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Sample records for accurate spatially resolved

  1. Hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved technique for accurate measurement of the optical properties of horticultural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Haiyan

    Hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved technique is promising for determining the optical properties and quality attributes of horticultural and food products. However, considerable challenges still exist for accurate determination of spectral absorption and scattering properties from intact horticultural products. The objective of this research was, therefore, to develop and optimize hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved technique for accurate measurement of the optical properties of horticultural products. Monte Carlo simulations and experiments for model samples of known optical properties were performed to optimize the inverse algorithm of a single-layer diffusion model and the optical designs, for extracting the absorption (micro a) and reduced scattering (micros') coefficients from spatially-resolved reflectance profiles. The logarithm and integral data transformation and the relative weighting methods were found to greatly improve the parameter estimation accuracy with the relative errors of 10.4%, 10.7%, and 11.4% for micro a, and 6.6%, 7.0%, and 7.1% for micros', respectively. More accurate measurements of optical properties were obtained when the light beam was of Gaussian type with the diameter of less than 1 mm, and the minimum and maximum source-detector distances were 1.5 mm and 10--20 transport mean free paths, respectively. An optical property measuring prototype was built, based on the optimization results, and evaluated for automatic measurement of absorption and reduced scattering coefficients for the wavelengths of 500--1,000 nm. The instrument was used to measure the optical properties, and assess quality/maturity, of 500 'Redstar' peaches and 1039 'Golden Delicious' (GD) and 1040 'Delicious' (RD) apples. A separate study was also conducted on confocal laser scanning and scanning electron microscopic image analysis and compression test of fruit tissue specimens to measure the structural and mechanical properties of 'Golden

  2. Spatially resolved multicomponent gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, Emily R.; Eden, Edward G. B.; McDonald, Tom O.; Adams, Dave J.

    2015-10-01

    Multicomponent supramolecular systems could be used to prepare exciting new functional materials, but it is often challenging to control the assembly across multiple length scales. Here we report a simple approach to forming patterned, spatially resolved multicomponent supramolecular hydrogels. A multicomponent gel is first formed from two low-molecular-weight gelators and consists of two types of fibre, each formed by only one gelator. One type of fibre in this ‘self-sorted network’ is then removed selectively by a light-triggered gel-to-sol transition. We show that the remaining network has the same mechanical properties as it would have done if it initially formed alone. The selective irradiation of sections of the gel through a mask leads to the formation of patterned multicomponent networks, in which either one or two networks can be present at a particular position with a high degree of spatial control.

  3. Practical aspects of spatially high accurate methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfrey, Andrew G.; Mitchell, Curtis R.; Walters, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    The computational qualities of high order spatially accurate methods for the finite volume solution of the Euler equations are presented. Two dimensional essentially non-oscillatory (ENO), k-exact, and 'dimension by dimension' ENO reconstruction operators are discussed and compared in terms of reconstruction and solution accuracy, computational cost and oscillatory behavior in supersonic flows with shocks. Inherent steady state convergence difficulties are demonstrated for adaptive stencil algorithms. An exact solution to the heat equation is used to determine reconstruction error, and the computational intensity is reflected in operation counts. Standard MUSCL differencing is included for comparison. Numerical experiments presented include the Ringleb flow for numerical accuracy and a shock reflection problem. A vortex-shock interaction demonstrates the ability of the ENO scheme to excel in simulating unsteady high-frequency flow physics.

  4. Spatially resolved spectral-imaging device

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, Joshua Simon; Tyson, John Anthony

    2016-02-09

    A spatially resolved spectral device comprising a dispersive array to receive an incident light comprising a principal ray. The dispersive array comprising a plurality of dichroic layers, each of the plurality of dichroic layers disposed in a path of a direction of the principal ray. Each of the plurality of dichroic layers configured to at least one of reflect or transmit a different wavelength range of the incident light. The device further comprising a detection array operatively coupled with the dispersive array. The detection array comprising a photosensitive component including a plurality of detection pixels, each of the plurality of detection pixels having a light-receiving surface disposed parallel to the direction of the principal ray to detect a respective one of the different wavelength ranges of incident light reflected from a corresponding one of the plurality of dichroic layers.

  5. Resolving coastal conflicts using marine spatial planning.

    PubMed

    Tuda, Arthur O; Stevens, Tim F; Rodwell, Lynda D

    2014-01-15

    We applied marine spatial planning (MSP) to manage conflicts in a multi-use coastal area of Kenya. MSP involves several steps which were supported by using geographical information systems (GISs), multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) and optimization. GIS was used in identifying overlapping coastal uses and mapping conflict hotspots. MCDA was used to incorporate the preferences of user groups and managers into a formal decision analysis procedure. Optimization was applied in generating optimal allocation alternatives to competing uses. Through this analysis three important objectives that build a foundation for future planning of Kenya's coastal waters were achieved: 1) engaging competing stakeholders; 2) illustrating how MSP can be adapted to aid decision-making in multi-use coastal regions; and 3) developing a draft coastal use allocation plan. The successful application of MSP to resolve conflicts in coastal regions depends on the level of stakeholder involvement, data availability and the existing knowledge base.

  6. Spatially resolved solid-state MAS-NMR-spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Scheler, U; Schauss, G; Blümich, B; Spiess, H W

    1996-07-01

    A comprehensive account of spatially resolved solid-state MAS NMR of 13C is given. A device generating field gradients rotating synchronously with the magic angle spinner is described. Spatial resolution and sensitivity are compared for phase and frequency encoding of spatial information. The suppression of spinning sidebands is demonstrated for both cases. Prior knowledge about the involved materials can be used for the reduction of data from spatially resolved spectra to map chemical structure. Indirect detection via 13C NMR gives access to the information about mobility from proton-wideline spectra. Two-dimensional solid-state spectroscopy with spatial resolution is demonstrated for a rotor synchronized MAS experiment which resolves molecular order as a function of space. By comparison of different experiments the factors affecting the spatial resolution are investigated.

  7. Spatially resolved two-dimensional Fourier transform electron spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewert, Uwe; Crepeau, Richard H.; Lee, Sanghyuk; Dunnam, Curt R.; Xu, Dajiang; Freed, Jack H.

    1991-09-01

    Fourier transform ESR methods have been extended to permit spatially resolved two-dimensional (2D)-ESR experiments. This is illustrated for the case of 2D-electron-electron double resonance (2D-ELDOR) spectra of nitroxides in a liquid that exhibits appreciable cross-peaks due to Heisenberg spin exchange. The use of spin-echo decays in spatially resolved FT-ESR is also demonstrated.

  8. Spatially resolved contrast measurement of diffractive micromirror arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicker, Cornelius; Heber, Jörg; Berndt, Dirk; Rückerl, Florian; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Shorte, Spencer; Wagner, Michael; Schenk, Harald

    2015-02-01

    Diffractive micromirror arrays (MMA) are a special class of optical MEMS, serving as spatial light modulators (SLM) that control the phase of reflected light. Since the surface profile is the determining factor for an accurate phase modulation, high-precision topographic characterization techniques are essential to reach highest optical performance. While optical profiling techniques such as white-light interferometry are still considered to be most suitable to this task, the practical limits of interferometric techniques start to become apparent with the current state of optical MEMS technology. Light scatter from structured surfaces carries information about their topography, making scatter techniques a promising alternative. Therefore, a spatially resolved scatter measurement technique, which takes advantage of the MMA's diffractive principle, has been implemented experimentally. Spectral measurements show very high contrast ratios (up to 10 000 in selected samples), which are consistent with calculations from micromirror roughness parameters obtained by white-light interferometry, and demonstrate a high sensitivity to changes in the surface topography. The technique thus seems promising for the fast and highly sensitive characterization of diffractive MMAs.

  9. Super-resolved spatial light interference microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chu, Kaiqin; Smith, Zachary J; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian; Lane, Stephen

    2012-03-01

    We report a scheme to achieve resolution beyond the diffraction limit in spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM). By adding a grating to the optical path, the structured illumination technique can be used to improve the resolution by a factor of 2. We show that a direct application of the structured illumination technique, however, has proved to be unsuccessful. Through two crucial modifications, namely, one to the pupil plane of the objective and the other to the demodulation procedure, faithful phase information of the object is recovered and the resolution is improved by a factor of 2.

  10. Response Surface Methods For Spatially-Resolved Optical Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, P. M.; Dorrington, A. A.; Cutler, A. D.; DeLoach, R.

    2003-01-01

    Response surface methods (or methodology), RSM, have been applied to improve data quality for two vastly different spatially-resolved optical measurement techniques. In the first application, modern design of experiments (MDOE) methods, including RSM, are employed to map the temperature field in a direct-connect supersonic combustion test facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The laser-based measurement technique known as coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is used to measure temperature at various locations in the combustor. RSM is then used to develop temperature maps of the flow. Even though the temperature fluctuations at a single point in the flowfield have a standard deviation on the order of 300 K, RSM provides analytic fits to the data having 95% confidence interval half width uncertainties in the fit as low as +/- 30 K. Methods of optimizing future CARS experiments are explored. The second application of RSM is to quantify the shape of a 5-meter diameter, ultra-lightweight, inflatable space antenna at NASA Langley Research Center. Photogrammetry is used to simultaneously measure the shape of the antenna at approximately 500 discrete spatial locations. RSM allows an analytic model to be developed that describes the shape of the majority of the antenna with an uncertainty of 0.4 mm, with 95% confidence. This model would allow a quantitative comparison between the actual shape of the antenna and the original design shape. Accurately determining this shape also allows confident interpolation between the measured points. Such a model could, for example, be used for ray tracing of radio-frequency waves up to 95 GHz. to predict the performance of the antenna.

  11. The spatial resolving power of earth resources satellites: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townshend, J. R. G.

    1980-01-01

    The significance of spatial resolving power on the utility of current and future Earth resources satellites is critically discussed and the relative merits of different approaches in defining and estimating spatial resolution are outlined. It is shown that choice of a particular measure of spatial resolution depends strongly on the particular needs of the user. Several experiments have simulated the capabilities of future satellite systems by degradation of aircraft images. Surprisingly, many of these indicated that improvements in resolution may lead to a reduction in the classification accuracy of land cover types using computer assisted methods. However, where the frequency of boundary pixels is high, the converse relationship is found. Use of imagery dependent upon visual interpretation is likely to benefit more consistently from higher resolutions. Extraction of information from images will depend upon several other factors apart from spatial resolving power: these include characteristics of the terrain being sensed, the image processing methods that are applied as well as certain sensor characteristics.

  12. Spatially resolved argon microplasma diagnostics by diode laser absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Naoto; Hopwood, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Microplasmas were diagnosed by spatially resolved diode laser absorption using the Ar 801.4 nm transition (1s{sub 5}-2p{sub 8}). A 900 MHz microstrip split ring resonator was used to excite the microplasma which was operated between 100-760 Torr (13-101 kPa). The gas temperatures and the Ar 1s{sub 5} line-integrated densities were obtained from the atomic absorption lineshape. Spatially resolved data were obtained by focusing the laser to a 30 {mu}m spot and translating the laser path through the plasma with an xyz microdrive. At 1 atm, the microplasma has a warm core (850 K) that spans 0.2 mm and a steep gradient to room temperature at the edge of the discharge. At lower pressure, the gas temperature decreases and the spatial profiles become more diffuse.

  13. The Block recursion library: accurate calculation of resolvent submatrices using the block recursion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, T. J.; Haydock, Roger

    1991-04-01

    The Block Recursion Library, a collection of FORTRAN subroutines, calculates submatrices of the resolvent of a linear operator. The resolvent, in matrix theory, is a powerful tool for extracting information about solutions of linear systems. The routines use the block recursion method and achieve high accuracy for very large systems of coupled equations. This technique is a generalization of the scalar recursion method, an accurate technique for finding the local density of states. A sample program uses these routines to find the quantum mechanical transmittance of a randomly disordered two-dimensional cluster of atoms.

  14. Development of a temporally and spatially resolved grazing incidence spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, D.D.; Fortner, R.J.; Price, D.F.; Stewart, R.E.; Gilman, C.; Helava, H.

    1980-01-01

    The design considerations are presented for a grazing incidence spectrometer which will resolve both temporally and spatially the emission from a wide variety of plasmas. The basis of the design involves use of microchannel plates (MCPs) which are curved to conform to the Rowland circle of the spectrometer. The spectra are obtained when the anode is properly biased. The use of multiple anodes allows gating and with appropriate delays results in sequential time resolution of a few nanoseconds. Simultaneous gating of the anodes with spatial resolution of < 100..mu.. for any given time frame can also be obtained. The efficiency of this spectrometer is also compared with conventional grazing incidence spectrometers.

  15. Spatially: resolved heterogeneous dynamics in a strong colloidal gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzaccaro, Stefano; Alaimo, Matteo David; Secchi, Eleonora; Piazza, Roberto

    2015-05-01

    We re-examine the classical problem of irreversible colloid aggregation, showing that the application of Digital Fourier Imaging (DFI), a class of optical correlation methods that combine the power of light scattering and imaging, allows one to pick out novel useful evidence concerning the restructuring processes taking place in a strong colloidal gel. In particular, the spatially-resolved displacement fields provided by DFI strongly suggest that the temporally-intermittent local rearrangements taking place in the course of gel ageing are characterized by very long-ranged spatial correlations.

  16. The dynamics of spatially-resolved laser eigenstates

    SciTech Connect

    Bretenaker, F.; LeFloch, A. )

    1990-09-01

    The existence of partially spatially-resolved laser eigenstates is proven, using the polarization walkoff provided by an uniaxial birefringent crystal. The coupling between the ordinary and extraordinary eigenstates is shown to depend drastically on the relative positions of the different elements in the cavity, leading to different eigenstates dynamics. Rotation and inhibition vectorial bistability and vectorial simultaneity are successively isolated, the removal of the transversal degeneracy of the two eigenstates allowing a simple eigenstate selection.

  17. A Spatially - Resolved Study of the GRB 020903 Host Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorp, Mallory; Levesque, Emily M.

    2017-01-01

    The host complex of GRB 020903 is one of only a few long-duration gamma ray burst (GRB) environments where spatially-resolved observations are possible. It may also be the only known GRB host consisting of multiple interacting components, as well as an active galactic nucleus. We were granted 4.5 hours of observing time on the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (South) to obtain spatially resolved spectra of the GRB 020903 host complex. Using long-slit observations at two different position angles we were able to obtain optical spectra of the four main regions of the GRB host, with a spectral range of 3600 - 9000 Å. From this data we discern the redshift of each region to confirm that they comprise a single interacting system at an approximate redshift of z ~ 0.251. We also measure the metallicity, star formation rate, and young stellar population age of each region to create a spatially-resolved map of these parameters for the larger host complex. Based on the distribution of these characteristics we determine whether the localized GRB explosion site is representative of the host complex as a whole, or localized in a metal-poor or strongly star-forming region. Lastly, we consider the dynamics and past interactions of the host complex, studying the strongest emission lines for signs of potential inflows or outflows through each region.

  18. Complex structure of spatially resolved high-order-harmonic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catoire, F.; Ferré, A.; Hort, O.; Dubrouil, A.; Quintard, L.; Descamps, D.; Petit, S.; Burgy, F.; Mével, E.; Mairesse, Y.; Constant, E.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the spatiospectral coupling appearing in the spatially resolved high-order-harmonic spectra generated in gases. When ionization is weak, harmonic generation in the far field often exhibits rings surrounding a central spot centered on each odd harmonics in the spatiospectral domain. The nature of these structures is debated. They could stem from interferences between the emission of short and long trajectories, or could be the signature of the temporal and spatial dependence of the longitudinal phase matching of long trajectories (Maker fringes). We conducted spectrally and spatially resolved measurements of the harmonic spectra as a function of pressure, intensity, and ellipticity. In addition, we performed calculations where only a single emission plane is included (i.e., omitting deliberately the longitudinal phase matching), reproducing the features experimentally observed. This study has been completed by the spatiospectral coupling when strong ionization occurs leading to complex patterns which have been compared to calculations using the same model and also show good agreement. We conclude that many spatiospectral structures of the harmonic spectrum can be interpreted in terms of spatial and temporal transverse coherence of the emitting medium without resorting to longitudinal phase matching or quantum phase interference between short and long trajectories.

  19. Spatially resolved single photon detection with a quantum sensor array

    PubMed Central

    Zagoskin, A. M.; Wilson, R. D.; Everitt, M.; Savel'ev, S.; Gulevich, D. R.; Allen, J.; Dubrovich, V. K.; Il'ichev, E.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a method of resolving a spatially coherent signal, which contains on average just a single photon, against the background of local noise at the same frequency. The method is based on detecting the signal simultaneously in several points more than a wavelength apart through the entangling interaction of the incoming photon with the quantum metamaterial sensor array. The interaction produces the spatially correlated quantum state of the sensor array, characterised by a collective observable (e.g., total magnetic moment), which is read out using a quantum nondemolition measurement. We show that the effects of local noise (e.g., fluctuations affecting the elements of the array) are suppressed relative to the signal from the spatially coherent field of the incoming photon as , where N is the number of array elements. The realisation of this approach in the microwave range would be especially useful and is within the reach of current experimental techniques. PMID:24322568

  20. Asteroids (21) Lutetia: global and spatially resolved photometric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faury, G.; Lamy, P.; Vernazza, P.; Jorda, L.; Toth, I.

    2011-10-01

    Asteroids (21) Lutetia has recently been visited by the Rosetta spacecraft of the European Space Agency and imaged by its Rosetta narrow (NAC) and wide (WAC) angle cameras. The accurate photometric analysis of the images requires utmost care due to several instrumental problems, the most severe and complex to handle being the presence of optical ghosts which result from multiple reflections on the two filters inserted in the optical beam and on the thick window which protects the CCD detector from cosmic ray impacts. These ghosts prominently appears as either slighlty defocused images offset from the primary images or large round or elliptical halos. The appearance, the location and the radiance of each individual ghost depends upon the optical configuration (selected filters) and on the image itself so that no general model can be proposed. Consequently, a case-by-case approach must be adopted which requires a long and tedious work where each ghost is individually parametrized according to its specific geometry (defocused offset image or halo) and iteratively fitted to the original image. The procedure has been successfully applied to all NAC and WAC images and works extremely well with residuals and sometime artifacts at insignificant levels. Both NAC and WAC have further been recalibrated using the most recent observations of stellar calibrators VEGA and the solar analog 16 Cyg B allowing to correct the quantum efficiency response of the two CCD and the throughput for all channels (i.e., filters). We will present results on the global photometric properties of (21) Lutetia, albedo, phase function and spectral reflectivity as well as spatially resolved properties based on a novel method developed in the space of the facets representing the three-dimensional shape of the body. This method successfully implemented in the cases of the nucleus of comet 9P/Tempel 2 and of asteroid (2867) Steins (Spjuth et al. 2011) has the advantage of automatically tracking the same

  1. The Spatially Resolved Star Formation History of NGC 300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogarten, S. M.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Williams, B. F.

    2009-01-01

    We present the star formation histories (SFH) of two regions in NGC 300 from the ACS Nearby Galaxies Survey Treasury (ANGST). ANGST is using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to determine the star formation histories of a volume-limited sample of nearby galaxies. We demonstrate that even small regions within a galaxy contain enough stars to derive the SFH by comparing color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of the resolved stellar populations to synthetic CMDs from stellar evolution models. Of the two regions selected, one can be identified as star-forming from its UV, Hα, and dust emission. The SFH of this region shows significant star formation over the past 10 Myr, unlike a non-star-forming region of the same size. These preliminary results will form the basis of a larger study of spatially-resolved star formation in nearby spirals.

  2. Does the Taylor Spatial Frame Accurately Correct Tibial Deformities?

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Kira; Ilizarov, Svetlana; Fragomen, Austin T.; Ilizarov, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    Background Optimal leg alignment is the goal of tibial osteotomy. The Taylor Spatial Frame (TSF) and the Ilizarov method enable gradual realignment of angulation and translation in the coronal, sagittal, and axial planes, therefore, the term six-axis correction. Questions/purposes We asked whether this approach would allow precise correction of tibial deformities. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 102 patients (122 tibiae) with tibial deformities treated with percutaneous osteotomy and gradual correction with the TSF. The proximal osteotomy group was subdivided into two subgroups to distinguish those with an intentional overcorrection of the mechanical axis deviation (MAD). The minimum followup after frame removal was 10 months (average, 48 months; range, 10–98 months). Results In the proximal osteotomy group, patients with varus and valgus deformities for whom the goal of alignment was neutral or overcorrection experienced accurate correction of MAD. In the proximal tibia, the medial proximal tibial angle improved from 80° to 89° in patients with a varus deformity and from 96° to 85° in patients with a valgus deformity. In the middle osteotomy group, all patients had less than 5° coronal plane deformity and 15 of 17 patients had less that 5° sagittal plane deformity. In the distal osteotomy group, the lateral distal tibial angle improved from 77° to 86° in patients with a valgus deformity and from 101° to 90° for patients with a varus deformity. Conclusions Gradual correction of all tibial deformities with the TSF was accurate and with few complications. Level of Evidence Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19911244

  3. Progress toward accurate high spatial resolution actinide analysis by EPMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jercinovic, M. J.; Allaz, J. M.; Williams, M. L.

    2010-12-01

    High precision, high spatial resolution EPMA of actinides is a significant issue for geochronology, resource geochemistry, and studies involving the nuclear fuel cycle. Particular interest focuses on understanding of the behavior of Th and U in the growth and breakdown reactions relevant to actinide-bearing phases (monazite, zircon, thorite, allanite, etc.), and geochemical fractionation processes involving Th and U in fluid interactions. Unfortunately, the measurement of minor and trace concentrations of U in the presence of major concentrations of Th and/or REEs is particularly problematic, especially in complexly zoned phases with large compositional variation on the micro or nanoscale - spatial resolutions now accessible with modern instruments. Sub-micron, high precision compositional analysis of minor components is feasible in very high Z phases where scattering is limited at lower kV (15kV or less) and where the beam diameter can be kept below 400nm at high current (e.g. 200-500nA). High collection efficiency spectrometers and high performance electron optics in EPMA now allow the use of lower overvoltage through an exceptional range in beam current, facilitating higher spatial resolution quantitative analysis. The U LIII edge at 17.2 kV precludes L-series analysis at low kV (high spatial resolution), requiring careful measurements of the actinide M series. Also, U-La detection (wavelength = 0.9A) requires the use of LiF (220) or (420), not generally available on most instruments. Strong peak overlaps of Th on U make highly accurate interference correction mandatory, with problems compounded by the ThMIV and ThMV absorption edges affecting peak, background, and interference calibration measurements (especially the interference of the Th M line family on UMb). Complex REE bearing phases such as monazite, zircon, and allanite have particularly complex interference issues due to multiple peak and background overlaps from elements present in the activation

  4. Spatially resolved optoelectronic characterization of perovskite lead iodide nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Rui; Peng, Xingyu; Hou, Yasen; Yu, Dong

    The high power conversion efficiency of organo-lead halide perovskite-based solar cells has attracted world-wide attention over the past few years. The high efficiency was believed to originate from the unusual properties including long carrier lifetimes and consequent long carrier diffusion lengths in these materials. Ion drift, ferroelectricity, and charge traps have been proposed to account for the efficient charge separation and photocurrent hysteresis. However, it remains unclear which mechanism is dominating. We fabricate field effect transistors (FETs) incorporating single nanoplates/nanowires of organic perovskite and perform scanning photocurrent microscopic (SPCM) measurements to extract carrier diffusion lengths as a function of gate voltage, source-drain bias. Spatially resolved optoelectronic investigations of single crystalline perovskite nanostructures provide valuable information and key evidence on distinguishing the dominating charge transport/separation mechanism.

  5. Spatially resolved study of primary electron transport in magnetic cusps

    SciTech Connect

    Hubble, Aimee A.; Foster, John E.

    2012-01-15

    Spatially resolved primary electron current density profiles were measured using a planar Langmuir probe in the region above a magnetic cusp in a small ion thruster discharge chamber. The probe current maps obtained were used to study the electron collection mechanics in the cusp region in the limit of zero gas flow and no plasma production, and they allowed for the visualization of primary electron transport through the cusp. Attenuation coefficients and loss widths were calculated as a function of probe distance above the anode at various operating conditions. Finally, the collection mechanics between two magnetic cusps were studied and compared. It was found that primary electron collection was dominated by the upstream magnet ring.

  6. Spatially Resolved Electronic Structures of Atomically Precise Armchair Graphene Nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Han; Wei, Dacheng; Sun, Jiatao; Wong, Swee Liang; Feng, Yuan Ping; Neto, A. H. Castro; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2012-01-01

    Graphene has attracted much interest in both academia and industry. The challenge of making it semiconducting is crucial for applications in electronic devices. A promising approach is to reduce its physical size down to the nanometer scale. Here, we present the surface-assisted bottom-up fabrication of atomically precise armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) with predefined widths, namely 7-, 14- and 21-AGNRs, on Ag(111) as well as their spatially resolved width-dependent electronic structures. STM/STS measurements reveal their associated electron scattering patterns and the energy gaps over 1 eV. The mechanism to form such AGNRs is addressed based on the observed intermediate products. Our results provide new insights into the local properties of AGNRs, and have implications for the understanding of their electrical properties and potential applications. PMID:23248746

  7. PHL 5038: a spatially resolved white dwarf + brown dwarf binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, P. R.; Burleigh, M. R.; Farihi, J.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Jameson, R. F.; Dobbie, P. D.; Barstow, M. A.

    2009-06-01

    A near-infrared excess is detected at the white dwarf PHL 5038 in UKIDSS photometry, consistent with the presence of a cool, substellar companion. We have obtained H- and K-grism spectra and images of PHL 5038 using NIRI on Gemini North. The target is spatially and spectrally resolved into two components: an 8000 K DA white dwarf, and a likely L8 brown dwarf companion, separated by 0.94 arcsec. The spectral type of the secondary was determined using standard spectral indices for late L and T dwarfs. The projected orbital separation of the binary is 55 AU, so it becomes only the second known wide WD+dL binary to be found after GD 165AB. This object could potentially be used as a benchmark for testing substellar evolutionary models at intermediate to older ages.

  8. Spatially Resolved Spectrum of the TW Hydrae Circumstellar Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberge, Aki; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Malumuth, Eliot

    2004-06-01

    We present the first spatially resolved spectrum of scattered light from the TW Hydrae protoplanetary disk. This nearly face-on disk is optically thick, surrounding a classical T-Tauri star in the nearby 8 Myr old TW Hya association. Accretion of disk material onto the central star is still occurring, but there are signs that growth of planetary material has begun. Our HST-STIS spectrum covers the optical bandpass from 5000 Å to 1 μm. After careful subtraction of a PSF star spectrum, spectra can be extracted between 37 AU and about 124 AU from the star. The scattered light spectra have the same color as the star (gray scattering) at all radii, except possibly the very innermost region. This likely indicates that either the scattering dust grains are much larger than 1 μm throughout the bulk of the disk or that the disk remains very optically thick out to 124 AU.

  9. Spatially Resolving Ocean Color and Sediment Dispersion in River Plumes, Coastal Systems, and Continental Shelf Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aurin, Dirk Alexander; Mannino, Antonio; Franz, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing of ocean color in dynamic coastal, inland, and nearshorewaters is impeded by high variability in optical constituents, demands specialized atmospheric correction, and is limited by instrument sensitivity. To accurately detect dispersion of bio-optical properties, remote sensors require ample signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to sense small variations in ocean color without saturating over bright pixels, an atmospheric correction that can accommodate significantwater-leaving radiance in the near infrared (NIR), and spatial and temporal resolution that coincides with the scales of variability in the environment. Several current and historic space-borne sensors have met these requirements with success in the open ocean, but are not optimized for highly red-reflective and heterogeneous waters such as those found near river outflows or in the presence of sediment resuspension. Here we apply analytical approaches for determining optimal spatial resolution, dominant spatial scales of variability ("patches"), and proportions of patch variability that can be resolved from four river plumes around the world between 2008 and 2011. An offshore region in the Sargasso Sea is analyzed for comparison. A method is presented for processing Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Aqua and Terra imagery including cloud detection, stray lightmasking, faulty detector avoidance, and dynamic aerosol correction using short-wave- and near-infrared wavebands in extremely turbid regions which pose distinct optical and technical challenges. Results showthat a pixel size of approx. 520 mor smaller is generally required to resolve spatial heterogeneity in ocean color and total suspended materials in river plumes. Optimal pixel size increases with distance from shore to approx. 630 m in nearshore regions, approx 750 m on the continental shelf, and approx. 1350 m in the open ocean. Greater than 90% of the optical variability within plume regions is resolvable with

  10. Factors which affect spatial resolving power in large array biomagnetic sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, E.R. )

    1994-04-01

    A reduced chi-squared test has been used to evaluate factors that affect the spatial resolving power of large array biomagnetic sensors for the brain. Realistic array geometries are used and a classical description of spatial resolving power is applied to determine when two separate sources may be resolved. Array parameters such as sensor spacing, coil diameter, and gradiometer type are varied to determine their effect on spatial resolving power. The consequences of the number of sensors is considered and a comparison of existing systems is made. The effects of the vector nature of magnetic sources on spatial resolving power is also considered. It is shown that spatial resolving power is not strongly dependent upon individual sensor diameter, but that sensor spacing is important. It is also found that the instrumental spatial resolving power as a function of depth degrades much more quickly when planar gradiometers are used, as compared to axial gradiometers.

  11. Is the Separable Propagator Perturbation Approach Accurate in Calculating Angle Resolved Photoelectron Diffraction Spectra?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. N.; Chu, T. P.; Wu, Huasheng; Tong, S. Y.; Huang, Hong

    1997-03-01

    We compare multiple scattering results of angle-resolved photoelectron diffraction spectra between the exact slab method and the separable propagator perturbation method. In the slab method,footnote C.H. Li, A.R. Lubinsky and S.Y. Tong, Phys. Rev. B17, 3128 (1978). the source wave and multiple scattering within the strong scattering atomic layers are expanded in spherical waves while interlayer scattering is expressed in plane waves. The transformation between spherical waves and plane waves is done exactly. The plane waves are then matched across the solid-vacuum interface to a single outgoing plane wave in the detector's direction. The separable propagator perturbation approach uses two approximations: (i) A separable representation of the Green's function propagator and (ii) A perturbation expansion of multiple scattering terms. Results of c(2x2) S-Ni(001) show that this approximate method fails to converge due to the very slow convergence of the separable representation for scattering angles less than 90^circ. However, this method is accurate in the backscattering regime and may be applied to XAFS calculations.(J.J. Rehr and R.C. Albers, Phys. Rev. B41, 8139 (1990).) The use of this method for angle-resolved photoelectron diffraction spectra is substantially less reliable.

  12. Imaging of quantized magnetostatic modes using spatially resolved ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaru, S.; Bain, J. A.; van de Veerdonk, R. J. M.; Crawford, T. M.; Covington, M.; Kryder, M. H.

    2002-05-01

    We present a measurement technique for performing spatially resolved ferromagnetic resonance and directly imaging quantized magnetostatic modes in magnetic samples that undergo high frequency magnetic drive fields (up to 8 GHz). The dynamic response of a 50×50 μm2 permalloy structure (100 nm thick) under a 7.04 GHz highly nonuniform drive field was measured as a function of the dc bias field using this technique. The magnetization variation observed indicates that quantized magnetostatic mode waves appear at certain bias fields, with the number of nodes decreasing with an increase in the bias field. We tentatively assign the indices of each mode using the Damon-Eshbach (DE) model. Similar modes have been observed for a similar sample geometry using an inductive measurement and they showed good agreement with the DE model. However, the result measured using this technique showed some discrepancy with the DE model and the spatial patterns observed are more complicated than simple one-dimensional standing waves. This complexity suggests that analysis beyond that of the DE model is required to explain the observations.

  13. Calibration and analysis of spatially resolved x-ray absorption spectra from a nonuniform plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, P. F.; Hansen, S. B.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.

    2012-07-01

    We report here the calibration and analysis techniques used to obtain spatially resolved density and temperature measurements of a pair of imploding aluminum wires from x-ray absorption spectra. A step wedge is used to measure backlighter fluence at the film, allowing transmission through the sample to be measured with an accuracy of ±14% or better. A genetic algorithm is used to search the allowed plasma parameter space and fit synthetic spectra with 20 μm spatial resolution to the measured spectra, taking into account that the object plasma nonuniformity must be physically reasonable. The inferred plasma conditions must be allowed to vary along the absorption path in order to obtain a fit to the spectral data. The temperature is estimated to be accurate to within ±25% and the density to within a factor of two. This information is used to construct two-dimensional maps of the density and temperature of the object plasma.

  14. Developing Accurate Spatial Maps of Cotton Fiber Quality Parameters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Awareness of the importance of cotton fiber quality (Gossypium, L. sps.) has increased as advances in spinning technology require better quality cotton fiber. Recent advances in geospatial information sciences allow an improved ability to study the extent and causes of spatial variability in fiber p...

  15. Multimodal spatial calibration for accurately registering EEG sensor positions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianhua; Chen, Jian; Chen, Shengyong; Xiao, Gang; Li, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a fast and accurate calibration method to calibrate multiple multimodal sensors using a novel photogrammetry system for fast localization of EEG sensors. The EEG sensors are placed on human head and multimodal sensors are installed around the head to simultaneously obtain all EEG sensor positions. A multiple views' calibration process is implemented to obtain the transformations of multiple views. We first develop an efficient local repair algorithm to improve the depth map, and then a special calibration body is designed. Based on them, accurate and robust calibration results can be achieved. We evaluate the proposed method by corners of a chessboard calibration plate. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can achieve good performance, which can be further applied to EEG source localization applications on human brain.

  16. Spatially resolved Hall effect measurement in a single semiconductor nanowire.

    PubMed

    Storm, Kristian; Halvardsson, Filip; Heurlin, Magnus; Lindgren, David; Gustafsson, Anders; Wu, Phillip M; Monemar, Bo; Samuelson, Lars

    2012-11-01

    Efficient light-emitting diodes and photovoltaic energy-harvesting devices are expected to play an important role in the continued efforts towards sustainable global power consumption. Semiconductor nanowires are promising candidates as the active components of both light-emitting diodes and photovoltaic cells, primarily due to the added freedom in device design offered by the nanowire geometry. However, for nanowire-based components to move past the proof-of-concept stage and be implemented in production-grade devices, it is necessary to precisely quantify and control fundamental material properties such as doping and carrier mobility. Unfortunately, the nanoscale geometry that makes nanowires interesting for applications also makes them inherently difficult to characterize. Here, we report a method to carry out Hall measurements on single core-shell nanowires. Our technique allows spatially resolved and quantitative determination of the carrier concentration and mobility of the nanowire shell. As Hall measurements have previously been completely unavailable for nanowires, the experimental platform presented here should facilitate the implementation of nanowires in advanced practical devices.

  17. Spatially resolved kinematics of an ultracompact dwarf galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, M. J.; Hilker, M.; Mieske, S.; Baumgardt, H.; Grebel, E. K.; Infante, L.

    2011-06-01

    We present the internal kinematics of UCD3, the brightest known ultracompact dwarf galaxy (UCD) in the Fornax cluster, making this the first UCD with spatially resolved spectroscopy. Our study is based on seeing-limited observations obtained with the ARGUS Integral Field Unit of the VLT/FLAMES spectrograph under excellent seeing conditions (0.5-0.67 arcsec FWHM). The velocity field of UCD3 shows the signature of weak rotation, comparable to that found in massive globular clusters. Its velocity dispersion profile is fully consistent with an isotropic velocity distribution and the assumption that mass follows the light distribution obtained from Hubble Space Telescope imaging. In particular, there is no evidence for the presence of an extended dark matter halo contributing a significant (≳33 per cent within R < 200 pc) mass fraction, nor for a central black hole more massive than ˜5 per cent of the UCD's mass. While this result does not exclude a galaxian origin for UCD3, we conclude that its internal kinematics are fully consistent with it being a massive star cluster. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory, Chile [Observing Programme 078.B-0496(B)].

  18. Determining the Spatially Resolved Mass Outflow Rate in Markarian 573

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revalski, Mitchell; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Fischer, Travis C.; Kraemer, Steven B.; Schmitt, Henrique R.

    2017-01-01

    We report on current progress in calculating the narrow line region (NLR) mass outflow rate in the Seyfert 2 galaxy Markarian 573. Our goal is to determine the mass outflow rate as a function of distance from the nucleus in 10 nearby Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) with spatially resolved NLRs. These nearby AGN allow us to study the feeding and feedback of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) that may play an important role in understanding large scale structure, enrichment of the interstellar medium, and coevolution of SMBHs with their host galaxies. Utilizing archival spectra from the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) we measured emission line ratios from a wide range of ionized species. Next we used the line ratios to find a reddening correction and determined the physical conditions in the ionized gas using the photoionization code Cloudy. Specifically, we derived the mass of the ionized gas and then estimate the total mass outside of the spectral slit using HST [O III] images. Combined with kinematic models of the outflows we will determine the mass outflow rate and kinetic luminosity as a function of distance from the central AGN. Ultimately, we aim to determine if NLR outflows are effective in regulating AGN feedback by comparing our observed outflow rates with theoretical models.

  19. A versatile assay for the accurate, time-resolved determination of cellular viability.

    PubMed

    Amano, Toyoki; Hirasawa, Ken ichi; O'Donohue, Michael J; Pernolle, Jean Claude; Shioi, Yuzo

    2003-03-01

    A convenient and versatile method for the accurate, time-resolved determination of cellular viability has been developed. The conventional viability indicator fluorescein diacetate (FDA), which is converted to the fluorescent compound fluorescein in living cells, was employed as a viability probe. Fluorescence emission from cells was measured using a spectrofluorimeter equipped with a magnetic stirrer. Using this assay cell suspensions exhibiting densities in the range 0.5 x 10(5) to 2.0 x 10(5) cells displayed a linear response when FDA concentrations less than 12 micro M were employed. To calibrate the method, viability standards were elaborated using different proportions of living and dead cells, and a correlation coefficient for the viability of tobacco BY-2 suspensions was calculated as 0.998. This viability assay was also found to be applicable to Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Arabidopsis thaliana cultured cells. Using this cell viability assay, kinetic analyses of cell death could be performed. Using the proteinaceous elicitor from Phytophthora cryptogea, cryptogein, to induce cell death in tobacco cell suspensions, values for the maximum velocity of death induction rate (V(max)) and the LD50 (half-maximal velocity or k(1/2)) were calculated as 17.2 (% death/h) and 65 nM, respectively.

  20. A spatially resolved surface kinetic model for forsterite dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Kate; Johnson, Natalie C.; Jackson, Ariel; Lammers, Laura N.; Torchinsky, Abe B.; Weaver, Karrie L.; Bird, Dennis K.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2016-02-01

    The development of complex alteration layers on silicate mineral surfaces undergoing dissolution is a widely observed phenomenon. Given the complexity of these layers, most kinetic models used to predict rates of mineral-fluid interactions do not explicitly consider their formation. As a result, the relationship between the development of the altered layers and the final dissolution rate is poorly understood. To improve our understanding of the relationship between the alteration layer and the dissolution rate, we developed a spatially resolved surface kinetic model for olivine dissolution and applied it to a series of closed-system experiments consisting of three-phases (water (±NaCl), olivine, and supercritical CO2) at conditions relevant to in situ mineral carbonation (i.e. 60 °C, 100 bar CO2). We also measured the corresponding δ26/24Mg of the dissolved Mg during early stages of dissolution. Analysis of the solid reaction products indicates the formation of Mg-depleted layers on the olivine surface as quickly as 2 days after the experiment was started and before the bulk solution reached saturation with respect to amorphous silica. The δ26/24Mg of the dissolved Mg decreased by approximately 0.4‰ in the first stages of the experiment and then approached the value of the initial olivine (-0.35‰) as the steady-state dissolution rate was approached. We attribute the preferential release of 24Mg to a kinetic effect associated with the formation of a Mg-depleted layer that develops as protons exchange for Mg2+. We used experimental data to calibrate a surface kinetic model for olivine dissolution that includes crystalline olivine, a distinct ;active layer; from which Mg can be preferentially removed, and secondary amorphous silica precipitation. By coupling the spatial arrangement of ions with the kinetics, this model is able to reproduce both the early and steady-state long-term dissolution rates, and the kinetic isotope fractionation. In the early stages of

  1. Retinal ganglion cell topography and spatial resolving power in penguins.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, João Paulo; Nolan, Paul M; Collin, Shaun P; Hart, Nathan S

    2012-01-01

    Penguins are a group of flightless seabirds that exhibit numerous morphological, behavioral and ecological adaptations to their amphibious lifestyle, but little is known about the topographic organization of neurons in their retinas. In this study, we used retinal wholemounts and stereological methods to estimate the total number and topographic distribution of retinal ganglion cells in addition to an anatomical estimate of spatial resolving power in two species of penguins: the little penguin, Eudyptula minor, and the king penguin, Aptenodytes patagonicus. The total number of ganglion cells per retina was approximately 1,200,000 in the little penguin and 1,110,000 in the king penguin. The topographic distribution of retinal ganglion cells in both species revealed the presence of a prominent horizontal visual streak with steeper gradients in the little penguin. The little penguin retinas showed ganglion cell density peaks of 21,867 cells/mm², affording spatial resolution in water of 17.07-17.46 cycles/degree (12.81-13.09 cycles/degree in air). In contrast, the king penguin showed a relatively lower peak density of ganglion cells of 14,222 cells/mm², but--due to its larger eye--slightly higher spatial resolution in water of 20.40 cycles/degree (15.30 cycles/degree in air). In addition, we mapped the distribution of giant ganglion cells in both penguin species using Nissl-stained wholemounts. In both species, topographic mapping of this cell type revealed the presence of an area gigantocellularis with a concentric organization of isodensity contours showing a peak in the far temporal retina of approximately 70 cells/mm² in the little penguin and 39 cells/mm² in the king penguin. Giant ganglion cell densities gradually fall towards the outermost isodensity contours revealing the presence of a vertically organized streak. In the little penguin, we confirmed our cytological characterization of giant ganglion cells using immunohistochemistry for microtubule

  2. The Lyman alpha reference sample. VII. Spatially resolved Hα kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herenz, Edmund Christian; Gruyters, Pieter; Orlitova, Ivana; Hayes, Matthew; Östlin, Göran; Cannon, John M.; Roth, Martin M.; Bik, Arjan; Pardy, Stephen; Otí-Floranes, Héctor; Mas-Hesse, J. Miguel; Adamo, Angela; Atek, Hakim; Duval, Florent; Guaita, Lucia; Kunth, Daniel; Laursen, Peter; Melinder, Jens; Puschnig, Johannes; Rivera-Thorsen, Thøger E.; Schaerer, Daniel; Verhamme, Anne

    2016-03-01

    We present integral field spectroscopic observations with the Potsdam Multi-Aperture Spectrophotometer of all 14 galaxies in the z ~ 0.1 Lyman Alpha Reference Sample (LARS). We produce 2D line-of-sight velocity maps and velocity dispersion maps from the Balmer α (Hα) emission in our data cubes. These maps trace the spectral and spatial properties of the LARS galaxies' intrinsic Lyα radiation field. We show our kinematic maps that are spatially registered onto the Hubble Space Telescope Hα and Lyman α (Lyα) images. We can conjecture a causal connection between spatially resolved Hα kinematics and Lyα photometry for individual galaxies, however, no general trend can be established for the whole sample. Furthermore, we compute the intrinsic velocity dispersion σ0, the shearing velocity vshear, and the vshear/σ0 ratio from our kinematic maps. In general LARS galaxies are characterised by high intrinsic velocity dispersions (54 km s-1 median) and low shearing velocities (65 km s-1 median). The vshear/σ0 values range from 0.5 to 3.2 with an average of 1.5. It is noteworthy that five galaxies of the sample are dispersion-dominated systems with vshear/σ0< 1, and are thus kinematically similar to turbulent star-forming galaxies seen at high redshift. When linking our kinematical statistics to the global LARS Lyα properties, we find that dispersion-dominated systems show higher Lyα equivalent widths and higher Lyα escape fractions than systems with vshear/σ0> 1. Our result indicates that turbulence in actively star-forming systems is causally connected to interstellar medium conditions that favour an escape of Lyα radiation. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).The reduced data cubes (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130

  3. Spatially resolved and observer-free experimental quantification of spatial resolution in tomographic images

    SciTech Connect

    Tsekenis, S. A.; McCann, H.; Tait, N.

    2015-03-15

    We present a novel framework and experimental method for the quantification of spatial resolution of a tomography system. The framework adopts the “black box” view of an imaging system, considering only its input and output. The tomography system is locally stimulated with a step input, viz., a sharp edge. The output, viz., the reconstructed images, is analysed by Fourier decomposition of their spatial frequency components, and the local limiting spatial resolution is determined using a cut-off threshold. At no point is an observer involved in the process. The framework also includes a means of translating the quantification region in the imaging space, thus creating a spatially resolved map of objectively quantified spatial resolution. As a case-study, the framework is experimentally applied using a gaseous propane phantom measured by a well-established chemical species tomography system. A spatial resolution map consisting of 28 regions is produced. In isolated regions, the indicated performance is 4-times better than that suggested in the literature and varies by 57% across the imaging space. A mechanism based on adjacent but non-interacting beams is hypothesised to explain the observed behaviour. The mechanism suggests that, as also independently concluded by other methods, a geometrically regular beam array maintains maximum objectivity in reconstructions. We believe that the proposed framework, methodology, and findings will be of value in the design and performance evaluation of tomographic imaging arrays and systems.

  4. Spatially resolved dust emission of extremely metal-poor galaxies*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Luwenjia; Shi, Yong; Diaz-Santos, Taino; Armus, Lee; Helou, George; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Li, Aigen

    2016-05-01

    We present infrared (IR) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of individual star-forming regions in four extremely metal-poor (EMP) galaxies with metallicity Z ≲ Z⊙/10 as observed by the Herschel Space Observatory. With the good wavelength coverage of the SED, it is found that these EMP star-forming regions show distinct SED shapes as compared to those of grand design Spirals and higher metallicity dwarfs: they have on average much higher f70μm/f160 μm ratios at a given f160 μm/f250 μm ratio; single modified blackbody (MBB) fittings to the SED at λ ≥ 100 μm still reveal higher dust temperatures and lower emissivity indices compared to that of Spirals, while two MBB fittings to the full SED with a fixed emissivity index (β = 2) show that even at 100 μm, about half of the emission comes from warm (50 K) dust, in contrast to the cold (˜20 K) dust component. Our spatially resolved images furthermore reveal that the far-IR colours including f70 μm/f160 μm, f160 μm/f250 μm and f250 μm/f350 μm are all related to the surface densities of young stars as traced by far-UV, 24 μm and star formation rates (SFRs), but not to the stellar mass surface densities. This suggests that the dust emitting at wavelengths from 70 to 350 μm is primarily heated by radiation from young stars.

  5. Relevance for food sciences of quantitative spatially resolved element profile investigations in wheat (Triticum aestivum) grain.

    PubMed

    Pongrac, Paula; Kreft, Ivan; Vogel-Mikus, Katarina; Regvar, Marjana; Germ, Mateja; Vavpetic, Primoz; Grlj, Natasa; Jeromel, Luka; Eichert, Diane; Budic, Bojan; Pelicon, Primoz

    2013-07-06

    Bulk element concentrations of whole grain and element spatial distributions at the tissue level were investigated in wheat (Triticum aestivum) grain grown in Zn-enriched soil. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry were used for bulk analysis, whereas micro-proton-induced X-ray emission was used to resolve the two-dimensional localization of the elements. Soil Zn application did not significantly affect the grain yield, but did significantly increase the grain Ca, Fe and Zn concentrations, and decrease the grain Na, P and Mo concentrations; bulk Mg, S, K, Mn, Cu, Cd and Pb concentrations remained unchanged. These changes observed in bulk element concentrations are the reflection of tissue-specific variations within the grain, revealing that Zn application to soil can lead to considerable alterations in the element distributions within the grain, which might ultimately influence the quality of the milling fractions. Spatially resolved investigations into the partitioning of the element concentrations identified the tissues with the highest element concentrations, which is of utmost importance for accurate prediction of element losses during the grain milling and polishing processes.

  6. Relevance for food sciences of quantitative spatially resolved element profile investigations in wheat (Triticum aestivum) grain

    PubMed Central

    Pongrac, Paula; Kreft, Ivan; Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina; Regvar, Marjana; Germ, Mateja; Vavpetič, Primož; Grlj, Nataša; Jeromel, Luka; Eichert, Diane; Budič, Bojan; Pelicon, Primož

    2013-01-01

    Bulk element concentrations of whole grain and element spatial distributions at the tissue level were investigated in wheat (Triticum aestivum) grain grown in Zn-enriched soil. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry were used for bulk analysis, whereas micro-proton-induced X-ray emission was used to resolve the two-dimensional localization of the elements. Soil Zn application did not significantly affect the grain yield, but did significantly increase the grain Ca, Fe and Zn concentrations, and decrease the grain Na, P and Mo concentrations; bulk Mg, S, K, Mn, Cu, Cd and Pb concentrations remained unchanged. These changes observed in bulk element concentrations are the reflection of tissue-specific variations within the grain, revealing that Zn application to soil can lead to considerable alterations in the element distributions within the grain, which might ultimately influence the quality of the milling fractions. Spatially resolved investigations into the partitioning of the element concentrations identified the tissues with the highest element concentrations, which is of utmost importance for accurate prediction of element losses during the grain milling and polishing processes. PMID:23676898

  7. Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy of the SNR IC443

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.

    1998-01-01

    investigators examined the spatial structure of the thermal component and analyzed the GIS spectra with a non-equilibrium plasma model, and found no systematic variation of the interstellar absorption across the remnant. Evidence for shock acceleration of cosmic rays to high energies (10 TeV) was found by Keohane. X-ray imaging spectroscopy with ASCA reveals two regions of particularly hard emission: an unresolved source embedded in an extended emission region, and a ridge of emission coincident with the southeastern rim. Both features are located on part of the radio shell where the shock wave is interacting with molecular gas, and together they account for a majority of the emission at 7 keV. Though we would not have noticed it a priori, the unresolved feature is coincident with one resolved by the ROSAT HRI. The ASCA measurements were combined with higher energy data from the XTE and GRO missions and with radio and TeV gamma-ray data to produce a nonthermal multiwavelength spectrum for IC 443 which was fit with a cosmic ray interaction model. This model calculates the cynchrotron, bremsstrahlung, invers Compton, and neutral pion decay emission produced by locally accelerated cosmic ray interacting with ambient matter, soft photon fields, and magnetic fields.

  8. Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy of the SNR IC443

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorenstein, P.

    1998-07-01

    investigators examined the spatial structure of the thermal component and analyzed the GIS spectra with a non-equilibrium plasma model, and found no systematic variation of the interstellar absorption across the remnant. Evidence for shock acceleration of cosmic rays to high energies (10 TeV) was found by Keohane. X-ray imaging spectroscopy with ASCA reveals two regions of particularly hard emission: an unresolved source embedded in an extended emission region, and a ridge of emission coincident with the southeastern rim. Both features are located on part of the radio shell where the shock wave is interacting with molecular gas, and together they account for a majority of the emission at 7 keV. Though we would not have noticed it a priori, the unresolved feature is coincident with one resolved by the ROSAT HRI. The ASCA measurements were combined with higher energy data from the XTE and GRO missions and with radio and TeV gamma-ray data to produce a nonthermal multiwavelength spectrum for IC 443 which was fit with a cosmic ray interaction model. This model calculates the cynchrotron, bremsstrahlung, invers Compton, and neutral pion decay emission produced by locally accelerated cosmic ray interacting with ambient matter, soft photon fields, and magnetic fields.

  9. In situ, spatially resolved biosignature detection at the microbial scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williford, K. H.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Hallmann, C.; Kitajima, K.; Kozdon, R.; Summons, R. E.; Kudryavstev, A.; Lepot, K.; Schopf, J.; Spicuzza, M.; Sugitani, K.; Ushikubo, T.; van Kranendonk, M.; Valley, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Whether life has ever existed beyond Earth is one of the great human questions. The Science Definition Team (SDT) for the proposed NASA Mars 2020 rover mission recently announced a suggested approach for NASA to 'demonstrate significant technical progress towards the future return of scientifically selected, well-documented samples to Earth' in part 'to investigate whether Mars was ever inhabited by microbial life.' The SDT further recommended a per-sample volume of 8 cm3 [1] (e.g., a core with a diameter of 1 cm and length of 10 cm). Such samples would be the first available for scientific inquiry with the potential to definitively answer the fundamental question of astrobiology, and their small volume would necessitate analysis with non- or minimally destructive techniques. Potential biosignatures include 'chemical, isotopic, mineralogical, and morphological features that can be created by life and also appear to be inconsistent with nonbiological processes'[1]. Guidelines for biosignature detection in extraterrestrial samples derive in part from the search for evidence of life in the most ancient sedimentary rocks on Earth, wherein the most compelling case for biogenicity is made when these 'chemical, isotopic, mineralogical, and morphological features' occur in association. Sedimentary rocks deposited on Earth prior to ~3.5 billion years ago (i.e., when persistent surface water [e.g., 2] likely supported habitable environments on Mars) have only very rarely escaped severe alteration by metamorphism and metasomatism. Understanding how these processes have operated on Earth through strategic interrogation of biosignature alteration records in (meta)sedimentary rocks is thus a critical task in the search for extraterrestrial life. Here we present techniques for and results of in situ, spatially resolved, non- or minimally destructive detection of morphological, elemental, molecular, and light stable isotopic biosignatures, as well as records of alteration, in

  10. Effects analysis of array geometry for resolving performance based on spatial average ambiguity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Guofeng; Wang, Hongqiang; Cheng, Yongqiang; Qin, Yuliang

    2016-03-01

    For analyzing the three dimension (3D) spatial resolving performance of Multi-Transmitter Single-Receiver (MTSR) array radar with stochastic signals, the spatial average ambiguity function (SAAF) was introduced. The analytic expression of SAAF of array radar with stochastic is derived. To analyze the effects of array geometry, comparisons are implemented for three typical array geometries including circular, decussate and planar configuration. Simulated results illustrate that the spatial resolving performance is better for the circular array than that of others. Furthermore, it is shown that the array aperture size and the target's radial range are the main factors impacting the resolving performance.

  11. Accurate measurement of spatial noise portraits of photosensors of digital cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremkhin, P. A.; Evtikhiev, N. N.; Krasnov, V. V.; Kulakov, M. N.; Starikov, R. S.

    2016-08-01

    Method of measurement of accurate portraits of light and dark spatial noise of photosensors is described. The method consists of four steps: creation of spatially homogeneous illumination; shooting light and dark frames; digital processing and filtering. Unlike standard technique, this method uses iterative creation of spatially homogeneous illumination by display, compensation of photosensor dark spatial noise portrait and improved procedure of elimination of dark temporal noise. Portraits of light and dark spatial noise of photosensors of a scientific digital camera were found. Characteristics of the measured portraits were compared with values of photo response and dark signal non-uniformities of camera's photosensor.

  12. Spatially-resolved X-ray Scattering off shock-compressed carbon at the LCLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zastrau, Ulf

    2015-06-01

    The diversity of the electronic properties of carbon makes it of key interest to the material science community; nowhere is this more evident than in the myriad potential applications of structured allotropes like grapheme and nano tubes. By contrast, at the high pressures typical of planetary and stellar interiors, the behavior of carbon is poorly understood with large uncertainties in the conductivity and even the material phase. There is growing evidence of the abundance of diamond in the interiors of the ice giant planets Uranus and Neptune; the conductivity of which could potentially influence models for the origin of the unusual magnetic fields of these planets. In laboratory experiments, practical issues with gradients in the temperature and density of shock compressed matter have hindered accurate measurement and further from distinguishing theoretical models. Here, we present spatially resolved x-ray scattering experiments using LCLS free electron laser to examine and understand the gradients of thermal properties under dynamic shock loading. We employed curved mosaic and perfect imaging crystals. Compared with hydro-dynamic simulations, we present time-resolved data on plasmon dispersion, axial compression gradients and finally carbon melting at shock coalescence.

  13. Spatially resolved determination of the short-circuit current density of silicon solar cells via lock-in thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Fertig, Fabian Greulich, Johannes; Rein, Stefan

    2014-05-19

    We present a spatially resolved method to determine the short-circuit current density of crystalline silicon solar cells by means of lock-in thermography. The method utilizes the property of crystalline silicon solar cells that the short-circuit current does not differ significantly from the illuminated current under moderate reverse bias. Since lock-in thermography images locally dissipated power density, this information is exploited to extract values of spatially resolved current density under short-circuit conditions. In order to obtain an accurate result, one or two illuminated lock-in thermography images and one dark lock-in thermography image need to be recorded. The method can be simplified in a way that only one image is required to generate a meaningful short-circuit current density map. The proposed method is theoretically motivated, and experimentally validated for monochromatic illumination in comparison to the reference method of light-beam induced current.

  14. Spatially resolved, highly multiplexed RNA profiling in single cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kok Hao; Boettiger, Alistair N.; Moffitt, Jeffrey R.; Wang, Siyuan; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the expression profile and spatial landscape of the transcriptome in individual cells is essential for understanding the rich repertoire of cellular behaviors. Here we report multiplexed error-robust fluorescence in situ hybridization (MERFISH), a single-molecule imaging approach that allows the copy numbers and spatial localizations of thousands of RNA species to be determined in single cells. Using error-robust encoding schemes to combat single-molecule labeling and detection errors, we demonstrated the imaging of 100 – 1000 unique RNA species in hundreds of individual cells. Correlation analysis of the ~104 – 106 pairs of genes allowed us to constrain gene regulatory networks, predict novel functions for many unannotated genes, and identify distinct spatial distribution patterns of RNAs that correlate with properties of the encoded proteins. PMID:25858977

  15. Spatial Grouping Resolves Ambiguity to Drive Temporal Recalibration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarrow, Kielan; Roseboom, Warrick; Arnold, Derek H.

    2011-01-01

    Cross-modal temporal recalibration describes a shift in the point of subjective simultaneity (PSS) between 2 events following repeated exposure to asynchronous cross-modal inputs--the adaptors. Previous research suggested that audiovisual recalibration is insensitive to the spatial relationship between the adaptors. Here we show that audiovisual…

  16. The spatially resolved bipolar nebula of Sakurai's object

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Joyce, Richard R. E-mail: rjoyce@noao.edu

    2014-04-20

    Sakurai's object (V4334 Sgr), the final flash object discovered in the mid-1990s, underwent rapid cooling during the first decade of the 21st century becoming as faint as K ∼ 25. This stage of evolution has ceased. Between observations in 2010 September and 2013 April V4334 Sgr brightened >2 mag to K = 14.2 and the effective temperature increased to ∼590 K. AO images show a central source and two extended globules defining a 13° position angle. The globules span a spatial extent of ∼0.''3 in 2013. This spatial extent is consistent with sizes derived from spectral energy distributions taken over the previous decade and a debris cloud expanding at 0.055 mas d{sup –1} since late 1998. Near-simultaneous 0.85-2.5 μm spectra reveal helium lines attributed to a wind-interaction shock. The He I 1.0830 μm emission has a spectral width of ∼1000 km s{sup –1} and a spatial extent of ∼1.''4. The helium shell is fragmented, spatially asymmetric, and five times larger than the dust debris cloud. [C I] and [N I] forbidden lines are present in the 1 μm region spectrum. The forbidden line spectrum is similar to that of proto-planetary nebulae. The [C I] 9850 Å line is spatially extended. The expansion velocity and change of angular size limit the distance to 2.1-3.7 kpc.

  17. Highly accurate spatial mode generation using spatial cross modulation method for mode division multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuma, Hiroki; Okamoto, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Atsushi; Goto, Yuta; Tomita, Akihisa

    2016-02-01

    We propose a spatial mode generation technology using spatial cross modulation (SCM) for mode division multiplexing (MDM). The most well-known method for generating arbitrary complex amplitude fields is to display an off-axis computer-generated hologram (CGH) on a spatial light modulator (SLM). However, in this method, a desired complex amplitude field is obtained with first order diffraction light. This critically lowers the light utilization efficiency. On the other hand, in the SCM, the desired complex field is provided with zeroth order diffraction light. For this reason, our technology can generate spatial modes with large light utilization efficiency in addition to high accuracy. In this study, first, a numerical simulation was performed to verify that the SCM is applicable for spatial mode generation. Next, we made a comparison from two view points of the coupling efficiency and the light utilization between our technology and the technology using an off-axis amplitude hologram as a representative complex amplitude generation method. The simulation results showed that our technology can achieve considerably high light utilization efficiency while maintaining the enough coupling efficiency comparable to the technology using an off-axis amplitude hologram. Finally, we performed an experiment on spatial modes generation using the SCM. Experimental results showed that our technology has the great potential to realize the spatial mode generation with high accuracy.

  18. Spatial heterogeneity can resolve the nitrogen paradox of tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Menge, Duncan N L; Levin, Simon A

    2017-01-10

    Many tropical forests are characterized by large losses of plant-available forms of nitrogen (N), indicating that they are N-rich, and by an abundance of plants capable of symbiotic N fixation. These N-fixing plants can fix enough N to drive N-richness. However, biological N fixation (BNF) is more expensive than using plant-available N, so sustained BNF in N-rich soils appears to be a paradox. Here, we use spatially explicit ecosystem models to analyze the conditions under which spatial heterogeneity can induce simultaneous BNF and loss of plant-available N (hereafter, we call this combination "N-rich BNF"). Spatial movement of litter to neighboring plants' rooting zones can maintain N-rich BNF under a variety of conditions. For example, when N-fixers have higher N demand than non-fixers, N-fixers export N-rich litter to non-fixers, inducing large losses of plant-available N from the ecosystem, and receive N-poor litter from non-fixers, inducing BNF. BNF and N loss fluxes increase in proportion to the ratio of N-fixer litter N:P to non-fixer litter N:P, and also in proportion to the fraction of litter transferred out of a tree's rooting zone. Stoichiometric variability augments N-rich BNF, as does increasing the fraction of the landscape occupied by N-fixers, at least when they are rare. On the contrary, greater root overlap between neighbors and clumping of N-fixers diminish N-rich BNF. Finally, we examined how spatial litter transfer interacts with another mechanism that can sustain N-rich BNF, incomplete down-regulation of BNF. Spatial transfer and incomplete down-regulation can both sustain N-rich BNF, but they are compensatory rather than additive. These mechanisms can be distinguished by examining where N losses occur. Incomplete down-regulation of BNF leads to greater N loss under N-fixing trees, whereas spatial litter transfer leads to greater N loss under non-fixing trees. Along with time lags in regulating BNF, these results comprise a series of

  19. Spatially resolved SO2 flux emissions from Mt Etna.

    PubMed

    D'Aleo, R; Bitetto, M; Delle Donne, D; Tamburello, G; Battaglia, A; Coltelli, M; Patanè, D; Prestifilippo, M; Sciotto, M; Aiuppa, A

    2016-07-28

    We report on a systematic record of SO2 flux emissions from individual vents of Etna volcano (Sicily), which we obtained using a permanent UV camera network. Observations were carried out in summer 2014, a period encompassing two eruptive episodes of the New South East Crater (NSEC) and a fissure-fed eruption in the upper Valle del Bove. We demonstrate that our vent-resolved SO2 flux time series allow capturing shifts in activity from one vent to another and contribute to our understanding of Etna's shallow plumbing system structure. We find that the fissure eruption contributed ~50,000 t of SO2 or ~30% of the SO2 emitted by the volcano during the 5 July to 10 August eruptive interval. Activity from this eruptive vent gradually vanished on 10 August, marking a switch of degassing toward the NSEC. Onset of degassing at the NSEC was a precursory to explosive paroxysmal activity on 11-15 August.

  20. Spatially resolved SO2 flux emissions from Mt Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Aleo, R.; Bitetto, M.; Delle Donne, D.; Tamburello, G.; Battaglia, A.; Coltelli, M.; Patanè, D.; Prestifilippo, M.; Sciotto, M.; Aiuppa, A.

    2016-07-01

    We report on a systematic record of SO2 flux emissions from individual vents of Etna volcano (Sicily), which we obtained using a permanent UV camera network. Observations were carried out in summer 2014, a period encompassing two eruptive episodes of the New South East Crater (NSEC) and a fissure-fed eruption in the upper Valle del Bove. We demonstrate that our vent-resolved SO2 flux time series allow capturing shifts in activity from one vent to another and contribute to our understanding of Etna's shallow plumbing system structure. We find that the fissure eruption contributed ~50,000 t of SO2 or ~30% of the SO2 emitted by the volcano during the 5 July to 10 August eruptive interval. Activity from this eruptive vent gradually vanished on 10 August, marking a switch of degassing toward the NSEC. Onset of degassing at the NSEC was a precursory to explosive paroxysmal activity on 11-15 August.

  1. Spatially resolved micro-photoluminescence imaging of porphyrin single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Dawn M.; Castaneda, Jose; Kaushal, Meesha; Kaouk, Ghallia; Jones, Daniel S.; Walter, Michael G.

    2016-08-01

    We describe the collection of both time-resolved and steady-state micro-photoluminescence data from solution-grown single crystals of 5,15-bis(4-carbomethoxyphenyl)porphyrin (BCM2PP). Linking molecular orientation and structure with excited-state dynamics is crucial for engineering efficient organic solar cells, light-emitting diodes, and related molecular electronics. Photoluminescence features of single porphyrin crystals were imaged using a laser scanning confocal microscope equipped with time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC). We show enhanced exciton lifetimes (τs1 = 2.6 ns) and stronger steady-state emission in crystalline BCM2PP samples relative to semicrystalline thin films (τs1 = 1.8 ns).

  2. Anticipating HESSI's Spatially Resolved View of Spectral Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, Elizabeth K.; Giblin, Timothy; Tom, Metcalf

    2000-01-01

    The spectral evolution of observed flares' hard X-ray emission is found to conform to certain patterns in color-color diagrams. By combining the spectral resolution of BATSE data with the spatial resolution of HXT data, we are able to address the nature of flare energy release and anticipate what kind of observations HESSI may make of the energy release/particle acceleration site in flares.

  3. The Spatially Resolved [CII] Cooling Line Deficit in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. D. T.; Croxall, Kevin; Draine, Bruce; De Looze, Ilse; Sandstrom, Karin; Armus, Lee; Beirão, Pedro; Bolatto, Alberto; Boquien, Mederic; Brandl, Bernhard; Crocker, Alison; Dale, Daniel A.; Galametz, Maud; Groves, Brent; Helou, George; Herrera-Camus, Rodrigo; Hunt, Leslie; Kennicutt, Robert; Walter, Fabian; Wolfire, Mark

    2017-01-01

    We present [C ii] 158 μm measurements from over 15,000 resolved regions within 54 nearby galaxies of the Kingfish program to investigate the so-called [C ii] “line-cooling deficit” long known to occur in galaxies with different luminosities. The [C ii]/TIR ratio ranges from above 1% to below 0.1% in the sample, with a mean value of 0.48 ± 0.21%. We find that the surface density of 24 μm emission dominates this trend, with [C ii]/TIR dropping as ν {I}ν (24 μ {{m}}) increases. Deviations from this overall decline are correlated with changes in the gas-phase metal abundance, with higher metallicity associated with deeper deficits at a fixed surface brightness. We supplement the local sample with resolved [C ii] measurements from nearby luminous infrared galaxies and high-redshift sources from z = 1.8–6.4, and find that star formation rate density drives a continuous trend of deepening [C ii] deficit across six orders of magnitude in {{{Σ }}}{{sfr}}. The tightness of this correlation suggests that an approximate {{{Σ }}}{{sfr}} can be estimated directly from global measurements of [C ii]/TIR, and a relation is provided to do so. Several low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN) hosts in the sample show additional and significant central suppression of [C ii]/TIR, but these deficit enhancements occur not in those AGNs with the highest X-ray luminosities, but instead those with the highest central starlight intensities. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the [C ii] line-cooling line deficit in galaxies likely arises from local physical phenomena in interstellar gas.

  4. Tissue oxygenation and haemodynamics measurement with spatially resolved NIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Scopesi, F.; Serra, G.; Sun, J. W.; Rolfe, P.

    2010-08-01

    We describe the use of Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) for the non-invasive investigation of changes in haemodynamics and oxygenation of human peripheral tissues. The goal was to measure spatial variations of tissue NIRS oxygenation variables, namely deoxy-haemoglobin (HHb), oxy-haemoglobin (HbO2), total haemoglobin (HbT), and thereby to evaluate the responses of the peripheral circulation to imposed physiological challenges. We present a skinfat- muscle heterogeneous tissue model with varying fat thickness up to 15mm and a Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport within this model. The mean partial path length and the mean photon visit depth in the muscle layer were derived for different source-detector spacing. We constructed NIRS instrumentation comprising of light-emitting diodes (LED) as light sources at four wavelengths, 735nm, 760nm, 810nm and 850nm and sensitive photodiodes (PD) as the detectors. Source-detector spacing was varied to perform measurements at different depths within forearm tissue. Changes in chromophore concentration in response to venous and arterial occlusion were calculated using the modified Lambert-Beer Law. Studies in fat and thin volunteers indicated greater sensitivity in the thinner subjects for the tissue oxygenation measurement in the muscle layer. These results were consistent with those found using Monte Carlo simulation. Overall, the results of this investigation demonstrate the usefulness of the NIRS instrument for deriving spatial information from biological tissues.

  5. Spatially resolved resonant tunneling on single atoms in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voisin, B.; Salfi, J.; Bocquel, J.; Rahman, R.; Rogge, S.

    2015-04-01

    The ability to control single dopants in solid-state devices has opened the way towards reliable quantum computation schemes. In this perspective it is essential to understand the impact of interfaces and electric fields, inherent to address coherent electronic manipulation, on the dopants atomic scale properties. This requires both fine energetic and spatial resolution of the energy spectrum and wave-function, respectively. Here we present an experiment fulfilling both conditions: we perform transport on single donors in silicon close to a vacuum interface using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) in the single electron tunneling regime. The spatial degrees of freedom of the STM tip provide a versatility allowing a unique understanding of electrostatics. We obtain the absolute energy scale from the thermal broadening of the resonant peaks, allowing us to deduce the charging energies of the donors. Finally we use a rate equations model to derive the current in presence of an excited state, highlighting the benefits of the highly tunable vacuum tunnel rates which should be exploited in further experiments. This work provides a general framework to investigate dopant-based systems at the atomic scale.

  6. Recording Spatially Resolved Plasma Parameters in Microwave-Driven Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, Franz; Florian, Schamberger; Igor, Krstev; Stefan, Umrath

    2013-01-01

    In an almost cubical reactor 90 l in volume which is intended to deposit organic polymers by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), microwave power is coupled into the volume via a quartz window which extends to approximately 1/10 of the sidewall area. Since the plasma is excited locally, plasma parameters like electron temperature and plasma density are expected to exhibit a spatial variation. The compilation of these plasma quantities has been accomplished with a bendable single Langmuir probe. To isolate the tungsten wire against its grounded housing tube, it was coated with polyparylene. After having compared this construction with our Langmuir probe, which has been now in use for more than a decade, we have taken data of more than half the volume of the reactor with argon and have found a definitive radial inhomogenity for all plasma parameters. To investigate whether this conduct can be determined applying optical emission spectroscopy, we improved our spectrometer which had been used for endpoint detection purposes and plasma diagnostics in chlorine-containing ambients where we could detect also a spatial dependence. This behavior is discussed in terms of Lieberman's global model.

  7. Spatially resolved probing of electrochemical reactions via energy discovery platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Jilai; Strelcov, Evgheni; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Bassiri-Gharb, Nazanin

    2015-06-01

    The electrochemical reactivity of solid surfaces underpins functionality of a broad spectrum of materials and devices ranging from energy storage and conversion, to sensors and catalytic devices. The surface electrochemistry is, however, a complex process, controlled by the interplay of charge generation, field-controlled and diffusion-controlled transport. Here we explore the fundamental mechanisms of electrochemical reactivity on nanocrystalline ceria, using the synergy of nanofabricated devices and time-resolved Kelvin probe force microscopy (tr-KPFM), an approach we refer to as energy discovery platform. Through tr-KPFM, the surface potential mapping in both the space and time domains and current variation over time are obtained, enabling analysis of local ionic and electronic transport and their dynamic behavior on the 10 ms to 10 s scale. Based on their different responses in the time domain, conduction mechanisms can be separated and identified in a variety of environmental conditions, such as humidity and temperature. The theoretical modeling of ion transport through finite element method allows for creation of a minimal model consistent with observed phenomena, and establishing of the dynamic characteristics of the process, including mobility and diffusivity of charged species. Furthermore, the future potential of the energy discovery platforms is also discussed.

  8. Spatially resolving edge states of chiral graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Chenggang; Jiao, Liying; Yazyev, Oleg V.; Chen, Yen-Chia; Feng, Juanjuan; Zhang, Xiaowei; Capaz, Rodrigo B.; Tour, James M.; Zettl, Alex; Louie, Steven G.; Dai, Hongjie; Crommie, Michael F.

    2011-08-01

    A central question in the field of graphene-related research is how graphene behaves when it is patterned at the nanometre scale with different edge geometries. A fundamental shape relevant to this question is the graphene nanoribbon (GNR), a narrow strip of graphene that can have different chirality depending on the angle at which it is cut. Such GNRs have been predicted to exhibit a wide range of behaviour, including tunable energy gaps and the presence of one-dimensional (1D) edge states with unusual magnetic structure. Most GNRs measured up to now have been characterized by means of their electrical conductivity, leaving the relationship between electronic structure and local atomic geometry unclear. Here we present a sub-nanometre-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) study of GNRs that allows us to examine how GNR electronic structure depends on the chirality of atomically well-defined GNR edges. The GNRs used here were chemically synthesized using carbon nanotube (CNT) unzipping methods that allow flexible variation of GNR width, length, chirality, and substrate. Our STS measurements reveal the presence of 1D GNR edge states, the behaviour of which matches theoretical expectations for GNRs of similar width and chirality, including width-dependent energy splitting of the GNR edge state.

  9. Spatially resolved SO2 flux emissions from Mt Etna

    PubMed Central

    Bitetto, M.; Delle Donne, D.; Tamburello, G.; Battaglia, A.; Coltelli, M.; Patanè, D.; Prestifilippo, M.; Sciotto, M.; Aiuppa, A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report on a systematic record of SO2 flux emissions from individual vents of Etna volcano (Sicily), which we obtained using a permanent UV camera network. Observations were carried out in summer 2014, a period encompassing two eruptive episodes of the New South East Crater (NSEC) and a fissure‐fed eruption in the upper Valle del Bove. We demonstrate that our vent‐resolved SO2 flux time series allow capturing shifts in activity from one vent to another and contribute to our understanding of Etna's shallow plumbing system structure. We find that the fissure eruption contributed ~50,000 t of SO2 or ~30% of the SO2 emitted by the volcano during the 5 July to 10 August eruptive interval. Activity from this eruptive vent gradually vanished on 10 August, marking a switch of degassing toward the NSEC. Onset of degassing at the NSEC was a precursory to explosive paroxysmal activity on 11–15 August. PMID:27773952

  10. Time resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy with geometrically accurate models for bulk parameter recovery

    PubMed Central

    Guggenheim, James A.; Bargigia, Ilaria; Farina, Andrea; Pifferi, Antonio; Dehghani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    A novel straightforward, accessible and efficient approach is presented for performing hyperspectral time-domain diffuse optical spectroscopy to determine the optical properties of samples accurately using geometry specific models. To allow bulk parameter recovery from measured spectra, a set of libraries based on a numerical model of the domain being investigated is developed as opposed to the conventional approach of using an analytical semi-infinite slab approximation, which is known and shown to introduce boundary effects. Results demonstrate that the method improves the accuracy of derived spectrally varying optical properties over the use of the semi-infinite approximation. PMID:27699137

  11. Spatially resolved organic analysis of the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zenobi, Renato; Philippoz, Jean-Michel; Zare, Richard N.; Buseck, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    The distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the Allende meteorite has been probed with two-step laser desorption/laser multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry. This method allows direct in situ analysis with a spatial resolution of 1 sq mm or better of selected organic molecules. Spectra from freshly fractured interior surfaces of the meteorite show that PAH concentrations are locally high compared to the average concentrations found by wet chemical analysis of pulverized samples. The data suggest that the PAHs are primarily associated with the fine-grained matrix, where the organic polymer occurs. In addition, highly substituted PAH skeletons were observed. Interiors of individual chondrules were devoid of PAHs at the detection limit (about 0.05 ppm).

  12. Spatially resolved chemical reaction monitoring using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Feindel, Kirk W

    2016-06-01

    Over the previous three decades, the use of MRI for studying dynamic physical and chemical processes of materials systems has grown significantly. This mini-review provides a brief introduction to relevant principles of MRI, including methods of spatial localization, factors contributing to image contrast, and chemical shift imaging. A few historical examples of (1) H MRI for reaction monitoring will be presented, followed by a review of recent research including (1) H MRI studies of gelation and biofilms, (1) H, (7) Li, and (11) B MRI studies of electrochemical systems, in vivo glucose metabolism monitored with (19) F MRI, and in situ temperature monitoring with (27) Al MRI. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Spatially Resolved Monitoring of Drying of Hierarchical Porous Organic Networks.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Manuel Isaac; Silletta, Emilia V; Gomez, Cesar G; Strumia, Miriam C; Stapf, Siegfried; Monti, Gustavo Alberto; Mattea, Carlos; Acosta, Rodolfo H

    2016-03-01

    Evaporation kinetics of water confined in hierarchal polymeric porous media is studied by low field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Systems synthesized with various degrees of cross-linker density render networks with similar pore sizes but different response when soaked with water. Polymeric networks with low percentage of cross-linker can undergo swelling, which affects the porosity as well as the drying kinetics. The drying process is monitored macroscopically by single-sided NMR, with spatial resolution of 100 μm, while microscopic information is obtained by measurements of spin-spin relaxation times (T2). Transition from a funicular to a pendular regime, where hydraulic connectivity is lost and the capillary flow cannot compensate for the surface evaporation, can be observed from inspection of the water content in different sample layers. Relaxation measurements indicate that even when the larger pore structures are depleted of water, capillary flow occurs through smaller voids.

  14. Response Surface Methods for Spatially-Resolved Optical Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, P. M.; Dorrington, A. A.; Cutler, A. D.; DeLoach, R.

    2003-01-01

    Response surface methods (or methodology), RSM, have been applied to improve data quality for two vastly different spatial ly-re solved optical measurement techniques. In the first application, modern design of experiments (MDOE) methods, including RSM, are employed to map the temperature field in a direct-connect supersonic combustion test facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The laser-based measurement technique known as coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is used to measure temperature at various locations in the combustor. RSM is then used to develop temperature maps of the flow. Even though the temperature fluctuations at a single point in the flowfield have a standard deviation on the order of 300 K, RSM provides analytic fits to the data having 95% confidence interval half width uncertainties in the fit as low as +/-30 K. Methods of optimizing future CARS experiments are explored. The second application of RSM is to quantify the shape of a 5-meter diameter, ultra-light, inflatable space antenna at NASA Langley Research Center.

  15. Spatially Resolved Spectra of 3C Galaxy Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchings, J. B.; Baum, S. A.; Weistrop, D.; Nelson, C.; Kaiser, M. E.; Gelderman, R. F.

    1998-01-01

    We present and discuss visible-wavelength long-slit spectra of four low-redshift 3C galaxies obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The slit was aligned with near-nuclear jet-like structure seen in HST images of the galaxies, to give unprecedented spatial resolution of their inner regions. In 3C 135 and 3C 171, the spectra reveal clumpy emission-line structures that indicate outward motions of a few hundred kilometers per second within a centrally illuminated and ionized biconical region. There may also be some low-ionization, high-velocity material associated with 3C 135. In 3C 264 and 3C 78, the jets have blue featureless spectra consistent with their proposed synchrotron origin. There is weak associated line emission in the innermost part of the jets with mild outflow velocity. These jets are bright and highly collimated only within a circumnuclear region of lower galaxy luminosity, which is not dusty. We discuss the origins of these central regions and their connection with relativistic jets.

  16. Spatially resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopy of single-layer steps on Si(100) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiqiao; Namboodiri, Pradeep; Li, Kai; Deng, Xiao; Silver, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Single-layer steps at Si(100) surfaces/interfaces present significant challenges to the quantitative characterization of buried dopant devices as well as the accurate imaging and relocation of fabricated quantum structures. We demonstrate the detailed spatially resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopy study across monolayer step edges on Si(100) surfaces and quantitative determination of the local density of state distributions and behavior of the band gap at step edges. The influence on the local electrostatic environment due to step edge states has been quantified while accounting for the effects of scanning tunneling measurement conditions. The dangling bond states on Si(100) surfaces are utilized as a fingerprint to quantify the local band bending landscape and to make corrections to the experimentally observed surface state energy levels and band gap values at the step edge regions. We observe a significant band gap narrowing behavior along a rebonded single-layer type B step edge on a degenerately boron-doped p -type Si substrate.

  17. Toward reliable retrieval of functional information of papillary dermis using spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Guo, Jun-Yen; Tzeng, Shih-Yu; Chou, Ting-Chun; Lin, Ming-Jen; Huang, Lynn Ling-Huei; Yang, Chao-Chun; Hsu, Chao-Kai; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2016-02-01

    Spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (SRDRS) has been employed to quantify tissue optical properties and its interrogation volume is majorly controlled by the source-to-detector separations (SDSs). To noninvasively quantify properties of dermis, a SRDRS setup that includes SDS shorter than 1 mm is required. It will be demonstrated in this study that Monte Carlo simulations employing the Henyey-Greenstein phase function cannot always precisely predict experimentally measured diffuse reflectance at such short SDSs, and we speculated this could be caused by the non-negligible backward light scattering at short SDSs that cannot be properly modeled by the Henyey-Greenstein phase function. To accurately recover the optical properties and functional information of dermis using SRDRS, we proposed the use of the modified two-layer (MTL) geometry. Monte Carlo simulations and phantom experiment results revealed that the MTL probing geometry was capable of faithfully recovering the optical properties of upper dermis. The capability of the MTL geometry in probing the upper dermis properties was further verified through a swine study, and it was found that the measurement results were reasonably linked to histological findings. Finally, the MTL probe was utilized to study psoriatic lesions. Our results showed that the MTL probe was sensitive to the physiological condition of tissue volumes within the papillary dermis and could be used in studying the physiology of psoriasis.

  18. Toward reliable retrieval of functional information of papillary dermis using spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Guo, Jun-Yen; Tzeng, Shih-Yu; Chou, Ting-Chun; Lin, Ming-Jen; Huang, Lynn Ling-Huei; Yang, Chao-Chun; Hsu, Chao-Kai; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (SRDRS) has been employed to quantify tissue optical properties and its interrogation volume is majorly controlled by the source-to-detector separations (SDSs). To noninvasively quantify properties of dermis, a SRDRS setup that includes SDS shorter than 1 mm is required. It will be demonstrated in this study that Monte Carlo simulations employing the Henyey-Greenstein phase function cannot always precisely predict experimentally measured diffuse reflectance at such short SDSs, and we speculated this could be caused by the non-negligible backward light scattering at short SDSs that cannot be properly modeled by the Henyey-Greenstein phase function. To accurately recover the optical properties and functional information of dermis using SRDRS, we proposed the use of the modified two-layer (MTL) geometry. Monte Carlo simulations and phantom experiment results revealed that the MTL probing geometry was capable of faithfully recovering the optical properties of upper dermis. The capability of the MTL geometry in probing the upper dermis properties was further verified through a swine study, and it was found that the measurement results were reasonably linked to histological findings. Finally, the MTL probe was utilized to study psoriatic lesions. Our results showed that the MTL probe was sensitive to the physiological condition of tissue volumes within the papillary dermis and could be used in studying the physiology of psoriasis. PMID:26977361

  19. Spatially-resolved intracellular sensing of hydrogen peroxide in living cells.

    PubMed

    Warren, Emilie A K; Netterfield, Tatiana S; Sarkar, Saheli; Kemp, Melissa L; Payne, Christine K

    2015-11-20

    Understanding intracellular redox chemistry requires new tools for the site-specific visualization of intracellular oxidation. We have developed a spatially-resolved intracellular sensor of hydrogen peroxide, HyPer-Tau, for time-resolved imaging in live cells. This sensor consists of a hydrogen peroxide-sensing protein tethered to microtubules. We demonstrate the use of the HyPer-Tau sensor for three applications; dose-dependent response of human cells to exogenous hydrogen peroxide, a model immune response of mouse macrophages to stimulation by bacterial toxin, and a spatially-resolved response to localized delivery of hydrogen peroxide. These results demonstrate that HyPer-Tau can be used as an effective tool for tracking changes in spatially localized intracellular hydrogen peroxide and for future applications in redox signaling.

  20. Spatially-resolved intracellular sensing of hydrogen peroxide in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Emilie A. K.; Netterfield, Tatiana S.; Sarkar, Saheli; Kemp, Melissa L.; Payne, Christine K.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding intracellular redox chemistry requires new tools for the site-specific visualization of intracellular oxidation. We have developed a spatially-resolved intracellular sensor of hydrogen peroxide, HyPer-Tau, for time-resolved imaging in live cells. This sensor consists of a hydrogen peroxide-sensing protein tethered to microtubules. We demonstrate the use of the HyPer-Tau sensor for three applications; dose-dependent response of human cells to exogenous hydrogen peroxide, a model immune response of mouse macrophages to stimulation by bacterial toxin, and a spatially-resolved response to localized delivery of hydrogen peroxide. These results demonstrate that HyPer-Tau can be used as an effective tool for tracking changes in spatially localized intracellular hydrogen peroxide and for future applications in redox signaling. PMID:26585385

  1. Hemoglobin concentration determination based on near infrared spatially resolved transmission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linna; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2016-10-01

    Spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy method has been proved to be more effective than single point spectroscopy method in the experiment to predict the concentration of the Intralipid diluted solutions. However, Intralipid diluted solution is simple, cannot be the representative of turbid liquids. Blood is a natural and meaningful turbid liquid, more complicate. Hemoglobin is the major constituent of the whole blood. And hemoglobin concentration is commonly used in clinical medicine to diagnose many diseases. In this paper, near infrared spatially resolved transmission spectra (NIRSRTS) and Partial Least Square Regression (PLSR) were used to predict the hemoglobin concentration of human blood. The results showed the prediction ability for hemoglobin concentration of the proposed method is better than single point transmission spectroscopy method. This paper demonstrated the feasibility of the spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy method for practical liquid composition analysis. This research provided a new thinking of practical turbid liquid composition analysis.

  2. Spatially resolved microfluidic stimulation of lymphoid tissue ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Ross, Ashley E; Belanger, Maura C; Woodroof, Jacob F; Pompano, Rebecca R

    2016-11-30

    The lymph node is a structurally complex organ of the immune system, whose dynamic cellular arrangements are thought to control much of human health. Currently, no methods exist to precisely stimulate substructures within the lymph node or analyze local stimulus-response behaviors, making it difficult to rationally design therapies for inflammatory disease. Here we describe a novel integration of live lymph node slices with a microfluidic system for local stimulation. Slices maintained the cellular organization of the lymph node while making its core experimentally accessible. The 3-layer polydimethylsiloxane device consisted of a perfusion chamber stacked atop stimulation ports fed by underlying microfluidic channels. Fluorescent dextrans similar in size to common proteins, 40 and 70 kDa, were delivered to live lymph node slices with 284 ± 9 μm and 202 ± 15 μm spatial resolution, respectively, after 5 s, which is sufficient to target functional zones of the lymph node. The spread and quantity of stimulation were controlled by varying the flow rates of delivery; these were predictable using a computational model of isotropic diffusion and convection through the tissue. Delivery to two separate regions simultaneously was demonstrated, to mimic complex intercellular signaling. Delivery of a model therapeutic, glucose-conjugated albumin, to specific regions of the lymph node indicated that retention of the drug was greater in the B-cell zone than in the T-cell zone. Together, this work provides a novel platform, the lymph node slice-on-a-chip, to target and study local events in the lymph node and to inform the development of new immunotherapeutics.

  3. Accurate, multi-kb reads resolve complex populations and detect rare microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Sharon, Itai; Kertesz, Michael; Hug, Laura A.; Pushkarev, Dmitry; Blauwkamp, Timothy A.; Castelle, Cindy J.; Amirebrahimi, Mojgan; Thomas, Brian C.; Burstein, David; Tringe, Susannah G.; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate evaluation of microbial communities is essential for understanding global biogeochemical processes and can guide bioremediation and medical treatments. Metagenomics is most commonly used to analyze microbial diversity and metabolic potential, but assemblies of the short reads generated by current sequencing platforms may fail to recover heterogeneous strain populations and rare organisms. Here we used short (150-bp) and long (multi-kb) synthetic reads to evaluate strain heterogeneity and study microorganisms at low abundance in complex microbial communities from terrestrial sediments. The long-read data revealed multiple (probably dozens of) closely related species and strains from previously undescribed Deltaproteobacteria and Aminicenantes (candidate phylum OP8). Notably, these are the most abundant organisms in the communities, yet short-read assemblies achieved only partial genome coverage, mostly in the form of short scaffolds (N50 = ∼2200 bp). Genome architecture and metabolic potential for these lineages were reconstructed using a new synteny-based method. Analysis of long-read data also revealed thousands of species whose abundances were <0.1% in all samples. Most of the organisms in this “long tail” of rare organisms belong to phyla that are also represented by abundant organisms. Genes encoding glycosyl hydrolases are significantly more abundant than expected in rare genomes, suggesting that rare species may augment the capability for carbon turnover and confer resilience to changing environmental conditions. Overall, the study showed that a diversity of closely related strains and rare organisms account for a major portion of the communities. These are probably common features of many microbial communities and can be effectively studied using a combination of long and short reads. PMID:25665577

  4. NMR methods for in-situ biofilm metabolism studies: spatial and temporal resolved measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Majors, Paul D.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Wind, Robert A.

    2005-11-01

    We are developing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microscopy, spectroscopy and combined NMR/optical techniques to the study of biofilms. Objectives include: time and depth-resolved metabolite concentrations with isotropic spatial resolution on the order of 10 microns, metabolic pathways and flux rates, mass transport and ultimately their correlation with gene expression by optical microscopy in biofilms. These methods are being developed with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a model system, but are equally applicable to other biofilm systems of interest. Thus, spatially resolved NMR of biofilms is expected to contribute significantly to the understanding of adherent cell metabolism.

  5. Performance of orbital neutron instruments for spatially resolved hydrogen measurements of airless planetary bodies.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, David J; Elphic, Richard C; Feldman, William C; Funsten, Herbert O; Prettyman, Thomas H

    2010-03-01

    Orbital neutron spectroscopy has become a standard technique for measuring planetary surface compositions from orbit. While this technique has led to important discoveries, such as the deposits of hydrogen at the Moon and Mars, a limitation is its poor spatial resolution. For omni-directional neutron sensors, spatial resolutions are 1-1.5 times the spacecraft's altitude above the planetary surface (or 40-600 km for typical orbital altitudes). Neutron sensors with enhanced spatial resolution have been proposed, and one with a collimated field of view is scheduled to fly on a mission to measure lunar polar hydrogen. No quantitative studies or analyses have been published that evaluate in detail the detection and sensitivity limits of spatially resolved neutron measurements. Here, we describe two complementary techniques for evaluating the hydrogen sensitivity of spatially resolved neutron sensors: an analytic, closed-form expression that has been validated with Lunar Prospector neutron data, and a three-dimensional modeling technique. The analytic technique, called the Spatially resolved Neutron Analytic Sensitivity Approximation (SNASA), provides a straightforward method to evaluate spatially resolved neutron data from existing instruments as well as to plan for future mission scenarios. We conclude that the existing detector--the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND)--scheduled to launch on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter will have hydrogen sensitivities that are over an order of magnitude poorer than previously estimated. We further conclude that a sensor with a geometric factor of approximately 100 cm(2) Sr (compared to the LEND geometric factor of approximately 10.9 cm(2) Sr) could make substantially improved measurements of the lunar polar hydrogen spatial distribution.

  6. Performance of Orbital Neutron Instruments for Spatially Resolved Hydrogen Measurements of Airless Planetary Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Elphic, Richard C.; Feldman, William C.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Prettyman, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Orbital neutron spectroscopy has become a standard technique for measuring planetary surface compositions from orbit. While this technique has led to important discoveries, such as the deposits of hydrogen at the Moon and Mars, a limitation is its poor spatial resolution. For omni-directional neutron sensors, spatial resolutions are 1–1.5 times the spacecraft's altitude above the planetary surface (or 40–600 km for typical orbital altitudes). Neutron sensors with enhanced spatial resolution have been proposed, and one with a collimated field of view is scheduled to fly on a mission to measure lunar polar hydrogen. No quantitative studies or analyses have been published that evaluate in detail the detection and sensitivity limits of spatially resolved neutron measurements. Here, we describe two complementary techniques for evaluating the hydrogen sensitivity of spatially resolved neutron sensors: an analytic, closed-form expression that has been validated with Lunar Prospector neutron data, and a three-dimensional modeling technique. The analytic technique, called the Spatially resolved Neutron Analytic Sensitivity Approximation (SNASA), provides a straightforward method to evaluate spatially resolved neutron data from existing instruments as well as to plan for future mission scenarios. We conclude that the existing detector—the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND)—scheduled to launch on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter will have hydrogen sensitivities that are over an order of magnitude poorer than previously estimated. We further conclude that a sensor with a geometric factor of ∼ 100 cm2 Sr (compared to the LEND geometric factor of ∼ 10.9 cm2 Sr) could make substantially improved measurements of the lunar polar hydrogen spatial distribution. Key Words: Planetary instrumentation—Planetary science—Moon—Spacecraft experiments—Hydrogen. Astrobiology 10, 183–200. PMID:20298147

  7. Spatially-resolved spectroscopic technique for measuring optical properties of food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantification of optical properties is important to understand light interaction with biological materials, and to develop effective optical sensing techniques for property characterization and quality measurement of food products. This chapter reviews spatially-resolved method, with the focus on f...

  8. Peach maturity/quality assessment using hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to measure the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of peaches, using a hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved method, for their maturity/quality assessment. A newly developed optical property measuring instrument was used for acquiring hyperspect...

  9. Spatially Resolved Analysis of Amines Using a Fluorescence Molecular Probe: Molecular Analysis of IDPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemett, S. J.; Messenger, S.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Wentworth, S. J.; Robinson, G. A.; McKay, D. S.

    2002-01-01

    Some Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) have large isotope anomalies in H and N. To address the nature of the carrier phase, we are developing a procedure to spatially resolve the distribution of organic species on IDP thin sections utilizing fluorescent molecular probes. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Spatially resolved refractive index profiles of electrically switchable computer-generated holographic gratings.

    PubMed

    Zito, Gianluigi; Finizio, Andrea; De Nicola, Sergio

    2009-10-12

    We describe a spatially resolved interferometric technique combined with a phase reconstruction method that provides a quantitative two-dimensional profile of the refractive index and spatial distribution of the optical contrast between the on-off states of electrically switchable diffraction gratings as a function of the external electric field. The studied structures are holographic gratings optically written into polymer/liquid crystal composites through single-beam spatial light modulation by means of computer-generated holograms. The electro-optical response of the gratings is also discussed. The diffraction efficiency results to be dependent on the incident light polarization suggesting the possibility to develop polarization dependent switching devices.

  11. Spatially Resolved Mapping of Disorder Type and Distribution in Random Systems using Artificial Neural Network Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Kumar, Amit; Ovchinnikov, Oleg S; Guo, Senli; Griggio, Flavio; Trolier-Mckinstry, Susan E

    2011-01-01

    The spatial variability of the polarization dynamics in thin film ferroelectric capacitors was probed by recognition analysis of spatially-resolved spectroscopic data. Switching spectroscopy piezoresponse force microscopy was used to measure local hysteresis loops and map them on a 2D random-bond, random-field Ising model. A neural-network based recognition approach was utilized to analyze the hysteresis loops and their spatial variability. Strong variability is observed in the polarization dynamics around macroscopic cracks due to the modified local elastic and electric boundary conditions, with most pronounced effect on the length scale of ~100 nm away from the crack.

  12. Geocoding large population-level administrative datasets at highly resolved spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Sharon E; Strauss, Benjamin; Miranda, Marie Lynn

    2014-08-01

    Using geographic information systems to link administrative databases with demographic, social, and environmental data allows researchers to use spatial approaches to explore relationships between exposures and health. Traditionally, spatial analysis in public health has focused on the county, zip code, or tract level because of limitations to geocoding at highly resolved scales. Using 2005 birth and death data from North Carolina, we examine our ability to geocode population-level datasets at three spatial resolutions - zip code, street, and parcel. We achieve high geocoding rates at all three resolutions, with statewide street geocoding rates of 88.0% for births and 93.2% for deaths. We observe differences in geocoding rates across demographics and health outcomes, with lower geocoding rates in disadvantaged populations and the most dramatic differences occurring across the urban-rural spectrum. Our results suggest highly resolved spatial data architectures for population-level datasets are viable through geocoding individual street addresses. We recommend routinely geocoding administrative datasets to the highest spatial resolution feasible, allowing public health researchers to choose the spatial resolution used in analysis based on an understanding of the spatial dimensions of the health outcomes and exposures being investigated. Such research, however, must acknowledge how disparate geocoding success across subpopulations may affect findings.

  13. Spatially resolved Fe- and S-isotope composition of sedimentary pyrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouxel, O.; Bekker, A.; Germain, Y.; Ponzevera, E.

    2012-04-01

    Past studies of iron and sulfur isotope records of sedimentary sulfides over geological time have placed important constraints on the biogeochemical cycle of sulfur and iron and the evolution of ocean chemistry. Since biogeochemical cycles of Fe and S are closely coupled in marine systems, Fe-limitation and S-limitation for pyrite formation in black shales should leave an imprint on the isotopic record of both elements. We developed a technique for accurate and spatially-resolved measurement of 34S/32S, 33S/32S, 56Fe/54Fe, and 57Fe/54Fe isotope ratios in sedimentary pyrite using a combination of solution and laser ablation analysis. Fe- and S-isotope ratios were measured by high-resolution MC-ICP-MS (ThermoElectron Neptune), enabling us to resolve major isobaric interferences on S isotopes and Fe isotopes from O2+, ArN+, and ArO+. A CETAC LSX 213 nm laser was used as the ablation source with He as the sample carrier gas. Fe- and S-isotope ratios were calibrated against several pyrite standards using the conventional "sample-standard bracketing technique". Instrumental mass bias of Fe and S isotopes were also corrected through an internal normalization technique using respectively Ni and Mg of known isotope composition. The long-term reproducibility of S- and Fe-isotope compositions was typically better than 0.2 per mil. We investigated the fine scale variations of d56Fe, d34S and d33S values of diagenetic pyrite nodules in several Devonian, Paleoproterozoic and Archean black shales in order to (1) explore biosignature potential of co-variations of Fe- and S-isotopes at the grain-size scale; (2) assess potential diagenetic effects on Fe-isotope fractionation during sulfide formation; and (3) assess potential mixing between isotopically distinct Fe- and S-pools using multiple S isotope data. Those results will be presented together with bulk stratigraphic S- and Fe-isotopic variations and Fe speciation data in order to establish an Fe isotope mass balance in black

  14. Computational optimization of the configuration of a spatially resolved spectroscopy sensor for milk analysis.

    PubMed

    Watté, Rodrigo; Aernouts, Ben; Van Beers, Robbe; Postelmans, Annelies; Saeys, Wouter

    2016-04-21

    A global optimizer has been developed, capable of computing the optimal configuration in a probe for spatially resolved reflectance spectroscopy (SRS). The main objective is to minimize the number of detection fibers, while maintaining an accurate estimation of both absorption and scattering profiles. Multiple fibers are necessary to robustify the estimation of optical properties against noise, which is typically present in the measured signals and influences the accuracy of the inverse estimation. The optimizer is based on a robust metamodel-based inverse estimation of the absorption coefficient and a reduced scattering coefficient from the acquired SRS signals. A genetic algorithm is used to evaluate the effect of the fiber placement on the performance of the inverse estimator to find the bulk optical properties of raw milk. The algorithm to find the optimal fiber placement was repeatedly executed for cases with a different number of detection fibers, ranging from 3 to 30. Afterwards, the optimal designs for each considered number of fibers were compared based on their performance in separating the absorption and scattering properties, and the significance of the differences was tested. A sensor configuration with 13 detection fibers was found to be the combination with the lowest number of fibers which provided an estimation performance which was not significantly worse than the one obtained with the best design (30 detection fibers). This design resulted in the root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP) of 1.411 cm(-1) (R(2) = 0.965) for the estimation of the bulk absorption coefficient values, and 0.382 cm(-1) (R(2) = 0.996) for the reduced scattering coefficient values.

  15. Determination of glucose concentration in tissue-like material using spatially resolved steady-state diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjalmarsson, Pär; Thennadil, Suresh N.

    2008-02-01

    An important parameter in medical diagnostic and one of the most frequently determined analyte in the hospitals is blood glucose. Fast and accurate methods of measuring blood glucose concentrations could therefore be significant. We will in this paper investigate the feasibility of using a spatially resolved steady-state diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in the wavelength region 1000-1700nm, where glucose has two absorption peaks at around 1250nm and 1600nm, to quickly determine the concentration of glucose in tissue-like material. This method could later be transferred to estimate the amount of glucose in blood both in vivo e.g. the forearm and in vitro e.g. on blood samples. The novel spatially resolved system that is used for this study is based around a 2D InGaAs detector and a fibre probe with 10 fibres, one as a source and 9 to collect the diffuse reflected light at distances between 0.3-2.7mm from the source. An inversion method using Monte Carlo generated diffuse reflectance profiles is used to estimate the absolute absorption coefficient (μ a) and reduced scattering coefficient (μ s') which could be used to estimate the glucose concentration in the tissue-like phantoms. The method was investigated by performing spatially resolved measurements on turbid gelatin phantoms containing mixtures of water and D IIO as absorbers, Intralipid as a scatterer and glucose. The phantoms were made with four different glucose concentrations spanning the range of 0-5000 mg/dl.

  16. Determining Chemically and Spatially Resolved Atomic Profile of Low Contrast Interface Structure with High Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Maheswar; Pradhan, P. C.; Lodha, G. S.

    2015-01-01

    We present precise measurements of atomic distributions of low electron density contrast at a buried interface using soft x-ray resonant scattering. This approach allows one to construct chemically and spatially highly resolved atomic distribution profile upto several tens of nanometer in a non-destructive and quantitative manner. We demonstrate that the method is sensitive enough to resolve compositional differences of few atomic percent in nano-scaled layered structures of elements with poor electron density differences (0.05%). The present study near the edge of potential impurities in soft x-ray range for low-Z system will stimulate the activity in that field. PMID:25726866

  17. Isoscapes resolve species-specific spatial patterns in plant-plant interactions in an invaded Mediterranean dune ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Hellmann, Christine; Rascher, Katherine G; Oldeland, Jens; Werner, Christiane

    2016-12-01

    Environmental heterogeneity and plant-plant interactions are key factors shaping plant communities. However, the spatial dimension of plant-plant interactions has seldom been addressed in field studies. This is at least partially rooted in a lack of methods that can accurately resolve functional processes in a spatially explicit manner. Isoscapes, that is, spatially explicit representations of stable isotope data, provide a versatile means to trace functional changes on spatial scales, for example, related to N-cycling (foliar δ(15)N) and water use efficiency (WUEi, foliar δ(13)C). In a case study in a nutrient-depleted Mediterranean dune ecosystem, we analysed the spatial impact of the invasive N2-fixing Acacia longifolia on three native species of different functional types using δ(15)N and δ(13)C isoscapes and spatial autocorrelation analyses. Isoscapes revealed strong spatial patterns in δ(15)N and δ(13)C with pronounced species-specific differences, demonstrating distinct spatial ranges of plant-plant interactions. A coniferous tree and an ericaceous dwarf shrub showed significant enrichment in δ(15)N within a range of 5-8 m surrounding the canopy of A. longifolia, indicating input of N originating from symbiotic N2-fixation by the invader. In the dwarf shrub, which was most responsive to invader influence, enrichment in δ(13)C additionally demonstrated spatially explicit changes to WUEi, while a native N2-fixer was unresponsive to the presence of the invader. Furthermore, δ(15)N and δ(13)C isoscapes yielded different patterns, indicating that plant-plant interactions can have distinct spatial distributions and ranges based on the process measured. Additionally, the magnitude of the effect differed between field situations with high and low invasion pressure. This study highlights that the spatial scale must be accounted for when assessing the effects and outcome of species interactions. Functional tracers such as stable isotopes enable us to

  18. Accurate mask-based spatially regularized correlation filter for visual tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xiaodong; Xu, Xinping

    2017-01-01

    Recently, discriminative correlation filter (DCF)-based trackers have achieved extremely successful results in many competitions and benchmarks. These methods utilize a periodic assumption of the training samples to efficiently learn a classifier. However, this assumption will produce unwanted boundary effects, which severely degrade the tracking performance. Correlation filters with limited boundaries and spatially regularized DCFs were proposed to reduce boundary effects. However, their methods used the fixed mask or predesigned weights function, respectively, which was unsuitable for large appearance variation. We propose an accurate mask-based spatially regularized correlation filter for visual tracking. Our augmented objective can reduce the boundary effect even in large appearance variation. In our algorithm, the masking matrix is converted into the regularized function that acts on the correlation filter in frequency domain, which makes the algorithm fast convergence. Our online tracking algorithm performs favorably against state-of-the-art trackers on OTB-2015 Benchmark in terms of efficiency, accuracy, and robustness.

  19. Spatially resolved lasers using a glassy cholesteric liquid crystal film with lateral pitch gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Simon K. H.; Chen, Shaw H.

    2011-03-01

    To fabricate spatially resolved glassy cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) lasers, a lateral pitch gradient was introduced by thermally activated diffusion across the interface of two films comprising nematic and cholesteric oligofluorene doped with a red-emitting oligifluorene. The formation of spatially resolved Grandjean-Cano bands was accountable by strong surface anchoring at substrates and the qualitative chiral concentration profile. Across each band there was a common stop band, and a set of bands produced multiple lasing peaks across the spectral range determined by light-emitter's fluorescence spectrum. The resultant lasing thresholds, 6.6-7.6 mJ/cm2, and slope efficiencies, 0.2%-1.5%, are superior to those reported to date for gradient-pitch CLC lasers.

  20. Spatially resolved in operando neutron scattering studies on Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senyshyn, A.; Mühlbauer, M. J.; Dolotko, O.; Hofmann, M.; Pirling, T.; Ehrenberg, H.

    2014-01-01

    Spatially-resolved neutron diffraction has been applied to probe the lithium distribution in radial direction of a commercial Li-ion cell of 18650-type. The spatial evolution of selected Bragg reflections for LiCoO2 (positive electrode, "cathode") and graphite and lithium intercalated graphite (negative electrode, "anode") was observed and evaluated by taking beam attenuation and cell geometry effects into account. No evidences for lithium inhomogeneities have been found for the investigated set of cells. Computed neutron tomography using a monochromatic neutron beam confirmed the homogeneous lithium distribution. The relevance of the monochromatic beam to neutron imaging studies of Li-ion cells is discussed.

  1. Spatially resolving variations in giant magnetoresistance, undetectable with four-point probe measurements, using infrared microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, C. S.; Thompson, S. M.; Illman, M. D.; LeFrancois, S.; Dumas, P.

    2012-10-15

    Magnetorefractive infrared (IR) microspectroscopy is demonstrated to resolve spatial variations in giant magnetoresistance (GMR) and, by modelling, provide an insight into the origin of the variations. Spatial variations are shown to be masked in conventional four-point probe electrical or IR spectral measurements. IR microspectroscopy was performed at the SMIS beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron, modified to enable measurements in magnetic fields. A GMR gradient was induced in a CoFe/Cu multilayer sample by annealing in a temperature gradient. Modelling revealed that variations in GMR at 900 Oe could be attributed to local variations in interlayer coupling locally changing the switching field.

  2. Spatially-Resolved Characterization Techniques to Investigate Impact Damage in Ultra-High Performance Concretes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    ER D C/ G SL T R -1 3 -1 7 Spatially-Resolved Characterization Techniques to Investigate Impact Damage in Ultra- High Performance...Impact Damage in Ultra- High Performance Concretes Robert D. Moser, Paul G. Allison, and Mei Q. Chandler Geotechnical and Structures Laboratory US...Portland Cement concrete (OPC) and Ultra- High Performance Concretes (UHPCs) under high -strain impact and penetration loads at lower length scales

  3. Natural gas leaks detection by spatial-resolvable cw-laser-based remote monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agishev, Ravil R.; Bajazitov, Ravil A.; Galeyev, Marat M.; Ismagilov, Zufar B.

    1996-11-01

    The opportunities of spatial-resolvable atmosphere monitoring and atmospheric pollutions' remote chemical analysis based on the CW-laser radiants are investigated. A frequency-responsive processing peculiarities of atmosphere remote sensing signals are described. Application of the mentioned approach for the limited hydrocarbons remote detection and sensing is discussed. The requirements to the CW-LIDAR' receiving and radiating systems parameters are formulated. The evaluations of the system sensitivity limit, measurement accuracy and accuracy increase ways are presented.

  4. Spatial-resolvable remote sensing and detection of hydrocarbons based on cw low-power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agishev, Ravil R.; Bajazitov, Ravil A.; Galeyev, Marat M.

    1996-09-01

    The opportunities of spatial-resolvable atmosphere monitoring and atmospheric pollutions' remote chemical analysis based on the CW-laser radiants are investigated. A frequency-responsive processing peculiarities of atmosphere remote sensing signals are described. Application of the mentioned approach for the limited hydrocarbons remote detection and sensing is discussed. The requirements to the CW-LIDAR receiving and radiating systems parameters are formulated. The evaluations of the system sensitivity limit, measurement accuracy and accuracy increase ways are presented.

  5. The Spatially Resolved H(alpha)-Emitting Wind Structure of P Cygni

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    1.7± 0.1 kpc to 1.8± 0.1 kpc (Lamers et al. 1983; Najarro et al. 1997). The circumstellar region of P Cyg has been spatially resolved in the past...diameter of 0.2 mas to represent the central star at the continuum wavelengths. We obtain this diameter based on a distance estimate of 1.8 ± 0.1 kpc and a

  6. Spatially resolving unconventional interface Landau quantization in a graphene monolayer-bilayer planar junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wei; Li, Si-Yu; Yin, Long-Jing; Qiao, Jia-Bin; Nie, Jia-Cai; He, Lin

    2016-05-01

    Hybrid quantum Hall (QH) junctions have been extensively studied by transport measurements due to their exciting physics and device applications. Here we report on spatially resolving electronic properties of such a junction on the nanoscale. We present a subnanometer-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy study of a monolayer-bilayer graphene planar junction in the QH regime. The atomically well-defined interface of such a junction allows us to spatially resolve the interface electronic properties. Around the interface, we detect Landau quantization of massless Dirac fermions as expected in the graphene monolayer for filled states of the junction, whereas unexpectedly, only Landau quantization of massive Dirac fermions as expected in the graphene bilayer is observed for empty states. The observed unconventional interface Landau quantization arises from the fact that the quantum conductance across the interface is solely determined by the minimum filling factors (number of edge modes) in the graphene monolayer and bilayer regions of the junction. Our finding opens the way to spatially explore the QH effect of different graphene hybrid structures only using a STM.

  7. Narrow-Band Imaging and Spatially Resolved Spectra of Nova Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillwig, T. C.; Honeycutt, R. K.; Shore, S. N.

    2000-12-01

    Observations of nova shells were made at the WIYN Observatory using the WIYN Imager, the ``naked'' DensePak fiber array, and a Barlow 4x magnifying assembly used with DensePak. DensePak was used to obtain spatially resolved spectra of several nova shells at wavelengths including the Hα , Hβ , [OIII], and [NII] emission lines. The purpose is to derive true shapes and sizes of the nova shells, velocity structure, and abundance structure. The ability to spatially resolve the shell with spectroscopy, with the accuracy and resolution available to DensePak is a useful and unique tool. The velocity structure of the shell provides data which can be compared to models of expected shell structure. Measuring abundances in different, spatially resolved portions of the shell can give indications of the cause of the structure. For example, in shaping by a fast wind, we may expect to see different abundances in the slowly moving ejected material than in the material comprising the fast wind (which becomes apparent in planetary nebulae with wind-blown bubbles). Imaging also provides, along with comparison to velocity structure, an additional constraint on the determination of parallax distances, and the narrow-band imaging can supply estimates of excitation levels in various regions of the shells. All of these are important contributors to the determination of the physical mechanism responsible for the nova shell structure. The first phase of this research is presented here.

  8. Probing the limitations of Sigmund's model of spatially resolved sputtering using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobler, Gerhard; Bradley, R. Mark; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2016-05-01

    Sigmund's model of spatially resolved sputtering is the underpinning of many models of nanoscale pattern formation induced by ion bombardment. It is based on three assumptions: (i) the number of sputtered atoms is proportional to the nuclear energy deposition (NED) near the surface, (ii) the NED distribution is independent of the orientation and shape of the solid surface and is identical to the one in an infinite medium, and (iii) the NED distribution in an infinite medium can be approximated by a Gaussian. We test the validity of these assumptions using Monte Carlo simulations of He, Ar, and Xe impacts on Si at energies of 2, 20, and 200 keV with incidence angles from perpendicular to grazing. We find that for the more commonly-employed beam parameters (Ar and Xe ions at 2 and 20 keV and nongrazing incidence), the Sigmund model's predictions are within a factor of 2 of the Monte Carlo results for the total sputter yield and the first two moments of the spatially resolved sputter yield. This is partly due to a compensation of errors introduced by assumptions (i) and (ii). The Sigmund model, however, does not describe the skewness of the spatially resolved sputter yield, which is almost always significant. The approximation is much poorer for He ions and/or high energies (200 keV). All three of Sigmund's assumptions break down at grazing incidence angles. In all cases, we discuss the origin of the deviations from Sigmund's model.

  9. Communication: Vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of the tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) anion and accurate determination of the electron affinity of TCNQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guo-Zhu; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) is widely used as an electron acceptor to form highly conducting organic charge-transfer solids. Surprisingly, the electron affinity (EA) of TCNQ is not well known and has never been directly measured. Here, we report vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) of the TCNQ- anion produced using electrospray and cooled in a cryogenic ion trap. Photoelectron spectrum taken at 354.7 nm represents the detachment transition from the ground state of TCNQ- to that of neutral TCNQ with a short vibrational progression. The EA of TCNQ is measured accurately to be 3.383 ± 0.001 eV (27 289 ± 8 cm-1), compared to the 2.8 ± 0.1 eV value known in the literature and measured previously using collisional ionization technique. In addition, six vibrational peaks are observed in the photoelectron spectrum, yielding vibrational frequencies for three totally symmetric modes of TCNQ. Two-photon PES via a bound electronic excited state of TCNQ- at 3.100 eV yields a broad low kinetic energy peak due to fast internal conversion to vibrationally excited levels of the anion ground electronic state. The high EA measured for TCNQ underlies its ability as a good electron acceptor.

  10. Communication: Vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of the tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) anion and accurate determination of the electron affinity of TCNQ

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Guo-Zhu; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2015-12-14

    Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) is widely used as an electron acceptor to form highly conducting organic charge-transfer solids. Surprisingly, the electron affinity (EA) of TCNQ is not well known and has never been directly measured. Here, we report vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) of the TCNQ{sup −} anion produced using electrospray and cooled in a cryogenic ion trap. Photoelectron spectrum taken at 354.7 nm represents the detachment transition from the ground state of TCNQ{sup −} to that of neutral TCNQ with a short vibrational progression. The EA of TCNQ is measured accurately to be 3.383 ± 0.001 eV (27 289 ± 8 cm{sup −1}), compared to the 2.8 ± 0.1 eV value known in the literature and measured previously using collisional ionization technique. In addition, six vibrational peaks are observed in the photoelectron spectrum, yielding vibrational frequencies for three totally symmetric modes of TCNQ. Two-photon PES via a bound electronic excited state of TCNQ{sup −} at 3.100 eV yields a broad low kinetic energy peak due to fast internal conversion to vibrationally excited levels of the anion ground electronic state. The high EA measured for TCNQ underlies its ability as a good electron acceptor.

  11. Communication: Vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of the tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) anion and accurate determination of the electron affinity of TCNQ.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guo-Zhu; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2015-12-14

    Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) is widely used as an electron acceptor to form highly conducting organic charge-transfer solids. Surprisingly, the electron affinity (EA) of TCNQ is not well known and has never been directly measured. Here, we report vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) of the TCNQ(-) anion produced using electrospray and cooled in a cryogenic ion trap. Photoelectron spectrum taken at 354.7 nm represents the detachment transition from the ground state of TCNQ(-) to that of neutral TCNQ with a short vibrational progression. The EA of TCNQ is measured accurately to be 3.383 ± 0.001 eV (27,289 ± 8 cm(-1)), compared to the 2.8 ± 0.1 eV value known in the literature and measured previously using collisional ionization technique. In addition, six vibrational peaks are observed in the photoelectron spectrum, yielding vibrational frequencies for three totally symmetric modes of TCNQ. Two-photon PES via a bound electronic excited state of TCNQ(-) at 3.100 eV yields a broad low kinetic energy peak due to fast internal conversion to vibrationally excited levels of the anion ground electronic state. The high EA measured for TCNQ underlies its ability as a good electron acceptor.

  12. Time-resolved and spatially-resolved infrared spectroscopic observation of seeded nucleation controlling geopolymer gel formation.

    PubMed

    Hajimohammadi, Ailar; Provis, John L; van Deventer, Jannie S J

    2011-05-15

    The effect of seeded nucleation on the formation and structural evolution of one-part ("just add water") geopolymer gels is investigated. Gel-forming systems are seeded with each of three different oxide nanoparticles, and seeding is shown to have an important role in controlling the silica release rate from the solid geothermal silica precursor, and in the development of physical properties of the gels. Nucleation accelerates the chemical changes taking place during geopolymer formation. The nature of the seeds affects the structure of the growing gel by affecting the extent of phase separation, identified by the presence of a distinct silica-rich gel in addition to the main, more alumina-rich gel phase. Synchrotron radiation-based infrared microscopy (SR-FTIR) shows the effect of nucleation on the heterogeneous nanostructure and microstructure of geopolymer gels, and is combined with data obtained by time-resolved FTIR analysis to provide a more holistic view of the reaction processes at a level of detail that has not previously been available. While spatially averaged (ATR-FTIR) infrared results show similar spectra for seeded and unseeded samples which have been cured for more than 3 weeks, SR-FTIR results show marked differences in gel structure as a result of seeding.

  13. Explicit off-line criteria for stable accurate time filtering of strongly unstable spatially extended systems.

    PubMed

    Majda, Andrew J; Grote, Marcus J

    2007-01-23

    Many contemporary problems in science involve making predictions based on partial observation of extremely complicated spatially extended systems with many degrees of freedom and physical instabilities on both large and small scales. Various new ensemble filtering strategies have been developed recently for these applications, and new mathematical issues arise. Here, explicit off-line test criteria for stable accurate discrete filtering are developed for use in the above context and mimic the classical stability analysis for finite difference schemes. First, constant coefficient partial differential equations, which are randomly forced and damped to mimic mesh scale energy spectra in the above problems are developed as off-line filtering test problems. Then mathematical analysis is used to show that under natural suitable hypothesis the time filtering algorithms for general finite difference discrete approximations to an sxs partial differential equation system with suitable observations decompose into much simpler independent s-dimensional filtering problems for each spatial wave number separately; in other test problems, such block diagonal models rigorously provide upper and lower bounds on the filtering algorithm. In this fashion, elementary off-line filtering criteria can be developed for complex spatially extended systems. The theory is illustrated for time filters by using both unstable and implicit difference scheme approximations to the stochastically forced heat equation where the combined effects of filter stability and model error are analyzed through the simpler off-line criteria.

  14. Spatially resolved measurement of high doses in microbeam radiation therapy using samarium doped fluorophosphate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Go; Morrell, Brian; Koughia, Cyril; Kasap, Safa; Edgar, Andy; Varoy, Chris; Belev, George; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Chapman, Dean

    2011-09-19

    The measurement of spatially resolved high doses in microbeam radiation therapy has always been a challenging task, where a combination of high dose response and high spatial resolution (microns) is required for synchrotron radiation peaked around 50 keV. The x-ray induced Sm{sup 3+}{yields} Sm{sup 2+} valence conversion in Sm{sup 3+} doped fluorophosphates glasses has been tested for use in x-ray dosimetry for microbeam radiation therapy. The conversion efficiency depends almost linearly on the dose of irradiation up to {approx}5 Gy and saturates at doses exceeding {approx}80 Gy. The conversion shows strong correlation with x-ray induced absorbance of the glass which is related to the formation of phosphorus-oxygen hole centers. When irradiated through a microslit collimator, a good spatial resolution and high ''peak-to-valley'' contrast have been observed by means of confocal photoluminescence microscopy.

  15. Spatially resolved spectroscopy analysis of the XMM-Newton large program on SN1006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiang-Tao; Decourchelle, Anne; Miceli, Marco; Vink, Jacco; Bocchino, Fabrizio

    2016-04-01

    We perform analysis of the XMM-Newton large program on SN1006 based on our newly developed methods of spatially resolved spectroscopy analysis. We extract spectra from low and high resolution meshes. The former (3596 meshes) is used to roughly decompose the thermal and non-thermal components and characterize the spatial distributions of different parameters, such as temperature, abundances of different elements, ionization age, and electron density of the thermal component, as well as photon index and cutoff frequency of the non-thermal component. On the other hand, the low resolution meshes (583 meshes) focus on the interior region dominated by the thermal emission and have enough counts to well characterize the Si lines. We fit the spectra from the low resolution meshes with different models, in order to decompose the multiple plasma components at different thermal and ionization states and compare their spatial distributions. In this poster, we will present the initial results of this project.

  16. Spatially Resolved Substorm Dynamical Model with Internal and External Substorm Triggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, W.; Crabtree, C.; Weigel, R. S.; Vassiliadis, D.; Doxas, I.

    2002-12-01

    A spatially-resolved nonlinear dynamics model of the coupled solar wind driven magnetosphere-ionosphere system is developed for the purpose of determining the electrical power flow from the solar wind through the nightside magnetosphere into the ionosphere. The model is derived from Maxwell equations and nonlinear plasma dynamics and focuses on the key conservation laws of mass, charge and energy in the power transfer elements in this complex dynamical system. The models has numerous feedback and feedforward loops for six forms of the distributed energy storage in the M-I system. In contrast to neural networks, the model delineates physically realizable time ordered sequence of energetic events in substorm dynamics. Three types of energy releases are observed in the substorm data and studied with the model. Type I events occur for solar wind conditions that lead to the creation of a near Earth neutral line (NENL) in the geomagnetic tail. Other solar wind conditions lead dominantly to the onset of convection in flux tubes with foot points in the auroral region that produced enhanced field aligned currents (FACs) closing in the ionosphere. These are the type II and type III events. In type II events a sudden northward turning of the IMF produces a transient mis-alignment of the pressure gradient with the gradient of the flux volumes as in the Lyons model. Large transient substorm current wedge and auroral region 1 sense currents are driven by the steep near-Earth pressure gradient in these events type II events. In type III events the slower evolving IMF field directly drives the nightside M-I system. This is the directly driven auroral substorm. We use physics-based filters to classify events in historical databases, and we use the 2-1/2D transport model to simulate the events for model solar wind inputs. The results of the research stress the need for more accurate determinations of the day-side magnetopause arrival times of structures in the solar wind required

  17. Spatial connectivity in a large river system: resolving the sources and fate of dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Massicotte, Philippe; Frenette, Jean-Jacques

    2011-10-01

    Large rivers are generally heterogeneous and productive systems that receive important inputs of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from terrestrial and in situ sources. Thus, they are likely to play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycling of the DOM flowing to the oceans. The asymmetric spatial gradient driven by directional flow and environmental heterogeneity contributes to the fate of DOM flowing downstream. Yet, the relative effects of spatial connectivity and environmental heterogeneity on DOM dynamics are poorly understood. For example, since environmental variables show spatial heterogeneity, the variation explained by environmental and spatial variables may be redundant. We used the St. Lawrence River (SLR) as a representative large river to resolve the unique influences of environmental heterogeneity and spatial connectivity on DOM dynamics. We used three-dimensional fluorescence matrices combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) to characterize the DOM pool in the SLR. Seven fluorophores were modeled, of which two were identified to be of terrestrial origin and three from algal exudates. We measured a set of environmental variables that are known to drive the fate of DOM in aquatic systems. Additionally, we used asymmetric eigenvector map (AEM) modeling to take spatial connectivity into account. The combination of spatial and environmental models explained 85% of the DOM variation. We show that spatial connectivity is an important driver of DOM dynamics, as a large fraction of environmental heterogeneity was attributable to the asymmetric spatial gradient. Along the longitudinal axis, we noted a rapid increase in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), mostly controlled by terrestrial input of DOM originating from the tributaries. Variance partitioning demonstrated that freshly produced protein-like DOM was found to be the preferential substrate for heterotrophic bacteria undergoing rapid proliferation, while humic-like DOM was more correlated to the

  18. Ultrafast spatially-resolved carrier dynamics in single CdSSe nanobelts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, Lars; Piotrowiak, Piotr

    2009-03-01

    A recently constructed Kerr-gated microscope was applied to spatially, temporally, and spectrally resolve the ultrafast non-linear excitation relaxation dynamics in single CdSSe nanobelts. Luminescence movies with a 100 fs frame resolution were constructed. The ability to spatially resolve the femtosecond dynamics in a single emitting object gives insights which would be impossible to obtain in an ensemble measurement. By applying the Kerr-gated microscope we are able to monitor the dynamics in a single nanobelt with a sufficient time resolution to reveal the different pathways that compete with the dissociation of multiple excitons. We will show that ensemble averaging methods give results that are complicated because of ensemble inhomogeneities. Indeed, already a different orientation of the nanoparticles with respect to the light-field leads to different dynamic response and difficult to interpret results. The onset of nonlinear behavior and the subsequent dynamics are particularly sensitive to even the most subtle inhomogeneities in composition and morphology and hence most difficult to study under the condition of ensemble averaging making time-resolved wide-field fluorescence microscopy a perfect aid in disentangling the complex response.

  19. A spatially-resolved study of initial mass function in the outer Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Chikako; Izumi, Natsuko; Saito, Masao; Kobayashi, Naoto

    2017-03-01

    Outskirts of spiral galaxies, including our own, and dwarf irregular galaxies are known to have a different environment from the solar neighborhood, e.g., low metallicities ( ~ - 1 dex). Among them, the outer Galaxy is the closest and hence is so far the only site suitable for population studies of resolved stars on the same basis as solar neighborhood. We have obtained NIR images of young clusters in the outer Galaxy, using the Subaru 8.2-m telescope, and clearly resolved cluster members with mass detection limits of ~ 0.1 M ⊙. Based on the fitting of K-band luminosity functions (KLFs) for four clusters, we found that the initial mass function (IMF) in the outer Galaxy is consistent with that in the solar neighborhood in terms of the high-mass slope and IMF peak. Upcoming observations with a higher spatial resolution and sensitivity, using JWST, TMT, etc., will allow us to extend spatially-resolved studies of the IMF to Local Group galaxies.

  20. A comparison of spatially resolved and global mean reconstructions of continental denudation under ice-free and present conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, L. Cirbus; Bluth, Gregg J. S.; Filippelli, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    We assess the impact of continental-scale processes on global denudation through the use of spatially resolved information for both an ice-free paleoclimate and the present climate. Runoff from general circulation modeling cases representing the early Eocene is superimposed upon an Eocene paleogeologic reconstruction, and this information is combined with chemical denudation rates for silica (dissolved moles Si) and bicarbonate (dissolved moles HCO3-). Global fluxes of silica and bicarbonate to the global ocean are then calculated. A parallel procedure is carried out with present-day distributions of lithology and model-derived runoff. This work demonstrates that fluxes produced by a simple model such as the one used here are significantly different when calculated with spatially uniform runoff values versus those calculated with a spatially varying runoff distribution having the same global mean value. Use of a uniform runoff distribution produces denudation rates that are significantly higher than the global results derived from a spatially varying runoff distribution. We show that present-day fluxes of silica calculated by our model containing spatially varying runoff and lithology are similar to observations of current fluxes, suggesting that our model captures the first-order relationship accurately; however, the bicarbonate value compares less well to observations. Comparison of Eocene and present-day flux results shows that present-day fluxes of Si are greater than Eocene values, while calculated present-day HCO3- fluxes are greater than or equal to Eocene values. This result occurs despite the existence of greater global mean annual runoff for the Eocene cases and despite the existence of ice-covered areas (by definition, not contributing to chemical weathering in our model) in the present case. The increase in Si global denudation fluxes from the Eocene to the present are caused primarily by the large increase in exposed granitic, basaltic, and shale

  1. Absolute Spatially- and Temporally-Resolved Optical Emission Measurements of rf Glow Discharges in Argon

    PubMed Central

    Djurović, S.; Roberts, J. R.; Sobolewski, M. A.; Olthoff, J. K.

    1993-01-01

    Spatially- and temporally-resolved measurements of optical emission intensities are presented from rf discharges in argon over a wide range of pressures (6.7 to 133 Pa) and applied rf voltages (75 to 200 V). Results of measurements of emission intensities are presented for both an atomic transition (Ar I, 750.4 nm) and an ionic transition (Ar II, 434.8 nm). The absolute scale of these optical emissions has been determined by comparison with the optical emission from a calibrated standard lamp. All measurements were made in a well-defined rf reactor. They provide detailed characterization of local time-resolved plasma conditions suitable for the comparison with results from other experiments and theoretical models. These measurements represent a new level of detail in diagnostic measurements of rf plasmas, and provide insight into the electron transport properties of rf discharges. PMID:28053464

  2. Spatially Resolved Star Formation Main Sequence of Galaxies in the CALIFA Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano-Díaz, M.; Sánchez, S. F.; Zibetti, S.; Ascasibar, Y.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Ziegler, B.; González Delgado, R. M.; Walcher, C. J.; García-Benito, R.; Mast, D.; Mendoza-Pérez, M. A.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Galbany, L.; Husemann, B.; Kehrig, C.; Marino, R. A.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; López-Cobá, C.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Vilchez, J. M.

    2016-04-01

    The “main sequence of galaxies”—defined in terms of the total star formation rate ψ versus the total stellar mass M *—is a well-studied tight relation that has been observed at several wavelengths and at different redshifts. All earlier studies have derived this relation from integrated properties of galaxies. We recover the same relation from an analysis of spatially resolved properties, with integral field spectroscopic (IFS) observations of 306 galaxies from the CALIFA survey. We consider the SFR surface density in units of log(M ⊙ yr-1 Kpc-2) and the stellar mass surface density in units of log(M ⊙ Kpc-2) in individual spaxels that probe spatial scales of 0.5-1.5 Kpc. This local relation exhibits a high degree of correlation with small scatter (σ = 0.23 dex), irrespective of the dominant ionization source of the host galaxy or its integrated stellar mass. We highlight (i) the integrated star formation main sequence formed by galaxies whose dominant ionization process is related to star formation, for which we find a slope of 0.81 ± 0.02; (ii) for the spatially resolved relation obtained with the spaxel analysis, we find a slope of 0.72 ± 0.04; and (iii) for the integrated main sequence, we also identified a sequence formed by galaxies that are dominated by an old stellar population, which we have called the retired galaxies sequence.

  3. Test Sample for the Spatially Resolved Quantification of Illicit Drugs on Fingerprints Using Imaging Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Muramoto, Shin; Forbes, Thomas P; van Asten, Arian C; Gillen, Greg

    2015-01-01

    A novel test sample for the spatially resolved quantification of illicit drugs on the surface of a fingerprint using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) was demonstrated. Calibration curves relating the signal intensity to the amount of drug deposited on the surface were generated from inkjet-printed arrays of cocaine, methamphetamine, and heroin with a deposited-mass ranging nominally from 10 pg to 50 ng per spot. These curves were used to construct concentration maps that visualized the spatial distribution of the drugs on top of a fingerprint, as well as being able to quantify the amount of drugs in a given area within the map. For the drugs on the fingerprint on silicon, ToF-SIMS showed great success, as it was able to generate concentration maps of all three drugs. On the fingerprint on paper, only the concentration map of cocaine could be constructed using ToF-SIMS and DESI-MS, as the signals of methamphetamine and heroin were completely suppressed by matrix and substrate effects. Spatially resolved quantification of illicit drugs using imaging mass spectrometry is possible, but the choice of substrates could significantly affect the results.

  4. Based on time and spatial-resolved SERS mapping strategies for detection of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bingbing; Li, Pan; Yang, Liangbao; Liu, Jinhuai

    2015-08-15

    For the sensitive and convenient detection of pesticides, several sensing methods and materials have been widely explored. However, it is still a challenge to obtain sensitive, simple detection techniques for pesticides. Here, the simple and sensitive Time-resolved SERS mapping (T-SERS) and Spatial-resolved SERS mapping (S-SERS) are presented for detection of pesticides by using Au@Ag NPs as SERS substrate. The Time-resolved SERS mapping (T-SERS) is based on state translation nanoparticles from the wet state to the dry state to realize SERS measurements. During the SERS measurement, adhesive force drives the particles closer together and then average interparticle gap becomes smaller. Following, air then begins to intersperse into the liquid network and the particles are held together by adhesive forces at the solid-liquid-air interface. In the late stage of water evaporation, all particles are uniformly distributed. Thus, so called hotspots matrix that can hold hotspots between every two adjacent particles in efficient space with minimal polydispersity of particle size are achieved, accompanying the red-shift of surface plasmon peak and appearance of an optimal SPR resonated sharply with excitation wavelength. Here, we found that the T-SERS method exhibits the detection limits of 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than that of S-SERS. On the other hand, the T-SERS is very simple method with high detection sensitivity, better reproducibility (RSD=10.8%) and is beneficial to construction of a calibration curve in comparison with that of Spatial-resolved SERS mapping (S-SERS). Most importantly, as a result of its remarkable sensitivity, T-SERS mapping strategies have been applied to detection of several pesticides and the detect limit can down to 1nM for paraoxon, 0.5nM for sumithion. In short, T-SERS mapping measurement promises to open a market for SERS practical detection with prominent advantages.

  5. Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy Across HD189733 (K1V) Using Exoplanet Transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, Martin; Dravins, Dainis; Ludwig, Hans-Günter

    2016-06-01

    For testing 3-dimensional models of stellar atmospheres, spectroscopy across spatially resolved stellar surfaces would be desired with a spectral resolution of(R = 100,000) or more. Hydrodynamic models predict variations in line profile shapes, strengths, wavelength positions and asymmetries. These variations vary systematically between disk center and limb and as a function of line strength, excitation potential and wavelength region. However, except for a few supergiants and the Sun, current telescopes are not yet capable of resolving any stellar surfaces. One alternative method to resolve distant stellar surfaces, feasible already now, is differential spectroscopy of transiting exoplanet systems. By subtracting in-transit spectra from the spectrum outside of transit, the spectra from stellar surface portions temporarily hidden behind the planet can be disentangled. Since transiting planets cover only a small portion of the stellar surface, the method requires a very high signal-to-noise ratio, obtainable by averaging numerous similar spectral lines. We apply such differential spectroscopy on the 7.7 mag K1V star HD 189733 ('Alopex'*); its transiting planet covers ˜ 3% of its host star's surface, which is the deepest known transit among the brighter systems. Archival data from the ESO HARPS spectrometerare used to construct averaged profiles of photospheric Fe I lines, with the aim of comparing spatially resolved profiles to analogous synthetic line profiles computed from the 3-dimensional hydrodynamic CO5BOLD model. * We refer to HD 189733 as 'Alopex' (from the Greek 'αλɛπού'), denoting a fox related to the one that gave name to its constellation of Vulpecula.

  6. Community 15N isoscapes to resolve plant-plant-interactions at the spatial scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellmann, Christine; Rascher, Katherine G.; Máguas, Cristina; Werner, Christiane

    2014-05-01

    Isoscapes have greatly improved our ability to understand biogeochemical processes on continental to global scales. However, the isoscapes framework may also have significant potential to resolve the spatial component of within-community interactions. For example, exotic plant invaders often exert strong impacts on ecosystem functioning, particularly regarding water-, carbon- and nutrient-cycles, but the spatial extent of such alterations is largely unknown. Here we show that massive N input by the N2-fixing exotic invasive Acacia longifolia to a Portuguese dune system can be traced using spatially resolved information on native plants' leaf δ15N. We found isotopic signatures of N to differ strongly between the native system (δ15N c. -10 o) and the atmospherically derived N in A. longifolia phyllodes (δ15N c. 0 o). Thus, sources of N for native plants could be readily distinguished. Leaf δ15N of a native, non-fixing species was increasingly enriched the closer the plant grew to the invader, indicating uptake of fixed N provided by A. longifolia. The enrichment was evident far beyond the stands of the invader, demonstrating that A. longifolia affected N budgets of native species up to a distance of 8 m exceeding the margin of the canopy. Furthermore, using the isoscapes approach, we were able to quantify the total area of N enrichment and could thus show that the area affected by invasion was at least 3.5 times larger than the area actually occupied by the invader. However, a native N2-fixing species had no such effects. Thus, downscaling isoscapes to the community level opens new frontiers in quantifying the spatial dimension of functional changes associated with plant invasions. Moreover, considering the feasibility and applicability of this approach, it may provide a promising tool to identify, quantify and monitor different types of functional plant-plant interactions within communities at a spatially explicit scale.

  7. Spatially resolved spectra of the 'teacup' active galactic nucleus: tracing the history of a dying quasar

    SciTech Connect

    Gagne, J. P.; Crenshaw, D. M.; Fischer, T. C.; Kraemer, S. B.; Schmitt, H. R.; Keel, W. C.; Rafter, S.; Bennert, V. N.; Schawinski, K.

    2014-09-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Galaxy Zoo project has revealed a number of spectacular galaxies possessing extended emission-line regions (EELRs), the most famous being Hanny's Voorwerp galaxy. We present another EELR object discovered in the SDSS endeavor: the Teacup active galactic nucleus (AGN). Nicknamed for its EELR, which has a 'handle'-like structure protruding 15 kpc into the northeast quadrant of the galaxy. We analyze the physical conditions of this galaxy with long-slit, ground-based spectroscopy from the Lowell, Lick, and KPNO observatories. With the Lowell 1.8 m Perkin's telescope we took multiple observations at different offset positions, allowing us to recover spatially resolved spectra across the galaxy. Line diagnostics indicate the ionized gas is photoionized primarily by the AGN. Additionally we are able to derive the hydrogen density from the [S II] λ6716/λ6731 ratio. We generated two-component photoionization models for each spatially resolved Lowell spectrum. These models allow us to calculate the AGN bolometric luminosity seen by the gas at different radii from the nuclear center of the Teacup. Our results show a drop in bolometric luminosity by more than two orders of magnitude from the EELR to the nucleus, suggesting that the AGN has decreased in luminosity by this amount in a continuous fashion over 46,000 yr, supporting the case for a dying AGN in this galaxy independent of any IR based evidence. We demonstrate that spatially resolved photoionization modeling could be applied to EELRs to investigate long timescale variability.

  8. Spatially Resolved Mid-IR Spectra from Meteorites; Linking Composition, Crystallographic Orientation and Spectra on the Micro-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen, N. R.

    2016-08-01

    IR spectroscopy is used to infer composition of extraterrestrial bodies, comparing bulk spectra to databases of separate mineral phases. We extract spatially resolved meteorite-specific spectra from achondrites with respect to zonation and orientation.

  9. Hydrogen tracer diffusion in LiBH4 measured by spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Borgschulte, A; Gremaud, R; Łodziana, Z; Züttel, A

    2010-05-21

    The hydrogen tracer diffusion in LiBH(4) has been determined by spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy. The measurements give direct evidence of a macroscopic diffusion of BH ions as well as atomic exchange of hydrogen between the anions. An effective tracer diffusion coefficient of deuterium in LiBH(4) of D approximately 7 x 10(-14) m(2) s(-1) at 473 K is derived. The direct exchange rate of hydrogen between BH(4) units is 10 orders of magnitude slower, i.e. the relatively fast effective hydrogen diffusion has its origin in the fast diffusion of BH(4) units.

  10. Spatially-resolved stellar populations of nearby galaxies in multi-filter surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Roman, Izaskun; Cenarro, A. Javier; Díaz-García, Luis A.; López-Sanjuan, Carlos; Varela, Jesús; J-PLUS Team

    2017-03-01

    We have developed a new technique using a novel approach to analyze unresolved stellar populations of spatially-resolved galaxies based on large sky multi-filter surveys. We have successfully applied this technique to 42 early-type galaxies in the ALHAMBRA survey. In agreement with some previous work, we find the gradients of early-type galaxies to be on average slightly positive in age and negative in metallicity at large radii (R > Reff). These mildly negative metallicity gradients support a merging scenario. The positive/flat age gradients could support a more uniformly distributed star formation or even secondary burst triggered by mergers.

  11. Spatially resolved density and ionization measurements of shocked foams using x-ray fluorescence

    DOE PAGES

    MacDonald, M. J.; Keiter, P. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; ...

    2016-09-22

    We present experiments at the Trident laser facility demonstrating the use of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to simultaneously measure density, ionization state populations, and electron temperature in shocked foams. An imaging x-ray spectrometer was used to obtain spatially-resolved measurements of Ti K-more » $$\\alpha$$ emission. Density profiles were measured from K-$$\\alpha$$ intensity. Ti ionization state distributions and electron temperatures were inferred by fitting K-$$\\alpha$$ spectra to spectra from CRETIN simulations. This study shows that XRF provides a powerful tool to complement other diagnostics to make equation of state measurements of shocked materials containing a suitable tracer element.« less

  12. Spatially resolved density and ionization measurements of shocked foams using x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, M. J.; Keiter, P. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Scott, H. A.; Biener, M. M.; Fein, J. R.; Fournier, K. B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Kemp, G. E.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; LeFevre, H. J.; Manuel, M. J. -E.; Wan, W. C.; Drake, R. P.

    2016-09-22

    We present experiments at the Trident laser facility demonstrating the use of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to simultaneously measure density, ionization state populations, and electron temperature in shocked foams. An imaging x-ray spectrometer was used to obtain spatially-resolved measurements of Ti K-$\\alpha$ emission. Density profiles were measured from K-$\\alpha$ intensity. Ti ionization state distributions and electron temperatures were inferred by fitting K-$\\alpha$ spectra to spectra from CRETIN simulations. This study shows that XRF provides a powerful tool to complement other diagnostics to make equation of state measurements of shocked materials containing a suitable tracer element.

  13. Clinical determination of tissue optical properties by endoscopic spatially resolved reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bays, Roland; Wagnières, Georges; Robert, Dimitri; Braichotte, Daniel; Savary, Jean-François; Monnier, Philippe; van den Bergh, Hubert

    1996-04-01

    A noninvasive method to measure the optical properties of a diffusing and absorbing medium is described. Based on the spatially resolved measurement of diffuse reflectance at the sample surface, this method is particularly suitable for investigating the in vivo optical properties of biological tissues endoscopically in a clinical context. The sensitivity of the measurement is discussed, and two optical probes for two different clinical applications are presented. Preliminary measurements are performed on a nonbiological medium, which illustrate the possibilities of the proposed method. Finally, we report on in vivo measurements of the optical properties of the human esophageal wall at 630 nm. optical probe, optical properties, scattering.

  14. High-fidelity spatially resolved multiphoton counting for quantum imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Chrapkiewicz, Radosław; Wasilewski, Wojciech; Banaszek, Konrad

    2014-09-01

    We present a method for spatially resolved multiphoton counting based on an intensified camera with the retrieval of multimode photon statistics fully accounting for nonlinearities in the detection process. The scheme relies on one-time quantum tomographic calibration of the detector. Faithful, high-fidelity reconstruction of single- and two-mode statistics of multiphoton states is demonstrated for coherent states and their statistical mixtures. The results consistently exhibit classical values of the Mandel parameter and the noise reduction factor in contrast to raw statistics of camera photo-events. Detector operation is reliable for illumination levels up to the average of one detected photon per an event area-substantially higher than in previous approaches to characterize quantum statistical properties of light with spatial resolution.

  15. Spatially-resolved structure and electronic properties of graphene on polycrystalline Ni.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiebing; Hannon, James B; Tromp, Rudolf M; Johari, Priya; Bol, Ageeth A; Shenoy, Vivek B; Pohl, Karsten

    2010-12-28

    We have used in situ low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) to correlate the atomic and electronic structure of graphene films on polycrystalline Ni with nm-scale spatial resolution. Spatially resolved electron scattering measurements show that graphene monolayers formed by carbon segregation do not support the π-plasmon of graphene, indicating strong covalent bonding to the Ni. Graphene bilayers have the Bernal stacking characteristic of graphite and show the expected plasmon loss at 6.5 eV. The experimental results, in agreement with first-principles calculations, show that the π-band structure of free-standing graphene appears only in films with a thickness of at least two layers and demonstrate the sensitivity of the plasmon loss to the electronic structure.

  16. Novel characterization of the nonlinear refractive response of materials using spatially and spectrally resolved interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Amanda; Adams, Daniel; Squier, Jeff; Durfee, Charles

    2010-10-01

    Characterization of the nonlinear refractive index of a material is important in order to fully understand the nonlinear propagation of femtosecond laser pulses. The most common method to obtaining the nonlinear refractive index is Z-scan. However, since it averages over pulse duration and beam profile, Z-scan is not reliable when there is time- and intensity-dependence of the nonlinear response. The new method we are exploring to make these nonlinear refractive index measurements is spatially and spectrally resolved interferometry (SSRI). SSRI is a method that can give a simultaneous measurement of the spatial wave-front across the frequency or temporal profile of the pulse. The SSRI method proves better in measuring response at specific y and t, allowing it to measure both delayed response and saturation effects. The ability to make a measurement in both dimensions enables understanding of spatiotemporal dynamics in other experiments as cross-wave polarization and filamentation.

  17. Spatially resolved, in situ potential measurements through porous electrodes as applied to fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Hess, Katherine C; Epting, William K; Litster, Shawn

    2011-12-15

    We report the development and use of a microstructured electrode scaffold (MES) to make spatially resolved, in situ, electrolyte potential measurements through the thickness of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) electrode. This new approach uses a microfabricated apparatus to analyze the coupled transport and electrochemical phenomena in porous electrodes at the microscale. In this study, the MES allows the fuel cell to run under near-standard operating conditions, while providing electrolyte potential measurements at discrete distances through the electrode's thickness. Here we use spatial distributions of electrolyte potential to evaluate the effects of Ohmic and mass transport resistances on the through-plane reaction distribution for various operating conditions. Additionally, we use the potential distributions to estimate the ionic conductivity of the electrode. Our results indicate the in situ conductivity is higher than typically estimated for PEFC electrodes based on bulk polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) conductivity.

  18. Determination of optical parameters of human breast tissue from spatially resolved fluorescence: a diffusion theory model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Maya S.; Ghosh, Nirmalya; Raju, Narisetti Sundar; Pradhan, Asima

    2002-07-01

    We report the measurement of optical transport parameters of pathologically characterized malignant tissues, normal tissues, and different types of benign tumors of the human breast in the visible wavelength region. A spatially resolved steady-state diffuse fluorescence reflectance technique was used to estimate the values for the reduced-scattering coefficient (mu's) and the absorption coefficient (mua) of human breast tissues at three wavelengths (530, 550, and 590 nm). Different breast tissues could be well differentiated from one another, and different benign tumors could also be distinguished by their measured transport parameters. A diffusion theory model was developed to describe fluorescence light energy distribution, especially its spatial variation in a turbid and multiply scattering medium such as human tissue. The validity of the model was checked with a Monte Carlo simulation and also with different tissue phantoms prepared with polystyrene microspheres as scatterers, riboflavin as fluorophores, and methylene blue as absorbers.

  19. Catalysts at work: From integral to spatially resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Kimmerle, Bertram; Baiker, Alfons; Boye, Pit; Schroer, Christian G.; Glatzel, Pieter; Borca, Camelia N.; Beckmann, Felix

    2009-09-25

    Spectroscopic studies on heterogeneous catalysts have mostly been done in an integral mode. However, in many cases spatial variations in catalyst structure can occur, e.g. during impregnation of pre-shaped particles, during reaction in a catalytic reactor, or in microstructured reactors as the present overview shows. Therefore, spatially resolved molecular information on a microscale is required for a comprehensive understanding of theses systems, partly in ex situ studies, partly under stationary reaction conditions and in some cases even under dynamic reaction conditions. Among the different available techniques, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a well-suited tool for this purpose as the different selected examples highlight. Two different techniques, scanning and full-field X-ray microscopy/tomography, are described and compared. At first, the tomographic structure of impregnated alumina pellets is presented using full-field transmission microtomography and compared to the results obtained with a scanning X-ray microbeam technique to analyse the catalyst bed inside a catalytic quartz glass reactor. On the other hand, by using XAS in scanning microtomography, the structure and the distribution of Cu(0), Cu(I), Cu(II) species in a Cu/ZnO catalyst loaded in a quartz capillary microreactor could be reconstructed quantitatively on a virtual section through the reactor. An illustrating example for spatially resolved XAS under reaction conditions is the partial oxidation of methane over noble metal-based catalysts. In order to obtain spectroscopic information on the spatial variation of the oxidation state of the catalyst inside the reactor XAS spectra were recorded by scanning with a micro-focussed beam along the catalyst bed. Alternatively, full-field transmission imaging was used to efficiently determine the distribution of the oxidation state of a catalyst inside a reactor under reaction conditions. The new technical approaches together with quantitative data

  20. A simple method for correcting spatially resolved solar intensity oscillation observations for variations in scattered light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferies, S. M.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A measurement of the intensity distribution in an image of the solar disk will be corrupted by a spatial redistribution of the light that is caused by the earth's atmosphere and the observing instrument. A simple correction method is introduced here that is applicable for solar p-mode intensity observations obtained over a period of time in which there is a significant change in the scattering component of the point spread function. The method circumvents the problems incurred with an accurate determination of the spatial point spread function and its subsequent deconvolution from the observations. The method only corrects the spherical harmonic coefficients that represent the spatial frequencies present in the image and does not correct the image itself.

  1. Spatially-Resolved Proteomics: Rapid Quantitative Analysis of Laser Capture Microdissected Alveolar Tissue Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Clair, Geremy; Piehowski, Paul D.; Nicola, Teodora; Kitzmiller, Joseph A.; Huang, Eric L.; Zink, Erika M.; Sontag, Ryan L.; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Carson, James P.; Smith, Richard D.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Corley, Richard A.; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Ansong, Charles

    2016-12-22

    Global proteomics approaches allow characterization of whole tissue lysates to an impressive depth. However, it is now increasingly recognized that to better understand the complexity of multicellular organisms, global protein profiling of specific spatially defined regions/substructures of tissues (i.e. spatially-resolved proteomics) is essential. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) enables microscopic isolation of defined regions of tissues preserving crucial spatial information. However, current proteomics workflows entail several manual sample preparation steps and are challenged by the microscopic mass-limited samples generated by LCM, and that impact measurement robustness, quantification, and throughput. Here, we coupled LCM with a fully automated sample preparation workflow that with a single manual step allows: protein extraction, tryptic digestion, peptide cleanup and LC-MS/MS analysis of proteomes from microdissected tissues. Benchmarking against the current state of the art in ultrasensitive global proteomic analysis, our approach demonstrated significant improvements in quantification and throughput. Using our LCM-SNaPP proteomics approach, we characterized to a depth of more than 3,400 proteins, the ontogeny of protein changes during normal lung development in laser capture microdissected alveolar tissue containing ~4,000 cells per sample. Importantly, the data revealed quantitative changes for 350 low abundance transcription factors and signaling molecules, confirming earlier transcript-level observations and defining seven modules of coordinated transcription factor/signaling molecule expression patterns, suggesting that a complex network of temporal regulatory control directs normal lung development with epigenetic regulation fine-tuning pre-natal developmental processes. Our LCM-proteomics approach facilitates efficient, spatially-resolved, ultrasensitive global proteomics analyses in high-throughput that will be enabling for several clinical and

  2. CALIFA across the Hubble types: spatially resolved properties of the stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, R. M.; García-Benito, R.; Pérez, R.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Amorim, A. L.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; Lacerda, E. A. D.; López Fernández, R.; Sánchez, S. F.; Vale Asari, N.; CALIFA Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    We analyze the spatially resolved star formation history of 300 nearby galaxies from the CALIFA integral field spectroscopic survey to investigate the radial structure and gradients of the present day stellar populations properties as a function of Hubble type and galaxy stellar mass. A fossil record method based on spectral synthesis techniques is used to recover spatially and temporally resolved maps of stellar population properties of spheroidal and spiral galaxies with masses 10^9 to 7 × 10^{11} M_⊙. The results show that galaxy-wide spatially averaged stellar population properties (stellar mass, mass surface density, age, metallicity, and extinction) match those obtained from the integrated spectrum, and that these spatially averaged properties match those at R = 1 HLR (half light radius), proving that the effective radii are really effective. Further, the individual radial profiles of the stellar mass surface density (μ_star), luminosity weighted ages (ageL), and mass weighted metallicity (logZM) are stacked in bins of galaxy morphology (E, S0, Sa, Sb, Sbc, Sc and Sd). All these properties show negative gradients as a sign of the inside-out growth of massive galaxies. However, the gradients depend on the Hubble type in different ways. For the same galaxy mass, E and S0 galaxies show the largest inner gradients in μ_star; while MW-like galaxies (Sb with M_star ˜ 10^{11} {M}_⊙) show the largest inner age and metallicity gradients. The age and metallicity gradients suggest that major mergers have a relevant role in growing the center (within 3 HLR) of massive early type galaxies; and radial mixing may play a role flattening the radial metallicity gradient in MW-like disks.

  3. Spatially resolved measurement of Ar excited species in magnetized inductively coupled plasma using multi-port optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yun-Gi; Ha, Chang-Seung; Han, Moon-Ki; Seo, Kwon-Sang; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Hae June; Lee, Ho-Jun; Koo, Il Gyo; Lee, Soojin; Seong, Hyo-Seong

    2013-09-01

    Optical emission spectrometry (OES), which is the spectral analysis of the light emanating from plasma, is probably the most widely used method for monitoring and diagnosis of plasma processes. This technique has the advantage of being external to the reactor and vacuum system. However, the OES method is limited to measure spatial distribution of species accurately. In this work, multi-port optical emission spectroscopy system was developed to improve the space-resolved ability. This multi-port OES system consists of Si wafers, optical fibers, prisms and windows. The Si wafers are used for making the same condition while this device is put in the etching or deposition reactor. The emission light from plasma is collected and transferred through the optical fibers. The spatial distribution of Ar excited species is measured using this device in inductively coupled plasma with and without external axial magnetic field. The off-axis density profile of electron, Ar ion and excited species are appeared in weakly magnetized inductively coupled plasma. Also the emission intensity was changed in this experimental condition. Two-dimensional simulation was studied to verify this experimental result. This was supported by SEMES cooperative research project.

  4. Simulations of the temporal and spatial resolution for a compact time-resolved electron diffractometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Matthew S.; Lane, Paul D.; Wann, Derek A.

    2016-02-01

    A novel compact electron gun for use in time-resolved gas electron diffraction experiments has recently been designed and commissioned. In this paper we present and discuss the extensive simulations that were performed to underpin the design in terms of the spatial and temporal qualities of the pulsed electron beam created by the ionisation of a gold photocathode using a femtosecond laser. The response of the electron pulses to a solenoid lens used to focus the electron beam has also been studied. The simulated results show that focussing the electron beam affects the overall spatial and temporal resolution of the experiment in a variety of ways, and that factors that improve the resolution of one parameter can often have a negative effect on the other. A balance must, therefore, be achieved between spatial and temporal resolution. The optimal experimental time resolution for the apparatus is predicted to be 416 fs for studies of gas-phase species, while the predicted spatial resolution of better than 2 nm-1 compares well with traditional time-averaged electron diffraction set-ups.

  5. Allocating Damage Compensation in a Federalist System: Lessons from Spatially Resolved Air Emissions in the Marcellus.

    PubMed

    Behrer, A Patrick; Mauter, Meagan S

    2017-04-04

    The benefits and impacts of unconventional natural gas development are realized at different spatial scales, calling into question the appropriate jurisdictional level at which to set and enforce environmental policy. This paper evaluates impact fee allocation under Pennsylvania Act 13, which authorizes Commonwealth payments to Pennsylvania counties to offset damages from unconventional natural gas extraction in exchange for consolidated state-level regulatory authority. We evaluate the adequacy of damage compensation allocation for impacts that are spatially and temporally removed from the well site, using the air emissions associated with natural gas wastewater transport as a case study. Wastewater transport from wells eligible for 2011 impact fee disbursement calculations generated an estimated $11.6 million in air emission damages from 2004 to 2013, with 35% of damages occurring out-of-state and an average of 94% of damages occurring out-of-county. We find that compensatory payments from Pennsylvania Act 13, which are based upon the number of wells drilled in a county in a single year, inadequately account for spatially and temporally distributed impacts from wastewater transport. This case study of Pennsylvania Act 13 highlights potential issues associated with central regulators using compensatory payments as a means of resolving jurisdictional conflict. In cases where the central regulator benefits from the polluting activity, we argue that there is incentive to focus compensation on local damages and undervalue regional and spatially distributed damages in compensation algorithms.

  6. A SPATIALLY RESOLVED VERTICAL TEMPERATURE GRADIENT IN THE HD 163296 DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Andrews, Sean M.; Wilner, David J.; Qi, Chunhua; Hughes, A. Meredith

    2013-09-01

    We analyze sensitive, sub-arcsecond resolution ALMA science verification observations of CO emission lines in the protoplanetary disk hosted by the young, isolated Ae star HD 163296. The observed spatial morphology of the {sup 12}CO J = 3-2 emission line is asymmetric across the major axis of the disk; the {sup 12}CO J = 2-1 line features a much less pronounced, but similar, asymmetry. The J = 2-1 emission from {sup 12}CO and its main isotopologues have no resolved spatial asymmetry. We associate this behavior with the direct signature of a vertical temperature gradient and layered molecular structure in the disk. This is demonstrated using both toy models and more sophisticated calculations assuming non-local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. A model disk structure is developed to reproduce both the distinctive spatial morphology of the {sup 12}CO J = 3-2 line as well as the J = 2-1 emission from the CO isotopologues assuming relative abundances consistent with the interstellar medium. This model disk structure has {tau} = 1 emitting surfaces for the {sup 12}CO emission lines that make an angle of {approx}15 Degree-Sign with respect to the disk midplane. Furthermore, we show that the spatial and spectral sensitivity of these data can distinguish between models that have sub-Keplerian gas velocities due to the vertical extent of the disk and its associated radial pressure gradient (a fractional difference in the bulk gas velocity field of {approx}> 5%)

  7. The Time-Resolved Flow Field of a Spatially Oscillating Jet in Crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostermann, F.; Woszidlo, R.; Nayeri, C. N.; Paschereit, C. O.

    2016-11-01

    Spatially oscillating jets in crossflow emitted by fluidic oscillators have been proven beneficial for flow control applications in recent studies. However, the driving mechanism behind the efficacy remains unknown. The presented study examines the fundamental, time-resolved flow field of a spatially oscillating jet in crossflow. The inclination angle between oscillation plane and crossflow is 90°. The underlying experimental dataset is acquired plane-by-plane by a traversable stereoscopic particle image velocimetry system. Phase-averaging reduces stochastic noise, compensates low sampling rates, and allows combining the individual planes to a time-resolved three-dimensional flow field. The trajectory of the oscillating jet is much shallower than a steady jet. Two counter-rotating streamwise vortices are revealed. The sense of rotation is opposite to that of the counter-rotating vortex pair of steady jets in crossflow. This sense of rotation enables the vortices to prevail far downstream because they push each other toward the wall. The strength of the vortices is alternating. This vortex pair is a promising candidate to be the driving mechanism behind the high efficacy in separation control. PhD Student.

  8. Spatially resolved photoresponse on individual ZnO nanorods: correlating morphology, defects and conductivity

    PubMed Central

    Bandopadhyay, K.; Mitra, J.

    2016-01-01

    Electrically active native point defects have a significant impact on the optical and electrical properties of ZnO nanostructures. Control of defect distribution and a detailed understanding of their physical properties are central to designing ZnO in novel functional forms and architecture, which ultimately decides device performance. Defect control is primarily achieved by either engineering nanostructure morphology by tailoring growth techniques or doping. Here, we report conducting atomic force microscopy studies of spatially resolved photoresponse properties on ZnO nanorod surfaces. The photoresponse for super-band gap, ultraviolet excitations show a direct correlation between surface morphology and photoactivity localization. Additionally, the system exhibits significant photoresponse with sub-bandgap, green illumination; the signature energy associated with the deep level oxygen vacancy states. While the local current-voltage characteristics provide evidence of multiple transport processes and quantifies the photoresponse, the local time-resolved photoresponse data evidences large variations in response times (90 ms–50 s), across the surface of a nanorod. The spatially varied photoconductance and the range in temporal response display a complex interplay of morphology, defects and connectivity that brings about the true colour of these ZnO nanostructures. PMID:27334573

  9. Scanning photoelectron microscope for nanoscale three-dimensional spatial-resolved electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiba, K.; Nakamura, Y.; Nagamura, N.; Toyoda, S.; Kumigashira, H.; Oshima, M.; Amemiya, K.; Senba, Y.; Ohashi, H.

    2011-11-01

    In order to achieve nondestructive observation of the three-dimensional spatially resolved electronic structure of solids, we have developed a scanning photoelectron microscope system with the capability of depth profiling in electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). We call this system 3D nano-ESCA. For focusing the x-ray, a Fresnel zone plate with a diameter of 200 μm and an outermost zone width of 35 nm is used. In order to obtain the angular dependence of the photoelectron spectra for the depth-profile analysis without rotating the sample, we adopted a modified VG Scienta R3000 analyzer with an acceptance angle of 60° as a high-resolution angle-resolved electron spectrometer. The system has been installed at the University-of-Tokyo Materials Science Outstation beamline, BL07LSU, at SPring-8. From the results of the line-scan profiles of the poly-Si/high-k gate patterns, we achieved a total spatial resolution better than 70 nm. The capability of our system for pinpoint depth-profile analysis and high-resolution chemical state analysis is demonstrated.

  10. Development of dispersive XAFS system for analysis of time-resolved spatial distribution of electrode reaction.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Misaki; Miyahara, Ryota; Watanabe, Toshiki; Yamagishi, Hirona; Yamashita, Shohei; Kizaki, Terue; Sugawara, Yoshimi; Inada, Yasuhiro

    2015-09-01

    Apparatus for a technique based on the dispersive optics of X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) has been developed at beamline BL-5 of the Synchrotron Radiation Center of Ritsumeikan University. The vertical axis of the cross section of the synchrotron light is used to disperse the X-ray energy using a cylindrical polychromator and the horizontal axis is used for the spatially resolved analysis with a pixel array detector. The vertically dispersive XAFS (VDXAFS) instrument was designed to analyze the dynamic changeover of the inhomogeneous electrode reaction of secondary batteries. The line-shaped X-ray beam is transmitted through the electrode sample, and then the dispersed transmitted X-rays are detected by a two-dimensional detector. An array of XAFS spectra in the linear footprint of the transmitted X-ray on the sample is obtained with the time resolution of the repetition frequency of the detector. Sequential measurements of the space-resolved XAFS data are possible with the VDXAFS instrument. The time and spatial resolutions of the VDXAFS instrument depend on the flux density of the available X-ray beam and the size of the light source, and they were estimated as 1 s and 100 µm, respectively. The electrode reaction of the LiFePO4 lithium ion battery was analyzed during the constant current charging process and during the charging process after potential jumping.

  11. Spatially resolved resistance of NiO nanostructures under humid environment

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Christopher B; Ievlev, Anton; Collins, Liam F; Muckley, Eric S; Joshi, Pooran C; Ivanov, Ilia N

    2016-01-01

    The spatially resolved electrical response of polycrystalline NiO films composed of 40 nm crystallites was investigated under different relative humidity levels (RH). The topological and electrical properties (surface potential and resistance) were characterized with sub 25nm resolution using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and conductive scanning probe microscopy under argon atmosphere at 0%, 50%, and 80% relative humidity. The dimensionality of surface features obtained through autocorrelation analysis of topological maps increased linearly with increased relative humidity, as water was adsorbed onto the film surface. Surface potential decreased from about 280mV to about 100 mV and resistance decreased from about 5 G to about 3 G , in a nonlinear fashion when relative humidity was increased from 0% to 80%. Spatially resolved surface potential and resistance of the NiO films was found to be heterogeneous throughout the film, with distinct domains that grew in size from about 60 nm to 175 nm at 0% and 80% RH levels, respectively. The heterogeneous character of the topological, surface potential, and resistance properties of the polycrystalline NiO film observed under dry conditions decreased with increased relative humidity, yielding nearly homogeneous surface properties at 80% RH, suggesting that the nanoscale potential and resistance properties converge with the mesoscale properties as water is adsorbed onto the NiO film.

  12. Scanning photoelectron microscope for nanoscale three-dimensional spatial-resolved electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Horiba, K.; Oshima, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Nagamura, N.; Toyoda, S.; Kumigashira, H.; Amemiya, K.; Senba, Y.; Ohashi, H.

    2011-11-15

    In order to achieve nondestructive observation of the three-dimensional spatially resolved electronic structure of solids, we have developed a scanning photoelectron microscope system with the capability of depth profiling in electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). We call this system 3D nano-ESCA. For focusing the x-ray, a Fresnel zone plate with a diameter of 200 {mu}m and an outermost zone width of 35 nm is used. In order to obtain the angular dependence of the photoelectron spectra for the depth-profile analysis without rotating the sample, we adopted a modified VG Scienta R3000 analyzer with an acceptance angle of 60 deg. as a high-resolution angle-resolved electron spectrometer. The system has been installed at the University-of-Tokyo Materials Science Outstation beamline, BL07LSU, at SPring-8. From the results of the line-scan profiles of the poly-Si/high-k gate patterns, we achieved a total spatial resolution better than 70 nm. The capability of our system for pinpoint depth-profile analysis and high-resolution chemical state analysis is demonstrated.

  13. Spatially Resolved Quantification of Chromatin Condensation through Differential Local Rheology in Cell Nuclei Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging.

    PubMed

    Spagnol, Stephen T; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2016-01-01

    The linear sequence of DNA encodes access to the complete set of proteins that carry out cellular functions. Yet, much of the functionality appropriate for each cell is nested within layers of dynamic regulation and organization, including a hierarchy of chromatin structural states and spatial arrangement within the nucleus. There remain limitations in our understanding of gene expression within the context of nuclear organization from an inability to characterize hierarchical chromatin organization in situ. Here we demonstrate the use of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to quantify and spatially resolve chromatin condensation state using cell-permeable, DNA-binding dyes (Hoechst 33342 and PicoGreen). Through in vitro and in situ experiments we demonstrate the sensitivity of fluorescence lifetime to condensation state through the mechanical effects that accompany the structural changes and are reflected through altered viscosity. The establishment of FLIM for resolving and quantifying chromatin condensation state opens the door for single-measurement mechanical studies of the nucleus and for characterizing the role of genome structure and organization in nuclear processes that accompany physiological and pathological changes.

  14. Nitrogenase FeMoco investigated by spatially resolved anomalous dispersion refinement

    PubMed Central

    Spatzal, Thomas; Schlesier, Julia; Burger, Eva-Maria; Sippel, Daniel; Zhang, Limei; Andrade, Susana L.A.; Rees, Douglas C.; Einsle, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    The [Mo:7Fe:9S:C] iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMoco) of nitrogenase is the largest known metal cluster and catalyses the 6-electron reduction of dinitrogen to ammonium in biological nitrogen fixation. Only recently its atomic structure was clarified, while its reactivity and electronic structure remain under debate. Here we show that for its resting S=3/2 state the common iron oxidation state assignments must be reconsidered. By a spatially resolved refinement of the anomalous scattering contributions of the 7 Fe atoms of FeMoco, we conclude that three irons (Fe1/3/7) are more reduced than the other four (Fe2/4/5/6). Our data are in agreement with the recently revised oxidation state assignment for the molybdenum ion, providing the first spatially resolved picture of the resting-state electron distribution within FeMoco. This might provide the long-sought experimental basis for a generally accepted theoretical description of the cluster that is in line with available spectroscopic and functional data. PMID:26973151

  15. Spatially resolved photoresponse on individual ZnO nanorods: correlating morphology, defects and conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandopadhyay, K.; Mitra, J.

    2016-06-01

    Electrically active native point defects have a significant impact on the optical and electrical properties of ZnO nanostructures. Control of defect distribution and a detailed understanding of their physical properties are central to designing ZnO in novel functional forms and architecture, which ultimately decides device performance. Defect control is primarily achieved by either engineering nanostructure morphology by tailoring growth techniques or doping. Here, we report conducting atomic force microscopy studies of spatially resolved photoresponse properties on ZnO nanorod surfaces. The photoresponse for super-band gap, ultraviolet excitations show a direct correlation between surface morphology and photoactivity localization. Additionally, the system exhibits significant photoresponse with sub-bandgap, green illumination; the signature energy associated with the deep level oxygen vacancy states. While the local current-voltage characteristics provide evidence of multiple transport processes and quantifies the photoresponse, the local time-resolved photoresponse data evidences large variations in response times (90 ms–50 s), across the surface of a nanorod. The spatially varied photoconductance and the range in temporal response display a complex interplay of morphology, defects and connectivity that brings about the true colour of these ZnO nanostructures.

  16. Spatially Resolved Temperature and Water Vapor Concentration Distributions in Supersonic Combustion Facilities by TDLAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busa, K. M.; McDaniel J. C.; Diskin, G. S.; DePiro, M. J.; Capriotti, D. P.; Gaffney, R. L.

    2012-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the internal structure of high-enthalpy flows can provide valuable insight to the performance of scramjet combustors. Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) is often employed to measure temperature and species concentration. However, TDLAS is a path-integrated line-of-sight (LOS) measurement, and thus does not produce spatially resolved distributions. Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Tomography (TDLAT) is a non-intrusive measurement technique for determining two-dimensional spatially resolved distributions of temperature and species concentration in high enthalpy flows. TDLAT combines TDLAS with tomographic image reconstruction. More than 2500 separate line-of-sight TDLAS measurements are analyzed in order to produce highly resolved temperature and species concentration distributions. Measurements have been collected at the University of Virginia's Supersonic Combustion Facility (UVaSCF) as well as at the NASA Langley Direct-Connect Supersonic Combustion Test Facility (DCSCTF). Due to the UVaSCF s unique electrical heating and ability for vitiate addition, measurements collected at the UVaSCF are presented as a calibration of the technique. Measurements collected at the DCSCTF required significant modifications to system hardware and software designs due to its larger measurement area and shorter test duration. Tomographic temperature and water vapor concentration distributions are presented from experimentation on the UVaSCF operating at a high temperature non-reacting case for water vitiation level of 12%. Initial LOS measurements from the NASA Langley DCSCTF operating at an equivalence ratio of 0.5 are also presented. Results show the capability of TDLAT to adapt to several experimental setups and test parameters.

  17. A comparison of magnetic resonance methods for spatially resolved T2 distribution measurements in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashaee, S.; Marica, F.; Newling, B.; Balcom, B. J.

    2015-05-01

    Naturally occurring porous media are usually characterized by a distribution of pore sizes. If the material is fluid saturated, the 1H magnetic resonance (MR) signal depends on the pore size, the surface relaxivity and the fluid itself. Measurement of the transverse relaxation time T2 is a well-established technique to characterize material samples by means of MR. T2 distribution measurements, including T2 distribution mapping, are widely employed in clinical applications and in petroleum engineering. T2 distribution measurements are the most basic measurement employed to determine the fluid-matrix properties in MR core analysis. Three methods for T2 distribution mapping, namely spin-echo single point imaging (SE-SPI), DANTE-Z Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) and adiabatic inversion CPMG are compared in terms of spatial resolution, minimum observable T2 and sensitivity. Bulk CPMG measurement is considered to be the gold standard for T2 determination. Bulk measurement of uniform samples is compared to the three spatially resolved measurements. SE-SPI is an imaging method, which measures spatially resolved T2s in samples of interest. A variant is introduced in this work that employs pre-equalized magnetic field gradient waveforms and is therefore able to measure shorter T2s than previously reported. DANTE-Z CPMG and adiabatic inversion CPMG are faster, non-imaging, local T2 distribution measurements. The DANTE-Z pulse train and adiabatic inversion pulse are compared in terms of T1 or T2 relaxation time effects during the RF pulse application, minimum pulse duration, requisite RF pulse power, and inversion profile quality. In addition to experimental comparisons, simulation results are presented.

  18. Spatially Resolved Imaging and Spectroscopy of Candidate Dual Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGurk, R. C.; Max, C. E.; Medling, A. M.; Shields, G. A.; Comerford, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    When galaxies merge, both central supermassive black holes are immersed in a dense and chaotic environment. If there is sufficient gas in the nuclear regions, one expects to see close pairs of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), or dual AGNs, in a fraction of galaxy mergers. However, finding them remains a challenge. The presence of double-peaked [O iii] emission lines has been proposed as a technique to select dual AGNs efficiently. We studied a sample of double-peaked narrow [O iii] emitting AGNs from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7. By obtaining new and archival high spatial resolution images taken with the Keck II Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system and the near-infrared camera NIRC2, we show that 30% of 140 double-peaked [O iii] emission line SDSS AGNs have two spatial components within a 3″ radius. However, spatially resolved spectroscopy or X-ray observations are needed to confirm these galaxy pairs as systems containing two AGNs. We followed up three spatially double candidate dual AGNs with integral field spectroscopy from Keck OSIRIS and 10 candidates with long-slit spectroscopy from the Shane Kast Double Spectrograph at Lick Observatory. We find that the double-peaked emission lines in our sample of 12 candidates are caused by: one dual AGN (SDSS J114642.47+511029.6), one confirmed outflow and four likely outflows, two pairs of star-forming galaxies, one candidate indeterminate due to sky line interference, and three AGNs with spatially coincident double [O iii] peaks, likely due to unresolved complex narrow line kinematics, outflows, binary AGN, or small-scale jets.

  19. SPATIALLY RESOLVED IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY OF CANDIDATE DUAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    McGurk, R. C.; Max, C. E.; Medling, A. M.; Shields, G. A.; Comerford, J. M. E-mail: max@ucolick.org E-mail: shields@lfastro.org

    2015-09-20

    When galaxies merge, both central supermassive black holes are immersed in a dense and chaotic environment. If there is sufficient gas in the nuclear regions, one expects to see close pairs of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), or dual AGNs, in a fraction of galaxy mergers. However, finding them remains a challenge. The presence of double-peaked [O iii] emission lines has been proposed as a technique to select dual AGNs efficiently. We studied a sample of double-peaked narrow [O iii] emitting AGNs from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7. By obtaining new and archival high spatial resolution images taken with the Keck II Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system and the near-infrared camera NIRC2, we show that 30% of 140 double-peaked [O iii] emission line SDSS AGNs have two spatial components within a 3″ radius. However, spatially resolved spectroscopy or X-ray observations are needed to confirm these galaxy pairs as systems containing two AGNs. We followed up three spatially double candidate dual AGNs with integral field spectroscopy from Keck OSIRIS and 10 candidates with long-slit spectroscopy from the Shane Kast Double Spectrograph at Lick Observatory. We find that the double-peaked emission lines in our sample of 12 candidates are caused by: one dual AGN (SDSS J114642.47+511029.6), one confirmed outflow and four likely outflows, two pairs of star-forming galaxies, one candidate indeterminate due to sky line interference, and three AGNs with spatially coincident double [O iii] peaks, likely due to unresolved complex narrow line kinematics, outflows, binary AGN, or small-scale jets.

  20. Spatially resolved quantification of organic matter in synthetic organo-mineral associations by NanoSIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurig, Christian; Schrank, Thomas; Müller, Carsten W.; Pohl, Lydia; Höschen, Carmen; Totsche, Kai-Uwe; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2016-04-01

    Soil structure is resulting from soil forming processes at the molecular scale, but has feedbacks on soil functions on macroscopic or even global scales. In this framework, soil organic matter (SOM) is of special importance as a gluing agent for soil structure, besides being a carbon sink. Conventional bulk-scale analyses allows for quantification and for a characterisation of the chemical bonding types of OM. However, all information of the spatial distribution of OM on the relevant scale of few nano- to micrometres is lost during this kind of analyses. While nano-scale secondary ion mass-spectroscopy (NanoSIMS) delivers qualitative data on the spatial distribution of SOM at the nano-scale, receiving quantitative data from this method remains challenging due to matrix and charging effects. In order to overcome this problem, the aim of this study was to develop scaling factors between conventional bulk-scale methods and NanoSIMS. For developing these factors, dissolved organic matter (DOM) was extracted from organic material, which was sampled from a podzol. Subsequently, model minerals, such as boehmite and illite, were loaded with defined amounts of this DOM by means of sorption experiments. After the end of the experiments the liquid and solid phases were divided by means of centrifugation and the solid phase was subjected to freeze drying. Carbon and nitrogen content of the solid and liquid phases were measured via C/N and TOC analyses, respectively. The measured data was fitted with Freundlich-type adsorption isotherms. Samples for NanoSIMS analyses were distributed onto silicon wafers as individual particles. The following elements were analysed: C, N, O, Si, S and Al. Spatially resolved analysis of the NanoSIMS data yielded a increased detection of SOM on the minerals in higher concentration steps. Linear relationships with high correlation and low deviation were found when comparing the spatially resolved NanoSIMS data with the bulk scale methods. The

  1. Monthly and spatially resolved black carbon emission inventory of India: uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliwal, Umed; Sharma, Mukesh; Burkhart, John F.

    2016-10-01

    Black carbon (BC) emissions from India for the year 2011 are estimated to be 901.11 ± 151.56 Gg yr-1 based on a new ground-up, GIS-based inventory. The grid-based, spatially resolved emission inventory includes, in addition to conventional sources, emissions from kerosene lamps, forest fires, diesel-powered irrigation pumps and electricity generators at mobile towers. The emissions have been estimated at district level and were spatially distributed onto grids at a resolution of 40 × 40 km2. The uncertainty in emissions has been estimated using a Monte Carlo simulation by considering the variability in activity data and emission factors. Monthly variation of BC emissions has also been estimated to account for the seasonal variability. To the total BC emissions, domestic fuels contributed most significantly (47 %), followed by industry (22 %), transport (17 %), open burning (12 %) and others (2 %). The spatial and seasonal resolution of the inventory will be useful for modeling BC transport in the atmosphere for air quality, global warming and other process-level studies that require greater temporal resolution than traditional inventories.

  2. Improvement of photomask CD uniformity using spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Junhwa; Kim, Youngkeun; Jang, Il-Yong; Kim, Byung-Gook; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Kang, Minwook; Lee, Changmin; Hahn, Jae W.

    2016-10-01

    According to the design rule shrinkage, more precise control of mask CD, including mean to target and uniformity, is required in lithography process. Since dry etching is one of the most critical processes to determine CD qualities in photomask, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) to monitor plasma status during dry etching process could be useful. However, it is not possible to obtain distributional information of plasma with a conventional OES tool because the OES acquires totally integrated signals of light from the chamber. To overcome the limit of OES, we set up a spatially resolved (SR)-OES tool and measure the distribution of radicals in plasma during dry etch process. The SR-OES consists of a series of lenses, apertures, and a pinhole as a spatial filter which enable us to focus on certain area in the chamber, to extract the emitted light from plasma, and to perform the spectroscopic analysis. The Argon based actinometry combined with SR-OES shows spatially distinguished peaks related to the etch rate of Chromium on photomask. In this paper, we present experimental results of SR-OES installed on a commercial photomask dry etcher and discuss its practical effectiveness by correlation of the results with chamber etch rate.

  3. Comparison of grain to grain orientation and stiffness mapping by spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy and EBSD.

    PubMed

    Mark, A F; Li, W; Sharples, S; Withers, P J

    2017-03-15

    Our aim was to establish the capability of spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy (SRAS) to map grain orientations and the anisotropy in stiffness at the sub-mm to micron scale by comparing the method with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) undertaken within a scanning electron microscope. In the former the grain orientations are deduced by measuring the spatial variation in elastic modulus; conversely, in EBSD the elastic anisotropy is deduced from direct measurements of the crystal orientations. The two test-cases comprise mapping the fusion zones for large TIG and MMA welds in thick power plant austenitic and ferritic steels, respectively; these are technologically important because, among other things, elastic anisotropy can cause ultrasonic weld inspection methods to become inaccurate because it causes bending in the paths of sound waves. The spatial resolution of SRAS is not as good as that for EBSD (∼100 μm vs. ∼a few nm), nor is the angular resolution (∼1.5° vs. ∼0.5°). However the method can be applied to much larger areas (currently on the order of 300 mm square), is much faster (∼5 times), is cheaper and easier to perform, and it could be undertaken on the manufacturing floor. Given these advantages, particularly to industrial users, and the on-going improvements to the method, SRAS has the potential to become a standard method for orientation mapping, particularly in cases where the elastic anisotropy is important over macroscopic/component length scales.

  4. Peach maturity/quality assessment using hyperspectral imaging-based spatially resolved technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Haiyan; Lu, Renfu; Mendoza, Fernando A.; Ariana, Diwan P.

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this research was to measure the absorption (μa) and reduced scattering coefficients (μs') of peaches, using a hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved method, for their maturity/quality assessment. A newly developed optical property measuring instrument was used for acquiring hyperspectral reflectance images of 500 'Redstar' peaches. μa and μs' spectra for 515-1,000 nm were extracted from the spatially-resolved reflectance profiles using a diffusion model coupled with an inverse algorithm. The absorption spectra of peach fruit presented several absorption peaks around 525 nm for anthocyanin, 620 nm for chlorophyll-b, 675 nm for chlorophyll-a, and 970 nm for water, while μs' decreased consistently with the increase of wavelength for most of the tested samples. Both μa and μs' were correlated with peach firmness, soluble solids content (SSC), and skin and flesh color parameters. Better prediction results for partial least squares models were obtained using the combined values of μa and μs' (i.e., μa × μs' and μeff) than using μa or μs', where μeff = [3 μa (μa + μs')]1/2 is the effective attenuation coefficient. The results were further improved using least squares support vector machine models with values of the best correlation coefficient for firmness, SSC, skin lightness and flesh lightness being 0.749 (standard error of prediction or SEP = 17.39 N), 0.504 (SEP = 0.92 °Brix), 0.898 (SEP = 3.45), and 0.741 (SEP = 3.27), respectively. These results compared favorably to acoustic and impact firmness measurements with the correlation coefficient of 0.639 and 0.631, respectively. Hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved technique is useful for measuring the optical properties of peach fruit, and it also has good potential for assessing fruit maturity/quality attributes.

  5. Comparison of spatially and temporally resolved diffuse-reflectance measurement systems for determination of biomedical optical properties.

    PubMed

    Swartling, Johannes; Dam, Jan S; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2003-08-01

    Time-resolved and spatially resolved measurements of the diffuse reflectance from biological tissue are two well-established techniques for extracting the reduced scattering and absorption coefficients. We have performed a comparison study of the performance of a spatially resolved and a time-resolved instrument at wavelengths 660 and 786 nm and also of an integrating-sphere setup at 550-800 nm. The first system records the diffuse reflectance from a diode laser by means of a fiber bundle probe in contact with the sample. The time-resolved system utilizes picosecond laser pulses and a single-photon-counting detection scheme. We extracted the optical properties by calibration using known standards for the spatially resolved system, by fitting to the diffusion equation for the time-resolved system, and by using an inverse Monte Carlo model for the integrating sphere. The measurements were performed on a set of solid epoxy tissue phantoms. The results showed less than 10% difference in the evaluation of the reduced scattering coefficient among the systems for the phantoms in the range 9-20 cm(-1), and absolute differences of less than 0.05 cm(-1) for the absorption coefficient in the interval 0.05-0.30 cm(-1).

  6. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Studies of the Human Microbiome (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Rob

    2011-03-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Rob Knight of the University of Colorado gives a presentation on "Spatially and Temporally Resolved Studies of the Human Microbiome" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  7. Time, Energy, and Spatially Resolved TEM Investigations of Defectsin InGaN

    SciTech Connect

    Jinschek, J.R.; Kisielowski, C.

    2005-10-01

    A novel sample preparation technique is reported to fabricate electron transparent samples from devices utilizing a FIB process with a successive wet etching step. The high quality of the obtained samples allows for band gap--and chemical composition measurements of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N quantum wells where electron beam induced damage can be controlled and shown to be negligible. The results reveal indium enrichment in nanoclusters and defects that cause fluctuations of the band gap energy and can be measured by low loss Electron Energy Spectroscopy with nm resolution. Comparing our time, energy, and spatially resolved measurements of band gap energies, chemical composition, and their related fluctuations with literature data, we find quantitative agreement if the band gap energy of InN is 1.5-2 eV.

  8. Electronic transport characterization of silicon wafers by spatially resolved steady-state photocarrier radiometric imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qian; Li, Bincheng

    2015-09-28

    Spatially resolved steady-state photocarrier radiometric (PCR) imaging technique is developed to characterize the electronic transport properties of silicon wafers. Based on a nonlinear PCR theory, simulations are performed to investigate the effects of electronic transport parameters (the carrier lifetime, the carrier diffusion coefficient, and the front surface recombination velocity) on the steady-state PCR intensity profiles. The electronic transport parameters of an n-type silicon wafer are simultaneously determined by fitting the measured steady-state PCR intensity profiles to the three-dimensional nonlinear PCR model. The determined transport parameters are in good agreement with the results obtained by the conventional modulated PCR technique with multiple pump beam radii.

  9. The Fossil Record of Black Hole Seeds, with Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trump, Jonathan R.; CANDELS, 3D-HST

    2016-01-01

    I will present the first robust measurement of black hole occupation over a wide range of host galaxy mass (8spatially resolved spectroscopy, which reliably distinguishes a nuclear AGN from extended star formation and largely avoids the star-formation dilution bias plaguing traditional low-mass AGN selection. The observations suggest bimodal seed formation: while many low-mass galaxies host massive black holes, their black hole occupation is ~10% that of massive galaxies. The measured black hole occupation qualitatively agrees with theoretical models of black hole formation, with massive direct-collapse seeds forming only in massive halos and black hole formation confined to lower-mass Pop III remnants in small halos.

  10. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Studies of the Human Microbiome (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Knight, Rob [University of Colorado

    2016-07-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Rob Knight of the University of Colorado gives a presentation on "Spatially and Temporally Resolved Studies of the Human Microbiome" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  11. Spatially resolved element analysis of historical violin varnishes by use of muPIXE.

    PubMed

    von Bohlen, Alex; Röhrs, Stefan; Salomon, Joseph

    2007-02-01

    External muPIXE has been used for characterisation of small samples of varnish from historical violins, and pieces of varnished wood from historical and modern stringed instruments. To obtain spatially resolved information about the distribution of elements across the varnish layers single-spot analysis, line-scans, and area-mapping were performed. Local resolution of approximately 20 mum was obtained from the 3 MeV, 1 nA proton micro-probe. Results from simultaneous multi-element determination of Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Br, Rb, Sr, Ag, Cd, Sn, Ba, and Pb in historical varnishes are presented. Semi-quantitative evaluation of line-scans recorded on diverse historical varnishes is reported. The applied method is discussed in detail and the results obtained are critically reviewed and compared with those in the literature.

  12. Interface between heavy fermions and normal electrons investigated by spatially resolved nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Takayoshi; Shimozawa, Masaaki; Endo, Ryota; Mizukami, Yuta; Shishido, Hiroaki; Terashima, Takahito; Shibauchi, Takasada; Matsuda, Yuji; Ishida, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    We have studied the superlattices with alternating block layers (BLs) of heavy-fermion superconductor CeCoIn5 and conventional-metal YbCoIn5 by site-selective nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which uniquely offers spatially resolved dynamical magnetic information. We find that the presence of antiferromagnetic fluctuations is confined to the Ce BLs, indicating that magnetic degrees of freedom of f electrons are quenched inside the Yb BLs. Contrary to simple expectations that the two dimensionalization enhances fluctuations, we observe that antiferromagnetic fluctuations are rapidly suppressed with decreasing Ce BL thickness. Moreover, the suppression is more prominent near the interfaces between the BLs. These results imply significant effects of local inversion symmetry breaking at the interfaces.

  13. Imaging buried organic islands by spatially resolved ballistic electron emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Goh, Kuan Eng J; Bannani, A; Troadec, C

    2008-11-05

    The well-known Au/n-Si(111) Schottky interface is modified by a discontinuous pentacene film (∼1.5 nm thick) and studied using spatially resolved ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES). The pentacene film introduced subtle changes to the interface which cannot be definitively detected by current-voltage measurements or a standard BEES analysis of the barrier height. In contrast, analyzing the BEES results in a dual-parameter (transmission attenuation and barrier height) space allows the effect of the pentacene film on the Au/n-Si(111) interface to be clearly demonstrated. We found that the pentacene film behaves like a tunneling barrier and increases the distribution of local barrier heights with a tendency toward lower values. Our results highlight the potential of the dual-parameter BEES analysis for understanding local interface modification by molecules.

  14. Spatially Resolved Measurements of a Double Layer in an Argon Helicon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Evan; Siddiqui, Umair; McKee, John; Scime, Earl

    2015-11-01

    We report 2-dimensional, spatially resolved observations of a double layer in an expanding helicon plasma. These new measurements investigate the origins of previously observed multiple ion beam populations in the downstream plasma. We use Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) to measure the ion velocity distribution functions (IVDFs) of argon ions and neutrals both parallel and perpendicular to the background magnetic field and an rf-compensated Langmuir probe to determine the local plasma potential. These are the first multi-dimensional LIF measurements of ion acceleration in a current-free double layer and were obtained with a recently installed, internal scanning probe system in the HELIX-LEIA experimental facility. This work is supported by US National Science Foundation grant number PHY-1360278.

  15. Spatially resolved positron annihilation spectroscopy on friction stir weld induced defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hain, Karin; Hugenschmidt, Christoph; Pikart, Philip; Böni, Peter

    2010-04-01

    A friction stir welded (FSW) Al alloy sample was investigated by Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) of the positron annihilation line. The spatially resolved defect distribution showed that the material in the joint zone becomes completely annealed during the welding process at the shoulder of the FSW tool, whereas at the tip, annealing is prevailed by the deterioration of the material due to the tool movement. This might be responsible for the increased probability of cracking in the heat affected zone of friction stir welds. Examination of a material pairing of steel S235 and the Al alloy Silafont36 by coincident Doppler broadening spectroscopy (CDBS) indicates the formation of annealed steel clusters in the Al alloy component of the sample. The clear visibility of Fe in the CDB spectra is explained by the very efficient trapping at the interface between steel cluster and bulk.

  16. Spatially resolved positron annihilation spectroscopy on friction stir weld induced defects

    PubMed Central

    Hain, Karin; Hugenschmidt, Christoph; Pikart, Philip; Böni, Peter

    2010-01-01

    A friction stir welded (FSW) Al alloy sample was investigated by Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) of the positron annihilation line. The spatially resolved defect distribution showed that the material in the joint zone becomes completely annealed during the welding process at the shoulder of the FSW tool, whereas at the tip, annealing is prevailed by the deterioration of the material due to the tool movement. This might be responsible for the increased probability of cracking in the heat affected zone of friction stir welds. Examination of a material pairing of steel S235 and the Al alloy Silafont36 by coincident Doppler broadening spectroscopy (CDBS) indicates the formation of annealed steel clusters in the Al alloy component of the sample. The clear visibility of Fe in the CDB spectra is explained by the very efficient trapping at the interface between steel cluster and bulk. PMID:27877329

  17. Instrument for spatially resolved simultaneous measurements of forces and currents in particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Spethmann, A. Trottenberg, T. Kersten, H.

    2015-01-15

    The article presents a device for spatially resolved and simultaneous measurements of forces and currents in particle beams, especially in beams composed of ions and neutral atoms. The forces are exerted by the impinging beam particles on a plane circular conductive target plate of 20 mm diameter mounted on a pendulum with electromagnetic force compensation. The force measurement in the micronewton range is achieved by electromagnetic compensation by means of static Helmholtz coils and permanent magnets attached to the pendulum. Exemplary measurements are performed in the 1.2 keV beam of a broad beam ion source. The simultaneous measurements of forces and currents onto the same target are compared with each other and with Faraday cup measurements.

  18. Photoluminescence imaging for determining the spatially resolved implied open circuit voltage of silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallam, Brett; Augarten, Yael; Tjahjono, Budi; Trupke, Thorsten; Wenham, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Photoluminescence imaging has widely been used as a characterisation tool for the development of silicon solar cells. However, photoluminescence images typically only give qualitative information due to the presence of an unknown calibration constant. In this work, quasi-steady-state photoconductance measurements on partially processed solar cells and I-V measurements on finished solar cells are used to determine the calibration constants to yield spatially resolved implied open circuit voltage images. This technique is then applied to determine the implied open circuit voltage of laser doped selective emitter solar cells at various stages of cell fabrication after the formation of the full area aluminium back surface field when other characterisation techniques such as photoconductance cannot be used.

  19. Spatially resolved positron annihilation spectroscopy on friction stir weld induced defects.

    PubMed

    Hain, Karin; Hugenschmidt, Christoph; Pikart, Philip; Böni, Peter

    2010-04-01

    A friction stir welded (FSW) Al alloy sample was investigated by Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) of the positron annihilation line. The spatially resolved defect distribution showed that the material in the joint zone becomes completely annealed during the welding process at the shoulder of the FSW tool, whereas at the tip, annealing is prevailed by the deterioration of the material due to the tool movement. This might be responsible for the increased probability of cracking in the heat affected zone of friction stir welds. Examination of a material pairing of steel S235 and the Al alloy Silafont36 by coincident Doppler broadening spectroscopy (CDBS) indicates the formation of annealed steel clusters in the Al alloy component of the sample. The clear visibility of Fe in the CDB spectra is explained by the very efficient trapping at the interface between steel cluster and bulk.

  20. Muscle oxygenation during exercise under hypoxic conditions assessed by spatially resolved broadband NIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraskin, Dmitri; Platen, Petra; Franke, Julia; Andre, Christiane; Bloch, Wilhelm; Kohl-Bareis, Matthias

    2005-08-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is used for the non-invasive measurement of muscle oxygenation during an incremental cycle test in healthy volunteers. A broad band spatially resolved system is used that allows the reliability of current algorithms to be inspected with the main emphasis on tissue oxygen saturation (SO2) and oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin concentrations. Physiological conditions were modulated by changing oxygen supply from normal (21 % O2 in inspired air) to conditions corresponding to 2000 and 4000 m altitude above sea level (15.4 and 11.9 % O2). Under these hypoxic conditions the decrease in SO2 with increased exercise power is highly correlated with the oxygen content of the inspired air. There is a clear correlation with physiological parameters (heart rate, pulse oxymetry, blood gas, lactate, spirometric data). Skin oxygenation parameters are compared to those of muscle.

  1. Imaging buried organic islands by spatially resolved ballistic electron emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, Kuan Eng J.; Bannani, A.; Troadec, C.

    2008-11-01

    The well-known Au/n-Si(111) Schottky interface is modified by a discontinuous pentacene film (~1.5 nm thick) and studied using spatially resolved ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES). The pentacene film introduced subtle changes to the interface which cannot be definitively detected by current-voltage measurements or a standard BEES analysis of the barrier height. In contrast, analyzing the BEES results in a dual-parameter (transmission attenuation and barrier height) space allows the effect of the pentacene film on the Au/n-Si(111) interface to be clearly demonstrated. We found that the pentacene film behaves like a tunneling barrier and increases the distribution of local barrier heights with a tendency toward lower values. Our results highlight the potential of the dual-parameter BEES analysis for understanding local interface modification by molecules.

  2. Spatially Resolved Emission of a z~3 Damped Lyman Alpha Galaxy with Keck/OSIRIS IFU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christenson, Holly; Jorgenson, Regina

    2017-01-01

    The damped Lyman alpha (DLA) class of galaxies contains most of the neutral hydrogen gas over cosmic time. Few DLAs have been detected directly, which limits our knowledge of fundamental properties like size and mass. We present Keck/OSIRIS infrared integral field spectroscopy (IFU) observations of a DLA that was first detected in absorption toward a background quasar. Our observations use the Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system to reduce the point-spread function of the quasar, making it possible to spatially resolve the DLA emission. We map this emission in O[III] 5007 Å. At redshift z~3, this DLA represents one of the highest redshift DLAs mapped with IFU spectroscopy. We present measurements of the star formation rate, metallicity, and gas mass of the galaxy.This project was supported in part by the NSF REU grant AST-1358980 and by the Nantucket Maria Mitchell Association.

  3. Redox-dependent spatially resolved electrochemistry at graphene and graphite step edges.

    PubMed

    Güell, Aleix G; Cuharuc, Anatolii S; Kim, Yang-Rae; Zhang, Guohui; Tan, Sze-yin; Ebejer, Neil; Unwin, Patrick R

    2015-04-28

    The electrochemical (EC) behavior of mechanically exfoliated graphene and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) is studied at high spatial resolution in aqueous solutions using Ru(NH3)6(3+/2+) as a redox probe whose standard potential sits close to the intrinsic Fermi level of graphene and graphite. When scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM) data are coupled with that from complementary techniques (AFM, micro-Raman) applied to the same sample area, different time-dependent EC activity between the basal planes and step edges is revealed. In contrast, other redox couples (ferrocene derivatives) whose potential is further removed from the intrinsic Fermi level of graphene and graphite show uniform and high activity (close to diffusion-control). Macroscopic voltammetric measurements in different environments reveal that the time-dependent behavior after HOPG cleavage, peculiar to Ru(NH3)6(3+/2+), is not associated particularly with any surface contaminants but is reasonably attributed to the spontaneous delamination of the HOPG with time to create partially coupled graphene layers, further supported by conductive AFM measurements. This process has a major impact on the density of states of graphene and graphite edges, particularly at the intrinsic Fermi level to which Ru(NH3)6(3+/2+) is most sensitive. Through the use of an improved voltammetric mode of SECCM, we produce movies of potential-resolved and spatially resolved HOPG activity, revealing how enhanced activity at step edges is a subtle effect for Ru(NH3)6(3+/2+). These latter studies allow us to propose a microscopic model to interpret the EC response of graphene (basal plane and edges) and aged HOPG considering the nontrivial electronic band structure.

  4. The Lyman break analogue Haro 11: spatially resolved chemodynamics with VLT FLAMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, B. L.; Tsamis, Y. G.; Walsh, J. R.; Barlow, M. J.; Westmoquette, M. S.

    2013-04-01

    Using VLT/Fibre Large Array Multi Element Spectrograph (FLAMES) optical integral field unit observations, we present the first spatially resolved spectroscopic study of the well-known blue compact galaxy Haro 11, thought to be a local analogue to high-redshift Lyman break galaxies. Haro 11 displays complex emission line profiles, consisting of narrow (full width at half-maximum, FWHM ≲ 200 km s-1) and broad (FWHM ˜ 200-300 km s-1) components. We identify three distinct emission knots kinematically connected to one another. A chemodynamical analysis is presented, revealing that spatially resolved ionic and elemental abundances do not agree with those derived from integrated spectra across the galaxy. We conclude that this is almost certainly due to the surface brightness weighting of electron temperature in integrated spectra, leading to higher derived abundances. We find that the eastern knot has a low gas density, but a higher temperature (by ˜4000 K) and consequently an oxygen abundance ˜0.4 dex lower than the neighbouring regions. A region of enhanced N/O is found specifically in Knot C, confirming previous studies that found anomalously high N/O ratios in this system. Maps of the Wolf-Rayet (WR) feature at 4686 Å reveal large WR populations (˜900-1500 stars) in Knots A and B. The lack of WR stars in Knot C combined with an age of ˜7.4 Myr suggests that a recently completed WR phase may be responsible for the observed N/O excess. Conversely, the absence of N-enriched gas and strong WR emission in Knots A and B suggests that we are observing these regions at an epoch where stellar ejecta has yet to cool and mix with the interstellar medium.

  5. Direct Observation of Phase Transformations in Austenitic Stainless Steel Welds Using In-situ Spatially Resolved and Time-resolved X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J.; Wong, J.; Ressler, T.

    1999-09-23

    Spatially resolved x-ray diffraction (SRXRD) and time resolved x-ray diffraction (TRXRD) were used to investigate real time solid state phase transformations and solidification in AISI type 304 stainless steel gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds. These experiments were conducted at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) using a high flux beam line. Spatially resolved observations of {gamma} {leftrightarrow} {delta} solid state phase transformations were performed in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of moving welds and time-resolved observations of the solidification sequence were performed in the fusion zone (FZ) of stationary welds after the arc had been terminated. Results of the moving weld experiments showed that the kinetics of the {gamma}{yields}{delta} phase transformation on heating in the HAZ were sufficiently rapid to transform a narrow region surrounding the liquid weld pool to the {delta} ferrite phase. Results of the stationary weld experiments showed, for the first time, that solidification can occur directly to the {delta} ferrite phase, which persisted as a single phase for 0.5s. Upon solidification to {delta}, the {delta} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation followed and completed in 0.2s as the weld cooled further to room temperature.

  6. Method for depth-resolved quantitation of optical properties in layered media using spatially modulated quantitative spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Saager, Rolf B; Truong, Alex; Cuccia, David J; Durkin, Anthony J

    2011-07-01

    We have demonstrated that spatially modulated quantitative spectroscopy (SMoQS) is capable of extracting absolute optical properties from homogeneous tissue simulating phantoms that span both the visible and near-infrared wavelength regimes. However, biological tissue, such as skin, is highly structured, presenting challenges to quantitative spectroscopic techniques based on homogeneous models. In order to more accurately address the challenges associated with skin, we present a method for depth-resolved optical property quantitation based on a two layer model. Layered Monte Carlo simulations and layered tissue simulating phantoms are used to determine the efficacy and accuracy of SMoQS to quantify layer specific optical properties of layered media. Initial results from both the simulation and experiment show that this empirical method is capable of determining top layer thickness within tens of microns across a physiological range for skin. Layer specific chromophore concentration can be determined to <±10% the actual values, on average, whereas bulk quantitation in either visible or near infrared spectroscopic regimes significantly underestimates the layer specific chromophore concentration and can be confounded by top layer thickness.

  7. Spatially and momentum resolved energy electron loss spectra from an ultra-thin PrNiO{sub 3} layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kinyanjui, M. K. Kaiser, U.; Benner, G.; Pavia, G.; Boucher, F.; Habermeier, H.-U.; Keimer, B.

    2015-05-18

    We present an experimental approach which allows for the acquisition of spectra from ultra-thin films at high spatial, momentum, and energy resolutions. Spatially and momentum (q) resolved electron energy loss spectra have been obtained from a 12 nm ultra-thin PrNiO{sub 3} layer using a nano-beam electron diffraction based approach which enabled the acquisition of momentum resolved spectra from individual, differently oriented nano-domains and at different positions of the PrNiO{sub 3} thin layer. The spatial and wavelength dependence of the spectral excitations are obtained and characterized after the analysis of the experimental spectra using calculated dielectric and energy loss functions. The presented approach makes a contribution towards obtaining momentum-resolved spectra from nanostructures, thin film, heterostructures, surfaces, and interfaces.

  8. Investigation of microstructure in additive manufactured Inconel 625 by spatially resolved neutron transmission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tremsin, Anton S.; Gao, Yan; Dial, Laura C.; Grazzi, Francesco; Shinohara, Takenao

    2016-07-08

    Non-destructive testing techniques based on neutron imaging and diffraction can provide information on the internal structure of relatively thick metal samples (up to several cm), which are opaque to other conventional non-destructive methods. Spatially resolved neutron transmission spectroscopy is an extension of traditional neutron radiography, where multiple images are acquired simultaneously, each corresponding to a narrow range of energy. The analysis of transmission spectra enables studies of bulk microstructures at the spatial resolution comparable to the detector pixel. In this study we demonstrate the possibility of imaging (with ~100 μm resolution) distribution of some microstructure properties, such as residual strain, texture, voids and impurities in Inconel 625 samples manufactured with an additive manufacturing method called direct metal laser melting (DMLM). Although this imaging technique can be implemented only in a few large-scale facilities, it can be a valuable tool for optimization of additive manufacturing techniques and materials and for correlating bulk microstructure properties to manufacturing process parameters. Additionally, the experimental strain distribution can help validate finite element models which many industries use to predict the residual stress distributions in additive manufactured components.

  9. A microreactor array for spatially resolved measurement of catalytic activity for high-throughput catalysis science

    SciTech Connect

    Kondratyuk, Petro; Gumuslu, Gamze; Shukla, Shantanu; Miller, James B; Morreale, Bryan D; Gellman, Andrew J

    2013-04-01

    We describe a 100 channel microreactor array capable of spatially resolved measurement of catalytic activity across the surface of a flat substrate. When used in conjunction with a composition spread alloy film (CSAF, e.g. Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y}) across which component concentrations vary smoothly, such measurements permit high-throughput analysis of catalytic activity and selectivity as a function of catalyst composition. In the reported implementation, the system achieves spatial resolution of 1 mm{sup 2} over a 10×10 mm{sup 2} area. During operation, the reactant gases are delivered at constant flow rate to 100 points of differing composition on the CSAF surface by means of a 100-channel microfluidic device. After coming into contact with the CSAF catalyst surface, the product gas mixture from each of the 100 points is withdrawn separately through a set of 100 isolated channels for analysis using a mass spectrometer. We demonstrate the operation of the device on a Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y} CSAF catalyzing the H{sub 2}-D{sub 2} exchange reaction at 333 K. In essentially a single experiment, we measured the catalytic activity over a broad swathe of concentrations from the ternary composition space of the Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y} alloy.

  10. SPATIALLY RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER RZ 2109 AND THE NATURE OF ITS BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, Mark B.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Kundu, Arunav; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John J.; Waters, Christopher Z.; Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, Caryl; Stern, Daniel

    2012-11-10

    We present optical Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS) spectroscopy of RZ 2109, a globular cluster (GC) in the elliptical galaxy NGC 4472. This GC is notable for hosting an ultraluminous X-ray source as well as associated strong and broad [O III] {lambda}{lambda}4959, 5007 emission. We show that the HST/STIS spectroscopy spatially resolves the [O III] emission in RZ 2109. While we are unable to make a precise determination of the morphology of the emission-line nebula, the best-fitting models all require that the [O III] {lambda}5007 emission has a half-light radius in the range 3-7 pc. The extended nature of the [O III] {lambda}5007 emission is inconsistent with published models that invoke an intermediate-mass black hole origin. It is also inconsistent with the ionization of ejecta from a nova in the cluster. The spatial scale of the nebula could be produced via the photoionization of a strong wind driven from a stellar mass black hole accreting at roughly its Eddington rate.

  11. Reactor for in situ measurements of spatially resolved kinetic data in heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Horn, R; Korup, O; Geske, M; Zavyalova, U; Oprea, I; Schlögl, R

    2010-06-01

    The present work describes a reactor that allows in situ measurements of spatially resolved kinetic data in heterogeneous catalysis. The reactor design allows measurements up to temperatures of 1300 degrees C and 45 bar pressure, i.e., conditions of industrial relevance. The reactor involves reactants flowing through a solid catalyst bed containing a sampling capillary with a side sampling orifice through which a small fraction of the reacting fluid (gas or liquid) is transferred into an analytical device (e.g., mass spectrometer, gas chromatograph, high pressure liquid chromatograph) for quantitative analysis. The sampling capillary can be moved with microm resolution in or against flow direction to measure species profiles through the catalyst bed. Rotation of the sampling capillary allows averaging over several scan lines. The position of the sampling orifice is such that the capillary channel through the catalyst bed remains always occupied by the capillary preventing flow disturbance and fluid bypassing. The second function of the sampling capillary is to provide a well which can accommodate temperature probes such as a thermocouple or a pyrometer fiber. If a thermocouple is inserted in the sampling capillary and aligned with the sampling orifice fluid temperature profiles can be measured. A pyrometer fiber can be used to measure the temperature profile of the solid catalyst bed. Spatial profile measurements are demonstrated for methane oxidation on Pt and methane oxidative coupling on Li/MgO, both catalysts supported on reticulated alpha-Al(2)O(3) foam supports.

  12. Reactor for in situ measurements of spatially resolved kinetic data in heterogeneous catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, R.; Korup, O.; Geske, M.; Zavyalova, U.; Oprea, I.; Schlögl, R.

    2010-06-01

    The present work describes a reactor that allows in situ measurements of spatially resolved kinetic data in heterogeneous catalysis. The reactor design allows measurements up to temperatures of 1300 °C and 45 bar pressure, i.e., conditions of industrial relevance. The reactor involves reactants flowing through a solid catalyst bed containing a sampling capillary with a side sampling orifice through which a small fraction of the reacting fluid (gas or liquid) is transferred into an analytical device (e.g., mass spectrometer, gas chromatograph, high pressure liquid chromatograph) for quantitative analysis. The sampling capillary can be moved with μm resolution in or against flow direction to measure species profiles through the catalyst bed. Rotation of the sampling capillary allows averaging over several scan lines. The position of the sampling orifice is such that the capillary channel through the catalyst bed remains always occupied by the capillary preventing flow disturbance and fluid bypassing. The second function of the sampling capillary is to provide a well which can accommodate temperature probes such as a thermocouple or a pyrometer fiber. If a thermocouple is inserted in the sampling capillary and aligned with the sampling orifice fluid temperature profiles can be measured. A pyrometer fiber can be used to measure the temperature profile of the solid catalyst bed. Spatial profile measurements are demonstrated for methane oxidation on Pt and methane oxidative coupling on Li/MgO, both catalysts supported on reticulated α -Al2O3 foam supports.

  13. Investigation of microstructure in additive manufactured Inconel 625 by spatially resolved neutron transmission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tremsin, Anton S; Gao, Yan; Dial, Laura C; Grazzi, Francesco; Shinohara, Takenao

    2016-01-01

    Non-destructive testing techniques based on neutron imaging and diffraction can provide information on the internal structure of relatively thick metal samples (up to several cm), which are opaque to other conventional non-destructive methods. Spatially resolved neutron transmission spectroscopy is an extension of traditional neutron radiography, where multiple images are acquired simultaneously, each corresponding to a narrow range of energy. The analysis of transmission spectra enables studies of bulk microstructures at the spatial resolution comparable to the detector pixel. In this study we demonstrate the possibility of imaging (with ~100 μm resolution) distribution of some microstructure properties, such as residual strain, texture, voids and impurities in Inconel 625 samples manufactured with an additive manufacturing method called direct metal laser melting (DMLM). Although this imaging technique can be implemented only in a few large-scale facilities, it can be a valuable tool for optimization of additive manufacturing techniques and materials and for correlating bulk microstructure properties to manufacturing process parameters. In addition, the experimental strain distribution can help validate finite element models which many industries use to predict the residual stress distributions in additive manufactured components.

  14. Spatially resolved TiOx phases in switched RRAM devices using soft X-ray spectromicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Carta, D.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Guttmann, P.; Regoutz, A.; Khiat, A.; Serb, A.; Gupta, I.; Prodromakis, T.

    2016-01-01

    Reduction in metal-oxide thin films has been suggested as the key mechanism responsible for forming conductive phases within solid-state memory devices, enabling their resistive switching capacity. The quantitative spatial identification of such conductive regions is a daunting task, particularly for metal-oxides capable of exhibiting multiple phases as in the case of TiOx. Here, we spatially resolve and chemically characterize distinct TiOx phases in localized regions of a TiOx–based memristive device by combining full-field transmission X-ray microscopy with soft X-ray spectroscopic analysis that is performed on lamella samples. We particularly show that electrically pre-switched devices in low-resistive states comprise reduced disordered phases with O/Ti ratios around 1.37 that aggregate in a ~100 nm highly localized region electrically conducting the top and bottom electrodes of the devices. We have also identified crystalline rutile and orthorhombic-like TiO2 phases in the region adjacent to the main reduced area, suggesting that the temperature increases locally up to 1000 K, validating the role of Joule heating in resistive switching. Contrary to previous studies, our approach enables to simultaneously investigate morphological and chemical changes in a quantitative manner without incurring difficulties imposed by interpretation of electron diffraction patterns acquired via conventional electron microscopy techniques. PMID:26891776

  15. Spatially resolved proteomic mapping in living cells with the engineered peroxidase APEX2

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Victoria; Udeshi, Namrata D; Lam, Stephanie S; Loh, Ken H; Cox, Kurt J; Pedram, Kayvon; Carr, Steven A; Ting, Alice Y

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes a method to obtain spatially resolved proteomic maps of specific compartments within living mammalian cells. An engineered peroxidase, APEX2, is genetically targeted to a cellular region of interest. Upon the addition of hydrogen peroxide for 1 min to cells preloaded with a biotin-phenol substrate, APEX2 generates biotin-phenoxyl radicals that covalently tag proximal endogenous proteins. Cells are then lysed, and biotinylated proteins are enriched with streptavidin beads and identified by mass spectrometry. We describe the generation of an appropriate APEX2 fusion construct, proteomic sample preparation, and mass spectrometric data acquisition and analysis. A two-state stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) protocol is used for proteomic mapping of membrane-enclosed cellular compartments from which APEX2-generated biotin-phenoxyl radicals cannot escape. For mapping of open cellular regions, we instead use a ‘ratiometric’ three-state SILAC protocol for high spatial specificity. Isotopic labeling of proteins takes 5–7 cell doublings. Generation of the biotinylated proteomic sample takes 1 d, acquiring the mass spectrometric data takes 2–5 d and analysis of the data to obtain the final proteomic list takes 1 week. PMID:26866790

  16. Investigation of microstructure in additive manufactured Inconel 625 by spatially resolved neutron transmission spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Tremsin, Anton S.; Gao, Yan; Dial, Laura C.; ...

    2016-07-08

    Non-destructive testing techniques based on neutron imaging and diffraction can provide information on the internal structure of relatively thick metal samples (up to several cm), which are opaque to other conventional non-destructive methods. Spatially resolved neutron transmission spectroscopy is an extension of traditional neutron radiography, where multiple images are acquired simultaneously, each corresponding to a narrow range of energy. The analysis of transmission spectra enables studies of bulk microstructures at the spatial resolution comparable to the detector pixel. In this study we demonstrate the possibility of imaging (with ~100 μm resolution) distribution of some microstructure properties, such as residual strain,more » texture, voids and impurities in Inconel 625 samples manufactured with an additive manufacturing method called direct metal laser melting (DMLM). Although this imaging technique can be implemented only in a few large-scale facilities, it can be a valuable tool for optimization of additive manufacturing techniques and materials and for correlating bulk microstructure properties to manufacturing process parameters. Additionally, the experimental strain distribution can help validate finite element models which many industries use to predict the residual stress distributions in additive manufactured components.« less

  17. A split imaging spectrometer for temporally and spatially resolved titanium absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hager, J. D. Lanier, N. E.; Kline, J. L.; Flippo, K. A.; Bruns, H. C.; Schneider, M.; Saculla, M.; McCarville, T.

    2014-11-15

    We present a temporally and a spatially resolved spectrometer for titanium x-ray absorption spectroscopy along 2 axial symmetric lines-of-sight. Each line-of-sight of the instrument uses an elliptical crystal to acquire both the 2p and 3p Ti absorption lines on a single, time gated channel of the instrument. The 2 axial symmetric lines-of-sight allow the 2p and 3p absorption features to be measured through the same point in space using both channels of the instrument. The spatially dependent material temperature can be inferred by observing the 2p and the 3p Ti absorption features. The data are recorded on a two strip framing camera with each strip collecting data from a single line-of-sight. The design is compatible for use at both the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility. The spectrometer is intended to measure the material temperature behind a Marshak wave in a radiatively driven SiO{sub 2} foam with a Ti foam tracer. In this configuration, a broad band CsI backlighter will be used for a source and the Ti absorption spectrum measured.

  18. Spatially-resolved K-band Spectra of Neptune from the W.M. Keck Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbard, S. G.; de Pater, I.; Martin, S. C.; Roe, H. G.; Macintosh, B. A.; Max, C. E.

    2002-09-01

    We have obtained 2-micron spectra of Neptune using adaptive optics coupled to the NIRSPEC and NIRC2 spectrographs at the 10-meter W.M. Keck 2 Telescope. Spectra were obtained in June 2000 (NIRSPEC) and in August 2002 (NIRC2). The spatial resolving power of adaptive optics allows us to obtain spectra of individual features on the disk of Neptune at a spatial resolution of approximately 1000 km (0.05-0.06 arcseconds). These features include the north polar haze and bright features near the north pole as well as bright features in the southern hemisphere and small bright features in the solar polar region. Radiative transfer modeling allows us to determine the altitude of the various features and thus to obtain a 3-dimensional picture of the structure of Neptune's atmosphere. This research was supported in part under the auspices of the US Department of Energy at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Univ. of Calif. under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48. Data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  19. Analyzing Spatially Resolved Z-pinch Spectra to Determine the Nature of ``Bright Spots''*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apruzese, J. P.; Giuliani, J. L.; Thornhill, J. W.; Ampleford, D. J.; Jones, B.; Coverdale, C. A.

    2011-10-01

    Wire array Z-pinch implosions which access the K-shell stages of their load elements are usually characterized by spatially nonuniform emission. But, is the existence of the ``bright spots'' due to density enhancement, higher temperature, or some combination of the two? Does the answer vary with atomic number of the load? To investigate this issue we have analyzed spatially resolved spectra from Cu and Al pinches driven by the Z generator. Correlation studies and regression analyses from the derived conditions are employed in order to infer the cause(s) of the local enhancements of K-shell powers. Work supported by U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. JPA is a consultant to NRL through L3 Communications, Chantilly, VA 20151.

  20. In situ distributed diagnostics of flowable electrode systems: resolving spatial and temporal limitations.

    PubMed

    Dennison, C R; Gogotsi, Y; Kumbur, E C

    2014-09-14

    In this study, we have developed an in situ distributed diagnostics tool to investigate spatial and temporal effects in electrochemical systems based on flowable electrodes. Specifically, an experimental approach was developed that enables spatially-resolved voltage measurements to be obtained in situ, in real-time. To extract additional data from these distributed measurements, an experimentally-parameterized equivalent circuit model with a new 'flow capacitor' circuit element was developed to predict the distributions of various system parameters during operation. As a case study, this approach was applied to investigate the behavior of the suspension electrodes used in an electrochemical flow capacitor under flowing and static conditions. The volumetric capacitance is reduced from 15.6 F ml(-1) to 1.1 F ml(-1) under flowing conditions. Results indicate that the majority of the charging in suspension electrodes occurs within ∼750 μm of the current collectors during flow, which gives rise to significant state-of-charge gradients across the cell, as well as underutilization of the available active material. The underlying cause of this observation is attributed to the relatively high electrical resistance of the slurry coupled with a stratified charging regime and insufficient residence time. The observations highlight the need to develop more conductive slurries and to design cells with reduced charge transport lengths.

  1. Investigation of microstructure in additive manufactured Inconel 625 by spatially resolved neutron transmission spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tremsin, Anton S.; Gao, Yan; Dial, Laura C.; Grazzi, Francesco; Shinohara, Takenao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Non-destructive testing techniques based on neutron imaging and diffraction can provide information on the internal structure of relatively thick metal samples (up to several cm), which are opaque to other conventional non-destructive methods. Spatially resolved neutron transmission spectroscopy is an extension of traditional neutron radiography, where multiple images are acquired simultaneously, each corresponding to a narrow range of energy. The analysis of transmission spectra enables studies of bulk microstructures at the spatial resolution comparable to the detector pixel. In this study we demonstrate the possibility of imaging (with ~100 μm resolution) distribution of some microstructure properties, such as residual strain, texture, voids and impurities in Inconel 625 samples manufactured with an additive manufacturing method called direct metal laser melting (DMLM). Although this imaging technique can be implemented only in a few large-scale facilities, it can be a valuable tool for optimization of additive manufacturing techniques and materials and for correlating bulk microstructure properties to manufacturing process parameters. In addition, the experimental strain distribution can help validate finite element models which many industries use to predict the residual stress distributions in additive manufactured components. PMID:27877885

  2. Spatially resolved air-water emissions tradeoffs improve regulatory impact analyses for electricity generation.

    PubMed

    Gingerich, Daniel B; Sun, Xiaodi; Behrer, A Patrick; Azevedo, Inês L; Mauter, Meagan S

    2017-02-21

    Coal-fired power plants (CFPPs) generate air, water, and solids emissions that impose substantial human health, environmental, and climate change (HEC) damages. This work demonstrates the importance of accounting for cross-media emissions tradeoffs, plant and regional emissions factors, and spatially variation in the marginal damages of air emissions when performing regulatory impact analyses for electric power generation. As a case study, we assess the benefits and costs of treating wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater at US CFPPs using the two best available treatment technology options specified in the 2015 Effluent Limitation Guidelines (ELGs). We perform a life-cycle inventory of electricity and chemical inputs to FGD wastewater treatment processes and quantify the marginal HEC damages of associated air emissions. We combine these spatially resolved damage estimates with Environmental Protection Agency estimates of water quality benefits, fuel-switching benefits, and regulatory compliance costs. We estimate that the ELGs will impose average net costs of $3.01 per cubic meter for chemical precipitation and biological wastewater treatment and $11.26 per cubic meter for zero-liquid discharge wastewater treatment (expected cost-benefit ratios of 1.8 and 1.7, respectively), with damages concentrated in regions containing a high fraction of coal generation or a large chemical manufacturing industry. Findings of net cost for FGD wastewater treatment are robust to uncertainty in auxiliary power source, location of chemical manufacturing, and binding air emissions limits in noncompliant regions, among other variables. Future regulatory design will minimize compliance costs and HEC tradeoffs by regulating air, water, and solids emissions simultaneously and performing regulatory assessments that account for spatial variation in emissions impacts.

  3. Retinal ganglion cell distribution and spatial resolving power in the Japanese catshark Scyliorhinus torazame.

    PubMed

    Muguruma, Kaori; Takei, Shiro; Yamamoto, Naoyuki

    2013-01-01

    Topographic distribution of retinal ganglion cells (GCs) is linked with the visual capabilities and behavioral ecology of vertebrates. Studies on the distribution of different types of GCs, however, have been conducted in only a few species of elasmobranchs. In the present study, the distribution and peak cell density of GCs, and spatial resolving power (SRP) were examined in the Japanese catshark, Scyliorhinus torazame. Distinct populations of GCs were identified in the ganglion cell layer of S. torazame based on soma size: small and large GCs, which showed different spatial distribution patterns. A horizontal streak of high cell density was recognized in the dorsal retina for small GCs. The highest cell density occurred within the streak, and the peak SRPs of the three fish investigated in the present study were 2.32, 2.64, and 3.01 cycles/deg. In contrast, two spots of high cell density, or areae gigantocellulares, were identified for large GCs, one in the temporal and the other in the nasal retina. The highest cell density occurred in the temporal or nasal area gigantocellularis (SRP: 1.36, 1.55 and 1.83 cycles/deg). This is the first study reporting an elasmobranch species with a horizontal visual streak of small GCs and two areae gigantocellulares. The horizontal streak of small GCs in the dorsal retina, which serves for the inferior visual field, is likely important for food search on the bottom, and the areae gigantocellulares may be important to the detection of prey and/or predators approaching from the front or behind the catshark.

  4. SDSS IV MaNGA - spatially resolved diagnostic diagrams: a proof that many galaxies are LIERs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belfiore, Francesco; Maiolino, Roberto; Maraston, Claudia; Emsellem, Eric; Bershady, Matthew A.; Masters, Karen L.; Yan, Renbin; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Boquien, Médéric; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Drory, Niv; Heckman, Timothy M.; Law, David R.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Pan, Kaike; Stanghellini, Letizia; Thomas, Daniel; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Westfall, Kyle B.

    2016-09-01

    We study the spatially resolved excitation properties of the ionized gas in a sample of 646 galaxies using integral field spectroscopy data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) programme. Making use of Baldwin-Philips-Terlevich diagnostic diagrams we demonstrate the ubiquitous presence of extended (kpc scale) low-ionization emission-line regions (LIERs) in both star-forming and quiescent galaxies. In star-forming galaxies LIER emission can be associated with diffuse ionized gas, most evident as extraplanar emission in edge-on systems. In addition, we identify two main classes of galaxies displaying LIER emission: `central LIER' (cLIER) galaxies, where central LIER emission is spatially extended, but accompanied by star formation at larger galactocentric distances, and `extended LIER' (eLIER) galaxies, where LIER emission is extended throughout the whole galaxy. In eLIER and cLIER galaxies, LIER emission is associated with radially flat, low H α equivalent width of line emission (<3 Å) and stellar population indices demonstrating the lack of young stellar populations, implying that line emission follows tightly the continuum due to the underlying old stellar population. The H α surface brightness radial profiles are always shallower than 1/r2 and the line ratio [O III] λ5007/[O II] λλ3727,29 (a tracer of the ionization parameter of the gas) shows a flat gradient. This combined evidence strongly supports the scenario in which LIER emission is not due to a central point source but to diffuse stellar sources, the most likely candidates being hot, evolved (post-asymptotic giant branch) stars. Shocks are observed to play a significant role in the ionization of the gas only in rare merging and interacting systems.

  5. EMCCD based luminescence imaging system for spatially resolved geo-chronometric and radiation dosimetric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, N.; Adhyaru, P.; Vaghela, H.; Singhvi, A. K.

    2014-11-01

    We report the development of an Electron Multiplier Charge Coupled Device (EMCCD) based luminescence dating system. The system enables position sensitive measurements of luminescence for the estimation of spatially resolved distribution of equivalent dose for complex geological samples. The system includes: 1) a sample stimulation unit (with both thermal and optical stimulations), 2) an optics unit that comprises imaging optics and, 3) a data acquisition and processing unit. The system works in a LabVIEW environment with a graphical user interface (GUI). User specified stimulation protocols enable thermal and optical stimulation in any desired combination. The optics unit images the luminescence on to a EMCCD (512 × 512 pixels, each of 16μm × 16μm size) and maintains a unit magnification. This unit has flexible focusing and a filter housing that enables change of filters combinations without disturbing the setup. Time integrated EMCCD images of luminescence from the sample are acquired as a function of programmable dwell time and these images are processed using indigenously developed MATLAB based programs. Additionally, the programs align the acquired images using a set of control points (identifier features on the images) to a single pixel accuracy. The dose evaluation is based on integrated intensity from selected pixels followed by generation of a growth curve giving luminescence as a function of applied beta doses. Development of this EMCCD camera based luminescence system will enable in-situ luminescence measurements of the samples, without the requirement of separating mineral grains from their matrix. It will also allow age estimation of samples such as lithic artifacts/structures via dating of their surfaces, fusion crust of meteorites, pedogenic carbonates, etc and will additionally open up possibilities of application like testing spatial uniformity of doping in artificial luminescence phosphors, dating/dosimetry of inclusions etc.

  6. An approach to estimate spatial distribution of analyte within cells using spectrally-resolved fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Dharmendar Kumar; Irfanullah, Mir; Basu, Santanu Kumar; Madhu, Sheri; De, Suman; Jadhav, Sameer; Ravikanth, Mangalampalli; Chowdhury, Arindam

    2017-03-01

    While fluorescence microscopy has become an essential tool amongst chemists and biologists for the detection of various analyte within cellular environments, non-uniform spatial distribution of sensors within cells often restricts extraction of reliable information on relative abundance of analytes in different subcellular regions. As an alternative to existing sensing methodologies such as ratiometric or FRET imaging, where relative proportion of analyte with respect to the sensor can be obtained within cells, we propose a methodology using spectrally-resolved fluorescence microscopy, via which both the relative abundance of sensor as well as their relative proportion with respect to the analyte can be simultaneously extracted for local subcellular regions. This method is exemplified using a BODIPY sensor, capable of detecting mercury ions within cellular environments, characterized by spectral blue-shift and concurrent enhancement of emission intensity. Spectral emission envelopes collected from sub-microscopic regions allowed us to compare the shift in transition energies as well as integrated emission intensities within various intracellular regions. Construction of a 2D scatter plot using spectral shifts and emission intensities, which depend on the relative amount of analyte with respect to sensor and the approximate local amounts of the probe, respectively, enabled qualitative extraction of relative abundance of analyte in various local regions within a single cell as well as amongst different cells. Although the comparisons remain semi-quantitative, this approach involving analysis of multiple spectral parameters opens up an alternative way to extract spatial distribution of analyte in heterogeneous systems. The proposed method would be especially relevant for fluorescent probes that undergo relatively nominal shift in transition energies compared to their emission bandwidths, which often restricts their usage for quantitative ratiometric imaging in

  7. A SCR Model Calibration Approach with Spatially Resolved Measurements and NH3 Storage Distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Xiaobo; Parker, Gordon G.; Johnson, John H.; ...

    2014-11-27

    The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is a technology used for reducing NO x emissions in the heavy-duty diesel (HDD) engine exhaust. In this study, the spatially resolved capillary inlet infrared spectroscopy (Spaci-IR) technique was used to study the gas concentration and NH3 storage distributions in a SCR catalyst, and to provide data for developing a SCR model to analyze the axial gaseous concentration and axial distributions of NH3 storage. A two-site SCR model is described for simulating the reaction mechanisms. The model equations and a calculation method was developed using the Spaci-IR measurements to determine the NH3 storage capacity andmore » the relationships between certain kinetic parameters of the model. Moreover, a calibration approach was then applied for tuning the kinetic parameters using the spatial gaseous measurements and calculated NH3 storage as a function of axial position instead of inlet and outlet gaseous concentrations of NO, NO2, and NH3. The equations and the approach for determining the NH3 storage capacity of the catalyst and a method of dividing the NH3 storage capacity between the two storage sites are presented. It was determined that the kinetic parameters of the adsorption and desorption reactions have to follow certain relationships for the model to simulate the experimental data. Finally, the modeling results served as a basis for developing full model calibrations to SCR lab reactor and engine data and state estimator development as described in the references (Song et al. 2013a, b; Surenahalli et al. 2013).« less

  8. Spatially resolved characterization of biogenic manganese oxideproduction within a bacterial biofilm

    SciTech Connect

    Toner, Brandy; Fakra, Sirine; Villalobos, Mario; Warwick, Tony; Sposito, Garrison

    2004-10-01

    Pseudomonas putida strain MnB1, a biofilm forming bacteria, was used as a model for the study of bacterial Mn oxidation in freshwater and soil environments. The oxidation of Mn{sub (aq)}{sup +2} by P. putida was characterized by spatially and temporally resolving the oxidation state of Mn in the presence of a bacterial biofilm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) combined with near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy at the Mn-L{sub 2,3} absorption edges. Subsamples were collected from growth flasks containing 0.1 mM and 1 mM total Mn at 16, 24, 36 and 48 hours after inoculation. Immediately after collection, the unprocessed hydrated subsamples were imaged at 40 nm resolution. Manganese NEXAFS spectra were extracted from x-ray energy sequences of STXM images (stacks) and fit with linear combinations of well characterized reference spectra to obtain quantitative relative abundances of Mn(II), Mn(III) and Mn(IV). Careful consideration was given to uncertainty in the normalization of the reference spectra, choice of reference compounds, and chemical changes due to radiation damage. The STXM results confirm that Mn{sub (aq)}{sup +2} was removed from solution by P. putida and was concentrated as Mn(III) and Mn(IV) immediately adjacent to the bacterial cells. The Mn precipitates were completely enveloped by bacterial biofilm material. The distribution of Mn oxidation states was spatially heterogeneous within and between the clusters of bacterial cells. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy is a promising tool to advance the study of hydrated interfaces between minerals and bacteria, particularly in cases where the structure of bacterial biofilms needs to be maintained.

  9. Spatially resolved intake fraction estimates for primary and secondary particulate matter in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamancusa, Carmen; Parvez, Fatema; Wagstrom, Kristina

    2017-02-01

    This study uses intake fraction, the fraction of emissions that are inhaled from a given source, to quantify how emissions from different regions proportionally contribute to human exposure to both primary and secondary particulate matter species. The intake fraction for secondary species is defined using the common atomic constituents between precursor species and products, allowing estimates to include both primary and secondary species. The Particulate Matter Source Apportionment Technology (PSAT) in the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions (CAMx) regional air quality model is used to calculate the intake fraction for twenty-five source regions throughout the contiguous United States over four seasons. The calculations use spatially explicit emissions and population density to more accurately capture the variation in intake fraction between regions. The spatially explicit emissions allow for the calculation of spatial trends and variations within the intake fraction. More specifically it allows for the calculation of the amount of intake that occurs within a given distance of the emissions source or source region. Based on the results sulfate inhalation occurs over larger distances than other particulate matter species. For most regions, a substantial fraction (>75%) of the inhalation occurs within 50 km for all seasons, demonstrating that efforts to reduce emissions will have the largest health impact on the local community. Furthermore the distance over which 75% of the inhalation occurs increases by 20% for all species during the winter and a larger percentage of pollutants emitted during the winter are inhaled relative to pollutants emitted during other seasons. This demonstrates that emission reductions during the winter will have a greater impact on health than reductions during other seasons.

  10. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Single-Cell Exocytosis Utilizing Individually Addressable Carbon Microelectrode Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Adams, Kelly L.; Luber, Sarah J.; Eves, Daniel J.; Heien, Michael L.; Ewing, Andrew G.

    2009-01-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of carbon microelectrode arrays (MEAs) and their application to spatially and temporally resolve neurotransmitter release from single pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. The carbon MEAs are composed of individually addressable 2.5-μm-radius microdisks embedded in glass. The fabrication involves pulling a multibarrel glass capillary containing a single carbon fiber in each barrel into a sharp tip, followed by beveling the electrode tip to form an array (10−20 μm) of carbon microdisks. This simple fabrication procedure eliminates the need for complicated wiring of the independent electrodes, thus allowing preparation of high-density individually addressable microelectrodes. The carbon MEAs have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy, steady-state and fast-scan voltammetry, and numerical simulations. Amperometric results show that subcellular heterogeneity in single-cell exocytosis can be electrochemically detected with MEAs. These ultrasmall electrochemical probes are suitable for detecting fast chemical events in tight spaces, as well as for developing multifunctional electrochemical microsensors. PMID:18232712

  11. Using broadband spatially resolved NIRS to assess muscle oxygenation during altered running protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukourakis, Georg; Vafiadou, Maria; Steimers, André; Geraskin, Dmitri; Neary, Patrick; Kohl-Bareis, Matthias

    2009-07-01

    We used spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (SRS-NIRS) to assess calf and thigh muscle oxygenation during running on a motor-driven treadmill. Two protocols were used: An incremental speed protocol (velocity = 6 - 12 km/h, ▵v = 2 km/h) was performed in 3 minute stages, while a pacing paradigm modulated step frequency alternatively (2.3 Hz [SLow]; 3.3 Hz [SHigh]) during a constant velocity for 2 minutes each. A SRS-NIRS broadband system (600 - 1000 nm) was used to measure total haemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation (SO2). An accelerometer was placed on the hip joints to measure limb acceleration through the experiment. The data showed that the calf (SO2 58 to 42%) desaturated to a significantly lower level than the thigh (61 to 54%). During the pacing protocol, SO2 was significantly different between the SLow vs. SHigh trials. Additionally, physiological data as measured by spirometry were different between the SLow vs. SHigh pacing trials (VO2 (2563+/- 586 vs. 2503 +/- 605 mL/min). Significant differences in VO2 at the same workload (speed) indicate alterations in mechanical efficiency. These data suggest that SRS broadband NIRS can be used to discern small changes in muscle oxygenation, making this device useful for metabolic exercise studies in addition to spirometry and movement monitoring by accelerometers.

  12. Spatially resolved X-ray spectra of the anomalous arm of NGC 4258 (M106)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Li, B.; Wilson, A. S.

    2006-06-01

    We present the preliminary results of a spatially resolved spectral analysis of the soft X-ray emission from the anomalous arms of NGC 4258 (M 106), using the archived Chandra and XMM data. The total exposure time for the Chandra and XMM observations are ˜ 35 ks and ˜ 66 ks respectively. The combined Chandra observation provides the best X-ray image of the anomalous arms, while the XMM observations produce the best S/N X-ray spectra. We find that the X-ray absorbing columns are higher in the NW arm than in the SE arm, the latter column densities being consistent with the Galactic value. This result suggests that at least part of the NW arm is behind the disk of NGC 4258 and the SE in front of it, consistent with the structure suggested by Wilson, Yang and Cecil (2001). We also find that the extended emission in the SW quadrant of the galaxy has a higher absorption column density than that in the NE quadrant, consistent with the known orientation of the galactic disk of NGC 4258 and a halo origin of the extended X-ray emission. We also present the X-ray spectra of the compact X-ray sources close to the N and S ends of the radio jets. The research is supported by NASA through grant NAG 513065.

  13. Spectroscopically and spatially resolved optical line emission in the Superantennae (IRAS 19254-7245)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendo, George J.; Clements, David L.; Khan, Sophia A.

    2009-10-01

    We present Visible Multi-Object Spectrograph integral-field spectroscopic observations of the ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) pair IRAS 19254-7245 (the Superantennae). We resolve Hα, [NII], [OI] and [SII] emission both spatially and spectroscopically, and separate the emission into multiple velocity components. We identify spectral line emission characteristic of star formation associated with both galaxies, broad spectral line emission from the nucleus of the southern progenitor and potential outflows with shock-excited spectral features near both nuclei. We estimate that <~10 per cent of the 24 μm flux density originates from star formation, implying that most of the 24 μm emission originates from the active galactic nuclei in the southern nucleus. We also measure a gas consumption time of ~1 Gyr, which is consistent with other measurements of ULIRGs. Based on observations collected at the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern hemisphere, Chile [080.B-0085]. E-mail: g.bendo@imperial.ac.uk ‡ ALMA fellow.

  14. Estimation of optical properties by spatially resolved reflectance spectroscopy in the subdiffusive regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naglič, Peter; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan; Bürmen, Miran

    2016-09-01

    We propose and objectively evaluate an inverse Monte Carlo model for estimation of absorption and reduced scattering coefficients and similarity parameter γ from spatially resolved reflectance (SRR) profiles in the subdiffusive regime. The similarity parameter γ carries additional information on the phase function that governs the angular properties of scattering in turbid media. The SRR profiles at five source-detector separations were acquired with an optical fiber probe. The inverse Monte Carlo model was based on a cost function that enabled robust estimation of optical properties from a few SRR measurements without a priori knowledge about spectral dependencies of the optical properties. Validation of the inverse Monte Carlo model was performed on synthetic datasets and measured SRR profiles of turbid phantoms comprising molecular dye and polystyrene microspheres. We observed that the additional similarity parameter γ substantially reduced the reflectance variability arising from the phase function properties and significantly improved the accuracy of the inverse Monte Carlo model. However, the observed improvement of the extended inverse Monte Carlo model was limited to reduced scattering coefficients exceeding ˜15 cm-1, where the relative root-mean-square errors of the estimated optical properties were well within 10%.

  15. Spatially Resolved HCN Absorption Features in the Circumnuclear Region of NGC 1052

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada-Satoh, Satoko; Roh, Duk-Gyoo; Oh, Se-Jin; Lee, Sang-Sung; Byun, Do-Young; Kameno, Seiji; Yeom, Jae-Hwan; Jung, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Hyo-Ryoung; Hwang, Ju-Yeon

    2016-10-01

    We present the first VLBI detection of HCN molecular absorption in the nearby active galactic nucleus NGC 1052. Utilizing the 1 mas resolution achieved by the Korean VLBI Network, we have spatially resolved the HCN absorption against a double-sided nuclear jet structure. Two velocity features of HCN absorption are detected significantly at the radial velocity of 1656 and 1719 km s-1, redshifted by 149 and 212 km s-1 with respect to the systemic velocity of the galaxy. The column density of the HCN molecule is estimated to be 1015-1016 cm-2, assuming an excitation temperature of 100-230 K. The absorption features show high optical depth localized on the receding jet side, where the free-free absorption occurred due to the circumnuclear torus. The size of the foreground absorbing molecular gas is estimated to be on approximately one-parsec scales, which agrees well with the approximate size of the circumnuclear torus. HCN absorbing gas is likely to be several clumps smaller than 0.1 pc inside the circumnuclear torus. The redshifted velocities of the HCN absorption features imply that HCN absorbing gas traces ongoing infall motion inside the circumnuclear torus onto the central engine.

  16. Microstructure Imaging Using Frequency Spectrum Spatially Resolved Acoustic Spectroscopy F-Sras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharples, S. D.; Li, W.; Clark, M.; Somekh, M. G.

    2010-02-01

    Material microstructure can have a profound effect on the mechanical properties of a component, such as strength and resistance to creep and fatigue. SRAS—spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy—is a laser ultrasonic technique which can image microstructure using highly localized surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity as a contrast mechanism, as this is sensitive to crystallographic orientation. The technique is noncontact, nondestructive, rapid, can be used on large components, and is highly tolerant of acoustic aberrations. Previously, the SRAS technique has been demonstrated using a fixed frequency excitation laser and a variable grating period (к-vector) to determine the most efficiently generated SAWs, and hence the velocity. Here, we demonstrate an implementation which uses a fixed grating period with a broadband laser excitation source. The velocity is determined by analyzing the measured frequency spectrum. Experimental results using this "frequency spectrum SRAS" (f-SRAS) method are presented. Images of microstructure on an industrially relevant material are compared to those obtained using the previous SRAS method ("k-SRAS"), excellent agreement is observed. Moreover, f-SRAS is much simpler and potentially much more rapid than k-SRAS as the velocity can be determined at each sample point in one single laser shot, rather than scanning the grating period.

  17. Spatially resolved measurements of electron cyclotron resonance ion source beam profile characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Panitzsch, Lauri; Stalder, Michael; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2011-03-15

    Simulations predict that the concentric rings and the triangular structures in the profiles of strongly focused ion beams that are found in different experiments should be dominated by ion species with the same or at least similar m/q-ratio. To verify these theoretical predictions we have tuned our ECR ion source to deliver a beam consisting of multiple ion species whose particular m/q-depending focusing ranges from weakly focused to overfocused. We then recorded spatially resolved charge-state distributions of the beam profile at characteristic positions in the plane perpendicular to the beam line. The results validate theoretical predictions and are summarized in this paper. To achieve the required beam profile characteristics we moved the extraction along the beam line to achieve stronger focusing than by only changing the extraction voltage. To fit the regions of interest of the beam profile into the transmission area of the sector magnet, we steered the beam by moving the extraction in the plane perpendicular to the beam axis. The results of both investigations, beam focusing and beam steering by using a 3D-movable extraction, are also reported in this paper. A brief overview of the new beam monitor extensively used during these measurements, the Faraday cup array, is also given.

  18. SPATIALLY RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF EUROPA: THE DISTINCT SPECTRUM OF LARGE-SCALE CHAOS

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, P. D.; Brown, M. E.; Hand, K. P.

    2015-11-15

    We present a comprehensive analysis of spatially resolved moderate spectral resolution near-infrared spectra obtained with the adaptive optics system at the Keck Observatory. We identify three compositionally distinct end member regions: the trailing hemisphere bullseye, the leading hemisphere upper latitudes, and a third component associated with leading hemisphere chaos units. We interpret the composition of the three end member regions to be dominated by irradiation products, water ice, and evaporite deposits or salt brines, respectively. The third component is associated with geological features and distinct from the geography of irradiation, suggesting an endogenous identity. Identifying the endogenous composition is of particular interest for revealing the subsurface composition. However, its spectrum is not consistent with linear mixtures of the salt minerals previously considered relevant to Europa. The spectrum of this component is distinguished by distorted hydration features rather than distinct spectral features, indicating hydrated minerals but making unique identification difficult. In particular, it lacks features common to hydrated sulfate minerals, challenging the traditional view of an endogenous salty component dominated by Mg-sulfates. Chloride evaporite deposits are one possible alternative.

  19. A spatially resolved fuel-based inventory of Utah and Colorado oil and natural gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorchov Negron, A.; McDonald, B. C.; De Gouw, J. A.; Frost, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    A fuel-based approach is presented for estimating emissions from US oil and natural gas production that utilizes state-level fuel surveys of oil and gas engine activity, well-level production data, and emission factors for oil and gas equipment. Emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) are mapped on a 4 km x 4 km horizontal grid for 2013-14 in Utah and Colorado. Emission sources include combustion from exploration (e.g., drilling), production (e.g., heaters, dehydrators, and compressor engines), and natural gas processing plants, which comprise a large fraction of the local combustion activity in oil and gas basins. Fuel-based emission factors of NOx are from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and applied to spatially-resolved maps of CO2 emissions. Preliminary NOx emissions from this study are estimated for the Uintah Basin, Utah, to be ~5300 metric tons of NO2-equivalent in 2013. Our result compares well with an observations-based top-down emissions estimate of NOx derived from a previous study, ~4200 metric tons of NO2-equivalent. By contrast, the 2011 National Emissions Inventory estimates oil and gas emissions of NOx to be ~3 times higher than our study in the Uintah Basin. We intend to expand our fuel-based approach to map combustion-related emissions in other U.S. oil and natural gas basins and compare with additional observational datasets.

  20. Spatially Resolved Elemental Analysis, Spectroscopy and Diffraction at the GSECARS Sector at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, Stephen R.; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Newville, Matthew; Rivers, Mark L.; Eng, Peter; Lefticariu, Liliana

    2017-01-01

    X-ray microprobes (XRM) coupled with high-brightness synchrotron X-ray facilities are powerful tools for environmental biogeochemistry research. One such instrument, the XRM at the Geo Soil Enviro Center for Advanced Radiation Sources Sector 13 at the Advanced Photon Source (APS; Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL) was recently improved as part of a canted undulator geometry upgrade of the insertion device port, effectively doubling the available undulator beam time and extending the operating energy of the branch supporting the XRM down to the sulfur K edge (2.3 keV). Capabilities include rapid, high-resolution, elemental imaging including fluorescence microtomography, microscale X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy including sulfur K edge capability, and microscale X-ray diffraction. These capabilities are advantageous for (i) two-dimensional elemental mapping of relatively large samples at high resolution, with the dwell times typically limited only by the count times needed to obtain usable counting statistics for low concentration elements, (ii) three-dimensional imaging of internal elemental distributions in fragile hydrated specimens, such as biological tissues, avoiding the need for physical slicing, (iii) spatially resolved speciation determinations of contaminants in environmental materials, and (iv) identification of contaminant host phases. In this paper, we describe the XRM instrumentation, techniques, applications demonstrating these capabilities, and prospects for further improvements associated with the proposed upgrade of the APS.

  1. Distribution of Nanoflares as Spatially Resolved Current Sheets in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. S.; Lin, L.

    2014-05-01

    In a recent numerical study [Ng et al., Astrophys. J. 747, 109, 2012], based on a three-dimensional model of coronal heating using reduced magnetohydrodynamics, we have obtained scaling results of heating rate versus Lundquist number S based on a series of runs in which random photospheric motions are imposed for hundreds to thousands of Alfvén time in order to obtain converged statistical values. The heating rate found in these simulations saturates to a level that is independent of S in the high S limit and is consistent with the required level for coronal heating. In a previous study based on the total heating rate time series [Ng and Lin, AIP Conf. Proc. 1500, 38, 2012] in these simulations, we have also calculated heating events distributions, which are consistent with observations but do not support the nanoflares scenario [Parker, Astrophys. J. 330, 474, 1988]. This method has a limitation of not distinguishing individual heating events. We now extend this analysis to investigate the distribution of energy release events defined as spatially resolved current sheets [Lin et el., ASP Conf. Ser. 474, 159, 2013]. We report preliminary results and compare to results obtained using only time-series analysis.

  2. Spatially resolved two-color diffusion measurements in human skin applied to transdermal liposome penetration.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Jonathan; Bloksgaard, Maria; Kubiak, Jakub; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Bagatolli, Luis A

    2013-05-01

    A multiphoton excitation-based fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy method, Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS), was used to measure the local diffusion coefficients of distinct model fluorescent substances in excised human skin. In combination with structural information obtained by multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy imaging, the acquired diffusion information was processed to construct spatially resolved diffusion maps at different depths of the stratum corneum (SC). Experiments using amphiphilic and hydrophilic fluorescently labeled molecules show that their diffusion in SC is very heterogeneous on a microscopic scale. This diffusion-based strategy was further exploited to investigate the integrity of liposomes during transdermal penetration. Specifically, the diffusion of dual-color fluorescently labeled liposomes--containing an amphiphilic fluorophore in the lipid bilayer and a hydrophilic fluorophore encapsulated in the liposome lumen--was measured using cross-correlation RICS. This type of experiment allows discrimination between separate (uncorrelated) and joint (correlated) diffusion of the two different fluorescent probes, giving information about liposome integrity. Independent of the liposome composition (phospholipids or transfersomes), our results show a clear lack of cross-correlation below the skin surface, indicating that the penetration of intact liposomes is highly compromised by the skin barrier.

  3. Resolving the spatial relationship between intracellular components by dual color super resolution optical fluctuations imaging (SOFI)

    PubMed Central

    Gallina, Maria Elena; Xu, Jianmin; Dertinger, Thomas; Aizer, Adva; Shav-Tal, Yaron; Weiss, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    Background Multi-color super-resolution (SR) imaging microscopy techniques can resolve ultrastructura relationships between- and provide co-localization information of- different proteins inside the cell or even within organelles at a higher resolution than afforded by conventional diffraction-limited imaging. While still very challenging, important SR colocalization results have been reported in recent years using STED, PALM and STORM techniques. Results In this work, we demonstrate dual-color Super Resolution Optical Fluctuations Imaging (SOFI) using a standard far-field fluorescence microscope and different color blinking quantum dots. We define the spatial relationship between hDcp1a, a processing body (P-body, PB) protein, and the tubulin cytoskeletal network. Our finding could open up new perspectives on the role of the cytoskeleton in PB formation and assembly. Further insights into PB internal organization are also reported and discussed. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the suitability and facile use of multi-color SOFI for the investigation of intracellular ultrastructures. PMID:24324919

  4. Large area extreme-UV lithography of graphene oxide via spatially resolved photoreduction.

    PubMed

    Prezioso, S; Perrozzi, F; Donarelli, M; Bisti, F; Santucci, S; Palladino, L; Nardone, M; Treossi, E; Palermo, V; Ottaviano, L

    2012-03-27

    The ability to pattern graphene over large areas with nanometer resolution is the current request for nanodevice fabrication at the industrial scale. Existing methods do not match high throughput with nanometer resolution. We propose a high-throughput resistless extreme-UV (EUV) photolithographic approach operating with sub-micrometer resolution on large area (~10 mm(2)) graphene oxide (GO) films via spatially resolved photoreduction. The efficiency of EUV photoreduction is tested with 46.9 nm coherent light produced by a table top capillary discharge plasma source. Irradiated samples are studied by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and micro-Raman Spectroscopy (μRS). XPS data show that 200 mJ/cm(2) EUV dose produces, onto pristine GO, a 6% increase of sp(2) carbon bonds and a 20% decrease of C-O bonds. μRS data demonstrate a photoreduction efficiency 2 orders of magnitude higher than the one reported in the literature for UV-assisted photoreduction. GO patterning is obtained modulating the EUV dose with a Lloyd's interferometer. The lithographic features consist of GO stripes with modulated reduction degree. Such modulation is investigated and demonstrated by μRS on patterns with 2 μm periodicity.

  5. Experimental observation of spatially resolved photo-luminescence intensity distribution in dual mode upconverting nanorod bundles

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pawan; Singh, Satbir; Singh, V. N.; Singh, Nidhi; Gupta, R. K.; Gupta, Bipin Kumar

    2017-01-01

    A novel method for demonstration of photoluminescence intensity distribution in upconverting nanorod bundles using confocal microscopy is reported. Herein, a strategy for the synthesis of highly luminescent dual mode upconverting/downshift Y1.94O3:Ho3+0.02/Yb3+0.04 nanorod bundles by a facile hydrothermal route has been introduced. These luminescent nanorod bundles exhibit strong green emission at 549 nm upon excitations at 449 nm and 980 nm with quantum efficiencies of ~6.3% and ~1.1%, respectively. The TEM/HRTEM results confirm that these bundles are composed of several individual nanorods with diameter of ~100 nm and length in the range of 1–3 μm. Furthermore, two dimensional spatially resolved photoluminescence intensity distribution study has been carried out using confocal photoluminescence microscope throughout the nanorod bundles. This study provides a new direction for the potential use of such emerging dual mode nanorod bundles as photon sources for next generation flat panel optical display devices, bio-medical applications, luminescent security ink and enhanced energy harvesting in photovoltaic applications. PMID:28211891

  6. Measurement of the optical properties of rat brain tissue using contact spatially resolved spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gysbrechts, Barbara; Nguyen Do Trong, Nghia; Wang, Ling; Cabral, Henrique; Navratilova, Zaneta; Battaglia, Francesco P.; Saeys, Wouter; Bartic, Carmen

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays, biophotonics is widely used in neuroscience. The effectiveness of biophotonic techniques, such as fluorescence imaging and optogenetics, is affected by the optical properties of the examined tissue. Therefore, knowledge of these properties is essential to carefully plan experiments. Mice and rats are widely used in neuroscience studies. However, reports about optical properties of their brains are very rare. We measured optical absorption μa and reduced scattering μ's coefficients of native rat brain in the visible and near-infrared wavelength region, using contact spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS). In this study, we estimate μa and μ's for the rat cortex and discuss their stability in time. Additionally, variations in optical properties within and between samples were characterized. The results extend the range of known optical properties for the rat cortex, especially in the visible range, relevant to optogenetics. μa and μ's are stable within a time span of four hours, and show low variation in and between brain samples. This indicates that a suitable protocol was used to estimate optical properties of rodent brain tissue. Since contact SRS is a non-destructive method, this technique could be used also to measure μa and μ's in living animals. Moreover, the probe has small dimensions, allowing the characterization of optical properties in different structures of the brain.

  7. Multiple spatially resolved reflection spectroscopy for in vivo determination of carotenoids in human skin and blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvin, Maxim E.; Magnussen, Björn; Lademann, Juergen; Köcher, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Non-invasive measurement of carotenoid antioxidants in human skin is one of the important tasks to investigate the skin physiology in vivo. Resonance Raman spectroscopy and reflection spectroscopy are the most frequently used non-invasive techniques in dermatology and skin physiology. In the present study, an improved method based on multiple spatially resolved reflection spectroscopy (MSRRS) was introduced. The results obtained were compared with those obtained using the ‘gold standard’ resonance Raman spectroscopy method and showed strong correlations for the total carotenoid concentration (R  =  0.83) as well as for lycopene (R  =  0.80). The measurement stability was confirmed to be better than 10% within the total temperature range from 5 °C to  +  30 °C and pressure contact between the skin and the MSRRS sensor from 800 Pa to 18 000 Pa. In addition, blood samples taken from the subjects were analyzed for carotenoid concentrations. The MSRRS sensor was calibrated on the blood carotenoid concentrations resulting in being able to predict with a correlation of R  =  0.79. On the basis of blood carotenoids it could be demonstrated that the MSRRS cutaneous measurements are not influenced by Fitzpatrick skin types I-VI. The MSRRS sensor is commercially available under the brand name biozoom.

  8. Experimental observation of spatially resolved photo-luminescence intensity distribution in dual mode upconverting nanorod bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pawan; Singh, Satbir; Singh, V. N.; Singh, Nidhi; Gupta, R. K.; Gupta, Bipin Kumar

    2017-02-01

    A novel method for demonstration of photoluminescence intensity distribution in upconverting nanorod bundles using confocal microscopy is reported. Herein, a strategy for the synthesis of highly luminescent dual mode upconverting/downshift Y1.94O3:Ho3+0.02/Yb3+0.04 nanorod bundles by a facile hydrothermal route has been introduced. These luminescent nanorod bundles exhibit strong green emission at 549 nm upon excitations at 449 nm and 980 nm with quantum efficiencies of ~6.3% and ~1.1%, respectively. The TEM/HRTEM results confirm that these bundles are composed of several individual nanorods with diameter of ~100 nm and length in the range of 1–3 μm. Furthermore, two dimensional spatially resolved photoluminescence intensity distribution study has been carried out using confocal photoluminescence microscope throughout the nanorod bundles. This study provides a new direction for the potential use of such emerging dual mode nanorod bundles as photon sources for next generation flat panel optical display devices, bio-medical applications, luminescent security ink and enhanced energy harvesting in photovoltaic applications.

  9. Dose calculation for permanent prostate implants incorporating spatially anisotropic linearly time-resolving edema

    SciTech Connect

    Monajemi, T. T.; Clements, Charles M.; Sloboda, Ron S.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were (i) to develop a dose calculation method for permanent prostate implants that incorporates a clinically motivated model for edema and (ii) to illustrate the use of the method by calculating the preimplant dosimetry error for a reference configuration of {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 137}Cs seeds subject to edema-induced motions corresponding to a variety of model parameters. Methods: A model for spatially anisotropic edema that resolves linearly with time was developed based on serial magnetic resonance imaging measurements made previously at our center to characterize the edema for a group of n=40 prostate implant patients [R. S. Sloboda et al., ''Time course of prostatic edema post permanent seed implant determined by magnetic resonance imaging,'' Brachytherapy 9, 354-361 (2010)]. Model parameters consisted of edema magnitude, {Delta}, and period, T. The TG-43 dose calculation formalism for a point source was extended to incorporate the edema model, thus enabling calculation via numerical integration of the cumulative dose around an individual seed in the presence of edema. Using an even power piecewise-continuous polynomial representation for the radial dose function, the cumulative dose was also expressed in closed analytical form. Application of the method was illustrated by calculating the preimplant dosimetry error, RE{sub preplan}, in a 5x5x5 cm{sup 3} volume for {sup 125}I (Oncura 6711), {sup 103}Pd (Theragenics 200), and {sup 131}Cs (IsoRay CS-1) seeds arranged in the Radiological Physics Center test case 2 configuration for a range of edema relative magnitudes ({Delta}=[0.1,0.2,0.4,0.6,1.0]) and periods (T=[28,56,84] d). Results were compared to preimplant dosimetry errors calculated using a variation of the isotropic edema model developed by Chen et al. [''Dosimetric effects of edema in permanent prostate seed implants: A rigorous solution,'' Int. J. Radiat. Oncol., Biol., Phys. 47, 1405-1419 (2000

  10. Determination of bedform resolution necessary to accurately resolve the flow field by comparing numerical simulations with field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margelowsky, G.; Foster, D.; Traykovski, P.; Felzenberg, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    The dynamics of wave-current and tidal flow bottom boundary layers are evaluated with a quasi-three-dimensional non-hydrostatic phase-resolving wave-current bottom boundary layer model, Dune. In each case, the model is evaluated with field observations of velocity profiles and seabed geometry. For wave-current boundary layers, the observations were obtained over a 26-day period in 13 m of water at the Martha’s Vineyard Coastal Observatory (MVCO, Edgartown, MA) in 2002 - 2003. Bedforms were orbital-scale ripples with wavelengths of 50-125 cm and heights of 5-20 cm with peak root-mean-square orbital velocities and mean flows typically ranging from 50-70 cm/s and 10-20 cm/s, respectively. The observations for tidal flows were obtained over a 3-day period in 13-16 m of water in Portsmouth Harbor (Portsmouth, NH) in 2008. Bedforms were dunes with wavelengths on the order of 1 m and heights on the order of 10 cm with typical peak tidal currents of approximately 1 m/s. The flow field is simulated with a finite volume approach to solve the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations with a k-ω 2nd order turbulence closure scheme. The model simulations are performed for a range of theoretical and observed bedforms to examine the boundary layer sensitivity to the resolution of the bottom roughness. The observed and predicted vertical velocity profiles are evaluated with correlations and Briar’s Skill scores over the range of data sets.

  11. Temporally and spatially resolved characterization of microwave induced argon plasmas: Experiment and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Baeva, M. Andrasch, M.; Ehlbeck, J.; Loffhagen, D.; Weltmann, K.-D.

    2014-04-14

    Experiments and modeling of the plasma-microwave interaction have been performed in a coaxial microwave plasma source at a field frequency of 2.45 GHz generating argon plasmas at pressures of 20 and 40 millibars and a ratio of flow rate to pressure of 0.125 sccm/Pa. The incident microwave power between 100 W and 300 W is supplied in a regime of a pulse-width modulation with cycle duration of 110 ms and a power-on time of 23 ms. The experiments are based on heterodyne reflectometry and microwave interferometry at 45.75 GHz. They provide the temporal behaviour of the complex reflection coefficient, the microwave power in the plasma, as well as the electron density in the afterglow zone of the discharge. The self-consistent spatially two-dimensional and time-dependent modeling complements the analysis of the plasma-microwave interaction delivering the plasma and electromagnetic field parameters. The consolidating experimental observations and model predictions allow further characterizing the plasma source. The generated plasma has a core occupying the region close to the end of the inner electrode, where maximum electron densities above 10{sup 20} m{sup −3} and electron temperatures of about 1 eV are observed. Due to a longer outer electrode of the coaxial structure, the plasma region is extended and fills the volume comprised by the outer electrode. The electron density reaches values of the order of 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. The heating of the gas occurs in its great part due to elastic collisions with the plasma electrons. However, the contribution of the convective heating is important especially in the extended plasma region, where the gas temperature reaches its maximum values up to approximately 1400 K. The temporally and spatially resolved modeling enables a thorough investigation of the plasma-microwave interaction which clearly shows that the power in-coupling occurs in the region of the highest electron density during the early stage of

  12. Spatially resolved assessment of hepatic function using 99mTc-IDA SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hesheng; Cao, Yue

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: 99mTc-iminodiacetic acid (IDA) hepatobiliary imaging is usually quantified for hepatic function on the entire liver or regions of interest (ROIs) in the liver. The authors presented a method to estimate the hepatic extraction fraction (HEF) voxel-by-voxel from single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT with a 99mTc-labeled IDA agent of mebrofenin and evaluated the spatially resolved HEF measurements with an independent physiological measurement.Methods: Fourteen patients with intrahepatic cancers were treated with radiation therapy (RT) and imaged by 99mTc-mebrofenin SPECT before and 1 month after RT. The dynamic SPECT volumes were with a resolution of 3.9 × 3.9 × 2.5 mm{sup 3}. Throughout the whole liver with approximate 50 000 voxels, voxelwise HEF quantifications were estimated and compared between using arterial input function (AIF) from the heart and using vascular input function (VIF) from the spleen. The correlation between mean of the HEFs over the nontumor liver tissue and the overall liver function measured by Indocyanine green clearance half-time (T1/2) was assessed. Variation of the voxelwise estimation was evaluated in ROIs drawn in relatively homogeneous regions of the livers. The authors also examined effects of the time range parameter on the voxelwise HEF quantification.Results: Mean of the HEFs over the liver estimated using AIF significantly correlated with the physiological measurement T1/2 (r= 0.52, p= 0.0004), and the correlation was greatly improved by using VIF (r= 0.79, p < 0.0001). The parameter of time range for the retention phase did not lead to a significant difference in the means of the HEFs in the ROIs. Using VIF and a retention phase time range of 7–30 min, the relative variation of the voxelwise HEF in the ROIs was 10%± 6% of respective mean HEF.Conclusions: The voxelwise HEF derived from 99mTc-IDA SPECT by the deconvolution analysis is feasible to assess the spatial distribution of hepatic function in the

  13. SPATIALLY RESOLVED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON EMISSION FEATURES IN NEARBY, LOW METALLICITY, STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, Korey; Cannon, John M.; Skillman, Evan D.; Gehrz, Robert; Jackson, Dale C. E-mail: khaynes5@gmu.ed E-mail: gehrz@astro.umn.ed

    2010-11-20

    Low-resolution, mid-infrared Spitzer/IRS spectral maps are presented for three nearby, low-metallicity dwarf galaxies (NGC 55, NGC 3109, and IC 5152) for the purpose of examining the spatial distribution and variation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission. The sample straddles a metallicity of 12 + log(O/H) {approx} 8, a transition point below which PAH intensity empirically drops and the character of the interstellar medium changes. We derive quantitative radiances of PAH features and atomic lines on both global and spatially resolved scales. The Spitzer spectra, combined with extensive ancillary data from the UV through the mid-infrared, allow us to examine changes in the physical environments and in PAH feature radiances down to a physical scale of {approx}50 pc. We discuss correlations between various PAH emission feature and atomic line radiances. The (6.2 {mu}m)/(11.3 {mu}m), (7.7 {mu}m)/(11.3 {mu}m), (8.6 {mu}m)/(11.3 {mu}m), (7.7 {mu}m)/(6.2 {mu}m), and (8.6 {mu}m)/(6.2 {mu}m) PAH radiance ratios are found to be independent of position across all three galaxies, although the ratios do vary from galaxy to galaxy. As seen in other galaxies, we find no variation in the grain size distribution as a function of local radiation field strength. Absolute PAH feature intensities as measured by a ratio of PAH/(24 {mu}m) radiances are seen to vary both positionally within a given galaxy and from one galaxy to another when integrated over the full observed extent of each system. We examine direct comparisons of CC mode PAH ratios (7.7 {mu}m)/(6.2 {mu}m) and (8.6 {mu}m)/(6.2 {mu}m) to the mixed (CC/CH) mode PAH ratio (7.7 {mu}m)/(11.3 {mu}m). We find little variation in either mode and no difference in trends between modes. While the local conditions change markedly over the observed regions of these galaxies, the properties of PAH emission show a remarkable degree of uniformity.

  14. The dust mass in Cassiopeia A from a spatially resolved Herschel analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Looze, I.; Barlow, M. J.; Swinyard, B. M.; Rho, J.; Gomez, H. L.; Matsuura, M.; Wesson, R.

    2017-03-01

    Theoretical models predict that core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) can be efficient dust producers (0.1-1.0 M⊙), potentially accounting for most of the dust production in the early Universe. Observational evidence for this dust production efficiency is however currently limited to only a few CCSN remnants (e.g. SN 1987A, Crab nebula). In this paper, we revisit the dust mass produced in Cassiopeia A (Cas A), a ∼330-yr old O-rich Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) embedded in a dense interstellar foreground and background. We present the first spatially resolved analysis of Cas A based on Spitzer and Herschel infrared and submillimetre data at a common resolution of ∼0.6 arcmin for this 5 arcmin diameter remnant following a careful removal of contaminating line emission and synchrotron radiation. We fit the dust continuum from 17 to 500 μm with a four-component interstellar medium and supernova (SN) dust model. We find a concentration of cold dust in the unshocked ejecta of Cas A and derive a mass of 0.3-0.5 M⊙ of silicate grains freshly produced in the SNR, with a lower limit of ≥0.1-0.2 M⊙. For a mixture of 50 per cent of silicate-type grains and 50 per cent of carbonaceous grains, we derive a total SN dust mass between 0.4 and 0.6 M⊙. These dust mass estimates are higher than from most previous studies of Cas A and support the scenario of SN-dominated dust production at high redshifts. We furthermore derive an interstellar extinction map for the field around Cas A which towards Cas A gives average values of AV = 6-8 mag, up to a maximum of AV = 15 mag.

  15. Spatial-resolved electrochemiluminescence ratiometry based on bipolar electrode for bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin-Zhu; Zhao, Wei; Dai, Pan-Pan; Lu, Hai-Jie; Xu, Jing-Juan; Pan, Jing; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-12-15

    Herein, a spatial-resolved electrochemiluminescene (ECL) ratiometry based on a closed biopolar electrode (BPE) is reported for the highly sensitive detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA). Au@g-C3N4 NCs as one ECL emitter were firstly coated on the cathode of BPE, while the anode of the BPE served for calibration via another ECL substance, Ru(bpy)3(2+). The electroneutrality across the BPE makes the reactions on each pole of BPE electrically coupled. Thus one electrochemical sensing reaction at one pole of BPE could be quantified at both ends. A composite, Pt-PAMAM-DNAzyme was assembled on the surface of cathode via DNA hybridization between probe DNA and PSA aptamer. It acted as an ECL quencher of g-C3N4 via resonance energy transfer (RET) and catalyzing the reduction of O2, the co-reactant of g-C3N4. Meanwhile, it could promote the ECL of Ru(bpy)3(2+) at anode, since the catalytic reduction of O2 at the cathode increased the faradiac current flowing through the BPE. Based on this signal composite, an ECL "off-on" phenomenon was observed at the cathode, after Pt-PAMAM-DNAzyme was "peeled off" by PSA. Conversely, at the anode, an "on-off" ECL changing was obtained. Therefore, a sensitive ratiometry for PSA detection was achieved with a linear range from 0.10 to 200ng/mL. Since the two ECL emitters were physically separated, the ratiometric system was relatively simple and neither optical filters nor spectrometer were required. The strategy combining the ECL ratiometry and BPE broadens the applications of BPE-ECL and shows good perspective in clinical application.

  16. Cerebral oxygenation monitoring during cardiac bypass surgery in infants with broad band spatially resolved spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soschinski, Jan; Ben Mine, Lofti; Geraskin, Dmitri; Bennink, Gerardus; Kohl-Bareis, Matthias

    2007-07-01

    Neurological impairments following cardio-pulmonary bypass (CPB) during open heart surgery can result from microembolism and ischaemia. Here we present results from monitoring cerebral haemodynamics during CPB with near infrared spatially resolved broadband spectroscopy. In particular, the study has the objective (a) to monitor oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations (oxy-Hb, deoxy-Hb) and their changes as well as oxygen saturation during CPB surgery and (b) to develop and test algorithms for the calculation of these parameters from broad band spectroscopy. For this purpose a detection system was developed based on an especially designed lens imaging spectrograph with optimised sensitivity of recorded reflectance spectra for wavelengths between 600 and 1000 nm. The high f/#-number of 1:1.2 of the system results in about a factor of 10 higher light throughput combined with a lower astigmatism and crosstalk between channels when compared with a commercial mirror spectrometers (f/# = 1:4). For both hemispheres two independent channels each with three source-detector distances (ρ = 25 . 35 mm) were used resulting in six spectra. The broad band approach allows to investigate the influence of the wavelength range on the calculated haemoglobin concentrations and their changes and oxygen saturation when the attenuation A(λ) and its slope ΔA(λ)/Δρ are evaluated. Furthermore, the different depth sensitivities of these measurement parameters are estimated from Monte Carlo simulations and exploited for an optimization of the cerebral signals. It is demonstrated that the system does record cerebral oxygenation parameters during CPB in infants. In particular, the correlation of haemoglobin concentrations with blood supply (flow, pressure) by the heart-lung machine and the significant decreases in oxygen saturation during cardiac arrest is discussed.

  17. Spatially resolved confocal resonant Raman microscopic analysis of anode-grown Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, Nikolai; Strycharz-Glaven, Sarah M; Tender, Leonard M

    2014-02-03

    When grown on the surface of an anode electrode, Geobacter sulfurreducens forms a multi-cell thick biofilm in which all cells appear to couple the oxidation of acetate with electron transport to the anode, which serves as the terminal metabolic electron acceptor. Just how electrons are transported through such a biofilm from cells to the underlying anode surface over distances that can exceed 20 microns remains unresolved. Current evidence suggests it may occur by electron hopping through a proposed network of redox cofactors composed of immobile outer membrane and/or extracellular multi-heme c-type cytochromes. In the present work, we perform a spatially resolved confocal resonant Raman (CRR) microscopic analysis to investigate anode-grown Geobacter biofilms. The results confirm the presence of an intra-biofilm redox gradient whereby the probability that a heme is in the reduced state increases with increasing distance from the anode surface. Such a gradient is required to drive electron transport toward the anode surface by electron hopping via cytochromes. The results also indicate that at open circuit, when electrons are expected to accumulate in redox cofactors involved in electron transport due to the inability of the anode to accept electrons, nearly all c-type cytochrome hemes detected in the biofilm are oxidized. The same outcome occurs when a comparable potential to that measured at open circuit (-0.30 V vs. SHE) is applied to the anode, whereas nearly all hemes are reduced when an exceedingly negative potential (-0.50 V vs. SHE) is applied to the anode. These results suggest that nearly all c-type cytochrome hemes detected in the biofilm can be electrochemically accessed by the electrode, but most have oxidation potentials too negative to transport electrons originating from acetate metabolism. The results also reveal a lateral heterogeneity (x-y dimensions) in the type of c-type cytochromes within the biofilm that may affect electron transport to the

  18. SDSS-IV MaNGA - the spatially resolved transition from star formation to quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belfiore, Francesco; Maiolino, Roberto; Maraston, Claudia; Emsellem, Eric; Bershady, Matthew A.; Masters, Karen L.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Boquien, Médéric; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Drory, Niv; Heckman, Timothy M.; Law, David R.; Malanushenko, Olena; Oravetz, Audrey; Pan, Kaike; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Thomas, Daniel; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Westfall, Kyle B.; Yan, Renbin

    2017-04-01

    Using spatially resolved spectroscopy from SDSS-IV MaNGA we have demonstrated that low ionization emission-line regions (LIERs) in local galaxies result from photoionization by hot evolved stars, not active galactic nuclei, hence tracing galactic region hosting old stellar population where, despite the presence of ionized gas, star formation is no longer occurring. LIERs are ubiquitous in both quiescent galaxies and in the central regions of galaxies where star formation takes place at larger radii. We refer to these two classes of galaxies as extended LIER (eLIER) and central LIER (cLIER) galaxies, respectively. cLIERs are late-type galaxies primarily spread across the green valley, in the transition region between the star formation main sequence and quiescent galaxies. These galaxies display regular disc rotation in both stars and gas, although featuring a higher central stellar velocity dispersion than star-forming galaxies of the same mass. cLIERs are consistent with being slowly quenched inside-out; the transformation is associated with massive bulges, pointing towards the importance of bulge growth via secular evolution. eLIERs are morphologically early types and are indistinguishable from passive galaxies devoid of line emission in terms of their stellar populations, morphology and central stellar velocity dispersion. Ionized gas in eLIERs shows both disturbed and disc-like kinematics. When a large-scale flow/rotation is observed in the gas, it is often misaligned relative to the stellar component. These features indicate that eLIERs are passive galaxies harbouring a residual cold gas component, acquired mostly via external accretion. Importantly, quiescent galaxies devoid of line emission reside in denser environments and have significantly higher satellite fraction than eLIERs. Environmental effects thus represent the likely cause for the existence of line-less galaxies on the red sequence.

  19. Fueling active galactic nuclei. II. Spatially resolved molecular inflows and outflows

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, R. I.; Erwin, P.; Burtscher, L.; Lin, M.; Orban de Xivry, G.; Rosario, D. J.; Schnorr-Müller, A.; Maciejewski, W.; Hicks, E. K. S.; Emsellem, E.; Dumas, G.; Malkan, M. A.; Müller-Sánchez, F.; Tran, A.

    2014-09-10

    We analyze the two-dimensional distribution and kinematics of the stars as well as molecular and ionized gas in the central few hundred parsecs of five active and five matched inactive galaxies. The equivalent widths of the Brγ line indicate that there is no ongoing star formation in their nuclei, although recent (terminated) starbursts are possible in the active galaxies. The stellar velocity fields show no signs of non-circular motions, while the 1-0 S(1) H{sub 2} kinematics exhibit significant deviations from simple circular rotation. In the active galaxies the H{sub 2} kinematics reveal inflow and outflow superimposed on disk rotation. Steady-state circumnuclear inflow is seen in three active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and hydrodynamical models indicate it can be driven by a large-scale bar. In three of the five AGNs, molecular outflows are spatially resolved. The outflows are oriented such that they intersect, or have an edge close to, the disk, which may be the source of molecular gas in the outflow. The relatively low speeds imply the gas will fall back onto the disk, and with moderate outflow rates, they will have only a local impact on the host galaxy. H{sub 2} was detected in two inactive galaxies. These exhibit chaotic circumnuclear dust morphologies and have molecular structures that are counter-rotating with respect to the main gas component, which could lead to gas inflow in the near future. In our sample, all four galaxies with chaotic dust morphology in the circumnuclear region exist in moderately dense groups with 10-15 members where accretion of stripped gas can easily occur.

  20. Scene from above: retinal ganglion cell topography and spatial resolving power in the giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis).

    PubMed

    Coimbra, João Paulo; Hart, Nathan S; Collin, Shaun P; Manger, Paul R

    2013-06-15

    The giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) is a browser that uses its extensible tongue to selectively collect leaves during foraging. As the tallest extant terrestrial mammal, its elevated head height provides panoramic surveillance of the environment. These aspects of the giraffe's ecology and phenotype suggest that vision is of prime importance. Using Nissl-stained retinal wholemounts and stereological methods, we quantitatively assessed the retinal specializations in the ganglion cell layer of the giraffe. The mean total number of retinal ganglion cells was 1,393,779 and their topographic distribution revealed the presence of a horizontal visual streak and a temporal area. With a mean peak of 14,271 cells/mm(2), upper limits of spatial resolving power in the temporal area ranged from 25 to 27 cycles/degree. We also observed a dorsotemporal extension (anakatabatic area) that tapers toward the nasal retina giving rise to a complete dorsal arch. Using neurofilament-200 immunohistochemistry, we also detected a dorsal arch formed by alpha ganglion cells with density peaks in the temporal (14-15 cells/mm(2)) and dorsonasal (10 cells/mm(2)) regions. As with other artiodactyls, the giraffe shares the presence of a horizontal streak and a temporal area which, respectively, improve resolution along the horizon and in the frontal visual field. The dorsal arch is related to the giraffe's head height and affords enhanced resolution in the inferior visual field. The alpha ganglion cell distribution pattern is unique to the giraffe and enhances acquisition of motion information for the control of tongue movement during foraging and the detection of predators.

  1. Retinal ganglion cell topography and spatial resolving power in the river hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius).

    PubMed

    Coimbra, João Paulo; Bertelsen, Mads F; Manger, Paul R

    2017-01-31

    The river hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius), one of the closest extant relatives to cetaceans, is a large African even-toed ungulate (Artiodactyla) that grazes and has a semiaquatic lifestyle. Given its unusual phenotype, ecology and evolutionary history, we sought to measure the topographic distribution of retinal ganglion cell density using stereology and retinal wholemounts. We estimated a total of 243,000 ganglion cells of which 3.4% (8,300) comprise alpha cells. The topographic distribution of both total and alpha cells reveal a dual topographic organization of a temporal and nasal area embedded within a well-defined horizontal streak. Using maximum density of total ganglion cells and eye size (35 mm, axial length), we estimated upper limits of spatial resolving power of 8 cycles/deg (temporal area, 1,800 cells/mm(2) ), 7.7 cycles/deg (nasal area, 1,700 cells/mm(2) ) and 4.2 cycles/deg (horizontal streak, 250 cells/mm(2) ). Enhanced resolution of the temporal area towards the frontal visual field may facilitate grazing, whereas resolution of the horizontal streak and nasal area may help the discrimination of objects (predators, conspecifics) in the lateral and posterior visual fields, respectively. Given the presumed role of alpha cells to detect brisk transient stimuli, their similar distribution to the total ganglion cell population may facilitate the detection of approaching objects in equivalent portions of the visual field. Our finding of a nasal area in the river hippopotamus retina supports the notion that this specialization may enhance visual sampling in the posterior visual field to compensate for limited neck mobility as suggested for rhinoceroses and cetaceans. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: spatially resolving the environmental quenching of star formation in GAMA galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, A. L.; Croom, S. M.; Allen, J. T.; Brough, S.; Medling, A. M.; Ho, I.-T.; Scott, N.; Richards, S. N.; Pracy, M. B.; Gunawardhana, M. L. P.; Norberg, P.; Alpaslan, M.; Bauer, A. E.; Bekki, K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bloom, J. V.; Bryant, J. J.; Couch, W. J.; Driver, S. P.; Fogarty, L. M. R.; Foster, C.; Goldstein, G.; Green, A. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Lawrence, J. S.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; Lorente, N. P. F.; Owers, M. S.; Sharp, R.; Sweet, S. M.; Taylor, E. N.; van de Sande, J.; Walcher, C. J.; Wong, O. I.

    2017-01-01

    We use data from the Sydney-AAO Multi-Object Integral Field Spectrograph Galaxy Survey and the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey to investigate the spatially resolved signatures of the environmental quenching of star formation in galaxies. Using dust-corrected measurements of the distribution of Hα emission, we measure the radial profiles of star formation in a sample of 201 star-forming galaxies covering three orders of magnitude in stellar mass (M*; 108.1-1010.95 M⊙) and in fifth nearest neighbour local environment density (Σ5; 10-1.3-102.1 Mpc-2). We show that star formation rate gradients in galaxies are steeper in dense (log10(Σ5/Mpc2) > 0.5) environments by 0.58 ± 0.29 dex re^{-1} in galaxies with stellar masses in the range 10^{10} < M_{*}/M_{⊙} < 10^{11} and that this steepening is accompanied by a reduction in the integrated star formation rate. However, for any given stellar mass or environment density, the star formation morphology of galaxies shows large scatter. We also measure the degree to which the star formation is centrally concentrated using the unitless scale-radius ratio (r50,Hα/r50,cont), which compares the extent of ongoing star formation to previous star formation. With this metric, we find that the fraction of galaxies with centrally concentrated star formation increases with environment density, from ˜5 ± 4 per cent in low-density environments (log10(Σ5/Mpc2) < 0.0) to 30 ± 15 per cent in the highest density environments (log10(Σ5/Mpc2) > 1.0). These lines of evidence strongly suggest that with increasing local environment density, the star formation in galaxies is suppressed, and that this starts in their outskirts such that quenching occurs in an outside-in fashion in dense environments and is not instantaneous.

  3. A cortico-subcortical model for generation of spatially accurate sequential saccades.

    PubMed

    Dominey, P F; Arbib, M A

    1992-01-01

    This article provides a systems framework for the analysis of cortical and subcortical interactions in the control of saccadic eye movements, A major thesis of this model is that a topography of saccade direction and amplitude is preserved through multiple projections between brain regions until they are finally transformed into a temporal pattern of activity that drives the eyes to the target. The control of voluntary saccades to visual and remembered targets is modeled in terms of interactions between posterior parietal cortex, frontal eye fields, the basal ganglia (caudate and substantia nigra), superior colliculus, mediodorsal thalamus, and the saccade generator of the brainstem. Interactions include the modulation of eye movement motor error maps by topographic inhibitory projections, dynamic remapping of spatial target representations in saccade motor error maps, and sustained neural activity that embodies spatial memory. Models of these mechanisms implemented in our Neural Simulation Language simulate behavior and neural activity described in the literature, and suggest new experiments.

  4. Spatially-Resolved Hydraulic Conductivity Estimation Via Poroelastic Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    PubMed Central

    McGarry, Matthew; Weaver, John B.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2015-01-01

    Poroelastic magnetic resonance elastography is an imaging technique that could recover mechanical and hydrodynamical material properties of in vivo tissue. To date, mechanical properties have been estimated while hydrodynamical parameters have been assumed homogeneous with literature-based values. Estimating spatially-varying hydraulic conductivity would likely improve model accuracy and provide new image information related to a tissue’s interstitial fluid compartment. A poroelastic model was reformulated to recover hydraulic conductivity with more appropriate fluid-flow boundary conditions. Simulated and physical experiments were conducted to evaluate the accuracy and stability of the inversion algorithm. Simulations were accurate (property errors were < 2%) even in the presence of Gaussian measurement noise up to 3%. The reformulated model significantly decreased variation in the shear modulus estimate (p≪0.001) and eliminated the homogeneity assumption and the need to assign hydraulic conductivity values from literature. Material property contrast was recovered experimentally in three different tofu phantoms and the accuracy was improved through soft-prior regularization. A frequency-dependence in hydraulic conductivity contrast was observed suggesting that fluid-solid interactions may be more prominent at low frequency. In vivo recovery of both structural and hydrodynamical characteristics of tissue could improve detection and diagnosis of neurological disorders such as hydrocephalus and brain tumors. PMID:24771571

  5. The CALIFA survey across the Hubble sequence. Spatially resolved stellar population properties in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, R. M.; García-Benito, R.; Pérez, E.; Cid Fernandes, R.; de Amorim, A. L.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; Lacerda, E. A. D.; López Fernández, R.; Vale-Asari, N.; Sánchez, S. F.; Mollá, M.; Ruiz-Lara, T.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Walcher, C. J.; Alves, J.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Bekeraité, S.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Galbany, L.; Gallazzi, A.; Husemann, B.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Kalinova, V.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; Marino, R. A.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Mast, D.; Méndez-Abreu, J.; Mendoza, A.; del Olmo, A.; Pérez, I.; Quirrenbach, A.; Zibetti, S.

    2015-09-01

    Various different physical processes contribute to the star formation and stellar mass assembly histories of galaxies. One important approach to understanding the significance of these different processes on galaxy evolution is the study of the stellar population content of today's galaxies in a spatially resolved manner. The aim of this paper is to characterize in detail the radial structure of stellar population properties of galaxies in the nearby universe, based on a uniquely large galaxy sample, considering the quality and coverage of the data. The sample under study was drawn from the CALIFA survey and contains 300 galaxies observed with integral field spectroscopy. These cover a wide range of Hubble types, from spheroids to spiral galaxies, while stellar masses range from M⋆ ~ 109 to 7 × 1011 M⊙. We apply the fossil record method based on spectral synthesis techniques to recover the following physical properties for each spatial resolution element in our target galaxies: the stellar mass surface density (μ⋆), stellar extinction (AV), light-weighted and mass-weighted ages (⟨log age⟩L, ⟨log age⟩M), and mass-weighted metallicity (⟨log Z⋆⟩M). To study mean trends with overall galaxy properties, the individual radial profiles are stacked in seven bins of galaxy morphology (E, S0, Sa, Sb, Sbc, Sc, and Sd). We confirm that more massive galaxies are more compact, older, moremetal rich, and less reddened by dust. Additionally, we find that these trends are preserved spatially with the radial distance to the nucleus. Deviations from these relations appear correlated with Hubble type: earlier types are more compact, older, and more metal rich for a given M⋆, which is evidence that quenching is related to morphology, but not driven by mass. Negative gradients of ⟨log age⟩L are consistent with an inside-out growth of galaxies, with the largest ⟨log age⟩L gradients in Sb-Sbc galaxies. Further, the mean stellar ages of disks and bulges are

  6. Evaluation of Equivalent Circuit Models for Plasma Bulk Characterization by Comparing IEDF Predictions with those of a Spatially Resolved CCP Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naggary, Schabnam; Shihab, Mohammed; Atteln, Frank; Megahed, Mustafa; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2013-09-01

    Capacitively coupled radio frequency discharges are widely used in the semiconductor processing industry for thin film deposition and etching. Thus the evaluation of the ion energy distribution function (IEDF) is of paramount importance for industrial applications. Spatially and temporally resolved CCP models are generally computationally expensive leading to reduced applicability of these models for industrial optimization. In order to reduce the simulation time, as an alternative method, we use equivalent circuits based on a global model to characterize the plasma bulk and provide the needed input parameters for a hybrid sheath model [ 1 , 2 , 3 ] . The overall computational time to obtain time averaged IEDFs lies within seconds, hence the concept is very attractive for industrial scanning and optimization. In order to assess the applicability of this novel approach the results are compared with those of commercial multi-physics software CFD-ACE+ in 2 and 3 dimensions. Our investigation demonstrates the feasibility of the compromise between short simulation times and accurate calculation of spatially resolved IEDF. The authors acknowledge support by the ESI Group, DFG via SFB-TR87, and the Ruhr-University Research School.

  7. Experimental measurement of spatially resolved electron density in a filament of a pulsed positive streamer discharge in water

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Xiao Qiong; Niu, Zhi Wen; Ren, Chun-Sheng; Hou, Bo

    2015-06-29

    By combining a high-speed frame camera with a monochromator, the spatially resolved optical emission spectrum of hydrogen α line in a single filament of a pulsed positive streamer discharge in water has been experimentally measured. The spatially resolved electron densities in a single filament of a pulsed positive streamer discharge in water with a conductivity of 200 μS/cm were investigated. During the experiment, the average energy per pulse of discharge was 90.6 ± 13.6 mJ. The results show that the electron density in the streamer filament is 10{sup 17–18}/cm{sup 3}, and present a decreasing tendency along the axial direction of the streamer filament with increasing distance from the tip of the anode.

  8. Time-resolved contrast function and optical characterization of spatially varying absorptive inclusions at different depths in diffusing media.

    PubMed

    De Nicola, S; Esposito, R; Lepore, M; Indovina, P L

    2004-03-01

    The role of a spatially varying absorptive inhomogeneity located at different depths within a turbid material has been investigated. This inhomogeneity has been characterized by a spatially dependent Gaussian distribution of its absorption coefficient. The present study has been performed calculating the time-resolved contrast function in the framework of the first-order perturbative approach to the diffusion equation for a slab geometry and a coaxial measurement scheme. The model has allowed us to take into account different locations of the inclusion along the source-detector axis. The accuracy of time-resolved contrast predictions has been analyzed through comparisons with results of the finite element method that has been used to numerically solve the diffusion equation. Recovery of the absorption perturbation parameter of the inhomogeneity for different axial positions has also been investigated.

  9. Imaging of strain in laterally overgrown GaAs layers by spatially resolved x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domagala, J. Z.; Czyzak, A.; Zytkiewicz, Z. R.

    2007-06-01

    Spatially resolved x-ray diffraction is used to analyze the strain in GaAs layers grown by liquid phase epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) on SiO2-masked GaAs substrates. A downward tilt of ELO wings caused by their interaction with the mask is observed. The distribution of the tilt magnitude across the wings width is determined with micrometer-scale spatial resolution. A residual upward tilt originating from inhomogeneous Si dopant distribution in the ELO wing is found after mask removal. If a large area of the sample is studied, the technique provides precise information on the tilt of an individual wing and its distribution.

  10. Early Results from the VENGA Integral Field Spectroscopy Survey: Current and Past Spatially-Resolved Star Formation in NGC2903

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mimi; Gebhardt, K.; Jogee, S.; VENGA

    2012-01-01

    We present spatially-resolved integral field spectroscopy of the nearby isolated spiral galaxy NGC 2903 from the VIRUS-P Exploration of Nearby Spiral Galaxies (VENGA) survey. Among science goals that the survey aims at, here we focus on its star formation activity, stellar population modeling and constraining its star formation history. We acknowledge support from the Norman Hackerman Advanced Research Program (NHARP) ARP-03658-0234-2009.

  11. Efficient and accurate laser shaping with liquid crystal spatial light modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxson, Jared M.; Bartnik, Adam C.; Bazarov, Ivan V.

    2014-10-01

    A phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM) is capable of precise transverse laser shaping by either functioning as a variable phase grating or by serving as a variable mask via polarization rotation. As a phase grating, the highest accuracy algorithms, based on computer generated holograms (CGHs), have been shown to yield extended laser shapes with <10% rms error, but conversely little is known about the experimental efficiency of the method in general. In this work, we compare the experimental tradeoff between error and efficiency for both the best known CGH method and polarization rotation-based intensity masking when generating hard-edged flat top beams. We find that the masking method performs comparably with CGHs, both having rms error < 10% with efficiency > 15%. Informed by best practices for high efficiency from a SLM phase grating, we introduce an adaptive refractive algorithm which has high efficiency (92%) but also higher error (16%), for nearly cylindrically symmetric cases.

  12. Efficient and accurate laser shaping with liquid crystal spatial light modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Maxson, Jared M.; Bartnik, Adam C.; Bazarov, Ivan V.

    2014-10-27

    A phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM) is capable of precise transverse laser shaping by either functioning as a variable phase grating or by serving as a variable mask via polarization rotation. As a phase grating, the highest accuracy algorithms, based on computer generated holograms (CGHs), have been shown to yield extended laser shapes with <10% rms error, but conversely little is known about the experimental efficiency of the method in general. In this work, we compare the experimental tradeoff between error and efficiency for both the best known CGH method and polarization rotation-based intensity masking when generating hard-edged flat top beams. We find that the masking method performs comparably with CGHs, both having rms error < 10% with efficiency > 15%. Informed by best practices for high efficiency from a SLM phase grating, we introduce an adaptive refractive algorithm which has high efficiency (92%) but also higher error (16%), for nearly cylindrically symmetric cases.

  13. Modeling spatially and spectrally resolved observations to diagnose the formation of elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Gregory Frantz

    2013-03-01

    In extragalactic astronomy, a central challenge is that we cannot directly watch what happens to galaxies before and after they are observed. This dissertation focuses on linking predictions of galaxy time-evolution directly with observations, evaluating how interactions, mergers, and other processes affect the appearance of elliptical galaxies. The primary approach is to combine hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation, including all major components, with dust radiative transfer to predict their observational signatures The current paradigm implies that a quiescent elliptical emerges following a formative starburst event. These trigger accretion onto the central supermassive black hole (SMBH), which then radiates as an active galactic nucleus (AGN). However, it is not clear the extent to which SMBH growth is fueled by these events nor how important is their energy input at setting the appearance of the remnant. This thesis presents results drawing from three phases in the formation of a typical elliptical: 1) I evaluate how to disentangle AGN from star formation signatures in mid-infrared spectra during a dust-enshrouded starburst, making testable predictions for robustly tracing SMBH growth with the James Webb Space Telescope; 2) I develop a model for the rate of merger-induced post-starburst galaxies selected from optical spectra, resolving tension between their observed rarity and merger rates from other estimates; and 3) I present results from Hubble Space Telescope imaging of elliptical galaxies in galaxy clusters at 1 < z < 2, the precursors of present-day massive clusters with M ~ 1015 solar masses, demonstrating that their stars formed over an extended period and ruling out the simplest model for their formation history. These results lend support to a stochastic formation history for ellipticals driven by mergers or interactions. However, significant uncertainties remain in how to evaluate the implications of galaxy appearance, in particular their

  14. Spatially resolved integral field spectroscopy of the ionized gas in IZw18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehrig, C.; Vílchez, J. M.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Hernández-Fernández, J. D.; Duarte Puertas, S.; Brinchmann, J.; Durret, F.; Kunth, D.

    2016-07-01

    We present a detailed 2D study of the ionized ionized interstellar medium (ISM) of IZw18 using new Potsdam Multi-Aperture Spectrophotometer-integral field unit (PMAS-IFU) optical observations. IZw18 is a high-ionization galaxy which is among the most metal-poor starbursts in the local Universe. This makes IZw18 a local benchmark for understanding the properties most closely resembling those prevailing at distant starbursts. Our IFU aperture (˜1.4 × 1.4 kpc2) samples the entire IZw18 main body and an extended region of its ionized gas. Maps of relevant emission lines and emission line ratios show that higher-excitation gas is preferentially located close to the north-west knot and thereabouts. We detect a Wolf-Rayet feature near the north-west knot. We derive spatially resolved and integrated physical-chemical properties for the ionized gas in IZw18. We find no dependence between the metallicity indicator R23 and the ionization parameter (as traced by [O III]/[O II]) across IZw18. Over ˜0.30 kpc2, using the [O III] λ4363 line, we compute Te[O III] values (˜15 000-25 000 K), and oxygen abundances are derived from the direct determinations of Te[O III]. More than 70 per cent of the higher-Te[O III] (≳22 000 K) spaxels are He IIλ4686-emitting spaxels too. From a statistical analysis, we study the presence of variations in the ISM physical-chemical properties. A galaxy-wide homogeneity, across hundreds of parsecs, is seen in O/H. Based on spaxel-by-spaxel measurements, the error-weighted mean of 12 + log(O/H) = 7.11 ± 0.01 is taken as the representative O/H for IZw18. Aperture effects on the derivation of O/H are discussed. Using our IFU data we obtain, for the first time, the IZw18 integrated spectrum.

  15. Spatially-resolved stable isotope analysis of a hypersaline microbial mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J.; Cory, A. B.; Lindemann, S. R.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    Hot Lake is a hypersaline, meromictic lake located in north-central Washington. High rates of evapotranspiration coupled with its location in an endorrheic basin contribute to the lake's high salinity. The predominant dissolved salt is magnesium sulfate; hypolimnion waters may seasonally exceed 2 M magnesium sulfate concentrations. In addition to extreme salinity, horizons within the lake seasonally exceed 50 °C, in part due to the enhanced light absorption by magnesium sulfate-saturated water. Despite extreme and highly variable seasonal conditions (salinity, temperature, photon flux), dense benthic microbial mats composed of cyanobacteria and bacterial heterotroph populations develop annually at the lake. These mats may exceed 5 mm in thickness and display stratification observable by eye associated with dominant bacterial phototrophic pigments. Typical mat stratification includes an orange surface layer followed by green and purple layers at increasing depth into the mat. Carbonates including aragonite and magnesite are observed within the mat and their formation is likely induced or influenced by microbial activities. While not exclusively limited to the green stratum in the mat, maximum carbonate content is within this layer. We are exploring the role Hot Lake's microbial mats play in carbon cycling within the system. Namely, we seek to understand the rates of carbon accumulation in the mat and associated sediments and the various forms this carbon takes (organic or inorganic species). We are assessing mat development, community composition, and carbon accumulation in pre-cleaned devices installed at the lake as they are colonized by native mat. We are using laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LA-IRMS) to provide spatially-resolved stable isotope analysis of mat cross-sections. Currently, this technique permits isotope analysis at the 50 μm scale, and can provide multiple isotope analyses within the thickness of each major layer of the mat. We

  16. A High-mass Protobinary System with Spatially Resolved Circumstellar Accretion Disks and Circumbinary Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, S.; Kluska, J.; Kreplin, A.; Bate, M.; Harries, T. J.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Hone, E.; Monnier, J. D.; Weigelt, G.; Anugu, A.; de Wit, W. J.; Wittkowski, M.

    2017-01-01

    High-mass multiples might form via fragmentation of self-gravitational disks or alternative scenarios such as disk-assisted capture. However, only a few observational constraints exist on the architecture and disk structure of high-mass protobinaries and their accretion properties. Here, we report the discovery of a close (57.9 ± 0.2 mas = 170 au) high-mass protobinary, IRAS17216-3801, where our VLTI/GRAVITY+AMBER near-infrared interferometry allows us to image the circumstellar disks around the individual components with ∼3 mas resolution. We estimate the component masses to ∼20 and ∼18 M⊙ and find that the radial intensity profiles can be reproduced with an irradiated disk model, where the inner regions are excavated of dust, likely tracing the dust sublimation region in these disks. The circumstellar disks are strongly misaligned with respect to the binary separation vector, which indicates that the tidal forces did not have time to realign the disks, pointing toward a young dynamical age of the system. We constrain the distribution of the Brγ and CO-emitting gas using VLTI/GRAVITY spectro-interferometry and VLT/CRIRES spectro-astrometry and find that the secondary is accreting at a higher rate than the primary. VLT/NACO imaging shows L‧-band emission on (3–4)× larger scales than the binary separation, matching the expected dynamical truncation radius for the circumbinary disk. The IRAS17216-3801 system is ∼3× more massive and ∼5× more compact than other high-mass multiplies imaged at infrared wavelength and the first high-mass protobinary system where circumstellar and circumbinary dust disks could be spatially resolved. This opens exciting new opportunities for studying star–disk interactions and the role of multiplicity in high-mass star formation. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at Paranal Observatory under program IDs 60.A-9174(A), 089.C-0819(A,C), 089.C-0959(D,E), 094.C-0153(A), 096.C-0652(A).

  17. Spatially resolved streaming potentials of human intervertebral disk motion segments under dynamic axial compression.

    PubMed

    Iatridis, James C; Furukawa, Masaru; Stokes, Ian A F; Gardner-Morse, Mack G; Laible, Jeffrey P

    2009-03-01

    Intervertebral disk degeneration results in alterations in the mechanical, chemical, and electrical properties of the disk tissue. The purpose of this study is to record spatially resolved streaming potential measurements across intervertebral disks exposed to cyclic compressive loading. We hypothesize that the streaming potential profile across the disk will vary with radial position and frequency and is proportional to applied load amplitude, according to the presumed fluid-solid relative velocity and measured glycosaminoglycan content. Needle electrodes were fabricated using a linear array of AgAgCl micro-electrodes and inserted into human motion segments in the midline from anterior to posterior. They were connected to an amplifier to measure electrode potentials relative to the saline bath ground. Motion segments were loaded in axial compression under a preload of 500 N, sinusoidal amplitudes of +/-200 N and +/-400 N, and frequencies of 0.01 Hz, 0.1 Hz, and 1 Hz. Streaming potential data were normalized by applied force amplitude, and also compared with paired experimental measurements of glycosaminoglycans in each disk. Normalized streaming potentials varied significantly with sagittal position and there was a significant location difference at the different frequencies. Normalized streaming potential was largest in the central nucleus region at frequencies of 0.1 Hz and 1.0 Hz with values of approximately 3.5 microVN. Under 0.01 Hz loading, normalized streaming potential was largest in the outer annulus regions with a maximum value of 3.0 microVN. Correlations between streaming potential and glycosaminoglycan content were significant, with R(2) ranging from 0.5 to 0.8. Phasic relationships between applied force and electrical potential did not differ significantly by disk region or frequency, although the largest phase angles were observed at the outermost electrodes. Normalized streaming potentials were associated with glycosaminoglycan content, fluid, and

  18. Spatially-resolved carbon flow through a hypersaline phototrophic microbial mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J.; Lindemann, S. R.; Cory, A. B.; Courtney, S.; Cole, J. K.; Fredrickson, J.

    2013-12-01

    analysis (via elemental analysis IRMS and gas bench IRMS) we are employing laser ablation IRMS (LA-IRMS) to provide a spatially-resolved accounting of label uptake through the mat cross section. This technique permits isotope analysis at the 50 μm scale, and can provide multiple isotope analyses within each mat strata. By coupling LA-IRMS analysis with laminar sectioning of the mat and amplicon sequencing of the rrnA gene, we seek to establish linkages between phylogeny and function over the course of a diel cycle with highlighted emphasis on evidence of carbon transfer between mat laminae and the phylotypes that inhabit them. We are also using a series of carbon accumulation microcosms to quantify net carbon fixation over the seasonal cycle. These microcosms are deployed at multiple depths to provide an accounting of carbon cycling under the specific geochemical conditions experienced at variable depth. Coupling the data from these individual microcosms to our bathymetric survey of Hot Lake permits us to estimate total mat carbon fixation, and therefore to begin to assess the impact of the mat on the greater lake carbon cycle.

  19. In-Situ Observations of Phase Transformations During Welding of 1045 Steel using Spatially Resolved and Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J; Palmer, T; DebRoy, T

    2005-10-28

    Synchrotron-based methods have been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the direct observation of microstructure evolution during welding. These techniques, known as spatially resolved (SRXRD) and time resolved (TRXRD) x-ray diffraction, allow in-situ experiments to be performed during welding and provide direct observations of high temperature phases that form under the intense thermal cycles that occur. This paper presents observations of microstructural evolution that occur during the welding of a medium carbon AISI 1045 steel, using SRXRD to map the phases that are present during welding, and TRXRD to dynamically observe transformations during rapid heating and cooling. SRXRD was further used to determine the influence of welding heat input on the size of the high temperature austenite region, and the time required to completely homogenize this region during welding. These data can be used to determine the kinetics of phase transformations under the steep thermal gradients of welds, as well as benchmark and verify phase transformation models.

  20. ISM Dust Grains and N-band Spectral Variability in the Spatially Resolved Subarcsecond Binary UY Aur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skemer, Andrew J.; Close, Laird M.; Hinz, Philip M.; Hoffmann, William F.; Greene, Thomas P.; Males, Jared R.; Beck, Tracy L.

    2010-03-01

    The 10 μm silicate feature is an essential diagnostic of dust-grain growth and planet formation in young circumstellar disks. The Spitzer Space Telescope has revolutionized the study of this feature, but due to its small (85 cm) aperture, it cannot spatially resolve small/medium-separation binaries (lsim3''; <~ 420 AU) at the distances of the nearest star-forming regions (~140 pc). Large, 6-10 m ground-based telescopes with mid-infrared instruments can resolve these systems. In this paper, we spatially resolve the 0farcs88 binary, UY Aur, with MMTAO/BLINC-MIRAC4 mid-infrared spectroscopy. We then compare our spectra to Spitzer/IRS (unresolved) spectroscopy, and resolved images from IRTF/MIRAC2, Keck/OSCIR, and Gemini/Michelle, which were taken over the past decade. We find that UY Aur A has extremely pristine, interstellar medium (ISM)-like grains and that UY Aur B has an unusually shaped silicate feature, which is probably the result of blended emission and absorption from foreground extinction in its disk. We also find evidence for variability in both UY Aur A and UY Aur B by comparing synthetic photometry from our spectra with resolved imaging from previous epochs. The photometric variability of UY Aur A could be an indication that the silicate emission itself is variable, as was recently found in EX Lupi. Otherwise, the thermal continuum is variable, and either the ISM-like dust has never evolved, or it is being replenished, perhaps by UY Aur's circumbinary disk. The observations reported here were partially obtained at the Infrared Telescope Facility, which is operated by the University of Hawaii under Cooperative Agreement no. NCC 5-538 with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Science Mission Directorate, Planetary Astronomy Program.

  1. Spatially resolved HST/STIS observations of Io's dayside equatorial atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessup, Kandis Lea; Spencer, John R.

    2015-03-01

    We report on an investigation of the spatial distribution of Io's atmosphere, and its diurnal variability, using Hubble's Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS). From December 2010 to January 2012, we obtained spatially resolved limb-to-limb 2100-3100 Å spectra at low latitudes (<30°), with the STIS 0.1″ slit. Spectra taken at two central meridian longitudes (CMLs), 200 and 250W, over regions that are both bright and dark at near-UV (3000-4000 Å) wavelengths, allowed investigation of the variation in atmospheric density with terrain type and local time. The combined longitudinal coverage of these observations extends from 120 to 320W longitude, and observations of the 200-250W longitude region are obtained at 2 distinct times of day, differing by 50° of rotation of Io. Using primarily SO2 gas absorptions from 2100 to 2300 Å, we detect SO2 gas densities ranging from 0.3 to 2.2 × 1017 cm-2, and 100-200 K gas temperatures. Because we avoided known persistent plume sites, and see little enhancement of SO2 density near known active volcanic centers, we conclude that SO2 gas densities ∼2 × 1017 cm-2 can be obtained via sublimation alone. We correct column densities at each location to equatorial values by assuming vapor-pressure equilibrium with frost at temperatures that vary as cosine1/4(latitude), as inferred from earlier low latitude HST/STIS observations (Jessup, K.L., Spencer, J.R., Ballester, G.E., Howell, R.R., Roesler, F., Vigil, M., Yelle, R. [2004]. Icarus 169, 197-215). Inferred equatorial SO2 gas densities in the 120-320W longitude range show the following behavior: (i) rapid decrease from longitude 170W to 310W, consistent with previous disk-integrated 19 μm and 2100 Å spectroscopy (Spencer, J.R., Lellouch, E., Richter, M.J., López-Valverde, M.A., Jessup, K.L., Greathouse, T.K., Flaud, J.M. [2005]. Icarus 176, 283-304; Tsang, C.C.C., Spencer, J.R., Jessup, K.L. [2013]. Icarus 226, 604-616) and Ly-α imaging (Feaga, L.M., McGrath, M

  2. SPATIALLY RESOLVED STAR FORMATION IMAGE AND THE ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE POPULATION IN NGC 2207/IC 2163

    SciTech Connect

    Mineo, S.; Rappaport, S.; Steinhorn, B.; Levine, A.; Gilfanov, M.; Pooley, D. E-mail: sar@mit.edu E-mail: bsteinho@mit.edu E-mail: gilfanov@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2013-07-10

    The colliding galaxy pair NGC 2207/IC 2163, at a distance of {approx}39 Mpc, was observed with Chandra, and an analysis reveals 28 well resolved X-ray sources, including 21 ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) with L{sub X} {approx}> 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}, as well as the nucleus of NGC 2207. The number of ULXs is comparable with the largest numbers of ULXs per unit mass in any galaxy yet reported. In this paper we report on these sources, and quantify how their locations correlate with the local star formation rates seen in spatially resolved star formation rate density images that we have constructed using combinations of GALEX FUV and Spitzer 24 {mu}m images. We show that the numbers of ULXs are strongly correlated with the local star formation rate densities surrounding the sources, but that the luminosities of these sources are not strongly correlated with star formation rate density.

  3. All optical method for investigation of spin and charge transport in semiconductors: Combination of spatially and time-resolved luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Cadiz, F.; Paget, D.; Grebenkov, D.; Korb, J. P.; Rowe, A. C. H.; Barate, P.; Amand, T.; Arscott, S.; Peytavit, E.

    2014-07-14

    A new approach is demonstrated for investigating charge and spin diffusion as well as surface and bulk recombination in unpassivated doped semiconductors. This approach consists in using two complementary, conceptually related, techniques, which are time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) and spatially resolved microluminescence (μPL) and is applied here to p{sup +} GaAs. Analysis of the sole TRPL signal is limited by the finite risetime. On the other hand, it is shown that joint TRPL and μPL can be used to determine the diffusion constant, the bulk recombination time, and the spin relaxation time. As an illustration, the temperature variation of these quantities is investigated for p{sup +} GaAs.

  4. Investigation of the Spatially Resolved Electronic Structure of Single Layer WS2 on Transition Metal Oxide Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katoch, Jyoti; Ulstrup, Søren; Koch, Roland; Schwarz, Daniel; Singh, Simranjeet; McCreary, Kathy; Keun Yoo, Hyang; Xu, Jinsong; Jonker, Berry; Kawakami, Roland; Bostwick, Aaron; Rotenberg, Eli; Jozwiak, Chris

    The family of semiconducting single layer (SL) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have lately been intensely studied, owing to the strong coupling between spin and valley degrees of freedom as well as the presence of strongly bound excitons. The choice of supporting substrate is known to strongly influence these properties. We set out to investigate the electronic properties of CVD grown SL WS2 transferred onto the dielectric oxide materials SrTiO3 and TiO2. By using a combination of photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) and angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) with micrometer focus we obtain simultaneous spatial, momentum and energy-resolved information about SL WS2 on a polar (SrTiO3) and a nonpolar (TiO2) surface for the first time.

  5. Inverse Algorithm Optimization for Determining Optical Properties of Biological Materials from Spatially-Resolved Diffuse Reflectance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optical characterization of biological materials is useful in many scientific and industrial applications like biomedical diagnosis and nondestructive quality evaluation of food and agricultural products. However, accurate determination of the optical properties from intact biological materials base...

  6. Determination of spatially-resolved porosity, tracer distributions and diffusion coefficients in porous media using MRI measurements and numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Marica, Florea; Jofré, Sergio Andrés Bea; Mayer, K Ulrich; Balcom, Bruce J; Al, Tom A

    2011-07-01

    This work is focused on measuring the concentration distribution of a conservative tracer in a homogeneous synthetic porous material and in heterogeneous natural sandstone using MRI techniques, and on the use of spatially resolved porosity data to define spatially variable diffusion coefficients in heterogeneous media. The measurements are made by employing SPRITE, a fast MRI method that yields quantitative, spatially-resolved tracer concentrations in porous media. Diffusion experiments involving the migration of H(2)O into D(2)O-saturated porous media are conducted. One-dimensional spatial distributions of H(2)O-tracer concentrations acquired from experiments with the homogeneous synthetic calcium silicate are fitted with the one-dimensional analytical solution of Fick's second law to confirm that the experimental method provides results that are consistent with expectations for Fickian diffusion in porous media. The MRI-measured concentration profiles match well with the solution for Fick's second law and provide a pore-water diffusion coefficient of 1.75×10(-9)m(2)s(-1). The experimental approach was then extended to evaluate diffusion in a heterogeneous natural sandstone in three dimensions. The relatively high hydraulic conductivity of the sandstone, and the contrast in fluid density between the H(2)O tracer and the D(2)O pore fluid, lead to solute transport by a combination of diffusion and density-driven advection. The MRI measurements of spatially distributed tracer concentration, combined with numerical simulations allow for the identification of the respective influences of advection and diffusion. The experimental data are interpreted with the aid of MIN3P-D - a multicomponent reactive transport code that includes the coupled processes of diffusion and density-driven advection. The model defines local diffusion coefficients as a function of spatially resolved porosity measurements. The D(e) values calculated for the heterogeneous sandstone and used to

  7. Spatially resolved chemical imaging of individual atmospheric particles using nanoscale imaging mass spectrometry: insight into particle origin and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosal, Sutapa; Weber, Peter K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2014-01-14

    Knowledge of the spatially resolved composition of atmospheric particles is essential for differentiating between their surface versus bulk chemistry and understanding particle reactivity and the potential environmental impact. Here, we demonstrate the application of nanometer-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (CAMECA NanoSIMS 50 ion probe) for 3D chemical imaging of individual atmospheric particles without any sample pre-treatment, such as sectioning of particles. Use of NanoSIMS depth profile analysis enables elemental mapping of particles with nanometer spatial resolution over a broad range of particle sizes. We have used this technique to probe the spatially resolved composition of ambient particles collected during a field campaign in Mexico City. Particles collected during this campaign have been extensively characterized in the past using other particle analysis techniques and hence offer a unique opportunity for exploring the utility of depth-resolved chemical imaging in ambient particle research. The particles that we examined in our study include those collected during a pollution episode related to urban waste incineration as well as background particles from the same location before the episode. Particles from the pollution episode show substantial intra-particle compositional variability typical of particles resulting from multiple emission sources. In contrast, the background particles have relatively homogeneous compositions with enhanced presence of nitrogen, oxygen, and chlorine at the particle surface. We also observed the surface enhancement of nitrogen and oxygen species is consistent with the presence of surface nitrates resulting from gas–particle heterogeneous interactions and is indicative of atmospheric ageing of the particles. The results presented here illustrate 3D characterization of ambient particles for insight into their chemical history.

  8. Spatially resolved chemical imaging of individual atmospheric particles using nanoscale imaging mass spectrometry: insight into particle origin and chemistry

    DOE PAGES

    Ghosal, Sutapa; Weber, Peter K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2014-01-14

    Knowledge of the spatially resolved composition of atmospheric particles is essential for differentiating between their surface versus bulk chemistry and understanding particle reactivity and the potential environmental impact. Here, we demonstrate the application of nanometer-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (CAMECA NanoSIMS 50 ion probe) for 3D chemical imaging of individual atmospheric particles without any sample pre-treatment, such as sectioning of particles. Use of NanoSIMS depth profile analysis enables elemental mapping of particles with nanometer spatial resolution over a broad range of particle sizes. We have used this technique to probe the spatially resolved composition of ambient particles collected during amore » field campaign in Mexico City. Particles collected during this campaign have been extensively characterized in the past using other particle analysis techniques and hence offer a unique opportunity for exploring the utility of depth-resolved chemical imaging in ambient particle research. The particles that we examined in our study include those collected during a pollution episode related to urban waste incineration as well as background particles from the same location before the episode. Particles from the pollution episode show substantial intra-particle compositional variability typical of particles resulting from multiple emission sources. In contrast, the background particles have relatively homogeneous compositions with enhanced presence of nitrogen, oxygen, and chlorine at the particle surface. We also observed the surface enhancement of nitrogen and oxygen species is consistent with the presence of surface nitrates resulting from gas–particle heterogeneous interactions and is indicative of atmospheric ageing of the particles. The results presented here illustrate 3D characterization of ambient particles for insight into their chemical history.« less

  9. Spatially resolved chemical imaging of individual atmospheric particles using nanoscale imaging mass spectrometry: Insights into particle origin and chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, S.; Weber, P. K.; Laskin, A.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of the spatially-resolved composition of atmospheric particles is essential for differentiating between their surface versus bulk chemistry, understanding particle reactivity and the potential environmental impact. We demonstrate the application of nanometer-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (Cameca NanoSIMS 50 ion probe) for 3D chemical imaging of individual atmospheric particles without any sample pre-treatment, such as the sectioning of particles. Use of NanoSIMS depth profile analysis enables elemental mapping of particles with nanometer spatial resolution over a broad of range of particle sizes. We have used this technique to probe spatially resolved composition of ambient particles collected during a field campaign in Mexico City. Particles collected during this campaign have been extensively characterized in the past using other particle analysis techniques and hence offer a unique opportunity for exploring the utility of depth resolved chemical imaging in ambient particle research. Particles examined in this study include those collected during a pollution episode related to urban waste incineration as well as background particles from the same location prior to the episode. Particles from the pollution episode show substantial intra-particle compositional variability typical of particles resulting from multiple emission sources. In contrast, the background particles have relatively homogeneous compositions with enhanced presence of nitrogen, oxygen and chlorine at the particle surface. The observed surface enhancement of nitrogen and oxygen species is consistent with the presence of surface nitrates resulting from gas-particle heterogeneous interactions and is indicative of atmospheric ageing of the particles. The results presented here illustrate 3D characterization of ambient particles for insights into their chemical history.

  10. Microbe-Mineral Interactions in Extinct Hydrothermal Chimneys at East Pacific Rise: Spatially-Resolved Chemical and Mineralogical Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, B. M.; Santelli, C. M.; Marlow, J. J.; Rouxel, O.; Edwards, K. J.

    2006-12-01

    The mid-ocean ridge system is a 60,000 km seam along the ocean floor where greater than 200 known or suspected sites of hydrothermal venting are present. Hydrothermal processes result in the precipitation of sulfide minerals, which represent an estimated 4.9 kJ (kg vented fluid)-1 of energy to microorganisms capable of growing lithotrophically via oxidation of Fe and S derived from sulfide minerals. Low-temperature seafloor weathering of sulfide minerals represents an important biogeochemical process where chemical energy may harvested from sulfide minerals by primary producers of an ecosystem that is underpinned by chemolithoautotrophy. The role of these microbial communities in deep-sea rock alteration, mineral deposition, and rock-derived primary productivity is largely unknown. Research into these areas presents significant challenges in regard to Fe and S speciation in heterogeneous materials, microbial processes at mineral surfaces, and metabolic processes of uncultured microorganisms. To overcome these challenges and conclusively link microbial processes to biogeochemical cycles, research tools must provide molecular-level chemical speciation, spatially-resolved analyses of geochemical and microbiological features at the mm-, micro-, and nm- scales, in situ measurements of microbial activity, and cultured microorganisms representative of the environment. The focus of this presentation will be on the mineralogical and Fe speciation data obtained from spatially-resolved X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of Fe oxide- encrusted biofilms associated with extinct hydrothermal chimneys at East Pacific Rise 9 o N. Special attention will be given to how this study, and future studies, may select from existing spatially-resolved techniques to describe the interactions among parent minerals, microbial growth, and secondary mineral formation. In addition, the need for methodological development in the area of microbe-mineral interactions will be

  11. A Spatially Resolved Plerionic X-Ray Nebula around PSR B0540-69.

    PubMed

    Gotthelf; Wang

    2000-04-01

    We present a high-resolution Chandra X-ray observation of PSR B0540-69, the Crab-like 50 ms pulsar in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We use phase-resolved imaging to decompose the extended X-ray emission, as expected of a synchrotron nebula, from the pointlike emission of the pulsar. The image of the pulsed X-ray emission shows a well-defined point-spread function of the observation, while the resolved nebula has a morphology and size remarkably similar to the Crab nebula, including evidence for a jetlike feature from PSR B0540-69. The patchy outer shell, which most likely represents the expanding blast wave of the supernova, is reminiscent of that seen in radio. Based on morphology, size, and energetics, there can be little doubt that SNR B0540-69 is an analogous system to the Crab but located in our neighboring galaxy.

  12. Spatially Resolved Photocurrent Mapping of Operating Organic Photovoltaic Devices Using Atomic Force Photovoltaic Microscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    106, 191 2006. 14H. R. Moutinho, R. G. Dhere, C. S. Jiang, M. M. Al-Jassim, and L. L. Kazmerski, Thin Solid Films 514, 150 2006. 15D. C. Coffey...characterize spatially localized inhomogeneities in organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. In AFPM, a biased cAFM probe is raster scanned over an array...technique, atomic force photovoltaic microscopy (AFPM), has been developed to characterize spatially localized inhomogeneities in organic photovoltaic

  13. X-ray diffraction in temporally and spatially resolved biomolecular science.

    PubMed

    Helliwell, John R; Brink, Alice; Kaenket, Surasak; Starkey, Victoria Laurina; Tanley, Simon W M

    2015-01-01

    Time-resolved Laue protein crystallography at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) opened up the field of sub-nanosecond protein crystal structure analyses. There are a limited number of such time-resolved studies in the literature. Why is this? The X-ray laser now gives us femtosecond (fs) duration pulses, typically 10 fs up to ∼50 fs. Their use is attractive for the fastest time-resolved protein crystallography studies. It has been proposed that single molecules could even be studied with the advantage of being able to measure X-ray diffraction from a 'crystal lattice free' single molecule, with or without temporal resolved structural changes. This is altogether very challenging R&D. So as to assist this effort we have undertaken studies of metal clusters that bind to proteins, both 'fresh' and after repeated X-ray irradiation to assess their X-ray-photo-dynamics, namely Ta6Br12, K2PtI6 and K2PtBr6 bound to a test protein, hen egg white lysozyme. These metal complexes have the major advantage of being very recognisable shapes (pseudo spherical or octahedral) and thereby offer a start to (probably very difficult) single molecule electron density map interpretations, both static and dynamic. A further approach is to investigate the X-ray laser beam diffraction strength of a well scattering nano-cluster; an example from nature being the iron containing ferritin. Electron crystallography and single particle electron microscopy imaging offers alternatives to X-ray structural studies; our structural studies of crustacyanin, a 320 kDa protein carotenoid complex, can be extended either by electron based techniques or with the X-ray laser representing a fascinating range of options. General outlook remarks concerning X-ray, electron and neutron macromolecular crystallography as well as 'NMR crystallography' conclude the article.

  14. Characterization of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectrometers for high energy density physics and light source experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K. W. Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparacio, L.; Efthimion, P.; Pablant, N. A.; Lu, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Magee, E.

    2014-11-15

    A high resolution 1D imaging x-ray spectrometer concept comprising a spherically bent crystal and a 2D pixelated detector is being optimized for diagnostics of small sources such as high energy density physics (HEDP) and synchrotron radiation or x-ray free electron laser experiments. This instrument is used on tokamak experiments for Doppler measurements of ion temperature and plasma flow velocity profiles. Laboratory measurements demonstrate a resolving power, E/ΔE of order 10 000 and spatial resolution better than 10 μm. Initial tests of the high resolution instrument on HEDP plasmas are being performed.

  15. Spatially resolved quantitative magnetic order measurement in spinel CuCr{sub 2}S{sub 4} nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Negi, D. S.; Loukya, B.; Datta, R.; Ramasamy, K.; Gupta, A.

    2015-05-04

    We have utilized spatially resolved high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy to quantify the relative percentage of ferromagnetic order in the core and the surface regions of CuCr{sub 2}S{sub 4} nanoparticles with nanocube and nanocluster morphology. The organic capping layer is found to play a significant role in restoring magnetic order at the surface. The technique is based on recording the fine features of the Cr L{sub 3} absorption edge and matching them with the theoretical spectra. The nanoscale probing technique we have developed is quite versatile and can be extended to understand magnetic ordering in a number of nanodimensional magnetic materials.

  16. Macroscopic and microscopic spatially-resolved analysis of food contaminants and constituents using laser-ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Nielen, Michel W F; van Beek, Teris A

    2014-11-01

    Laser-ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) does not require very flat surfaces, high-precision sample preparation, or the addition of matrix. Because of these features, LAESI-MSI may be the method of choice for spatially-resolved food analysis. In this work, LAESI time-of-flight MSI was investigated for macroscopic and microscopic imaging of pesticides, mycotoxins, and plant metabolites on rose leaves, orange and lemon fruit, ergot bodies, cherry tomatoes, and maize kernels. Accurate mass ion-map data were acquired at sampling locations with an x-y center-to-center distance of 0.2-1.0 mm and were superimposed onto co-registered optical images. The spatially-resolved ion maps of pesticides on rose leaves suggest co-application of registered and banned pesticides. Ion maps of the fungicide imazalil reveal that this compound is only localized on the peel of citrus fruit. However, according to three-dimensional LAESI-MSI the penetration depth of imazalil into the peel has significant local variation. Ion maps of different plant alkaloids on ergot bodies from rye reveal co-localization in accordance with expectations. The feasibility of using untargeted MSI for food analysis was revealed by ion maps of plant metabolites in cherry tomatoes and maize-kernel slices. For tomatoes, traveling-wave ion mobility (TWIM) was used to discriminate between different lycoperoside glycoalkaloid isomers; for maize quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS) was successfully used to elucidate the structure of a localized unknown. It is envisaged that LAESI-MSI will contribute to future research in food science, agriforensics, and plant metabolomics.

  17. Spatially resolved micro-absorption spectroscopy with a broadband source and confocal detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Silki; Mauser, Jennifer; Chakrabarti, Debopam; Schulte, Alfons

    2015-11-01

    We present a novel approach to measure optical absorption spectra with spatial resolution at the micron scale. The setup combines a continuous white light excitation beam in transmission geometry with a confocal microscope. The spatial resolution is found to be better than 1.4 μm in the lateral and 3.6 μm in the axial direction. Employing multichannel detection the absorption spectrum of hemoglobin in a single red blood cell is measured on the timescale of seconds. Through measurements of the transmitted intensity in solutions in nanoliter quantities we establish that the absorbance varies linearly with concentration. Our setup enables the investigation of spatial variations in the optical density of small samples on the micron scale and can be applied to the study of biological assemblies at the single cell level, in optical diagnostics, and in micro-fluidics.

  18. RNA imaging. Spatially resolved, highly multiplexed RNA profiling in single cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kok Hao; Boettiger, Alistair N; Moffitt, Jeffrey R; Wang, Siyuan; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2015-04-24

    Knowledge of the expression profile and spatial landscape of the transcriptome in individual cells is essential for understanding the rich repertoire of cellular behaviors. Here, we report multiplexed error-robust fluorescence in situ hybridization (MERFISH), a single-molecule imaging approach that allows the copy numbers and spatial localizations of thousands of RNA species to be determined in single cells. Using error-robust encoding schemes to combat single-molecule labeling and detection errors, we demonstrated the imaging of 100 to 1000 distinct RNA species in hundreds of individual cells. Correlation analysis of the ~10(4) to 10(6) pairs of genes allowed us to constrain gene regulatory networks, predict novel functions for many unannotated genes, and identify distinct spatial distribution patterns of RNAs that correlate with properties of the encoded proteins.

  19. Observed Spatial Properties of the Solar Eigenfunctions and the Implications for the Existence of Resolved Multiplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caudell, T. P.; Hill, H. A.; Bos, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Solar oscillations are manifested in the solar atmosphere as spatial and temporal perturbations in the local thermodynamical and mechanical properties. When measuring the solar radius/diameter, these perturbations enter the observation through changes in the radiative source function and opacity at the extreme limb. When compared to the disk center, the observable portion of these perturbations is changed in spatial character by projection effects and oblique optical depth geometry. The time varying solar radius signal at SCLERA (Santa Catalina Laboratory for Experimental Relativity) is produced by an edge definition sensitive to the resultant changes in the spatial shape of the limb intensity profile. An attempt is made to further determine the shape and properties of the limb signals which display global solar oscillations.

  20. Sub-nA spatially resolved conductivity profiling of surface and interface defects in ceria films

    SciTech Connect

    Farrow, Tim; Yang, Nan; Doria, Sandra; Belianinov, Alex; Jesse, Stephen; Arruda, Thomas M.; Balestrino, Giuseppe; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Kumar, Amit

    2015-03-17

    Spatial variability of conductivity in ceria is explored using scanning probe microscopy with galvanostatic control. Ionically blocking electrodes are used to probe the conductivity under opposite polarities to reveal possible differences in the defect structure across a thin film of CeO2. Data suggest the existence of a large spatial inhomogeneity that could give rise to constant phase elements during standard electrochemical characterization, potentially affecting the overall conductivity of films on the macroscale. The approach discussed here can also be utilized for other mixed ionic electronic conductor systems including memristors and electroresistors, as well as physical systems such as ferroelectric tunneling barriers

  1. Sub-nA spatially resolved conductivity profiling of surface and interface defects in ceria films

    DOE PAGES

    Farrow, Tim; Yang, Nan; Doria, Sandra; ...

    2015-03-17

    Spatial variability of conductivity in ceria is explored using scanning probe microscopy with galvanostatic control. Ionically blocking electrodes are used to probe the conductivity under opposite polarities to reveal possible differences in the defect structure across a thin film of CeO2. Data suggest the existence of a large spatial inhomogeneity that could give rise to constant phase elements during standard electrochemical characterization, potentially affecting the overall conductivity of films on the macroscale. The approach discussed here can also be utilized for other mixed ionic electronic conductor systems including memristors and electroresistors, as well as physical systems such as ferroelectric tunnelingmore » barriers« less

  2. Sub-nA spatially resolved conductivity profiling of surface and interface defects in ceria films

    SciTech Connect

    Farrow, Tim; Kumar, Amit; Yang, Nan; Doria, Sandra; Balestrino, Giuseppe; Belianinov, Alex; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Arruda, Thomas M.

    2015-03-01

    Spatial variability of conductivity in ceria is explored using scanning probe microscopy with galvanostatic control. Ionically blocking electrodes are used to probe the conductivity under opposite polarities to reveal possible differences in the defect structure across a thin film of CeO{sub 2}. Data suggest the existence of a large spatial inhomogeneity that could give rise to constant phase elements during standard electrochemical characterization, potentially affecting the overall conductivity of films on the macroscale. The approach discussed here can also be utilized for other mixed ionic electronic conductor systems including memristors and electroresistors, as well as physical systems such as ferroelectric tunneling barriers.

  3. Spatially resolved dynamic structure factor of finite systems from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Raitza, Thomas; Roepke, Gerd; Reinholz, Heidi; Morozov, Igor

    2011-09-15

    The dynamical response of metallic clusters up to 10{sup 3} atoms is investigated using the restricted molecular dynamics simulations scheme. Exemplarily, a sodium like material is considered. Correlation functions are evaluated to investigate the spatial structure of collective electron excitations and the optical response of laser-excited clusters. In particular, the spectrum of bilocal correlation functions shows resonances representing different modes of collective excitations inside the nano plasma. The spatial structure, the resonance energy, and the width of the eigenmodes have been investigated for various values of electron density, temperature, cluster size, and ionization degree. Comparison with bulk properties is performed and the dispersion relation of collective excitations is discussed.

  4. Velocity gradients in spatially resolved laser Doppler flowmetry and dynamic light scattering with confocal and coherence gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe-Patarroyo, Néstor; Bouma, Brett E.

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is widely used to characterize diffusive motion to obtain precise information on colloidal suspensions by calculating the autocorrelation function of the signal from a heterodyne optical system. DLS can also be used to determine the flow velocity field in systems that exhibit mass transport by incorporating the effects of the deterministic motion of scatterers on the autocorrelation function, a technique commonly known as laser Doppler flowmetry. DLS measurements can be localized with confocal and coherence gating techniques such as confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography, thereby enabling the determination of the spatially resolved velocity field in three dimensions. It has been thought that spatially resolved DLS can determine the axial velocity as well as the lateral speed in a single measurement. We demonstrate, however, that gradients in the axial velocity of scatterers exert a fundamental influence on the autocorrelation function even in well-behaved, nonturbulent flow. By obtaining the explicit functional relation between axial-velocity gradients and the autocorrelation function, we show that the velocity field and its derivatives are intimately related and their contributions cannot be separated. Therefore, a single DLS measurement cannot univocally determine the velocity field. Our extended theoretical model was found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  5. Velocity gradients in spatially-resolved laser Doppler flowmetry and dynamic light scattering with confocal and coherence gating

    PubMed Central

    Uribe-Patarroyo, Néstor; Bouma, Brett E.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is widely used to characterize diffusive motion to obtain precise information on colloidal suspensions by calculating the autocorrelation function of the signal from a heterodyne optical system. DLS can also be used to determine the flow velocity field in systems that exhibit mass transport by incorporating the effects of the deterministic motion of scatterers on the autocorrelation function, a technique commonly known as laser Doppler flowmetry. DLS measurements can be localized with confocal and coherence gating techniques such as confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography, thereby enabling the determination of the spatially-resolved velocity field in three dimensions. It has been thought that spatially-resolved DLS can determine the axial velocity as well as the lateral speed in a single measurement. We demonstrate, however, that gradients in the axial velocity of scatterers exert a fundamental influence on the autocorrelation function even in well-behaved, non-turbulent flow. By obtaining the explicit functional relation between axial-velocity gradients and the autocorrelation function, we show that the velocity field and its derivatives are intimately related and their contributions cannot be separated. Therefore, a single DLS measurement cannot univocally determine the velocity field. Our extended theoretical model was found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements. PMID:27627357

  6. Spatially Resolved Chemical Imaging for Biosignature Analysis: Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhartia, R.; Wanger, G.; Orphan, V. J.; Fries, M.; Rowe, A. R.; Nealson, K. H.; Abbey, W. J.; DeFlores, L. P.; Beegle, L. W.

    2014-12-01

    Detection of in situ biosignatures on terrestrial and planetary missions is becoming increasingly more important. Missions that target the Earth's deep biosphere, Mars, moons of Jupiter (including Europa), moons of Saturn (Titan and Enceladus), and small bodies such as asteroids or comets require methods that enable detection of materials for both in-situ analysis that preserve context and as a means to select high priority sample for return to Earth. In situ instrumentation for biosignature detection spans a wide range of analytical and spectroscopic methods that capitalize on amino acid distribution, chirality, lipid composition, isotopic fractionation, or textures that persist in the environment. Many of the existing analytical instruments are bulk analysis methods and while highly sensitive, these require sample acquisition and sample processing. However, by combining with triaging spectroscopic methods, biosignatures can be targeted on a surface and preserve spatial context (including mineralogy, textures, and organic distribution). To provide spatially correlated chemical analysis at multiple spatial scales (meters to microns) we have employed a dual spectroscopic approach that capitalizes on high sensitivity deep UV native fluorescence detection and high specificity deep UV Raman analysis.. Recently selected as a payload on the Mars 2020 mission, SHERLOC incorporates these optical methods for potential biosignatures detection on Mars. We present data from both Earth analogs that operate as our only examples known biosignatures and meteorite samples that provide an example of abiotic organic formation, and demonstrate how provenance effects the spatial distribution and composition of organics.

  7. Spatially resolved cathodoluminescence of individual BN-coated CaS:Eu nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jing; Dierre, Benjamin; Huang, Yang; Bando, Yoshio; Tang, Chengchun; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Golberg, Dmitri

    2011-02-01

    Luminescence properties of individual BN-coated CaS:Eu nanowires have been studied by high-spatial-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy. A broad red light-emitting band from an individual nanowire has been observed. Detailed local CL studies on the nanowires reveal spatial variations of luminescence from the structure surfaces toward their cores. Such variations are attributed to the different Eu2+ ions surroundings within the surface and core nanowire regions. The attractive luminescence properties are meaningful for fundamental studies of nanoscaled luminescent materials and may be of interest for novel optoelectronic applications.Luminescence properties of individual BN-coated CaS:Eu nanowires have been studied by high-spatial-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy. A broad red light-emitting band from an individual nanowire has been observed. Detailed local CL studies on the nanowires reveal spatial variations of luminescence from the structure surfaces toward their cores. Such variations are attributed to the different Eu2+ ions surroundings within the surface and core nanowire regions. The attractive luminescence properties are meaningful for fundamental studies of nanoscaled luminescent materials and may be of interest for novel optoelectronic applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: CL images of two different BN-coated CaS:Eu nanowires; CL spectra taken at various locations across the different nanowires. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00700e

  8. Single shot Hugoniot of cyclohexane using a spatially resolved laser driven shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolme, C. A.; McGrane, S. D.; Moore, D. S.; Whitley, V. H.; Funk, D. J.

    2008-11-01

    To develop a more efficient method of determining pressure dependent material response to shock loading, we used the spatial energy distribution of a shock generating laser beam to create a range of nearly one-dimensional stresses in a single laser shot. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry was used to measure the Hugoniot and shocked refractive index of cyclohexane subject to this shock loading.

  9. Quantifying Seagrass Light Requirements Using an Algorithm to Spatially Resolve Depth of Colonization

    EPA Science Inventory

    The maximum depth of colonization (Zc) is a useful measure of seagrass growth that describes response to light attenuation in the water column. However, lack of standardization among methods for estimating Zc has limited the description of habitat requirements at spatial scales m...

  10. Research Update: Spatially resolved mapping of electronic structure on atomic level by multivariate statistical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Belianinov, Alex; Panchapakesan, G.; Lin, Wenzhi; Sales, Brian C.; Sefat, Athena Safa; Jesse, Stephen; Pan, Minghu; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-12-02

    Atomic level spatial variability of electronic structure in Fe-based superconductor FeTe0.55Se0.45 (Tc = 15 K) is explored using current-imaging tunneling-spectroscopy. Multivariate statistical analysis of the data differentiates regions of dissimilar electronic behavior that can be identified with the segregation of chalcogen atoms, as well as boundaries between terminations and near neighbor interactions. Subsequent clustering analysis allows identification of the spatial localization of these dissimilar regions. Similar statistical analysis of modeled calculated density of states of chemically inhomogeneous FeTe1 x Sex structures further confirms that the two types of chalcogens, i.e., Te and Se, can be identified by their electronic signature and differentiated by their local chemical environment. This approach allows detailed chemical discrimination of the scanning tunneling microscopy data including separation of atomic identities, proximity, and local configuration effects and can be universally applicable to chemically and electronically inhomogeneous surfaces.

  11. Spatially Resolved Synthetic Spectra from 2D Simulations of Stainless Steel Wire Array Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R. W.; Giuliani, J. L.; Thornhill, J. W.; Chong, Y. K.; Dasgupta, A.; Davis, J.

    2009-01-21

    A 2D radiation MHD model has been developed to investigate stainless steel wire array implosion experiments on the Z and refurbished Z machines. This model incorporates within the Mach2 MHD code a self-consistent calculation of the non-LTE kinetics and ray trace based radiation transport. Such a method is necessary in order to account for opacity effects in conjunction with ionization kinetics of K-shell emitting plasmas. Here the model is used to investigate multi-dimensional effects of stainless steel wire implosions. In particular, we are developing techniques to produce non-LTE, axially and/or radially resolved synthetic spectra based upon snapshots of our 2D simulations. Comparisons between experimental spectra and these synthetic spectra will allow us to better determine the state of the experimental pinches.

  12. Global and Spatially Resolved Photometric Properties of the Nucleus of Comet 67P/C-G from OSIRIS Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, P.

    2014-04-01

    photometric properties of the nucleus of comet 67P/C-G, albedo, phase function and spectral reflectivity and compare with previous results obtained with the Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes [2, 3, 4]. Then observations during the approach and first bound orbits in July-August 2014 will allow mapping the surface of the nucleus with OSIRIS at a scale of up to 1 meter per pixel. The images will be used to reconstruct the 3D surface of the nucleus at highresolution allowing separating true photometric variations from topographic effects. We will present results on the spatially resolved photometric properties of the nucleus based on a novel method developed in the space of the facets representing the three-dimensional shape of the body. This method successfully implemented in the cases of the nucleus of comet 9P/Tempel 2 and of asteroid (2867) Steins [5] has the advantage of automatically tracking the same local surface element on a series of images. The analysis will then proceed with the determination of the global Hapke and other standard photometric parameters as well as their two-dimensional variations across the surface. This allows defining, in the body-fixed reference frame, ``high residual regions'' (HRRs) which correspond to significant relative differences between the observed and modeled photometric parameters such as the singlescattering albedo (SSA), the mean roughness slope angle, and the reflectivity gradient. Of particular interest will be the search for ice patches and possible mineralogical differences resulting from the past activity of the comet.

  13. Spatial resolving power and spectral sensitivity of the saltwater crocodile, Crocodylus porosus, and the freshwater crocodile, Crocodylus johnstoni.

    PubMed

    Nagloo, Nicolas; Collin, Shaun P; Hemmi, Jan M; Hart, Nathan S

    2016-05-01

    Crocodilians are apex amphibious predators that occupy a range of tropical habitats. In this study, we examined whether their semi-aquatic lifestyle and ambush hunting mode are reflected in specific adaptations in the peripheral visual system. Design-based stereology and microspectrophotometry were used to assess spatial resolving power and spectral sensitivity of saltwater (Crocodylus porosus) and freshwater crocodiles (Crocodylus johnstoni). Both species possess a foveal streak that spans the naso-temporal axis and mediates high spatial acuity across the central visual field. The saltwater crocodile and freshwater crocodile have a peak spatial resolving power of 8.8 and 8.0 cycles deg(-1), respectively. Measurement of the outer segment dimensions and spectral absorbance revealed five distinct photoreceptor types consisting of three single cones, one twin cone and a rod. The three single cones (saltwater/freshwater crocodile) are violet (424/426 nm λmax), green (502/510 nm λmax) and red (546/554 nm λmax) sensitive, indicating the potential for trichromatic colour vision. The visual pigments of both members of the twin cones have the same λmax as the red-sensitive single cone and the rod has a λmax at 503/510 nm (saltwater/freshwater). The λmax values of all types of visual pigment occur at longer wavelengths in the freshwater crocodile compared with the saltwater crocodile. Given that there is a greater abundance of long wavelength light in freshwater compared with a saltwater environment, the photoreceptors would be more effective at detecting light in their respective habitats. This suggests that the visual systems of both species are adapted to the photic conditions of their respective ecological niche.

  14. Spatially resolved characterization of cellulose nanocrystal-polypropylene composite by confocal Raman microscopy.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Umesh P; Sabo, Ronald; Reiner, Richard S; Clemons, Craig M; Rudie, Alan W

    2012-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to analyze cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) -polypropylene (PP) composites and to investigate the spatial distribution of CNCs in extruded composite filaments. Three composites were made from two forms of nanocellulose (CNCs from wood pulp and the nano-scale fraction of microcrystalline cellulose) and two of the three composites investigated used maleated PP as a coupling agent. Raman maps, based on cellulose and PP bands at 1098 and 1460 cm(-1), respectively, obtained at 1 μm spatial resolution showed that the CNCs were aggregated to various degrees in the PP matrix. Of the three composites analyzed, two showed clear existence of phase-separated regions: Raman images with strong PP and absent/weak cellulose or vice versa. For the third composite, the situation was slightly improved but a clear transition interface between the PP-abundant and CNC-abundant regions was observed, indicating that the CNC remained poorly dispersed. The spectroscopic approach to investigating spatial distribution of the composite components was helpful in evaluating CNC dispersion in the composite at the microscopic level, which helped explain the relatively modest reinforcement of PP by the CNCs.

  15. Spatially resolved in situ reaction dynamics of graphene via optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, Michal; Li, Yunqi; Li, Wan; Xu, Ke

    2017-04-05

    The potential of rising two-dimensional materials, such as graphene, can be substantially expanded through chemistry. However, it has been a challenge to study how chemical reactions of two-dimensional materials progress. Existing techniques offer limited signal contrast and/or spatial-temporal resolution, and are difficult to apply to in situ studies. Here we employ an optical approach to quantitatively monitor the redox reaction dynamics of graphene and graphene oxide (GO) in situ with diffraction-limited (~300 nm) spatial resolution and video-rate time resolution. Remarkably, we found that the oxidation kinetics of graphene is characterized by a seeded, autocatalytic process that gives rise to unique, wave-like propagation of reaction in two dimensions. The reaction is initially slow and confined to highly localized, nanoscale hot spots associated with structural defects, but then self-accelerates while propagating outwards, hence flower-like, micrometer-sized reaction patterns over the entire sample. In contrast, the reduction of GO is spatially homogeneous and temporally pseudo-first-order, and through in situ data we further identify pH as a key reaction parameter.

  16. The beauty of resolution: The SN Ib factory NGC 2770 spatially resolved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thöne, C. C.; Christensen, L.; Gorosabel, J.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.

    2015-02-01

    The late-type spiral NGC 2770 hosted 3 Type Ib supernovae (SNe) in or next to star-forming regions in its outer spiral arms. We study the properties of the SN sites and the galaxy at different spatial resolutions to infer propeties of the SN progenitors and the SF history of the galaxy. Several 3D techniques are used and, for the first time, we present images of metallicity, shocks and stellar population ages from OSIRIS/GTC imaging with tunable narrowband filters.

  17. Raman line imaging for spatially and temporally resolved mole fraction measurements in internal combustion engines.

    PubMed

    Miles, P C

    1999-03-20

    An optical diagnostic system based on line imaging of Raman-scattered light has been developed to study the mixing processes in internal combustion engines. The system permits multipoint, single laser-shot measurements of CO(2), O(2), N(2), C(3)H(8), and H(2)O mole fractions with submillimeter spatial resolution. Selection of appropriate system hardware is discussed, as are subsequent data reduction and analysis procedures. Results are reported for data obtained at multiple crank angles and in two different engine flow fields. Measurements are made at 12 locations simultaneously, each location having measurement volume dimensions of 0.5 mm x 0.5 mm x 0.9 mm. The data are analyzed to obtain statistics of species mole fractions: mean, rms, histograms, and both spatial and cross-species covariance functions. The covariance functions are used to quantify the accuracy of the measured rms mole fraction fluctuations, to determine the integral length scales of the mixture inhomogeneities, and to quantify the cycle-to-cycle fluctuations in bulk mixture composition under well-mixed conditions.

  18. Spatially resolved measurement of singlet delta oxygen by radar resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Zhang, Zhili; Ombrello, Timothy M

    2013-07-01

    Coherent microwave Rayleigh scattering (Radar) from resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) was demonstrated to directly and nonintrusively measure singlet delta oxygen, O(2)(a(1)Δ(g)), with high spatial resolution. Two different approaches, photodissociation of ozone and microwave discharge plasma in an argon and oxygen flow, were utilized for O(2)(a(1)Δ(g)) generation. The d(1)Π(g)←a(1)Δ(g) (3-0) and d(1)Π(g)←a(1)Δ(g) (1-0) bands of O(2)(a(1)Δ(g)) were detected by Radar REMPI for two different flow conditions. Quantitative absorption measurements using sensitive off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) was used simultaneously to evaluate the accuracy and sensitivity of the Radar REMPI technique. The detection limit of Radar REMPI was found to be comparable to the ICOS technique with a detection threshold of approximately 10(14) molecules/cm(3) but with a spatial resolution that was 8 orders of magnitude smaller than the ICOS technique.

  19. Application of spatially resolved high resolution crystal spectrometry to inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparacio, L.; Pablant, N. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Schneider, M.; Widmann, K.; Sanchez del Rio, M.; Zhang, L.

    2012-10-15

    High resolution ({lambda}/{Delta}{lambda}{approx} 10 000) 1D imaging x-ray spectroscopy using a spherically bent crystal and a 2D hybrid pixel array detector is used world wide for Doppler measurements of ion-temperature and plasma flow-velocity profiles in magnetic confinement fusion plasmas. Meter sized plasmas are diagnosed with cm spatial resolution and 10 ms time resolution. This concept can also be used as a diagnostic of small sources, such as inertial confinement fusion plasmas and targets on x-ray light source beam lines, with spatial resolution of micrometers, as demonstrated by laboratory experiments using a 250-{mu}m {sup 55}Fe source, and by ray-tracing calculations. Throughput calculations agree with measurements, and predict detector counts in the range 10{sup -8}-10{sup -6} times source x-rays, depending on crystal reflectivity and spectrometer geometry. Results of the lab demonstrations, application of the technique to the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and predictions of performance on NIF will be presented.

  20. Spatially resolved localized vibrational mode spectroscopy of carbon in liquid encapsulated Czochralski grown gallium arsenide wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Yau, Waifan.

    1988-04-01

    Substitutional carbon on an arsenic lattice site is the shallowest and one of the most dominant acceptors in semi-insulating Liquid Encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) GaAs. However, the role of this acceptor in determining the well known W'' shape spatial variation of neutral EL2 concentration along the diameter of a LEC wafer is not known. In this thesis, we attempt to clarify the issue of the carbon acceptor's effect on this W'' shaped variation by measuring spatial profiles of this acceptor along the radius of three different as-grown LEC GaAs wafers. With localized vibrational mode absorption spectroscopy, we find that the profile of the carbon acceptor is relatively constant along the radius of each wafer. Average values of concentration are 8 {times} 10E15 cm{sup -3}, 1.1 {times} 10E15 cm{sup -3}, and 2.2 {times} 10E15 cm{sup -3}, respectively. In addition, these carbon acceptor LVM measurements indicate that a residual donor with concentration comparable to carbon exists in these wafers and it is a good candidate for the observed neutral EL2 concentration variation. 22 refs., 39 figs.

  1. Research Update: Spatially resolved mapping of electronic structure on atomic level by multivariate statistical analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Belianinov, Alex; Panchapakesan, G.; Lin, Wenzhi; ...

    2014-12-02

    Atomic level spatial variability of electronic structure in Fe-based superconductor FeTe0.55Se0.45 (Tc = 15 K) is explored using current-imaging tunneling-spectroscopy. Multivariate statistical analysis of the data differentiates regions of dissimilar electronic behavior that can be identified with the segregation of chalcogen atoms, as well as boundaries between terminations and near neighbor interactions. Subsequent clustering analysis allows identification of the spatial localization of these dissimilar regions. Similar statistical analysis of modeled calculated density of states of chemically inhomogeneous FeTe1 x Sex structures further confirms that the two types of chalcogens, i.e., Te and Se, can be identified by their electronic signaturemore » and differentiated by their local chemical environment. This approach allows detailed chemical discrimination of the scanning tunneling microscopy data including separation of atomic identities, proximity, and local configuration effects and can be universally applicable to chemically and electronically inhomogeneous surfaces.« less

  2. Research Update: Spatially resolved mapping of electronic structure on atomic level by multivariate statistical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Belianinov, Alex Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Lin, Wenzhi; Jesse, Stephen; Pan, Minghu; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Sales, Brian C.; Sefat, Athena S.

    2014-12-01

    Atomic level spatial variability of electronic structure in Fe-based superconductor FeTe{sub 0.55}Se{sub 0.45} (T{sub c} = 15 K) is explored using current-imaging tunneling-spectroscopy. Multivariate statistical analysis of the data differentiates regions of dissimilar electronic behavior that can be identified with the segregation of chalcogen atoms, as well as boundaries between terminations and near neighbor interactions. Subsequent clustering analysis allows identification of the spatial localization of these dissimilar regions. Similar statistical analysis of modeled calculated density of states of chemically inhomogeneous FeTe{sub 1−x}Se{sub x} structures further confirms that the two types of chalcogens, i.e., Te and Se, can be identified by their electronic signature and differentiated by their local chemical environment. This approach allows detailed chemical discrimination of the scanning tunneling microscopy data including separation of atomic identities, proximity, and local configuration effects and can be universally applicable to chemically and electronically inhomogeneous surfaces.

  3. Spatially resolving the very high energy emission from MGRO J2019+37 with VERITAS

    SciTech Connect

    Aliu, E.; Errando, M.; Aune, T.; Behera, B.; Chen, X.; Federici, S.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M.; Berger, K.; Bird, R.; Bouvier, A.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dumm, J.; Dwarkadas, V. V.; Falcone, A. E-mail: nahee@uchicago.edu; and others

    2014-06-10

    We present very high energy (VHE) imaging of MGRO J2019+37 obtained with the VERITAS observatory. The bright extended (∼2°) unidentified Milagro source is located toward the rich star formation region Cygnus-X. MGRO J2019+37 is resolved into two VERITAS sources. The faint, point-like source VER J2016+371 overlaps CTB 87, a filled-center remnant (SNR) with no evidence of a supernova remnant shell at the present time. Its spectrum is well fit in the 0.65-10 TeV energy range by a power-law model with photon index 2.3 ± 0.4. VER J2019+378 is a bright extended (∼1°) source that likely accounts for the bulk of the Milagro emission and is notably coincident with PSR J2021+3651 and the star formation region Sh 2–104. Its spectrum in the range 1-30 TeV is well fit with a power-law model of photon index 1.75 ± 0.3, among the hardest values measured in the VHE band, comparable to that observed near Vela-X. We explore the unusual spectrum and morphology in the radio and X-ray bands to constrain possible emission mechanisms for this source.

  4. Spatially Resolving the Very High Energy Emission from MGRO J2019+37 with VERITAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliu, E.; Aune, T.; Behera, B.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Berger, K.; Bird, R.; Bouvier, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dumm, J.; Dwarkadas, V. V.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gillanders, G. H.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Griffin, S.; Griffiths, S. T.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Hughes, G.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kargaltsev, O.; Kertzman, M.; Khassen, Y.; Kieda, D.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Madhavan, A. S.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Millis, J.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nieto, D.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Pandel, D.; Park, N.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Prokoph, H.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Rajotte, J.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Roberts, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tucci, J. V.; Tyler, J.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Weinstein, A.; Welsing, R.; Wilhelm, A.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.

    2014-06-01

    We present very high energy (VHE) imaging of MGRO J2019+37 obtained with the VERITAS observatory. The bright extended (~2°) unidentified Milagro source is located toward the rich star formation region Cygnus-X. MGRO J2019+37 is resolved into two VERITAS sources. The faint, point-like source VER J2016+371 overlaps CTB 87, a filled-center remnant (SNR) with no evidence of a supernova remnant shell at the present time. Its spectrum is well fit in the 0.65-10 TeV energy range by a power-law model with photon index 2.3 ± 0.4. VER J2019+378 is a bright extended (~1°) source that likely accounts for the bulk of the Milagro emission and is notably coincident with PSR J2021+3651 and the star formation region Sh 2-104. Its spectrum in the range 1-30 TeV is well fit with a power-law model of photon index 1.75 ± 0.3, among the hardest values measured in the VHE band, comparable to that observed near Vela-X. We explore the unusual spectrum and morphology in the radio and X-ray bands to constrain possible emission mechanisms for this source.

  5. Energy release in the solar corona from spatially resolved magnetic braids.

    PubMed

    Cirtain, J W; Golub, L; Winebarger, A R; De Pontieu, B; Kobayashi, K; Moore, R L; Walsh, R W; Korreck, K E; Weber, M; McCauley, P; Title, A; Kuzin, S; DeForest, C E

    2013-01-24

    It is now apparent that there are at least two heating mechanisms in the Sun's outer atmosphere, or corona. Wave heating may be the prevalent mechanism in quiet solar periods and may contribute to heating the corona to 1,500,000 K (refs 1-3). The active corona needs additional heating to reach 2,000,000-4,000,000 K; this heat has been theoretically proposed to come from the reconnection and unravelling of magnetic 'braids'. Evidence favouring that process has been inferred, but has not been generally accepted because observations are sparse and, in general, the braided magnetic strands that are thought to have an angular width of about 0.2 arc seconds have not been resolved. Fine-scale braiding has been seen in the chromosphere but not, until now, in the corona. Here we report observations, at a resolution of 0.2 arc seconds, of magnetic braids in a coronal active region that are reconnecting, relaxing and dissipating sufficient energy to heat the structures to about 4,000,000 K. Although our 5-minute observations cannot unambiguously identify the field reconnection and subsequent relaxation as the dominant heating mechanism throughout active regions, the energy available from the observed field relaxation in our example is ample for the observed heating.

  6. Spatially resolved dielectric constant of confined water and its connection to the non-local nature of bulk water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, Christian; Gekle, Stephan

    2016-08-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to compute the spatially resolved static dielectric constant of water in cylindrical and spherical nanopores as occurring, e.g., in protein water pockets or carbon nanotubes. For this, we derive a linear-response formalism which correctly takes into account the dielectric boundary conditions in the considered geometries. We find that in cylindrical confinement, the axial component behaves similar as the local density akin to what is known near planar interfaces. The radial dielectric constant shows some oscillatory features when approaching the surface if their radius is larger than about 2 nm. Most importantly, however, the radial component exhibits pronounced oscillations at the center of the cavity. These surprising features are traced back quantitatively to the non-local dielectric nature of bulk water.

  7. Spatially resolved penetration depth measurements and vortex manipulation in the ferromagnetic superconductor ErNi2B2C

    DOE PAGES

    Wulferding, Dirk; Yang, Ilkyu; Yang, Jinho; ...

    2015-07-31

    We present a local probe study of the magnetic superconductor ErNi2B2C, using magnetic force microscopy at sub-Kelvin temperatures. ErNi2B2C is an ideal system to explore the effects of concomitant superconductivity and ferromagnetism. At 500 mK, far below the transition to a weakly ferromagnetic state, we directly observe a structured magnetic background on the micrometer scale. We determine spatially resolved absolute values of the magnetic penetration depth λ and study its temperature dependence as the system undergoes magnetic phase transitions from paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic, and to weak ferromagnetic, all within the superconducting regime. We estimate the absolute pinning force of Abrikosovmore » vortices, which shows a position dependence and temperature dependence as well, and discuss the possibility of the purported spontaneous vortex formation.« less

  8. Spatially resolved spectroscopy of AG Carinae, and direct evidence for stellar evolution: The central star of NGC 2392

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altner, Bruce; Shore, Steven N.

    1993-01-01

    We have performed spatially-resolved low dispersion long-slit spectroscopy for the circumstellar shell of the luminous blue variable AG Carinae with IUE between lambda lambda 1200 - 3200 A. At all positions a strong dust-scattered stellar continuum is detected. Only a few emission lines, FE II 2600 and O I (?) 1304, have been detected; the emission is stronger on the southern side of the shell. The UV surface brightness and derived dust properties are completely consistent with the groundbased and KAO FIR observations: the grains are large (0.1 - 1 micron), warm (45 - 100 K depending on composition), highly reflecting (C(sub sca)/C(sub abs) approximately equal to 1), and tie up about 10(exp -4) to 10(exp -3) solar mass of material. We also observe similarities of the results for HR Car and LBV's to those reported here.

  9. Time-resolved spatial profile of TEA CO2 laser pulses: influence of the gas mixture and intracavity apertures.

    PubMed

    Encinas-Sanz, F; Serna, J; Martínez-Herrero, R; Mejías, P M

    2001-07-01

    The evolution of the intensity profile of transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser pulses is investigated within the intensity moment formalism. The beam quality factor M2 is used to study the mode evolution. Attention is focused on the influence of both the gas mixture (N2 :CO2 :He) and the diameter of an intracavity diaphragm placed to attenuate higher-order modes. The degree of accuracy that can be attained by approximating the laser field amplitude by means of the lower-order terms of a Hermite-Gauss expansion is also analyzed. In particular, a bound for the truncation error is given in terms of two time-resolved spatial parameters, namely the beam width and the M2 parameter.

  10. Spatially and temporally resolved gas distributions around heterogeneous catalysts using infrared planar laser-induced fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Zetterberg, Johan; Blomberg, Sara; Gustafson, Johan; Evertsson, Jonas; Zhou, Jianfeng; Adams, Emma C.; Carlsson, Per-Anders; Aldén, Marcus; Lundgren, Edvin

    2015-01-01

    Visualizing and measuring the gas distribution in close proximity to a working catalyst is crucial for understanding how the catalytic activity depends on the structure of the catalyst. However, existing methods are not able to fully determine the gas distribution during a catalytic process. Here we report on how the distribution of a gas during a catalytic reaction can be imaged in situ with high spatial (400 μm) and temporal (15 μs) resolution using infrared planar laser-induced fluorescence. The technique is demonstrated by monitoring, in real-time, the distribution of carbon dioxide during catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide above powder catalysts. Furthermore, we demonstrate the versatility and potential of the technique in catalysis research by providing a proof-of-principle demonstration of how the activity of several catalysts can be measured simultaneously, either in the same reactor chamber, or in parallel, in different reactor tubes. PMID:25953006

  11. Spatially resolved measurements of size and velocity distributions of aerosol droplets from a direct injection nebulizer

    SciTech Connect

    Shum, S.C.K.; Johnson, S.K.; Pang, H.M.; Houk, R.S. )

    1993-05-01

    Aerosol droplet sizes and velocities from a direct injection nebulizer (DIN) are measured with radial and axial spatial resolution by phase Doppler particle analysis (PDPA). The droplets on the central axis of the spray become finer and their size becomes more uniform when [approx]20% methanol is added to the usual aqueous solvent. This could explain why the analyte signal is a maximum at this solvent composition when the DIN is used for inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Mean droplet velocities are 12 to 22 m s[sup [minus]1] with standard deviations of [plus minus]4 to [plus minus]7 m s[sup [minus]1]. The outer fringes of the aerosol plume tend to be enriched in large droplets. The Sauter mean diameter (D[sub 3,2]) and velocity of the droplets also vary substantially with axial position in the aerosol plume. 35 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Thermomechanical Response of a Gas to Spatially Resolved Power Deposition Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassoy, David R.

    2015-11-01

    Liquid propellant rocket engine (LPRE) instability is characterized by growing pressure oscillations that affect the integrity and performance of the system. Modeling and prediction have been topics of intense interest to designers for more than 60 years. LPRE combustion provides a wonderful opportunity to employ thermomechanical concepts and mathematical methodologies to quantify the response of combustion chamber gases to spatially distributed, transient thermal energy deposition. Nondimensional Euler equations, including a power deposition term in the energy equation are used to identify crucial parameters, time and length scales, as well as levels of energy deposition, relevant to LPRE performance. The objective is to provide first principles explanations of physical phenomena responsible for mechanical disturbances observed in operating LPRE's.

  13. Spatially resolved optical-emission spectroscopy of a radio-frequency driven iodine plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedrick, James; Doyle, Scott; Grondein, Pascaline; Aanesland, Ane

    2016-09-01

    Iodine is of interest for potential use as a propellant for spacecraft propulsion, and has become attractive as a replacement to xenon due to its similar mass and ionisation potential. Optical emission spectroscopy has been undertaken to characterise the emission from a low-pressure, radio-frequency driven inductively coupled plasma source operating in iodine with respect to axial distance across its transverse magnetic filter. The results are compared with axial profiles of the electron temperature and density for identical source conditions, and the spatial distribution of the emission intensity is observed to be closely correlated with the electron temperature. This work has been done within the LABEX Plas@Par project, and received financial state aid managed by the ``Agence Nationale de la Recherche'', as part of the ``Programme d'Investissements d'Avenir'' under the reference ANR-11-IDEX-0004-02.

  14. Spatially Resolved Gas Kinematics within a Lyα Nebula: Evidence for Large-scale Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prescott, Moire K. M.; Martin, Crystal L.; Dey, Arjun

    2015-01-01

    We use spatially extended measurements of Lyα as well as less optically thick emission lines from an ≈80 kpc Lyα nebula at z ≈ 1.67 to assess the role of resonant scattering and to disentangle kinematic signatures from Lyα radiative transfer effects. We find that the Lyα, C IV, He II, and C III] emission lines all tell a similar story in this system, and that the kinematics are broadly consistent with large-scale rotation. First, the observed surface brightness profiles are similar in extent in all four lines, strongly favoring a picture in which the Lyα photons are produced in situ instead of being resonantly scattered from a central source. Second, we see low kinematic offsets between Lyα and the less optically thick He II line (~100-200 km s-1), providing further support for the argument that the Lyα and other emission lines are all being produced within the spatially extended gas. Finally, the full velocity field of the system shows coherent velocity shear in all emission lines: ≈500 km s-1 over the central ≈50 kpc of the nebula. The kinematic profiles are broadly consistent with large-scale rotation in a gas disk that is at least partially stable against collapse. These observations suggest that the Lyα nebula represents accreting material that is illuminated by an offset, hidden active galactic nucleus or distributed star formation, and that is undergoing rotation in a clumpy and turbulent gas disk. With an implied mass of M(

  15. SPATIALLY RESOLVED GAS KINEMATICS WITHIN A Lyα NEBULA: EVIDENCE FOR LARGE-SCALE ROTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, Moire K. M.; Martin, Crystal L.; Dey, Arjun

    2015-01-20

    We use spatially extended measurements of Lyα as well as less optically thick emission lines from an ≈80 kpc Lyα nebula at z ≈ 1.67 to assess the role of resonant scattering and to disentangle kinematic signatures from Lyα radiative transfer effects. We find that the Lyα, C IV, He II, and C III] emission lines all tell a similar story in this system, and that the kinematics are broadly consistent with large-scale rotation. First, the observed surface brightness profiles are similar in extent in all four lines, strongly favoring a picture in which the Lyα photons are produced in situ instead of being resonantly scattered from a central source. Second, we see low kinematic offsets between Lyα and the less optically thick He II line (∼100-200 km s{sup –1}), providing further support for the argument that the Lyα and other emission lines are all being produced within the spatially extended gas. Finally, the full velocity field of the system shows coherent velocity shear in all emission lines: ≈500 km s{sup –1} over the central ≈50 kpc of the nebula. The kinematic profiles are broadly consistent with large-scale rotation in a gas disk that is at least partially stable against collapse. These observations suggest that the Lyα nebula represents accreting material that is illuminated by an offset, hidden active galactic nucleus or distributed star formation, and that is undergoing rotation in a clumpy and turbulent gas disk. With an implied mass of M(

  16. The Spatially-resolved Interacting Winds of Eta Carinae: Implications on the Orbit Orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Nielsen, K.E.; Corcoran, M.; Hamaguchi, K.; Madura, T.; Russell, C.; Hillier, D.J.; Owocki. S.; Okazaki, A.T.

    2010-01-01

    Medium-dispersion long slit spectra, recorded by HST/STIS (R=8000, Theta=0.l"), resolve the extended wind-wind interaction region of the massive binary, Eta Carinae. During the high state, extending for about five years of the 5.54-year binary period, lines of [N II], [Fe III], [S III], [Ar III] and [Ne III] extend outwards to 0.4" with a velocity range of -500 to +200 km/s. By comparison, lines of [Fe II] and [Ni II] extend to 0.7" with a velocity range of -500 to +500 km/s. During the high state, driven by the lesser wind of Eta Car B and photo-ionized by the FUV of Eta Car B, the high excitation lines originate in or near the outer ballistic portions of the wind-wind interaction region. The lower excitation lines ([Fe II] and [Ni II D originate from the boundary regions of the dominating wind of Eta Car A. As the binary system has an eccentricity exceeding 0.9, the two stars approach quite close across the periastron, estimated to be within 1 to 2 AU. As a result, Eta Car B moves into the primary wind structure, cutting off the FUV supporting the ionization of the high state lines. Forbidden emission lines of the doubly-ionized species disappear, He II 4686 drops along with the collapse of the X-ray flux. This behavior is understood through the 3-D models of A. Okazaki and of E. R. Parkin and Pittard. Discussion will address the orbit orientation relative to the geometry of the Homunculus, ejected by Eta Carinae in the 1840s.

  17. Spatially Resolved HCN J = 4-3 and CS J = 7-6 Emission from the Disk around HD 142527

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Plas, G.; Casassus, S.; Ménard, F.; Perez, S.; Thi, W. F.; Pinte, C.; Christiaens, V.

    2014-09-01

    The disk around HD 142527 attracts a great amount of attention compared to others because of its resolved (sub-)millimeter dust continuum that is concentrated into the shape of a horseshoe toward the north of the star. In this Letter we present spatially resolved ALMA detections of the HCN J = 4-3 and CS J = 7-6 emission lines. These lines give us a deeper view into the disk compared to the (optically thicker) CO isotopes. This is the first detection of CS J = 7-6 coming from a protoplanetary disk. Both emission lines are azimuthally asymmetric and are suppressed under the horseshoe-shaped continuum emission peak. A possible mechanism for explaining the decrease under the horseshoe-shaped continuum is the increased opacity coming from the higher dust concentration at the continuum peak. Lower dust and/or gas temperatures and an optically thick radio-continuum reduce line emission by freezing out and shielding emission from the far side of the disk.

  18. Fast Spatially Resolved Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) Distribution Measurements in an Internal Combustion Engine Using Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jihyung; Prikhodko, Vitaly; Parks, James E.; Perfetto, Anthony; Geckler, Sam; Partridge, William P.

    2015-09-01

    One effective method of reducing NOx emissions while improving efficiency is exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) in internal combustion engines. But, insufficient mixing between fresh air and exhaust gas can lead to cycle-to-cycle and cylinder-to-cylinder nonuniform charge gas mixtures of a multi-cylinder engine, which can in turn reduce engine performance and efficiency. Furthermore, a sensor packaged into a compact probe was designed, built and applied to measure spatiotemporal EGR distributions in the intake manifold of an operating engine. The probe promotes the development of more efficient and higher-performance engines by resolving high-speed in situ CO2 concentration at various locations in the intake manifold. Our study employed mid-infrared light sources tuned to an absorption band of CO2 near 4.3 μm, an industry standard species for determining EGR fraction. The calibrated probe was used to map spatial EGR distributions in an intake manifold with high accuracy and monitor cycle-resolved cylinder-specific EGR fluctuations at a rate of up to 1 kHz.

  19. Fast spatially resolved exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) distribution measurements in an internal combustion engine using absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jihyung; Prikhodko, Vitaly; Parks, James E; Perfetto, Anthony; Geckler, Sam; Partridge, William P

    2015-09-01

    Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) in internal combustion engines is an effective method of reducing NOx emissions while improving efficiency. However, insufficient mixing between fresh air and exhaust gas can lead to cycle-to-cycle and cylinder-to-cylinder non-uniform charge gas mixtures of a multi-cylinder engine, which can in turn reduce engine performance and efficiency. A sensor packaged into a compact probe was designed, built and applied to measure spatiotemporal EGR distributions in the intake manifold of an operating engine. The probe promotes the development of more efficient and higher-performance engines by resolving high-speed in situ CO2 concentration at various locations in the intake manifold. The study employed mid-infrared light sources tuned to an absorption band of CO2 near 4.3 μm, an industry standard species for determining EGR fraction. The calibrated probe was used to map spatial EGR distributions in an intake manifold with high accuracy and monitor cycle-resolved cylinder-specific EGR fluctuations at a rate of up to 1 kHz.

  20. Fast Spatially Resolved Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) Distribution Measurements in an Internal Combustion Engine Using Absorption Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Yoo, Jihyung; Prikhodko, Vitaly; Parks, James E.; ...

    2015-09-01

    One effective method of reducing NOx emissions while improving efficiency is exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) in internal combustion engines. But, insufficient mixing between fresh air and exhaust gas can lead to cycle-to-cycle and cylinder-to-cylinder nonuniform charge gas mixtures of a multi-cylinder engine, which can in turn reduce engine performance and efficiency. Furthermore, a sensor packaged into a compact probe was designed, built and applied to measure spatiotemporal EGR distributions in the intake manifold of an operating engine. The probe promotes the development of more efficient and higher-performance engines by resolving high-speed in situ CO2 concentration at various locations in themore » intake manifold. Our study employed mid-infrared light sources tuned to an absorption band of CO2 near 4.3 μm, an industry standard species for determining EGR fraction. The calibrated probe was used to map spatial EGR distributions in an intake manifold with high accuracy and monitor cycle-resolved cylinder-specific EGR fluctuations at a rate of up to 1 kHz.« less

  1. Retinal ganglion cell topography and spatial resolving power in the oriental fire-bellied toad Bombina orientalis.

    PubMed

    Pushchin, Igor I; Zyumchenko, Nataliya E

    2015-12-01

    The vertebrate visual system is determined by two main factors, a species' lifestyle and phylogenetic legacy. Studying the visual system in outgroup lineages may shed some light on the balance of these factors within a certain radiation. We studied the topography of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the retina of the oriental fire-bellied toad Bombina orientalis. These toads belong to the ancient superfamily Discoglossoidea, a sister group to all extant Anura except for two small families. RGCs were retrogradely labeled with tetramethylrhodamine- dextran amine (TMR-DA) and examined in retinal wholemounts. RGCs occurred all over the retina except for the far periphery. Their total number was [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]). They comprised 73-77% of all cells in the ganglion cell layer. The spatial density of GCs increased gradually from the dorsal and ventral retinal periphery toward the equator to form a weak visual streak and a moderately pronounced area centralis. The minimum density was [Formula: see text], and the maximum, [Formula: see text]. The maximum density gradient was [Formula: see text]. The spatial resolution was minimum in the dorsal and ventral periphery ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] cycles per degree in water and air, respectively). Intermediate values of spatial resolving power were found within the visual streak ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] cycles per degree) and reached a peak in area centralis ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] cycles per degree). This is sufficient for efficient prey location and capture. The relatively high RGC density and the presence of specialized retinal regions in oriental fire-bellied toads are consistent with their highly visual behavior. A brief review comparing the phylogeny and ecology of this with other anuran species suggests that the main factor shaping the RGC distribution in Anura is phylogenetic legacy; the environmental pressure results

  2. Development of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectroscopy for fusion and light-source research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J.; Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Pablant, N. A.; Efthimion, P.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Widmann, K.; Sanchez del Rio, M.

    2014-09-01

    One dimensional spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectroscopy with spherically bent crystals and 2D pixelated detectors is an established technique on magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) experiments world wide for Doppler measurements of spatial profiles of plasma ion temperature and flow velocity. This technique is being further developed for diagnosis of High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) plasmas at laser-plasma facilities and synchrotron/x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) facilities. Useful spatial resolution (micron scale) of such small-scale plasma sources requires magnification, because of the finite pixel size of x-ray CCD detectors (13.5 μm). A von-Hamos like spectrometer using spherical crystals is capable of magnification, as well as uniform sagittal focusing across the full x-ray spectrum, and is being tested in laboratory experiments using a tungsten-target microfocus (5-10 μm) x-ray tube and 13-μm pixel x-ray CCD. A spatial resolution better than 10 μm has been demonstrated. Good spectral resolution is indicated by small differences (0.02 - 0.1 eV) of measured line widths with best available published natural line widths. Progress and status of HEDP measurements and the physics basis for these diagnostics are presented. A new type of x-ray crystal spectrometer with a convex spherically bent crystal is also reported. The status of testing of a 2D imaging microscope using matched pairs of spherical crystals with x rays will also be presented. The use of computational x-ray optics codes in development of these instrumental concepts is addressed.

  3. Full-Dimensional Potential Energy and Dipole Moment Surfaces of GeH4 Molecule and Accurate First-Principle Rotationally Resolved Intensity Predictions in the Infrared.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, A V; Rey, M; Rodina, A; Krishna, B M; Tyuterev, Vl G

    2016-11-17

    Nine-dimensional potential energy surface (PES) and dipole moment surface (DMS) of the germane molecule are constructed using extended ab initio CCSD(T) calculations at 19 882 points. PES analytical representation is determined as an expansion in nonlinear symmetry adapted products of orthogonal and internal coordinates involving 340 parameters up to eighth order. Minor empirical refinement of the equilibrium geometry and of four quadratic parameters of the PES computed at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVQZ-DK level of the theory yielded the accuracy below 1 cm(-1) for all experimentally known vibrational band centers of five stable isotopologues of (70)GeH4, (72)GeH4, (73)GeH4, (74)GeH4, and (76)GeH4 up to 8300 cm(-1). The optimized equilibrium bond re = 1.517 594 Å is very close to best ab initio values. Rotational energies up to J = 15 are calculated using potential expansion in normal coordinate tensors with maximum errors of 0.004 and 0.0006 cm(-1) for (74)GeH4 and (76)GeH4. The DMS analytical representation is determined through an expansion in symmetry-adapted products of internal nonlinear coordinates involving 967 parameters up to the sixth order. Vibration-rotation line intensities of five stable germane isotopologues were calculated from purely ab initio DMS using nuclear motion variational calculations with a full account of the tetrahedral symmetry of the molecules. For the first time a good overall agreement of main absorption features with experimental rotationally resolved Pacific Northwest National Laboratory spectra was achieved in the entire range of 700-5300 cm(-1). It was found that very accurate description of state-dependent isotopic shifts is mandatory to correctly describe complex patterns of observed spectra at natural isotopic abundance resulting from the superposition of five stable isotopologues. The data obtained in this work will be made available through the TheoReTS information system.

  4. An inverse method for determining the spatially resolved properties of viscoelastic–viscoplastic three-dimensional printed materials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X.; Ashcroft, I. A.; Wildman, R. D.; Tuck, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    A method using experimental nanoindentation and inverse finite-element analysis (FEA) has been developed that enables the spatial variation of material constitutive properties to be accurately determined. The method was used to measure property variation in a three-dimensional printed (3DP) polymeric material. The accuracy of the method is dependent on the applicability of the constitutive model used in the inverse FEA, hence four potential material models: viscoelastic, viscoelastic–viscoplastic, nonlinear viscoelastic and nonlinear viscoelastic–viscoplastic were evaluated, with the latter enabling the best fit to experimental data. Significant changes in material properties were seen in the depth direction of the 3DP sample, which could be linked to the degree of cross-linking within the material, a feature inherent in a UV-cured layer-by-layer construction method. It is proposed that the method is a powerful tool in the analysis of manufacturing processes with potential spatial property variation that will also enable the accurate prediction of final manufactured part performance. PMID:26730216

  5. Spatially-resolved SFR in nearby disk galaxies using IFS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalán-Torrecilla, C.; Gil de Paz, A.; Castillo-Morales, A.; Méndez-Abreu, J.; Pascual, S.; Ruiz-Lara, T.; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, A.; Sánchez-Menguiano, L.

    2017-03-01

    Exploring the spatial distribution of the star formation rate (SFR) in nearby galaxies is essential to understand their evolution through cosmic time. With this aim in mind, we use a representative sample that contains a variety of morphological types, the CALIFA Integral Field Spectroscopy (IFS) sample. Previous to this work, we have verified that our extinction-corrected Hα measurements successfully reproduce the values derived from other SFR tracers such as Hα obs + IR or UV obs + IR (Catalán-Torrecilla et al. 2015). Now, we go one step further applying 2-dimensional photometric decompositions (Méndez-Abreu et al. (2008), Méndez-Abreu et al. (2014)) over these datacubes. This method allows us to obtain the amount of SFR in the central part (bulge or nuclear source), the bar and the disk, separately. First, we determine the light coming from each component as the ratio between the luminosity in every component (bulge, bar or disk) and the total luminosity of the galaxy. Then, for each galaxy we multiply the IFS datacubes by these previous factors to recover the luminosity in each component. Finally, we derive the spectrum associated to each galaxy component integrating the spatial information in the weighted datacube using an elliptical aperture covering the whole galaxy. 2D photometric decomposition applied over 3D datacubes will give us a more detailed understanding of the role that disks play in more massive galaxies. Knowing if the disks in more massive SF galaxies have on average a lower or higher level of star formation activity and how these results are affected by the presence of nuclear bars are still open questions that we can now solve. We describe the behavior of these components in the SFR vs. stellar mass diagram. In particular, we highlight the role of the disks and their contribution to both the integrated SFR for the whole galaxy and the SFR in the disk at different stellar masses in the SFR vs. stellar mass diagram together with their

  6. Spatially resolved edge currents and guided-wave electronic states in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, M. T.; Shtanko, O.; Fulga, I. C.; Akhmerov, A. R.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Jarillo-Herrero, P.; Levitov, L. S.; Yacoby, A.

    2016-02-01

    Exploiting the light-like properties of carriers in graphene could allow extreme non-classical forms of electronic transport to be realized. In this vein, finding ways to confine and direct electronic waves through nanoscale streams and streamlets, unimpeded by the presence of other carriers, has remained a grand challenge. Inspired by guiding of light in fibre optics, here we demonstrate a route to engineer such a flow of electrons using a technique for mapping currents at submicron scales. We employ real-space imaging of current flow in graphene to provide direct evidence of the confinement of electron waves at the edges of a graphene crystal near charge neutrality. This is achieved by using superconducting interferometry in a graphene Josephson junction and reconstructing the spatial structure of conducting pathways using Fourier methods. The observed edge currents arise from coherent guided-wave states, confined to the edge by band bending and transmitted as plane waves. As an electronic analogue of photon guiding in optical fibres, the observed states afford non-classical means for information transduction and processing at the nanoscale.

  7. Spatially-Resolved Analyses of Aerodynamic Fallout from a Uranium-Fueled Nuclear Test

    DOE PAGES

    Lewis, L. A.; Knight, K. B.; Matzel, J. E.; ...

    2015-07-28

    The fiive silicate fallout glass spherules produced in a uranium-fueled, near-surface nuclear test were characterized by secondary ion mass spectrometry, electron probe microanalysis, autoradiography, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Several samples display compositional heterogeneity suggestive of incomplete mixing between major elements and natural U (238U/235U = 0.00725) and enriched U. Samples exhibit extreme spatial heterogeneity in U isotopic composition with 0.02 < 235U/238U < 11.84 among all five spherules and 0.02 < 235U/238U < 7.41 within a single spherule. Moreover, in two spherules, the 235U/238U ratio is correlated with changes in major element composition, suggesting the agglomeration ofmore » chemically and isotopically distinct molten precursors. Two samples are nearly homogenous with respect to major element and uranium isotopic composition, suggesting extensive mixing possibly due to experiencing higher temperatures or residing longer in the fireball. Linear correlations between 234U/238U, 235U/238U, and 236U/238U ratios are consistent with a two-component mixing model, which is used to illustrate the extent of mixing between natural and enriched U end members.« less

  8. Spatially-Resolved Analyses of Aerodynamic Fallout from a Uranium-Fueled Nuclear Test

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, L. A.; Knight, K. B.; Matzel, J. E.; Prussin, S. G.; Zimmer, M. M.; Kinman, W S; Ryerson, F. J.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2015-07-28

    The fiive silicate fallout glass spherules produced in a uranium-fueled, near-surface nuclear test were characterized by secondary ion mass spectrometry, electron probe microanalysis, autoradiography, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Several samples display compositional heterogeneity suggestive of incomplete mixing between major elements and natural U (238U/235U = 0.00725) and enriched U. Samples exhibit extreme spatial heterogeneity in U isotopic composition with 0.02 < 235U/238U < 11.84 among all five spherules and 0.02 < 235U/238U < 7.41 within a single spherule. Moreover, in two spherules, the 235U/238U ratio is correlated with changes in major element composition, suggesting the agglomeration of chemically and isotopically distinct molten precursors. Two samples are nearly homogenous with respect to major element and uranium isotopic composition, suggesting extensive mixing possibly due to experiencing higher temperatures or residing longer in the fireball. Linear correlations between 234U/238U, 235U/238U, and 236U/238U ratios are consistent with a two-component mixing model, which is used to illustrate the extent of mixing between natural and enriched U end members.

  9. Spatially Resolved Photoexcited Charge-Carrier Dynamics in Phase-Engineered Monolayer MoS2

    DOE PAGES

    Yamaguchi, Hisato; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Kappera, Rajesh; ...

    2014-12-18

    A fundamental understanding of the intrinsic optoelectronic properties of atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is crucial for its integration into high performance semiconductor devices. We investigate the transport properties of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) under photo-excitation using correlated scanning photocurrent microscopy and photoluminescence imaging. We examined the effect of local phase transformation underneath the metal electrodes on the generation of photocurrent across the channel length with diffraction-limited spatial resolution. While maximum photocurrent generation occurs at the Schottky contacts of semiconducting (2H-phase) MoS2, after the metallic phase transformation (1T-phase), the photocurrent peak is observed towardsmore » the center of the device channel, suggesting a strong reduction of native Schottky barriers. Analysis using the bias and position dependence of the photocurrent indicates that the Schottky barrier heights are few meV for 1T- and ~200 meV for 2H-contacted devices. We also demonstrate that a reduction of native Schottky barriers in a 1T device enhances the photo responsivity by more than one order of magnitude, a crucial parameter in achieving high performance optoelectronic devices. The obtained results pave a pathway for the fundamental understanding of intrinsic optoelectronic properties of atomically thin TMDs where Ohmic contacts are necessary for achieving high efficiency devices with low power consumption.« less

  10. Spatially resolved spectroscopic differentiation of hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains on individual insulin amyloid fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Kurouski, Dmitry; Hedegaard, Martin A. B.; Singh, Pushkar; Lednev, Igor K.; Deckert, Volker

    2016-09-01

    The formation of insoluble β-sheet-rich protein structures known as amyloid fibrils is associated with numerous neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. A detailed understanding of the molecular structure of the fibril surface is of interest as the first contact with the physiological environment in vivo and plays a decisive role in biological activity and associated toxicity. Recent studies reveal that the inherent sensitivity and specificity of tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) renders this technique a compelling method for fibril surface analysis at the single-particle level. Here, the reproducibility of TERS is demonstrated, indicating its relevance for detecting molecular variations. Consequently, individual fibrils are systematically investigated at nanometer spatial resolution. Spectral parameters were obtained by band-fitting, particularly focusing on the identification of the secondary structure via the amide III band and the differentiation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains on the surface. In addition multivariate data analysis, specifically the N-FINDR procedure, was employed to generate structure-specific maps. The ability of TERS to localize specific structural domains on fibril surfaces shows promise to the development of new fibril dissection strategies and can be generally applied to any (bio)chemical surface when structural variations at the nanometer level are of interest.

  11. Evaluation of a spatially resolved forest fire smoke model for population-based epidemiologic exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jiayun; Eyamie, Jeff; Henderson, Sarah B

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to forest fire smoke (FFS) is associated with multiple adverse health effects, mostly respiratory. Findings for cardiovascular effects have been inconsistent, possibly related to the limitations of conventional methods to assess FFS exposure. In previous work, we developed an empirical model to estimate smoke-related fine particulate matter (PM2.5) for all populated areas in British Columbia (BC), Canada. Here, we evaluate the utility of our model by comparing epidemiologic associations between modeled and measured PM2.5. For each local health area (LHA), we used Poisson regression to estimate the effects of PM2.5 estimates and measurements on counts of medication dispensations and outpatient physician visits. We then used meta-regression to estimate the overall effects. A 10 μg/m(3) increase in modeled PM2.5 was associated with increased sabutamol dispensations (RR=1.04, 95% CI 1.03-1.06), and physician visits for asthma (1.06, 1.04-1.08), COPD (1.02, 1.00-1.03), lower respiratory infections (1.03, 1.00-1.05), and otitis media (1.05, 1.03-1.07), all comparable to measured PM2.5. Effects on cardiovascular outcomes were only significant using model estimates in all LHAs during extreme fire days. This suggests that the exposure model is a promising tool for increasing the power of epidemiologic studies to detect the health effects of FFS via improved spatial coverage and resolution.

  12. Spatially resolved mapping of electrical conductivity across individual domain (grain) boundaries in graphene.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kendal W; Zhang, X-G; Vlassiouk, Ivan V; He, Guowei; Feenstra, Randall M; Li, An-Ping

    2013-09-24

    All large-scale graphene films contain extended topological defects dividing graphene into domains or grains. Here, we spatially map electronic transport near specific domain and grain boundaries in both epitaxial graphene grown on SiC and CVD graphene on Cu subsequently transferred to a SiO2 substrate, with one-to-one correspondence to boundary structures. Boundaries coinciding with the substrate step on SiC exhibit a significant potential barrier for electron transport of epitaxial graphene due to the reduced charge transfer from the substrate near the step edge. Moreover, monolayer-bilayer boundaries exhibit a high resistance that can change depending on the height of substrate step coinciding at the boundary. In CVD graphene, the resistance of a grain boundary changes with the width of the disordered transition region between adjacent grains. A quantitative modeling of boundary resistance reveals the increased electron Fermi wave vector within the boundary region, possibly due to boundary induced charge density variation. Understanding how resistance change with domain (grain) boundary structure in graphene is a crucial first step for controlled engineering of defects in large-scale graphene films.

  13. Spatially resolved observation of the fundamental and second harmonic standing kink modes using SDO/AIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoe, D. J.; Goddard, C. R.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    Aims: We consider a coronal loop kink oscillation observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) which demonstrates two strong spectral components. The period of the lower frequency component being approximately twice that of the shorter frequency component suggests the presence of harmonics. Methods: We examine the presence of two longitudinal harmonics by investigating the spatial dependence of the loop oscillation. The time-dependent displacement of the loop is measured at 15 locations along the loop axis. For each position the displacement is fitted as the sum of two damped sinusoids, having periods P1 and P2, and a damping time τ. The shorter period component exhibits anti-phase oscillations in the loop legs. Results: We interpret the observation in terms of the first (global or fundamental) and second longitudinal harmonics of the standing kink mode. The strong excitation of the second harmonic appears connected to the preceding coronal mass ejection (CME) which displaced one of the loop legs. The oscillation parameters found are P1 = 5.00±0.62 min, P2 = 2.20±0.23 min, P1/ 2P2 = 1.15±0.22, and τ/P = 3.35 ± 1.45. A movie associated to Fig. 5 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. Spatially-resolved analyses of aerodynamic fallout from a uranium-fueled nuclear test.

    PubMed

    Lewis, L A; Knight, K B; Matzel, J E; Prussin, S G; Zimmer, M M; Kinman, W S; Ryerson, F J; Hutcheon, I D

    2015-10-01

    Five silicate fallout glass spherules produced in a uranium-fueled, near-surface nuclear test were characterized by secondary ion mass spectrometry, electron probe microanalysis, autoradiography, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Several samples display compositional heterogeneity suggestive of incomplete mixing between major elements and natural U ((238)U/(235)U = 0.00725) and enriched U. Samples exhibit extreme spatial heterogeneity in U isotopic composition with 0.02 < (235)U/(238)U < 11.84 among all five spherules and 0.02 < (235)U/(238)U < 7.41 within a single spherule. In two spherules, the (235)U/(238)U ratio is correlated with changes in major element composition, suggesting the agglomeration of chemically and isotopically distinct molten precursors. Two samples are nearly homogenous with respect to major element and uranium isotopic composition, suggesting extensive mixing possibly due to experiencing higher temperatures or residing longer in the fireball. Linear correlations between (234)U/(238)U, (235)U/(238)U, and (236)U/(238)U ratios are consistent with a two-component mixing model, which is used to illustrate the extent of mixing between natural and enriched U end members.

  15. The Future of Spatially-Resolved Polychromatic Neutron and X-Ray Microdiffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ice, Gene E.

    2009-09-25

    Polychromatic microdiffraction is an emerging materials-characterization tool made practical by powerful X-ray and neutron sources, and by advanced optics and software. With polychromatic techniques, local crystalline properties including phase, texture (orientation), elastic strain, and defect density can be mapped with submicron spatial resolution in three dimensions. Here, we describe the evolving ability to nondestructively map local crystal structure in three dimensions and discuss how future advances will help address long-standing issues of inhomogeneous grain growth, deformation, fracture, and elastic strain. Current and future applications impact virtually all materials including electronic, solar, and light-emitting-diode (LED) materials, nanomaterials, structural materials, and joining materials. In addition, the ability to focus small beams on small samples dramatically increases signal-to-noise and greatly reduces the cost for extreme environmental chambers required for high-pressure, high-temperature, high-magnetic field or corrosive environments. Polychromatic techniques efficiently use source brilliance and minimize the required sample volume, which is essential for hard-to-make materials, irreplaceable materials, and for radioactive, toxic, or otherwise dangerous materials. New polychromatic neutron capabilities will significantly extend the range of samples that can be studied with neutrons and presents important new scientific opportunities for studies of magnetic materials, low Z elements, fragile crystal structures, and small samples in extreme environments.

  16. Spatially Resolved One-Dimensional Boundary States in Graphene-Hexagonal Boron Nitride Planar Heterostructures

    DOE PAGES

    Li, An-Ping; Park, Jewook; Lee, Jaekwang; ...

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) interfaces between crystalline materials have been shown to generate unusual interfacial electronic states in complex oxides1-4. Recently, a onedimensional (1D) polar-on-nonpolar interface has been realized in hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and graphene heterostructures 5-10, where a coherent 1D boundary is expected to possess peculiar electronic states dictated by edge states of graphene and the polarity of hBN 11-13. Here we present a combined scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and firstprinciples theory study of the graphene-hBN boundary to provide a rare glimpse into the spatial and energetic distributions of the 1D boundary states in real-space. The interfaces studied here aremore » crystallographically coherent with sharp transitions from graphene zigzag edges to B (or N) terminated hBN atomic layers on a Cu foil substrate5. The revealed boundary states are about 0.6 eV below or above the Fermi energy depending on the termination of the hBN at the boundary, and are extended along but localized at the boundary with a lateral thickness of 2-3nm. These results suggest that unconventional physical effects similar to those observed at 2D interfaces can also exist in lower dimensions, opening a route for tuning of electronic properties at interfaces in 2D heterostructures.« less

  17. Spatially Resolved Galactic Wind in Lensed Galaxy RCSGA 032727-132609

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bordoloi, Rongmon; Rigby, Jane R.; Tumlinson, Janson; Bayliss, Matthew B.; Sharon, Keren; Gladders, Michael G.; Wuyts, Eva

    2016-01-01

    We probe the spatial distribution of outflowing gas along four lines of sight separated by up to 6 kpc in a gravitationally lensed star-forming galaxy at z = 1.70. Using Mg II and Fe II emission and absorption as tracers, we find that the clumps of star formation are driving galactic outflows with velocities of - 170 to - 250 km/s. The velocities of Mg II emission are redshifted with respect to the systemic velocities of the galaxy, consistent with being backscattered. By contrast, the Fe II fluorescent emission lines are either slightly blueshifted or at the systemic velocity of the galaxy. Taken together, the velocity structure of the Mg II and Fe II emission is consistent with arising through scattering in galactic winds. Assuming a thin shell geometry for the outflowing gas, the estimated masses carried out by these outflows are large (approx 30-50 M/yr), with mass loading factors several times the star formation rate. Almost 20 per cent to 50 per cent of the blueshifted absorption probably escapes the gravitational potential of the galaxy. In this galaxy, the outflow is 'locally sourced', that is, the properties of the outflow in each line of sight are dominated by the properties of the nearest clump of star formation; the wind is not global to the galaxy. The mass outflow rates and the momentum flux carried out by outflows in individual star-forming knots of this object are comparable to that of starburst galaxies in the local Universe.

  18. The Future of Spatially-Resolved Polychromatic Neutron and X-Ray Microdiffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ice, Gene E

    2008-01-01

    Polychromatic microdiffraction is an emerging materials-characterization tool made practical by powerful X-ray and neutron sources, and by advanced optics and software. With polychromatic techniques, local crystalline properties including phase, texture (orientation), elastic strain, and defect density can be mapped with submicron spatial resolution in three dimensions. Here, we describe the evolving ability to nondestructively map local crystal structure in three dimensions and discuss how future advances will help address long-standing issues of inhomogeneous grain growth, deformation, fracture, and elastic strain. Current and future applications impact virtually all materials including electronic, solar, and light-emitting-diode (LED) materials, nanomaterials, structural materials, and joining materials. In addition, the ability to focus small beams on small samples dramatically increases signal-to-noise and greatly reduces the cost for extreme environmental chambers required for high-pressure, high-temperature, high-magnetic field or corrosive environments. Polychromatic techniques efficiently use source brilliance and minimize the required sample volume, which is essential for hard-to-make materials, irreplaceable materials, and for radioactive, toxic, or otherwise dangerous materials. New polychromatic neutron capabilities will significantly extend the range of samples that can be studied with neutrons and presents important new scientific opportunities for studies of magnetic materials, low Z elements, fragile crystal structures, and small samples in extreme environments.

  19. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Analysis of Environmental Trade-Offs in Electricity Generation.

    PubMed

    Peer, Rebecca A M; Garrison, Jared B; Timms, Craig P; Sanders, Kelly T

    2016-04-19

    The US power sector is a leading contributor of emissions that affect air quality and climate. It also requires a lot of water for cooling thermoelectric power plants. Although these impacts affect ecosystems and human health unevenly in space and time, there has been very little quantification of these environmental trade-offs on decision-relevant scales. This work quantifies hourly water consumption, emissions (i.e., carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and sulfur oxides), and marginal heat rates for 252 electricity generating units (EGUs) in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) region in 2011 using a unit commitment and dispatch model (UC&D). Annual, seasonal, and daily variations, as well as spatial variability are assessed. When normalized over the grid, hourly average emissions and water consumption intensities (i.e., output per MWh) are found to be highest when electricity demand is the lowest, as baseload EGUs tend to be the most water and emissions intensive. Results suggest that a large fraction of emissions and water consumption are caused by a small number of power plants, mainly baseload coal-fired generators. Replacing 8-10 existing power plants with modern natural gas combined cycle units would result in reductions of 19-29%, 51-55%, 60-62%, and 13-27% in CO2 emissions, NOx emissions, SOx emissions, and water consumption, respectively, across the ERCOT region for two different conversion scenarios.

  20. Spatially resolved spectroscopic differentiation of hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains on individual insulin amyloid fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Kurouski, Dmitry; Hedegaard, Martin A. B.; Singh, Pushkar; Lednev, Igor K.; Deckert, Volker

    2016-01-01

    The formation of insoluble β-sheet-rich protein structures known as amyloid fibrils is associated with numerous neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. A detailed understanding of the molecular structure of the fibril surface is of interest as the first contact with the physiological environment in vivo and plays a decisive role in biological activity and associated toxicity. Recent studies reveal that the inherent sensitivity and specificity of tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) renders this technique a compelling method for fibril surface analysis at the single-particle level. Here, the reproducibility of TERS is demonstrated, indicating its relevance for detecting molecular variations. Consequently, individual fibrils are systematically investigated at nanometer spatial resolution. Spectral parameters were obtained by band-fitting, particularly focusing on the identification of the secondary structure via the amide III band and the differentiation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains on the surface. In addition multivariate data analysis, specifically the N-FINDR procedure, was employed to generate structure-specific maps. The ability of TERS to localize specific structural domains on fibril surfaces shows promise to the development of new fibril dissection strategies and can be generally applied to any (bio)chemical surface when structural variations at the nanometer level are of interest. PMID:27650589

  1. Spatially resolved metabolic phenotyping of breast cancer by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Sabine; Muirhead, Laura J; Speller, Abigail V M; Golf, Ottmar; Strittmatter, Nicole; Ramakrishnan, Rathi; Goldin, Robert D; Jones, Emrys; Veselkov, Kirill; Nicholson, Jeremy; Darzi, Ara; Takats, Zoltan

    2015-05-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease characterized by varying responses to therapeutic agents and significant differences in long-term survival. Thus, there remains an unmet need for early diagnostic and prognostic tools and improved histologic characterization for more accurate disease stratification and personalized therapeutic intervention. This study evaluated a comprehensive metabolic phenotyping method in breast cancer tissue that uses desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI MSI), both as a novel diagnostic tool and as a method to further characterize metabolic changes in breast cancer tissue and the tumor microenvironment. In this prospective single-center study, 126 intraoperative tissue biopsies from tumor and tumor bed from 50 patients undergoing surgical resections were subject to DESI MSI. Global DESI MSI models were able to distinguish adipose, stromal, and glandular tissue based on their metabolomic fingerprint. Tumor tissue and tumor-associated stroma showed evident changes in their fatty acid and phospholipid composition compared with normal glandular and stromal tissue. Diagnosis of breast cancer was achieved with an accuracy of 98.2% based on DESI MSI data (PPV 0.96, NVP 1, specificity 0.96, sensitivity 1). In the tumor group, correlation between metabolomic profile and tumor grade/hormone receptor status was found. Overall classification accuracy was 87.7% (PPV 0.92, NPV 0.9, specificity 0.9, sensitivity 0.92). These results demonstrate that DESI MSI may be a valuable tool in the improved diagnosis of breast cancer in the future. The identified tumor-associated metabolic changes support theories of de novo lipogenesis in tumor tissue and the role of stroma tissue in tumor growth and development and overall disease prognosis.

  2. Spatially resolved optical and near-infrared spectroscopy of the low-metallicity galaxy UGC 4483

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skillman, Evan D.; Televich, Roberto J.; Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.; Garnett, Donald R.; Terlevich, Elena

    1994-01-01

    UGC 4483 is a dwarf irregular galaxy in the M81 group. Narrow-band imaging has revealed an H II region in UGC 4483 with an H alpha flux approximately = 1 x 10 (exp - 13) ergs/sq cm/s. Optical and near-infrared spectroscopy of this H ll region yields He, N, O, Ne, and S abundances for the interstellar matter (ISM) in this galaxy. The spectra were acquired with several different telescope/instrument combinations in order to assess the quality of the derived uncertainties. With oxygen abundance of 3.3 x 10 (exp -5) (12 + log (O/H) = 7.5), this galaxy is similar to GR 8 and among the most metal poor dwarf irregulars known to date. However, the H II region in UGC 4483 has high excitation and higher surface brightness than GR 8, allowing very accurate abundance estimates. The N/O ratio is 3%, in good agreement with other low-metallicity dwarf galaxies. The S/O abundance ratio in UGC 4483 is close to the solar ratio, consistent with results for I Zw 18 and other low-metallicity dwarf irregulars. A He/H abundance of 0.079 +/- 0.002 is derived from observations of the lambda 6678 He ll emission line. A comparison of observations obtained with different telescopes and with the same telescope on different nights supports our relatively small estimated uncertainty in this measurement. We determine that the neutral helium fraction is insignificant through both direct observations of the He(+)/H(+) ratio across the nebula and through photoionization modeling. This results in a helium mass fraction of 0.239 +/- 0.006, consistent with the most recent theoretical and observational determinations of the primordial helium abundance. We also discuss remaining systematic uncertainties in the calculation of the primordial helium abundance

  3. On-board monitoring of 2-D spatially-resolved temperatures in cylindrical lithium-ion batteries: Part I. Low-order thermal modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Robert R.; Zhao, Shi; Howey, David A.

    2016-09-01

    Estimating the temperature distribution within Li-ion batteries during operation is critical for safety and control purposes. Although existing control-oriented thermal models - such as thermal equivalent circuits (TEC) - are computationally efficient, they only predict average temperatures, and are unable to predict the spatially resolved temperature distribution throughout the cell. We present a low-order 2D thermal model of a cylindrical battery based on a Chebyshev spectral-Galerkin (SG) method, capable of predicting the full temperature distribution with a similar efficiency to a TEC. The model accounts for transient heat generation, anisotropic heat conduction, and non-homogeneous convection boundary conditions. The accuracy of the model is validated through comparison with finite element simulations, which show that the 2-D temperature field (r, z) of a large format (64 mm diameter) cell can be accurately modelled with as few as 4 states. Furthermore, the performance of the model for a range of Biot numbers is investigated via frequency analysis. For larger cells or highly transient thermal dynamics, the model order can be increased for improved accuracy. The incorporation of this model in a state estimation scheme with experimental validation against thermocouple measurements is presented in the companion contribution (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378775316308163).

  4. Spatially resolved Spectroscopy of Europa’s Large-scale Compositional Units at 3–4 μm with Keck NIRSPEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, P. D.; Brown, M. E.; Trumbo, S. K.; Hand, K. P.

    2017-01-01

    We present spatially resolved spectroscopic observations of Europa’s surface at 3–4 μm obtained with the near-infrared spectrograph and adaptive optics system on the Keck II telescope. These are the highest quality spatially resolved reflectance spectra of Europa’s surface at 3–4 μm. The observations spatially resolve Europa’s large-scale compositional units at a resolution of several hundred kilometers. The spectra show distinct features and geographic variations associated with known compositional units; in particular, large-scale leading hemisphere chaos shows a characteristic longward shift in peak reflectance near 3.7 μm compared to icy regions. These observations complement previous spectra of large-scale chaos, and can aid efforts to identify the endogenous non-ice species.

  5. Integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensor for spatially resolved detection of redox-active metabolites in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Bellin, Daniel L; Sakhtah, Hassan; Rosenstein, Jacob K; Levine, Peter M; Thimot, Jordan; Emmett, Kevin; Dietrich, Lars E P; Shepard, Kenneth L

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in monitoring spatiotemporal expression patterns of genes and proteins with fluorescent probes, direct detection of metabolites and small molecules remains challenging. A technique for spatially resolved detection of small molecules would benefit the study of redox-active metabolites that are produced by microbial biofilms and can affect their development. Here we present an integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensing platform featuring an array of working electrodes and parallel potentiostat channels. 'Images' over a 3.25 × 0.9 mm(2) area can be captured with a diffusion-limited spatial resolution of 750 μm. We demonstrate that square wave voltammetry can be used to detect, identify and quantify (for concentrations as low as 2.6 μM) four distinct redox-active metabolites called phenazines. We characterize phenazine production in both wild-type and mutant Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 colony biofilms, and find correlations with fluorescent reporter imaging of phenazine biosynthetic gene expression.

  6. Spatially resolved genomic, stable isotopic, and lipid analyses of a modern freshwater microbialite from Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Nitti, Anthony; Daniels, Camille A; Siefert, Janet; Souza, Valeria; Hollander, David; Breitbart, Mya

    2012-07-01

    Microbialites are biologically mediated carbonate deposits found in diverse environments worldwide. To explore the organisms and processes involved in microbialite formation, this study integrated genomic, lipid, and both organic and inorganic stable isotopic analyses to examine five discrete depth horizons spanning the surface 25 mm of a modern freshwater microbialite from Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico. Distinct bacterial communities and geochemical signatures were observed in each microbialite layer. Photoautotrophic organisms accounted for approximately 65% of the sequences in the surface community and produced biomass with distinctive lipid biomarker and isotopic (δ(13)C) signatures. This photoautotrophic biomass was efficiently degraded in the deeper layers by heterotrophic organisms, primarily sulfate-reducing proteobacteria. Two spatially distinct zones of carbonate precipitation were observed within the microbialite, with the first zone corresponding to the phototroph-dominated portion of the microbialite and the second zone associated with the presence of sulfate-reducing heterotrophs. The coupling of photoautotrophic production, heterotrophic decomposition, and remineralization of organic matter led to the incorporation of a characteristic biogenic signature into the inorganic CaCO(3) matrix. Overall, spatially resolved multidisciplinary analyses of the microbialite enabled correlations to be made between the distribution of specific organisms, precipitation of carbonate, and preservation of unique lipid and isotopic geochemical signatures. These findings are critical for understanding the formation of modern microbialites and have implications for the interpretation of ancient microbialite records.

  7. Spatially resolved, diffuse reflectance imaging for subsurface pattern visualization toward development of a lensless imaging platform: phantom experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelkanova, Irina; Pandya, Aditya; Saiko, Guennadi; Nacy, Lidia; Babar, Hannan; Shah, Duoaud; Lilge, Lothar; Douplik, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    A portable, spatially resolved, diffuse reflectance lensless imaging technique based on the charge-coupled device or complementary metal-oxide semiconductor sensor directly coupled to the fiber optic bundle is proposed for visualization of subsurface structures such as superficial microvasculature in the epithelium. We discuss an experimental method for emulating a lensless imaging setup via raster scanning a single fiber-optic cable over a microfluidic phantom containing periodic hemoglobin absorption contrast. To evaluate the ability of the technique to recover information about the subsurface linear structures, scattering layers formed of the Sylgard® 184 Silicone Elastomer and titanium dioxide were placed atop the microfluidic phantom. Thickness of the layers ranged from 0.2 to 0.7 mm, and the values of the reduced scattering coefficient (μs‧) were between 0.85 and 4.25 mm-1. The results demonstrate that fiber-optic, lensless platform can be used for two-dimensional imaging of absorbing inclusions in diffuse reflectance mode. In these experiments, it was shown that diffuse reflectance imaging can provide sufficient spatial sampling of the phantom for differentiation of 30 μm structural features of the embedded absorbing pattern inside the scattering media.

  8. Integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensor for spatially resolved detection of redox-active metabolites in biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Bellin, Daniel L.; Sakhtah, Hassan; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Levine, Peter M.; Thimot, Jordan; Emmett, Kevin; Dietrich, Lars E. P.; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in monitoring spatiotemporal expression patterns of genes and proteins with fluorescent probes, direct detection of metabolites and small molecules remains challenging. A technique for spatially resolved detection of small molecules would benefit the study of redox-active metabolites produced by microbial biofilms, which can drastically affect colony development. Here we present an integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensing platform featuring an array of working electrodes and parallel potentiostat channels. “Images” over a 3.25 × 0.9 mm area can be captured with a diffusion-limited spatial resolution of 750 μm. We demonstrate that square wave voltammetry can be used to detect, identify, and quantify (for concentrations as low as 2.6 μM) four distinct redox-active metabolites called phenazines. We characterize phenazine production in both wild-type and mutant Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 colony biofilms, and find correlations with fluorescent reporter imaging of phenazine biosynthetic gene expression. PMID:24510163

  9. Spatially and spectrally resolved particle swarm optimization for precise optical property estimation using diffuse-reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kholodtsova, Maria N; Daul, Christian; Loschenov, Victor B; Blondel, Walter C P M

    2016-06-13

    This paper presents a new approach to estimate optical properties (absorption and scattering coefficients µa and µs) of biological tissues from spatially-resolved spectroscopy measurements. A Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO)-based algorithm was implemented and firstly modified to deal with spatial and spectral resolutions of the data, and to solve the corresponding inverse problem. Secondly, the optimization was improved by fitting exponential decays to the two best points among all clusters of the "particles" randomly distributed all over the parameter space (µs, µa) of possible solutions. The consequent acceleration of all the groups of particles to the "best" curve leads to significant error decrease in the optical property estimation. The study analyzes the estimated optical property error as a function of the various PSO parameter combinations, and several performance criteria such as the cost-function error and the number of iterations in the algorithms proposed. The final one led to error values between ground truth and estimated values of µs and µa less than 6%.

  10. Integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensor for spatially resolved detection of redox-active metabolites in biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellin, Daniel L.; Sakhtah, Hassan; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Levine, Peter M.; Thimot, Jordan; Emmett, Kevin; Dietrich, Lars E. P.; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2014-02-01

    Despite advances in monitoring spatiotemporal expression patterns of genes and proteins with fluorescent probes, direct detection of metabolites and small molecules remains challenging. A technique for spatially resolved detection of small molecules would benefit the study of redox-active metabolites that are produced by microbial biofilms and can affect their development. Here we present an integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensing platform featuring an array of working electrodes and parallel potentiostat channels. ‘Images’ over a 3.25 × 0.9 mm2 area can be captured with a diffusion-limited spatial resolution of 750 μm. We demonstrate that square wave voltammetry can be used to detect, identify and quantify (for concentrations as low as 2.6 μM) four distinct redox-active metabolites called phenazines. We characterize phenazine production in both wild-type and mutant Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 colony biofilms, and find correlations with fluorescent reporter imaging of phenazine biosynthetic gene expression.

  11. Spatially-resolved mapping of history-dependent coupled electrochemical and electronical behaviors of electroresistive NiO

    DOE PAGES

    Sugiyama, Issei; Kim, Yunseok; Jesse, Stephen; ...

    2014-10-22

    Bias-induced oxygen ion dynamics underpins a broad spectrum of electroresistive and memristive phenomena in oxide materials. Although widely studied by device-level and local voltage-current spectroscopies, the relationship between electroresistive phenomena, local electrochemical behaviors, and microstructures remains elusive. Here, the interplay between history-dependent electronic transport and electrochemical phenomena in a NiO single crystalline thin film with a number of well-defined defect types is explored on the nanometer scale using an atomic force microscopy-based technique. A variety of electrochemically-active regions were observed and spatially resolved relationship between the electronic and electrochemical phenomena was revealed. The regions with pronounced electroresistive activity were furthermore » correlated with defects identified by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Using fully coupled mechanical-electrochemical modeling, we illustrate that the spatial distribution of strain plays an important role in electrochemical and electroresistive phenomena. In conclusion, these studies illustrate an approach for simultaneous mapping of the electronic and ionic transport on a single defective structure level such as dislocations or interfaces, and pave the way for creating libraries of defect-specific electrochemical responses.« less

  12. Spatially-resolved mapping of history-dependent coupled electrochemical and electronical behaviors of electroresistive NiO

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Issei; Kim, Yunseok; Jesse, Stephen; Strelcov, Evgheni; Kumar, Amit; Tselev, Alexander; Rahani, Ehasan Kabiri; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Yamamoto, Takahisa; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-10-22

    Bias-induced oxygen ion dynamics underpins a broad spectrum of electroresistive and memristive phenomena in oxide materials. Although widely studied by device-level and local voltage-current spectroscopies, the relationship between electroresistive phenomena, local electrochemical behaviors, and microstructures remains elusive. Here, the interplay between history-dependent electronic transport and electrochemical phenomena in a NiO single crystalline thin film with a number of well-defined defect types is explored on the nanometer scale using an atomic force microscopy-based technique. A variety of electrochemically-active regions were observed and spatially resolved relationship between the electronic and electrochemical phenomena was revealed. The regions with pronounced electroresistive activity were further correlated with defects identified by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Using fully coupled mechanical-electrochemical modeling, we illustrate that the spatial distribution of strain plays an important role in electrochemical and electroresistive phenomena. In conclusion, these studies illustrate an approach for simultaneous mapping of the electronic and ionic transport on a single defective structure level such as dislocations or interfaces, and pave the way for creating libraries of defect-specific electrochemical responses.

  13. Near-infrared spatially resolved spectroscopy of (136108) Haumea's multiple system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourgeot, F.; Carry, B.; Dumas, C.; Vachier, F.; Merlin, F.; Lacerda, P.; Barucci, M. A.; Berthier, J.

    2016-08-01

    Context. The transneptunian region of the solar system is populated by a wide variety of icy bodies showing great diversity in orbital behavior, size, surface color, and composition. Aims: The dwarf planet (136108) Haumea is among the largest transneptunian objects (TNOs) and is a very fast rotator (~3.9 h). This dwarf planet displays a highly elongated shape and hosts two small moons that are covered with crystalline water ice, similar to their central body. A particular region of interest is the Dark Red Spot (DRS) identified on the surface of Haumea from multiband light-curve analysis (Lacerda et al. 2008). Haumea is also known to be the largest member of the sole TNO family known to date, and an outcome of a catastrophic collision that is likely responsible for the unique characteristics of Haumea. Methods: We report here on the analysis of a new set of near-infrared Laser Guide Star assisted observations of Haumea obtained with the Integral Field Unit (IFU) Spectrograph for INtegral Field Observations in the Near Infrared (SINFONI) at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope (VLT) Observatory. Combined with previous data published by Dumas et al. (2011), and using light-curve measurements in the optical and far infrared to associate each spectrum with its corresponding rotational phase, we were able to carry out a rotationally resolved spectroscopic study of the surface of Haumea. Results: We describe the physical characteristics of the crystalline water ice present on the surface of Haumea for both regions, in and out of the DRS, and analyze the differences obtained for each individual spectrum. The presence of crystalline water ice is confirmed over more than half of the surface of Haumea. Our measurements of the average spectral slope (1.45 ± 0.82% by 100 nm) confirm the redder characteristic of the spot region. Detailed analysis of the crystalline water-ice absorption bands do not show significant differences between the DRS and the

  14. Spatially resolved flux measurements of NOx from London suggest significantly higher emissions than predicted by inventories.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Adam R; Lee, James D; Misztal, Pawel K; Metzger, Stefan; Shaw, Marvin D; Lewis, Alastair C; Purvis, Ruth M; Carslaw, David C; Goldstein, Allen H; Hewitt, C Nicholas; Davison, Brian; Beevers, Sean D; Karl, Thomas G

    2016-07-18

    To date, direct validation of city-wide emissions inventories for air pollutants has been difficult or impossible. However, recent technological innovations now allow direct measurement of pollutant fluxes from cities, for comparison with emissions inventories, which are themselves commonly used for prediction of current and future air quality and to help guide abatement strategies. Fluxes of NOx were measured using the eddy-covariance technique from an aircraft flying at low altitude over London. The highest fluxes were observed over central London, with lower fluxes measured in suburban areas. A footprint model was used to estimate the spatial area from which the measured emissions occurred. This allowed comparison of the flux measurements to the UK's National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI) for NOx, with scaling factors used to account for the actual time of day, day of week and month of year of the measurement. The comparison suggests significant underestimation of NOx emissions in London by the NAEI, mainly due to its under-representation of real world road traffic emissions. A comparison was also carried out with an enhanced version of the inventory using real world driving emission factors and road measurement data taken from the London Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (LAEI). The measurement to inventory agreement was substantially improved using the enhanced version, showing the importance of fully accounting for road traffic, which is the dominant NOx emission source in London. In central London there was still an underestimation by the inventory of 30-40% compared with flux measurements, suggesting significant improvements are still required in the NOx emissions inventory.

  15. Spatially resolved galactic wind in lensed galaxy RCSGA 032727-132609

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordoloi, Rongmon; Rigby, Jane R.; Tumlinson, Jason; Bayliss, Matthew B.; Sharon, Keren; Gladders, Michael G.; Wuyts, Eva

    2016-05-01

    We probe the spatial distribution of outflowing gas along four lines of sight separated by up to 6 kpc in a gravitationally lensed star-forming galaxy at z = 1.70. Using Mg II and Fe II emission and absorption as tracers, we find that the clumps of star formation are driving galactic outflows with velocities of -170 to -250 km s-1. The velocities of Mg II emission are redshifted with respect to the systemic velocities of the galaxy, consistent with being back-scattered. By contrast, the Fe II fluorescent emission lines are either slightly blueshifted or at the systemic velocity of the galaxy. Taken together, the velocity structure of the Mg II and Fe II emission is consistent with arising through scattering in galactic winds. Assuming a thin shell geometry for the outflowing gas, the estimated masses carried out by these outflows are large (≳30-50 M⊙ yr- 1), with mass loading factors several times the star formation rate. Almost 20 per cent to 50 per cent of the blueshifted absorption probably escapes the gravitational potential of the galaxy. In this galaxy, the outflow is `locally sourced', that is, the properties of the outflow in each line of sight are dominated by the properties of the nearest clump of star formation; the wind is not global to the galaxy. The mass outflow rates and the momentum flux carried out by outflows in individual star-forming knots of this object are comparable to that of starburst galaxies in the local Universe.

  16. SPATIALLY RESOLVED CHEMISTRY IN NEARBY GALAXIES. II. THE NUCLEAR BAR IN MAFFEI 2

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, David S.; Turner, Jean L. E-mail: turner@astro.ucla.edu

    2012-08-20

    We present 2''-10'' imaging of 11 transitions from 9 molecular species across the nuclear bar in Maffei 2. The data were obtained with the BIMA and OVRO interferometers. The 10 detected transitions are compared with existing CO isotopologues, HCN, CS, and millimeter continuum data. Dramatic spatial variations among the mapped species are observed across the nuclear bar. A principal component analysis is performed to characterize correlations between the transitions, star formation, and molecular column density. The analysis reveals that HCN, HNC, HCO{sup +}, and 3 mm continuum are tightly correlated, indicating a direct connection to massive star formation. We find two main morphologically distinct chemical groups, CH{sub 3}OH, SiO, and HNCO comprising the grain chemistry molecules, versus HCN, HNC, HCO{sup +}, and C{sub 2}H, molecules strong in the presence of star formation. The grain chemistry molecules, HNCO, CH{sub 3}OH, and SiO, trace hydrodynamical bar shocks. The near constancy of the HNCO/CH{sub 3}OH, SiO/CH{sub 3}OH, and SiO/HNCO ratios argues that shock properties are uniform across the nucleus. HCN/HCO{sup +}, HCN/HNC, HCN/CS, and HCN/CO ratios are explained primarily by variations in density. High HCO{sup +}/N{sub 2}H{sup +} ratios are correlated with the C{sub 2}H line, suggesting that this ratio may be a powerful new dense photon-dominated region probe in external galaxies. C{sub 2}H reveals a molecular outflow along the minor axis. The morphology and kinematics of the outflow are consistent with an outflow age of 6-7 Myr.

  17. Spatially resolved observation of crystal-face-dependent catalysis by single turnover counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeffaers, Maarten B. J.; Sels, Bert F.; Uji-I, Hiroshi; de Schryver, Frans C.; Jacobs, Pierre A.; de Vos, Dirk E.; Hofkens, Johan

    2006-02-01

    Catalytic processes on surfaces have long been studied by probing model reactions on single-crystal metal surfaces under high vacuum conditions. Yet the vast majority of industrial heterogeneous catalysis occurs at ambient or elevated pressures using complex materials with crystal faces, edges and defects differing in their catalytic activity. Clearly, if new or improved catalysts are to be rationally designed, we require quantitative correlations between surface features and catalytic activity-ideally obtained under realistic reaction conditions. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning tunnelling microscopy have allowed in situ characterization of catalyst surfaces with atomic resolution, but are limited by the need for low-pressure conditions and conductive surfaces, respectively. Sum frequency generation spectroscopy can identify vibrations of adsorbed reactants and products in both gaseous and condensed phases, but so far lacks sensitivity down to the single molecule level. Here we adapt real-time monitoring of the chemical transformation of individual organic molecules by fluorescence microscopy to monitor reactions catalysed by crystals of a layered double hydroxide immersed in reagent solution. By using a wide field microscope, we are able to map the spatial distribution of catalytic activity over the entire crystal by counting single turnover events. We find that ester hydrolysis proceeds on the lateral {1010} crystal faces, while transesterification occurs on the entire outer crystal surface. Because the method operates at ambient temperature and pressure and in a condensed phase, it can be applied to the growing number of liquid-phase industrial organic transformations to localize catalytic activity on and in inorganic solids. An exciting opportunity is the use of probe molecules with different size and functionality, which should provide insight into shape-selective or structure-sensitive catalysis and thus help with the rational design of new or

  18. A Concept for the Development of Spatially Resolved Measurements for Soil Moisture with TEM Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapteva, Yulia; Schmidt, Felix; Bumberger, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Soil water content plays a leading role in delimitating water and energy fluxes at the land surface and controlling groundwater recharging. The information about water content in the soil would be very useful in overcoming the challenge of managing water resources under conditions of increasing scarcity in Southern Europe and the Mediterranean region.For collecting data about the water content in soil, it is possible to use remote sensing and groundwater monitoring, built wireless sensor networks for water monitoring. Remote sensing provides a unique capability to get the information of soil moisture at global and regional scales. Wireless environmental sensor networks enable to connect local and regional-scale soil water content observations. There exist different ground based soil moisture measurement methods such as TDR, FDR, electromagnetic waves (EW), electrical and acoustic methods. Among these methods, the time domain reflectometry (TDR) is considered to be the most important and widely used electromagnetic approach. The special techniques for the reconstruction of the layered soil with TDR are based on differential equations in the time domain and numerical optimization algorithms. However, these techniques are time- consuming and suffering from some problems, like multiple reflections at the boundary surfaces. To overcome these limitations, frequency domain measurement (FDM) techniques could be used. With devices like vector network analyzers (VNA) the accuracy of the measurement itself and of the calibration can be improved. For field applicable methods the reflection coefficient is mathematically transformed in the time domain, which can be treated like TDR-data and the same information can be obtained. There are already existed some experiments using the frequency domain data directly as an input for inversion algorithms to find the spatial distribution of the soil parameters. The model that is used represents an exact solution of the Maxwell

  19. LOCAL LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES. I. SPATIALLY RESOLVED OBSERVATIONS WITH THE SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Colina, Luis; Diaz-Santos, Tanio; Rieke, George H.; Engelbracht, Charles W.; Smith, J.-D. T.; Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo G.

    2010-06-15

    We present results from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectral mapping observations of 15 local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs). In this paper, we investigate the spatial variations of the mid-IR emission which includes fine structure lines, molecular hydrogen lines, polycyclic aromatic features (PAHs), continuum emission, and the 9.7 {mu}m silicate feature. We also compare the nuclear and integrated spectra. We find that the star formation takes place in extended regions (several kpc) as probed by the PAH emission, as well as the [Ne II]12.81 {mu}m and [Ne III]15.56 {mu}m emissions. The behavior of the integrated PAH emission and 9.7 {mu}m silicate feature is similar to that of local starburst galaxies. We also find that the minima of the [Ne III]15.56 {mu}m/[Ne II]12.81 {mu}m ratio tends to be located at the nuclei and its value is lower than that of H II regions in our LIRGs and nearby galaxies. It is likely that increased densities in the nuclei of LIRGs are responsible for the smaller nuclear [Ne III]15.56 {mu}m/[Ne II]12.81 {mu}m ratios. This includes the possibility that some of the most massive stars in the nuclei are still embedded in ultracompact H II regions. In a large fraction of our sample, the 11.3 {mu}m PAH emission appears more extended than the dust 5.5 {mu}m continuum emission. We find a dependency of the 11.3 {mu}m PAH/7.7 {mu}m PAH and [Ne II]12.81 {mu}m/11.3 {mu}m PAH ratios with the age of the stellar populations. Smaller and larger ratios, respectively, indicate recent star formation. The estimated warm (300 K

  20. Analysis for nonlinear inversion technique developed to estimate depth-distribution of absorption by spatially resolved backscattering measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Kazuhiro; Namita, Takeshi; Kato, Yuji; Shimizu, Koichi

    2015-03-01

    We have proposed a new nonlinear inversion technique to estimate the spatial distribution of the absorption coefficient (μa) in the depth direction of a turbid medium by spatially resolved backscattering measurement. With this technique, we can obtain cross-sectional image of μa as deep as the backscattered light traveled even when the transmitted light through the medium cannot be detected. In this technique, the depth distribution of absorption coefficient is determined by iterative calculation using the spatial path-length distribution (SPD) of traveled photons as a function of source-detector distance. In this calculation, the variance of path-length of many photons in each layer is also required. The SPD and the variance of path-length are obtained by Monte Carlo simulation using a known reduced scattering coefficient (μs'). Therefore, we need to know the μs' of the turbid medium beforehand. We have shown in computer simulation that this technique works well when the μs' is the typical values of mammalian body tissue, or 1.0 /mm. In this study, the accuracy of the μa estimation was analyzed and its dependence on the μs' was clarified quantitatively in various situations expected in practice. 10% deviations in μs' resulted in about 30% error in μa estimation, in average. This suggested that the measurement or the appropriate estimation of μs' is required to utilize the proposed technique effectively. Through this analysis, the effectiveness and the limitation of the newly proposed technique were clarified, and the problems to be solved were identified.

  1. Spatially Resolved, In Situ Carbon Isotope Analysis of Archean Organic Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williford, Kenneth H.; Ushikubo, Takayuki; Lepot, Kevin; Hallmann, Christian; Spicuzza, Michael J.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Summons, Roger E.; Valley, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Spatiotemporal variability in the carbon isotope composition of sedimentary organic matter (OM) preserves information about the evolution of the biosphere and of the exogenic carbon cycle as a whole. Primary compositions, and imprints of the post-depositional processes that obscure them, exist at the scale of individual sedimentary grains (mm to micron). Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) (1) enables analysis at these scales and in petrographic context, (2) permits morphological and compositional characterization of the analyte and associated minerals prior to isotopic analysis, and (3) reveals patterns of variability homogenized by bulk techniques. Here we present new methods for in situ organic carbon isotope analysis with sub-permil precision and spatial resolution to 1 micron using SIMS, as well as new data acquired from a suite of Archean rocks. Three analytical protocols were developed for the CAMECA ims1280 at WiscSIMS to analyze domains of varying size and carbon concentration. Average reproducibility (at 2SD) using a 6 micron spot size with two Faraday cup detectors was 0.4 %, and 0.8 % for analyses using 1 micron and 3 micron spot sizes with a Faraday cup (for C-12) and an electron multiplier (for C-13). Eight coals, two ambers, a shungite, and a graphite were evaluated for micron-scale isotopic heterogeneity, and LCNN anthracite (delta C-13 = -23.56 +/- 0.1 %, 2SD) was chosen as the working standard. Correlation between instrumental bias and H/C was observed and calibrated for each analytical session using organic materials with H/C between 0.1 and 1.5 (atomic), allowing a correction based upon a C-13H/C-13 measurement included in every analysis. Matrix effects of variable C/SiO2 were evaluated by measuring mm to sub-micron graphite domains in quartzite from Bogala mine, Sri Lanka. Apparent instrumental bias and C-12 count rate are correlated in this case, but this may be related to a crystal orientation effect in graphite. Analyses of amorphous

  2. The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury. XI. The Spatially Resolved Recent Star Formation History of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Alexia R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Bell, Eric F.; Seth, Anil C.; Simones, Jacob E.; Skillman, Evan D.; Choi, Yumi; Fouesneau, Morgan; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Johnson, Lent C.; Kalirai, Jason S.; Leroy, Adam K.; Monachesi, Antonela; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schruba, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    We measure the recent star formation history (SFH) across M31 using optical images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope as part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT). We fit the color-magnitude diagrams in ˜9000 regions that are ˜100 pc × 100 pc in projected size, covering a 0.5 square degree area (˜380 kpc2, deprojected) in the NE quadrant of M31. We show that the SFHs vary significantly on these small spatial scales but that there are also coherent galaxy-wide fluctuations in the SFH back to ˜500 Myr, most notably in M31's 10 kpc star-forming ring. We find that the 10 kpc ring is at least 400 Myr old, showing ongoing star formation (SF) over the past ˜500 Myr. This indicates the presence of molecular gas in the ring over at least 2 dynamical times at this radius. We also find that the ring’s position is constant throughout this time, and is stationary at the level of 1 km s-1, although there is evidence for broadening of the ring due to the diffusion of stars into the disk. Based on existing models of M31's ring features, the lack of evolution in the ring’s position makes a purely collisional ring origin highly unlikely. Besides the well-known 10 kpc ring, we observe two other ring-like features. There is an outer ring structure at 15 kpc with concentrated SF starting ˜80 Myr ago. The inner ring structure at 5 kpc has a much lower star formation rate (SFR) and therefore lower contrast against the underlying stellar disk. It was most clearly defined ˜200 Myr ago, but is much more diffuse today. We find that the global SFR has been fairly constant over the last ˜500 Myr, though it does show a small increase at 50 Myr that is 1.3 times the average SFR over the past 100 Myr. During the last ˜500 Myr, ˜60% of all SF has occurred in the 10 kpc ring. Finally, we find that in the past 100 Myr, the average SFR over the PHAT survey area is 0.28 ± 0.03 {{M}⊙ } y{{r}-1} with an average deprojected intensity of 7.3× {{10}-4} {{M}⊙ } y

  3. Quantitative, depth-resolved determination of particle motion using multi-exposure speckle imaging and spatial frequency domain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Tyler Bywaters

    Laser Speckle Imaging (LSI) is a simple, noninvasive technique to quickly image particle motion in scattering media such as biological tissue. LSI is generally used as a qualitative metric of relative flow speeds due to unknown impact from other variables that affect speckle contrast. These variables include: the intensity profile of the coherent laser beam, optical absorption and scattering coefficients, multi-layered dynamics including static, non-ergodic sections, and systematic effects such as laser coherence length. We overcame these obstacles using a methodology that combined accurate photon transport modeling, multi-exposure speckle imaging (MESI), spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI), and careful instrument calibration to determine absolute flow metrics in layered geometries. The impact of the beam profile was explored by first demonstrating a significant effect using in vivo experiments. Next, we determined the spatial frequencies of the beam shape using Discrete Fourier Transforms (DFT's), and modeled the propagation of each frequency individually using SFDI methodology. We found that we could accurately predict the effect of the beam profile, and correct the aberration using optical components to form a flat, planar light projection. Next, diffusion and Monte Carlo forward models of light transport were compared and used to determine flow dynamics in a simple homogenous diffusing solution. Results showed that Monte Carlo outperformed diffusion, due to breakdown of the diffusion approximation at clinically relevant camera exposure times. Phantoms were created with varying sizes of scattering polystyrene spheres and concentrations of viscous glycerine. Speckle contrast measurements were taken and fit using Monte Carlo models, and expected Brownian Diffusion Coefficients were returned within ~10% of expected values. Monte Carlo models were then extended to generate total and layer-specific fractional momentum transfer distributions. This information was

  4. Development of Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Tomography for Determination of Spatially Resolved Distributions of Water Vapor Temperature and Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryner, Elliott

    Optical diagnostic techniques used in high speed, high enthalpy flows, such as in a supersonic ramjet (scramjet) combustor, allow direct measurement of temperature and species concentration. Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) is a common laser based measurement technique for measuring temperature and species concentration in harsh environments such as chemically reacting flows. TDLAS is a one-dimensional, path integrated measurement that provides average values of the measured quantities and can be affected by gradients in the measurement space. By combining TDLAS with tomographic image reconstruction a two-dimensional spatially resolved distribution can be obtained. This technique is called Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Tomography. TDLAT has been developed for the purpose of making temperature and species concentration measurements on the supersonic combustion facility at the Aerospace Research Laboratory. TDLAT has been developed for the purpose of making two-dimensional measurements of water vapor concentration, which when combined with Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry can be used to calculate supersonic combustion efficiency of a scramjet combustor. This measurement system has been used in measurements of a flat flame burner from which two-dimensional distributions of temperature and water vapor concentration have been calculated. The calculated temperatures were then compared to measurements made on the same flat flame burner. Reconstructions of temperature and concentration show the structure of the flat flame burner, resolving regions of ambient room air, nitrogen co-flow, mixing layer and hot burner core. The TDLAT system was then installed on the supersonic combustion facility, where measurements were made for a known mole fraction of steam injected into the free stream. The TDLAT system was then used to measure water vapor concentration and temperature for clean-air combustion for an equivalence ratio of 0.17. The resulting values

  5. Joint derivation method for determining optical properties based on steady-state spatially resolved diffuse reflectance measurement at small source-detector separations and large reduced albedo range: theory and simulation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhenzhi; Fan, Ying; Zhao, Huijuan; Xu, Kexin

    2012-06-01

    Accurate determination of the optical properties (the absorption coefficient μ(a) and the reduced scattering coefficient μ(s) (')) of tissues is very important in a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Optical diffusion theory is frequently used as the forward model for describing the photon transfer in media with large reduced albedos (a(')) and in large source-detector separations (SDS). Several other methods (PN approximation, hybrid diffusion-P3 approximation) have also been published that describe photon transfer in media with low a(') or small SDSs. We studied the theoretical models for the steady-state spatially resolved diffuse reflectance measurement to accurately determine μ(a) and μ(s) (') at large a(') range but small SDSs. Instead of using a single model, a joint derivation method is proposed. The developed method uses one of the best aforementioned theoretical methods separately in five ranges of a(') determined from several forward models. In the region of small SDSs (the range between 0.4 and 8 mm) and large a(') range (between 0.5 and 0.99), the best theoretical derivation model was determined. The results indicate that the joint derivation method can improve the derivation accuracy and that a(') range can be determined by the steady-state spatially resolved diffuse reflectance measurement.

  6. Robust metamodel-based inverse estimation of bulk optical properties of turbid media from spatially resolved diffuse reflectance measurements.

    PubMed

    Watté, Rodrigo; Aernouts, Ben; Van Beers, Robbe; Saeys, Wouter

    2015-10-19

    Estimation of the bulk optical properties of turbid samples from spatially resolved reflectance measurements remains challenging, as the relation between the bulk optical properties and the acquired spatially resolved reflectance profiles is influenced by wavelength-dependent properties of the measurement system. The resulting measurement noise is apparent in the estimation of the bulk optical properties. In this study, a constrained inverse metamodeling approach is proposed to overcome these problems. First, a metamodel has been trained on a set of intralipid phantoms covering a wide range of optical properties to link the acquired spatially resolved reflectance profiles to the respective combinations of bulk optical properties (absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient). In this metamodel, the wavelength (500 - 1700 nm) is considered as a third input parameter for the model to account for the wavelength dependent effects introduced by the measurement system. Secondly, a smoothness constraint on the reduced scattering coefficient spectra was implemented in the iterative inverse estimation procedure to robustify it against measurement noise and increase the reliability of the obtained bulk absorption and reduced scattering coefficient spectra. As the estimated values in some regions may be more reliable than others, the difference between simulated and measured values as a function of the evaluated absorption and scattering coefficients was combined in a 2D cost function. This cost function was used as a weight in the fitting procedure to find the parameters of the µ(s)' function giving the lowest cost over all the wavelengths together. In accordance with previous research, an exponential function was considered to represent the µ(s)' spectra of intralipid phantoms. The fitting procedure also provides an absorption coefficient spectrum which is in accordance with the measurements and the estimated parameters of the exponential function. This

  7. Spatially resolved behavior of laser-produced copper plasma along expansion direction in the presence of static uniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Khwairakpam Shantakumar; Sharma, Ashwini Kumar

    2016-12-01

    We report on the spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopic study of laser-produced copper plasma in the presence of static uniform magnetic field in air ambient at atmospheric pressure. The response of copper atomic/ionic lines to magnetic field along the axial direction of plasma is different. It is attributed to the difference in populating process (electron impact excitation and recombination) of each transition. In the present work, we introduced air pressure to calculate the stopping radius and found it to be around the distance at which the intensity is pronounced. The electron density varied as ne = 9.2z-0.33 without magnetic field and in the presence of 0.3 T magnetic field, it varied as ne = 7.9z-0.27. The electron temperature variation with distance from the target in the absence and presence of magnetic field is found to be Te = 1.1z-0.23 and Te = 0.9z-0.18. The electron density and temperature decay slowly along the plasma expansion direction in the presence of magnetic field. It is due to magnetic confinement of plasma. We demonstrated that the thermal conductivity of plasma is enhanced in the presence of magnetic field. From the spatial evolution of the electron density and temperature, we estimated the approximate dimension of the core and tail region of the plasma and found an increase in the core dimension in the presence of magnetic field. The increase in core dimension is in agreement with the intensity variation of ionic line. It is attributed to an increase in heat transfer due to an increase in thermal conductivity in the presence of magnetic field. The present work may help optimize the distance from target to enhance spectral line intensity in optical emission spectroscopy in the presence of magnetic field.

  8. Spatially Resolved Genomic, Stable Isotopic, and Lipid Analyses of a Modern Freshwater Microbialite from Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Nitti, Anthony; Daniels, Camille A.; Siefert, Janet; Souza, Valeria; Hollander, David

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Microbialites are biologically mediated carbonate deposits found in diverse environments worldwide. To explore the organisms and processes involved in microbialite formation, this study integrated genomic, lipid, and both organic and inorganic stable isotopic analyses to examine five discrete depth horizons spanning the surface 25 mm of a modern freshwater microbialite from Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico. Distinct bacterial communities and geochemical signatures were observed in each microbialite layer. Photoautotrophic organisms accounted for approximately 65% of the sequences in the surface community and produced biomass with distinctive lipid biomarker and isotopic (δ13C) signatures. This photoautotrophic biomass was efficiently degraded in the deeper layers by heterotrophic organisms, primarily sulfate-reducing proteobacteria. Two spatially distinct zones of carbonate precipitation were observed within the microbialite, with the first zone corresponding to the phototroph-dominated portion of the microbialite and the second zone associated with the presence of sulfate-reducing heterotrophs. The coupling of photoautotrophic production, heterotrophic decomposition, and remineralization of organic matter led to the incorporation of a characteristic biogenic signature into the inorganic CaCO3 matrix. Overall, spatially resolved multidisciplinary analyses of the microbialite enabled correlations to be made between the distribution of specific organisms, precipitation of carbonate, and preservation of unique lipid and isotopic geochemical signatures. These findings are critical for understanding the formation of modern microbialites and have implications for the interpretation of ancient microbialite records. Key Words: Microbial ecology—Microbe-mineral interactions—Microbial mats—Stromatolites—Genomics. Astrobiology 12, 685–698. PMID:22882001

  9. A SCR Model Calibration Approach with Spatially Resolved Measurements and NH3 Storage Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Xiaobo; Parker, Gordon G.; Johnson, John H.; Naber, Jeffrey D.; Pihl, Josh A.

    2014-11-27

    The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is a technology used for reducing NO x emissions in the heavy-duty diesel (HDD) engine exhaust. In this study, the spatially resolved capillary inlet infrared spectroscopy (Spaci-IR) technique was used to study the gas concentration and NH3 storage distributions in a SCR catalyst, and to provide data for developing a SCR model to analyze the axial gaseous concentration and axial distributions of NH3 storage. A two-site SCR model is described for simulating the reaction mechanisms. The model equations and a calculation method was developed using the Spaci-IR measurements to determine the NH3 storage capacity and the relationships between certain kinetic parameters of the model. Moreover, a calibration approach was then applied for tuning the kinetic parameters using the spatial gaseous measurements and calculated NH3 storage as a function of axial position instead of inlet and outlet gaseous concentrations of NO, NO2, and NH3. The equations and the approach for determining the NH3 storage capacity of the catalyst and a method of dividing the NH3 storage capacity between the two storage sites are presented. It was determined that the kinetic parameters of the adsorption and desorption reactions have to follow certain relationships for the model to simulate the experimental data. Finally, the modeling results served as a basis for developing full model calibrations to SCR lab reactor and engine data and state estimator development as described in the references (Song et al. 2013a, b; Surenahalli et al. 2013).

  10. Direct observation of single layer graphene oxide reduction through spatially resolved, single sheet absorption/emission microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Denis A; Morozov, Yurii V; McDonald, Matthew P; Vietmeyer, Felix; Hodak, Jose H; Kuno, Masaru

    2014-06-11

    Laser reduction of graphene oxide (GO) offers unique opportunities for the rapid, nonchemical production of graphene. By tuning relevant reduction parameters, the band gap and conductivity of reduced GO can be precisely controlled. In situ monitoring of single layer GO reduction is therefore essential. In this report, we show the direct observation of laser-induced, single layer GO reduction through correlated changes to its absorption and emission. Absorption/emission movies illustrate the initial stages of single layer GO reduction, its transition to reduced-GO (rGO) as well as its subsequent decomposition upon prolonged laser illumination. These studies reveal GO's photoreduction life cycle and through it native GO/rGO absorption coefficients, their intrasheet distributions as well as their spatial heterogeneities. Extracted absorption coefficients for unreduced GO are α405 nm ≈ 6.5 ± 1.1 × 10(4) cm(-1), α520 nm ≈ 2.1 ± 0.4 × 10(4) cm(-1), and α640 nm ≈ 1.1 ± 0.3 × 10(4) cm(-1) while corresponding rGO α-values are α405 nm ≈ 21.6 ± 0.6 × 10(4) cm(-1), α520 nm ≈ 16.9 ± 0.4 × 10(4) cm(-1), and α640 nm ≈ 14.5 ± 0.4 × 10(4) cm(-1). More importantly, the correlated absorption/emission imaging provides us with unprecedented insight into GO's underlying photoreduction mechanism, given our ability to spatially resolve its kinetics and to connect local rate constants to activation energies. On a broader level, the developed absorption imaging is general and can be applied toward investigating the optical properties of other two-dimensional materials, especially those that are nonemissive and are invisible to current single molecule optical techniques.

  11. HST Spatially Resolved Spectra of the Accretion Disc and Gas Stream of the Nova-Like Variable UX Ursae Majoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baptista, Raymundo; Horne, Keith; Wade, Richard A.; Hubeny, Ivan; Long, Knox S.; Rutten, Rene G. M.

    1998-01-01

    Time-resolved eclipse spectroscopy of the nova-like variable UX UMa obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope/Faint Object Spectrograph (HST/FOS) on 1994 August and November is analysed with eclipse mapping techniques to produce spatially resolved spectra of its accretion disk and gas stream as a function of distance from the disk centre. The inner accretion disk is characterized by a blue continuum filled with absorption bands and lines, which cross over to emission with increasing disk radius, similar to that reported at optical wavelengths. The comparison of spatially resolved spectra at different azimuths reveals a significant asymmetry in the disk emission at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, with the disk side closest to the secondary star showing pronounced absorption by an 'iron curtain' and a Balmer jump in absorption. These results suggest the existence of an absorbing ring of cold gas whose density and/or vertical scale increase with disk radius. The spectrum of the infalling gas stream is noticeably different from the disc spectrum at the same radius suggesting that gas overflows through the impact point at the disk rim and continues along the stream trajectory, producing distinct emission down to 0.1 R(sub LI). The spectrum of the uneclipsed light shows prominent emission lines of Lyalpha, N v lambda1241, SiIV Lambda 1400, C IV Lambda 1550, HeII Lambda 1640, and MgII Lambda 2800, and a UV continuum rising towards longer wavelengths. The Balmer jump appears clearly in emission indicating that the uneclipsed light has an important contribution from optically thin gas. The lines and optically thin continuum emission are most probably emitted in a vertically extended disk chromosphere + wind. The radial temperature profiles of the continuum maps are well described by a steady-state disc model in the inner and intermediate disk regions (R greater than or equal to 0.3R(sub LI) ). There is evidence of an increase in the mass accretion rate from August to November

  12. A KECK/LRIS SPATIALLY RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF A LINER GALAXY SDSS J091628.05+420818.7

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Hyun-Jin; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Woo, Jong-Hak; Yagi, Masafumi; Yoshida, Michitoshi

    2012-07-01

    Using spatially resolved spectra obtained with the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer at the Keck I telescope, we investigate the nature of ionizing sources and kinematic properties of emission-line gas in a LINER galaxy SDSS J091628.05+420818.7, which is a nearby (z = 0.0241) and bright (M{sub r} = -20.2) early-type galaxy. After subtracting stellar absorption features using a combination of simple stellar population models, we measure the flux, line-of-sight velocity, and velocity dispersion of four emission lines, i.e., H{alpha}, H{beta}, [O III] {lambda}5007, and [N II] {lambda}6584, to study radial change of emission-line fluxes and velocities. Compared to the point-spread function of the observation, the emission-line region is slightly extended but comparable to the seeing size. The central concentration of emission-line gas suggests that ionization is triggered by a nuclear source, excluding old stellar population as ionizing sources. We find that emission-line gas is counter-rotating with respect to stellar component and that the [O III] {lambda}5007 line is blueshifted compared to other emission lines, possibly due to an outflow.

  13. The Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII): Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy in the Far-Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Astronomical studies at infrared wavelengths have dramatically improved our understanding of the universe, and observations with Spitzer, the upcoming Herschel mission, and SOFIA will continue to provide exciting new discoveries. The relatively low angular resolution of these missions, however, is insufficient to resolve the physical scale on which mid-to far-infrared emission arises, resulting in source and structure ambiguities that limit our ability to answer key science questions. Interferometry enables high angular resolution at these wavelengths - a powerful tool for scientific discovery. We will build the Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII), an eight-meter baseline Michelson stellar interferometer to fly on a high-altitude balloon. BETTII's spectral-spatial capability, provided by an instrument using double-Fourier techniques, will address key questions about the nature of disks in young star clusters and active galactic nuclei and the envelopes of evolved stars. BETTII will also lay the technological groundwork for future space interferometers and for suborbital programs optimized for studying extrasolar planets.

  14. Solid-State Selective 13C Excitation and Spin Diffusion NMR to Resolve Spatial Dimensions in Plant Cell Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Foston, M.; Katahira, R.; Gjersing, E.; Davis, M. F.; Ragauskas, A. J.

    2012-02-15

    The average spatial dimensions between major biopolymers within the plant cell wall can be resolved using a solid-state NMR technique referred to as a {sup 13}C cross-polarization (CP) SELDOM (selectively by destruction of magnetization) with a mixing time delay for spin diffusion. Selective excitation of specific aromatic lignin carbons indicates that lignin is in close proximity to hemicellulose followed by amorphous and finally crystalline cellulose. {sup 13}C spin diffusion time constants (T{sub SD}) were extracted using a two-site spin diffusion theory developed for {sup 13}C nuclei under magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. These time constants were then used to calculate an average lower-limit spin diffusion length between chemical groups within the plant cell wall. The results on untreated {sup 13}C enriched corn stover stem reveal that the lignin carbons are, on average, located at distances {approx}0.7-2.0 nm from the carbons in hemicellulose and cellulose, whereas the pretreated material had larger separations.

  15. Probing the strain effect on near band edge emission of a curved ZnO nanowire via spatially resolved cathodoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Haizhou; Pan, Nan; Li, Ming; Wu, Yukun; Wang, Xiaoping; Hou, J. G.

    2010-05-01

    Curved ZnO nanowires were deliberately prepared on a Si substrate and the strain effect on their near band edge (NBE) emission was investigated by spatially resolved cathodoluminescence (CL). By moving the electron beam step-by-step across individual curved nanowires and acquiring the CL spectra simultaneously, we found that the NBE emissions from the inner region of the curved nanowires with compressive strain show blueshift, while those from the outer region with tensile strain show redshift. Both the strains have been estimated from the local curvature by a geometrical model and have been further examined by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. A nearly linear relation between the strain and the peak energy shift in NBE emission was obtained. The result indicates that the optical band gap of ZnO nanowire is quite sensitive to and can be readily modulated by the induced strain via simply curving the nanowire, which has potential applications for designing new optical-electromechanical (OEM) and flexible optoelectronic nanodevices.

  16. Spatially resolved bimodal spectroscopy for classification/evaluation of mouse skin inflammatory and pre-cancerous stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Ayil, Gilberto; Amouroux, Marine; Clanché, Fabien; Granjon, Yves; Blondel, Walter C. P. M.

    2009-07-01

    Spatially-resolved bimodal spectroscopy (multiple AutoFluorescence AF excitation and Diffuse Reflectance DR), was used in vivo to discriminate various healthy and precancerous skin stages in a pre-clinical model (UV-irradiated mouse): Compensatory Hyperplasia CH, Atypical Hyperplasia AH and Dysplasia D. A specific data preprocessing scheme was applied to intensity spectra (filtering, spectral correction and intensity normalization), and several sets of spectral characteristics were automatically extracted and selected based on their discrimination power, statistically tested for every pair-wise comparison of histological classes. Data reduction with Principal Components Analysis (PCA) was performed and 3 classification methods were implemented (k-NN, LDA and SVM), in order to compare diagnostic performance of each method. Diagnostic performance was studied and assessed in terms of Sensibility (Se) and Specificity (Sp) as a function of the selected features, of the combinations of 3 different inter-fibres distances and of the numbers of principal components, such that: Se and Sp ~ 100% when discriminating CH vs. others; Sp ~ 100% and Se > 95% when discriminating Healthy vs. AH or D; Sp ~ 74% and Se ~ 63% for AH vs. D.

  17. Spatially resolved variations of the IMF mass normalization in early-type galaxies as probed by molecular gas kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Timothy A.; McDermid, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    We here present the first spatially resolved study of the initial mass function (IMF) in external galaxies derived using a dynamical tracer of the mass-to-light ratio (M/L). We use the kinematics of relaxed molecular gas discs in seven early-type galaxies (ETGs) selected from the ATLAS3D survey to dynamically determine M/L gradients. These M/L gradients are not very strong in the inner parts of these objects, and galaxies that do show variations are those with the highest specific star formation rates. Stellar population parameters derived from star formation histories are then used in order to estimate the stellar IMF mismatch parameter, and shed light on its variation within ETGs. Some of our target objects require a light IMF, otherwise their stellar population masses would be greater than their dynamical masses. In contrast, other systems seem to require heavier IMFs to explain their gas kinematics. Our analysis again confirms that IMF variation seems to be occurring within massive ETGs. We find good agreement between our IMF normalizations derived using molecular gas kinematics and those derived using other techniques. Despite this, we do not see find any correlation between the IMF normalization and galaxy dynamical properties or stellar population parameters, either locally or globally. In the future, larger studies which use molecules as tracers of galaxy dynamics can be used to help us disentangle the root cause of IMF variation.

  18. Spatially-Resolved Analysis of Glycolipids and Metabolites in Living Synechococcus sp. PCC7002 Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Konopka, Allan; Laskin, Julia

    2013-04-07

    Microorganisms release a diversity of organic compounds that couple interspecies metabolism, enable communication, or provide benefits to other microbes. Increased knowledge of microbial metabolite production will contribute to understanding of the dynamic microbial world and can potentially lead to new developments in drug discovery, biofuel production, and clinical research. Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) is an ambient ionization technique that enables detailed chemical characterization of molecules from a specific location on a surface without special sample pretreatment. Due to its ambient nature, living bacterial colonies growing on agar plates can be rapidly and non-destructively analyzed. We performed spatially resolved nano-DESI analysis of living Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 colonies on agar plates. We use high resolution mass spectrometry and MS/MS analysis of the living Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 colonies to detect metabolites and lipids, and confirm their identities. We found that despite the high salt content of the agar (osmolarity ca. 700 mM), nano-DESI analysis enables detailed characterization of metabolites produced by the colony. Using this technique, we identified several glycolipids found on the living colonies and examined the effect of the age of the colony on the chemical gradient of glucosylglycerol secreted onto agar.

  19. Spatially resolved absolute diffuse reflectance measurements for noninvasive determination of the optical scattering and absorption coefficients of biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienle, Alwin; Lilge, Lothar; Patterson, Michael S.; Hibst, Raimund; Steiner, Rudolf; Wilson, Brian C.

    1996-05-01

    The absorption and transport scattering coefficients of biological tissues determine the radial dependence of the diffuse reflectance that is due to a point source. A system is described for making remote measurements of spatially resolved absolute diffuse reflectance and hence noninvasive, noncontact estimates of the tissue optical properties. The system incorporated a laser source and a CCD camera. Deflection of the incident beam into the camera allowed characterization of the source for absolute reflectance measurements. It is shown that an often used solution of the diffusion equation cannot be applied for these measurements. Instead, a neural network, trained on the results of Monte Carlo simulations, was used to estimate the absorption and scattering coefficients from the reflectance data. Tests on tissue-simulating phantoms with transport scattering coefficients between 0.5 and 2.0 mm-1 and absorption coefficients between 0.002 and 0.1 mm -1 showed the rms errors of this technique to be 2.6% for the transport scattering coefficient and 14% for the absorption coefficients. The optical properties of bovine muscle, adipose, and liver tissue, as well as chicken muscle (breast), were also measured ex vivo at 633 and 751 nm. For muscle tissue it was found that the Monte Carlo simulation did not agree with experimental measurements of reflectance at distances less than 2 mm from the incident beam. Carlo, neural network.

  20. [A Time-Spatial Resolvable High Speed Spectrograph and Its Application on Spectrum Measurement of a Nanosecond Pulsed Underwater Spark Discharge].

    PubMed

    Niu, Zhi-wen; Yan, Xian-feng; Li, Shu-han; Wen, Xiao-qiong; Liu, Jin-yuan

    2015-10-01

    Recently, the diagnosis of the characteristic of pulsed underwater electrical discharges plasma have received significant attention. The measurement of a time-spatial resolved spectrum emitted from a single discharge pulse is important for understanding the time-spatial evolution characteristics of plasma generated by a pulsed high-voltage discharge in water. In this paper, a high speed time-spatial resolvable spectrograph for measuring the emission spectrum of a single electrical discharge pulse was reported. The high speed time-spatial resolvable spectrograph has been constructed by combining an ultrahigh-speed frame camera system with monochromator. Software for the spectral analyzing was also developed. The performance of the spectrograph was tested by using a 632.8 nm He-Ne laser beam at a 1 200 g x mm(-1) grating. The pixel resolution for 632.8 nm spectra is 0.013 nm. The instrument broadening for 632.8 nm spectra is (0.150 ± 0.009)nm when the exposure.time of the camera is 20 ns and the width of entrance slit is 0.2 mm, and increases with increasing the slit width. The change of exposure time of the camera has no influence on the instrument broadening, ensuring the spectrograph in a steady performance while adjusting the exposure time of the camera. With the spectrograph, time-spatial resolved spectra emitted from a single discharge pulse of an underwater nanoseconds spark discharge were obtained. It provides good data for investigating the time-spatial evolution characteristics of the discharge plasma during a single discharge pulse. The spectrograph developed in this work provides a technical approach for studying the time-spatial evolution characteristic of, plasma generated by a single electrical discharge pulse.

  1. Tunable All Reflective Spatial Heterodyne Spectroscopy, A Technique For High Resolving Power Observation OI Defused Emission Line Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Seyedeh Sona

    The solar system presents a challenge to spectroscopic observers, because it is an astrophysically low energy environment populated with often angularly extended targets (e.g, interplanetary medium, comets, planetary upper atmospheres, and planet and satellite near space environments). Spectroscopy is a proven tool for determining compositional and other properties of remote objects. Narrow band imaging and low resolving spectroscopic measurements provide information about composition, photochemical evolution, energy distribution and density. The extension to high resolving power provides further access to temperature, velocity, isotopic ratios, separation of blended sources, and opacity effects. The drawback of high-resolution spectroscopy comes from the instrumental limitations of lower throughput, the necessity of small entrance apertures, sensitivity, field of view, and large physical instrumental size. These limitations quickly become definitive for faint and/or extended targets and for spacecraft encounters. An emerging technique with promise for the study of faint, extended sources at high resolving power is the all-reflective form of the Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer (SHS). SHS instruments are compact and naturally possess both high etendue and high resolving power. To achieve similar spectral grasp, grating spectrometers require big telescopes. SHS is a common-path beam Fourier transform interferometer that produces Fizeau fringe pattern for all other wavelengths except the tuned wavelength. Compared to similar Fourier transform Spectrometers (FTS), SHS has considerably relaxed optical tolerances that make it easier to use in the visible and UV spectral ranges. The large etendue of SHS instruments makes them ideal for observations of extended, low surface brightness, isolated emission line sources, while their intrinsically high spectral resolution enables the study of the dynamical and spectral characteristics described above. SHS also combines very

  2. Spatially resolved quantification of gadolinium(III)-based magnetic resonance agents in tissue by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry after in vivo MRI.

    PubMed

    Aichler, Michaela; Huber, Katharina; Schilling, Franz; Lohöfer, Fabian; Kosanke, Katja; Meier, Reinhard; Rummeny, Ernst J; Walch, Axel; Wildgruber, Moritz

    2015-03-27

    Gadolinium(III)-based contrast agents improve the sensitivity and specificity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), especially when targeted contrast agents are applied. Because of nonlinear correlation between the contrast agent concentration in tissue and the MRI signal obtained in vivo, quantification of certain biological or pathophysiological processes by MRI remains a challenge. Up to now, no technology has been able to provide a spatially resolved quantification of MRI agents directly within the tissue, which would allow a more precise verification of in vivo imaging results. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry for spatially resolved in situ quantification of gadolinium(III) agents, in correlation to in vivo MRI, were evaluated. Enhanced kinetics of Gadofluorine M were determined dynamically over time in a mouse model of myocardial infarction. MALDI imaging was able to corroborate the in vivo imaging MRI signals and enabled in situ quantification of the gadolinium probe with high spatial resolution.

  3. Spatially resolved analysis of plutonium isotopic signatures in environmental particle samples by laser ablation-MC-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Konegger-Kappel, Stefanie; Prohaska, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Laser ablation-multi-collector-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS) was optimized and investigated with respect to its performance for determining spatially resolved Pu isotopic signatures within radioactive fuel particle clusters. Fuel particles had been emitted from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (ChNPP) where the 1986 accident occurred and were deposited in the surrounding soil, where weathering processes caused their transformation into radioactive clusters, so-called micro-samples. The size of the investigated micro-samples, which showed surface alpha activities below 40 mBq, ranged from about 200 to 1000 μm. Direct single static point ablations allowed to identify variations of Pu isotopic signatures not only between distinct fuel particle clusters but also within individual clusters. The resolution was limited to 100 to 120 μm as a result of the applied laser ablation spot sizes and the resolving power of the nuclear track radiography methodology that was applied for particle pre-selection. The determined (242)Pu/(239)Pu and (240)Pu/(239)Pu isotope ratios showed a variation from low to high Pu isotope ratios, ranging from 0.007(2) to 0.047(8) for (242)Pu/(239)Pu and from 0.183(13) to 0.577(40) for (240)Pu/(239)Pu. In contrast to other studies, the applied methodology allowed for the first time to display the Pu isotopic distribution in the Chernobyl fallout, which reflects the differences in the spent fuel composition over the reactor core. The measured Pu isotopic signatures are in good agreement with the expected Pu isotopic composition distribution that is typical for a RBMK-1000 reactor, indicating that the analyzed samples are originating from the ill-fated Chernobyl reactor. The average Pu isotope ratios [(240)Pu/(239)Pu = 0.388(86), (242)Pu/(239)Pu = 0.028(11)] that were calculated from all investigated samples (n = 48) correspond well to previously published results of Pu analyses in contaminated samples from

  4. Spatially resolved in vivo measurement system for estimating the optical properties of tissue in the wavelength range 1000-1700 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjalmarsson, Pär; Thennadil, Suresh N.

    2007-07-01

    For non-invasive estimation of optical properties (i.e. determination of the absorption and the reduced scattering coefficients) of turbid media such as tissue, spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is one of most used technique. So far this has only been done for wavelengths covered by CCD-detectors (about 350-1050nm). The NIR region beyond 1050nm i.e. the second and first overtone regions, has absorption peaks of interest e.g. for tissue the glucose peak at around 1250nm and 1600nm. Thus for non-invasive medical diagnostics applications, a spatially resolved measurement system capable of estimating optical properties in this region will be very useful. Until now optical properties of tissue in this region have only been estimated using in vitro methods e.g. using an integrating sphere set-up. In this paper we describe a spatially resolved system that will extend the region up to 1700nm by using a TE cooled 320×256 pixel InGaAS detector, a white light source and a probe that consists of 9×200micron fibres spanning 0.3 to 2.7mm from the source. Across the 320 pixels 680nm will be dispersed giving a resolution of 2.125nm/pixel and a resolving power of about 14nm. The system is validated using tissue-like phantoms. Since tissue has a high concentration of water which leads to high absorption after 950nm, the diffusion approximation cannot be used to extract the optical properties from the spatially resolved measurements. Instead, two techniques based around Monte Carlo simulations of diffuse reflectance profiles, to build a lookup table coupled with interpolation using splines or a third order polynomial, have been used to calculate the optical properties for different wavelengths. The performances of these techniques are compared. It was found that the spline fitting produced lower error for the wavelength region considered.

  5. Highly spatially resolved structural and optical investigation of Bi nanoparticles in Y-Er disilicate thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarangella, A.; Amiard, G.; Reitano, R.; Priolo, F.; Boninelli, S.; Miritello, M.

    2016-08-01

    Er-containing silicon compatible materials have been widely used as infrared emitters for microphotonics application. In this field, the additional introduction of a proper sensitizer permits to increase the Er excitation cross sections, thus increasing its optical efficiency. This work aims to investigate the influence of a post-transition metal, bismuth, on the optical properties of erbium-yttrium disilicate thin films synthesized by magnetron co-sputtering. After thermal treatments at 1000 °C in O2 or N2 environment, the presence of small precipitates, about 6 nm in diameter, was evidenced by transmission electron microscopy analyses. The spatially resolved chemical nature of the nanoparticles was discerned in the Si and O rich environments by means of scanning transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray and scanning transmission electron microscopy-electron energy loss spectroscopy analyses performed with nanometric resolution. In particular, metallic Bi nanoparticles were stabilized in the N2 environment, being strongly detrimental for the Er emission. A different scenario was instead observed in O2, where the formation of Bi silicate nanoparticles was demonstrated with the support of photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy. In particular, a broad band peaked at 255 nm, correlated to the excitation band of Bi silicate nanoparticles, was identified in Er excitation spectrum. Thus Bi silicate clusters act as sensitizer for Er ions, permitting to improve Er emission up to 250 times with respect to the resonant condition. Moreover, the Er decay time increases in the presence of the Bi silicate nanoparticles that act as cages for Er ions. These last results permit to further increase Er optical efficiency in the infrared range, suggesting (Bi + Er)-Y disilicate as a good candidate for applications in microphotonics.

  6. A SPATIALLY RESOLVED STUDY OF THE SYNCHROTRON EMISSION AND TITANIUM IN TYCHO’S SUPERNOVA REMNANT USING NuSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Laura A.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; An, Hongjun; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Zoglauer, Andreas; Christensen, Finn E.; Eriksen, Kristoffer A.; Fryer, Chris L.; Hailey, Charles J.; Stern, Daniel K.; Zhang, William W.

    2015-12-01

    We report results from deep observations (∼750 ks) of Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR) with NuSTAR. Using these data, we produce narrow-band images over several energy bands to identify the regions producing the hardest X-rays and to search for radioactive decay line emission from {sup 44}Ti. We find that the hardest (>10 keV) X-rays are concentrated in the southwest of Tycho, where recent Chandra observations have revealed high emissivity “stripes” associated with particles accelerated to the knee of the cosmic-ray spectrum. We do not find evidence of {sup 44}Ti, and we set limits on its presence and distribution within the SNR. These limits correspond to an upper-limit {sup 44}Ti mass of M{sub 44} < 2.4 × 10{sup −4} M{sub ⊙} for a distance of 2.3 kpc. We perform a spatially resolved spectroscopic analysis of 66 regions across Tycho. We map the best-fit rolloff frequency of the hard X-ray spectra, and we compare these results to measurements of the shock expansion and ambient density. We find that the highest energy electrons are accelerated at the lowest densities and in the fastest shocks, with a steep dependence of the rolloff frequency with shock velocity. Such a dependence is predicted by models where the maximum energy of accelerated electrons is limited by the age of the SNR rather than by synchrotron losses, but this scenario requires far lower magnetic field strengths than those derived from observations in Tycho. One way to reconcile these discrepant findings is through shock obliquity effects, and future observational work is necessary to explore the role of obliquity in the particle acceleration process.

  7. A spatially resolved study of the synchrotron emission and titanium in Tycho's supernova remnant using NuSTAR

    DOE PAGES

    Lopez, Laura A.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; ...

    2015-11-30

    Here, we report results from deep observations (~750 ks) of Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR) with NuSTAR. Using these data, we produce narrow-band images over several energy bands to identify the regions producing the hardest X-rays and to search for radioactive decay line emission from 44Ti. We find that the hardest (>10 keV) X-rays are concentrated in the southwest of Tycho, where recent Chandra observations have revealed high emissivity "stripes" associated with particles accelerated to the knee of the cosmic-ray spectrum. We do not find evidence of 44Ti, and we set limits on its presence and distribution within the SNR. Furthermore,more » these limits correspond to an upper-limit 44Ti mass of M44 < 2.4 × 10-4 M⊙ for a distance of 2.3 kpc. We perform a spatially resolved spectroscopic analysis of 66 regions across Tycho. We map the best-fit rolloff frequency of the hard X-ray spectra, and we compare these results to measurements of the shock expansion and ambient density. We also find that the highest energy electrons are accelerated at the lowest densities and in the fastest shocks, with a steep dependence of the rolloff frequency with shock velocity. Such a dependence is predicted by models where the maximum energy of accelerated electrons is limited by the age of the SNR rather than by synchrotron losses, but this scenario requires far lower magnetic field strengths than those derived from observations in Tycho. One way to reconcile these discrepant findings is through shock obliquity effects, and future observational work is necessary to explore the role of obliquity in the particle acceleration process.« less

  8. Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy and Chemical History of Star-forming Galaxies in the Hercules Cluster: The Effects of the Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulou, V.; Vílchez, J.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Papaderos, P.; Magrini, L.; Cedrés, B.; Reverte, D.

    2011-06-01

    Spatially resolved spectroscopy has been obtained for a sample of 27 star-forming (SF) galaxies selected from our deep Hα survey of the Hercules cluster. We have applied spectral synthesis models to all emission-line spectra of this sample using the population synthesis code STARLIGHT and have obtained fundamental parameters of stellar components such as mean metallicity and age. The emission-line spectra were corrected for underlying stellar absorption using these spectral synthesis models. Line fluxes were measured and O/H and N/O gas chemical abundances were obtained using the latest empirical calibrations. We have derived the masses and total luminosities of the galaxies using available Sloan Digital Sky Survey broadband photometry. The effects of cluster environment on the chemical evolution of galaxies and on their mass-metallicity (MZ) and luminosity-metallicity (LZ) relations were studied by combining the derived gas metallicities, the mean stellar metallicities and ages, the masses and luminosities of the galaxies, and their existing H I data. Our Hercules SF galaxies are divided into three main subgroups: (1) chemically evolved spirals with truncated ionized-gas disks and nearly flat oxygen gradients, demonstrating the effect of ram-pressure stripping; (2) chemically evolved dwarfs/irregulars populating the highest local densities, possible products of tidal interactions in preprocessing events; and (3) less metallic dwarf galaxies that appear to be "newcomers" to the cluster and are experiencing pressure-triggered star formation. Most Hercules SF galaxies follow well-defined MZ and LZ sequences (for both O/H and N/O), though the dwarf/irregular galaxies located at the densest regions appear to be outliers to these global relations, suggesting a physical reason for the dispersion in these fundamental relations. The Hercules cluster appears to be currently assembling via the merger of smaller substructures, providing an ideal laboratory where the local

  9. Influence of cutaneous and muscular circulation on spatially resolved versus standard Beer-Lambert near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Messere, Alessandro; Roatta, Silvestro

    2013-12-01

    The potential interference of cutaneous circulation on muscle blood volume and oxygenation monitoring by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) remains an important limitation of this technique. Spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS) was reported to minimize the contribution of superficial tissue layers in cerebral monitoring but this characteristic has never been documented in muscle tissue monitoring. This study aims to compare SRS with the standard Beer-Lambert (BL) technique in detecting blood volume changes selectively induced in muscle and skin. In 16 healthy subjects, the biceps brachii was investigated during isometric elbow flexion at 70% of the maximum voluntary contractions lasting 10 sec, performed before and after exposure of the upper arm to warm air flow. From probes applied over the muscle belly the following variables were recorded: total hemoglobin index (THI, SRS-based), total hemoglobin concentration (tHb, BL-based), tissue oxygenation index (TOI, SRS-based), and skin blood flow (SBF), using laser Doppler flowmetry. Blood volume indices exhibited similar changes during muscle contraction but only tHb significantly increased during warming (+5.2 ± 0.7 μmol/L·cm, an effect comparable to the increase occurring in postcontraction hyperemia), accompanying a 10-fold increase in SBF. Contraction-induced changes in tHb and THI were not substantially affected by warming, although the tHb tracing was shifted upward by (5.2 ± 3.5 μmol/L·cm, P < 0.01). TOI was not affected by cutaneous warming. In conclusion, SRS appears to effectively reject interference by SBF in both muscle blood volume and oxygenation monitoring. Instead, BL-based parameters should be interpreted with caution, whenever changes in cutaneous perfusion cannot be excluded.

  10. Temporally and spatially resolved plasma spectroscopy in pulsed laser deposition of ultra-thin boron nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavin, Nicholas R.; Muratore, Christopher; Jespersen, Michael L.; Hu, Jianjun; Fisher, Timothy S.; Voevodin, Andrey A.

    2015-04-01

    Physical vapor deposition (PVD) has recently been investigated as a viable, alternative growth technique for two-dimensional materials with multiple benefits over other vapor deposition synthesis methods. The high kinetic energies and chemical reactivities of the condensing species formed from PVD processes can facilitate growth over large areas and at reduced substrate temperatures. In this study, chemistry, kinetic energies, time of flight data, and spatial distributions within a PVD plasma plume ablated from a boron nitride (BN) target by a KrF laser at different pressures of nitrogen gas were investigated. Time resolved spectroscopy and wavelength specific imaging were used to identify and track atomic neutral and ionized species including B+, B*, N+, N*, and molecular species including N2*, N2+, and BN. Formation and decay of these species formed both from ablation of the target and from interactions with the background gas were investigated and provided insights into fundamental growth mechanisms of continuous, amorphous boron nitride thin films. The correlation of the plasma diagnostic results with film chemical composition and thickness uniformity studies helped to identify that a predominant mechanism for BN film formation is condensation surface recombination of boron ions and neutral atomic nitrogen species. These species arrive nearly simultaneously to the substrate location, and BN formation occurs microseconds before arrival of majority of N+ ions generated by plume collisions with background molecular nitrogen. The energetic nature and extended dwelling time of incident N+ ions at the substrate location was found to negatively impact resulting BN film stoichiometry and thickness. Growth of stoichiometric films was optimized at enriched concentrations of ionized boron and neutral atomic nitrogen in plasma near the condensation surface, providing few nanometer thick films with 1:1 BN stoichiometry and good thicknesses uniformity over macroscopic areas.

  11. Visualizing chemical states and defects induced magnetism of graphene oxide by spatially-resolved-X-ray microscopy and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y F; Singh, Shashi B; Limaye, Mukta V; Shao, Y C; Hsieh, S H; Chen, L Y; Hsueh, H C; Wang, H T; Chiou, J W; Yeh, Y C; Chen, C W; Chen, C H; Ray, Sekhar C; Wang, J; Pong, W F; Takagi, Y; Ohigashi, T; Yokoyama, T; Kosugi, N

    2015-10-20

    This investigation studies the various magnetic behaviors of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxides (rGOs) and elucidates the relationship between the chemical states that involve defects therein and their magnetic behaviors in GO sheets. Magnetic hysteresis loop reveals that the GO is ferromagnetic whereas photo-thermal moderately reduced graphene oxide (M-rGO) and heavily reduced graphene oxide (H-rGO) gradually become paramagnetic behavior at room temperature. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and corresponding X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy were utilized to investigate thoroughly the variation of the C 2p(π*) states that are bound with oxygen-containing and hydroxyl groups, as well as the C 2p(σ*)-derived states in flat and wrinkle regions to clarify the relationship between the spatially-resolved chemical states and the magnetism of GO, M-rGO and H-rGO. The results of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism further support the finding that C 2p(σ*)-derived states are the main origin of the magnetism of GO. Based on experimental results and first-principles calculations, the variation in magnetic behavior from GO to M-rGO and to H-rGO is interpreted, and the origin of ferromagnetism is identified as the C 2p(σ*)-derived states that involve defects/vacancies rather than the C 2p(π*) states that are bound with oxygen-containing and hydroxyl groups on GO sheets.

  12. A spatially resolved study of the synchrotron emission and titanium in Tycho's supernova remnant using NuSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Laura A.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; An, Hongjun; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Eriksen, Kristoffer A.; Fryer, Chris L.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Stern, Daniel K.; Zhang, William W.; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2015-11-30

    Here, we report results from deep observations (~750 ks) of Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR) with NuSTAR. Using these data, we produce narrow-band images over several energy bands to identify the regions producing the hardest X-rays and to search for radioactive decay line emission from 44Ti. We find that the hardest (>10 keV) X-rays are concentrated in the southwest of Tycho, where recent Chandra observations have revealed high emissivity "stripes" associated with particles accelerated to the knee of the cosmic-ray spectrum. We do not find evidence of 44Ti, and we set limits on its presence and distribution within the SNR. Furthermore, these limits correspond to an upper-limit 44Ti mass of M44 < 2.4 × 10-4 M⊙ for a distance of 2.3 kpc. We perform a spatially resolved spectroscopic analysis of 66 regions across Tycho. We map the best-fit rolloff frequency of the hard X-ray spectra, and we compare these results to measurements of the shock expansion and ambient density. We also find that the highest energy electrons are accelerated at the lowest densities and in the fastest shocks, with a steep dependence of the rolloff frequency with shock velocity. Such a dependence is predicted by models where the maximum energy of accelerated electrons is limited by the age of the SNR rather than by synchrotron losses, but this scenario requires far lower magnetic field strengths than those derived from observations in Tycho. One way to reconcile these discrepant findings is through shock obliquity effects, and future observational work is necessary to explore the role of obliquity in the particle acceleration process.

  13. Influence of cutaneous and muscular circulation on spatially resolved versus standard Beer–Lambert near‐infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Messere, Alessandro; Roatta, Silvestro

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The potential interference of cutaneous circulation on muscle blood volume and oxygenation monitoring by near‐infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) remains an important limitation of this technique. Spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS) was reported to minimize the contribution of superficial tissue layers in cerebral monitoring but this characteristic has never been documented in muscle tissue monitoring. This study aims to compare SRS with the standard Beer–Lambert (BL) technique in detecting blood volume changes selectively induced in muscle and skin. In 16 healthy subjects, the biceps brachii was investigated during isometric elbow flexion at 70% of the maximum voluntary contractions lasting 10 sec, performed before and after exposure of the upper arm to warm air flow. From probes applied over the muscle belly the following variables were recorded: total hemoglobin index (THI, SRS‐based), total hemoglobin concentration (tHb, BL‐based), tissue oxygenation index (TOI, SRS‐based), and skin blood flow (SBF), using laser Doppler flowmetry. Blood volume indices exhibited similar changes during muscle contraction but only tHb significantly increased during warming (+5.2 ± 0.7 μmol/L·cm, an effect comparable to the increase occurring in postcontraction hyperemia), accompanying a 10‐fold increase in SBF. Contraction‐induced changes in tHb and THI were not substantially affected by warming, although the tHb tracing was shifted upward by (5.2 ± 3.5 μmol/L·cm, P < 0.01). TOI was not affected by cutaneous warming. In conclusion, SRS appears to effectively reject interference by SBF in both muscle blood volume and oxygenation monitoring. Instead, BL‐based parameters should be interpreted with caution, whenever changes in cutaneous perfusion cannot be excluded. PMID:24744858

  14. Late Enrichment Maintains Accurate Recent and Remote Spatial Memory Only in Aged Rats That Were Unimpaired When Middle Aged

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Fanny; Herbeaux, Karine; Aufrere, Noémie; Kelche, Christian; Mathis, Chantal; Barbelivien, Alexandra; Majchrzak, Monique

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of rodents to a stimulating environment has beneficial effects on some cognitive functions that are impaired during physiological aging, and especially spatial reference memory. The present study investigated whether environmental enrichment rescues these functions in already declining subjects and/or protects them from subsequent…

  15. Accurate Memory for Object Location by Individuals with Intellectual Disability: Absolute Spatial Tagging Instead of Configural Processing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giuliani, Fabienne; Favrod, Jerome; Grasset, Francois; Schenk, Francoise

    2011-01-01

    Using head-mounted eye tracker material, we assessed spatial recognition abilities (e.g., reaction to object permutation, removal or replacement with a new object) in participants with intellectual disabilities. The "Intellectual Disabilities (ID)" group (n = 40) obtained a score totalling a 93.7% success rate, whereas the "Normal Control" group…

  16. Spatial and temporal patterns of water flow generated by suction-feeding bluegill sunfish Lepomis macrochirus resolved by Particle Image Velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Day, Steven W; Higham, Timothy E; Cheer, Angela Y; Wainwright, Peter C

    2005-07-01

    The suction-feeding fish generates a flow field external to its head in order to draw prey into the mouth. To date there are very few empirical measurements that characterize the fluid mechanics of suction feeding, particularly the temporal and spatial patterns of water velocity in front of the fish. To characterize the flow in front of suction-feeding bluegill sunfish Lepomis macrochirus, measurements with high spatial (<1 mm) and temporal (500 Hz) resolution were taken using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). In an analysis separate from the PIV, high-speed video sequences were used for a novel method of visually tracking every seed particle for the duration of each feeding in order to determine directly the total parcel of water that the fish ingests. PIV measurements and particle tracking show that water is drawn from all around the mouth. Fluid velocity decreases rapidly with distance from the mouth and is only significant (>5% of speed at the mouth) within roughly 1 mouth diameter of the fish. Suction feeders gain little in terms of extending this flow field by even substantial increases in the fluid speed at the mouth opening. Instead, the chief advantage of increased flow speed at the mouth may be the increased magnitude of generated forces within the space very close to the mouth. After scaling of the velocity field based on size of the mouth opening and the measured fluid speed at a fixed position, the measured velocity profiles for all feedings are very similar to one another, so that a functional relationship for the magnitude of fluid speed as a function of distance from the predator mouth is presented and shown to be accurate over the range of kinematic variables tested. This relationship describes the velocity field both along the centerline of the fish and along transects lying at an angle to the centerline within both the mid-sagittal and frontal planes. Comparison of the time-resolved fluid velocity measurements to gape kinematics demonstrate that

  17. Accurate ab initio dipole moment surfaces of ozone: First principle intensity predictions for rotationally resolved spectra in a large range of overtone and combination bands.

    PubMed

    Tyuterev, Vladimir G; Kochanov, Roman V; Tashkun, Sergey A

    2017-02-14

    Ab initio dipole moment surfaces (DMSs) of the ozone molecule are computed using the MRCI-SD method with AVQZ, AV5Z, and VQZ-F12 basis sets on a dense grid of about 1950 geometrical configurations. The analytical DMS representation used for the fit of ab initio points provides better behavior for large nuclear displacements than that of previous studies. Various DMS models were derived and tested. Vibration-rotation line intensities of (16)O3 were calculated from these ab initio surfaces by the variational method using two different potential functions determined in our previous works. For the first time, a very good agreement of first principle calculations with the experiment was obtained for the line-by-line intensities in rotationally resolved ozone spectra in a large far- and mid-infrared range. This includes high overtone and combination bands up to ΔV = 6. A particular challenge was a correct description of the B-type bands (even ΔV3 values) that represented major difficulties for the previous ab initio investigations and for the empirical spectroscopic models. The major patterns of various B-type bands were correctly described without empirically adjusted dipole moment parameters. For the 10 μm range, which is of key importance for the atmospheric ozone retrievals, our ab initio intensity results are within the experimental error margins. The theoretical values for the strongest lines of the ν3 band lie in general between two successive versions of HITRAN (HIgh-resolution molecular TRANsmission) empirical database that corresponded to most extended available sets of observations. The overall qualitative agreement in a large wavenumber range for rotationally resolved cold and hot ozone bands up to about 6000 cm(-1) is achieved here for the first time. These calculations reveal that several weak bands are yet missing from available spectroscopic databases.

  18. Accurate ab initio dipole moment surfaces of ozone: First principle intensity predictions for rotationally resolved spectra in a large range of overtone and combination bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyuterev, Vladimir G.; Kochanov, Roman V.; Tashkun, Sergey A.

    2017-02-01

    Ab initio dipole moment surfaces (DMSs) of the ozone molecule are computed using the MRCI-SD method with AVQZ, AV5Z, and VQZ-F12 basis sets on a dense grid of about 1950 geometrical configurations. The analytical DMS representation used for the fit of ab initio points provides better behavior for large nuclear displacements than that of previous studies. Various DMS models were derived and tested. Vibration-rotation line intensities of 16O3 were calculated from these ab initio surfaces by the variational method using two different potential functions determined in our previous works. For the first time, a very good agreement of first principle calculations with the experiment was obtained for the line-by-line intensities in rotationally resolved ozone spectra in a large far- and mid-infrared range. This includes high overtone and combination bands up to Δ V = 6. A particular challenge was a correct description of the B-type bands (even Δ V3 values) that represented major difficulties for the previous ab initio investigations and for the empirical spectroscopic models. The major patterns of various B-type bands were correctly described without empirically adjusted dipole moment parameters. For the 10 μ m range, which is of key importance for the atmospheric ozone retrievals, our ab initio intensity results are within the experimental error margins. The theoretical values for the strongest lines of the ν3 band lie in general between two successive versions of HITRAN (HIgh-resolution molecular TRANsmission) empirical database that corresponded to most extended available sets of observations. The overall qualitative agreement in a large wavenumber range for rotationally resolved cold and hot ozone bands up to about 6000 cm-1 is achieved here for the first time. These calculations reveal that several weak bands are yet missing from available spectroscopic databases.

  19. Spatially-resolved chemical analysis of frozen ice cores by cryo-cell-UV-laser-ablation-ICPMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Wolfgang; Della Lunga, Damiano; Rasmussen, Sune O.; Svensson, Anders

    2015-04-01

    High-latitude ice cores have become the master records of late Pleistocene climate variability. Especially the high-resolution data from Greenland of the past ~125 ka reveal a remarkably changeable glacial climate, and these rapid climate oscillations have been shown to take place within a few years only [1, 2]. The requirement for an improvement in spatial resolution in ice core analysis arises from 1) the continuous thinning of annual layers in deep parts of ice cores to below what is routinely resolvable by continuous flow analysis and 2) the concomitant recrystallization of ice that potentially affects the location of impurities and thus the identification of annual layers. We developed a new technique to analyze elemental concentrations at ppb-levels in frozen ice cores at ~100 um (0.1 mm) resolution, which focuses on seasalt and dust tracers (e.g. Na, Mg, Ca, Al, Fe). It utilizes a custom-built, peltier-cooled cryo-sample holder fully compatible with the two-volume Laurin LA-cell of our RESOlution M-50 excimer (193 nm ArF) LA system, which is coupled to an Agilent 7500cs ICPMS, operated in reaction cell gas mode with H2 to eliminate 40Ar and 40Ar16O to access 40Ca and 56Fe [3]. Using 3 x 5 cm strips of ice cores per sample holder, this setup allows elemental concentrations to be acquired using both depth-profiling along (chains of) spots and/or as continuous lateral profiles, following surface cleaning with a major-element-free ceramic blade. Ice crystal boundaries can be observed with transmitted or reflected light illumination. We focus on NGRIP samples from Greenland Stadial 22 (GS22; ~84-88 ka; ~2695-2720 m) with its corresponding transitions. Owing to analysis in frozen ice, we can easily identify - relative to ice crystal boundaries - the location of cation impurities in both clear ice and so-called cloudy bands that are enriched in impurities. We find a remarkable difference in the location of impurities between these different ice domains [4]. Lower

  20. Magellanic Clues to Spatially-resolved Extinction Corrections for Distant Galaxies in the HST/JWST Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Rolf A.; Kim, Duho; Shewcraft, Timothy; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Tamura, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    star formation histories. Resulting predicted βV,0 will serve as calibrations for the spatially-resolved extinction correction of galaxies at all redshifts where the method is proved reliable. This work is funded by NASA/ADAP grant NNX12AE47G.

  1. SPATIALLY RESOLVING SUBSTRUCTURES WITHIN THE MASSIVE ENVELOPE AROUND AN INTERMEDIATE-MASS PROTOSTAR: MMS 6/OMC-3

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Satoko; Ho, Paul T. P.; Saigo, Kazuya; Tomida, Kengo

    2012-06-10

    With the Submillimeter Array, the brightest (sub)millimeter continuum source in the Orion Molecular Cloud-2/3 region, MMS 6, has been observed in the 850 {mu}m continuum emission with approximately 10 times better angular resolution than previous studies ( Almost-Equal-To 0.''3, Almost-Equal-To 120 AU at Orion). The deconvolved size, the mass, and the column density of MMS 6-main are estimated to be 0.''32 Multiplication-Sign 0.''29 (132 AU Multiplication-Sign 120 AU), 0.29 M{sub Sun }, and 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 25} cm{sup -2}, respectively. The estimated extremely high mean number density, 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}, suggests that MMS 6-main is likely optically thick at 850 {mu}m. We compare our observational data with three theoretical core models: prestellar core, protostellar core + disk-like structure, and first adiabatic core. These comparisons clearly show that the observational data cannot be modeled as a simple prestellar core with a gas temperature of 20 K. A self-luminous source is necessary to explain the observed flux density in the (sub)millimeter wavelengths. Our recent detection of a very compact and energetic outflow in the CO (3-2) and HCN (4-3) lines supports the presence of a protostar. We suggest that MMS 6 is one of the first cases of an intermediate-mass protostellar core at an extremely young stage. In addition to the MMS 6-main peak, we have also spatially resolved a number of spiky structures and sub-clumps, distributed over the central 1000 AU. The masses of these sub-clumps are estimated to be 0.066-0.073 M{sub Sun }, which are on the order of brown dwarf masses. Higher angular resolution and higher sensitivity observations with ALMA and EVLA will reveal the origin and nature of these structures such as whether they are originated from fragmentations, spiral arms, or inhomogeneity within the disk-like structures/envelope.

  2. Accurate lumen diameter measurement in curved vessels in carotid ultrasound: an iterative scale-space and spatial transformation approach.

    PubMed

    Krishna Kumar, P; Araki, Tadashi; Rajan, Jeny; Saba, Luca; Lavra, Francesco; Ikeda, Nobutaka; Sharma, Aditya M; Shafique, Shoaib; Nicolaides, Andrew; Laird, John R; Gupta, Ajay; Suri, Jasjit S

    2016-12-10

    Monitoring of cerebrovascular diseases via carotid ultrasound has started to become a routine. The measurement of image-based lumen diameter (LD) or inter-adventitial diameter (IAD) is a promising approach for quantification of the degree of stenosis. The manual measurements of LD/IAD are not reliable, subjective and slow. The curvature associated with the vessels along with non-uniformity in the plaque growth poses further challenges. This study uses a novel and generalized approach for automated LD and IAD measurement based on a combination of spatial transformation and scale-space. In this iterative procedure, the scale-space is first used to get the lumen axis which is then used with spatial image transformation paradigm to get a transformed image. The scale-space is then reapplied to retrieve the lumen region and boundary in the transformed framework. Then, inverse transformation is applied to display the results in original image framework. Two hundred and two patients' left and right common carotid artery (404 carotid images) B-mode ultrasound images were retrospectively analyzed. The validation of our algorithm has done against the two manual expert tracings. The coefficient of correlation between the two manual tracings for LD was 0.98 (p < 0.0001) and 0.99 (p < 0.0001), respectively. The precision of merit between the manual expert tracings and the automated system was 97.7 and 98.7%, respectively. The experimental analysis demonstrated superior performance of the proposed method over conventional approaches. Several statistical tests demonstrated the stability and reliability of the automated system.

  3. Temporally and spatially resolved photoluminescence investigation of (112{sup ¯}2) semi-polar InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells grown on nanorod templates

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B.; Smith, R.; Athanasiou, M.; Yu, X.; Bai, J.; Wang, T.

    2014-12-29

    By means of time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) and confocal PL measurements, temporally and spatially resolved optical properties have been investigated on a number of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N/GaN multiple-quantum-well (MQW) structures with a wide range of indium content alloys from 13% to 35% on (112{sup ¯}2) semi-polar GaN with high crystal quality, obtained through overgrowth on nanorod templates. With increasing indium content, the radiative recombination lifetime initially increases as expected, but decreases if the indium content further increases to 35%, corresponding to emission in the green spectral region. The reduced radiative recombination lifetime leads to enhanced optical performance for the high indium content MQWs as a result of strong exciton localization, which is different from the behaviour of c-plane InGaN/GaN MQWs, where quantum confined Stark effect plays a dominating role in emission process.

  4. An enhanced droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling system coupled with HPLC-ESI-MS/MS for spatially resolved analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J.; Weiskittel, Taylor M.; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2014-11-07

    Droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-electrospray ionization (ESI)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for spatially resolved analysis provides the possibility of effective analysis of complex matrix samples and can provide a greater degree of chemical information from a single spot sample than is typically possible with a direct analysis of an extract. Described here is the setup and enhanced capabilities of a discrete droplet liquid microjunction surface sampling system employing a commercially available CTC PAL autosampler. The system enhancements include incorporation of a laser distance sensor enabling unattended analysis of samples and sample locations of dramatically disparate height as well as reliably dispensing just 0.5 μL of extraction solvent to make the liquid junction to the surface, wherein the extraction spot size was confined to an area about 0.7 mm in diameter; software modifications improving the spatial resolution of sampling spot selection from 1.0 to 0.1 mm; use of an open bed tray system to accommodate samples as large as whole-body rat thin tissue sections; and custom sample/solvent holders that shorten sampling time to approximately 1 min per sample. Lastly, the merit of these new features was demonstrated by spatially resolved sampling, HPLC separation, and mass spectral detection of pharmaceuticals and metabolites from whole-body rat thin tissue sections and razor blade (“crude”) cut mouse tissue.

  5. An enhanced droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling system coupled with HPLC-ESI-MS/MS for spatially resolved analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Van Berkel, Gary J.; Weiskittel, Taylor M.; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2014-11-07

    Droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-electrospray ionization (ESI)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for spatially resolved analysis provides the possibility of effective analysis of complex matrix samples and can provide a greater degree of chemical information from a single spot sample than is typically possible with a direct analysis of an extract. Described here is the setup and enhanced capabilities of a discrete droplet liquid microjunction surface sampling system employing a commercially available CTC PAL autosampler. The system enhancements include incorporation of a laser distance sensor enabling unattended analysis of samples and sample locations of dramatically disparatemore » height as well as reliably dispensing just 0.5 μL of extraction solvent to make the liquid junction to the surface, wherein the extraction spot size was confined to an area about 0.7 mm in diameter; software modifications improving the spatial resolution of sampling spot selection from 1.0 to 0.1 mm; use of an open bed tray system to accommodate samples as large as whole-body rat thin tissue sections; and custom sample/solvent holders that shorten sampling time to approximately 1 min per sample. Lastly, the merit of these new features was demonstrated by spatially resolved sampling, HPLC separation, and mass spectral detection of pharmaceuticals and metabolites from whole-body rat thin tissue sections and razor blade (“crude”) cut mouse tissue.« less

  6. Ontogenetic changes in retinal ganglion cell distribution and spatial resolving power in the brown-banded bamboo shark Chiloscyllium punctatum (Elasmobranchii).

    PubMed

    Harahush, Blake K; Hart, Nathan S; Collin, Shaun P

    2014-01-01

    The development of the visual system in anamniotic vertebrates is a continual process, allowing for ontogenetic changes in retinal topography and spatial resolving power. We examined the number and distribution of retinal ganglion cells in wholemounted retinae throughout the protracted embryonic development (∼5 months) of a chondrichthyan, i.e. the brown-banded bamboo shark Chiloscyllium punctatum, from the beginning of retinal cell differentiation (approximately halfway through embryogenesis) to adulthood. We also identified and quantified the number of apoptosed cells within the ganglion cell layer to evaluate the contribution of apoptosis to changes in retinal topography. C. punctatum undergoes rapid changes in ganglion cell distribution during embryogenesis, where high levels of apoptosis, especially around the retinal periphery, result in relative increases in ganglion cell density in the central retina which progressively extend nasally and temporally to form a meridional band at hatching. After hatching, C. punctatum forms and maintains a horizontal streak, showing only minor changes in topography during growth, with basal levels of apoptosis. The total number of retinal ganglion cells reaches 547,881 in adult sharks, but the mean (3,228 cells·mm(-2)) and peak (4,983 cells·mm(-2)) retinal ganglion cell densities are highest around the time of hatching. Calculated estimates of spatial resolving power, based on ganglion cell spacing (assuming a hexagonal mosaic) and assessment of the focal length from cryosections of the eye, increase from 1.47 cycles·degree(-1) during embryogenesis to 4.29 cycles·degree(-1) in adults. The increase in spatial resolving power across the retinal meridian would allow this species to hunt and track faster, more mobile prey as it reaches maturity.

  7. Spatially resolved X-ray emission measurements of the residual velocity during the stagnation phase of inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Ruby, J. J.; Pak, A.; Field, J. E.; ...

    2016-07-01

    A technique for measuring residual motion during the stagnation phase of an indirectly driven inertial confinement experiment has been implemented. Our method infers a velocity from spatially and temporally resolved images of the X-ray emission from two orthogonal lines of sight. This work investigates the accuracy of recovering spatially resolved velocities from the X-ray emission data. A detailed analytical and numerical modeling of the X-ray emission measurement shows that the accuracy of this method increases as the displacement that results from a residual velocity increase. For the typical experimental configuration, signal-to-noise ratios, and duration of X-ray emission, it is estimatedmore » that the fractional error in the inferred velocity rises above 50% as the velocity of emission falls below 24 μm/ns. Furthermore, by inputting measured parameters into this model, error estimates of the residual velocity as inferred from the X-ray emission measurements are now able to be generated for experimental data. Details of this analysis are presented for an implosion experiment conducted with an unintentional radiation flux asymmetry. The analysis shows a bright localized region of emission that moves through the larger emitting volume at a relatively higher velocity towards the location of the imposed flux deficit. Our technique allows for the possibility of spatially resolving velocity flows within the so-called central hot spot of an implosion. This information would help to refine our interpretation of the thermal temperature inferred from the neutron time of flight detectors and the effect of localized hydrodynamic instabilities during the stagnation phase. Across several experiments, along a single line of sight, the average difference in magnitude and direction of the measured residual velocity as inferred from the X-ray and neutron time of flight detectors was found to be ~13 μm/ns and ~14°, respectively.« less

  8. Spatially resolved X-ray emission measurements of the residual velocity during the stagnation phase of inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ruby, J. J.; Pak, A.; Field, J. E.; Ma, T.; Spears, B. K.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Döppner, T.; Eder, D.; Fittinghoff, D.; Grim, G.; Hatarik, R.; Hinkel, D. E.; Izumi, N.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Khan, S. F.; Knauer, J. P.; Kritcher, A. L.; Merrill, F. E.; Moody, J. D.; Nagel, S. R.; Park, H. -S.; Salmonson, J. D.; Sayre, D. B.; Callahan, D. A.; Hsing, W. W.; Hurricane, O. A.; Patel, P. K.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-07-01

    A technique for measuring residual motion during the stagnation phase of an indirectly driven inertial confinement experiment has been implemented. Our method infers a velocity from spatially and temporally resolved images of the X-ray emission from two orthogonal lines of sight. This work investigates the accuracy of recovering spatially resolved velocities from the X-ray emission data. A detailed analytical and numerical modeling of the X-ray emission measurement shows that the accuracy of this method increases as the displacement that results from a residual velocity increase. For the typical experimental configuration, signal-to-noise ratios, and duration of X-ray emission, it is estimated that the fractional error in the inferred velocity rises above 50% as the velocity of emission falls below 24 μm/ns. Furthermore, by inputting measured parameters into this model, error estimates of the residual velocity as inferred from the X-ray emission measurements are now able to be generated for experimental data. Details of this analysis are presented for an implosion experiment conducted with an unintentional radiation flux asymmetry. The analysis shows a bright localized region of emission that moves through the larger emitting volume at a relatively higher velocity towards the location of the imposed flux deficit. Our technique allows for the possibility of spatially resolving velocity flows within the so-called central hot spot of an implosion. This information would help to refine our interpretation of the thermal temperature inferred from the neutron time of flight detectors and the effect of localized hydrodynamic instabilities during the stagnation phase. Across several experiments, along a single line of sight, the average difference in magnitude and direction of the measured residual velocity as inferred from the X-ray and neutron time of flight detectors was found to be ~13 μm/ns and ~14°, respectively.

  9. Spatially resolved measurements to improve analytical performance of solution-cathode glow discharge optical-emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Andrew J.; Ray, Steven J.; Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2016-11-01

    Past studies of the solution-cathode glow discharge (SCGD) revealed that elemental and molecular emission are not spatially homogenous throughout the source, but rather conform to specific zones within the discharge. Exploiting this inhomogeneity can lead to improved analytical performance if emission is collected only from regions of the discharge where analyte species emit strongly and background emission (from continuum, elemental and/or molecular sources) is lower. Effects of this form of spatial discrimination on the analytical performance of SCGD optical emission spectrometry (OES) have been investigated with an imaging spectrograph for fourteen atomic lines, with emphasis on detection limits and precision. Vertical profiles of the emission intensity, signal-to-background ratio, and signal-to-noise ratio were collected and used to determine the optimal region to view the SCGD on a per-element basis. With optimized spatial filtering, detection limits ranged from 0.09-360 ppb, a 1.4-13.6 fold improvement over those obtained when emission is collected from the full vertical profile (1.1-840 ppb), with a 4.2-fold average improvement. Precision was found to be unaffected by spatial filtering, ranging from 0.5-2.6% relative standard deviation (RSD) for all elements investigated, closely comparable to the 0.4-2.4% RSD observed when no spatial filtering is used. Spatial profiles also appear useful for identifying optimal line pairs for internal standardization and for flagging the presence of matrix interferences in SCGD-OES.

  10. Development of a Spatially Resolving X-Ray Crystal Spectrometer (XCS) for Measurement of Ion-Temperature (Ti) and Rotation-Velocity (v) Profiles in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K W; Delgado-Aprico, L; Johnson, D; Feder, R; Beiersdorfer,; Dunn, J; Morris, K; Wang, E; Reinke, M; Podpaly, Y; Rice, J E; Barnsley, R; O'Mullane, M; Lee, S G

    2010-05-21

    Imaging XCS arrays are being developed as a US-ITER activity for Doppler measurement of Ti and v profiles of impurities (W, Kr, Fe) with ~7 cm (a/30) and 10-100 ms resolution in ITER. The imaging XCS, modeled after a PPPL-MIT instrument on Alcator C-Mod, uses a spherically bent crystal and 2d x-ray detectors to achieve high spectral resolving power (E/dE>6000) horizontally and spatial imaging vertically. Two arrays will measure Ti and both poloidal and toroidal rotation velocity profiles. Measurement of many spatial chords permits tomographic inversion for inference of local parameters. The instrument design, predictions of performance, and results from C-Mod will be presented.

  11. Development of a spatially resolving x-ray crystal spectrometer for measurement of ion-temperature (T[sub i]) and rotation-velocity (v) profiles in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Johnson, D.; Feder, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Dunn, J.; Morris, K.; Wang, E.; Reinke, M.; Podpaly, Y.; Rice, J. E.; Barnsley, R.; O’Mullane, M.; Lee, S. G.

    2010-01-01

    Imaging x-ray crystal spectrometer XCS arrays are being developed as a US-ITER activity for Doppler measurement of Ti and v profiles of impurities (W, Kr, and Fe) with ~ 7 cm (a/30) and 10-100 ms resolution in ITER. The imaging XCS, modeled after a prototype instrument on Alcator C-Mod, uses a spherically bent crystal and 2D x-ray detectors to achieve high spectral resolving power (E / dE > 6000) horizontally and spatial imaging vertically. Two arrays will measure Ti and both poloidal and toroidal rotation velocity profiles. The measurement of many spatial chords permits tomographic inversion for the inference of local parameters. The instrument design, predictions of performance, and results from C-Mod are presented.

  12. Development of a spatially resolving x-ray crystal spectrometer for measurement of ion-temperature (T{sub i}) and rotation-velocity (v) profiles in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Johnson, D.; Feder, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Dunn, J.; Morris, K.; Wang, E.; Reinke, M.; Podpaly, Y.; Rice, J. E.; Barnsley, R.; O'Mullane, M.; Lee, S. G.

    2010-10-15

    Imaging x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) arrays are being developed as a US-ITER activity for Doppler measurement of T{sub i} and v profiles of impurities (W, Kr, and Fe) with {approx}7 cm (a/30) and 10-100 ms resolution in ITER. The imaging XCS, modeled after a prototype instrument on Alcator C-Mod, uses a spherically bent crystal and 2D x-ray detectors to achieve high spectral resolving power (E/dE>6000) horizontally and spatial imaging vertically. Two arrays will measure T{sub i} and both poloidal and toroidal rotation velocity profiles. The measurement of many spatial chords permits tomographic inversion for the inference of local parameters. The instrument design, predictions of performance, and results from C-Mod are presented.

  13. A spatially resolved network spike in model neuronal cultures reveals nucleation centers, circular traveling waves and drifting spiral waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraskevov, A. V.; Zendrikov, D. K.

    2017-04-01

    We show that in model neuronal cultures, where the probability of interneuronal connection formation decreases exponentially with increasing distance between the neurons, there exists a small number of spatial nucleation centers of a network spike, from where the synchronous spiking activity starts propagating in the network typically in the form of circular traveling waves. The number of nucleation centers and their spatial locations are unique and unchanged for a given realization of neuronal network but are different for different networks. In contrast, if the probability of interneuronal connection formation is independent of the distance between neurons, then the nucleation centers do not arise and the synchronization of spiking activity during a network spike occurs spatially uniform throughout the network. Therefore one can conclude that spatial proximity of connections between neurons is important for the formation of nucleation centers. It is also shown that fluctuations of the spatial density of neurons at their random homogeneous distribution typical for the experiments in vitro do not determine the locations of the nucleation centers. The simulation results are qualitatively consistent with the experimental observations.

  14. Spatially Resolved Observation of Static Magnetic Flux States in YBa2Cu3O7-dgr Grain Boundary Josephson Junctions.

    PubMed

    Fischer, G M; Mayer, B; Gross, R; Nissel, T; Husemann, K D; Huebener, R P; Freltoft, T; Shen, Y; Vase, P

    1994-02-25

    With low-temperature scanning electron microscopy, the magnetic flux states in high critical temperature Josephson junctions have been imaged. The experiments were performed with YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-delta) thin-film grain boundary Josephson junctions fabricated on [001] tilt SrTiO(3) bicrystals. For applied magnetic fields parallel to the grain boundary plane, which correspond to local maxima of the magnetic field dependence of the critical current, the images clearly show the corresponding magnetic flux states in the grain boundary junction. The spatial modulation of the Josephson current density by the external magnetic field is imaged directly with a spatial resolution of about 1 micrometer.

  15. Tunable Reflective Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer: A Technique for High Resolving Power, Wide Field Of View Observation Of Diffuse Emission Line Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Seyedeh Sona

    The purpose of this dissertation is to discuss the need for new technology in broadband high-resolution spectroscopy based on the emerging technique of Spatial Heterodyne Spectroscopy (SHS) and to propose new solutions that should enhance and generalize this technology to other fields. Spectroscopy is a proven tool for determining compositional and other properties of remote objects. Narrow band imaging and low resolving spectroscopic measurements provide information about composition, photochemical evolution, energy distribution and density. The extension to high resolving power provides further access to temperature, velocity, isotopic ratios, separation of blended sources, and opacity effects. In current high resolving power devices, the drawback of high-resolution spectroscopy is bound to the instrumental limitations of lower throughput, the necessity of small entrance apertures, sensitivity, field of view, and large physical instrumental size. These limitations quickly become handicapping for observation of faint and/or extended targets and for spacecraft encounters. A technique with promise for the study of faint and extended sources at high resolving power is the reflective format of the Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer (SHS). SHS instruments are compact and naturally tailored for both high etendue (defined in section 2.2.5) and high resolving power. In contrast, to achieve similar spectral grasp, grating spectrometers require large telescopes. For reference, SHS is a cyclical interferometer that produces Fizeau fringe pattern for all other wavelengths except the tuned wavelength. The large etendue obtained by SHS instruments makes them ideal for observations of extended, low surface brightness, isolated emission line sources, while their intrinsically high spectral resolution enables one to study the dynamical and physical properties described above. This document contains four chapters. Chapter 1, introduces a class of scientific targets that formerly have

  16. Performance and Prospects of Khayyam, A Tunable Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer (SHS) for High Spectral Resolving Power Observation of Extended Planetary Targets in Optical Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, S.; Harris, W.

    2014-12-01

    We present initial results, calibration and data reduction process from observations of wide-field targets using Khayyam at Mt. Hamilton, a new instrument based on a reflective spatial heterodyne spectrometer (SHS) at the focus of the Coudé Auxiliary Telescope (CAT). SHS instruments are common path two-beam Fourier transform spectrometers that produce 2-D spatial interference patterns without the requirement for moving parts. The utility of SHS comes from its combination of a wide input acceptance angle (0.5-1°), high resolving power (of order ~105), compact format, high dynamic range, and relaxed optical tolerances compared with other interferometer designs. This combination makes them extremely useful for velocity resolved for observations of wide field targets from both small and large telescopes. This report focuses on the tunable instrument at Mt Hamilton, The CAT provides a test case for on-axis use of SHS, and the impact of the resulting field non-uniformity caused by the spider pattern will be discussed. Observations of several targets will be presented that demonstrate the capabilities of SHS, including comet C/2014 E2 (Jacques), Jupiter, and both the day sky and night glow. Raw interferometric data and transformed power spectra will be shown and evaluated in terms of instrumental stability.

  17. Continuous Flow Liquid Microjunction Surface Sampling Probe Connected On-line with HPLC/MS for Spatially Resolved Analysis of Small Molecules and Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE: A continuous flow liquid microjunction surface sampling probe extracts soluble material from surfaces for direct ionization and detection by MS. Demonstrated here is the on-line coupling of such a probe with HPLC/MS enabling extraction, separation and detection of small molecules and proteins from surfaces in a spatially resolved (~0.5 mm diameter spots) manner. Methods: A continuous flow liquid microjunction surface sampling probe was connected to a 6-port, 2-position valve for extract collection and injection to an HPLC column. A QTRAP 5500 hybrid triple quadrupole linear ion trap equipped with a Turbo V ion source operated in positive ESI mode was used for all experiments. System operation was tested with extraction, separation and detection of propranolol and associated metabolites from drug dosed tissues and proteins from dried sheep blood spots on paper. Results: Confirmed in the tissue were the parent drug and two different hydroxypropranolol glucuronides. The mass spectrometric response for these compounds from different locations in the liver showed an increase with increasing extraction time (5, 20 and 40 s extractions). For on-line separation and detection/identification of extracted proteins from dried sheep blood spots, two major protein peaks dominated the chromatogram and could be correlated with the expected masses for the hemoglobin and chains. Conclusions: Spatially resolved sampling, separation, and detection of small molecules and proteins from surfaces can be accomplished using a continuous flow liquid microjunction surface sampling probe coupled on-line with HPLC/MS detection.

  18. Characterization of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for high-resolution spatially-resolved x-ray Thomson scattering measurements in shock-compressed experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J.; Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Pablant, N. A.; Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Efthimion, P. C.; Lee, H. J.; Zastrau, U.

    2017-01-01

    We have proposed, designed and built a dual-channel x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) for spectrally- and spatially-resolved x-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) measurements in the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) end station at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). This spectrometer employs two spherically-bent germanium (Ge) 220 crystals, which are combined to form a large aperture dispersive element with a spectral bandwidth of 300 eV that enables both the elastic and inelastic x-ray scattering peaks to be simultaneously measured. The apparatus and its characterization are described. A resolving power of 1900 was demonstrated and a spatial resolution of 12 μm was achieved in calibration tests. For XRTS measurements, a narrow-bandwidth (ΔE/E<0.003) LCLS x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) beam at 5.07 keV was used to probe a dense carbon plasma produced in shock-compressed samples of different forms of carbon. Preliminary results of the scattering experiments from Pyrolytic Graphite samples that illustrate the utility of the instrument are presented.

  19. Spatially-resolved in-situ structural study of organic electronic devices with nanoscale resolution: the plasmonic photovoltaic case study.

    PubMed

    Paci, B; Bailo, D; Albertini, V Rossi; Wright, J; Ferrero, C; Spyropoulos, G D; Stratakis, E; Kymakis, E

    2013-09-14

    A novel high spatial resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction stratigraphy technique has been applied in-situ to an integrated plasmonic nanoparticle-based organic photovoltaic device. This original approach allows for the disclosure of structure-property relations linking large scale organic devices to length scales of local nano/hetero structures and interfaces between the different components.

  20. Methods and apparatus of spatially resolved electroluminescence of operating organic light-emitting diodes using conductive atomic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersam, Mark C. (Inventor); Pingree, Liam S. C. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A conductive atomic force microscopy (cAFM) technique which can concurrently monitor topography, charge transport, and electroluminescence with nanometer spatial resolution. This cAFM approach is particularly well suited for probing the electroluminescent response characteristics of operating organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) over short length scales.

  1. Growth and development of the barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite: time and spatially resolved structure and chemistry of the base plate.

    PubMed

    Burden, Daniel K; Spillmann, Christopher M; Everett, Richard K; Barlow, Daniel E; Orihuela, Beatriz; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Fears, Kenan P; Rittschof, Daniel; Wahl, Kathryn J

    2014-01-01

    The radial growth and advancement of the adhesive interface to the substratum of many species of acorn barnacles occurs underwater and beneath an opaque, calcified shell. Here, the time-dependent growth processes involving various autofluorescent materials within the interface of live barnacles are imaged for the first time using 3D time-lapse confocal microscopy. Key features of the interface development in the striped barnacle, Amphibalanus (= Balanus) amphitrite were resolved in situ and include advancement of the barnacle/substratum interface, epicuticle membrane development, protein secretion, and calcification. Microscopic and spectroscopic techniques provide ex situ material identification of regions imaged by confocal microscopy. In situ and ex situ analysis of the interface support the hypothesis that barnacle interface development is a complex process coupling sequential, timed secretory events and morphological changes. This results in a multi-layered interface that concomitantly fulfills the roles of strongly adhering to a substratum while permitting continuous molting and radial growth at the periphery.

  2. MULTI-EPOCH NEAR-INFRARED INTERFEROMETRY OF THE SPATIALLY RESOLVED DISK AROUND THE BE STAR {zeta} TAU

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, G. H.; Brummelaar, T. ten; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Turner, N. H.; Farrington, C. D.; Goldfinger, P. J.; Gies, D. R.; Richardson, N. D.; Touhami, Y.; McAlister, H. A.; Monnier, J. D.; Che, X.; Zhao, M.; Pedretti, E.; Thureau, N.; Ridgway, S. T. E-mail: gies@chara.gsu.ed

    2010-12-15

    We present interferometric observations of the Be star {zeta} Tau obtained using the MIRC beam combiner at the CHARA Array. We resolved the disk during four epochs in 2007-2009. We fit the data with a geometric model to characterize the circumstellar disk as a skewed elliptical Gaussian and the central Be star as a uniform disk. The visibilities reveal a nearly edge-on disk with an FWHM major axis of {approx}1.8 mas in the H band. The non-zero closure phases indicate an asymmetry within the disk. Interestingly, when combining our results with previously published interferometric observations of {zeta} Tau, we find a correlation between the position angle of the disk and the spectroscopic V/R ratio, suggesting that the tilt of the disk is precessing. This work is part of a multi-year monitoring campaign to investigate the development and outward motion of asymmetric structures in the disks of Be stars.

  3. Development of a Schottky CdTe Medipix3RX hybrid photon counting detector with spatial and energy resolving capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez, E. N.; Astromskas, V.; Horswell, I.; Omar, D.; Spiers, J.; Tartoni, N.

    2016-07-01

    A multichip CdTe-Medipix3RX detector system was developed in order to bring the advantages of photon-counting detectors to applications in the hard X-ray range of energies. The detector head consisted of 2×2 Medipix3RX ASICs bump-bonded to a 28 mm×28 mm e- collection Schottky contact CdTe sensor. Schottky CdTe sensors undergo performance degrading polarization which increases with temperature, flux and the longer the HV is applied. Keeping the temperature stable and periodically refreshing the high voltage bias supply was used to minimize the polarization and achieve a stable and reproducible detector response. This leads to good quality images and successful results on the energy resolving capabilities of the system.

  4. Spatially Resolved M-band Emission from Io's Loki Patera-Fizeau Imaging at the 22.8 m LBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Albert; de Kleer, Katherine; Leisenring, Jarron; La Camera, Andrea; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Bertero, Mario; Boccacci, Patrizia; Defrère, Denis; de Pater, Imke; Hinz, Philip; Hofmann, Karl-Heinz; Kürster, Martin; Rathbun, Julie; Schertl, Dieter; Skemer, Andy; Skrutskie, Michael; Spencer, John; Veillet, Christian; Weigelt, Gerd; Woodward, Charles E.

    2015-05-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer mid-infrared camera, LMIRcam, imaged Io on the night of 2013 December 24 UT and detected strong M-band (4.8 μm) thermal emission arising from Loki Patera. The 22.8 m baseline of the Large Binocular Telescope provides an angular resolution of ˜32 mas (˜100 km at Io) resolving the Loki Patera emission into two distinct maxima originating from different regions within Loki’s horseshoe lava lake. This observation is consistent with the presence of a high-temperature source observed in previous studies combined with an independent peak arising from cooling crust from recent resurfacing. The deconvolved images also reveal 15 other emission sites on the visible hemisphere of Io including two previously unidentified hot spots.

  5. TU-F-17A-04: Respiratory Phase-Resolved 3D MRI with Isotropic High Spatial Resolution: Determination of the Average Breathing Motion Pattern for Abdominal Radiotherapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Z; Pang, J; Yang, W; Yue, Y; Tuli, R; Fraass, B; Li, D; Fan, Z

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a retrospective 4D-MRI technique (respiratory phase-resolved 3D-MRI) for providing an accurate assessment of tumor motion secondary to respiration. Methods: A 3D projection reconstruction (PR) sequence with self-gating (SG) was developed for 4D-MRI on a 3.0T MRI scanner. The respiration-induced shift of the imaging target was recorded by SG signals acquired in the superior-inferior direction every 15 radial projections (i.e. temporal resolution 98 ms). A total of 73000 radial projections obtained in 8-min were retrospectively sorted into 10 time-domain evenly distributed respiratory phases based on the SG information. Ten 3D image sets were then reconstructed offline. The technique was validated on a motion phantom (gadolinium-doped water-filled box, frequency of 10 and 18 cycles/min) and humans (4 healthy and 2 patients with liver tumors). Imaging protocol included 8-min 4D-MRI followed by 1-min 2D-realtime (498 ms/frame) MRI as a reference. Results: The multiphase 3D image sets with isotropic high spatial resolution (1.56 mm) permits flexible image reformatting and visualization. No intra-phase motion-induced blurring was observed. Comparing to 2D-realtime, 4D-MRI yielded similar motion range (phantom: 10.46 vs. 11.27 mm; healthy subject: 25.20 vs. 17.9 mm; patient: 11.38 vs. 9.30 mm), reasonable displacement difference averaged over the 10 phases (0.74mm; 3.63mm; 1.65mm), and excellent cross-correlation (0.98; 0.96; 0.94) between the two displacement series. Conclusion: Our preliminary study has demonstrated that the 4D-MRI technique can provide high-quality respiratory phase-resolved 3D images that feature: a) isotropic high spatial resolution, b) a fixed scan time of 8 minutes, c) an accurate estimate of average motion pattern, and d) minimal intra-phase motion artifact. This approach has the potential to become a viable alternative solution to assess the impact of breathing on tumor motion and determine appropriate treatment margins

  6. Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Coronal Diagnostic Spectrograph and Ground-based Observations of a Two-Ribbon Flare: Spatially Resolved Signatures of Chromospheric Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teriaca, L.; Falchi, A.; Cauzzi, G.; Falciani, R.; Smaldone, L. A.; Andretta, V.

    2003-05-01

    During a coordinated observing campaign (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, SOHO JOP 139), we obtained simultaneous spectroheliograms of a solar active region in several spectral lines, sampling levels from the chromosphere to the corona. Ground-based spectroheliograms were acquired at the Dunn Solar Tower of the National Solar Observatory/Sacramento Peak in four chromospheric lines, while the coronal diagnostic spectrograph on board SOHO was used to obtain rasters of the active region in transition region (TR) and coronal lines. Such a complete data set allowed us to compare the development of intensity and velocity fields during a small two-ribbon flare in the whole atmosphere. In particular, we obtained for the first time quasi-simultaneous and spatially resolved observations of velocity fields during the impulsive phase of a flare, in both the chromosphere and upper atmosphere. In this phase, strong downflows (up to 40 km s-1) following the shape of the developing ribbons are measured at chromospheric levels, while strong upward motions are instead measured in TR (up to -100 km s-1) and coronal lines (-160 km s-1). The spatial pattern of these velocities have a common area about 10" wide. This is the first time that opposite-directed flows at different atmospheric levels are observed in the same spatial location during a flare. These signatures are highly suggestive of the chromospheric evaporation scenario predicted in theoretical models of flares.

  7. A highly spatially resolved GIS-based model to assess the isoprenoid emissions from key Italian ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Claudia Kemper; Fares, Silvano; Ciccioli, Paolo

    2014-10-01

    The amount of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOC) emitted from terrestrial vegetation is of great importance in atmospheric reactivity, particularly for ozone-forming reactions and as condensation nuclei in aerosol formation and growth. This work presents a detailed inventory of isoprenoid emissions from vegetation in Italy using an original approach which combines state of the art models to estimate the species-specific isoprenoid emissions and a Geographic Information System (GIS) where emissions are spatially represented. Isoprenoid species and basal emission factors were obtained by combining results from laboratory experiments with those published in literature. For the first time, our investigation was not only restricted to isoprene and total monoterpenes, but our goal was to provide maps of isoprene and individual monoterpenes at a high-spatial (˜1 km2) and temporal resolution (daily runs, monthly trends in emissions are discussed in the text). Another novelty in our research was the inclusion of the effects of phenology on plant emissions. Our results show that: a) isoprene, a-pinene, sabinene and b-pinene are the most important compounds emitted from vegetation in Italy; b) annual biogenic isoprene and monoterpene fluxes for the year 2006 were ˜31.30 Gg and ˜37.70 Gg, respectively; and c) Quercus pubescens + Quercus petrea + Quercus robur, Quercus ilex, Quercus suber and Fagus sylvatica are the principal isoprenoid emitting species in the country. The high spatial and temporal resolution, combined with the species-specific emission output, makes the model particularly suitable for assessing local budgets, and for modeling photochemical pollution in Italy.

  8. Correlated observations of a spatially resolved type III solar radio burst group and the associated hard X-ray emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, S. R.; Pick, M.; Raoult, A.

    1980-01-01

    The first measurements of the spatial structure of a group of type III solar radio bursts associated with an impulsive hard X-ray burst are presented. At 169 MHz the radio source has been found to consist of two principal regions separated by about 300,000 km. The two regions together produced a total of four component bursts in good time correlation with spikes in the hard X-ray emission. The observations indicate that electron acceleration/injection occurs over a region which covers a wide range of magnetic field lines.

  9. An Assessment of the Ability of Potential Satellite Instruments to Resolve Spatial and Temporal Variability of Atmospheric CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, A.; Bhartia, Pawan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Sufficiently precise satellite observations with adequate spatial and temporal resolution would substantially increase our knowledge of the atmospheric CO2 distribution and would undoubtedly lead to reduced uncertainty in estimates of the global carbon budget. An overview of possible strategies for measuring CO2 from space will be presented, including IR and nearby measurements, active sensors and broad band and narrow band passive sensors. The ability of potential satellite instruments with a variety of orbits, horizontal resolution and vertical weighting functions to capture the variation in atmospheric CO2 mixing ratios will be illustrated using a combination of surface data, aircraft data and model results.

  10. Depth-resolved mid-infrared photothermal imaging of living cells and organisms with submicrometer spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Delong; Li, Chen; Zhang, Chi; Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Eakins, Gregory; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2016-09-01

    Chemical contrast has long been sought for label-free visualization of biomolecules and materials in complex living systems. Although infrared spectroscopic imaging has come a long way in this direction, it is thus far only applicable to dried tissues because of the strong infrared absorption by water. It also suffers from low spatial resolution due to long wavelengths and lacks optical sectioning capabilities. We overcome these limitations through sensing vibrational absorption-induced photothermal effect by a visible laser beam. Our mid-infrared photothermal (MIP) approach reached 10 μM detection sensitivity and submicrometer lateral spatial resolution. This performance has exceeded the diffraction limit of infrared microscopy and allowed label-free three-dimensional chemical imaging of live cells and organisms. Distributions of endogenous lipid and exogenous drug inside single cells were visualized. We further demonstrated in vivo MIP imaging of lipids and proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans. The reported MIP imaging technology promises broad applications from monitoring metabolic activities to high-resolution mapping of drug molecules in living systems, which are beyond the reach of current infrared microscopy.

  11. Depth-resolved mid-infrared photothermal imaging of living cells and organisms with submicrometer spatial resolution

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Delong; Li, Chen; Zhang, Chi; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Eakins, Gregory; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Chemical contrast has long been sought for label-free visualization of biomolecules and materials in complex living systems. Although infrared spectroscopic imaging has come a long way in this direction, it is thus far only applicable to dried tissues because of the strong infrared absorption by water. It also suffers from low spatial resolution due to long wavelengths and lacks optical sectioning capabilities. We overcome these limitations through sensing vibrational absorption–induced photothermal effect by a visible laser beam. Our mid-infrared photothermal (MIP) approach reached 10 μM detection sensitivity and submicrometer lateral spatial resolution. This performance has exceeded the diffraction limit of infrared microscopy and allowed label-free three-dimensional chemical imaging of live cells and organisms. Distributions of endogenous lipid and exogenous drug inside single cells were visualized. We further demonstrated in vivo MIP imaging of lipids and proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans. The reported MIP imaging technology promises broad applications from monitoring metabolic activities to high-resolution mapping of drug molecules in living systems, which are beyond the reach of current infrared microscopy. PMID:27704043

  12. Spatially resolved optical and ultrastructural properties of colorectal and pancreatic field carcinogenesis observed by inverse spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ji; Radosevich, Andrew J.; Stypula-Cyrus, Yolanda; Mutyal, Nikhil N.; Azarin, Samira Michelle; Horcher, Elizabeth; Goldberg, Michael J.; Bianchi, Laura K.; Bajaj, Shailesh; Roy, Hemant K.; Backman, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Field carcinogenesis is the initial stage of cancer progression. Understanding field carcinogenesis is valuable for both cancer biology and clinical medicine. Here, we used inverse spectroscopic optical coherence tomography to study colorectal cancer (CRC) and pancreatic cancer (PC) field carcinogenesis. Depth-resolved optical and ultrastructural properties of the mucosa were quantified from histologically normal rectal biopsies from patients with and without colon adenomas (n=85) as well as from histologically normal peri-ampullary duodenal biopsies from patients with and without PC (n=22). Changes in the epithelium and stroma in CRC field carcinogenesis were separately quantified. In both compartments, optical and ultra-structural alterations were consistent. Optical alterations included lower backscattering (μb) and reduced scattering (μs′) coefficients and higher anisotropy factor g. Ultrastructurally pronounced alterations were observed at length scales up to ∼450  nm, with the shape of the mass density correlation function having a higher shape factor D, thus implying a shift to larger length scales. Similar alterations were found in the PC field carcinogenesis despite the difference in genetic pathways and etiologies. We further verified that the chromatin clumping in epithelial cells and collagen cross-linking caused D to increase in vitro and could be among the mechanisms responsible for the observed changes in epithelium and stroma, respectively. PMID:24643530

  13. Tempo-spatially resolved dynamics of elec- trons and holes in bilayer MoS2 -WS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galicia-Hernandez, J. M.; Turkowski, V.; Hernandez-Cocoletzi, G.; Rahman, T. S.

    We have performed a Density-Matrix Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory analysis of the response of bilayer MoS2-WS2 to external laser-pulse perturbations. Time-resolved study of the dynamics of electrons and holes, including formation and dissociation of strongly-bound intra- and inter-layer excitonic states, shows that the experimentally observed ultrafast inter-layer MoS2 to WS2 migration of holes may be attributed to unusually large delocalization of the hole state which extends far into the inter-layer region. We also argue that the velocity of the hole transfer may be further enhanced by its interaction with transfer phonon modes. We analyze other possible consequences of the hole delocalization in the system, including reduction of the effects of the electron-electron and hole-hole repulsion in the trions and biexcitons as compared to that in the monolayers Work supported in part by DOE Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-07ER46354 and by CONACYT Scholarship No. 23210 (J.M.G.H.).

  14. Growth and development of the barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite: time and spatially resolved structure and chemistry of the base plate

    PubMed Central

    Burden, Daniel K.; Spillmann, Christopher M.; Everett, Richard K.; Barlow, Daniel E.; Orihuela, Beatriz; Deschamps, Jeffrey R.; Fears, Kenan P.; Rittschof, Daniel; Wahl, Kathryn J.

    2014-01-01

    The radial growth and advancement of the adhesive interface to the substratum of many species of acorn barnacles occurs underwater and beneath an opaque, calcified shell. Here, the time-dependent growth processes involving various autofluorescent materials within the interface of live barnacles are imaged for the first time using 3D time-lapse confocal microscopy. Key features of the interface development in the striped barnacle, Amphibalanus (= Balanus) amphitrite were resolved in situ and include advancement of the barnacle/substratum interface, epicuticle membrane development, protein secretion, and calcification. Microscopic and spectroscopic techniques provide ex situ material identification of regions imaged by confocal microscopy. In situ and ex situ analysis of the interface support the hypothesis that barnacle interface development is a complex process coupling sequential, timed secretory events and morphological changes. This results in a multi-layered interface that concomitantly fulfills the roles of strongly adhering to a substratum while permitting continuous molting and radial growth at the periphery. PMID:25115515

  15. Continuous wave dye-laser technique for simultaneous, spatially resolved measurements of temperature, pressure, and velocity of NO in an underexpanded free jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Di Rosa, Michael D.; Chang, Albert Y.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    1993-01-01

    Gas dynamic quantities within an underexpanded nitrogen free jet, seeded with 0.5 percent NO, were measured nonintrusively by using an intracavity-doubled, rapid-tuning, CW ring dye laser. The UV beam passed obliquely through the jet axis, and its frequency repetitively scanned across adjacent rotational lines in the NO gamma band near 225 nm at a rate of 4 kHz. Spatially resolved excitation scans were obtained by monitoring the induced broadband fluoresence. Modeling the Doppler-shifted excitation scans with Voigt profiles permitted simultaneous determinations of NO velocity, rotational temperature, and pressure. Zero Doppler shift was referenced to an absorption trace obtained across a static cell and recorded concurrently with the excitation scan. Typically, the measured and predicted axial distributions agreed within 10 percent. At high Mach numbers there was evidence of rotational freezing of NO.

  16. Spatially resolved characterization of catalyst-coated membranes by distance-controlled scanning mass spectrometry utilizing catalytic methanol oxidation as gas-solid probe reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Assmann, Jens; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Muhler, Martin

    2007-08-01

    The spatially resolved catalytic activity of a catalyst-coated membrane (CCM), which is the essential part of PEM fuel cells, was visualized rapidly without any damage by a distance-controlled scanning mass spectrometer with an improved resolution of 250 microm. Methanol oxidation was identified as a suitable gas-solid probe reaction for the characterization of local catalytic activity. In addition, defects were manually generated in the CCM to simulate inhomogeneous coating and pinholes. The measurements successfully demonstrated that catalytically active and less active regions can be clearly distinguished. Simultaneously, the local topography was recorded, providing additional information on the location of the scratches and pinholes. The catalytic results were highly reproducible due to the constant-distance feedback loop rendering scanning mass spectrometry a promising tool for the quantitative quality control of CCMs.

  17. Spectral and spatial resolving of photoelectric property of femtosecond laser drilled holes of GaSb(1-x)Bi(x).

    PubMed

    Pan, C B; Zha, F X; Song, Y X; Shao, J; Dai, Y; Chen, X R; Ye, J Y; Wang, S M

    2015-07-15

    Femtosecond laser drilled holes of GaSbBi were characterized by the joint measurements of photoconductivity (PC) spectroscopy and laser-beam-induced current (LBIC) mapping. The excitation light in PC was focused down to 60 μm presenting the spectral information of local electronic property of individual holes. A redshift of energy band edge of about 6-8 meV was observed by the PC measurement when the excitation light irradiated on the laser drilled holes. The spatial resolving of photoelectric property was achieved by the LBIC mapping which shows "pseudo-holes" with much larger dimensions than the geometric sizes of the holes. The reduced LBIC current with the pseudo-holes is associated with the redshift effect indicating that the electronic property of the rim areas of the holes is modified by the femtosecond laser drilling.

  18. Implications for gravitational lensing and the dark matter content in clusters of galaxies from spatially resolved x-ray spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenstein, M.

    1994-01-01

    A simple method for deriving well-behaved temperature solutions to the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium for intracluster media with X-ray imaging observations is presented and applied to a series of generalized models as well as to observations of the Perseus cluster and Abell 2256. In these applications the allowed range in the ratio of nonbaryons to baryons as a function of radius is derived, taking into account the uncertainties and crude spatial resolution of the X-ray spectra and considering a range of physically reasonable mass models with various scale heights. Particular attention is paid to the central regions of the cluster, and it is found that the dark matter can be sufficiently concentrated to be consistent with the high central mass surface densities for moderate-redshift clusters from their gravitational lensing properties.

  19. A temporally and spatially resolved electron density diagnostic method for the edge plasma based on Stark broadening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, A.; Martin, E. H.; Shannon, S. C.; Isler, R. C.; Caughman, J. B. O.

    2016-11-01

    An electron density diagnostic (≥1010 cm-3) capable of high temporal (ms) and spatial (mm) resolution is currently under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The diagnostic is based on measuring the Stark broadened, Doppler-free spectral line profile of the n = 6-2 hydrogen Balmer series transition. The profile is then fit to a fully quantum mechanical model including the appropriate electric and magnetic field operators. The quasi-static approach used to calculate the Doppler-free spectral line profile is outlined here and the results from the model are presented for H-δ spectra for electron densities of 1010-1013 cm-3. The profile shows complex behavior due to the interaction between the magnetic substates of the atom.

  20. Spatially confined and temporally resolved refractive index and scattering evaluation in human skin performed with optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuettel, Alexander R.; Boehlau-Godau, Martin

    2000-01-01

    In the present applications of optical coherence tomography (OCT), parameters besides pure morphology are evaluated in skin tissue under in vivo conditions. Spatially mapped refractive indices and scattering coefficients may support tissue characterization for research and diagnostic purposes in cosmetics/pharmacy and medicine, respectively. The sample arm of our OCT setup has been arranged to permit refractive index evaluation with little mechanical adjustment of a lens within the objective. A simple algorithm has been derived. Known from atmospheric work, the Klett algorithm has been applied to the same data set for retrieval of scattering coefficients. Both parameters have been measured in layered structures in skin like stratum corneum, epidermis and dermis. Significant water content in a localized sweat gland duct has been observed by refractive index evaluation. Time studies over 1.5 h permitted a first understanding about physiological changes in skin which are not obtainable by intrusive methods.

  1. Determining the nature of active region heating using high spatially and spectrally resolved x-ray observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterrett, M. W.; Cirtain, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Rarely have active regions on the Sun been studied at wavelengths less than 10 nm while simultaneously maintaining both high spatial and high spectral measurements. Marshall's Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrometer (MaGIXS) will measure the soft X-ray solar spectrum within a wavelength range of 0.6 - 2.4 nm (0.5 - 2.0 keV) while maintaining a 5 arcsec spatial resolution. The wavelength range of 0.6 - 2.4 nm can provide insight into the heating roles of two of the likely coronal heating mechanisms: nanoflare and Alfven wave heating. The key difference in nanoflares and Alfven wave heating is the high temperature components of plasmas inside single magnetic strands. If the observed frequency of the heating event is low, it is determined to be a nanoflare. If the frequency of the heating event is high, it is Alfvenic in nature. To discriminate between these two distinct events requires that the components of the local high-temperature plasma be measured. MaGIXS is a proposed sounding rocket experiment. Currently in its prototype phase, MaGIXS is being aligned and characterized in hopes of a 2015 launch. To measure the attributes of high-temperature plasma, MaGIXS will employ the use of a matched pair of parabolic mirrors in conjunction with a planar varied-line-space silicon wafer grating. The two mirrors act as a collimator and re-focusing system, molding the beam to desired specifications and removing off-axis optical aberrations in the process. The grating has a HeNe alignment feature which allows the grating to be aligned at atmospheric pressure while focusing the HeNe laser beam near the center of MaGIXS wavelength range. This presentation will cover the alignment procedure of the mirrors, and the results of preliminary testing using both white light and X-ray sources.

  2. SPATIALLY RESOLVED STAR FORMATION HISTORY ALONG THE DISK OF M82 USING MULTI-BAND PHOTOMETRIC DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Merino, L. H.; Rosa-Gonzalez, D.; Mayya, Y. D.

    2011-01-01

    We present results on the star formation history and extinction in the disk of M82 over spatial scales of 10'' ({approx}180 pc). Multi-band photometric data covering the far-ultraviolet to the near-infrared bands were fitted to a grid of synthetic spectral energy distributions. We obtained distribution functions of age and extinction for each of the 117 apertures analyzed, taking into account observational errors through Monte Carlo simulations. These distribution functions were fitted with Gaussian functions to obtain the mean ages and extinctions together with their errors. The zones analyzed include the high surface brightness complexes defined by O'Connell and Mangano. We found that these complexes share the same star formation history and extinction as the field stellar populations in the disk. There is an indication that the stellar populations are marginally older at the outer disk (450 Myr at {approx}3 kpc) as compared to the inner disk (100 Myr at 0.5 kpc). For the nuclear region (radius less than 500 pc), we obtained an age of less than 10 Myr. The results obtained in this work are consistent with the idea that the 0.5-3 kpc part of the disk of M82 formed around 90% of the stellar mass in a star-forming episode that started around 450 Myr ago and lasted for about 350 Myr. We found that field stars are the major contributors to the flux over the spatial scales analyzed in this study, with the stellar cluster contribution being 7% in the nucleus and 0.7% in the disk.

  3. An ultra-clean technique for accurately analysing Pb isotopes and heavy metals at high spatial resolution in ice cores with sub-pg g(-1) Pb concentrations.

    PubMed

    Burn, Laurie J; Rosman, Kevin J R; Candelone, Jean-Pierre; Vallelonga, Paul; Burton, Graeme R; Smith, Andrew M; Morgan, Vin I; Barbante, Carlo; Hong, Sungmin; Boutron, Claude F

    2009-02-23

    Measurements of Pb isotope ratios in ice containing sub-pg g(-1) concentrations are easily compromised by contamination, particularly where limited sample is available. Improved techniques are essential if Antarctic ice cores are to be analysed with sufficient spatial resolution to reveal seasonal variations due to climate. This was achieved here by using stainless steel chisels and saws and strict protocols in an ultra-clean cold room to decontaminate and section ice cores. Artificial ice cores, prepared from high purity water were used to develop and refine the procedures and quantify blanks. Ba and In, two other important elements present at pg g(-1) and fg g(-1) concentrations in Polar ice, were also measured. The final blank amounted to 0.2+/-0.2 pg of Pb with (206)Pb/(207)Pb and (208)Pb/(207)Pb ratios of 1.16+/-0.12 and 2.35+/-0.16, respectively, 1.5+/-0.4 pg of Ba and 0.6+/-2.0 fg of In, most of which probably originates from abrasion of the steel saws by the ice. The procedure was demonstrated on a Holocene Antarctic ice core section and was shown to contribute blanks of only approximately 5%, approximately 14% and approximately 0.8% to monthly resolved samples with respective Pb, Ba and In concentrations of 0.12 pg g(-1), 0.3 pg g(-1) and 2.3 fg g(-1). Uncertainties in the Pb isotopic ratio measurements were degraded by only approximately 0.2%.

  4. Tracing Trajectories of Air Parcels Transported through Spatially Resolved Horizontal Neutral Wind Fields Observed in the Thermosphere above Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhadly, M. S.; Conde, M.

    2014-12-01

    Transport by fluid flow is a very complex problem. Any type of velocity gradient introduces distortion of the original air masses which, over time, can become extraordinarily severe. In Earth's thermosphere, it is however widely presumed that viscosity hinders both horizontal and vertical wind shears, and hence rapidly attenuates any gradients that might occur over distances shorter than synoptic scales. As a result, particle trajectories predicted by current models are often relatively simple, so that transport effects only slowly disperse and mix air masses. This means that regions of perturbed chemical composition, formed for example by intense aurora, would be expected to remain intact for many hours or even days. However, our observations show that this simple picture does not hold in practice; wind fields in the thermosphere have much more local-scale structure than predicated by models, at least in the auroral zone. These local small scale structures complicate air parcel trajectories enormously, relative to typical expectations. In Alaska, three Scanning Doppler Imaging Fabry-Perot interferometers are currently in operation. A single SDI instrument can simultaneously observe the thermospheric wind's line-of-sight component in 115 (typically) independent look directions. From these data it is possible to reconstruct time-resolved two-dimensional maps of the horizontal vector wind field, and use these to infer forward and backward air parcel trajectories over time. Tracing parcel trajectories through a given geographic location maps where they will go from there (forward tracing in time) and where they come from previously (history of parcels or tracing back in time). Results show that transport of thermospheric neutral species in the presence of the local scale wind gradients that are actually observed is far more complicated than what current models typically predict.

  5. Tempo-spatially resolved cellular dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus transacting activator of transcription (Tat) peptide-modified nanocargos in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lin; Yang, Qiaoyu; Xiao, Lehui

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular fate of nanocarriers in living cells is of great importance for the rational design of efficient drug delivery cargos as well as the development of robust biomedical diagnostic probes. In present study, with a dual wavelength view darkfield microscope (DWVD), the tempo-spatially resolved dynamics of Tat peptide-functionalized gold nanoparticles (TGNPs, with size similar to viruses) in living HeLa cells were extensively explored. It was found that energy-dependent endocytosis (both clathrin- and caveolae-mediated processes were involved) was the prevailing pathway for the cellular uptake of TGNPs. The time-correlated dynamic spatial distribution information revealed that TGNPs could not actively target the cell nuclei, which is contrary to previous observations based on fixed cell results. More importantly, the inheritance of TGNPs to the daughter cells through mitosis was found to be the major route to metabolize TGNPs by HeLa cells. These understandings on the cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular fate of nanocargos in living cells would provide deep insight on how to improve and controllably manipulate their translocation efficiency for targeted drug delivery.Understanding the cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular fate of nanocarriers in living cells is of great importance for the rational design of efficient drug delivery cargos as well as the development of robust biomedical diagnostic probes. In present study, with a dual wavelength view darkfield microscope (DWVD), the tempo-spatially resolved dynamics of Tat peptide-functionalized gold nanoparticles (TGNPs, with size similar to viruses) in living HeLa cells were extensively explored. It was found that energy-dependent endocytosis (both clathrin- and caveolae-mediated processes were involved) was the prevailing pathway for the cellular uptake of TGNPs. The time-correlated dynamic spatial distribution information revealed that TGNPs

  6. Spatially resolved, high-spectral resolution observation of the K giant Aldebaran in the CO first overtone lines with VLTI/AMBER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnaka, K.

    2013-05-01

    Aims: We present a high-spatial and high-spectral resolution observation of the well-studied K giant Aldebaran with AMBER at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). Our aim is to spatially resolve the outer atmosphere (so-called MOLsphere) in individual CO first overtone lines and derive its physical properties, which are important for understanding the mass-loss mechanism in normal (i.e., non-Mira) K-M giants. Methods: Aldebaran was observed between 2.28 and 2.31 μm with a projected baseline length of 10.4 m and a spectral resolution of 12 000. Results: The uniform-disk diameter observed in the CO first overtone lines is 20-35% larger than is measured in the continuum. We have also detected a signature of inhomogeneities in the CO-line-forming region on a spatial scale of ~45 mas, which is more than twice as large as the angular diameter of the star itself. While the MARCS photospheric model reproduces the observed spectrum well, the angular size in the CO lines predicted by the MARCS model is significantly smaller than observed. This is because the MARCS model with the parameters of Aldebaran has a geometrical extension of only ~2% (with respect to the stellar radius). The observed spectrum and interferometric data in the CO lines can be simultaneously reproduced by placing an additional CO layer above the MARCS photosphere. This CO layer is extended to 2.5 ± 0.3 R⋆ with CO column densities of 5 × 1019-2 × 1020 cm-2 and a temperature of 1500 ± 200 K. Conclusions: The high spectral resolution of AMBER has enabled us to spatially resolve the inhomogeneous, extended outer atmosphere (MOLsphere) in the individual CO lines for the first time in a K giant. Our modeling of the MOLsphere of Aldebaran suggests a rather small gradient in the temperature distribution above the photosphere up to 2-3 R⋆. Based on AMBER observations made with the Very Large Telescope Interferometer of the European Southern Observatory. Program ID: 090.D-0459(A).

  7. Spatially resolving the outer atmosphere of the M giant BK Virginis in the CO first overtone lines with VLTI/AMBER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnaka, K.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Schertl, D.; Weigelt, G.; Malbet, F.; Massi, F.; Meilland, A.; Stee, Ph.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The mass-loss mechanism in normal K-M giant stars with small variability amplitudes is not yet understood, although the majority among red giant stars are precisely of this type. Aims: We present high-spatial and high-spectral resolution observations of the M7 giant BK Vir with AMBER at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). Our aim is to probe the physical properties of the outer atmosphere by spatially resolving the star in the individual CO first overtone lines. Methods: BK Vir was observed between 2.26 and 2.31 μm using the 16-32-48 m telescope configuration with an angular resolution of 9.8 mas and a spectral resolution of 12 000. Results: The uniform-disk diameters observed in the CO first overtone lines are 12 - 31% larger than those measured in the continuum. We also detected asymmetry in the CO line-forming region, which manifests itself as non-zero/non-π differential and closure phases. The data taken 1.5 months apart show possible time variation on a spatial scale of 30 mas (corresponding to 3 × stellar diameter) at the CO band head. Comparison of the observed data with the MARCS photospheric model shows that whereas the observed CO line spectrum can be satisfactorily reproduced by the model, the angular sizes observed in the CO lines are much larger than predicted by the model. Our model with two additional CO layers above the MARCS photosphere reproduces the observed spectrum and interferometric data in the CO lines simultaneously. This model suggests that the inner CO layer at ~1.2 R⋆ is very dense and warm with a CO column density of ~1022 cm-2 and temperatures of 1900 - 2100 K, while the outer CO layer at 2.5-3.0 R⋆ is characterized by column densities of 1019-1020 cm-2 and temperatures of 1500 - 2100 K. Conclusions: Our AMBER observations of BK Vir have spatially resolved the extended molecular outer atmosphere of a normal M giant in the individual CO lines for the first time. The temperatures derived for the CO layers are

  8. CW dye laser technique for simultaneous, spatially-resolved measurements of temperature, pressure, and velocity of NO in an underexpanded free jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Di Rosa, M. D.; Chang, A. Y.; Hanson, R. K.

    1992-01-01

    Gas dynamic quantities within an underexpanded free jet were measured nonintrusively using a rapid-tuning, CW ring dye laser. A nitrogen jet was seeded with 0.5 percent NO in N2, and the conditions were controlled such that a barrel shock formed. The frequency-doubled output of the dye laser was used to spectrally resolve rotational lines in the NO gamma band near 225 nm. With the rapid-tuning capability, these rotational spectra were acquired at a repetition rate of 4 kHz. Spatial resolution was afforded by monitoring the induced fluorescence via a lens and photomultiplier tube. Modeling the spectrally-resolved features with Voigt profiles permitted simultaneous measurements of NO velocity, rotational temperature, and pressure. Expansion of the jet was assumed to be isentropic, and agreement between measured and expected values was typically better than 10 percent over most of the Mach-number range encountered. At high Mach numbers, the measured rotational temperatures systematically departed from the isentropic temperature distribution. Such a measured departure could be ascribed to the onset of a non-Boltzmann distribution of NO rotational states.

  9. Developing a spatially and temporally resolved emission inventory for photochemical modeling in the City of Cape Town and assessing its uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowden, Miles; Cairncross, Eugene; Wilson, Gary; Zunckel, Mark; Kirillova, Elena; Reddy, Vis; Hietkamp, Sibbele

    In an urban environment where reactive pollutants are emitted, it is critically important that atmospheric chemistry be considered in modeling and air quality management including the evaluation of secondary pollutants such as ozone. This may be achieved through photochemical modeling, which is reliant on detailed, grid resolved emissions inventories. The US-EPA's approved Emissions Processing System (EPS) is used to develop a temporally and spatially resolved emissions inventory for the City of Cape Town for use in the Dynamic Air Pollution Prediction System (DAPPS). Included in this inventory are large and small point sources, mobile sources, and emissions from residential fuel burning and biogenic sources. Large point sources are usually well defined unlike the other source types that can have large uncertainties associated with them. In these circumstances, surrogate data are used to estimate emission rates. The FRamework for the Assessment of Uncertainties in Large-scale Emission INventories (FRAULEIN) approach to assessing uncertainty in the emissions inventory is adapted for DAPPS. A reasonable level of confidence exists for the characterization of large point sources but the two biggest source contributors namely vehicle and biogenic emissions, needs improvement.

  10. A sequential method for measuring the optical properties of two-layer media with spatially-resolved diffuse reflectance: simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Aichen; Lu, Renfu; Xie, Lijuan

    2016-05-01

    A sequential method for estimating the optical properties of two-layer media with spatially-resolved diffuse reflectance was proposed and validated using Monte Carlo-generated reflectance profiles. The relationship between the penetration depth of detected photons and source-detector separation was first studied. Photons detected at larger source-detector separations generally penetrated deeper into the medium than those detected at small source-detector separations. The effect of each parameter (i.e., the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients (μa and μs') of each layer, and the thickness of top layer) on reflectance was investigated. It was found that the relationship between the optical properties and thickness of top layer was a critical factor in determining whether photons would have sufficient interactions with the top layer and also penetrate into the bottom layer. The constraints for the proposed sequential estimation method were quantitatively determined by the curve fitting procedure coupled with error contour map analyses. Results showed that the optical properties of top layer could be determined within 10% error using the semi-infinite diffusion model for reflectance profiles with properly selected start and end points, when the thickness of top layer was larger than two times its mean free path (mfp'). And the optical properties of the bottom layer could be estimated within 10% error by the two-layer diffusion model, when the thickness of top layer was less than 16 times its mfp'. The proposed sequential estimation method is promising for improving the estimation of the optical properties of two-layer tissues from the same spatially-resolved reflectance.

  11. Measurement of Low Signal-To-Noise Ratio Solar p-Modes in Spatially Resolved Helioseismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salabert, D.; Leibacher, J.; Appourchaux, T.; Hill, F.

    2009-05-01

    We present an adaptation of the rotation-corrected, m-averaged spectrum technique designed to observe low signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), low-frequency solar p-modes. The frequency shift of each of the 2l + 1 m spectra of a given (n, l) multiplet is chosen that maximizes the likelihood of the m-averaged spectrum. A high S/N can result from combining individual low S/N, individual-m spectra, none of which would yield a strong enough peak to measure. We apply the technique to Global Oscillation Network Group and Michelson Doppler Imager data and show that it allows us to measure modes with lower frequencies than those obtained with classic peak-fitting analysis of the individual-m spectra. We measure their central frequencies, splittings, asymmetries, lifetimes, and amplitudes. The low frequency, low- and intermediate-angular degrees rendered accessible by this new method correspond to modes that are sensitive to the deep solar interior down to the core (l <= 3) and to the radiative interior (4 <= l <= 35). Moreover, the low-frequency modes have deeper upper turning points, and are thus less sensitive to the turbulence and magnetic fields of the outer layers, as well as uncertainties in the nature of the external boundary condition. As a result of their longer lifetimes (narrower linewidths) at the same S/N the determination of the frequencies of lower frequency modes is more accurate, and the resulting inversions should be more precise.

  12. Spatially resolved modeling of the combined effect of dislocations and grain boundaries on minority carrier lifetime in multicrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokkan, G.; Riepe, S.; Lohne, O.; Warta, W.

    2007-03-01

    A model for the combined effect of dislocations and grain boundaries on minority carrier lifetime has been developed. Lifetime varies with dislocation density, grain boundary misorientation, and the coincidence site lattice (CSL) nature of the boundaries. Minority carrier lifetime was measured with high spatial resolution (50 μm) using the carrier density imaging (CDI) technique on a silicon nitride passivated multicrystalline sample. Dislocation density was measured on the same sample by image recognition of optical microscope pictures of a Secco etched surface. Grain boundaries were then mapped and characterized by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Lifetime was simulated based on the dislocation and grain boundary measurements. Parameters were chosen to match closely the simulated and measured maps. Very good two-dimensional (2D) correlation was obtained by assigning roughly equal importance to recombination at dislocations and grain boundaries. The value for the capture cross section, which gives the best correlation, is 4×10-14 cm-3. This is in the range of values reported for interstitial transition metals like, for instance, iron. It appears necessary to include also the effect of grain boundaries to explain recombination in low lifetime areas. Sub grain boundaries were particularly recombination active and are dominating the number of active grain boundaries.

  13. Automated Image Processing for Spatially Resolved Analysis of Lipid Droplets in Cultured 3T3-L1 Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sims, James Kenneth; Rohr, Brian; Miller, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Cellular hypertrophy of adipose tissue underlies many of the proposed proinflammatory mechanisms for obesity-related diseases. Adipose hypertrophy results from an accumulation of esterified lipids (triglycerides) into membrane-enclosed intracellular lipid droplets (LDs). The coupling between adipocyte metabolism and LD morphology could be exploited to investigate biochemical regulation of lipid pathways by monitoring the dynamics of LDs. This article describes an image processing method to identify LDs based on several distinctive optical and morphological characteristics of these cellular bodies as they appear under bright-field. The algorithm was developed against images of 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cultures induced to differentiate into adipocytes. We show that the calculated lipid volumes are in excellent agreement with enzymatic assay data on total intracellular triglyceride content. We also demonstrate that the image processing method can efficiently characterize the highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of LDs in a culture by showing that differentiation occurs in distinct clusters separated by regions of nearly undifferentiated cells. Prospectively, the LD detection method described in this work could be applied to time-lapse data collected with simple visible light microscopy equipment to quantitatively investigate LD dynamics. PMID:25390760

  14. Spatially resolved studies of the phases and morphology of methylammonium and formamidinium lead tri-halide perovskites.

    PubMed

    Galkowski, K; Mitioglu, A A; Surrente, A; Yang, Z; Maude, D K; Kossacki, P; Eperon, G E; Wang, J T-W; Snaith, H J; Plochocka, P; Nicholas, R J

    2017-03-02

    The family of organic-inorganic tri-halide perovskites including MA (MethylAmmonium)PbI3, MAPbI3-xClx, FA (FormAmidinium)PbI3 and FAPbBr3 are having a tremendous impact on the field of photovoltaic cells due to the combination of their ease of deposition and high energy conversion efficiencies. Device performance, however, is known to be still significantly affected by the presence of inhomogeneities. Here we report on a study of temperature dependent micro-photoluminescence which shows a strong spatial inhomogeneity related to the presence of microcrystalline grains, which can be both bright and dark. In all of the tri-iodide based materials there is evidence that the tetragonal to orthorhombic phase transition observed around 160 K does not occur uniformly across the sample with domain formation related to the underlying microcrystallite grains, some of which remain in the high temperature, tetragonal, phase even at very low temperatures. At low temperature the tetragonal domains can be significantly influenced by local defects in the layers or the introduction of residual levels of chlorine in mixed halide layers or dopant atoms such as aluminium. We see that improvements in room temperature energy conversion efficiency appear to be directly related to reductions in the proportions of the layer which remain in the tetragonal phase at low temperature. In FAPbBr3 a more macroscopic domain structure is observed with large numbers of grains forming phase correlated regions.

  15. Spatially resolved charge-state and current-density distributions at the extraction of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Panitzsch, Lauri; Peleikis, Thies; Stalder, Michael; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2011-09-15

    In this paper we present our measurements of charge-state and current-density distributions performed in very close vicinity (15 mm) of the extraction of our hexapole geometry electron cyclotron resonance ion source. We achieved a relatively high spatial resolution reducing the aperture of our 3D-movable extraction (puller) electrode to a diameter of only 0.5 mm. Thus, we are able to limit the source of the extracted ion beam to a very small region of the plasma electrode's hole (O = 4 mm) and therefore to a very small region of the neutral plasma sheath. The information about the charge-state distribution and the current density in the plane of the plasma electrode at each particular position is conserved in the ion beam. We determined the total current density distribution at a fixed coaxial distance of only 15 mm to the plasma electrode by remotely moving the small-aperture puller electrode which contained a dedicated Faraday cup (FC) across the aperture of the plasma electrode. In a second measurement we removed the FC and recorded m/q-spectra for the different positions using a sector magnet. From our results we can deduce that different ion charge-states can be grouped into bloated triangles of different sizes and same orientation at the extraction with the current density peaking at centre. This confirms observations from other groups based on simulations and emittance measurements. We present our measurements in detail and discuss possible systematic errors.

  16. Undergraduate ALFALFA Team: Analysis of Spatially-Resolved Star-Formation in Nearby Galaxy Groups and Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Rose; Collova, Natasha; Spicer, Sandy; Whalen, Kelly; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Durbala, Adriana; Haynes, Martha P.; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    2017-01-01

    As part of the Undergraduate ALFALFA Team, we are conducting a survey of the gas and star-formation properties of galaxies in 36 groups and clusters in the local universe. The galaxies in our sample span a large range of galactic environments, from the centers of galaxy groups and clusters to the surrounding infall regions. One goal of the project is to map the spatial distribution of star-formation; the relative extent of the star-forming and stellar disks provides important information about the internal and external processes that deplete gas and thus drive galaxy evolution. We obtained wide-field H-alpha observations with the WIYN 0.9m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory for galaxies in the vicinity of the MKW11 and NRGb004 galaxy groups and the Abell 1367 cluster. We present a preliminary analysis of the relative size of the star-forming and stellar disks as a function of galaxy morphology and local galaxy density, and we calculate gas depletion times using star-formation rates and HI gas mass. We will combine these results with those from other UAT members to determine if and how environmentally-driven gas depletion varies with the mass and X-ray properties of the host group or cluster. This work has supported by NSF grants AST-0847430, AST-1211005 and AST-1637339.

  17. Spatially Resolved Stellar Populations Of Nearby Post-Starburst Galaxies In SDSS-IV MaNGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Charles; Betances, Ashley; Bonilla, Alaina Marie; Gonzalez, Andrea; Migliore, Christina; Goddard, Daniel; Masters, Karen; SDSS-IV MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    We have selected five galaxies in the Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA) project of the latest generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) identified as post-starburst (E+A) systems, in the transition between "blue cloud" and "red sequence" galaxies. We measure the equivalent widths of the Balmer series, D4000 break, and metal lines across each galaxy, and produce maps of the stellar age, stellar mass, and metallicities of each galaxy using FIREFLY, a full spectral analysis code. We have found that the measured properties of the galaxies overall generally matches well with single-aperture SDSS spectra from which the original post-starburst identifications were made. The variation in the spatial distributions of the stellar populations, in particular the A-stars, give us insight into the details of the transitional E+A quenching phase. This work was supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation via the SDSS-IV Faculty and Student Team (FAST) initiative, ARC Agreement No. SSP483 to the CUNY College of Staten Island.

  18. Spatially Resolved Photoexcited Charge-Carrier Dynamics in Phase-Engineered Monolayer MoS2

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Hisato; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Kappera, Rajesh; Lei, Sidong; Najmaei, Sina; Mangum, Benjamin D.; Gupta, Gautam; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Lou, Jun; Chhowalla, Manish; Crochet, Jared J.; Mohite, Aditya D.

    2014-12-18

    A fundamental understanding of the intrinsic optoelectronic properties of atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is crucial for its integration into high performance semiconductor devices. We investigate the transport properties of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) under photo-excitation using correlated scanning photocurrent microscopy and photoluminescence imaging. We examined the effect of local phase transformation underneath the metal electrodes on the generation of photocurrent across the channel length with diffraction-limited spatial resolution. While maximum photocurrent generation occurs at the Schottky contacts of semiconducting (2H-phase) MoS2, after the metallic phase transformation (1T-phase), the photocurrent peak is observed towards the center of the device channel, suggesting a strong reduction of native Schottky barriers. Analysis using the bias and position dependence of the photocurrent indicates that the Schottky barrier heights are few meV for 1T- and ~200 meV for 2H-contacted devices. We also demonstrate that a reduction of native Schottky barriers in a 1T device enhances the photo responsivity by more than one order of magnitude, a crucial parameter in achieving high performance optoelectronic devices. The obtained results pave a pathway for the fundamental understanding of intrinsic optoelectronic properties of atomically thin TMDs where Ohmic contacts are necessary for achieving high efficiency devices with low power consumption.

  19. Spatially Resolved Spectra from a new X-ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Measurements of Ion and Electron Temperature Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, M; Stratton, B; Roquemore, A; Mastrovito, D; Lee, S; Bak, J; Moon, M; Nam, U; Smith, G; Rice, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Fraenkel, B

    2004-08-10

    A new type of high-resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer is being developed to measure ion and electron temperature profiles in tokamak plasmas. The instrument is particularly valuable for diagnosing plasmas with purely Ohmic heating and rf heating, since it does not require the injection of a neutral beam - although it can also be used for the diagnosis of neutral-beam heated plasmas. The spectrometer consists of a spherically bent quartz crystal and a two-dimensional position-sensitive detector. It records spectra of helium-like argon (or krypton) from multiple sightlines through the plasma and projects a de-magnified image of a large plasma cross-section onto the detector. The spatial resolution in the plasma is solely determined by the height of the crystal, its radius of curvature, and the Bragg angle. This new X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer may also be of interest for the diagnosis of ion temperature profiles in future large tokamaks, such as KSTAR and ITER, where the application of the presently used charge-exchange spectroscopy will be difficult, if the neutral beams do not penetrate to the plasma center. The paper presents the results from proof-of-principle experiments performed with a prototype instrument at Alcator C-Mod.

  20. An Assessment of the Ability of Potential Spaceborne Instruments to Resolve Spatial and Temporal Variability of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Arlyn E.; Kawa, S. Randolph

    2001-01-01

    Mounting concern regarding the possibility that increasing carbon dioxide concentrations will initiate climate change has stimulated interest in the feasibility of measuring CO2 mixing ratios from satellites. Currently, the most comprehensive set of atmospheric CO2 data is from the NOAA CMDL cooperative air sampling network, consisting of more than 40 sites where flasks of air are collected approximately weekly. Sporadic observations in the troposphere and stratosphere from airborne in situ and flask samplers are also available. Although the surface network is extensive, there is a dearth of data in the Southern Hemisphere and most of the stations were intentionally placed in remote areas, far from major sources. Sufficiently precise satellite observations with adequate spatial and temporal resolution would substantially increase our knowledge of the atmospheric CO2 distribution and would undoubtedly lead to improved understanding of the global carbon budget. We use a 3-D chemical transport model to investigate the ability of potential satellite instruments with a variety of orbits, horizontal resolution and vertical weighting functions to capture the variation in the modeled CO2 fields. The model is driven by analyzed winds from the Goddard Data Assimilation Office. Simulated CO2 fields are compared with existing surface and aircraft data, and the effects of the model convection scheme and representation of the planetary boundary layer are considered.

  1. Influence of climate and land use change on spatially resolved volatilization of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) from background soils.

    PubMed

    Komprda, Jiří; Komprdová, Klára; Sáňka, Milan; Možný, Martin; Nizzetto, Luca

    2013-07-02

    The subject of this study is the assessment of the influence of climate and land use change on the potential re-emission of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) from background and agricultural soils. A deterministic spatially and temporally explicit model of the air-surface exchange was created, fed with distributed data of soil and atmospheric concentrations from real measurements, and run under various scenarios of temperature and land use change for a case study area representative of central European conditions. To describe land use influence, some important features were implemented including effect of plowing, influence of land cover, temperature of soil, and seasonal changes of air layer stability. Results show that volatilization of pesticides from soil largely exceeded dry gas deposition in most of the area. Agricultural soils accounted for more than 90% of the total re-emissions both because of the generally higher soil fugacities (higher loads of chemicals and relatively low organic carbon content), but also due to physical characteristics and land management practices enhancing the dynamics of the exchange. An increase of 1 °C in air temperature produced an increase of 8% in the averaged total volatilization flux, however this effect can be neutralized by a change of land use of 10% of the arable lands to grassland or forest, which is consistent with projected land use change in Europe. This suggests that future assessment of climate impact on POP fate and distribution should take into consideration land use aspects.

  2. Studies of Shear Band Velocity Using Spatially and Temporally Resolved Measurements of Strain During Quasistatic Compression of Bulk Metallic Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, W J; Samale, M; Hufnagel, T; LeBlanc, M; Florando, J

    2009-06-15

    We have made measurements of the temporal and spatial features of the evolution of strain during the serrated flow of Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glass tested under quasistatic, room temperature, uniaxial compression. Strain and load data were acquired at rates of up to 400 kHz using strain gages affixed to all four sides of the specimen and a piezoelectric load cell located near the specimen. Calculation of the displacement rate requires an assumption about the nature of the shear displacement. If one assumes that the entire shear plane displaces simultaneously, the displacement rate is approximately 0.002 m/s. If instead one assumes that the displacement occurs as a localized propagating front, the velocity of the front is approximately 2.8 m/s. In either case, the velocity is orders of magnitude less than the shear wave speed ({approx}2000 m/s). The significance of these measurements for estimates of heating in shear bands is discussed.

  3. Evaluation of spatially resolved diffuse reflectance imaging for subsurface pattern visualization towards applicability for fiber optic lensless imaging setup: phantom experiments and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelkanova, I.; Pandya, A.; Saiko, G.; Nacy, L.; Babar, H.; Shah, D.; Lilge, L.; Douplik, A.

    2015-07-01

    A portable, spatially resolved diffuse reflectance (SRDR) lensless imaging technique based on the charge coupled device (CCD), or complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor directly coupled with fiber optic bundle can be proposed for visualization of subsurface structures such as intrapapillary capillary loops (IPCLs). In this article, we discuss an experimental method for emulating a lensless imaging setup via raster scanning a single fiberoptic cable (where image is relayed onto the sensor surface through a fiber-optic cable equivalent to coupling a fiber optic conduit directly onto the sensor surface without any lenses) over a microfluidic phantom containing periodic hemoglobin absorption contrast. For mimicking scattering properties of turbid media, a diffusive layer formed of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) was placed atop of the microfluidic phantom. Thickness of the layers ranged from 0.2-0.7mm, and the μs` value of the layers were in the range of 0.85 mm-1 - 4.25mm-1. The results demonstrate that a fiber-optic bundle/plate coupled lensless imaging setup has a high potential to recover intensity modulations from the subsurface patterns. Decreasing of the interrogation volumes leads to enhanced spatial resolution of diffuse reflectance imaging, and hence, can potentially overcome the scattering caused blurring.

  4. A multiscale computational model of spatially resolved calcium cycling in cardiac myocytes: from detailed cleft dynamics to the whole cell concentration profiles

    PubMed Central

    Vierheller, Janine; Neubert, Wilhelm; Falcke, Martin; Gilbert, Stephen H.; Chamakuri, Nagaiah

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of excitation-contraction coupling (ECC) in ventricular cardiac myocytes is a multiscale problem, and it is therefore difficult to develop spatially detailed simulation tools. ECC involves gradients on the length scale of 100 nm in dyadic spaces and concentration profiles along the 100 μm of the whole cell, as well as the sub-millisecond time scale of local concentration changes and the change of lumenal Ca2+ content within tens of seconds. Our concept for a multiscale mathematical model of Ca2+ -induced Ca2+ release (CICR) and whole cardiomyocyte electrophysiology incorporates stochastic simulation of individual LC- and RyR-channels, spatially detailed concentration dynamics in dyadic clefts, rabbit membrane potential dynamics, and a system of partial differential equations for myoplasmic and lumenal free Ca2+ and Ca2+-binding molecules in the bulk of the cell. We developed a novel computational approach to resolve the concentration gradients from dyadic space to cell level by using a quasistatic approximation within the dyad and finite element methods for integrating the partial differential equations. We show whole cell Ca2+-concentration profiles using three previously published RyR-channel Markov schemes. PMID:26441674

  5. CARMA INTERFEROMETRIC OBSERVATIONS OF 2MASS J044427+2512: THE FIRST SPATIALLY RESOLVED OBSERVATIONS OF THERMAL EMISSION OF A BROWN DWARF DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, L.; Isella, A.; Carpenter, J. M.; Testi, L.

    2013-02-20

    We present CARMA 1.3 mm continuum data of the disk surrounding the young brown dwarf 2MASS J044427+2512 in the Taurus molecular cloud. The high angular resolution of the CARMA observations (0.''16) allows us to spatially resolve for the first time the thermal emission from dust around a brown dwarf. We analyze the interferometric visibilities and constrain the disk outer radius adopting disk models with power-law radial profiles of the dust surface density. In the case of a power-law index {<=}1, we obtain a disk radius in the range of about 15-30 AU, while larger disks are inferred for steeper radial profiles. By combining this information on the disk spatial extent with the sub-mm spectral index of this source, we find conclusive evidence for mm-sized grains, or larger, in this brown dwarf disk. We discuss the implications of our results on the models of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks and brown dwarf formation.

  6. Two-dimensional superresolution multiple-input multiple-output and inverse synthetic aperture radar imaging based on spatial frequency ambiguity resolving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianchao; Su, Weimin; Gu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Combining multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar and inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) techniques can reduce the number of antennas used and shorten the radar integrated time compared with the single-channel ISAR for the same cross-range resolution. In existing MIMO-ISAR processing, the echoes of different sensors are rearranged into an equivalent single-channel ISAR signal. A new method without echo rearrangement is proposed for two-dimensional (2-D) MIMO-ISAR imaging. A 2-D frequency estimation algorithm based on Unitary ESPRIT and projection transformation is used to obtain the spatial and Doppler frequencies of scatterers, and a high cross-range resolution can be achieved. The relationship between the two frequencies is exploited to resolve the ambiguity of spatial frequency. The analysis and simulation results show that, compared with the existing method, the proposed method can decrease the relative rotation angle (or integrated time) required for imaging. Thus, this method is more suitable for imaging targets with limited rotation or high maneuvering.

  7. Spatially Resolved Stellar Kinematics of Field Early-Type Galaxies at z = 1: Evolution of the Rotation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wel, Arjen; van der Marel, Roeland P.

    2008-09-01

    We use the spatial information of our previously published VLT/FORS2 absorption-line spectroscopy to measure mean stellar velocity and velocity dispersion profiles of 25 field early-type galaxies at a median redshift z = 0.97 (full range 0.6 < z < 1.2). This provides the first detailed study of early-type galaxy rotation at these redshifts. From surface brightness profiles from HST imaging we calculate two-integral oblate axisymmetric Jeans equation models for the observed kinematics. Fits to the data yield for each galaxy the degree of rotational support and the mass-to-light ratio M/LJeans. S0 and Sa galaxies are generally rotationally supported, whereas elliptical galaxies rotate less rapidly or not at all. Down to MB = - 19.5 (corrected for luminosity evolution), we find no evidence for evolution in the fraction of rotating early-type (E+S0) galaxies between z ~ 1 (63% +/- 11% ) and the present (61% +/- 5% ). We interpret this as evidence for little or no change in the field S0 fraction with redshift. We compare M/LJeans with M/Lvir inferred from the virial theorem and globally averaged quantities and assuming homologous evolution. There is good agreement for nonrotating (mostly E) galaxies. However, for rotationally supported galaxies (mostly S0) M/LJeans is on average ~40% higher than M/Lvir. We discuss possible explanations and the implications for the evolution of M/L between z = 1 and the present and its dependence on mass. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile (169.A-0458), and on observations with the Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  8. Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy of a Balmer-dominated Shock in the Cygnus Loop: An Extremely Thin Cosmic-Ray Precursor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Maeda, Keiichi; Ohira, Yutaka; Yatsu, Yoichi; Mori, Koji; Aoki, Wako; Morihana, Kumiko; Raymond, John C.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Lee, Jae-Joon; Shimoda, Jiro; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2016-03-01

    We present high-resolution long-slit spectroscopy of a Balmer-dominated shock in the northeastern limb of the Cygnus Loop with the Subaru high dispersion spectrograph. By setting the slit angle along the shock normal, we investigate variations of the flux and profile of the Hα line from preshock to postshock regions with a spatial resolution of ˜4 × 1015 cm. The Hα line profile can be represented by a narrow (28.9 ± 0.7 km s-1) Gaussian in a diffuse region ahead of the shock, i.e., a photoionization precursor, and narrow (33.1 ± 0.2 km s-1) plus broad (130-230 km s-1) Gaussians at the shock itself. We find that the width of the narrow component abruptly increases up to 33.1 ± 0.2 km s-1, or 38.8 ± 0.4 km s-1 if we eliminate projected emission originating from the photoionization precursor, in an unresolved thin layer (≲4 × 1015 cm at a distance of 540 pc) at the shock. We show that the sudden broadening can be best explained by heating via damping of Alfvén waves in a thin cosmic-ray (CR) precursor, although other possibilities are not fully ruled out. The thickness of the CR precursor in the Cygnus Loop (a soft gamma-ray emitter) is an order of magnitude thinner than that in Tycho’s Knot g (a hard gamma-ray emitter), which may be caused by the different energy distribution of accelerated particles between the two sources. In this context, systematic studies might reveal a positive correlation between the thickness of the CR precursor and the hardness of the CR energy distribution.

  9. Classification of crystal defects in multicrystalline silicon solar cells and wafer using spectrally and spatially resolved photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lausch, D.; Mehl, T.; Petter, K.; Svarstad Flø, A.; Burud, I.; Olsen, E.

    2016-02-01

    In this contribution, spectral photoluminescence (SPL) imaging detecting both the spectral distribution and the lateral position is applied on recombination active defects in multicrystalline silicon solar cells and wafers. The result is analysed by a Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR) algorithm using the spectral photoluminescence response and their positions. (i) Without any pre-assumptions made, the algorithm distinguishes four different recombination active defect types. Looking at the spatial distribution, it is shown that two of these defect types coincide with two defect types that have been distinguished on solar cell level using an analysis of forward and reverse biased electroluminescence (denoted as Type-A and -B) previously. (ii) Using SPL, all previously classified defects can also be distinguished at the wafer level. Therefore, the defects limiting the solar cell efficiency are already present in the wafer material and not introduced by the solar cell process. This is of particular interest for the question of how to predict the solar cell efficiency based on the PL measurements at the wafer level. The SPL is able to distinguish between the recombination activity of the dominant Type-A and -B defects that cannot be distinguished by classical PL measurements of the band-to-band recombination at the wafer level. The technique also highlights the changes in recombination activity of the given defects throughout the fabrication process. (iii) Additionally, it is shown that the spectral peak positions of Type-A defects coincide with the known D3 and D4 lines and of Type-B defects with the D1 line on both solar cell and wafer level. Two further defects are captured by the MCR algorithm denoted as Type-VID3 and Type-D07 defects occurring as spot-like defects in isolated positions. Their spectral PL response is analysed as well.

  10. Policy applications of a highly resolved spatial and temporal onroad carbon dioxide emissions data product for the U.S.: Analyses and their implications for mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza Lebrun, Daniel

    Onroad CO2 emissions were analyzed as part of overall GHG emissions, but those studies have suffered from one or more of these five shortcomings: 1) the spatial resolution was coarse, usually encompassing a region, or the entire U.S.; 2) the temporal resolution was coarse (annual or monthly); 3) the study region was limited, usually a metropolitan planning organization (MPO) or state; 4) fuel sales were used as a proxy to quantify fuel consumption instead of focusing on travel; 5) the spatial heterogeneity of fleet and road network composition was not considered and instead national averages are used. Normalized vehicle-type state-level spatial biases range from 2.6% to 8.1%, while the road type classification biases range from -6.3% to 16.8%. These biases are found to cause errors in reduction estimates as large as ±60%, corresponding to ±0.2 MtC, for a national-average emissions mitigation strategy focused on a 10% emissions reduction from a single vehicle class. Temporal analysis shows distinct emissions seasonality that is particularly visible in the northernmost latitudes, demonstrating peak-to-peak deviations from the annual mean of up to 50%. The hourly structure shows peak-to-peak deviation from a weekly average of up to 200% for heavy-duty (HD) vehicles and 140% for light-duty (LD) vehicles. The present study focuses on reduction of travel and fuel economy improvements by putting forth several mitigation scenarios aimed at reducing VMT and increasing vehicle fuel efficiency. It was found that the most effective independent reduction strategies are those that increase fuel efficiency by extending standards proposed by the corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) or reduction of fuel consumption due to price increases. These two strategies show cumulative emissions reductions of approximately 11% and 12%, respectively, from a business as usual (BAU) approach over the 2000-2050 period. The U.S. onroad transportation sector is long overdue a comprehensive study

  11. Spatially resolved measurements and diagnostics of digitally controlled rotating field pulsed plasma operated in helium at 20 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giersz, Jacek; Jankowski, Krzysztof; Reszke, Edward

    2017-04-01

    Using optical emission spectrometry, fundamental properties are investigated of a stable, planar atmospheric pressure micro discharge, several dozen microliters in volume, driven by a digitally controlled 20 kHz rotating microsecond pulsed power. The discharge is generated by rectangular wave pulses using helium as the working gas. At a low cost, the digitally controlled plasma source produces a highly symmetrical, non-stationary helium discharge maintained in open air within 5 electrodes positioned in the plane toward the center. It has been shown that the geometrical shapes of the momentary discharges, which occur between the electrodes, are not arc-like shaped, but rather have a diffusive character and the resulting plasma can become doughnut-like in shape. Rotational and vibrational temperatures from OH and N2 bands, excitation temperatures from He lines and ionization temperatures from Ca lines, as well as electron number densities from Hβ Stark broadening have been estimated along the plasma diameter using axial viewing. The results demonstrated that Texc (He) reaches stable value of 3800 K for selected plasma generation conditions (one anode and two cathodes commutation mode, cathode pulse width 8 microseconds, supplied power 200 W, helium gas flow 1 L·min- 1), while the Trot (OH) is considerably lower (1700 K). The electron number density has been evaluated to be (1.7-3.3) × 1014 cm- 3 and both Tion (Ca) and Tvib (N2) varied, throughout in the 4500-5100 K and 4000-4800 K ranges respectively, reaching its peak value near 2 mm off the plasma axis. Spatial measurements revealed symmetrical distribution of the plasma parameters, while the measurements of calcium and nitrogen ionic emission confirmed symmetrical doughnut shape of the discharge. Moreover, the processes running inside the discharge and their interaction with the surrounding atmosphere have been described in accordance to the recorded spectra. Spectroscopic observation has shown the existence of

  12. Spatially resolved star formation relation in two HI-rich galaxies with central post-starburst signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klitsch, Anne; Zwaan, Martin A.; Kuntschner, Harald; Couch, Warrick J.; Pracy, Michael B.; Owers, Matt

    2017-04-01

    Context. E+A galaxies are post-starburst systems that are identified based on their optical spectra. These galaxies contain a substantial young A-type stellar component but display no emission lines, which indicates only little ongoing star formation (SF). HI 21 cm line emission is found in approximately half of the nearby E+A galaxies, indicating that they contain a reservoir of gas that could fuel active SF. Aims: We study the distribution and kinematics of atomic and molecular gas in two HI-rich galaxies, which show a typical E+A spectrum at the centre and SF at larger radii. From our results we aim to infer whether the SF activity of these galaxies is consistent with the activity seen in disc galaxies, or if it indicates a transition towards another evolutionary phase. Methods: We present newly obtained high spatial resolution radio interferometric observations of the HI 21 cm emission line using the Karl Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and of the CO(1-0) emission line using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We combine these data sets to predict the star formation rate (SFR) using a pressure-based SF relation and show that it does not correlate well with the SFR derived from Hα on sub-kpc scales. We apply a recently developed statistical model for the small-scale behaviour of the SF relation to predict and interpret the observed scatter. Results: We find regularly rotating HI gas that is smoothly distributed across the entire disc. The CO(1-0) emission line is not detected for either of the two galaxies. The derived upper limit on the CO mass implies a molecular gas depletion time of tdepl ≲ 20 Myr. However, because of the low metallicity, the CO-to-H2 conversion factor is highly uncertain. In the relations between the Hα-based SFR and the HI mass, we observe a substantial scatter we demonstrate results from small-number statistics of independent SF regions on sub-kpc scales. Conclusions: We confirm the HI-richness of ESO534-G001 and 2d

  13. Spatially-Resolved Influence of Temperature and Salinity on Stock and Recruitment Variability of Commercially Important Fishes in the North Sea

    PubMed Central

    Akimova, Anna; Núñez-Riboni, Ismael; Kempf, Alexander; Taylor, Marc H.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of the processes affecting recruitment of commercially important fish species is one of the major challenges in fisheries science. Towards this aim, we investigated the relation between North Sea hydrography (temperature and salinity) and fish stock variables (recruitment, spawning stock biomass and pre-recruitment survival index) for 9 commercially important fishes using spatially-resolved cross-correlation analysis. We used high-resolution (0.2° × 0.2°) hydrographic data fields matching the maximal temporal extent of the fish population assessments (1948–2013). Our approach allowed for the identification of regions in the North Sea where environmental variables seem to be more influential on the fish stocks, as well as the regions of a lesser or nil influence. Our results confirmed previously demonstrated negative correlations between temperature and recruitment of cod and plaice and identified regions of the strongest correlations (German Bight for plaice and north-western North Sea for cod). We also revealed a positive correlation between herring spawning stock biomass and temperature in the Orkney-Shetland area, as well as a negative correlation between sole pre-recruitment survival index and temperature in the German Bight. A strong positive correlation between sprat stock variables and salinity in the central North Sea was also found. To our knowledge the results concerning correlations between North Sea hydrography and stocks’ dynamics of herring, sole and sprat are novel. The new information about spatial distribution of the correlation provides an additional help to identify mechanisms underlying these correlations. As an illustration of the utility of these results for fishery management, an example is provided that incorporates the identified environmental covariates in stock-recruitment models. PMID:27584155

  14. Spatially resolved estimation of ozone-related mortality in the United States under two Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs)