manipulates the control parameters, i.e., x, y stage, applying the field, etc., after extracting the significant features directly from image data. Visual servoing includes an imaging device and computer system to determine the location of the object. A second stage having a plurality of tubes positioned on top of the second stage, can be accurately positioned by visual servoing so that one end of one of the plurality of tubes surrounds at least part of the object on the first stage.

  14. Method and apparatus for accurately manipulating an object during microelectrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Parvin, B.A.; Maestre, M.F.; Fish, R.H.; Johnston, W.E.

    1997-09-23

    An apparatus using electrophoresis provides accurate manipulation of an object on a microscope stage for further manipulations and reactions. The present invention also provides an inexpensive and easily accessible means to move an object without damage to the object. A plurality of electrodes are coupled to the stage in an array whereby the electrode array allows for distinct manipulations of the electric field for accurate manipulations of the object. There is an electrode array control coupled to the plurality of electrodes for manipulating the electric field. In an alternative embodiment, a chamber is provided on the stage to hold the object. The plurality of electrodes are positioned in the chamber, and the chamber is filled with fluid. The system can be automated using visual servoing, which manipulates the control parameters, i.e., x, y stage, applying the field, etc., after extracting the significant features directly from image data. Visual servoing includes an imaging device and computer system to determine the location of the object. A second stage having a plurality of tubes positioned on top of the second stage, can be accurately positioned by visual servoing so that one end of one of the plurality of tubes surrounds at least part of the object on the first stage. 11 figs.

  15. An accurate Rb density measurement method for a plasma wakefield accelerator experiment using a novel Rb reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öz, E.; Batsch, F.; Muggli, P.

    2016-09-01

    A method to accurately measure the density of Rb vapor is described. We plan on using this method for the Advanced Wakefield (AWAKE) (Assmann et al., 2014 [1]) project at CERN , which will be the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield experiment. The method is similar to the hook (Marlow, 1967 [2]) method and has been described in great detail in the work by Hill et al. (1986) [3]. In this method a cosine fit is applied to the interferogram to obtain a relative accuracy on the order of 1% for the vapor density-length product. A single-mode, fiber-based, Mach-Zenhder interferometer will be built and used near the ends of the 10 meter-long AWAKE plasma source to be able to make accurate relative density measurement between these two locations. This can then be used to infer the vapor density gradient along the AWAKE plasma source and also change it to the value desired for the plasma wakefield experiment. Here we describe the plan in detail and show preliminary results obtained using a prototype 8 cm long novel Rb vapor cell.

  16. Object Locating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A portable system is provided that is operational for determining, with three dimensional resolution, the position of a buried object or approximately positioned object that may move in space or air or gas. The system has a plurality of receivers for detecting the signal front a target antenna and measuring the phase thereof with respect to a reference signal. The relative permittivity and conductivity of the medium in which the object is located is used along with the measured phase signal to determine a distance between the object and each of the plurality of receivers. Knowing these distances. an iteration technique is provided for solving equations simultaneously to provide position coordinates. The system may also be used for tracking movement of an object within close range of the system by sampling and recording subsequent position of the object. A dipole target antenna. when positioned adjacent to a buried object, may be energized using a separate transmitter which couples energy to the target antenna through the medium. The target antenna then preferably resonates at a different frequency, such as a second harmonic of the transmitter frequency.

  17. AOTV bow shock location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desautel, D.

    1985-01-01

    Hypersonic bow-shock location and geometry are of central importance to the aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles (AOTVs), but they are difficult to predict for a given vehicle configuration. This paper reports experimental measurements of shock standoff distance for the 70 deg cone AOTV configuration in shock-tunnel-test flows at Mach numbers of 3.8 to 7.9 and for angles of attack from 0 deg to 20 deg. The controlling parameter for hypersonic bow-shock standoff distance (for a given forebody shape) is the mean normal-shock density ratio. Values for this parameter in the tests reported are in the same range as those of the drag-brake AOTV perigee regime. Results for standoff distance are compared with those previously reported in the literature for this AOTV configuration. It is concluded that the AOTV shock standoff distance for the conical configuration, based on frustrum (base) radius, is equivalent to that of a sphere with a radius about 35 percent greater than that of the cone; the distance is, therefore, much less than reported in previous studies. Some reasons for the discrepancies between the present and previous are advanced. The smaller standoff distance determined here implies there will be less radiative heat transfer than was previously expected.

  18. Double point source W-phase inversion: Real-time implementation and automated model selection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nealy, Jennifer; Hayes, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    Rapid and accurate characterization of an earthquake source is an extremely important and ever evolving field of research. Within this field, source inversion of the W-phase has recently been shown to be an effective technique, which can be efficiently implemented in real-time. An extension to the W-phase source inversion is presented in which two point sources are derived to better characterize complex earthquakes. A single source inversion followed by a double point source inversion with centroid locations fixed at the single source solution location can be efficiently run as part of earthquake monitoring network operational procedures. In order to determine the most appropriate solution, i.e., whether an earthquake is most appropriately described by a single source or a double source, an Akaike information criterion (AIC) test is performed. Analyses of all earthquakes of magnitude 7.5 and greater occurring since January 2000 were performed with extended analyses of the September 29, 2009 magnitude 8.1 Samoa earthquake and the April 19, 2014 magnitude 7.5 Papua New Guinea earthquake. The AIC test is shown to be able to accurately select the most appropriate model and the selected W-phase inversion is shown to yield reliable solutions that match published analyses of the same events.

  19. Double Point Source W-phase Inversion: Real-time Implementation and Automated Model Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nealy, J. L.; Hayes, G. P.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid and accurate characterization of an earthquake source is an extremely important and ever-evolving field of research. Within this field, source inversion of the W-phase has recently been shown to be an effective technique, which can be efficiently implemented in real-time. An extension to the W-phase source inversion is presented in which two point sources are derived to better characterize complex earthquakes. A single source inversion followed by a double point source inversion with centroid locations fixed at the single source solution location can be efficiently run as part of earthquake monitoring network operational procedures. In order to determine the most appropriate solution, i.e., whether an earthquake is most appropriately described by a single source or a double source, an Akaike information criterion (AIC) test is performed. Analyses of all earthquakes of magnitude 7.5 and greater occurring since January 2000 were performed with extended analyses of the September 29, 2009 magnitude 8.1 Samoa and the April 19, 2014 magnitude 7.5 Papua New Guinea earthquakes. The AIC test is shown to be able to accurately select the most appropriate model and the selected W-phase inversion is shown to yield reliable solutions that match previously published analyses of the same events.

  20. Double point source W-phase inversion: Real-time implementation and automated model selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nealy, Jennifer L.; Hayes, Gavin P.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid and accurate characterization of an earthquake source is an extremely important and ever evolving field of research. Within this field, source inversion of the W-phase has recently been shown to be an effective technique, which can be efficiently implemented in real-time. An extension to the W-phase source inversion is presented in which two point sources are derived to better characterize complex earthquakes. A single source inversion followed by a double point source inversion with centroid locations fixed at the single source solution location can be efficiently run as part of earthquake monitoring network operational procedures. In order to determine the most appropriate solution, i.e., whether an earthquake is most appropriately described by a single source or a double source, an Akaike information criterion (AIC) test is performed. Analyses of all earthquakes of magnitude 7.5 and greater occurring since January 2000 were performed with extended analyses of the September 29, 2009 magnitude 8.1 Samoa earthquake and the April 19, 2014 magnitude 7.5 Papua New Guinea earthquake. The AIC test is shown to be able to accurately select the most appropriate model and the selected W-phase inversion is shown to yield reliable solutions that match published analyses of the same events.

  1. Accurate pointing of tungsten welding electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegelmeier, P.

    1971-01-01

    Thoriated-tungsten is pointed accurately and quickly by using sodium nitrite. Point produced is smooth and no effort is necessary to hold the tungsten rod concentric. The chemically produced point can be used several times longer than ground points. This method reduces time and cost of preparing tungsten electrodes.

  2. Prototype autonomous earthquake locator for regional networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsky, V.

    2000-11-01

    A fully autonomous source location algorithm, which identifies the local earthquake P and S phases by finding the network seismogram envelope maxima Pmax and Smax, is designed. These picks are approximated to theoretical travel times of the wavefield intensity by varying epicenter and origin time, thus providing initial estimates for source coordinates, origin time and phase onsets. Then the onsets are improved by detection of the time-series discrepancy points with the subsequent fitting to the theoretical first arrival times for the final source location. Fitting is performed using a grid-search robust optimization procedure based on the bell-like factor functions. Application of the algorithm to 61 local earthquakes recorded by the Israel Seismic Network shows location accuracy of 3 km for epicenter and ±7 km for depth. For the four blasts from a quarry near the Dead Sea with known coordinates and ignition time the automatic locator provided accuracy of 0.3-1.7 km and even outperformed the analyst solutions.

  3. The New Algorithm for Fast Probabilistic Hypocenter Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dębski, Wojciech; Klejment, Piotr

    2016-12-01

    The spatial location of sources of seismic waves is one of the first tasks when transient waves from natural (uncontrolled) sources are analysed in many branches of physics, including seismology, oceanology, to name a few. It is well recognised that there is no single universal location algorithm which performs equally well in all situations. Source activity and its spatial variability in time, the geometry of recording network, the complexity and heterogeneity of wave velocity distribution are all factors influencing the performance of location algorithms. In this paper we propose a new location algorithm which exploits the reciprocity and time-inverse invariance property of the wave equation. Basing on these symmetries and using a modern finite-difference-type eikonal solver, we have developed a new very fast algorithm performing the full probabilistic (Bayesian) source location. We illustrate an efficiency of the algorithm performing an advanced error analysis for 1647 seismic events from the Rudna copper mine operating in southwestern Poland.

  4. Pioneer F Plaque Location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Pioneer F spacecraft, destined to be the first man made object to escape from the solar system into interstellar space, carries this pictorial plaque. It is designed to show scientifically educated inhabitants of some other star system, who might intercept it millions of years from now, when Pioneer was launched, from where, and by what kind of beings. (Hopefully, any aliens reading the plaque will not use this knowledge to immediately invade Earth.) The design is etched into a 6 inch by 9 inch gold-anodized aluminum plate, attached to the spacecraft's attenna support struts in a position to help shield it from erosion by interstellar dust. The radiating lines at left represents the positions of 14 pulsars, a cosmic source of radio energy, arranged to indicate our sun as the home star of our civilization. The '1-' symbols at the ends of the lines are binary numbers that represent the frequencies of these pulsars at the time of launch of Pioneer F relative of that to the hydrogen atom shown at the upper left with a '1' unity symbol. The hydrogen atom is thus used as a 'universal clock,' and the regular decrease in the frequencies of the pulsars will enable another civilization to determine the time that has elapsed since Pioneer F was launched. The hydrogen is also used as a 'universal yardstick' for sizing the human figures and outline of the spacecraft shown on the right. The hydrogen wavelength, about 8 inches, multiplied by the binary number representing '8' shown next to the woman gives her height, 64 inches. The figures represent the type of creature that created Pioneer. The man's hand is raised in a gesture of good will. Across the bottom are the planets, ranging outward from the Sun, with the spacecraft trajectory arching away from Earth, passing Mars, and swinging by Jupiter.

  5. Locating the source of hyperglycemia: Liver versus muscle

    PubMed Central

    YU, Haoyong; ZHOU, Dequan; JIA, Weiping; GUO, ZengKui

    2014-01-01

    Background Glucose homeostasis relies on insulin to suppress hepatic glucose production and to stimulate glucose uptake by peripheral tissues (primarily skeletal muscle) during and after a meal or glucose load. Glucose metabolism impairments in the liver and/or muscle attenuate these insulin actions, causing hyperglycemia. Thus, identifying the loci of the impairments can improve the understanding of hyperglycemia and enable organtargeted interventions. Methods Studies were performed to identify such loci using modified oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) techniques in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and overweight/obese individuals. Results Individuals with severe T2D were found to have significantly impaired glucose metabolism in both the liver and muscle. In contrast, impairments in glucose metabolism in individuals with non-severe T2D were predominantly localized in the liver or muscle, but not both. Similarly, milder impairments in overweight or obese individuals were clearly localized in either the liver or muscle, but not both. All these impairments are quantifiable. Conclusion Impairments in glucose metabolism in the liver and muscle can be differentiated and quantified in a clinical setting. PMID:22074132

  6. Methane concentrations and source strengths in urban locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, D. R.; Woo, V. H.; Tyler, S. C.; Rowland, F. S.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a six year measurement of trace gases in 18 different urban and remote areas throughout the Northern and Southern Hemispheres are reported. It is found that the measurements are consistent with a yearly atmospheric release of 30 to 60 megatons of CH4 in urban environments. Concentrations of CCl3F, CCl2F2, and CH3CCl3 were also found to be higher in the same urban samples than in corresponding samples from remote areas. The 'urban excess' (urban concentration minus remote concentration) was generally 1000 to 2000 times larger on a molar basis for CH4 than for CCl3F. The fraction of world-wide methane release occurring in the urban environment is estimated from the concentration ratios for CH4 vs CCl3F. It is shown that about 8 to 15 percent of atmospheric methane release occurs in urban areas.

  7. Location of energy source for coronal heating on the photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Zhen-Xiang; Yang, Xu; Wang, Ya; Ji, Kai-Fan; Ji, Hai-Sheng; Cao, Wen-Da

    2017-02-01

    It is reported that ultra-fine dynamic ejections along magnetic loops of an active region originate from intergranular lanes and they are associated with subsequent heating in the corona. As continuing work, we analyze the same set of data but focus on a quiet region and the overlying EUV/UV emission as observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We find that there appear to be dark patches scattered across the quiet region and the dark patches always stay along intergranular lanes. Over the dark patches, the average UV/EUV emission at 131, 171, 304 and 1600 Å (middle temperature) is more intense than that of other regions and EUV brightness is negatively correlated with 10830 Å intensity, though, such a trend does not exist for high temperature lines at 94, 193, 211 and 335 Å. For the same quiet region, where both TiO 7057 Å broad band images and 10830 Å filtergrams are available, contours for the darkest lane areas on TiO images and dark patches on 10830 Å filtergrams frequently differ in space. The results suggest that the dark patches do not simply reflect the areas with the darkest lanes but are associated with a kind of enhanced absorption (EA) at 10830 Å. A strict definition for EA with narrow band 10830 Å filtergrams is found to be difficult. In this paper, we define enhanced absorption patches (EAPs) of a quiet region as the areas where emission is less than ∼90% of the mean intensity of the region. The value is equivalent to the average intensity along thin dark loops connecting two moss regions of the active region. A more strict definition for EAPs, say 88%, gives even more intense UV/EUV emission over those in the middle temperature range. The results provide further observational evidence that energy for heating the upper solar atmosphere comes from the intergranular lane area where the magnetic field is constantly brought in by convection motion in granules.

  8. Feedback about More Accurate versus Less Accurate Trials: Differential Effects on Self-Confidence and Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected by feedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On Day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of…

  9. New method for lightning location using optical ground wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhaoyu; Cheng, Zhaogu; Zhang, Zhiping; Zhu, Jianqiang; Li, Feng

    2006-12-01

    A new technology of lightning location is described, which is based on detecting the state of polarization (SOP) fluctuation of the laser light in the optic ground wire (OPGW). Compared with the conventional lightning location method, the new method is more accurate, more stable, and cheaper. Theories of Stokes parameters and Poincare sphere are introduced to analyze the SOP at the lightning strike point. It can be concluded that although the initial points of SOP on the Poincare sphere are random, the SOP fluctuation generated by lightning strike can still be accurately identified by detecting the velocity of polarization motion. A new algorithm to quantify the velocity is also introduced.

  10. Accurate Guitar Tuning by Cochlear Implant Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  11. New model accurately predicts reformate composition

    SciTech Connect

    Ancheyta-Juarez, J.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E. )

    1994-01-31

    Although naphtha reforming is a well-known process, the evolution of catalyst formulation, as well as new trends in gasoline specifications, have led to rapid evolution of the process, including: reactor design, regeneration mode, and operating conditions. Mathematical modeling of the reforming process is an increasingly important tool. It is fundamental to the proper design of new reactors and revamp of existing ones. Modeling can be used to optimize operating conditions, analyze the effects of process variables, and enhance unit performance. Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo has developed a model of the catalytic reforming process that accurately predicts reformate composition at the higher-severity conditions at which new reformers are being designed. The new AA model is more accurate than previous proposals because it takes into account the effects of temperature and pressure on the rate constants of each chemical reaction.

  12. Accurate colorimetric feedback for RGB LED clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Kwong; Ashdown, Ian

    2006-08-01

    We present an empirical model of LED emission spectra that is applicable to both InGaN and AlInGaP high-flux LEDs, and which accurately predicts their relative spectral power distributions over a wide range of LED junction temperatures. We further demonstrate with laboratory measurements that changes in LED spectral power distribution with temperature can be accurately predicted with first- or second-order equations. This provides the basis for a real-time colorimetric feedback system for RGB LED clusters that can maintain the chromaticity of white light at constant intensity to within +/-0.003 Δuv over a range of 45 degrees Celsius, and to within 0.01 Δuv when dimmed over an intensity range of 10:1.

  13. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    PubMed

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task.

  14. An Accurate, Simplified Model Intrabeam Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, Karl LF

    2002-05-23

    Beginning with the general Bjorken-Mtingwa solution for intrabeam scattering (IBS) we derive an accurate, greatly simplified model of IBS, valid for high energy beams in normal storage ring lattices. In addition, we show that, under the same conditions, a modified version of Piwinski's IBS formulation (where {eta}{sub x,y}{sup 2}/{beta}{sub x,y} has been replaced by {Eta}{sub x,y}) asymptotically approaches the result of Bjorken-Mtingwa.

  15. An accurate registration technique for distorted images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delapena, Michele; Shaw, Richard A.; Linde, Peter; Dravins, Dainis

    1990-01-01

    Accurate registration of International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) images is crucial because the variability of the geometrical distortions that are introduced by the SEC-Vidicon cameras ensures that raw science images are never perfectly aligned with the Intensity Transfer Functions (ITFs) (i.e., graded floodlamp exposures that are used to linearize and normalize the camera response). A technique for precisely registering IUE images which uses a cross correlation of the fixed pattern that exists in all raw IUE images is described.

  16. On accurate determination of contact angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.

    1992-01-01

    Methods are proposed that exploit a microgravity environment to obtain highly accurate measurement of contact angle. These methods, which are based on our earlier mathematical results, do not require detailed measurement of a liquid free-surface, as they incorporate discontinuous or nearly-discontinuous behavior of the liquid bulk in certain container geometries. Physical testing is planned in the forthcoming IML-2 space flight and in related preparatory ground-based experiments.

  17. Event reconstruction for line source releases

    SciTech Connect

    Zajic, Dragan; Brown, Michael J; Williams, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    The goal of source inversion, also called event reconstruction, is the calculation of source parameters from information obtained by network of concentration (or dosage) and meteorological sensors. Source parameters include source location and strength, but in certain cases there could be more than one source so the inversion procedure could deal with determination of number of sources, as well. In a case of limited time period pollutant emission events, as for example during accidents or intentional releases, it is of great use to estimate starting and ending times of the event. This kind of research is very useful for estimating the source parameters of industrial pollutants since it provides important information for regulation purposes. Also it provides information to fast responders in a case of accidental pollutant releases or for homeland security needs when chemical, biological or radiological agent is deliberately released. Development of faster and more accurate algorithms is very important since it could help reduce the populace's exposure to dangerous airborne contaminants, plan evacuation routes, and help assess the magnitude of clean up. During the last decade, the large number of research papers in area of source inversion was published where many different approaches were used. Most of the source inversion work publish to date apply to point source releases. The forward dispersion models used range from fast Gaussian plume and puff codes that enable almost instantaneous calculations of concentrations and dosages to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes that provide more detailed and precise calculation but at the same time are expensive with respect to time and computer resources. The optimization methods were often used and examples are simulated annealing and genetic algorithms.

  18. Blind location and separation of callers in a natural chorus using a microphone array

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Douglas L.; Ratnam, Rama

    2009-01-01

    Male frogs and toads call in dense choruses to attract females. Determining the vocal interactions and spatial distribution of the callers is important for understanding acoustic communication in such assemblies. It has so far proved difficult to simultaneously locate and recover the vocalizations of individual callers. Here a microphone-array technique is developed for blindly locating callers using arrival-time delays at the microphones, estimating their steering-vectors, and recovering the calls with a frequency-domain adaptive beamformer. The technique exploits the time-frequency sparseness of the signal space to recover sources even when there are more sources than sensors. The method is tested with data collected from a natural chorus of Gulf Coast toads (Bufo valliceps) and Northern cricket frogs (Acris crepitans). A spatial map of locations accurate to within a few centimeters is constructed, and the individual call waveforms are recovered for nine individual animals within a 9×9 m2. These methods work well in low reverberation when there are no reflectors other than the ground. They will require modifications to incorporate multi-path propagation, particularly for the estimation of time-delays. PMID:19640054

  19. Normal mode solutions for seismo-acoustic propagation resulting from shear and combined wave point sources.

    PubMed

    Nealy, Jennifer L; Collis, Jon M; Frank, Scott D

    2016-04-01

    Normal mode solutions to range-independent seismo-acoustic problems are benchmarked against elastic parabolic equation solutions and then used to benchmark the shear elastic parabolic equation self-starter [Frank, Odom, and Collis, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 1358-1367 (2013)]. The Pekeris waveguide with an elastic seafloor is considered for a point source located in the ocean emitting compressional waves, or in the seafloor, emitting both compressional and shear waves. Accurate solutions are obtained when the source is in the seafloor, and when the source is at the interface between the fluid and elastic layers.

  20. Locating, quantifying and characterising radiation hazards in contaminated nuclear facilities using a novel passive non-electrical polymer based radiation imaging device.

    PubMed

    Stanley, S J; Lennox, K; Farfán, E B; Coleman, J R; Adamovics, J; Thomas, A; Oldham, M

    2012-06-01

    This paper provides a summary of recent trials which took place at the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during December 2010. The overall objective for the trials was to demonstrate that a newly developed technology could be used to locate, quantify and characterise the radiological hazards within two separate ORNL hot cells (B and C). The technology used, known as RadBall(®), is a novel, passive, non-electrical polymer based radiation detection device which provides a 3D visualisation of radiation from areas where effective measurements have not been previously possible due to lack of access. This is particularly useful in the nuclear industry prior to the decommissioning of facilities where the quantity, location and type of contamination are often unknown. For hot cell B, the primary objective of demonstrating that the technology could be used to locate, quantify and characterise three radiological sources was met with 100% success. Despite more challenging conditions in hot cell C, two sources were detected and accurately located. To summarise, the technology performed extremely well with regards to detecting and locating radiation sources and, despite the challenging conditions, moderately well when assessing the relative energy and intensity of those sources. Due to the technology's unique deployability, non-electrical nature and its directional awareness the technology shows significant promise for the future characterisation of radiation hazards prior to and during the decommissioning of contaminated nuclear facilities.

  1. An algorithm for LQ optimal actuator location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darivandi, Neda; Morris, Kirsten; Khajepour, Amir

    2013-03-01

    The locations of the control hardware are typically a design variable in controller design for distributed parameter systems. In order to obtain the most efficient control system, the locations of control hardware as well as the feedback gain should be optimized. These optimization problems are generally non-convex. In addition, the models for these systems typically have a large number of degrees of freedom. Consequently, existing optimization schemes for optimal actuator placement may be inaccurate or computationally impractical. In this paper, the feedback control is chosen to be an optimal linear quadratic regulator. The optimal actuator location problem is reformulated as a convex optimization problem. A subgradient-based optimization scheme which leads to the global solution of the problem is used to optimize actuator locations. The optimization algorithm is applied to optimize the placement of piezoelectric actuators in vibration control of flexible structures. This method is compared with a genetic algorithm, and is observed to be faster and more accurate. Experiments are performed to verify the efficacy of optimal actuator placement.

  2. 3-D AE visualization of bone-cement fatigue locations.

    PubMed

    Qi, G; Pujol, J; Fan, Z

    2000-11-01

    This study addresses the visualization of crack locations in bone-cement material using a three-dimensional acoustic emission source location technique. Computer software based on an earthquake location technique was developed to determine AE source locations and was used to investigate material cracks formed at the tip of a notch in bone cement. The computed locations show that the cracks form linear features with dimensions between 0.1 and 0.2 mm although larger linear features (almost 3.5 mm) also are present. There is a difference of about 2.5 mm between the average of the event locations, and the location of the tip of the notch is 2.5 mm, which may be due to the finite size of the sensors (5 mm in diameter).

  3. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  4. Impact-Locator Sensor Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Byers, Terry; Gibbons, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Electronic sensor systems for detecting and locating impacts of rapidly moving particles on spacecraft have been invented. Systems of this type could also be useful on Earth in settings in which the occurrence of impacts and/or the locations of impacts are not immediately obvious and there are requirements to detect and quickly locate impacts to prevent or minimize damage.

  5. DIORAMA Location Type User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, James Russell

    2015-01-29

    The purpose of this report is to present the current design and implementation of the DIORAMA location type object (LocationType) and to provide examples and use cases. The LocationType object is included in the diorama-app package in the diorama::types namespace. Abstractly, the object is intended to capture the full time history of the location of an object or reference point. For example, a location may be speci ed as a near-Earth orbit in terms of a two-line element set, in which case the location type is capable of propagating the orbit both forward and backward in time to provide a location for any given time. Alternatively, the location may be speci ed as a xed set of geodetic coordinates (latitude, longitude, and altitude), in which case the geodetic location of the object is expected to remain constant for all time. From an implementation perspective, the location type is de ned as a union of multiple independent objects defi ned in the DIORAMA tle library. Types presently included in the union are listed and described in subsections below, and all conversions or transformation between these location types are handled by utilities provided by the tle library with the exception of the \\special-values" location type.

  6. Spring loaded locator pin assembly

    DOEpatents

    Groll, Todd A.; White, James P.

    1998-01-01

    This invention deals with spring loaded locator pins. Locator pins are sometimes referred to as captured pins. This is a mechanism which locks two items together with the pin that is spring loaded so that it drops into a locator hole on the work piece.

  7. Spring loaded locator pin assembly

    DOEpatents

    Groll, T.A.; White, J.P.

    1998-03-03

    This invention deals with spring loaded locator pins. Locator pins are sometimes referred to as captured pins. This is a mechanism which locks two items together with the pin that is spring loaded so that it drops into a locator hole on the work piece. 5 figs.

  8. Interpolating for the location of remote sensor data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puccinelli, E. F.; Kornfield, J.

    1981-01-01

    An interpolation algorithm is presented as a practical alternative to common interpolation and approximation methods when applied to the problem of determining the location of remote sensor data. This algorithm is based upon knowledge of the geometry of the problem and is shown to be inherently more accurate than common interpolation schemes which may be applied to all types of data. A practical location problem is used to demonstrate its accuracy and computational cost.

  9. Locating influential nodes via dynamics-sensitive centrality.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Lin, Jian-Hong; Guo, Qiang; Zhou, Tao

    2016-02-24

    With great theoretical and practical significance, locating influential nodes of complex networks is a promising issue. In this paper, we present a dynamics-sensitive (DS) centrality by integrating topological features and dynamical properties. The DS centrality can be directly applied in locating influential spreaders. According to the empirical results on four real networks for both susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) and susceptible-infected (SI) spreading models, the DS centrality is more accurate than degree, k-shell index and eigenvector centrality.

  10. Identification of emission sources of umbral flashes using phase congruency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Song; Yu, Lan; Yang, Yun-Fei; Ji, Kai-Fan

    2014-08-01

    The emission sources of umbral flashes (UFs) are believed to be closely related to running umbral and penumbral waves, and are concluded to be associated with umbral dots in the solar photosphere. Accurate identification of emission sources of UFs is crucial for investigating these physical phenomena and their inherent relationships. A relatively novel model of shape perception, namely phase congruency (PC), uses phase information in the Fourier domain to identify the geometrical shape of the region of interest in different intensity levels, rather than intensity or gradient. Previous studies indicate that the model is suitable for identifying features with low contrast and low luminance. In the present paper, we applied the PC model to identify the emission sources of UFs and to locate their positions. For illustrating the high performance of our proposed method, two time sequences of Ca II H images derived from the Hinode/SOT on 2010 August 10 and 2013 August 20 were used. Furthermore, we also compared these results with the analysis results that are identified by the traditional/classical identification methods, including the gray-scale adjusted technique and the running difference technique. The result of our analysis demonstrates that our proposed method is more accurate and effective than the traditional identification methods when applied to identifying the emission sources of UFs and to locating their positions.

  11. Instrument accurately measures weld angle and offset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, W. G.

    1967-01-01

    Weld angle is measured to the nearest arc minute and offset to one thousandth of an inch by an instrument designed to use a reference plane at two locations on a test coupon. A special table for computation has been prepared for use with the instrument.

  12. An interpretation of induced electric currents in long pipelines caused by natural geomagnetic sources of the upper atmosphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.H.

    1986-01-01

    Electric currents in long pipelines can contribute to corrosion effects that limit the pipe's lifetime. One cause of such electric currents is the geomagnetic field variations that have sources in the Earth's upper atmosphere. Knowledge of the general behavior of the sources allows a prediction of the occurrence times, favorable locations for the pipeline effects, and long-term projections of corrosion contributions. The source spectral characteristics, the Earth's conductivity profile, and a corrosion-frequency dependence limit the period range of the natural field changes that affect the pipe. The corrosion contribution by induced currents from geomagnetic sources should be evaluated for pipelines that are located at high and at equatorial latitudes. At midlatitude locations, the times of these natural current maxima should be avoided for the necessary accurate monitoring of the pipe-to-soil potential. ?? 1986 D. Reidel Publishing Company.

  13. Role of spectral detail in sound-source localization.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, A; Colburn, H S

    Sounds heard over headphones are typically perceived inside the head (internalized), unlike real sound sources which are perceived outside the head (externalized). If the acoustical waveforms from a real sound source are reproduced precisely using headphones, auditory images are appropriately externalized and localized. The filtering (relative boosting, attenuation and delaying of component frequencies) of a sound by the head and outer ear provides information about the location of a sound source by means of the differences in the frequency spectra between the ears as well as the overall spectral shape. This location-dependent filtering is explicitly described by the head-related transfer function (HRTF) from sound source to ear canal. Here we present sounds to subjects through open-canal tube-phones and investigate how accurately the HRTFs must be reproduced to achieve true three-dimensional perception of auditory signals in anechoic space. Listeners attempted to discriminate between 'real' sounds presented from a loudspeaker and 'virtual' sounds presented over tube-phones. Our results show that the HRTFs can be smoothed significantly in frequency without affecting the perceived location of a sound. Listeners cannot distinguish real from virtual sources until the HRTF has lost most of its detailed variation in frequency, at which time the perceived elevation of the image is the reported cue.

  14. Location of Maximum Credible Beam Losses in LCLS Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Stan

    2010-12-13

    The memo describes the maximum credible beam the LCLS injector can produce and lose at various locations along the beamline. The estimation procedure is based upon three previous reports [1, 2, 3]. While specific numbers have been updated to accurately reflect the present design parameters, the conclusions are very similar to those given in Ref 1. The source of the maximum credible beam results from the explosive electron emission from the photocathode if the drive laser intensity exceeds the threshold for plasma production. In this event, the gun's RF field can extract a large number of electrons from this plasma which are accelerated out of the gun and into the beamline. This electron emission persists until it has depleted the gun of all its energy. Hence the number of electrons emitted per pulse is limited by the amount of stored RF energy in the gun. It needs to be emphasized that this type of emission is highly undesirable, as it causes permanent damage to the cathode.

  15. Efficient and Accurate Indoor Localization Using Landmark Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, F.; Kealy, A.; Khoshelham, K.; Shang, J.

    2016-06-01

    Indoor localization is important for a variety of applications such as location-based services, mobile social networks, and emergency response. Fusing spatial information is an effective way to achieve accurate indoor localization with little or with no need for extra hardware. However, existing indoor localization methods that make use of spatial information are either too computationally expensive or too sensitive to the completeness of landmark detection. In this paper, we solve this problem by using the proposed landmark graph. The landmark graph is a directed graph where nodes are landmarks (e.g., doors, staircases, and turns) and edges are accessible paths with heading information. We compared the proposed method with two common Dead Reckoning (DR)-based methods (namely, Compass + Accelerometer + Landmarks and Gyroscope + Accelerometer + Landmarks) by a series of experiments. Experimental results show that the proposed method can achieve 73% accuracy with a positioning error less than 2.5 meters, which outperforms the other two DR-based methods.

  16. Accurate superimposition of perimetry data onto fundus photographs.

    PubMed

    Bek, T; Lund-Andersen, H

    1990-02-01

    A technique for accurate superimposition of computerized perimetry data onto the corresponding retinal locations seen on fundus photographs was developed. The technique was designed to take into account: 1) that the photographic field of view of the fundus camera varies with ametropia-dependent camera focusing 2) possible distortion by the fundus camera, and 3) that corrective lenses employed during perimetry magnify or minify the visual field. The technique allowed an overlay of perimetry data of the central 60 degrees of the visual field onto fundus photographs with an accuracy of 0.5 degree. The correlation of localized retinal morphology to localized retinal function was therefore limited by the spatial resolution of the computerized perimetry, which was 2.5 degrees in the Dicon AP-2500 perimeter employed for this study. The theoretical assumptions of the technique were confirmed by comparing visual field records to fundus photographs from patients with morphologically well-defined non-functioning lesions in the retina.

  17. Method for Accurate Surface Temperature Measurements During Fast Induction Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larregain, Benjamin; Vanderesse, Nicolas; Bridier, Florent; Bocher, Philippe; Arkinson, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    A robust method is proposed for the measurement of surface temperature fields during induction heating. It is based on the original coupling of temperature-indicating lacquers and a high-speed camera system. Image analysis tools have been implemented to automatically extract the temporal evolution of isotherms. This method was applied to the fast induction treatment of a 4340 steel spur gear, allowing the full history of surface isotherms to be accurately documented for a sequential heating, i.e., a medium frequency preheating followed by a high frequency final heating. Three isotherms, i.e., 704, 816, and 927°C, were acquired every 0.3 ms with a spatial resolution of 0.04 mm per pixel. The information provided by the method is described and discussed. Finally, the transformation temperature Ac1 is linked to the temperature on specific locations of the gear tooth.

  18. Trace element fingerprinting of cockle (Cerastoderma edule) shells can reveal harvesting location in adjacent areas

    PubMed Central

    Ricardo, Fernando; Génio, Luciana; Costa Leal, Miguel; Albuquerque, Rui; Queiroga, Henrique; Rosa, Rui; Calado, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Determining seafood geographic origin is critical for controlling its quality and safeguarding the interest of consumers. Here, we use trace element fingerprinting (TEF) of bivalve shells to discriminate the geographic origin of specimens. Barium (Ba), manganese (Mn), magnesium (Mg), strontium (Sr) and lead (Pb) were quantified in cockle shells (Cerastoderma edule) captured with two fishing methods (by hand and by hand-raking) and from five adjacent fishing locations within an estuarine system (Ria de Aveiro, Portugal). Results suggest no differences in TEF of cockle shells captured by hand or by hand-raking, thus confirming that metal rakes do not act as a potential source of metal contamination that could somehow bias TEF results. In contrast, significant differences were recorded among locations for all trace elements analysed. A Canonical Analysis of Principal Coordinates (CAP) revealed that 92% of the samples could be successfully classified according to their fishing location using TEF. We show that TEF can be an accurate, fast and reliable method to determine the geographic origin of bivalves, even among locations separated less than 1 km apart within the same estuarine system. Nonetheless, follow up studies are needed to determine if TEF can reliably discriminate between bivalves originating from different ecosystems. PMID:26149418

  19. Trace element fingerprinting of cockle (Cerastoderma edule) shells can reveal harvesting location in adjacent areas.

    PubMed

    Ricardo, Fernando; Génio, Luciana; Costa Leal, Miguel; Albuquerque, Rui; Queiroga, Henrique; Rosa, Rui; Calado, Ricardo

    2015-07-07

    Determining seafood geographic origin is critical for controlling its quality and safeguarding the interest of consumers. Here, we use trace element fingerprinting (TEF) of bivalve shells to discriminate the geographic origin of specimens. Barium (Ba), manganese (Mn), magnesium (Mg), strontium (Sr) and lead (Pb) were quantified in cockle shells (Cerastoderma edule) captured with two fishing methods (by hand and by hand-raking) and from five adjacent fishing locations within an estuarine system (Ria de Aveiro, Portugal). Results suggest no differences in TEF of cockle shells captured by hand or by hand-raking, thus confirming that metal rakes do not act as a potential source of metal contamination that could somehow bias TEF results. In contrast, significant differences were recorded among locations for all trace elements analysed. A Canonical Analysis of Principal Coordinates (CAP) revealed that 92% of the samples could be successfully classified according to their fishing location using TEF. We show that TEF can be an accurate, fast and reliable method to determine the geographic origin of bivalves, even among locations separated less than 1 km apart within the same estuarine system. Nonetheless, follow up studies are needed to determine if TEF can reliably discriminate between bivalves originating from different ecosystems.

  20. Accurate upwind methods for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1993-01-01

    A new class of piecewise linear methods for the numerical solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations of gas dynamics is presented. These methods are uniformly second-order accurate, and can be considered as extensions of Godunov's scheme. With an appropriate definition of monotonicity preservation for the case of linear convection, it can be shown that they preserve monotonicity. Similar to Van Leer's MUSCL scheme, they consist of two key steps: a reconstruction step followed by an upwind step. For the reconstruction step, a monotonicity constraint that preserves uniform second-order accuracy is introduced. Computational efficiency is enhanced by devising a criterion that detects the 'smooth' part of the data where the constraint is redundant. The concept and coding of the constraint are simplified by the use of the median function. A slope steepening technique, which has no effect at smooth regions and can resolve a contact discontinuity in four cells, is described. As for the upwind step, existing and new methods are applied in a manner slightly different from those in the literature. These methods are derived by approximating the Euler equations via linearization and diagonalization. At a 'smooth' interface, Harten, Lax, and Van Leer's one intermediate state model is employed. A modification for this model that can resolve contact discontinuities is presented. Near a discontinuity, either this modified model or a more accurate one, namely, Roe's flux-difference splitting. is used. The current presentation of Roe's method, via the conceptually simple flux-vector splitting, not only establishes a connection between the two splittings, but also leads to an admissibility correction with no conditional statement, and an efficient approximation to Osher's approximate Riemann solver. These reconstruction and upwind steps result in schemes that are uniformly second-order accurate and economical at smooth regions, and yield high resolution at discontinuities.

  1. The first accurate description of an aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Wilfried

    2006-12-01

    As technology has advanced, the scientific study of auroral phenomena has increased by leaps and bounds. A look back at the earliest descriptions of aurorae offers an interesting look into how medieval scholars viewed the subjects that we study.Although there are earlier fragmentary references in the literature, the first accurate description of the aurora borealis appears to be that published by the German Catholic scholar Konrad von Megenberg (1309-1374) in his book Das Buch der Natur (The Book of Nature). The book was written between 1349 and 1350.

  2. Determining accurate distances to nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanos, Alceste Zoe

    2005-11-01

    Determining accurate distances to nearby or distant galaxies is a very simple conceptually, yet complicated in practice, task. Presently, distances to nearby galaxies are only known to an accuracy of 10-15%. The current anchor galaxy of the extragalactic distance scale is the Large Magellanic Cloud, which has large (10-15%) systematic uncertainties associated with it, because of its morphology, its non-uniform reddening and the unknown metallicity dependence of the Cepheid period-luminosity relation. This work aims to determine accurate distances to some nearby galaxies, and subsequently help reduce the error in the extragalactic distance scale and the Hubble constant H 0 . In particular, this work presents the first distance determination of the DIRECT Project to M33 with detached eclipsing binaries. DIRECT aims to obtain a new anchor galaxy for the extragalactic distance scale by measuring direct, accurate (to 5%) distances to two Local Group galaxies, M31 and M33, with detached eclipsing binaries. It involves a massive variability survey of these galaxies and subsequent photometric and spectroscopic follow-up of the detached binaries discovered. In this work, I also present a catalog of variable stars discovered in one of the DIRECT fields, M31Y, which includes 41 eclipsing binaries. Additionally, we derive the distance to the Draco Dwarf Spheroidal galaxy, with ~100 RR Lyrae found in our first CCD variability study of this galaxy. A "hybrid" method of discovering Cepheids with ground-based telescopes is described next. It involves applying the image subtraction technique on the images obtained from ground-based telescopes and then following them up with the Hubble Space Telescope to derive Cepheid period-luminosity distances. By re-analyzing ESO Very Large Telescope data on M83 (NGC 5236), we demonstrate that this method is much more powerful for detecting variability, especially in crowded fields. I finally present photometry for the Wolf-Rayet binary WR 20a

  3. New law requires 'medically accurate' lesson plans.

    PubMed

    1999-09-17

    The California Legislature has passed a bill requiring all textbooks and materials used to teach about AIDS be medically accurate and objective. Statements made within the curriculum must be supported by research conducted in compliance with scientific methods, and published in peer-reviewed journals. Some of the current lesson plans were found to contain scientifically unsupported and biased information. In addition, the bill requires material to be "free of racial, ethnic, or gender biases." The legislation is supported by a wide range of interests, but opposed by the California Right to Life Education Fund, because they believe it discredits abstinence-only material.

  4. Bulk sediment 14C dating in an estuarine environment: How accurate can it be?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lougheed, Bryan C.; Obrochta, Stephen P.; Lenz, Conny; Mellström, Anette; Metcalfe, Brett; Muscheler, Raimund; Reinholdsson, Maja; Snowball, Ian; Zillén, Lovisa

    2017-02-01

    Due to a lack of marine macrofossils in many sediment cores from the estuarine Baltic Sea, researchers are often forced to carry out 14C determinations on bulk sediment samples. However, ambiguity surrounding the carbon source pathways that contribute to bulk sediment formation introduces a large uncertainty into 14C geochronologies based on such samples, and such uncertainty may not have been fully considered in previous Baltic Sea studies. We quantify this uncertainty by analyzing bulk sediment 14C determinations carried out on densely spaced intervals in independently dated late-Holocene sediment sequences from two central Baltic Sea cores. Our results show a difference of 600 14C yr in median bulk sediment reservoir age, or R(t)bulk, between the two core locations ( 1200 14C yr for one core, 620 14C yr for the other), indicating large spatial variation. Furthermore, we also find large downcore (i.e., temporal) R(t)bulk variation of at least 200 14C yr for both cores. We also find a difference of 585 14C yr between two samples taken from the same core depth. We propose that studies using bulk sediment 14C dating in large brackish water bodies should take such spatiotemporal variation in R(t)bulk into account when assessing uncertainties, thus leading to a larger, but more accurate, calibrated age range.

  5. A fast and accurate sparse continuous signal reconstruction by homotopy DCD with non-convex regularization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianyun; Lu, Xinfei; Yu, Xiaofei; Xi, Zhendong; Chen, Weidong

    2014-03-26

    In recent years, various applications regarding sparse continuous signal recovery such as source localization, radar imaging, communication channel estimation, etc., have been addressed from the perspective of compressive sensing (CS) theory. However, there are two major defects that need to be tackled when considering any practical utilization. The first issue is off-grid problem caused by the basis mismatch between arbitrary located unknowns and the pre-specified dictionary, which would make conventional CS reconstruction methods degrade considerably. The second important issue is the urgent demand for low-complexity algorithms, especially when faced with the requirement of real-time implementation. In this paper, to deal with these two problems, we have presented three fast and accurate sparse reconstruction algorithms, termed as HR-DCD, Hlog-DCD and Hlp-DCD, which are based on homotopy, dichotomous coordinate descent (DCD) iterations and non-convex regularizations, by combining with the grid refinement technique. Experimental results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms and related analysis.

  6. A Fast and Accurate Sparse Continuous Signal Reconstruction by Homotopy DCD with Non-Convex Regularization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianyun; Lu, Xinfei; Yu, Xiaofei; Xi, Zhendong; Chen, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, various applications regarding sparse continuous signal recovery such as source localization, radar imaging, communication channel estimation, etc., have been addressed from the perspective of compressive sensing (CS) theory. However, there are two major defects that need to be tackled when considering any practical utilization. The first issue is off-grid problem caused by the basis mismatch between arbitrary located unknowns and the pre-specified dictionary, which would make conventional CS reconstruction methods degrade considerably. The second important issue is the urgent demand for low-complexity algorithms, especially when faced with the requirement of real-time implementation. In this paper, to deal with these two problems, we have presented three fast and accurate sparse reconstruction algorithms, termed as HR-DCD, Hlog-DCD and Hlp-DCD, which are based on homotopy, dichotomous coordinate descent (DCD) iterations and non-convex regularizations, by combining with the grid refinement technique. Experimental results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms and related analysis. PMID:24675758

  7. Accurate 3D quantification of the bronchial parameters in MDCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saragaglia, A.; Fetita, C.; Preteux, F.; Brillet, P. Y.; Grenier, P. A.

    2005-08-01

    The assessment of bronchial reactivity and wall remodeling in asthma plays a crucial role in better understanding such a disease and evaluating therapeutic responses. Today, multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) makes it possible to perform an accurate estimation of bronchial parameters (lumen and wall areas) by allowing a quantitative analysis in a cross-section plane orthogonal to the bronchus axis. This paper provides the tools for such an analysis by developing a 3D investigation method which relies on 3D reconstruction of bronchial lumen and central axis computation. Cross-section images at bronchial locations interactively selected along the central axis are generated at appropriate spatial resolution. An automated approach is then developed for accurately segmenting the inner and outer bronchi contours on the cross-section images. It combines mathematical morphology operators, such as "connection cost", and energy-controlled propagation in order to overcome the difficulties raised by vessel adjacencies and wall irregularities. The segmentation accuracy was validated with respect to a 3D mathematically-modeled phantom of a pair bronchus-vessel which mimics the characteristics of real data in terms of gray-level distribution, caliber and orientation. When applying the developed quantification approach to such a model with calibers ranging from 3 to 10 mm diameter, the lumen area relative errors varied from 3.7% to 0.15%, while the bronchus area was estimated with a relative error less than 5.1%.

  8. Accurate interlaminar stress recovery from finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessler, Alexander; Riggs, H. Ronald

    1994-01-01

    The accuracy and robustness of a two-dimensional smoothing methodology is examined for the problem of recovering accurate interlaminar shear stress distributions in laminated composite and sandwich plates. The smoothing methodology is based on a variational formulation which combines discrete least-squares and penalty-constraint functionals in a single variational form. The smoothing analysis utilizes optimal strains computed at discrete locations in a finite element analysis. These discrete strain data are smoothed with a smoothing element discretization, producing superior accuracy strains and their first gradients. The approach enables the resulting smooth strain field to be practically C1-continuous throughout the domain of smoothing, exhibiting superconvergent properties of the smoothed quantity. The continuous strain gradients are also obtained directly from the solution. The recovered strain gradients are subsequently employed in the integration o equilibrium equations to obtain accurate interlaminar shear stresses. The problem is a simply-supported rectangular plate under a doubly sinusoidal load. The problem has an exact analytic solution which serves as a measure of goodness of the recovered interlaminar shear stresses. The method has the versatility of being applicable to the analysis of rather general and complex structures built of distinct components and materials, such as found in aircraft design. For these types of structures, the smoothing is achieved with 'patches', each patch covering the domain in which the smoothed quantity is physically continuous.

  9. Central Chemoreceptors: Locations and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Nattie, Eugene; Li, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    Central chemoreception traditionally refers to a change in ventilation attributable to changes in CO2/H+ detected within the brain. Interest in central chemoreception has grown substantially since the previous Handbook of Physiology published in 1986. Initially, central chemoreception was localized to areas on the ventral medullary surface, a hypothesis complemented by the recent identification of neurons with specific phenotypes near one of these areas as putative chemoreceptor cells. However, there is substantial evidence that many sites participate in central chemoreception some located at a distance from the ventral medulla. Functionally, central chemoreception, via the sensing of brain interstitial fluid H+, serves to detect and integrate information on 1) alveolar ventilation (arterial PCO2), 2) brain blood flow and metabolism and 3) acid-base balance, and, in response, can affect breathing, airway resistance, blood pressure (sympathetic tone) and arousal. In addition, central chemoreception provides a tonic ‘drive’ (source of excitation) at the normal, baseline PCO2 level that maintains a degree of functional connectivity among brainstem respiratory neurons necessary to produce eupneic breathing. Central chemoreception responds to small variations in PCO2 to regulate normal gas exchange and to large changes in PCO2 to minimize acid-base changes. Central chemoreceptor sites vary in function with sex and with development. From an evolutionary perspective, central chemoreception grew out of the demands posed by air vs. water breathing, homeothermy, sleep, optimization of the work of breathing with the ‘ideal’ arterial PCO2, and the maintenance of the appropriate pH at 37°C for optimal protein structure and function. PMID:23728974

  10. Accurate taxonomic assignment of short pyrosequencing reads.

    PubMed

    Clemente, José C; Jansson, Jesper; Valiente, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Ambiguities in the taxonomy dependent assignment of pyrosequencing reads are usually resolved by mapping each read to the lowest common ancestor in a reference taxonomy of all those sequences that match the read. This conservative approach has the drawback of mapping a read to a possibly large clade that may also contain many sequences not matching the read. A more accurate taxonomic assignment of short reads can be made by mapping each read to the node in the reference taxonomy that provides the best precision and recall. We show that given a suffix array for the sequences in the reference taxonomy, a short read can be mapped to the node of the reference taxonomy with the best combined value of precision and recall in time linear in the size of the taxonomy subtree rooted at the lowest common ancestor of the matching sequences. An accurate taxonomic assignment of short reads can thus be made with about the same efficiency as when mapping each read to the lowest common ancestor of all matching sequences in a reference taxonomy. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach on several metagenomic datasets of marine and gut microbiota.

  11. Accurate pose estimation for forensic identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merckx, Gert; Hermans, Jeroen; Vandermeulen, Dirk

    2010-04-01

    In forensic authentication, one aims to identify the perpetrator among a series of suspects or distractors. A fundamental problem in any recognition system that aims for identification of subjects in a natural scene is the lack of constrains on viewing and imaging conditions. In forensic applications, identification proves even more challenging, since most surveillance footage is of abysmal quality. In this context, robust methods for pose estimation are paramount. In this paper we will therefore present a new pose estimation strategy for very low quality footage. Our approach uses 3D-2D registration of a textured 3D face model with the surveillance image to obtain accurate far field pose alignment. Starting from an inaccurate initial estimate, the technique uses novel similarity measures based on the monogenic signal to guide a pose optimization process. We will illustrate the descriptive strength of the introduced similarity measures by using them directly as a recognition metric. Through validation, using both real and synthetic surveillance footage, our pose estimation method is shown to be accurate, and robust to lighting changes and image degradation.

  12. Sparse and accurate high resolution SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Duc; Zhao, Kexin; Rowe, William; Li, Jian

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the usage of an adaptive method, the Iterative Adaptive Approach (IAA), in combination with a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate to reconstruct high resolution SAR images that are both sparse and accurate. IAA is a nonparametric weighted least squares algorithm that is robust and user parameter-free. IAA has been shown to reconstruct SAR images with excellent side lobes suppression and high resolution enhancement. We first reconstruct the SAR images using IAA, and then we enforce sparsity by using MAP with a sparsity inducing prior. By coupling these two methods, we can produce a sparse and accurate high resolution image that are conducive for feature extractions and target classification applications. In addition, we show how IAA can be made computationally efficient without sacrificing accuracies, a desirable property for SAR applications where the size of the problems is quite large. We demonstrate the success of our approach using the Air Force Research Lab's "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set Version 1.0" challenge dataset. Via the widely used FFT, individual vehicles contained in the scene are barely recognizable due to the poor resolution and high side lobe nature of FFT. However with our approach clear edges, boundaries, and textures of the vehicles are obtained.

  13. Accurate basis set truncation for wavefunction embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Taylor A.; Goodpaster, Jason D.; Manby, Frederick R.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2013-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) provides a formally exact framework for performing embedded subsystem electronic structure calculations, including DFT-in-DFT and wavefunction theory-in-DFT descriptions. In the interest of efficiency, it is desirable to truncate the atomic orbital basis set in which the subsystem calculation is performed, thus avoiding high-order scaling with respect to the size of the MO virtual space. In this study, we extend a recently introduced projection-based embedding method [F. R. Manby, M. Stella, J. D. Goodpaster, and T. F. Miller III, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2564 (2012)], 10.1021/ct300544e to allow for the systematic and accurate truncation of the embedded subsystem basis set. The approach is applied to both covalently and non-covalently bound test cases, including water clusters and polypeptide chains, and it is demonstrated that errors associated with basis set truncation are controllable to well within chemical accuracy. Furthermore, we show that this approach allows for switching between accurate projection-based embedding and DFT embedding with approximate kinetic energy (KE) functionals; in this sense, the approach provides a means of systematically improving upon the use of approximate KE functionals in DFT embedding.

  14. Practical constraints on estimation of source extent with MEG beamformers.

    PubMed

    Hillebrand, Arjan; Barnes, Gareth R

    2011-02-14

    We aimed to determine practical constraints on the estimation of the spatial extent of neuronal activation using MEG beamformers. Correct estimation of spatial extent is a pre-requisite for accurate models of electrical activity, allows one to estimate current density, and enables non-invasive monitoring of functional recovery following stroke. The output of an MEG beamformer is maximum when the correct source model is used, so that the spatial extent of a source can in principal be determined through evaluation of different source models with the beamformer. Here, we simulated 275-channel MEG data using sources of varying spatial extents that followed the cortical geometry. These data were subsequently used to estimate the spatial extent of generic disc elements without knowledge of the underlying surface, and we compared these results to estimates based on cortical surface geometry (with and without error in surface location). We found that disc-shaped source models are too simplistic, particularly for areas with high curvature. For areas with low curvature spatial extent was underestimated, although on average there was a linear relationship between the true and estimated extent. In contrast, cortical surface models gave accurate predictions of spatial extent. However, adding small errors (>2 mm) to the estimated location of the cortical surface abolished this relationship between true and estimated extent, implying that accurate co-registration is needed with such models. Our results show that models exploiting surface information are necessary in order to model spatial extent and in turn current density, but in order to render such models applicable in practical situations, the accuracy of the cortical surface model itself needs to improve.

  15. Lunar Impact Flash Locations from NASA's Lunar Impact Monitoring Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, D. E.; Suggs, R. M.; Kupferschmidt, L.; Feldman, J.

    2015-01-01

    dependent upon LRO finding a fresh impact crater associated with one of the impact flashes recorded by Earth-based instruments, either the bright event of March 2013 or any other in the database of impact observations. To find the crater, LRO needed an accurate area to search. This Technical Memorandum (TM) describes the geolocation technique developed to accurately determine the impact flash location, and by association, the location of the crater, thought to lie directly beneath the brightest portion of the flash. The workflow and software tools used to geolocate the impact flashes are described in detail, along with sources of error and uncertainty and a case study applying the workflow to the bright impact flash in March 2013. Following the successful geolocation of the March 2013 flash, the technique was applied to all impact flashes detected by the MEO between November 7, 2005, and January 3, 2014.

  16. Moving sound source localization based on triangulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Feng; Yang, Diange; Wen, Junjie; Lian, Xiaomin

    2016-12-01

    This study develops a sound source localization method that extends traditional triangulation to moving sources. First, the possible sound source locating plane is scanned. Secondly, for each hypothetical source location in this possible plane, the Doppler effect is removed through the integration of sound pressure. Taking advantage of the de-Dopplerized signals, the moving time difference of arrival (MTDOA) is calculated, and the sound source is located based on triangulation. Thirdly, the estimated sound source location is compared to the original hypothetical location and the deviations are recorded. Because the real sound source location leads to zero deviation, the sound source can be finally located by minimizing the deviation matrix. Simulations have shown the superiority of MTDOA method over traditional triangulation in case of moving sound sources. The MTDOA method can be used to locate moving sound sources with as high resolution as DAMAS beamforming, as shown in the experiments, offering thus a new method for locating moving sound sources.

  17. AN ACCURATE FLUX DENSITY SCALE FROM 1 TO 50 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Perley, R. A.; Butler, B. J. E-mail: BButler@nrao.edu

    2013-02-15

    We develop an absolute flux density scale for centimeter-wavelength astronomy by combining accurate flux density ratios determined by the Very Large Array between the planet Mars and a set of potential calibrators with the Rudy thermophysical emission model of Mars, adjusted to the absolute scale established by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. The radio sources 3C123, 3C196, 3C286, and 3C295 are found to be varying at a level of less than {approx}5% per century at all frequencies between 1 and 50 GHz, and hence are suitable as flux density standards. We present polynomial expressions for their spectral flux densities, valid from 1 to 50 GHz, with absolute accuracy estimated at 1%-3% depending on frequency. Of the four sources, 3C286 is the most compact and has the flattest spectral index, making it the most suitable object on which to establish the spectral flux density scale. The sources 3C48, 3C138, 3C147, NGC 7027, NGC 6542, and MWC 349 show significant variability on various timescales. Polynomial coefficients for the spectral flux density are developed for 3C48, 3C138, and 3C147 for each of the 17 observation dates, spanning 1983-2012. The planets Venus, Uranus, and Neptune are included in our observations, and we derive their brightness temperatures over the same frequency range.

  18. Accurate multipixel phase measurement with classical-light interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mandeep; Khare, Kedar; Jha, Anand Kumar; Prabhakar, Shashi; Singh, R. P.

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate accurate phase measurement from experimental low photon level interferograms using a constrained optimization method that takes into account the expected redundancy in the unknown phase function. This approach is shown to have significant noise advantage over traditional methods, such as balanced homodyning or phase shifting, that treat individual pixels in the interference data as independent of each other. Our interference experiments comparing the optimization method with the traditional phase-shifting method show that when the same photon resources are used, the optimization method provides phase recoveries with tighter error bars. In particular, rms phase error performance of the optimization method for low photon number data (10 photons per pixel) shows a >5 × noise gain over the phase-shifting method. In our experiments where a laser light source is used for illumination, the results imply phase measurement with an accuracy better than the conventional single-pixel-based shot-noise limit that assumes independent phases at individual pixels. The constrained optimization approach presented here is independent of the nature of the light source and may further enhance the accuracy of phase detection when a nonclassical-light source is used.

  19. LOCAT - A Data Retrieval Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    STANDARSIA1 3 -A Suznn Y4Sl ’ś’. Doc 0 006 U m Nalionai Deftense U’" Defence nationale LOCAT -A DATA RETRIEVAL PROGRAM by Suzanne Y. Slinn SA RSA T Project...2.1 DESIGN PHILOSOPHY...................2 2.2 SATELLITE AND LOCATION SOFT KEY DISPLAY .. .. ........ 3 2.3...LOCAT -Calling